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Sample records for repair gene reca

  1. Molecular analysis of the Deinococcus radiodurans recA locus and identification of a mutation site in a DNA repair-deficient mutant, rec30.

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    Narumi, I; Satoh, K; Kikuchi, M; Funayama, T; Kitayama, S; Yanagisawa, T; Watanabe, H; Yamamoto, K

    1999-12-07

    Deinococcus radiodurans strain rec30, which is a DNA damage repair-deficient mutant, has been estimated to be defective in the deinococcal recA gene. To identify the mutation site of strain rec30 and obtain information about the region flanking the gene, a 4.4-kb fragment carrying the wild-type recA gene was sequenced. It was revealed that the recA locus forms a polycistronic operon with the preceding cistrons (orf105a and orf105b). Predicted amino acid sequences of orf105a and orf105b showed substantial similarity to the competence-damage inducible protein (cinA gene product) from Streptococcus pneumoniae and the 2'-5' RNA ligase from Escherichia coli, respectively. By analyzing polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragments derived from the genomic DNA of strain rec30, the mutation site in the strain was identified as a single G:C to A:T transition which causes an amino acid substitution at position 224 (Gly to Ser) of the deinococcal RecA protein. Furthermore, we succeeded in expressing both the wild-type and mutant recA genes of D. radiodurans in E. coli without any obvious toxicity or death. The gamma-ray resistance of an E. coli recA1 strain was fully restored by the expression of the wild-type recA gene of D. radiodurans that was cloned in an E. coli vector plasmid. This result is consistent with evidence that RecA proteins from many bacterial species can functionally complement E. coli recA mutants. In contrast with the wild-type gene, the mutant recA gene derived from strain rec30 did not complement E. coli recA1, suggesting that the mutant RecA protein lacks functional activity for recombinational repair.

  2. E. coli recA gene improves gene targeted homologous recombination in Mycoplasma hyorhinis.

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    Ishag, Hassan Z A; Xiong, Qiyan; Liu, Maojun; Feng, Zhixin; Shao, Guoqing

    2017-05-01

    Mycoplasma hyorhinis is an opportunistic pathogen of pigs. Recently, it has been shown to transform cell cultures, increasing the attention of the researchers. Studies on the pathogenesis require specific genetic tool that is not yet available for the pathogen. To address this limitation, we constructed two suicide plasmids pGEMT-tetM/LR and pGEMT-recA-tetM/LR having a tetracycline resistance marker flanked by two hemolysin gene arms. The latter plasmid encodes an E. coli recA, a gene involved in DNA recombination, repair and maintenance of DNA. Using inactivation of the hemolysin gene, which results in a detectable and measurable phenotype, we found that each plasmid can disrupt the hemolysin gene of M. hyorhinis through a double cross-over homologous recombination. However, inclusion of the E. coli recA gene in the construct resulted in 9-fold increase in the frequency of hemolysin gene mutants among the screened tetracycline resistance colonies. The resultant hemolysin mutant strain lacks the ability to lyse mouse bed blood cells (RBC) when tested in vitro (p<0.001). The host-plasmid system described in this study, has applications for the genetic manipulation of this pathogen and potentially other mycoplasmas.

  3. Repair of ultraviolet-irradiated transforming DNA in A recA mutant of Haemophilus influenzae

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    Stuy, J.H.; Walter, R.B. (Florida State Univ., Tallahassee (USA). Dept. of Biological Science)

    1983-04-01

    Ultraviolet-irradiated transforming DNA was assayed on a wild-type strain of Haemophilus influenzae strain Rd, on an excision repair-deficient (uvr-2) mutant, on a recombination repair-deficient (recA4) mutant, and on a strain carrying both mutations. The donor DNA had a point mutation genetic marker (strAl) and a long nonhomologous plasmid-derived DNA segment inserted in the HPl prophage. The shape of the inactivation curves suggested that only recombination was responsible for the inverse square root kinetics observed with excision repair-proficient recipients.

  4. Characterization of RecA424 and RecA670 proteins from Deinococcus radiodurans.

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    Satoh, Katsuya; Narumi, Issay; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Kitayama, Shigeru; Yanagisawa, Tadashi; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    RecA protein is considered to be the most important participant in the radiation resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans. However, it is still unclear how RecA contributes to the resistance. In this study, we identified a new recA mutation (recA424) in the DNA-repair deficient mutant strain KI696, the phenotype of which is remarkably different from mutant strain rec30 carrying recA670. The properties of the gene products from the recA mutants were compared. recA424 could not complement the deficiency in Escherichia coli RecA, as found for recA670. In vitro, neither RecA424 nor RecA670 could promote DNA strand exchange under conditions in which wild-type RecA promoted the reaction, indicating that both RecA424 and Rec670 are defective in recombination activity. RecA424 promoted the autocleavage reaction of LexA in vitro, whereas RecA670 did not. The intracellular LexA level in KI696 was decreased following gamma-irradiation. However, the LexA level in strain rec30 was constant irrespective of irradiation. These results indicate that RecA424 retains co-protease activity, whereas RecA670 does not. While strain rec30 is extremely radiation sensitive, strain KI696 is only slightly sensitive. Together, these observations suggest that the co-protease activity rather than the recombination activity of RecA contributes to radiation resistance in D. radiodurans.

  5. RecA: A NOVEL TARGET FOR DRUG DELIVERY

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    Ramani Gade

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The RecA protein is a recombinase functioning in recombinational DNA repair in bacteria. RecA is regulated at many levels. The expression of the recA gene is regulated within the SOS response. The activity of the RecA protein itself is autoregulated by its own C-terminus. RecA responsible for the development of resistance by the microbes against antibiotic. Development of new medication against RecA focus light on the future newer antibiotics in the phrma sector.

  6. Direct evidence of recombination in the recA gene of Aeromonas bestiarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanglas, Ariadna; Albarral, Vicenta; Farfán, Maribel; Lorén, J Gaspar; Fusté, M Carmen

    2016-03-01

    Two hundred and twenty-one strains representative of all Aeromonas species were characterized using the recA gene sequence, assessing its potential as a molecular marker for the genus Aeromonas. The inter-species distance values obtained demonstrated that recA has a high discriminatory power. Phylogenetic analysis, based on full-length gene nucleotide sequences, revealed a robust topology with clearly separated clusters for each species. The maximum likelihood tree showed the Aeromonas bestiarum strains in a well-defined cluster, containing a subset of four strains of different geographical origins in a deep internal branch. Data analysis provided strong evidence of recombination at the end of the recA sequences in these four strains. Intergenomic recombination corresponding to partial regions of the two adjacent genes recA and recX (248 bp) was identified between A. bestiarum (major parent) and Aeromonas eucrenophila (minor parent). The low number of recombinant strains detected (1.8%) suggests that horizontal flow between recA sequences is relatively uncommon in this genus. Moreover, only a few nucleotide differences were detected among these fragments, indicating that recombination has occurred recently. Finally, we also determined if the recombinant fragment could have influenced the structure and basic functions of the RecA protein, comparing models reconstructed from the translated amino acid sequences of our A. bestiarum strains with known Escherichia coli RecA structures.

  7. Evidence that the phr+ gene enhances the ultraviolet resistance of Escherichia coli recA strains in the dark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, K; Fujiwara, Y; Shinagawa, H

    1983-01-01

    An Escherichia coli recA phr+ purA strain was more resistant to ultraviolet radiation than its isogenic derivative recA phr+ purA+ in the absence of photoreactivating light, whereas their nearly isogenic derivative recA phr showed most UV-induced lethality. The amounts of photoreactivating enzyme (PRE) per cell in the recA phr+ purA was higher than in the recA phr+ purA+. The recA phr is defective for photoreactivation. Thus, in the recA strain, UV resistance in the dark increased in proportion to the amounts of PRE per cell, suggesting that PRE participates in the process of dark repair of UV-damaged DNA.

  8. Implication of the E. coli K12 uvrA and recA genes in the repair of 8-methoxypsoralen-induced mono adducts and crosslinks on plasmid DNA; Implicacion de los genes uvrA de E. coli K12 en la reparacion de monoaductos y entrecruzamien tos inducidos en DNA plasmidico por 8-metoxipso raleno mas luz ultravioleta A

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    Paramio, J.M.; Bauluz, C.; Vidania, R. de

    1986-07-01

    Genotoxicity of psoralen damages on plasmid DNA has been studied. pBR322 DNA was randomly modified with several concentrations of 8-methoxypsoralen plus 365 nm-UV light. After transformation into E. coli strains (wild-type, uvrA and recA) plasmid survival and mutagenesis were analyzed. To study the influence of the SOS response on plasmid recovery, preirradiation of the cells was performed. In absence of cell preirradiation, crosslinks were not repaired in any strain. Mono adducts were also lethal but in part removed by the excision-repair pathway. Preirradiation of the cells significantly. increased plasmid recovery in recA+ celia. In uvrA- only the mutagenic pathway seemed to be involved in the repair of the damaged DNA. Wild type strain showed the highest increase in plasmid survival, involving the repair of mono adducts and some fraction of crosslinks mainly through an error-free repair pathway. This suggests an enhancement of the excision repair promoted by the induction of SOS functions. (Author) 32 refs.

  9. Effect of bacterial recA expression on DNA repair in the rad51 and rad52 mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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    M.A. Morais Jr.

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular and functional homology between yeast proteins pRad51 and pRad52 and Escherichia coli pRecA involved in recombinational DNA repair led us to investigate possible effects of recA gene expression on DNA repair in rad51 and rad52 mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The mutant cells were subjected to one of the following treatments: preincubation with 8-methoxypsoralen and subsequent irradiation with 360-nm ultraviolet (UVA (8-MOP + UVA, irradiation with 254-nm UV light or treatment with methyl methane sulfonate (MMS. While recA expression did not repair lethal DNA lesions in mutant rad51, it was able to partially restore resistance to 8-MOP + UVA and MMS in rad52. Expression of recA could not complement the sensitivity of rad51rad52 double mutants, indicating that pRad51 may be essential for the repair-stimulating activity of pRecA in the rad52 mutant. Spontaneous mutagenesis was increased, and 8-MOP-photoinduced mutagenesis was decreased by the presence of pRecA in rad52, whereas pRecA decreased UV-induced mutagenesis in rad51. Thus, pRecA may function in yeast DNA repair either as a member of a protein complex or as an individual protein that binds to mutagen-damaged DNA.A homologia tanto a nível molecular como funcional entre as proteínas de leveduras pRad51 e pRad52 envolvidas na reparação de DNA tipo recombinacional e pRecA de E. coli nos levou a analisar os possíveis efeitos da expressão do gene recA sobre a reparação de DNA nos mutantes rad51 e rad52 de S. cerevisiae após tratamento com 8-MOP + UVA, com UV e com MMS. A expressão de recA não foi capaz de restaurar a reparação das lesões induzidas no DNA do mutante rad51 após tratamento com esses agentes, entretanto ela restaurou parcialmente a resistência ao 8-MOP + UVA e ao MMS no mutante rad52. A expressão de recA não complementou a sensibilidade do duplo mutante rad51rad52, indicando que pRad51 pode ser essencial para estimular a atividade de reparação da p

  10. Regulated expression of the dinR and recA genes during competence development and SOS induction in Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haijema, BJ; vanSinderen, D; Winterling, K; Kooistra, J; Venema, G; Hamoen, LW

    1996-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that the dinR gene product of Bacillus subtilis acts as a repressor of the SOS regulon by binding to DNA sequences located upstream of SOS genes, including dinR and recA. Following activation as a result of DNA damage, RecA is believed to catalyse DinR-autocleavage, thus der

  11. Involvement of recA and exr genes in the in vivo inhibition of the recBC nuclease.

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    Marsden, H S; Pollard, E C; Ginoza, W; Randall, E P

    1974-05-01

    When Escherichia coli cells are gamma irradiated they degrade their deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). The DNA of previously gamma-irradiated T4 phage is also degraded in infected cells. The amount of degradation is not only dependent on the dose but also on the genotype of the cell. The amount of degradation is less in cells carrying a recB or a recC mutation, suggesting that most of the DNA degradation is due to the recB(+) and recC(+) gene product (exonuclease V). In some strains a previous dose of ultraviolet (UV) light followed by incubation renders the cells resistant to DNA degradation after gamma irradiation. We have shown this inhibition to take place for infecting T4 phage also. By using six strains of E. coli selected for mutations in the genes recA, exr (or lex), and uvrB, we have been able to show that the preliminary UV treatment produces no change in recA and exr cells for both endogenous DNA degradation and the degradation of infecting irradiated T4 phage DNA, i.e., inhibition was not detected in these strains. On the other hand, wild-type cells and strains carrying mutations of uvrB show inhibition in both types of experiments. Because the recA gene product and the exr(+) (lex(+)) gene product are necessary for the induction of prophage, it is possible that the phenomenon of inducible inhibition requires recA(+) and exr(+) presence. One interpretation of these results is that an inducible inhibitor may be controlled by the exr gene.

  12. [Analysis of the meiotic recombination frequency in transgenic tomato hybrids expressing recA and NLS-recA-licBM3 genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komakhin, R A; Komakhina, V V; Miliukova, N A; Zhuchenko, A A

    2012-01-01

    To study and induce meiotic recombination in plants, we generated and analyzed transgenic tomato hybrids F1-RecA and F1-NLS-recA-LicBM3 expressing, respectively, the recA gene of Escherichia coli and the NLS-recA-licBM3 gene. It was found that the recA and NLS-recA-licBM3 genes are inherited through the maternal and paternal lineages, they have no selective influence on the pollen and are contained in tomato F1-RecA and F1-NLS-RecA-LicBM3 hybrids outside the second chromosome in the hemizygous state. The comparative analysis of the meiotic recombination frequency (rf) in the progenies of the transgenic and nontransgenic hybrids showed that only the expression of the recA gene of E. coli in cells of the F1-RecA plants produced a 1.2-1.5-fold increase in the frequency of recombination between some linked marker genes of the second chromosome of tomato.

  13. A multicopy phr-plasmid increases the ultraviolet resistance of a recA strain of Escherichia coli.

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    Yamamoto, K; Satake, M; Shinagawa, H

    1984-01-01

    It has been previously reported that the ultraviolet sensitivity of recA strains of Escherichia coli in the dark is suppressed by a plasmid pKY1 which carries the phr gene, suggesting that this is due to a novel effect of photoreactivating enzyme (PRE) of E. coli in the dark (Yamamoto et al., 1983a). In this work, we observed that an increase of UV-resistance by pKY1 in the dark is not apparent in strains with a mutation in either uvrA, uvrB, uvrC, lexA, recBC or recF. The sensitivity of recA lexA and recA recBC multiple mutants to UV is suppressed by the plasmid but that of recA uvrA, recA uvrB and recA uvrC is not. Host-cell reactivation of UV-irradiated lambda phage is slightly more efficient in the recA/pKY1 strain compared with the parental recA strain. On the other hand, the recA and recA/pKY1 strains do not differ significantly in the following properties: Hfr recombination, induction of lambda by UV, and mutagenesis. We suggest that dark repair of PRE is correlated with its capacity of excision repair.

  14. Identification of Bacillus Probiotics Isolated from Soil Rhizosphere Using 16S rRNA, recA, rpoB Gene Sequencing and RAPD-PCR.

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    Mohkam, Milad; Nezafat, Navid; Berenjian, Aydin; Mobasher, Mohammad Ali; Ghasemi, Younes

    2016-03-01

    Some Bacillus species, especially Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus pumilus groups, have highly similar 16S rRNA gene sequences, which are hard to identify based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis. To conquer this drawback, rpoB, recA sequence analysis along with randomly amplified polymorphic (RAPD) fingerprinting was examined as an alternative method for differentiating Bacillus species. The 16S rRNA, rpoB and recA genes were amplified via a polymerase chain reaction using their specific primers. The resulted PCR amplicons were sequenced, and phylogenetic analysis was employed by MEGA 6 software. Identification based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing was underpinned by rpoB and recA gene sequencing as well as RAPD-PCR technique. Subsequently, concatenation and phylogenetic analysis showed that extent of diversity and similarity were better obtained by rpoB and recA primers, which are also reinforced by RAPD-PCR methods. However, in one case, these approaches failed to identify one isolate, which in combination with the phenotypical method offsets this issue. Overall, RAPD fingerprinting, rpoB and recA along with concatenated genes sequence analysis discriminated closely related Bacillus species, which highlights the significance of the multigenic method in more precisely distinguishing Bacillus strains. This research emphasizes the benefit of RAPD fingerprinting, rpoB and recA sequence analysis superior to 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis for suitable and effective identification of Bacillus species as recommended for probiotic products.

  15. Comparative evolution of the recA gene of surface and deep subsurface microorganisms (an evolutionary clock of intermediate rate). Final report

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    Miller, R.V.

    1998-04-01

    Because of the ability of the recA protein product to maintain both DNA integrity and increase genetic diversity, this gene may be essential to the survival of microorganisms following the damaging effects of numerous environmental stresses such as exposure to solar UV radiation, exposure to gamma radiation, starvation, and changing environments. While the various activities and amino-acid sequence of recA have been highly conserved among the eubacteria and archaea, little is known as to whether a strict structure-function relationship has been conserved. In other words, are the same regions of this highly plastic, functionally heterogeneous protein involved in the same catalytic capacities throughout the bacterial kingdom? While it is reasonable to assume that this type of conservation has also occurred, we felt it necessary to test the assumption by demonstrating that mutations in different genera of bacteria which eliminate similar functions (i.e., lead to similar phenotypes) are caused by changes in the amino-acid sequence in the same regions of their recA proteins. Therefore, we located the changes in nucleotide sequence in two recA mutants of P. aeruginosa which displayed mutant phenotypes in recombination and UV resistance. Our assumption was that if structure-function relationships held, these mutations would be found in areas already identified as essential for the function of the E. coli recA protein.

  16. A genomic island integrated into recA of Vibrio cholerae contains a divergent recA and provides multi-pathway protection from DNA damage.

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    Rapa, Rita A; Islam, Atiqul; Monahan, Leigh G; Mutreja, Ankur; Thomson, Nicholas; Charles, Ian G; Stokes, Harold W; Labbate, Maurizio

    2015-04-01

    Lateral gene transfer (LGT) has been crucial in the evolution of the cholera pathogen, Vibrio cholerae. The two major virulence factors are present on two different mobile genetic elements, a bacteriophage containing the cholera toxin genes and a genomic island (GI) containing the intestinal adhesin genes. Non-toxigenic V. cholerae in the aquatic environment are a major source of novel DNA that allows the pathogen to morph via LGT. In this study, we report a novel GI from a non-toxigenic V. cholerae strain containing multiple genes involved in DNA repair including the recombination repair gene recA that is 23% divergent from the indigenous recA and genes involved in the translesion synthesis pathway. This is the first report of a GI containing the critical gene recA and the first report of a GI that targets insertion into a specific site within recA. We show that possession of the island in Escherichia coli is protective against DNA damage induced by UV-irradiation and DNA targeting antibiotics. This study highlights the importance of genetic elements such as GIs in the evolution of V. cholerae and emphasizes the importance of environmental strains as a source of novel DNA that can influence the pathogenicity of toxigenic strains.

  17. Sequence diversity within the argF, fbp and recA genes of natural isolates of Neisseria meningitidis: interspecies recombination within the argF gene.

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    Zhou, J; Spratt, B G

    1992-08-01

    Studies of natural populations of Neisseria meningitidis using multilocus enzyme electrophoresis have shown extensive genetic variation within this species, which, it has been proposed, implies a level of sequence diversity within meningococci that is greater than that normally considered as the criterion for species limits in bacteria. To obtain a direct measure of the sequence diversity among meningococci, we obtained the nucleotide sequences of most of the argF, recA and fbp genes of eight meningococci of widely differing electrophoretic type (from the reference collection of Caugant). Sequence variation between the meningococcal strains ranged from 0-0.6% for fbp, 0-1.3% for argF, and 0-3.3% for recA. These levels of diversity are no greater than those found within Escherichia coli 'housekeeping' genes and suggest that multilocus enzyme electrophoresis may overestimate the extent of nucleotide sequence diversity within meningococci. The average sequence divergence between the Neisseria meningitidis strains and N. gonorrhoeae strain FA19 was 1.0% for fbp and 1.6% for recA. The argF gene, although very uniform among the eight meningococcal isolates, had a striking mosaic structure when compared with the gonococcal argF gene: two regions of the gene differed by greater than 13% in nucleotide sequence between meningococci and gonococci, whereas the rest of the gene differed by less than 1.7%. One of the diverged regions was shown to have been introduced from the argF gene of a commensal Neisseria species that is closely related to Neisseria cinerea. The source of the other region was unclear.

  18. The RecX protein interacts with the RecA protein and modulates its activity in Herbaspirillum seropedicae

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    Galvão, C.W. [Departamento de Biologia Estrutural, Molecular e Genética, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Souza, E.M. [Departamento de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Etto, R.M. [Departamento de Biologia Estrutural, Molecular e Genética, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Pedrosa, F.O.; Chubatsu, L.S.; Yates, M.G. [Departamento de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Schumacher, J.; Buck, M. [Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Steffens, M.B.R. [Departamento de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2012-10-15

    DNA repair is crucial to the survival of all organisms. The bacterial RecA protein is a central component in the SOS response and in recombinational and SOS DNA repairs. The RecX protein has been characterized as a negative modulator of RecA activity in many bacteria. The recA and recX genes of Herbaspirillum seropedicae constitute a single operon, and evidence suggests that RecX participates in SOS repair. In the present study, we show that the H. seropedicae RecX protein (RecX{sub Hs}) can interact with the H. seropedicae RecA protein (RecA{sub Hs}) and that RecA{sub Hs} possesses ATP binding, ATP hydrolyzing and DNA strand exchange activities. RecX{sub Hs} inhibited 90% of the RecA{sub Hs} DNA strand exchange activity even when present in a 50-fold lower molar concentration than RecA{sub Hs}. RecA{sub Hs} ATP binding was not affected by the addition of RecX, but the ATPase activity was reduced. When RecX{sub Hs} was present before the formation of RecA filaments (RecA-ssDNA), inhibition of ATPase activity was substantially reduced and excess ssDNA also partially suppressed this inhibition. The results suggest that the RecX{sub Hs} protein negatively modulates the RecA{sub Hs} activities by protein-protein interactions and also by DNA-protein interactions.

  19. Expression of the recA gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO is inducible by DNA-damaging agents

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    Miller, R.V.; Kokjohn, T.A.

    1988-05-01

    Western (immunoblot) analysis using Escherichia coli anti-RecA antiserum revealed that expression of the RecA protein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO is induced upon exposure of the bacterium to UV irradiation or norfloxacin, a quinolone related to nalidixic acid.

  20. Amplified UvrA protein can ameliorate the ultraviolet sensitivity of an Escherichia coli recA mutant.

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    Kiyosawa, K; Tanaka, M; Matsunaga, T; Nikaido, O; Yamamoto, K

    2001-12-19

    When a recA strain of Escherichia coli was transformed with the multicopy plasmid pSF11 carrying the uvrA gene of E. coli, its extreme ultraviolet (UV) sensitivity was decreased. The sensitivity of the lexA1 (Ind(-)) strain to UV was also decreased by pSF11. The recA cells expressing Neurospora crassa UV damage endonuclease (UVDE), encoding UV-endonuclease, show UV resistance. On the other hand, only partial amelioration of UV sensitivity of the recA strain was observed in the presence of the plasmid pNP10 carrying the uvrB gene. Host cell reactivation of UV-irradiated lambda phage in recA cells with pSF11 was as efficient as that in wild-type cells. Using an antibody to detect cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, we found that UV-irradiated recA cells removed dimers from their DNA more rapidly if they carried pSF11 than if they carried a vacant control plasmid. Using anti-UvrA antibody, we observed that the expression level of UvrA protein was about 20-fold higher in the recA strain with pSF11 than in the recA strain without pSF11. Our results were consistent with the idea that constitutive level of UvrA protein in the recA cells results in constitutive levels of active UvrABC nuclease which is not enough to operate full nucleotide excision repair (NER), thus leading to extreme UV sensitivity.

  1. Comparative sequence analysis of a recA gene fragment brings new evidence for a change in the taxonomy of the Lactobacillus casei group.

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    Felis, G E; Dellaglio, F; Mizzi, L; Torriani, S

    2001-11-01

    The taxonomic positions of species of the Lactobacillus casei group have been evaluated by sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of a 277 bp recA gene fragment. High sequence similarity between strain ATCC 393T, currently designated as the type strain of L. casei, and the type strain of Lactobacillus zeae, LMG 17315T, has been established, while L. casei ATCC 334 and Lactobacillus paracasei NCDO 151T form a single phylogenetic group. The taxonomic status of species and strains at issue is discussed.

  2. Overexpression of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi recA gene confers fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli DH5α.

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    Yassien, M A M; Elfaky, M A

    2015-11-01

    A spontaneous fluoroquinolone-resistant mutant (STM1) was isolated from its parent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) clinical isolate. Unlike its parent isolate, this mutant has selective resistance to fluoroquinolones without any change in its sensitivity to various other antibiotics. DNA gyrase assays revealed that the fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype of the STM1 mutant did not result from alteration of the fluoroquinolone sensitivity of the DNA gyrase isolated from it. To study the mechanism of fluoroquinolone resistance, a genomic library from the STM1 mutant was constructed in Escherichia coli DH5α and two recombinant plasmids were obtained. Only one of these plasmids (STM1-A) conferred the selective fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype to E. coli DH5α. The chromosomal insert from STM1-A, digested with EcoRI and HindIII restriction endonucleases, produced two DNA fragments and these were cloned separately into pUC19 thereby generating two new plasmids, STM1-A1 and STM1-A2. Only STM1-A1 conferred the selective fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype to E. coli DH5α. Sequence and subcloning analyses of STM1-A1 showed the presence of an intact RecA open reading frame. Unlike that of the wild-type E. coli DH5α, protein analysis of a crude STM1-A1 extract showed overexpression of a 40 kDa protein. Western blotting confirmed the 40 kDa protein band to be RecA. When a RecA PCR product was cloned into pGEM-T and introduced into E. coli DH5α, the STM1-A11 subclone retained fluoroquinolone resistance. These results suggest that overexpression of RecA causes selective fluoroquinolone resistance in E. coli DH5α.

  3. Overexpression of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi recA gene confers fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli DH5α

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    M.A.M. Yassien

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A spontaneous fluoroquinolone-resistant mutant (STM1 was isolated from its parent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi clinical isolate. Unlike its parent isolate, this mutant has selective resistance to fluoroquinolones without any change in its sensitivity to various other antibiotics. DNA gyrase assays revealed that the fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype of the STM1 mutant did not result from alteration of the fluoroquinolone sensitivity of the DNA gyrase isolated from it. To study the mechanism of fluoroquinolone resistance, a genomic library from the STM1 mutant was constructed in Escherichia coli DH5α and two recombinant plasmids were obtained. Only one of these plasmids (STM1-A conferred the selective fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype to E. coli DH5α. The chromosomal insert from STM1-A, digested with EcoRI and HindIII restriction endonucleases, produced two DNA fragments and these were cloned separately into pUC19 thereby generating two new plasmids, STM1-A1 and STM1-A2. Only STM1-A1 conferred the selective fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype to E. coli DH5α. Sequence and subcloning analyses of STM1-A1 showed the presence of an intact RecA open reading frame. Unlike that of the wild-type E. coli DH5α, protein analysis of a crude STM1-A1 extract showed overexpression of a 40 kDa protein. Western blotting confirmed the 40 kDa protein band to be RecA. When a RecA PCR product was cloned into pGEM-T and introduced into E. coli DH5α, the STM1-A11 subclone retained fluoroquinolone resistance. These results suggest that overexpression of RecA causes selective fluoroquinolone resistance in E. coli DH5α.

  4. Targeted gene repair – in the arena

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    The development of targeted gene repair is under way and, despite some setbacks, shows promise as an alternative form of gene therapy. This approach uses synthetic DNA molecules to activate and direct the cell’s inherent DNA repair systems to correct inborn errors. The progress of this technique and its therapeutic potential are discussed in relation to the treatment of genetic diseases.

  5. The Walker A motif mutation recA4159 abolishes the SOS response and recombination in a recA730 mutant of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šimatović, Ana; Mitrikeski, Petar T; Vlašić, Ignacija; Sopta, Mary; Brčić-Kostić, Krunoslav

    2016-01-01

    In bacteria, the RecA protein forms recombinogenic filaments required for the SOS response and DNA recombination. In order to form a recombinogenic filament, wild type RecA needs to bind ATP and to interact with mediator proteins. The RecA730 protein is a mutant version of RecA with superior catalytic abilities, allowing filament formation without the help of mediator proteins. The mechanism of RecA730 filament formation is not well understood, and the question remains as to whether the RecA730 protein requires ATP binding in order to become competent for filament formation. We examined two mutants, recA730,4159 (presumed to be defective for ATP binding) and recA730,2201 (defective for ATP hydrolysis), and show that they have different properties with respect to SOS induction, conjugational recombination and double-strand break repair. We show that ATP binding is essential for all RecA730 functions, while ATP hydrolysis is required only for double-strand break repair. Our results emphasize the similarity of the SOS response and conjugational recombination, neither of which requires ATP hydrolysis by RecA730.

  6. DNA repair genes in the Megavirales pangenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc-Mathieu, Romain; Ogata, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    The order 'Megavirales' represents a group of eukaryotic viruses with a large genome encoding a few hundred up to two thousand five hundred genes. Several members of Megavirales possess genes involved in major DNA repair pathways. Some of these genes were likely inherited from an ancient virus world and some others were derived from the genomes of their hosts. Here we examine molecular phylogenies of key DNA repair enzymes in light of recent hypotheses on the origin of Megavirales, and propose that the last common ancestors of the individual families of the order Megavirales already possessed DNA repair functions to achieve and maintain a moderately large genome and that this repair capacity gradually increased, in a family-dependent manner, during their recent evolution.

  7. RecA Inhibitors Potentiate Antibiotic Activity and Block Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md Kausar; Alhhazmi, Areej; DeCoteau, John F; Luo, Yu; Geyer, C Ronald

    2016-03-17

    Antibiotic resistance arises from the maintenance of resistance mutations or genes acquired from the acquisition of adaptive de novo mutations or the transfer of resistance genes. Antibiotic resistance is acquired in response to antibiotic therapy by activating SOS-mediated DNA repair and mutagenesis and horizontal gene transfer pathways. Initiation of the SOS pathway promotes activation of RecA, inactivation of LexA repressor, and induction of SOS genes. Here, we have identified and characterized phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid RecA inhibitors that block antibiotic-induced activation of the SOS response. These inhibitors potentiate the activity of bactericidal antibiotics, including members of the quinolone, β-lactam, and aminoglycoside families in both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. They reduce the ability of bacteria to acquire antibiotic resistance mutations and to transfer mobile genetic elements conferring resistance. This study highlights the advantage of including RecA inhibitors in bactericidal antibiotic therapies and provides a new strategy for prolonging antibiotic shelf life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Transactivation of repair genes by BRCA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2002-01-01

    Recent studies have identified a link between the BRCA1 tumor suppressor and transcriptional regulation of a group of genes involved in nucleotide excision repair. There is some controversy regarding the precise mechanism of upregulation of XPE DDB2 or XPC by BRCA1, with some evidence suggesting that p53 is involved in their regulation. Some evidence suggests BRCA1 may stabilize p53 and direct regulation of DNA repair genes, although how BRCA1 stabilizes p53 remains unclear and whether BRCA1 can upregulate DNA repair genes in a p53-independent manner remains a possibility. A transcriptional component to the action of BRCA1 and involvement of XP genes brings up new and interesting questions about breast cancer development and therapy.

  9. The influence of carbon sources on the expression of the recA gene and genotoxicity detection by an Acinetobacter bioreporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bo; Song, Yizhi; Zhang, Dayi; Huang, Wei E; Zhang, Xu; Li, Guanghe

    2015-04-01

    Bacterial whole-cell bioreporters are practical and reliable analytical tools to assess the toxicity and bioavailability of environmental contaminants, yet evidence has shown that their performance could be affected by different carbon sources. This paper evaluated the influence of carbon sources on the recA gene (ACIAD1385) in a DNA damage-inducible recA::luxCDABE Acinetobacter bioreporter and optimized the induction conditions for its practical application in environmental monitoring. Different carbon sources, including LB, potassium acetate (MMA), sodium citrate (MMC), sodium pyruvate (MMP), and sodium succinate (MMS), significantly influenced (p Acinetobacter bioreporter at the transcriptional level. Additionally, proteomic analysis identified 122 proteins that were differentially expressed after exposure to mitomycin C in defined media and LB, and 5 of them were related to the DNA damage response, indicating the effects of carbon sources on the DNA damage response in Acinetobacter at the translational level. The repression effect caused by the rich medium, LB, was possibly related to the mechanism of carbon catabolite repression. Our results suggest that the practical application of Acinetobacter bioreporters to the genotoxicity assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soils could be significantly improved by using a standard medium of defined composition, as this could increase their sensitivity.

  10. Gene Therapy for Fracture Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    case, the external catheter hub is visible (D), though the internal tubing cannot be visualized by X-Ray. 11 MLV-based vector with BMP-2/4...catheter) injection. Top: A fluoroscope was used to visualize a radio- opaque contrast dye during a percutaneous injection from the lateral aspect...analysis was performed using ImaGene software (BioDiscovery, El Segundo, CA), that used an internal statistical analysis of the signal intensity of

  11. [Relationship between the UV-induction of exact exclusion of transposons and the function of umuDC, lexA, recA genes and plasmid pkM101].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusina, O Iu; Andreeva, I V; Tiganova, I G; Mirskaia, E E; Skavronskaia, A G

    1997-01-01

    A pair of isogenic strains-E. coli K-12 and E. coli B/r differing by the status of umuDC genes and presence of pKM101 plasmid-were constructed and the relationship between UV induction of transposons Tn5 and Tn 10 and the gene umuDC function shown. This relationship is not absolute, in contrast to that of point mutations. Induction of precise excision of these transposons can be inhibited by pKM101 plasmid. Induction of precise excision of Tn5 and Tn 10 from the sites under study is absolutely lexA- and recA- dependent.

  12. Purification and characterization of the RecA protein from Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

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    Elizabeth A Stohl

    Full Text Available The strict human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the only causative agent of the sexually transmitted infection gonorrhea. The recA gene from N. gonorrhoeae is essential for DNA repair, natural DNA transformation, and pilin antigenic variation, all processes that are important for the pathogenesis and persistence of N. gonorrhoeae in the human population. To understand the biochemical features of N. gonorrhoeae RecA (RecA(Ng, we overexpressed and purified the RecA(Ng and SSB(Ng proteins and compared their activities to those of the well-characterized E. coli RecA and SSB proteins in vitro. We observed that RecA(Ng promoted more strand exchange at early time points than RecA(Ec through DNA homologous substrates, and exhibited the highest ATPase activity of any RecA protein characterized to date. Further analysis of this robust ATPase activity revealed that RecA(Ng is more efficient at displacing SSB from ssDNA and that RecA(Ng shows higher ATPase activity during strand exchange than RecA(Ec. Using substrates created to mimic the cellular processes of DNA transformation and pilin antigenic variation we observed that RecA(Ec catalyzed more strand exchange through a 100 bp heterologous insert, but that RecA(Ng catalyzed more strand exchange through regions of microheterology. Together, these data suggest that the processes of ATP hydrolysis and DNA strand exchange may be coupled differently in RecA(Ng than in RecA(Ec. This difference may explain the unusually high ATPase activity observed for RecA(Ng with the strand exchange activity between RecA(Ng and RecA(Ec being more similar.

  13. Phylogenetic diversity based on rrs, atpD, recA genes and 16S-23S intergenic sequence analyses of rhizobial strains isolated from Vicia faba and Pisum sativum in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillana, Nery; Ramírez-Bahena, Martha Helena; García-Fraile, Paula; Velázquez, Encarna; Zúñiga, Doris

    2008-03-01

    In this study 17 isolates from effective nodules of Vicia faba and Pisum sativum var. macrocarpum growing in different soils from Peru were isolated and characterized. The isolates, presenting 11 different RAPD profiles, were distributed in three groups on the basis of their 16S-RFLP patterns. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of strains from 16S-RFLP groups I, II and III were closely related (identities higher than 99.5%) to Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii DSM 30141 (=ATCC 14480), R. leguminosarum bv. viciae DSM 30132(T) and Rhizobium etli CFN42(T) (=USDA 9032(T)), respectively. The analysis of the 16S-23S intergenic spacer (ITS) and two housekeeping genes, atpD and recA, confirmed the identification of strains from group I, however those from groups II and III were phylogenetically divergent to strains DSM 30132(T) and CFN42(T). These results support the fact that the 16S rRNA gene is not adequate for identification at species level within genus Rhizobium and suggest the existence of putative new species within the phylogenetic group of R. leguminosarum. They also confirm the need of a taxonomic revision of R. leguminosarum since the reference strains of the three biovars included in this study are phylogenetically divergent according to their ITS, atpD and recA gene sequences.

  14. Rhizobia with 16S rRNA and nifH similar to Mesorhizobium huakuii but Novel recA, glnII, nodA and nodC genes are symbionts of New Zealand Carmichaelinae.

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    Heng Wee Tan

    Full Text Available New Zealand became geographically isolated about 80 million years ago and this separation gave rise to a unique native flora including four genera of legume, Carmichaelia, Clianthus and Montigena in the Carmichaelinae clade, tribe Galegeae, and Sophora, tribe Sophoreae, sub-family Papilionoideae. Ten bacterial strains isolated from NZ Carmichaelinae growing in natural ecosystems grouped close to the Mesorhizobium huakuii type strain in relation to their 16S rRNA and nifH gene sequences. However, the ten strains separated into four groups on the basis of their recA and glnII sequences: all groups were clearly distinct from all Mesorhizobium type strains. The ten strains separated into two groups on the basis of their nodA sequences but grouped closely together in relation to nodC sequences; all nodA and nodC sequences were novel. Seven strains selected and the M. huakuii type strain (isolated from Astragalus sinicus produced functional nodules on Carmichaelia spp., Clianthus puniceus and A. sinicus but did not nodulate two Sophora species. We conclude that rhizobia closely related to M. huakuii on the basis of 16S rRNA and nifH gene sequences, but with variable recA and glnII genes and novel nodA and nodC genes, are common symbionts of NZ Carmichaelinae.

  15. Structural and Functional Studies of H. seropedicae RecA Protein – Insights into the Polymerization of RecA Protein as Nucleoprotein Filament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leite, Wellington C.; Galvão, Carolina W.; Saab, Sérgio C.; Iulek, Jorge; Etto, Rafael M.; Steffens, Maria B. R.; Chitteni-Pattu, Sindhu; Stanage, Tyler; Keck, James L.; Cox, Michael M.; Spies, Maria

    2016-07-22

    The bacterial RecA protein plays a role in the complex system of DNA damage repair. Here, we report the functional and structural characterization of the Herbaspirillum seropedicae RecA protein (HsRecA). HsRecA protein is more efficient at displacing SSB protein from ssDNA than Escherichia coli RecA protein. HsRecA also promotes DNA strand exchange more efficiently. The three dimensional structure of HsRecA-ADP/ATP complex has been solved to 1.7 Å resolution. HsRecA protein contains a small N-terminal domain, a central core ATPase domain and a large C-terminal domain, that are similar to homologous bacterial RecA proteins. Comparative structural analysis showed that the N-terminal polymerization motif of archaeal and eukaryotic RecA family proteins are also present in bacterial RecAs. Reconstruction of electrostatic potential from the hexameric structure of HsRecA-ADP/ATP revealed a high positive charge along the inner side, where ssDNA is bound inside the filament. The properties of this surface may explain the greater capacity of HsRecA protein to bind ssDNA, forming a contiguous nucleoprotein filament, displace SSB and promote DNA exchange relative to EcRecA. In conclusion, our functional and structural analyses provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of polymerization of bacterial RecA as a helical nucleoprotein filament.

  16. Structural and Functional Studies of H. seropedicae RecA Protein - Insights into the Polymerization of RecA Protein as Nucleoprotein Filament.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wellington C Leite

    Full Text Available The bacterial RecA protein plays a role in the complex system of DNA damage repair. Here, we report the functional and structural characterization of the Herbaspirillum seropedicae RecA protein (HsRecA. HsRecA protein is more efficient at displacing SSB protein from ssDNA than Escherichia coli RecA protein. HsRecA also promotes DNA strand exchange more efficiently. The three dimensional structure of HsRecA-ADP/ATP complex has been solved to 1.7 Å resolution. HsRecA protein contains a small N-terminal domain, a central core ATPase domain and a large C-terminal domain, that are similar to homologous bacterial RecA proteins. Comparative structural analysis showed that the N-terminal polymerization motif of archaeal and eukaryotic RecA family proteins are also present in bacterial RecAs. Reconstruction of electrostatic potential from the hexameric structure of HsRecA-ADP/ATP revealed a high positive charge along the inner side, where ssDNA is bound inside the filament. The properties of this surface may explain the greater capacity of HsRecA protein to bind ssDNA, forming a contiguous nucleoprotein filament, displace SSB and promote DNA exchange relative to EcRecA. Our functional and structural analyses provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of polymerization of bacterial RecA as a helical nucleoprotein filament.

  17. QUANTIFICATION OF RECA GENE EXPRESSION AS AN INDICATOR OF REPAIR POTENTIAL IN MARINE BACTERIOPLANKTON COMMUNITIES OF ANTARCTICA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marine bacteria in surface waters must cope daily with the damaging effects of exposure to solar radiation (containing both UV-A and UV-B wavelengths), which produces lesions in their DNA. As the stratospheric ozone layer is depleted, these coping mechanisms are likely to play an...

  18. Modulating cellular recombination potential through alterations in RecA structure and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhlanova, Irina V; Dudkina, Alexandra V; Baitin, Dima M; Knight, Kendall L; Cox, Michael M; Lanzov, Vladislav A

    2010-12-01

    The wild-type Escherichia coli RecA protein is a recombinase platform with unrealized recombination potential. We have explored the factors affecting recombination during conjugation with a quantitative assay. Regulatory proteins that affect RecA function have the capacity to increase or decrease recombination frequencies by factors up to sixfold. Autoinhibition by the RecA C-terminus can affect recombination frequency by factors up to fourfold. The greatest changes in recombination frequency measured here are brought about by point mutations in the recA gene. RecA variants can increase recombination frequencies by more than 50-fold. The RecA protein thus possesses an inherently broad functional range. The RecA protein of E. coli (EcRecA) is not optimized for recombination function. Instead, much of the recombination potential of EcRecA is structurally suppressed, probably reflecting cellular requirements. One point mutation in EcRecA with a particularly dramatic effect on recombination frequency, D112R, exhibits an enhanced capacity to load onto SSB-coated ssDNA, overcome the effects of regulatory proteins such as PsiB and RecX, and to pair homologous DNAs. Comparisons of key RecA protein mutants reveal two components to RecA recombination function - filament formation and the inherent DNA pairing activity of the formed filaments.

  19. Mismatch repair genes of Streptococcus pneumoniae: HexA confers a mutator phenotype in Escherichia coli by negative complementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudhomme, M; Méjean, V; Martin, B; Claverys, J P

    1991-11-01

    DNA repair systems able to correct base pair mismatches within newly replicated DNA or within heteroduplex molecules produced during recombination are widespread among living organisms. Evidence that such generalized mismatch repair systems evolved from a common ancestor is particularly strong for two of them, the Hex system of the gram-positive Streptococcus pneumoniae and the Mut system of the gram-negative Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. The homology existing between HexA and MutS and between HexB and MutL prompted us to investigate the effect of expressing hex genes in E. coli. Complementation of mutS or mutL mutations, which confer a mutator phenotype, was assayed by introducing on a multicopy plasmid the hexA and hexB genes, under the control of an inducible promoter, either individually or together in E. coli strains. No decrease in mutation rate was conferred by either hexA or hexB gene expression. However, a negative complementation effect was observed in wild-type E. coli cells: expression of hexA resulted in a typical Mut- mutator phenotype. hexB gene expression did not increase the mutation rate either individually or in conjunction with hexA. Since expression of hexA did not affect the mutation rate in mutS mutant cells and the hexA-induced mutator effect was recA independent, it is concluded that this effect results from inhibition of the Mut system. We suggest that HexA, like its homolog MutS, binds to mismatches resulting from replication errors, but in doing so it protects them from repair by the Mut system. In agreement with this hypothesis, an increase in mutS gene copy number abolished the hexA-induced mutator phenotype. HexA protein could prevent repair either by being unable to interact with Mut proteins or by producing nonfunctional repair complexes.

  20. Horizontal gene transfer regulation in bacteria as a "spandrel" of DNA repair mechanisms.

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    Saliou Fall

    Full Text Available Horizontal gene transfer (HGT is recognized as the major force for bacterial genome evolution. Yet, numerous questions remain about the transferred genes, their function, quantity and frequency. The extent to which genetic transformation by exogenous DNA has occurred over evolutionary time was initially addressed by an in silico approach using the complete genome sequence of the Ralstonia solanacearum GMI1000 strain. Methods based on phylogenetic reconstruction of prokaryote homologous genes families detected 151 genes (13.3% of foreign origin in the R. solanacearum genome and tentatively identified their bacterial origin. These putative transfers were analyzed in comparison to experimental transformation tests involving 18 different genomic DNA positions in the genome as sites for homologous or homeologous recombination. Significant transformation frequency differences were observed among these positions tested regardless of the overall genomic divergence of the R. solanacearum strains tested as recipients. The genomic positions containing the putative exogenous DNA were not systematically transformed at the highest frequencies. The two genomic "hot spots", which contain recA and mutS genes, exhibited transformation frequencies from 2 to more than 4 orders of magnitude higher than positions associated with other genes depending on the recipient strain. These results support the notion that the bacterial cell is equipped with active mechanisms to modulate acquisition of new DNA in different genomic positions. Bio-informatics study correlated recombination "hot-spots" to the presence of Chi-like signature sequences with which recombination might be preferentially initiated. The fundamental role of HGT is certainly not limited to the critical impact that the very rare foreign genes acquired mainly by chance can have on the bacterial adaptation potential. The frequency to which HGT with homologous and homeologous DNA happens in the environment

  1. A novel role for RecA under non-stress: promotion of swarming motility in Escherichia coli K-12

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    Blázquez Jesús

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial motility is a crucial factor in the colonization of natural environments. Escherichia coli has two flagella-driven motility types: swimming and swarming. Swimming motility consists of individual cell movement in liquid medium or soft semisolid agar, whereas swarming is a coordinated cellular behaviour leading to a collective movement on semisolid surfaces. It is known that swimming motility can be influenced by several types of environmental stress. In nature, environmentally induced DNA damage (e.g. UV irradiation is one of the most common types of stress. One of the key proteins involved in the response to DNA damage is RecA, a multifunctional protein required for maintaining genome integrity and the generation of genetic variation. Results The ability of E. coli cells to develop swarming migration on semisolid surfaces was suppressed in the absence of RecA. However, swimming motility was not affected. The swarming defect of a ΔrecA strain was fully complemented by a plasmid-borne recA gene. Although the ΔrecA cells grown on semisolidsurfaces exhibited flagellar production, they also presented impaired individual movement as well as a fully inactive collective swarming migration. Both the comparative analysis of gene expression profiles in wild-type and ΔrecA cells grown on a semisolid surface and the motility of lexA1 [Ind-] mutant cells demonstrated that the RecA effect on swarming does not require induction of the SOS response. By using a RecA-GFP fusion protein we were able to segregate the effect of RecA on swarming from its other functions. This protein fusion failed to regulate the induction of the SOS response, the recombinational DNA repair of UV-treated cells and the genetic recombination, however, it was efficient in rescuing the swarming motility defect of the ΔrecA mutant. The RecA-GFP protein retains a residual ssDNA-dependent ATPase activity but does not perform DNA strand exchange. Conclusion

  2. Evolutionary relationships among salivarius streptococci as inferred from multilocus phylogenies based on 16S rRNA-encoding, recA, secA, and secY gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pombert, Jean-François; Sistek, Viridiana; Boissinot, Maurice; Frenette, Michel

    2009-10-30

    Streptococci are divided into six phylogenetic groups, i.e, anginosus, bovis, mitis, mutans, pyogenic, and salivarius, with the salivarius group consisting of only three distinct species. Two of these species, Streptococcus salivarius and Streptococcus vestibularis, are members of the normal human oral microflora whereas the third, Streptococcus thermophilus, is found in bovine milk. Given that S. salivarius and S. vestibularis share several physiological characteristics, in addition to inhabiting the same ecosystem, one would assume that they would be more closely related to each other than to S. thermophilus. However, the few phylogenetic trees published so far suggest that S. vestibularis is more closely related to S. thermophilus. To determine whether this phylogenetic relationship is genuine, we performed phylogenetic inferences derived from secA and secY, the general secretion housekeeping genes, recA, a gene from a separate genetic locus that encodes a major component of the homologous recombinational apparatus, and 16S rRNA-encoding gene sequences using other streptococcal species as outgroups. The maximum likelihood (ML) and maximum parsimony (MP) phylogenetic inferences derived from the secA and recA gene sequences provided strong support for the S. vestibularis/S. thermophilus sister-relationship, whereas 16S rRNA-encoding and secY-based analyses could not discriminate between alternate topologies. Phylogenetic analyses derived from the concatenation of these sequences unambiguously supported the close affiliation of S. vestibularis and S. thermophilus. Our results corroborated the sister-relationship between S. vestibularis and S. thermophilus and the concomitant early divergence of S. salivarius at the base of the salivarius lineage.

  3. Evolutionary relationships among salivarius streptococci as inferred from multilocus phylogenies based on 16S rRNA-encoding, recA, secA, and secY gene sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boissinot Maurice

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococci are divided into six phylogenetic groups, i.e, anginosus, bovis, mitis, mutans, pyogenic, and salivarius, with the salivarius group consisting of only three distinct species. Two of these species, Streptococcus salivarius and Streptococcus vestibularis, are members of the normal human oral microflora whereas the third, Streptococcus thermophilus, is found in bovine milk. Given that S. salivarius and S. vestibularis share several physiological characteristics, in addition to inhabiting the same ecosystem, one would assume that they would be more closely related to each other than to S. thermophilus. However, the few phylogenetic trees published so far suggest that S. vestibularis is more closely related to S. thermophilus. To determine whether this phylogenetic relationship is genuine, we performed phylogenetic inferences derived from secA and secY, the general secretion housekeeping genes, recA, a gene from a separate genetic locus that encodes a major component of the homologous recombinational apparatus, and 16S rRNA-encoding gene sequences using other streptococcal species as outgroups. Results The maximum likelihood (ML and maximum parsimony (MP phylogenetic inferences derived from the secA and recA gene sequences provided strong support for the S. vestibularis/S. thermophilus sister-relationship, whereas 16S rRNA-encoding and secY-based analyses could not discriminate between alternate topologies. Phylogenetic analyses derived from the concatenation of these sequences unambiguously supported the close affiliation of S. vestibularis and S. thermophilus. Conclusion Our results corroborated the sister-relationship between S. vestibularis and S. thermophilus and the concomitant early divergence of S. salivarius at the base of the salivarius lineage.

  4. RecA: Regulation and Mechanism of a Molecular Search Engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jason C; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C

    2016-06-01

    Homologous recombination maintains genomic integrity by repairing broken chromosomes. The broken chromosome is partially resected to produce single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) that is used to search for homologous double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). This homology driven 'search and rescue' is catalyzed by a class of DNA strand exchange proteins that are defined in relation to Escherichia coli RecA, which forms a filament on ssDNA. Here, we review the regulation of RecA filament assembly and the mechanism by which RecA quickly and efficiently searches for and identifies a unique homologous sequence among a vast excess of heterologous DNA. Given that RecA is the prototypic DNA strand exchange protein, its behavior affords insight into the actions of eukaryotic RAD51 orthologs and their regulators, BRCA2 and other tumor suppressors.

  5. Epigenetic changes of DNA repair genes in cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christoph Lahtz; Gerd P. Pfeifer

    2011-01-01

    'Every Hour Hurts, The Last One Kills'. That is an old saying about getting old. Every day, thousands of DNA damaging events take place in each cell of our body, but efficient DNA repair systems have evolved to prevent that. However, our DNA repair system and that of most other organisms are not as perfect as that of Deinococcus radiodurans, for example, which is able to repair massive amounts of DNA damage at one time. In many instances, accumulation of DNA damage has been linked to cancer, and genetic deficiencies in specific DNA repair genes are associated with tumor-prone phenotypes. In addition to mutations, which can be either inherited or somatically acquired, epigenetic silencing of DNA repair genes may promote tumorigenesis. This review will summarize current knowledge of the epigenetic inactivation of different DNA repair components in human cancer.

  6. Polynucleotide phosphorylase exonuclease and polymerase activities on single-stranded DNA ends are modulated by RecN, SsbA and RecA proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Paula P; Carzaniga, Thomas; Zangrossi, Sandro; Briani, Federica; Garcia-Tirado, Esther; Dehò, Gianni; Alonso, Juan C

    2011-11-01

    Bacillus subtilis pnpA gene product, polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), is involved in double-strand break (DSB) repair via homologous recombination (HR) or non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). RecN is among the first responders to localize at the DNA DSBs, with PNPase facilitating the formation of a discrete RecN focus per nucleoid. PNPase, which co-purifies with RecA and RecN, was able to degrade single-stranded (ss) DNA with a 3' → 5' polarity in the presence of Mn(2+) and low inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentration, or to extend a 3'-OH end in the presence dNDP · Mn(2+). Both PNPase activities were observed in evolutionarily distant bacteria (B. subtilis and Escherichia coli), suggesting conserved functions. The activity of PNPase was directed toward ssDNA degradation or polymerization by manipulating the Pi/dNDPs concentrations or the availability of RecA or RecN. In its dATP-bound form, RecN stimulates PNPase-mediated polymerization. ssDNA phosphorolysis catalyzed by PNPase is stimulated by RecA, but inhibited by SsbA. Our findings suggest that (i) the PNPase degradative and polymerizing activities might play a critical role in the transition from DSB sensing to end resection via HR and (ii) by blunting a 3'-tailed duplex DNA, in the absence of HR, B. subtilis PNPase might also contribute to repair via NHEJ.

  7. Dynamic regulation of cerebral DNA repair genes by psychological stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, Kristin; Aalling, Nadia; Wörtwein, Gitta

    2015-01-01

    for maintaining genomic integrity. The aim of the present study was to characterize the pattern of cerebral DNA repair enzyme regulation after stress through the quantification of a targeted range of gene products involved in different types of DNA repair. 72 male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either...... was seen in HC, but with overall smaller effects and without the induction after acute stress. Nuclear DNA damage from oxidation as measured by the comet assay was unaffected by stress in both regions. We conclude that psychological stress have a dynamic influence on brain DNA repair gene expression...

  8. Control of gene editing by manipulation of DNA repair mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danner, Eric; Bashir, Sanum; Yumlu, Saniye; Wurst, Wolfgang; Wefers, Benedikt; Kühn, Ralf

    2017-04-03

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are produced intentionally by RNA-guided nucleases to achieve genome editing through DSB repair. These breaks are repaired by one of two main repair pathways, classic non-homologous end joining (c-NHEJ) and homology-directed repair (HDR), the latter being restricted to the S/G2 phases of the cell cycle and notably less frequent. Precise genome editing applications rely on HDR, with the abundant c-NHEJ formed mutations presenting a barrier to achieving high rates of precise sequence modifications. Here, we give an overview of HDR- and c-NHEJ-mediated DSB repair in gene editing and summarize the current efforts to promote HDR over c-NHEJ.

  9. Suppressed expression of non-DSB repair genes inhibits gamma-radiation-induced cytogenetic repair and cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H; Emami, Kamal; Hammond, Dianne; Casey, Rachael; Mehta, Satish K; Jeevarajan, Antony S; Pierson, Duane L; Wu, Honglu

    2008-11-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in double-strand break (DSB) repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been well studied. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of IR inducible genes in regulating DSB repair and cell cycle progression. In this study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. Frequency of micronuclei (MN) formation and chromosome aberrations were measured to determine efficiency of cytogenetic repair, especially DSB repair. In response to IR, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of five genes: Ku70 (DSB repair pathway), XPA (nucleotide excision repair pathway), RPA1 (mismatch repair pathway), RAD17 and RBBP8 (cell cycle control). Knocked-down expression of four genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Moreover, decreased XPA, p21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Nine of these eleven genes, whose knock-down expression affected cytogenetic repair, were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate IR-induced biological consequences. Furthermore, eight non-DBS repair genes showed involvement in regulating DSB repair, indicating that

  10. Multilocus sequence analysis of the central clade of the genus Vibrio by using the 16S rRNA, recA, pyrH, rpoD, gyrB, rctB and toxR genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Javier; Macián, M Carmen; Arahal, David R; Garay, Esperanza; Pujalte, María J

    2010-01-01

    The central clade of the genus Vibrio, also called the Vibrio core group, comprises six species that are tightly related (DNA-DNA reassociation values are very close to 70 % for most species pairs). Identification of novel strains to the species level within this group is troublesome and results are quite often dependent on the methodology employed. Therefore, this group represents an excellent framework to test the robustness of multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) not only for inferring phylogeny but also as an identification tool without the need for DNA-DNA hybridization assays. The genes selected, 16S rRNA, recA, pyrH, rpoD, gyrB, rctB and toxR, were amplified by direct PCR from 44 Vibrio core-group strains. Subsequent analysis allowed us to recognize toxR and rpoD as the most resolving individual genes and showed that concatenated sequences of rpoD, rctB and toxR were more useful than concatenated sequences of all seven genes. To validate our conclusions, MLSA similarities have been correlated with DNA-DNA relatedness values obtained in this study and values taken from the literature. Although the seven concatenated genes gave the best correlation, the concatenated sequences of rpoD, rctB and toxR have the practical advantage of showing a considerable gap between the maximal interspecies similarity and the minimal intraspecies similarity recorded, meaning that they can be used quite conveniently for species identification of vibrios.

  11. Specificity in suppression of SOS expression by recA4162 and uvrD303.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massoni, Shawn C; Sandler, Steven J

    2013-12-01

    Detection and repair of DNA damage is essential in all organisms and depends on the ability of proteins recognizing and processing specific DNA substrates. In E. coli, the RecA protein forms a filament on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) produced by DNA damage and induces the SOS response. Previous work has shown that one type of recA mutation (e.g., recA4162 (I298V)) and one type of uvrD mutation (e.g., uvrD303 (D403A, D404A)) can differentially decrease SOS expression depending on the type of inducing treatments (UV damage versus RecA mutants that constitutively express SOS). Here it is tested using other SOS inducing conditions if there is a general feature of ssDNA generated during these treatments that allows recA4162 and uvrD303 to decrease SOS expression. The SOS inducing conditions tested include growing cells containing temperature-sensitive DNA replication mutations (dnaE486, dnaG2903, dnaN159, dnaZ2016 (at 37°C)), a del(polA)501 mutation and induction of Double-Strand Breaks (DSBs). uvrD303 could decrease SOS expression under all conditions, while recA4162 could decrease SOS expression under all conditions except in the polA strain or when DSBs occur. It is hypothesized that recA4162 suppresses SOS expression best when the ssDNA occurs at a gap and that uvrD303 is able to decrease SOS expression when the ssDNA is either at a gap or when it is generated at a DSB (but does so better at a gap).

  12. Targeted gene repair: the ups and downs of a promising gene therapy approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Semir, David; Aran, Josep M

    2006-08-01

    As a novel form of molecular medicine based on direct actions over the genes, targeted gene repair has raised consideration recently above classical gene therapy strategies based on genetic augmentation or complementation. Targeted gene repair relies on the local induction of the cell's endogenous DNA repair mechanisms to attain a therapeutic gene conversion event within the genome of the diseased cell. Successful repair has been achieved both in vitro and in vivo with a variety of corrective molecules ranging from oligonucleotides (chimeraplasts, modified single-stranded oligonucleotides, triplex-forming oligonucleotides), to small DNA fragments (small fragment homologous replacement (SFHR)), and even viral vectors (AAV-based). However, controversy on the consistency and lack of reproducibility of early experiments regarding frequencies and persistence of targeted gene repair, particularly for chimeraplasty, has flecked the field. Nevertheless, several hurdles such as inefficient nuclear uptake of the corrective molecules, and misleading assessment of targeted repair frequencies have been identified and are being addressed. One of the key bottlenecks for exploiting the overall potential of the different targeted gene repair modalities is the lack of a detailed knowledge of their mechanisms of action at the molecular level. Several studies are now focusing on the assessment of the specific repair pathway(s) involved (homologous recombination, mismatch repair, etc.), devising additional strategies to increase their activity (using chemotherapeutic drugs, chimeric nucleases, etc.), and assessing the influence of the cell cycle in the regulation of the repair process. Until therapeutic correction frequencies for single gene disorders are reached both in cellular and animal models, precision and undesired side effects of this promising gene therapy approach will not be thoroughly evaluated.

  13. Molecular cloning of the human excision repair gene ERCC-6.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Troelstra (Christine); H. Odijk (Hanny); J. de Wit (Jan); A. Westerveld (Andries); L.H. Thompson; D. Bootsma (Dirk); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractThe UV-sensitive, nucleotide excision repair-deficient Chinese hamster mutant cell line UV61 was used to identify and clone a correcting human gene, ERCC-6. UV61, belonging to rodent complementation group 6, is only moderately UV sensitive in comparison with mutant lines in groups 1 to 5

  14. Mismatch-mediated error prone repair at the immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahwan, Richard; Edelmann, Winfried; Scharff, Matthew D; Roa, Sergio

    2011-12-01

    The generation of effective antibodies depends upon somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) of antibody genes by activation induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and the subsequent recruitment of error prone base excision and mismatch repair. While AID initiates and is required for SHM, more than half of the base changes that accumulate in V regions are not due to the direct deamination of dC to dU by AID, but rather arise through the recruitment of the mismatch repair complex (MMR) to the U:G mismatch created by AID and the subsequent perversion of mismatch repair from a high fidelity process to one that is very error prone. In addition, the generation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) is essential during CSR, and the resolution of AID-generated mismatches by MMR to promote such DSBs is critical for the efficiency of the process. While a great deal has been learned about how AID and MMR cause hypermutations and DSBs, it is still unclear how the error prone aspect of these processes is largely restricted to antibody genes. The use of knockout models and mice expressing mismatch repair proteins with separation-of-function point mutations have been decisive in gaining a better understanding of the roles of each of the major MMR proteins and providing further insight into how mutation and repair are coordinated. Here, we review the cascade of MMR factors and repair signals that are diverted from their canonical error free role and hijacked by B cells to promote genetic diversification of the Ig locus. This error prone process involves AID as the inducer of enzymatically-mediated DNA mismatches, and a plethora of downstream MMR factors acting as sensors, adaptors and effectors of a complex and tightly regulated process from much of which is not yet well understood.

  15. DNA repair and gene therapy: implications for translational uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limp-Foster, M; Kelley, M R

    2000-01-01

    Gene therapy has been proposed to have implications in the treatment of cancer. By genetically manipulating the hematopoietic stem cell compartment with genes that confer resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, the dose escalation that is necessary to effectively treat the cancers could potentially be achieved. DNA repair genes are some of the potential candidates to confer increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. Although initial focus in this area has been on the direct reversal protein (MGMT), its protective ability is limited to those agents that produce O(6)-methylGuanine cross-links-agents that are not extensively used clinically (e.g., nitrosoureas). Furthermore, most alkylating agents attack more sites in DNA other than O(6)-methylGuanine, such that the protections afforded by MGMT may prevent the initial cytotoxicity, but at a price of increased mutational burden and potential secondary leukemias. Therefore, some of the genes that are being tested as candidates for gene transfer are base excision repair (BER) genes. We and others have found that overexpression of selective BER genes confers resistance to chemotherapeutic agents such as thiotepa, ionizing radiation, bleomycin, and other agents. As these "proof of concept" analyses mature, many more clinically relevant chemotherapeutic agents can be tested for BER protective ability.

  16. The effects of buffers and pH on the thermal stability, unfolding and substrate binding of RecA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metrick, Michael A; Temple, Joshua E; MacDonald, Gina

    2013-12-31

    The Escherichia coli protein RecA is responsible for catalysis of the strand transfer reaction used in DNA repair and recombination. Previous studies in our lab have shown that high concentrations of salts stabilize RecA in a reverse-anionic Hofmeister series. Here we investigate how changes in pH and buffer alter the thermal unfolding and cofactor binding. RecA in 20mM HEPES, MES, Tris and phosphate buffers was studied in the pH range from 6.5 to 8.5 using circular dichroism (CD), infrared (IR) and fluorescence spectroscopies. The results show all of the buffers studied stabilize RecA up to 50°C above the Tris melting temperature and influence RecA's ability to nucleate on double-stranded DNA. Infrared and CD spectra of RecA in the different buffers do not show that secondary structural changes are associated with increased stability or decreased ability to nucleate on dsDNA. These results suggest the differences in stability arise from decreasing positive charge and/or buffer interactions.

  17. Gene therapy and peripheral nerve repair: a perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan A. Hoyng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Clinical phase I/II studies have demonstrated the safety of gene therapy for a variety of central nervous system disorders, including Canavan’s, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease, retinal diseases and pain. The majority of gene therapy studies in the CNS have used adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV and the first AAV-based therapeutic, a vector encoding lipoprotein lipase, is now marketed in Europe under the name Glybera. These remarkable advances may become relevant to translational research on gene therapy to promote peripheral nervous system (PNS repair. This short review first summarizes the results of gene therapy in animal models for peripheral nerve repair. Secondly, we identify key areas of future research in the domain of PNS-gene therapy. Finally, a perspective is provided on the path to clinical translation of PNS gene therapy for traumatic nerve injuries. In the latter section we discuss the route and mode of delivery of the vector to human patients, the efficacy and safety of the vector, and the choice of the patient population for a first possible proof-of-concept clinical study.

  18. Differential requirements of two recA mutants for constitutive SOS expression in Escherichia coli K-12.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarukit Edward Long

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Repairing DNA damage begins with its detection and is often followed by elicitation of a cellular response. In E. coli, RecA polymerizes on ssDNA produced after DNA damage and induces the SOS Response. The RecA-DNA filament is an allosteric effector of LexA auto-proteolysis. LexA is the repressor of the SOS Response. Not all RecA-DNA filaments, however, lead to an SOS Response. Certain recA mutants express the SOS Response (recA(C in the absence of external DNA damage in log phase cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Genetic analysis of two recA(C mutants was used to determine the mechanism of constitutive SOS (SOS(C expression in a population of log phase cells using fluorescence of single cells carrying an SOS reporter system (sulAp-gfp. SOS(C expression in recA4142 mutants was dependent on its initial level of transcription, recBCD, recFOR, recX, dinI, xthA and the type of medium in which the cells were grown. SOS(C expression in recA730 mutants was affected by none of the mutations or conditions tested above. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: It is concluded that not all recA(C alleles cause SOS(C expression by the same mechanism. It is hypothesized that RecA4142 is loaded on to a double-strand end of DNA and that the RecA filament is stabilized by the presence of DinI and destabilized by RecX. RecFOR regulate the activity of RecX to destabilize the RecA filament. RecA730 causes SOS(C expression by binding to ssDNA in a mechanism yet to be determined.

  19. Differential requirements of two recA mutants for constitutive SOS expression in Escherichia coli K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jarukit Edward; Renzette, Nicholas; Centore, Richard C; Sandler, Steven J

    2008-01-01

    Repairing DNA damage begins with its detection and is often followed by elicitation of a cellular response. In E. coli, RecA polymerizes on ssDNA produced after DNA damage and induces the SOS Response. The RecA-DNA filament is an allosteric effector of LexA auto-proteolysis. LexA is the repressor of the SOS Response. Not all RecA-DNA filaments, however, lead to an SOS Response. Certain recA mutants express the SOS Response (recA(C)) in the absence of external DNA damage in log phase cells. Genetic analysis of two recA(C) mutants was used to determine the mechanism of constitutive SOS (SOS(C)) expression in a population of log phase cells using fluorescence of single cells carrying an SOS reporter system (sulAp-gfp). SOS(C) expression in recA4142 mutants was dependent on its initial level of transcription, recBCD, recFOR, recX, dinI, xthA and the type of medium in which the cells were grown. SOS(C) expression in recA730 mutants was affected by none of the mutations or conditions tested above. It is concluded that not all recA(C) alleles cause SOS(C) expression by the same mechanism. It is hypothesized that RecA4142 is loaded on to a double-strand end of DNA and that the RecA filament is stabilized by the presence of DinI and destabilized by RecX. RecFOR regulate the activity of RecX to destabilize the RecA filament. RecA730 causes SOS(C) expression by binding to ssDNA in a mechanism yet to be determined.

  20. Natural populations of lactic acid bacteria associated with silage fermentation as determined by phenotype, 16S ribosomal RNA and recA gene analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Huili; Qin, Guangyong; Tan, Zhongfang; Li, Zongwei; Wang, Yanping; Cai, Yimin

    2011-05-01

    One hundred and fifty-six strains isolated from corn (Zea mays L.), forage paddy rice (Oryza sativa L.), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) silages prepared on dairy farms were screened, of which 110 isolates were considered to be lactic acid bacteria (LAB) according to their Gram-positive and catalase-negative characteristics and, mainly, the lactic acid metabolic products. These isolates were divided into eight groups (A-H) based on the following properties: morphological and biochemical characteristics, γ-aminobutyric acid production capacity, and 16S rRNA gene sequences. They were identified as Weissella cibaria (36.4%), Weissella confusa (9.1%), Leuconostoc citreum (5.3%), Leuconostoc lactis (4.9%), Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides (8.0%), Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis (4.5%), Lactobacillus paraplantarum (4.5%) and Lactobacillus plantarum (27.3%). W. cibaria and W. confusa were mainly present in corn silages, and L. plantarum was dominant on sorghum and forage paddy rice silages, while L. pseudomesenteroides, L. plantarum and L. paraplantarum were the dominant species in alfalfa silage. The corn, sorghum and forage paddy rice silages were well preserved with lower pH values and ammonia-N concentrations, but had higher lactic acid content, while the alfalfa silage had relatively poor quality with higher pH values and ammonia-N concentrations, and lower lactic acid content. The present study confirmed the diversity of LAB species inhabiting silages. It showed that the differing natural populations of LAB on these silages might influence fermentation quality. These results will enable future research on the relationship between LAB species and silage fermentation quality, and will enhance the screening of appropriate inoculants aimed at improving such quality. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Induction of a mutant phenotype in human repair proficient cells after overexpression of a mutated human DNA repair gene.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.B.G.M. Belt; M.F. van Oostenrijk; H. Odijk (Hanny); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); C.M.P. Backendorf (Claude)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractAntisense and mutated cDNA of the human excision repair gene ERCC-1 were overexpressed in repair efficient HeLa cells by means of an Epstein-Barr-virus derived CDNA expression vector. Whereas antisense RNA did not influence the survival of the transfected cells, a mutated cDNA generating

  2. Non-DBS DNA Repair Genes Regulate Radiation-induced Cytogenetic Damage Repair and Cell Cycle Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Emami, Kamal; Casey, Rachael; Wu, Honglu

    2008-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in DSB repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been systematically studied. In the present study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by transfection with small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of these selected genes on regulating DSB repair and cell cycle progression , as measured in the micronuclei formation and chromosome aberration. In response to IR, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of 5 genes: Ku70 in the DSB repair pathway, XPA in the NER pathway, RPA1 in the MMR pathway, and RAD17 and RBBP8 in cell cycle control. Knocked-down expression of 4 genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Furthermore, loss of XPA, P21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Most of the 11 genes that affected cytogenetic responses are not known to have clear roles influencing DBS repair. Nine of these 11 genes were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate the biological consequences after IR.

  3. Non-DBS DNA Repair Genes Regulate Radiation-induced Cytogenetic Damage Repair and Cell Cycle Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Emami, Kamal; Casey, Rachael; Wu, Honglu

    2008-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in DSB repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been systematically studied. In the present study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by transfection with small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of these selected genes on regulating DSB repair and cell cycle progression , as measured in the micronuclei formation and chromosome aberration. In response to IR, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of 5 genes: Ku70 in the DSB repair pathway, XPA in the NER pathway, RPA1 in the MMR pathway, and RAD17 and RBBP8 in cell cycle control. Knocked-down expression of 4 genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Furthermore, loss of XPA, P21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Most of the 11 genes that affected cytogenetic responses are not known to have clear roles influencing DBS repair. Nine of these 11 genes were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate the biological consequences after IR.

  4. Sister chromatid gene conversion is a prominent double-strand break repair pathway in mammalian cells

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Roger D.; Jasin, Maria

    2000-01-01

    In mammalian cells, repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) occurs by both homologous and non-homologous mechanisms. By definition, homologous recombination requires a template with sufficient sequence identity to the damaged molecule in order to direct repair. We now show that the sister chromatid acts as a repair template in a substantial proportion of DSB repair events. The outcome of sister chromatid repair is primarily gene conversion unassociated with reciprocal exchange. This contras...

  5. Deinococcus radiodurans RecA nucleoprotein filaments characterized at the single-molecule level with optical tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pobegalov, Georgii, E-mail: george.pobegalov@nanobio.spbstu.ru [Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University, Saint-Petersburg 195251 (Russian Federation); Cherevatenko, Galina; Alekseev, Aleksandr; Sabantsev, Anton; Kovaleva, Oksana; Vedyaykin, Alexey; Morozova, Natalia [Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University, Saint-Petersburg 195251 (Russian Federation); Baitin, Dmitrii [Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University, Saint-Petersburg 195251 (Russian Federation); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, NRC Kurchatov Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation); Khodorkovskii, Mikhail [Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University, Saint-Petersburg 195251 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-23

    Deinococcus radiodurans can survive extreme doses of ionizing radiation due to the very efficient DNA repair mechanisms that are able to cope even with hundreds of double-strand breaks. RecA, the critical protein of homologous recombination in bacteria, is one of the key components of the DNA-repair system. Repair of double-strand breaks requires RecA binding to DNA and assembly of the RecA nucleoprotein helical filaments. The Escherichia coli RecA protein (EcRecA) and its interactions with DNA have been extensively studied using various approaches including single-molecule techniques, while the D. radiodurans RecA (DrRecA) remains much less characterized. However, DrRecA shows some remarkable differences from E. coli homolog. Here we combine microfluidics and single-molecule DNA manipulation with optical tweezers to follow the binding of DrRecA to long double-stranded DNA molecules and probe the mechanical properties of DrRecA nucleoprotein filaments at physiological pH. Our data provide a direct comparison of DrRecA and EcRecA binding to double-stranded DNA under identical conditions. We report a significantly faster filaments assembly as well as lower values of persistence length and contour length for DrRecA nucleoprotein filaments compared to EcRecA. Our results support the existing model of DrRecA forming more frequent and less continuous filaments relative to those of EcRecA. - Highlights: • We investigate Deinococcus radiodurans RecA interactions with long double-stranded DNA at the single-molecule level. • At physiological pH D. radiodurans RecA forms nucleoprotein filaments significantly faster relative to Escherichia coli RecA. • D. radiodurans RecA-dsDNA nucleoprotein filaments are more flexible and slightly shorter compared to those of E. coli RecA.

  6. Regulation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA repair gene RAD16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, D D; Timmermans, V; Verhage, R; Zeeman, A M; van de Putte, P; Brouwer, J

    1995-05-25

    The RAD16 gene product has been shown to be essential for the repair of the silenced mating type loci [Bang et al. (1992) Nucleic Acids Res. 20, 3925-3931]. More recently we demonstrated that the RAD16 and RAD7 proteins are also required for repair of non-transcribed strands of active genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae [Waters et al. (1993) Mol. Gen. Genet. 239, 28-32]. We have studied the regulation of the RAD16 gene and found that the RAD16 transcript levels increased up to 7-fold upon UV irradiation. Heat shock at 42 degrees C also results in elevated levels of RAD16 mRNA. In sporulating MAT alpha/MATa diploid cells RAD16 mRNA is also induced. The basal level of the RAD16 transcript is constant during the mitotic cell cycle. G1-arrested cells show normal induction of RAD16 mRNA upon UV irradiation demonstrating that the induction is not a secondary consequence of G2 cell cycle arrest following UV irradiation. However, in cells arrested in G1 the induction of RAD16 mRNA after UV irradiation is not followed by a rapid decline as occurs in normal growing cells suggesting that the down regulation of RAD16 transcription is dependent on progression into the cell cycle.

  7. Double-strand break damage and associated DNA repair genes predispose smokers to gene methylation

    OpenAIRE

    Leng, Shuguang; Stidley, Christine A.; Willink, Randy; Bernauer, Amanda; Do, Kieu; Picchi, Maria A.; Sheng, Xin; Frasco, Melissa, A.; Berg, David Van Den; Gilliland, Frank D.; Zima, Christopher; Crowell, Richard E.; Belinsky, Steven A.

    2008-01-01

    Gene promoter hypermethylation in sputum is a promising biomarker for predicting lung cancer. Identifying factors that predispose smokers to methylation of multiple gene promoters in the lung could impact strategies for early detection and chemoprevention. This study evaluated the hypothesis that double-strand break repair capacity and sequence variation in genes in this pathway are associated with a high methylation index in a cohort of current and former cancer-free smokers. A 50% reduction...

  8. Simulated microgravity influenced the expression of DNA damage repair genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Jiawei, Liu; Wang, Ting

    2016-07-01

    Ionizing radiation and microgravity were considered to be the most important stress factors of space environmental the respective study of the biological effects of the radiation and microgravity carried out earlier, but the interaction of the effects of radiation with microgravity started later, and due to difference of the materials and methods the result of this experiment were not consistent. To further investigate the influence of microgravity on the expression of the radiation damage repair genes, the seed of Arabidopsis (Col) and its gravity-insensitive mutant (PIN2) were exposed to 0.1Gy of the dose of energetic carbon-ion beam radiation (LET = 30KeV / μm), and the germinated seed were than fixed in the 3D random positioning apparatus immediately for a 10-day simulated microgravity. By measuring the deflection angle of root tip and the changes of the expression of Ku70 and RAD51 protein, we investigated the impact of microgravity effect on radiation damage repair systems. The results shown that radiation, microgravity and microgravity with radiation could increase the angle of the root of the Col significantly, but no obvious effect on PIN2 type. The radiation could increase the expression of Ku70 significantly in both Col and PIN2, microgravity does not affect the expression, but the microgravity with radiation could decrease the expression of Ku70. This result shown that the microgravity could influence the radiation damage repair systems in molecular level. Moreover, our findings were important to understand the molecular mechanism of the impact of microgravity effect on radiation damage repair systems in vivo.

  9. Polymorphism of the DNA Base Excision Repair Genes in Keratoconus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna A. Wojcik

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Keratoconus (KC is a degenerative corneal disorder for which the exact pathogenesis is not yet known. Oxidative stress is reported to be associated with this disease. The stress may damage corneal biomolecules, including DNA, and such damage is primarily removed by base excision repair (BER. Variation in genes encoding BER components may influence the effectiveness of corneal cells to cope with oxidative stress. In the present work we genotyped 5 polymorphisms of 4 BER genes in 284 patients and 353 controls. The A/A genotype of the c.–1370T>A polymorphism of the DNA polymerase γ (POLG gene was associated with increased occurrence of KC, while the A/T genotype was associated with decreased occurrence of KC. The A/G genotype and the A allele of the c.1196A>G polymorphism of the X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1 were associated with increased, and the G/G genotype and the G allele, with decreased KC occurrence. Also, the C/T and T as well as C/C genotypes and alleles of the c.580C>T polymorphism of the same gene displayed relationship with KC occurrence. Neither the g.46438521G>C polymorphism of the Nei endonuclease VIII-like 1 (NEIL1 nor the c.2285T>C polymorphism of the poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1 was associated with KC. In conclusion, the variability of the XRCC1 and POLG genes may play a role in KC pathogenesis and determine the risk of this disease.

  10. Molecular Interaction and Cellular Location of RecA and CheW Proteins in Salmonella enterica during SOS Response and Their Implication in Swarming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irazoki, Oihane; Aranda, Jesús; Zimmermann, Timo; Campoy, Susana; Barbé, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    In addition to its role in DNA damage repair and recombination, the RecA protein, through its interaction with CheW, is involved in swarming motility, a form of flagella-dependent movement across surfaces. In order to better understand how SOS response modulates swarming, in this work the location of RecA and CheW proteins within the swarming cells has been studied by using super-resolution microscopy. Further, and after in silico docking studies, the specific RecA and CheW regions associated with the RecA-CheW interaction have also been confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis and immunoprecipitation techniques. Our results point out that the CheW distribution changes, from the cell poles to foci distributed in a helical pattern along the cell axis when SOS response is activated or RecA protein is overexpressed. In this situation, the CheW presents the same subcellular location as that of RecA, pointing out that the previously described RecA storage structures may be modulators of swarming motility. Data reported herein not only confirmed that the RecA-CheW pair is essential for swarming motility but it is directly involved in the CheW distribution change associated to SOS response activation. A model explaining not only the mechanism by which DNA damage modulates swarming but also how both the lack and the excess of RecA protein impair this motility is proposed. PMID:27766091

  11. Evolution and mutagenesis of the mammalian excision repair gene ERCC-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Duin (Mark); J. van den Tol; P. Warmerdam (Peter); H. Odijk (Hanny); D.N. Meijer (Dies); A. Westerveld (Andries); D. Bootsma (Dirk); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractThe human DNA excision repair protein ERCC-1 exhibits homology to the yeast RADIO repair protein and its longer C-terminus displays similarity to parts of the E.coli repair proteins uvrA and uvrC. To study the evolution of this 'mosaic' ERCC-1 gene we have isolated the mouse homologue.

  12. Right or left turn? RecA family protein filaments promote homologous recombination through clockwise axial rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting-Fang; Chen, Li-Tzu; Wang, Andrew H-J

    2008-01-01

    The RecA family proteins mediate homologous recombination, a ubiquitous mechanism for repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and stalled replication forks. Members of this family include bacterial RecA, archaeal RadA and Rad51, and eukaryotic Rad51 and Dmc1. These proteins bind to single-stranded DNA at a DSB site to form a presynaptic nucleoprotein filament, align this presynaptic filament with homologous sequences in another double-stranded DNA segment, promote DNA strand exchange and then dissociate. It was generally accepted that RecA family proteins function throughout their catalytic cycles as right-handed helical filaments with six protomers per helical turn. However, we recently reported that archaeal RadA proteins can also form an extended right-handed filament with three monomers per helical turn and a left-handed protein filament with four monomers per helical turn. Subsequent structural and functional analyses suggest that RecA family protein filaments, similar to the F1-ATPase rotary motor, perform ATP-dependent clockwise axial rotation during their catalytic cycles. This new hypothesis has opened a new avenue for understanding the molecular mechanism of RecA family proteins in homologous recombination.

  13. Discovery and characterization of RecA protein of thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus MAT72 phage Tt72 that increases specificity of a PCR-based DNA amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanska, Aleksandra; Kaczorowska, Anna-Karina; Plotka, Magdalena; Fridjonsson, Olafur H; Hreggvidsson, Gudmundur O; Hjorleifsdottir, Sigridur; Kristjansson, Jakob K; Dabrowski, Slawomir; Kaczorowski, Tadeusz

    2014-07-20

    The recA gene of newly discovered Thermus thermophilus MAT72 phage Tt72 (Myoviridae) was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The 1020-bp gene codes for a 339-amino-acid polypeptide with an Mr of 38,155 which shows 38.7% positional identity to the E. coli RecA protein. When expressed in E. coli, the Tt72 recA gene did not confer the ability to complement the ultraviolet light (254nm) sensitivity of an E. coli recA mutant. Tt72 RecA protein has been purified with good yield to catalytic and electrophoretic homogeneity using a three-step chromatography procedure. Biochemical characterization indicated that the protein can pair and promote ATP-dependent strand exchange reaction resulting in formation of a heteroduplex DNA at 60°C under conditions otherwise optimal for E. coli RecA. When the Tt72 RecA protein was included in a standard PCR-based DNA amplification reaction, the specificity of the PCR assays was significantly improved by eliminating non-specific products.

  14. Interaction of DNA repair gene polymorphisms and aflatoxin B1 in the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is an important environmental carcinogen and can induce DNA damage and involve in the carcinogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The deficiency of DNA repair capacity related to the polymorphisms of DNA repair genes might play a central role in the process of HCC tumorigenesis. However, the interaction of DNA repair gene polymorphisms and AFB1 in the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma has not been elucidated. In this study, we investigated whether six polymorphisms (i...

  15. Molecular characterization of the human excision repair gene ERCC-1: cDNA cloning and aminoacid homology with the yeast DNA repair gene RAD10.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Duin (Mark); J. de Wit (Jan); H. Odijk (Hanny); A. Westerveld (Andries); A. Yasui (Akira); M.H.M. Koken (Marcel); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); D. Bootsma (Dirk)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractThe human excision repair gene ERCC-7 was cloned after DNA mediated gene transfer to the CHO mutant 43-38, which is sensitive to ultraviolet light and mitomycin-C. We describe the cloning and sequence analysis of the ERCC-7 cDNA and partial characterization of the gene. ERCC.1 has a size

  16. Analysis of DNA repair gene polymorphisms and survival in low-grade and anaplastic gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berntsson, Shala Ghaderi; Wibom, Carl; Sjöström, Sara;

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the variation in DNA repair genes in adults with WHO grade II and III gliomas and their relationship to patient survival. We analysed a total of 1,458 tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were selected to cover DNA repair genes, in 81 grade ...

  17. Deinococcus radiodurans RecA nucleoprotein filaments characterized at the single-molecule level with optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pobegalov, Georgii; Cherevatenko, Galina; Alekseev, Aleksandr; Sabantsev, Anton; Kovaleva, Oksana; Vedyaykin, Alexey; Morozova, Natalia; Baitin, Dmitrii; Khodorkovskii, Mikhail

    2015-10-23

    Deinococcus radiodurans can survive extreme doses of ionizing radiation due to the very efficient DNA repair mechanisms that are able to cope even with hundreds of double-strand breaks. RecA, the critical protein of homologous recombination in bacteria, is one of the key components of the DNA-repair system. Repair of double-strand breaks requires RecA binding to DNA and assembly of the RecA nucleoprotein helical filaments. The Escherichia coli RecA protein (EcRecA) and its interactions with DNA have been extensively studied using various approaches including single-molecule techniques, while the D. radiodurans RecA (DrRecA) remains much less characterized. However, DrRecA shows some remarkable differences from E. coli homolog. Here we combine microfluidics and single-molecule DNA manipulation with optical tweezers to follow the binding of DrRecA to long double-stranded DNA molecules and probe the mechanical properties of DrRecA nucleoprotein filaments at physiological pH. Our data provide a direct comparison of DrRecA and EcRecA binding to double-stranded DNA under identical conditions. We report a significantly faster filaments assembly as well as lower values of persistence length and contour length for DrRecA nucleoprotein filaments compared to EcRecA. Our results support the existing model of DrRecA forming more frequent and less continuous filaments relative to those of EcRecA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Transfection of the cloned human excision repair gene ERCC-1 to UV-sensitive CHO mutants only corrects the repair defect in complementation group 2 mutants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Duin (Mark); J.H. Janssen; J. de Wit (Jan); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); L.H. Thompson; D. Bootsma (Dirk); A. Westerveld (Andries)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractThe human DNA-excision repair gene ERCC-1 is cloned by its ability to correct the excision-repair defect of the ultraviolet light- and mitomycin-C-sensitive CHO mutant cell line 43-3B. This mutant is assigned to complementation group 2 of the excision-repair-deficient CHO mutants. In ord

  19. On the Mechanism of Homology Search by RecA Protein Filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochugaeva, Maria P; Shvets, Alexey A; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B

    2017-03-14

    Genetic stability is a key factor in maintaining, survival, and reproduction of biological cells. It relies on many processes, but one of the most important is a homologous recombination, in which the repair of breaks in double-stranded DNA molecules is taking place with a help of several specific proteins. In bacteria, this task is accomplished by RecA proteins that are active as nucleoprotein filaments formed on single-stranded segments of DNA. A critical step in the homologous recombination is a search for a corresponding homologous region on DNA, which is called a homology search. Recent single-molecule experiments clarified some aspects of this process, but its molecular mechanisms remain not well understood. We developed a quantitative theoretical approach to analyze the homology search. It is based on a discrete-state stochastic model that takes into account the most relevant physical-chemical processes in the system. Using a method of first-passage processes, a full dynamic description of the homology search is presented. It is found that the search dynamics depends on the degree of extension of DNA molecules and on the size of RecA nucleoprotein filaments, in agreement with experimental single-molecule measurements of DNA pairing by RecA proteins. Our theoretical calculations, supported by extensive Monte Carlo computer simulations, provide a molecular description of the mechanisms of the homology search. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Uncovering the microscopic mechanism of strand exchange during RecA mediated homologous recombination using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankla, Manish; Yoo, Jejoong; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2012-02-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a key step during the repair process of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) breakage. RecA is a protein that mediates HR in bacteria. RecA monomers polymerize on a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) separated from the broken dsDNA to form a helical filament, thus allowing strand exchange to occur. Recent crystal structures depict each RecA monomer in contact with three contiguous nucleotides called DNA triplets. Surprisingly, the conformation of each triplet is similar to that of a triplet in B-form DNA. However, in the filament the neighboring triplets are separated by loops of the RecA proteins. Single molecule experiments demonstrated that strand exchange propagation occurs in 3 base-pair increments. However, the temporal resolution of the experiments was insufficient to determine the exact molecular mechanism of the triplet propagation. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we investigated the effect of both the RecA protein and the conformation of the bound ssDNA fragment on the stability of the duplex DNA intermediate formed during the strand-exchange process. Specifically, we report simulations of force-induced unzipping of duplex DNA in the presence and absence of the RecA filament that explored the effect of the triplet ladder conformation.

  1. Gene expression of the mismatch repair gene MSH2 in primary colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Henrik; Kuramochi, Hidekazu; Crüger, Dorthe Gylling

    2011-01-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) is caused by defective mismatch repair (MMR) and is one of the very few molecular markers with proven clinical importance in colorectal cancer with respect to heredity, prognosis, and treatment effect. The gene expression of the MMR gene MSH2 may be a quantitative...... marker for the level of MMR and a potential molecular marker with clinical relevance. The aim was to investigate the gene expression of MSH2 in primary operable colorectal cancer in correlation with MSI, protein expression, and promoter hypermethylation. In a cohort of 210 patients, the primary tumor...... and lymphnode metastases were analyzed with immunohistochemistry, methylation and MSI analyses, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The median gene expression of MSH2 was 1.00 (range 0.16-11.2, quartiles 0.70-1.51) and there was good agreement between the gene expression in primary tumor and lymph...

  2. Triple Negative Breast Cancers Have a Reduced Expression of DNA Repair Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreis, Daniele; Bertoni, Ramona; Giardini, Roberto; Fox, Stephen B.; Broggini, Massimo; Bottini, Alberto; Zanoni, Vanessa; Bazzola, Letizia; Foroni, Chiara; Generali, Daniele; Damia, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    DNA repair is a key determinant in the cellular response to therapy and tumor repair status could play an important role in tailoring patient therapy. Our goal was to evaluate the mRNA of 13 genes involved in different DNA repair pathways (base excision, nucleotide excision, homologous recombination, and Fanconi anemia) in paraffin embedded samples of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) compared to luminal A breast cancer (LABC). Most of the genes involved in nucleotide excision repair and Fanconi Anemia pathways, and CHK1 gene were significantly less expressed in TNBC than in LABC. PARP1 levels were higher in TNBC than in LABC. In univariate analysis high level of FANCA correlated with an increased overall survival and event free survival in TNBC; however multivariate analyses using Cox regression did not confirm FANCA as independent prognostic factor. These data support the evidence that TNBCs compared to LABCs harbour DNA repair defects. PMID:23825533

  3. Polymorphisms of the DNA repair genes XRCC1 and XRCC3 in a Brazilian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte Márcia Cristina

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In several DNA repair genes, polymorphisms may result in reduced repair capacity, which has been implicated as a risk factor for various types of cancer. The frequency of the polymorphic alleles varies among populations, suggesting an ethnic distribution of genotypes. We genotyped 300 healthy Southeastern Brazilian individuals (262 of European ancestry and 38 of African ancestry for polymorphisms of codons 194 and 399 of the XRCC1 base excision repair pathway gene and of codon 241 of the XRCC3 homologous recombination repair pathway gene. The allele frequencies were 0.07 for the Arg194Trp and 0.33 for the Arg399Gln codons of the XRCC1 gene and 0.35 for the Thr241Met codon of the XRCC3 gene. The genotypic frequencies were within Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. These frequencies showed ethnic variability when compared with those obtained for different populations from several countries.

  4. DNA repair in human cells: from genetic complementation to isolation of genes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Bootsma (Dirk); A. Westerveld (Andries); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractThe genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) demonstrates the association between defective repair of DNA lesions and cancer. Complementation analysis performed on XP cell strains and on repair deficient rodent cell lines has revealed that at least nine and possibly more than 13 genes

  5. Cloning and characterization of the human DNA-excision repair gene ERCC-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Duin (Michel)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractIt is the aim of the work described in this thesis to isolate and characterize human genes involved DNA excision repair. This will facilitate the understanding of the mechanism of this repair process whereas it also provides an important step to better understand the relationship

  6. Cloning and characterization of the human DNA-excision repair gene ERCC-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Duin (Michel)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractIt is the aim of the work described in this thesis to isolate and characterize human genes involved DNA excision repair. This will facilitate the understanding of the mechanism of this repair process whereas it also provides an important step to better understand the relationship between

  7. DNA repair in human cells: from genetic complementation to isolation of genes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Bootsma (Dirk); A. Westerveld (Andries); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractThe genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) demonstrates the association between defective repair of DNA lesions and cancer. Complementation analysis performed on XP cell strains and on repair deficient rodent cell lines has revealed that at least nine and possibly more than 13 genes

  8. SELECTIVE-INHIBITION OF REPAIR OF ACTIVE GENES BY HYPERTHERMIA IS DUE TO INHIBITION OF GLOBAL AND TRANSCRIPTION COUPLED REPAIR PATHWAYS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SAKKERS, RJ; FILON, AR; BRUNSTING, JF; KAMPINGA, HH; KONINGS, AWT; MULLENDERS, LHF

    1995-01-01

    Hyperthermia specifically inhibits the repair of UV-induced DNA photolesions in transcriptionally active genes, To define more precisely which mechanisms underlie the heat-induced inhibition of repair of active genes, removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) was studied in human fibroblasts w

  9. Differential expression of tissue repair genes in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gosselink, John V; Hayashi, Shizu; Elliott, W Mark; Xing, Li; Chan, Becky; Yang, Luojia; Wright, Claire; Sin, Don; Paré, Peter D; Pierce, John A; Pierce, Richard A; Patterson, Alex; Cooper, Joel; Hogg, James C

    2010-01-01

    .... The expression of 54 genes associated with repair of repetitively damaged tissue was measured in 136 paired samples of small bronchioles and surrounding lung tissue separated by laser capture microdissection...

  10. Genomic survey and expression analysis of DNA repair genes in the genus Leptospira.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins-Pinheiro, Marinalva; Schons-Fonseca, Luciane; da Silva, Josefa B; Domingos, Renan H; Momo, Leonardo Hiroyuki Santos; Simões, Ana Carolina Quirino; Ho, Paulo Lee; da Costa, Renata M A

    2016-04-01

    Leptospirosis is an emerging zoonosis with important economic and public health consequences and is caused by pathogenic leptospires. The genus Leptospira belongs to the order Spirochaetales and comprises saprophytic (L. biflexa), pathogenic (L. interrogans) and host-dependent (L. borgpetersenii) members. Here, we present an in silico search for DNA repair pathways in Leptospira spp. The relevance of such DNA repair pathways was assessed through the identification of mRNA levels of some genes during infection in animal model and after exposition to spleen cells. The search was performed by comparison of available Leptospira spp. genomes in public databases with known DNA repair-related genes. Leptospires exhibit some distinct and unexpected characteristics, for instance the existence of a redundant mechanism for repairing a chemically diverse spectrum of alkylated nucleobases, a new mutS-like gene and a new shorter version of uvrD. Leptospira spp. shares some characteristics from Gram-positive, as the presence of PcrA, two RecQ paralogs and two SSB proteins; the latter is considered a feature shared by naturally competent bacteria. We did not find a significant reduction in the number of DNA repair-related genes in both pathogenic and host-dependent species. Pathogenic leptospires were enriched for genes dedicated to base excision repair and non-homologous end joining. Their evolutionary history reveals a remarkable importance of lateral gene transfer events for the evolution of the genus. Up-regulation of specific DNA repair genes, including components of SOS regulon, during infection in animal model validates the critical role of DNA repair mechanisms for the complex interplay between host/pathogen.

  11. Transcript RNA supports precise repair of its own DNA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Havva; Meers, Chance; Storici, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    The transfer of genetic information from RNA to DNA is considered an extraordinary process in molecular biology. Despite the fact that cells transcribe abundant amount of RNA with a wide range of functions, it has been difficult to uncover whether RNA can serve as a template for DNA repair and recombination. An increasing number of experimental evidences suggest a direct role of RNA in DNA modification. Recently, we demonstrated that endogenous transcript RNA can serve as a template to repair a DNA double-strand break (DSB), the most harmful DNA lesion, not only indirectly via formation of a DNA copy (cDNA) intermediate, but also directly in a homology driven mechanism in budding yeast. These results point out that the transfer of genetic information from RNA to DNA is more general than previously thought. We found that transcript RNA is more efficient in repairing a DSB in its own DNA (in cis) than in a homologous but ectopic locus (in trans). Here, we summarize current knowledge about the process of RNA-driven DNA repair and recombination, and provide further data in support of our model of DSB repair by transcript RNA in cis. We show that a DSB is precisely repaired predominately by transcript RNA and not by residual cDNA in conditions in which formation of cDNA by reverse transcription is inhibited. Additionally, we demonstrate that defects in ribonuclease (RNase) H stimulate precise DSB repair by homologous RNA or cDNA sequence, and not by homologous DNA sequence carried on a plasmid. These results highlight an antagonistic role of RNase H in RNA-DNA recombination. Ultimately, we discuss several questions that should be addressed to better understand mechanisms and implications of RNA-templated DNA repair and recombination.

  12. Sequence analysis of the DNA-repair gene rad51 in the tardigrades Milnesium cf. tardigradum, Hypsibius dujardini and Macrobiotus cf. harmsworthi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana A. Beltrán-Pardo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Tardigrades are known for being resistant to extreme conditions, including tolerance to ionising and UV radiation in both the hydrated and the dehydrated state. It is known that these factors may cause damage to DNA. It has recently been shown that single and double DNA strand breaks occur when tardigrades are maintained for a long time in the anhydrobiotic state. This may suggest that perhaps tardigrades rely on efficient DNA repair mechanisms. Among all proteins that comprise the DNA repair system, recombinases such as RecA or Rad51 have a very important function: DNA exchange activity. This enzyme is used in the homologous recombination and allows repair of the damaged strand using homologous non-damaged strands as a template. In this study, Rad51 induction was evaluated by western blot in Milnesium cf. tardigradum, after exposure to gamma radiation. The Rad51 protein was highly induced by radiation, when compared to the control. The rad51 genes were searched in three tardigrades: Milnesium cf. tardigradum, Hypsibius dujardini and Macrobiotus cf. harmsworthi. The gene sequences were obtained by preparing and sequencing transcriptome libraries for H. dujardini and M. cf. harmsworthi and designing rad51 degenerate primers specific for M. cf. tardigradum. Comparison of Rad51 putative proteins from tardigrades with other organisms showed that they are highly similar to the corresponding sequence from the nematode Trichinella spiralis. A structure-based sequence alignment from tardigrades and other organisms revealed that putative Rad51 predicted proteins from tardigrades contain the expected motifs for these important recombinases. In a cladogram tree based on this alignment, tardigrades tend to cluster together suggesting that they have selective differences in these genes that make them diverge between species. Predicted Rad51 structures from tardigrades were also compared with crystalline structure of Rad51 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These

  13. DNA repair gene polymorphisms in relation to chromosome aberration frequencies in retired radiation workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilding, Craig S. [Genetics Department, Westlakes Research Institute, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3JY (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: craig.wilding@westlakes.ac.uk; Relton, Caroline L. [Genetics Department, Westlakes Research Institute, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3JY (United Kingdom); Paediatric and Lifecourse Epidemiology Research Group, School of Clinical Medical Sciences (Child Health), Newcastle University, Sir James Spence Institute, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle-upon-Tyne NE1 4LP (United Kingdom); Rees, Gwen S. [Genetics Department, Westlakes Research Institute, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3JY (United Kingdom); Tarone, Robert E. [International Epidemiology Institute, 1455 Research Boulevard, Suite 550, Rockville, MD 20850 (United States); Whitehouse, Caroline A. [Genetics Department, Westlakes Research Institute, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3JY (United Kingdom); Tawn, E. Janet [Genetics Department, Westlakes Research Institute, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3JY (United Kingdom)

    2005-02-15

    Polymorphic variation in DNA repair genes was examined in a group of retired workers from the British Nuclear Fuels plc facility at Sellafield in relation to previously determined translocation frequencies in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Variation at seven polymorphisms in four genes involved in the base excision repair (XRCC1 R194W, R399Q and a [AC]{sub n} microsatellite in the 3' UTR) and double strand break repair (XRCC3 T241M and a [AC]{sub n} microsatellite in intron 3 of XRCC3, XRCC4 I134T, and a GACTAn microsatellite located 120kb 5' of XRCC5) pathways was determined for 291 retired radiation workers who had received cumulative occupational external radiation doses of between 0 and 1873mSv. When the interaction between radiation dose and each DNA repair gene polymorphism was examined in relation to translocation frequency there was no evidence for any of the polymorphisms studied influencing the response to occupational exposure. A positive interaction observed between genotype (individuals with at least one allele >=20 repeat units) at a microsatellite locus in the XRCC3 gene and smoking status should be interpreted cautiously because interactions were investigated for seven polymorphisms and two exposures. Nonetheless, further research is warranted to examine whether this DNA repair gene variant might be associated with a sub-optimal repair response to smoking-induced DNA damage and hence an increased frequency of translocations.

  14. Chromosomal Aberrations and DNA Repair Gene Variants in a Radon-exposed Population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiuru, A.; Lindholm, C.; Koivistoinen, A.; Salomaa, S.

    2004-07-01

    Polymorphisms of XRCC1 (X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1), XRCC3 (X-ray repair cross-complementing group 3), and hOGG1 (the human homologue of the yeast OGG1 gene) DNA repair genes have been associated with altered DNA repair capacity and risk of various cancers. In the present study our goal was to clarify the influence of various DNA repair gene variants on the frequency of chromosomal aberrations (CA) in subjects exposed to residential radon. The study group of 84 non-smoking, healthy individuals exposed to domestic radon were analysed using the fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) technique. No association between radon concentration and CA frequencies was observed. However, a significant increase with age was shown as well as a large variability in translocation frequencies between individuals within the same age group. In order to investigate the role of individual susceptibility to this variation genotypes of DNA repair genes XRCC1 (codons 194, 280 and 399), XRCC3 (codon 241) and hOGG1 (codon 326) were determined from leukocyte DNA using methods based on polymerase chain reaction. Multiple regression analysis was applied to evaluate the effect of the polymorphisms and the other confounding factors (age, exposure to randon etc) to the frequency of CA. The preliminary statistical analyses showed that the different gene appeared not to be related to a pronounced increase in chromosome aberration frequencies observed by FISH painting. However, the analysis indicated that the homozygous variant of XRCC3 codon 241 was associated (P<0.05) with two-ways translocations in conjunction with age. Larger studies, both with regard to the cohort and the number of gene variants are needed to elucidate the influence of other DNA repair variants to the yield of chromosomal aberrations. The results indicate that the chromosomal translocations accumulated by age (spontaneous background) may be partly explained by defects in homologous recombination repair. (Author

  15. Genome analysis of DNA repair genes in the alpha proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menck Carlos FM

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The integrity of DNA molecules is fundamental for maintaining life. The DNA repair proteins protect organisms against genetic damage, by removal of DNA lesions or helping to tolerate them. DNA repair genes are best known from the gamma-proteobacterium Escherichia coli, which is the most understood bacterial model. However, genome sequencing raises questions regarding uniformity and ubiquity of these DNA repair genes and pathways, reinforcing the need for identifying genes and proteins, which may respond to DNA damage in other bacteria. Results In this study, we employed a bioinformatic approach, to analyse and describe the open reading frames potentially related to DNA repair from the genome of the alpha-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus. This was performed by comparison with known DNA repair related genes found in public databases. As expected, although C. crescentus and E. coli bacteria belong to separate phylogenetic groups, many of their DNA repair genes are very similar. However, some important DNA repair genes are absent in the C. crescentus genome and other interesting functionally related gene duplications are present, which do not occur in E. coli. These include DNA ligases, exonuclease III (xthA, endonuclease III (nth, O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (ada gene, photolyase-like genes, and uracil-DNA-glycosylases. On the other hand, the genes imuA and imuB, which are involved in DNA damage induced mutagenesis, have recently been described in C. crescentus, but are absent in E. coli. Particularly interesting are the potential atypical phylogeny of one of the photolyase genes in alpha-proteobacteria, indicating an origin by horizontal transfer, and the duplication of the Ada orthologs, which have diverse structural configurations, including one that is still unique for C. crescentus. Conclusion The absence and the presence of certain genes are discussed and predictions are made considering the particular

  16. Molecular origin analysis of Shigella boydii Str. hn03 isolated from chicken based on 16S rRNA,gyrB,grpE and recA genes%16S rRNA基因联合gyrB、grpE、recA基因对鸡源鲍氏志贺菌hn03株进行分子起源分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨霞; 陈陆; 赵军; 王新卫; 常洪涛; 刘红英; 姚慧霞; 王川庆

    2011-01-01

    The sequences of 16S rDNA, gyrB, grpE, recA of Shigella were analysed for the farther identification of newly found Shigella boydii strain isolated from chicken and the evolutionary position of the new strain was determined. Part of 16S rRNA and other three genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from one identified Shigella boydii strains isolated from chicken and the PCR products were cloned and sequenced. These sequences obtained in this study were compared with the related sequneces reported in GenBank by software of DNA analyses. The similarity were gained and phylogenetic tree were constructed. Further evolutionary relationships among chicken Shigella boydii and other related strains were examined based on sequences. Shigella boydii isolated from chicken had the nearest homogeneity with Shigella boydii isolated from human and their homogeneity is 99.6 %-100 %. Shigella boydii isolated from chicken was in a small cluster with Shigella boydii isolated from human in four phylogenetic trees,and almost all Shigella strains are distributed among E. coli strains. Genes recA and gyrB shown a greater evolutionary divergence than 16S rRNA genes. Sequence analysis of 16S rDNA and gyrB,grpE, recA may be a reliable, rapid and low costs way for identification of Shigella strains. The homogeneity and the phylogenetic tree constructed by these four genes above revealed that the Shigella strain isolated from chicken may be a new species or subspecies of Shigella boydii.%为了从基因水平鉴定鸡源鲍氏志贺菌,分别根据GenBank中登陆的相应序列针对16srRNA、gyrB、grpE、recA4基因设计4对引物,用PCR扩增出鸡源鲍氏志贺菌4基因的部分片段并进行了克隆测序。将所获序列与GenBank中同源性较高的相关序列相比较,计算种间相似性,并构建志贺菌的系统发育树,对分离株进行分类与鉴定。研究发现,从4基因的序列分析结果总体上可知鸡

  17. Preferential repair of DNA double-strand break at the active gene in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurasia, Priyasri; Sen, Rwik; Pandita, Tej K; Bhaumik, Sukesh R

    2012-10-19

    Previous studies have demonstrated transcription-coupled nucleotide/base excision repair. We report here for the first time that DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair is also coupled to transcription. We generated a yeast strain by introducing a homing (Ho) endonuclease cut site followed by a nucleotide sequence for multiple Myc epitopes at the 3' end of the coding sequence of a highly active gene, ADH1. This yeast strain also contains the Ho cut site at the nearly silent or poorly active mating type α (MATα) locus and expresses Ho endonuclease under the galactose-inducible GAL1 promoter. Using this strain, DSBs were generated at the ADH1 and MATα loci in galactose-containing growth medium that induced HO expression. Subsequently, yeast cells were transferred to dextrose-containing growth medium to stop HO expression, and the DSB repair was monitored at the ADH1 and MATα loci by PCR, using the primer pairs flanking the Ho cut sites. Our results revealed a faster DSB repair at the highly active ADH1 than that at the nearly silent MATα locus, hence implicating a transcription-coupled DSB repair at the active gene in vivo. Subsequently, we extended this study to another gene, PHO5 (carrying the Ho cut site at its coding sequence), under transcriptionally active and inactive growth conditions. We found a fast DSB repair at the active PHO5 gene in comparison to its inactive state. Collectively, our results demonstrate a preferential DSB repair at the active gene, thus supporting transcription-coupled DSB repair in living cells.

  18. Polymorphisms in human DNA repair genes and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rim Khlifi; Ahmed Rebai; Amel Hamza-Chaffai

    2012-12-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in some DNA repair proteins are associated with a number of malignant transformations like head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD) and X-ray repair cross-complementing proteins 1 (XRCC1) and 3 (XRCC3) genes are involved in DNA repair and were found to be associated with HNSCC in numerous studies. To establish our overall understanding of possible relationships between DNA repair gene polymorphisms and development of HNSCC, we surveyed the literature on epidemiological studies that assessed potential associations with HNSCC risk in terms of gene–environment interactions, genotype-induced functional defects in enzyme activity and/or protein expression, and the influence of ethnic origin on these associations.We conclude that large, well-designed studies of common polymorphisms in DNA repair genes are needed. Such studies may benefit from analysis of multiple genes or polymorphisms and from the consideration of relevant exposures that may influence the likelihood of HNSCC when DNA repair capacity is reduced.

  19. Approaches to diagnose DNA mismatch repair gene defects in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peña-Diaz, Javier; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2016-01-01

    The DNA repair pathway mismatch repair (MMR) is responsible for the recognition and correction of DNA biosynthetic errors caused by inaccurate nucleotide incorporation during replication. Faulty MMR leads to failure to address the mispairs or insertion deletion loops (IDLs) left behind...... already been well defined and their pathogenicity assessed. Despite this substantial wealth of knowledge, the effects of a large number of alterations remain uncharacterized (variants of uncertain significance, VUSs). The advent of personalized genomics is likely to increase the list of VUSs found in MMR...

  20. Assignment of ten DNA repair genes from Schizosaccharomyces pombe to chromosomal NotI restriction fragments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.C. Broughton; N.C. Barbet; J. Murray (Johanne); F.Z. Watts (Felicity); M.H.M. Koken (Marcel); A.R. Lehmann (Alan); A.M. Carr (Anthony)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractTen DNA repair (rad) genes from the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe were mapped to the 17 NotI fragments of the three chromosomes. Nine of the genes map to chromosome I, but there is no evidence for significant clustering.

  1. FISH comets show that the salvage enzyme TK1 contributes to gene-specific DNA repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen eDownes

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Thymidine kinase 1 (TK1 is a salvage enzyme that phosphorylates thymidine, imported from surrounding fluids, to create dTMP, which is further phosphorylated to the DNA precursor dTTP. TK1 deficiency has for a long time been known to cause increased cellular sensitivity to DNA damage. We have examined preferential strand break repair of DNA domains in TK1+ and TK1- clones of the Raji cell line, by the Comet-FISH technique, in bulk DNA and in the actively transcribed tumour suppressor (TP53 and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT gene regions, over 1 hour after 5Gy γ-irradiation. Results showed that repair of the TP53 and hTERT gene regions was more efficient in TK1+ compared to TK1- cells, while levels of genomic DNA repair were consistant between the two cell-lines. The targeted gene-specific repair in TK+ cells occurred rapidly, mainly over the first 15 minute repair-period. Therefore, TK1 is needed for preferential repair of actively transcribed regions, through a previously unsuspected mechanism. In principle, TK1 could exert its protective effects through supply of a supplementary dTTP pool for accurate repair of damaged genes; but Raji TK1+ cells in thymidine free media still show preferential repair of transcribed regions. TK1 therefore does not exert its protective effects through dTTP pools, but through another unidentified mechanism, which affects sensitivity to and mutagenicity by DNA damaging agents.

  2. FISH comets show that the salvage enzyme TK1 contributes to gene-specific DNA repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Katherine A.; Yasseen, Akeel A.; McKerr, George; Downes, C. S.; McKelvey-Martin, Valerie J.

    2014-01-01

    Thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) is a salvage enzyme that phosphorylates thymidine, imported from surrounding fluids, to create dTMP, which is further phosphorylated to the DNA precursor dTTP. TK1 deficiency has for a long time been known to cause increased cellular sensitivity to DNA damage. We have examined preferential strand break repair of DNA domains in TK1+ and TK1- clones of the Raji cell line, by the Comet-FISH technique, in bulk DNA and in the actively transcribed tumor suppressor (TP53) and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene regions, over 1 h after 5Gy γ-irradiation. Results showed that repair of the TP53 and hTERT gene regions was more efficient in TK1+ compared to TK1- cells, a trend also reflected to a lesser degree in genomic DNA repair between the cell-lines. The targeted gene-specific repair in TK+ cells occurred rapidly, mainly over the first 15 min repair-period. Therefore, TK1 is needed for preferential repair of actively transcribed regions, through a previously unsuspected mechanism. In principle, TK1 could exert its protective effects through supply of a supplementary dTTP pool for accurate repair of damaged genes; but Raji TK1+ cells in thymidine free media still show preferential repair of transcribed regions. TK1 therefore does not exert its protective effects through dTTP pools, but through another unidentified mechanism, which affects sensitivity to and mutagenicity by DNA damaging agents. PMID:25152750

  3. 'Hide-then-hit' to explain the importance of genotypic polymorphism of DNA repair genes in determining susceptibility to cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei-Ei Wu; Chen-Yang Shen

    2011-01-01

    Interindividual variations in DNA repair capacity/efficiency linked to the presence of polymorphisms in DNA repair-related genes have been suggested to account for different risk of developing cancers. In this review article, on the basis of breast cancer formation as a model, we propose a 'hide-then-hit' hypothesis indicating the importance of escaping checkpoint surveillance for sub-optimal DNA repair variants to cause cancer. Therefore, only cells with subtle defects in repair capacity arising from low-penetrance variants of DNA repair genes would have the opportunity to grow and accumulate the genetic changes needed for cancer formation, without triggering cell-cycle checkpoint surveillance. Furthermore, distinct from high-penetrance alleles, these polymorphic alleles of DNA repair genes would predispose carriers to a higher risk of developing cancer but would not necessarily cause cancer. To examine this,we simultaneously genotyped multiple SNPs of cell-cycle checkpoint genes and the DNA repair genes. Support for the hypothesis came from observations that breast cancer risk associated with variant genotypes of DNA repair genes became more significant in be confirmed by biological evidence in which a cause-effect relationship has to be established. However, based on this, possible gene-gene interaction is considered to play an important role in modifying the cancer risk associated with genotypic polymorphism of DNA repair gene in different study populations.

  4. Structure/function relationships in RecA protein-mediated homology recognition and strand exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentiss, Mara; Prévost, Chantal; Danilowicz, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    RecA family proteins include RecA, Rad51, and Dmc1. These recombinases are responsible for homology search and strand exchange. Homology search and strand exchange occur during double-strand break repair and in eukaryotes during meiotic recombination. In bacteria, homology search begins when RecA binds an initiating single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) in the primary DNA-binding site to form the presynaptic filament. The filament is a right-handed helix, where the initiating strand is bound deep within the filament. Once the presynaptic filament is formed, it interrogates nearby double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) to find a homologous sequence; therefore, we provide a detailed discussion of structural features of the presynaptic filament that play important functional roles. The discussion includes many diagrams showing multiple filament turns. These diagrams illustrate interactions that are not evident in single turn structures. The first dsDNA interactions with the presynaptic filament are insensitive to mismatches. The mismatch insensitive interactions lead to dsDNA deformation that triggers a homology testing process governed by kinetics. The first homology test involves ∼8 bases. Almost all interactions are rejected by this initial rapid test, leading to a new cycle of homology testing. Interactions that pass the initial rapid test proceed to a slower testing stage. That slower stage induces nonhomologous dsDNA to reverse strand exchange and begin a new cycle of homology testing. In contrast, homologous dsDNA continues to extend the heteroduplex strand-exchange product until ATP hydrolysis makes strand exchange irreversible.

  5. Genetic variants of the DNA repair genes from Exome Aggregation Consortium (EXAC) database: significance in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Raima; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar

    2017-04-01

    DNA repair pathway is a primary defense system that eliminates wide varieties of DNA damage. Any deficiencies in them are likely to cause the chromosomal instability that leads to cell malfunctioning and tumorigenesis. Genetic polymorphisms in DNA repair genes have demonstrated a significant association with cancer risk. Our study attempts to give a glimpse of the overall scenario of the germline polymorphisms in the DNA repair genes by taking into account of the Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC) database as well as the Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD) for evaluating the disease link, particularly in cancer. It has been found that ExAC DNA repair dataset (which consists of 228 DNA repair genes) comprises 30.4% missense, 12.5% dbSNP reported and 3.2% ClinVar significant variants. 27% of all the missense variants has the deleterious SIFT score of 0.00 and 6% variants carrying the most damaging Polyphen-2 score of 1.00, thus affecting the protein structure and function. However, as per HGMD, only a fraction (1.2%) of ExAC DNA repair variants was found to be cancer-related, indicating remaining variants reported in both the databases to be further analyzed. This, in turn, may provide an increased spectrum of the reported cancer linked variants in the DNA repair genes present in ExAC database. Moreover, further in silico functional assay of the identified vital cancer-associated variants, which is essential to get their actual biological significance, may shed some lights in the field of targeted drug development in near future. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Gene Expression in Experimental Aortic Coarctation and Repair: Candidate Genes for Therapeutic Intervention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaDisa, John F; Bozdag, Serdar; Olson, Jessica; Ramchandran, Ramani; Kersten, Judy R; Eddinger, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Coarctation of the aorta (CoA) is a constriction of the proximal descending thoracic aorta and is one of the most common congenital cardiovascular defects. Treatments for CoA improve life expectancy, but morbidity persists, particularly due to the development of chronic hypertension (HTN). Identifying the mechanisms of morbidity is difficult in humans due to confounding variables such as age at repair, follow-up duration, coarctation severity and concurrent anomalies. We previously developed an experimental model that replicates aortic pathology in humans with CoA without these confounding variables, and mimics correction at various times using dissolvable suture. Here we present the most comprehensive description of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) to date from the pathology of CoA, which were obtained using this model. Aortic samples (n=4/group) from the ascending aorta that experiences elevated blood pressure (BP) from induction of CoA, and restoration of normal BP after its correction, were analyzed by gene expression microarray, and enriched genes were converted to human orthologues. 51 DEGs with >6 fold-change (FC) were used to determine enriched Gene Ontology terms, altered pathways, and association with National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headers (MeSH) IDs for HTN, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and CoA. The results generated 18 pathways, 4 of which (cell cycle, immune system, hemostasis and metabolism) were shared with MeSH ID's for HTN and CVD, and individual genes were associated with the CoA MeSH ID. A thorough literature search further uncovered association with contractile, cytoskeletal and regulatory proteins related to excitation-contraction coupling and metabolism that may explain the structural and functional changes observed in our experimental model, and ultimately help to unravel the mechanisms responsible for persistent morbidity after treatment for CoA.

  7. Modeling the early stage of DNA sequence recognition within RecA nucleoprotein filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saladin, Adrien; Amourda, Christopher; Poulain, Pierre; Férey, Nicolas; Baaden, Marc; Zacharias, Martin; Delalande, Olivier; Prévost, Chantal

    2010-10-01

    Homologous recombination is a fundamental process enabling the repair of double-strand breaks with a high degree of fidelity. In prokaryotes, it is carried out by RecA nucleofilaments formed on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). These filaments incorporate genomic sequences that are homologous to the ssDNA and exchange the homologous strands. Due to the highly dynamic character of this process and its rapid propagation along the filament, the sequence recognition and strand exchange mechanism remains unknown at the structural level. The recently published structure of the RecA/DNA filament active for recombination (Chen et al., Mechanism of homologous recombination from the RecA-ssDNA/dsDNA structure, Nature 2008, 453, 489) provides a starting point for new exploration of the system. Here, we investigate the possible geometries of association of the early encounter complex between RecA/ssDNA filament and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). Due to the huge size of the system and its dense packing, we use a reduced representation for protein and DNA together with state-of-the-art molecular modeling methods, including systematic docking and virtual reality simulations. The results indicate that it is possible for the double-stranded DNA to access the RecA-bound ssDNA while initially retaining its Watson-Crick pairing. They emphasize the importance of RecA L2 loop mobility for both recognition and strand exchange.

  8. DNA damage and gene therapy of xeroderma pigmentosum, a human DNA repair-deficient disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupuy, Aurélie [Laboratory of Genetic Instability and Oncogenesis UMR8200CNRS, Institut Gustave Roussy and University Paris-Sud, Villejuif (France); Sarasin, Alain, E-mail: alain.sarasin@gustaveroussy.fr [Laboratory of Genetic Instability and Oncogenesis UMR8200CNRS, Institut Gustave Roussy and University Paris-Sud, Villejuif (France); Service de Génétique, Institut Gustave Roussy (France)

    2015-06-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Full correction of mutation in the XPC gene by engineered nucleases. • Meganucleases and TALENs are inhibited by 5-MeC for inducing double strand breaks. • Gene therapy of XP cells is possible using homologous recombination for DSB repair. - Abstract: Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a genetic disease characterized by hypersensitivity to ultra-violet and a very high risk of skin cancer induction on exposed body sites. This syndrome is caused by germinal mutations on nucleotide excision repair genes. No cure is available for these patients except a complete protection from all types of UV radiations. We reviewed the various techniques to complement or to correct the genetic defect in XP cells. We, particularly, developed the correction of XP-C skin cells using the fidelity of the homologous recombination pathway during repair of double-strand break (DSB) in the presence of XPC wild type sequences. We used engineered nucleases (meganuclease or TALE nuclease) to induce a DSB located at 90 bp of the mutation to be corrected. Expression of specific TALE nuclease in the presence of a repair matrix containing a long stretch of homologous wild type XPC sequences allowed us a successful gene correction of the original TG deletion found in numerous North African XP patients. Some engineered nucleases are sensitive to epigenetic modifications, such as cytosine methylation. In case of methylated sequences to be corrected, modified nucleases or demethylation of the whole genome should be envisaged. Overall, we showed that specifically-designed TALE-nuclease allowed us to correct a 2 bp deletion in the XPC gene leading to patient's cells proficient for DNA repair and showing normal UV-sensitivity. The corrected gene is still in the same position in the human genome and under the regulation of its physiological promoter. This result is a first step toward gene therapy in XP patients.

  9. A multistep genomic screen identifies new genes required for repair of DNA double-strand breaks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Jennifer Summers; Sethi, Sunaina; Tripp, Jennifer DeMars; Nguyen, Thuy N; Sanderson, Brian A; Westmoreland, James W; Resnick, Michael A; Lewis, L Kevin

    2013-04-15

    Efficient mechanisms for rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are vital because misrepair of such lesions leads to mutation, aneuploidy and loss of cell viability. DSB repair is mediated by proteins acting in two major pathways, called homologous recombination and nonhomologous end-joining. Repair efficiency is also modulated by other processes such as sister chromatid cohesion, nucleosome remodeling and DNA damage checkpoints. The total number of genes influencing DSB repair efficiency is unknown. To identify new yeast genes affecting DSB repair, genes linked to gamma radiation resistance in previous genome-wide surveys were tested for their impact on repair of site-specific DSBs generated by in vivo expression of EcoRI endonuclease. Eight members of the RAD52 group of DNA repair genes (RAD50, RAD51, RAD52, RAD54, RAD55, RAD57, MRE11 and XRS2) and 73 additional genes were found to be required for efficient repair of EcoRI-induced DSBs in screens utilizing both MATa and MATα deletion strain libraries. Most mutants were also sensitive to the clastogenic chemicals MMS and bleomycin. Several of the non-RAD52 group genes have previously been linked to DNA repair and over half of the genes affect nuclear processes. Many proteins encoded by the protective genes have previously been shown to associate physically with each other and with known DNA repair proteins in high-throughput proteomics studies. A majority of the proteins (64%) share sequence similarity with human proteins, suggesting that they serve similar functions. We have used a genetic screening approach to detect new genes required for efficient repair of DSBs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The findings have spotlighted new genes that are critical for maintenance of genome integrity and are therefore of greatest concern for their potential impact when the corresponding gene orthologs and homologs are inactivated or polymorphic in human cells.

  10. Polymorphisms in base excision repair genes: Breast cancer risk and individual radiosensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrono, Clarice; Sterpone, Silvia; Testa, Antonella; Cozzi, Renata

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most common cancer among women worldwide. The aetiology and carcinogenesis of BC are not clearly defined, although genetic, hormonal, lifestyle and environmental risk factors have been established. The most common treatment for BC includes breast-conserving surgery followed by a standard radiotherapy (RT) regimen. However, radiation hypersensitivity and the occurrence of RT-induced toxicity in normal tissue may affect patients’ treatment. The role of DNA repair in cancer has been extensively investigated, and an impaired DNA damage response may increase the risk of BC and individual radiosensitivity. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in DNA repair genes may alter protein function and modulate DNA repair efficiency, influencing the development of various cancers, including BC. SNPs in DNA repair genes have also been studied as potential predictive factors for the risk of RT-induced side effects. Here, we review the literature on the association between SNPs in base excision repair (BER) genes and BC risk. We focused on X-ray repair cross complementing group 1 (XRCC1), which plays a key role in BER, and on 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1, apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1, which encode three important BER enzymes that interact with XRCC1. Although no association between SNPs and radiation toxicity has been validated thus far, we also report published studies on XRCC1 SNPs and variants in other BER genes and RT-induced side effects in BC patients, emphasising that large well-designed studies are needed to determine the genetic components of individual radiosensitivity. PMID:25493225

  11. Gene therapy and peripheral nerve repair : a perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoyng, Stefan A; de Winter, Fred; Tannemaat, Martijn R; Blits, Bas; Malessy, Martijn J A; Verhaagen, J.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical phase I/II studies have demonstrated the safety of gene therapy for a variety of central nervous system disorders, including Canavan's, Parkinson's (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD), retinal diseases and pain. The majority of gene therapy studies in the CNS have used adeno-associated viral

  12. Gene therapy and peripheral nerve repair : a perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoyng, Stefan A; de Winter, Fred; Tannemaat, Martijn R; Blits, Bas; Malessy, Martijn J A; Verhaagen, J.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical phase I/II studies have demonstrated the safety of gene therapy for a variety of central nervous system disorders, including Canavan's, Parkinson's (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD), retinal diseases and pain. The majority of gene therapy studies in the CNS have used adeno-associated viral

  13. Cloning of human and mouse genes homologous to RAD52, a yeast gene involved in DNA repair and recombination.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.F.R. Muris; O.Y. Bezzubova (Olga); J-M. Buerstedde; K. Vreeken; A.S. Balajee; C.J. Osgood; C. Troelstra (Christine); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); K. Ostermann; H. Schmidt (Henning); A.T. Natarajan; J.C.J. Eeken; P.H.M. Lohmann (Paul); A. Pastink (Albert)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe RAD52 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for recombinational repair of double-strand breaks. Using degenerate oligonucleotides based on conserved amino acid sequences of RAD52 and rad22, its counterpart from Schizosaccharomyces pombe, RAD52 homologs from man and mouse were

  14. Chromosomal localization of three repair genes: the xeroderma pigmentosum group C gene and two human homologs of yeast RAD23.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. van der Spek (Peter); E.M.E. Smit (Elisabeth); H.B. Beverloo (Berna); K. Sugasawa (Kaoru); C. Matsutani; F. Hanaoka (Fumio); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); A. Hagemeier

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe nucleotide excision repair (NER) disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by sun (UV) sensitivity, predisposition to skin cancer, and extensive genetic heterogeneity. Recently, we reported the cloning and analysis of three human NER genes, XPC, HHR23A, and HHR23B. The

  15. Structural and functional conservation of two human homologs of the yeast DNA repair gene RAD6.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H.M. Koken (Marcel); P. Reynolds (Paul); I. Jaspers-Dekker (Iris); L. Prakash; S. Prakash; D. Bootsma (Dirk); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractThe RAD6 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2) that is required for DNA repair, damage-induced mutagenesis, and sporulation. We have cloned the two human RAD6 homologs, designated HHR6A and HHR6B. The two 152-amino acid human proteins share 95% sequ

  16. Comprehensive analysis of DNA repair gene variants and risk of meningioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bethke, L.; Murray, A.; Webb, E.

    2008-01-01

    of meningioma and exposure to ionizing radiation is also well known and led us to examine whether variants in DNA repair genes contribute to disease susceptibility. METHODS: We analyzed 1127 tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were selected to capture most of the common variation in 136 DNA...

  17. Semiconservative replication, genetic repair, and many-gened genomes: Extending the quasispecies paradigm to living systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannenbaum, Emmanuel; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2005-12-01

    Quasispecies theory has emerged as an important tool for modeling the evolutionary dynamics of biological systems. We review recent advances in the field, with an emphasis on the quasispecies dynamics of semiconservatively replicating genomes. Applications to cancer and adult stem cell growth are discussed. Additional topics, such as genetic repair and many-gene genomes, are covered as well.

  18. A Database to Support the Interpretation of Human Mismatch Repair Gene Variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ou, Jianghua; Niessen, Renee C.; Vonk, Jan; Westers, Helga; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Sijmons, Rolf H.

    2008-01-01

    Germline mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, or PMS2 can cause Lynch syndrome. This syndrome, also known as hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), is an autosomal dominantly-inherited disorder predominantly characterized by colorectal and endometrial cancer. Tr

  19. Loss of transcription factor early growth response gene 1 results in impaired endochondral bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reumann, Marie K; Strachna, Olga; Yagerman, Sarah; Torrecilla, Daniel; Kim, Jihye; Doty, Stephen B; Lukashova, Lyudmila; Boskey, Adele L; Mayer-Kuckuk, Philipp

    2011-10-01

    Transcription factors that play a role in ossification during development are expected to participate in postnatal fracture repair since the endochondral bone formation that occurs in embryos is recapitulated during fracture repair. However, inherent differences exist between bone development and fracture repair, including a sudden disruption of tissue integrity followed by an inflammatory response. This raises the possibility that repair-specific transcription factors participate in bone healing. Here, we assessed the consequence of loss of early growth response gene 1 (EGR-1) on endochondral bone healing because this transcription factor has been shown to modulate repair in vascularized tissues. Model fractures were created in ribs of wild type (wt) and EGR-1(-/-) mice. Differences in tissue morphology and composition between these two animal groups were followed over 28 post fracture days (PFDs). In wt mice, bone healing occurred in healing phases characteristic of endochondral bone repair. A similar healing sequence was observed in EGR-1(-/-) mice but was impaired by alterations. A persistent accumulation of fibrin between the disconnected bones was observed on PFD7 and remained pronounced in the callus on PFD14. Additionally, the PFD14 callus was abnormally enlarged and showed increased deposition of mineralized tissue. Cartilage ossification in the callus was associated with hyper-vascularity and -proliferation. Moreover, cell deposits located in proximity to the callus within skeletal muscle were detected on PFD14. Despite these impairments, repair in EGR-1(-/-) callus advanced on PFD28, suggesting EGR-1 is not essential for healing. Together, this study provides genetic evidence that EGR-1 is a pleiotropic regulator of endochondral fracture repair. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Polymorphisms in DNA Repair Genes and MDR1 and the Risk for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Nam Kim

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The damage caused by oxidative stress and exposure to cigarette smoke and alcohol necessitate DNA damage repair and transport by multidrug resistance-1 (MDR1. To explore the association between polymorphisms in these genes and non-Hodgkin lymphoma risk, we analyzed 15 polymorphisms of 12 genes in a population-based study in Korea (694 cases and 1700 controls. Four genotypes of DNA repair pathway genes (XRCC1 399 GA, OGG1 326 GG, BRCA1 871 TT, and WRN 787 TT were associated with a decreased risk for NHL [odds ratio (ORXRCC1 GA = 0.80, p = 0.02; OROGG1 GG = 0.70, p = 0.008; ORBRCA1 TT = 0.71, p = 0.048; ORWRN TT = 0.68, p = 0.01]. Conversely, the MGMT 115 CT genotype was associated with an increased risk for NHL (OR = 1.25, p = 0.04. In the MDR1 gene, the 1236 CC genotype was associated with a decreased risk for NHL (OR = 0.74, p = 0.04, and the 3435 CT and TT genotypes were associated with an increased risk (OR3435CT = 1.50, p < 0.0001; OR3435TT = 1.43, p = 0.02. These results suggest that polymorphisms in the DNA repair genes XRCC1, OGG1, BRCA1, WRN1, and MGMT and in the MDR1 gene may affect the risk for NHL in Korean patients.

  1. Cytogenetic Response to Ionizing Radiation Exposure in Human Fibroblasts with Suppressed Expression of Non-DSB Repair Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Emami, Kamal; Hammond, Dianne; Mehta, Satish K.; Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Pierson, Duane L.; Wu, Honglu

    2009-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in double-strand break (DSB) repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been well studied. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of IR inducible genes in radiation-induced chromosome aberrations and micronuclei formation. In the study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. Frequencies of micronuclei (MN) formation and chromosome aberrations were measured to determine the efficiency of cytogenetic repair, and the fraction of bi-nucleated cells in the MN analysis was used as a marker for cell cycle progression. In response to gamma radiation, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of five genes: Ku70 (DSB repair pathway), XPA (nucleotide excision repair pathway), RPA1 (mismatch repair pathway), RAD17 and RBBP8 (cell cycle control). Knocked-down expression of four genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Moreover, decreased XPA, p21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Nine of these eleven genes, whose knock-down expression affected cytogenetic repair, were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate IR

  2. Cytogenetic Response to Ionizing Radiation Exposure in Human Fibroblasts with Suppressed Expression of Non-DSB Repair Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Emami, Kamal; Hammond, Dianne; Mehta, Satish K.; Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Pierson, Duane L.; Wu, Honglu

    2009-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in double-strand break (DSB) repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been well studied. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of IR inducible genes in radiation-induced chromosome aberrations and micronuclei formation. In the study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. Frequencies of micronuclei (MN) formation and chromosome aberrations were measured to determine the efficiency of cytogenetic repair, and the fraction of bi-nucleated cells in the MN analysis was used as a marker for cell cycle progression. In response to gamma radiation, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of five genes: Ku70 (DSB repair pathway), XPA (nucleotide excision repair pathway), RPA1 (mismatch repair pathway), RAD17 and RBBP8 (cell cycle control). Knocked-down expression of four genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Moreover, decreased XPA, p21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Nine of these eleven genes, whose knock-down expression affected cytogenetic repair, were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate IR

  3. DNA double-strand break repair is involved in desiccation resistance of Sinorhizobium meliloti, but is not essential for its symbiotic interaction with Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuy, Pierre; Gourion, Benjamin; Sauviac, Laurent; Bruand, Claude

    2016-11-23

    The soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti, a nitrogen-fixing symbiont of legume plants, is exposed to numerous stress conditions in nature, some of which cause the formation of harmful DNA double strand breaks (DSB). In particular, the reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species produced during symbiosis, and the desiccation occurring in dry soils, are conditions which induce DSB. Two major systems of DSB repair are known in S. meliloti: homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). However, their role in the resistance to ROS, RNS and desiccation has never been examined in this bacterial species, and the importance of DSB repair in the symbiotic interaction has not been properly evaluated. Here, we constructed S. meliloti strains deficient in HR (by deleting the recA gene) or in NHEJ (by deleting the four ku genes) or both. Interestingly, we observed that ku and/or recA genes are involved in S. meliloti resistance to ROS and RNS. Nevertheless, a S. meliloti strain deficient in both HR and NHEJ was not altered in its ability to establish and maintain an efficient nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with Medicago truncatula, showing that rhizobial DSB repair is not essential for this process. This result suggests either that DSB formation in S. meliloti is efficiently prevented during symbiosis, or that DSB are not detrimental for symbiosis efficiency. In contrast, we found for the first time that both recA and ku genes are involved in S. meliloti resistance to desiccation, suggesting that DSB repair could be important for rhizobium persistence in the soil.

  4. Mutagen sensitivity and DNA repair of the EGFR gene in oropharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Maximilian; Welz, Christian; Baumeister, Philipp; Schwenk-Zieger, Sabina; Harréus, Ulrich

    2010-07-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed in several epithelial malignancies, including head and neck squamous cell cancer. Up to 90% of the tumour cases in this area exhibit EGFR overexpression. The reasons for overexpression are still not clear. Mutagen sensitivity, pre-existing conditions for genotoxic damage, gene amplification, and reduced DNA repair of the EGFR gene are possible causes for EGFR protein overexpression. DNA damage in macroscopically healthy pharyngeal mucosal tissue of 30 patients with (15) and without cancer (15) of the oropharynx was evaluated after incubation with Benz[a]pyren-7,8-diol-9,10-epoxid (BPDE), a tobacco-associated carcinogen. Emerging DNA fragmentation of the EGFR gene located on chromosome 7 was evaluated. The centromere of the chromosome served as a reference gene. Comet FISH was applied to assess the mutagen sensitivity in these regions. The extent of DNA repair was evaluated in the same samples after a 24-h repair-period. Differences in gene amplification and protein expression between the two groups were analysed by Interphase-FISH (I-FISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC), respectively. BPDE caused significant DNA damage compared to the negative control in oropharyngeal mucosa cells of patients with- and without carcinoma. DNA fragmentation of the EGFR gene in the two groups was comparable. Mutagen sensitivity was significantly higher in the EGFR gene than in the reference gene, but fragmentation of the EGFR gene was not enhanced compared to the DNA damage of the entire DNA. The DNA repair period led to a significant reduction in DNA damage levels in all groups, without preference for any of the groups or genes. EGFR amplification was found in 7.7% of the tumour patients but not in control patients. Of the patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma, 66.6% showed enhanced expression of EGFR protein (grades 2 and 3), whereas only 13% of tumour-free patients showed such protein expression. No significant differences in

  5. recA and catalase in H sub 2 O sub 2 -mediated toxicity in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassett, D.J.; Charniga, L.; Cohen, M.S. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (USA))

    1990-12-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae cells defective in the biosynthesis of the recA gene product are no more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide than wild-type cells. Although gonococci possess nearly 100-fold-greater catalase levels than Escherichia coli, they are more susceptible to hydrogen peroxide than this organism. The natural niche of gonococci undoubtedly results in exposure to oxidant stress; however, they do not demonstrate particularly efficient antioxidant defense systems.

  6. Evaluating the effects of genetic variants of DNA repair genes using cytogenetic mutagen sensitivity approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z; El-Zein, Randa A

    2011-08-01

    Mutagen sensitivity, measured in short-term cultures of peripheral blood lymphocytes by cytogenetic endpoints, is an indirect measure for DNA repair capacity and has been used for many years as a biomarker for intrinsic susceptibility for cancer. In this article, we briefly give an overview of the different cytogenetic mutagen sensitivity approaches that have been used successfully to evaluate the biological effects of polymorphisms in DNA repair genes based on a current review of the literature and based on the need for biomarkers that would allow the characterization of the biological and functional significance of such polymorphisms. We also address some of the future challenges facing this emerging area of research.

  7. Determining the functional significance of mismatch repair gene missense variants using biochemical and cellular assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinen, Christopher D; Juel Rasmussen, Lene

    2012-01-01

    provided an important experimental tool for studying the functional consequences of VUS. However, beyond this repair assay, a number of other experimental methods have been developed that allow us to test the effect of a VUS on discrete biochemical steps or other aspects of MMR function. Here, we describe......ABSTRACT: With the discovery that the hereditary cancer susceptibility disease Lynch syndrome (LS) is caused by deleterious germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes nearly 20 years ago, genetic testing can now be used to diagnose this disorder in patients. A definitive diagnosis...

  8. Low-level infrared laser modulates muscle repair and chromosome stabilization genes in myoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Neto Trajano, Larissa Alexsandra; Stumbo, Ana Carolina; da Silva, Camila Luna; Mencalha, Andre Luiz; Fonseca, Adenilson S

    2016-08-01

    Infrared laser therapy is used for skeletal muscle repair based on its biostimulative effect on satellite cells. However, shortening of telomere length limits regenerative potential in satellite cells, which occurs after each cell division cycle. Also, laser therapy could be more effective on non-physiologic tissues. This study evaluated low-level infrared laser exposure effects on mRNA expression from muscle injury repair and telomere stabilization genes in myoblasts in normal and stressful conditions. Laser fluences were those used in clinical protocols. C2C12 myoblast cultures were exposed to low-level infrared laser (10, 35, and 70 J/cm(2)) in standard or normal (10 %) and reduced (2 %) fetal bovine serum concentrations; total RNA was extracted for mRNA expression evaluation from muscle injury repair (MyoD and Pax7) and chromosome stabilization (TRF1 and TRF2) genes by real time quantitative polymerization chain reaction. Data show that low-level infrared laser increases the expression of MyoD and Pax7 in 10 J/cm(2) fluence, TRF1 expression in all fluences, and TRF2 expression in 70 J/cm(2) fluence in both 10 and 2 % fetal bovine serum. Low-level infrared laser increases mRNA expression from genes related to muscle repair and telomere stabilization in myoblasts in standard or normal and stressful conditions.

  9. Enhanced gene repair mediated by methyl-CpG-modified single-stranded oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoni, Carmen; Rustagi, Arjun; Rando, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    Gene editing mediated by oligonucleotides has been shown to induce stable single base alterations in genomic DNA in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. However, the low frequencies of gene repair have limited its applicability for both basic manipulation of genomic sequences and for the development of therapeutic approaches for genetic disorders. Here, we show that single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides (ssODNs) containing a methyl-CpG modification and capable of binding to the methyl-CpG binding domain protein 4 (MBD4) are able to induce >10-fold higher levels of gene correction than ssODNs lacking the specific modification. Correction was stably inherited through cell division and was confirmed at the protein, transcript and genomic levels. Downregulation of MBD4 expression using RNAi prevented the enhancement of gene correction efficacy obtained using the methyl-CpG-modified ssODN, demonstrating the specificity of the repair mechanism being recruited. Our data demonstrate that efficient manipulation of genomic targets can be achieved and controlled by the type of ssODN used and by modulation of the repair mechanism involved in the correction process. This new generation of ssODNs represents an important technological advance that is likely to have an impact on multiple applications, especially for gene therapy where permanent correction of the genetic defect has clear advantages over viral and other nonviral approaches currently being tested. PMID:19854937

  10. DNA-repair gene variants are associated with glioblastoma survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wibom, Carl; Sjöström, Sara; Henriksson, Roger

    2012-01-01

    genes, in 138 glioblastoma samples from Sweden and Denmark. We confirmed our findings in an independent cohort of 121 glioblastoma patients from the UK. Our analysis revealed nine SNPs annotating MSH2, RAD51L1 and RECQL4 that were significantly (p

  11. Chromosomal localization of three repair genes: The xeroderma pigmentosum group C gene and two human homologs of yeast RAD23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spek, P.J. van der; Smit, E.M.E.; Beverloo, H.B. [Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (Netherlands)] [and others

    1994-10-01

    The nucleotide excision repair (NER) disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by sun (UV) sensitivity, predisposition to skin cancer, and extensive genetic heterogeneity. Recently, we reported the cloning and analysis of three human NER genes, XPC, HHR23A, and HHR23B. The previously cloned XPC gene is involved in the common XP complementation group C, which is defective in excision repair of nontranscribed sequences in the genome. The XPC protein was found to be complexed with the product of HHR23B, one of the two human homologs of the Saccharomyes cerevisiae NER gene RAD23. Here we present the chromosomal localization by in situ hybridization using haptenized probes of all three genes. The HHR23A gene was assigned to chromosome 19p13.2. Interestingly, the HHR23B and XPC genes, the product of which forms a tight complex, were found to colocalize on band 3p25.1. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed that the HHR23B and XPC genes possibly share a MluI restriction fragment of about 625 kb. Potential involvement of the HHR23 genes in human genetic disorders is discussed. 53 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Repair of 8-methoxypsoralen monoadducts and diadducts in bacteriophages and bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belogurov, A.A.; Zuev, A.V.; Zavil' gel' skii, G.B.

    1976-01-01

    The combined action of 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) and light with lambda greater than 310 nm on bacteriophages and bacteria results in the formation of the following two types of photo-products in the DNA: monoadducts, in which 8-MOP is covalently bound to a pyrimidine base, and diadducts or cross links, in which 8-MOP is covalently bound to two pyrimidines from complementary strands. The method of repeated irradiation has been proposed for analyzing the degree of lethality of the photoproducts in DNA. According to this method, the preparation is freed of free 8-MOP molecules after the first irradiation and then irradiated for a second time. In this case the monoadducts are converted into cross linkages between the strands. Approximately 3-10(-9) cross links/Dalton-min form in Escherichia coli DNA during the first irradiation. The rate of the formation of cross links drops by a factor of about 2 during the repeated irradiation. It has been shown that the 8-MOP monoadducts are repaired by the uvr system just as efficiently as are lethal photoproducts of the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer type. Lethal cross linkages in bacteria and phages are repaired by the joint action of the uvr, recA, and lex systems. A scheme has been proposed for the repair of cross linkages in one genome by these systems. The photoreactivating enzyme is inactive on DNA subjected to the combined action of 8-MOP and light. The kinetics of the repair of monadducts in bacteria and phages with various defects in the repair systems have been studied. It has been shown that the products of genes recA and lex take part in the repair process according to an excision-resynthesis method. The use of the method of repeated irradiation with 8-MOP as an express method for detecting repair systems of the uvr type in cells has been proposed.

  13. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of nucleotide excision repair genes in human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefkofsky, Hailey B. [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Veloso, Artur [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Bioinformatics Program, Department of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ljungman, Mats, E-mail: ljungman@umich.edu [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) removes DNA helix-distorting lesions induced by UV light and various chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin. These lesions efficiently block the elongation of transcription and need to be rapidly removed by transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER) to avoid the induction of apoptosis. Twenty-nine genes have been classified to code for proteins participating in nucleotide excision repair (NER) in human cells. Here we explored the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of these NER genes across 13 human cell lines using Bru-seq and BruChase-seq, respectively. Many NER genes are relatively large in size and therefore will be easily inactivated by UV-induced transcription-blocking lesions. Furthermore, many of these genes produce transcripts that are rather unstable. Thus, these genes are expected to rapidly lose expression leading to a diminished function of NER. One such gene is ERCC6 that codes for the CSB protein critical for TC-NER. Due to its large gene size and high RNA turnover rate, the ERCC6 gene may act as dosimeter of DNA damage so that at high levels of damage, ERCC6 RNA levels would be diminished leading to the loss of CSB expression, inhibition of TC-NER and the promotion of cell death.

  14. A data mining approach for classifying DNA repair genes into ageing-related or non-ageing-related

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasieva Olga

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ageing of the worldwide population means there is a growing need for research on the biology of ageing. DNA damage is likely a key contributor to the ageing process and elucidating the role of different DNA repair systems in ageing is of great interest. In this paper we propose a data mining approach, based on classification methods (decision trees and Naive Bayes, for analysing data about human DNA repair genes. The goal is to build classification models that allow us to discriminate between ageing-related and non-ageing-related DNA repair genes, in order to better understand their different properties. Results The main patterns discovered by the classification methods are as follows: (a the number of protein-protein interactions was a predictor of DNA repair proteins being ageing-related; (b the use of predictor attributes based on protein-protein interactions considerably increased predictive accuracy of attributes based on Gene Ontology (GO annotations; (c GO terms related to "response to stimulus" seem reasonably good predictors of ageing-relatedness for DNA repair genes; (d interaction with the XRCC5 (Ku80 protein is a strong predictor of ageing-relatedness for DNA repair genes; and (e DNA repair genes with a high expression in T lymphocytes are more likely to be ageing-related. Conclusions The above patterns are broadly integrated in an analysis discussing relations between Ku, the non-homologous end joining DNA repair pathway, ageing and lymphocyte development. These patterns and their analysis support non-homologous end joining double strand break repair as central to the ageing-relatedness of DNA repair genes. Our work also showcases the use of protein interaction partners to improve accuracy in data mining methods and our approach could be applied to other ageing-related pathways.

  15. Single-molecule imaging of DNA pairing by RecA reveals a three-dimensional homology search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forget, Anthony L; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C

    2012-02-08

    DNA breaks can be repaired with high fidelity by homologous recombination. A ubiquitous protein that is essential for this DNA template-directed repair is RecA. After resection of broken DNA to produce single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), RecA assembles on this ssDNA into a filament with the unique capacity to search and find DNA sequences in double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) that are homologous to the ssDNA. This homology search is vital to recombinational DNA repair, and results in homologous pairing and exchange of DNA strands. Homologous pairing involves DNA sequence-specific target location by the RecA-ssDNA complex. Despite decades of study, the mechanism of this enigmatic search process remains unknown. RecA is a DNA-dependent ATPase, but ATP hydrolysis is not required for DNA pairing and strand exchange, eliminating active search processes. Using dual optical trapping to manipulate DNA, and single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to image DNA pairing, we demonstrate that both the three-dimensional conformational state of the dsDNA target and the length of the homologous RecA-ssDNA filament have important roles in the homology search. We discovered that as the end-to-end distance of the target dsDNA molecule is increased, constraining the available three-dimensional (3D) conformations of the molecule, the rate of homologous pairing decreases. Conversely, when the length of the ssDNA in the nucleoprotein filament is increased, homology is found faster. We propose a model for the DNA homology search process termed 'intersegmental contact sampling', in which the intrinsic multivalent nature of the RecA nucleoprotein filament is used to search DNA sequence space within 3D domains of DNA, exploiting multiple weak contacts to rapidly search for homology. Our findings highlight the importance of the 3D conformational dynamics of DNA, reveal a previously unknown facet of the homology search, and provide insight into the mechanism of DNA target location by this member of a

  16. DNA Repair Gene Polymorphisms in Relation to Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliang Su

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the DNA repair genes are suspected to be related to the survival of lung cancer patients due to their possible influence on DNA repair capacity (DRC. However, the study results are inconsistent. Methods: A follow-up study of 610 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients was conducted to investigate genetic polymorphisms associated with the DNA repair genes in relation to NSCLC survival; 6 SNPs were genotyped, including XRCC1 (rs25487 G>A, hOGG1 (rs1052133 C>G, MUTYH (rs3219489 G>C, XPA (rs1800975 G>A, ERCC2 (rs1799793 G>A and XRCC3 (rs861539 C>T. Kaplan-Meier survival curve and Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were performed. SNP-SNP interaction was also examined using the survival tree analysis. Results: Advanced disease stage and older age at diagnosis were associated with poor prognosis of NSCLC. Patients with the variant ‘G' allele of hOGG1 rs1052133 had poor overall survival compared with those with the homozygous wild ‘CC' genotype, especially in female patients, adenocarcinoma histology, early stage, light smokers and without family history of cancer. For never smoking female lung cancer patients, individuals carrying homozygous variant ‘AA' genotype of XPA had shorter survival time compared to those with wild ‘G' alleles. Furthermore, females carrying homozygous variant XPA and hOGG1 genotypes simultaneously had 2.78-fold increased risk for death. Among all 6 polymorphisms, the homozygous variant ‘AA' of XPA carriers had poor prognosis compared to the carriers of wild ‘G' alleles of XPA together with other base excision repair (BER polymorphisms. Conclusions: Besides disease stage and age, the study found DNA repair gene polymorphisms were associated with lung cancer survival.

  17. Germline mutations in DNA repair genes predispose asbestos-exposed patients to malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betti, Marta; Casalone, Elisabetta; Ferrante, Daniela; Aspesi, Anna; Morleo, Giulia; Biasi, Alessandra; Sculco, Marika; Mancuso, Giuseppe; Guarrera, Simonetta; Righi, Luisella; Grosso, Federica; Libener, Roberta; Pavesi, Mansueto; Mariani, Narciso; Casadio, Caterina; Boldorini, Renzo; Mirabelli, Dario; Pasini, Barbara; Magnani, Corrado; Matullo, Giuseppe; Dianzani, Irma

    2017-10-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare, aggressive cancer caused by asbestos exposure. An inherited predisposition has been suggested to explain multiple cases in the same family and the observation that not all individuals highly exposed to asbestos develop the tumor. Germline mutations in BAP1 are responsible for a rare cancer predisposition syndrome that includes predisposition to mesothelioma. We hypothesized that other genes involved in hereditary cancer syndromes could be responsible for the inherited mesothelioma predisposition. We investigated the prevalence of germline variants in 94 cancer-predisposing genes in 93 MPM patients with a quantified asbestos exposure. Ten pathogenic truncating variants (PTVs) were identified in PALB2, BRCA1, FANCI, ATM, SLX4, BRCA2, FANCC, FANCF, PMS1 and XPC. All these genes are involved in DNA repair pathways, mostly in homologous recombination repair. Patients carrying PTVs represented 9.7% of the panel and showed lower asbestos exposure than did all the other patients (p = 0.0015). This suggests that they did not efficiently repair the DNA damage induced by asbestos and leading to carcinogenesis. This study shows that germline variants in several genes may increase MPM susceptibility in the presence of asbestos exposure and may be important for specific treatment. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. DNA damage and gene therapy of xeroderma pigmentosum, a human DNA repair-deficient disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuy, Aurélie; Sarasin, Alain

    2015-06-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a genetic disease characterized by hypersensitivity to ultra-violet and a very high risk of skin cancer induction on exposed body sites. This syndrome is caused by germinal mutations on nucleotide excision repair genes. No cure is available for these patients except a complete protection from all types of UV radiations. We reviewed the various techniques to complement or to correct the genetic defect in XP cells. We, particularly, developed the correction of XP-C skin cells using the fidelity of the homologous recombination pathway during repair of double-strand break (DSB) in the presence of XPC wild type sequences. We used engineered nucleases (meganuclease or TALE nuclease) to induce a DSB located at 90 bp of the mutation to be corrected. Expression of specific TALE nuclease in the presence of a repair matrix containing a long stretch of homologous wild type XPC sequences allowed us a successful gene correction of the original TG deletion found in numerous North African XP patients. Some engineered nucleases are sensitive to epigenetic modifications, such as cytosine methylation. In case of methylated sequences to be corrected, modified nucleases or demethylation of the whole genome should be envisaged. Overall, we showed that specifically-designed TALE-nuclease allowed us to correct a 2 bp deletion in the XPC gene leading to patient's cells proficient for DNA repair and showing normal UV-sensitivity. The corrected gene is still in the same position in the human genome and under the regulation of its physiological promoter. This result is a first step toward gene therapy in XP patients.

  19. Low intensity infrared laser affects expression of oxidative DNA repair genes in mitochondria and nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, A. S.; Magalhães, L. A. G.; Mencalha, A. L.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.

    2014-11-01

    Practical properties and physical characteristics of low intensity lasers have made possible their application to treat soft tissue diseases. Excitation of intracellular chromophores by red and infrared radiation at low energy fluences with increase of mitochondrial metabolism is the basis of the biostimulation effect but free radicals can be produced. DNA lesions induced by free radicals are repaired by the base excision repair pathway. In this work, we evaluate the expression of POLγ and APEX2 genes related to repair of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, respectively. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats were exposed to low intensity infrared laser at different fluences. One hour and 24 hours after laser exposure, tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and evaluation of POLγ and APEX2 mRNA expression by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats exposed to laser radiation show different expression of POLγ and APEX2 mRNA depending of the fluence and time after exposure. Our study suggests that a low intensity infrared laser affects expression of genes involved in repair of oxidative lesions in mitochondrial and nuclear DNA.

  20. Rearrangement of Rag-1 recombinase gene in DNA-repair deficient/immunodeficient ``wasted`` mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Weaver, P.; Churchill, M.; Chang-Liu, C-M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Libertin, C.R. [Loyola Univ., Maywood, IL (United States)

    1992-11-01

    Mice recessive for the autosomal gene ``wasted`` (wst) display a disease pattern which includes increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency, and neurologic dysfunction. The recent cloning and characterization of recombinase genes (Rag-l/Rag-2) expressed in lymphoid and possibly central nervous system tissues prompted us to examine expression of these genes in DNA repair-deficient/immunodeficient wasted mice. Our results revealed that in thymus tissue, a small Rag-I transcript (1.0 kb) was detected in wst/wst mice that was not evident in thymus from control mice. In wst/{sm_bullet} mice, a two-fold increase in Rag-1 mRNA was evident in thymus tissue. Rag-2 mRNA could only be detected in thymus tissue from wst/{sm_bullet} and not from wst/wst or parental control BCF, mice. Southern blots revealed a rearrangement or deletion within the Rag-1 gene of affected wasted mice that was not evident in known strain-specific parental or littermate controls. These results support the idea that the Rag-1 gene may map at or near the locus for the wasted mutation. In addition, they suggest the importance of recombinase function in normal immune and central nervous system development as well as the potential contribution of this gene family to the normal repair of radiation-induced DNA damage.

  1. DNA repair gene ERCC2 polymorphisms and associations with breast and ovarian cancer risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabiau Nadège

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Breast and ovarian cancers increased in the last decades. Except rare cases with a genetic predisposition and high penetrance, these pathologies are viewed as a polygenic disease. In this concept, association studies look for genetic variations such as polymorphisms in low penetrance genes, i.e. genes in interaction with environmental factors. DNA repair systems that protect the genome from deleterious endogenous and exogenous damages have been shown to have significantly reduced. In particular, enzymes of the nucleotide excision repair pathway are suspected to be implicated in cancer. In this study, 2 functional polymorphisms in a DNA repair gene ERCC2 were analyzed. The population included 911 breast cancer cases, 51 ovarian cancer cases and 1000 controls. The genotyping of 2 SNP (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism was carried out on the population with the MGB (Minor Groove Binder probe technique which consists of the use of the allelic discrimination with the Taqman® method. This study enabled us to show an increase in risk of breast cancer with no oral contraceptive users and with women exhibiting a waist-to-hip ratio (WHR > 0.85 for Asn homozygous for ERCC2 312.

  2. Mutation mismatch repair gene deletions in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couronné, Lucile; Ruminy, Philippe; Waultier-Rascalou, Agathe; Rainville, Vinciane; Cornic, Marie; Picquenot, Jean-Michel; Figeac, Martin; Bastard, Christian; Tilly, Hervé; Jardin, Fabrice

    2013-05-01

    To further unravel the molecular pathogenesis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), we performed high-resolution comparative genomic hybridization on lymph node biopsies from 70 patients. With this strategy, we identified microdeletions of genes involved in the mutation mismatch repair (MMR) pathway in two samples. The first patient presented with a homozygous deletion of MSH2-MSH6 due to duplication of an unbalanced pericentric inversion of chromosome 2. The other case showed a PMS2 heterozygous deletion. PMS2 and MSH2-MSH6 abnormalities, respectively, resulted in a decrease and complete loss of gene expression. However, unlike tumors associated with the hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer syndrome or immunodeficiency-related lymphomas, no microsatellite instability was detected. Mutational profiles revealed especially in one patient an aberrant hypermutation without a clear activation-induced cytidine deaminase signature, indicating a breakdown of the high-fidelity repair in favor of the error-prone repair pathway. Our findings suggest that in a rare subset of patients, inactivation of the genes of the MMR pathway is likely an important step in the molecular pathogenesis of DLBCL and does not involve the same molecular mechanisms as other common neoplasms with MMR deficiency.

  3. RecA filament sliding on DNA facilitates homology search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragunathan, Kaushik; Liu, Cheng; Ha, Taekjip

    2012-01-01

    During homologous recombination, RecA forms a helical filament on a single stranded (ss) DNA that searches for a homologous double stranded (ds) DNA and catalyzes the exchange of complementary base pairs to form a new heteroduplex. Using single molecule fluorescence imaging tools with high spatiotemporal resolution we characterized the encounter complex between the RecA filament and dsDNA. We present evidence in support of the ‘sliding model’ wherein a RecA filament diffuses along a dsDNA track. We further show that homology can be detected during sliding. Sliding occurs with a diffusion coefficient of approximately 8000 bp2/s allowing the filament to sample several hundred base pairs before dissociation. Modeling suggests that sliding can accelerate homology search by as much as 200 fold. Homology recognition can occur for as few as 6 nt of complementary basepairs with the recognition efficiency increasing for higher complementarity. Our data represents the first example of a DNA bound multi-protein complex which can slide along another DNA to facilitate target search. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00067.001 PMID:23240082

  4. Characterization of the rec-1 gene of Haemophilus influenzae and behavior of the gene in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setlow, J.K.; Spikes, D.; Griffin, K.

    1988-09-01

    The rec-1 gene of Haemophilus influenzae was cloned into a shuttle vector that replicates in Escherichia coli as well as in H. influenzae. The plasmid, called pRec1, complemented the defects of a rec-1 mutant in repair of UV damage, transformation, and ability of prophage to be induced by UV radiation. Although UV resistance and recombination were caused by pRec1 in E. coli recA mutants, UV induction of lambda and UV mutagenesis were not. We suggest that the ability of the H. influenzae Rec-1 protein to cause cleavage of repressors but not the recombinase function differs from that of the E. coli RecA protein.

  5. A comparison of synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides, DNA fragments and AAV-1 for targeted episomal and chromosomal gene repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leclerc Xavier

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current strategies for gene therapy of inherited diseases consist in adding functional copies of the gene that is defective. An attractive alternative to these approaches would be to correct the endogenous mutated gene in the affected individual. This study presents a quantitative comparison of the repair efficiency using different forms of donor nucleic acids, including synthetic DNA oligonucleotides, double stranded DNA fragments with sizes ranging from 200 to 2200 bp and sequences carried by a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV-1. Evaluation of each gene repair strategy was carried out using two different reporter systems, a mutated eGFP gene or a dual construct with a functional eGFP and an inactive luciferase gene, in several different cell systems. Gene targeting events were scored either following transient co-transfection of reporter plasmids and donor DNAs, or in a system where a reporter construct was stably integrated into the chromosome. Results In both episomal and chromosomal assays, DNA fragments were more efficient at gene repair than oligonucleotides or rAAV-1. Furthermore, the gene targeting frequency could be significantly increased by using DNA repair stimulating drugs such as doxorubicin and phleomycin. Conclusion Our results show that it is possible to obtain repair frequencies of 1% of the transfected cell population under optimized transfection protocols when cells were pretreated with phleomycin using rAAV-1 and dsDNA fragments.

  6. Assessment by Southern blot analysis of UV-induced damage and repair in human immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, M S; Bianchi, N O; de la Chapelle, A

    1990-09-01

    Irradiation of DNA with UV light induces pyrimidine dimers and (6-4) photoproducts. The presence of one of these photolesions in the restriction site of a given endonuclease inhibits DNA cleavage and induces the formation of fragments by incomplete DNA digestion which appear as additional, facultative bands in Southern hybridization autoradiograms. The number and size of these fragments show a positive correlation with the UV dose. The response to UV light of immunoglobulin light-chain constant kappa and heavy-chain constant mu genes was analyzed with 2 specific probes. Constant kappa and mu genes when irradiated as part of the chromatin of living lymphocytes showed a UV sensitivity similar to that of naked DNA. The same genes from granulocytes had 50-60 times lower UV sensitivity. When cells were allowed to repair photolesions for 24 h the facultative bands from granulocytes disappeared indicating that these cells were able to remove photolesions from constant kappa and mu genes. Facultative bands from lymphocytes showed a smaller decrease of density after 24 h repair. This suggests that lymphocytes are less efficient than granulocytes in removing UV damage from constant kappa and mu genes.

  7. Tissue repair genes: the TiRe database and its implication for skin wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanai, Hagai; Budovsky, Arie; Tacutu, Robi; Barzilay, Thomer; Abramovich, Amir; Ziesche, Rolf; Fraifeld, Vadim E

    2016-04-19

    Wound healing is an inherent feature of any multicellular organism and recent years have brought about a huge amount of data regarding regular and abnormal tissue repair. Despite the accumulated knowledge, modulation of wound healing is still a major biomedical challenge, especially in advanced ages. In order to collect and systematically organize what we know about the key players in wound healing, we created the TiRe (Tissue Repair) database, an online collection of genes and proteins that were shown to directly affect skin wound healing. To date, TiRe contains 397 entries for four organisms: Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Sus domesticus, and Homo sapiens. Analysis of the TiRe dataset of skin wound healing-associated genes showed that skin wound healing genes are (i) over-conserved among vertebrates, but are under-conserved in invertebrates; (ii) enriched in extracellular and immuno-inflammatory genes; and display (iii) high interconnectivity and connectivity to other proteins. The latter may provide potential therapeutic targets. In addition, a slower or faster skin wound healing is indicative of an aging or longevity phenotype only when assessed in advanced ages, but not in the young. In the long run, we aim for TiRe to be a one-station resource that provides researchers and clinicians with the essential data needed for a better understanding of the mechanisms of wound healing, designing new experiments, and the development of new therapeutic strategies. TiRe is freely available online at http://www.tiredb.org.

  8. Reduced Activity of Double-Strand Break Repair Genes in Prostate Cancer Patients With Late Normal Tissue Radiation Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oorschot, Bregje van, E-mail: b.vanoorschot@amc.uva.nl [Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology (LEXOR), Center for Molecular Medicine (CEMM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hovingh, Suzanne E. [Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology (LEXOR), Center for Molecular Medicine (CEMM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Moerland, Perry D. [Bioinformatics Laboratory, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Medema, Jan Paul; Stalpers, Lukas J.A. [Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology (LEXOR), Center for Molecular Medicine (CEMM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vrieling, Harry [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Franken, Nicolaas A.P. [Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology (LEXOR), Center for Molecular Medicine (CEMM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate clinical parameters and DNA damage response as possible risk factors for radiation toxicity in the setting of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Clinical parameters of 61 prostate cancer patients, 34 with (overresponding, OR) and 27 without (non-responding, NR) severe late radiation toxicity were assembled. In addition, for a matched subset the DNA damage repair kinetics (γ-H2AX assay) and expression profiles of DNA repair genes were determined in ex vivo irradiated lymphocytes. Results: Examination of clinical data indicated none of the considered clinical parameters to be correlated with the susceptibility of patients to develop late radiation toxicity. Although frequencies of γ-H2AX foci induced immediately after irradiation were similar (P=.32), significantly higher numbers of γ-H2AX foci were found 24 hours after irradiation in OR compared with NR patients (P=.03). Patient-specific γ-H2AX foci decay ratios were significantly higher in NR patients than in OR patients (P<.0001). Consequently, NR patients seem to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) more efficiently than OR patients. Moreover, gene expression analysis indicated several genes of the homologous recombination pathway to be stronger induced in NR compared with OR patients (P<.05). A similar trend was observed in genes of the nonhomologous end-joining repair pathway (P=.09). This is congruent with more proficient repair of DNA DSBs in patients without late radiation toxicity. Conclusions: Both gene expression profiling and DNA DSB repair kinetics data imply that less-efficient repair of radiation-induced DSBs may contribute to the development of late normal tissue damage. Induction levels of DSB repair genes (eg, RAD51) may potentially be used to assess the risk for late radiation toxicity.

  9. Altered Gene Expressions and Cytogenetic Repair Efficiency in Cells with Suppressed Expression of XPA after Proton Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Gridley, Daila S.; Mehta, Satish K.; Pierson, Duane L.; Wu, Honglu

    2009-01-01

    Cellular responses to damages from ionizing radiation (IR) exposure are influenced not only by the genes involved in DNA double strand break (DSB) repair, but also by non- DSB repair genes. We demonstrated previously that suppressed expression of several non-DSB repair genes, such as XPA, elevated IR-induced cytogenetic damages. In the present study, we exposed human fibroblasts that were treated with control or XPA targeting siRNA to 250 MeV protons (0 to 4 Gy), and analyzed chromosome aberrations and expressions of genes involved in DNA repair. As expected, after proton irradiation, cells with suppressed expression of XPA showed a significantly elevated frequency of chromosome aberrations compared with control siRNA treated (CS) cells. Protons caused more severe DNA damages in XPA knock-down cells, as 36% cells contained multiple aberrations compared to 25% in CS cells after 4Gy proton irradiation. Comparison of gene expressions using the real-time PCR array technique revealed that expressions of p53 and its regulated genes in irradiated XPA suppressed cells were altered similarly as in CS cells, suggesting that the impairment of IR induced DNA repair in XPA suppressed cells is p53-independent. Except for XPA, which was more than 2 fold down regulated in XPA suppressed cells, several other DNA damage sensing and repair genes (GTSE1, RBBP8, RAD51, UNG and XRCC2) were shown a more than 1.5 fold difference between XPA knock-down cells and CS cells after proton exposure. The possible involvement of these genes in the impairment of DNA repair in XPA suppressed cells will be further investigated.

  10. Proteasome inhibition enhances resistance to DNA damage via upregulation of Rpn4-dependent DNA repair genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, Dmitry S; Spasskaya, Daria S; Tutyaeva, Vera V; Mironov, Alexander S; Karpov, Vadim L

    2013-09-17

    The 26S proteasome is an ATP-dependent multi-subunit protease complex and the major regulator of intracellular protein turnover and quality control. However, its role in the DNA damage response is controversial. We addressed this question in yeast by disrupting the transcriptional regulation of the PRE1 proteasomal gene. The mutant strain has decreased proteasome activity and is hyper-resistant to various DNA-damaging agents. We found that Rpn4-target genes MAG1, RAD23, and RAD52 are overexpressed in this strain due to Rpn4 stabilisation. These genes represent three different pathways of base excision, nucleotide excision and double strand break repair by homologous recombination (DSB-HR). Consistently, the proteasome mutant displays increased DSB-HR activity. Our data imply that the proteasome may have a negative role in DNA damage response.

  11. Rapid assessment of repair of ultraviolet DNA damage with a modified host-cell reactivation assay using a luciferase reporter gene and correlation with polymorphisms of DNA repair genes in normal human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao Yawei; Spitz, Margaret R.; Guo Zhaozheng; Hadeyati, Mohammad; Grossman, Lawrence; Kraemer, Kenneth H.; Wei Qingyi

    2002-11-30

    As DNA repair plays an important role in genetic susceptibility to cancer, assessment of the DNA repair phenotype is critical for molecular epidemiological studies of cancer. In this report, we compared use of the luciferase (luc) reporter gene in a host-cell reactivation (HCR) (LUC) assay of repair of ultraviolet (UV) damage to DNA to use of the chloramphenicol (cat) gene-based HCR (CAT) assay we used previously for case-control studies. We performed both the assays on cryopreserved lymphocytes from 102 healthy non-Hispanic white subjects. There was a close correlation between DNA repair capacity (DRC) as measured by the LUC and CAT assays. Although these two assays had similar variation, the LUC assay was faster and more sensitive. We also analyzed the relationship between DRC and the subjects' previously determined genotypes for four polymorphisms of two nucleotide-excision repair (NER) genes (in intron 9 of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) C and exons 6, 10 and 23 of XPD) and one polymorphism of a base-excision repair gene in exon 10 of X-ray complementing group 1 (XRCC1). The DRC was significantly lower in subjects homozygous for one or more polymorphisms of the two NER genes than in subjects with other genotypes (P=0.010). In contrast, the polymorphic XRCC1 allele had no significant effect on DRC. These results suggest that the post-UV LUC assay measures NER phenotype and that polymorphisms of XPC and XPD genes modulate DRC. For population studies of the DNA repair phenotype, many samples need to be evaluated, and so the LUC assay has several advantages over the CAT assay: the LUC assay was more sensitive, had less variation, was not radioactive, was easier to perform, and required fewer cryopreserved cells. These features make the LUC-based HCR assay suitable for molecular epidemiological studies.

  12. Rearrangement of RAG-1 recombinase gene in DNA-repair deficient ``wasted`` mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Libertin, C.R.; Weaver, P. [Loyola Univ., Chicago, IL (United States); Churchill, M.; Chang-Liu, C.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1993-11-01

    Mice recessive for the autosomal gene ``wasted`` wst display a disease pattern which includes increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency, and neurologic dysfunction. The recent cloning and characterization of recombinase genes (RAG-l/RAG-2) expressed in lymphoid and possibly central nervous system tissues prompted us to examine expression of these genes in DNA repair-deficient/immunodeficient wasted mice. Our results revealed expression of RAG-1 mRNA in spinal cord (but not brain) of control mice; no expression of RAG-1 mRNA was detected in spinal cord or brain from wst/wst mice or their normal littermates (wst/{center_dot}mice). In thymus tissue, a small RAG-1 transcript (1.0 kb) was detected in wst/wst mice that was not evident in thymus from control mice. In wst/{center_dot}mice, a two-fold increase in RAG-1 mRNA was evident in thymus tissue. RAG-2 mRNA could only be detected in thymus tissue from wst/{center_dot} and not from wst/wst or parental control BCF{sub 1} mice. Southern blots revealed a rearrangement/deletion within the RAG-1 gene of affected wasted mice, not evident in known strain-specific parental or littermate controls. These results support the idea that the RAG-1 gene may map at or near the locus for the wasted mutation. In addition, they suggest the importance of recombinase function in normal immune and central nervous system development as well as the potential contribution of this gene family to the normal repair of radiation-induced DNA damage.

  13. Paradoxical DNA repair and peroxide resistance gene conservation in Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Gioia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacillus spores are notoriously resistant to unfavorable conditions such as UV radiation, gamma-radiation, H2O2, desiccation, chemical disinfection, or starvation. Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 survives standard decontamination procedures of the Jet Propulsion Lab spacecraft assembly facility, and both spores and vegetative cells of this strain exhibit elevated resistance to UV radiation and H2O2 compared to other Bacillus species. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The genome of B. pumilus SAFR-032 was sequenced and annotated. Lists of genes relevant to DNA repair and the oxidative stress response were generated and compared to B. subtilis and B. licheniformis. Differences in conservation of genes, gene order, and protein sequences are highlighted because they potentially explain the extreme resistance phenotype of B. pumilus. The B. pumilus genome includes genes not found in B. subtilis or B. licheniformis and conserved genes with sequence divergence, but paradoxically lacks several genes that function in UV or H2O2 resistance in other Bacillus species. SIGNIFICANCE: This study identifies several candidate genes for further research into UV and H2O2 resistance. These findings will help explain the resistance of B. pumilus and are applicable to understanding sterilization survival strategies of microbes.

  14. The democratization of gene editing: Insights from site-specific cleavage and double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasin, Maria; Haber, James E

    2016-08-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are dangerous lesions that if not properly repaired can lead to genomic change or cell death. Organisms have developed several pathways and have many factors devoted to repairing DSBs, which broadly occurs by homologous recombination, which relies on an identical or homologous sequence to template repair, or nonhomologous end-joining. Much of our understanding of these repair mechanisms has come from the study of induced DNA cleavage by site-specific endonucleases. In addition to their biological role, these cellular pathways can be co-opted for gene editing to study gene function or for gene therapy or other applications. While the first gene editing experiments were done more than 20 years ago, the recent discovery of RNA-guided endonucleases has simplified approaches developed over the years to make gene editing an approach that is available to the entire biomedical research community. Here, we review DSB repair mechanisms and site-specific cleavage systems that have provided insight into these mechanisms and led to the current gene editing revolution.

  15. Specific targeted gene repair using single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides at an endogenous locus in mammalian cells uses homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLachlan, Jennifer; Fernandez, Serena; Helleday, Thomas; Bryant, Helen E

    2009-12-03

    The feasibility of introducing point mutations in vivo using single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssON) has been demonstrated but the efficiency and mechanism remain elusive and potential side effects have not been fully evaluated. Understanding the mechanism behind this potential therapy may help its development. Here, we demonstrate the specific repair of an endogenous non-functional hprt gene by a ssON in mammalian cells, and show that the frequency of such an event is enhanced when cells are in S-phase of the cell cycle. A potential barrier in using ssONs as gene therapy could be non-targeted mutations or gene rearrangements triggered by the ssON. Both the non-specific mutation frequencies and the frequency of gene rearrangements were largely unaffected by ssONs. Furthermore, we find that the introduction of a mutation causing the loss of a functional endogenous hprt gene by a ssON occurred at a similarly low but statistically significant frequency in wild type cells and in cells deficient in single strand break repair, nucleotide excision repair and mismatch repair. However, this mutation was not induced in XRCC3 mutant cells deficient in homologous recombination. Thus, our data suggest ssON-mediated targeted gene repair is more efficient in S-phase and involves homologous recombination.

  16. Expression of DNA repair genes in burned skin exposed to low-level red laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajano, Eduardo Tavares Lima; Mencalha, Andre Luiz; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa; Pôrto, Luís Cristóvão; de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson

    2014-11-01

    Although red laser lights lie in the region of non-ionizing radiations in the electromagnetic spectrum, there are doubts whether absorption of these radiations causes lesions in the DNA molecule. Our aim was to investigate the expression of the genes involved with base excision and nucleotide excision repair pathways in skin tissue submitted to burn injury and exposed to low-level red laser. Wistar rats were divided as follows: control group-rats burned and not irradiated, laser group-rats burned and irradiated 1 day after injury for five consecutive days, and later laser group-rats injured and treated 4 days after injury for five consecutive days. Irradiation was performed according to a clinical protocol (20 J/cm(2), 100 mW, continuous wave emission mode). The animals were sacrificed on day 10, and scarred tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, complementary DNA (cDNA) synthesis, and evaluation of gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Low-level red laser exposure (1) reduces the expression of APE1 messenger (mRNA), (2) increases the expression of OGG1 mRNA, (3) reduces the expression of XPC mRNA, and (4) increases the expression of XPA mRNA both in laser and later laser groups. Red laser exposure at therapeutic fluences alters the expression of genes related to base excision and nucleotide excision pathways of DNA repair during wound healing of burned skin.

  17. Are SNP-Smoking Association Studies Needed in Controls? DNA Repair Gene Polymorphisms and Smoking Intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verde, Zoraida; Reinoso, Luis; Chicharro, Luis Miguel; Resano, Pilar; Sánchez-Hernández, Ignacio; Rodríguez González-Moro, Jose Miguel; Bandrés, Fernando; Gómez-Gallego, Félix; Santiago, Catalina

    2015-01-01

    Variations in tobacco-related cancers, incidence and prevalence reflect differences in tobacco consumption in addition to genetic factors. Besides, genes related to lung cancer risk could be related to smoking behavior. Polymorphisms altering DNA repair capacity may lead to synergistic effects with tobacco carcinogen-induced lung cancer risk. Common problems in genetic association studies, such as presence of gene-by-environment (G x E) correlation in the population, may reduce the validity of these designs. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the independence assumption for selected SNPs and smoking behaviour in a cohort of 320 healthy Spanish smokers. We found an association between the wild type alleles of XRCC3 Thr241Met or KLC3 Lys751Gln and greater smoking intensity (OR = 12.98, 95% CI = 2.86-58.82 and OR=16.90, 95% CI=2.09-142.8; respectively). Although preliminary, the results of our study provide evidence that genetic variations in DNA-repair genes may influence both smoking habits and the development of lung cancer. Population-specific G x E studies should be carried out when genetic and environmental factors interact to cause the disease.

  18. Are SNP-Smoking Association Studies Needed in Controls? DNA Repair Gene Polymorphisms and Smoking Intensity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoraida Verde

    Full Text Available Variations in tobacco-related cancers, incidence and prevalence reflect differences in tobacco consumption in addition to genetic factors. Besides, genes related to lung cancer risk could be related to smoking behavior. Polymorphisms altering DNA repair capacity may lead to synergistic effects with tobacco carcinogen-induced lung cancer risk. Common problems in genetic association studies, such as presence of gene-by-environment (G x E correlation in the population, may reduce the validity of these designs. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the independence assumption for selected SNPs and smoking behaviour in a cohort of 320 healthy Spanish smokers. We found an association between the wild type alleles of XRCC3 Thr241Met or KLC3 Lys751Gln and greater smoking intensity (OR = 12.98, 95% CI = 2.86-58.82 and OR=16.90, 95% CI=2.09-142.8; respectively. Although preliminary, the results of our study provide evidence that genetic variations in DNA-repair genes may influence both smoking habits and the development of lung cancer. Population-specific G x E studies should be carried out when genetic and environmental factors interact to cause the disease.

  19. A systematic gene-gene and gene-environment interaction analysis of DNA repair genes XRCC1, XRCC2, XRCC3, XRCC4, and oral cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-Hong; Lin, Yu-Da; Yen, Ching-Yui; Chuang, Li-Yeh; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2015-04-01

    Oral cancer is the sixth most common cancer worldwide with a high mortality rate. Biomarkers that anticipate susceptibility, prognosis, or response to treatments are much needed. Oral cancer is a polygenic disease involving complex interactions among genetic and environmental factors, which require multifaceted analyses. Here, we examined in a dataset of 103 oral cancer cases and 98 controls from Taiwan the association between oral cancer risk and the DNA repair genes X-ray repair cross-complementing group (XRCCs) 1-4, and the environmental factors of smoking, alcohol drinking, and betel quid (BQ) chewing. We employed logistic regression, multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR), and hierarchical interaction graphs for analyzing gene-gene (G×G) and gene-environment (G×E) interactions. We identified a significantly elevated risk of the XRCC2 rs2040639 heterozygous variant among smokers [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 3.7, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.1-12.1] and alcohol drinkers [adjusted OR=5.7, 95% CI=1.4-23.2]. The best two-factor based G×G interaction of oral cancer included the XRCC1 rs1799782 and XRCC2 rs2040639 [OR=3.13, 95% CI=1.66-6.13]. For the G×E interaction, the estimated OR of oral cancer for two (drinking-BQ chewing), three (XRCC1-XRCC2-BQ chewing), four (XRCC1-XRCC2-age-BQ chewing), and five factors (XRCC1-XRCC2-age-drinking-BQ chewing) were 32.9 [95% CI=14.1-76.9], 31.0 [95% CI=14.0-64.7], 49.8 [95% CI=21.0-117.7] and 82.9 [95% CI=31.0-221.5], respectively. Taken together, the genotypes of XRCC1 rs1799782 and XRCC2 rs2040639 DNA repair genes appear to be significantly associated with oral cancer. These were enhanced by exposure to certain environmental factors. The observations presented here warrant further research in larger study samples to examine their relevance for routine clinical care in oncology.

  20. Dietary Berries and Ellagic Acid Prevent Oxidative DNA Damage and Modulate Expression of DNA Repair Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh C. Gupta

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage is a pre-requisite for the initiation of cancer and agents that reduce this damage are useful in cancer prevention. In this study, we evaluated the ability of whole berries and berry phytochemical, ellagic acid to reduce endogenous oxidative DNA damage. Ellagic acid was selected based on > 95% inhibition of 8-oxodeoxyguosine (8-oxodG and other unidentified oxidative DNA adducts induced by 4-hydroxy-17B;-estradiol and CuCl2 in vitro. Inhibition of the latter occurred at lower concentrations (10 u(microM than that for 8-oxodG (100 u(microM. In the in vivo study, female CD-1 mice (n=6 were fed either a control diet or diet supplemented with ellagic acid (400 ppm and dehydrated berries (5% w/w with varying ellagic acid contents -- blueberry (low, strawberry (medium and red raspberry (high, for 3 weeks. Blueberry and strawberry diets showed moderate reductions in endogenous DNA adducts (25%. However, both red raspberry and ellagic acid diets showed a significant reduction of 59% (p < 0.001 and 48% (p < 0.01, respectively. Both diets also resulted in a 3-8 fold over-expression of genes involved in DNA repair such as xeroderma pigmentosum group A complementing protein (XPA, DNA excision repair protein (ERCC5 and DNA ligase III (DNL3. These results suggest that red raspberry and ellagic acid reduce endogenous oxidative DNA damage by mechanisms which may involve increase in DNA repair.

  1. Nucleotide Excision Repair in Cellular Chromatin: Studies with Yeast from Nucleotide to Gene to Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Reed

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Here we review our development of, and results with, high resolution studies on global genome nucleotide excision repair (GGNER in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have focused on how GGNER relates to histone acetylation for its functioning and we have identified the histone acetyl tranferase Gcn5 and acetylation at lysines 9/14 of histone H3 as a major factor in enabling efficient repair. We consider results employing primarily MFA2 as a model gene, but also those with URA3 located at subtelomeric sequences. In the latter case we also see a role for acetylation at histone H4. We then go on to outline the development of a high resolution genome-wide approach that enables one to examine correlations between histone modifications and the nucleotide excision repair (NER of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers throughout entire genomes. This is an approach that will enable rapid advances in understanding the complexities of how compacted chromatin in chromosomes is processed to access DNA damage and then returned to its pre-damaged status to maintain epigenetic codes.

  2. Polymorphisms in nucleotide excision repair genes, smoking and intake of fruit and vegetables in relation to lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Sørensen, Mette; Overvad, Kim

    2007-01-01

    Polymorphisms in nucleotide excision repair genes have been associated with risk for lung cancer. We examined gene-environment interactions in relation to lung cancer in 430 cases and 790 comparison persons identified within a prospective cohort of 57,053 persons. We included polymorphisms...... in the XPC, XPA and XPD genes involved in the nucleotide excision DNA repair pathway and analysed possible interactions with smoking and dietary intake of fruit and vegetables in relation to risk for lung cancer. We found that intake of fruit was associated with lower risk for lung cancer only among carriers...

  3. Homologous recombination in DNA repair and DNA damage tolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuan Li; Wolf-Dietrich Heyer

    2008-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) comprises a series of interrelated pathways that function in the repair of DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) and interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). In addition, recombination provides critical sup-port for DNA replication in the recovery of stalled or broken replication forks, contributing to tolerance of DNA damage. A central core of proteins, most critically the RecA homolog Rad51, catalyzes the key reactions that typify HR: homology search and DNA strand invasion. The diverse functions of recombination are reflected in the need for context-specific factors that perform supplemental functions in conjunction with the core proteins. The inability to properly repair complex DNA damage and resolve DNA replication stress leads to genomic instability and contributes to cancer etiology. Mutations in the BRCA2 recombination gene cause predisposition to breast and ovarian cancer as well as Fanconi anemia, a cancer predisposition syndrome characterized by a defect in the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks. The cellular functions of recombination are also germane to DNA-based treatment modaUties of cancer, which target replicating cells by the direct or indirect induction of DNA lesions that are substrates for recombination pathways. This review focuses on mechanistic aspects of HR relating to DSB and ICL repair as well as replication fork support.

  4. Early passage bone marrow stromal cells express genes involved in nervous system development supporting their relevance for neural repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nandoe, R.D.S.; Bossers, K.; Ritfeld, G.J.; Blits, B.; Grotenhuis, J.A.; Verhaagen, J.; Oudega, M.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The assessment of the capacity of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) to repair the nervous system using gene expression profiling. The evaluation of effects of long-term culturing on the gene expression profile of BMSC. METHODS: Fourty four k whole genome rat microarrays were used to study

  5. UV-induced dark repair mechanisms in bacteria associated with drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungfer, Christina; Schwartz, Thomas; Obst, Ursula

    2007-01-01

    Caulobacter crescentus and Aquabacterium commune, both isolated from drinking water, as well as environmental isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococcus faecium were treated with different UV fluences to study their capacity to restore induced DNA damages. Here, the induction of a key mechanism of bacterial dark repair, the so-called recA system, was analysed. With newly designed probes, the specific recA mRNA was detected by Northern blot. Additionally, the RecA protein was measured by the Western blot technique using a specific antibody. In drinking water bacteria as well as in opportunistic microorganisms, a specific induction of dark repair mechanisms was found even at UV fluences higher than 400J/m(2), the German standard for UV disinfection. This induction depended on the incubation time after UV treatment. Nevertheless, the UV-induced recA expressions were found to differ in the bacteria under investigation.

  6. Synergistic interactions between RAD5, RAD16, and RAD54, three partially homologous yeast DNA repair genes each in a different repair pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glassner, B.J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Mortimer, R.K. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-07-01

    Considerable homology has recently been noted between the proteins encoded by the RAD5, RAD16 and RAD54 genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These genes are members of the RAD6, RAD3 and RAD50 epistasis groups, respectively, which correspond to the three major DNA repair pathways in yeast. These proteins also share homology with other eucaryotic proteins, including those encoded by SNF2 and MO1 of yeast, brahma and lodestar of Drosophila and the human ERCC6 gene. The homology shares features with known helicases, suggesting a newly identified helicase subfamily. We have constructed a series of congenic single-, double- and triple-deletion mutants involving RAD5, RAD16 and RAD54 to examine the interactions between these genes. Each deletion mutation alone has only a moderate effect on survival after exposure to UV radiation. Each pairwise-double mutant exhibits marked synergism. The triple-deletion mutant displays further synergism. These results confirm the assignment of the RAD54 gene to the RAD50 epistasis group and suggest that the RAD16 gene plays a larger role in DNA repair after exposure to UV radiation than has been suggested previously. Additionally, the proteins encoded by RAD5, RAD16, and RAD54 may compete for the same substrate after damage induced by UV radiation, possibly at an early step in their respective pathways. 49 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Intervención en prevención de recaídas

    OpenAIRE

    Delgado Suárez, María Inmaculada

    2012-01-01

    El presente trabajo desarrolla una Intervención en Prevención de Recaídas en problemas de drogodependencias. Se aporta un marco teórico basado en la definición del problema y las intervenciones existentes para posteriormente abordar el desarrollo de un programa de prevención de recaída

  8. Haplotype analyses of DNA repair gene polymorphisms and their role in ulcerative colitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Bardia

    Full Text Available Ulcerative colitis (UC is a major clinical form of inflammatory bowel disease. UC is characterized by mucosal inflammation limited to the colon, always involving the rectum and a variable extent of the more proximal colon in a continuous manner. Genetic variations in DNA repair genes may influence the extent of repair functions, DNA damage, and thus the manifestations of UC. This study thus evaluated the role of polymorphisms of the genes involved in DNA repair mechanisms. A total of 171 patients and 213 controls were included. Genotyping was carried out by ARMS PCR and PCR-RFLP analyses for RAD51, XRCC3 and hMSH2 gene polymorphisms. Allelic and genotypic frequencies were computed in both control & patient groups and data was analyzed using appropriate statistical tests. The frequency of 'A' allele of hMSH2 in the UC group caused statistically significant increased risk for UC compared to controls (OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.16-2.31, p = 0.004. Similarly, the CT genotype of XRCC3 gene was predominant in the UC group and increased the risk for UC by 1.75 fold compared to controls (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.15-2.67, p = 0.03, further confirming the risk of 'T' allele in UC. The GC genotype frequency of RAD51 gene was significantly increased (p = 0.02 in the UC group (50.3% compared to controls (38%. The GC genotype significantly increased the risk for UC compared to GG genotype by 1.73 fold (OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.14-2.62, p = 0.02 confirming the strong association of 'C' allele with UC. Among the controls, the SNP loci combination of hMSH2:XRCC3 were in perfect linkage. The GTC and ACC haplotypes were found to be predominant in UC than controls with a 2.28 and 2.93 fold significant increase risk of UC.

  9. Polymorphisms in genes controlling inflammation and tissue repair in rheumatoid arthritis: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Vogel Lisette

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various cytokines and inflammatory mediators are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. We hypothesized that polymorphisms in selected inflammatory response and tissue repair genes contribute to the susceptibility to and severity of RA. Methods Polymorphisms in TNFA, IL1B, IL4, IL6, IL8, IL10, PAI1, NOS2a, C1INH, PARP, TLR2 and TLR4 were genotyped in 376 Caucasian RA patients and 463 healthy Caucasian controls using single base extension. Genotype distributions in patients were compared with those in controls. In addition, the association of polymorphisms with the need for anti-TNF-α treatment as a marker of RA severity was assessed. Results The IL8 781 CC genotype was associated with early onset of disease. The TNFA -238 G/A polymorphism was differentially distributed between RA patients and controls, but only when not corrected for age and gender. None of the polymorphisms was associated with disease severity. Conclusions We here report an association between IL8 781 C/T polymorphism and age of onset of RA. Our findings indicate that there might be a role for variations in genes involved in the immune response and in tissue repair in RA pathogenesis. Nevertheless, additional larger genomic and functional studies are required to further define their role in RA.

  10. Repair of spinal cord injury by neural stem cells modified with BDNF gene in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei LI; Wen-Qin CAI; Cheng-Ren LI

    2006-01-01

    Objective To explore repair of spinal cord injury by neural stem cells (NSCs) modified with brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene (BDNF-NSCs) in rats. Methods Neural stem cells modified with BDNF gene were transplanted into the complete transection site of spinal cord at the lumbar 4 (L4) level in rats. Motor function of rats'hind limbs was observed and HE and X-gal immunocytochemical staining, in situ hybridization, and retrograde HRP tracing were also performed. Results BDNF-NSCs survived and integrated well with host spinal cord. In the transplant group, some X-gal positive, NF-200 positive, GFAP positive, BDNF positive, and BDNF mRNA positive cells, and many NF-200 positive nerve fibers were observed in the injury site. Retrograde HRP tracing through sciatic nerve showed some HRP positive cells and nerve fibers near the rostral side of the injury one month after transplant and with time, they increased in number. Examinations on rats' motor function and behavior demonstrated that motor function of rats' hind limbs improved better in the transplant group than the injury group. Conclusion BDNF-NSCs can survive, differentiate,and partially integrate with host spinal cord, and they significantly ameliorate rats ' motor function of hind limbs, indicating their promising role in repairing spinal cord injury.

  11. Role of APC and DNA mismatch repair genes in the development of colorectal cancers

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    Roy Deodutta

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Colorectal cancer is the third most common cause of cancer-related death in both men and women in the western hemisphere. According to the American Cancer Society, an estimated 105,500 new cases of colon cancer with 57,100 deaths will occur in the U.S. in 2003, accounting for about 10% of cancer deaths. Among the colon cancer patients, hereditary risk contributes approximately 20%. The main inherited colorectal cancers are the familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP and the hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancers (HNPCC. The FAP and HNPCC are caused due to mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC and DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes. The focus of this review is to summarize the functions of APC and MMR gene products in the development of colorectal cancers.

  12. Repairing DNA damage in xeroderma pigmentosum: T4N5 lotion and gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, Sarwar; Brownell, Isaac

    2008-04-01

    Patients with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) have defective DNA repair and are at a high risk for cutaneous malignancies. Standard treatments for XP are limited in scope and effectiveness. Understanding the molecular etiology of XP has led to the development of novel therapeutic approaches, including enzyme and gene therapies. One new topical treatment utilizing bacteriophage T4 endonuclease 5 (T4N5) in a liposomal lotion is currently in clinical trials and has received a Fast Track designation from the FDA. Gene therapy for XP, while making leaps in preclinical studies, has been slower to develop due to tactical hurdles, but seems to have much potential for future treatment. If these treatments prove effective in lowering the risk of cancer in patients with XP, they may also be found useful in reducing skin cancers in other at-risk patient populations.

  13. ProfileGrids as a new visual representation of large multiple sequence alignments: a case study of the RecA protein family

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    Abajian Aaron C

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple sequence alignments are a fundamental tool for the comparative analysis of proteins and nucleic acids. However, large data sets are no longer manageable for visualization and investigation using the traditional stacked sequence alignment representation. Results We introduce ProfileGrids that represent a multiple sequence alignment as a matrix color-coded according to the residue frequency occurring at each column position. JProfileGrid is a Java application for computing and analyzing ProfileGrids. A dynamic interaction with the alignment information is achieved by changing the ProfileGrid color scheme, by extracting sequence subsets at selected residues of interest, and by relating alignment information to residue physical properties. Conserved family motifs can be identified by the overlay of similarity plot calculations on a ProfileGrid. Figures suitable for publication can be generated from the saved spreadsheet output of the colored matrices as well as by the export of conservation information for use in the PyMOL molecular visualization program. We demonstrate the utility of ProfileGrids on 300 bacterial homologs of the RecA family – a universally conserved protein involved in DNA recombination and repair. Careful attention was paid to curating the collected RecA sequences since ProfileGrids allow the easy identification of rare residues in an alignment. We relate the RecA alignment sequence conservation to the following three topics: the recently identified DNA binding residues, the unexplored MAW motif, and a unique Bacillus subtilis RecA homolog sequence feature. Conclusion ProfileGrids allow large protein families to be visualized more effectively than the traditional stacked sequence alignment form. This new graphical representation facilitates the determination of the sequence conservation at residue positions of interest, enables the examination of structural patterns by using residue physical

  14. Comparative genomics of DNA recombination and repair in cyanobacteria: biotechnological implications

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    Corinne Cassier-Chauvat

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are fascinating photosynthetic prokaryotes that are regarded as the ancestors of the plant chloroplast; the purveyors of oxygen and biomass for the food chain; and promising cell factories for an environmentally friendly production of chemicals. In colonizing most waters and soils of our planet, cyanobacteria are inevitably challenged by environmental stresses that generate DNA damages. Furthermore, many strains engineered for biotechnological purposes can use DNA recombination to stop synthesizing the biotechnological product. Hence, it is important to study DNA recombination and repair in cyanobacteria for both basic and applied research. This review reports what is known in a few widely studied model cyanobacteria and what can be inferred by mining the sequenced genomes of morphologically and physiologically diverse strains. We show that cyanobacteria possess many E. coli-like DNA recombination and repair genes, and possibly other genes not yet identified. E. coli-homolog genes are unevenly distributed in cyanobacteria, in agreement with their wide genome diversity. Many genes are extremely well conserved in cyanobacteria (mutMS, radA, recA, recFO, recG, recN, ruvABC, ssb and uvrABCD, even in small genomes, suggesting that they encode the core DNA repair process. In addition to these core genes, the marine Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus strains harbor recBCD (DNA recombination, umuCD (mutational DNA replication, as well as the key SOS genes lexA (regulation of the SOS system and sulA (postponing of cell division until completion of DNA reparation. Hence, these strains could possess an E. coli-type SOS system. In contrast, several cyanobacteria endowed with larger genomes lack typical SOS genes. For examples, the two studied Gloeobacter strains lack alkB, lexA and sulA; and Synechococcus PCC7942 has neither lexA nor recCD. Furthermore, the Synechocystis PCC6803 lexA product does not regulate DNA repair genes. Collectively

  15. Mutation screening of mismatch repair gene Mlh3 in familial esophageal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Xu Liu; Yu Li; Xue-Dong Jiang; Hong-Nian Yin; Lin Zhang; Yu Wang; Jun Yang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To shed light on the possible role of mismatch repair gene Mlh3 in familial esophageal cancer (FEC).METHODS: A total of 66 members from 10 families suggestive of a genetic predisposition to hereditary esophageal cancer were screened for germline mutations in Mlh3 with denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC), a newly developed method of comparative sequencing based on heteroduplex detection. For all samples exhibiting abnormal DHPLC profiles,sequence changes were evaluated by cycle sequencing.For any mutation in family members, we conducted a segregation study to compare its prevalence in sporadic esophageal cancer patients and normal controls.RESULTS: Exons of Mlh3 in all samples were successfully examined. Overall, 4 missense mutations and 3 polymorphisms were identified in 4 families. Mlh3 missense mutations in families 9 and 10 might be pathogenic, but had a reduced penetrance. While in families 1 and 7,there was no sufficient evidence supporting the monogenic explanations of esophageal cancers in families.The mutations were found in 33% of high-risk families and 50% of low-risk families.CONCLUSION: Mlh3 is a high risk gene with a reduced penetrance in some families. However, it acts as a low risk gene for esophageal cancer in most families. Mutations of Mlh3 may work together with other genes in an accumulated manner and result in an increased risk of esophageal tumor. DHPLC is a robust and sensitive technique for screening gene mutations.

  16. Tissue-engineering strategies to repair joint tissue in osteoarthritis: nonviral gene-transfer approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madry, Henning; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2014-10-01

    Loss of articular cartilage is a common clinical consequence of osteoarthritis (OA). In the past decade, substantial progress in tissue engineering, nonviral gene transfer, and cell transplantation have provided the scientific foundation for generating cartilaginous constructs from genetically modified cells. Combining tissue engineering with overexpression of therapeutic genes enables immediate filling of a cartilage defect with an engineered construct that actively supports chondrogenesis. Several pioneering studies have proved that spatially defined nonviral overexpression of growth-factor genes in constructs of solid biomaterials or hydrogels is advantageous compared with gene transfer or scaffold alone, both in vitro and in vivo. Notably, these investigations were performed in models of focal cartilage defects, because advanced cartilage-repair strategies based on the principles of tissue engineering have not advanced sufficiently to enable resurfacing of extensively degraded cartilage as therapy for OA. These studies serve as prototypes for future technological developments, because they raise the possibility that cartilage constructs engineered from genetically modified chondrocytes providing autocrine and paracrine stimuli could similarly compensate for the loss of articular cartilage in OA. Because cartilage-tissue-engineering strategies are already used in the clinic, combining tissue engineering and nonviral gene transfer could prove a powerful approach to treat OA.

  17. Fibrin patch-based insulin-like growth factor-1 gene-modified stem cell transplantation repairs ischemic myocardium

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jun; Zhu, Kai; Yang, Shan; WANG, YULIN; Guo, Changfa; Yin, Kanhua; Wang, Chunsheng; Lai, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), tissue-engineered cardiac patch, and therapeutic gene have all been proposed as promising therapy strategies for cardiac repair after myocardial infarction. In our study, BMSCs were modified with insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) gene, loaded into a fibrin patch, and then transplanted into a porcine model of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) myocardium injury. The results demonstrated that IGF-1 gene overexpression could promote proliferation of endothe...

  18. Stimulation of proteoglycan synthesis by glucuronosyltransferase-I gene delivery: a strategy to promote cartilage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, N; Barré, L; Benani, A; Netter, P; Magdalou, J; Fournel-Gigleux, S; Ouzzine, M

    2004-12-28

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative joint disease characterized by a progressive loss of articular cartilage components, mainly proteoglycans (PGs), leading to destruction of the tissue. We investigate a therapeutic strategy based on stimulation of PG synthesis by gene transfer of the glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-synthesizing enzyme, beta1,3-glucuronosyltransferase-I (GlcAT-I) to promote cartilage repair. We previously reported that IL-1beta down-regulated the expression and activity of GlcAT-I in primary rat chondrocytes. Here, by using antisense oligonucleotides, we demonstrate that GlcAT-I inhibition impaired PG synthesis and deposition in articular cartilage explants, emphasizing the crucial role of this enzyme in PG anabolism. Thus, primary chondrocytes and cartilage explants were engineered by lipid-mediated gene delivery to efficiently overexpress a human GlcAT-I cDNA. Interestingly, GlcAT-I overexpression significantly enhanced GAG synthesis and deposition as evidenced by (35)S-sulfate incorporation, histology, estimation of GAG content, and fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis analysis. Metabolic labeling and Western blot analyses further suggested that GlcAT-I expression led to an increase in the abundance rather than in the length of GAG chains. Importantly, GlcAT-I delivery was able to overcome IL-1beta-induced PG depletion and maintain the anabolic activity of chondrocytes. Moreover, GlcAT-I also restored PG synthesis to a normal level in cartilage explants previously depleted from endogenous PGs by IL-1beta-treatment. In concert, our investigations strongly indicated that GlcAT-I was able to control and reverse articular cartilage defects in terms of PG anabolism and GAG content associated with IL-1beta. This study provides a basis for a gene therapy approach to promote cartilage repair in degenerative joint diseases.

  19. Polymorphisms in DNA Repair Genes and Susceptibility to Glioma in a Chinese Population

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    Jun-Hong Guan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The excision repair cross-complementing rodent repair deficiency complementation group 1 (ERCC1, and X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1 genes appear to protect mammalian cells from the harmful effects of ionizing radiation. We conducted a large case-control study to investigate the association of polymorphisms in ERCC1 C118T, ERCC1 C8092A, XRCC1 A194T, XRCC1 A194T, and XRCC3 C241T, with glioma risk in a Chinese population. Five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were genotyped, using the MassARRAY IPLEX platform, in 443 glioma cases and 443 controls. Association analyses based on an χ2 test and binary logistic regression were performed to determine the odds ratio (OR and a 95% confidence interval (95% CI for each SNP. For XRCC1 Arg194Trp, the variant genotype T/T was strongly associated with a lower risk of glioma cancer when compared with the wild type C/C (OR = 2.45, 95% CI = 1.43–4.45. Individuals carrying the XRCC1 399A allele had an increased risk of glioma (OR = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.02–1.64. The XRCC3 241T/T genotype was associated with a strong increased glioma risk (OR = 3.78, 95% CI = 1.86–9.06. Further analysis of the interactions of two susceptibility-associated SNPs, XRCC1 Arg194Trp and XRCC3 Thr241Met, showed that the combination of the XRCC1 194T and XRCC3 241T alleles brought a large increase in glioma risk (OR = 2.75, 95% CI = 1.54–4.04. XRCC1 Arg194Trp, XRCC1 Arg399Gln, and XRCC3 C241T, appear to be associated with susceptibility to glioma in a Chinese population.

  20. Prophage induction and differential RecA and UmuDAb transcriptome regulation in the DNA damage responses of Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter baylyi.

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    Janelle M Hare

    Full Text Available The SOS response to DNA damage that induces up to 10% of the prokaryotic genome requires RecA action to relieve LexA transcriptional repression. In Acinetobacter species, which lack LexA, the error-prone polymerase accessory UmuDAb is instead required for ddrR induction after DNA damage, suggesting it might be a LexA analog. RNA-Seq experiments defined the DNA damage transcriptome (mitomycin C-induced of wild type, recA and umuDAb mutant strains of both A. baylyi ADP1 and A. baumannii ATCC 17978. Of the typical SOS response genes, few were differentially regulated in these species; many were repressed or absent. A striking 38.4% of all ADP1 genes, and 11.4% of all 17978 genes, were repressed under these conditions. In A. baylyi ADP1, 66 genes (2.0% of the genome, including a CRISPR/Cas system, were DNA damage-induced, and belonged to four regulons defined by differential use of recA and umuDAb. In A. baumannii ATCC 17978, however, induction of 99% of the 152 mitomycin C-induced genes depended on recA, and only 28 of these genes required umuDAb for their induction. 90% of the induced A. baumannii genes were clustered in three prophage regions, and bacteriophage particles were observed after mitomycin C treatment. These prophages encoded esvI, esvK1, and esvK2, ethanol-stimulated virulence genes previously identified in a Caenorhabditis elegans model, as well as error-prone polymerase alleles. The induction of all 17978 error-prone polymerase alleles, whether prophage-encoded or not, was recA dependent, but only these DNA polymerase V-related genes were de-repressed in the umuDAb mutant in the absence of DNA damage. These results suggest that both species possess a robust and complex DNA damage response involving both recA-dependent and recA-independent regulons, and further demonstrates that although umuDAb has a specialized role in repressing error-prone polymerases, additional regulators likely participate in these species' transcriptional

  1. Fibrin patch-based insulin-like growth factor-1 gene-modified stem cell transplantation repairs ischemic myocardium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Zhu, Kai; Yang, Shan; Wang, Yulin; Guo, Changfa; Yin, Kanhua; Wang, Chunsheng

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), tissue-engineered cardiac patch, and therapeutic gene have all been proposed as promising therapy strategies for cardiac repair after myocardial infarction. In our study, BMSCs were modified with insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) gene, loaded into a fibrin patch, and then transplanted into a porcine model of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) myocardium injury. The results demonstrated that IGF-1 gene overexpression could promote proliferation of endothelial cells and cardiomyocyte-like differentiation of BMSCs in vitro. Four weeks after transplantation of fibrin patch loaded with gene-modified BMSCs, IGF-1 overexpression could successfully promote angiogenesis, inhibit remodeling, increase grafted cell survival and reduce apoptosis. In conclusion, the integrated strategy, which combined fibrin patch with IGF-1 gene modified BMSCs, could promote the histological cardiac repair for a clinically relevant porcine model of I/R myocardium injury. PMID:25767192

  2. Vascular endothelial growth factor gene transfection to enhance the repair of avascular necrosis of the femoral head of rabbit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨操; 杨述华; 杜靖远; 李进; 许伟华; 熊宇芳

    2003-01-01

    Objective To explore a new method for the therapy of avascular necrosis of the femoral head.Methods The recombinant plasmid pCD-hVEGF165 was mixed with collagen and was implanted in the necrotic femoral head. The expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was examined by RNA dot hybridization and immunohistochemical techniques. Repair of the femoral head was observed by histological and histomorphometric analysis.Results The expression of VEGF was detected in the femoral head transfected with the VEGF gene. The femoral head transfected with the VEGF gene showed a significant increase in angiogenesis 2 and 4 weeks after gene transfection and a significant increase in bone formation 6 and 8 weeks after gene transfection on histomorphometric analysis (P<0.01).Conclusions Transfection of the VEGF gene enhances bone tissue angiogenesis. Repair of osteonecrosis could be accelerated accordingly, thus providing a potential method for therapy of osteonecrosis.

  3. Enzymatic repair of selected cross-linked homoduplex molecules enhances nuclear gene rescue from Pompeii and Herculaneum remains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bernardo, Giovanni; Del Gaudio, Stefania; Cammarota, Marcella; Galderisi, Umberto; Cascino, Antonino; Cipollaro, Marilena

    2002-02-15

    Ancient DNA (aDNA) samples extracted from the bone remains of six equids buried by the Vesuvius eruption in 79 AD were investigated to test pre-amplification and enzymatic repair procedures designed to enhance the rescue of nuclear genes. The extracts, which proved all positive for Equidae mtDNA amplification, proved positive only four times out of 18 when tested for single-copy Equidae nuclear genes (epsilon globin, p53 and gamma interferon). Pre-amplification did not change the number of retrieved aDNA sequences but 10 times out of 14 enzymatic repair restored the amplifiability of the genes analysed, proving that repair increases the rate of successful rescue from 22 to alpha(lambda)mu(omicron)sigma(tau) 80%. These findings support the hypothesis that some of these cross-linked aDNA molecules, which are not completely separated when DNA is extracted under denaturing conditions, become homoduplex substrates for Pol I and/or T4 ligase action upon renaturation. aDNA authenticity is proved by the homology of the nucleotide sequences of loci tested to the corresponding modern Equidae sequences. Data also indicate that cross-linked homoduplex molecules selected by denaturation of the extract are repaired without any chimera formation. The general features of aDNA amplification with and without denaturation and enzymatic repair are discussed.

  4. p53 Gene repair with zinc finger nucleases optimised by yeast 1-hybrid and validated by Solexa sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Herrmann

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor gene p53 is mutated or deleted in over 50% of human tumors. As functional p53 plays a pivotal role in protecting against cancer development, several strategies for restoring wild-type (wt p53 function have been investigated. In this study, we applied an approach using gene repair with zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs. We adapted a commercially-available yeast one-hybrid (Y1H selection kit to allow rapid building and optimization of 4-finger constructs from randomized PCR libraries. We thus generated novel functional zinc finger nucleases against two DNA sites in the human p53 gene, near cancer mutation 'hotspots'. The ZFNs were first validated using in vitro cleavage assays and in vivo episomal gene repair assays in HEK293T cells. Subsequently, the ZFNs were used to restore wt-p53 status in the SF268 human cancer cell line, via ZFN-induced homologous recombination. The frequency of gene repair and mutation by non-homologous end-joining was then ascertained in several cancer cell lines, using a deep sequencing strategy. Our Y1H system facilitates the generation and optimisation of novel, sequence-specific four- to six-finger peptides, and the p53-specific ZFN described here can be used to mutate or repair p53 in genomic loci.

  5. p53 Gene Repair with Zinc Finger Nucleases Optimised by Yeast 1-Hybrid and Validated by Solexa Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Frank; Garriga-Canut, Mireia; Baumstark, Rebecca; Fajardo-Sanchez, Emmanuel; Cotterell, James; Minoche, André; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Isalan, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The tumor suppressor gene p53 is mutated or deleted in over 50% of human tumors. As functional p53 plays a pivotal role in protecting against cancer development, several strategies for restoring wild-type (wt) p53 function have been investigated. In this study, we applied an approach using gene repair with zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs). We adapted a commercially-available yeast one-hybrid (Y1H) selection kit to allow rapid building and optimization of 4-finger constructs from randomized PCR libraries. We thus generated novel functional zinc finger nucleases against two DNA sites in the human p53 gene, near cancer mutation ‘hotspots’. The ZFNs were first validated using in vitro cleavage assays and in vivo episomal gene repair assays in HEK293T cells. Subsequently, the ZFNs were used to restore wt-p53 status in the SF268 human cancer cell line, via ZFN-induced homologous recombination. The frequency of gene repair and mutation by non-homologous end-joining was then ascertained in several cancer cell lines, using a deep sequencing strategy. Our Y1H system facilitates the generation and optimisation of novel, sequence-specific four- to six-finger peptides, and the p53-specific ZFN described here can be used to mutate or repair p53 in genomic loci. PMID:21695267

  6. Ndrg3 gene regulates DSB repair during meiosis through modulation the ERK signal pathway in the male germ cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hongjie; Zhang, Xuan; Jiang, Hanwei; Jiang, Xiaohua; Wang, Liu; Qi, Qi; Bi, Yuan; Wang, Jian; Shi, Qinghua; Li, Runsheng

    2017-01-01

    The N-myc downstream regulated gene (NDRG) family consists of 4 members, NDRG-1, -2, -3, -4. Physiologically, we found Ndrg3, a critical gene which led to homologous lethality in the early embryo development, regulated the male meiosis in mouse. The expression of Ndrg3 was enhanced specifically in germ cells, and reached its peak level in the pachytene stage spermatocyte. Haplo-insufficiency of Ndrg3 gene led to sub-infertility during the male early maturation. In the Ndrg3+/− germ cells, some meiosis events such as DSB repair and synaptonemal complex formation were impaired. Disturbances on meiotic prophase progression and spermatogenesis were observed. In mechanism, the attenuation of pERK1/2 signaling was detected in the heterozygous testis. With our primary spermatocyte culture system, we found that lactate promoted DSB repair via ERK1/2 signaling in the male mouse germ cells in vitro. Deficiency of Ndrg3 gene attenuated the activation of ERK which further led to the aberrancy of DSB repair in the male germ cells in mouse. Taken together, we reported that Ndrg3 gene modulated the lactate induced ERK pathway to facilitate DSB repair in male germ cells, which further regulated meiosis and subsequently fertility in male mouse. PMID:28290521

  7. Ndrg3 gene regulates DSB repair during meiosis through modulation the ERK signal pathway in the male germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hongjie; Zhang, Xuan; Jiang, Hanwei; Jiang, Xiaohua; Wang, Liu; Qi, Qi; Bi, Yuan; Wang, Jian; Shi, Qinghua; Li, Runsheng

    2017-03-14

    The N-myc downstream regulated gene (NDRG) family consists of 4 members, NDRG-1, -2, -3, -4. Physiologically, we found Ndrg3, a critical gene which led to homologous lethality in the early embryo development, regulated the male meiosis in mouse. The expression of Ndrg3 was enhanced specifically in germ cells, and reached its peak level in the pachytene stage spermatocyte. Haplo-insufficiency of Ndrg3 gene led to sub-infertility during the male early maturation. In the Ndrg3(+/-) germ cells, some meiosis events such as DSB repair and synaptonemal complex formation were impaired. Disturbances on meiotic prophase progression and spermatogenesis were observed. In mechanism, the attenuation of pERK1/2 signaling was detected in the heterozygous testis. With our primary spermatocyte culture system, we found that lactate promoted DSB repair via ERK1/2 signaling in the male mouse germ cells in vitro. Deficiency of Ndrg3 gene attenuated the activation of ERK which further led to the aberrancy of DSB repair in the male germ cells in mouse. Taken together, we reported that Ndrg3 gene modulated the lactate induced ERK pathway to facilitate DSB repair in male germ cells, which further regulated meiosis and subsequently fertility in male mouse.

  8. Recombination-dependent deletion formation in mammalian cells deficient in the nucleotide excision repair gene ERCC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, R G; Rolig, R L; Kilburn, A E; Adair, G M; Wilson, J H; Nairn, R S

    1997-11-25

    Nucleotide excision repair proteins have been implicated in genetic recombination by experiments in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Drosophila melanogaster, but their role, if any, in mammalian cells is undefined. To investigate the role of the nucleotide excision repair gene ERCC1, the hamster homologue to the S. cerevisiae RADIO gene, we disabled the gene by targeted knockout. Partial tandem duplications of the adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) gene then were constructed at the endogenous APRT locus in ERCC1- and ERCC1+ cells. To detect the full spectrum of gene-altering events, we used a loss-of-function assay in which the parental APRT+ tandem duplication could give rise to APRT- cells by homologous recombination, gene rearrangement, or point mutation. Measurement of rates and analysis of individual APRT- products indicated that gene rearrangements (principally deletions) were increased at least 50-fold, whereas homologous recombination was affected little. The formation of deletions is not caused by a general effect of the ERCC1 deficiency on gene stability, because ERCC1- cell lines with a single wild-type copy of the APRT gene yielded no increase in deletions. Thus, deletion formation is dependent on the tandem duplication, and presumably the process of homologous recombination. Recombination-dependent deletion formation in ERCC1- cells is supported by a significant decrease in a particular class of crossover products that are thought to arise by repair of a heteroduplex intermediate in recombination. We suggest that the ERCC1 gene product in mammalian cells is involved in the processing of heteroduplex intermediates in recombination and that the misprocessed intermediates in ERCC1- cells are repaired by illegitimate recombination.

  9. The Gene Targeting Approach of Small Fragment Homologous Replacement (SFHR Alters the Expression Patterns of DNA Repair and Cell Cycle Control Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Pierandrei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular responses and molecular mechanisms activated by exogenous DNA that invades cells are only partially understood. This limits the practical use of gene targeting strategies. Small fragment homologous replacement (SFHR uses a small exogenous wild-type DNA fragment to restore the endogenous wild-type sequence; unfortunately, this mechanism has a low frequency of correction. In this study, we used a mouse embryonic fibroblast cell line with a stably integrated mutated gene for enhanced green fluorescence protein. The restoration of a wild-type sequence can be detected by flow cytometry analysis. We quantitatively analyzed the expression of 84 DNA repair genes and 84 cell cycle control genes. Peculiar temporal gene expression patterns were observed for both pathways. Different DNA repair pathways, not only homologous recombination, as well as the three main cell cycle checkpoints appeared to mediate the cellular response. Eighteen genes were selected as highly significant target/effectors of SFHR. We identified a wide interconnection between SFHR, DNA repair, and cell cycle control. Our results increase the knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved in cell invasion by exogenous DNA and SFHR. Specific molecular targets of both the cell cycle and DNA repair machineries were selected for manipulation to enhance the practical application of SFHR.

  10. A peek into the possible future of management of articular cartilage injuries: gene therapy and scaffolds for cartilage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hubert T; Zaffagnini, Stefano; Mizuno, Shuichi; Abelow, Stephen; Safran, Marc R

    2006-10-01

    Two rapidly progressing areas of research will likely contribute to cartilage repair procedures in the foreseeable future: gene therapy and synthetic scaffolds. Gene therapy refers to the transfer of new genetic information to cells that contribute to the cartilage repair process. This approach allows for manipulation of cartilage repair at the cellular and molecular level. Scaffolds are the core technology for the next generation of autologous cartilage implantation procedures in which synthetic matrices are used in conjunction with chondrocytes. This approach can be improved further using bioreactor technologies to enhance the production of extracellular matrix proteins by chondrocytes seeded onto a scaffold. The resulting "neo-cartilage implant" matures within the bioreactor, and can then be used to fill cartilage defects.

  11. Phenotypic Heterogeneity by Germline Mismatch Repair Gene Defect in Lynch Syndrome Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernâni-Eusébio, Jorge; Barbosa, Elisabete

    2016-10-01

    Introdução: A síndrome de Lynch é a forma hereditária mais comum de cancro colo-rectal, sendo também responsável por cancro do endométrio e de outros tipos. Associa-se a mutações germinativas nos genes de mismatch repair do ADN e a instabilidade de microssatélites. As mutações MLH1 e MSH2 têm um fenótipo de síndrome de Lynch ‘clássico’, sendo o MSH2 mais associado a cancro extra-cólico. Mutações do MSH6 e PMS2 têm um fenótipo atípico. A expressão clínica é heterogénea, existindo uma correlação entre o gene mismatch repair mutado e o padrão fenotípico. Material e Métodos: Análise retrospetiva dos dados clínicos de doentes que cumpriam os critérios de Amesterdão ou que tinha mutações nos genes mismatch repair, entre setembro de 2012 e outubro de 2015. Resultados: Identificámos 28 doentes. Dezassete tinham cancro colo-rectal sendo a localização no cólon direito predominante. Cinco tiveram cancro do endométrio (mediana da idade de diagnóstico – 53), sem qualquer mutação no MSH6. Cinco desenvolveram outros cancros. Todos os casos com mutações mismatch repair estudados tinham instabilidade de microssatélites. Discussão: Na maioria dos casos foi encontrada mutação no MSH2 apesar de o MLH1 ser descrito na literatura como o gene mais frequentemente mutado. Interessa dizer que os doentes com cancro colo-rectal não evidenciam uma tendência para ter muito infiltrado inflamatório. Na maioria dos casos foi realizada colectomia parcial apesar da incidência elevada de lesões síncronas e metácronas associadas. Histerectomia e anexectomia profilática foi realizada em doentes em menopausa/perimenopausa. Conclusão: O registo standardizado dos dados dos doentes poderá levar a um melhor acompanhamento e conhecimento desta síndrome. O uso das Guidelines de Bethesda poderá identificar novos casos que escapam aos critérios de Amesterdão. A pesquisa de instabilidade de microssatélites deve ser feita em muito maior n

  12. XRCC1 and XPD DNA repair gene polymorphisms: a potential risk factor for glaucoma in the Pakistani population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yousaf, S.; Khan, M.I.; Micheal, S.; Akhtar, F.; Ali, S.H.; Riaz, M.; Ali, M.; Lall, P.; Waheed, N.K.; Hollander, A.I. den; Ahmed, A.; Qamar, R.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The present study was designed to determine the association of polymorphisms of the DNA repair genes X-ray cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) (c.1316G>A [rs25487]) and xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D (XPD) (c.2298A>C [rs13181]) with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) an

  13. Cloning, comparative mapping, and RNA expression of the mouse homologues of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae nucleotide excision repair gene RAD23.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. van der Spek (Peter); C.E. Visser (Cécile); F. Hanaoka (Fumio); B. Smit (Bep); A. Hagemeijer (Anne); D. Bootsma (Dirk); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD23 gene is involved in nucleotide excision repair (NER). Two human homologs of RAD23, HHR23A and HHR23B (HGMW-approved symbols RAD23A and RAD23B), were previously isolated. The HHR23B protein is complexed with the protein defective in the cancer-prone

  14. Conserved pattern of antisense overlapping transcription in the homologous ERCC-1 and yeast RAD10 DNA repair gene regions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Duin (Mark); J. van den Tol; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); D. Bootsma (Dirk); I.P. Rupp; P. Reynolds (Paul); L. Prakash; S. Prakash

    1989-01-01

    textabstractWe report that the genes for the homologous Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD10 and human ERCC-1 DNA excision repair proteins harbor overlapping antisense transcription units in their 3' regions. Since naturally occurring antisense transcription is rare in S. cerevisiae and humans (this is

  15. Genetic Variation in Base Excision Repair Pathway Genes, Pesticide Exposure, and Prostate Cancer Risk

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kathryn Hughes Barry; Stella Koutros; Sonja I. Berndt; Gabriella Andreotti; Jane A. Hoppin; Dale P. Sandler; Laurie A. Burdette; Meredith Yeager; Laura E. Beane Freeman; Jay H. Lubin; Xiaomei Ma; Tongzhang Zheng; Michael C. R. Alavanja

    2011-01-01

    .... OBJECTIVES: Because base excision repair (BER) is the predominant pathway involved in repairing oxidative damage, we evaluated interactions between 39 pesticides and 394 tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs...

  16. SNPs in DNA repair or oxidative stress genes and late subcutaneous fibrosis in patients following single shot partial breast irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential association between single nucleotide polymorphisms related response to radiotherapy injury, such as genes related to DNA repair or enzymes involved in anti-oxidative activities. The paper aims to identify marker genes able to predict an increased risk of late toxicity studying our group of patients who underwent a Single Shot 3D-CRT PBI (SSPBI) after BCS (breast conserving surgery). Methods A total of 57 breast cancer pa...

  17. DNA Damage/Repair and Polymorphism of the hOGG1 Gene in Lymphocytes of AMD Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Wozniak

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD. We determined the extent of oxidative DNA damage and the kinetics of its removal as well as the genotypes of the Ser326Cys polymorphism of the hOGG1 gene in lymphocytes of 30 wet AMD patients and 30 controls. Oxidative DNA damage induced by hydrogen peroxide and its repair were evaluated by the comet assay and DNA repair enzymes. We observed a higher extent of endogenous oxidative DNA damage and a lower efficacy of its repair in AMD patients as compared with the controls. We did not find any correlation between the extent of DNA damage and efficacy of DNA repair with genotypes of the Ser326Cys polymorphism. The results obtained suggest that oxidative DNA damage and inefficient DNA repair can be associated with AMD and the variability of the hOOG1 gene may not contribute to this association.

  18. Assessment of the repair and damage of DNA induced by parent and reduced RSU-1069, a 2-nitroimidazole-aziridine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neill, P.; Cunniffe, S.M.

    1989-04-01

    The cellular repair and damage of DNA induced by parent and reduced RSU-1069, a 2-nitroimidazole-aziridine, was assessed at both the molecular and cellular level. At the molecular level, after in vitro incubation with parent or reduced RSU-1069, plasmid DNA was transfected into Escherichia coli (AB1157) with subsequent selection for gene expression. For equivalent levels of DNA strand breakage following such treatment it is evident from the relative transformation frequencies that interactions with reduced RSU-1069 lead to DNA damage consistent with bifunctional action of a metabolite(s). At the cellular level, the cytoxicity of RSU-1069 was determined for a series of repair deficient mutants of E. coli under both aerobic and hypoxic conditions. The differential aerobic:hypoxic cytotoxicity ratio is approximately 3. We conclude that the repair of cellular DNA damage induced by RSU-1069 involves activation of the gene products under the control of the recA gene and not those under the control of the ada gene. The ability of cellular systems to repair damage induced by RSU-1069 may play a significant role in determining its efficiency to act as a hypoxic cell radiosensitizer and a hypoxia selective cytotoxin.

  19. DNA repair and gene targeting in plant end-joining mutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jia, Qi

    2011-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) can be repaired by homologous recombination (HR) or by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). The latter mechanism is the major route for DSB repair in the somatic cells of higher eukaryotes, including plants. If we could manipulate the balance of the DSB repair pathways

  20. DNA repair and gene targeting in plant end-joining mutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jia, Qi

    2011-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) can be repaired by homologous recombination (HR) or by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). The latter mechanism is the major route for DSB repair in the somatic cells of higher eukaryotes, including plants. If we could manipulate the balance of the DSB repair pathways

  1. Basic fibroblast growth factor gene transfection in repair of internal carotid artery aneurysm wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Jiao; Ming Jiang; Jinghai Fang; Yinsheng Deng; Zejun Chen; Min Wu

    2012-01-01

    Surgery or interventional therapy has some risks in the treatment of cerebral aneurysm. We established an internal carotid artery aneurysm model by dripping elastase in the crotch of the right internal and external carotid arteries of New Zealand rabbits. Following model induction, lentivirus carrying basic fibroblast growth factor was injected through the ear vein. We found that the longer the action time of the lentivirus, the smaller the aneurysm volume. Moreover, platelet-derived growth factor expression in the aneurysm increased, but smooth muscle 22 alpha and hypertension-related gene 1 mRNA expression decreased. At 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks following model establishment, following 1 week of injection of lentivirus carrying basic fibroblast growth factor, the later the intervention time, the more severe the blood vessel damage, and the bigger the aneurysm volume, the lower the smooth muscle 22 alpha and hypertension-related gene 1 mRNA expression. Simultaneously, platelet-derived growth factor expression decreased. These data suggest that recombinant lentivirus carrying basic fibroblast growth factor can repair damaged cells in the aneurysmal wall and inhibit aneurysm dynamic growth, and that the effect is dependent on therapeutic duration.

  2. Cell and gene therapy for arrhythmias: Repair of cardiac conduction damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Fu Xiao

    2011-01-01

    Action potentials generated in the sinoatrial node(SAN)dominate the rhythm and rate of a healthy human heart.Subsequently,these action potentials propagate to the whole heart via its conduction system .Abnormalities of impulse generation and/or propagation in a heart can cause arrhythmias.For example,SAN dysfunction or conduction block of the atrioventricular node can lead to serious bradycardia which is currently treated with an implanted electronic pacemaker.On the other hand conduction damage may cause reentrant tachyarrhythmias which are primarily treated pharmacologically or by medical device-based therapies,including defibrillation and tissue ablation.However,drug therapies sometimes may not be effective or are associated with serious side effects.Device-based therapies for cardiac arrhythmias,even with well developed technology,still face inadequacies,limitations,hardware complications,and other challenges.Therefore,scientists are actively seeking other alternatives for antiarrhythmic therapy.In particular,cells and genes used for repairing cardiac conduction damage/defect have been investigated in various studies both in vitro and in vivo.Despite the complexities of the excitation and conduction systems of the heart,cell and gene-based strategies provide novel alternatives for treatment or cure of cardiac anhythmias.This review summarizes some highlights of recent research progress in this field.

  3. Expression Silence of DNA Repair Gene hMGMT Induced by RNA Interference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiu-ying; LAI Yan-dong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: MGMT protein expression has been associated with tumor resistance to alkylating agents. The objective of this paper is to construct the RNA interference vector which can specifically induce the expression silence of human DNA repair gene hMGMT. Methods: The hMGMT specific siRNA expression cassette was made by two steps PCR, linked with pUC19 to get pU6-MGMTi, co-transfected with pEGFP-C1 into 16HBE and screened by G418. The MGMT mRNA and protein levels were detected by RT-PCR and Western Blot respectively. Results: hMGMT specific RNA interfere vector pU6-MGMTi was constructed successfully. In transfected 16HBE cells MGMT mRNA level could hardly be detected and the protein level was only 10% of control. Conclusion: MGMT specific RNAi expression cassette can effectively inhibit MGMT expression. MGMT silence cell line was built by co-transfection technology, which offered condition for studying the gene function of MGMT.

  4. Characterisation of the promoter region of the human DNA-repair gene Rad51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselbach, L; Haase, S; Fischer, D; Kolberg, H C; Stürzbecher, H W

    2005-01-01

    Regulatory elements of the 5'-flanking region of the DNA-repair gene Rad51 were analysed to characterise pathological alterations of Rad51 mRNA expression during tumour development. Various fragments of the Rad51 promoter were cloned into the pGL3 reporter vector and the respective promoter activity was determined by luciferase assays in transfected U2-OS cells. Transcription factor binding was identified using Protein/DNA arrays. The region encompassing base pairs -204 to -58 was identified as crucial for Rad51 gene transcription. Down regulator sequences are present upstream (-305 to -204) and downstream (-48 and +204) of this core promoter element. Promoter activity is significantly enhanced by substituting G at the polymorphic positions +135 and +172 for C and T, respectively. Transcription factors Ets1/PEA3, E2F1, p53, EGR1, and Stat5 were identified as relevant for regulating expression of Rad51. We identified three separate cis-sequence elements within the Rad51 transcriptional promoter, one ensuring basal levels of expression and two elements limiting expression to relatively low levels. The characterisation of transcription factor binding might help to explain high-level expression of Rad51 in a variety of solid tumours. The polymorphic sites appear important for the increased risk of breast and/or ovarian cancer for BRCA2 mutation carriers.

  5. The effect of a DNA repair gene on cellular invasiveness: XRCC3 over-expression in breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica L Martinez-Marignac

    Full Text Available Over-expression of DNA repair genes has been associated with resistance to radiation and DNA-damage induced by chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin. More recently, based on the analysis of genome expression profiling, it was proposed that over-expression of DNA repair genes enhances the invasive behaviour of tumour cells. In this study we present experimental evidence utilizing functional assays to test this hypothesis. We assessed the effect of the DNA repair proteins known as X-ray complementing protein 3 (XRCC3 and RAD51, to the invasive behavior of the MCF-7 luminal epithelial-like and BT20 basal-like triple negative human breast cancer cell lines. We report that stable or transient over-expression of XRCC3 but not RAD51 increased invasiveness in both cell lines in vitro. Moreover, XRCC3 over-expressing MCF-7 cells also showed a higher tumorigenesis in vivo and this phenotype was associated with increased activity of the metalloproteinase MMP-9 and the expression of known modulators of cell-cell adhesion and metastasis such as CD44, ID-1, DDR1 and TFF1. Our results suggest that in addition to its' role in facilitating repair of DNA damage, XRCC3 affects invasiveness of breast cancer cell lines and the expression of genes associated with cell adhesion and invasion.

  6. Risk of colorectal cancer for people with a mutation in both a MUTYH and a DNA mismatch repair gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Aung Ko; Reece, Jeanette C.; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Clendenning, Mark; Young, Joanne P.; Cleary, Sean P.; Kim, Hyeja; Cotterchio, Michelle; Dowty, James G.; MacInnis, Robert J.; Tucker, Katherine M.; Winship, Ingrid M.; Macrae, Finlay A.; Burnett, Terrilea; Le Marchand, Loïc; Casey, Graham; Haile, Robert W.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Hopper, John L.; Gallinger, Steven; Jenkins, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    The base excision repair protein, MUTYH, functionally interacts with the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system. As genetic testing moves from testing one gene at a time, to gene panel and whole exome next generation sequencing approaches, understanding the risk associated with co-existence of germline mutations in these genes will be important for clinical interpretation and management. From the Colon Cancer Family Registry, we identified 10 carriers who had both a MUTYH mutation (6 with c.1187G>A p.(Gly396Asp), 3 with c.821G>A p.(Arg274Gln), and 1 with c.536A>G p.(Tyr179Cys)) and a MMR gene mutation (3 in MLH1, 6 in MSH2, and 1 in PMS2), 375 carriers of a single (monoallelic) MUTYH mutation alone, and 469 carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone. Of the 10 carriers of both gene mutations, 8 were diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Using a weighted cohort analysis, we estimated that risk of colorectal cancer for carriers of both a MUTYH and a MMR gene mutation was substantially higher than that for carriers of a MUTYH mutation alone [hazard ratio (HR) 21.5, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 9.19–50.1; p colorectal cancer for carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone. Our finding suggests MUTYH mutation testing in MMR gene mutation carriers is not clinically informative. PMID:26202870

  7. Gene and pathway level analyses of germline DNA-repair gene variants and prostate cancer susceptibility using the iCOGS-genotyping array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saunders, Edward J; Dadaev, Tokhir; Leongamornlert, Daniel A

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Germline mutations within DNA-repair genes are implicated in susceptibility to multiple forms of cancer. For prostate cancer (PrCa), rare mutations in BRCA2 and BRCA1 give rise to moderately elevated risk, whereas two of B100 common, low-penetrance PrCa susceptibility variants identif...

  8. Assessment of single nucleotide polymorphisms in screening 52 DNA repair and cell cycle control genes in Fanconi anemia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi anemia (FA is a rare genetically heterogeneous disorder associated with bone marrow failure, birth defects and cancer susceptibility. Apart from the disease- causing mutations in FANC genes, the identification of specific DNA variations, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, in other candidate genes may lead to a better clinical description of this condition enabling individualized treatment with improvement of the prognosis. In this study, we have assessed 95 SNPs located in 52 key genes involved in base excision repair (BER, nucleotide excision repair (NER, mismatch repair (MMR, double strand break (DSB repair and cell cycle control using a DNA repair chip (Asper Biotech, Estonia which includes most of the common variants for the candidate genes. The SNP genotyping was performed in five FA-D2 patients and in one FA-A patient. The polymorphisms studied were synonymous (n=10, nonsynonymous (missense (n=52 and in non-coding regions of the genome (introns and 5 ‘and 3’ untranslated regions (UTR (n=33. Polymorphisms found at the homozygous state are selected for further analysis. Our results have shown a significant inter-individual variability among patients in the type and the frequency of SNPs and also elucidate the need for further studies of polymorphisms located in ATM, APEX APE 1, XRCC1, ERCC2, MSH3, PARP4, NBS1, BARD1, CDKN1B, TP53 and TP53BP1 which may be of great importance for better clinical description of FA. In addition, the present report recommends the use of SNPs as predictive and prognostic genetic markers to individualize therapy of FA patients. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173046

  9. Downregulation of homologous recombination DNA repair genes by HDAC inhibition in prostate cancer is mediated through the E2F1 transcription factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushant K Kachhap

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis re-express silenced tumor suppressor genes and are currently undergoing clinical trials. Although HDACis have been known to induce gene expression, an equal number of genes are downregulated upon HDAC inhibition. The mechanism behind this downregulation remains unclear. Here we provide evidence that several DNA repair genes are downregulated by HDAC inhibition and provide a mechanism involving the E2F1 transcription factor in the process. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Applying Analysis of Functional Annotation (AFA on microarray data of prostate cancer cells treated with HDACis, we found a number of genes of the DNA damage response and repair pathways are downregulated by HDACis. AFA revealed enrichment of homologous recombination (HR DNA repair genes of the BRCA1 pathway, as well as genes regulated by the E2F1 transcription factor. Prostate cancer cells demonstrated a decreased DNA repair capacity and an increased sensitization to chemical- and radio-DNA damaging agents upon HDAC inhibition. Recruitment of key HR repair proteins to the site of DNA damage, as well as HR repair capacity was compromised upon HDACi treatment. Based on our AFA data, we hypothesized that the E2F transcription factors may play a role in the downregulation of key repair genes upon HDAC inhibition in prostate cancer cells. ChIP analysis and luciferase assays reveal that the downregulation of key repair genes is mediated through decreased recruitment of the E2F1 transcription factor and not through active repression by repressive E2Fs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study indicates that several genes in the DNA repair pathway are affected upon HDAC inhibition. Downregulation of the repair genes is on account of a decrease in amount and promoter recruitment of the E2F1 transcription factor. Since HDAC inhibition affects several pathways that could potentially have an impact on DNA repair, compromised DNA repair upon HDAC

  10. Gene polymorphisms of the DNA Repairing Genes APE1 and XRCC1 among Smoking Lung Cancer Egyptians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezk Ahmed Abd-ellateef Elbaz, Salim Abd-elhady Habib, Maha Ebraheem Esmael Ebraheem, Gamal Kamel EL-Ebidy, Lamiaa Mohamed Mahmoud Ramadan and Ahmed Settin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide and is thus a major public health problem. DNA base damage or losses caused by endogenous and exogenous agents occur constantly at a high frequency in human cells. The removal or repair of damaged bases is an important mechanism in protecting the integrity of the genome. APE1 (Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonuclease 1 and XRCC1 (X-ray cross-complementing group1 are DNA repair proteins that play important roles in the base excision repair (BER pathway. The focus of this work is limited to the association between polymorphisms in the DNA repair genes, (APE1 Asp148Glu (2197 T→G and XRCC1 Arg399Gln (28152 G→A genotypes, cigarette smoking and lung cancer. This study has included 131 cases affected with lung cancers include; 33cases with small cell carcinoma (25.2% and 98 cases with non-small cell carcinoma (74.8%. They were recruited from oncology Center, Mansoura University, Egypt; in the period between April 2008 to March 2010. For comparison, a negative control group including 150 healthy individuals randomly selected from blood donors. Controls were selected by random sampling cancer-free individuals without a past history of cancer, who visited Mansoura University hospitals and provided peripheral blood between April 2008 and March 2010. DNA was extracted from the whole peripheral blood using generation DNA purification capture column kit (Gentra system, USA and genotyping for APE1 Glu148Asp and XRCC1 Arg399Gln polymorphisms was performed by a PCR--CTPP (PCR with confronting two-pair primers method. The collected data were organized and statistically analyzed using SPSS statistical computer package version 10 software. we observed that, There were no significant differences in the frequencies of the APE1 Asp148Glu (2197 T→G polymorphism of all genotypes and alleles in all lung cancer cases compared to all healthy controls. Also, there were no significant differences in the

  11. Association of common variants in mismatch repair genes and breast cancer susceptibility: a multigene study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pina Julieta

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MMR is responsible for the repair of base-base mismatches and insertion/deletion loops. Besides this, MMR is also associated with an anti-recombination function, suppressing homologous recombination. Losses of heterozygosity and/or microsatellite instability have been detected in a large number of skin samples from breast cancer patients, suggesting a potential role of MMR in breast cancer susceptibility. Methods We carried out a hospital-based case-control study in a Caucasian Portuguese population (287 cases and 547 controls to estimate the susceptibility to non-familial breast cancer associated with some polymorphisms in mismatch repair genes (MSH3, MSH4, MSH6, MLH1, MLH3, PMS1 and MUTYH. Results Using unconditional logistic regression we found that MLH3 (L844P, G>A polymorphism GA (Leu/Pro and AA (Pro/Pro genotypes were associated with a decreased risk: OR = 0.65 (0.45-0.95 (p = 0.03 and OR = 0.62 (0.41-0.94 (p = 0.03, respectively. Analysis of two-way SNP interaction effects on breast cancer revealed two potential associations to breast cancer susceptibility: MSH3 Ala1045Thr/MSH6 Gly39Glu - AA/TC [OR = 0.43 (0.21-0.83, p = 0.01] associated with a decreased risk; and MSH4 Ala97Thr/MLH3 Leu844Pro - AG/AA [OR = 2.35 (1.23-4.49, p = 0.01], GG/AA [OR = 2.11 (1.12-3,98, p = 0.02], and GG/AG [adjusted OR = 1.88 (1.12-3.15, p = 0.02] all associated with an increased risk for breast cancer. Conclusion It is possible that some of these common variants in MMR genes contribute significantly to breast cancer susceptibility. However, further studies with a large sample size will be needed to support our results.

  12. Cloning of the hexA mismatch-repair gene of Streptococcus pneumoniae and identification of the product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, B; Prats, H; Claverys, J P

    1985-01-01

    The hexA mismatch repair gene of Streptococcus pneumoniae has been cloned into multicopy plasmid vectors. The cloned hexA gene is expressed as judged from its ability to complement various chromosomal hexA- alleles. Its direction of transcription was defined and the functional limits were localized by original methods relying on homology-dependent integration of nonautonomous chimeric plasmids carrying chromosomal inserts into the chromosome. Comparison of the proteins encoded by recombinant plasmids and by restriction fragments allowed us to identify an Mr 94 000 protein as the probable product of the hexA gene.

  13. Use of the comet-FISH assay to compare DNA damage and repair in p53 and hTERT genes following ionizing radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Declan J McKenna

    Full Text Available The alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay can be combined with fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH methodology in order to investigate the localisation of specific gene domains within an individual cell. The number and position of the fluorescent signal(s provides information about the relative damage and subsequent repair that is occurring in the targeted gene domain(s. In this study, we have optimised the comet-FISH assay to detect and compare DNA damage and repair in the p53 and hTERT gene regions of bladder cancer cell-lines RT4 and RT112, normal fibroblasts and Cockayne Syndrome (CS fibroblasts following γ-radiation. Cells were exposed to 5Gy γ-radiation and repair followed for up to 60 minutes. At each repair time-point, the number and location of p53 and hTERT hybridisation spots was recorded in addition to standard comet measurements. In bladder cancer cell-lines and normal fibroblasts, the p53 gene region was found to be rapidly repaired relative to the hTERT gene region and the overall genome, a phenomenon that appeared to be independent of hTERT transcriptional activity. However, in the CS fibroblasts, which are defective in transcription coupled repair (TCR, this rapid repair of the p53 gene region was not observed when compared to both the hTERT gene region and the overall genome, proving the assay can detect variations in DNA repair in the same gene. In conclusion, we propose that the comet-FISH assay is a sensitive and rapid method for detecting differences in DNA damage and repair between different gene regions in individual cells in response to radiation. We suggest this increases its potential for measuring radiosensitivity in cells and may therefore have value in a clinical setting.

  14. Stimulation of DNA repair and increased light output in response to UV irradiation in Escherichia coli expressing lux genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutter, Kerry L; Alloush, Habib M; Salisbury, Vyv C

    2007-01-01

    It has previously been suggested that the evolutionary drive of bacterial bioluminescence is a mechanism of DNA repair. By assessing the UV sensitivity of Escherichia coli, it is shown that the survival of UV-irradiated E. coli constitutively expressing luxABCDE in the dark is significantly better than either a strain with no lux gene expression or the same strain expressing only luciferase (luxAB) genes. This shows that UV resistance is dependent on light output, and not merely on luciferase production. Also, bacterial survival was found to be dependent on the conditions following UV irradiation, as bioluminescence-mediated repair was not as efficient as repair in visible light. Moreover, photon emission revealed a dose-dependent increase in light output per cell after UV exposure, suggesting that increased lux gene expression correlates with UV-induced DNA damage. This phenomenon has been previously documented in organisms where the lux genes are under their natural luxR regulation but has not previously been demonstrated under the regulation of a constitutive promoter.

  15. c-Myc directly regulates the transcription of the NBS1 gene involved in DNA double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Yu-Chi; Teng, Shu-Chun; Su, Yi-Ning; Hsieh, Fon-Jou; Wu, Kou-Juey

    2003-05-23

    The c-myc proto-oncogene encodes a ubiquitous transcription factor involved in the control of cell growth and implicated in inducing tumorigenesis. Understanding the function of c-Myc and its role in cancer depends upon the identification of c-Myc target genes. Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is a chromosomal-instability syndrome associated with cancer predisposition, radiosensitivity, and chromosomal instability. The NBS gene product, NBS1 (p95 or nibrin), is a part of the hMre11 complex, a central player associated with double-strand break (DSB) repair. NBS1 contains domains characteristic for proteins involved in DNA repair, recombination, and replication. Here we show that c-Myc directly activates NBS1. c-Myc-mediated induction of NBS1 gene transcription occurs in different tissues, is independent of cell proliferation, and is mediated by a c-Myc binding site in the intron 1 region of NBS1 gene. Overexpression of NBS1 in Rat1a cells increased cell proliferation. These results indicate that NBS1 is a direct transcriptional target of c-Myc and links the function of c-Myc to the regulation of DNA DSB repair pathway operating during DNA replication.

  16. Gypenosides causes DNA damage and inhibits expression of DNA repair genes of human oral cancer SAS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Kung-Wen; Chen, Jung-Chou; Lai, Tung-Yuan; Yang, Jai-Sing; Weng, Shu-Wen; Ma, Yi-Shih; Tang, Nou-Ying; Lu, Pei-Jung; Weng, Jing-Ru; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2010-01-01

    Gypenosides (Gyp) are the major components of Gynostemma pentaphyllum Makino, a Chinese medical plant. Recently, Gyp has been shown to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in many human cancer cell lines. However, there is no available information to address the effects of Gyp on DNA damage and DNA repair-associated gene expression in human oral cancer cells. Therefore, we investigated whether Gyp induced DNA damage and DNA repair gene expression in human oral cancer SAS cells. The results from flow cytometric assay indicated that Gyp-induced cytotoxic effects led to a decrease in the percentage of viable SAS cells. The results from comet assay revealed that the incubation of SAS cells with Gyp led to a longer DNA migration smear (comet tail) when compared with control and this effect was dose-dependent. The results from real-time PCR analysis indicated that treatment of SAS cells with 180 mug/ml of Gyp for 24 h led to a decrease in 14-3-3sigma, DNA-dependent serine/threonine protein kinase (DNAPK), p53, ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ataxia-telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) and breast cancer gene 1 (BRCA1) mRNA expression. These observations may explain the cell death caused by Gyp in SAS cells. Taken together, Gyp induced DNA damage and inhibited DNA repair-associated gene expressions in human oral cancer SAS cells in vitro.

  17. Manipulation of cell cycle progression can counteract the apparent loss of correction frequency following oligonucleotide-directed gene repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kmiec Eric B

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single-stranded oligonucleotides (ssODN are used routinely to direct specific base alterations within mammalian genomes that result in the restoration of a functional gene. Despite success with the technique, recent studies have revealed that following repair events, correction frequencies decrease as a function of time, possibly due to a sustained activation of damage response signals in corrected cells that lead to a selective stalling. In this study, we use thymidine to slow down the replication rate to enhance repair frequency and to maintain substantial levels of correction over time. Results First, we utilized thymidine to arrest cells in G1 and released the cells into S phase, at which point specific ssODNs direct the highest level of correction. Next, we devised a protocol in which cells are maintained in thymidine following the repair reaction, in which the replication is slowed in both corrected and non-corrected cells and the initial correction frequency is retained. We also present evidence that cells enter a senescence state upon prolonged treatment with thymidine but this passage can be avoided by removing thymidine at 48 hours. Conclusion Taken together, we believe that thymidine may be used in a therapeutic fashion to enable the maintenance of high levels of treated cells bearing repaired genes.

  18. Contribution of DNA double-strand break repair gene XRCC3 genotypes to oral cancer susceptibility in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chia-Wen; Chang, Wen-Shin; Liu, Juhn-Cherng; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Bau, Da-Tian

    2014-06-01

    The DNA repair gene X-ray repair cross complementing protein 3 (XRCC3) is thought to play a major role in double-strand break repair and in maintaining genomic stability. Very possibly, defective double-strand break repair of cells can lead to carcinogenesis. Therefore, a case-control study was performed to reveal the contribution of XRCC3 genotypes to individual oral cancer susceptibility. In this hospital-based research, the association of XRCC3 rs1799794, rs45603942, rs861530, rs3212057, rs1799796, rs861539, rs28903081 genotypes with oral cancer risk in a Taiwanese population was investigated. In total, 788 patients with oral cancer and 956 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were genotyped. The results showed that there was significant differential distribution among oral cancer and controls in the genotypic (p=0.001428) and allelic (p=0.0013) frequencies of XRCC3 rs861539. As for the other polymorphisms, there was no difference between case and control groups. In gene-lifestyle interaction analysis, we have provided the first evidence showing that there is an obvious joint effect of XRCC3 rs861539 genotype with individual areca chewing habits on oral cancer risk. In conclusion, the T allele of XRCC3 rs861539, which has an interaction with areca chewing habit in oral carcinogenesis, may be an early marker for oral cancer in Taiwanese.

  19. Escherichia coli radD (yejH) gene: a novel function involved in radiation resistance and double-strand break repair

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Stefanie H.; Byrne, Rose T.; Wood, Elizabeth A; Cox, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    A transposon insertion screen implicated the yejH gene in the repair of ionizing radiation-induced damage. The yejH gene, which exhibits significant homology to the human transcription-coupled DNA repair gene XPB, is involved in the repair of double strand DNA breaks. Deletion of yejH significantly sensitized cells to agents that cause double strand breaks (ionizing radiation, UV radiation, ciprofloxacin). In addition, deletion of both yejH and radA hypersensitized the cells to ionizing radia...

  20. Mating-type suppression of the DNA-repair defect of the yeast rad6 delta mutation requires the activity of genes in the RAD52 epistasis group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Y X; Schiestl, R H; Prakash, L

    1995-06-01

    The RAD6 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for post-replication repair of UV-damaged DNA, UV mutagenesis, and sporulation. Here, we show that the radiation sensitivity of a MATa rad6 delta strain can be suppressed by the MAT alpha 2 gene carried on a multicopy plasmid. The a1-alpha 2 suppression is specific to the RAD6 pathway, as mutations in genes required for nucleotide excision repair or for recombinational repair do not show such mating-type suppression. The a1-alpha 2 suppression of the rad6 delta mutation requires the activity of the RAD52 group of genes, suggesting that suppression occurs by channelling of post-replication gaps present in the rad6 delta mutant into the RAD52 recombinational repair pathway. The a1-alpha 2 repressor could mediate this suppression via an enhancement in the expression, or the activity, of recombination genes.

  1. Exome sequencing identifies rare deleterious mutations in DNA repair genes FANCC and BLM as potential breast cancer susceptibility alleles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ella R Thompson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite intensive efforts using linkage and candidate gene approaches, the genetic etiology for the majority of families with a multi-generational breast cancer predisposition is unknown. In this study, we used whole-exome sequencing of thirty-three individuals from 15 breast cancer families to identify potential predisposing genes. Our analysis identified families with heterozygous, deleterious mutations in the DNA repair genes FANCC and BLM, which are responsible for the autosomal recessive disorders Fanconi Anemia and Bloom syndrome. In total, screening of all exons in these genes in 438 breast cancer families identified three with truncating mutations in FANCC and two with truncating mutations in BLM. Additional screening of FANCC mutation hotspot exons identified one pathogenic mutation among an additional 957 breast cancer families. Importantly, none of the deleterious mutations were identified among 464 healthy controls and are not reported in the 1,000 Genomes data. Given the rarity of Fanconi Anemia and Bloom syndrome disorders among Caucasian populations, the finding of multiple deleterious mutations in these critical DNA repair genes among high-risk breast cancer families is intriguing and suggestive of a predisposing role. Our data demonstrate the utility of intra-family exome-sequencing approaches to uncover cancer predisposition genes, but highlight the major challenge of definitively validating candidates where the incidence of sporadic disease is high, germline mutations are not fully penetrant, and individual predisposition genes may only account for a tiny proportion of breast cancer families.

  2. Polymorphism of the DNA repair gene XPA and susceptibility to lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinfu Zhu; Zhibin Hu; Hongxia Ma; Xiang Huo; Lin Xu; Jiannong Zhou; Hongbing Shen; Yijiang Chen

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between one polymorphism in the promoter of the DNA repair gene XPA and the susceptibility to lung cancer. Methods: Genotypes were determined by the PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP)method in 310 histologically-confirmed lung cancer cases and 341 age and sex frequency-matched cancer-free controls. Results: The XPA A23G genotype frequencies were 27.1% (AA), 42.9% (AG), and 30.0% (GG) in case patients and 21.1% (AA), 52.8% (AG),and 26.1% (GG) in control subjects. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that individuals carrying at least one 23G variant allele (AG + GG genotypes) had a significantly decreased risk for lung cancer (adjusted OR = 0.66; 95% CI = 0.44- 0.98) compared with the wild-type genotype (23AA). Stratified analysis showed that the protective effect was more evident in subjects with a family history of cancer. Conclusion: These results suggest that the XPA A23G polymorphism may have a role in lung cancer susceptibility in this study population.

  3. Human INO80 chromatin-remodelling complex contributes to DNA double-strand break repair via the expression of Rad54B and XRCC3 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun-Jung; Hur, Shin-Kyoung; Kwon, Jongbum

    2010-10-15

    Recent studies have shown that the SWI/SNF family of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodelling complexes play important roles in DNA repair as well as in transcription. The INO80 complex, the most recently described member of this family, has been shown in yeast to play direct role in DNA DSB (double-strand break) repair without affecting the expression of the genes involved in this process. However, whether this function of the INO80 complex is conserved in higher eukaryotes has not been investigated. In the present study, we found that knockdown of hINO80 (human INO80) confers DNA-damage hypersensitivity and inefficient DSB repair. Microarray analysis and other experiments have identified the Rad54B and XRCC3 (X-ray repair complementing defective repair in Chinese-hamster cells 3) genes, implicated in DSB repair, to be repressed by hINO80 deficiency. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies have shown that hINO80 binds to the promoters of the Rad54B and XRCC3 genes. Re-expression of the Rad54B and XRCC3 genes rescues the DSB repair defect in hINO80-deficient cells. These results suggest that hINO80 assists DSB repair by positively regulating the expression of the Rad54B and XRCC3 genes. Therefore, unlike yeast INO80, hINO80 can contribute to DSB repair indirectly via gene expression, suggesting that the mechanistic role of this chromatin remodeller in DSB repair is evolutionarily diversified.

  4. Clinical features and mismatch repair gene mutation screening in Chinese patients with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan-Run Liu; Bo Zhao; Zhen-Jun Wang; Yuan-Lian Wan; Yan-Ting Huang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is an autosomal dominantly- inherited cancer-susceptibility syndrome that confers an increased risk for colorectal cancer and a variety of other tumors at a young age. It has been associated with germline mutations in five mismatch repair (MMR) genes (hMSH2, hMLH1, hPMS1, hPMS2, and hMSH6/GTBP). The great majority of germline mutations were found in hMSH2 and hMLH1. The purpose of this study was to analyze the clinical features of Chinese HNPCC patients and to screen hMSH2 and hMLH1 gene mutations. METHODS: Twenty-eight independent Chinese families were collected, of which 15 met Amsterdam criteria I and 13 met the Japanese clinical diagnosis criteria. The data were recorded including sex, site of colorectal cancer (CRC),age of diagnosis, history of synchronous and/or metachronous CRC, instance of extracolonic cancers, and histopathology of tumors. Peripheral blood samples were collected from all pedigrees after formal written consents were signed. PCR and denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) were used to screen the coding regions of hMSH2 and hMLH1 genes. The samples showing abnormal DHPLC profiles were sequenced by a 377 DNA sequencer.RESULTS: One hundred and seventy malignant neoplasms were found in one hundred and twenty-six patients (multiple cancer in twenty-three), including one hundred and twentyseven CRCs, fifteen gastric, seven endometrial, and five esophageal cancers. Seventy-seven point eight percent of the patients had CRCs, sharing the features of early occurrence (average age of onset, 45.9 years) and of the right-sided predominance reported in the literature. In Chinese HNPCC patients, gastric cancer occurred more frequently, accounting for 11.9% of all cancers patients and ranking second in the spectrum of HNPCC predisposing cancers. Synchronous CRCs occurred less frequently, only accounting for 3.1% of the total CRCs. Twenty percent of the colorectal patients had

  5. Association between DNA damage response and repair genes and risk of invasive serous ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joellen M Schildkraut

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We analyzed the association between 53 genes related to DNA repair and p53-mediated damage response and serous ovarian cancer risk using case-control data from the North Carolina Ovarian Cancer Study (NCOCS, a population-based, case-control study. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The analysis was restricted to 364 invasive serous ovarian cancer cases and 761 controls of white, non-Hispanic race. Statistical analysis was two staged: a screen using marginal Bayes factors (BFs for 484 SNPs and a modeling stage in which we calculated multivariate adjusted posterior probabilities of association for 77 SNPs that passed the screen. These probabilities were conditional on subject age at diagnosis/interview, batch, a DNA quality metric and genotypes of other SNPs and allowed for uncertainty in the genetic parameterizations of the SNPs and number of associated SNPs. Six SNPs had Bayes factors greater than 10 in favor of an association with invasive serous ovarian cancer. These included rs5762746 (median OR(odds ratio(per allele = 0.66; 95% credible interval (CI = 0.44-1.00 and rs6005835 (median OR(per allele = 0.69; 95% CI = 0.53-0.91 in CHEK2, rs2078486 (median OR(per allele = 1.65; 95% CI = 1.21-2.25 and rs12951053 (median OR(per allele = 1.65; 95% CI = 1.20-2.26 in TP53, rs411697 (median OR (rare homozygote = 0.53; 95% CI = 0.35 - 0.79 in BACH1 and rs10131 (median OR( rare homozygote = not estimable in LIG4. The six most highly associated SNPs are either predicted to be functionally significant or are in LD with such a variant. The variants in TP53 were confirmed to be associated in a large follow-up study. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on our findings, further follow-up of the DNA repair and response pathways in a larger dataset is warranted to confirm these results.

  6. FRAGILE HISTIDINE TRIAD GENE EXPRESSION AND ITS CORRALATION WITH MISMATCH REPAIR PROTEIN IN HUMAN SPORADIC COLORECTAL CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚成才; 林从尧

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of fragile histidine triad (FHIT) gene and its correlation with clinicopathological features and correlation with mismatch repair protein (mainly MLH1 and MSH2) in human sporadic colorectal carcinoma (SCC). Methods:Immunohistochemistry SP method was used to determine the expression of FHIT, MLH1 and MSH2 protein in surgically resected specimens of 84 human SCC. Results:The positive rates of FHIT, MLH1 and MSH2 protein expression were 48.81%, 92.86% and 100% respectively.Loss or reduced expression of FHIT protein was not related with tumors clinicopathological features such as age, gender,tumors site and histological type (P>0.05), but was correlated with tumors invade depth, degree of the differentiation, Ducks' stage and metastasis (P<0.05). There was no relationship between FHIT gene expression and MLH1 protein (r=0.0991, P>0.05) and MSH2 protein (r=0.0000, P=l.00) expression in human SCC. Conclusion:Absent or reduction of FHIT gene expression consists of high proportion and is a frequent event in SCC. FHIT gene is involved in the development and progression of human SCC and may be a candidate tumors suppressor gene. The relationship between alteration of FHIT gene expression and mismatch repair protein (mainly MLH1 and MSH2)deserved further study in human SCC.

  7. Rearrangement of Rag-1 recombinase gene in DNA-repair deficient/immunodeficient wasted'' mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Weaver, P.; Churchill, M.; Chang-Liu, C-M. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Libertin, C.R. (Loyola Univ., Maywood, IL (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Mice recessive for the autosomal gene wasted'' (wst) display a disease pattern which includes increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency, and neurologic dysfunction. The recent cloning and characterization of recombinase genes (Rag-l/Rag-2) expressed in lymphoid and possibly central nervous system tissues prompted us to examine expression of these genes in DNA repair-deficient/immunodeficient wasted mice. Our results revealed that in thymus tissue, a small Rag-I transcript (1.0 kb) was detected in wst/wst mice that was not evident in thymus from control mice. In wst/[sm bullet] mice, a two-fold increase in Rag-1 mRNA was evident in thymus tissue. Rag-2 mRNA could only be detected in thymus tissue from wst/[sm bullet] and not from wst/wst or parental control BCF, mice. Southern blots revealed a rearrangement or deletion within the Rag-1 gene of affected wasted mice that was not evident in known strain-specific parental or littermate controls. These results support the idea that the Rag-1 gene may map at or near the locus for the wasted mutation. In addition, they suggest the importance of recombinase function in normal immune and central nervous system development as well as the potential contribution of this gene family to the normal repair of radiation-induced DNA damage.

  8. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes, smoking, and bladder cancer risk: findings from the International Consortium of Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Mariana C.; Lin, Jie; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Kelsey, Karl T.; Kiltie, Anne E.; Yuan, Jian-Min; Matullo, Giuseppe; Fletcher, Tony; Benhamou, Simone; Taylor, Jack A.; Placidi, Donatella; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Steineck, Gunnar; Rothman, Nathaniel; Kogevinas, Manolis; Silverman, Debra; Malats, Nuria; Chanock, Stephen; Wu, Xifeng; Karagas, Margaret R.; Andrew, Angeline S.; Nelson, Heather H.; Bishop, D. Timothy; Sak, Sei Chung; Choudhury, Ananya; Barrett, Jennifer H; Elliot, Faye; Corral, Román; Joshi, Amit D.; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Cortessis, Victoria K.; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Vineis, Paolo; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Guarrera, Simonetta; Polidoro, Silvia; Allione, Alessandra; Gurzau, Eugen; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Kumar, Rajiv; Rudnai, Peter; Porru, Stefano; Carta, Angela; Campagna, Marcello; Arici, Cecilia; Park, SungShim Lani; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2009-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is the most important and well-established bladder cancer risk factor, and a rich source of chemical carcinogens and reactive oxygen species that can induce damage to DNA in urothelial cells. Therefore, common variation in DNA repair genes might modify bladder cancer risk. In this study we present results from meta- and pooled analyses conducted as part of the International Consortium of Bladder Cancer. We included data on 10 single nucleotide polymorphisms corresponding to 7 DNA repair genes from 13 studies. Pooled- and meta-analyses included 5,282 cases and 5,954 controls of non-Latino white origin. We found evidence for weak but consistent associations with ERCC2 D312N (rs1799793) (per allele OR = 1.10; 95% CI = 1.01–1.19; p = 0.021), NBN E185Q (rs1805794) (per allele OR = 1.09; 95% CI = 1.01–1.18; p = 0.028), and XPC A499V (rs2228000) (per allele OR = 1.10; 95% CI = 1.00–1.21, p = 0.044). The association with NBN E185Q was limited to ever smokers (interaction p = 0.002), and was strongest for the highest levels of smoking dose and smoking duration. Overall, our study provides the strongest evidence to date for a role of common variants in DNA repair genes in bladder carcinogenesis. PMID:19706757

  9. Targeted Modification of Gene Function Exploiting Homology-Directed Repair of TALEN-Mediated Double-Strand Breaks in Barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budhagatapalli, Nagaveni; Rutten, Twan; Gurushidze, Maia; Kumlehn, Jochen; Hensel, Goetz

    2015-07-06

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases open up new opportunities for targeted mutagenesis in eukaryotic genomes. Similar to zinc-finger nucleases, sequence-specific DNA-binding domains can be fused with effector domains like the nucleolytically active part of FokI to induce double-strand breaks and thereby modify the host genome on a predefined target site via nonhomologous end joining. More sophisticated applications of programmable endonucleases involve the use of a DNA repair template facilitating homology-directed repair (HDR) so as to create predefined rather than random DNA sequence modifications. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of editing the barley genome by precisely modifying a defined target DNA sequence resulting in a predicted alteration of gene function. We used gfp-specific transcription activator-like effector nucleases along with a repair template that, via HDR, facilitates conversion of gfp into yfp, which is associated with a single amino acid exchange in the gene product. As a result of co-bombardment of leaf epidermis, we detected yellow fluorescent protein accumulation in about three of 100 mutated cells. The creation of a functional yfp gene via HDR was unambiguously confirmed by sequencing of the respective genomic site. In addition to the allele conversion accomplished in planta, a readily screenable marker system is introduced that might be useful for optimization approaches in the field of genome editing.

  10. The Mutyh base excision repair gene influences the inflammatory response in a mouse model of ulcerative colitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Casorelli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Mutyh DNA glycosylase is involved in the repair of oxidized DNA bases. Mutations in the human MUTYH gene are responsible for colorectal cancer in familial adenomatous polyposis. Since defective DNA repair genes might contribute to the increased cancer risk associated with inflammatory bowel diseases, we compared the inflammatory response of wild-type and Mutyh(-/- mice to oxidative stress. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The severity of colitis, changes in expression of genes involved in DNA repair and inflammation, DNA 8-oxoguanine levels and microsatellite instability were analysed in colon of mice treated with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS. The Mutyh(-/- phenotype was associated with a significant accumulation of 8-oxoguanine in colon DNA of treated mice. A single DSS cycle induced severe acute ulcerative colitis in wild-type mice, whereas lesions were modest in Mutyh(-/- mice, and this was associated with moderate variations in the expression of several cytokines. Eight DSS cycles caused chronic colitis in both wild-type and Mutyh(-/- mice. Lymphoid hyperplasia and a significant reduction in Foxp3(+ regulatory T cells were observed only in Mutyh(-/- mice. CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicate that, in this model of ulcerative colitis, Mutyh plays a major role in maintaining intestinal integrity by affecting the inflammatory response.

  11. New single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in homologous recombination repair genes detected by microarray analysis in Polish breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowicz, Hanna; Strapagiel, Dominik; Słomka, Marcin; Sobalska-Kwapis, Marta; Kępka, Ewa; Siewierska-Górska, Anna; Zadrożny, Marek; Bieńkiewicz, Jan; Smolarz, Beata

    2016-11-30

    Breast cancer is the most common cause of malignancy and mortality in women worldwide. This study aimed at localising homologous recombination repair (HR) genes and their chromosomal loci and correlating their nucleotide variants with susceptibility to breast cancer. In this study, authors analysed the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in homologous recombination repair genes and the incidence of breast cancer in the population of Polish women. Blood samples from 94 breast cancer patients were analysed as test group. Individuals were recruited into the study at the Department of Oncological Surgery and Breast Diseases of the Institute of the Polish Mother's Memorial Hospital in Lodz, Poland. Healthy controls (n = 500) were obtained from the Biobank Laboratory, Department of Molecular Biophysics, University of Lodz. Then, DNA of breast cancer patients was compared with one of the disease-free women. The test was supported by microarray analysis. Statistically significant correlations were identified between breast cancer and 3 not described previously SNPs of homologous recombination repair genes BRCA1 and BRCA2: rs59004709, rs4986852 and rs1799950. Further studies on larger groups are warranted to support the hypothesis of correlation between the abovementioned genetic variants and breast cancer risk.

  12. Transplantation of erythropoietin gene-modified neural stem cells improves the repair of injured spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-fei Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The protective effects of erythropoietin on spinal cord injury have not been well described. Here, the eukaryotic expression plasmid pcDNA3.1 human erythropoietin was transfected into rat neural stem cells cultured in vitro. A rat model of spinal cord injury was established using a free falling object. In the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group, transfected neural stem cells were injected into the rat subarachnoid cavity, while the neural stem cells group was injected with non-transfected neural stem cells. Dulbecco′s modified Eagle′s medium/F12 medium was injected into the rats in the spinal cord injury group as a control. At 1-4 weeks post injury, the motor function in the rat lower limbs was best in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group, followed by the neural stem cells group, and lastly the spinal cord injury group. At 72 hours, compared with the spinal cord injury group, the apoptotic index and Caspase-3 gene and protein expressions were apparently decreased, and the bcl-2 gene and protein expressions were noticeably increased, in the tissues surrounding the injured region in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group. At 4 weeks, the cavities were clearly smaller and the motor and somatosensory evoked potential latencies were remarkably shorter in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group and neural stem cells group than those in the spinal cord injury group. These differences were particularly obvious in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group. More CM-Dil-positive cells and horseradish peroxidase-positive nerve fibers and larger amplitude motor and somatosensory evoked potentials were found in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group and neural stem cells group than in the spinal cord injury group. Again, these differences were particularly obvious in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group. These data indicate that transplantation of erythropoietin gene-modified neural stem

  13. Transplantation of erythropoietin gene-modified neural stem cells improves the repair of injured spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min-Fei; Zhang, Shu-Quan; Gu, Rui; Liu, Jia-Bei; Li, Ye; Zhu, Qing-San

    2015-09-01

    The protective effects of erythropoietin on spinal cord injury have not been well described. Here, the eukaryotic expression plasmid pcDNA3.1 human erythropoietin was transfected into rat neural stem cells cultured in vitro. A rat model of spinal cord injury was established using a free falling object. In the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group, transfected neural stem cells were injected into the rat subarachnoid cavity, while the neural stem cells group was injected with non-transfected neural stem cells. Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium/F12 medium was injected into the rats in the spinal cord injury group as a control. At 1-4 weeks post injury, the motor function in the rat lower limbs was best in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group, followed by the neural stem cells group, and lastly the spinal cord injury group. At 72 hours, compared with the spinal cord injury group, the apoptotic index and Caspase-3 gene and protein expressions were apparently decreased, and the bcl-2 gene and protein expressions were noticeably increased, in the tissues surrounding the injured region in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group. At 4 weeks, the cavities were clearly smaller and the motor and somatosensory evoked potential latencies were remarkably shorter in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group and neural stem cells group than those in the spinal cord injury group. These differences were particularly obvious in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group. More CM-Dil-positive cells and horseradish peroxidase-positive nerve fibers and larger amplitude motor and somatosensory evoked potentials were found in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group and neural stem cells group than in the spinal cord injury group. Again, these differences were particularly obvious in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group. These data indicate that transplantation of erythropoietin gene-modified neural stem cells into the

  14. Transplantation of erythropoietin gene-modiifed neural stem cells improves the repair of injured spinal cord

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min-fei Wu; Shu-quan Zhang; Rui Gu; Jia-bei Liu; Ye Li; Qing-san Zhu

    2015-01-01

    The protective effects of erythropoietin on spinal cord injury have not been well described. Here, the eukaryotic expression plasmid pcDNA3.1 human erythropoietin was transfected into rat neural stem cells culturedin vitro. A rat model of spinal cord injury was established using a free falling object. In the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group, transfected neural stem cells were injected into the rat subarachnoid cavity, while the neural stem cells group was inject-ed with non-transfected neural stem cells. Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium/F12 medium was injected into the rats in the spinal cord injury group as a control. At 1–4 weeks post injury, the motor function in the rat lower limbs was best in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group, followed by the neural stem cells group, and lastly the spinal cord injury group. At 72 hours, compared with the spinal cord injury group, the apoptotic index and Caspase-3 gene and protein expressions were apparently decreased, and the bcl-2 gene and protein expressions were noticeably increased, in the tissues surrounding the injured region in the human erythro-poietin-neural stem cells group. At 4 weeks, the cavities were clearly smaller and the motor and somatosensory evoked potential latencies were remarkably shorter in the human erythropoi-etin-neural stem cells group and neural stem cells group than those in the spinal cord injury group. These differences were particularly obvious in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group. More CM-Dil-positive cells and horseradish peroxidase-positive nerve fibers and larger amplitude motor and somatosensory evoked potentials were found in the human erythro-poietin-neural stem cells group and neural stem cells group than in the spinal cord injury group. Again, these differences were particularly obvious in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group. These data indicate that transplantation of erythropoietin gene-modified neural stem cells into the

  15. Alcohol Consumption and the Risk of Colorectal Cancer for Mismatch Repair Gene Mutation Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashti, S Ghazaleh; Buchanan, Daniel D; Jayasekara, Harindra; Ait Ouakrim, Driss; Clendenning, Mark; Rosty, Christophe; Winship, Ingrid M; Macrae, Finlay A; Giles, Graham G; Parry, Susan; Casey, Graham; Haile, Robert W; Gallinger, Steven; Le Marchand, Loïc; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Lindor, Noralane M; Newcomb, Polly A; Potter, John D; Baron, John A; Hopper, John L; Jenkins, Mark A; Win, Aung Ko

    2017-03-01

    Background: People with germline mutation in one of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes have increased colorectal cancer risk. For these high-risk people, study findings of the relationship between alcohol consumption and colorectal cancer risk have been inconclusive.Methods: 1,925 MMR gene mutations carriers recruited into the Colon Cancer Family Registry who had completed a questionnaire on lifestyle factors were included. Weighted Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between alcohol consumption and colorectal cancer.Results: Colorectal cancer was diagnosed in 769 carriers (40%) at a mean (SD) age of 42.6 (10.3) years. Compared with abstention, ethanol consumption from any alcoholic beverage up to 14 g/day and >28 g/day was associated with increased colorectal cancer risk (HR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.09-2.07 and 1.69; 95% CI, 1.07-2.65, respectively; Ptrend = 0.05), and colon cancer risk (HR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.27-2.49 and 1.94; 95% CI, 1.19-3.18, respectively; Ptrend = 0.02). However, there was no clear evidence for an association with rectal cancer risk. Also, there was no evidence for associations between consumption of individual alcoholic beverage types (beer, wine, spirits) and colorectal, colon, or rectal cancer risk.Conclusions: Our data suggest that alcohol consumption, particularly more than 28 g/day of ethanol (∼2 standard drinks of alcohol in the United States), is associated with increased colorectal cancer risk for MMR gene mutation carriers.Impact: Although these data suggested that alcohol consumption in MMR carriers was associated with increased colorectal cancer risk, there was no evidence of a dose-response, and not all types of alcohol consumption were associated with increased risk. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(3); 366-75. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Heteroduplex DNA mismatch repair system of Streptococcus pneumoniae: cloning and expression of the hexA gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Balganesh, T S; Lacks, S A

    1985-01-01

    Mutations affecting heteroduplex DNA mismatch repair in Streptococcus pneumoniae were localized in two genes, hexA and hexB, by fractionation of restriction fragments carrying mutant alleles. A fragment containing the hexA4 allele was cloned in the S. pneumoniae cloning system, and the hexA+ allele was introduced into the recombinant plasmid by chromosomal facilitation of plasmid transfer. Subcloning localized the functional hexA gene to a 3.5-kilobase segment of the cloned pneumococcal DNA. ...

  17. Topoisomerase-1 and -2A gene copy numbers are elevated in mismatch repair-proficient colorectal cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderstrup, Ida Marie Heeholm; Nygård, Sune Boris; Poulsen, Tim Svenstrup

    2015-01-01

    (MMR) subtypes of CRC have been associated with benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy of primary CRC. Given the involvement of the topoisomerase enzymes in DNA replication and repair, we raised the hypothesis that an association may exist between TOP gene copy numbers and MMR proficiency/deficiency in CRC...... patients with deficient MMR (dMMR) CRC. TOP1 and TOP2A gene copy numbers and their ratios per nucleus were correlated with MMR status using the Mann-Whitney test. Validation cohort: FFPE samples from 154 patients with primary stage III CRC (originally included in the RANX05 study) were classified according...

  18. Two DNA repair and recombination genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, RAD52 and RAD54, are induced during meiosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, G.M.; Mortimer, R.K. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)); Schild, D. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

    1989-07-01

    The DNA repair and recombination genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, RAD52 and RAD54, were transcriptionally induced approximately 10- to 15-fold in sporulating MATa/{alpha} cells. Congenic MATa/a cells, which did not sporulate, did not show similar increases. Assays of {beta}-galactosidase activity in strains harboring either a RAD52- or RAD54-lacZ gene fusion indicated that this induction occurred at a time concomitant with a commitment to meiotic recombination, as measured by prototroph formation from his1 heteroalleles.

  19. A small interfering RNA screen of genes involved in DNA repair identifies tumor-specific radiosensitization by POLQ knockdown

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Higgins, Geoff S; Prevo, Remko; Lee, Yin-Fai

    2010-01-01

    radiosensitivity are largely unknown. We have conducted a small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen of 200 genes involved in DNA damage repair aimed at identifying genes whose knockdown increased tumor radiosensitivity. Parallel siRNA screens were conducted in irradiated and unirradiated tumor cells (SQ20B...... polymerase ) as a potential tumor-specific target. Subsequent investigations showed that POLQ knockdown resulted in radiosensitization of a panel of tumor cell lines from different primary sites while having little or no effect on normal tissue cell lines. These findings raise the possibility that POLQ...

  20. RAD1 and RAD10, but not other excision repair genes, are required for double-strand break-induced recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, E L; Haber, J E

    1995-04-01

    HO endonuclease-induced double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be repaired by the process of gap repair or, alternatively, by single-strand annealing if the site of the break is flanked by directly repeated homologous sequences. We have shown previously (J. Fishman-Lobell and J. E. Haber, Science 258:480-484, 1992) that during the repair of an HO-induced DSB, the excision repair gene RAD1 is needed to remove regions of nonhomology from the DSB ends. In this report, we present evidence that among nine genes involved in nucleotide excision repair, only RAD1 and RAD10 are required for removal of nonhomologous sequences from the DSB ends. rad1 delta and rad10 delta mutants displayed a 20-fold reduction in the ability to execute both gap repair and single-strand annealing pathways of HO-induced recombination. Mutations in RAD2, RAD3, and RAD14 reduced HO-induced recombination by about twofold. We also show that RAD7 and RAD16, which are required to remove UV photodamage from the silent HML, locus, are not required for MAT switching with HML or HMR as a donor. Our results provide a molecular basis for understanding the role of yeast nucleotide excision repair gene and their human homologs in DSB-induced recombination and repair.

  1. An integrative approach to the study of filamentous oligomeric assemblies, with application to RecA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Benjamin; Ezelin, Johann; Poulain, Pierre; Saladin, Adrien; Zacharias, Martin; Robert, Charles H; Prévost, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    Oligomeric macromolecules in the cell self-organize into a wide variety of geometrical motifs such as helices, rings or linear filaments. The recombinase proteins involved in homologous recombination present many such assembly motifs. Here, we examine in particular the polymorphic characteristics of RecA, the most studied member of the recombinase family, using an integrative approach that relates local modes of monomer/monomer association to the global architecture of their screw-type organization. In our approach, local modes of association are sampled via docking or Monte Carlo simulations. This enables shedding new light on fiber morphologies that may be adopted by the RecA protein. Two distinct RecA helical morphologies, the so-called "extended" and "compressed" forms, are known to play a role in homologous recombination. We investigate the variability within each form in terms of helical parameters and steric accessibility. We also address possible helical discontinuities in RecA filaments due to multiple monomer-monomer association modes. By relating local interface organization to global filament morphology, the strategies developed here to study RecA self-assembly are particularly well suited to other DNA-binding proteins and to filamentous protein assemblies in general.

  2. Structural studies on Mycobacterium tuberculosis RecA: Molecular plasticity and interspecies variability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anu V Chandran; J Rajan Prabu; Astha Nautiyal; K Neelakanteshwar Patil; K Muniyappa; M Vijayan

    2015-03-01

    Structures of crystals of Mycobacterium tuberculosis RecA, grown and analysed under different conditions, provide insights into hitherto underappreciated details of molecular structure and plasticity. In particular, they yield information on the invariant and variable features of the geometry of the P-loop, whose binding to ATP is central for all the biochemical activities of RecA. The strengths of interaction of the ligands with the P-loop reveal significant differences. This in turn affects the magnitude of the motion of the `switch’ residue, Gln195 in M. tuberculosis RecA, which triggers the transmission of ATP-mediated allosteric information to the DNA binding region. M. tuberculosis RecA is substantially rigid compared with its counterparts from M. smegmatis and E. coli, which exhibit concerted internal molecular mobility. The interspecies variability in the plasticity of the two mycobacterial proteins is particularly surprising as they have similar sequence and 3D structure. Details of the interactions of ligands with the protein, characterized in the structures reported here, could be useful for design of inhibitors against M. tuberculosis RecA.

  3. An integrative approach to the study of filamentous oligomeric assemblies, with application to RecA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Boyer

    Full Text Available Oligomeric macromolecules in the cell self-organize into a wide variety of geometrical motifs such as helices, rings or linear filaments. The recombinase proteins involved in homologous recombination present many such assembly motifs. Here, we examine in particular the polymorphic characteristics of RecA, the most studied member of the recombinase family, using an integrative approach that relates local modes of monomer/monomer association to the global architecture of their screw-type organization. In our approach, local modes of association are sampled via docking or Monte Carlo simulations. This enables shedding new light on fiber morphologies that may be adopted by the RecA protein. Two distinct RecA helical morphologies, the so-called "extended" and "compressed" forms, are known to play a role in homologous recombination. We investigate the variability within each form in terms of helical parameters and steric accessibility. We also address possible helical discontinuities in RecA filaments due to multiple monomer-monomer association modes. By relating local interface organization to global filament morphology, the strategies developed here to study RecA self-assembly are particularly well suited to other DNA-binding proteins and to filamentous protein assemblies in general.

  4. Repair genes expression profile of MLH1, MSH2 and ATM in the normal oral mucosa of chronic smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Mônica Ghislaine Oliveira; Carta, Celina Faig Lima; de Barros, Patrícia Pimentel; Issa, Jaqueline Scholz; Nunes, Fábio Daumas; Almeida, Janete Dias

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of chronic smoking on the expression profile of the repair genes MLH1, MSH2 and ATM in the normal oral mucosa of chronic smokers and never smokers. The sample consisted of thirty exfoliative cytology smears per group obtained from Smokers and Never Smokers. Total RNA was extracted and expression of the MLH1, MSH2 and ATM genes were evaluated by quantitative real-time and immunocytochemistry. The gene and protein expression data were correlated to the clinical data. Gene expression was analyzed statistically using the Student t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient, with pexpression of MLH1, MSH2, ATM and age, number of cigarettes consumed per day, time of smoking during life, smoking history or levels of CO in expired air. The expression of genes and proteins related to DNA repair mechanism MLH1, MSH2 and ATM in the normal oral mucosa of chronic smokers was reduced. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. DNA repair and damage pathway related cancer suppressor genes in low-dose-rate irradiated AKR/J an IR mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Hyun Soon; Bong, Jin Jong; Kang, Yumi; Choi, Moo Hyun; Lee, Hae Un; Yoo, Jae Young; Choi, Seung Jin; Kim, Hee Sun [Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung Mi [Global Research Lab, BAERI Institute, Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    It has been reported that low-dose-rate radiation stimulates the immune response, prolongs life span and inhibits carcinogenesis. The high dose-rate radiation influences the expression of DNA repair and damage-related genes. In contrast, DNA repair and damage signaling triggered by low-dose-rate irradiation remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the differential expression of DNA repair and damage pathway related genes in the thymus of AKR/J and ICR mice after 100th day low-dose-rate irradiation. Our findings demonstrated that low-dose-rate γ -radiation suppressed tumorigenesis.

  6. Prognostic impact of mismatch repair genes germline defects in colorectal cancer patients: are all mutations equal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccaroni, Elena; Bracci, Raffaella; Giampieri, Riccardo; Bianchi, Francesca; Belvederesi, Laura; Brugiati, Cristiana; Pagliaretta, Silvia; Del Prete, Michela; Scartozzi, Mario; Cascinu, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Background Lynch syndrome (LS) is the most common hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) syndrome, caused by germline mutations in MisMatch Repair (MMR) genes, particularly in MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6. Patients with LS seem to have a more favourable prognosis than those with sporadic CRC, although the prognostic impact of different mutation types is unknown. Aim of our study is to compare survival outcomes of different types of MMR mutations in patients with LS-related CRC. Methods 302 CRC patients were prospectively selected on the basis of Amsterdam or Revised Bethesda criteria to undergo genetic testing: direct sequencing of DNA and MLPA were used to examine the entire MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 coding sequence. Patients were classified as mutation-positive or negative according to the genetic testing result. Results A deleterious MMR mutation was found in 38/302 patients. Median overall survival (OS) was significantly higher in mutation-positive vs mutation-negative patients (102.6 vs 77.7 months, HR:0.63, 95%CI:0.46–0.89, p = 0.0083). Different types of mutation were significantly related with OS: missense or splicing-site mutations were associated with better OS compared with rearrangement, frameshift or non-sense mutations (132.5 vs 82.5 months, HR:0.46, 95%CI:0.16–0.82, p = 0.0153). Conclusions Our study confirms improved OS for LS-patients compared with mutation-negative CRC patients. In addition, not all mutations could be considered equal: the better prognosis in CRC patients with MMR pathogenic missense or splicing site mutation could be due to different functional activity of the encoded MMR protein. This matter should be investigated by use of functional assays in the future. PMID:26485756

  7. Failure to induce a DNA repair gene, RAD54, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae does not affect DNA repair or recombination phenotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, G.M.; Mortimer, R.K. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (USA))

    1989-08-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD54 gene is transcriptionally regulated by a broad spectrum of DNA-damaging agents. Induction of RAD54 by DNA-damaging agents is under positive control. Sequences responsible for DNA damage induction (the DRS element) lie within a 29-base-pair region from -99 to -70 from the most proximal transcription start site. This inducible promoter element is functionally separable from a poly(dA-dT) region immediately downstream which is required for constitutive expression. Deletions which eliminate induction of RAD54 transcription by DNA damage but do not affect constitutive expression have no effect on growth or survival of noninducible strains relative to wild-type strains in the presence of DNA-damaging agents. The DRS element is also not required for homothallic mating type switching, transcriptional induction of RAD54 during meiosis, meiotic recombination, or spontaneous or X-ray-induced mitotic recombination. We find no phenotype for a lack of induction of RAD54 message via the damage-inducible DRS, which raises significant questions about the physiology of DNA damage induction in S. cerevisiae.

  8. Homology Requirements and Competition between Gene Conversion and Break-Induced Replication during Double-Strand Break Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Anuja; Beach, Annette; Haber, James E

    2017-02-02

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae mating-type switching is initiated by a double-strand break (DSB) at MATa, leaving one cut end perfectly homologous to the HMLα donor, while the second end must be processed to remove a non-homologous tail before completing repair by gene conversion (GC). When homology at the matched end is ≤150 bp, efficient repair depends on the recombination enhancer, which tethers HMLα near the DSB. Thus, homology shorter than an apparent minimum efficient processing segment can be rescued by tethering the donor near the break. When homology at the second end is ≤150 bp, second-end capture becomes inefficient and repair shifts from GC to break-induced replication (BIR). But when pol32 or pif1 mutants block BIR, GC increases 3-fold, indicating that the steps blocked by these mutations are reversible. With short second-end homology, absence of the RecQ helicase Sgs1 promotes gene conversion, whereas deletion of the FANCM-related Mph1 helicase promotes BIR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Probing the dynamic differential stiffness of dsDNA interacting with RecA in the enthalpic regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Chia-Hui; Wei, Ming-Tzo; Tseng, Te-Yu; Lee, Chien-Der; Wang, Chung; Wang, Ting-Fang; Ou-Yang, H Daniel; Chiou, Arthur

    2009-10-26

    RecA plays a central role in homologous recombination of DNA. When RecA combines with dsDNA to form RecA-dsDNA nucleofilament, it unwinds dsDNA and changes its structure. The unwinding length extension of a DNA segment interacting with RecA has been studied by various techniques, but the dynamic differential stiffness of dsDNA conjugating with RecA has not been well characterized. We applied oscillatory optical tweezers to measure the differential stiffness of dsDNA molecules, interacting with RecA, as a function of time at a constant stretching force of 33.6pN. The values of the differential stiffness of DNA (for stretching force in the range of 20.0pN to 33.6pN) measured by oscillatory optical tweezers, both before and after its interaction with RecA, are consistent with those measured by stationary optical tweezers. In the dynamic measurement, we have shown that the association (or binding) rate increases with higher concentration of RecA; besides, we have also monitored in real-time the dissociation of RecA from the stretched RecA-dsDNA filament as ATPgammaS was washed off from the sample chamber. Finally, we verified that RecA (I26C), a form of RecA mutant, does not affect the differential stiffness of the stretched DNA sample. It implies that mutant RecA (I26C) does not bind to the DNA, which is consistent with the result obtained by conventional biochemical approach.

  10. Evaluation of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and dna-repair genes as potential biomarkers for ethanol-induced cns alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicks Steven D

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alcohol use disorders (AUDs lead to alterations in central nervous system (CNS architecture along with impaired learning and memory. Previous work from our group and that of others suggests that one mechanism underlying these changes is alteration of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and DNA-repair in neural stem cells (NSCs produced as a consequence of ethanol-induced effects on the expression of genes related to p53-signaling. This study tests the hypothesis that changes in the expression of p53-signaling genes represent biomarkers of ethanol abuse which can be identified in the peripheral blood of rat drinking models and human AUD subjects and posits that specific changes may be correlated with differences in neuropsychological measures and CNS structure. Results Remarkably, microarray analysis of 350 genes related to p53-signaling in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs of binge-drinking rats revealed 190 genes that were significantly altered after correcting for multiple testing. Moreover, 40 of these genes overlapped with those that we had previously observed to be changed in ethanol-exposed mouse NSCs. Expression changes in nine of these genes were tested for independent confirmation by a custom QuantiGene Plex (QGP assay for a subset of p53-signaling genes, where a consistent trend for decreased expression of mitosis-related genes was observed. One mitosis-related gene (Pttg1 was also changed in human lymphoblasts cultured with ethanol. In PBLs of human AUD subjects seven p53-signaling genes were changed compared with non-drinking controls. Correlation and principal components analysis were then used to identify significant relationships between the expression of these seven genes and a set of medical, demographic, neuropsychological and neuroimaging measures that distinguished AUD and control subjects. Two genes (Ercc1 and Mcm5 showed a highly significant correlation with AUD-induced decreases in the volume of the left

  11. Evaluation of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and DNA-repair genes as potential biomarkers for ethanol-induced CNS alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Steven D; Lewis, Lambert; Ritchie, Julie; Burke, Patrick; Abdul-Malak, Ynesse; Adackapara, Nyssa; Canfield, Kelly; Shwarts, Erik; Gentile, Karen; Meszaros, Zsuzsa Szombathyne; Middleton, Frank A

    2012-10-25

    Alcohol use disorders (AUDs) lead to alterations in central nervous system (CNS) architecture along with impaired learning and memory. Previous work from our group and that of others suggests that one mechanism underlying these changes is alteration of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and DNA-repair in neural stem cells (NSCs) produced as a consequence of ethanol-induced effects on the expression of genes related to p53-signaling. This study tests the hypothesis that changes in the expression of p53-signaling genes represent biomarkers of ethanol abuse which can be identified in the peripheral blood of rat drinking models and human AUD subjects and posits that specific changes may be correlated with differences in neuropsychological measures and CNS structure. Remarkably, microarray analysis of 350 genes related to p53-signaling in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) of binge-drinking rats revealed 190 genes that were significantly altered after correcting for multiple testing. Moreover, 40 of these genes overlapped with those that we had previously observed to be changed in ethanol-exposed mouse NSCs. Expression changes in nine of these genes were tested for independent confirmation by a custom QuantiGene Plex (QGP) assay for a subset of p53-signaling genes, where a consistent trend for decreased expression of mitosis-related genes was observed. One mitosis-related gene (Pttg1) was also changed in human lymphoblasts cultured with ethanol. In PBLs of human AUD subjects seven p53-signaling genes were changed compared with non-drinking controls. Correlation and principal components analysis were then used to identify significant relationships between the expression of these seven genes and a set of medical, demographic, neuropsychological and neuroimaging measures that distinguished AUD and control subjects. Two genes (Ercc1 and Mcm5) showed a highly significant correlation with AUD-induced decreases in the volume of the left parietal supramarginal gyrus and

  12. Deficiency in nucleotide excision repair family gene activity, especially ERCC3, is associated with non-pigmented hair fiber growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Yu

    Full Text Available We conducted a microarray study to discover gene expression patterns associated with a lack of melanogenesis in non-pigmented hair follicles (HF by microarray. Pigmented and non-pigmented HFs were collected and micro-dissected into the hair bulb (HB and the upper hair sheaths (HS including the bulge region. In comparison to pigmented HS and HBs, nucleotide excision repair (NER family genes ERCC1, ERCC2, ERCC3, ERCC4, ERCC5, ERCC6, XPA, NTPBP, HCNP, DDB2 and POLH exhibited statistically significantly lower expression in non- pigmented HS and HBs. Quantitative PCR verified microarray data and identified ERCC3 as highly differentially expressed. Immunohistochemistry confirmed ERCC3 expression in HF melanocytes. A reduction in ERCC3 by siRNA interference in human melanocytes in vitro reduced their tyrosinase production ability. Our results suggest that loss of NER gene function is associated with a loss of melanin production capacity. This may be due to reduced gene transcription and/or reduced DNA repair in melanocytes which may eventually lead to cell death. These results provide novel information with regard to melanogenesis and its regulation.

  13. Redox regulation of genome stability by effects on gene expression, epigenetic pathways and DNA damage/repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhed, Yuliya; Görlach, Agnes; Knaus, Ulla G; Daiber, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (e.g. H2O2, nitric oxide) confer redox regulation of essential cellular signaling pathways such as cell differentiation, proliferation, migration and apoptosis. In addition, classical regulation of gene expression or activity, including gene transcription to RNA followed by translation to the protein level, by transcription factors (e.g. NF-κB, HIF-1α) and mRNA binding proteins (e.g. GAPDH, HuR) is subject to redox regulation. This review will give an update of recent discoveries in this field, and specifically highlight the impact of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species on DNA repair systems that contribute to genomic stability. Emphasis will be placed on the emerging role of redox mechanisms regulating epigenetic pathways (e.g. miRNA, DNA methylation and histone modifications). By providing clinical correlations we discuss how oxidative stress can impact on gene regulation/activity and vise versa, how epigenetic processes, other gene regulatory mechanisms and DNA repair can influence the cellular redox state and contribute or prevent development or progression of disease.

  14. Redox regulation of genome stability by effects on gene expression, epigenetic pathways and DNA damage/repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliya Mikhed

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (e.g. H2O2, nitric oxide confer redox regulation of essential cellular signaling pathways such as cell differentiation, proliferation, migration and apoptosis. In addition, classical regulation of gene expression or activity, including gene transcription to RNA followed by translation to the protein level, by transcription factors (e.g. NF-κB, HIF-1α and mRNA binding proteins (e.g. GAPDH, HuR is subject to redox regulation. This review will give an update of recent discoveries in this field, and specifically highlight the impact of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species on DNA repair systems that contribute to genomic stability. Emphasis will be placed on the emerging role of redox mechanisms regulating epigenetic pathways (e.g. miRNA, DNA methylation and histone modifications. By providing clinical correlations we discuss how oxidative stress can impact on gene regulation/activity and vise versa, how epigenetic processes, other gene regulatory mechanisms and DNA repair can influence the cellular redox state and contribute or prevent development or progression of disease.

  15. Expansion of a chromosomal repeat in Escherichia coli: roles of replication, repair, and recombination functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poteete Anthony R

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies of gene amplification in Escherichia coli have suggested that it occurs in two steps: duplication and expansion. Expansion is thought to result from homologous recombination between the repeated segments created by duplication. To explore the mechanism of expansion, a 7 kbp duplication in the chromosome containing a leaky mutant version of the lac operon was constructed, and its expansion into an amplified array was studied. Results Under selection for lac function, colonies bearing multiple copies of the mutant lac operon appeared at a constant rate of approximately 4 to 5 per million cells plated per day, on days two through seven after plating. Expansion was not seen in a recA strain; null mutations in recBCD and ruvC reduced the rate 100- and 10-fold, respectively; a ruvC recG double mutant reduced the rate 1000-fold. Expansion occurred at an increased rate in cells lacking dam, polA, rnhA, or uvrD functions. Null mutations of various other cellular recombination, repair, and stress response genes had little effect upon expansion. The red recombination genes of phage lambda could substitute for recBCD in mediating expansion. In the red-substituted cells, expansion was only partially dependent upon recA function. Conclusion These observations are consistent with the idea that the expansion step of gene amplification is closely related, mechanistically, to interchromosomal homologous recombination events. They additionally provide support for recently described models of RecA-independent Red-mediated recombination at replication forks.

  16. DNA Repair Gene Polymorphisms in the Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathway and Lung Cancer Risk: A Meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao-rong Mei; Meng Luo; Hong-mei Li; Wen-jun Deng; Qing-hua Zhou

    2011-01-01

    Objective: A number of studies have reported the association of “XPA”, “XPC”, “XPD/ERCC2” gene polymorphisms with lung cancer risk. However, the results were conflict. To clarify the impact of polymorphisms of “XPA”, “XPC”; “XPD/ERCC2”, on lung cancer risk, a meta-analysis was performed in this study. Methods: The electronic databases PubMed and Embase were retrieved for studies included in this meta-analysis by “XPA”; “XPC”, “XPD/ERCC2”, “lung”, “cancer/neoplasm/tumor/carcinoma”, “polymorphism” (An upper date limit of October, 31, 2009). A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the relationship among XPA, XPC and XPD polymorphism and lung cancer risks. Results: A total of 31 publications retrieved from Pubmed and Embase included in this study. XPC A939C CC genotype increased lung cancer risk in total population (recessive genetic model: OR=1.23, 95% Cl:1.05-1.44;homozygote comparison: OR=1.21,95%Cl:1.02-1.43and CC vs. CA contrast: OR=1.25,95%Cl:1.06-1.48), except in Asians. XPD A751C, 751C allele and CC genotype also increased lung cancer risk in total population and in Caucasians (recessive genetic model: Total population: OR=1.20, 95%Cl:1.07-1.35). No significant correlation was found between XPD A751C and lung cancer risk in Asians and African Americans. XPD G312A AA genotype increased lung cancer risk in total population, in Asians and Caucasians(recessive genetic model: Total population: OR=1.20, 95%Cl:1.06-1.36). No significant association was found between XPA G23A, XPC C499T, XPD C156A and lung cancer risk. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the polymorphisms in XPC and XPD involve in lung cancer risks. XPA polymorphisms is less related to lung cancer risk.

  17. Association Between Polymorphisms of DNA Repair Gene XRCC1 and DNA Damage in Asbestos-Exposed Workers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO-HONG ZHAO; GUANG JIA; YONG-QUAN LIU; SHAO-WEI LIU; LEI YAN; YU JIN; NIAN LIU

    2006-01-01

    Objective To compare the asbestos-induced DNA damage and repair capacities of DNA damage between 104 asbestos exposed workers and 101 control workers in Qingdao City of China and to investigate the possible association between polymorphisms in codon 399 of XRCC1 and susceptibility to asbestosis. Methods DNA damage levels in peripheral bloodlymphocytes were determined by comet assay, and XRCC 1 genetic polymorphisms of DNA samples from 51 asbestosis cases and 53 non-asbestosis workers with a similar asbestos exposure history were analyzed by PCR/RFLP. Results The basal comet scores (3.95±2.95) were significantly higher in asbestos-exposed workers than in control workers (0.10±0.28). After 1 h H2O2 stimulation, DNA damage of lymphocytes exhibited different increases. After a 4 h repair period, the comet scores were 50.98±19.53 in asbestos-exposed workers and 18.32±12.04 in controls. The residual DNA damage (RD) was significantly greater (P<0.01) in asbestos-exposed workers (35.62%) than in controls (27.75%). XRCC1 genetic polymorphism in 104 asbestos-exposed workers was not associated with increased risk of asbestosis. But compared with polymorphisms in the DNA repair gene XRCC1 (polymorphisms in codon 399) and the DNA damage induced by asbestos, the comet scores in asbestosis cases with Gln/Gln, Gln/Arg, and Arg/Arg were 40.26±18.94, 38.03±28.22, and 32.01±11.65, respectively, which were higher than those in non-asbestosis workers with the same genotypes (25.58±11.08, 37.08±14.74, and 29.38±10.15). There were significant differences in the comet scores between asbestosis cases and non-asbestosis workers with Gln/Gln by Student's t-test (P<0.05 or 0.01). The comet scores were higher in asbestosis workers with Gln/Gln than in those with Arg/Arg and in non-asbestosis workers exposed to asbestos, but without statistically significant difference. Conclusions Exposure to asbestos may be related to DNA damage or the capacity of cells to repair H2O2-induced

  18. A mutation in the XPB/ERCC3 DNA repair transcription gene, associated with trichothiodystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weeda, G.; Donker, I.; Vermeulen, W. [Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (Netherlands)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    Trichothiodystrophy (TTD) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by sulfur-deficient brittle hair and nails, mental retardation, impaired sexual development, and ichthyosis. Photosensitivity has been reported in {approximately}50% of the cases, but no skin cancer is associated with TTD. Virtually all photosensitive TTD patients have a deficiency in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) of UV-induced DNA damage that is indistinguishable from that of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group D (XP-D) patients. DNA repair defects in XP-D are associated with two additional, quite different diseases; XP, a sun-sensitive and cancer-prone repair disorder, and Cockayne syndrome (CS), a photosensitive condition characterized by physical and mental retardation and wizened facial appearance. One photosensitive TTD case constitutes a new repair-deficient complementation group, TTD-A. Remarkably, both TTD-A and XP-D defects are associated with subunits of TFIIH, a basal transcription factor with a second function in DNA repair. Thus, mutations in TFIIH components may, on top of a repair defect, also cause transcriptional insufficiency, which may explain part of the non-XP clinical features of TTD. To date, three patients with the remarkable conjunction of XP and CS but not TM have been assigned to XP complementation group B (XP-B). Here we present the characterization of the NER defect in two mild TTD patients (TTD6VI and TTD4VI) and confirm the assignment to X-PB. The causative mutation was found to be a single base substitution resulting in a missense mutation (T119P) in a region of the XPB protein. These findings define a third TTD complementation group, extend the clinical heterogeneity associated with XP-B, stress the exclusive relationship between TTD and mutations in subunits of repair/transcription factor TFIIH, and strongly support the concept of {open_quotes}transcription syndromes.{close_quotes} 46 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Gene Expression Profiling in the Injured Spinal Cord of Trachemys scripta elegans: An Amniote with Self-Repair Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentin-Kahan, Adrián; García-Tejedor, Gabriela B.; Robello, Carlos; Trujillo-Cenóz, Omar; Russo, Raúl E.; Alvarez-Valin, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Slider turtles are the only known amniotes with self-repair mechanisms of the spinal cord that lead to substantial functional recovery. Their strategic phylogenetic position makes them a relevant model to investigate the peculiar genetic programs that allow anatomical reconnection in some vertebrate groups but are absent in others. Here, we analyze the gene expression profile of the response to spinal cord injury (SCI) in the turtle Trachemys scripta elegans. We found that this response comprises more than 1000 genes affecting diverse functions: reaction to ischemic insult, extracellular matrix re-organization, cell proliferation and death, immune response, and inflammation. Genes related to synapses and cholesterol biosynthesis are down-regulated. The analysis of the evolutionary distribution of these genes shows that almost all are present in most vertebrates. Additionally, we failed to find genes that were exclusive of regenerating taxa. The comparison of expression patterns among species shows that the response to SCI in the turtle is more similar to that of mice and non-regenerative Xenopus than to Xenopus during its regenerative stage. This observation, along with the lack of conserved “regeneration genes” and the current accepted phylogenetic placement of turtles (sister group of crocodilians and birds), indicates that the ability of spinal cord self-repair of turtles does not represent the retention of an ancestral vertebrate character. Instead, our results suggest that turtles developed this capability from a non-regenerative ancestor (i.e., a lineage specific innovation) that was achieved by re-organizing gene expression patterns on an essentially non-regenerative genetic background. Among the genes activated by SCI exclusively in turtles, those related to anoxia tolerance, extracellular matrix remodeling, and axonal regrowth are good candidates to underlie functional recovery. PMID:28223917

  20. PAH-DNA adducts in environmentally exposed population in relation to metabolic and DNA repair gene polymorphisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binkova, Blanka [Laboratory of Genetic Ecotoxicology, Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR and Health Institute of Central Bohemia, Videnska 1083, 14220 Prague (Czech Republic); Chvatalova, Irena [Laboratory of Genetic Ecotoxicology, Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR and Health Institute of Central Bohemia, Videnska 1083, 14220 Prague (Czech Republic); Lnenickova, Zdena [Laboratory of Genetic Ecotoxicology, Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR and Health Institute of Central Bohemia, Videnska 1083, 14220 Prague (Czech Republic); Milcova, Alena [Laboratory of Genetic Ecotoxicology, Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR and Health Institute of Central Bohemia, Videnska 1083, 14220 Prague (Czech Republic); Tulupova, Elena [Laboratory of Genetic Ecotoxicology, Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR and Health Institute of Central Bohemia, Videnska 1083, 14220 Prague (Czech Republic); Cancer Biomarkers and Prevention Group, Biocentre, University of Leicester (United Kingdom); Farmer, Peter B. [Cancer Biomarkers and Prevention Group, Biocentre, University of Leicester (United Kingdom); Sram, Radim J. [Laboratory of Genetic Ecotoxicology, Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR and Health Institute of Central Bohemia, Videnska 1083, 14220 Prague (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: sram@biomed.cas.cz

    2007-07-01

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that prolonged exposure to particulate air pollution may be associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and cancer in general population. These effects may be attributable to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) adsorbed to respirable air particles. It is expected that metabolic and DNA repair gene polymorphisms may modulate individual susceptibility to PAH exposure. This study investigates relationships between exposure to PAHs, polymorphisms of these genes and DNA adducts in group of occupationally exposed policemen (EXP, N = 53, males, aged 22-50 years) working outdoors in the downtown area of Prague and in matched 'unexposed' controls (CON, N = 52). Personal exposure to eight carcinogenic PAHs (c-PAHs) was evaluated by personal samplers during working shift prior to collection of biological samples. Bulky-aromatic DNA adducts were analyzed in lymphocytes by {sup 32}P-postlabeling assay. Polymorphisms of metabolizing (GSTM1, GSTP1, GSTT1, EPHX1, CYP1A1-MspI) and DNA repair (XRCC1, XPD) genes were determined by PCR-based RFLP assays. As potential modifiers and/or cofounders, urinary cotinine levels were analyzed by radioimmunoassay, plasma levels of vitamins A, C, E and folates by HPLC, cholesterol and triglycerides using commercial kits. During the sampling period ambient particulate air pollution was as follows: PM10 32-55 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, PM2.5 27-38 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, c-PAHs 18-22 ng/m{sup 3}; personal exposure to c-PAHs: 9.7 ng/m{sup 3} versus 5.8 ng/m{sup 3} (P < 0.01) for EXP and CON groups, respectively. The total DNA adduct levels did not significantly differ between EXP and CON groups (0.92 {+-} 0.28 adducts/10{sup 8} nucleotides versus 0.82 {+-} 0.23 adducts/10{sup 8} nucleotides, P = 0.065), whereas the level of the B[a]P-'like' adduct was significantly higher in exposed group (0.122 {+-} 0.036 adducts/10{sup 8} nucleotides versus 0.099 {+-} 0.035 adducts/10{sup 8} nucleotides, P = 0

  1. ANTIBODIES DEFINING RAT ENDOTHELIAL-CELLS - RECA-1, A PAN-ENDOTHELIAL CELL-SPECIFIC MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DUIJVESTIJN, AM; VANGOOR, H; KLATTER, F; MAJOOR, GD; VANBUSSEL, E; VRIESMAN, PJCV

    1992-01-01

    We have been searching for antibodies reactive with rat endothelial cells. Two monoclonal antibodies (mAb), named RECA-1 and RECA-2 were produced and tested in immunoperoxidase staining on frozen sections of various rat tissues. Staining patterns were compared to those obtained with the mAbs OX-2, O

  2. ANTIBODIES DEFINING RAT ENDOTHELIAL-CELLS - RECA-1, A PAN-ENDOTHELIAL CELL-SPECIFIC MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DUIJVESTIJN, AM; VANGOOR, H; KLATTER, F; MAJOOR, GD; VANBUSSEL, E; VRIESMAN, PJCV

    1992-01-01

    We have been searching for antibodies reactive with rat endothelial cells. Two monoclonal antibodies (mAb), named RECA-1 and RECA-2 were produced and tested in immunoperoxidase staining on frozen sections of various rat tissues. Staining patterns were compared to those obtained with the mAbs OX-2, O

  3. Nucleotide excision repair and recombination are engaged in repair of trans-4-hydroxy-2-nonenal adducts to DNA bases in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Janowska, Marek Komisarski, Paulina Prorok, Beata Sokołowska, Jarosław Kuśmierek, Celina Janion, Barbara Tudek

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the major products of lipid peroxidation is trans-4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE. HNE forms highly mutagenic and genotoxic adducts to all DNA bases. Using M13 phage lacZ system, we studied the mutagenesis and repair of HNE treated phage DNA in E. coli wild-type or uvrA, recA, and mutL mutants. These studies revealed that: (i nucleotide excision and recombination, but not mismatch repair, are engaged in repair of HNE adducts when present in phage DNA replicating in E. coli strains; (ii in the single uvrA mutant, phage survival was drastically decreased while mutation frequency increased, and recombination events constituted 48 % of all mutations; (iii in the single recA mutant, the survival and mutation frequency of HNE-modified M13 phage was slightly elevated in comparison to that in the wild-type bacteria. The majority of mutations in recA- strain were G:C → T:A transversions, occurring within the sequence which in recA+ strains underwent RecA-mediated recombination, and the entire sequence was deleted; (iv in the double uvrA recA mutant, phage survival was the same as in the wild-type although the mutation frequency was higher than in the wild-type and recA single mutant, but lower than in the single uvrA mutant. The majority of mutations found in the latter strain were base substitutions, with G:C → A:T transitions prevailing. These transitions could have resulted from high reactivity of HNE with G and C, and induction of SOS-independent mutations.

  4. Crystal structure of THEP1 from the hyperthermophile Aquifex aeolicus: a variation of the RecA fold

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    Wittinghofer Alfred

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background aaTHEP1, the gene product of aq_1292 from Aquifex aeolicus, shows sequence homology to proteins from most thermophiles, hyperthermophiles, and higher organisms such as man, mouse, and fly. In contrast, there are almost no homologous proteins in mesophilic unicellular microorganisms. aaTHEP1 is a thermophilic enzyme exhibiting both ATPase and GTPase activity in vitro. Although annotated as a nucleotide kinase, such an activity could not be confirmed for aaTHEP1 experimentally and the in vivo function of aaTHEP1 is still unknown. Results Here we report the crystal structure of selenomethionine substituted nucleotide-free aaTHEP1 at 1.4 Å resolution using a multiple anomalous dispersion phasing protocol. The protein is composed of a single domain that belongs to the family of 3-layer (α/β/α-structures consisting of nine central strands flanked by six helices. The closest structural homologue as determined by DALI is the RecA family. In contrast to the latter proteins, aaTHEP1 possesses an extension of the β-sheet consisting of four additional β-strands. Conclusion We conclude that the structure of aaTHEP1 represents a variation of the RecA fold. Although the catalytic function of aaTHEP1 remains unclear, structural details indicate that it does not belong to the group of GTPases, kinases or adenosyltransferases. A mainly positive electrostatic surface indicates that aaTHEP1 might be a DNA/RNA modifying enzyme. The resolved structure of aaTHEP1 can serve as paradigm for the complete THEP1 family.

  5. Beryllium chloride-induced oxidative DNA damage and alteration in the expression patterns of DNA repair-related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attia, Sabry M; Harisa, Gamaleldin I; Hassan, Memy H; Bakheet, Saleh A

    2013-09-01

    Beryllium metal has physical properties that make its use essential for very specific applications, such as medical diagnostics, nuclear/fusion reactors and aerospace applications. Because of the widespread human exposure to beryllium metals and the discrepancy of the genotoxic results in the reported literature, detail assessments of the genetic damage of beryllium are warranted. Mice exposed to beryllium chloride at an oral dose of 23mg/kg for seven consecutive days exhibited a significant increase in the level of DNA-strand breaking and micronuclei formation as detected by a bone marrow standard comet assay and micronucleus test. Whereas slight beryllium chloride-induced oxidative DNA damage was detected following formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase digestion, digestion with endonuclease III resulted in considerable increases in oxidative DNA damage after the 11.5 and 23mg/kg/day treatment as detected by enzyme-modified comet assays. Increased 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine was also directly correlated with increased bone marrow micronuclei formation and DNA strand breaks, which further confirm the involvement of oxidative stress in the induction of bone marrow genetic damage after exposure to beryllium chloride. Gene expression analysis on the bone marrow cells from beryllium chloride-exposed mice showed significant alterations in genes associated with DNA damage repair. Therefore, beryllium chloride may cause genetic damage to bone marrow cells due to the oxidative stress and the induced unrepaired DNA damage is probably due to the down-regulation in the expression of DNA repair genes, which may lead to genotoxicity and eventually cause carcinogenicity.

  6. DNA compaction in the early part of the SOS response is dependent on RecN and RecA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odsbu, Ingvild; Skarstad, Kirsten

    2014-05-01

    The nucleoids of undamaged Escherichia coli cells have a characteristic shape and number, which is dependent on the growth medium. Upon induction of the SOS response by a low dose of UV irradiation an extensive reorganization of the nucleoids occurred. Two distinct phases were observed by fluorescence microscopy. First, the nucleoids were found to change shape and fuse into compact structures at midcell. The compaction of the nucleoids lasted for 10-20 min and was followed by a phase where the DNA was dispersed throughout the cells. This second phase lasted for ~1 h. The compaction was found to be dependent on the recombination proteins RecA, RecO and RecR as well as the SOS-inducible, SMC (structural maintenance of chromosomes)-like protein RecN. RecN protein is produced in high amounts during the first part of the SOS response. It is possible that the RecN-mediated 'compact DNA' stage at the beginning of the SOS response serves to stabilize damaged DNA prior to recombination and repair.

  7. DNA repair gene XRCC3 241Met variant and breast cancer susceptibility of Azeri population in Iranian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gohari-Lasaki Sahar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA-repair systems are essential for repairing damage that occurs when there is recombination between homologous chromosomes. The gene XRCC3 (X-ray cross complementing group 3 encodes a member of the RecA/Rad51-related protein family that participates in homologous recombination to maintain chromosome stability and repair DNA damage. The Thr241Met XRCC3-18067C>T, rs861539 substitution, a C to T transition at codon 241 in exon7, thus plays critical roles in cancer development. The aim of this study was association between XRCC3 Thr241Met polymorphism and risk of sporadic breast cancer in Azari population. We analysed DNA samples from 100 sporadic breast cancer patients and 100 healthy women, for XRCC3 Thr241Met polymorphism using PCR-RFLP. Genotype specific risks were tested using chi-test with 95% confident intervals. Frequency of Thr/Thr at codon 241was 69% in controls and 70% in patients, Thr/Met frequency was 22% in controls and 13 % in patients, the Met/Met genotype was 9% incontrols and 17% in patients. No correlation between the genotype and allele distribution and increased susceptibility for breast Cancer. Our results suggested that in pre-menopausal women, breast cancer riskis not significantly associated with rs861539 in Azari population.

  8. Target Molecular Simulations of RecA Family Protein Filaments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeng-Tseng Wang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of the RadA family mechanism is crucial to understanding the DNA SOS repair process. In a 2007 report, the archaeal RadA proteins function as rotary motors (linker region: I71-K88 such as shown in Figure 1. Molecular simulations approaches help to shed further light onto this phenomenon. We find 11 rotary residues (R72, T75-K81, M84, V86 and K87 and five zero rotary residues (I71, K74, E82, R83 and K88 in the simulations. Inclusion of our simulations may help to understand the RadA family mechanism.

  9. Zebrafish with mutations in mismatch repair genes develop neurofibromas and other tumors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feitsma, H.; Kuiper, R.V.; Korving, J.; Nijman, I.J.; Cuppen, E.

    2008-01-01

    Defective mismatch repair (MMR) in humans causes hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. This genetic predisposition to colon cancer is linked to heterozygous familial mutations, and loss-of-heterozygosity is necessary for tumor development. In contrast, the rare cases with biallelic MMR

  10. Impaired Cytogenetic Damage Repair and Cell Cycle Regulation in Response to Ionizing Radiation in Human Fibroblast Cells with Individual Knock-down of 25 Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry; Emami, Kamal; Hammond, Dianne; Casey, Rachael; Mehta, Satish; Jeevarajan, Antony; Pierson, Duane; Wu, Honglu

    2008-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have demonstrated that genes with upregulated expression induced by IR may play important roles in DNA damage sensing, cell cycle checkpoint and chromosomal repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR and its impact on cytogenetic responses to ionizing radiation has not been systematically studied. In our present study, the expression of 25 genes selected based on their transcriptional changes in response to IR or from their known DNA repair roles were individually knocked down by siRNA transfection in human fibroblast cells. Chromosome aberrations (CA) and micronuclei (MN) formation were measured as the cytogenetic endpoints. Our results showed that the yield of MN and/or CA formation were significantly increased by suppressed expression of 5 genes that included Ku70 in the DSB repair pathway; XPA in the NER pathway; RPA1 in the MMR pathway; RAD17 and RBBP8 in cell cycle control. Knocked-down expression of 4 genes including MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, and SESN1 and SUMO1 showed significant inhibition of cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Furthermore, loss of XPA, p21 and MLH1 expression resulted in both enhanced cell cycle progression and significantly higher yield of cytogenetic damage, indicating the involvement of these gene products in both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Of these 11 genes that affected the cytogenetic response, 9 were up-regulated in the cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulating the biological consequences after IR. Failure to express these IR-responsive genes, such as by gene mutation, could seriously change the outcome of the post IR scenario and lead to carcinogenesis.

  11. Excess single-stranded DNA inhibits meiotic double-strand break repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Johnson

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available During meiosis, self-inflicted DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs are created by the protein Spo11 and repaired by homologous recombination leading to gene conversions and crossovers. Crossover formation is vital for the segregation of homologous chromosomes during the first meiotic division and requires the RecA orthologue, Dmc1. We analyzed repair during meiosis of site-specific DSBs created by another nuclease, VMA1-derived endonuclease (VDE, in cells lacking Dmc1 strand-exchange protein. Turnover and resection of the VDE-DSBs was assessed in two different reporter cassettes that can repair using flanking direct repeat sequences, thereby obviating the need for a Dmc1-dependent DNA strand invasion step. Access of the single-strand binding complex replication protein A, which is normally used in all modes of DSB repair, was checked in chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments, using antibody against Rfa1. Repair of the VDE-DSBs was severely inhibited in dmc1Delta cells, a defect that was associated with a reduction in the long tract resection required to initiate single-strand annealing between the flanking repeat sequences. Mutants that either reduce Spo11-DSB formation or abolish resection at Spo11-DSBs rescued the repair block. We also found that a replication protein A component, Rfa1, does not accumulate to expected levels at unrepaired single-stranded DNA (ssDNA in dmc1Delta cells. The requirement of Dmc1 for VDE-DSB repair using flanking repeats appears to be caused by the accumulation of large quantities of ssDNA that accumulate at Spo11-DSBs when Dmc1 is absent. We propose that these resected DSBs sequester both resection machinery and ssDNA binding proteins, which in wild-type cells would normally be recycled as Spo11-DSBs repair. The implication is that repair proteins are in limited supply, and this could reflect an underlying mechanism for regulating DSB repair in wild-type cells, providing protection from potentially harmful effects

  12. Antioxidative Dietary Compounds Modulate Gene Expression Associated with Apoptosis, DNA Repair, Inhibition of Cell Proliferation and Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Likui Wang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Many dietary compounds are known to have health benefits owing to their antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. To determine the molecular mechanism of these food-derived compounds, we analyzed their effect on various genes related to cell apoptosis, DNA damage and repair, oxidation and inflammation using in vitro cell culture assays. This review further tests the hypothesis proposed previously that downstream products of COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-2 called electrophilic oxo-derivatives induce antioxidant responsive elements (ARE, which leads to cell proliferation under antioxidative conditions. Our findings support this hypothesis and show that cell proliferation was inhibited when COX-2 was down-regulated by polyphenols and polysaccharides. Flattened macrophage morphology was also observed following the induction of cytokine production by polysaccharides extracted from viili, a traditional Nordic fermented dairy product. Coix lacryma-jobi (coix polysaccharides were found to reduce mitochondrial membrane potential and induce caspase-3- and 9-mediated apoptosis. In contrast, polyphenols from blueberries were involved in the ultraviolet-activated p53/Gadd45/MDM2 DNA repair system by restoring the cell membrane potential. Inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 by saponin extracts of ginsenoside (Ginsen and Gynostemma and inhibition of S100A4 by coix polysaccharides inhibited cancer cell migration and invasion. These observations suggest that antioxidants and changes in cell membrane potential are the major driving forces that transfer signals through the cell membrane into the cytosol and nucleus, triggering gene expression, changes in cell proliferation and the induction of apoptosis or DNA repair.

  13. SNPs in DNA repair or oxidative stress genes and late subcutaneous fibrosis in patients following single shot partial breast irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falvo Elisabetta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential association between single nucleotide polymorphisms related response to radiotherapy injury, such as genes related to DNA repair or enzymes involved in anti-oxidative activities. The paper aims to identify marker genes able to predict an increased risk of late toxicity studying our group of patients who underwent a Single Shot 3D-CRT PBI (SSPBI after BCS (breast conserving surgery. Methods A total of 57 breast cancer patients who underwent SSPBI were genotyped for SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms in XRCC1, XRCC3, GST and RAD51 by Pyrosequencing technology. Univariate analysis (ORs and 95% CI was performed to correlate SNPs with the risk of developing ≥ G2 fibrosis or fat necrosis. Results A higher significant risk of developing ≥ G2 fibrosis or fat necrosis in patients with: polymorphic variant GSTP1 (Ile105Val (OR = 2.9; 95%CI, 0.88-10.14, p = 0.047. Conclusions The presence of some SNPs involved in DNA repair or response to oxidative stress seem to be able to predict late toxicity. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01316328

  14. Trichostatin A enhances vascular repair by injected human endothelial progenitors through increasing the expression of TAL1-dependent genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palii, Carmen G; Vulesevic, Branka; Fraineau, Sylvain; Pranckeviciene, Erinija; Griffith, Alexander J; Chu, Alphonse; Faralli, Hervé; Li, Yuhua; McNeill, Brian; Sun, Jie; Perkins, Theodore J; Dilworth, F Jeffrey; Perez-Iratxeta, Carol; Suuronen, Erik J; Allan, David S; Brand, Marjorie

    2014-05-01

    A major goal of cell therapy for vascular diseases is to promote revascularization through the injection of endothelial stem/progenitor cells. The gene regulatory mechanisms that underlie endothelial progenitor-mediated vascular repair, however, remain elusive. Here, we identify the transcription factor TAL1/SCL as a key mediator of the vascular repair function of primary human endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs). Genome-wide analyses in ECFCs demonstrate that TAL1 activates a transcriptional program that promotes cell adhesion and migration. At the mechanistic level, we show that TAL1 upregulates the expression of migratory and adhesion genes through recruitment of the histone acetyltransferase p300. Based on these findings, we establish a strategy that enhances the revascularization efficiency of ECFCs after ischemia through ex vivo priming with the histone deacetylase inhibitor TSA. Thus, small molecule epigenetics drugs are effective tools for modifying the epigenome of stem/progenitor cells prior to transplantation as a means to enhance their therapeutic potential.

  15. Three-dimensionally Specific Inhibition of DNA Repair-Related Genes by Activated KRAS in Colon Crypt Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Tsunoda

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Growth and differentiation of colonic epithelium are regulated in the three-dimensional (3D physiological architecture, colonic crypt, and deregulation of 3D interactions is involved in tumorigenesis. Cell-based 3D culture systems provide a suitable approach bridging the gap between two-dimensional (2D culture and animal models. KRAS mutations are found at high frequencies in human colorectal cancer (CRC; however, KRAS-targeted cancer therapy has not been developed. Here, we have established a 3D cell culture model resembling the colonic crypt by use of HKe3 cells, human CRC HCT116 cells disrupted at activated KRAS. In this 3D colonic crypt model, HKe3 cells showed the features of time course-dependent transit-amplifying and terminal-differentiated stages, which are characteristic of normal colonic crypt. On the basis of the features of HCT116 cells, activated KRAS inhibited normal cell polarity and apoptosis in 3D culture. The expression of DNA repair-related tumor suppressor genes including TP53, BRCA1, BRCA2, and EXO-1 was markedly suppressed by activated KRAS in 3D culture but not in 2D culture. These results together suggest that activated KRAS plays critical roles in the accumulation of genetic alterations through inhibition of DNA repair genes and apoptosis and that this 3D culture model will provide a useful tool for investigating the molecular mechanisms of CRC development.

  16. Regulated expression of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA repair gene RAD7 in response to DNA damage and during sporulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J S; Prakash, L; Prakash, S

    1990-06-11

    The RAD7 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae affects the proficiency of excision repair of DNA damaged by UV light. Here, we report our studies on the regulation of the RAD7 gene in response to UV irradiation and during sporulation. RAD7 transcript levels increased 6-fold within 40 min of exposure of cells to 37 J/m2 of UV light. Higher UV doses also elicited rapid increases in the level of RAD7 mRNA. RAD7 mRNA levels increased in sporulating MATa/MAT alpha diploid cells, but not in the asporogenous MATa/MATa strain exposed to sporulation conditions. The increase in RAD7 mRNA level in MATa/MAT alpha cells was 15-fold after 6 h and 9-fold after 7 h in sporulation medium; thereafter, RAD7 mRNA levels declined. Periodic transcription of RAD7 during sporulation suggests a role for RAD7 in this process.

  17. A study of molecular signals deregulating mismatch repair genes in prostate cancer compared to benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sanmitra; Majumder, Subhadipa; Bhowal, Ankur; Ghosh, Alip; Naskar, Sukla; Nandy, Sumit; Mukherjee, Subhabrata; Sinha, Rajan Kumar; Basu, Keya; Karmakar, Dilip; Banerjee, Soma; Sengupta, Sanghamitra

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of mortality among aging males. There is an unmet requirement of clinically useful biomarkers for early detection of prostate cancer to reduce the liabilities of overtreatment and accompanying morbidity. The present population-based study investigates the factors disrupting expression of multiple functionally related genes of DNA mismatch repair pathway in prostate cancer patients to identify molecular attributes distinguishing adenocarcinoma from benign hyperplasia of prostate. Gene expression was compared between tissue samples from prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia using real-time-PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry. Assessment of genotypes of seven single-nucleotide-polymorphisms of three MMR genes was conducted using PCR-coupled RFLP and sequencing. Promoter methylation was interrogated by methylation-specific-PCR and bisulfite-sequencing. Interaction between microRNAs and MMR genes was verified by 3'UTR-based dual luciferase assays. Concurrent reduction of three MMR genes namely hMLH1, hMSH6 and hMSH2 (34-85%, Pprostate cancer tissues. hMSH6 polymorphism rs1800932(Pro92Pro) conferred a borderline protection in cancer patients (OR = 0.33, 95% CI = 0.15-0.75). Relative transcript level of hMLH1 was inversely related (r = -0.59, Pprostate cancer. This comparative study reflects that microRNA expression level, particularly hsa-miR-155, exhibits predictive signature of prostate adenocarcinoma.

  18. The GH/IGF-1 axis in a critical period early in life determines cellular DNA repair capacity by altering transcriptional regulation of DNA repair-related genes: implications for the developmental origins of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlutsky, Andrej; Valcarcel-Ares, Marta Noa; Yancey, Krysta; Podlutskaya, Viktorija; Nagykaldi, Eszter; Gautam, Tripti; Miller, Richard A; Sonntag, William E; Csiszar, Anna; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2017-02-23

    Experimental, clinical, and epidemiological findings support the concept of developmental origins of health and disease (DOHAD), suggesting that early-life hormonal influences during a sensitive period around adolescence have a powerful impact on cancer morbidity later in life. The endocrine changes that occur during puberty are highly conserved across mammalian species and include dramatic increases in circulating GH and IGF-1 levels. Importantly, patients with developmental IGF-1 deficiency due to GH insensitivity (Laron syndrome) do not develop cancer during aging. Rodents with developmental GH/IGF-1 deficiency also exhibit significantly decreased cancer incidence at old age, marked resistance to chemically induced carcinogenesis, and cellular resistance to genotoxic stressors. Early-life treatment of GH/IGF-1-deficient mice and rats with GH reverses the cancer resistance phenotype; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that developmental GH/IGF-1 status impacts cellular DNA repair mechanisms. To achieve that goal, we assessed repair of γ-irradiation-induced DNA damage (single-cell gel electrophoresis/comet assay) and basal and post-irradiation expression of DNA repair-related genes (qPCR) in primary fibroblasts derived from control rats, Lewis dwarf rats (a model of developmental GH/IGF-1 deficiency), and GH-replete dwarf rats (GH administered beginning at 5 weeks of age, for 30 days). We found that developmental GH/IGF-1 deficiency resulted in persisting increases in cellular DNA repair capacity and upregulation of several DNA repair-related genes (e.g., Gadd45a, Bbc3). Peripubertal GH treatment reversed the radiation resistance phenotype. Fibroblasts of GH/IGF-1-deficient Snell dwarf mice also exhibited improved DNA repair capacity, showing that the persisting influence of peripubertal GH/IGF-1 status is not species-dependent. Collectively, GH/IGF-1 levels during a critical period

  19. Strategies for psbA gene expression in cyanobacteria, green algae and higher plants: from transcription to PSII repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulo, Paula; Sakurai, Isamu; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2012-01-01

    The Photosystem (PS) II of cyanobacteria, green algae and higher plants is prone to light-induced inactivation, the D1 protein being the primary target of such damage. As a consequence, the D1 protein, encoded by the psbA gene, is degraded and re-synthesized in a multistep process called PSII repair cycle. In cyanobacteria, a small gene family codes for the various, functionally distinct D1 isoforms. In these organisms, the regulation of the psbA gene expression occurs mainly at the level of transcription, but the expression is fine-tuned by regulation of translation elongation. In plants and green algae, the D1 protein is encoded by a single psbA gene located in the chloroplast genome. In chloroplasts of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii the psbA gene expression is strongly regulated by mRNA processing, and particularly at the level of translation initiation. In chloroplasts of higher plants, translation elongation is the prevalent mechanism for regulation of the psbA gene expression. The pre-existing pool of psbA transcripts forms translation initiation complexes in plant chloroplasts even in darkness, while the D1 synthesis can be completed only in the light. Replacement of damaged D1 protein requires also the assistance by a number of auxiliary proteins, which are encoded by the nuclear genome in green algae and higher plants. Nevertheless, many of these chaperones are conserved between prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Here, we describe the specific features and fundamental differences of the psbA gene expression and the regeneration of the PSII reaction center protein D1 in cyanobacteria, green algae and higher plants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Photosystem II.

  20. DNA repair genes implicated in triple negative familial non-BRCA1/2 breast cancer predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollier, Marie; Radosevic-Robin, Nina; Kwiatkowski, Fabrice; Ponelle, Flora; Viala, Sandrine; Privat, Maud; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bernard-Gallon, Dominique; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Bidet, Yannick

    2015-01-01

    Among breast cancers, 10 to 15% of cases would be due to hereditary risk. In these familial cases, mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are found in only 15% to 20%, meaning that new susceptibility genes remain to be found. Triple-negative breast cancers represent 15% of all breast cancers, and are generally aggressive tumours without targeted therapies available. Our hypothesis is that some patients with triple negative breast cancer could share a genetic susceptibility different from other types of breast cancers. We screened 36 candidate genes, using pyrosequencing, in all the 50 triple negative breast cancer patients with familial history of cancer but no BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation of a population of 3000 families who had consulted for a familial breast cancer between 2005 and 2013. Any mutations were also sequenced in available relatives of cases. Protein expression and loss of heterozygosity were explored in tumours. Seven deleterious mutations in 6 different genes (RAD51D, MRE11A, CHEK2, MLH1, MSH6, PALB2) were observed in one patient each, except the RAD51D mutation found in two cases. Loss of heterozygosity in the tumour was found for 2 of the 7 mutations. Protein expression was absent in tumour tissue for 5 mutations. Taking into consideration a specific subtype of tumour has revealed susceptibility genes, most of them in the homologous recombination DNA repair pathway. This may provide new possibilities for targeted therapies, along with better screening and care of patients.

  1. Polysaccharides of Aloe vera induce MMP-3 and TIMP-2 gene expression during the skin wound repair of rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabandeh, Mohammad Reza; Oryan, Ahmad; Mohammadalipour, Adel

    2014-04-01

    Polysaccharides are the main macromolecules of Aloe vera gel but no data about their effect on extracellular matrix (ECM) elements are available. Here, mannose rich Aloe vera polysaccharides (AVP) with molecular weight between 50 and 250 kDa were isolated and characterized. Open cutaneous wounds on the back of 45 rats (control and treated) were daily treated with 25mg (n=15) and 50 mg (n=15) AVP for 30 days. The levels of MMP-3 and TIMP-2 gene expression were analyzed using real time PCR. The levels of n-acetyl glucosamine (NAGA), n-acetyl galactosamine (NAGLA) and collagen contents were also measured using standard biochemical methods. Faster wound closure was observed at day 15 post wounding in AVP treated animals in comparison with untreated group. At day 10 post wounding, AVP inhibited MMP-3 gene expression, while afterwards MMP-3 gene expression was upregulated. AVP enhanced TIMP-2 gene expression, collagen, NAGLA and NAGA synthesis in relation to untreated wounds. Our results suggest that AVP has positive effects on the regulation of ECM factor synthesis, which open up new perspectives for the wound repair activity of Aloe vera polysaccharide at molecular level.

  2. Genomic structure and characterization of the Drosophila S3 ribosomal/DNA repair gene and mutant alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, M R; Xu, Y; Wilson, D M; Deutsch, W A

    2000-03-01

    The Drosophila S3 protein is known to be associated with ribosomes, where it is thought to play a role in the initiation of protein translation. The S3 protein also contains a DNA repair activity, efficiently processing 8-oxoguanine residues in DNA via an N-glycosylase/apurinic-apyrimidinic (AP) lyase activity. The gene that encodes S3 has previously been localized to one of the Minute loci on chromosome 3 in Drosophila. This study focused on the genomic organization of S3 at M(3)95A, initial promoter characterization, and analysis of three mutant alleles at this locus. The S3 gene was found to be a single-copy gene 2 to 3 kb in length and containing a single intron. The upstream 1.6-kb region was analyzed for promoter activity, identifying a presumptive regulatory domain containing potential enhancer and suppressor elements. This finding is of interest, as the S3 gene is constitutively expressed throughout development and mRNA is most likely maternally inherited. Lastly, three Minute alleles from the same locus were sequenced and two alleles found to contain a 22-bp deletion in exon 2, resulting in a truncated S3 protein, although wildtype levels of S3 mRNA and protein were detected in the viable heterozygous Minute alleles, possibly reflecting dosage compensation.

  3. RAD25 (SSL2), the yeast homolog of the human xeroderma pigmentosum group B DNA repair gene, is essential for viability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, E.; Prakash, L. (Univ. of Rochester School of Medicine, NY (United States)); Guzder, S.N.; Prakash, S. (Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)); Koken, M.H.M.; Jaspers-Dekker, I.; Weeda, G.; Hoeijmakers, H.J. (Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (Netherlands))

    1992-12-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients are extremely sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) light and suffer from a high incidence of skin cancers, due to a defect in nucleotide excision repair. The disease is genetically heterogeneous, and seven complementation groups, A-G, have been identified. Homologs of human excision repair genes ERCC1, XPDC/ERCC2, and XPAC have been identified in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Since no homolog of human XPBC/ERCC3 existed among the known yeast genes, we cloned the yeast homolog by using XPBC cDNA as a hybridization probe. The yeast homolog, RAD25 (SSL2), encodes a protein of 843 amino acids (M[sub r] 95,356). The RAD25 (SSL2)- and XPCX-encoded proteins share 55% identical and 72% conserved amino acid residues, and the two proteins resemble one another in containing the conserved DNA helicase sequence motifs. A nonsense mutation at codon 799 that deletes the 45 C-terminal amino acid residues in RAD25 (SSL2) confers UV sensitivity. This mutation shows epistasis with genes in the excision repair group, whereas a synergistic increase in UN sensitivity occurs when it is combined with mutations in genes in other DNA repair pathways, indicating that RAD25 (SSL2) functions in excision repair but not in other repair pathways. We also show that RAD25 (SSL2) is an essential gene. A mutation of the Lys[sup 392] residue to arginine in the conserved Walker type A nucleotide-binding motif is lethal, suggesting an essential role of the putative RAD 25 (SSL2) ATPase/DNA helicase activity in viability. 40 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Low-level laser irradiation alters mRNA expression from genes involved in DNA repair and genomic stabilization in myoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajano, L. A. S. N.; Sergio, L. P. S.; Silva, C. L.; Carvalho, L.; Mencalha, A. L.; Stumbo, A. C.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2016-07-01

    Low-level lasers are used for the treatment of diseases in soft and bone tissues, but few data are available regarding their effects on genomic stability. In this study, we investigated mRNA expression from genes involved in DNA repair and genomic stabilization in myoblasts exposed to low-level infrared laser. C2C12 myoblast cultures in different fetal bovine serum concentrations were exposed to low-level infrared laser (10, 35 and 70 J cm-2), and collected for the evaluation of DNA repair gene expression. Laser exposure increased gene expression related to base excision repair (8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1), nucleotide excision repair (excision repair cross-complementation group 1 and xeroderma pigmentosum C protein) and genomic stabilization (ATM serine/threonine kinase and tumor protein p53) in normal and low fetal bovine serum concentrations. Results suggest that genomic stability could be part of a biostimulation effect of low-level laser therapy in injured muscles.

  5. Human longevity and variation in DNA damage response and repair: study of the contribution of sub-processes using competitive gene-set analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debrabant, Birgit; Soerensen, Mette; Flachsbart, Friederike; Dato, Serena; Mengel-From, Jonas; Stevnsner, Tinna; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Kruse, Torben A; Schreiber, Stefan; Nebel, Almut; Christensen, Kaare; Tan, Qihua; Christiansen, Lene

    2014-09-01

    DNA-damage response and repair are crucial to maintain genetic stability, and are consequently considered central to aging and longevity. Here, we investigate whether this pathway overall associates to longevity, and whether specific sub-processes are more strongly associated with longevity than others. Data were applied on 592 SNPs from 77 genes involved in nine sub-processes: DNA-damage response, base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair, non-homologous end-joining, homologous recombinational repair (HRR), RecQ helicase activities (RECQ), telomere functioning and mitochondrial DNA processes. The study population was 1089 long-lived and 736 middle-aged Danes. A self-contained set-based test of all SNPs displayed association with longevity (P-value=9.9 × 10(-5)), supporting that the overall pathway could affect longevity. Investigation of the nine sub-processes using the competitive gene-set analysis by Wang et al indicated that BER, HRR and RECQ associated stronger with longevity than the respective remaining genes of the pathway (P-values=0.004-0.048). For HRR and RECQ, only one gene contributed to the significance, whereas for BER several genes contributed. These associations did, however, generally not pass correction for multiple testing. Still, these findings indicate that, of the entire pathway, variation in BER might influence longevity the most. These modest sized P-values were not replicated in a German sample. This might, though, be due to differences in genotyping procedures and investigated SNPs, potentially inducing differences in the coverage of gene regions. Specifically, five genes were not covered at all in the German data. Therefore, investigations in additional study populations are needed before final conclusion can be drawn.

  6. Many amino acid substitution variants identified in DNA repair genes during human population screenings are predicted to impact protein function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, T; Jones, I M; Mohrenweiser, H W

    2003-11-03

    Over 520 different amino acid substitution variants have been previously identified in the systematic screening of 91 human DNA repair genes for sequence variation. Two algorithms were employed to predict the impact of these amino acid substitutions on protein activity. Sorting Intolerant From Tolerant (SIFT) classified 226 of 508 variants (44%) as ''Intolerant''. Polymorphism Phenotyping (PolyPhen) classed 165 of 489 amino acid substitutions (34%) as ''Probably or Possibly Damaging''. Another 9-15% of the variants were classed as ''Potentially Intolerant or Damaging''. The results from the two algorithms are highly associated, with concordance in predicted impact observed for {approx}62% of the variants. Twenty one to thirty one percent of the variant proteins are predicted to exhibit reduced activity by both algorithms. These variants occur at slightly lower individual allele frequency than do the variants classified as ''Tolerant'' or ''Benign''. Both algorithms correctly predicted the impact of 26 functionally characterized amino acid substitutions in the APE1 protein on biochemical activity, with one exception. It is concluded that a substantial fraction of the missense variants observed in the general human population are functionally relevant. These variants are expected to be the molecular genetic and biochemical basis for the associations of reduced DNA repair capacity phenotypes with elevated cancer risk.

  7. Associations of polymorphisms in DNA repair genes and MDR1 gene with chemotherapy response and survival of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Du

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: We aimed to determine the associations of genetic polymorphisms of excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1 rs11615, xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD/ERCC2 rs13181, X-ray repair cross complementing group 1 (XRCC1 rs25487, XRCC3 rs1799794, and breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1 rs1799966 from the DNA repair pathway and multiple drug resistance 1 (MDR1/ABCB1 rs1045642 with response to chemotherapy and survival of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC in a Chinese population. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 352 NSCLC patients were enrolled to evaluate the associations of the six SNPs with response to chemotherapy and overall survival. Logistic regressions were applied to test the associations of genetic polymorphisms with response to chemotherapy in 161 advanced NSCLC patients. Overall survival was analyzed in 161 advanced and 156 early stage NSCLC patients using the Kaplan-Meier method with log-rank test, respectively. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards model was performed to determine the factors independently associated with NSCLC prognosis. RESULTS: BRCA1 rs1799966 minor allele C (TC+CC vs. TT, OR = 0.402, 95% CI = 0.204-0.794, p = 0.008 and MDR1/ABCB1 rs1045642 minor allele A (GA +AA vs. GG, OR = 0.478, 95% CI = 0.244-0.934, p = 0.030 were associated with a better response to chemotherapy in advanced NSCLC patients. Survival analyses indicated that BRCA1 rs1799966 TC+CC genotypes were associated with a decreased risk of death (HR = 0.617, 95% CI = 0.402-0.948, p = 0.028 in advanced NSCLC patients, and the association was still significant after the adjustment for covariates. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that ERCC1 rs11615 AA genotype (P = 0.020 and smoking (p = 0.037 were associated with increased risks of death in early stage NSCLC patients after surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Polymorphisms of genes in DNA repair pathway and MDR1 could contribute to chemotherapy response and survival of patients with

  8. A model for the RecA protein of Mycoplasma synoviae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marbella Maria Fonseca

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we predict a structural model for the RecA protein from M. synoviae (MsRecA by theoretical homology modeling and evaluate the occurrence of polymorphisms in this protein within several isolates of this species. The structural model suggested for MsRecA conserves the main domains present in MtRecA and EcRecA. The L1 and L2 regions showed six and three amino acid substitutions, respectively, which apparently do not affect the conformation and function of MsRecA. The C-terminal domain is shorter than that found in EcRecA and MtRecA, which may increase its capacity to bind dsDNA and displace SSB, compensating the absence of recombination initiation enzymes. The MS59 isolate RecA sequence showed one polymorphism which does not affect its functions since these belong to the same physical-chemical group.

  9. Intergenerational and striatal CAG repeat instability in Huntington's disease knock-in mice involve different DNA repair genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragileva, Ella; Hendricks, Audrey; Teed, Allison; Gillis, Tammy; Lopez, Edith T; Friedberg, Errol C; Kucherlapati, Raju; Edelmann, Winfried; Lunetta, Kathryn L; MacDonald, Marcy E; Wheeler, Vanessa C

    2009-01-01

    Modifying the length of the Huntington's disease (HD) CAG repeat, the major determinant of age of disease onset, is an attractive therapeutic approach. To explore this we are investigating mechanisms of intergenerational and somatic HD CAG repeat instability. Here, we have crossed HD CAG knock-in mice onto backgrounds deficient in mismatch repair genes, Msh3 and Msh6, to discern the effects on CAG repeat size and disease pathogenesis. We find that different mechanisms predominate in inherited and somatic instability, with Msh6 protecting against intergenerational contractions and Msh3 required both for increasing CAG length and for enhancing an early disease phenotype in striatum. Therefore, attempts to decrease inherited repeat size may entail a full understanding of Msh6 complexes, while attempts to block the age-dependent increases in CAG size in striatal neurons and to slow the disease process will require a full elucidation of Msh3 complexes and their function in CAG repeat instability.

  10. Deproteinized bone with VEGF gene transfer to facilitate the repair of early avascular necrosis of femoral head of rabbit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Kai; HUANG Wei; AN Hong; JIANG Dian-ming; SHU Yong; HAN Zhi-min

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore a new method for early avascular necrosis of femoral head (AVNFH) therapy.Methods: Sixty-nine AVNFH New Zealand adult rabbits were randomly divided into three groups with equal number. In Group A, deproteinized bone (DPB) that absorbed with recombinant plasmid pcDNA3.1-hVEGF165 was implanted into the drilled tunnel of necrotic femoral head. In Group B, only DPB was implanted. In Group C, only tunnel was drilled without DPB or plasmid implanted. Femoral head specimens were obtained at postoperative 1, 2, 4, 8, 16 weeks. The expression of VEGF165 and collagen I was detected by immunohistochemistry. Bone formation was detected generally by X-ray. Angiogenesis and the repair of the femoral head were observed histologically.Results: The expression of VEGF 165 could be detected 2 weeks after implantation in Group A, but it was not observed in other groups. The result of collagen I expression had a significantly difference 2, 4 and 8 weeks after operation in Group A from those in other groups (P<0.01).X-ray results indicated that there was more bone formation in Group A than in other groups. The regenerated capillary vessels staining result of necrotic femoral head in Group A was significantly different from those in other groups at postoperative 2 and 4 weeks (P<0.01).Conclusions: Transfection ofhVEGF165 gene enhances local angiogenesis and DPB-VEGF compound improves the repair of necrotic femoral head. Deproteinized bone grafting with VEGF gene transfer provides a potential method for the treatment of osteonecrosis.

  11. Sequence and stress-response analyses of the DNA mismatch repair gene hexA in Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, J; Park, J H; Dunn, N W; Kim, W S

    2001-10-01

    The DNA mismatch repair gene hexA was identified in Lactococcus lactis by PCR amplification by using a pair of primers homologous to the DNA-binding Dps protein. The gene in its entirety, including the regulatory regions, was sequenced, by using a strategy of chromosomal walking based on two PCR protocols. The open reading frame of 2526 bp was preceded by a strong ribosome-binding site (AGGAAG) and was followed by a potential transcription terminator (hairpin loop structure). The 5' terminus of the hexA mRNA was located 135 bp upstream of the start codon, and putative -10 and -35 regions were identified. The deduced amino acid sequence revealed two motifs, the ATP/GTP-binding site (P-loop) and the "MutS family signature". The hexA promoter was cloned into pMU1327, which contained a promoter-less CAT reporter gene, and the promoter activity was examined under oxidative-stress conditions. It appears that the promoter activity is down-shifted by H2O2 at 4 mM.

  12. Factores asociados a recaídas por tuberculosis en Lima este - Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Ríos Hipólito

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Determinar los factores de riesgo asociados a recaídas por tuberculosis en Lima Este - Perú, entre marzo y diciembre del 2000. Materiales y métodos: estudio caso-control. Se definió a los casos (184 como los pacientes que recibieron tratamiento con el esquema I alguna vez, egresaron como curados y volvieron a presentar otro episodio de tuberculosis BK positivo durante 1999. Los controles (368 fueron los pacientes nuevos con tuberculosis BK positivo tratados en 1998 que no recayeron. Resultados: se asociaron significativamente a las recaídas el sexo masculino, la edad mayor de 50 años, el consumo de drogas, la residencia en un área urbana, el hacinamiento, la percepción errada de la enfermedad (PEE y la desocupación, no así el contacto con un paciente tuberculoso. Luego del análisis multivariado, sólo se asociaron el área urbana, el hacinamiento, la PEE y el tratamiento irregular. Conclusiones: la residencia en un área urbana, el hacinamiento, la PEE y la irregularidad en el tratamiento son factores asociados significativamente a recaídas en pacientes con TBC pulmonar BK(+ de Lima Este, Perú.

  13. ATPase activity tightly regulates RecA nucleofilaments to promote homologous recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bailin; Zhang, Dapeng; Li, Chengmin; Yuan, Zheng; Yu, Fangzhi; Zhong, Shangwei; Jiang, Guibin; Yang, Yun-Gui; Le, X Chris; Weinfeld, Michael; Zhu, Ping; Wang, Hailin

    2017-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR), catalyzed in an evolutionarily conserved manner by active RecA/Rad51 nucleofilaments, maintains genomic integrity and promotes biological evolution and diversity. The structures of RecA/Rad51 nucleofilaments provide information critical for the entire HR process. By exploiting a unique capillary electrophoresis-laser-induced fluorescence polarization assay, we have discovered an active form of RecA nucleofilament, stimulated by ATP hydrolysis, that contains mainly unbound nucleotide sites. This finding was confirmed by a nuclease protection assay and electron microscopy (EM) imaging. We further found that these RecA-unsaturated filaments promote strand exchange in vitro and HR in vivo. RecA mutants (P67D and P67E), which only form RecA-unsaturated nucleofilaments, were able to mediate HR in vitro and in vivo, but mutants favoring the formation of the saturated nucleofilaments failed to support HR. We thus present a new model for RecA-mediated HR in which RecA utilizes its intrinsic DNA binding-dependent ATPase activity to remodel the nucleofilaments to a less saturated form and thereby promote HR. PMID:28101376

  14. A Structure-Function Study of RecA: The Structural Basis for ATP Specificity in the Strand Exchange Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegner, Julie; Spruill, Natalie; Plesniak, Leigh A.

    1999-11-01

    The terms "structure" and "function" can assume a variety of meanings. In biochemistry, the "structure" of a protein can refer to its sequence of amino acids, the three-dimensional arrangement of atoms within a subunit, or the arrangement of subunits into a larger oligomeric or filamentous state. Likewise, the function of biological macromolecules can be examined at many levels. The function of a protein can be described by its role in an organism's survival or by a chemical reaction that it promotes. We have designed a three-part biochemical laboratory experiment that characterizes the structure and function of the Escherichia coli RecA protein. The first part examines the importance of RecA in the survival of bacteria that have been exposed to UV light. This is the broadest view of function of the enzyme. Second, the students use an in vitro assay of RecA whereby the protein promotes homologous recombination. Because RecA functions not catalytically, but rather stoichiometrically, in this recombination reaction, the oligomeric state of RecA in complex with DNA must also be discussed. Finally, through molecular modeling of X-ray crystallographic structures, students identify functionally important features of the ATP cofactor binding site of RecA.

  15. Ultraviolet B retards growth, induces oxidative stress, and modulates DNA repair-related gene and heat shock protein gene expression in the monogonont rotifer, Brachionus sp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ryeo-Ok [Department of Chemistry, and Research Institute for Natural Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, Jae-Sung [Department of Molecular and Environmental Bioscience, Graduate School, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Won, Eun-Ji [Department of Environmental Marine Sciences, College of Science and Technology, Hanyang University, Ansan 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyun-Woo [Department of Chemistry, and Research Institute for Natural Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Chang-Mo [Laboratory of Cytogenetics and Tissue Regeneration, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Seoul 139-709 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young-Mi [Department of Green Life Science, College of Convergence, Sangmyung University, Seoul 110-743 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae-Seong, E-mail: jslee2@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, and Research Institute for Natural Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Molecular and Environmental Bioscience, Graduate School, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    Ultraviolet B (UV-B) radiation causes direct cellular damage by breakage of DNA strands and oxidative stress induction in aquatic organisms. To understand the effect of UV-B radiation on the rotifer, Brachionus sp., several parameters including 24-h survival rate, population growth rate, and ROS level were measured after exposure to a wide range of UV-B doses. To check the expression of other important inducible genes such as replication protein A (RPA), DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), Ku70, Ku80, and heat shock proteins (hsps) after UV-B radiation, we observed dose- and time-dependency at 2 kJ/m{sup 2}. We also examined 13 hsp genes for their roles in the UV-B damaged rotifer. Results showed that UV-B remarkably inhibited the population growth of Brachionus sp. The level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was high at 2 kJ/m{sup 2}, suggesting that 2 kJ/m{sup 2} would already be toxic. This result was supported by other enzymatic activities, such as GSH levels, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase, and glutathione reductase. For dose dependency, low doses of UV-B radiation (2, 4, and 6 kJ/m{sup 2}) significantly up-regulated the examined genes (e.g. RPA, DNA-PK, Ku70, and Ku80). For the time course study, RPA genes showed immediate up-regulation but returned to basal or lower expression levels compared to the control 3 h after UV-B exposure. The DNA-PK and Ku70/80 genes significantly increased, indicating that they may be involved in repairing processes against a low dose of UV-B exposure (2 kJ/m{sup 2}). At the basal level, the hsp90{alpha}1 gene showed the highest expression, and followed by hsp10, hsp30, hsp60, and hsc70, and hsp90{beta} in adults (w/o egg). In eggs, the hsp10 gene was expressed the highest, and followed by hsp30, hsp27, hsp90{alpha}1, and hsp60 genes. In real-time RT-PCR array on rotifer hsp genes, low doses of UV-B radiation (2 and 4 kJ/m{sup 2}) showed up-regulation of several hsp genes but most of the hsp

  16. Identification of mismatch repair gene mutations in young patients with colorectal cancer and in patients with multiple tumours associated with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, R C; Berends, M J W; Wu, Y; Sijmons, R H; Hollema, H; Ligtenberg, M J L; de Walle, H E K; de Vries, E G E; Karrenbeld, A; Buys, C H C M; van der Zee, A G J; Hofstra, R M W; Kleibeuker, J H

    2006-01-01

    Background: Patients with early-onset colorectal cancer (CRC) or those with multiple tumours associated with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) raise suspicion of the presence of germline DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations. Aim: To analyse the value of family history,

  17. Identification of mismatch repair gene mutations in young patients with colorectal cancer and in patients with multiple tumours associated with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, R.C.; Berends, M.J.; Wu, Y.; Sijmons, R.H.; Hollema, H.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Walle, H.E. de; Vries, E.G.F. de; Karrenbeld, A.; Buys, C.H.C.M.; Zee, A.G. van der; Hofstra, R.M.; Kleibeuker, J.H.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with early-onset colorectal cancer (CRC) or those with multiple tumours associated with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) raise suspicion of the presence of germline DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations. AIM: To analyse the value of family history,

  18. Bacillus subtilis SbcC protein plays an important role in DNA inter-strand cross-link repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krisnamurthy Mahalakshmi

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several distinct pathways for the repair of damaged DNA exist in all cells. DNA modifications are repaired by base excision or nucleotide excision repair, while DNA double strand breaks (DSBs can be repaired through direct joining of broken ends (non homologous end joining, NHEJ or through recombination with the non broken sister chromosome (homologous recombination, HR. Rad50 protein plays an important role in repair of DNA damage in eukaryotic cells, and forms a complex with the Mre11 nuclease. The prokaryotic ortholog of Rad50, SbcC, also forms a complex with a nuclease, SbcD, in Escherichia coli, and has been implicated in the removal of hairpin structures that can arise during DNA replication. Ku protein is a component of the NHEJ pathway in pro- and eukaryotic cells. Results A deletion of the sbcC gene rendered Bacillus subtilis cells sensitive to DNA damage caused by Mitomycin C (MMC or by gamma irradiation. The deletion of the sbcC gene in a recN mutant background increased the sensitivity of the single recN mutant strain. SbcC was also non-epistatic with AddAB (analog of Escherichia coli RecBCD, but epistatic with RecA. A deletion of the ykoV gene encoding the B. subtilis Ku protein in a sbcC mutant strain did not resulted in an increase in sensitivity towards MMC and gamma irradiation, but exacerbated the phenotype of a recN or a recA mutant strain. In exponentially growing cells, SbcC-GFP was present throughout the cells, or as a central focus in rare cases. Upon induction of DNA damage, SbcC formed 1, rarely 2, foci on the nucleoids. Different to RecN protein, which forms repair centers at any location on the nucleoids, SbcC foci mostly co-localized with the DNA polymerase complex. In contrast to this, AddA-GFP or AddB-GFP did not form detectable foci upon addition of MMC. Conclusion Our experiments show that SbcC plays an important role in the repair of DNA inter-strand cross-links (induced by MMC, most likely

  19. Genetic variations in DNA repair genes, radiosensitivity to cancer and susceptibility to acute tissue reactions in radiotherapy-treated cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A. (Dept. of Pathology, Univ. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh (US)); Voronova, Natalia V. (Dept. of Molecular Diagnostics, National Research Center GosNIIgenetika, Moscow (RU)); Chistiakov, Pavel A. (Dept. of Radiology, Cancer Research Center, Moscow (RU))

    2008-06-15

    Ionizing radiation is a well established carcinogen for human cells. At low doses, radiation exposure mainly results in generation of double strand breaks (DSBs). Radiation-related DSBs could be directly linked to the formation of chromosomal rearrangements as has been proven for radiation-induced thyroid tumors. Repair of DSBs presumably involves two main pathways, non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). A number of known inherited syndromes, such as ataxia telangiectasia, ataxia-telangiectasia like-disorder, radiosensitive severe combined immunodeficiency, Nijmegen breakage syndrome, and LIG4 deficiency are associated with increased radiosensitivity and/or cancer risk. Many of them are caused by mutations in DNA repair genes. Recent studies also suggest that variations in the DNA repair capacity in the general population may influence cancer susceptibility. In this paper, we summarize the current status of DNA repair proteins as potential targets for radiation-induced cancer risk. We will focus on genetic alterations in genes involved in HR- and NHEJ-mediated repair of DSBs, which could influence predisposition to radiation-related cancer and thereby explain interindividual differences in radiosensitivity or radioresistance in a general population

  20. A study of molecular signals deregulating mismatch repair genes in prostate cancer compared to benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanmitra Basu

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of mortality among aging males. There is an unmet requirement of clinically useful biomarkers for early detection of prostate cancer to reduce the liabilities of overtreatment and accompanying morbidity. The present population-based study investigates the factors disrupting expression of multiple functionally related genes of DNA mismatch repair pathway in prostate cancer patients to identify molecular attributes distinguishing adenocarcinoma from benign hyperplasia of prostate. Gene expression was compared between tissue samples from prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia using real-time-PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry. Assessment of genotypes of seven single-nucleotide-polymorphisms of three MMR genes was conducted using PCR-coupled RFLP and sequencing. Promoter methylation was interrogated by methylation-specific-PCR and bisulfite-sequencing. Interaction between microRNAs and MMR genes was verified by 3'UTR-based dual luciferase assays. Concurrent reduction of three MMR genes namely hMLH1, hMSH6 and hMSH2 (34-85%, P<0.05 was observed in prostate cancer tissues. hMSH6 polymorphism rs1800932(Pro92Pro conferred a borderline protection in cancer patients (OR = 0.33, 95% CI = 0.15-0.75. Relative transcript level of hMLH1 was inversely related (r = -0.59, P<0.05 with methylation quotient of its promoter which showed a significantly higher methylation density (P = 0.008, Z = -2.649 in cancer patients. hsa-miR-155, hsa-miR-141 and hsa-miR-21 gene expressions were significantly elevated (66-85%, P<0.05 in tumor specimens and negatively correlated (r = -0.602 to -0.527, P<0.05 with that of MMR genes. hsa-miR-155 & hsa-miR-141 and hsa-miR-155 & hsa-miR-21 were demonstrated to bind to their putative seed sequences in hMLH1 and hMSH6 3'UTRs respectively. Relatively higher expression of DNA methyl-transferases (DNMT1 and DNMT3b and HIF-1α genes (34-50%, P<0.05 were also detected in tumor

  1. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD7 and RAD16 genes are required for inducible excision of endonuclease III sensitive-sites, yet are not needed for the repair of these lesions following a single UV dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, A D; Waters, R

    1997-01-31

    The RAD7 and RAD16 genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have roles in the repair of UV induced CPDs in nontranscribed genes [1], and in the repair of CPDs in the nontranscribed strand of transcribed genes [2]. Previously, we identified an inducible component to nucleotide excision repair (NER), which is absent in a rad16 delta strain [3]. We have examined the repair of UV induced endonuclease III sensitive-sites (EIIISS), and have shown repair of these lesions to proceed by NER but their removal from nontranscribed regions is independent of RAD7 and RAD16. Furthermore, EIIISS are repaired with equal efficiency from both transcribed and nontranscribed genes [4]. In order to dissect the roles of RAD7 and RAD16 in the above processes we examined the repair of EIIISS in the MAT alpha and HML alpha loci, which are, respectively, transcriptionally active and inactive in alpha haploid cells. These loci have elevated levels of these lesions after UV (in genomic DNA EIIISS constitute about 10% of total lesions, whereas CPDs are about 70% of total lesions). We have shown that excision of UV induced EIIISS is enhanced following a prior UV irradiation. No enhancement of repair was detected in either the rad7 delta or the rad16 delta mutant. The fact that RAD7 and RAD16 are not required for the repair of EIIISS per se yet are required for the enhanced excision of these lesions from MAT alpha and HML alpha suggests two possibilities. These genes have two roles in NER, namely in the repair of CPDs from nontranscribed sequences, and in enhancing NER itself regardless of whether these genes' products are required for the excision of the specific lesion being repaired. In the latter case, the induction of RAD7 and RAD16 may increase the turnover of complexes stalled in nontranscribed DNA so as to increase the availability of NER proteins for the repair of CPDs and EIIISS in all regions of the genome.

  2. Promoter Hypermethylation of DNA Repair Gene MGMT in Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between hypermethylation of CpG islands in the promoter regions of O6methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT)genes and laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma was explored. Methylation-specific PCR and semi-quantitative RT-PCR were used to study the promoter methylation and mRNA expression of the MGMT gene in laryngeal carcinoma tissues, t issues adjacent to the tumor and normal laryngeal tissues. Hypermethylation of MGMT gene was detected in 16 samples of 46 (34.8 %) laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma samples. However, the MGMT hypermethylation was not detected in all tissues adjacent to the tumors and normal tissues. No significant difference in MGMT gene hypermethylation was found in samples with different histological grades (x2= 3. 130, P=0. 077) or in samples from patients with different TNM status (x2=3. 957, P=0. 138). No expression of MGMT mRNA was detected in all hypermethylated laryngeal carcinoma tissues. The expression of MGMT mRNA was detected in all unmethylated laryngeal carcinoma tissues, tissues adjacent to the tumors and normal tissues. It suggests that MGMT gene promoter hypermethylation is associated with MGMT gene transcription loss in laryngeal carcinoma tissues and possibly plays an important role in carcinogenesis of laryngeal tissues.

  3. Immunoglobulin genes undergo legitimate repair in human B cells not only after cis- but also frequent trans-class switch recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffleur, B; Bardet, S M; Garot, A; Brousse, M; Baylet, A; Cogné, M

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) genes specifically recruit activation-induced deaminase (AID) for 'on-target' DNA deamination, initiating either variable (V) region somatic hypermutation, or double-strand break intermediates of class switch recombination (CSR). Such breaks overwhelmingly undergo legitimate intra-Ig repair rather than rare illegitimate and potentially oncogenic junctions outside of Ig loci. We show that in human B cells, legitimate synapsis and repair efficiently join Ig genes whether physically linked on one chromosome or located apart on both alleles. This indicates mechanisms faithfully recognizing and/or pairing loci with homology in structure and accessibility, thus licensing interchromosomal trans-CSR junctions while usually preventing illegitimate interchromosomal recombination with AID off-target genes. Physical linkage of IgH genes in cis on the same allele just increases the likelihood of legitimate repair by another fourfold. The strongest force driving CSR might thus be recognition of legitimate target genes. Formation of IgH intra-allelic loops along this process would then constitute a consequence rather than a pre-requisite of this gene-pairing process.

  4. Genetic variants in DNA double-strand break repair genes and risk of salivary gland carcinoma: a case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xu

    Full Text Available DNA double strand break (DSB repair is the primary defense mechanism against ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage. Ionizing radiation is the only established risk factor for salivary gland carcinoma (SGC. We hypothesized that genetic variants in DSB repair genes contribute to individual variation in susceptibility to SGC. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a case-control study in which we analyzed 415 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 45 DSB repair genes in 352 SGC cases and 598 controls. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to calculate odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Rs3748522 in RAD52 and rs13180356 in XRCC4 were significantly associated with SGC after Bonferroni adjustment; ORs (95% CIs for the variant alleles of these SNPs were 1.71 (1.40-2.09, P = 1.70 × 10(-7 and 0.58 (0.45-0.74, P = 2.00 × 10(-5 respectively. The genetic effects were modulated by histological subtype. The association of RAD52-rs3748522 with SGC was strongest for mucoepidermoid carcinoma (OR = 2.21, 95% CI: 1.55-3.15, P = 1.25 × 10(-5, n = 74, and the association of XRCC4-rs13180356 with SGC was strongest for adenoid cystic carcinoma (OR = 0.60, 95% CI: 0.42-0.87, P = 6.91 × 10(-3, n = 123. Gene-level association analysis revealed one gene, PRKDC, with a marginally significant association with SGC risk in non-Hispanic whites. To our knowledge, this study is the first to comprehensively evaluate the genetic effect of DSB repair genes on SGC risk. Our results indicate that genetic variants in the DSB repair pathways contribute to inter-individual differences in susceptibility to SGC and show that the impact of genetic variants differs by histological subtype. Independent studies are warranted to confirm these findings.

  5. Loss of genes related to Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) and implications for reductive genome evolution in symbionts of deep-sea vesicomyid clams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamura, Shigeru; Kaneko, Takashi; Ozawa, Genki; Matsumoto, Mamiko Nishino; Koshiishi, Takeru; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Kato, Chiaki; Takai, Ken; Yoshida, Takao; Fujikura, Katsunori; Barry, James P.

    2017-01-01

    Intracellular thioautotrophic symbionts of deep-sea vesicomyid clams lack some DNA repair genes and are thought to be undergoing reductive genome evolution (RGE). In this study, we addressed two questions, 1) how these symbionts lost their DNA repair genes and 2) how such losses affect RGE. For the first question, we examined genes associated with nucleotide excision repair (NER; uvrA, uvrB, uvrC, uvrD, uvrD paralog [uvrDp] and mfd) in 12 symbionts of vesicomyid clams belonging to two clades (5 clade I and 7 clade II symbionts). While uvrA, uvrDp and mfd were conserved in all symbionts, uvrB and uvrC were degraded in all clade I symbionts but were apparently intact in clade II symbionts. UvrD was disrupted in two clade II symbionts. Among the intact genes in Ca. Vesicomyosocius okutanii (clade I), expressions of uvrD and mfd were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), but those of uvrA and uvrDp were not. In contrast, all intact genes were expressed in the symbiont of Calyptogena pacifica (clade II). To assess how gene losses affect RGE (question 2), genetic distances of the examined genes in symbionts from Bathymodiolus septemdierum were shown to be larger in clade I than clade II symbionts. In addition, these genes had lower guanine+cytosine (GC) content and higher repeat sequence densities in clade I than measured in clade II. Our results suggest that NER genes are currently being lost from the extant lineages of vesicomyid clam symbionts. The loss of NER genes and mutY in these symbionts is likely to promote increases in genetic distance and repeat sequence density as well as reduced GC content in genomic genes, and may have facilitated reductive evolution of the genome. PMID:28199404

  6. Phylogeny of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains constructed from polymorphisms in genes involved in DNA replication, recombination and repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Mestre

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Beijing family is a successful group of M. tuberculosis strains, often associated with drug resistance and widely distributed throughout the world. Polymorphic genetic markers have been used to type particular M. tuberculosis strains. We recently identified a group of polymorphic DNA repair replication and recombination (3R genes. It was shown that evolution of M. tuberculosis complex strains can be studied using 3R SNPs and a high-resolution tool for strain discrimination was developed. Here we investigated the genetic diversity and propose a phylogeny for Beijing strains by analyzing polymorphisms in 3R genes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A group of 3R genes was sequenced in a collection of Beijing strains from different geographic origins. Sequence analysis and comparison with the ones of non-Beijing strains identified several SNPs. These SNPs were used to type a larger collection of Beijing strains and allowed identification of 26 different sequence types for which a phylogeny was constructed. Phylogenetic relationships established by sequence types were in agreement with evolutionary pathways suggested by other genetic markers, such as Large Sequence Polymorphisms (LSPs. A recent Beijing genotype (Bmyc10, which included 60% of strains from distinct parts of the world, appeared to be predominant. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We found SNPs in 3R genes associated with the Beijing family, which enabled discrimination of different groups and the proposal of a phylogeny. The Beijing family can be divided into different groups characterized by particular genetic polymorphisms that may reflect pathogenic features. These SNPs are new, potential genetic markers that may contribute to better understand the success of the Beijing family.

  7. Repair of full-thickness articular cartilage defects by cultured mesenchymal stem cells transfected with the transforming growth factor {beta}{sub 1} gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Xiaodong [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Zheng Qixin [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Yang Shuhua [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Shao Zengwu [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Yuan Quan [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Pan Zhengqi [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Tang Shuo [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Liu Kai [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Quan Daping [Institute of Polymer Science, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2006-12-15

    Articular cartilage repair remains a clinical and scientific challenge with increasing interest focused on the combined techniques of gene transfer and tissue engineering. Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-{beta}{sub 1}) is a multifunctional molecule that plays a central role in promotion of cartilage repair, and inhibition of inflammatory and alloreactive immune response. Cell mediated gene therapy can allow a sustained expression of TGF-{beta}{sub 1} that may circumvent difficulties associated with growth factor delivery. The objective of this study was to investigate whether TGF-{beta}{sub 1} gene modified mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) could enhance the repair of full-thickness articular cartilage defects in allogeneic rabbits. The pcDNA{sub 3}-TGF-{beta}{sub 1} gene transfected MSCs were seeded onto biodegradable poly-L-lysine coated polylactide (PLA) biomimetic scaffolds in vitro and allografted into full-thickness articular cartilage defects in 18 New Zealand rabbits. The pcDNA{sub 3} gene transfected MSCs/biomimetic scaffold composites and the cell-free scaffolds were taken as control groups I and II, respectively. The follow-up times were 2, 4, 12 and 24 weeks. Macroscopical, histological and ultrastructural studies were performed. In vitro SEM studies found that abundant cartilaginous matrices were generated and completely covered the interconnected pores of the scaffolds two weeks post-seeding in the experimental groups. In vivo, the quality of regenerated tissue improved over time with hyaline cartilage filling the chondral region and a mixture of trabecular and compact bone filling the subchondral region at 24 weeks post-implantation. Joint repair in the experimental groups was better than that of either control group I or II, with respect to: (1) synthesis of hyaline cartilage specific extracellular matrix at the upper portion of the defect; (2) reconstitution of the subchondral bone at the lower portion of the defect and (3) inhibition of

  8. Repair of endonuclease-induced double-strand breaks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: essential role for genes associated with nonhomologous end-joining.

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, L K; Westmoreland, J W; Resnick, M A

    1999-01-01

    Repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) in chromosomal DNA by nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) is not well characterized in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here we demonstrate that several genes associated with NHEJ perform essential functions in the repair of endonuclease-induced DSBs in vivo. Galactose-induced expression of EcoRI endonuclease in rad50, mre11, or xrs2 mutants, which are deficient in plasmid DSB end-joining and some forms of recombination, resulted in G2 arrest and rapid ce...

  9. Cobalt-induced genotoxicity in male zebrafish (Danio rerio), with implications for reproduction and expression of DNA repair genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinardy, Helena C.; Syrett, James R. [School of Biomedical and Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth (United Kingdom); Jeffree, Ross A. [Faculty of Science, University of Technology, Sydney, PO Box 123, Broadway, NSW 2007 (Australia); Henry, Theodore B., E-mail: ted.henry@plymouth.ac.uk [School of Biomedical and Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth (United Kingdom); Center for Environmental Biotechnology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Department of Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996. USA (United States); Jha, Awadhesh N. [School of Biomedical and Biological Sciences, The University of Plymouth (United Kingdom)

    2013-01-15

    Although cobalt (Co) is an environmental contaminant of surface waters in both radioactive (e.g. {sup 60}Co) and non-radioactive forms, there is relatively little information about Co toxicity in fishes. The objective of this study was to investigate acute and chronic toxicity of Co in zebrafish, with emphasis on male genotoxicity and implications for reproductive success. The lethal concentration for 50% mortality (LC{sub 50}) in larval zebrafish exposed (96 h) to 0-50 mg l{sup -1} Co was 35.3 {+-} 1.1 (95% C.I.) mg l{sup -1} Co. Adult zebrafish were exposed (13 d) to sub-lethal (0-25 mg l{sup -1}) Co and allowed to spawn every 4 d and embryos were collected. After 12-d exposure, fertilisation rate was reduced (6% total eggs fertilised, 25 mg l{sup -1}) and embryo survival to hatching decreased (60% fertilised eggs survived, 25 mg l{sup -1}). A concentration-dependent increase in DNA strand breaks was detected in sperm from males exposed (13 d) to Co, and DNA damage in sperm returned to control levels after males recovered for 6 d in clean water. Induction of DNA repair genes (rad51, xrcc5, and xrcc6) in testes was complex and not directly related to Co concentration, although there was significant induction in fish exposed to 15 and 25 mg l{sup -1} Co relative to controls. Induction of 4.0 {+-} 0.9, 2.5 {+-} 0.7, and 3.1 {+-} 0.7-fold change (mean {+-} S.E.M. for rad51, xrcc5, and xrcc6, respectively) was observed in testes at the highest Co concentration (25 mg l{sup -1}). Expression of these genes was not altered in offspring (larvae) spawned after 12-d exposure. Chronic exposure to Co resulted in DNA damage in sperm, induction of DNA repair genes in testes, and indications of reduced reproductive success.

  10. Integration-defective lentiviral vector mediates efficient gene editing through homology-directed repair in human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yebo; Wang, Yingjia; Chang, Tammy; Huang, He; Yee, Jiing-Kuan

    2016-11-28

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are used as platforms for disease study, drug screening and cell-based therapy. To facilitate these applications, it is frequently necessary to genetically manipulate the hESC genome. Gene editing with engineered nucleases enables site-specific genetic modification of the human genome through homology-directed repair (HDR). However, the frequency of HDR remains low in hESCs. We combined efficient expression of engineered nucleases and integration-defective lentiviral vector (IDLV) transduction for donor template delivery to mediate HDR in hESC line WA09. This strategy led to highly efficient HDR with more than 80% of the selected WA09 clones harboring the transgene inserted at the targeted genomic locus. However, certain portions of the HDR clones contained the concatemeric IDLV genomic structure at the target site, probably resulted from recombination of the IDLV genomic input before HDR with the target. We found that the integrase protein of IDLV mediated the highly efficient HDR through the recruitment of a cellular protein, LEDGF/p75. This study demonstrates that IDLV-mediated HDR is a powerful and broadly applicable technology to carry out site-specific gene modification in hESCs.

  11. Methylation and protein expression of DNA repair genes: association with chemotherapy exposure and survival in sporadic ovarian and peritoneal carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walsh Tom

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA repair genes critically regulate the cellular response to chemotherapy and epigenetic regulation of these genes may be influenced by chemotherapy exposure. Restoration of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mediates resistance to platinum chemotherapy in recurrent BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutated hereditary ovarian carcinomas. We evaluated BRCA1, BRCA2, and MLH1 protein expression in 115 sporadic primary ovarian carcinomas, of which 31 had paired recurrent neoplasms collected after chemotherapy. Additionally, we assessed whether promoter methylation of BRCA1, MLH1 or FANCF influenced response to chemotherapy or explained alterations in protein expression after chemotherapy exposure. Results Of 115 primary sporadic ovarian carcinomas, 39 (34% had low BRCA1 protein and 49 (42% had low BRCA2 expression. BRCA1 and BRCA2 protein expression were highly concordant (p Conclusion Low BRCA1 expression in primary sporadic ovarian carcinoma is associated with prolonged survival. Recurrent ovarian carcinomas commonly have increased BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 protein expression post chemotherapy exposure which could mediate resistance to platinum based therapies. However, alterations in expression of these proteins after chemotherapy are not commonly mediated by promoter methylation, and other regulatory mechanisms are likely to contribute to these alterations.

  12. Defects in the DNA repair and transcription gene ERCC2(XPD) in trichothiodystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takayama, K.; Salazar, E.P.; Thompson, L.H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-02-01

    Trichothiodystrophy (TTD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by brittle hair with reduced sulfur content, ichthyosis, peculiar face, and mental and growth retardation. Clinical photosensitivity is present in {approximately}50% of TTD patients but is not associated with an elevated frequency of cancers. Previous complementation studies show that the photosensitivity in nearly all of the studied patients is due to a defect in the same genetic locus that underlies the cancer-prone genetic disorder xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XP-D). Nucleotide-sequence analysis of the ERCC2 cDNA from three TTD cell strains (TTD1VI, TTD3VI, and TTD1RO) revealed mutations within the region from amino acid 713-730 and within previously identified helicase functional domains. The various clinical presentations and DNA repair characteristics of the cell strains can be correlated with the particular mutations found in the ERCC2 locus. Mutations of Arg658 to either His or Cys correlate with TTD cell strains with intermediate UV-sensitivity, mutation of Arg722 to Trp correlates with highly UV-sensitive TTD cell strains, and mutation of Arg683 to Trp correlates with XP-D. Alleles with mutation of Arg616 to Pro or with the combined mutation of Leu461 to Val and deletion of 716-730 are found in both XP-D and TTD cell strains. 39 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Candidate driver genes involved in genome maintenance and DNA repair in Sézary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woollard, Wesley J; Pullabhatla, Venu; Lorenc, Anna; Patel, Varsha M; Butler, Rosie M; Bayega, Anthony; Begum, Nelema; Bakr, Farrah; Dedhia, Kiran; Fisher, Joshua; Aguilar-Duran, Silvia; Flanagan, Charlotte; Ghasemi, Aria A; Hoffmann, Ricarda M; Castillo-Mosquera, Nubia; Nuttall, Elisabeth A; Paul, Arisa; Roberts, Ceri A; Solomonidis, Emmanouil G; Tarrant, Rebecca; Yoxall, Antoinette; Beyers, Carl Z; Ferreira, Silvia; Tosi, Isabella; Simpson, Michael A; de Rinaldis, Emanuele; Mitchell, Tracey J; Whittaker, Sean J

    2016-06-30

    Sézary syndrome (SS) is a leukemic variant of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) and represents an ideal model for study of T-cell transformation. We describe whole-exome and single-nucleotide polymorphism array-based copy number analyses of CD4(+) tumor cells from untreated patients at diagnosis and targeted resequencing of 101 SS cases. A total of 824 somatic nonsynonymous gene variants were identified including indels, stop-gain/loss, splice variants, and recurrent gene variants indicative of considerable molecular heterogeneity. Driver genes identified using MutSigCV include POT1, which has not been previously reported in CTCL; and TP53 and DNMT3A, which were also identified consistent with previous reports. Mutations in PLCG1 were detected in 11% of tumors including novel variants not previously described in SS. This study is also the first to show BRCA2 defects in a significant proportion (14%) of SS tumors. Aberrations in PRKCQ were found to occur in 20% of tumors highlighting selection for activation of T-cell receptor/NF-κB signaling. A complex but consistent pattern of copy number variants (CNVs) was detected and many CNVs involved genes identified as putative drivers. Frequent defects involving the POT1 and ATM genes responsible for telomere maintenance were detected and may contribute to genomic instability in SS. Genomic aberrations identified were enriched for genes implicated in cell survival and fate, specifically PDGFR, ERK, JAK STAT, MAPK, and TCR/NF-κB signaling; epigenetic regulation (DNMT3A, ASLX3, TET1-3); and homologous recombination (RAD51C, BRCA2, POLD1). This study now provides the basis for a detailed functional analysis of malignant transformation of mature T cells and improved patient stratification and treatment.

  14. Improved generation of rat gene knockouts by target-selected mutagenesis in mismatch repair-deficient animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Roekel Henk S

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus is one of the preferred model organisms in physiological and pharmacological research, although the availability of specific genetic models, especially gene knockouts, is limited. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU-driven target-selected mutagenesis is currently the most successful method in rats, although it is still very laborious and expensive. Results As ENU-induced DNA damage is normally recognized by the mismatch repair (MMR system, we hypothesized that the effectiveness of the target-selected mutagenesis approach could be improved by using a MMR-deficient genetic background. Indeed, Msh6 knockout rats were found to be more sensitive to ENU treatment and the germ line mutation rate was boosted more than two-fold to 1 mutation per 585 kb. In addition, the molecular mutation spectrum was found to be changed in favor of generating knockout-type alleles by ~20%, resulting in an overall increase in efficiency of ~2.5 fold. The improved effectiveness was demonstrated by high throughput mutation discovery in 70 Mb of sequence in a set of only 310 mutant F1 rats. This resulted in the identification of 89 mutations of which four introduced a premature stopcodon and 64 resulted in amino acid changes. Conclusion Taken together, we show that the use of a MMR-deficient background considerably improves ENU-driven target-selected mutagenesis in the rat, thereby reducing animal use as well as screening costs. The use of a mismatch repair-deficient genetic background for improving mutagenesis and target-selected knockout efficiency is in principle applicable to any organism of interest.

  15. Improved generation of rat gene knockouts by target-selected mutagenesis in mismatch repair-deficient animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Boxtel, Ruben; Toonen, Pim W; Verheul, Mark; van Roekel, Henk S; Nijman, Isaac J; Guryev, Victor; Cuppen, Edwin

    2008-01-01

    Background The laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus) is one of the preferred model organisms in physiological and pharmacological research, although the availability of specific genetic models, especially gene knockouts, is limited. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-driven target-selected mutagenesis is currently the most successful method in rats, although it is still very laborious and expensive. Results As ENU-induced DNA damage is normally recognized by the mismatch repair (MMR) system, we hypothesized that the effectiveness of the target-selected mutagenesis approach could be improved by using a MMR-deficient genetic background. Indeed, Msh6 knockout rats were found to be more sensitive to ENU treatment and the germ line mutation rate was boosted more than two-fold to 1 mutation per 585 kb. In addition, the molecular mutation spectrum was found to be changed in favor of generating knockout-type alleles by ~20%, resulting in an overall increase in efficiency of ~2.5 fold. The improved effectiveness was demonstrated by high throughput mutation discovery in 70 Mb of sequence in a set of only 310 mutant F1 rats. This resulted in the identification of 89 mutations of which four introduced a premature stopcodon and 64 resulted in amino acid changes. Conclusion Taken together, we show that the use of a MMR-deficient background considerably improves ENU-driven target-selected mutagenesis in the rat, thereby reducing animal use as well as screening costs. The use of a mismatch repair-deficient genetic background for improving mutagenesis and target-selected knockout efficiency is in principle applicable to any organism of interest. PMID:18840264

  16. Prevalence of Germline Mutations in Genes Engaged in DNA Damage Repair by Homologous Recombination in Patients with Triple-Negative and Hereditary Non-Triple-Negative Breast Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Domagala

    Full Text Available This study sought to assess the prevalence of common germline mutations in several genes engaged in the repair of DNA double-strand break by homologous recombination in patients with triple-negative breast cancers and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers. Tumors deficient in this type of DNA damage repair are known to be especially sensitive to DNA cross-linking agents (e.g., platinum drugs and to poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitors.Genetic testing was performed for 36 common germline mutations in genes engaged in the repair of DNA by homologous recombination, i.e., BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2, NBN, ATM, PALB2, BARD1, and RAD51D, in 202 consecutive patients with triple-negative breast cancers and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers.Thirty five (22.2% of 158 patients in the triple-negative group carried mutations in genes involved in DNA repair by homologous recombination, while 10 (22.7% of the 44 patients in the hereditary non-triple-negative group carried such mutations. Mutations in BRCA1 were most frequent in patients with triple-negative breast cancer (18.4%, and mutations in CHEK2 were most frequent in patients with hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers (15.9%. In addition, in the triple-negative group, mutations in CHEK2, NBN, and ATM (3.8% combined were found, while mutations in BRCA1, NBN, and PALB2 (6.8% combined were identified in the hereditary non-triple-negative group.Identifying mutations in genes engaged in DNA damage repair by homologous recombination other than BRCA1/2 can substantially increase the proportion of patients with triple-negative breast cancer and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancer who may be eligible for therapy using PARP inhibitors and platinum drugs.

  17. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes XRCC2 and XRCC3 risk of gastric cancer in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlhami Gok

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We studied the prevalence of polymorphisms in genes XRCC2 and XRCC3 in stomach cancer patients who lived in North Eastern Turkey. A total of 61 cancer patients and 78 controls were included in this study. Single nucleotide changes were studied in XRCC2 and XRCC3 genes at locus Arg188His and Thr241Met. Blood samples were taken from the patients and controls, and DNA was isolated. The regions of interest were amplified using a polymerase chain reaction method. After amplification, we used restriction enzymes (HphI and NcoI to digest the amplified product. Digested product was then run through gel electrophoresis. We identified changes in the nucleotides in these specific regions. It was found that the Arg188His polymorphism of the XRCC2 gene was about 39% (24 out of the 61 among cancer patients. However, only 15% (12 out of 78 of the control group indicated this polymorphism. We also observed that 18 of the 61 cancer patients (29% carried the Thr241Met polymorphism of the XRCC3 gene whereas 11 of the 78 (14% individuals in the control group had the polymorphism. Our results showed a significant difference in polymorphism ratios between the cancer patients and health control group for the regions of interest. This result clearly showed that these polymorphisms increase the risk of stomach cancer and might be a strong marker for early diagnosis of gastric cancer.

  18. DNA mismatch repair gene MSH6 implicated in determining age at natural menopause

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, John R B; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Chasman, Daniel I

    2014-01-01

    The length of female reproductive lifespan is associated with multiple adverse outcomes, including breast cancer, cardiovascular disease and infertility. The biological processes that govern the timing of the beginning and end of reproductive life are not well understood. Genetic variants are kno...... to contribute to ∼50% of the variation in both age at menarche and menopause, but to date the known genes explain...

  19. The Regularities of Mutagenic Action of gamma-Radiation on Vegetative Bacillus subtilis Cells with Different Repair Genotype

    CERN Document Server

    Boreyko, A V; Krasavin, E A

    2000-01-01

    The regularities of induction of his^-\\to his^+ mutations in vegetative Bacillus subtilis cells with different repair capacity after gamma-irradiation have been studied. The wild type cells, polA1, recE4, recA, recP, add5, recH were used in experiments. It was shown that radiation-induced mutagenesis is determined by a repair genotype of cells. The blocking of different reparation genes is reflected on mutagenesis ratio by the various ways. A frequency of induction mutations in polA strain is higher than in wild type cells and it is characterized by the linearly-quadratic dose curve. The different rec^- strains that belong to various epistatic groups reveal an unequal mutation induction. The add5 and recP strains are characterized by the high-level induction mutations in contrast with the wild type cells. The mutagenesis in recE and recH strains, on the contrary, sharply reduces. The different influence of rec genes inhering to various epistatic groups on mutagenesis in Bacillus subtilis cells probably reflec...

  20. Efficient gene targeting by homology-directed repair in rat zygotes using TALE nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remy, Séverine; Tesson, Laurent; Menoret, Séverine; Usal, Claire; De Cian, Anne; Thepenier, Virginie; Thinard, Reynald; Baron, Daniel; Charpentier, Marine; Renaud, Jean-Baptiste; Buelow, Roland; Cost, Gregory J; Giovannangeli, Carine; Fraichard, Alexandre; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Anegon, Ignacio

    2014-08-01

    The generation of genetically modified animals is important for both research and commercial purposes. The rat is an important model organism that until recently lacked efficient genetic engineering tools. Sequence-specific nucleases, such as ZFNs, TALE nucleases, and CRISPR/Cas9 have allowed the creation of rat knockout models. Genetic engineering by homology-directed repair (HDR) is utilized to create animals expressing transgenes in a controlled way and to introduce precise genetic modifications. We applied TALE nucleases and donor DNA microinjection into zygotes to generate HDR-modified rats with large new sequences introduced into three different loci with high efficiency (0.62%-5.13% of microinjected zygotes). Two of these loci (Rosa26 and Hprt1) are known to allow robust and reproducible transgene expression and were targeted for integration of a GFP expression cassette driven by the CAG promoter. GFP-expressing embryos and four Rosa26 GFP rat lines analyzed showed strong and widespread GFP expression in most cells of all analyzed tissues. The third targeted locus was Ighm, where we performed successful exon exchange of rat exon 2 for the human one. At all three loci we observed HDR only when using linear and not circular donor DNA. Mild hypothermic (30°C) culture of zygotes after microinjection increased HDR efficiency for some loci. Our study demonstrates that TALE nuclease and donor DNA microinjection into rat zygotes results in efficient and reproducible targeted donor integration by HDR. This allowed creation of genetically modified rats in a work-, cost-, and time-effective manner.

  1. The Effect of Polymorphisms in DNA Repair Genes and Carcinogen Metabolizers on Leukocyte Telomere Length: A Cohort of Healthy Spanish Smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verde, Zoraida; Reinoso-Barbero, Luis; Chicharro, Luis; Resano, Pilar; Sánchez-Hernández, Ignacio; Rodríguez González-Moro, Jose Miguel; Bandrés, Fernando; Gómez-Gallego, Félix; Santiago, Catalina

    2016-04-01

    Smoking implies exposure to carcinogenic agents that causes DNA damage, which could be suspected to enhance telomere attrition. To protect and deal with DNA damage, cells possess mechanisms that repair and neutralize harmful substances. Polymorphisms altering DNA repair capacity or carcinogen metabolism may lead to synergistic effects with tobacco carcinogen-induced shorter telomere length independently of cancer interaction. The aim of this study was to explore the association between leukocyte telomere length (LTL) and several genetic polymorphisms in DNA repair genes and carcinogen metabolizers in a cohort of healthy smokers. We evaluated the effect of six genetic polymorphisms in cytochrome P1A1 (Ile462Val), XRCC1 (Arg399Gln), APEX1 (Asp148Glu), XRCC3 (Thr241Met), and XPD (Asp312Asn; Lys751Gln) on LTL in a cohort of 145 healthy smokers in addition to smoking habits. Logistic regression analysis showed an association between XRCC1 399Gln allele and shorter telomere length (OR = 5.03, 95% CI = 1.08% to 23.36%). There were not association between the rest of polymorphisms analyzed and LTL. Continuous exposure to tobacco could overwhelm the DNA repair machinery, making the effect of the polymorphisms that reduce repair capacity more pronounced. Analyzing the function of smoking-induced DNA-repair genes and LTL is an important goal in order to identify therapeutic targets to treat smoking-induced diseases. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Gene expression and DNA repair in progeroid syndromes and human aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyng, Kasper J; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2005-11-01

    Human progeroid syndromes are caused by mutations in single genes accelerating some but not all features of normal aging. Most progeroid disorders are linked to defects in genome maintenance, and while it remains unknown if similar processes underlie normal and premature aging, they provide useful models for the study of aging. Altered transcription is speculated to play a causative role in aging, and is involved in the pathology of most if not all progeroid syndromes. Previous studies demonstrate that there is a similar pattern of gene expression changes in primary cells from old and Werner syndrome compared to young suggesting a presence of common cellular aging mechanisms in old and progeria. Here we review the role of transcription in progeroid syndromes and discuss the implications of similar transcription aberrations in normal and premature aging.

  3. Interactive effects of ultraviolet-B radiation and pesticide exposure on DNA photo-adduct accumulation and expression of DNA damage and repair genes in Xenopus laevis embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shuangying; Tang, Song; Mayer, Gregory D; Cobb, George P; Maul, Jonathan D

    2015-02-01

    Pesticide use and ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation have both been suggested to adversely affect amphibians; however, little is known about their interactive effects. One potential adverse interaction could involve pesticide-induced dysregulation of DNA repair pathways, resulting in greater numbers of DNA photo-adducts from UVB exposure. In the present study, we investigated the interactive effects of UVB radiation and two common pesticides (endosulfan and α-cypermethrin) on induction of DNA photo-adducts and expression of DNA damage and repair related genes in African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) embryos. We examined 13 genes that are, collectively, involved in stress defense, cell cycle arrest, nucleotide excision repair (NER), base excision repair, mismatch repair, DNA repair regulation, and apoptosis. We exposed X. laevis embryos to 0, 25, and 50 μg/L endosulfan or 0, 2.5, and 5.0 μg/L α-cypermethrin for 96 h, with environmentally relevant exposures of UVB radiation during the last 7 h of the 96 h exposure. We measured the amount of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and mRNA abundance of the 13 genes among treatments including control, pesticide only, UVB only, and UVB and pesticide co-exposures. Each of the co-exposure scenarios resulted in elevated CPD levels compared to UVB exposure alone, suggesting an inhibitory effect of endosulfan and α-cypermethrin on CPD repair. This is attributed to results indicating that α-cypermethrin and endosulfan reduced mRNA abundance of XPA and HR23B, respectively, to levels that may affect the initial recognition of DNA lesions. In contrast, both pesticides increased transcript abundance of CSA and MUTL. In addition, mRNA abundance of HSP70 and GADD45α were increased by endosulfan and mRNA abundance of XPG was increased by α-cypermethrin. XPC, HR23B, XPG, and GADD45α exhibited elevated mRNA concentrations whereas there was a reduction in MUTL transcript concentrations in UVB-alone treatments. It appeared that even

  4. Participation of different genes in the ruptures repair of double chain in Escherichia coli stumps exposed to gamma radiation; Participacion de diferentes genes en la reparacion de rupturas de doble cadena en cepas de Escherichia coli expuestas a radiacion gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serment G, J. H.; Martinez M, E.; Alcantara D, D., E-mail: jorge.serment@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Departamento de Biologia, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-05-01

    All living organisms are naturally exposed to radiation from different sources. Ionizing radiation produces a plethora of lesions upon DNA that can be categorized as single and double strand breaks and base damage. Among them, unrepaired double strand breaks (Dbs) have the greatest biological significance, since they are responsible of cell death. In Escherichia coli this kind of lesions are repaired mostly by homologous recombination. In this work the participation of some recombination genes in the repair of Dbs is evaluated. Escherichia coli defective strains were exposed to gamma radiation and incubated for different periods in ideal conditions. Both micro electrophoresis and pulse field gel electrophoresis techniques were used to evaluate the kinetics of repair of such lesions, reflecting the importance of each defective gene in the process. (Author)

  5. The novel quinolone CHM-1 induces DNA damage and inhibits DNA repair gene expressions in a human osterogenic sarcoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hung-Yi; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Yang, Jai-Sing; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Lo, Chyi; Yang, Mei-Due; Chiu, Tsan-Hung; Chueh, Fu-Shin; Ho, Heng-Chien; Ko, Yang-Ching; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2010-10-01

    20-Fluoro-6,7-methylenedioxy-2-phenyl-4-quino-lone (CHM-1) has been reported to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in many types of cancer cells. However, there is no available information to show CHM-1 affecting DNA damage and expression of associated repair genes. Herein, we investigated whether or not CHM-1 induced DNA damage and affected DNA repair gene expression in U-2 OS human osterogenic sarcoma cells. The comet assay showed that incubation of U-2 OS cells with 0, 0.75, 1.5, 3 and 6 μM of CHM-1 led to a longer DNA migration smear (comet tail). DNA gel electrophoresis showed that 3 μM of CHM-1 for 24 and 48 h treatment induced DNA fragmentation in U-2 OS cells. Real-time PCR analysis showed that treatment with 3 μM of CHM-1 for 24 h reduced the mRNA expression levels of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ataxia-telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR), breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1), 14-3-3sigma (14-3-3σ), DNA-dependent serine/threonine protein kinase (DNA-PK) and O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) genes in a time-dependent manner. Taken together, the results indicate that CHM-1 caused DNA damage and reduced DNA repair genes in U-2 OS cells, which may be the mechanism for CHM-1-inhibited cell growth and induction of apoptosis.

  6. The human Bloom syndrome gene suppresses the DNA replication and repair defects of yeast dna2 mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Osamu; Campbell, Judith L

    2003-07-08

    Bloom syndrome is a disorder of profound and early cancer predisposition in which cells become hypermutable, exhibit high frequency of sister chromatid exchanges, and show increased micronuclei. BLM, the gene mutated in Bloom syndrome, has been cloned previously, and the BLM protein is a member of the RecQ family of DNA helicases. Many lines of evidence suggest that BLM is involved either directly in DNA replication or in surveillance during DNA replication, but its specific roles remain unknown. Here we show that hBLM can suppress both the temperature-sensitive growth defect and the DNA damage sensitivity of the yeast DNA replication mutant dna2-1. The dna2-1 mutant is defective in a helicase-nuclease that is required either to coordinate with the crucial Saccharomyces cerevisiae (sc) FEN1 nuclease in Okazaki fragment maturation or to compensate for scFEN1 when its activity is impaired. We show that human BLM interacts with both scDna2 and scFEN1 by using coimmunoprecipitation from yeast extracts, suggesting that human BLM participates in the same steps of DNA replication or repair as scFEN1 and scDna2.

  7. Inactivation of RAD52 and HDF1 DNA repair genes leads to premature chronological aging and cellular instability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SILVIA MERCADO-SÁENZ; BEATRIZ LÓPEZ-DÍAZ; FRANCISCO SENDRA-PORTERO; MANUEL MARTÍNEZ-MORILLO; MIGUEL J RUIZ-GÓMEZ

    2017-06-01

    The present study aims to investigate the role of radiation sensitive 52 (RAD52) and high-affinity DNA binding factor1 (HDF1) DNA repair genes on the life span of budding yeasts during chronological aging. Wild type (wt) and rad52,hdf1, and rad52 hdf1 mutant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were used. Chronological aging and survival assayswere studied by clonogenic assay and drop test. DNA damage was analyzed by electrophoresis after phenol extraction.Mutant analysis, colony forming units and the index of respiratory competence were studied by growing on dextroseand glycerol plates as a carbon source. Rad52 and rad52 hdf1 mutants showed a gradual decrease in surviving fractionin relation to wt and hdf1 mutant during aging. Genomic DNA was spontaneously more degraded during aging,mainly in rad52 mutants. This strain showed an increased percentage of revertant colonies. Moreover, all mutantsshowed a decrease in the index of respiratory competence during aging. The inactivation of RAD52 leads to prematurechronological aging with an increase in DNA degradation and mutation frequency. In addition, RAD52 and HDF1contribute to maintain the metabolic state, in a different way, during chronological aging. The results obtained couldhave important implications in the chronobiology of aging.

  8. Distinctive adaptive response to repeated exposure to hydrogen peroxide associated with upregulation of DNA repair genes and cell cycle arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria A. Santa-Gonzalez

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Many environmental and physiological stresses are chronic. Thus, cells are constantly exposed to diverse types of genotoxic insults that challenge genome stability, including those that induce oxidative DNA damage. However, most in vitro studies that model cellular response to oxidative stressors employ short exposures and/or acute stress models. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that chronic and repeated exposure to a micromolar concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 could activate DNA damage responses, resulting in cellular adaptations. For this purpose, we developed an in vitro model in which we incubated mouse myoblast cells with a steady concentration of ~50 μM H2O2 for one hour daily for seven days, followed by a final challenge of a 10 or 20X higher dose of H2O2 (0.5 or 1 mM. We report that intermittent long-term exposure to this oxidative stimulus nearly eliminated cell toxicity and significantly decreased genotoxicity (in particular, a >5-fold decreased in double-strand breaks resulting from subsequent acute exposure to oxidative stress. This protection was associated with cell cycle arrest in G2/M and induction of expression of nine DNA repair genes. Together, this evidence supports an adaptive response to chronic, low-level oxidative stress that results in genomic protection and up-regulated maintenance of cellular homeostasis.

  9. Evolution of DNA Double-Strand Break Repair by Gene Conversion: Coevolution Between a Phage and a Restriction-Modification System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahara, Koji; Horie, Ryota; Kobayashi, Ichizo; Sasaki, Akira

    2007-01-01

    The necessity to repair genome damage has been considered to be an immediate factor responsible for the origin of sex. Indeed, attack by a cellular restriction enzyme of invading DNA from several bacteriophages initiates recombinational repair by gene conversion if there is homologous DNA. In this work, we modeled the interaction between a bacteriophage and a bacterium carrying a restriction enzyme as antagonistic coevolution. We assume a locus on the bacteriophage genome has either a restriction-sensitive or a restriction-resistant allele, and another locus determines whether it is recombination/repair proficient or defective. A restriction break can be repaired by a co-infecting phage genome if one of them is recombination/repair proficient. We define the fitness of phage (resistant/sensitive and repair-positive/-negative) genotypes and bacterial (restriction-positive/-negative) genotypes by assuming random encounter of the genotypes, with given probabilities of single and double infections, and the costs of resistance, repair, and restriction. Our results show the evolution of the repair allele depends on \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}b_{1}/b_{0},\\end{equation*}\\end{document} the ratio of the burst size \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}b_{1}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} under damage to host cell physiology induced by an unrepaired double-strand break to the default burst size \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage

  10. Micronuclei in humans induced by exposure to low level of ionizing radiation: influence of polymorphisms in DNA repair genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelini, Sabrina [Department of Pharmacology, University of Bologna, Via Irnerio 48, Bologna 40126 (Italy) and Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institute, Novum, Huddinge 141 57 (Sweden)]. E-mail: angelini@biocfarm.unibo.it; Kumar, Rajiv [Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institute, Novum, Huddinge 141 57 (Sweden); Division of Molecular Genetic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Carbone, Fabio [Department of Pharmacology, University of Bologna, Via Irnerio 48, Bologna 40126 (Italy); Maffei, Francesca [Department of Pharmacology, University of Bologna, Via Irnerio 48, Bologna 40126 (Italy); Forti, Giorgio Cantelli [Department of Pharmacology, University of Bologna, Via Irnerio 48, Bologna 40126 (Italy); Violante, Francesco Saverio [Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institute, Novum, Huddinge 141 57 (Sweden); Occupational Medicine Unit, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Via Pelagi 9, Bologna 40100 (Italy); Lodi, Vittorio [Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institute, Novum, Huddinge 141 57 (Sweden); Curti, Stefania [Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institute, Novum, Huddinge 141 57 (Sweden); Hemminki, Kari [Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institute, Novum, Huddinge 141 57 (Sweden); Hrelia, Patrizia [Department of Pharmacology, University of Bologna, Via Irnerio 48, Bologna 40126 (Italy)

    2005-02-15

    Understanding the risks deriving from protracted exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation has remarkable societal importance in view of the large number of work settings in which sources of IR are encountered. To address this question, we studied the frequency of micronuclei (MN), which is an indicator of DNA damage, in a population exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation and in matched controls. In both exposed population and controls, the possible influence of single nucleotide polymorphisms in XRCC1, XRCC3 and XPD genes on the frequency of micronuclei was also evaluated. We also considered the effects of confounding factors, like smoking status, age and gender. The results indicated that MN frequency was significantly higher in the exposed workers than in the controls [8.62 {+-} 2.80 versus 6.86 {+-} 2.65; P = 0.019]. Radiological workers with variant alleles for XRCC1 or XRCC3 polymorphisms or wild-type alleles for XPD exon 23 or 10 polymorphisms showed a significantly higher MN frequency than controls with the same genotypes. Smoking status did not affect micronuclei frequency either in exposed workers or controls, while age was associated with increased MN frequency in the exposed only. In the combined population, gender but not age exerted an influence on the yield of MN, being higher in females than in males. Even though there is a limitation in this study due to the small number of subjects, these results suggest that even exposures to low level of ionizing radiation could have genotoxic effects and that XRCC3, XRCC1 and XPD polymorphisms might contribute to the increased genetic damage in susceptible individuals occupationally exposed to chronic low levels of ionizing radiation. For a clear conclusion on the induction of DNA damage caused by protracted exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation and the possible influence of genetic polymorphism in DNA repair genes larger studies are needed.

  11. Assessing SNP-SNP interactions among DNA repair, modification and metabolism related pathway genes in breast cancer susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Sapkota

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWASs have identified low-penetrance common variants (i.e., single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs associated with breast cancer susceptibility. Although GWASs are primarily focused on single-locus effects, gene-gene interactions (i.e., epistasis are also assumed to contribute to the genetic risks for complex diseases including breast cancer. While it has been hypothesized that moderately ranked (P value based weak single-locus effects in GWASs could potentially harbor valuable information for evaluating epistasis, we lack systematic efforts to investigate SNPs showing consistent associations with weak statistical significance across independent discovery and replication stages. The objectives of this study were i to select SNPs showing single-locus effects with weak statistical significance for breast cancer in a GWAS and/or candidate-gene studies; ii to replicate these SNPs in an independent set of breast cancer cases and controls; and iii to explore their potential SNP-SNP interactions contributing to breast cancer susceptibility. A total of 17 SNPs related to DNA repair, modification and metabolism pathway genes were selected since these pathways offer a priori knowledge for potential epistatic interactions and an overall role in breast carcinogenesis. The study design included predominantly Caucasian women (2,795 cases and 4,505 controls from Alberta, Canada. We observed two two-way SNP-SNP interactions (APEX1-rs1130409 and RPAP1-rs2297381; MLH1-rs1799977 and MDM2-rs769412 in logistic regression that conferred elevated risks for breast cancer (P(interaction<7.3 × 10(-3. Logic regression identified an interaction involving four SNPs (MBD2-rs4041245, MLH1-rs1799977, MDM2-rs769412, BRCA2-rs1799943 (P(permutation = 2.4 × 10(-3. SNPs involved in SNP-SNP interactions also showed single-locus effects with weak statistical significance, while BRCA2-rs1799943 showed stronger statistical significance (P

  12. Interactive effects of ultraviolet-B radiation and pesticide exposure on DNA photo-adduct accumulation and expression of DNA damage and repair genes in Xenopus laevis embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Shuangying, E-mail: shuangying.yu@ttu.edu [Department of Environmental Toxicology, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, 1207 S. Gilbert Dr., Lubbock, TX 79416 (United States); Tang, Song, E-mail: song.tang@usask.ca [Department of Environmental Toxicology, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, 1207 S. Gilbert Dr., Lubbock, TX 79416 (United States); Mayer, Gregory D., E-mail: greg.mayer@ttu.edu [Department of Environmental Toxicology, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, 1207 S. Gilbert Dr., Lubbock, TX 79416 (United States); Cobb, George P., E-mail: george_cobb@baylor.edu [Department of Environmental Science, Baylor University, One Bear Place #97266, Waco, TX 76798 (United States); Maul, Jonathan D., E-mail: jonathan.maul@ttu.edu [Department of Environmental Toxicology, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, 1207 S. Gilbert Dr., Lubbock, TX 79416 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Interactive effects of UVB radiation-pesticide co-exposures were examined in frogs. • Responses included induction of DNA photo-adducts and DNA damage and repair genes. • Elevated DNA adduct levels occurred for co-exposures compared to UVB alone. • One mechanism is that pesticides may alter nuclear excision repair gene expression. - Abstract: Pesticide use and ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation have both been suggested to adversely affect amphibians; however, little is known about their interactive effects. One potential adverse interaction could involve pesticide-induced dysregulation of DNA repair pathways, resulting in greater numbers of DNA photo-adducts from UVB exposure. In the present study, we investigated the interactive effects of UVB radiation and two common pesticides (endosulfan and α-cypermethrin) on induction of DNA photo-adducts and expression of DNA damage and repair related genes in African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) embryos. We examined 13 genes that are, collectively, involved in stress defense, cell cycle arrest, nucleotide excision repair (NER), base excision repair, mismatch repair, DNA repair regulation, and apoptosis. We exposed X. laevis embryos to 0, 25, and 50 μg/L endosulfan or 0, 2.5, and 5.0 μg/L α-cypermethrin for 96 h, with environmentally relevant exposures of UVB radiation during the last 7 h of the 96 h exposure. We measured the amount of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and mRNA abundance of the 13 genes among treatments including control, pesticide only, UVB only, and UVB and pesticide co-exposures. Each of the co-exposure scenarios resulted in elevated CPD levels compared to UVB exposure alone, suggesting an inhibitory effect of endosulfan and α-cypermethrin on CPD repair. This is attributed to results indicating that α-cypermethrin and endosulfan reduced mRNA abundance of XPA and HR23B, respectively, to levels that may affect the initial recognition of DNA lesions. In contrast, both pesticides

  13. In vivo effects of UV radiation on multiple endpoints and expression profiles of DNA repair and heat shock protein (Hsp) genes in the cycloid copepod Paracyclopina nana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Eun-Ji; Han, Jeonghoon [Department of Biological Science, College of Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yeonjung; Kumar, K. Suresh; Shin, Kyung-Hoon [Department of Marine Sciences and Convergent Technology, College of Science and Technology, Hanyang University, Ansan 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Su-Jae [Department of Life Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Heum Gi, E-mail: hgpark@gwnu.ac.kr [Department of Marine Resource Development, College of Life Sciences, Gangneung-Wonju National University, Gangneung 210-702 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae-Seong, E-mail: jslee2@skku.edu [Department of Biological Science, College of Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • UV-B radiation induced a significant reduction of the re-brooding rate of ovigerous females. • A dose-dependent decrease in food ingestion and the rate of assimilation to the body upon UV radiation. • Expression of base excision repair-associated and hsp chaperoning genes was significantly increased upon UV radiation in P. nana. - Abstract: To evaluate the effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation on energy acquisition and consumption, the copepod Paracyclopina nana was irradiated with several doses (0–3 kJ/m{sup 2}) of UV. After UV radiation, we measured the re-brooding success, growth pattern of newly hatched nauplii, ingestion rate, and assimilation of diet. In addition, we checked the modulated patterns of DNA repair and heat shock protein (hsp) chaperoning genes of P. nana. UV-B radiation induced a significant reduction (7–87%) of the re-brooding rate of ovigerous females, indicating that UV-induced egg sac damage is closely correlated with a reduction in the hatching rate of UV-irradiated ovigerous female offspring. Using chlorophyll a and stable carbon isotope incubation experiments, we found a dose-dependent decrease (P < 0.05) in food ingestion and the rate of assimilation to the body in response to UV radiation, implying that P. nana has an underlying ability to shift its balanced-energy status from growth and reproduction to DNA repair and adaptation. Also, expression of P. nana base excision repair (BER)-associated genes and hsp chaperoning genes was significantly increased in response to UV radiation in P. nana. These findings indicate that even 1 kJ/m{sup 2} of UV radiation induces a reduction in reproduction and growth patterns, alters the physiological balance and inhibits the ability to cope with UV-induced damage in P. nana.

  14. Association between Genetic Polymorphisms of DNA Repair Genes and Chromosomal Damage for 1,3-Butadiene-Exposed Workers in a Matched Study in China

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the association between polymorphisms of DNA repair genes and chromosomal damage of 1,3-butadiene- (BD-) exposed workers. The study was conducted in 45 pairs of occupationally exposed workers in a BD product workshop and matched control workers in an administrative office and a circulatory water workshop in China. Newly developed biomarkers (micronuclei, MNi; nucleoplasmic bridges, NPBs; nuclear buds, NBUDs) in the cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus (CBMN) cy...

  15. Germ line mutations of mismatch repair genes in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer patients with small bowel cancer: International Society for Gastrointestinal Hereditary Tumours Collaborative Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Jae-Gahb; Kim, Duck-Woo; Hong, Chang Won;

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of study was to determine the clinical characteristics and mutational profiles of the mismatch repair genes in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) patients with small bowel cancer (SBC). EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: A questionnaire was mailed to 55 members of the Internatio.......8%, P teens. The distribution of MSH2 mutations found in patients with HNPCC-associated SBCs significantly differed from that found in the control group (P

  16. Association between Genetic Polymorphisms of DNA Repair Genes and Chromosomal Damage for 1,3-Butadiene-Exposed Workers in a Matched Study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Menglong; Sun, Lei; Dong, Xiaomei; Yang, Huan; Liu, Wen-bin; Zhou, Niya; Han, Xue; Zhou, Ziyuan; Cui, Zhihong; Liu, Jing-yi; Cao, Jia; Ao, Lin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the association between polymorphisms of DNA repair genes and chromosomal damage of 1,3-butadiene- (BD-) exposed workers. The study was conducted in 45 pairs of occupationally exposed workers in a BD product workshop and matched control workers in an administrative office and a circulatory water workshop in China. Newly developed biomarkers (micronuclei, MNi; nucleoplasmic bridges, NPBs; nuclear buds, NBUDs) in the cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus (CBMN) cytome assay were adopted to detect chromosomal damage. PCR and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) are adopted to analyze polymorphisms of DNA repair genes, such as X-ray repair cross-complementing Group 1 (XRCC1), O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerases (ADPRT), and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonucleases (APE1). The BD-exposed workers exhibited increased frequencies of MNi and NPBs when compared to subjects in the control group. The results also show that the BD-exposed workers carrying XRCC1 diplotypes TCGA-CCGG (4.25 ± 2.06 ‰) (FR = 2.10, 95% CI: 1.03-4.28) and TCGG-TCGA (5.80 ± 3.56 ‰) (FR = 2.75, 95% CI: 0.76-2.65) had statistically higher NBUD frequencies than those who carried diplotype TCGG-TCGG (1.89 ± 1.27 ‰). Our study suggests that polymorphisms of XRCC1 gene may influence chromosomal damage in BD-exposed workers.

  17. In vivo effects of UV radiation on multiple endpoints and expression profiles of DNA repair and heat shock protein (Hsp) genes in the cycloid copepod Paracyclopina nana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Eun-Ji; Han, Jeonghoon; Lee, Yeonjung; Kumar, K Suresh; Shin, Kyung-Hoon; Lee, Su-Jae; Park, Heum Gi; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation on energy acquisition and consumption, the copepod Paracyclopina nana was irradiated with several doses (0-3kJ/m(2)) of UV. After UV radiation, we measured the re-brooding success, growth pattern of newly hatched nauplii, ingestion rate, and assimilation of diet. In addition, we checked the modulated patterns of DNA repair and heat shock protein (hsp) chaperoning genes of P. nana. UV-B radiation induced a significant reduction (7-87%) of the re-brooding rate of ovigerous females, indicating that UV-induced egg sac damage is closely correlated with a reduction in the hatching rate of UV-irradiated ovigerous female offspring. Using chlorophyll a and stable carbon isotope incubation experiments, we found a dose-dependent decrease (Pnana has an underlying ability to shift its balanced-energy status from growth and reproduction to DNA repair and adaptation. Also, expression of P. nana base excision repair (BER)-associated genes and hsp chaperoning genes was significantly increased in response to UV radiation in P. nana. These findings indicate that even 1kJ/m(2) of UV radiation induces a reduction in reproduction and growth patterns, alters the physiological balance and inhibits the ability to cope with UV-induced damage in P. nana.

  18. Normal repair of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in familial melanoma without CDKN2A or CDK4 gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, J A; Matias, C; Luxford, C; Kefford, R F; Mann, G J

    1999-04-01

    Excessive sun exposure and family history are strong risk factors for the development of cutaneous melanoma. Inherited susceptibility to this type of skin cancer could therefore result from constitutively impaired capacity to repair ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA lesions. While a proportion of familial melanoma kindreds exhibit germline mutations in the cell cycle regulatory gene CDKN2A (p16INK4a) or its protein target, cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), the biochemical basis of most familial melanoma is unknown. We have examined lymphoblastoid cell lines from melanoma-affected and unaffected individuals from large hereditary melanoma kindreds which are not attributable to CDKN2A or CDK4 gene mutation. These lines were tested for sensitivity of clonogenic growth to UV radiation and for their ability to repair transfected UV-damaged plasmid templates (host cell reactivation). Two of seven affected-unaffected pairs differed in colony survival after exposure to UVB radiation; however, no significant differences were observed in the host-cell reactivation assays. These results indicate that melanoma susceptibility genes other than CDKN2A and CDK4 do not impair net capacity to repair UV-induced DNA damage.

  19. Polymorphisms in DNA Repair Gene XRCC3 and Susceptibility to Breast Cancer in Saudi Females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa Mohammed Ali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated three common polymorphisms (SNPs in the XRCC3 gene (rs861539, rs1799794, and rs1799796 in 143 Saudi females suffering from breast cancer (median age = 51.4 years and 145 age matched normal healthy controls. DNA was extracted from whole blood and genotyping was conducted using PCR-RFLP. rs1799794 showed significant association, where AA and AA+AG occurred at a significantly higher frequency in the cancer patients compared to the control group (OR: 28.1; 95% CI: 3.76–21.12; χ2: 22.82; pT and rs1799796 A>G did not show a significant difference when the results in the patients and controls were compared. However, the frequency of rs1799796 differed significantly in patients with different age of diagnosis, tumor grade, and ER and HER2 status. The wild type A allele occurred at a higher frequency in the ER− and HER2− group. Our results among Saudis suggest that some variations in XRCC3 may contribute to breast cancer susceptibility. In conclusion, the results obtained during this study suggest that rs1799794 in XRCC3 shows strong association with breast cancer development in Saudi females.

  20. Nanoscale programmable sequence-specific patterning of DNA scaffolds using RecA protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R.; Davies, A. G.; Wälti, C.

    2012-09-01

    Molecular self-assembly inherent to many biological molecules, in conjunction with suitable molecular scaffolds to facilitate programmable positioning of nanoscale objects, offers a promising approach for the integration of functional nanoscale complexes into macroscopic host devices. Here, we report the use of the protein RecA as a means of highly efficient programmable patterning of double-stranded (ds)DNA molecules with molecular-scale precision at specific locations along the DNA strand. RecA proteins form nucleoprotein filaments with single-stranded (ss)DNA molecules, which are chosen to be of sequence homologous to the desired binding region on the dsDNA scaffold. We show that the patterning yield can be in excess of 85% and we demonstrate that concurrent patterning of multiple locations on the same dsDNA scaffold can be achieved with separation between the assembled nucleoprotein filaments of less than 4 nm. This is an important prerequisite for this programmable and flexible DNA scaffold patterning technique to be employed in molecular- and nanoscale assembly applications.

  1. De novo design of potential RecA inhibitors using multi objective optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Soumi; Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra

    2012-01-01

    De novo ligand design involves optimization of several ligand properties such as binding affinity, ligand volume, drug likeness, etc. Therefore, optimization of these properties independently and simultaneously seems appropriate. In this paper, the ligand design problem is modeled in a multiobjective using Archived MultiObjective Simulated Annealing (AMOSA) as the underlying search algorithm. The multiple objectives considered are the energy components similarity to a known inhibitor and a novel drug likeliness measure based on Lipinski's rule of five. RecA protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, causative agent of tuberculosis, is taken as the target for the drug design. To gauge the goodness of the results, they are compared to the outputs of LigBuilder, NEWLEAD, and Variable genetic algorithm (VGA). The same problem has also been modeled using a well-established genetic algorithm-based multiobjective optimization technique, Nondominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm-II (NSGA-II), to find the efficacy of AMOSA through comparative analysis. Results demonstrate that while some small molecules designed by the proposed approach are remarkably similar to the known inhibitors of RecA, some new ones are discovered that may be potential candidates for novel lead molecules against tuberculosis.

  2. Insertional Mutagenesis by CRISPR/Cas9 Ribonucleoprotein Gene Editing in Cells Targeted for Point Mutation Repair Directed by Short Single-Stranded DNA Oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Torres, Natalia; Banas, Kelly; Bialk, Pawel; Bloh, Kevin M; Kmiec, Eric B

    2017-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 and single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs) have been used to direct the repair of a single base mutation in human genes. Here, we examine a method designed to increase the precision of RNA guided genome editing in human cells by utilizing a CRISPR/Cas9 ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex to initiate DNA cleavage. The RNP is assembled in vitro and induces a double stranded break at a specific site surrounding the mutant base designated for correction by the ssODN. We use an integrated mutant eGFP gene, bearing a single base change rendering the expressed protein nonfunctional, as a single copy target in HCT 116 cells. We observe significant gene correction activity of the mutant base, promoted by the RNP and single-stranded DNA oligonucleotide with validation through genotypic and phenotypic readout. We demonstrate that all individual components must be present to obtain successful gene editing. Importantly, we examine the genotype of individually sorted corrected and uncorrected clonally expanded cell populations for the mutagenic footprint left by the action of these gene editing tools. While the DNA sequence of the corrected population is exact with no adjacent sequence modification, the uncorrected population exhibits heterogeneous mutagenicity with a wide variety of deletions and insertions surrounding the target site. We designate this type of DNA aberration as on-site mutagenicity. Analyses of two clonal populations bearing specific DNA insertions surrounding the target site, indicate that point mutation repair has occurred at the level of the gene. The phenotype, however, is not rescued because a section of the single-stranded oligonucleotide has been inserted altering the reading frame and generating truncated proteins. These data illustrate the importance of analysing mutagenicity in uncorrected cells. Our results also form the basis of a simple model for point mutation repair directed by a short single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides and

  3. Insertional Mutagenesis by CRISPR/Cas9 Ribonucleoprotein Gene Editing in Cells Targeted for Point Mutation Repair Directed by Short Single-Stranded DNA Oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Torres, Natalia; Bialk, Pawel; Bloh, Kevin M.; Kmiec, Eric B.

    2017-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 and single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs) have been used to direct the repair of a single base mutation in human genes. Here, we examine a method designed to increase the precision of RNA guided genome editing in human cells by utilizing a CRISPR/Cas9 ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex to initiate DNA cleavage. The RNP is assembled in vitro and induces a double stranded break at a specific site surrounding the mutant base designated for correction by the ssODN. We use an integrated mutant eGFP gene, bearing a single base change rendering the expressed protein nonfunctional, as a single copy target in HCT 116 cells. We observe significant gene correction activity of the mutant base, promoted by the RNP and single-stranded DNA oligonucleotide with validation through genotypic and phenotypic readout. We demonstrate that all individual components must be present to obtain successful gene editing. Importantly, we examine the genotype of individually sorted corrected and uncorrected clonally expanded cell populations for the mutagenic footprint left by the action of these gene editing tools. While the DNA sequence of the corrected population is exact with no adjacent sequence modification, the uncorrected population exhibits heterogeneous mutagenicity with a wide variety of deletions and insertions surrounding the target site. We designate this type of DNA aberration as on-site mutagenicity. Analyses of two clonal populations bearing specific DNA insertions surrounding the target site, indicate that point mutation repair has occurred at the level of the gene. The phenotype, however, is not rescued because a section of the single-stranded oligonucleotide has been inserted altering the reading frame and generating truncated proteins. These data illustrate the importance of analysing mutagenicity in uncorrected cells. Our results also form the basis of a simple model for point mutation repair directed by a short single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides and

  4. Relationship among the repair mechanisms and the genetic recombination; Relacion entre los mecanismos de reparacion y la recombinacion genetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcantara D, D. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    1987-12-15

    In accordance with the previous reports of the Project BZ87 of the Department of Radiobiology, a dependent stimulation of the system exists in E.coli SOS, of the recombination of the bacteriophage Lambda whose genetic material has not been damaged. This stimulation is not due to the increase of the cellular concentration of the protein RecA and the mechanism but probable for which we find that it is carried out, it is through a cooperation among the product of the gene rec N of E. coli and the system Net of recombination of Lambda. The gene recN belongs to the group of genes SOS and its expression is induced when damaging the bacterial DNA where it intervenes in the repair of breaks of the double helix of the molecule (Picksley et, 1984). If the repair of breaks of this type is a factor that limits the speed with which it happens the recombination among viral chromosomes, then the biggest readiness in the protein RecN, due to the induction of the functions SOS, would facilitate the repair of such ruptures. In this new project it is to enlarge the knowledge about this phenomenon, it was, on one hand of corroborating in a way but he/she specifies the relationship between the recombinogenic response of Lambda and the System SOS of E. coli and for the other one to determine the effect that has the inhibition of the duplication of the DNA on the stimulation of the viral recombination. Everything it with the idea of making it but evident and to be able to use it as a system of genotoxic agents detection in E. coli. (Author)

  5. Influence of DNA repair gene polymorphisms of hOGG1, XRCC1, XRCC3, ERCC2 and the folate metabolism gene MTHFR on chromosomal aberration frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skjelbred, Camilla Furu; Svendsen, Marit; Haugan, Vera; Eek, Anette Kildal; Clausen, Kjell Oskar; Svendsen, Martin Veel; Hansteen, Inger-Lise

    2006-12-01

    We have studied the effect of genetic polymorphisms in the DNA repair genes hOGG1, XRCC1, XRCC3, ERCC2 and the MTHFR gene in the folate metabolism on the frequencies of cells with chromosomal aberrations (CA), chromosome-type aberrations (CSA), chromatid-type aberrations (CTA), chromatid breaks (CTB) and chromatid gaps (CTG) scored in peripheral blood lymphocytes from 651 Norwegian subjects of Caucasian descendant. DNA was extracted from fixed cell suspensions. The log-linear Poisson regression model was used for the combined data which included age, smoking, occupational exposure and genotype for 449 subjects. Our results suggest that individuals carrying the hOGG1 326Cys or the XRCC1 399Gln allele have an increased risk of chromosomal damage, while individuals carrying the XRCC1 194Trp or the ERCC2 751Gln allele have a reduced risk regardless of smoking habits and age. Individuals carrying the XRCC1 280His allele had an increased risk of CSA which was only apparent in non-smokers. This was independent of age. A protective effect of the XRCC3 241Met allele was only found in the older age group in non-smokers for CA, CSA and CTA, and in smokers for CSA. In the youngest age group, the opposite effect was found, with an increased risk for CA, CTA and CTG in smokers. Carrying the MTHFR 222Val allele gave an increased risk for chromosome and chromatid-type aberrations for both non-smokers and smokers, especially for individuals in the older age group, and with variable results in the youngest age group. The variables included in the different regression models accounted, however, for only 4-10% of the variation. The frequency ratio for CTG was significantly higher than for CTA and CTB for only 7 of the 43 comparisons performed. Some of the gap frequencies diverge from the trend in the CA, CSA, CTA and CTB results.

  6. Search for genes essential for pneumococcal transformation: the RADA DNA repair protein plays a role in genomic recombination of donor DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghout, Peter; Bootsma, Hester J; Kloosterman, Tomas G; Bijlsma, Jetta J E; de Jongh, Christa E; Kuipers, Oscar P; Hermans, Peter W M

    2007-09-01

    We applied a novel negative selection strategy called genomic array footprinting (GAF) to identify genes required for genetic transformation of the gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae. Genome-wide mariner transposon mutant libraries in S. pneumoniae strain R6 were challenged by transformation with an antibiotic resistance cassette and growth in the presence of the corresponding antibiotic. The GAF screen identified the enrichment of mutants in two genes, i.e., hexA and hexB, and the counterselection of mutants in 21 different genes during the challenge. Eight of the counterselected genes were known to be essential for pneumococcal transformation. Four other genes, i.e., radA, comGF, parB, and spr2011, have previously been linked to the competence regulon, and one, spr2014, was located adjacent to the essential competence gene comFA. Directed mutants of seven of the eight remaining genes, i.e., spr0459-spr0460, spr0777, spr0838, spr1259-spr1260, and spr1357, resulted in reduced, albeit modest, transformation rates. No connection to pneumococcal transformation could be made for the eighth gene, which encodes the response regulator RR03. We further demonstrated that the gene encoding the putative DNA repair protein RadA is required for efficient transformation with chromosomal markers, whereas transformation with replicating plasmid DNA was not significantly affected. The radA mutant also displayed an increased sensitivity to treatment with the DNA-damaging agent methyl methanesulfonate. Hence, RadA is considered to have a role in recombination of donor DNA and in DNA damage repair in S. pneumoniae.

  7. Down-regulation of the Nucleotide Excision Repair gene XPG as a new mechanism of drug resistance in human and murine cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geroni Cristina

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug resistance is one of the major obstacles limiting the activity of anticancer agents. Activation of DNA repair mechanism often accounts for increase resistance to cancer chemotherapy. Results We present evidence that nemorubicin, a doxorubicin derivative currently in clinical evaluation, acts through a mechanism of action different from classical anthracyclines, requiring an intact nucleotide excision repair (NER system to exert its activity. Cells made resistant to nemorubicin show increased sensitivity to UV damage. We have analysed the mechanism of resistance and discovered a previously unknown mechanism resulting from methylation-dependent silencing of the XPG gene. Restoration of NER activity through XPG gene transfer or treatment with demethylating agents restored sensitivity to nemorubicin. Furthermore, we found that a significant proportion of ovarian tumors present methylation of the XPG promoter. Conclusions Methylation of a NER gene, as described here, is a completely new mechanism of drug resistance and this is the first evidence that XPG gene expression can be influenced by an epigenetic mechanism. The reported methylation of XPG gene could be an important determinant of the response to platinum based therapy. In addition, the mechanism of resistance reported opens up the possibility of reverting the resistant phenotype using combinations with demethylating agents, molecules already employed in the clinical setting.

  8. Recombination activating activity of XRCC1 analogous genes in X-ray sensitive and resistant CHO cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubnitchaya-Labudová, O.; Portele, A.; Vaçata, V.; Lubec, G.; Rink, H.; Höfer, M.

    1997-10-01

    The XRCC1 gene (X-ray repair cross complementing) complements the DNA repair deficiency of the radiation sensitive Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutant cell line EM9 but the mechanism of the correction is not elucidated yet. XRCC1 shows substantial homology to the RAG2 gene (recombination activating gene) and we therefore tried to answer question, whether structural similarities (sequence of a putative recombination activating domain, aa 332-362 for XRCC1 and aa 286-316 in RAG2) would reflect similar functions of the homologous, putative recombination activating domain. PCR experiments revealed that no sequence homologous to the structural part of human XRCC1 was present in cDNA of CHO. Differential display demonstrated two putative recombination activating domains in the parental CHO line AA8 and one in the radiosensitive mutant EM9. Southern blot experiments showed the presence of several genes with partial homology to human XRCC1. Recombination studies consisted of expressing amplified target domains within chimeric proteins in recA - bacteria and subsequent detection of recombination events by sequencing the recombinant plasmids. Recombination experiments demonstrated recombination activating activity of all putative recombination activating domains amplified from AA8 and EM9 genomes as reflected by deletions within the insert of the recombinant plasmids. The recombination activating activity of XRCC1 analogues could explain a mechanism responsible for the correction of the DNA repair defect in EM9.

  9. DNA Repair Genes ERCC1 and BRCA1 Expression in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Chemotherapy Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Liu, Feng; Zhu, Jingyan; Chen, Peng; Liu, Hongxing; Liu, Qi; Han, Junqing

    2016-06-12

    BACKGROUND Surgery combined with chemotherapy is an important therapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, chemotherapy drug resistance seriously hinders the curative effect. Studies show that DNA repair genes ERCC1 and BRCA1 are associated with NSCLC chemotherapy, but their expression and mechanism in NSCLC chemotherapy drug-resistant cells has not been elucidated. MATERIAL AND METHODS NSCLC cell line A549 and drug resistance cell line A549/DDP were cultured. Real-time PCR and Western blot analyses were used to detect ERCC1 and BRCA1 mRNA expression. A549/DDP cells were randomly divided into 3 groups: the control group; the siRNA-negative control group (scramble group); and the siRNA ERCC1 and BRCA1siRNA transfection group. Real-time PCR and Western blot analyses were used to determine ERCC1 and BRCA1 mRNA and protein expression. MTT was used to detect cell proliferation activity. Caspase 3 activity was tested by use of a kit. Western blot analysis was performed to detect PI3K, AKT, phosphorylated PI3K, and phosphorylated AKT protein expression. RESULTS ERCC1 and BRCA1 were overexpressed in A549/DDP compared with A549 (P<0.05). ERCC1 and BRCA1siRNA transfection can significantly reduce ERCC1 and BRCA1 mRNA and protein expression (P<0.05). Downregulating ERCC1 and BRCA1 expression obviously inhibited cell proliferation and increased caspase 3 activity (P<0.05). Downregulating ERCC1 and BRCA1 significantly decreased PI3K and AKT phosphorylation levels (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS ERCC1 and BRCA1 were overexpressed in NSCLC drug-resistant cells, and they regulated lung cancer occurrence and development through the phosphorylating PI3K/AKT signaling pathway.

  10. Comparative analysis of meiotic progression in female mice bearing mutations in genes of the DNA mismatch repair pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Rui; Sun, Xianfei; Kolas, Nadine K; Avdievich, Elena; Kneitz, Burkhard; Edelmann, Winfried; Cohen, Paula E

    2008-03-01

    The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) family functions in a variety of contexts to preserve genome integrity in most eukaryotes. In particular, members of the MMR family are involved in the process of meiotic recombination in germ cells. MMR gene mutations in mice result in meiotic disruption during prophase I, but the extent of this disruption often differs between male and female meiocytes. To address the role of MMR proteins specifically in female meiosis, we explored the progression of oocytes through prophase I and the meiotic divisions in mice harboring deletions in members of the MMR pathway (Mlh1, Mlh3, Exo1, and an ATPase-deficient variant of Mlh1, Mlh1(G67R)). The colocalization of MLH1 and MLH3, key proteins involved in stabilization of nascent crossovers, was dependent on intact heterodimer formation and was highly correlated with the ability of oocytes to progress through to metaphase II. The exception was Exo1(-/-) oocytes, in which normal MLH1/MLH3 localization was observed followed by failure to proceed to metaphase II. All mutant oocytes were able to resume meiosis after dictyate arrest, but they showed a dramatic decline in chiasmata (to less than 25% of normal), accompanied by varied progression through metaphase I. Taken together, these results demonstrate that MMR function is required for the formation and stabilization of crossovers in mammalian oocytes and that, in the absence of a functional MMR system, the failure to maintain chiasmata results in a reduced ability to proceed normally through the first and second meiotic divisions, despite near-normal levels of meiotic resumption after dictyate arrest.

  11. Macrophage-specific apoE gene repair reduces diet-induced hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis in hypomorphic Apoe mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Gaudreault

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Apolipoprotein (apo E is best known for its ability to lower plasma cholesterol and protect against atherosclerosis. Although the liver is the major source of plasma apoE, extra-hepatic sources of apoE, including from macrophages, account for up to 10% of plasma apoE levels. This study examined the contribution of macrophage-derived apoE expression levels in diet-induced hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Hypomorphic apoE (Apoe(h/h mice expressing wildtype mouse apoE at ∼2-5% of physiological levels in all tissues were derived by gene targeting in embryonic stem cells. Cre-mediated gene repair of the Apoe(h/h allele in Apoe(h/hLysM-Cre mice raised apoE expression levels by 26 fold in freshly isolated peritoneal macrophages, restoring it to 37% of levels seen in wildtype mice. Chow-fed Apoe(h/hLysM-Cre and Apoe(h/h mice displayed similar plasma apoE and cholesterol levels (55.53±2.90 mg/dl versus 62.70±2.77 mg/dl, n = 12. When fed a high-cholesterol diet (HCD for 16 weeks, Apoe(h/hLysM-Cre mice displayed a 3-fold increase in plasma apoE and a concomitant 32% decrease in plasma cholesterol when compared to Apoe(h/h mice (602.20±22.30 mg/dl versus 888.80±24.99 mg/dl, n = 7. On HCD, Apoe(h/hLysM-Cre mice showed increased apoE immunoreactivity in lesional macrophages and liver-associated Kupffer cells but not hepatocytes. In addition, Apoe(h/hLysM-Cre mice developed 35% less atherosclerotic lesions in the aortic root than Apoe(h/h mice (167×10(3±16×10(3 µm(2 versus 259×10(3±56×10(3 µm(2, n = 7. This difference in atherosclerosis lesions size was proportional to the observed reduction in plasma cholesterol. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Macrophage-derived apoE raises plasma apoE levels in response to diet-induced hyperlipidemia and by such reduces atherosclerosis proportionally to the extent to which it lowers plasma cholesterol levels.

  12. Mismatch repair genes of Streptococcus pneumoniae: HexA confers a mutator phenotype in Escherichia coli by negative complementation.

    OpenAIRE

    Prudhomme, M; Méjean, V; Martin, B; Claverys, J P

    1991-01-01

    DNA repair systems able to correct base pair mismatches within newly replicated DNA or within heteroduplex molecules produced during recombination are widespread among living organisms. Evidence that such generalized mismatch repair systems evolved from a common ancestor is particularly strong for two of them, the Hex system of the gram-positive Streptococcus pneumoniae and the Mut system of the gram-negative Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. The homology existing between HexA and ...

  13. H. pylori-Induced DNA Strand Breaks Are Introduced by Nucleotide Excision Repair Endonucleases and Promote NF-κB Target Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara L. Hartung

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The human bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori exhibits genotoxic properties that promote gastric carcinogenesis. H. pylori introduces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs in epithelial cells that trigger host cell DNA repair efforts. Here, we show that H. pylori-induced DSBs are repaired via error-prone, potentially mutagenic non-homologous end-joining. A genome-wide screen for factors contributing to DSB induction revealed a critical role for the H. pylori type IV secretion system (T4SS. Inhibition of transcription, as well as NF-κB/RelA-specific RNAi, abrogates DSB formation. DSB induction further requires β1-integrin signaling. DSBs are introduced by the nucleotide excision repair endonucleases XPF and XPG, which, together with RelA, are recruited to chromatin in a highly coordinated, T4SS-dependent manner. Interestingly, XPF/XPG-mediated DNA DSBs promote NF-κB target gene transactivation and host cell survival. In summary, H. pylori induces XPF/XPG-mediated DNA damage through activation of the T4SS/β1-integrin signaling axis, which promotes NF-κB target gene expression and host cell survival.

  14. Comprehensive SNP scan of DNA repair and DNA damage response genes reveal multiple susceptibility loci conferring risk to tobacco associated leukoplakia and oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Pinaki; Datta, Sayantan; Maiti, Guru Prasad; Baral, Aradhita; Jha, Ganga Nath; Panda, Chinmay Kumar; Chowdhury, Shantanu; Ghosh, Saurabh; Roy, Bidyut; Roychoudhury, Susanta

    2013-01-01

    Polymorphic variants of DNA repair and damage response genes play major role in carcinogenesis. These variants are suspected as predisposition factors to Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). For identification of susceptible variants affecting OSCC development in Indian population, the "maximally informative" method of SNP selection from HapMap data to non-HapMap populations was applied. Three hundred twenty-five SNPs from 11 key genes involved in double strand break repair, mismatch repair and DNA damage response pathways were genotyped on a total of 373 OSCC, 253 leukoplakia and 535 unrelated control individuals. The significantly associated SNPs were validated in an additional cohort of 144 OSCC patients and 160 controls. The rs12515548 of MSH3 showed significant association with OSCC both in the discovery and validation phases (discovery P-value: 1.43E-05, replication P-value: 4.84E-03). Two SNPs (rs12360870 of MRE11A, P-value: 2.37E-07 and rs7003908 of PRKDC, P-value: 7.99E-05) were found to be significantly associated only with leukoplakia. Stratification of subjects based on amount of tobacco consumption identified SNPs that were associated with either high or low tobacco exposed group. The study reveals a synergism between associated SNPs and lifestyle factors in predisposition to OSCC and leukoplakia.

  15. Mice with DNA repair gene Ercc1 deficiency in a neural crest lineage are a model for late-onset Hirschsprung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selfridge, Jim; Song, Liang; Brownstein, David G; Melton, David W

    2010-06-04

    The Ercc1 gene is essential for nucleotide excision repair and is also important in recombination repair and the repair of interstrand crosslinks. We have previously used a floxed Ercc1 allele with a keratinocyte-specific Cre recombinase transgene to inactivate Ercc1 in the epidermal layer of the skin and so generate a mouse model for UV-induced non-melanoma skin cancer. Now, in an attempt to generate a model for UV-induced melanoma, we have used the floxed Ercc1 allele in combination with a Cre transgene under the control of the tyrosinase gene promoter to produce mice with Ercc1-deficient melanocytes that are hypersensitive to UV irradiation. These animals developed normally, but died when 4-6 months old with severe colonic obstruction. Melanocytes are derived from the neural crest and the tyrosinase promoter is also expressed in additional neural crest-derived lineages, including the progenitors of the parasympathetic nervous system that innervates the gastrointestinal tract and controls gut peristalsis. A functional enteric nervous system developed in floxed Ercc1 mice with the tyrosinase Cre transgene, but was found to have degenerated in the colons of affected mice. We suggest that accumulating unrepaired endogenous DNA damage in the Ercc1-deficient colonic parasympathetic ganglia leads to the degeneration of this network and results in a colonic obstructive disorder that resembles late-onset Hirschsprung disease in man.

  16. [Photoreactivating Activity of Bioluminescence: Repair of UV-damaged DNA of Escherichia coli Occurs with Assistance of lux-Genes of Marine Bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavilgelsky, G B; Melkina, O E; Kotova, V Yu; Konopleva, M N; Manukhov, I V; Pustovoit, K Ss

    2015-01-01

    The UV resistance of luminescent bacteria Escherichia coli AB1886 uvrA6 (pLeo1) containing the plasmid with luxCDABE genes of marine bacteria Photobacterium leiognathi is approximately two times higher than the UV resistance of non-luminous bacteria E. coli AB1886 uvrA6. Introduction of phr::kan(r) mutations (a defect in the functional activity of photolyase) into the genome of E. coli AB1886 uvrA6 (pLeo1) completely removes the high UV resistance of the cells. Therefore, photoreactivation that involves bacterial photolyase contributes mainly to the bioluminescence-induced DNA repair. It is shown that photoreactivating activity of bioluminescence of P. leiognathi is about 2.5 times lower compared with that one induced by a light source with λ > 385 nm. It is also shown that an increase in the bioluminescence intensity, induced by UV radiation in E. coli bacterial cells with a plasmid containing the luxCD ABE genes under RecA-LexA-regulated promoters, occurs only 25-30 min later after UV irradiation of cells and does not contribute to DNA repair. A quorum sensing regulatory system is not involved in the DNA repair by photolyase.

  17. Dickeya species relatedness and clade structure determined by comparison of recA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Neil; Stead, David; Bew, Janice; Heeney, John; Tsror Lahkim, Leah; Elphinstone, John

    2009-10-01

    Using sequences from the recA locus, we have produced a phylogeny of 188 Dickeya strains from culture collections and identified species relatedness and subspecies clade structure within the genus. Of the six recognized species, Dickeya paradisiaca, D. chrysanthemi and D. zeae were discriminated with long branch lengths. The clade containing the D. paradisiaca type strain included just one additional strain, isolated from banana in Colombia. Strains isolated from Chrysanthemum and Parthenium species made up most of the clade containing the D. chrysanthemi type strain, and the host range of this species was extended to include potato. The D. zeae clade had the largest number of sequevars and branched into two major sister clades that contained all of the Zea mays isolates, and were identified as phylotypes PI and PII. The host range was increased from six to 13 species, including potato. The recA sequence of an Australian sugar-cane strain was sufficiently distinct to rank as a new species-level branch. In contrast to these species, Dickeya dadantii, D. dianthicola and D. dieffenbachiae were distinguished with shorter branch lengths, indicating relatively closer relatedness. The recA sequence for the type strain of D. dadantii clustered separately from other strains of the species. However, sequence comparison of three additional loci revealed that the D. dadantii type strain grouped together with the six other D. dadantii strains that were sequenced. Analysis of all four loci indicated that the D. dadantii strains were most closely related to D. dieffenbachiae. Three further branches (DUC-1, -2 and -3) were associated with these three species, which all diverged from a common origin and can be considered as a species complex. The large clade containing the D. dianthicola type strain comprised 58 strains and had little sequence diversity. One sequevar accounted for the majority of these strains, which were isolated nearly exclusively from eight hosts from Europe

  18. Polymorphisms in XPC, XPD, XRCC1, and XRCC3 DNA repair genes and lung cancer risk in a population of Northern Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tardón Adonina

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes have been associated to repair DNA lesions, and might contribute to the individual susceptibility to develop different types of cancer. Nucleotide excision repair (NER, base excision repair (BER, and double-strand break repair (DSBR are the main DNA repair pathways. We investigated the relationship between polymorphisms in two NER genes, XPC (poly (AT insertion/deletion: PAT-/+ and XPD (Asp312Asn and Lys751Gln, the BER gene XRCC1 (Arg399Gln, and the DSBR gene XRCC3 (Thr241Met and the risk of developing lung cancer. Methods A hospital-based case-control study was designed with 516 lung cancer patients and 533 control subjects, matched on ethnicity, age, and gender. Genotypes were determined by PCR-RFLP and the results were analysed using multivariate unconditional logistic regression, adjusting for age, gender and pack-years. Results Borderline association was found for XPC and XPD NER genes polymorphisms, while no association was observed for polymorphisms in BER and DSBR genes. XPC PAT+/+ genotype was associated with no statistically significant increased risk among ever smokers (OR = 1.40; 95%CI = 0.94–2.08, squamous cell carcinoma (OR = 1.44; 95%CI = 0.85–2.44, and adenocarcinoma (OR = 1.72; 95%CI = 0.97–3.04. XPD variant genotypes (312Asn/Asn and 751Gln/Gln presented a not statistically significant risk of developing lung cancer (OR = 1.52; 95%CI = 0.91–2.51; OR = 1.38; 95%CI = 0.85–2.25, respectively, especially among ever smokers (OR = 1.58; 95%CI = 0.96–2.60, heavy smokers (OR = 2.07; 95%CI = 0.74–5.75, and adenocarcinoma (OR = 1.88; 95%CI = 0.97–3.63. On the other hand, individuals homozygous for the XRCC1 399Gln allele presented no risk of developing lung cancer (OR = 0.87; 95%CI = 0.57–1.31 except for individuals carriers of 399Gln/Gln genotype and without family history of cancer (OR = 0.57; 95%CI = 0.33–0.98 and no association was found between XRCC3 Thr241Met

  19. Large-scale structure of RecA protein from Deinococcus radiodurance and its complexes in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karelov, D. V.; Lebedev, D. V.; Suslov, A. V.; Shalguev, V. I.; Kuklin, A. I.; Islamov, A. Kh; Lauter, H.; Lanzov, V. A.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V.

    2008-03-01

    Different conformational states of the filaments formed by RecA protein from a radiation resistant strain Deinococcus radiodurance (RecADr) in solution were investigated using small angle neutron scattering. Scattering by the protein self-polymer was consistent with a long helix model, with the pitch of the helix being lower than that in the crystal structure. Compared to those of RecA proteins from Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, helical filaments of RecA from D. radiodurance exhibited a lower helical pitch and lower stability at low Mg2+ concentrations or under conditions of elevated ionic strength in the absence of ATP (adenosine triphosphate). Formation of an active filament upon binding of ATPγS and either single- or double-stranded DNA brought about a significant increase in the helix pitch and a moderate decrease in the cross-sectional gyration radius, but resulted in little change in the number of monomers per helix turn. The helix pitch value of the RecADr presynaptic complex was conservative and close to that found for other RecA proteins and their analogs.

  20. Electron microscopic visualization of the RecA protein-mediated pairing and branch migration phases of DNA strand exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Register, JC; Christiansen, Gunna; Griffith, J

    1987-01-01

    examined by electron microscopy: supertwisted double-stranded (ds) DNA and linear single-stranded (ss) DNA, linear dsDNA and circular ssDNA, and linear dsDNA and colinear ssDNA. Several major observations were: (i) with RecA protein bound to the DNA, plectonemic joints were ultrastructurally...

  1. Removal of nonhomologous DNA ends in double-strand break recombination: The role of the yeast ultraviolet repair gene RAD1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fishman-Lobell, J.; Habert, J.E. (Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (United States))

    1992-10-15

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be repaired by gene conversions or by deletions resulting from single-strand annealing between direct repeats of homologous sequences. Although rad1 mutants are resistant to x-rays and can complete DSB-mediated mating-type switching, they could not complete recombination when the ends of the break contained approximately 60 base pairs of nonhomology. Recombination was restored when the ends of the break were made homologous to donor sequences. Additionally, the absence of RAD1 led to the frequent appearance of a previously unobserved type of recombination product. These data suggest RAD1 is required to remove nonhomologous DNA from the 3{prime} ends of recombining DNA, a process analogous to the excision of photodimers during repair of ultraviolet-damaged DNA.

  2. Inducible Apoe Gene Repair in Hypomorphic ApoE Mice Deficient in the LDL Receptor Promotes Atheroma Stabilization with a Human-like Lipoprotein Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberlé, Delphine; Luk, Fu Sang; Kim, Roy Y.; Olivas, Victor R.; Kumar, Nikit; Posada, Jessica M.; Li, Kang; Gaudreault, Nathalie; Rapp, Joseph H.; Raffai, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study atherosclerosis regression in mice following plasma lipid reduction to moderately elevated apolipoprotein B (apoB)-lipoprotein levels. Approach and Results Chow-fed hypomorphic Apoe mice deficient in LDL receptor expression (Apoeh/hLdlr−/−Mx1-cre mice) develop hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis. These mice were studied before and after inducible cre-mediated Apoe gene repair. By 1 week, induced mice displayed a 2-fold reduction in plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels and a decrease in the non-HDL:HDL-cholesterol ratio from 87%:13% to 60%:40%. This halted atherosclerotic lesion growth and promoted macrophage loss and accumulation of thick collagen fibers for up to 8 weeks. Concomitantly, blood Ly-6Chi monocytes were decreased by 2-fold but lesional macrophage apoptosis was unchanged. The expression of several genes involved in extra-cellular matrix remodeling and cell migration were changed in lesional macrophages 1 week after Apoe gene repair. However, mRNA levels of numerous genes involved in cholesterol efflux and inflammation were not significantly changed at this time point. Conclusions Restoring apoE expression in Apoeh/hLdlr−/−Mx1-cre mice resulted in lesion stabilization in the context of a human-like ratio of non-HDL:HDL-cholesterol. Our data suggest that macrophage loss derived in part from reduced blood Ly-6Chi monocytes levels and genetic reprogramming of lesional macrophages. PMID:23788760

  3. Tendon repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repair of tendon ... Tendon repair can be performed using: Local anesthesia (the immediate area of the surgery is pain-free) ... a cut on the skin over the injured tendon. The damaged or torn ends of the tendon ...

  4. International congress on DNA damage and repair: Book of abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    This document contains the abstracts of 105 papers presented at the Congress. Topics covered include the Escherichia coli nucleotide excision repair system, DNA repair in malignant transformations, defective DNA repair, and gene regulation. (TEM)

  5. Impact of recA on Levofloxacin Exposure-Related Resistance Development▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Renu; Ledesma, Kimberly R.; Chang, Kai-Tai; Tam, Vincent H.

    2010-01-01

    Genetic mutations are one of the major mechanisms by which bacteria acquire drug resistance. One of the known mechanisms for inducing mutations is the SOS response system. We investigated the effect of disrupting recA, an inducer of the SOS response, on resistance development using an in vitro hollow-fiber infection model. A clinical Staphylococcus aureus isolate and a laboratory wild-type strain of Escherichia coli were compared to their respective recA-deleted isogenic daughter isolates. Approximately 2 × 105 CFU/ml of bacteria were subjected to escalating levofloxacin exposures for up to 120 h. Serial samples were obtained to ascertain simulated drug exposures and total and resistant bacterial burdens. Quinolone resistance determining regions of gyrA and grlA (parC for E. coli) in levofloxacin-resistant isolates were sequenced to confirm the mechanism of resistance. The preexposure MICs of the recA-deleted isolates were 4-fold lower than those of their respective parents. In S. aureus, a lower area under the concentration-time curve over 24 h at steady state divided by the MIC (AUC/MIC) was required to suppress resistance development in the recA-deleted mutant (an AUC/MIC of >23 versus an AUC/MIC of >32 was necessary in the mutant versus the parent isolate, respectively), and a prominent difference in the total bacterial burden was observed at 72 h. Using an AUC/MIC of approximately 30, E. coli resistance emergence was delayed by 24 h in the recA-deleted mutant. Diverse mutations in gyrA were found in levofloxacin-resistant isolates recovered. Disruption of recA provided additional benefits apart from MIC reduction, attesting to its potential role for pharmacologic intervention. The clinical relevance of our findings warrants further investigations. PMID:20660686

  6. Role of RecA and the SOS response in thymineless death in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie C Fonville

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Thymineless death (TLD is a classic and enigmatic phenomenon, documented in bacterial, yeast, and human cells, whereby cells lose viability rapidly when deprived of thymine. Despite its being the essential mode of action of important chemotherapeutic agents, and despite having been studied extensively for decades, the basic mechanisms of TLD have remained elusive. In Escherichia coli, several proteins involved in homologous recombination (HR are required for TLD, however, surprisingly, RecA, the central HR protein and activator of the SOS DNA-damage response was reported not to be. We demonstrate that RecA and the SOS response are required for a substantial fraction of TLD. We show that some of the Rec proteins implicated previously promote TLD via facilitating activation of the SOS response and that, of the roughly 40 proteins upregulated by SOS, SulA, an SOS-inducible inhibitor of cell division, accounts for most or all of how SOS causes TLD. The data imply that much of TLD results from an irreversible cell-cycle checkpoint due to blocked cell division. FISH analyses of the DNA in cells undergoing TLD reveal blocked replication and apparent DNA loss with the region near the replication origin underrepresented initially and the region near the terminus lost later. Models implicating formation of single-strand DNA at blocked replication forks, a SulA-blocked cell cycle, and RecQ/RecJ-catalyzed DNA degradation and HR are discussed. The data predict the importance of DNA damage-response and HR networks to TLD and chemotherapy resistance in humans.

  7. Mismatch repair genes Mlh1 and Mlh3 modify CAG instability in Huntington's disease mice: genome-wide and candidate approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Mouro Pinto

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Huntington's disease gene (HTT CAG repeat mutation undergoes somatic expansion that correlates with pathogenesis. Modifiers of somatic expansion may therefore provide routes for therapies targeting the underlying mutation, an approach that is likely applicable to other trinucleotide repeat diseases. Huntington's disease Hdh(Q111 mice exhibit higher levels of somatic HTT CAG expansion on a C57BL/6 genetic background (B6.Hdh(Q111 than on a 129 background (129.Hdh(Q111 . Linkage mapping in (B6x129.Hdh(Q111 F2 intercross animals identified a single quantitative trait locus underlying the strain-specific difference in expansion in the striatum, implicating mismatch repair (MMR gene Mlh1 as the most likely candidate modifier. Crossing B6.Hdh(Q111 mice onto an Mlh1 null background demonstrated that Mlh1 is essential for somatic CAG expansions and that it is an enhancer of nuclear huntingtin accumulation in striatal neurons. Hdh(Q111 somatic expansion was also abolished in mice deficient in the Mlh3 gene, implicating MutLγ (MLH1-MLH3 complex as a key driver of somatic expansion. Strikingly, Mlh1 and Mlh3 genes encoding MMR effector proteins were as critical to somatic expansion as Msh2 and Msh3 genes encoding DNA mismatch recognition complex MutSβ (MSH2-MSH3. The Mlh1 locus is highly polymorphic between B6 and 129 strains. While we were unable to detect any difference in base-base mismatch or short slipped-repeat repair activity between B6 and 129 MLH1 variants, repair efficiency was MLH1 dose-dependent. MLH1 mRNA and protein levels were significantly decreased in 129 mice compared to B6 mice, consistent with a dose-sensitive MLH1-dependent DNA repair mechanism underlying the somatic expansion difference between these strains. Together, these data identify Mlh1 and Mlh3 as novel critical genetic modifiers of HTT CAG instability, point to Mlh1 genetic variation as the likely source of the instability difference in B6 and 129 strains and suggest

  8. Mismatch repair genes Mlh1 and Mlh3 modify CAG instability in Huntington's disease mice: genome-wide and candidate approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Ricardo Mouro; Dragileva, Ella; Kirby, Andrew; Lloret, Alejandro; Lopez, Edith; St Claire, Jason; Panigrahi, Gagan B; Hou, Caixia; Holloway, Kim; Gillis, Tammy; Guide, Jolene R; Cohen, Paula E; Li, Guo-Min; Pearson, Christopher E; Daly, Mark J; Wheeler, Vanessa C

    2013-10-01

    The Huntington's disease gene (HTT) CAG repeat mutation undergoes somatic expansion that correlates with pathogenesis. Modifiers of somatic expansion may therefore provide routes for therapies targeting the underlying mutation, an approach that is likely applicable to other trinucleotide repeat diseases. Huntington's disease Hdh(Q111) mice exhibit higher levels of somatic HTT CAG expansion on a C57BL/6 genetic background (B6.Hdh(Q111) ) than on a 129 background (129.Hdh(Q111) ). Linkage mapping in (B6x129).Hdh(Q111) F2 intercross animals identified a single quantitative trait locus underlying the strain-specific difference in expansion in the striatum, implicating mismatch repair (MMR) gene Mlh1 as the most likely candidate modifier. Crossing B6.Hdh(Q111) mice onto an Mlh1 null background demonstrated that Mlh1 is essential for somatic CAG expansions and that it is an enhancer of nuclear huntingtin accumulation in striatal neurons. Hdh(Q111) somatic expansion was also abolished in mice deficient in the Mlh3 gene, implicating MutLγ (MLH1-MLH3) complex as a key driver of somatic expansion. Strikingly, Mlh1 and Mlh3 genes encoding MMR effector proteins were as critical to somatic expansion as Msh2 and Msh3 genes encoding DNA mismatch recognition complex MutSβ (MSH2-MSH3). The Mlh1 locus is highly polymorphic between B6 and 129 strains. While we were unable to detect any difference in base-base mismatch or short slipped-repeat repair activity between B6 and 129 MLH1 variants, repair efficiency was MLH1 dose-dependent. MLH1 mRNA and protein levels were significantly decreased in 129 mice compared to B6 mice, consistent with a dose-sensitive MLH1-dependent DNA repair mechanism underlying the somatic expansion difference between these strains. Together, these data identify Mlh1 and Mlh3 as novel critical genetic modifiers of HTT CAG instability, point to Mlh1 genetic variation as the likely source of the instability difference in B6 and 129 strains and suggest that MLH1

  9. Biological Augmentation of Rotator Cuff Tendon Repair

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kovacevic, David; Rodeo, Scott A

    2008-01-01

    A histologically normal insertion site does not regenerate following rotator cuff tendon-to-bone repair, which is likely due to abnormal or insufficient gene expression and/or cell differentiation at the repair site...

  10. Deoxyribonucleic acid repair gene X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 polymorphisms and non-carcinogenic disease risk in different populations: A meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagher Larijani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study aims to assess a meta-analysis of the association of X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1 polymorphisms with the risk of various non-carcinogenic diseases in different population. Materials and Methods: This meta-analysis was performed by critically reviewing reveals 38 studies involving 10043 cases and 11037 controls. Among all the eligible studies, 14 focused on Arg194Trp polymorphism, 33 described the Arg399Gln and three articles investigated on Arg280His. Populations were divided into three different ethnic subgroups include Caucasians, Asians and other (Turkish and Iranian. Results: Pooled results showed no correlation between Arg194Trp and non-carcinogenic disease. There was only weak relation in the recessive (odds ratio [OR] =1.11, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.86-1.44 model in Asian population and dominant (OR = 1.04, 95% CI: 0.66-1.63 model of other populations. In Arg399Gln polymorphism, there was no relation with diseases of interest generally. In the pooled analysis, there were weak relation in the dominant (OR = 1.08, 95% CI: 0.86-1.35 model of Asian population and quite well-correlation with recessive (OR = 1.49, 95% CI: 1.19-1.88, dominant (OR = 1.23, 95% CI: 0.94-1.62, and additive (OR = 1.23, 95% CI: 0.94-1.62 models of other subgroup. For Arg280His, there was a weak relation only in the dominant model (OR = 1.06, 95% CI: 0.74-1.51. Conclusion: The present meta-analysis correspondingly shows that Arg399Gln variant to be associated with increased non-carcinogenic diseases risk through dominant and recessive modes among Iranian and Turkish population. It also suggests a trend of dominant and recessive effect of Arg280His variant in all population and its possible protective effect on non-carcinogenic diseases.

  11. Homologous and homeologous intermolecular gene conversion are not differentially affected by mutations in the DNA damage or the mismatch repair genes RAD1, RAD50, RAD51, RAD52, RAD54, PMS1 and MSH2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, G.; Westmoreland, J.; Priebe, S. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)] [and others

    1996-06-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) genes or genes involved in both DNA damage repair and homologous recombination might affect homeologous vs. homologous recombination differentially. Spontaneous mitotic gene conversion between a chromosome and a homologous or homeologous donor sequence (14% diverged) on a single copy plasmid was examined in wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains and in MMR or DNA damage repair mutants. Homologous recombination in rad51, rad52 and rad54 mutants was considerably reduced, while there was little effect of rad1, rad50, pms1 and msh2 null mutations. DNA divergence resulted in no differential effect on recombination rates in the wild type or the mutants; there was only a five- to 10-fold reduction in homeologous relative to homologous recombination regardless of background. Since DNA divergence is known to affect recombination in some systems, we propose that differences in the role of MMR depends on the mode of recombination and/or the level of divergence. Based on analysis of the recombination breakpoints, there is a minimum of three homologous bases required at a recombination junction. A comparison of Rad{sup +} vs. rad52 strains revealed that while all conversion tracts are continuous, elimination of RAD52 leads to the appearance of a novel class of very short conversion tracts. 67 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Association between Genetic Polymorphisms of DNA Repair Genes and Chromosomal Damage for 1,3-Butadiene-Exposed Workers in a Matched Study in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menglong Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to examine the association between polymorphisms of DNA repair genes and chromosomal damage of 1,3-butadiene- (BD- exposed workers. The study was conducted in 45 pairs of occupationally exposed workers in a BD product workshop and matched control workers in an administrative office and a circulatory water workshop in China. Newly developed biomarkers (micronuclei, MNi; nucleoplasmic bridges, NPBs; nuclear buds, NBUDs in the cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus (CBMN cytome assay were adopted to detect chromosomal damage. PCR and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP are adopted to analyze polymorphisms of DNA repair genes, such as X-ray repair cross-complementing Group 1 (XRCC1, O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT, poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerases (ADPRT, and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonucleases (APE1. The BD-exposed workers exhibited increased frequencies of MNi and NPBs when compared to subjects in the control group. The results also show that the BD-exposed workers carrying XRCC1 diplotypes TCGA-CCGG (4.25±2.06‰ (FR=2.10, 95% CI: 1.03–4.28 and TCGG-TCGA (5.80±3.56‰ (FR=2.75, 95% CI: 0.76–2.65 had statistically higher NBUD frequencies than those who carried diplotype TCGG-TCGG (1.89±1.27‰. Our study suggests that polymorphisms of XRCC1 gene may influence chromosomal damage in BD-exposed workers.

  13. Identification and Analysis of MS5(d): A Gene That Affects Double-Strand Break (DSB) Repair during Meiosis I in Brassica napus Microsporocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xinhua; Yan, Xiaohong; Yuan, Rong; Li, Keqi; Wu, Yuhua; Liu, Fang; Luo, Junling; Li, Jun; Wu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the identification of the Brassica-specific gene MS5(d), which is responsible for male sterility in Brassica napus. The MS5(d) gene is highly expressed in the microsporocyte and encodes a protein that localizes to the nucleus. Light microscopy analyses have demonstrated that the MS5(d) gene affects microsporocyte meiosis in the thermosensitive genic male sterility line TE5A. Sequence comparisons and genetic complementation revealed a C-to-T transition in MS5(d), encoding a Leu-to-Phe (L281F) substitution and causing abnormal male meiosis in TE5A. These findings suggest arrested meiotic chromosome dynamics at pachytene. Furthermore, immunofluorescence analyses showed that double-strand break (DSB) formation and axial elements were normal but that DSB repair and spindle behavior were aberrant in TE5A meiocytes. Collectively, our results indicate that MS5(d) likely encodes a protein required for chromosomal DSB repair at early stages of meiosis in B. napus.

  14. Radio-adaptive response of base excision repair genes and proteins in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to gamma radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toprani, Sneh M; Das, Birajalaxmi

    2015-09-01

    Radio-adaptive response is a mechanism whereby a low-dose exposure (priming dose) induces resistance to a higher dose (challenging dose) thus significantly reducing its detrimental effects. Radiation-induced DNA damage gets repaired through various DNA repair pathways in human cells depending upon the type of lesion. The base excision repair (BER) pathway repairs radiation-induced base damage, abasic sites and single-strand breaks in cellular DNA. In the present study, an attempt has been made to investigate the involvement of BER genes and proteins in the radio-adaptive response in human resting peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Venous blood samples were collected from 20 randomly selected healthy male individuals with written informed consent. PBMC were isolated and irradiated at a priming dose of 0.1 Gy followed 4h later with a challenging dose of 2.0 Gy (primed cells). Quantitation of DNA damage was done using the alkaline comet assay immediately and expression profile of BER genes and proteins were studied 30 min after the challenging dose using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot, respectively. The overall result showed significant (P ≤ 0.05) reduction of DNA damage in terms of percentage of DNA in tail (%T) with a priming dose of 0.1 Gy followed by a challenging dose of 2.0 Gy after 4 h. Twelve individuals showed significant (P ≤ 0.05) reduction in %T whereas eight individuals showed marginal reduction in DNA damage that was not statistically significant. However, at the transcriptional level, BER genes such as APE1, FEN1 and LIGASE1 showed significant (P ≤ 0.05) up-regulation in both groups. Significant (P ≤ 0.05) up-regulation was also observed at the protein level for OGG1, APE1, MBD4, FEN1 and LIGASE1 in primed cells. Up-regulation of some BER genes and proteins such as APE1, FEN1 and LIGASE1 in primed cells of resting PBMC is suggestive of active involvement of the BER pathway in radio-adaptive response.

  15. Inter-individual variation in nucleotide excision repair pathway is modulated by non-synonymous polymorphisms in ERCC4 and MBD4 genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allione, Alessandra, E-mail: alessandra.allione@hugef-torino.org [Human Genetics Foundation (HuGeF), Via Nizza 52, 10126 Turin (Italy); Guarrera, Simonetta; Russo, Alessia [Human Genetics Foundation (HuGeF), Via Nizza 52, 10126 Turin (Italy); Ricceri, Fulvio [Human Genetics Foundation (HuGeF), Via Nizza 52, 10126 Turin (Italy); Department of Medical Sciences, University of Turin, Via Santena 19, 10126 Turin (Italy); Purohit, Rituraj [Human Genetics Foundation (HuGeF), Via Nizza 52, 10126 Turin (Italy); Bioinformatics Division, School of Bio Sciences and Technology, Vellore Institute of Technology University, Vellore 632014, Tamil Nadu (India); Pagnani, Andrea; Rosa, Fabio; Polidoro, Silvia; Voglino, Floriana [Human Genetics Foundation (HuGeF), Via Nizza 52, 10126 Turin (Italy); Matullo, Giuseppe [Human Genetics Foundation (HuGeF), Via Nizza 52, 10126 Turin (Italy); Department of Medical Sciences, University of Turin, Via Santena 19, 10126 Turin (Italy)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • We reported a large inter-individual variability of NER capacity. • ERCC4 rs1800124 and MBD4 rs10342 nsSNP variants were associated with DNA repair capacity. • DNA–protein interaction analyses showed alteration of binding for ERCC4 and MBD4 variants. • A new possible cross-talk between NER and BER pathways has been reported. - Abstract: Inter-individual differences in DNA repair capacity (DRC) may lead to genome instability and, consequently, modulate individual cancer risk. Among the different DNA repair pathways, nucleotide excision repair (NER) is one of the most versatile, as it can eliminate a wide range of helix-distorting DNA lesions caused by ultraviolet light irradiation and chemical mutagens. We performed a genotype–phenotype correlation study in 122 healthy subjects in order to assess if any associations exist between phenotypic profiles of NER and DNA repair gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Individuals were genotyped for 768 SNPs with a custom Illumina Golden Gate Assay, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of the same subjects were tested for a NER comet assay to measure DRC after challenging cells by benzo(a)pyrene diolepoxide (BPDE). We observed a large inter-individual variability of NER capacity, with women showing a statistically significant lower DRC (mean ± SD: 6.68 ± 4.76; p = 0.004) than men (mean ± SD: 8.89 ± 5.20). Moreover, DRC was significantly lower in individuals carrying a variant allele for the ERCC4 rs1800124 non-synonymous SNP (nsSNP) (p = 0.006) and significantly higher in subjects with the variant allele of MBD4 rs2005618 SNP (p = 0.008), in linkage disequilibrium (r{sup 2} = 0.908) with rs10342 nsSNP. Traditional in silico docking approaches on protein–DNA and protein–protein interaction showed that Gly875 variant in ERCC4 (rs1800124) decreases the DNA–protein interaction and that Ser273 and Thr273 variants in MBD4 (rs10342) indicate complete loss of protein

  16. Completion of meiosis in male zebrafish (Danio rerio) despite lack of DNA mismatch repair gene mlh1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leal, M.C.; Feitsma, H.; Cuppen, E.; França, L.R.; Schulz, R.W.

    2008-01-01

    Mlh1 is a member of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) machinery and is also essential for the stabilization of crossovers during the first meiotic division. Recently, we have shown that zebrafish mlh1 mutant males are completely infertile because of a block in metaphase I, whereas females are fertile but ha

  17. Deletion of the nucleotide excision repair gene Ercc1 reduces immunoglobulin class switching and alters mutations near switch recombination junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.E. Schrader; J. Vardo; E. Linehan; M.Z. Twarog; L.J. Niedernhofer (Laura); J. Stavnezer; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe structure-specific endonuclease ERCC1-XPF is an essential component of the nucleotide excision DNA repair pathway. ERCC1-XPF nicks double-stranded DNA immediately adjacent to 3' single-strand regions. Substrates include DNA bubbles and flaps. Furthermore, ERCC1 interacts with Msh2, a

  18. Explorative study to identify novel candidate genes related to oxaliplatin efficacy and toxicity using a DNA repair array.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kweekel, D.M.; Antonini, N.F.; Nortier, J.W.; Punt, C.J.A.; Gelderblom, H.; Guchelaar, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To identify new polymorphisms (single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs) in DNA repair pathways that are associated with efficacy and toxicity in patients receiving oxaliplatin and capecitabine for advanced colorectal cancer (ACC). METHODS: We studied progression-free survival (PFS) in 91 ACC

  19. Completion of meiosis in male zebrafish (Danio rerio) despite lack of DNA mismatch repair gene mlh1.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leal, M.C.; Feitsma, H.; Cuppen, E.; Franca, L.R.; Schulz, R.W.

    2008-01-01

    Mlh1 is a member of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) machinery and is also essential for the stabilization of crossovers during the first meiotic division. Recently, we have shown that zebrafish mlh1 mutant males are completely infertile because of a block in metaphase I, whereas females are fertile but

  20. Bladder exstrophy repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladder birth defect repair; Everted bladder repair; Exposed bladder repair; Repair of bladder exstrophy ... Bladder exstrophy repair involves two surgeries. The first surgery is to repair the bladder and the second one is to attach ...

  1. Kin-cohort estimates for familial breast cancer risk in relation to variants in DNA base excision repair, BRCA1 interacting and growth factor genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutter Joni L

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subtle functional deficiencies in highly conserved DNA repair or growth regulatory processes resulting from polymorphic variation may increase genetic susceptibility to breast cancer. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes can impact protein function leading to genomic instability facilitated by growth stimulation and increased cancer risk. Thus, 19 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in eight genes involved in base excision repair (XRCC1, APEX, POLD1, BRCA1 protein interaction (BRIP1, ZNF350, BRCA2, and growth regulation (TGFß1, IGFBP3 were evaluated. Methods Genomic DNA samples were used in Taqman 5'-nuclease assays for most SNPs. Breast cancer risk to ages 50 and 70 were estimated using the kin-cohort method in which genotypes of relatives are inferred based on the known genotype of the index subject and Mendelian inheritance patterns. Family cancer history data was collected from a series of genotyped breast cancer cases (N = 748 identified within a cohort of female US radiologic technologists. Among 2,430 female first-degree relatives of cases, 190 breast cancers were reported. Results Genotypes associated with increased risk were: XRCC1 R194W (WW and RW vs. RR, cumulative risk up to age 70, risk ratio (RR = 2.3; 95% CI 1.3–3.8; XRCC1 R399Q (QQ vs. RR, cumulative risk up to age 70, RR = 1.9; 1.1–3.9; and BRIP1 (or BACH1 P919S (SS vs. PP, cumulative risk up to age 50, RR = 6.9; 1.6–29.3. The risk for those heterozygous for BRCA2 N372H and APEX D148E were significantly lower than risks for homozygotes of either allele, and these were the only two results that remained significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. No associations with breast cancer were observed for: APEX Q51H; XRCC1 R280H; IGFPB3 -202A>C; TGFß1 L10P, P25R, and T263I; BRCA2 N289H and T1915M; BRIP1 -64A>C; and ZNF350 (or ZBRK1 1845C>T, L66P, R501S, and S472P. Conclusion Some variants in genes within the base-excision repair pathway (XRCC1 and

  2. Dose response and adaptive response of non-homologous end joining repair genes and proteins in resting human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to γ radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelke, Shridevi; Das, Birajalaxmi

    2015-05-01

    Ionising radiation induces single-strand breaks, double-strand breaks (DSB) and base damages in human cell. DSBs are the most deleterious and if not repaired may lead to genomic instability and cell death. DSB can be repaired through non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway in resting lymphocytes. In this study, NHEJ genes and proteins were studied in irradiated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) at resting stage. Dose-response, time point kinetics and adaptive-response studies were conducted in irradiated PBMC at various end points such as DNA damage quantitation, transcription and protein expression profile. Venous blood samples were collected from 20 random, normal and healthy donors with written informed consent. PBMC was separated and irradiated with various doses between 0.1 and 2.0 Gy ((60)CO-γ source) for dose-response study. Repair kinetics of DNA damage and time point changes in expression of genes and proteins were studied in post-irradiated PBMC at 2.0 Gy at various time points up to 240 min. Adaptive-response study was conducted with a priming dose of 0.1 Gy followed by a challenging dose of 2.0 Gy after 4-h incubation. Our results revealed that Ku70, Ku80, XLF and Ligase IV were significantly upregulated (P Adaptive-response study showed significantly increased expression of the proteins involved in NHEJ, suggesting their role in adaptive response in human PBMC at G0/G1, which has important implications to human health. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the UK Environmental Mutagen Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Gene expression analysis during recovery process indicates the mechanism for innate immune injury and repair from Coxsackievirus B3-induced myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hai-Lan; Song, Juan; Sun, Peng; Song, Qin-Qin; Sheng, Lin-Jun; Chi, Miao-Miao; Han, Jun

    2016-02-02

    To investigate the innate immune injury and repair mechanism during recovery from Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) induced myocarditis, we established an acute viral myocarditis recovery model by infecting BALB/c mice with CVB3. Histopathological examination of cardiac tissues after infection showed a gradual increase of myocardial injury to the maximum degree at 8 dpi (days post infection), followed by a recovery process with reduced viral replication. We also measured expression changes of innate immune genes in heart after 4, 8 and 12 days of infection using innate immune real-time PCR array. The results showed expression alterations in many Pattern Recognition Receptors (PRRs) genes upon CVB3 infection, which activated multiple important signaling pathways during recovery process. The expression of TLRs, RLRs, PKR and cytokines were strongly induced and reached the peak at 4 dpi in early myocarditis stage, followed by a gradual reduction in recovery stage, during which the levels were even lower than normal at 12 dpi. The strong correlation between cardiac histopathology score and chemokine expression level suggested that the chemokines might play a role in pathological changes during early myocarditis stage. In addition, we also found that both cell survival signaling pathways (AKT1, p38MAPK) and antiviral signaling pathways (IKKα/β/ε) were activated and promoted the recovery during late myocarditis stage. Altogether, our observations improved the understanding of formation and progression of the pathological lesions, as well as the repair mechanism for acute viral myocarditis.

  4. DNA repair genes XRCC1 and XRCC3 polymorphisms and their relationship with the level of micronuclei in breast cancer patients

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    Raquel A. Santos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer (BC is the most prevalent type worldwide, besides being one of the most common causes of death among women. It has been suggested that sporadic BC is most likely caused by low-penetrance genes, including those involved in DNA repair mechanisms. Furthermore, the accumulation of DNA damage may contribute to breast carcinogenesis. In the present study, the relationship between two DNA repair genes, viz., XRCC1 (Arg399Gln and XRCC3 (Thr241Met polymorphisms, and the levels of chromosome damage detected in 65 untreated BC women and 85 healthy controls, was investigated. Chromosome damage was evaluated through micronucleus assaying, and genotypes determined by PCR-RFLP methodology. The results showed no alteration in the risk of BC and DNA damage brought about by either XRCC1 (Arg399Gln or XRCC3 (Thr241Met action in either of the two groups. Nevertheless, on evaluating BC risk in women presenting levels of chromosome damage above the mean, the XRCC3 Thr241Met polymorphism was found to be more frequent in the BC group than in the control, thereby leading to the conclusion that there is a slight association between XRCC3 (241 C/T genotypes and BC risk in the subgroups with higher levels of chromosome damage.

  5. Transcript levels of the Saccharomyes cerevisiae DNA repair gene RAD23 increase in response to UV light and in meiosis but remain constant in the mitotic cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madura, K; Prakash, S

    1990-08-25

    The RAD23 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for excision-repair of UV damaged DNA. In this paper, we determine the location of the RAD23 gene in a cloned DNA fragment, identify the 1.6 kb RAD23 transcript, and examine RAD23 transcript levels in UV damaged cells, during the mitotic cell cycle, and in meiosis. The RAD23 mRNA levels are elevated 5-fold between 30 to 60 min after 37 J/m2 of UV light. RAD23 mRNA levels rise over 6-fold during meiosis at a stage coincident with high levels of genetic recombination. This response is specific to sporulation competent MATa/MAT alpha diploid cells, and is not observed in asporogenous MATa/MATa diploids. RAD23 mRNA levels, however, remain constant during the mitotic cell cycle.

  6. Characterization of Rad51 from apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii: an implication for inefficient gene targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achanta, Sita Swati; Varunan, Shalu M; Bhattacharyya, Sunanda; Bhattacharyya, Mrinal Kanti

    2012-01-01

    Repairing double strand breaks (DSBs) is absolutely essential for the survival of obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii. Thus, DSB repair mechanisms could be excellent targets for chemotherapeutic interventions. Recent genetic and bioinformatics analyses confirm the presence of both homologous recombination (HR) as well as non homologous end joining (NHEJ) proteins in this lower eukaryote. In order to get mechanistic insights into the HR mediated DSB repair pathway in this parasite, we have characterized the key protein involved in homologous recombination, namely TgRad51, at the biochemical and genetic levels. We have purified recombinant TgRad51 protein to 99% homogeneity and have characterized it biochemically. The ATP hydrolysis activity of TgRad51 shows a higher K(M) and much lower k(cat) compared to bacterial RecA or Rad51 from other related protozoan parasites. Taking yeast as a surrogate model system we have shown that TgRad51 is less efficient in gene conversion mechanism. Further, we have found that TgRad51 mediated gene integration is more prone towards random genetic loci rather than targeted locus. We hypothesize that compromised ATPase activity of TgRad51 is responsible for inefficient gene targeting and poor gene conversion efficiency in this protozoan parasite. With increase in homologous flanking regions almost three fold increments in targeted gene integration is observed, which is similar to the trend found with ScRad51. Our findings not only help us in understanding the reason behind inefficient gene targeting in T. gondii but also could be exploited to facilitate high throughput knockout as well as epitope tagging of Toxoplasma genes.

  7. Characterization of Rad51 from apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii: an implication for inefficient gene targeting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sita Swati Achanta

    Full Text Available Repairing double strand breaks (DSBs is absolutely essential for the survival of obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii. Thus, DSB repair mechanisms could be excellent targets for chemotherapeutic interventions. Recent genetic and bioinformatics analyses confirm the presence of both homologous recombination (HR as well as non homologous end joining (NHEJ proteins in this lower eukaryote. In order to get mechanistic insights into the HR mediated DSB repair pathway in this parasite, we have characterized the key protein involved in homologous recombination, namely TgRad51, at the biochemical and genetic levels. We have purified recombinant TgRad51 protein to 99% homogeneity and have characterized it biochemically. The ATP hydrolysis activity of TgRad51 shows a higher K(M and much lower k(cat compared to bacterial RecA or Rad51 from other related protozoan parasites. Taking yeast as a surrogate model system we have shown that TgRad51 is less efficient in gene conversion mechanism. Further, we have found that TgRad51 mediated gene integration is more prone towards random genetic loci rather than targeted locus. We hypothesize that compromised ATPase activity of TgRad51 is responsible for inefficient gene targeting and poor gene conversion efficiency in this protozoan parasite. With increase in homologous flanking regions almost three fold increments in targeted gene integration is observed, which is similar to the trend found with ScRad51. Our findings not only help us in understanding the reason behind inefficient gene targeting in T. gondii but also could be exploited to facilitate high throughput knockout as well as epitope tagging of Toxoplasma genes.

  8. The CREB Coactivator CRTC2 is a Lymphoma Tumor Suppressor that Preserves Genome Integrity Through Transcription of DNA Mismatch Repair Genes

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    Fang, Minggang; Pak, Magnolia L.; Chamberlain, Lynn; Xing, Wei; Yu, Hongbo; Green, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The CREB-regulated transcription coactivator CRTC2 stimulates CREB target gene expression and has a well-established role in modulating glucose and lipid metabolism. Here we find, unexpectedly, that loss of CRTC2, as well as CREB1 and its coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP), results in a deficiency in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) and a resultant increased mutation frequency. We show that CRTC2, CREB1 and CBP are transcriptional activators of well-established MMR genes, including EXO1, MSH6, PMS1 and POLD2. Mining of expression profiling databases and analysis of patient samples reveal that CRTC2 and its target MMR genes are down-regulated in specific T-cell lymphoma subtypes, which are microsatellite unstable. The levels of acetylated histone H3 on the CRTC2 promoter are significantly reduced in lymphoma compared to normal tissue, explaining the decreased CRTC2 expression. Our results establish a role for CRTC2 as a lymphoma tumor suppressor gene that preserves genome integrity by stimulating transcription of MMR genes. PMID:26004186

  9. Comparison of clastogen-induced gene expression profiles in wild-type and DNA repair-deficient Rad54/Rad54B cells

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    van Benthem Jan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously we found that Rad54/Rad54B cells are more sensitive towards mitomycin C (MMC as compared to wild-type (WT cells. This difference in sensitivity was absent upon exposure to other clastogens like bleomycin (BLM and γ-radiation. In order to get further insight into possible underlying mechanisms, gene expression changes in WT and Rad54/Rad54B MEFs (mouse embryonic fibroblasts after exposure to the clastogens MMC and BLM were investigated. Exposures of these cells to mutagens (N-ac-AAF and ENU and vehicle were taken as controls. Results Most exposures resulted in an induction of DNA damage signaling and apoptosis genes and a reduced expression of cell division genes in cells of both genotypes. As expected, responses to N-ac-AAF were very similar in both genotypes. ENU exposure did not lead to significant gene expression changes in cells of both genotypes, presumably due to its short half-life. Gene expression responses to clastogens, however, showed a genotype-dependent effect for BLM and MMC. MMC treated Rad54/Rad54B MEFs showed no induction of p53-signaling, DNA damage response and apoptosis as seen for all the other treatments. Conclusion These data support our finding that different types of clastogens exist and that responses to these types depend on the DNA repair status of the cells.

  10. Association of Polymorphisms in X-Ray Repair Cross Complementing 1 Gene and Risk of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma in a Chinese Population

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    Yu-Xia Yun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To investigate the association between three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the X-ray repair cross complementing 1 gene (XRCC1 and the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC in Chinese population. Methods. A case-control study including 381 primary ESCC patients recruited from hospital and 432 normal controls matched with patients by age and gender from Chinese Han population was conducted. The genotypes of three XRCC1 polymorphisms at −77T>C (T-77C, codon 194 (Arg194Trp, and codon 399 (Arg399Gln were studied by means of polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism techniques (PCR-RFLP. Unconditional logistic regression model and haplotype analysis were used to estimate associations of these three SNPs in XRCC1 gene with ESCC risk. Results. Polymorphisms at these three sites in XRCC1 gene were not found to be associated with risk for developing ESCC; however the haplotype Ccodon 194Gcodon 399C-77T>C was significantly associated with reduced risk of ESCC (OR: 0.62, 95% CI: 0.40–0.96 upon haplotype analysis. Conclusion. These results suggested that the gene-gene interactions might play vital roles in the progression on esophageal cancer in Chinese Han population and it would be necessary to confirm these findings in a large and multiethnic population.

  11. Genetic polymorphisms of DNA repair genes and chromosomal damage in workers exposed to 1,3-butadiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Wang, Ai-hong; Tan, Hong-shan; Feng, Nan-nan; Ye, Yun-jie; Feng, Xiao-qing; Liu, Geoffrey; Zheng, Yu-xin; Xia, Zhao-lin

    2010-05-01

    The base excision repair (BER) pathway is important in repairing DNA damage incurred from occupational exposure to 1,3-butadiene (BD). This study examines the relationship between inherited polymorphisms of the BER pathway (x-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) Arg194Trp, Arg280His, Arg399Gln, T-77C, ADPRT Val762Ala, MGMT Leu84Phe and APE1 Asp148Glu) and chromosomal damage in BD-exposed workers, using the cytokinesis-blocked (CB) micronucleus (MN) assay in peripheral lymphocytes of 166 workers occupationally exposed to BD and 41 non-exposed healthy individuals. The MN frequency of exposed workers (3.39 +/- 2.42) per thousand was higher than that of the non-exposed groups (1.48 +/- 1.26) per thousand (P damage among BD-exposed workers. In workers exposed to BD, multiple BER polymorphisms and a XRCC1 haplotype were associated with differential levels of chromosome damage.

  12. Temporal Gene Expression of the Cyanobacterium Arthrospira in Response to Gamma Rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badri, Hanène; Monsieurs, Pieter; Coninx, Ilse; Nauts, Robin; Wattiez, Ruddy; Leys, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    The edible cyanobacterium Arthrospira is resistant to ionising radiation. The cellular mechanisms underlying this radiation resistance are, however, still largely unknown. Therefore, additional molecular analysis was performed to investigate how these cells can escape from, protect against, or repair the radiation damage. Arthrospira cells were shortly exposed to different doses of 60Co gamma rays and the dynamic response was investigated by monitoring its gene expression and cell physiology at different time points after irradiation. The results revealed a fast switch from an active growth state to a kind of 'survival modus' during which the cells put photosynthesis, carbon and nitrogen assimilation on hold and activate pathways for cellular protection, detoxification, and repair. The higher the radiation dose, the more pronounced this global emergency response is expressed. Genes repressed during early response, suggested a reduction of photosystem II and I activity and reduced tricarboxylic acid (TCA) and Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycles, combined with an activation of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). For reactive oxygen species detoxification and restoration of the redox balance in Arthrospira cells, the results suggested a powerful contribution of the antioxidant molecule glutathione. The repair mechanisms of Arthrospira cells that were immediately switched on, involve mainly proteases for damaged protein removal, single strand DNA repair and restriction modification systems, while recA was not induced. Additionally, the exposed cells showed significant increased expression of arh genes, coding for a novel group of protein of unknown function, also seen in our previous irradiation studies. This observation confirms our hypothesis that arh genes are key elements in radiation resistance of Arthrospira, requiring further investigation. This study provides new insights into phasic response and the cellular pathways involved in the radiation resistance of

  13. Temporal Gene Expression of the Cyanobacterium Arthrospira in Response to Gamma Rays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanène Badri

    Full Text Available The edible cyanobacterium Arthrospira is resistant to ionising radiation. The cellular mechanisms underlying this radiation resistance are, however, still largely unknown. Therefore, additional molecular analysis was performed to investigate how these cells can escape from, protect against, or repair the radiation damage. Arthrospira cells were shortly exposed to different doses of 60Co gamma rays and the dynamic response was investigated by monitoring its gene expression and cell physiology at different time points after irradiation. The results revealed a fast switch from an active growth state to a kind of 'survival modus' during which the cells put photosynthesis, carbon and nitrogen assimilation on hold and activate pathways for cellular protection, detoxification, and repair. The higher the radiation dose, the more pronounced this global emergency response is expressed. Genes repressed during early response, suggested a reduction of photosystem II and I activity and reduced tricarboxylic acid (TCA and Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB cycles, combined with an activation of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP. For reactive oxygen species detoxification and restoration of the redox balance in Arthrospira cells, the results suggested a powerful contribution of the antioxidant molecule glutathione. The repair mechanisms of Arthrospira cells that were immediately switched on, involve mainly proteases for damaged protein removal, single strand DNA repair and restriction modification systems, while recA was not induced. Additionally, the exposed cells showed significant increased expression of arh genes, coding for a novel group of protein of unknown function, also seen in our previous irradiation studies. This observation confirms our hypothesis that arh genes are key elements in radiation resistance of Arthrospira, requiring further investigation. This study provides new insights into phasic response and the cellular pathways involved in the radiation

  14. RecA Binding to a Single Double-Stranded DNA Molecule: A Possible Role of DNA Conformational Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leger, J. F.; Robert, J.; Bourdieu, L.; Chatenay, D.; Marko, J. F.

    1998-10-01

    Most genetic regulatory mechanisms involve protein-DNA interactions. In these processes, the classical Watson-Crick DNA structure sometimes is distorted severely, which in turn enables the precise recognition of the specific sites by the protein. Despite its key importance, very little is known about such deformation processes. To address this general question, we have studied a model system, namely, RecA binding to double-stranded DNA. Results from micromanipulation experiments indicate that RecA binds strongly to stretched DNA; based on this observation, we propose that spontaneous thermal stretching fluctuations may play a role in the binding of RecA to DNA. This has fundamental implications for the protein-DNA binding mechanism, which must therefore rely in part on a combination of flexibility and thermal fluctuations of the DNA structure. We also show that this mechanism is sequence sensitive. Theoretical simulations support this interpretation of our experimental results, and it is argued that this is of broad relevance to DNA-protein interactions.

  15. Effects of virus and host genes on recombination among ultraviolet-irradiated bacteriophage T4

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    Priemer, M.M.; Chan, V.L.

    1978-07-15

    The influence of the polA, uvrA, and recA genes of Escherichia coli on recombination among ultraviolet-irradiated T4 bacteriophages was determined with respect to recombination between rII markers and phage yield. The polA and uvrA gene products have no effect on these two aspects of phage DNA metabolism. A recA mutation does not significantly alter rII recombination frequencies in irradiated phage crosses, nor does it greatly change the yield of infectious particles in wild-type phage crosses or crosses in which the phage strains possess the v mutation. However, the same cross experiment performed with a pair of T4x mutants in a recA host demonstrates an 84% reduction in the phage yield in an unirradiated control cross. Furthermore, with increasing doses of uv irradiation, phage productivity of the T4x mutant declines at an accelerated rate compared to T4x/sup +/ strains crossed in recA cells. Multiplicity reactivation experiments in which wild-type or recombination-deficient (x or y) T4 phages infect wild-type or recombination-deficient (recA) host cells show that irradiated phages can only be reactivated in recA/sup +/ hosts, regardless of the bacteriophage genotype. These results indicate the involvement of the E. coli recA gene product in normal T4 replication and multiplicity reactivation.

  16. Microarray analysis of DNA damage repair gene expression profiles in cervical cancer cells radioresistant to 252Cf neutron and X-rays

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    Yang Zhen-Zhou

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the study was to obtain stable radioresistant sub-lines from the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa by prolonged exposure to 252Cf neutron and X-rays. Radioresistance mechanisms were investigated in the resulting cells using microarray analysis of DNA damage repair genes. Methods HeLa cells were treated with fractionated 252Cf neutron and X-rays, with a cumulative dose of 75 Gy each, over 8 months, yielding the sub-lines HeLaNR and HeLaXR. Radioresistant characteristics were detected by clone formation assay, ultrastructural observations, cell doubling time, cell cycle distribution, and apoptosis assay. Gene expression patterns of the radioresistant sub-lines were studied through microarray analysis and verified by Western blotting and real-time PCR. Results The radioresistant sub-lines HeLaNR and HeLaXR were more radioresisitant to 252Cf neutron and X-rays than parental HeLa cells by detecting their radioresistant characteristics, respectively. Compared to HeLa cells, the expression of 24 genes was significantly altered by at least 2-fold in HeLaNR cells. Of these, 19 genes were up-regulated and 5 down-regulated. In HeLaXR cells, 41 genes were significantly altered by at least 2-fold; 38 genes were up-regulated and 3 down-regulated. Conclusions Chronic exposure of cells to ionizing radiation induces adaptive responses that enhance tolerance of ionizing radiation and allow investigations of cellular radioresistance mechanisms. The insights gained into the molecular mechanisms activated by these "radioresistance" genes will lead to new therapeutic targets for cervical cancer.

  17. Repair of Staphylococcus aureus-infected wound with gene-modified C3H10T1/2 cells expressing BPI-BD3 fusion antibiotic peptide

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    Xin-ran ZHANG

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To study the antibacterial and tissue reparative effect of BPI-BD3 gene-modified mesenchymal stem cells in a mouse model of wound infection. Methods C3H10T1/2 cells were transfected with recombinant adenovirus vector pAdxsi-BPI-BD3, the expression of BPI-BD3 fusion protein was verified by RT-PCR and Western blotting. Excision wound with a diameter of 1cm was inoculated with Staphylococcus aureuswas made on the back of 30 mice. The mice were randomly divided into 3 groups (10 each. Mice in group T were injected with BPI-BD3 gene-modified C3H10T1/2 cells through caudal vein, those in group C were injected with unmodified C3H10T1/2 cells, and in group N were injected with PBS as control. The wound repair result was evaluated by estimation of the percentage of remaining wound area and the amount of wound bacteria under the scar, followed by observation of pathological changes. Inflammatory reactions of the wounds were assessed accordingly. Results The amount of bacteria under the scar was less in group T than in the other two groups (P<0.05. It was also found that the wound healing process was faster in group T than in group C and group N. Pathological observation showed that the inflammatory reaction in group T was also significantly milder than in the other two groups. Conclusion BPI-BD3 gene-modified mesenchymal stem cells may enhance wound repair by controlling infection and promoting tissue regeneration, thus it may be promising in clinical application. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.09.07

  18. Epigenetic Studies Point to DNA Replication/Repair Genes as a Basis for the Heritable Nature of Long Term Complications in Diabetes

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    Alexey A. Leontovich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic memory (MM is defined as the persistence of diabetic (DM complications even after glycemic control is pharmacologically achieved. Using a zebrafish diabetic model that induces a MM state, we previously reported that, in this model, tissue dysfunction was of a heritable nature based on cell proliferation studies in limb tissue and this correlated with epigenetic DNA methylation changes that paralleled alterations in gene expression. In the current study, control, DM, and MM excised fin tissues were further analyzed by MeDIP sequencing and microarray techniques. Bioinformatics analysis of the data found that genes of the DNA replication/DNA metabolism process group (with upregulation of the apex1, mcm2, mcm4, orc3, lig1, and dnmt1 genes were altered in the DM state and these molecular changes continued into MM. Interestingly, DNA methylation changes could be found as far as 6–13 kb upstream of the transcription start site for these genes suggesting potential higher levels of epigenetic control. In conclusion, DNA methylation changes in members of the DNA replication/repair process group best explain the heritable nature of cell proliferation impairment found in the zebrafish DM/MM model. These results are consistent with human diabetic epigenetic studies and provide one explanation for the persistence of long term tissue complications as seen in diabetes.

  19. Epigenetic Studies Point to DNA Replication/Repair Genes as a Basis for the Heritable Nature of Long Term Complications in Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leontovich, Alexey A.; Intine, Robert V.; Sarras, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic memory (MM) is defined as the persistence of diabetic (DM) complications even after glycemic control is pharmacologically achieved. Using a zebrafish diabetic model that induces a MM state, we previously reported that, in this model, tissue dysfunction was of a heritable nature based on cell proliferation studies in limb tissue and this correlated with epigenetic DNA methylation changes that paralleled alterations in gene expression. In the current study, control, DM, and MM excised fin tissues were further analyzed by MeDIP sequencing and microarray techniques. Bioinformatics analysis of the data found that genes of the DNA replication/DNA metabolism process group (with upregulation of the apex1, mcm2, mcm4, orc3, lig1, and dnmt1 genes) were altered in the DM state and these molecular changes continued into MM. Interestingly, DNA methylation changes could be found as far as 6–13 kb upstream of the transcription start site for these genes suggesting potential higher levels of epigenetic control. In conclusion, DNA methylation changes in members of the DNA replication/repair process group best explain the heritable nature of cell proliferation impairment found in the zebrafish DM/MM model. These results are consistent with human diabetic epigenetic studies and provide one explanation for the persistence of long term tissue complications as seen in diabetes. PMID:26981540

  20. Evaluating the performance of clinical criteria for predicting mismatch repair gene mutations in Lynch syndrome: a comprehensive analysis of 3,671 families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Verena; Holzapfel, Stefanie; Loeffler, Markus; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Morak, Monika; Schackert, Hans K; Görgens, Heike; Pox, Christian; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte; von Knebel-Doeberitz, Magnus; Büttner, Reinhard; Propping, Peter; Engel, Christoph

    2014-07-01

    Carriers of mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations have a high lifetime risk for colorectal and endometrial cancers, as well as other malignancies. As mutation analysis to detect these patients is expensive and time-consuming, clinical criteria and tumor-tissue analysis are widely used as pre-screening methods. The aim of our study was to evaluate the performance of commonly applied clinical criteria (the Amsterdam I and II Criteria, and the original and revised Bethesda Guidelines) and the results of tumor-tissue analysis in predicting MMR gene mutations. We analyzed 3,671 families from the German HNPCC Registry and divided them into nine mutually exclusive groups with different clinical criteria. A total of 680 families (18.5%) were found to have a pathogenic MMR gene mutation. Among all 1,284 families with microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H) colorectal cancer, the overall mutation detection rate was 53.0%. Mutation frequencies and their distribution between the four MMR genes differed significantly between clinical groups (p small-bowel cancer (p small-bowel cancer were clinically relevant predictors for Lynch syndrome. © 2013 UICC.

  1. Identification of a deletion in the mismatch repair gene, MSH2, using mouse-human cell hybrids monosomal for chromosome 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyatt, R E; Nakagawa, H; Hampel, H; Sedra, M; Fuchik, M B; Comeras, I; de la Chapelle, A; Prior, T W

    2003-03-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer is characterized by mutations in one of the DNA mismatch repair genes, primarily MLH1, MSH2, or MSH6. We report here the identification of a genomic deletion of approximately 11.4 kb encompassing the first two exons of the MSH2 gene in two generations of an Ohio family. By Southern blot analysis, using a cDNA probe spanning the first seven exons of MSH2, an alteration in each of three different enzyme digests (including a unique 13-kb band on HindIII digests) was observed, which suggested the presence of a large alteration in the 5' region of this gene. Mouse-human cell hybrids from a mutation carrier were then generated which contained a single copy each of human chromosome 2 on which the MSH2 gene resides. Southern blots on DNA from the cell hybrids demonstrated the same, unique 13-kb band from one MSH2 allele, as seen in the diploid DNA. DNA from this same monosomal cell hybrid failed to amplify in polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) using primers to exons 1 and 2, demonstrating the deletion of these sequences in one MSH2 allele, and the breakpoints involving Alu repeats were identified by PCR amplification and sequence analysis.

  2. Methylation Analysis of DNA Mismatch Repair Genes Using DNA Derived from the Peripheral Blood of Patients with Endometrial Cancer: Epimutation in Endometrial Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Takashi; Banno, Kouji; Yanokura, Megumi; Adachi, Masataka; Iijima, Moito; Kunitomi, Haruko; Nakamura, Kanako; Iida, Miho; Nogami, Yuya; Umene, Kiyoko; Masuda, Kenta; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Yamagami, Wataru; Hirasawa, Akira; Tominaga, Eiichiro; Susumu, Nobuyuki; Aoki, Daisuke

    2016-10-14

    Germline mutation of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes is a cause of Lynch syndrome. Methylation of MutL homolog 1 (MLH1) and MutS homolog 2 (MSH2) has been detected in peripheral blood cells of patients with colorectal cancer. This methylation is referred to as epimutation. Methylation of these genes has not been studied in an unselected series of endometrial cancer cases. Therefore, we examined methylation of MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 promoter regions of peripheral blood cells in 206 patients with endometrial cancer using a methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP). Germline mutation of MMR genes, microsatellite instability (MSI), and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were also analyzed in each case with epimutation. MLH1 epimutation was detected in a single patient out of a total of 206 (0.49%)-1 out of 58 (1.72%) with an onset age of less than 50 years. The patient with MLH1 epimutation showed high level MSI (MSI-H), loss of MLH1 expression and had developed endometrial cancer at 46 years old, complicated with colorectal cancer. No case had epimutation of MSH2 or MSH6. The MLH1 epimutation detected in a patient with endometrial cancer may be a cause of endometrial carcinogenesis. This result indicates that it is important to check epimutation in patients with endometrial cancer without a germline mutation of MMR genes.

  3. Polymorphisms in DNA Repair Genes (APEX1, XPD, XRCC1 and XRCC3 and Risk of Preeclampsia in a Mexican Mestizo Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada Sandoval-Carrillo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Variations in genes involved in DNA repair systems have been proposed as risk factors for the development of preeclampsia (PE. We conducted a case-control study to investigate the association of Human apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP endonuclease (APEX1 Asp148Glu (rs1130409, Xeroderma Pigmentosum group D (XPD Lys751Gln (rs13181, X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC Arg399Gln (rs25487 and X-ray repair cross-complementing group 3 (XRCC3 Thr241Met (rs861539 polymorphisms with PE in a Mexican population. Samples of 202 cases and 350 controls were genotyped using RTPCR. Association analyses based on a χ2 test and binary logistic regression were performed to determine the odds ratio (OR and a 95% confidence interval (95% CI for each polymorphism. The allelic frequencies of APEX1 Asp148Glu polymorphism showed statistical significant differences between preeclamptic and normal women (p = 0.036. Although neither of the polymorphisms proved to be a risk factor for the disease, the APEX1 Asp148Glu polymorphism showed a tendency of association (OR: 1.74, 95% CI = 0.96–3.14 and a significant trend (p for trend = 0.048. A subgroup analyses revealed differences in the allelic frequencies of APEX1 Asp148Glu polymorphism between women with mild preeclampsia and severe preeclampsia (p = 0.035. In conclusion, our results reveal no association between XPD Lys751Gln, XRCC Arg399Gln and XRCC3 Thr241Met polymorphisms and the risk of PE in a Mexican mestizo population; however, the results in the APEX1 Asp148Glu polymorphism suggest the need for future studies using a larger sample size.

  4. The TMPRSS2-ERG Gene Fusion Blocks XRCC4-Mediated Nonhomologous End-Joining Repair and Radiosensitizes Prostate Cancer Cells to PARP Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Payel; Choudhary, Gaurav S; Alswillah, Turkeyah; Xiong, Xiahui; Heston, Warren D; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Zhang, Junran; Klein, Eric A; Almasan, Alexandru

    2015-08-01

    Exposure to genotoxic agents, such as ionizing radiation (IR), produces DNA damage, leading to DNA double-strand breaks (DSB); IR toxicity is augmented when the DNA repair is impaired. We reported that radiosensitization by a PARP inhibitor (PARPi) was highly prominent in prostate cancer cells expressing the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion protein. Here, we show that TMPRSS2-ERG blocks nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) DNA repair by inhibiting DNA-PKcs. VCaP cells, which harbor TMPRSS2-ERG and PC3 cells that stably express it, displayed γH2AX and 53BP1 foci constitutively, indicating persistent DNA damage that was absent if TMPRSS2-ERG was depleted by siRNA in VCaP cells. The extent of DNA damage was enhanced and associated with TMPRSS2-ERG's ability to inhibit DNA-PKcs function, as indicated by its own phosphorylation (Thr2609, Ser2056) and that of its substrate, Ser1778-53BP1. DNA-PKcs deficiency caused by TMPRSS2-ERG destabilized critical NHEJ components on chromatin. Thus, XRCC4 was not recruited to chromatin, with retention of other NHEJ core factors being reduced. DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation was restored to the level of parental cells when TMPRSS2-ERG was depleted by siRNA. Following IR, TMPRSS2-ERG-expressing PC3 cells had elevated Rad51 foci and homologous recombination (HR) activity, indicating that HR compensated for defective NHEJ in these cells, hence addressing why TMPRSS2-ERG alone did not lead to radiosensitization. However, the presence of TMPRSS2-ERG, by inhibiting NHEJ DNA repair, enhanced PARPi-mediated radiosensitization. IR in combination with PARPi resulted in enhanced DNA damage in TMPRSS2-ERG-expressing cells. Therefore, by inhibiting NHEJ, TMPRSS2-ERG provides a synthetic lethal interaction with PARPi in prostate cancer patients expressing TMPRSS2-ERG. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Human Longevity and Variation in GH/IGF-1/Insulin Signaling, DNA Damage Signaling and Repair and Pro/antioxidant Pathway Genes: Cross Sectional and Longitudinal Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soerensen, Mette; Dato, Serena; Tan, Qihua; Thinggaard, Mikael; Kleindorp, Rabea; Beekman, Marian; Jacobsen, Rune; Suchiman, H. Eka D.; de Craen, Anton J.M.; Westendorp, Rudi G.J.; Schreiber, Stefan; Stevnsner, Tinna; Bohr, Vilhelm A.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Nebel, Almut; Vaupel, James W.; Christensen, Kaare; McGue, Matt; Christiansen, Lene

    2012-01-01

    Here we explore association with human longevity of common genetic variation in three major candidate pathways: GH/IGF-1/insulin signaling, DNA damage signaling and repair and pro/antioxidants by investigating 1273 tagging SNPs in 148 genes composing these pathways. In a case-control study of 1089 oldest-old (age 92–93) and 736 middle-aged Danes we found 1 pro/antioxidant SNP (rs1002149 (GSR)), 5 GH/IGF-1/INS SNPs (rs1207362 (KL), rs2267723 (GHRHR), rs3842755 (INS), rs572169 (GHSR), rs9456497 (IGF2R)) and 5 DNA repair SNPs (rs11571461 (RAD52), rs13251813 (WRN), rs1805329 (RAD23B), rs2953983 (POLB), rs3211994 (NTLH1)) to be associated with longevity after correction for multiple testing. In a longitudinal study with 11 years of follow-up on survival in the oldest-old Danes we found 2 pro/antioxidant SNPs (rs10047589 (TNXRD1), rs207444 (XDH)), 1 GH/IGF-1/INS SNP (rs26802 (GHRL)) and 3 DNA repair SNPs (rs13320360 (MLH1), rs2509049 (H2AFX) and rs705649 (XRCC5)) to be associated with mortality in late life after correction for multiple testing. When examining the 11 SNPs from the case-control study in the longitudinal data, rs3842755 (INS), rs13251813 (WRN) and rs3211994 (NTHL1) demonstrated the same directions of effect (pbased association study, the largest to date applying a pathway approach, points to potential new longevity loci, but does also underline the difficulties of replicating association findings in independent study populations and thus the difficulties in identifying universal longevity polymorphisms. PMID:22406557

  6. Pulsed low-level infrared laser alters mRNA levels from muscle repair genes dependent on power output in Wistar rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajano, L. A. S. N.; Trajano, E. T. L.; Thomé, A. M. C.; Sergio, L. P. S.; Mencalha, A. L.; Stumbo, A. C.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2017-10-01

    Satellite cells are present in skeletal muscle functioning in the repair and regeneration of muscle injury. Activation of these cells depends on the expression of myogenic factor 5 (Myf5), myogenic determination factor 1(MyoD), myogenic regulatory factor 4 (MRF4), myogenin (MyoG), paired box transcription factors 3 (Pax3), and 7 (Pax7). Low-level laser irradiation accelerates the repair of muscle injuries. However, data from the expression of myogenic factors have been controversial. Furthermore, the effects of different laser beam powers on the repair of muscle injuries have been not evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of low-level infrared laser at different powers and in pulsed emission mode on the expression of myogenic regulatory factors and on Pax3 and Pax7 in injured skeletal muscle from Wistar rats. Animals that underwent cryoinjury were divided into three groups: injury, injury laser 25 Mw, and injury laser 75 mW. Low-level infrared laser irradiation (904 nm, 3 J cm‑2, 5 kHz) was carried out at 25 and 75 mW. After euthanasia, skeletal muscle samples were withdrawn and the total RNA was extracted for the evaluation of mRNA levels from the MyoD, MyoG, MRF4, Myf5, Pax3, and Pax7 gene. Pax 7 mRNA levels did not alter, but Pax3 mRNA levels increased in the injured and laser-irradiated group at 25 mW. MyoD, MyoG, and MYf5 mRNA levels increased in the injured and laser-irradiated animals at both powers, and MRF4 mRNA levels decreased in the injured and laser-irradiated group at 75 mW. In conclusion, exposure to pulsed low-level infrared laser, by power-dependent effect, could accelerate the muscle repair process altering mRNA levels from paired box transcription factors and myogenic regulatory factors.

  7. Mutation of the mouse Syce1 gene disrupts synapsis and suggests a link between synaptonemal complex structural components and DNA repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina Bolcun-Filas

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, the synaptonemal complex is a structure required to complete crossover recombination. Although suggested by cytological work, in vivo links between the structural proteins of the synaptonemal complex and the proteins of the recombination process have not previously been made. The central element of the synaptonemal complex is traversed by DNA at sites of recombination and presents a logical place to look for interactions between these components. There are four known central element proteins, three of which have previously been mutated. Here, we complete the set by creating a null mutation in the Syce1 gene in mouse. The resulting disruption of synapsis in these animals has allowed us to demonstrate a biochemical interaction between the structural protein SYCE2 and the repair protein RAD51. In normal meiosis, this interaction may be responsible for promoting homologous synapsis from sites of recombination.

  8. Meta-analysis of estrogen response in MCF-7 distinguishes early target genes involved in signaling and cell proliferation from later target genes involved in cell cycle and DNA repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagannathan Vidhya

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies have been published outlining the global effects of 17β-estradiol (E2 on gene expression in human epithelial breast cancer derived MCF-7 cells. These studies show large variation in results, reporting between ~100 and ~1500 genes regulated by E2, with poor overlap. Results We performed a meta-analysis of these expression studies, using the Rank product method to obtain a more accurate and stable list of the differentially expressed genes, and of pathways regulated by E2. We analyzed 9 time-series data sets, concentrating on response at 3-4 hrs (early and at 24 hrs (late. We found >1000 statistically significant probe sets after correction for multiple testing at 3-4 hrs, and >2000 significant probe sets at 24 hrs. Differentially expressed genes were examined by pathway analysis. This revealed 15 early response pathways, mostly related to cell signaling and proliferation, and 20 late response pathways, mostly related to breast cancer, cell division, DNA repair and recombination. Conclusions Our results confirm that meta-analysis identified more differentially expressed genes than the individual studies, and that these genes act together in networks. These results provide new insight into E2 regulated mechanisms, especially in the context of breast cancer.

  9. Rad51 and RecA juxtapose dsDNA ends ready for DNA ligase-catalyzed end-joining under recombinase-suppressive conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konomura, Naoto; Arai, Naoto; Shinohara, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Jun; Iwasaki, Wakana; Ikawa, Shukuko; Kusano, Kohji; Shibata, Takehiko

    2017-01-09

    RecA-family recombinase-catalyzed ATP-dependent homologous joint formation is critical for homologous recombination, in which RecA or Rad51 binds first to single-stranded (ss)DNA and then interacts with double-stranded (ds)DNA. However, when RecA or Rad51 interacts with dsDNA before binding to ssDNA, the homologous joint-forming activity of RecA or Rad51 is quickly suppressed. We found that under these and adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-generating suppressive conditions for the recombinase activity, RecA or Rad51 at similar optimal concentrations enhances the DNA ligase-catalyzed dsDNA end-joining (DNA ligation) about 30- to 40-fold. The DNA ligation enhancement by RecA or Rad51 transforms most of the substrate DNA into multimers within 2-5 min, and for this enhancement, ADP is the common and best cofactor. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is effective for RecA, but not for Rad51. Rad51/RecA-enhanced DNA ligation depends on dsDNA-binding, as shown by a mutant, and is independent of physical interactions with the DNA ligase. These observations demonstrate the common and unique activities of RecA and Rad51 to juxtapose dsDNA-ends in preparation for covalent joining by a DNA ligase. This new in vitro function of Rad51 provides a simple explanation for our genetic observation that Rad51 plays a role in the fidelity of the end-joining of a reporter plasmid DNA, by yeast canonical non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) in vivo.

  10. Mouse BAZ1A (ACF1 is dispensable for double-strand break repair but is essential for averting improper gene expression during spermatogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A Dowdle

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers control DNA access for transcription, recombination, and other processes. Acf1 (also known as BAZ1A in mammals is a defining subunit of the conserved ISWI-family chromatin remodelers ACF and CHRAC, first purified over 15 years ago from Drosophila melanogaster embryos. Much is known about biochemical properties of ACF and CHRAC, which move nucleosomes in vitro and in vivo to establish ordered chromatin arrays. Genetic studies in yeast, flies and cultured human cells clearly implicate these complexes in transcriptional repression via control of chromatin structures. RNAi experiments in transformed mammalian cells in culture also implicate ACF and CHRAC in DNA damage checkpoints and double-strand break repair. However, their essential in vivo roles in mammals are unknown. Here, we show that Baz1a-knockout mice are viable and able to repair developmentally programmed DNA double-strand breaks in the immune system and germ line, I-SceI endonuclease-induced breaks in primary fibroblasts via homologous recombination, and DNA damage from mitomycin C exposure in vivo. However, Baz1a deficiency causes male-specific sterility in accord with its high expression in male germ cells, where it displays dynamic, stage-specific patterns of chromosomal localization. Sterility is caused by pronounced defects in sperm development, most likely a consequence of massively perturbed gene expression in spermatocytes and round spermatids in the absence of BAZ1A: the normal spermiogenic transcription program is largely intact but more than 900 other genes are mis-regulated, primarily reflecting inappropriate up-regulation. We propose that large-scale changes in chromatin composition that occur during spermatogenesis create a window of vulnerability to promiscuous transcription changes, with an essential function of ACF and/or CHRAC chromatin remodeling activities being to safeguard against these alterations.

  11. A symphony on C : orchestrating DNA repair for gene expression via cytosine modification The 2012 IMB Conference: DNA Demethylation, Repair and Beyond Institute of Molecular Biology, Mainz, Germany, 18-21 October 2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rots, Marianne G.; Petersen-Mahrt, Svend K.

    2013-01-01

    Headline-grabbing attention has been given to DNA demethylation pathways as new epigenetic mechanisms, with reviews and hypotheses outnumbering research papers. As candidate proteins for DNA demethylation include well-known DNA repair enzymes, it was timely to join epigenetics and DNA repair experts

  12. Hypospadias repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the problem. If the repair is not done, problems may occur later on such as: Difficulty controlling and directing urine stream A curve in the penis during erection Decreased fertility Embarrassment about appearance of penis Surgery ...

  13. Base excision repair in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnez-Lima Lucymara F.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage can be induced by a large number of physical and chemical agents from the environment as well as compounds produced by cellular metabolism. This type of damage can interfere with cellular processes such as replication and transcription, resulting in cell death and/or mutations. The low frequency of mutagenesis in cells is due to the presence of enzymatic pathways which repair damaged DNA. Several DNA repair genes (mainly from bacteria, yeasts and mammals have been cloned and their products characterized. The high conservation, especially in eukaryotes, of the majority of genes related to DNA repair argues for their importance in the maintenance of life on earth. In plants, our understanding of DNA repair pathways is still very poor, the first plant repair genes having only been cloned in 1997 and the mechanisms of their products have not yet been characterized. The objective of our data mining work was to identify genes related to the base excision repair (BER pathway, which are present in the database of the Sugarcane Expressed Sequence Tag (SUCEST Project. This search was performed by tblastn program. We identified sugarcane clusters homologous to the majority of BER proteins used in the analysis and a high degree of conservation was observed. The best results were obtained with BER proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana. For some sugarcane BER genes, the presence of more than one form of mRNA is possible, as shown by the occurrence of more than one homologous EST cluster.

  14. Immunohistochemical expression of mismatch repair genes: A screening tool for predicting mutator phenotype in liver fluke infection-associated intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Upama Liengswangwong; Anant Karalak; Yukio Morishita; Masayuki Noguchi; Thiravud Khuhaprema; Petcharin Srivatanakul; Masanao Miwa

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To clarify possible contributions of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system in carcinogenesis of liver fluke infection-associated intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) by using immunohistochemical assay.METHODS: A total of 29 ICC samples, which had been assessed for genomic instability by a PCR-based method, were used for study. They were examined immunohistochemically to demonstrate protein expression of two MMR genes, hMSH2 and hMLH1.Results obtained were compared with their mutator phenotype assessed previously.RESULTS: Either hMSH2or hMLH1 protein was obviously expressed in 28 of 29 (96.6%) ICC samples.Positive nuclear localization of hMSH2 or hMLH1 protein was observed in 86.2% (25/29) or 93.1% (27/29) ICC cases, respectively, while their negative nuclear reactivity was only detected in 13.8% (4/29) or 6.9% (2/29) ICC cases analyzed, respectively.CONCLUSION: Our study, probably for the first time,showed through immunohistochemical detection of hMSH2 and hMLH1 gene that DNA MMR system does not play a prominent role in liver fluke infection-associated cholangiocarcinogenesis. These results confirm previous findings on mutational status of these genes assessed through a PCR-based method. The immunohistochemical analysis has proven to be an effective and sensitive approach for screening MMR deficiency regardless of somatic inactivation or promoter hypermethylation of hMSH2 and/or hMLH1 gene. Furthermore,immunohistochemistry is more advantageous compared to mutator phenotyping assay in terms of simplicity,less time consuming and cost effectiveness for screening possible involvements of target MMR genes in tumorigenesis.

  15. DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID ALTERS EXPRESSION OF OXIDATIVE STRESS AND DNA REPAIR GENES IN A DOSE DEPENDENT MANNER IN THE TRANSITIONAL EPITHELIUM OF THE URINARY BLADDER FROM FEMALE F344 RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dose-dependent alteration of oxidative stress and DNA repair gene expression by Dimethylarsinic acid [DMA(V)] in transitional epithelium of urinary bladder from female F344 rats.Arsenic (As) is a major concern as millions of people are at risk from drinking arsenic contaminat...

  16. DNA repair in Chromobacterium violaceum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Fábio Teixeira; Carvalho, Fabíola Marques de; Bezerra e Silva, Uaska; Scortecci, Kátia Castanho; Blaha, Carlos Alfredo Galindo; Agnez-Lima, Lucymara Fassarella; Batistuzzo de Medeiros, Silvia Regina

    2004-03-31

    Chromobacterium violaceum is a Gram-negative beta-proteobacterium that inhabits a variety of ecosystems in tropical and subtropical regions, including the water and banks of the Negro River in the Brazilian Amazon. This bacterium has been the subject of extensive study over the last three decades, due to its biotechnological properties, including the characteristic violacein pigment, which has antimicrobial and anti-tumoral activities. C. violaceum promotes the solubilization of gold in a mercury-free process, and has been used in the synthesis of homopolyesters suitable for the production of biodegradable polymers. The complete genome sequence of this organism has been completed by the Brazilian National Genome Project Consortium. The aim of our group was to study the DNA repair genes in this organism, due to their importance in the maintenance of genomic integrity. We identified DNA repair genes involved in different pathways in C. violaceum through a similarity search against known sequences deposited in databases. The phylogenetic analyses were done using programs of the PHILYP package. This analysis revealed various metabolic pathways, including photoreactivation, base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair, recombinational repair, and the SOS system. The similarity between the C. violaceum sequences and those of Neisserie miningitidis and Ralstonia solanacearum was greater than that between the C. violaceum and Escherichia coli sequences. The peculiarities found in the C. violaceum genome were the absence of LexA, some horizontal transfer events and a large number of repair genes involved with alkyl and oxidative DNA damage.

  17. Allelic variants of XRCC1 and XRCC3 repair genes and susceptibility of oral cancer in Brazilian patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dos Reis, Mariana Bisarro; Losi-Guembarovski, Roberta; de Souza Fonseca Ribeiro, Enilze Maria

    2013-01-01

    genes have been found to be associated with oral cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the presence of allelic variants Arg194Trp (rs:1799782) and Arg399Gln (rs: 25487) of XRCC1 gene and Thr241Met (rs: 861539) of XRCC3 gene and susceptibility to oral cancer. We also...... variants of the XRCC1 gene within codon 194 (OR 0.82, 95% CI: 0.44-1.51) and codon 399 (OR 0.94, 95% CI: 0.59-1.50) and within the XRCC3 gene (OR 0.72; 95% CI: 0.45-1.16) were not associated with an increased risk of oral cancer. A combinational analysis of SNPs in both genes indicated no association....... The presence of the allelic variants of these two genes had no statistically significant effect on tumor differentiation, lymph node invasion or tumor size. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that allelic variants of XRCC1 and XRCC3 are not suitable markers for susceptibility to carcinomas of the oral cavity...

  18. Antibody to a human DNA repair protein allows for cloning of a Drosophila cDNA that encodes an apurinic endonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, M R; Venugopal, S; Harless, J; Deutsch, W A

    1989-03-01

    The cDNA of a Drosophila DNA repair gene, AP3, was cloned by screening an embryonic lambda gt11 expression library with an antibody that was originally prepared against a purified human apurinic-apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease. The 1.2-kilobase (kb) AP3 cDNA mapped to a region on the third chromosome where a number of mutagen-sensitive alleles were located. The cDNA clone yielded an in vitro translation product of 35,000 daltons, in agreement with the predicted size of the translation product of the only open reading frame of AP3, and identical to the molecular size of an AP endonuclease activity recovered following sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of Drosophila extracts. The C-terminal portion of the predicted protein contained regions of presumptive DNA-binding domains, while the DNA sequence at the amino end of AP3 showed similarity to the Escherichia coli recA gene. AP3 is expressed as an abundant 1.3-kb mRNA that is detected throughout the life cycle of Drosophila melanogaster. Another 3.5-kb mRNA also hybridized to the AP3 cDNA, but this species was restricted to the early stages of development.

  19. Identification of genetic polymorphisms in DNA repair xenoderma pigmentosum group D gene and its association with head and neck cancer susceptibility in rural Indian population: a hospital based case-control study from south-western Maharashtra, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailas D. Datkhile

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: This study indicates that polymorphisms in cd199 of XPD gene could play a role in modifying genetic susceptibility of individual to head and neck cancer in Maharashtra patients. Thus, the case-control study suggest that selected DNA repair genes represent genetic determinants in oral carcinogenesis along with other risk factors in the rural Indian population. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(6.000: 1997-2005

  20. Screening for Escherichia coli K-12 genes conferring glyoxal resistance or sensitivity by transposon insertions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changhan; Kim, Jihong; Kwon, Minsuk; Lee, Kihyun; Min, Haeyoung; Kim, Seong Hun; Kim, Dongkyu; Lee, Nayoung; Kim, Jiyeun; Kim, Doyun; Ko, Changmin; Park, Chankyu

    2016-09-01

    Glyoxal (GO) belongs to the reactive electrophilic species generated in vivo in all organisms. In order to identify targets of GO and their response mechanisms, we attempted to screen for GO-sensitive mutants by random insertions of TnphoA-132. The genes responsible for GO susceptibility were functionally classified as the following: (i) tRNA modification; trmE, gidA and truA, (ii) DNA repair; recA and recC, (iii) toxin-antitoxin; mqsA and (iv) redox metabolism; yqhD and caiC In addition, an insertion in the crp gene, encoding the cAMP responsive transcription factor, exhibits a GO-resistant phenotype, which is consistent with the phenotype of adenylate cyclase (cya) mutant showing GO resistance. This suggests that global regulation involving cAMP is operated in a stress response to GO. To further characterize the CRP-regulated genes directly associated with GO resistance, we created double mutants deficient in both crp and one of the candidate genes including yqhD, gloA and sodB The results indicate that these genes are negatively regulated by CRP as confirmed by real-time RT-PCR. We propose that tRNA as well as DNA are the targets of GO and that toxin/antitoxin, antioxidant and cAMP are involved in cellular response to GO.

  1. Avances en el tratamiento de los pacientes con Leucemia Promielocítica Aguda en Recaída

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Hasta la demostración de la actividad sobresaliente del trióxido de arsénico (ATO) en recaídas de pacientes con leucemia promielocítica (LPA), el tratamiento de rescate en esta enfermedad consistía en la readministración de ácido holo-trans retinóico (ATRA) y quimioterapia para inducir la remisión, generalmente conteniendo citarabina a altas dosis, seguido de consolidación y/o trasplante de progenitores hematopoyéticos (TPH).

  2. Avances en el tratamiento de los pacientes con Leucemia Promielocítica Aguda en Recaída

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sanz Miguel

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Hasta la demostración de la actividad sobresaliente del trióxido de arsénico (ATO en recaídas de pacientes con leucemia promielocítica (LPA, el tratamiento de rescate en esta enfermedad consistía en la readministración de ácido holo-trans retinóico (ATRA y quimioterapia para inducir la remisión, generalmente conteniendo citarabina a altas dosis, seguido de consolidación y/o trasplante de progenitores hematopoyéticos (TPH.

  3. Silencing of end-joining repair for efficient site-specific gene insertion after TALEN/CRISPR mutagenesis in Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sanjay; Aryan, Azadeh; Overcash, Justin M; Samuel, Glady Hazitha; Anderson, Michelle A E; Dahlem, Timothy J; Myles, Kevin M; Adelman, Zach N

    2015-03-31

    Conventional control strategies for mosquito-borne pathogens such as malaria and dengue are now being complemented by the development of transgenic mosquito strains reprogrammed to generate beneficial phenotypes such as conditional sterility or pathogen resistance. The widespread success of site-specific nucleases such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 in model organisms also suggests that reprogrammable gene drive systems based on these nucleases may be capable of spreading such beneficial phenotypes in wild mosquito populations. Using the mosquito Aedes aegypti, we determined that mutations in the FokI domain used in TALENs to generate obligate heterodimeric complexes substantially and significantly reduce gene editing rates. We found that CRISPR/Cas9-based editing in the mosquito Ae. aegypti is also highly variable, with the majority of guide RNAs unable to generate detectable editing. By first evaluating candidate guide RNAs using a transient embryo assay, we were able to rapidly identify highly effective guide RNAs; focusing germ line-based experiments only on this cohort resulted in consistently high editing rates of 24-90%. Microinjection of double-stranded RNAs targeting ku70 or lig4, both essential components of the end-joining response, increased recombination-based repair in early embryos as determined by plasmid-based reporters. RNAi-based suppression of Ku70 concurrent with embryonic microinjection of site-specific nucleases yielded consistent gene insertion frequencies of 2-3%, similar to traditional transposon- or ΦC31-based integration methods but without the requirement for an initial docking step. These studies should greatly accelerate investigations into mosquito biology, streamline development of transgenic strains for field releases, and simplify the evaluation of novel Cas9-based gene drive systems.

  4. Cortical gene expression in spinal cord injury and repair: insight into the functional complexity of the neural regeneration program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian eKruse

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI results in the formation of a fibrous scar acting as a growth barrier for regenerating axons at the lesion site. We have previously shown (Klapka et al., 2005 that transient suppression of the inhibitory lesion scar in rat spinal cord leads to long distance axon regeneration, retrograde rescue of axotomized cortical motoneurons and improvement of locomotor function. Here we applied a systemic approach to investigate for the first time specific and dynamic alterations in the cortical gene expression profile following both thoracic SCI and regeneration-promoting anti-scarring treatment (AST. In order to monitor cortical gene expression we carried out microarray analyses using total RNA isolated from layer V/VI of rat sensorimotor cortex at 1-60 days post-operation (dpo. We demonstrate that cortical neurons respond to injury by massive changes in gene expression, starting as early as 1 dpo. AST, in turn, results in profound modifications of the lesion-induced expression profile. The treatment attenuates SCI-triggered transcriptional changes of genes related to inhibition of axon growth and impairment of cell survival, while upregulating the expression of genes associated with axon outgrowth, cell protection and neural development. Thus, AST not only modifies the local environment impeding spinal cord regeneration by reduction of fibrous scarring in the injured spinal cord, but, in addition, strikingly changes the intrinsic capacity of cortical pyramidal neurons towards enhanced cell maintenance and axonal regeneration.

  5. Femoral hernia repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Femorocele repair; Herniorrhaphy; Hernioplasty - femoral ... During surgery to repair the hernia, the bulging tissue is pushed back in. The weakened area is sewn closed or strengthened. This repair ...

  6. Undescended testicle repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orchidopexy; Inguinal orchidopexy; Orchiopexy; Repair of undescended testicle; Cryptorchidism repair ... first year of life without treatment. Undescended testicle repair surgery is recommended for patients whose testicles do ...

  7. Potential risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma due to nucleotide excision repair XPA and XPC gene variants and their interaction among themselves and with environmental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, Rumaisa; Bhat, Gulzar Ahmad; Lone, Mohd Maqbool; Masood, Akbar; Dar, Nazir Ahmad

    2016-08-01

    The association of nucleotide excision repair (NER) gene polymorphisms with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is inconclusive. The aim of the current study was to assess the association of repair gene xeroderma pigmentosum A (XPA) (rs-1800975) and xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) (rs-2228000) polymorphisms with ESCC risk as well as modifying effects of environmental factors. The genotyping was done in 450 confirmed ESCC cases and equal number of individually matched controls by the polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and direct sequencing methods. Conditional logistic regression models were used to assess the genotypic associations and interactions. A high ESCC risk was found in subjects who carried the homozygous minor allele of XPA (odds ratio (OR) = 3.57; 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 1.76-7.23), and the risk was higher when analysis was limited to participants who were ever smokers (OR = 4.22; 95 % CI = 2.01-8.88), lived in adobe houses (OR = 8.42; 95 % CI = 3.74-18.95), consumed large volumes of salt tea (OR = 7.42; 95 % CI = 3.30-16.69), or had a positive family history of cancer (FHC) (OR = 9.47; 95 % CI = 4.67-19.20). In case of XPC, a homozygous minor allele also showed strong association with ESCC risk (OR = 4.43; 95 % CI = 2.41-8.16). We again observed a very strong effect of the above environmental factors in elevating the risk of ESCC. Further, the variant genotypes of both genes in combination showed an increased risk towards ESCC (OR = 7.01; 95 % CI = 3.14-15.64) and such association was synergistically significant. Salt tea consumption showed an interaction with genotypes of XPA and XPC. However, an interaction with FHC was significant in the case of XPA genotype only. XPA and XPC genotypes are associated with an increased risk of ESCC, and such association was reasonably modulated by different exposures.

  8. Phylogenetic diversity of rhizobia associated with horsegram [Macrotyloma uniflorum (Lam.) Verdc.] grown in South India based on glnII, recA and 16S-23S intergenic sequence analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appunu, Chinnaswamy; Ganesan, Govindan; Kalita, Michał; Kaushik, Raghavan; Saranya, Balamurugan; Prabavathy, Vaiyapuri Ramalingam; Sudha, Nair

    2011-04-01

    Horsegram [Macrotyloma uniflorum (Lam.) Verdc.) is an important grain legume and fodder crop in India. Information on root nodule endosymbionts of this legume in India is limited. In the present study, 69 isolates from naturally occurring root nodules of horsegram collected from two agro-eco-climatic regions of South India was analyzed by generation rate, acid/alkali reaction on YMA medium, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer region (IGS), and sequence analyses of IGS and housekeeping genes glnII and recA. Based on the rDNA IGS RFLP by means of three restriction enzymes rhizobia were grouped in five clusters (I-V). By sequence analysis of 16S-23S rDNA IGS identified genotypes of horsegram rhizobia were distributed into five divergent lineages of Bradyrhizobium genus which comprised (I) the IGS type IV rhizobia and valid species B. yuanmingense, (II) the strains of IGS type I and Bradyrhizobium sp. ORS 3257 isolated from Vigna sp., (III) the strains of the IGS type II and Bradyrhizobium sp. CIRADAc12 from Acacia sp., (IV) the IGS type V strains and Bradyrhizobium sp. genospecies IV, and (V) comprising genetically distinct IGS type III strains which probably represent an uncharacterized new genomic species. Nearly, 87% of indigenous horsegram isolates (IGS types I, II, III, and V) could not be related to any other species within the genus Bradyrhizobium. Phylogeny based on housekeeping glnII and recA genes confirmed those results found by the analysis of the IGS sequence. All the isolated rhizobia nodulated Macrotyloma sp. and Vigna spp., and only some of them formed nodules on Arachis hypogeae. The isolates within each IGS type varied in their ability to fix nitrogen. Selection for high symbiotic effective strains could reward horsegram production in poor soils of South India where this legume is largely cultivated.

  9. Pharmacogenetic Study in Rectal Cancer Patients Treated With Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy: Polymorphisms in Thymidylate Synthase, Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor, GSTP1, and DNA Repair Genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paez, David, E-mail: dpaez@santpau.cat [Department of Medical Oncology, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Salazar, Juliana; Pare, Laia [Centre for Biomedical Network Research on Rare Diseases, Barcelona (Spain); Department of Genetics, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Pertriz, Lourdes [Department of Radiotherapy, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Targarona, Eduardo [Department of Surgery, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Rio, Elisabeth del [Centre for Biomedical Network Research on Rare Diseases, Barcelona (Spain); Department of Genetics, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Barnadas, Agusti; Marcuello, Eugenio [Department of Medical Oncology, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Baiget, Montserrat [Centre for Biomedical Network Research on Rare Diseases, Barcelona (Spain); Department of Genetics, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Several studies have been performed to evaluate the usefulness of neoadjuvant treatment using oxaliplatin and fluoropyrimidines for locally advanced rectal cancer. However, preoperative biomarkers of outcome are lacking. We studied the polymorphisms in thymidylate synthase, epidermal growth factor receptor, glutathione S-transferase pi 1 (GSTP1), and several DNA repair genes to evaluate their usefulness as pharmacogenetic markers in a cohort of 128 rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Blood samples were obtained from 128 patients with Stage II-III rectal cancer. DNA was extracted from the peripheral blood nucleated cells, and the genotypes were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction amplification and automated sequencing techniques or using a 48.48 dynamic array on the BioMark system. The germline polymorphisms studied were thymidylate synthase, (VNTR/5 Prime UTR, 2R G>C single nucleotide polymorphism [SNP], 3R G>C SNP), epidermal growth factor receptor (Arg497Lys), GSTP1 (Ile105val), excision repair cross-complementing 1 (Asn118Asn, 8092C>A, 19716G>C), X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) (Arg194Trp, Arg280His, Arg399Gln), and xeroderma pigmentosum group D (Lys751Gln). The pathologic response, pathologic regression, progression-free survival, and overall survival were evaluated according to each genotype. Results: The Asterisk-Operator 3/ Asterisk-Operator 3 thymidylate synthase genotype was associated with a greater response rate (pathologic complete remission and microfoci residual tumor, 59% in Asterisk-Operator 3/ Asterisk-Operator 3 vs. 35% in Asterisk-Operator 2/ Asterisk-Operator 2 and Asterisk-Operator 2/ Asterisk-Operator 3; p = .013). For the thymidylate synthase genotype, the median progression-free survival was 103 months for the Asterisk-Operator 3/ Asterisk-Operator 3 patients and 84 months for the Asterisk-Operator 2/ Asterisk-Operator 2 and Asterisk-Operator 2/ Asterisk

  10. Nuclear survivin and its relationship to DNA damage repair genes in non-small cell lung cancer investigated using tissue array.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songliu Hu

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the predictive role and association of nuclear survivin and the DNA double-strand breaks repair genes in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC: DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs, Ku heterodimeric regulatory complex 70-KD subunit (Ku70 and ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM. METHODS: The protein expression of nuclear survivin, DNA-PKcs, Ku70 and ATM were investigated using immunohistochemistry in tumors from 256 patients with surgically resected NSCLC. Furthermore, we analyzed the correlation between the expression of nuclear survivin, DNA-PKcs, Ku70 and ATM. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine the prognostic factors that inuenced the overall survival and disease-free survival of NSCLC. RESULTS: The expression of nuclear survivin, DNA-PKcs, Ku70 and ATM was significantly higher in tumor tissues than in normal tissues. By dichotomizing the specimens as expressing low or high levels of nuclear survivin, nuclear survivin correlated significantly with the pathologic stage (P = 0.009 and lymph node status (P = 0.004. The nuclear survivin levels were an independent prognostic factor for both the overall survival and the disease-free survival in univariate and multivariate analyses. Patients with low Ku70 and DNA-PKcs expression had a greater benefit from radiotherapy than patients with high expression of Ku70 (P = 0.012 and DNA-PKcs (P = 0.02. Nuclear survivin expression positively correlated with DNA-PKcs (P<0.001 and Ku70 expression (P<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Nuclear survivin may be a prognostic factor for overall survival in patients with resected stage I-IIIA NSCLC. DNA-PKcs and Ku70 could predict the effect of radiotherapy in patients with NSCLC. Nuclear survivin may also stimulates DNA double-strand breaks repair by its interaction with DNA-PKcs and Ku70.

  11. Variation in the RAD51 gene and familial breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lose, Felicity; Lovelock, Paul; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Mann, Graham J; Pupo, Gulietta M; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Human RAD51 is a homologue of the Escherichia coli RecA protein and is known to function in recombinational repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. Mutations in the lower eukaryotic homologues of RAD51 result in a deficiency in the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. Loss of RAD51 function would therefore be expected to result in an elevated mutation rate, leading to accumulation of DNA damage and, hence, to increased cancer risk. RAD51 interacts directly or indirectly with a number of proteins implicated in breast cancer, such as BRCA1 and BRCA2. Similar to BRCA1 mice, RAD51-/- mice are embryonic lethal. The RAD51 gene region has been shown to exhibit loss of heterozygosity in breast tumours, and deregulated RAD51 expression in breast cancer patients has also been reported. Few studies have investigated the role of coding region variation in the RAD51 gene in familial breast cancer, with only one coding region variant – exon 6 c.449G>A (p.R150Q) – reported to date. Methods All nine coding exons of the RAD51 gene were analysed for variation in 46 well-characterised, BRCA1/2-negative breast cancer families using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography. Genotyping of the exon 6 p.R150Q variant was performed in an additional 66 families. Additionally, lymphoblastoid cell lines from breast cancer patients were subjected to single nucleotide primer extension analysis to assess RAD51 expression. Results No coding region variation was found, and all intronic variation detected was either found in unaffected controls or was unlikely to have functional consequences. Single nucleotide primer extension analysis did not reveal any allele-specific changes in RAD51 expression in all lymphoblastoid cell lines tested. Conclusion Our study indicates that RAD51 is not a major familial breast cancer predisposition gene. PMID:16762046

  12. Energy and Technology Review: Unlocking the mysteries of DNA repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirk, W.A.

    1993-04-01

    DNA, the genetic blueprint, has the remarkable property of encoding its own repair following diverse types of structural damage induced by external agents or normal metabolism. We are studying the interplay of DNA damaging agents, repair genes, and their protein products to decipher the complex biochemical pathways that mediate such repair. Our research focuses on repair processes that correct DNA damage produced by chemical mutagens and radiation, both ionizing and ultraviolet. The most important type of DNA repair in human cells is called excision repair. This multistep process removes damaged or inappropriate pieces of DNA -- often as a string of 29 nucleotides containing the damage -- and replaces them with intact ones. We have isolated, cloned, and mapped several human repair genes associated with the nucleotide excision repair pathway and involved in the repair of DNA damage after exposure to ultraviolet light or mutagens in cooked food. We have shown that a defect in one of these repair genes, ERCC2, is responsible for the repair deficiency in one of the groups of patients with the recessive genetic disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP group D). We are exploring ways to purify sufficient quantities (milligrams) of the protein products of these and other repair genes so that we can understand their functions. Our long-term goals are to link defective repair proteins to human DNA repair disorders that predispose to cancer, and to produce DNA-repair-deficient mice that can serve as models for the human disorders.

  13. Improved generation of rat gene knockouts by target-selected mutagenesis in mismatch repair-deficient animals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Boxtel, R.; Toonen, P.W.; Verheul, M.; van Roekel, H.S.; Nijman, I.J.; Guryev, V.; Cuppen, E.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus) is one of the preferred model organisms in physiological and pharmacological research, although the availability of specific genetic models, especially gene knockouts, is limited. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-driven target-selected mutagenesis is cur

  14. Improved generation of rat gene knockouts by target-selected mutagenesis in mismatch repair-deficient animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Boxtel, Ruben; Toonen, Pim W; Verheul, Mark; van Roekel, Henk S; Nijman, Isaac J; Guryev, Victor; Cuppen, Edwin

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus) is one of the preferred model organisms in physiological and pharmacological research, although the availability of specific genetic models, especially gene knockouts, is limited. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-driven target-selected mutagenesis is cur

  15. Mutation avoidance and DNA repair proficiency in Ustilago maydis are differentially lost with progressive truncation of the REC1 gene product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onel, K.; Thelen, M.P.; Ferguson, D.O.; Bennett, R.L.; Holloman, W.K. [Cornell Univ. Medical College, NY, NY (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The REC1 gene of Ustilago maydis has an uninterrupted open reading frame, predicted from the genomic sequence to encode a protein of 522 amino acid residues. Nevertheless, an intron is present, and functional activity of the gene in mitotic cells requires an RNA processing event to remove the intron. This results in a change in reading frame and production of a protein of 463 amino acid residues. The 3{prime}{r_arrow}5{prime} exonuclease activity of proteins derived form the REC1 genomic open reading frame, the intronless open reading frame, and several mutants was investigated. The mutants included a series of deletions constructed by removing restriction fragments at the 3{prime} end of the cloned REC1 gene and a set of mutant alleles previously isolated in screens for radiation sensitivity. The results indicated that elimination of the C-terminal third of the protein did not result in a serious reduction in 3{prime}{r_arrow}5{prime} exonuclease activity, but deletion into the midsection caused a severe loss of activity. The biological activity of the rec1-1 allele, which encodes a truncated polypeptide with full 3{prime}{r_arrow}5{prime} exonuclease activity, and the rec1-5 allele, which encodes a more severely truncated polypeptide with no exonuclease activity, was investigated. The two mutants were equally sensitive to the lethal effect of UV light, but the spontaneous mutation rate was elevated 10-fold over the wild-type rate in the rec1-1 mutant and 100-fold in the rec1-5 mutant. The elevated spontaneous mutation rate correlated with the ablation of exonuclease activity, but the radiation sensitivity did not. These results indicate that the C-terminal portion of the Rec1 protein is not essential for exonuclease activity but is crucial in the role of REC1 in DNA damage repair. 49 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Intestinal obstruction repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repair of volvulus; Intestinal volvulus - repair; Bowel obstruction - repair ... Intestinal obstruction repair is done while you are under general anesthesia . This means you are asleep and DO NOT feel pain. ...

  17. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular

    Science.gov (United States)

    EVAR; Endovascular aneurysm repair - aorta; AAA repair - endovascular; Repair - aortic aneurysm - endovascular ... Endovascular aortic repair is done because your aneurysm is very large, growing quickly, or is leaking or bleeding. You may have ...

  18. Tratamiento de esquizofrénicos crónicos: uso de bajas dosis de neurolépticos y recaídas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Moreno Raymundo

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemos estudiado 109 pacientes esquizofrénicos atendidos durante un año en el CSM de Getafe. De sus historias clínicas hemos CSM recogido la dosis de mantenimiento con neurolépticos, datos sociodemográficos y las recaídas en el último año. La dosis de mantenimiento con neurolépticos mayoritariamente empleada se cuentra dentro del rango considerado como dosis baja por diferentes autores. El uso de estas bajas dosis no determina un mayor número de recaídas.

  19. Motorcycle Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Jim; Bundy, Mike

    This motorcycle repair curriculum guide contains the following ten areas of study: brake systems, clutches, constant mesh transmissions, final drives, suspension, mechanical starting mechanisms, electrical systems, fuel systems, lubrication systems, and overhead camshafts. Each area consists of one or more units of instruction. Each instructional…

  20. Investigation of DNA repair in human oocytes and preimplantation embryos

    OpenAIRE

    Jaroudi, S.

    2010-01-01

    DNA repair genes are expressed in mammalian embryos and in human germinal vesicles, however, little is known about DNA repair in human preimplantation embryos. This project had three aims: 1) to produce a DNA repair profile of human MII oocytes and blastocysts using expression arrays and identify repair pathways that may be active before and after embryonic genome activation; 2) to design an in vitro functional assay that targeted mismatch repair and which could be applied to human oocytes...

  1. Genetic polymorphisms in XRCC1, OGG1, APE1 and XRCC3 DNA repair genes, ionizing radiation exposure and chromosomal DNA damage in interventional cardiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreassi, Maria Grazia, E-mail: andreas@ifc.cnr.it [CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, National Research Council, Pisa (Italy); Foffa, Ilenia [CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, National Research Council, Pisa (Italy); Sant' Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa (Italy); Manfredi, Samantha; Botto, Nicoletta [CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, National Research Council, Pisa (Italy); Cioppa, Angelo [Clinica Cardiologica ' Montevergine' , Mercogliano (Italy); Picano, Eugenio [CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, National Research Council, Pisa (Italy); Clinica Cardiologica ' Montevergine' , Mercogliano (Italy)

    2009-06-18

    Interventional cardiologists working in high-volume cardiac catheterization laboratory are exposed to significant occupational radiation risks. Common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in DNA repair genes are thought to modify the effects of low-dose radiation exposure on DNA damage, the main initiating event in the development of cancer and hereditary disease. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between XRCC1 (Arg194Trp and Arg399Gln), OGG1 (Ser326Cys), APE1 (Asp148Glu) and XRCC3 (Thr241Met) SNPs and chromosomal DNA damage. We enrolled 77 subjects: 40 interventional cardiologists (27 male, 41.3 {+-} 9.4 years and 13 female, 37.8 {+-} 8.4 years) and 37 clinical cardiologists (26 male, 39.4 {+-} 9.5 years and 11 female, 35.0 {+-} 9.8 years) without radiation exposure as the control group. Micronucleus (MN) assay was performed as biomarker of chromosomal DNA damage and an early predictor of cancer. MN frequency was significantly higher in interventional cardiologists than in clinical physicians (19.7 {+-} 7.8 per mille vs. 13.5 {+-} 6.3 per mille , p = 0.0003). Within the exposed group, individuals carrying a XRCC3 Met241 allele had higher frequency than homozygous XRCC3 Thr241 (21.2 {+-} 7.8 per mille vs. 16.6 {+-} 7.1 per mille , p = 0.03). Individuals with two or more risk alleles showed a higher MN frequency when compared to subjects with one or no risk allele (18.4 {+-} 6.6 per mille vs. 14.4 {+-} 6.1 per mille , p = 0.02). An interactive effect was found between smoking, exposure >10 years and the presence of the two or more risk alleles on the MN frequency (F = 6.3, p = 0.02). XRCC3 241Met alleles, particularly in combination with multiple risk alleles of DNA repair genes, contribute to chromosomal DNA damage levels in interventional cardiologists.

  2. Turbine repair process, repaired coating, and repaired turbine component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Rupak; Delvaux, John McConnell; Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2015-11-03

    A turbine repair process, a repaired coating, and a repaired turbine component are disclosed. The turbine repair process includes providing a turbine component having a higher-pressure region and a lower-pressure region, introducing particles into the higher-pressure region, and at least partially repairing an opening between the higher-pressure region and the lower-pressure region with at least one of the particles to form a repaired turbine component. The repaired coating includes a silicon material, a ceramic matrix composite material, and a repaired region having the silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material. The repaired turbine component a ceramic matrix composite layer and a repaired region having silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material.

  3. Stem cells with FGF4-bFGF fused gene enhances the expression of bFGF and improves myocardial repair in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiang-Qi; Chen, Liang-Long, E-mail: xhzlyx@126.com; Fan, Lin; Fang, Jun; Chen, Zhao-Yang; Li, Wei-Wei

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • BFGF exists only in the cytoplasm of live cells. • BFGF cannot be secreted into the extracellular space to promote cell growth. • We combine the secretion-promoting signal peptide of FGF4. • We successfully modified BMSCs with the fused genes of FGF4-bFGF. • We promoted the therapeutic effects of transplanted BMSCs in myocardial infarction. - Abstract: The aim of this study was to investigate whether the modification of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) with the fused FGF4 (fibroblast growth factor 4)-bFGF (basic fibroblast growth factor) gene could improve the expression and secretion of BFGF, and increase the efficacies in repairing infarcted myocardium. We used In-Fusion technique to construct recombinant lentiviral vectors containing the individual gene of bFGF, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), or genes of FGF4-bFGF and EGFP, and then transfected these lentiviruses into rat BMSCs. We conducted an in vitro experiment to compare the secretion of bFGF in BMSCs infected by these lentiviruses and also examined their therapeutic effects in the treatment of myocardial infraction in a rodent study. Sixty rats were tested in the following five conditions: Group-SHAM received only sham operation as controls; Group-AMI received only injection of placebo PBS buffer; Group-BMSC, Group-bFGF and Group-FGF4-bFGF received implantation of BMSCs with empty lentivirus, bFGF lentivirus, and FGF4-bFGF lentivirus, respectively. Our results found out that the transplanted FGF4-bFGF BMSCs had the highest survival rate, and also the highest myocardial expression of bFGF and microvascular density as evidenced by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry, respectively. As compared to other groups, the Group-FGF4-BFGF rats had the lowest myocardial fibrotic fraction, and the highest left ventricular ejection fraction. These results suggest that the modification of BMSCs with the FGF4-bFGF fused gene can not only increase the expression of

  4. The relationship between seven common polymorphisms from five DNA repair genes and the risk for breast cancer in northern Chinese women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peijian Ding

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Converging evidence supports the central role of DNA damage in progression to breast cancer. We therefore in this study aimed to assess the potential interactions of seven common polymorphisms from five DNA repair genes (XRCC1, XRCC2, XRCC3, XPA and APEX1 in association with breast cancer among Han Chinese women. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This was a case-control study involving 606 patients diagnosed with sporadic breast cancer and 633 age- and ethnicity-matched cancer-free controls. The polymerase chain reaction-ligase detection reaction method was used to determine genotypes. All seven polymorphisms were in accordance with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in controls. Differences in the genotypes and alleles of XRCC1 gene rs25487 and XPA gene rs1800975 were statistically significant between patients and controls, even after the Bonferroni correction (P<0.05/7. Accordingly, the risk for breast cancer was remarkably increased for rs25487 (OR = 1.28; 95% CI: 1.07-1.51; P = 0.006, but decreased for rs1800975 (OR = 0.77; 95% CI: 0.67-0.90; P = 0.001 under an additive model at a Bonferroni corrected alpha of 0.05/7. Allele combination analysis showed higher frequencies of the most common combination C-G-G-C-G-G-G (alleles in order of rs1799782, rs25487, rs3218536, rs861539, rs1800975, rs1760944 and rs1130409 in controls than in patients (PSim = 0.002. In further interaction analysis, two-locus model including rs1800975 and rs25487 was deemed as the overall best model with the maximal testing accuracy of 0.654 and the cross-validation consistency of 10 out of 10 (P = 0.001. CONCLUSION: Our findings provide clear evidence that XRCC1 gene rs25487 and XPA gene rs1800975 might exert both independent and interactive effects on the development of breast cancer among northern Chinese women.

  5. Nucleotide excision repair genes are expressed at low levels and are not detectably inducible in Caenorhabditis elegans somatic tissues, but their function is required for normal adult life after UVC exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, Windy A. [Biomolecular Screening Branch, National Toxicology Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Crocker, Tracey L. [Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Rodriguez, Ana M. [Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Leung, Maxwell C.K. [Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Wade Lehmann, D. [Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Freedman, Jonathan H. [Laboratory of Molecular Toxicology, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Van Houten, Ben [Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Meyer, Joel N., E-mail: joel.meyer@duke.edu [Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States)

    2010-01-05

    We performed experiments to characterize the inducibility of nucleotide excision repair (NER) in Caenorhabditis elegans, and to examine global gene expression in NER-deficient and -proficient strains as well as germline vs. somatic tissues, with and without genotoxic stress. We also carried out experiments to elucidate the importance of NER in the adult life of C. elegans under genotoxin-stressed and control conditions. Adult lifespan was not detectably different between wild-type and NER-deficient xpa-1 nematodes under control conditions. However, exposure to 6 J/m{sup 2}/day of ultraviolet C radiation (UVC) decreased lifespan in xpa-1 nematodes more than a dose of 100 J/m{sup 2}/day in wild-type. Similar differential sensitivities were observed for adult size and feeding. Remarkably, global gene expression was nearly identical in young adult wild-type and xpa-1 nematodes, both in control conditions and 3 h after exposure to 50 J/m{sup 2} UVC. Neither NER genes nor repair activity were detectably inducible in young adults that lacked germ cells and developing embryos (glp-1 strain). However, expression levels of dozens of NER and other DNA damage response genes were much (5-30-fold) lower in adults lacking germ cells and developing embryos, suggesting that somatic and post-mitotic cells have a much lower DNA repair ability. Finally, we describe a refinement of our DNA damage assay that allows damage measurement in single nematodes.

  6. Efficacy of DNA double-strand breaks repair in breast cancer is decreased in carriers of the variant allele of the UBC9 gene c.73G>A polymorphism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Synowiec, Ewelina [Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Lodz (Poland); Krupa, Renata [Laboratory of DNA Repair, Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, Lodz (Poland); Morawiec, Zbigniew; Wasylecka, Maja [Department of Surgical Oncology, N. Copernicus Hospital, Lodz (Poland); Dziki, Lukasz; Morawiec, Jan [Department of General and Colorectal Surgery, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz (Poland); Blasiak, Janusz [Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Lodz (Poland); Wozniak, Katarzyna, E-mail: wozniak@biol.uni.lodz.pl [Laboratory of DNA Repair, Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, Lodz (Poland)

    2010-12-10

    UBC9 (E2) SUMO conjugating enzyme plays an important role in the maintenance of genome stability and integrity. In the present work we examined the association between the c.73G>A (Val25Met) polymorphism of the UBC9 gene (rs11553473) and efficacy of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) repair (DRE) in breast cancer patients. We determined the level of endogenous (basal) and exogenous (induced by {gamma}-irradiation) DSBs and efficacy of their repair in peripheral blood lymphocytes of 57 breast cancer patients and 70 healthy individuals. DNA damage and repair were studied by neutral comet assay. Genotypes were determined in DNA from peripheral blood lymphocytes by allele-specific PCR (ASO-PCR). We also correlated genotypes with the clinical characteristics of breast cancer patients. We observed a strong association between breast cancer occurrence and the variant allele carried genotypes in patients with elevated level of basal as well as induced DNA damage (OR 6.74, 95% CI 2.27-20.0 and OR 5.33, 95% CI 1.81-15.7, respectively). We also found statistically significant (p < 0.05) difference in DRE related to the c.73G>A polymorphism of the UBC9 gene in breast cancer patients. Carriers of variant allele have decreased DNA DRE as compared to wild type genotype carriers. We did not find any association with the UBC9 gene polymorphism and estrogen and progesterone receptor status. The variant allele of the UBC9 gene polymorphism was strongly inversely related to HER negative breast cancer patients (OR 0.03, 95% CI 0.00-0.23). Our results suggest that the c.73G>A polymorphism of the UBC9 gene may affect DNA DSBs repair efficacy in breast cancer patients.

  7. A plasmid-encoded UmuD homologue regulates expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa SOS genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Magaña, Amada; Alva-Murillo, Nayeli; Chávez-Moctezuma, Martha P; López-Meza, Joel E; Ramírez-Díaz, Martha I; Cervantes, Carlos

    2015-07-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa plasmid pUM505 contains the umuDC operon that encodes proteins similar to error-prone repair DNA polymerase V. The umuC gene appears to be truncated and its product is probably not functional. The umuD gene, renamed umuDpR, possesses an SOS box overlapped with a Sigma factor 70 type promoter; accordingly, transcriptional fusions revealed that the umuDpR gene promoter is activated by mitomycin C. The predicted sequence of the UmuDpR protein displays 23 % identity with the Ps. aeruginosa SOS-response LexA repressor. The umuDpR gene caused increased MMC sensitivity when transferred to the Ps. aeruginosa PAO1 strain. As expected, PAO1-derived knockout lexA-  mutant PW6037 showed resistance to MMC; however, when the umuDpR gene was transferred to PW6037, MMC resistance level was reduced. These data suggested that UmuDpR represses the expression of SOS genes, as LexA does. To test whether UmuDpR exerts regulatory functions, expression of PAO1 SOS genes was evaluated by reverse transcription quantitative PCR assays in the lexA-  mutant with or without the pUC_umuD recombinant plasmid. Expression of lexA, imuA and recA genes increased 3.4-5.3 times in the lexA-  mutant, relative to transcription of the corresponding genes in the lexA+ strain, but decreased significantly in the lexA- /umuDpR transformant. These results confirmed that the UmuDpR protein is a repressor of Ps. aeruginosa SOS genes controlled by LexA. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays, however, did not show binding of UmuDpR to 5' regions of SOS genes, suggesting an indirect mechanism of regulation.

  8. Subnormal albumin gene expression is associated with weight loss in immunodeficient/DNA-repair-deficient wasted mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libertin, C.R. [Loyola Univ., Maywood, IL (United States). Stritch School of Medicine; Weaver, P.; Woloschak, G.E. [Loyola Univ., Maywood, IL (United States). Stritch School of Medicine]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Mobarhan, S. [Loyola Univ., Maywood, IL (United States). Stritch School of Medicine

    1993-09-01

    Mice bearing the autosomal recessive mutation wst express a disease syndrome of immunodeficiency, neurologic dysfunction, and increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation. The mice were originally characterized as ``wasted`` because of their dramatic weight loss that begins at 21 days of age and progresses until death at 28-32 days of age. Because of the reported association between abnormal liver status and weight loss, we examined expression of a variety of liver-specific genes in wst/wst 10 mice relative to littermate (wst/{center_dot}) and parental strain (BCF{sub 1}) controls. Interestingly, the results revealed a greater than 67% reduction in albumin mRNA expression in livers derived from wst/wst mice relative to both controls. Expression of alpha-fetoprotein as well as a variety of other liver-specific genes (secretory component, metallothionein, cytochrome P{sub 1}450, transferrin receptor, tumor necrosis factor, and Ia antigen) was unaffected. These results suggest a relationship between low albumin expression and wasting syndromes in mice. In addition, we believe that our data suggest the wasted mouse as a unique model for subnormal albumin expression in humans.

  9. Association between expression of DNA mismatch repair genes and clinical features and prognosis of patients with radical resection of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J B; Ma, D L; Li, J Y; Sun, Q D; Liu, Y E

    2016-08-19

    The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of the expression of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes in patients subjected to radical surgical removal of colon cancer, as well as their correlation with disease prognosis. Ninety stage II and III colon cancer patients who received laparoscopic radical resection of colon cancer at our hospital were recruited in this study. The expression of hMLH1, hMSH2, hMSH6, and hPMS2 in the resected tumor tissues was examined by SP immunohistochemistry, in order to analyze the relationship between defective DNA MMR (dMMR) and the clinico-pathological features and prognosis of colon cancer. Patients were followed up over a period of 5-35 months, and the Kaplan-Meier survival curve was plotted. dMMR was confirmed in 27 subjects (30.0%), among whom recurrence with metastasis and death was reported in 5 (18.5%) and 2 (7.4%) patients, respectively. The remaining 63 subjects displayed proficient DNA MMR (pMMR); among these, 19 (30.2%) and 7 (11.1%) recurrences with metastasis and death were reported, respectively. dMMR showed no significant correlation with gender, age, or therapeutic modality (P > 0.05), but was significantly correlated with the degree of differentiation, tumor location, number of resected lymph nodes, presence of ileus, and TNM stage (P colon cancers.

  10. Correction of chromosomal instability and sensitivity to diverse mutagens by a cloned cDNA of the XRCC3 DNA repair gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tebbs, R.S.; Tucker, J.D.; Hwang, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-03

    The mutagen-sensitive CHO line irs1SF was previously isolated on the basis of hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation and was found to be chromosomally unstable as well as cross-sensitive to diverse kinds of DNA-damaging agents. The analysis of somatic cell hybrids formed between irs1SF and human lymphocytes implicated a human gene (defined as XRCC3; x-ray repair cross-complementing), which partially restored mitomycin C resistance to the mutant. A functional cDNA that confers mitomycin C resistance was transferred to irs1SF cells by transforming them with an expression cDNA library and obtaining primary and secondary transformants. Functional cDNA clones were recovered from a cosmid library prepared from a secondary transformant. Transformants also showed partial correction of sensitivity to displatin and {gamma}-rays, efficient correction of chromosomal instability, and substantially improved plating efficiency and growth rate. The XRCC3 cDNA insert is {approx} 2.5 kb and detects an {approx} 3.0-kb mRNA on Northern blots. The cDNA was mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization to human chromosome 14q32.3, which was consistent with the chromosome concordance data of two independent hybrid clone panels. 30 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Detection of CpG methylations in human mismatch repair gene hMLH1 promoter by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objectives: To develop a novel method to detect CpG methylation by DHPLC. Methods: After DNA was treated with sodium bisulfite, mismatch repair gene hMLH1 promoter was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). DHPLC was used to separate the PCR products at their partially denaturing temperatures. BstUI digestion assay was also used for compari