WorldWideScience

Sample records for repair facility requirements

  1. 14 CFR 145.103 - Housing and facilities requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., Materials, and Data § 145.103 Housing and facilities requirements. (a) Each certificated repair station must provide— (1) Housing for the facilities, equipment, materials, and personnel consistent with its ratings... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Housing and facilities requirements. 145...

  2. A Two-Unit Cold Standby Repairable System with One Replaceable Repair Facility and Delay Repair:Some Reliability Problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Ying-yuan; TANG Ying-hui

    2004-01-01

    This paper considers a two-unit same cold standby repairable system with a replaceable repair facility and delay repair .The failure time of unit is assumed to follow exponential distribution , and the repair time and delay time of failed unit are assumed to follow arbitrary distributions , whereas the failure and replacement time distributions of the repair facility are exponential and arbitrary . By using the Markov renewal process theory, some primary reliability quantities of the system are obtained.

  3. National Ignition Facility site requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    The Site Requirements (SR) provide bases for identification of candidate host sites for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and for the generation of data regarding potential actual locations for the facilities. The SR supplements the NIF Functional Requirements (FR) with information needed for preparation of responses to queries for input to HQ DOE site evaluation. The queries are to include both documents and explicit requirements for the potential host site responses. The Sr includes information extracted from the NIF FR (for convenience), data based on design approaches, and needs for physical and organization infrastructure for a fully operational NIF. The FR and SR describe requirements that may require new construction or may be met by use or modification of existing facilities. The SR do not establish requirements for NIF design or construction project planning. The SR document does not constitute an element of the NIF technical baseline.

  4. 46 CFR 196.30-10 - Notice required before repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notice required before repair. 196.30-10 Section 196.30... OPERATIONS Reports of Accidents, Repairs, and Unsafe Equipment § 196.30-10 Notice required before repair. (a) No repairs or alterations, except in an emergency, shall be made to any lifesaving or fire...

  5. 46 CFR 97.30-10 - Notice required before repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notice required before repair. 97.30-10 Section 97.30-10... OPERATIONS Reports of Accidents, Repairs, and Unsafe Equipment § 97.30-10 Notice required before repair. (a) No repairs or alterations, except in an emergency, shall be made to any lifesaving or fire...

  6. An Earth Orbiting Satellite Service and Repair Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Andrew; Cardoza, Mike; Chen, John; Daley, Gunter; Frizzell, Andy; Linton, Richard; Rast, Wayne

    1989-01-01

    A conceptual design was produced for the Geosynchronous Satellite Servicing Platform (GSSP), an orbital facility capable of repairing and servicing satellites in geosynchronous orbit. The GSSP is a man-tended platform, which consists of a habitation module, operations module, service bay and truss assembly. This design review includes an analysis of life support systems, thermal and power requirements, robotic and automated systems, control methods and navigation, and communications systems. The GSSP will utilize existing technology available at the time of construction, focusing mainly on modifying and integrating existing systems. The entire facility, along with two satellite retrieval vehicles (SRV), will be placed in geosynchronous orbit by the Advanced Launch System. The SRV will be used to ferry satellites to and from the GSSP. Technicians will be transferred from Earth to the GSSP and back in an Apollo-derived Crew Transfer Capsule (CTC). These missions will use advanced telerobotic equipment to inspect and service satellites. Four of these missions are tentatively scheduled per year. At this rate, the GSSP will service over 650 satelites during the projected 25 year lifespan.

  7. Cold vacuum drying facility design requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1999-07-01

    This document provides the detailed design requirements for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. Process, safety, and quality assurance requirements and interfaces are specified.

  8. Rehospitalization to primary versus different facilities following abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Richard S; Fernandes-Taylor, Sara; Kind, Amy J H; Engelbert, Travis L; Greenberg, Caprice C; Smith, Maureen A; Matsumura, Jon S; Kent, K Craig

    2014-06-01

    Reducing readmissions represents a unique opportunity to improve care and reduce health care costs and is the focus of major payers. A large number of surgical patients are readmitted to hospitals other than where the primary surgery was performed, resulting in clinical decisions that do not incorporate the primary surgeon and potentially alter outcomes. This study characterizes readmission to primary vs different hospitals after abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair and examines the implications with regard to mortality and cost. Patients who underwent open or endovascular aneurysm repair for AAA were identified from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Chronic Conditions Warehouse, a random 5% national sample of Medicare beneficiaries from 2005 to 2009. Outcomes for patients who underwent AAA repair and were readmitted within 30 days of initial discharge were compared based on readmission location (primary vs different hospital). A total of 885 patients underwent AAA repair and were readmitted within 30 days. Of these, 626 (70.7%) returned to the primary facility, and 259 (29.3%) returned to a different facility. Greater distance from patient residence to the primary hospital was the strongest predictor of readmission to a different facility. Patients living 50 to 100 miles from the primary hospital were more likely to be readmitted to a different hospital compared with patients living facility after AAA repair is common and occurs more frequently than for the overall Medicare population. Patients travelling a greater distance for AAA repair are more likely to return to different vs the primary hospital when further care is required. For AAA repair, quality healthcare may be achieved at marginally lower cost and with greater patient convenience for selected readmissions at hospitals other than where the initial procedure was performed. Copyright © 2014 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Food irradiation facilities: Requirements and technical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittendorfer, Josef

    2016-12-01

    This survey presents some aspects and requirement for food irradiation facilities. Topics like radiation source, dose ranges and dose rate are discussed, together with logistics and operational considerations

  10. Quality Requirements Regarding Aircraft Maintenance and Repair Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woźny Piotr

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available During operation, aircraft (AC are subject to use, maintenance, repair and disposal. Each of those processes requires adequate quality. This study presents requirements related to quality management with which an AC maintenance and repair sub-system ought to comply. Documents containing requirements pertaining to both management and technical aspects have been analysed. Applicable standards and regulations affecting the AC repair process quality assurance have been presented. A description of standards observance of which is required to ensure effective operation of modern AC maintenance and repair subsystems significantly affecting maintenance of the AC required airworthiness has been included. Complexity of the decision-taking process pertaining to AC maintenance and repair within the airworthiness maintenance sub-system has been presented

  11. Cold vacuum drying facility design requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irwin, J.J.

    1997-09-24

    This release of the Design Requirements Document is a complete restructuring and rewrite to the document previously prepared and released for project W-441 to record the design basis for the design of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility.

  12. Nuclear chemistry counting facilities: requirements definition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, D.W.; Baker, J.

    1979-04-05

    In an effort to upgrade outdated instrumentation and to take advantage of current and imminent technologies the Nuclear Chemistry Division at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory is about to undertake a major upgrade of their low level radiation counting and analysis facilities. It is expected that such a project will make a more coordinated data acquisition and data processing system, reduce manual data handling operations and speed up data processing throughput. Before taking on a systems design it is appropriate to establish a definition of the requirements of the facilities. This report examines why such a project is necessary in the context of the current and projected operations, needs, problems, risks and costs. The authors also address a functional specification as a prelude to a system design and the design constraints implicit in the systems implementation. Technical, operational and economic assessments establish necessary boundary conditions for this discussion. This report also establishes the environment in which the requirements definition may be considered valid. The validity of these analyses is contingent on known and projected technical, scientific and political conditions.

  13. Traumatic Tricuspid Insufficiency Requiring Valve Repair in an Acute Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Yoshinori; Sudo, Yoshio; Sueta, Tomonori

    2015-01-01

    Tricuspid insufficiency due to penetrating cardiac trauma is rare. Patients with tricuspid insufficiency due to trauma can tolerate this abnormality for months or even years. We report a case of a 66-year-old female with penetrating cardiac trauma on the right side of her heart that required tricuspid valve repair in an acute setting. She sustained cut and stab wounds on her bilateral forearms and in the neck and epigastric region. She had cardiac tamponade and developed pulseless electrical activity, which required emergency surgery. The right ventricle and superior vena cava were dissected approximately 5 cm and 2 cm, respectively. After these wounds had been repaired, the patient's inability to wean from cardiopulmonary bypass suggested rightsided heart failure; transesophageal echocardiography revealed tricuspid insufficiency. Right atriotomy was performed, and a detailed examination revealed that the tricuspid valve septal leaflet was split in two. There was also an atrial septal injury that created a connection with the left atrium; these injuries were not detected from the right ventricular wound. After repair, weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass with mild tricuspid insufficiency was achieved, and she recovered uneventfully. This case emphasized the importance of thoroughly investigating intracardiac injury and transesophageal echocardiography.

  14. Fuel Supply Shutdown Facility Interim Operational Safety Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BENECKE, M.W.

    2000-09-06

    The Interim Operational Safety Requirements for the Fuel Supply Shutdown (FSS) Facility define acceptable conditions, safe boundaries, bases thereof, and management of administrative controls to ensure safe operation of the facility.

  15. Nuclear thermal propulsion test facility requirements and development strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, George C.; Warren, John; Clark, J. S.

    1991-01-01

    The Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) subpanel of the Space Nuclear Propulsion Test Facilities Panel evaluated facility requirements and strategies for nuclear thermal propulsion systems development. High pressure, solid core concepts were considered as the baseline for the evaluation, with low pressure concepts an alternative. The work of the NTP subpanel revealed that a wealth of facilities already exists to support NTP development, and that only a few new facilities must be constructed. Some modifications to existing facilities will be required. Present funding emphasis should be on long-lead-time items for the major new ground test facility complex and on facilities supporting nuclear fuel development, hot hydrogen flow test facilities, and low power critical facilities.

  16. Nuclear thermal propulsion test facility requirements and development strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, George C.; Clark, John S.; Warren, John; Perkins, David R.; Martinell, John

    1992-01-01

    The Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) subpanel of the Space Nuclear Propulsion Test Facilities Panel evaluated facility requirements and strategies for nuclear thermal propulsion systems development. High pressure, solid core concepts were considered as the baseline for the evaluation, with low pressure concepts an alternative. The work of the NTP subpanel revealed that a wealth of facilities already exists to support NTP development, and that only a few new facilities must be constructed. Some modifications to existing facilities will be required. Present funding emphasis should be on long-lead-time items for the major new ground test facility complex and on facilities supporting nuclear fuel development, hot hydrogen flow test facilities, and low power critical facilities.

  17. Technical Safety Requirements for the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF)

    CERN Document Server

    Mahn, J A E M J G

    2003-01-01

    This document provides the Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Sandia National Laboratories Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF). The TSR is a compilation of requirements that define the conditions, the safe boundaries, and the administrative controls necessary to ensure the safe operation of a nuclear facility and to reduce the potential risk to the public and facility workers from uncontrolled releases of radioactive or other hazardous materials. These requirements constitute an agreement between DOE and Sandia National Laboratories management regarding the safe operation of the Gamma Irradiation Facility.

  18. A New Approach for Analyzing the Reliability of the Repair Facility in a Series System with Vacations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renbin Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the renewal process theory we develop a decomposition method to analyze the reliability of the repair facility in an n-unit series system with vacations. Using this approach, we study the unavailability and the mean replacement number during (0,t] of the repair facility. The method proposed in this work is novel and concise, which can make us see clearly the structures of the facility indices of a series system with an unreliable repair facility, two convolution relations. Special cases and numerical examples are given to show the validity of our method.

  19. 36 CFR 1234.10 - What are the facility requirements for all records storage facilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... facility as defined in the Department of Justice, U. S. Marshals Service report Vulnerability Assessment of... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the facility requirements for all records storage facilities? 1234.10 Section 1234.10 Parks, Forests, and Public Property...

  20. 10 CFR 70.64 - Requirements for new facilities or new processes at existing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... defense-in-depth practices. 1 The design must incorporate, to the extent practicable: 1 As used in § 70.64, Requirements for new facilities or new processes at existing facilities, defense-in-depth practices means a... incorporating defense-in-depth practices is a conservatively designed facility and system that will...

  1. Health maintenance facility: Dental equipment requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, John; Gosbee, John; Billica, Roger

    1991-01-01

    The objectives were to test the effectiveness of the Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) dental suction/particle containment system, which controls fluids and debris generated during simulated dental treatment, in microgravity; to test the effectiveness of fiber optic intraoral lighting systems in microgravity, while simulating dental treatment; and to evaluate the operation and function of off-the-shelf dental handheld instruments, namely a portable dental hand drill and temporary filling material, in microgravity. A description of test procedures, including test set-up, flight equipment, and the data acquisition system, is given.

  2. 77 FR 63849 - Facility Security Officer Training Requirements; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-17

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Facility Security Officer Training Requirements; Correction AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS...), announcing a public meeting to receive comments on the development of a Facility Security Officer training program. The notice contains an inaccurate Internet link to RSVP for the public meeting. DATES: The...

  3. Analysis of an M/G/1 Queue with Multiple Vacations, N-policy, Unreliable Service Station and Repair Facility Failures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqing Wu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies an M/G/1 repairable queueing system with multiple vacations and N-policy, in which the service station is subject to occasional random breakdowns. When the service station breaks down, it is repaired by a repair facility. Moreover, the repair facility may fail during the repair period of the service station. The failed repair facility resumes repair after completion of its replacement. Under these assumptions, applying a simple method, the probability that the service station is broken, the rate of occurrence of breakdowns of the service station, the probability that the repair facility is being replaced and the rate of occurrence of failures of the repair facility along with other performance measures are obtained. Following the construction of the long-run expected cost function per unit time, the direct search method is implemented for determining the optimum threshold N* that minimises the cost function.

  4. Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities May 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laycak, D. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-04-16

    This document contains the Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 625 (A625) and the Building 693 (B693) Yard Area of the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) at LLNL. The TSRs constitute requirements for safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the Documented Safety Analyses for the Waste Storage Facilities (DSA) (LLNL 2011). The analysis presented therein concluded that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts of waste from other DOE facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., size reduction and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities.

  5. Mock Nuclear Processing Facility-Safeguards Training Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbs, Philip [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hasty, Tim [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Johns, Rissell [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Baum, Gregory [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-08-31

    This document outlines specific training requirements in the topical areas of Material Control and Accounting (MC&A) and Physical Protection(PP) which are to be used as technical input for designing a mock Integrated Security Facility (ISF) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The overall project objective for these requirements is to enhance the ability to deliver training on Material Protection Control and Accounting (MC&A) concepts regarding hazardous material such as irradiated materials with respect to bulk processing facilities.

  6. Divergent Requirement for a DNA Repair Enzyme during Enterovirus Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Maciejewski

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Viruses of the Enterovirus genus of picornaviruses, including poliovirus, coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3, and human rhinovirus, commandeer the functions of host cell proteins to aid in the replication of their small viral genomic RNAs during infection. One of these host proteins is a cellular DNA repair enzyme known as 5′ tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2. TDP2 was previously demonstrated to mediate the cleavage of a unique covalent linkage between a viral protein (VPg and the 5′ end of picornavirus RNAs. Although VPg is absent from actively translating poliovirus mRNAs, the removal of VPg is not required for the in vitro translation and replication of the RNA. However, TDP2 appears to be excluded from replication and encapsidation sites during peak times of poliovirus infection of HeLa cells, suggesting a role for TDP2 during the viral replication cycle. Using a mouse embryonic fibroblast cell line lacking TDP2, we found that TDP2 is differentially required among enteroviruses. Our single-cycle viral growth analysis shows that CVB3 replication has a greater dependency on TDP2 than does poliovirus or human rhinovirus replication. During infection, CVB3 protein accumulation is undetectable (by Western blot analysis in the absence of TDP2, whereas poliovirus protein accumulation is reduced but still detectable. Using an infectious CVB3 RNA with a reporter, CVB3 RNA could still be replicated in the absence of TDP2 following transfection, albeit at reduced levels. Overall, these results indicate that TDP2 potentiates viral replication during enterovirus infections of cultured cells, making TDP2 a potential target for antiviral development for picornavirus infections.

  7. 49 CFR 192.711 - Transmission lines: General requirements for repair procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Maintenance § 192.711 Transmission lines: General requirements for repair procedures. (a) Temporary repairs... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transmission lines: General requirements for..., imperfection, or damage that impairs its serviceability is found in a segment of steel transmission...

  8. DEK is required for homologous recombination repair of DNA breaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Eric A; Gole, Boris; Willis, Nicholas A

    2017-01-01

    -deficiency phenotypes were thought to arise from a moderate attenuation of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair, the role of DEK in DNA repair remains incompletely understood. We present new evidence demonstrating the observed decrease in NHEJ is insufficient to impact immunoglobulin class switching in DEK knockout...... mice. Furthermore, DEK knockout cells were sensitive to apoptosis with NHEJ inhibition. Thus, we hypothesized DEK plays additional roles in homologous recombination (HR). Using episomal and integrated reporters, we demonstrate that HR repair of conventional DSBs is severely compromised in DEK...... filament formation, stability, or function. These findings define DEK as an important and multifunctional mediator of HR, and establish a synthetic lethal relationship between DEK loss and NHEJ inhibition....

  9. Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility interim operational safety requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Covey, L I

    2000-01-01

    The Interim Operational Safety Requirements (IOSRs) for the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) define acceptable conditions, safe boundaries, bases thereof, and management or administrative controls required to ensure safe operation during receipt and inspection of cesium and strontium capsules from private irradiators; decontamination of the capsules and equipment; surveillance of the stored capsules; and maintenance activities. Controls required for public safety, significant defense-in-depth, significant worker safety, and for maintaining radiological consequences below risk evaluation guidelines (EGs) are included.

  10. Rilem TC 203-RHM: repair mortars for historic masonry. Performance requirements for renders and plasters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hees, R.P.J. van; Hughes, J.J.; Balen, K. van; Bicer-Simsir, B.; Binda, L.; Elsen, J.; Konow, T. von; Lindqvist, J.E.; Maurenbrecher, P.; Papayanni, I.; Subercaseaux, M.; Tedeschi, C.; Toumbakari, E.E.; Thompson, M.

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on repair or replacement mortars for historical buildings. Both the decision process and questions arising are dealt with, in order to better define and illustrate technical requirements for mortars to be used for the repair or restoration of monuments and historic buildings (ma

  11. Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, H L

    2007-09-07

    This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 612 (A612) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities (DSA) (LLNL 2006). The analysis presented therein determined that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts from other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., drum crushing, size reduction, and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are located in two portions of the LLNL main site. A612 is located in the southeast quadrant of LLNL. The A612 fenceline is approximately 220 m west of Greenville Road. The DWTF Storage Area, which includes Building 693 (B693), Building 696 Radioactive Waste Storage Area (B696R), and associated yard areas and storage areas within the yard, is located in the northeast quadrant of LLNL in the DWTF complex. The DWTF Storage Area fenceline is approximately 90 m west of Greenville Road. A612 and the DWTF Storage Area are subdivided into various facilities and storage

  12. 14 CFR 147.13 - Facilities, equipment, and material requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Facilities, equipment, and material requirements. 147.13 Section 147.13 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES AVIATION MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN...

  13. Fuel supply shutdown facility interim operational safety requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besser, R.L.; Brehm, J.R.; Benecke, M.W.; Remaize, J.A.

    1995-05-23

    These Interim Operational Safety Requirements (IOSR) for the Fuel Supply Shutdown (FSS) facility define acceptable conditions, safe boundaries, bases thereof, and management or administrative controls to ensure safe operation. The IOSRs apply to the fuel material storage buildings in various modes (operation, storage, surveillance).

  14. Fault-tolerant Concave Facility Location Problem with Uniform Requirements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing WANG; Da-Chuan XU; Zheng-Hai HUANG

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,we consider the fault-tolerant concave facility location problem (FTCFL) with uniform requirements. By investigating the structure of the FTCFL,we obtain a modified dual-fitting bifactor approximation algorithm.Combining the scaling and greedy argumentation technique,the approximation factor is proved to be 1.52.

  15. Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laycak, D T

    2010-03-05

    This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities (DSA) (LLNL 2009). The analysis presented therein determined that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts from other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., size reduction and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are located in two portions of the LLNL main site. A625 is located in the southeast quadrant of LLNL. The A625 fenceline is approximately 225 m west of Greenville Road. The DWTF Storage Area, which includes Building 693 (B693), Building 696 Radioactive Waste Storage Area (B696R), and associated yard areas and storage areas within the yard, is located in the northeast quadrant of LLNL in the DWTF complex. The DWTF Storage Area fenceline is approximately 90 m west of Greenville Road. A625 and the DWTF Storage Area are subdivided into various facilities and storage areas, consisting

  16. Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laycak, D T

    2008-06-16

    This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the 'Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities' (DSA) (LLNL 2008). The analysis presented therein determined that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts from other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., size reduction and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are located in two portions of the LLNL main site. A625 is located in the southeast quadrant of LLNL. The A625 fenceline is approximately 225 m west of Greenville Road. The DWTF Storage Area, which includes Building 693 (B693), Building 696 Radioactive Waste Storage Area (B696R), and associated yard areas and storage areas within the yard, is located in the northeast quadrant of LLNL in the DWTF complex. The DWTF Storage Area fenceline is approximately 90 m west of Greenville Road. A625 and the DWTF Storage Area are subdivided into various facilities and storage areas

  17. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Technical Safety Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRAHN, D.E.

    2000-08-08

    The Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs) for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility define acceptable conditions, safe boundaries, bases thereof, and management or administrative controls required to ensure safe operation during receipt of multi-canister overpacks (MCOs) containing spent nuclear fuel. removal of free water from the MCOs using the cold vacuum drying process, and inerting and testing of the MCOs before transport to the Canister Storage Building. Controls required for public safety, significant defense in depth, significant worker safety, and for maintaining radiological and toxicological consequences below risk evaluation guidelines are included.

  18. [Health requirements of sauna facilities in East Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, R

    1989-07-01

    There was a considerable increase in sauna attendance in the GDR in recent years. For excluding the risk of an infection transfer when attenting the sauna it is necessary to pay particular hygienic attention to this special type of sports and recreational facilities. The special hygienic requirements to the staff and sauna users are explained. The tasks and responsibilities of the state sanitary inspection when opening and controlling public saunas are described.

  19. FUEL HANDLING FACILITY BACKUP CENTRAL COMMUNICATIONS ROOM SPACE REQUIREMENTS CALCULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. SZALEWSKI

    2005-03-22

    The purpose of the Fuel Handling Facility Backup Central Communications Room Space Requirements Calculation is to determine a preliminary estimate of the space required to house the backup central communications room in the Fuel Handling Facility (FHF). This room provides backup communications capability to the primary communication systems located in the Central Control Center Facility. This calculation will help guide FHF designers in allocating adequate space for communications system equipment in the FHF. This is a preliminary calculation determining preliminary estimates based on the assumptions listed in Section 4. As such, there are currently no limitations on the use of this preliminary calculation. The calculations contained in this document were developed by Design and Engineering and are intended solely for the use of Design and Engineering in its work regarding the FHF Backup Central Communications Room Space Requirements. Yucca Mountain Project personnel from Design and Engineering should be consulted before the use of the calculations for purposes other than those stated herein or use by individuals other than authorized personnel in Design and Engineering.

  20. Do all hemolytic anemias that occur after mitral valve repair require surgical treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gungunes, Askin; Akpinar, Ibrahim; Dogan, Mehmet; Baser, Kazim; Yildirim, Ismail Safa; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim C

    2010-12-01

    We report on a 29-year-old woman with severe hemolytic anemia following mitral valve annuloplasty. Although hemolysis due to mechanical prosthetic mitral valve is well recognized, hemolytic anemia associated with mitral valve repair is an uncommon condition. Reoperation may be considered if the patient has serious and persistent anemia. Although valve replacement is suggested to be a unique intervention, it may not be the solution every time because of mechanical effects. Various mechanisms of hemolysis related to mitral valve repair were suggested, but sufficient and precise data is not available. In this case, we tried to emphasize whether all hemolytic anemias that occur after mitral valve repair require surgical treatment.

  1. Sites Requiring Facility Response Plans, Geographic NAD83, EPA (2006) [facility_response_plan_sites_la_EPA_2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — Locations of facilities in Louisiana requiring Oil Pollution Act (OPA) Facility Response Plans (FRP). The dataset was provided by the Region 6 OSCARS program....

  2. Rilem TC 203-RHM: Repair mortars for historic masonry. Requirements for repointing mortars for historic masonry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hees, R.P.J. van; Groot, C.; Hughes, J.J.; Balen, K. van; Bicer-Simsir, B.; Binda, L.; Elsen, J.; Konow, T. von; Lindqvist, J.E.; Papayanni, I.; Subercaseaux, M.; Tedeschi, C.; Toumbakari, E.E.; Thompson, B.

    2012-01-01

    This paper gives a summary of functional and performance requirements for repointing mortars for historic masonry (design, execution and maintenance). Successful performance of repair and conservation of mortar in historic masonry requires more care with design and execution than with modern masonry

  3. The medical director and quality requirements in the dialysis facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Brigitte

    2015-03-06

    Four decades after the successful implementation of the ESRD program currently providing life-saving dialysis therapy to >430,000 patients, the definitions of and demands for a high-quality program have evolved and increased at the same time. Through substantial technological advances ESRD care improved, with a predominant focus on the technical aspects of care and the introduction of medications such as erythropoiesis-stimulating agents and active vitamin D for anemia and bone disease management. Despite many advances, the size of the program and the increasingly older and multimorbid patient population have contributed to continuing challenges for providing consistently high-quality care. Medicare's Final Rule of the Conditions for Coverage (April 2008) define the medical director of the dialysis center as the leader of the interdisciplinary team and the person ultimately accountable for quality, safety, and care provided in the center. Knowledge and active leadership with a hands-on approach in the quality assessment and performance improvement process (QAPI) is essential for the achievement of high-quality outcomes in dialysis centers. A collaborative approach between the dialysis provider and medical director is required to optimize outcomes and deliver evidence-based quality care. In 2011 the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services introduced a pay-for-performance program-the ESRD quality incentive program (QIP)- with yearly varying quality metrics that result in payment reductions in subsequent years when targets are not achieved during the performance period. Success with the QIP requires a clear understanding of the structure, metrics, and scoring methods. Information on achievement and nonachievement is publicly available, both in facilities (through the facility performance score card) and on public websites (including Medicare's Dialysis Facility Compare). By assuming the leadership role in the quality program of dialysis facilities, the medical

  4. A requirement for polymerized actin in DNA double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrin, Christi; McDonald, Darin; Attwood, Kathleen M; Rodrigue, Amélie; Ghosh, Sunita; Mirzayans, Razmik; Masson, Jean-Yves; Dellaire, Graham; Hendzel, Michael J

    2012-07-01

    Nuclear actin is involved in several nuclear processes from chromatin remodeling to transcription. Here we examined the requirement for actin polymerization in DNA double-strand break repair. Double-strand breaks are considered the most dangerous type of DNA lesion. Double-strand break repair consists of a complex set of events that are tightly regulated. Failure at any step can have catastrophic consequences such as genomic instability, oncogenesis or cell death. Many proteins involved in this repair process have been identified and their roles characterized. We discovered that some DNA double-strand break repair factors are capable of associating with polymeric actin in vitro and specifically, that purified Ku70/80 interacts with polymerized actin under these conditions. We find that the disruption of polymeric actin inhibits DNA double strand break repair both in vitro and in vivo. Introduction of nuclear targeted mutant actin that cannot polymerize, or the depolymerization of endogenous actin filaments by the addition of cytochalasin D, alters the retention of Ku80 at sites of DNA damage in live cells. Our results suggest that polymeric actin is required for proper DNA double-strand break repair and may function through the stabilization of the Ku heterodimer at the DNA damage site.

  5. RNF4 is required for DNA double-strand break repair in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vyas, R; Kumar, R; Clermont, F

    2013-01-01

    for both homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining repair. To establish a link between Rnf4 and the DNA damage response (DDR) in vivo, we generated an Rnf4 allelic series in mice. We show that Rnf4-deficiency causes persistent ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage and signaling......Unrepaired DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) cause genetic instability that leads to malignant transformation or cell death. Cells respond to DSBs with the ordered recruitment of signaling and repair proteins to the sites of DNA lesions. Coordinated protein SUMOylation and ubiquitylation have crucial......, and that Rnf4-deficient cells and mice exhibit increased sensitivity to genotoxic stress. Mechanistically, we show that Rnf4 targets SUMOylated MDC1 and SUMOylated BRCA1, and is required for the loading of Rad51, an enzyme required for HR repair, onto sites of DNA damage. Similarly to inactivating mutations...

  6. 75 FR 38959 - Lead; Clearance and Clearance Testing Requirements for the Renovation, Repair, and Painting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 745 RIN 2070-AJ57 Lead; Clearance and Clearance Testing Requirements for the Renovation, Repair, and Painting Program; Reopening of Comment Period AGENCY: Environmental Protection...

  7. The cell-cycle checkpoint kinase Chk1 is required for mammalian homologous recombination repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Claus Storgaard; Hansen, Lasse Tengbjerg; Dziegielewski, Jaroslaw

    2005-01-01

    The essential checkpoint kinase Chk1 is required for cell-cycle delays after DNA damage or blocked DNA replication. However, it is unclear whether Chk1 is involved in the repair of damaged DNA. Here we establish that Chk1 is a key regulator of genome maintenance by the homologous recombination...

  8. Moly99 Production Facility: Report on Beamline Components, Requirements, Costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishofberger, Kip A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-23

    In FY14 we completed the design of the beam line for the linear accelerator production design concept. This design included a set of three bending magnets, quadrupole focusing magnets, and octopoles to flatten the beam on target. This design was generic and applicable to multiple different accelerators if necessary. In FY15 we built on that work to create specifications for the individual beam optic elements, including power supply requirements. This report captures the specification of beam line components with initial cost estimates for the NorthStar production facility.This report is organized as follows: The motivation of the beamline design is introduced briefly, along with renderings of the design. After that, a specific list is provided, which accounts for each beamline component, including part numbers and costs, to construct the beamline. After that, this report details the important sections of the beamline and individual components. A final summary and list of follow-on activities completes this report.

  9. 75 FR 54025 - Revision of LNG and LHG Waterfront Facility General Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-03

    ...-27022] RIN 1625-AB13 Revision of LNG and LHG Waterfront Facility General Requirements AGENCY: Coast...) requirements for liquefied natural gas (LNG) and liquefied hazardous gas (LHG) facilities. The amendment... entitled ``Revision of LNG and LHG Waterfront Facility General Requirements'' (75 FR 29420) amending...

  10. 7 CFR 70.110 - Requirements for sanitation, facilities, and operating procedures in official plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirements for sanitation, facilities, and operating... Requirements for sanitation, facilities, and operating procedures in official plants. (a) The requirements for sanitation, facilities, and operating procedures in official plants shall be the applicable provisions...

  11. Ribonucleolytic resection is required for repair of strand displaced nonhomologous end-joining intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Edward J; Brissett, Nigel C; Doherty, Aidan J

    2013-05-28

    Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathways repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in eukaryotes and many prokaryotes, although it is not reported to operate in the third domain of life, archaea. Here, we describe a complete NHEJ complex, consisting of DNA ligase (Lig), polymerase (Pol), phosphoesterase (PE), and Ku from a mesophillic archaeon, Methanocella paludicola (Mpa). Mpa Lig has limited DNA nick-sealing activity but is efficient in ligating nicks containing a 3' ribonucleotide. Mpa Pol preferentially incorporates nucleoside triphosphates onto a DNA primer strand, filling DNA gaps in annealed breaks. Mpa PE sequentially removes 3' phosphates and ribonucleotides from primer strands, leaving a ligatable terminal 3' monoribonucleotide. These proteins, together with the DNA end-binding protein Ku, form a functional NHEJ break-repair apparatus that is highly homologous to the bacterial complex. Although the major roles of Pol and Lig in break repair have been reported, PE's function in NHEJ has remained obscure. We establish that PE is required for ribonucleolytic resection of RNA intermediates at annealed DSBs. Polymerase-catalyzed strand-displacement synthesis on DNA gaps can result in the formation of nonligatable NHEJ intermediates. The function of PE in NHEJ repair is to detect and remove inappropriately incorporated ribonucleotides or phosphates from 3' ends of annealed DSBs to configure the termini for ligation. Thus, PE prevents the accumulation of abortive genotoxic DNA intermediates arising from strand displacement synthesis that otherwise would be refractory to repair.

  12. 33 CFR 105.285 - Additional requirements-passenger and ferry facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and ferry facilities. 105.285 Section 105.285 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... § 105.285 Additional requirements-passenger and ferry facilities. (a) At all MARSEC Levels, the owner or operator of a passenger or ferry facility must ensure, in coordination with a vessel moored at the facility...

  13. 78 FR 38594 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Requirements for Long Term Care Facilities; Hospice Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-27

    ... requirements that an institution will have to meet in order to qualify to participate as a skilled nursing facility (SNF) in the Medicare program, or as a nursing facility (NF) in the Medicaid program. These... sections 1819(b)(2) and 1919(b)(2) of the Act, a skilled nursing facility (SNF) or nursing facility...

  14. 33 CFR 105.305 - Facility Security Assessment (FSA) requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., personnel identification documents and communication, alarm, lighting, access control, and similar systems...-keeping duties and risk of fatigue on facility personnel alertness and performance; (iv) Security training...

  15. Financial Assurance Requirements for Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requires all treatment, storage and disposal facilities (TSDFs) to demonstrate that they will have the financial resources to properly close the facility

  16. Review of Maintenance and Repair Times for Components in Technological Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. C. Cadwallader

    2012-11-01

    This report is a compilation of some unique component repair time data and it also presents citations of more extensive reports where lists of repair times can be found. This collection of information should support analysts who seek to quantify maintainability and availability of high technology and nuclear energy production systems. While there are newer sources of repair time information, most, if not all, of the newer sources are proprietary and cannot be shared. This report offers data that, while older, is openly accessible and can serve as reasonable estimates of repair times, at least for initial studies. Some times were found for maintenance times in radiation environments, and some guidance for multiplicative factors to use to account for work in contamination areas.

  17. Laser solder repair technique for nerve anastomosis: temperatures required for optimal tensile strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.; Dawes, Judith M.; Lauto, Antonio; Parker, Anthony E.; Owen, Earl R.; Piper, James A.

    1998-01-01

    Laser-assisted repair of nerves is often unsatisfactory and has a high failure rate. Two disadvantages of laser assisted procedures are low initial strength of the resulting anastomosis and thermal damage of tissue by laser heating. Temporary or permanent stay sutures are used and fluid solders have been proposed to increase the strength of the repair. These techniques, however, have their own disadvantages including foreign body reaction and difficulty of application. To address these problems solid protein solder strips have been developed for use in conjunction with a diode laser for nerve anastomosis. The protein helps to supplement the bond, especially in the acute healing phase up to five days post- operative. Indocyanine green dye is added to the protein solder to absorb a laser wavelength (approximately 800 nm) that is poorly absorbed by water and other bodily tissues. This reduces the collateral thermal damage typically associated with other laser techniques. An investigation of the feasibility of the laser-solder repair technique in terms of required laser irradiance, tensile strength of the repair, and solder and tissue temperature is reported here. The tensile strength of repaired nerves rose steadily with laser irradiance reaching a maximum of 105 plus or minus 10 N.cm-2 at 12.7 W.cm-2. When higher laser irradiances were used the tensile strength of the resulting bonds dropped. Histopathological analysis of the laser- soldered nerves, conducted immediately after surgery, showed the solder to have adhered well to the perineurial membrane, with minimal damage to the inner axons of the nerve. The maximum temperature reached at the solder surface and at the solder/nerve interface, measured using a non-contact fiber optic radiometer and thermocouple respectively, also rose steadily with laser irradiance. At 12.7 W.cm-2, the temperatures reached at the surface and at the interface were 85 plus or minus 4 and 68 plus or minus 4 degrees Celsius respectively

  18. 47 CFR 80.68 - Facilities requirements for public coast stations using telegraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Facilities requirements for public coast stations using telegraphy. 80.68 Section 80.68 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION... Procedures Station Requirements-Land Stations § 80.68 Facilities requirements for public coast stations...

  19. HVAC optimization as facility requirements change with corporate restructuring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodak, R.R.; Sankey, M.S.

    1997-06-01

    The hyper-competitive, dynamic 1990`s forced many corporations to {open_quotes}Right-Size,{close_quotes} relocating resources and equipment -- even consolidating. These changes led to utility reduction if HVAC optimization was thoroughly addressed, and energy conservation opportunities were identified and properly designed. This is true particularly when the facility`s heating and cooling systems are matched to correspond with the load changes attributed to the reduction of staff and computers. Computers have been downsized and processing power per unit of energy input increased, thus, the need for large mainframe computer centers, and their associated high intensity energy usage, have been decreased or eliminated. Cooling, therefore, also has been reduced.

  20. The nucleotide excision repair pathway is required for UV-C-induced apoptosis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stergiou, L; Doukoumetzidis, K; Sendoel, A; Hengartner, M O

    2007-06-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a mutagen of major clinical importance in humans. UV-induced damage activates multiple signaling pathways, which initiate DNA repair, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. To better understand these pathways, we studied the responses to UV-C light (254 nm) of germ cells in Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that UV activates the same cellular responses in worms as in mammalian cells. Both UV-induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest were completely dependent on the p53 homolog CEP-1, the checkpoint proteins HUS-1 and CLK-2, and the checkpoint kinases CHK-2 and ATL-1 (the C. elegans homolog of ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related); ATM-1 (ataxia telangiectasia mutated-1) was also required, but only at low irradiation doses. Importantly, mutation of genes encoding nucleotide excision repair pathway components severely disrupted both apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, suggesting that these genes not only participate in repair, but also signal the presence of damage to downstream components of the UV response pathway that we delineate here. Our study suggests that whereas DNA damage response pathways are conserved in metazoans in their general outline, there is significant evolution in the relative importance of individual checkpoint genes in the response to specific types of DNA damage.

  1. 75 FR 29420 - Revision of LNG and LHG Waterfront Facility General Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-26

    ... No. USCG-2007-27022] RIN 1625-AB13 Revision of LNG and LHG Waterfront Facility General Requirements... requirements for waterfront facilities handling liquefied natural gas (LNG) and liquefied hazardous gas (LHG... harmonize the Coast Guard's regulations for LNG with those established by the Federal Energy...

  2. 44 CFR 206.252 - Insurance requirements for facilities damaged by flood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... facilities damaged by flood. 206.252 Section 206.252 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY... Assistance Insurance Requirements § 206.252 Insurance requirements for facilities damaged by flood. (a) Where an insurable building damaged by flooding is located in a special flood hazard area identified...

  3. 30 CFR 75.1712-8 - Application for waiver of location requirements for underground sanitary facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... underground sanitary facilities. Applications for waivers of the location requirements of § 75.1712-6 shall be... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Application for waiver of location requirements for underground sanitary facilities. 75.1712-8 Section 75.1712-8 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND...

  4. 42 CFR 483.354 - General requirements for psychiatric residential treatment facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General requirements for psychiatric residential treatment facilities. 483.354 Section 483.354 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR STATES AND LONG TERM CARE FACILITIES Condition...

  5. Comparing Survival Following Hip Fracture Repair in VHA and Non-VHA Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutt, Evelyn; Radcliff, Tiffany A; Henderson, William; Maciejewski, Matthew; Cowper-Ripley, Diane; Whitfield, Emily

    2015-03-01

    Although postsurgical outcomes are similar between Veterans Health Administration (VHA) and non-VHA hospitals for many procedures, no studies have compared 30-day and 1-year survival following hip fracture repair. Therefore, this study compared survival of veterans aged 65 years and older treated in VHA hospitals with a propensity-matched cohort of Medicare beneficiaries in non-VHA hospitals. Retrospective cohort study of 1894 hip fracture repair patients in VHA or non-VHA hospitals between 2003 and 2005. Current Procedural Terminology codes identified 3542 male patients aged >65 years who had hip fracture repair between 2003 and 2005 in the Veterans Affairs' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. The Medicare comparison sample was drawn from 2003 to 2005 Medicare Part A inpatient hospital claims files. To create comparable VHA and Medicare cohorts, patients were propensity score matched on age, admission source (community vs. nursing home), repair type, comorbidity index, race, year, and region. Thirty-day and 1-year survival after surgery were compared between cohorts after further adjustment for selected comorbidities, year of surgery, and pre- and postsurgical length of hospital stay using logistic regression. Odds of survival were significantly better in the Medicare than the VHA cohort at 30 days (1.68, 95% CI 1.15-2.44) and 1 year (1.35, 95% CI 1.08-1.69). Medicare beneficiaries with hip fracture repair in non-VHA hospitals had better survival than veterans in VHA hospitals. Whether this is driven by unobserved patient characteristics or systematic care differences is unknown.

  6. Meeting today's requirements for large thermal vacuum test facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corinth, R. L.; Rouse, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    The Lockheed Thermal Vacuum Facility at Sunnyvale, California, completed in late 1986, one of the largest multi-program facilities constructed to date is described. The horizontal 12.2 m diameter by 24.4 m long chamber has removable heads at each end and houses a thermal shroud providing a test volume 10.4 m diameter by 24.4 m long. The chamber and thermal shroud are configured to permit the insertion of a 6.1 m wide by 24.4 m long vibration isolated optical bench. The pumpimg system incorporates an internal cryopumping array, turbomolecular pumps and cryopumps to handle multi-program needs and ranges of gas loads. The high vacuum system is capable of achieving clean, dry and empty pressures below 1.3 times 10 to the minus 6 power Pa (10 to the minus 8 power torr.)

  7. Repairing and Renovating Aging School Facilities. ERIC Digest Series Number EA28.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauke, Amy

    Recent influxes of baby boomers coupled with state reforms reducing student-teacher ratios are stretching the limits on available school facilities across the country. Several aspects of the school facilities issue are covered in question-and-answer format; (1) What is the current status of aging school buildings? (2) What are the financial…

  8. An Assessment of Testing Requirement Impacts on Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Ground Test Facility Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipers, Larry R.; Ottinger, Cathy A.; Sanchez, Lawrence C.

    1994-07-01

    Programs to develop solid core nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems have been under way at the Department of Defense (DoD), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the Department of Energy (DOE). These programs have recognized the need for a new ground test facility to support development of NTP systems. However, the different military and civilian applications have led to different ground test facility requirements. The Department of Energy (DOE) in its role as landlord and operator of the proposed research reactor test facilities has initiated an effort to explore opportunities for a common ground test facility to meet both DoD and NASA needs. The baseline design and operating limits of the proposed DoD NTP ground test facility are described. The NASA ground test facility requirements are reviewed and their potential impact on the DoD facility baseline is discussed.

  9. An assessment of testing requirement impacts on nuclear thermal propulsion ground test facility design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shipers, L.R.; Ottinger, C.A.; Sanchez, L.C.

    1993-10-25

    Programs to develop solid core nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems have been under way at the Department of Defense (DoD), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the Department of Energy (DOE). These programs have recognized the need for a new ground test facility to support development of NTP systems. However, the different military and civilian applications have led to different ground test facility requirements. The Department of Energy (DOE) in its role as landlord and operator of the proposed research reactor test facilities has initiated an effort to explore opportunities for a common ground test facility to meet both DoD and NASA needs. The baseline design and operating limits of the proposed DoD NTP ground test facility are described. The NASA ground test facility requirements are reviewed and their potential impact on the DoD facility baseline is discussed.

  10. A multistep genomic screen identifies new genes required for repair of DNA double-strand breaks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Jennifer Summers; Sethi, Sunaina; Tripp, Jennifer DeMars; Nguyen, Thuy N; Sanderson, Brian A; Westmoreland, James W; Resnick, Michael A; Lewis, L Kevin

    2013-04-15

    Efficient mechanisms for rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are vital because misrepair of such lesions leads to mutation, aneuploidy and loss of cell viability. DSB repair is mediated by proteins acting in two major pathways, called homologous recombination and nonhomologous end-joining. Repair efficiency is also modulated by other processes such as sister chromatid cohesion, nucleosome remodeling and DNA damage checkpoints. The total number of genes influencing DSB repair efficiency is unknown. To identify new yeast genes affecting DSB repair, genes linked to gamma radiation resistance in previous genome-wide surveys were tested for their impact on repair of site-specific DSBs generated by in vivo expression of EcoRI endonuclease. Eight members of the RAD52 group of DNA repair genes (RAD50, RAD51, RAD52, RAD54, RAD55, RAD57, MRE11 and XRS2) and 73 additional genes were found to be required for efficient repair of EcoRI-induced DSBs in screens utilizing both MATa and MATα deletion strain libraries. Most mutants were also sensitive to the clastogenic chemicals MMS and bleomycin. Several of the non-RAD52 group genes have previously been linked to DNA repair and over half of the genes affect nuclear processes. Many proteins encoded by the protective genes have previously been shown to associate physically with each other and with known DNA repair proteins in high-throughput proteomics studies. A majority of the proteins (64%) share sequence similarity with human proteins, suggesting that they serve similar functions. We have used a genetic screening approach to detect new genes required for efficient repair of DSBs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The findings have spotlighted new genes that are critical for maintenance of genome integrity and are therefore of greatest concern for their potential impact when the corresponding gene orthologs and homologs are inactivated or polymorphic in human cells.

  11. Development of High-Level Safety Requirements for a Pyroprocessing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Seok Jun; Jo, Woo Jin; You, Gil Sung; Choung, Won Myung; Lee, Ho Hee; Kim, Hyun Min; Jeon, Hong Rae; Ku, Jeong Hoe; Lee, Hyo Jik [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been developing a pyroproceesing technology to reduce the waste volume and recycle some elements. The pyroprocessing includes several treatment processes which are related with not only radiological and physical but also chemical and electrochemical properties. Thus, it is of importance to establish safety design requirements considering all the aspects of those properties for a reliable pyroprocessing facility. In this study, high-level requirements are presented in terms of not only radiation protection, nuclear criticality, fire protection, and seismic safety but also confinement and chemical safety for the unique characteristics of a pyroprocessing facility. Several high-level safety design requirements such as radiation protection, nuclear criticality, fire protection, seismic, confinement, and chemical processing were presented for a pyroprocessing facility. The requirements must fulfill domestic and international safety technology standards for a nuclear facility. Furthermore, additional requirements should be considered for the unique electrochemical treatments in a pyroprocessing facility.

  12. FACILITIES PLANNING WORKSHOP FOR BLASTING SUPPORT THE ACTIVITY OF DEVELOPMENT AND REPAIR SHIP IN PT. JASA MARINA INDAH UNIT II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Samuel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Blasting in the process of planning the workshop production of new building and ship repair to play a role in providing blasting and paint on the block that will be of erection. As a result of blasting workshop facilities that do not have resulted in low production capacity that can be achieved by this workshop, namely three block ships per month. Capacity blasting and paint shop in this low resulted in low productivity process stage (stage the previous workshops which of course result in a decrease in vessel productivity in general.                 In penelitiaan aims to plan for blasting and paint shop facility which has been adjusted to the planned production capacity of PT. JASA MARINA INDAH II units.                 In this study it - thing to note is to understand the data - the data field for research conducted in terms of both technical and economic terms, with the blasting and paint shop facilities on the construction or repair of ships that have been planned, then the effectiveness of the work and production flow at. Jasa Marina Indah II units can be known.                 Based on the analysis and calculation of both technical and economical it can be identified by the workshop on the process of blasting Blasting efficiency is obtained for 2.55 hours, at 10.16 hours during the painting process, while economical in terms of labor costs can be reduced blasting cost is Rp.930000    for          paint       and         Rp.1.23million

  13. Nuclear facilities: repair and replacement technologies; Installations nucleaires: technologies de reparation et de remplacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    The oldest operating reactors are more than 35 years old and are now facing major maintenance operations. The first replacement of a pressurizer took place in autumn 2005 at the St-Lucie plant (Usa) while steam generators have been currently replaced since 1983. Nuclear industry has to adapt to this new market by proposing innovative technological solutions in the reactor maintenance field. This document gathers the 9 papers presented at the conference. The main improvements concern repair works on internal components of PWR-type reactors, the replacement of major components of the primary coolant circuit and surface treatments to limit the propagation of damages. The first paper shows that adequate design and feedback experience are good assets to manage the ageing of a nuclear unit. Another paper shows that a new repair method of a relief valve can avoid its replacement. (A.C.)

  14. Estimating costs and manpower requirements for conventional wastewater treatment facilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patterson, W.L; Banker, R.F

    1971-01-01

    Data for estimating average construciton costs, operation and maintenance costs, and manpower staffing requirements, are presented for conventional wastewater treatment plants ranging from 1 to 100...

  15. 40 CFR 86.161-00 - Air conditioning environmental test facility ambient requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air conditioning environmental test... conditioning environmental test facility ambient requirements. The goal of an air conditioning test facility is..., within the test cell, during all phases of the air conditioning test sequence to 95 ±2 °F on average and...

  16. 30 CFR 75.1600-2 - Communication facilities; working sections; installation and maintenance requirements; audible or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Communication facilities; working sections; installation and maintenance requirements; audible or visual alarms. 75.1600-2 Section 75.1600-2 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Communications § 75.1600-2 Communication facilities;...

  17. DNA polymerase delta, RFC and PCNA are required for repair synthesis of large looped heteroduplexes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrette-Bennett, Stephanie E; Borgeson, Claudia; Sommer, Debbie; Burgers, Peter M J; Lahue, Robert S

    2004-01-01

    Small looped mispairs are corrected by DNA mismatch repair (MMR). In addition, a distinct process called large loop repair (LLR) corrects loops up to several hundred nucleotides in extracts of bacteria, yeast or human cells. Although LLR activity can be readily demonstrated, there has been little progress in identifying its protein components. This study identified some of the yeast proteins responsible for DNA repair synthesis during LLR. Polyclonal antisera to either Pol31 or Pol32 subunits of polymerase delta efficiently inhibited LLR in extracts by blocking repair just prior to gap filling. Gap filling was inhibited regardless of whether the loop was retained or removed. These experiments suggest polymerase delta is uniquely required in yeast extracts for LLR-associated synthesis. Similar results were obtained with antisera to the clamp loader proteins Rfc3 and Rfc4, and to PCNA, i.e. LLR was inhibited just prior to gap filling for both loop removal and loop retention. Thus PCNA and RFC seem to act in LLR only during repair synthesis, in contrast to their roles at both pre- and post-excision steps of MMR. These biochemical experiments support the idea that yeast polymerase delta, RFC and PCNA are required for large loop DNA repair synthesis.

  18. 78 FR 41694 - Final Priority and Requirements; Education Facilities Clearinghouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-11

    ... required under ESEA to ensure that their Title I schools, which tend to be those with the highest poverty... summarizing what research and statistics currently exist. However, with limited funds, we cannot support...'' as an action likely to result in a rule that may-- (1) Have an annual effect on the economy of $100...

  19. Ground Water Monitoring Requirements for Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    The groundwater monitoring requirements for hazardous waste treatment, storage and disposal facilities (TSDFs) are just one aspect of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste management strategy for protecting human health and the

  20. The Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 complex is required for yeast DNA postreplication repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Lindsay G; Hanna, Michelle D; Lambrecht, Amanda D; Mitchell, Bryan A; Ziola, Barry; Cobb, Jennifer A; Xiao, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Yeast DNA postreplication repair (PRR) bypasses replication-blocking lesions to prevent damage-induced cell death. PRR employs two different mechanisms to bypass damaged DNA, namely translesion synthesis (TLS) and error-free PRR, which are regulated via sequential ubiquitination of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). We previously demonstrated that error-free PRR utilizes homologous recombination to facilitate template switching. To our surprise, genes encoding the Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 (MRX) complex, which are also required for homologous recombination, are epistatic to TLS mutations. Further genetic analyses indicated that two other nucleases involved in double-strand end resection, Sae2 and Exo1, are also variably required for efficient lesion bypass. The involvement of the above genes in TLS and/or error-free PRR could be distinguished by the mutagenesis assay and their differential effects on PCNA ubiquitination. Consistent with the observation that the MRX complex is required for both branches of PRR, the MRX complex was found to physically interact with Rad18 in vivo. In light of the distinct and overlapping activities of the above nucleases in the resection of double-strand breaks, we propose that the interplay between distinct single-strand nucleases dictate the preference between TLS and error-free PRR for lesion bypass.

  1. Surgical repair of pectus excavatum not requiring exogenous implants in 113 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Hiroshi; Sunazawa, Toru; Ishida, Keiichi; Doi, Atsuo

    2010-02-01

    Pectus excavatum is relatively common congenital chest deformity that is often accompanied by physical and psychological impairment. The surgical methods for pectus excavatum repair are the subject of some controversy. We review our experience using a procedure in which the introduction of exogenous material is unnecessary. From July 1993 to March 2008, 113 patients underwent surgical repair of pectus excavatum. Sterno-costal elevation was adopted for 102 patients, including all of the paediatric patients and most of the adults. Sternal turnover was employed for 11 adult patients with severe asymmetric deformities. In sterno-costal elevation, a section of the third or fourth to the seventh costal cartilages as well as the lower tip of the sternum below the sixth cartilage junction are resected, and all of the cartilage stumps are re-sutured to the sternum. The secured ribs generate 0.5-10 kg of tension, pulling the sternum bilaterally, such that the resultant force causes the sternum to rise anteriorly. These forces are sufficient to correct the deformities and to prevent flail chest. In sternal turnover, the sternum is cut at the third intercostal space. The lower part of the sternum is turned over and fixed to the upper sternum with an overlap of 1cm. Sections of the third to the seventh rib cartilages are resected and affixed in the same fashion as in sterno-costal elevation. There were no operative deaths, and in all cases the deformities were corrected satisfactorily. Ninety-nine patients (88%) were graded as Excellent, and the remaining 14 (12%) were graded Good. None of the patients developed any life-threatening complications. No patient reported residual pain. No re-operations were required for any reasons. The patients resumed daily activities of all types, including contact sports, within 3 months after surgery. We believe that morbidity is one of the most important factors to be considered in operative invasions. Our technique represents a less

  2. Life Science Research Facility materials management requirements and concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Catherine C.

    1986-01-01

    The Advanced Programs Office at NASA Ames Research Center has defined hypothetical experiments for a 90-day mission on Space Station to allow analysis of the materials necessary to conduct the experiments and to assess the impact on waste processing of recyclable materials and storage requirements of samples to be returned to earth for analysis as well as of nonrecyclable materials. The materials include the specimens themselves, the food, water, and gases necessary to maintain them, the expendables necessary to conduct the experiments, and the metabolic products of the specimens. This study defines the volumes, flow rates, and states of these materials. Process concepts for materials handling will include a cage cleaner, trash compactor, biological stabilizer, and various recycling devices.

  3. Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) motivation and required capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Y. K. M.; Park, J. M.; Canik, J. M.; Diem, S. J.; Sontag, A. C.; Lumsdaine, A.; Murakami, M.; Katoh, Y.; Burgess, T. W.; Korsah, K.; Patton, B. D.; Wagner, J. C.; Yoder, G. L.; Cole, M. J.; Fogarty, P. J.; Sawan, M.

    2011-10-01

    A compact (R0 ~ 1.2-1.3m), low aspect ratio, low-Q (test, discover, and understand new nuclear-nonnuclear synergistic interactions involving plasma material interactions, neutron material interactions, tritium fuel breeding and transport, and power extraction, and innovate and develop solutions for DEMO components. Progress will be reported on the fusion nuclear-nonnuclear coupling effects identified that motivate research on such an FNSF, and on the required capabilities in fusion plasma, device operation, and fusion nuclear science and engineering to fulfill its mission. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. DOE under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  4. 41 CFR 102-74.70 - Are commercial vendors and nonprofit organizations required to operate vending facilities by...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and nonprofit organizations required to operate vending facilities by permit or contractual... Management Concession Services § 102-74.70 Are commercial vendors and nonprofit organizations required to operate vending facilities by permit or contractual arrangement? Commercial vendors and...

  5. Surgical tension pneumothorax during laparoscopic repair of massive hiatus hernia: a different situation requiring different management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Phillips, S; Falk, G L

    2011-01-01

    During laparoscopic repair of massive hiatus hernia, surgical dissection can breach the parietal pleura allowing insufflating carbon dioxide to rapidly expand the pleural space, causing a tension pneumothorax...

  6. Lead Coolant Test Facility Technical and Functional Requirements, Conceptual Design, Cost and Construction Schedule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soli T. Khericha

    2006-09-01

    This report presents preliminary technical and functional requirements (T&FR), thermal hydraulic design and cost estimate for a lead coolant test facility. The purpose of this small scale facility is to simulate lead coolant fast reactor (LFR) coolant flow in an open lattice geometry core using seven electrical rods and liquid lead or lead-bismuth eutectic. Based on review of current world lead or lead-bismuth test facilities and research need listed in the Generation IV Roadmap, five broad areas of requirements of basis are identified: Develop and Demonstrate Prototype Lead/Lead-Bismuth Liquid Metal Flow Loop Develop and Demonstrate Feasibility of Submerged Heat Exchanger Develop and Demonstrate Open-lattice Flow in Electrically Heated Core Develop and Demonstrate Chemistry Control Demonstrate Safe Operation and Provision for Future Testing. These five broad areas are divided into twenty-one (21) specific requirements ranging from coolant temperature to design lifetime. An overview of project engineering requirements, design requirements, QA and environmental requirements are also presented. The purpose of this T&FRs is to focus the lead fast reactor community domestically on the requirements for the next unique state of the art test facility. The facility thermal hydraulic design is based on the maximum simulated core power using seven electrical heater rods of 420 kW; average linear heat generation rate of 300 W/cm. The core inlet temperature for liquid lead or Pb/Bi eutectic is 420oC. The design includes approximately seventy-five data measurements such as pressure, temperature, and flow rates. The preliminary estimated cost of construction of the facility is $3.7M. It is also estimated that the facility will require two years to be constructed and ready for operation.

  7. Impact of occupational mechanical exposures on risk of lateral and medial inguinal hernia requiring surgical repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vad, Marie Vestergaard; Frost, Poul; Bay-Nielsen, Morten;

    2012-01-01

    We undertook a register-based cohort study to evaluate exposure-response relations between cumulative occupational mechanical exposures, and risk of lateral and medial inguinal hernia repair.......We undertook a register-based cohort study to evaluate exposure-response relations between cumulative occupational mechanical exposures, and risk of lateral and medial inguinal hernia repair....

  8. 33 CFR 154.812 - Facility requirements for vessel liquid overfill protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... shutdown signal from the cargo tank level sensor system that: (1) Closes the remotely operated cargo vapor... required by § 154.550 of this part when: (i) A tank overfill signal is received from the barge, or (ii... BULK Vapor Control Systems § 154.812 Facility requirements for vessel liquid overfill protection....

  9. 42 CFR 431.621 - State requirements with respect to nursing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS STATE ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL ADMINISTRATION Relations With Other Agencies § 431.621 State requirements with respect to nursing facilities. (a... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false State requirements with respect to...

  10. 78 FR 77606 - Security Requirements for Facilities Storing Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-24

    ... COMMISSION 10 CFR Parts 72 and 73 RIN 3150-AI78 Security Requirements for Facilities Storing Spent Nuclear... requirements for storing spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in an independent spent fuel storage installation (ISFSI), and for storing SNF and/or high-level radioactive waste (HLW) in a monitored retrievable storage...

  11. 42 CFR 424.14 - Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric facilities. 424.14 Section 424.14 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM CONDITIONS FOR MEDICARE PAYMENT Certification and Plan Requirements §...

  12. DNA Repair Cofactors ATMIN and NBS1 Are Required to Suppress T Cell Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Prochazkova

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Proper development of the immune system is an intricate process dependent on many factors, including an intact DNA damage response. The DNA double-strand break signaling kinase ATM and its cofactor NBS1 are required during T cell development and for the maintenance of genomic stability. The role of a second ATM cofactor, ATMIN (also known as ASCIZ in T cells is much less clear, and whether ATMIN and NBS1 function in synergy in T cells is unknown. Here, we investigate the roles of ATMIN and NBS1, either alone or in combination, using murine models. We show loss of NBS1 led to a developmental block at the double-positive stage of T cell development, as well as reduced TCRα recombination, that was unexpectedly neither exacerbated nor alleviated by concomitant loss of ATMIN. In contrast, loss of both ATMIN and NBS1 enhanced DNA damage that drove spontaneous peripheral T cell hyperactivation, proliferation as well as excessive production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, leading to a highly inflammatory environment. Intriguingly, the disease causing T cells were largely proficient for both ATMIN and NBS1. In vivo this resulted in severe intestinal inflammation, colitis and premature death. Our findings reveal a novel model for an intestinal bowel disease phenotype that occurs upon combined loss of the DNA repair cofactors ATMIN and NBS1.

  13. DNA Repair Cofactors ATMIN and NBS1 Are Required to Suppress T Cell Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochazkova, Jana; Sakaguchi, Shinya; Owusu, Michel; Mazouzi, Abdelghani; Wiedner, Marc; Velimezi, Georgia; Moder, Martin; Turchinovich, Gleb; Hladik, Anastasiya; Gurnhofer, Elisabeth; Hayday, Adrian; Behrens, Axel; Knapp, Sylvia; Kenner, Lukas; Ellmeier, Wilfried; Loizou, Joanna I

    2015-11-01

    Proper development of the immune system is an intricate process dependent on many factors, including an intact DNA damage response. The DNA double-strand break signaling kinase ATM and its cofactor NBS1 are required during T cell development and for the maintenance of genomic stability. The role of a second ATM cofactor, ATMIN (also known as ASCIZ) in T cells is much less clear, and whether ATMIN and NBS1 function in synergy in T cells is unknown. Here, we investigate the roles of ATMIN and NBS1, either alone or in combination, using murine models. We show loss of NBS1 led to a developmental block at the double-positive stage of T cell development, as well as reduced TCRα recombination, that was unexpectedly neither exacerbated nor alleviated by concomitant loss of ATMIN. In contrast, loss of both ATMIN and NBS1 enhanced DNA damage that drove spontaneous peripheral T cell hyperactivation, proliferation as well as excessive production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, leading to a highly inflammatory environment. Intriguingly, the disease causing T cells were largely proficient for both ATMIN and NBS1. In vivo this resulted in severe intestinal inflammation, colitis and premature death. Our findings reveal a novel model for an intestinal bowel disease phenotype that occurs upon combined loss of the DNA repair cofactors ATMIN and NBS1.

  14. REPAIR TECHNOLOGY IMPROVEMENT OF SPECIALIZED FREIGHT CARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Bubnov

    2016-02-01

    cars is obsolete and requires improvement. Considered organization of the repair process is of practical value and can be used both in-time development of new repair facilities and the modernization of existing ones.

  15. Ubiquitin-specific protease 5 is required for the efficient repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Nakajima

    Full Text Available During the DNA damage response (DDR, ubiquitination plays an important role in the recruitment and regulation of repair proteins. However, little is known about elimination of the ubiquitination signal after repair is completed. Here we show that the ubiquitin-specific protease 5 (USP5, a deubiquitinating enzyme, is involved in the elimination of the ubiquitin signal from damaged sites and is required for efficient DNA double-strand break (DSB repair. Depletion of USP5 sensitizes cells to DNA damaging agents, produces DSBs, causes delayed disappearance of γH2AX foci after Bleocin treatment, and influences DSB repair efficiency in the homologous recombination pathway but not in the non-homologous end joining pathway. USP5 co-localizes to DSBs induced by laser micro-irradiation in a RAD18-dependent manner. Importantly, polyubiquitin chains at sites of DNA damage remained for longer periods in USP5-depleted cells. Our results show that disassembly of polyubiquitin chains by USP5 at sites of damage is important for efficient DSB repair.

  16. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Engineering Test Facility (ETF) 200 MWe power plant. Design Requirements Document (DRD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigo, H. S.; Bercaw, R. W.; Burkhart, J. A.; Mroz, T. S.; Bents, D. J.; Hatch, A. M.

    1981-01-01

    A description and the design requirements for the 200 MWe (nominal) net output MHD Engineering Test Facility (ETF) Conceptual Design, are presented. Performance requirements for the plant are identified and process conditions are indicated at interface stations between the major systems comprising the plant. Also included are the description, functions, interfaces and requirements for each of these major systems. The lastest information (1980-1981) from the MHD technology program are integrated with elements of a conventional steam electric power generating plant.

  17. Waste encapsulation storage facility (WESF) standards/requirements identification document (S/RIDS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maddox, B.S., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-29

    This Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) sets forth the Environmental Safety and Health (ES{ampersand}H) standards/requirements for the Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility (WESF). This S/RID is applicable to the appropriate life cycle phases of design, construction, operation, and preparation for decommissioning. These standards/requirements are adequate to ensure the protection of the health and safety of workers, the public, and the environment.

  18. 33 CFR 150.502 - What are the maintenance and repair requirements for lifesaving equipment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... periodic maintenance; (4) A diagram of lubrication points with the recommended lubricants; (5) A list of... deepwater port may have its own onboard planned maintenance program for maintenance and repair that...

  19. Mammalian BTBD12/SLX4 assembles a Holliday junction resolvase and is required for DNA repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Jennifer M.; Smogorzewska, Agata; Sowa, Mathew E.; O’Connell, Brenda C.; Gygi, Steven P.; Elledge, Stephen J.; Harper, J. Wade

    2009-01-01

    Summary Structure-specific endonucleases mediate repair of DNA structures formed from replication fork collapse or during double-strand break (DSB) repair. Here we identify BTBD12 as the human ortholog of the budding yeast DNA repair factor Slx4p and D. melanogaster MUS312. Human SLX4 forms a multiprotein complex with the ERCC4(XPF)-ERCC1, MUS81-EME1, and SLX1 endonucleases, and also associates with MSH2/MSH3 mismatch repair complex, telomere binding complex TERF2(TRF2)-TERF2IP(RAP1), the protein kinase PLK1 and the uncharacterized protein C20orf94. Depletion of SLX4 causes sensitivity to mitomycin C and camptothecin, and reduces the efficiency of DSB repair in vivo. SLX4 complexes cleave 3’-flap, 5’-flap and replication fork structures; yet unlike other endonucleases associated with SLX4, the SLX1-SLX4 module promotes symmetrical cleavage of static and migrating Holliday junctions (HJs), identifying SLX1-SLX4 as a HJ resolvase. Thus, SLX4 assembles a modular tool-kit for repair of specific types of DNA lesions and is critical for cellular responses to replication fork failure. PMID:19596235

  20. Requirements Doc for Refurb of JASPER Facility in B131HB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knittel, Kenn M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-01-25

    The Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research (JASPER) Program target fabrication facility is currently located in building 131 (B131) of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). A portion of this current facility has been committed to another program as part of a larger effort to consolidate LLNL capabilities into newer facilities. This facility assembles precision targets for scientific studies at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). B131 is also going through a modernization project to upgrade the infrastructure and abate asbestos. These activities will interrupt the continuous target fabrication efforts for the JASPER Program. Several options are explored to meet the above conflicting requirements, with the final recommendation to prepare a new facility for JASPER target fabrication operations before modernization efforts begin in the current facility assigned to JASPER. This recommendation fits within all schedule constraints and minimizes the disruption to the JASPER Program. This option is not without risk, as it requires moving an aged, precision coordinate measuring machine, which is essential to the JASPER Program’s success. The selected option balances the risk to the machine with continuity of operations.

  1. Layaway Procedures for U.S. Army Facilities. Volume 2. Inspection and Maintenance and Repair Checklists

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-01

    and Space Administration (NASA), hnd others, Finally, studins performed by other Govrmment laboratorios were reviewed, A checklist of procedures was...material. I ID I X I I XI I ---------------------------- IFPM1 - Cover affected area ID I I X I XI X I X I with new stripping materiall I I I II I I I I...I x I IHypalon, stripping materiall I I I is not covering and tucked I I I I I I linto pitch pan. I I I I I I IM&R activities as required:I I I I I I

  2. CtIP is required to initiate replication-dependent interstrand crosslink repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle L Duquette

    Full Text Available DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs are toxic lesions that block the progression of replication and transcription. CtIP is a conserved DNA repair protein that facilitates DNA end resection in the double-strand break (DSB repair pathway. Here we show that CtIP plays a critical role during initiation of ICL processing in replicating human cells that is distinct from its role in DSB repair. CtIP depletion sensitizes human cells to ICL inducing agents and significantly impairs the accumulation of DNA damage response proteins RPA, ATR, FANCD2, γH2AX, and phosphorylated ATM at sites of laser generated ICLs. In contrast, the appearance of γH2AX and phosphorylated ATM at sites of laser generated double strand breaks (DSBs is CtIP-independent. We present a model in which CtIP functions early in ICL repair in a BRCA1- and FANCM-dependent manner prior to generation of DSB repair intermediates.

  3. 40 CFR 141.714 - Requirements for uncovered finished water storage facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements for uncovered finished water storage facilities. 141.714 Section 141.714 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS...

  4. 78 FR 47154 - Core Principles and Other Requirements for Swap Execution Facilities; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-05

    ... COMMISSION 17 CFR Part 37 RIN 3038-AD18 Core Principles and Other Requirements for Swap Execution Facilities... Acceptable Practices in, Compliance With Core Principles 2. On page 33600, in the second column, under the heading Core Principle 3 of Section 5h of the Act--Swaps Not Readily Susceptible to Manipulation,...

  5. 42 CFR 424.27 - Requirements for comprehensive outpatient rehabilitation facility (CORF) services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... for respiratory therapy services and every 90 days for physical therapy, occupational therapy, and... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for comprehensive outpatient rehabilitation facility (CORF) services. 424.27 Section 424.27 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID...

  6. A METHODOLOGY FOR DETERMINING FUTURE PHYSICAL FACILITIES REQUIREMENTS FOR INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    YURKOVICH, JOHN V.

    A COMPUTERIZED METHODOLOGY FOR DETERMINING THE PHYSICAL FACILITIES REQUIREMENTS OF A LARGE UNIVERSITY WAS DEVELOPED. THE RESEARCH INCLUDED THE DEVELOPMENT, IMPLEMENTATION, AND TESTING OF SYSTEMS FOR (1) CLASSIFYING SPACE, (2) MAINTAINING A PERPETUAL SPACE INVENTORY, (3) CONDUCTING ROOM UTILIZATION STUDIES, (4) PROJECTING STUDENTS BY A SET OF…

  7. Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 1 Data Management System software requirements specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosnick, C.K.

    1996-04-19

    This document provides the software requirements for Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 1 Data Management System (DMS). The DMS is one of the plant computer systems for the new WRAP 1 facility (Project W-0126). The DMS will collect, store and report data required to certify the low level waste (LLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste items processed at WRAP 1 as acceptable for shipment, storage, or disposal.

  8. Disposal facilities on land for low and intermediate level radioactive wastes: guidance on requirements for qauthorisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    This document, published by the Environmental Agency, contains guidance on the principles and requirements against which applications for authorisation to build or operate a land-based specialised disposal facility for solid low or intermediate level wastes, will be assessed, with the aim of protecting the public from hazards which may arise from their disposal to the environment. The guide provides information on terms used, the framework governing radioactive waste disposal and the Agencies` expectations of applicants, including radiological and technical requirements. (UK).

  9. Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 1 Data Management System Software Requirements Specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brann, E.C. II

    1994-09-09

    This document provides the software requirements for Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 1 Data Management System (DMS). The DMS is one of the plant computer systems for the new WRAP 1 facility (Project W-026). The DMS will collect, store and report data required to certify the low level waste (LLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste items processed at WRAP 1 as acceptable for shipment, storage, or disposal.

  10. The intracellular Ca²⁺ channel MCOLN1 is required for sarcolemma repair to prevent muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiping; Zhang, Xiaoli; Gao, Qiong; Ali Samie, Mohammad; Azar, Marlene; Tsang, Wai Lok; Dong, Libing; Sahoo, Nirakar; Li, Xinran; Zhuo, Yue; Garrity, Abigail G; Wang, Xiang; Ferrer, Marc; Dowling, James; Xu, Li; Han, Renzhi; Xu, Haoxing

    2014-10-01

    The integrity of the plasma membrane is maintained through an active repair process, especially in skeletal and cardiac muscle cells, in which contraction-induced mechanical damage frequently occurs in vivo. Muscular dystrophies (MDs) are a group of muscle diseases characterized by skeletal muscle wasting and weakness. An important cause of these group of diseases is defective repair of sarcolemmal injuries, which normally requires Ca(2+) sensor proteins and Ca(2+)-dependent delivery of intracellular vesicles to the sites of injury. MCOLN1 (also known as TRPML1, ML1) is an endosomal and lysosomal Ca(2+) channel whose human mutations cause mucolipidosis IV (ML4), a neurodegenerative disease with motor disabilities. Here we report that ML1-null mice develop a primary, early-onset MD independent of neural degeneration. Although the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex and the known membrane repair proteins are expressed normally, membrane resealing was defective in ML1-null muscle fibers and also upon acute and pharmacological inhibition of ML1 channel activity or vesicular Ca(2+) release. Injury facilitated the trafficking and exocytosis of vesicles by upmodulating ML1 channel activity. In the dystrophic mdx mouse model, overexpression of ML1 decreased muscle pathology. Collectively, our data have identified an intracellular Ca(2+) channel that regulates membrane repair in skeletal muscle via Ca(2+)-dependent vesicle exocytosis.

  11. Bus Yards and Repair Facilities, Local Buildings - Bus shop is included in local buildings layer, Published in 2008, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Effingham County Board Of Commissioners.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Bus Yards and Repair Facilities dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of 2008. It is...

  12. Mobile/Modular BSL-4 Facilities for Meeting Restricted Earth Return Containment Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calaway, M. J.; McCubbin, F. M.; Allton, J. H.; Zeigler, R. A.; Pace, L. F.

    2017-01-01

    NASA robotic sample return missions designated Category V Restricted Earth Return by the NASA Planetary Protection Office require sample containment and biohazard testing in a receiving laboratory as directed by NASA Procedural Requirement (NPR) 8020.12D - ensuring the preservation and protection of Earth and the sample. Currently, NPR 8020.12D classifies Restricted Earth Return for robotic sample return missions from Mars, Europa, and Enceladus with the caveat that future proposed mission locations could be added or restrictions lifted on a case by case basis as scientific knowledge and understanding of biohazards progresses. Since the 1960s, sample containment from an unknown extraterrestrial biohazard have been related to the highest containment standards and protocols known to modern science. Today, Biosafety Level (BSL) 4 standards and protocols are used to study the most dangerous high-risk diseases and unknown biological agents on Earth. Over 30 BSL-4 facilities have been constructed worldwide with 12 residing in the United States; of theses, 8 are operational. In the last two decades, these brick and mortar facilities have cost in the hundreds of millions of dollars dependent on the facility requirements and size. Previous mission concept studies for constructing a NASA sample receiving facility with an integrated BSL-4 quarantine and biohazard testing facility have also been estimated in the hundreds of millions of dollars. As an alternative option, we have recently conducted an initial trade study for constructing a mobile and/or modular sample containment laboratory that would meet all BSL-4 and planetary protection standards and protocols at a faction of the cost. Mobile and modular BSL-2 and 3 facilities have been successfully constructed and deployed world-wide for government testing of pathogens and pharmaceutical production. Our study showed that a modular BSL-4 construction could result in approximately 90% cost reduction when compared to

  13. 33 CFR 127.405 - Repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas Maintenance § 127.405 Repairs. The operator shall ensure that—...

  14. Guidelines on the facilities required for minor surgical procedures and minimal access interventions.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Humphreys, H

    2012-02-01

    There have been many changes in healthcare provision in recent years, including the delivery of some surgical services in primary care or in day surgery centres, which were previously provided by acute hospitals. Developments in the fields of interventional radiology and cardiology have further expanded the range and complexity of procedures undertaken in these settings. In the face of these changes there is a need to define from an infection prevention and control perspective the basic physical requirements for facilities in which such surgical procedures may be carried out. Under the auspices of the Healthcare Infection Society, we have developed the following recommendations for those designing new facilities or upgrading existing facilities. These draw upon best practice, available evidence, other guidelines where appropriate, and expert consensus to provide sensible and feasible advice. An attempt is also made to define minimal access interventions and minor surgical procedures. For minimal access interventions, including interventional radiology, new facilities should be mechanically ventilated to achieve 15 air changes per hour but natural ventilation is satisfactory for minor procedures. All procedures should involve a checklist and operators should be appropriately trained. There is also a need for prospective surveillance to accurately determine the post-procedure infection rate. Finally, there is a requirement for appropriate applied research to develop the evidence base required to support subsequent iterations of this guidance.

  15. The Relationship of Academic Courses to Skills Required of Automobile Repair Technicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Stephen H.

    2013-01-01

    The primary objective was to show the important need of academic skills, specifically general education coursework, to the effectiveness of the technician's expertise in the field of automobile repair. Additionally, I emphasized that one of the keys to the quality of the technician's education is the method of instruction analyzed through…

  16. The Relationship of Academic Courses to Skills Required of Automobile Repair Technicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Stephen H.

    2013-01-01

    The primary objective was to show the important need of academic skills, specifically general education coursework, to the effectiveness of the technician's expertise in the field of automobile repair. Additionally, I emphasized that one of the keys to the quality of the technician's education is the method of instruction analyzed…

  17. Fanconi DNA repair pathway is required for survival and long-term maintenance of neural progenitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sii-Felice, Karine; Etienne, Olivier; Hoffschir, Francoise; Mathieu, Celine; Riou, Lydia; Barroca, Vilma; Haton, Celine; Arwert, Fre; Fouchet, Pierre; Boussin, Francois D.; Mouthon, Marc-Andre

    2008-01-01

    Although brain development abnormalities and brain cancer predisposition have been reported in some Fanconi patients, the possible role of Fanconi DNA repair pathway during neurogenesis is unclear. We thus addressed the role of fanca and fancg, which are involved in the activation of Fanconi pathway

  18. Basic requirements for a preliminary conceptual design of the Korea advanced pyroprocess facility (KAPF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Hee; Ko, Won Il; Chang, Hong Lae; Song, Dae Yong; Kwon, Eun Ha; Lee, Jung Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been developing technologies for pyroprocessing for spent PWR fuels. This study is part of a long term R and D program in Korea to develop an advanced recycle system that has the potential to meet and exceed the proliferation resistance, waste minimization, resource minimization, safety and economic goals of approved Korean Government energy policy, as well as the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) program. To support this R and D program, KAERI requires that an independent estimate be made of the conceptual design and cost for construction and operation of a 'Korea Advanced Pyroprocessing Facility', This document describes the basic requirements for preliminary conceptual design of the Korea Advanced Pyroprocess Facility (KAPF). The presented requirements will be modified to be more effective and feasible on an engineering basis during the subsequent design process.

  19. Design characteristics and requirements of irradiation holes for research reactor experimental facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Cheol; Lee, B. C.; Chae, H. T.; Lee, C. S.; Seo, C. G

    2003-07-01

    In order to be helpful for the design of a new research reactor with high performance, are summarized the applications of research reactors in various fields and the design characteristics of experimental facility such as vertical irradiation holes and beam tubes. Basic requirements of such experimental facilities are also described. Research reactor has been widely utilized in various fields such as industry, engineering, medicine, life science, environment etc., and now the application fields are gradually being expanded together with the development of technology. Looking into the research reactors which are recently constructed or in plan, it seems that to develop a multi-purpose research reactor with intensive neutron beam research capability has become tendency. In the layout of the experimental facilities, the number and configuration of irradiation and beam holes should be optimized to meet required test conditions such as neutron flux at the early design stage. But, basically high neutron flux is required to perform experiments efficiently. In this aspect, neutron flux is regarded as one of important parameters to judge the degree of research reactor performance. One of main information for a new research reactor design is utilization demands and requirements of experimental holes. So basic requirements which should be considered in a new research reactor design were summarized from the survey of experimental facilities characteristics of various research reactors with around 20 MW thermal power and the experiences of HANARO utilization. Also is suggested an example of the requirements of experimental holes such as size, number and neutron flux, which are thought as minimum, in a new research reactor for exporting to developing countries such as Vietnam.

  20. 18 CFR 292.208 - Special requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or diversion. 292.208 Section... requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or diversion. (a) A... means of a new dam or diversion (as that term is defined in § 292.202(p)) is a qualifying facility...

  1. 33 CFR 154.1240 - Specific requirements for animal fats and vegetable oils facilities that could reasonably be...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... fats and vegetable oils facilities that could reasonably be expected to cause substantial harm to the... SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION FACILITIES TRANSFERRING OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN BULK Response Plans for Animal Fats and Vegetable Oils Facilities § 154.1240 Specific requirements for animal fats and...

  2. Future aerospace ground test facility requirements for the Arnold Engineering Development Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, Mark E.; Baron, Judson R.; Bogdonoff, Seymour M.; Carter, Donald I.; Couch, Lana M.; Fanning, Arthur E.; Heiser, William H.; Koff, Bernard L.; Melnik, Robert E.; Mercer, Stephen C.

    1992-01-01

    Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) was conceived at the close of World War II, when major new developments in flight technology were presaged by new aerodynamic and propulsion concepts. During the past 40 years, AEDC has played a significant part in the development of many aerospace systems. The original plans were extended through the years by some additional facilities, particularly in the area of propulsion testing. AEDC now has undertaken development of a master plan in an attempt to project requirements and to plan for ground test and computational facilities over the coming 20 to 30 years. This report was prepared in response to an AEDC request that the National Research Council (NRC) assemble a committee to prepare guidance for planning and modernizing AEDC facilities for the development and testing of future classes of aerospace systems as envisaged by the U.S. Air Force.

  3. Future aerospace ground test facility requirements for the Arnold Engineering Development Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, Mark E.; Baron, Judson R.; Bogdonoff, Seymour M.; Carter, Donald I.; Couch, Lana M.; Fanning, Arthur E.; Heiser, William H.; Koff, Bernard L.; Melnik, Robert E.; Mercer, Stephen C.

    1992-01-01

    Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) was conceived at the close of World War II, when major new developments in flight technology were presaged by new aerodynamic and propulsion concepts. During the past 40 years, AEDC has played a significant part in the development of many aerospace systems. The original plans were extended through the years by some additional facilities, particularly in the area of propulsion testing. AEDC now has undertaken development of a master plan in an attempt to project requirements and to plan for ground test and computational facilities over the coming 20 to 30 years. This report was prepared in response to an AEDC request that the National Research Council (NRC) assemble a committee to prepare guidance for planning and modernizing AEDC facilities for the development and testing of future classes of aerospace systems as envisaged by the U.S. Air Force.

  4. RAD1 and RAD10, but not other excision repair genes, are required for double-strand break-induced recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, E L; Haber, J E

    1995-04-01

    HO endonuclease-induced double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be repaired by the process of gap repair or, alternatively, by single-strand annealing if the site of the break is flanked by directly repeated homologous sequences. We have shown previously (J. Fishman-Lobell and J. E. Haber, Science 258:480-484, 1992) that during the repair of an HO-induced DSB, the excision repair gene RAD1 is needed to remove regions of nonhomology from the DSB ends. In this report, we present evidence that among nine genes involved in nucleotide excision repair, only RAD1 and RAD10 are required for removal of nonhomologous sequences from the DSB ends. rad1 delta and rad10 delta mutants displayed a 20-fold reduction in the ability to execute both gap repair and single-strand annealing pathways of HO-induced recombination. Mutations in RAD2, RAD3, and RAD14 reduced HO-induced recombination by about twofold. We also show that RAD7 and RAD16, which are required to remove UV photodamage from the silent HML, locus, are not required for MAT switching with HML or HMR as a donor. Our results provide a molecular basis for understanding the role of yeast nucleotide excision repair gene and their human homologs in DSB-induced recombination and repair.

  5. Safeguards Guidance for Designers of Commercial Nuclear Facilities – International Safeguards Requirements for Uranium Enrichment Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip Casey Durst; Scott DeMuth; Brent McGinnis; Michael Whitaker; James Morgan

    2010-04-01

    For the past two years, the United States National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of International Regimes and Agreements (NA-243), has sponsored the Safeguards-by-Design Project, through which it is hoped new nuclear facilities will be designed and constructed worldwide more amenable to nuclear safeguards. In the course of this project it was recognized that commercial designer/builders of nuclear facilities are not always aware of, or understand, the relevant domestic and international safeguards requirements, especially the latter as implemented by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). To help commercial designer/builders better understand these requirements, a report was prepared by the Safeguards-by-Design Project Team that articulated and interpreted the international nuclear safeguards requirements for the initial case of uranium enrichment plants. The following paper summarizes the subject report, the specific requirements, where they originate, and the implications for design and construction. It also briefly summarizes the established best design and operating practices that designer/builder/operators have implemented for currently meeting these requirements. In preparing the subject report, it is recognized that the best practices are continually evolving as the designer/builder/operators and IAEA consider even more effective and efficient means for meeting the safeguards requirements and objectives.

  6. Supplemental design requirements document, Multifunction Waste Tank Facility, Project W-236A. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groth, B.D.

    1995-01-11

    The Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) consists of four, nominal 1 million gallon, underground double-shell tanks, located in the 200-East area, and two tanks of the same capacity in the 200-West area. MWTF will provide environmentally safe storage capacity for wastes generated during remediation/retrieval activities of existing waste storage tanks. This document delineates in detail the information to be used for effective implementation of the Functional Design Criteria requirements.

  7. Final Environmental Assessment Airfield Storm Drainage System Repair Joint Base Andrews-Naval Air Facility Washington, MD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    eastern cottontail (Sylvilagus floridanus). Reptiles occasionally found on the airfield include the eastern garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis...and Noise Control. Acoustical Society of America . Sewickley, PA. HDR (HDR Engineering, Inc.). 2014. Design Analysis. Design for Repair/Replacement of

  8. 18 CFR 1304.206 - Requirements for community docks, piers, boathouses, or other water-use facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Requirements for community docks, piers, boathouses, or other water-use facilities. 1304.206 Section 1304.206 Conservation of....206 Requirements for community docks, piers, boathouses, or other water-use facilities. (a)...

  9. 7 CFR 56.76 - Minimum facility and operating requirements for shell egg grading and packing plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... egg grading and packing plants. 56.76 Section 56.76 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... Facility Requirements § 56.76 Minimum facility and operating requirements for shell egg grading and packing.... (2) The outside premises adjacent to grading, packing, cooler, and storage rooms must be...

  10. Clinical and Demographic Profile of Cases Requiring Ear Lobe Repair in North Gujarat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajeet K. Khilani

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Wearing various types of earrings is not only an age old custom but a fashion symbol also. This demographic and clinical profile study was done on ear lobe cleft cases attending ENT OPD of a tertiary care center of North Gujarat. Methodology: The size, number of ears involved, factors leading to ear lobe cleft such as weight of earring, duration of wearing heavy rings, pull leading to tear were noted in all cases. Surgical repair was done by scar excision and suturing. The procedure was completed in 15-20 minutes and minimal post surgical complications in the form of depressed linear scar and lower border notching are seen in 2 cases. Results: Prevalence of ear lobe cleft was 2.4% of all OPD cases. 192 cases (328 ears included 187 (97.3% females and 5 males. Both ears were involved in 136 (70.8% cases while 56 cases had unilateral involvement. A partial cleft of 6 to 10 mm size (range from 3-25 mm was most common reason in females to visit for repair and total cleft was observed in 122 (37.1% ears. 42% females (age 15-45 years had bilateral clefts whereas unilateral involvement was common at young age (1-15 years. Factors leading to cleft formation were earrings weight and prolonged use (44.4% tears were due to weight 15 grams or more. Conclusion: Ear lobe cleft can be repaired by simple surgical approximation. Prevention of recurrence can be done by simple advice of avoiding the scar site for re-piercing and use of light weight earrings. [Natl J Med Res 2013; 3(2.000: 140-142

  11. Requirements and impacts of the Federal Facility Compliance Act on the Department of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, L.; Tripp, S.C. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management

    1993-03-01

    The Federal Facilities Compliance Act (FFCA, the Act) was signed into law on October 6, 1992, primarily as a means of waiving sovereign immunity for federal facilities with respect to requirements under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. DOE`s implementation of the FFCA will have significant effects on current and future DOE waste management operations. DOE will need to rethink its strategy in the area of future compliance agreements to ensure commitments and deliverables are made consistent throughout the different DOE facilities. Several types of agreements that address mixed waste land disposal restriction (LDR) compliance have already been signed by both DOE and the regulators. These agreements are in place at the Hanford Reservation, the Savannah River Site, the Oak Ridge Reservation (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, K-25, Y-12), and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The Rocky Flats Agreement is now being renegotiated. Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia/Albuquerque National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory agreements are in progress. Major components of the FFCA include provisions on: sovereign immunity waiver; cost reimbursements; mixed waste requirements, including inventory reports on mixed waste and treatment capacity and technologies; and plans for the development of treatment capacities and technologies. Each of these components is discussed within this paper.

  12. Mating-type suppression of the DNA-repair defect of the yeast rad6 delta mutation requires the activity of genes in the RAD52 epistasis group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Y X; Schiestl, R H; Prakash, L

    1995-06-01

    The RAD6 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for post-replication repair of UV-damaged DNA, UV mutagenesis, and sporulation. Here, we show that the radiation sensitivity of a MATa rad6 delta strain can be suppressed by the MAT alpha 2 gene carried on a multicopy plasmid. The a1-alpha 2 suppression is specific to the RAD6 pathway, as mutations in genes required for nucleotide excision repair or for recombinational repair do not show such mating-type suppression. The a1-alpha 2 suppression of the rad6 delta mutation requires the activity of the RAD52 group of genes, suggesting that suppression occurs by channelling of post-replication gaps present in the rad6 delta mutant into the RAD52 recombinational repair pathway. The a1-alpha 2 repressor could mediate this suppression via an enhancement in the expression, or the activity, of recombination genes.

  13. Transforming growth factor Beta 3 is required for excisional wound repair in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Le

    Full Text Available Wound healing is a complex process that relies on proper levels of cytokines and growth factors to successfully repair the tissue. Of particular interest are the members of the transforming growth factor family. There are three TGF-ß isoforms-TGF- ß 1, 2, and 3, each isoform showing a unique expression pattern, suggesting that they each play a distinct function during development and repair. Previous studies reported an exclusive role for TGF-ß 3 in orofacial development and a potent anti-scarring effect. However, the role of TGF- ß 3 in excisional wound healing and keratinocyte migration remains poorly understood. We tested the effect of TGF-ß 3 levels on excisional cutaneous wounds in the adult mouse by directly injecting recombinant TGF-ß 3 or neutralizing antibody against TGF-ß 3 (NAB in the wounds. Our results demonstrate that TGF-ß 3 does not promote epithelialization. However, TGF-ß 3 is necessary for wound closure as wounds injected with neutralizing antibody against TGF-ß 3 showed increased epidermal volume and proliferation in conjunction with a delay in keratinocyte migration. Wild type keratinocytes treated with NAB and Tgfb3-deficient keratinocytes closed an in vitro scratch wound with no delay, suggesting that our in vivo observations likely result from a paracrine effect.

  14. Chromosomal Integrity after UV Irradiation Requires FANCD2-Mediated Repair of Double Strand Breaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federico, María Belén; Vallerga, María Belén; Radl, Analía; Paviolo, Natalia Soledad; Bocco, José Luis; Di Giorgio, Marina; Soria, Gastón; Gottifredi, Vanesa

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hypersensitivity to inter-strand crosslinks (ICLs). FANCD2, a central factor of the FA pathway, is essential for the repair of double strand breaks (DSBs) generated during fork collapse at ICLs. While lesions different from ICLs can also trigger fork collapse, the contribution of FANCD2 to the resolution of replication-coupled DSBs generated independently from ICLs is unknown. Intriguingly, FANCD2 is readily activated after UV irradiation, a DNA-damaging agent that generates predominantly intra-strand crosslinks but not ICLs. Hence, UV irradiation is an ideal tool to explore the contribution of FANCD2 to the DNA damage response triggered by DNA lesions other than ICL repair. Here we show that, in contrast to ICL-causing agents, UV radiation compromises cell survival independently from FANCD2. In agreement, FANCD2 depletion does not increase the amount of DSBs generated during the replication of UV-damaged DNA and is dispensable for UV-induced checkpoint activation. Remarkably however, FANCD2 protects UV-dependent, replication-coupled DSBs from aberrant processing by non-homologous end joining, preventing the accumulation of micronuclei and chromatid aberrations including non-homologous chromatid exchanges. Hence, while dispensable for cell survival, FANCD2 selectively safeguards chromosomal stability after UV-triggered replication stress. PMID:26765540

  15. TRF2 is required for repair of nontelomeric DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhiyong; Seluanov, Andrei; Jiang, Ying; Gorbunova, Vera

    2007-01-01

    TRF2 (telomeric repeat binding factor 2) is an essential component of the telomeric cap, where it forms and stabilizes the T-loop junctions. TRF2 forms the T-loops by stimulating strand invasion of the 3′ overhang into duplex DNA. TRF2 also has been shown to localize to nontelomeric DNA double-strand breaks, but its functional role in DNA repair has not been examined. Here, we present evidence that TRF2 is involved in homologous recombination (HR) repair of nontelomeric double-strand breaks. Depletion of TRF2 strongly inhibited HR and delayed the formation of Rad51 foci after γ-irradiation, whereas overexpression of TRF2 stimulated HR. Depletion of TRF2 had no effect on nonhomologous end-joining, and overexpression of TRF2 inhibited nonhomologous end-joining. We propose, based on our results and on the ability of TRF2 to mediate strand invasion, that TRF2 plays an essential role in HR by facilitating the formation of early recombination intermediates. PMID:17670947

  16. Safety requirements, facility user needs, and reactor concepts for a new Broad Application Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryskamp, J.M. [ed.; Liebenthal, J.L.; Denison, A.B.; Fletcher, C.D.

    1992-07-01

    This report describes the EG&G Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD) Broad Application Test Reactor (BATR) Project that was conducted in fiscal year 1991. The scope of this project was divided into three phases: a project process definition phase, a requirements development phase, and a preconceptual reactor design and evaluation phase. Multidisciplinary teams of experts conducted each phase. This report presents the need for a new test reactor, the project process definition, a set of current and projected regulatory compliance and safety requirements, a set of facility user needs for a broad range of projected testing missions, and descriptions of reactor concepts capable of meeting these requirements. This information can be applied to strategic planning to provide the Department of Energy with management options.

  17. Safety requirements, facility user needs, and reactor concepts for a new Broad Application Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryskamp, J.M. (ed.); Liebenthal, J.L.; Denison, A.B.; Fletcher, C.D.

    1992-07-01

    This report describes the EG G Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD) Broad Application Test Reactor (BATR) Project that was conducted in fiscal year 1991. The scope of this project was divided into three phases: a project process definition phase, a requirements development phase, and a preconceptual reactor design and evaluation phase. Multidisciplinary teams of experts conducted each phase. This report presents the need for a new test reactor, the project process definition, a set of current and projected regulatory compliance and safety requirements, a set of facility user needs for a broad range of projected testing missions, and descriptions of reactor concepts capable of meeting these requirements. This information can be applied to strategic planning to provide the Department of Energy with management options.

  18. A facile, solvent vapor-fumigation-induced, self-repair recrystallization of CH3NH3PbI3 films for high-performance perovskite solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weidong; Yu, Tao; Li, Faming; Bao, Chunxiong; Gao, Hao; Yi, Yong; Yang, Jie; Fu, Gao; Zhou, Xiaoxin; Zou, Zhigang

    2015-03-12

    A high-quality CH3NH3PbI3 film is crucial in the manufacture of a high-performance perovskite solar cell. Here, a recrystallization process via facile fumigation with DMF vapor has been successfully introduced to self-repair of CH3NH3PbI3 films with poor coverage and low crystallinity prepared by the commonly used one-step spin-coating method. We found that the CH3NH3PbI3 films with dendritic structures can spontaneously transform to the uniform ones with full coverage and high crystallinity by adjusting the cycles of the recrystallization process. The mesostructured perovskite solar cells based on these repaired CH3NH3PbI3 films showed reproducible optimal power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 11.15% and average PCE of 10.25±0.90%, which are much better than that of devices based on the non-repaired CH3NH3PbI3 films. In addition, the hysteresis phenomenon in the current-voltage test can also be effectively alleviated due to the quality of the films being improved in the optimized devices. Our work proved that the fumigation of solvent vapor can modify metal organic perovskite films such as CH3NH3PbI3. It offers a novel and attractive way to fabricate high-performance perovskite solar cells.

  19. Calcium-binding capacity of centrin2 is required for linear POC5 assembly but not for nucleotide excision repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago J Dantas

    Full Text Available Centrosomes, the principal microtubule-organising centres in animal cells, contain centrins, small, conserved calcium-binding proteins unique to eukaryotes. Centrin2 binds to xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein (XPC, stabilising it, and its presence slightly increases nucleotide excision repair (NER activity in vitro. In previous work, we deleted all three centrin isoforms present in chicken DT40 cells and observed delayed repair of UV-induced DNA lesions, but no centrosome abnormalities. Here, we explore how centrin2 controls NER. In the centrin null cells, we expressed centrin2 mutants that cannot bind calcium or that lack sites for phosphorylation by regulatory kinases. Expression of any of these mutants restored the UV sensitivity of centrin null cells to normal as effectively as expression of wild-type centrin. However, calcium-binding-deficient and T118A mutants showed greatly compromised localisation to centrosomes. XPC recruitment to laser-induced UV-like lesions was only slightly slower in centrin-deficient cells than in controls, and levels of XPC and its partner HRAD23B were unaffected by centrin deficiency. Interestingly, we found that overexpression of the centrin interactor POC5 leads to the assembly of linear, centrin-dependent structures that recruit other centrosomal proteins such as PCM-1 and NEDD1. Together, these observations suggest that assembly of centrins into complex structures requires calcium binding capacity, but that such assembly is not required for centrin activity in NER.

  20. Genetic requirements for the single-strand annealing pathway of double-strand break repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, E.L.; Sugawara, N.; Haber, J.E. [Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (United States)] [and others

    1996-03-01

    HO endonuclease-induced double-strand breaks (DSBs) within a direct duplication of Escherichia coli lacZ genes are repaired either by gene conversion or by single-strand annealing (SSA), with >80% being SSA. Previously it was demonstrated that the RAD52 gene is required for DSB-induced SSA. In the present study, the effects of other genes belonging to the RAD52 epistasis group were analyzed. We show that RAD51, RAD54, RAD55, and RAD57 genes are not required for SSA irrespective of whether recombination occurred in plasmid or chromosomal DNA. In both plasmid and chromosomal constructs with homologous sequences in direct orientation, the proportion of SSA events over gene conversion was significantly elevated in the mutant strains. However, gene conversion was not affected when the two lacZ sequences were in inverted orientation. These results suggest that there is a competition between SSA and gene conversion processes that favors SSA in the absence of RAD51, RAD54, RAD55 and RAD57. Mutations in RAD50 and XRS2 genes do not prevent the completion, but markedly retard the kinetics, of DSB repair by both mechanisms in the lacZ direct repeat plasmid, a result resembling the effects of these genes during mating-type (MAT) switching. 43 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. The MCM-binding protein ETG1 aids sister chromatid cohesion required for postreplicative homologous recombination repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Takahashi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The DNA replication process represents a source of DNA stress that causes potentially spontaneous genome damage. This effect might be strengthened by mutations in crucial replication factors, requiring the activation of DNA damage checkpoints to enable DNA repair before anaphase onset. Here, we demonstrate that depletion of the evolutionarily conserved minichromosome maintenance helicase-binding protein ETG1 of Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in a stringent late G2 cell cycle arrest. This arrest correlated with a partial loss of sister chromatid cohesion. The lack-of-cohesion phenotype was intensified in plants without functional CTF18, a replication fork factor needed for cohesion establishment. The synergistic effect of the etg1 and ctf18 mutants on sister chromatid cohesion strengthened the impact on plant growth of the replication stress caused by ETG1 deficiency because of inefficient DNA repair. We conclude that the ETG1 replication factor is required for efficient cohesion and that cohesion establishment is essential for proper development of plants suffering from endogenous DNA stress. Cohesion defects observed upon knockdown of its human counterpart suggest an equally important developmental role for the orthologous mammalian ETG1 protein.

  2. Water-related environmental control requirements at municipal solid waste-to-energy conversion facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, J C; Johnson, L D

    1980-09-01

    Water use and waste water production, water pollution control technology requirements, and water-related limitations to their design and commercialization are identified at municipal solid waste-to-energy conversion systems. In Part I, a summary of conclusions and recommendations provides concise statements of findings relative to water management and waste water treatment of each of four municipal solid waste-to-energy conversion categories investigated. These include: mass burning, with direct production of steam for use as a supplemental energy source; mechanical processing to produce a refuse-derived fuel (RDF) for co-firing in gas, coal or oil-fired power plants; pyrolysis for production of a burnable oil or gas; and biological conversion of organic wastes to methane. Part II contains a brief description of each waste-to-energy facility visited during the subject survey showing points of water use and wastewater production. One or more facilities of each type were selected for sampling of waste waters and follow-up tests to determine requirements for water-related environmental controls. A comprehensive summary of the results are presented. (MCW)

  3. Generalized peritonitis requiring re-operation after leakage of omental patch repair of perforated peptic ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemmat Maghsoudi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Peptic ulcer perforations are a common emergency, but available literature is silent on the exact definition, incidence, management, and complications of peritonitis due to omental patch leakage. Patients and Methods: Retrospective data were collected on 422 patients who underwent omental patch repair of perforated peptic ulcer between March 20, 1999 and March 20, 2006. The definitive diagnosis of perforated peptic ulcer and omental patch leakage was obtained at surgery. Results: Seventeen (4% patients experienced generalized peritonitis due to omental patch leakage. Mean age was 60.6 years. Mortality rate was 29.4%, and the mean hospital stay was 23.6 days. Delay in surgical approach, shock on admission, and age were all significantly associated with increased mortality. Conclusions: Peritonitis due to omental patch leakage can result in significant morbidity and mortality. The most common causes of omental patch leakage and operative procedures were unknown and reinsertion of omentum, respectively. Factors such as shock on admission or delayed surgery, have significantly contributed to fatal outcomes and need careful attention.

  4. UV-induced endonuclease III-sensitive sites at the mating type loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are repaired by nucleotide excision repair: RAD7 and RAD16 are not required for their removal from HML alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, S H; Boiteux, S; Waters, R

    1996-03-01

    Ultraviolet irradiation of DNA induces cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) 6-4'-(pyrimidine 2'-one) pyrimidines and pyrimidine hydrates. The dimer is the major photoproduct, and is specifically recognized by endonuclease V of phage T4. Pyrimidine hydrates represent a small fraction of the total photoproducts, and are substrates for endonuclease III of Escherichia coli. We used these enzymes to follow the fate of their substrates in the mating type loci of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In a RAD strain, CPSs in the transcriptionally active MAT alpha locus are preferentially repaired relative to the inactive HML alpha locus, whilst repair of endonuclease III-sensitive sites is not preferential. The rad1, 2, 3 and 4 mutants, which lack factors that are essential for the incision step of nucleotide excision repair (NER), repair neither CPDs nor endonuclease III-sensitive sites, clearly showing that these lesions are repaired by by NER pathway. Previously it had been shown that the products of the RAD7 and RAD16 genes are required for the NER of CPDs from the HML alpha locus. We show that, in the same locus, these gene products are not needed for removal of endonuclease III-sensitive sites by the same mechanism. This indicates that the components required for NER differ depending on either the type of lesion encountered or on the specific location of the lesion within the genome.

  5. 78 FR 16795 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Requirements for Long-Term Care (LTC) Facilities; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-19

    ... the current requirements for LTC facilities under the provisions of section 1128I(h) of the Social... addressing health care inequalities for racial and ethnic minorities that rely on Medicare and Medicaid...

  6. The use of Seabees to perform maintenance and repair on Naval facilities in the continental United States

    OpenAIRE

    LeNoir, Walter M.

    1996-01-01

    A masters report on the use of Seabees to supplement the other facility management assets that Navy Public Works Officers and Staff Civil Engineers have at their disposal. Every tool possible must be utilized to effectively manage and maintain the Navy's facility assets totaling 171 billion dollars. The paper will discuss Naval Mobile Construction Battalions, Construction Battalion Units, and individual Seabees assigned to shore installations. Chapter 1 of this report provides an introduction...

  7. 30 CFR 75.1712-3 - Minimum requirements of surface bathing facilities, change rooms, and sanitary toilet facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-1 shall include the following: (1) Bathing facilities. (i) Showers shall be provided with both hot and cold water. (ii) At least one shower head shall be provided where five or less miners use such showers. (iii) Where five or more miners use such showers, sufficient showers shall be furnished to...

  8. Access to Posthospitalization Acute Care Facilities is Associated with Payer Status for Open Abdominal Aortic Repair and Open Lower Extremity Revascularization in the Vascular Quality Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulloa, Jesus G; Woo, Karen; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Maggard-Gibbons, Melinda; Rigberg, David

    2017-07-01

    Uninsured patients may not have access to postacute care facilities that play an important role in clinical recovery, and functional outcomes after vascular surgery. We sought to determine whether discharge disposition is associated with insurance status. We retrospectively reviewed data from the Vascular Quality Initiative(®) for patients who underwent open abdominal aortic repair, infrainguinal bypass, or suprainguinal bypass (SB) between January 2012 and July 2015. Mixed-effects logistic regression analysis with clustering at the surgeon and facility level was used to calculate 95% confidence intervals for discharge disposition to home, skilled nursing facility (SNF) or rehabilitation (Rehab) facility by payer status (Medicare, Medicaid, Commercial, Military/Veterans Affairs, Non-US Insurance, or Self-pay), with adjustment for patient, operative, and postoperative characteristics. The study cohort comprised 18,478 procedures (open abdominal aortic repair = 2,817; infrainguinal bypass = 11,572; suprainguinal bypass = 4,089) after we excluded procedures with missing data and in-hospital deaths. Twenty-four percent of the cohort was discharged to an SNF or Rehab site. On univariate analysis, the odds ratio (OR) of discharge home was 4.38 (95% CI: 3.33-5.77) for self-pay as compared to Medicare. On mixed-effects analysis, the adjusted odds of discharge home for self-pay as compared to Medicare remained high (OR = 3.09; 95% CI: 2.23-4.26), after adjustment for age, gender, race/ethnicity, preoperative ambulatory status, number of comorbidities, case urgency, total operative time, presence of a postoperative complication, procedure type, and length of stay. Adjusted odds for discharge to SNF (OR = 0.26; 95% CI: 0.15-0.46) and Rehab (OR = 0.50; 95% CI: 0.35-0.72) were lowest for self-pay status. Access to postacute care facilities is associated with insurance status. Self-pay (uninsured) patients are less likely to have access to discharge services that

  9. 41 CFR 102-74.570 - Are State and local governments required to fund the cost of installing, repairing, and replacing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Replacing Sidewalks § 102-74.570 Are State and local governments required to fund the cost of installing... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Are State and local governments required to fund the cost of installing, repairing, and replacing sidewalks? 102-74.570...

  10. 10-MWe pilot-plant-receiver-panel test-requirements document: Solar Thermal Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-06-10

    Plans are presented for insolation testing of a full-scale test receiver panel and supporting hardware which essentially duplicate both physically and functionally the design planned for the 10 MWe pilot plant. Testing includes operation during normal start and shutdown, intermittent cloud conditions, and emergencies to determine the transient and steady state operating characteristics and performance under conditions equal to or exceeding those expected in the pilot plant. The effects of variations of input and output conditions on receiver operation are also to be investigated. A brief description of the pilot plant receiver subsystem is presented, followed by a detailed description of the receiver assembly to be tested at the Solar Thermal Test Facility. Major subassemblies are described, including the receiver panel, flow control, electrical control and instrumentation, and the structural assembly. Requirements of the Solar Thermal Test Facility for the tests are given. System safety measures are described. The tests, operating conditions, and expected results are presented. Quality assurance, task responsibilities, and test documentation are also discussed. (LEW)

  11. 10-MWe pilot-plant-receiver panel test requirements document solar thermal test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-08-25

    Testing plans for a full-scale test receiver panel and supporting hardware which essentially duplicate both physically and functionally, the design planned for the Barstow Solar Pilot Plant are presented. Testing is to include operation during normal start and shutdown, intermittent cloud conditions, and emergencies to determine the panel's transient and steady state operating characteristics and performance under conditions equal to or exceeding those expected in the pilot plant. The effects of variations of input and output conditions on receiver operation are also to be investigated. Test hardware are described, including the pilot plant receiver, the test receiver assembly, receiver panel, flow control, electrical control and instrumentation, and structural assembly. Requirements for the Solar Thermal Test Facility for the tests are given. The safety of the system is briefly discussed, and procedures are described for assembly, installation, checkout, normal and abnormal operations, maintenance, removal and disposition. Also briefly discussed are quality assurance, contract responsibilities, and test documentation. (LEW)

  12. A comprehensive five-step surgical management approach to penetrating liver injuries that require complex repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordoñez, Carlos Alberto; Parra, Michael W; Salamea, Juan Carlos; Puyana, Juan Carlos; Millán, Mauricio; Badiel, Marisol; Sanjuán, Juán; Pino, Luis F; Scavo, David; Botache, Wilmer; Ferrada, Ricardo

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to describe a comprehensive five-step surgical management approach for patients with penetrating liver trauma based on our collective institutional experience. A prospective consecutive study of all penetrating liver traumas from January 2003 to December 2011 at a regional Level I trauma center in Cali, Colombia, was conducted. A total of 538 patients with penetrating thoracoabdominal trauma were operated on at our institution. Of these, 146 had penetrating liver injuries that satisfied the inclusion criteria for surgical intervention to manage their hepatic and/or associated injuries. Eighty-eight patients (60%) had an American Association for the Surgery of Trauma-Organ Injury Scale (AAST-OIS) of Grade III (54 patients, 37%), Grade IV (24 patients, 16%), and Grade V (10 patients, 7%). This group of patients required advanced "complex" techniques of hemostasis such as the Pringle maneuver (PM), perihepatic liver packing (PHLP), and/or hepatotomy with selective vessel ligation (SVL). The focus of our study was this subgroup of patients, which we further divided into two as follows: those who required only PM + PHLP (55 patients, 63%) to obtain control of their liver hemorrhage and those who required PM + PHLP + SVL (33 patients, 37%). Of the patients who required PM + PHLP + SVL, 10 (27%) required ligation of major intrahepatic branches, which included suprahepatic veins (n = 4), portal vein (n = 4), retrohepatic vena cava (n = 1), and hepatic artery (n = 1). The remaining 23 patients (73%) required direct vessel ligation of smaller intraparenchymal vessels. The overall mortality was 15.9% (14 of 88), with 71.4% (10 of 14) related to coagulopathy. Mortality rates for Grade III was 3.7% (2 of 54), for Grade IV was 20.8% (5 of 24), and for Grade V was 70% (7 of 10). The mortality in the PM + PHLP + SVL group was higher compared with the PM + PHLP group (12 [36.4%] vs. 2 [3.6%], p = 0.001]. For those patients who fail to respond to PM

  13. Deep learning for evaluating difficult-to-detect incomplete repairs of high fluence laser optics at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundhenk, T. Nathan; Kegelmeyer, Laura M.; Trummer, Scott K.

    2017-03-01

    Two machine-learning methods were evaluated to help automate the quality control process for mitigating damage sites on laser optics. The mitigation is a cone-like structure etched into locations on large optics that have been chipped by the high fluence (energy per unit area) laser light. Sometimes the repair leaves a difficult to detect remnant of the damage that needs to be addressed before the optic can be placed back on the beam line. We would like to be able to automatically detect these remnants. We try Deep Learning (convolutional neural networks using features autogenerated from large stores of labeled data, like ImageNet) and find it outperforms ensembles of decision trees (using custom-built features) in finding these subtle, rare, incomplete repairs of damage. We also implemented an unsupervised method for helping operators visualize where the network has spotted problems. This is done by projecting the credit for the result backwards onto the input image. This shows regions in an image most responsible for the networks decision. This can also be used to help understand the black box decisions the network is making and potentially improve the training process.

  14. Amorphous calcium phosphate nanospheres/polylactide composite coated tantalum scaffold: facile preparation, fast biomineralization and subchondral bone defect repair application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Rong; Xu, Wei; Chen, Feng; Qi, Chao; Lu, Bing-Qiang; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Jin; Qian, Qi-Rong; Zhu, Ying-Jie

    2014-11-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) materials are widely used in various biomedical areas such as drug/gene delivery and bone repair/tissue engineering. In this study, amorphous CaP nanospheres synthesized by a simple co-precipitation method are used to prepare the CaP-polylactide (CaP-PLA) composite. Then, the as-prepared CaP-PLA composite is used to coat tantalum (Ta) plates and porous scaffolds. Compared with bare Ta plate, CaP-PLA coated Ta plates show a high performance of surface biomineralization in simulated body fluid (SBF). In addition, the hydrophilicity of the CaP-PLA coated Ta plates is significantly improved. CaP-PLA coated Ta plates with bovine serum albumin (BSA) are prepared and used for the investigation of BSA release in vitro. The experimental results indicate a sustained BSA release property and simultaneous biomineralization of the as-prepared BSA-containing CaP-PLA coated Ta plates. Furthermore, CaP-PLA coated Ta scaffolds are favorable for the human osteoblast-like MG63 cells adhesion and spreading. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and transforming growth factor (TGF)-containing CaP-PLA coated porous Ta scaffolds are used for the study of rabbit subchondral bone defect repair, covering with autogeneic periosteums. The as-prepared CaP-PLA composite coated Ta scaffolds are useful to guide the bone regeneration in vivo. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Repair, Replace or Throw Away: Linking Sustainment Strategies to Data Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Automobile A complete description of OSA requirements and implications is beyond this article’s scope. However, a familiar scenario— the choice of...a failing alternator—component 1.2.2.1.6 in Figure 1. In principle, a car owner who notices such indicators can either buy a brand new car or...on the day the car was purchased. For an automobile , access to essential information—and permission to use it—will depend not only on the

  16. YNK1, the yeast homolog of human metastasis suppressor NM23, is required for repair of UV radiation- and etoposide-induced DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Mengmeng; Jarrett, Stuart G.; Craven, Rolf [Department of Molecular and Biomedical Pharmacology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0298 (United States); Kaetzel, David M. [Department of Molecular and Biomedical Pharmacology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0298 (United States)], E-mail: dmkaetz@uky.edu

    2009-01-15

    In humans, NM23-H1 is a metastasis suppressor whose expression is reduced in metastatic melanoma and breast carcinoma cells, and which possesses the ability to inhibit metastatic growth without significant impact on the transformed phenotype. NM23-H1 exhibits three enzymatic activities in vitro, each with potential to maintain genomic stability, a 3'-5' exonuclease and two kinases, nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK), and protein histidine kinase. Herein we have investigated the potential contributions of NM23 proteins to DNA repair in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which contains a single NM23 homolog, YNK1. Ablation of YNK1 delayed repair of UV- and etoposide-induced nuclear DNA damage by 3-6 h. However, YNK1 had no impact upon the kinetics of MMS-induced DNA repair. Furthermore, YNK1 was not required for repair of mitochondrial DNA damage. To determine whether the nuclear DNA repair deficit manifested as an increase in mutation frequency, the CAN1 forward assay was employed. An YNK1 deletion was associated with increased mutation rates following treatment with either UV (2.6x) or MMS (1.6x). Mutation spectral analysis further revealed significantly increased rates of base substitution and frameshift mutations following UV treatment in the ynk1{delta} strain. This study indicates a novel role for YNK1 in DNA repair in yeast, and suggests an anti-mutator function that may contribute to the metastasis suppressor function of NM23-H1 in humans.

  17. Necessity and Requirements of a Collaborative Effort to Develop a Large Wind Turbine Blade Test Facility in North America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotrell, J.; Musial, W.; Hughes, S.

    2006-05-01

    The wind power industry in North America has an immediate need for larger blade test facilities to ensure the survival of the industry. Blade testing is necessary to meet certification and investor requirements and is critical to achieving the reliability and blade life needed for the wind turbine industry to succeed. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Wind Program is exploring options for collaborating with government, private, or academic entities in a partnership to build larger blade test facilities in North America capable of testing blades up to at least 70 m in length. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) prepared this report for DOE to describe the immediate need to pursue larger blade test facilities in North America, categorize the numerous prospective partners for a North American collaboration, and document the requirements for a North American test facility.

  18. METHODS FOR DETERMINING AGITATOR MIXING REQUIREMENTS FOR A MIXING & SAMPLING FACILITY TO FEED WTP (WASTE TREATMENT PLANT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GRIFFIN PW

    2009-08-27

    The following report is a summary of work conducted to evaluate the ability of existing correlative techniques and alternative methods to accurately estimate impeller speed and power requirements for mechanical mixers proposed for use in a mixing and sampling facility (MSF). The proposed facility would accept high level waste sludges from Hanford double-shell tanks and feed uniformly mixed high level waste to the Waste Treatment Plant. Numerous methods are evaluated and discussed, and resulting recommendations provided.

  19. Repair, Evaluation, Maintenance, and Rehabilitation Research Program. Evaluation of Existing Condition Rating Procedures for Civil Works Structures and Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-01

    L. McCartney (DAEN-CWH-D) and Dr. Tony C. Liu (DAEN-ECE-D) se",e as the REMR Overview Committee; Mr. William F. McCleese (WESSC-A), U.S. Army...34Maintenance Management System, Parts I-IV," Plant Engineering (October 14, 1976). 13. Hoyt, William G. and Walter B. Langbein, Floods (Princeton... Obstr --uctions in channels - vegetation, debris *%. Channel encroachments f. Rems controlled facilities g. PreVquency of operation for rights (SP

  20. Replication factor c recruits dna polymerase δ to sites of nucleotide excision repair but is not required for PCNA recruitment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.M. Overmeer (René); A.M. Gourdin (Audrey); G. Giglia-Mari (Giuseppina); H. Kool (Hanneke); A.B. Houtsmuller (Adriaan); T. Siegal (Tali); M.I. Fousteri (Maria); L.H.F. Mullenders (Leon); W. Vermeulen (Wim)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractNucleotide excision repair (NER) operates through coordinated assembly of repair factors into pre- and postincisioncomplexes. The postincision step of NER includes gap-filling DNA synthesis and ligation. However, the exact composition of this NER-associated DNA synthesis complex in vivo

  1. Safeguards Guidance Document for Designers of Commercial Nuclear Facilities: International Nuclear Safeguards Requirements and Practices For Uranium Enrichment Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Bean; Casey Durst

    2009-10-01

    This report is the second in a series of guidelines on international safeguards requirements and practices, prepared expressly for the designers of nuclear facilities. The first document in this series is the description of generic international nuclear safeguards requirements pertaining to all types of facilities. These requirements should be understood and considered at the earliest stages of facility design as part of a new process called “Safeguards-by-Design.” This will help eliminate the costly retrofit of facilities that has occurred in the past to accommodate nuclear safeguards verification activities. The following summarizes the requirements for international nuclear safeguards implementation at enrichment plants, prepared under the Safeguards by Design project, and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Office of NA-243. The purpose of this is to provide designers of nuclear facilities around the world with a simplified set of design requirements and the most common practices for meeting them. The foundation for these requirements is the international safeguards agreement between the country and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), pursuant to the Treaty on the Non-proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). Relevant safeguards requirements are also cited from the Safeguards Criteria for inspecting enrichment plants, found in the IAEA Safeguards Manual, Part SMC-8. IAEA definitions and terms are based on the IAEA Safeguards Glossary, published in 2002. The most current specification for safeguards measurement accuracy is found in the IAEA document STR-327, “International Target Values 2000 for Measurement Uncertainties in Safeguarding Nuclear Materials,” published in 2001. For this guide to be easier for the designer to use, the requirements have been restated in plainer language per expert interpretation using the source documents noted. The safeguards agreement is fundamentally a

  2. 5-millimeter Trocar-site Hernias After Laparoscopy Requiring Surgical Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Nigel; Hutchinson, Anne P; Irani, Mohamad; Chung, Eric R; Lekovich, Jovana P; Chung, Pak H; Zarnegar, Rasa; Rosenwaks, Zev

    2016-01-01

    Trocar-site hernias are rare complications of laparoscopic surgery. Although trocar-site hernias occur more often at >10-mm sites, hernias can still develop at 5-mm sites after laparoscopy and can lead to serious complications. The primary objective of this review is to summarize the current medical literature pertaining to the clinical presentation and predisposing risk factors of trocar-site hernias at 5-mm sites after laparoscopy. A total of 295 publications were identified, 17 (5.76%) of which met the inclusion criteria. Twenty-seven patients with trocar-site hernias were identified after laparoscopic cases. The median age (interquartile range) for all adult patients with trocar-site hernias was 63 years (interquartile range, 39.5-66.5 years). Eight of the 18 patients (44.4%) undergoing gynecologic laparoscopy were parous although details of parity were not reported in most publications. Simple manual reduction or laparoscopic reduction with fascial closure (21 patients [84%]) was used more often compared with exploratory laparotomy (4 patients [16%], p manipulation can extend 5-mm fascial incisions, thereby increasing the risk of trocar-site hernias. Parous women older than 60 years may have unrecognized fascial defects, which confer a higher risk of trocar-site hernias after laparoscopic surgery, even in the absence of incision manipulation or prolonged surgical duration. Such patients may benefit from closure of 5-mm fascial incisions although prospective data are required to validate the overall generalizability of this management strategy.

  3. 48 CFR 3004.470 - Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources, and sensitive information. 3004.470... Technology resources, and sensitive information. ... ACQUISITION REGULATION (HSAR) GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Safeguarding Classified and Sensitive...

  4. Test facility requirements for the thermal vacuum thermal balance test of the Cosmic Background Explorer Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milam, Laura J.

    1991-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer Observatory (COBE) underwant a thermal vacuum thermal balance test in the Space Environment Simulator (SES). This was the largest and most complex test ever conducted at this facility. The 4 x 4 m (13 x 13 ft) spacecraft weighed approx. 2223 kg (4900 lbs) for the test. The test set up included simulator panels for the inboard solar array panels, simulator panels for the flight cowlings, Sun and Earth Sensor stimuli, Thermal Radio Frequency Shield heater stimuli and a cryopanel for thermal control in the Attitude Control System Shunt Dissipator area. The fixturing also included a unique 4.3 m (14 ft) diameter Gaseous Helium Cryopanel which provided a 20 K environment for the calibration of one of the spacecraft's instruments, the Differential Microwave Radiometer. This cryogenic panel caused extra contamination concerns and a special method was developed and written into the test procedure to prevent the high buildup of condensibles on the panel which could have led to backstreaming of the thermal vacuum chamber. The test was completed with a high quality simulated space environment provided to the spacecraft. The test requirements, test set up, and special fixturing are described.

  5. 44 CFR 206.253 - Insurance requirements for facilities damaged by disasters other than flood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... facilities damaged by disasters other than flood. 206.253 Section 206.253 Emergency Management and Assistance... by disasters other than flood. (a) Prior to approval of a Federal grant for the restoration of a facility and its contents which were damaged by a disaster other than flood, the Grantee shall notify...

  6. Saw1 Localizes to Repair Sites but is not Required for Recruitment of Rad10 to Repair Intermediates Bearing Short Non-Homologous 3′ Flaps during Single-Strand Annealing in S. cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Mardirosian, Melina; Nalbandyan, Linette; Miller, Aaron D.; Phan, Claire; Kelson, Eric P.; Fischhaber, Paula L.

    2015-01-01

    SAW1 is required for efficient removal by the Rad1-Rad10 nuclease of 3′ non-homologous DNA ends (flaps) formed as intermediates during two modes of double-strand break repair in S. cerevisiae, single-strand annealing (SSA) and synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA). Saw1 was shown in vitro to bind flaps with high affinity, but displayed diminished affinity when flaps were short (< 30 deoxynucleotides [nt]), consistent with it not being required for short flap cleavage. Accordingly, this ...

  7. Release of Ku and MRN from DNA ends by Mre11 nuclease activity and Ctp1 is required for homologous recombination repair of double-strand breaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Langerak

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The multifunctional Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN protein complex recruits ATM/Tel1 checkpoint kinase and CtIP/Ctp1 homologous recombination (HR repair factor to double-strand breaks (DSBs. HR repair commences with the 5'-to-3' resection of DNA ends, generating 3' single-strand DNA (ssDNA overhangs that bind Replication Protein A (RPA complex, followed by Rad51 recombinase. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 (MRX complex is critical for DSB resection, although the enigmatic ssDNA endonuclease activity of Mre11 and the DNA-end processing factor Sae2 (CtIP/Ctp1 ortholog are largely unnecessary unless the resection activities of Exo1 and Sgs1-Dna2 are also eliminated. Mre11 nuclease activity and Ctp1/CtIP are essential for DSB repair in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and mammals. To investigate DNA end resection in Schizo. pombe, we adapted an assay that directly measures ssDNA formation at a defined DSB. We found that Mre11 and Ctp1 are essential for the efficient initiation of resection, consistent with their equally crucial roles in DSB repair. Exo1 is largely responsible for extended resection up to 3.1 kb from a DSB, with an activity dependent on Rqh1 (Sgs1 DNA helicase having a minor role. Despite its critical function in DSB repair, Mre11 nuclease activity is not required for resection in fission yeast. However, Mre11 nuclease and Ctp1 are required to disassociate the MRN complex and the Ku70-Ku80 nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ complex from DSBs, which is required for efficient RPA localization. Eliminating Ku makes Mre11 nuclease activity dispensable for MRN disassociation and RPA localization, while improving repair of a one-ended DSB formed by replication fork collapse. From these data we propose that release of the MRN complex and Ku from DNA ends by Mre11 nuclease activity and Ctp1 is a critical step required to expose ssDNA for RPA localization and ensuing HR repair.

  8. 40 CFR 63.11117 - Requirements for facilities with monthly throughput of 10,000 gallons of gasoline or more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... monthly throughput of 10,000 gallons of gasoline or more. 63.11117 Section 63.11117 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Source Category: Gasoline Dispensing Facilities Emission Limitations and... gasoline or more. (a) You must comply with the requirements in section § 63.11116(a). (b) Except...

  9. 40 CFR 63.11118 - Requirements for facilities with monthly throughput of 100,000 gallons of gasoline or more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... monthly throughput of 100,000 gallons of gasoline or more. 63.11118 Section 63.11118 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Source Category: Gasoline Dispensing Facilities Emission Limitations and... gasoline or more. (a) You must comply with the requirements in §§ 63.11116(a) and 63.11117(b). (b)...

  10. UvrD Participation in Nucleotide Excision Repair Is Required for the Recovery of DNA Synthesis following UV-Induced Damage in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelley N. Newton

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available UvrD is a DNA helicase that participates in nucleotide excision repair and several replication-associated processes, including methyl-directed mismatch repair and recombination. UvrD is capable of displacing oligonucleotides from synthetic forked DNA structures in vitro and is essential for viability in the absence of Rep, a helicase associated with processing replication forks. These observations have led others to propose that UvrD may promote fork regression and facilitate resetting of the replication fork following arrest. However, the molecular activity of UvrD at replication forks in vivo has not been directly examined. In this study, we characterized the role UvrD has in processing and restoring replication forks following arrest by UV-induced DNA damage. We show that UvrD is required for DNA synthesis to recover. However, in the absence of UvrD, the displacement and partial degradation of the nascent DNA at the arrested fork occur normally. In addition, damage-induced replication intermediates persist and accumulate in uvrD mutants in a manner that is similar to that observed in other nucleotide excision repair mutants. These data indicate that, following arrest by DNA damage, UvrD is not required to catalyze fork regression in vivo and suggest that the failure of uvrD mutants to restore DNA synthesis following UV-induced arrest relates to its role in nucleotide excision repair.

  11. A hybrid algorithm for stochastic single-source capacitated facility location problem with service level requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosseinali Salemi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Facility location models are observed in many diverse areas such as communication networks, transportation, and distribution systems planning. They play significant role in supply chain and operations management and are one of the main well-known topics in strategic agenda of contemporary manufacturing and service companies accompanied by long-lasting effects. We define a new approach for solving stochastic single source capacitated facility location problem (SSSCFLP. Customers with stochastic demand are assigned to set of capacitated facilities that are selected to serve them. It is demonstrated that problem can be transformed to deterministic Single Source Capacitated Facility Location Problem (SSCFLP for Poisson demand distribution. A hybrid algorithm which combines Lagrangian heuristic with adjusted mixture of Ant colony and Genetic optimization is proposed to find lower and upper bounds for this problem. Computational results of various instances with distinct properties indicate that proposed solving approach is efficient.

  12. A discussion of regulatory requirements and air dispersion modeling approaches applicable to U.S. chemical demilitarization facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, B W; Robbins, L B; Litynski, J

    1998-09-01

    Owners of hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities, and certain major air pollution sources, must conduct several separate ambient air dispersion modeling analyses before beginning construction of new facilities or modifying existing facilities. These analyses are critical components of the environmental permitting and facility certification processes and must be completed to the satisfaction of federal, state, and local regulatory authorities. The U.S. Army has conducted air dispersion modeling for its proposed chemical agent disposal facilities to fulfill the following environmental regulatory and risk management requirements: (1) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act human health and ecological risk assessment analysis for the hazardous waste treatment and storage permit applications, (2) Quantitative Risk Assessment to support the site-specific risk management programs, and (3) Prevention of Significant Deterioration ambient air impact analysis for the air permit applications. The purpose of these air dispersion modeling studies is to show that the potential impacts on human health and the environment, due to operation of the chemical agent disposal facilities, are acceptable. This paper describes and compares the types of air dispersion models, modeling input data requirements, modeling algorithms, and approaches used to satisfy the three environmental regulatory and risk management requirements listed above. Although this paper discusses only one industry (i.e., chemical demilitarization), the information it contains could help those in other industries who need to communicate to the public the purpose and objectives of each modeling analysis. It may also be useful in integrating the results of each analysis into an overarching summary of compliance and potential risks.

  13. Qualification requirements and training programs for nonreactor nuclear facility personnel in the Operations Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preston, E.L.; Culbert, W.H.; Baldwin, M.E.; McCormack, K.E.; Rivera, A.L.; Setaro, J.A.

    1985-11-01

    This document describes the program for training, retraining, and qualification of nonreactor nuclear operators in the Operations Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The objective of the program is to provide the Operators and Supervisors of nuclear facilities the knowledge and skills needed to perform assigned duties in a safe and efficient manner and to comply with US Department of Energy Order 5480.1A Chapter V. This order requires DOE nuclear facilities to maintain formal training programs for their operating staff and documentation of that training.

  14. Requirements for a multi-scale, ultra wide-band National Geoelectromagnetic Facility (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, A.

    2009-12-01

    Advances in data acquisition technology and modeling make it possible to image the electrical properties of the near surface, crust and mantle in 3D. A generation of investigators is emerging whose research depends on application of complementary methods including magnetotelluric (MT) [micro-Hz to kHz sampling frequencies], natural audio (AMT) and controlled source and radio-frequency magnetotellurics (CSAMT, RFMT) [1 Hz-300 kHz], time-domain (TDEM) EM, as well as DC resistivity, induced polarization and ground-penetrating radar. Different process studies involve different depths and spatial scales, requiring target illumination by signals of different frequency content, and application of one or more of the methods above. Current practice often assumes that near surface and deeper crustal imaging problems can be decoupled by treating shallower heterogeneities in e.g. electrical conductivity structure as surface distortions that can be dealt with either through tensor stripping techniques or thin sheet modeling. Such methods are based on parametric models with implicit or explicit assumptions that may not in all cases be satisfied by the physics of the situation. Large-scale EM imaging programs such as EarthScope/USArray's magnetotelluric (MT) component seek to reconstruct the electrical conductivity structure of the US on the crustal-to-upper mantle scale. A variety of PI-led investigations seek to increase the resolving power of this effort through a combination of targeted, finer-spaced arrays, and by pushing into a higher frequency domain. As these efforts continue, great care has to be made in dealing with the impact of near surface heterogeneities. There is no national or regional scale set of near surface conductivity maps that one could use to strip near surface effects from deeper studies. National radio propagation/absorption maps were assembled by the FCC in the 1950's, and maps of ground-penetrating radar soil suitability provide a rough guide to

  15. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD7 and RAD16 genes are required for inducible excision of endonuclease III sensitive-sites, yet are not needed for the repair of these lesions following a single UV dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, A D; Waters, R

    1997-01-31

    The RAD7 and RAD16 genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have roles in the repair of UV induced CPDs in nontranscribed genes [1], and in the repair of CPDs in the nontranscribed strand of transcribed genes [2]. Previously, we identified an inducible component to nucleotide excision repair (NER), which is absent in a rad16 delta strain [3]. We have examined the repair of UV induced endonuclease III sensitive-sites (EIIISS), and have shown repair of these lesions to proceed by NER but their removal from nontranscribed regions is independent of RAD7 and RAD16. Furthermore, EIIISS are repaired with equal efficiency from both transcribed and nontranscribed genes [4]. In order to dissect the roles of RAD7 and RAD16 in the above processes we examined the repair of EIIISS in the MAT alpha and HML alpha loci, which are, respectively, transcriptionally active and inactive in alpha haploid cells. These loci have elevated levels of these lesions after UV (in genomic DNA EIIISS constitute about 10% of total lesions, whereas CPDs are about 70% of total lesions). We have shown that excision of UV induced EIIISS is enhanced following a prior UV irradiation. No enhancement of repair was detected in either the rad7 delta or the rad16 delta mutant. The fact that RAD7 and RAD16 are not required for the repair of EIIISS per se yet are required for the enhanced excision of these lesions from MAT alpha and HML alpha suggests two possibilities. These genes have two roles in NER, namely in the repair of CPDs from nontranscribed sequences, and in enhancing NER itself regardless of whether these genes' products are required for the excision of the specific lesion being repaired. In the latter case, the induction of RAD7 and RAD16 may increase the turnover of complexes stalled in nontranscribed DNA so as to increase the availability of NER proteins for the repair of CPDs and EIIISS in all regions of the genome.

  16. National Ignition Facility sub-system design requirements ancillary systems SSDR 1.5.6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spann, J.; Reed, R.; VanArsdall, P.; Bliss, E.

    1996-09-01

    This System Design Requirement document establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Ancillary Systems, which is part of the NIF Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS).

  17. 75 FR 71733 - Requirements for Measurement Facilities Used for the Royalty Valuation of Processed Natural Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    ..., flare gas, condensate, natural gas liquids, or any other products recovered from Federal production... Used for the Royalty Valuation of Processed Natural Gas AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management... measurement equipment at gas plants and other processing facilities. SUMMARY: This notice provides...

  18. Military Personnel: Enhanced Collaboration and Process Improvements Needed for Determining Military Treatment Facility Medical Personnel Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    dentists, medical service corps, and veterinarians , to name a few, at the work center level across Army fixed military treatment facilities. The model uses...1072 - 896 903 Hematology /Oncology 41 40 43 - 12 17 - 18 14 Infectious Disease 63 59 62 - 29 34 - 16 17 Internal Medicine 315 e 254 e 277 e

  19. 75 FR 65282 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Requirements for Long Term Care Facilities; Hospice Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-22

    ... a resident's right to a dignified existence, self- determination, and communication with, and access... change.'' The article further stated that, while most non- hospice healthcare providers do not follow... for transfer. Thus, an LTC facility may accept a written or verbal request for transfer. We...

  20. Drosophila brca2 is required for mitotic and meiotic DNA repair and efficient activation of the meiotic recombination checkpoint.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Klovstad

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Heterozygous mutations in the tumor suppressor BRCA2 confer a high risk of breast and other cancers in humans. BRCA2 maintains genome stability in part through the regulation of Rad51-dependent homologous recombination. Much about its precise function in the DNA damage responses is, however, not yet known. We have made null mutations in the Drosophila homolog of BRCA2 and measured the levels of homologous recombination, non-homologous end-joining, and single-strand annealing in the pre-meiotic germline of Drosophila males. We show that repair by homologous recombination is dramatically decreased in Drosophila brca2 mutants. Instead, large flanking deletions are formed, and repair by the non-conservative single-strand annealing pathway predominates. We further show that during meiosis, Drosophila Brca2 has a dual role in the repair of meiotic double-stranded breaks and the efficient activation of the meiotic recombination checkpoint. The eggshell patterning defects that result from activation of the meiotic recombination checkpoint in other meiotic DNA repair mutants can be strongly suppressed by mutations in brca2. In addition, Brca2 co-immunoprecipitates with the checkpoint protein Rad9, suggesting a direct role for Brca2 in the transduction of the meiotic recombination checkpoint signal.

  1. Mound facility physical characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonne, W.R.; Alexander, B.M.; Cage, M.R.; Hase, E.H.; Schmidt, M.J.; Schneider, J.E.; Slusher, W.; Todd, J.E.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a baseline physical characterization of Mound`s facilities as of September 1993. The baseline characterizations are to be used in the development of long-term future use strategy development for the Mound site. This document describes the current missions and alternative future use scenarios for each building. Current mission descriptions cover facility capabilities, physical resources required to support operations, current safety envelope and current status of facilities. Future use scenarios identify potential alternative future uses, facility modifications required for likely use, facility modifications of other uses, changes to safety envelope for the likely use, cleanup criteria for each future use scenario, and disposition of surplus equipment. This Introductory Chapter includes an Executive Summary that contains narrative on the Functional Unit Material Condition, Current Facility Status, Listing of Buildings, Space Plans, Summary of Maintenance Program and Repair Backlog, Environmental Restoration, and Decontamination and Decommissioning Programs. Under Section B, Site Description, is a brief listing of the Site PS Development, as well as Current Utility Sources. Section C contains Site Assumptions. A Maintenance Program Overview, as well as Current Deficiencies, is contained within the Maintenance Program Chapter.

  2. Development of a Micro-Thruster Test Facility which fulfils the LISA requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hey, Franz Georg; Keller, A.; Johann, U.; Braxmaier, C.; Tajmar, M.; Fitzsimons, E.; Weise, D.

    2015-05-01

    In the context of investigations for a sufficient attitude control thruster for LISA, we have developed a thruster test facility which consists of a highly precise thrust balance coupled with plasma diagnostics. In parallel to the test facility development, investigations to downscale a High Efficiency Multistage Plasma Thruster (HEMP-T) are also being carried out. The thruster has been used to demonstrate the measurement capabilities of the facility. The setup allows a parallel operation of all instruments and can also be used for other types of μN propulsion systems including cold gas thrusters. The thrust balance consists of two pendulums. As read out a heterodyne laser interferometer is used. Differential wave front sensing (DWS) enables the measurement of the pendulum tilt which, via suitable calibration using an electrostatic comb, can be converted to a thrust. The whole setup is a symmetric configuration enabling a common-mode rejection of the dominant noise sources (e.g. seismic noise etc.). The thrust balance has a demonstrated precision of 0.1 μN. Based on our unique design, this precision can be attained down to 10-3 Hz. Thus, the measurement setup is especially suitable for characterising the thrust noise of potential eLISA propulsion candidates. We give an overview of the design, the present performance and the future plans.

  3. National Ignition Facility sub-system design requirements automatic alignment system SSDR 1.5.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VanArsdall, P.; Bliss, E.

    1996-09-01

    This System Design Requirement document establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Automatic Alignment System, which is part of the NIF Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS).

  4. National Ignition Facility sub-system design requirements integrated safety systems SSDR 1.5.4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, R.; VanArsdall, P.; Bliss, E.

    1996-09-01

    This System Design Requirement document establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Integrated Safety System, which is part of the NIF Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS).

  5. National Ignition Facility sub-system design requirements computer system SSDR 1.5.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spann, J.; VanArsdall, P.; Bliss, E.

    1996-09-05

    This System Design Requirement document establishes the performance, design, development and test requirements for the Computer System, WBS 1.5.1 which is part of the NIF Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS). This document responds directly to the requirements detailed in ICCS (WBS 1.5) which is the document directly above.

  6. 42 CFR 431.120 - State requirements with respect to nursing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false State requirements with respect to nursing... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS STATE ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL ADMINISTRATION Administrative Requirements: Provider Relations § 431.120 State requirements with respect...

  7. Requirement for PBAF in transcriptional repression and repair at DNA breaks in actively transcribed regions of chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Kakarougkas, Andreas; Ismail, Amani; Chambers, Anna; Riballo, Queti; Herbert, Alex; Kunzel, Julia; Lobrich, Markus; Jeggo, Penny; Downs, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Summary Actively transcribed regions of the genome are vulnerable to genomic instability. Recently, it was discovered that transcription is repressed in response to neighboring DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). It is not known whether a failure to silence transcription flanking DSBs has any impact on DNA repair efficiency or whether chromatin remodelers contribute to the process. Here, we show that the PBAF remodeling complex is important for DSB-induced transcriptional silencing and promotes ...

  8. A DNA2 Homolog Is Required for DNA Damage Repair, Cell Cycle Regulation, and Meristem Maintenance in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ning; Liu, Xiaomin; Gao, Hongbo

    2016-05-01

    Plant meristem cells divide and differentiate in a spatially and temporally regulated manner, ultimately giving rise to organs. In this study, we isolated the Arabidopsis jing he sheng 1 (jhs1) mutant, which exhibited retarded growth, an abnormal pattern of meristem cell division and differentiation, and morphological defects such as fasciation, an irregular arrangement of siliques, and short roots. We identified JHS1 as a homolog of human and yeast DNA Replication Helicase/Nuclease2, which is known to be involved in DNA replication and damage repair. JHS1 is strongly expressed in the meristem of Arabidopsis. The jhs1 mutant was sensitive to DNA damage stress and had an increased DNA damage response, including increased expression of genes involved in DNA damage repair and cell cycle regulation, and a higher frequency of homologous recombination. In the meristem of the mutant plants, cell cycle progression was delayed at the G2 or late S phase and genes essential for meristem maintenance were misregulated. These results suggest that JHS1 plays an important role in DNA replication and damage repair, meristem maintenance, and development in plants. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  9. SETD2-Dependent Histone H3K36 Trimethylation Is Required for Homologous Recombination Repair and Genome Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia X. Pfister

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Modulating chromatin through histone methylation orchestrates numerous cellular processes. SETD2-dependent trimethylation of histone H3K36 is associated with active transcription. Here, we define a role for H3K36 trimethylation in homologous recombination (HR repair in human cells. We find that depleting SETD2 generates a mutation signature resembling RAD51 depletion at I-SceI-induced DNA double-strand break (DSB sites, with significantly increased deletions arising through microhomology-mediated end-joining. We establish a presynaptic role for SETD2 methyltransferase in HR, where it facilitates the recruitment of C-terminal binding protein interacting protein (CtIP and promotes DSB resection, allowing Replication Protein A (RPA and RAD51 binding to DNA damage sites. Furthermore, reducing H3K36me3 levels by overexpressing KDM4A/JMJD2A, an oncogene and H3K36me3/2 demethylase, or an H3.3K36M transgene also reduces HR repair events. We propose that error-free HR repair within H3K36me3-decorated transcriptionally active genomic regions promotes cell homeostasis. Moreover, these findings provide insights as to why oncogenic mutations cluster within the H3K36me3 axis.

  10. Homology Requirements and Competition between Gene Conversion and Break-Induced Replication during Double-Strand Break Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Anuja; Beach, Annette; Haber, James E

    2017-02-02

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae mating-type switching is initiated by a double-strand break (DSB) at MATa, leaving one cut end perfectly homologous to the HMLα donor, while the second end must be processed to remove a non-homologous tail before completing repair by gene conversion (GC). When homology at the matched end is ≤150 bp, efficient repair depends on the recombination enhancer, which tethers HMLα near the DSB. Thus, homology shorter than an apparent minimum efficient processing segment can be rescued by tethering the donor near the break. When homology at the second end is ≤150 bp, second-end capture becomes inefficient and repair shifts from GC to break-induced replication (BIR). But when pol32 or pif1 mutants block BIR, GC increases 3-fold, indicating that the steps blocked by these mutations are reversible. With short second-end homology, absence of the RecQ helicase Sgs1 promotes gene conversion, whereas deletion of the FANCM-related Mph1 helicase promotes BIR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Expedient Repair of Structural Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-01

    DIO (b) Scraped out shear key connection method Exiting Beam - L~J ýEpox~y. ~iti~ai Wil ~Addifia WaD (c) Adhered precast concrete shear key method...Committee 506, Detroit, Michigan, 1988. 23. Robles, F., et al., Metod de raci Refuerzo Emnlados e la Ciudad di Mexico a Raiz de 10 Sismos de Sentiembre de

  12. Construction safety program for the National Ignition Facility Appendix A: Safety Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerruti, S.J.

    1997-01-14

    These rules apply to all LLNL employees, non-LLNL employees (including contract labor, supplemental labor, vendors, personnel matrixed/assigned from other National Laboratories, participating guests, visitors and students) and construction contractors/subcontractors. The General Safety and Health rules shall be used by management to promote accident prevention through indoctrination, safety and health training and on-the-job application. As a condition for contracts award, all contractors and subcontractors and their employees must certify on Form S & H A-1 that they have read and understand, or have been briefed and understand, the National Ignition Facility OCIP Project General Safety Rules.

  13. A kinetic framework for tRNA ligase and enforcement of a 2'-phosphate requirement for ligation highlights the design logic of an RNA repair machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remus, Barbara S; Shuman, Stewart

    2013-05-01

    tRNA ligases are essential components of informational and stress-response pathways entailing repair of RNA breaks with 2',3'-cyclic phosphate and 5'-OH ends. Plant and fungal tRNA ligases comprise three catalytic domains. Phosphodiesterase and kinase modules heal the broken ends to generate the 3'-OH, 2'-PO₄, and 5'-PO₄ required for sealing by the ligase. We exploit RNA substrates with different termini to define rates of individual steps or subsets of steps along the repair pathway of plant ligase AtRNL. The results highlight rate-limiting transactions, how repair is affected by active-site mutations, and how mutations are bypassed by RNA alterations. We gain insights to 2'-PO₄ specificity by showing that AtRNL is deficient in transferring AMP to pRNAOH to form AppRNAOH but proficient at sealing pre-adenylylated AppRNAOH. This strategy for discriminating 2'-PO₄ versus 2'-OH ends provides a quality-control checkpoint to ensure that only purposeful RNA breaks are sealed and to avoid nonspecific "capping" of 5'-PO₄ ends.

  14. Status and Control Requirements of the Planned Heavy Ion Tumor Therapy Accelerator Facility HICAT

    CERN Document Server

    Baer, R C; Haberer, T; Baer, Ralph C.; Eickhoff, Hartmut; Haberer, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    The HICAT project is a Heavy Ion accelerator for light ion Cancer Treatment to be built for the clinics in Heidelberg, Germany. It consists of a 7 MeV/u linac, a compact synchrotron and three treatment places, one of them equipped with a 360 degree gantry beam-line. The facility will implement the intensity controlled raster-scanning technique that was developed and successfully demonstrated at GSI with over 100 patients at present. In order to produce the beams with the characteristics requested by the treatment sequencer, the accelerator must operate on a pulse-to-pulse basis with different settings. This concept imposes strict and challenging demands on the operation of the accelerators and hence the control system of the facility. The control system should be developed, installed and maintained by and under the complete responsibility of an industrial system provider, using a state-of-the-art system and wide-spread industrial components wherever possible. The presentation covers the status of the project ...

  15. National Ignition Facility sub-system design requirements integrated timing system SSDR 1.5.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedwald, J.; Van Aersau, P.; Bliss, E.

    1996-08-26

    This System Design Requirement document establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Integrated Timing System, WBS 1.5.3 which is part of the NIF Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS). The Integrated Timing System provides all temporally-critical hardware triggers to components and equipment in other NIF systems.

  16. National Ignition Facility, subsystem design requirements beam control {ampersand} laser diagnostics SSDR 1.7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bliss, E.

    1996-11-01

    This Subsystem Design Requirement document is a development specification that establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Alignment subsystem (WBS 1.7.1), Beam Diagnostics (WBS 1.7.2), and the Wavefront Control subsystem (WBS 1.7. 3) of the NIF Laser System (WBS 1.3). These three subsystems are collectively referred to as the Beam Control & Laser Diagnostics Subsystem. The NIF is a multi-pass, 192-beam, high-power, neodymium-glass laser that meets requirements set forth in the NIF SDR 002 (Laser System). 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. System Requirements Analysis for a Computer-based Procedure in a Research Reactor Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jaek Wan; Jang, Gwi Sook; Seo, Sang Moon; Shin, Sung Ki [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    This can address many of the routine problems related to human error in the use of conventional, hard-copy operating procedures. An operating supporting system is also required in a research reactor. A well-made CBP can address the staffing issues of a research reactor and reduce the human errors by minimizing the operator's routine tasks. A CBP for a research reactor has not been proposed yet. Also, CBPs developed for nuclear power plants have powerful and various technical functions to cover complicated plant operation situations. However, many of the functions may not be required for a research reactor. Thus, it is not reasonable to apply the CBP to a research reactor directly. Also, customizing of the CBP is not cost-effective. Therefore, a compact CBP should be developed for a research reactor. This paper introduces high level requirements derived by the system requirements analysis activity as the first stage of system implementation. Operation support tools are under consideration for application to research reactors. In particular, as a full digitalization of the main control room, application of a computer-based procedure system has been required as a part of man-machine interface system because it makes an impact on the operating staffing and human errors of a research reactor. To establish computer-based system requirements for a research reactor, this paper addressed international standards and previous practices on nuclear plants.

  18. Hyperrecombination in pneumococcus: A/G to C.G repair and requirement for DNA polymerase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasta, F; Sicard, M A

    1994-09-01

    During pneumococcal transformation, we had previously described that the ami36 mutation, which results from a C.G to A.T transversion, induces a large excess of wild-type recombinants in two point crosses. Upon donor-recipient DNA recombination, two heteroduplexes are generated by this mutation: A36/G+ and C+/T36. In two point crosses, hyperrecombination is observed only when transformation leads to the A/G mismatch. Here, we have studied the separate evolution of A36/G+ and C+/T36 heterozygotes created upon transformation of an ami36 mutant strain with artificial heteroduplex DNAs. We found that the A36/G+ mismatch leads to a preferential generation of wild-type progeny as compared with the complementary C+/T36 mismatch. This result suggests that A/G carrying transformants partly behave as wild-type homozygotes. The only way to account for such behavior is an excision repair correcting some A/G mispairs created upon transformation into C.G pairs. Moreover, we show that hyperrecombination triggered by ami36 is strongly reduced in a DNA polymerase I deficient strain. This strengthens the fact of DNA repair synthesis, which should be therefore prominently due to DNA polymerase I.

  19. 40 CFR 63.11087 - What requirements must I meet for gasoline storage tanks if my facility is a bulk gasoline...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline storage tanks if my facility is a bulk gasoline terminal, pipeline breakout station, or pipeline... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Source Category: Gasoline... § 63.11087 What requirements must I meet for gasoline storage tanks if my facility is a bulk...

  20. 40 CFR 63.11088 - What requirements must I meet for gasoline loading racks if my facility is a bulk gasoline...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline loading racks if my facility is a bulk gasoline terminal, pipeline breakout station, or pipeline... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Source Category: Gasoline... § 63.11088 What requirements must I meet for gasoline loading racks if my facility is a bulk...

  1. 40 CFR 112.8 - Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure Plan requirements for onshore facilities (excluding...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Requirements for Petroleum Oils and Non-Petroleum Oils, Except Animal Fats and Oils and Greases, and Fish and... pits are commonly employed for this purpose. You may also use an alternative system consisting of a... qualifications for personnel performing tests and inspections, the frequency and type of testing and inspections...

  2. National Ignition Facility subsystem design requirements target diagnostics subsystem SSDR 1.8.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.

    1996-10-28

    This SSDR establishes the performance, design, development and test requirements for the Target Experimental System`s Diagnostic, WBS 1.8. 3. This includes the individual diagnostic components, the Target Diagnostic Data Acquisition System (Target DAS), the diagnostic vacuum system, the timing/fiducial system, and the EMI protection system.

  3. 33 CFR 154.814 - Facility requirements for vessel vapor overpressure and vacuum protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... vapor connection and the manual isolation valve, if required by § 154.810(h) of this subpart, unless an... valves and 80 percent of the lowest setting of any of the vessel's pressure relief valves for a non... pressure relief valves for an inerted tank vessel. The system must be capable of maintaining the pressure...

  4. A Study of Airbase Facility/Utility Energy R and D Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-01

    The boiler on top of the tower captures the heat focused on it by the heliostat field and transfers it to a working fluid. The working fluid is then...The operation of these airbases, each similar to a small city, in a posture of readiness requires large amounts of energy for electric power, heating ...118 76 Simplified Schematic of a Stirling Cycle Heat Engine

  5. System Design Description and Requirements for Modeling the Off-Gas Systems for Fuel Recycling Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daryl R. Haefner; Jack D. Law; Troy J. Tranter

    2010-08-01

    This document provides descriptions of the off-gases evolved during spent nuclear fuel processing and the systems used to capture the gases of concern. Two reprocessing techniques are discussed, namely aqueous separations and electrochemical (pyrochemical) processing. The unit operations associated with each process are described in enough detail so that computer models to mimic their behavior can be developed. The document also lists the general requirements for the desired computer models.

  6. Review of the neutral-beam current requirements for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, G.D.; Coensgen, F.H.; Devoto, R.S.; Molvik, A.W.; Osher, J.F.; Shearer, J.W.; Thomassen, K.I.

    1978-08-04

    The techniques used to evaluate the beam-current requirements for MFTF are similar to those in previous studies but incorporate some improvements. In particular, we have enlarged the radial code BUILDUP to allow for a smaller radial grid and to improve the numerical accuracy; we have also improved the model of the atomic physics processes and the particle-equilibrium calculations. Also, a model of plasma containment that conserves energy as well as particles but does not include any effect of the expected drift-cyclotron loss-cone (DCLC) turbulence has been incorporated into the previous studies. We show that the DCLC turbulence increases the average ion energy and decreases the particle confinement time. Because these effects cancel to first order, the beam-current requirements are independent of the turbulence. We find that 24 of the present LBL source modules would sustain a plasma with an average beta of 0.46. This figure is within 10% of the MFTF goal and is within our calculational accuracies. We further show that the beam-current requirements for the large-diameter plasma are consistent with those of experiments to study the buildup of a field-reversed plasma.

  7. Financial Responsibility Calculator to Accompany Proposed Requirements Under CERCLA Section 108(b) For Classes of Facilities in the Hardrock Mining Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    This calculator will help stakeholders (owners and operators) of hardrock mines or mineral processing facilities calculate the amount of financial responsibility they should obtain under the proposed CERCLA 108b requirements

  8. Interoperability requirements for a South African joint command and control test facility

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Le Roux, WH

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available , possibly using different protocols, addressing and content-based data routing is required. Routing is performed at application level, as opposed to network hubs, switches and routers. Data routing may also depend on a rule engine for routing... objects “on top of the terrain”) 4. Terrain passability 5. Land cover and vegetation 6. Political boundaries 7. Bodies of water and rivers 8. Roads and rail networks. JC3IEDM does provide for some geographic features, but it is not the aim...

  9. Waste disposal technology transfer matching requirement clusters for waste disposal facilities in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Thomas; Nelles, Michael; Flamme, Sabine; Jinming, Cai

    2012-11-01

    Even though technology transfer has been part of development aid programmes for many decades, it has more often than not failed to come to fruition. One reason is the absence of simple guidelines or decision making tools that help operators or plant owners to decide on the most suitable technology to adopt. Practical suggestions for choosing the most suitable technology to combat a specific problem are hard to get and technology drawbacks are not sufficiently highlighted. Western counterparts in technology transfer or development projects often underestimate or don't sufficiently account for the high investment costs for the imported incineration plant; the differing nature of Chinese MSW; the need for trained manpower; and the need to treat flue gas, bunker leakage water, and ash, all of which contain highly toxic elements. This article sets out requirements for municipal solid waste disposal plant owner/operators in China as well as giving an attribute assessment for the prevalent waste disposal plant types in order to assist individual decision makers in their evaluation process for what plant type might be most suitable in a given situation. There is no 'best' plant for all needs and purposes, and requirement constellations rely on generalisations meaning they cannot be blindly applied, but an alignment of a type of plant to a type of owner or operator can realistically be achieved. To this end, a four-step approach is suggested and a technology matrix is set out to ease the choice of technology to transfer and avoid past errors. The four steps are (1) Identification of plant owner/operator requirement clusters; (2) Determination of different municipal solid waste (MSW) treatment plant attributes; (3) Development of a matrix matching requirement clusters to plant attributes; (4) Application of Quality Function Deployment Method to aid in technology localisation. The technology transfer matrices thus derived show significant performance differences between the

  10. Research on Optimal Reserve Requirement of Repairable Air Material%航材可修件备用量需求优化研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    商兴华; 马燕妮

    2016-01-01

    为降低航材可修件成本,对其备用量进行优化研究。针对航材维修保障过程特点,用多服务窗有备用品的排队理论对航材可修件状态转移过程进行建模,仿真不同参数时相关目标值的变化情况,并以此为基础分析航材可修件最优备用量。结果表明:该模型可较为准确地模拟航材可修件的换修过程,减少航材可修件备用量需求,对实际工作中航材可修件备用量需求优化具有较好的指导作用。%In order to reduce the cost of repairable air material, the paper researches on its optimal reserve. In view of the characteristics of air material maintenance support process, a queuing theory of multi service window is used to model the state transfer process of the aircraft, and the relevant target values are simulated. The result shows that the model can simulate the repair process accurately and reduce the reserve level. The paper is useful for optimal reserve requirement of repairable air material.

  11. Air Quality Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research FacilityFacilities with operating permits for Title V of the Federal Clean Air Act, as well as facilities required to submit an air emissions inventory, and other facilities...

  12. APE1 is dispensable for S-region cleavage but required for its repair in class switch recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianliang; Husain, Afzal; Hu, Wenjun; Honjo, Tasuku; Kobayashi, Maki

    2014-12-02

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential for antibody diversification, namely somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR). The deficiency of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (Ape1) in CH12F3-2A B cells reduces CSR to ∼20% of wild-type cells, whereas the effect of APE1 loss on SHM has not been examined. Here we show that, although APE1's endonuclease activity is important for CSR, it is dispensable for SHM as well as IgH/c-myc translocation. Importantly, APE1 deficiency did not show any defect in AID-induced S-region break formation, but blocked both the recruitment of repair protein Ku80 to the S region and the synapse formation between Sμ and Sα. Knockdown of end-processing factors such as meiotic recombination 11 homolog (MRE11) and carboxy-terminal binding protein (CtBP)-interacting protein (CtIP) further reduced the remaining CSR in Ape1-null CH12F3-2A cells. Together, our results show that APE1 is dispensable for SHM and AID-induced DNA breaks and may function as a DNA end-processing enzyme to facilitate the joining of broken ends during CSR.

  13. Functional genomics indicates yeast requires Golgi/ER transport, chromatin remodeling, and DNA repair for low dose DMSO tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon David Gaytán

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO is frequently utilized as a solvent in toxicological and pharmaceutical investigations. It is therefore important to establish the cellular and molecular targets of DMSO in order to differentiate its intrinsic effects from those elicited by a compound of interest. We performed a genome-wide functional screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify deletion mutants exhibiting sensitivity to 1% DMSO, a concentration standard to yeast chemical profiling studies. We report that mutants defective in Golgi/ER transport are sensitive to DMSO, including those lacking components of the conserved oligomeric Golgi (COG complex. Moreover, strains deleted for members of the SWR1 histone exchange complex are hypersensitive to DMSO, with additional chromatin remodeling mutants displaying a range of growth defects. We also identify DNA repair genes important for DMSO tolerance. Finally, we demonstrate that overexpression of histone H2A.Z, which replaces chromatin-associated histone H2A in a SWR1-catalyzed reaction, confers resistance to DMSO. Many yeast genes described in this study have homologs in more complex organisms, and the data provided is applicable to future investigations into the cellular and molecular mechanisms of DMSO toxicity.

  14. Condensin HEAT subunits required for DNA repair, kinetochore/centromere function and ploidy maintenance in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingya Xu

    Full Text Available Condensin, a central player in eukaryotic chromosomal dynamics, contains five evolutionarily-conserved subunits. Two SMC (structural maintenance of chromosomes subunits contain ATPase, hinge, and coiled-coil domains. One non-SMC subunit is similar to bacterial kleisin, and two other non-SMC subunits contain HEAT (similar to armadillo repeats. Here we report isolation and characterization of 21 fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe mutants for three non-SMC subunits, created using error-prone mutagenesis that resulted in single-amino acid substitutions. Beside condensation, segregation, and DNA repair defects, similar to those observed in previously isolated SMC and cnd2 mutants, novel phenotypes were observed for mutants of HEAT-repeats containing Cnd1 and Cnd3 subunits. cnd3-L269P is hypersensitive to the microtubule poison, thiabendazole, revealing defects in kinetochore/centromere and spindle assembly checkpoints. Three cnd1 and three cnd3 mutants increased cell size and doubled DNA content, thereby eliminating the haploid state. Five of these mutations reside in helix B of HEAT repeats. Two non-SMC condensin subunits, Cnd1 and Cnd3, are thus implicated in ploidy maintenance.

  15. RAD50 is required for efficient initiation of resection and recombinational repair at random, gamma-induced double-strand break ends.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Westmoreland

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Resection of DNA double-strand break (DSB ends is generally considered a critical determinant in pathways of DSB repair and genome stability. Unlike for enzymatically induced site-specific DSBs, little is known about processing of random "dirty-ended" DSBs created by DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiation. Here we present a novel system for monitoring early events in the repair of random DSBs, based on our finding that single-strand tails generated by resection at the ends of large molecules in budding yeast decreases mobility during pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. We utilized this "PFGE-shift" to follow the fate of both ends of linear molecules generated by a single random DSB in circular chromosomes. Within 10 min after gamma-irradiation of G2/M arrested WT cells, there is a near-synchronous PFGE-shift of the linearized circular molecules, corresponding to resection of a few hundred bases. Resection at the radiation-induced DSBs continues so that by the time of significant repair of DSBs at 1 hr there is about 1-2 kb resection per DSB end. The PFGE-shift is comparable in WT and recombination-defective rad52 and rad51 strains but somewhat delayed in exo1 mutants. However, in rad50 and mre11 null mutants the initiation and generation of resected ends at radiation-induced DSB ends is greatly reduced in G2/M. Thus, the Rad50/Mre11/Xrs2 complex is responsible for rapid processing of most damaged ends into substrates that subsequently undergo recombinational repair. A similar requirement was found for RAD50 in asynchronously growing cells. Among the few molecules exhibiting shift in the rad50 mutant, the residual resection is consistent with resection at only one of the DSB ends. Surprisingly, within 1 hr after irradiation, double-length linear molecules are detected in the WT and rad50, but not in rad52, strains that are likely due to crossovers that are largely resection- and RAD50-independent.

  16. RAD50 is required for efficient initiation of resection and recombinational repair at random, gamma-induced double-strand break ends.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Westmoreland

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Resection of DNA double-strand break (DSB ends is generally considered a critical determinant in pathways of DSB repair and genome stability. Unlike for enzymatically induced site-specific DSBs, little is known about processing of random "dirty-ended" DSBs created by DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiation. Here we present a novel system for monitoring early events in the repair of random DSBs, based on our finding that single-strand tails generated by resection at the ends of large molecules in budding yeast decreases mobility during pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. We utilized this "PFGE-shift" to follow the fate of both ends of linear molecules generated by a single random DSB in circular chromosomes. Within 10 min after gamma-irradiation of G2/M arrested WT cells, there is a near-synchronous PFGE-shift of the linearized circular molecules, corresponding to resection of a few hundred bases. Resection at the radiation-induced DSBs continues so that by the time of significant repair of DSBs at 1 hr there is about 1-2 kb resection per DSB end. The PFGE-shift is comparable in WT and recombination-defective rad52 and rad51 strains but somewhat delayed in exo1 mutants. However, in rad50 and mre11 null mutants the initiation and generation of resected ends at radiation-induced DSB ends is greatly reduced in G2/M. Thus, the Rad50/Mre11/Xrs2 complex is responsible for rapid processing of most damaged ends into substrates that subsequently undergo recombinational repair. A similar requirement was found for RAD50 in asynchronously growing cells. Among the few molecules exhibiting shift in the rad50 mutant, the residual resection is consistent with resection at only one of the DSB ends. Surprisingly, within 1 hr after irradiation, double-length linear molecules are detected in the WT and rad50, but not in rad52, strains that are likely due to crossovers that are largely resection- and RAD50-independent.

  17. RAD50 Is Required for Efficient Initiation of Resection and Recombinational Repair at Random, γ-Induced Double-Strand Break Ends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westmoreland, Jim; Ma, Wenjian; Yan, Yan; Van Hulle, Kelly; Malkova, Anna; Resnick, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Resection of DNA double-strand break (DSB) ends is generally considered a critical determinant in pathways of DSB repair and genome stability. Unlike for enzymatically induced site-specific DSBs, little is known about processing of random “dirty-ended” DSBs created by DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiation. Here we present a novel system for monitoring early events in the repair of random DSBs, based on our finding that single-strand tails generated by resection at the ends of large molecules in budding yeast decreases mobility during pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). We utilized this “PFGE-shift” to follow the fate of both ends of linear molecules generated by a single random DSB in circular chromosomes. Within 10 min after γ-irradiation of G2/M arrested WT cells, there is a near-synchronous PFGE-shift of the linearized circular molecules, corresponding to resection of a few hundred bases. Resection at the radiation-induced DSBs continues so that by the time of significant repair of DSBs at 1 hr there is about 1–2 kb resection per DSB end. The PFGE-shift is comparable in WT and recombination-defective rad52 and rad51 strains but somewhat delayed in exo1 mutants. However, in rad50 and mre11 null mutants the initiation and generation of resected ends at radiation-induced DSB ends is greatly reduced in G2/M. Thus, the Rad50/Mre11/Xrs2 complex is responsible for rapid processing of most damaged ends into substrates that subsequently undergo recombinational repair. A similar requirement was found for RAD50 in asynchronously growing cells. Among the few molecules exhibiting shift in the rad50 mutant, the residual resection is consistent with resection at only one of the DSB ends. Surprisingly, within 1 hr after irradiation, double-length linear molecules are detected in the WT and rad50, but not in rad52, strains that are likely due to crossovers that are largely resection- and RAD50-independent. PMID:19763170

  18. Instrumentation concepts and requirements for a space vacuum research facility. [molecular shield for spaceborne experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, H. N.

    1979-01-01

    An earth-orbiting molecular shield that offers a unique opportunity for conducting physics, chemistry, and material processing experiments under a combination of environmental conditions that are not available in terrestrial laboratories is equipped with apparatus for forming a molecular beam from the freestream. Experiments are carried out using a moderate energy, high flux density, high purity atomic oxygen beam in the very low density environment within the molecular shield. As a minimum, the following instruments are required for the molecular shield: (1) a mass spectrometer; (2) a multifunction material analysis instrumentation system; and (3) optical spectrometry equipment. The design is given of a furlable molecular shield that allows deployment and retrieval of the system (including instrumentation and experiments) to be performed without contamination. Interfaces between the molecular shield system and the associated spacecraft are given. An in-flight deployment sequence is discussed that minimizes the spacecraft-induced contamination in the vicinity of the shield. Design approaches toward a precursor molecular shield system are shown.

  19. Tendon repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repair of tendon ... Tendon repair can be performed using: Local anesthesia (the immediate area of the surgery is pain-free) ... a cut on the skin over the injured tendon. The damaged or torn ends of the tendon ...

  20. 33 CFR 158.240 - Ship repair yards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ship repair yards. 158.240... Facilities: Oily Mixtures § 158.240 Ship repair yards. The reception facility that services oceangoing ships using a ship repair yard must have a capacity for receiving— (a) An amount of ballast from bunker...

  1. INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bill Bruce; Nancy Porter; George Ritter; Matt Boring; Mark Lozev; Ian Harris; Bill Mohr; Dennis Harwig; Robin Gordon; Chris Neary; Mike Sullivan

    2005-07-20

    The two broad categories of fiber-reinforced composite liner repair and deposited weld metal repair technologies were reviewed and evaluated for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Principal conclusions from a survey of natural gas transmission industry pipeline operators can be summarized in terms of the following performance requirements for internal repair: (1) Use of internal repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway crossings. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm (20 in.) to 762 mm (30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. Evaluation trials were conducted on pipe sections with simulated corrosion damage repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liners, carbon fiber-reinforced composite liners, and weld deposition. Additional un-repaired pipe sections were evaluated in the virgin condition and with simulated damage. Hydrostatic failure pressures for pipe sections repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liner were only marginally greater than that of pipe sections without

  2. 40 CFR 60.692-6 - Standards: Delay of repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards: Delay of repair. 60.692-6... From Petroleum Refinery Wastewater Systems § 60.692-6 Standards: Delay of repair. (a) Delay of repair of facilities that are subject to the provisions of this subpart will be allowed if the repair...

  3. 40 CFR 61.350 - Standards: Delay of repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards: Delay of repair. 61.350... Waste Operations § 61.350 Standards: Delay of repair. (a) Delay of repair of facilities or units that are subject to the provisions of this subpart will be allowed if the repair is technically...

  4. 40 CFR 265.1059 - Standards: Delay of repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards: Delay of repair. 265.1059... DISPOSAL FACILITIES Air Emission Standards for Equipment Leaks § 265.1059 Standards: Delay of repair. (a) Delay of repair of equipment for which leaks have been detected will be allowed if the repair...

  5. INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Ian Harris; Dennis Harwig; George Ritter; Bill Mohr; Matt Boring; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

    2004-12-31

    The two broad categories of fiber-reinforced composite liner repair and deposited weld metal repair technologies were reviewed and evaluated for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Principal conclusions from a survey of natural gas transmission industry pipeline operators can be summarized in terms of the following performance requirements for internal repair: (1) Use of internal repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway crossings. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm (20 in.) to 762 mm (30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. Evaluation trials were conducted on pipe sections with simulated corrosion damage repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liners, carbon fiber-reinforced composite liners, and weld deposition. Additional un-repaired pipe sections were evaluated in the virgin condition and with simulated damage. Hydrostatic failure pressures for pipe sections repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liner were only marginally greater than that of pipe sections without

  6. Alignment of Homologous Chromosomes and Effective Repair of Programmed DNA Double-Strand Breaks during Mouse Meiosis Require the Minichromosome Maintenance Domain Containing 2 (MCMDC2) Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterbusch, Friederike; Ravindranathan, Ramya; Dereli, Ihsan; Stanzione, Marcello; Tränkner, Daniel; Tóth, Attila

    2016-10-01

    Orderly chromosome segregation during the first meiotic division requires meiotic recombination to form crossovers between homologous chromosomes (homologues). Members of the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) helicase family have been implicated in meiotic recombination. In addition, they have roles in initiation of DNA replication, DNA mismatch repair and mitotic DNA double-strand break repair. Here, we addressed the function of MCMDC2, an atypical yet conserved MCM protein, whose function in vertebrates has not been reported. While we did not find an important role for MCMDC2 in mitotically dividing cells, our work revealed that MCMDC2 is essential for fertility in both sexes due to a crucial function in meiotic recombination. Meiotic recombination begins with the introduction of DNA double-strand breaks into the genome. DNA ends at break sites are resected. The resultant 3-prime single-stranded DNA overhangs recruit RAD51 and DMC1 recombinases that promote the invasion of homologous duplex DNAs by the resected DNA ends. Multiple strand invasions on each chromosome promote the alignment of homologous chromosomes, which is a prerequisite for inter-homologue crossover formation during meiosis. We found that although DNA ends at break sites were evidently resected, and they recruited RAD51 and DMC1 recombinases, these recombinases were ineffective in promoting alignment of homologous chromosomes in the absence of MCMDC2. Consequently, RAD51 and DMC1 foci, which are thought to mark early recombination intermediates, were abnormally persistent in Mcmdc2-/- meiocytes. Importantly, the strand invasion stabilizing MSH4 protein, which marks more advanced recombination intermediates, did not efficiently form foci in Mcmdc2-/- meiocytes. Thus, our work suggests that MCMDC2 plays an important role in either the formation, or the stabilization, of DNA strand invasion events that promote homologue alignment and provide the basis for inter-homologue crossover formation during

  7. Communication: An important element of maintenance and repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, James S.

    1992-01-01

    People from the airlines, the FAA, and the manufacturers have worked together in an effort to improve the Service Difficulty Reporting system. Their work to date is summarized as follows: (1) design a worldwide reporting system to provide safety alerts to aircraft operators, manufacturers, repair facilities, and regulatory authorities; (2) design a companion system to provide worldwide reliability experience; and (3) overhaul regulatory requirements to be consistent with (1) and (2) to provide information necessary and useful for public consumption.

  8. Bladder exstrophy repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladder birth defect repair; Everted bladder repair; Exposed bladder repair; Repair of bladder exstrophy ... Bladder exstrophy repair involves two surgeries. The first surgery is to repair the bladder and the second one is to attach ...

  9. 14 CFR 145.109 - Equipment, materials, and data requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment, materials, and data requirements... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES REPAIR STATIONS Housing, Facilities, Equipment, Materials, and Data § 145.109 Equipment, materials, and data requirements. (a) Except as otherwise...

  10. INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Ian Harris; Dennis Harwig; George Ritter; Bill Mohr; Matt Boring; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

    2004-08-17

    The two broad categories of fiber-reinforced composite liner repair and deposited weld metal repair technologies were reviewed and evaluated for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Principal conclusions from a survey of natural gas transmission industry pipeline operators can be summarized in terms of the following performance requirements for internal repair: (1) Use of internal repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm (20 in.) to 762 mm (30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. Evaluation trials were conducted on pipe sections with simulated corrosion damage repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liners, carbon fiber-reinforced composite liners, and weld deposition. Additional un-repaired pipe sections were evaluated in the virgin condition and with simulated damage. Hydrostatic failure pressures for pipe sections repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liner were only marginally greater than that of pipe sections without liners

  11. The test facility requirements for the thermal vacuum thermal balance test of the Cosmic Background Explorer Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milam, Laura J.

    1990-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer Observatory (COBE) underwent a thermal vacuum thermal balance test in the Space Environment Simulator (SES). This was the largest and most complex test ever conducted at this facility. The 4 x 4 m (13 x 13 ft) spacecraft weighed approx. 2223 kg (4900 lbs) for the test. The test set up included simulator panels for the inboard solar array panels, simulator panels for the flight cowlings, Sun and Earth Sensor stimuli, Thermal Radio Frequency Shield heater stimuli and a cryopanel for thermal control in the Attitude Control System Shunt Dissipator area. The fixturing also included a unique 4.3 m (14 ft) diameter Gaseous Helium Cryopanel which provided a 20 K environment for the calibration of one of the spacecraft's instruments, the Differential Microwave Radiometer. This cryogenic panel caused extra contamination concerns and a special method was developed and written into the test procedure to prevent the high buildup of condensibles on the panel which could have led to backstreaming of the thermal vacuum chamber. The test was completed with a high quality simulated space environment provided to the spacecraft. The test requirements, test set up, and special fixturing are described.

  12. Artemis is required to improve the accuracy of repair of double-strand breaks with 5'-blocked termini generated from non-DSB-clustered lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyarchuk, Svitlana; Castore, Reneau; Shi, Runhua; Harrison, Lynn

    2013-05-01

    Clustered DNA lesions are defined as ≥2 damage events within 20 bp. Oxidised bases, abasic (AP) sites, single-strand breaks and double-strand breaks (DSBs) exist in radiation-induced clusters, and these lesions are more difficult to repair and can be more mutagenic than single lesions. Understanding clustered lesion repair is therefore important for the design of complementary treatments to enhance radiotherapy. Non-DSB-clustered lesions consisting of opposing AP sites can be converted to DSBs by base excision repair, and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) plays a role in repairing these DSBs. Artemis is an endonuclease that removes blocking groups from DSB termini during NHEJ. Hence, we hypothesised that Artemis plays a role in the processing of DSBs or complex DSBs generated from non-DSB-clustered lesions. We examined the repair of clusters containing two or three lesions in wild-type (WT) or Artemis-deficient (ART(-/-)) mouse fibroblasts using a reporter plasmid. Each cluster contained two opposing tetrahydrofurans (an AP site analogue), which AP endonuclease can convert to a DSB with blocked 5' termini. Loss of Artemis did not decrease plasmid survival, but did result in more mutagenic repair with plasmids containing larger deletions. This increase in deletions did not occur with ClaI-linearised plasmid. Since Mre11 has been implicated in deletional NHEJ, we used small interfering RNA to reduce Mre11 in WT and ART(-/-) cells, but decreasing Mre11 did not change the size of deletions in the repair products. This work implicates Artemis in limiting the deletions introduced during repair of 5'-blocked termini DSBs generated from non-DSB-clustered lesions. Decreasing repair accuracy without decreasing repair capacity could result in mutated cells surviving irradiation. Inhibiting Artemis in normal cells could promote carcinogenesis, while in tumour cells enhanced mutagenic repair following irradiation could promote tumour recurrence.

  13. Sealing of chromosomal DNA nicks during nucleotide excision repair requires XRCC1 and DNA ligase III alpha in a cell-cycle-specific manner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moser, Jill; Kool, Hanneke; Giakzidis, Ioannis; Caldecott, Keith; Mullenders, Leon H. F.; Fousteri, Maria I.

    2007-01-01

    Impaired gap filling and sealing of chromosomal DNA in nucleotide excision repair (NER) leads to genome instability. XRCC1-DNA ligase III alpha (XRCC1-Lig3) plays a central role in the repair of DNA single-strand breaks but has never been implicated in NER. Here we show that XRCC1-Lig3 is indispensa

  14. Sealing of chromosomal DNA nicks during nucleotide excision repair requires XRCC1 and DNA ligase III alpha in a cell-cycle-specific manner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moser, Jill; Kool, Hanneke; Giakzidis, Ioannis; Caldecott, Keith; Mullenders, Leon H. F.; Fousteri, Maria I.

    2007-01-01

    Impaired gap filling and sealing of chromosomal DNA in nucleotide excision repair (NER) leads to genome instability. XRCC1-DNA ligase III alpha (XRCC1-Lig3) plays a central role in the repair of DNA single-strand breaks but has never been implicated in NER. Here we show that XRCC1-Lig3 is

  15. Meiosis-specific cohesin component, Stag3 is essential for maintaining centromere chromatid cohesion, and required for DNA repair and synapsis between homologous chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Hopkins

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cohesins are important for chromosome structure and chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis. Cohesins are composed of two structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC1-SMC3 proteins that form a V-shaped heterodimer structure, which is bridged by a α-kleisin protein and a stromal antigen (STAG protein. Previous studies in mouse have shown that there is one SMC1 protein (SMC1β, two α-kleisins (RAD21L and REC8 and one STAG protein (STAG3 that are meiosis-specific. During meiosis, homologous chromosomes must recombine with one another in the context of a tripartite structure known as the synaptonemal complex (SC. From interaction studies, it has been shown that there are at least four meiosis-specific forms of cohesin, which together with the mitotic cohesin complex, are lateral components of the SC. STAG3 is the only meiosis-specific subunit that is represented within all four meiosis-specific cohesin complexes. In Stag3 mutant germ cells, the protein level of other meiosis-specific cohesin subunits (SMC1β, RAD21L and REC8 is reduced, and their localization to chromosome axes is disrupted. In contrast, the mitotic cohesin complex remains intact and localizes robustly to the meiotic chromosome axes. The instability of meiosis-specific cohesins observed in Stag3 mutants results in aberrant DNA repair processes, and disruption of synapsis between homologous chromosomes. Furthermore, mutation of Stag3 results in perturbation of pericentromeric heterochromatin clustering, and disruption of centromere cohesion between sister chromatids during meiotic prophase. These defects result in early prophase I arrest and apoptosis in both male and female germ cells. The meiotic defects observed in Stag3 mutants are more severe when compared to single mutants for Smc1β, Rec8 and Rad21l, however they are not as severe as the Rec8, Rad21l double mutants. Taken together, our study demonstrates that STAG3 is required for the stability of all meiosis

  16. Meiosis-specific cohesin component, Stag3 is essential for maintaining centromere chromatid cohesion, and required for DNA repair and synapsis between homologous chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Jessica; Hwang, Grace; Jacob, Justin; Sapp, Nicklas; Bedigian, Rick; Oka, Kazuhiro; Overbeek, Paul; Murray, Steve; Jordan, Philip W

    2014-07-01

    Cohesins are important for chromosome structure and chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis. Cohesins are composed of two structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC1-SMC3) proteins that form a V-shaped heterodimer structure, which is bridged by a α-kleisin protein and a stromal antigen (STAG) protein. Previous studies in mouse have shown that there is one SMC1 protein (SMC1β), two α-kleisins (RAD21L and REC8) and one STAG protein (STAG3) that are meiosis-specific. During meiosis, homologous chromosomes must recombine with one another in the context of a tripartite structure known as the synaptonemal complex (SC). From interaction studies, it has been shown that there are at least four meiosis-specific forms of cohesin, which together with the mitotic cohesin complex, are lateral components of the SC. STAG3 is the only meiosis-specific subunit that is represented within all four meiosis-specific cohesin complexes. In Stag3 mutant germ cells, the protein level of other meiosis-specific cohesin subunits (SMC1β, RAD21L and REC8) is reduced, and their localization to chromosome axes is disrupted. In contrast, the mitotic cohesin complex remains intact and localizes robustly to the meiotic chromosome axes. The instability of meiosis-specific cohesins observed in Stag3 mutants results in aberrant DNA repair processes, and disruption of synapsis between homologous chromosomes. Furthermore, mutation of Stag3 results in perturbation of pericentromeric heterochromatin clustering, and disruption of centromere cohesion between sister chromatids during meiotic prophase. These defects result in early prophase I arrest and apoptosis in both male and female germ cells. The meiotic defects observed in Stag3 mutants are more severe when compared to single mutants for Smc1β, Rec8 and Rad21l, however they are not as severe as the Rec8, Rad21l double mutants. Taken together, our study demonstrates that STAG3 is required for the stability of all meiosis-specific cohesin

  17. Meiosis-specific cohesin component, Stag3 is essential for maintaining centromere chromatid cohesion, and required for DNA repair and synapsis between homologous chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Hopkins

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cohesins are important for chromosome structure and chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis. Cohesins are composed of two structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC1-SMC3 proteins that form a V-shaped heterodimer structure, which is bridged by a α-kleisin protein and a stromal antigen (STAG protein. Previous studies in mouse have shown that there is one SMC1 protein (SMC1β, two α-kleisins (RAD21L and REC8 and one STAG protein (STAG3 that are meiosis-specific. During meiosis, homologous chromosomes must recombine with one another in the context of a tripartite structure known as the synaptonemal complex (SC. From interaction studies, it has been shown that there are at least four meiosis-specific forms of cohesin, which together with the mitotic cohesin complex, are lateral components of the SC. STAG3 is the only meiosis-specific subunit that is represented within all four meiosis-specific cohesin complexes. In Stag3 mutant germ cells, the protein level of other meiosis-specific cohesin subunits (SMC1β, RAD21L and REC8 is reduced, and their localization to chromosome axes is disrupted. In contrast, the mitotic cohesin complex remains intact and localizes robustly to the meiotic chromosome axes. The instability of meiosis-specific cohesins observed in Stag3 mutants results in aberrant DNA repair processes, and disruption of synapsis between homologous chromosomes. Furthermore, mutation of Stag3 results in perturbation of pericentromeric heterochromatin clustering, and disruption of centromere cohesion between sister chromatids during meiotic prophase. These defects result in early prophase I arrest and apoptosis in both male and female germ cells. The meiotic defects observed in Stag3 mutants are more severe when compared to single mutants for Smc1β, Rec8 and Rad21l, however they are not as severe as the Rec8, Rad21l double mutants. Taken together, our study demonstrates that STAG3 is required for the stability of all meiosis

  18. 40 CFR 63.11086 - What requirements must I meet if my facility is a bulk gasoline plant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... facility is a bulk gasoline plant? 63.11086 Section 63.11086 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Source Category: Gasoline Distribution Bulk Terminals, Bulk Plants, and Pipeline Facilities Emission... gasoline plant? Each owner or operator of an affected bulk gasoline plant, as defined in § 63.11100,...

  19. Building Accountability: A Review of State Standards and Requirements for K-12 Public School Facility Planning and Design. Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to inform the California Department of Education (CDE) in ensuring the standards contained in Title 5 appropriately promote the planning and design of healthy, safe and educationally suitable K-12 school facilities. The study gathers and analyzes K-12 facility standards in other states across the country to understand…

  20. Building Accountability in California: A Review of State Standards and Requirements for K-12 Public School Facility Planning and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to inform the California Department of Education (CDE) in ensuring the standards contained in Title 5 appropriately promote the planning and design of healthy, safe and educationally suitable K-12 school facilities. The study gathers and analyzes K-12 facility standards in ten case study states across the country to understand…

  1. Effect of pre-operative rectal diclofenac suppository on post-operative analgesic requirement in cleft palate repair: A randomised clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E S Adarsh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Opioid analgesics used for analgesia are associated with sedation, respiratory depression and post-operative nausea and vomiting. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as diclofenac are a safe and effective alternative with opioid-sparing effect. Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of pre-operative rectal diclofenac suppository (1 mg/kg in cleft palate repair for post-operative analgesia and reduction in post-operative opioid requirements. Study Design: A randomized clinical trial. Methods: After obtaining approval from the institutional ethical committee, 60 children were allocated by a computer-generated randomisation into two groups of 30 each; group D (Diclofenac group and group C (Conventional group. Children in group D and group C were similar in all aspects except for the fact that group D children received 1 mg/kg diclofenac suppository after induction. Pain was evaluated using modification of the objective pain scale by Hannallah and colleagues for 6 h post-operatively by an anaesthesiology resident or nursing staff who was blinded to the group. If the pain score was more than 3, rescue analgesic I.V. fentanyl 0.5 μgm/kg was administered. The pain scores at different intervals, number of doses and quantity of rescue analgesic required were noted. Results: We observed that pre-operative rectal diclofenac provided effective analgesia in the immediate post-operative period, as evidenced by reduced pain scores and reduced opioid requirement (P=0.00002. There was no evidence of any increased perioperative bleeding in the diclofenac group. Conclusion: Pre-operative rectal diclofenac reduces opioid consumption and provides good post-operative analgesia.

  2. INCREASING EFFICIENCY OF REPAIRING, MANUFACTURING AND OPERATION OF THE TPP FACILITIES BY TECHNOLOGY OF GAS-THERMAL COATING AND LASER SURFACE MELTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. E. Grachev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers effectiveness increase of the TPP heat-mechanical equipment repair, manufacturing and maintenance as exemplified by gas-thermal technique for hardening laststages rotor blades of the steam turbines. The rotor blades work under conditions of intense power loading, their airfoil being erosion-corrosion destructed by the action of the moist-steam flow. Repairing companies employ quite a number of technologies to restore some of erosion-worn rotor blades. Inter alia, argon-arc, plasma and gas-powder weld deposition of the original material with subsequent machining, stellite protection recovery, electrical spark alloying the entry edge mat surface, spraying ion-plasma coating on the blade airfoil surface. In domestic turbine building, rotor blades of the steam turbines last stages are manufactured of martensitic class stainless steel. The key condition for successful blade restoration is thermal effect minimizing on the base material for excluding the slag areas possible forming. The laser surface coating technology provides these conditions. They coat the surface of an item being processed by way of melting the base and the adding material. In as much the base melts smallest, the coating characteristics depend mainly on the properties of adding material. The procedure of laser coating passes through several stages including physical contact creation, chemical interaction (laser radiation absorption, volumetrical processes resulting in formation of stable bonds in volume of the materials that have reacted. For the low-pressure cylinder rotor blades supplementary protection against erosion destruction, LLC ‘Technological Systems of Protective Coating’ developed technology of the blade airfoil protective finish by method of high-speed gas-flame sputter. The company realized this technology in 2012 during K-200-12,8 turbine (of the Leningrad Metallurgical Works – LMZ repairing in Zainsk SDPP by JSC ‘Tatenergo’. The

  3. Concept design theory and model for multi-use space facilities: Analysis of key system design parameters through variance of mission requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynerson, Charles Martin

    This research has been performed to create concept design and economic feasibility data for space business parks. A space business park is a commercially run multi-use space station facility designed for use by a wide variety of customers. Both space hardware and crew are considered as revenue producing payloads. Examples of commercial markets may include biological and materials research, processing, and production, space tourism habitats, and satellite maintenance and resupply depots. This research develops a design methodology and an analytical tool to create feasible preliminary design information for space business parks. The design tool is validated against a number of real facility designs. Appropriate model variables are adjusted to ensure that statistical approximations are valid for subsequent analyses. The tool is used to analyze the effect of various payload requirements on the size, weight and power of the facility. The approach for the analytical tool was to input potential payloads as simple requirements, such as volume, weight, power, crew size, and endurance. In creating the theory, basic principles are used and combined with parametric estimation of data when necessary. Key system parameters are identified for overall system design. Typical ranges for these key parameters are identified based on real human spaceflight systems. To connect the economics to design, a life-cycle cost model is created based upon facility mass. This rough cost model estimates potential return on investments, initial investment requirements and number of years to return on the initial investment. Example cases are analyzed for both performance and cost driven requirements for space hotels, microgravity processing facilities, and multi-use facilities. In combining both engineering and economic models, a design-to-cost methodology is created for more accurately estimating the commercial viability for multiple space business park markets.

  4. Flight-testing of the self-repairing flight control system using the F-15 highly integrated digital electronic control flight research facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, James F.; Shuck, Thomas L.

    1990-01-01

    Flight tests conducted with the self-repairing flight control system (SRFCS) installed on the NASA F-15 highly integrated digital electronic control aircraft are described. The development leading to the current SRFCS configuration is highlighted. Key objectives of the program are outlined: (1) to flight-evaluate a control reconfiguration strategy with three types of control surface failure; (2) to evaluate a cockpit display that will inform the pilot of the maneuvering capacity of the damage aircraft; and (3) to flight-evaluate the onboard expert system maintenance diagnostics process using representative faults set to occur only under maneuvering conditions. Preliminary flight results addressing the operation of the overall system, as well as the individual technologies, are included.

  5. Plant γH2AX foci are required for proper DNA DSB repair responses and colocalize with E2F factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Julien; Smetana, Ondrej; Sanchez-Calderon, Lenin; Lincker, Frédéric; Genestier, Julie; Schmit, Anne-Catherine; Houlné, Guy; Chabouté, Marie-Edith

    2012-04-01

    Cellular responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are linked in mammals and yeasts to the phosphorylated histones H2AX (γH2AX) repair foci which are multiproteic nuclear complexes responsible for DSB sensing and signalling. However, neither the components of these foci nor their role are yet known in plants. In this paper, we describe the effects of γH2AX deficiency in Arabidopsis thaliana plants challenged with DSBs in terms of genotoxic sensitivity and E2F-mediated transcriptional responses. We further establish the existence, restrictive to the G1/S transition, of specific DSB-induced foci containing tobacco E2F transcription factors, in both A. thaliana roots and BY-2 tobacco cells. These E2F foci partially colocalize with γH2AX foci while their formation is ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent, requires the E2F transactivation domain with its retinoblastoma-binding site and is optimal in the presence of functional H2AXs. Overall, our results unveil a new interplay between plant H2AX and E2F transcriptional activators during the DSB response.

  6. INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Ian Harris; Dennis Harwig; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

    2004-04-12

    The two broad categories of deposited weld metal repair and fiber-reinforced composite liner repair technologies were reviewed for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Preliminary test programs were developed for both deposited weld metal repair and for fiber-reinforced composite liner repair. Evaluation trials have been conducted using a modified fiber-reinforced composite liner provided by RolaTube and pipe sections without liners. All pipe section specimens failed in areas of simulated damage. Pipe sections containing fiber-reinforced composite liners failed at pressures marginally greater than the pipe sections without liners. The next step is to evaluate a liner material with a modulus of elasticity approximately 95% of the modulus of elasticity for steel. Preliminary welding parameters were developed for deposited weld metal repair in preparation of the receipt of Pacific Gas & Electric's internal pipeline welding repair system (that was designed specifically for 559 mm (22 in.) diameter pipe) and the receipt of 559 mm (22 in.) pipe sections from Panhandle Eastern. The next steps are to transfer welding parameters to the PG&E system and to pressure test repaired pipe sections to failure. A survey of pipeline operators was conducted to better understand the needs and performance requirements of the natural gas transmission industry regarding internal repair. Completed surveys contained the following principal conclusions: (1) Use of internal weld repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway crossings. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling (HDD) when a new bore must be created

  7. Logistics support of space facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, William C.

    1988-01-01

    The logistic support of space facilities is described, with special attention given to the problem of sizing the inventory of ready spares kept at the space facility. Where possible, data from the Space Shuttle Orbiter is extrapolated to provide numerical estimates for space facilities. Attention is also given to repair effort estimation and long duration missions.

  8. Repair of recurrent hernia is often performed at a different clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nolsøe, A; Andresen, K; Rosenberg, J

    2016-01-01

    were performed at a different healthcare facility. Time to reoperation, age at time of repair and having the primary repair performed at a private facility were all independent risk factors for being reoperated at a different facility in a logistic regression model. CONCLUSION: One in four patients......PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to assess the extent of reoperations after hernia repair in Denmark that are being performed at a different facility than the primary repair and thereby investigate whether or not reoperation is a reliable basis for assessment of personal- or facility recurrence...... underwent repair for recurrent hernia at a different facility than the prior repair. Having the primary repair performed at a private hospital increased the risk of being reoperated at a different facility compared to having it performed at a public facility. This indicates that personal or institutional...

  9. Hypospadias repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the problem. If the repair is not done, problems may occur later on such as: Difficulty controlling and directing urine stream A curve in the penis during erection Decreased fertility Embarrassment about appearance of penis Surgery ...

  10. Patient-reported opioid analgesic requirements after elective inguinal hernia repair: A call for procedure-specific opioid-administration strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylonas, Konstantinos S; Reinhorn, Michael; Ott, Lauren R; Westfal, Maggie L; Masiakos, Peter T

    2017-08-01

    A better understanding of the analgesia needs of patients who undergo common operative procedures is necessary as we address the growing opioid public health crisis in the United States. The aim of this study was to evaluate patient experience with our opioid prescribing practice after elective inguinal hernia repairs. A prospective, observational study was conducted between October 1, 2015, and September 30, 2016, in a single-surgeon, high-volume, practice of inguinal hernia operation. Adult patients undergoing elective inguinal herniorrhaphy under local anesthesia with intravenous sedation were invited to participate. All patients were prescribed 10 opioid analgesic tablets postoperatively and were counseled to reserve opioids for pain not controlled by nonopioid analgesics. Their experience was captured by completing a questionnaire 2 to 3 weeks postoperatively during their postoperative visit. A total of 185 patients were surveyed. The majority of the participants were males (177, 95.7%) and ≥60 years old (96, 51.9%). Of the 185 patients, 159 (85.9%) reported using ≤4 opioid tablets; 110 patients (59.5%) reported that they used no opioid analgesics postoperatively. None of the patients was taking opioids within 7 days of their postoperative appointment. Of the 147 patients who were employed, 111 (75.5%) reported missing ≤3 work days, 57 of whom (51.4%) missed no work at all. Patients who were employed were more likely to take opioid analgesics postoperatively (P = .049). Patients who took no opioid analgesics experienced less maximum (P require any opioid analgesics, and nearly all of those who thought that they did need opioids used reserved.

  11. Team Training (Training at Own Facility versus Individual Surgeon’s Training (Training at Trainer’s Facility When Implementing a New Surgical Technique: Example from the ONSTEP Inguinal Hernia Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Rosenberg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. When implementing a new surgical technique, the best method for didactic learning has not been settled. There are basically two scenarios: the trainee goes to the teacher’s clinic and learns the new technique hands-on, or the teacher goes to the trainee’s clinic and performs the teaching there. Methods. An informal literature review was conducted to provide a basis for discussing pros and cons. We also wanted to discuss how many surgeons can be trained in a day and the importance of the demand for a new surgical procedure to ensure a high adoption rate and finally to apply these issues on a discussion of barriers for adoption of the new ONSTEP technique for inguinal hernia repair after initial training. Results and Conclusions. The optimal training method would include moving the teacher to the trainee’s department to obtain team-training effects simultaneous with surgical technical training of the trainee surgeon. The training should also include a theoretical presentation and discussion along with the practical training. Importantly, the training visit should probably be followed by a scheduled visit to clear misunderstandings and fine-tune the technique after an initial self-learning period.

  12. 42 CFR 413.65 - Requirements for a determination that a facility or an organization has provider-based status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) Facilities, other than those operating as parts of CAHs, furnishing only physical, occupational, or speech... payment for coverage of physical, occupational, or speech therapy, as described in section 1833(g)(2) of... determination under paragraph (b)(3) of this section. (l) Correction of errors. (1) If CMS determines that a...

  13. 40 CFR 63.11116 - Requirements for facilities with monthly throughput of less than 10,000 gallons of gasoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... monthly throughput of less than 10,000 gallons of gasoline. 63.11116 Section 63.11116 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Source Category: Gasoline Dispensing Facilities Emission Limitations and... gallons of gasoline. (a) You must not allow gasoline to be handled in a manner that would result in...

  14. 30 CFR 285.902 - What are the general requirements for decommissioning for facilities authorized under my SAP, COP...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... decommissioning for facilities authorized under my SAP, COP, or GAP? 285.902 Section 285.902 Mineral Resources... SAP, COP, or GAP? (a) Except as otherwise authorized by MMS under § 285.909, within 2 years following... under your SAP, COP, or GAP, you must submit a decommissioning application and receive approval from the...

  15. Fix-It Careers: Jobs in Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torpey, Elka Maria

    2010-01-01

    From auto mechanic to HVAC technicians, many occupations require repair skills. For jobseekers with the right skills, there are many advantages to a repair career. Repair work provides millions of jobs throughout the United States. Wages are often higher than average. And in many occupations, the employment outlook is bright. Plus, most repair…

  16. 32 CFR 174.14 - Maintenance and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maintenance and repair. 174.14 Section 174.14... REVITALIZING BASE CLOSURE COMMUNITIES AND ADDRESSING IMPACTS OF REALIGNMENT Maintenance and Repair § 174.14 Maintenance and repair. (a) Facilities and equipment located on installations being closed are often...

  17. Femoral hernia repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Femorocele repair; Herniorrhaphy; Hernioplasty - femoral ... During surgery to repair the hernia, the bulging tissue is pushed back in. The weakened area is sewn closed or strengthened. This repair ...

  18. Undescended testicle repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orchidopexy; Inguinal orchidopexy; Orchiopexy; Repair of undescended testicle; Cryptorchidism repair ... first year of life without treatment. Undescended testicle repair surgery is recommended for patients whose testicles do ...

  19. New instrument calibration facility for the DOE Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkie, W.H.; Polz, E.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1993-12-31

    A new laboratory facility is being designed, constructed, and equipped at the Savannah River Site (SRS) as a fiscal year 1992 line item project. This facility will provide space and equipment for test, evaluation, repair, maintenance, and calibration of radiation monitoring instrumentation. The project will replace an obsolete facility and will allow implementation of program upgrades necessary to meet ANSI N323 requirements and National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) criteria for accreditation of federally owned secondary calibration laboratories. An outline of the project is presented including description, scope, cost, management organization, chronology, and current status. Selected design criteria and their impacts on the project are discussed. The upgraded SRS calibration program is described, and important features of the new facility and equipment that will accommodate this program are listed. The floor plan for the facility is shown, and equipment summaries and functional descriptions for each area are provided.

  20. 77 FR 16796 - Lead Requirements for Lead-Based Paint Activities in Target Housing and Child-Occupied Facilities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 745 Lead Requirements for Lead-Based Paint Activities in Target Housing and Child... requirements, training program accreditation requirements, and work practice standards for lead-based paint... the Arkansas lead-based paint program and passed a new statute establishing a State lead-based paint...

  1. SHARC: Space Habitat, Assembly and Repair Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangelo, Todd; Hoetger, Debora; Kuo, Addison; Lo, Michael; Marcus, Leland; Tran, Philip; Tutt, Chris; Wassmuth, Chad; Wildgrube, Gregory

    1992-01-01

    Integrated Space Systems (ISS) has taken on the task of designing a Space Habitat, Assembly and Repair Center (SHARC) in Low Earth Orbit to meet the future needs of the space program. Our goal is to meet the general requirements given by the 1991/1992 AIAA/LORAL Team Space Design competition with an emphasis on minimizing the costs of such a design. A baseline structural configuration along with preliminary designs of the major subsystems was created. Our initial mission requirements, which were set by AIAA, were that the facility be able to: support simultaneous assembly of three major vehicles; conduct assembly operations and minimal extra vehicular activity (EVA); maintain orbit indefinitely; and assemble components 30 feet long with a 10 foot diameter in a shirtsleeve environment.

  2. WRN translocation from nucleolus to nucleoplasm is regulated by SIRT1 and required for DNA repair and the development of chemoresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun-Young; Lee, Hyunwoo; Kim, Eun-Sun; Park, Sojin; Lee, Jiyoen; Ahn, Byungchan

    2015-04-01

    When defective or absent, Werner syndrome protein (WRN) causes a genetic premature aging disorder called Werner syndrome. Several studies have reported that defects in WRN function are responsible for not only progeria syndrome but also genomic instability via the deregulation of DNA repair, replication, recombination, and telomere stability. Given the importance of WRN in the repair process, we herein investigated the potential role of WRN in drug response by evaluating the DNA repair following exposure to cisplatin in human cancer cell lines. We found that the down-regulation of SIRT1 and inhibition of SIRT1 deacetylase activity blocked the translocation of WRN from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm in response to genotoxic stresses. In addition, cells expressing low levels of WRN responded favorably to cisplatin, whereas cells expressing high levels responded poorly to cisplatin. The forced expression of WRN protein in chemosensitive cells resulted in an approximately two-fold increase in cell viability in response to cisplatin compared with vector controls and promoted DNA repair, while WRN-deficient cells accumulate unrepaired double-strand breaks following cisplatin exposure. These results suggest that WRN is regulated by SIRT1 and increased expression of WRN might be one of the determinants for the development of chemotherapeutic drug resistance.

  3. The C-terminal Domain (CTD) of Human DNA Glycosylase NEIL1 Is Required for Forming BERosome Repair Complex with DNA Replication Proteins at the Replicating Genome: DOMINANT NEGATIVE FUNCTION OF THE CTD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Pavana M; Dutta, Arijit; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Mitra, Joy; Adhikari, Sanjay; Tomkinson, Alan E; Li, Guo-Min; Boldogh, Istvan; Hazra, Tapas K; Mitra, Sankar; Hegde, Muralidhar L

    2015-08-21

    The human DNA glycosylase NEIL1 was recently demonstrated to initiate prereplicative base excision repair (BER) of oxidized bases in the replicating genome, thus preventing mutagenic replication. A significant fraction of NEIL1 in cells is present in large cellular complexes containing DNA replication and other repair proteins, as shown by gel filtration. However, how the interaction of NEIL1 affects its recruitment to the replication site for prereplicative repair was not investigated. Here, we show that NEIL1 binarily interacts with the proliferating cell nuclear antigen clamp loader replication factor C, DNA polymerase δ, and DNA ligase I in the absence of DNA via its non-conserved C-terminal domain (CTD); replication factor C interaction results in ∼8-fold stimulation of NEIL1 activity. Disruption of NEIL1 interactions within the BERosome complex, as observed for a NEIL1 deletion mutant (N311) lacking the CTD, not only inhibits complete BER in vitro but also prevents its chromatin association and reduced recruitment at replication foci in S phase cells. This suggests that the interaction of NEIL1 with replication and other BER proteins is required for efficient repair of the replicating genome. Consistently, the CTD polypeptide acts as a dominant negative inhibitor during in vitro repair, and its ectopic expression sensitizes human cells to reactive oxygen species. We conclude that multiple interactions among BER proteins lead to large complexes, which are critical for efficient BER in mammalian cells, and the CTD interaction could be targeted for enhancing drug/radiation sensitivity of tumor cells.

  4. Capacitated two-echelon inventory models for repairable item systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avsar, Z.M.; Zijm, Willem H.M.; Gershwin, S.B.; Dallery, Y.; Papadopoulos, C.; Smith, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we consider two-echelon maintenance systems with repair facilities both at a number of local service centers (called bases) and at a central location. Each repair facility may be considered to be a job shop and is modeled as a (limited capacity) open queuing network, while any

  5. Closed loop two-echelon repairable item systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjers, L.; van Ommeren, Jan C.W.; Zijm, Willem H.M.

    In this paper we consider closed loop two-echelon repairable item systems with repair facilities both at a number of local service centers (called bases) and at a central location (the depot). The goal of the system is to maintain a number of production facilities (one at each base) in optimal

  6. ZTF-8 interacts with the 9-1-1 complex and is required for DNA damage response and double-strand break repair in the C. elegans germline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Min Kim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Germline mutations in DNA repair genes are linked to tumor progression. Furthermore, failure in either activating a DNA damage checkpoint or repairing programmed meiotic double-strand breaks (DSBs can impair chromosome segregation. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis for DNA damage response (DDR and DSB repair (DSBR within the germline is highly important. Here we define ZTF-8, a previously uncharacterized protein conserved from worms to humans, as a novel factor involved in the repair of both mitotic and meiotic DSBs as well as in meiotic DNA damage checkpoint activation in the C. elegans germline. ztf-8 mutants exhibit specific sensitivity to γ-irradiation and hydroxyurea, mitotic nuclear arrest at S-phase accompanied by activation of the ATL-1 and CHK-1 DNA damage checkpoint kinases, as well as accumulation of both mitotic and meiotic recombination intermediates, indicating that ZTF-8 functions in DSBR. However, impaired meiotic DSBR progression partially fails to trigger the CEP-1/p53-dependent DNA damage checkpoint in late pachytene, also supporting a role for ZTF-8 in meiotic DDR. ZTF-8 partially co-localizes with the 9-1-1 DDR complex and interacts with MRT-2/Rad1, a component of this complex. The human RHINO protein rescues the phenotypes observed in ztf-8 mutants, suggesting functional conservation across species. We propose that ZTF-8 is involved in promoting repair at stalled replication forks and meiotic DSBs by transducing DNA damage checkpoint signaling via the 9-1-1 pathway. Our findings define a conserved function for ZTF-8/RHINO in promoting genomic stability in the germline.

  7. Intestinal obstruction repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repair of volvulus; Intestinal volvulus - repair; Bowel obstruction - repair ... Intestinal obstruction repair is done while you are under general anesthesia . This means you are asleep and DO NOT feel pain. ...

  8. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular

    Science.gov (United States)

    EVAR; Endovascular aneurysm repair - aorta; AAA repair - endovascular; Repair - aortic aneurysm - endovascular ... Endovascular aortic repair is done because your aneurysm is very large, growing quickly, or is leaking or bleeding. You may have ...

  9. Motorcycle Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Jim; Bundy, Mike

    This motorcycle repair curriculum guide contains the following ten areas of study: brake systems, clutches, constant mesh transmissions, final drives, suspension, mechanical starting mechanisms, electrical systems, fuel systems, lubrication systems, and overhead camshafts. Each area consists of one or more units of instruction. Each instructional…

  10. Turbine repair process, repaired coating, and repaired turbine component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Rupak; Delvaux, John McConnell; Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2015-11-03

    A turbine repair process, a repaired coating, and a repaired turbine component are disclosed. The turbine repair process includes providing a turbine component having a higher-pressure region and a lower-pressure region, introducing particles into the higher-pressure region, and at least partially repairing an opening between the higher-pressure region and the lower-pressure region with at least one of the particles to form a repaired turbine component. The repaired coating includes a silicon material, a ceramic matrix composite material, and a repaired region having the silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material. The repaired turbine component a ceramic matrix composite layer and a repaired region having silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material.

  11. NEW MATERIALS DEVELOPED TO MEET REGULATORY AND TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS ASSOCIATED WITH IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING OF NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED FACILITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankenship, J.; Langton, C.; Musall, J.; Griffin, W.

    2012-01-18

    For the 2010 ANS Embedded Topical Meeting on Decommissioning, Decontamination and Reutilization and Technology, Savannah River National Laboratory's Mike Serrato reported initial information on the newly developed specialty grout materials necessary to satisfy all requirements associated with in-situ decommissioning of P-Reactor and R-Reactor at the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site. Since that report, both projects have been successfully completed and extensive test data on both fresh properties and cured properties has been gathered and analyzed for a total of almost 191,150 m{sup 3} (250,000 yd{sup 3}) of new materials placed. The focus of this paper is to describe the (1) special grout mix for filling the P-Reactor vessel (RV) and (2) the new flowable structural fill materials used to fill the below grade portions of the facilities. With a wealth of data now in hand, this paper also captures the test results and reports on the performance of these new materials. Both reactors were constructed and entered service in the early 1950s, producing weapons grade materials for the nation's defense nuclear program. R-Reactor was shut down in 1964 and the P-Reactor in 1991. In-situ decommissioning (ISD) was selected for both facilities and performed as Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensations and Liability Act actions (an early action for P-Reactor and a removal action for R-Reactor), beginning in October 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy concept for ISD is to physically stabilize and isolate intact, structurally robust facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose of producing (reactor facilities), processing (isotope separation facilities), or storing radioactive materials. Funding for accelerated decommissioning was provided under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Decommissioning of both facilities was completed in September 2011. ISD objectives for these CERCLA actions included: (1) Prevent

  12. A DOE contractor`s perspective of environmental monitoring requirements at a low-level waste facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferns, T.W. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., ID (United States)

    1989-11-01

    Environmental monitoring at a low-level waste disposal facility (LLWDF) should, (1) demonstrate compliance with environmental laws; (2) detect any spatial or temporal environmental changes; and (3) provide information on the potential or actual exposure of humans and/or the environment to disposed waste and/or waste by-products. Under the DOE Order system the LLWDF site manager has more freedom of implementation for a monitoring program than either the semi-prescriptive NRC, or the prescriptive EPA hazardous waste programs. This paper will attempt to compare and contrast environmental monitoring under the different systems (DOE, NRC, and EPA), and determine if the DOE might benefit from a more prescriptive system.

  13. Minimally disruptive schedule repair for MCM missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molineaux, Matthew; Auslander, Bryan; Moore, Philip G.; Gupta, Kalyan M.

    2015-05-01

    Mine countermeasures (MCM) missions entail planning and operations in very dynamic and uncertain operating environments, which pose considerable risk to personnel and equipment. Frequent schedule repairs are needed that consider the latest operating conditions to keep mission on target. Presently no decision support tools are available for the challenging task of MCM mission rescheduling. To address this capability gap, we have developed the CARPE system to assist operation planners. CARPE constantly monitors the operational environment for changes and recommends alternative repaired schedules in response. It includes a novel schedule repair algorithm called Case-Based Local Schedule Repair (CLOSR) that automatically repairs broken schedules while satisfying the requirement of minimal operational disruption. It uses a case-based approach to represent repair strategies and apply them to new situations. Evaluation of CLOSR on simulated MCM operations demonstrates the effectiveness of case-based strategy. Schedule repairs are generated rapidly, ensure the elimination of all mines, and achieve required levels of clearance.

  14. Functional and operational requirements document : building 1012, Battery and Energy Storage Device Test Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johns, William H.

    2013-11-01

    This report provides an overview of information, prior studies, and analyses relevant to the development of functional and operational requirements for electrochemical testing of batteries and energy storage devices carried out by Sandia Organization 2546, Advanced Power Sources R&D. Electrochemical operations for this group are scheduled to transition from Sandia Building 894 to a new Building located in Sandia TA-II referred to as Building 1012. This report also provides background on select design considerations and identifies the Safety Goals, Stakeholder Objectives, and Design Objectives required by the Sandia Design Team to develop the Performance Criteria necessary to the design of Building 1012. This document recognizes the Architecture-Engineering (A-E) Team as the primary design entity. Where safety considerations are identified, suggestions are provided to provide context for the corresponding operational requirement(s).

  15. 33 CFR Appendix C to Part 154 - Guidelines for Determining and Evaluating Required Response Resources for Facility Response Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Reserve Buoyancy to Weight Ratio 2:1 2:1 2:1 3:1 to 4:1 Total Tensile Strength—lbs. 4,500 15-20,000 15-20... this appendix is to describe the procedures for identifying response resources to meet the requirements... or ranges. 2.6The requirements of subparts F, G, H and I of this part establish response resource...

  16. Analyses in support of risk-informed natural gas vehicle maintenance facility codes and standards :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekoto, Isaac W.; Blaylock, Myra L.; LaFleur, Angela Christine; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Horne, Douglas B.

    2014-03-01

    Safety standards development for maintenance facilities of liquid and compressed gas fueled large-scale vehicles is required to ensure proper facility design and operation envelopes. Standard development organizations are utilizing risk-informed concepts to develop natural gas vehicle (NGV) codes and standards so that maintenance facilities meet acceptable risk levels. The present report summarizes Phase I work for existing NGV repair facility code requirements and highlights inconsistencies that need quantitative analysis into their effectiveness. A Hazardous and Operability study was performed to identify key scenarios of interest. Finally, scenario analyses were performed using detailed simulations and modeling to estimate the overpressure hazards from HAZOP defined scenarios. The results from Phase I will be used to identify significant risk contributors at NGV maintenance facilities, and are expected to form the basis for follow-on quantitative risk analysis work to address specific code requirements and identify effective accident prevention and mitigation strategies.

  17. Functional requirements document for the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Scientific Computing Facilities (SCF) of the NASA/MSFC Earth Science and Applications Division, 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botts, Michael E.; Phillips, Ron J.; Parker, John V.; Wright, Patrick D.

    1992-01-01

    Five scientists at MSFC/ESAD have EOS SCF investigator status. Each SCF has unique tasks which require the establishment of a computing facility dedicated to accomplishing those tasks. A SCF Working Group was established at ESAD with the charter of defining the computing requirements of the individual SCFs and recommending options for meeting these requirements. The primary goal of the working group was to determine which computing needs can be satisfied using either shared resources or separate but compatible resources, and which needs require unique individual resources. The requirements investigated included CPU-intensive vector and scalar processing, visualization, data storage, connectivity, and I/O peripherals. A review of computer industry directions and a market survey of computing hardware provided information regarding important industry standards and candidate computing platforms. It was determined that the total SCF computing requirements might be most effectively met using a hierarchy consisting of shared and individual resources. This hierarchy is composed of five major system types: (1) a supercomputer class vector processor; (2) a high-end scalar multiprocessor workstation; (3) a file server; (4) a few medium- to high-end visualization workstations; and (5) several low- to medium-range personal graphics workstations. Specific recommendations for meeting the needs of each of these types are presented.

  18. Bone repair and stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Noriaki; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2016-10-01

    Bones are an important component of vertebrates; they grow explosively in early life and maintain their strength throughout life. Bones also possess amazing capabilities to repair-the bone is like new without a scar after complete repair. In recent years, a substantial progress has been made in our understanding on mammalian bone stem cells. Mouse genetic models are powerful tools to understand the cell lineage, giving us better insights into stem cells that regulate bone growth, maintenance and repair. Recent findings about these stem cells raise new questions that require further investigations.

  19. Gamma-ray, neutron, and hard X-ray studies and requirements for a high-energy solar physics facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaty, R.; Dennis, B. R.; Emslie, A. G.

    1988-01-01

    The requirements for future high-resolution spatial, spectral, and temporal observation of hard X-rays, gamma rays and neutrons from solar flares are discussed in the context of current high-energy flare observations. There is much promise from these observations for achieving a deep understanding of processes of energy release, particle acceleration and particle transport in a complicated environment such as the turbulent and highly magnetized atmosphere of the active sun.

  20. Either non-homologous ends joining or homologous recombination is required to repair double-strand breaks in the genome of macrophage-internalized Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Brzostek

    Full Text Available The intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb is constantly exposed to a multitude of hostile conditions and is confronted by a variety of potentially DNA-damaging assaults in vivo, primarily from host-generated antimicrobial toxic radicals. Exposure to reactive nitrogen species and/or reactive oxygen species causes different types of DNA damage, including oxidation, depurination, methylation and deamination, that can result in single- or double-strand breaks (DSBs. These breaks affect the integrity of the whole genome and, when left unrepaired, can lead to cell death. Here, we investigated the role of the DSB repair pathways, homologous recombination (HR and non-homologous ends joining (NHEJ, in the survival of Mtb inside macrophages. To this end, we constructed Mtb strains defective for HR (ΔrecA, NHEJ [Δ(ku,ligD], or both DSB repair systems [Δ(ku,ligD,recA]. Experiments using these strains revealed that either HR or NHEJ is sufficient for the survival and propagation of tubercle bacilli inside macrophages. Inhibition of nitric oxide or superoxide anion production with L-NIL or apocynin, respectively, enabled the Δ(ku,ligD,recA mutant strain lacking both systems to survive intracellularly. Complementation of the Δ(ku,ligD,recA mutant with an intact recA or ku-ligD rescued the ability of Mtb to propagate inside macrophages.

  1. Cockayne syndrome: varied requirement of transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair for the removal of three structurally different adducts from transcribed DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya Kitsera

    Full Text Available Hereditary defects in the transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER pathway of damaged DNA cause severe neurodegenerative disease Cockayne syndrome (CS, however the origin and chemical nature of the underlying DNA damage had remained unknown. To find out, to which degree the structural properties of DNA lesions determine the extent of transcription arrest in human CS cells, we performed quantitative host cell reactivation analyses of expression vectors containing various synthetic adducts. We found that a single 3-(deoxyguanosin-N2-yl-2-acetylaminofluorene adduct (dG(N2-AAF constitutes an unsurmountable obstacle to transcription in both CS-A and CS-B cells and is removed exclusively by the CSA- and CSB-dependent pathway. In contrast, contribution of the CS proteins to the removal of two other transcription-blocking DNA lesions - N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl-2-acetylaminofluorene (dG(C8-AAF and cyclobutane thymine-thymine (TT dimer - is only minor (TT dimer or none (dG(C8-AAF. The unique properties of dG(N2-AAF identify this adduct as a prototype for a new class of DNA lesions that escape the alternative global genome repair and could be critical for the CS pathogenesis.

  2. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations for the 600 Area facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickels, J.M.

    1991-08-01

    This document determines the need for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans for Westinghouse Hanford Company's 600 Area facilities on the Hanford Site. The Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations were prepared in accordance with A Guide For Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans (WHC 1991). Five major Westinghouse Hanford Company facilities in the 600 Area were evaluated: the Purge Water Storage Facility, 212-N, -P, and -R Facilities, the 616 Facility, and the 213-J K Storage Vaults. Of the five major facilities evaluated in the 600 Area, none will require preparation of a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan.

  3. Development and application of robots for checking and repairing civil engineering facilities in hydraulic power plants. Suiryoku hatsudensho doboku setsubi wo taisho to shita kakushu tenken hoshu robot no kaihatsu to tekiyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, T.; Hibino, Y. (The Tokyo Electric Power Co. Inc., Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-07-25

    Development efforts are being made on robots to improve efficiency in the checking and repairing works that require a great amount of labor at hydraulic power plants. This paper introduces examples of the development and application of these robots. An underwater remotely controlled robot developed based on unmanned submarine boats mounts TV cameras, dives to a depth of 300 meters, and checks underwater structures under control from above the ground. A self-driven waterway investigating system mounting an underground radar equipment investigates tunnel covers and rear cavities, and can acquire continuous data for the cover thickness and cavities without a need of boring. The following robots have obtained satisfactory results in efficiency improvement and accuracy: an unmanned robot for checking inside of a waterway tunnel with small cross section difficult for a man to enter (using a video camera); a video photographing robot to photograph large underground cavities such as surge tanks; and a self-driven robot to visually inspect and photograph steel pipes and measure their thickness. 8 figs., 8 tabs.

  4. Idaho National Laboratory Lead or Lead-Bismuth Eutectic (LBE) Test Facility - R&D Requirements, Design Criteria, Design Concept, and Concept Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric P. Loewen; Paul Demkowicz

    2005-05-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Test Facility will advance the state of nuclear technology relative to heavy-metal coolants (primarily Pb and Pb-Bi), thereby allowing the U.S. to maintain the pre-eminent position in overseas markets and a future domestic market. The end results will be a better qualitative understanding and quantitative measure of the thermal physics and chemistry conditions in the molten metal systems for varied flow conditions (single and multiphase), flow regime transitions, heat input methods, pumping requirements for varied conditions and geometries, and corrosion performance. Furthering INL knowledge in these areas is crucial to sustaining a competitive global position. This fundamental heavy-metal research supports the National Energy Policy Development Group’s stated need for energy systems to support electrical generation.1 The project will also assist the Department of Energy in achieving goals outlined in the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Long Term Nuclear Technology Research and Development Plan,2 the Generation IV Roadmap for Lead Fast Reactor development, and Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative research and development. This multi-unit Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Test Facility with its flexible and reconfigurable apparatus will maintain and extend the U.S. nuclear knowledge base, while educating young scientists and engineers. The uniqueness of the Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Test Facility is its integrated Pool Unit and Storage Unit. This combination will support large-scale investigation of structural and fuel cladding material compatibility issues with heavy-metal coolants, oxygen chemistry control, and thermal hydraulic physics properties. Its ability to reconfigure flow conditions and piping configurations to more accurately approximate prototypical reactor designs will provide a key resource for Lead Fast Reactor research and development. The other principal elements of the Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Test Facility

  5. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Barfuss, Brad C.; Gervais, Todd L.

    2008-01-01

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP – U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection – Air Emissions. In these NESHAP assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at buildings that are part of the consolidated laboratory campus of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the NESHAP assessment performed in 2007.

  6. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.; Barnett, J. Matthew

    2011-05-13

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants ([NESHAP]; U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these NESHAP assessments, potential unabated off-site doses were evaluated for emission locations at buildings that are part of the consolidated laboratory campus of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the NESHAP assessment performed in 2010.

  7. 30 CFR 56.6800 - Storage facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Storage facilities. 56.6800 Section 56.6800... § 56.6800 Storage facilities. When repair work which could produce a spark or flame is to be performed on a storage facility— (a) The explosive material shall be moved to another facility, or moved at...

  8. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet induces DNA double-strand breaks that require a Rad51-mediated homologous recombination for repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoonna; Kim, Kangil; Kang, Kyu-Tae; Lee, Jong-Soo; Yang, Sang Sik; Chung, Woo-Hyun

    2014-10-15

    Non-thermal plasma generated under atmospheric pressure produces a mixture of chemically reactive molecules and has been developed for a number of biomedical applications. Recently, plasma jet has been proposed as novel cancer therapies based on the observation that free radicals generated by plasma jet induce mitochondria-mediated apoptotic cell death. We show here that air plasma jet induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in yeast chromosomes leading to genomic instability and loss of viability, which are alleviated by Rad51, the yeast homolog of Escherichiacoli RecA recombinase, through DNA damage repair by a homologous recombination (HR) process. Hypersensitivity of rad51 mutant to air plasma was not restored by antioxidant treatment unlike sod1 mutant that was highly sensitive to reactive oxygen species (ROS) challenge, suggesting that plasma jet induces DSB-mediated cell death independent of ROS generation. These results may provide a new insight into the mechanism of air plasma jet-induced cell death.

  9. Contact Dermatitis In Automobile Repair workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi M P

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Automobile repair workers are at risk of developing skin morbidity including occupational dermatoses because of their exposure to mineral oils, petroleum products and its derivatives and lubricating oil. This cross- sectional study was carried out at Maharashtra State Road Transport Corporation workshops in Nagpur city to investigate prevalence of skin morbidity including contact dermatitis in automobile repair workers. The study included 288 (49.9% automobile repair workers 180 (31.3% workshop office staff and 109 (18.8% divisional office employees. Dermatitis was the commonest skin morbidity in all the study subjects and it was significantly more prevalent in automobile repair workers. Folliculitis was detected in 13.2% of auto â€" repair workers and was not seen in the other two groups. Increasing trend of skin morbidity was correlated with the length of service of employees. Proper protective measures along with suitable washing facilities should be provided

  10. Eye muscle repair - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lazy eye repair - discharge; Strabismus repair - discharge; Extraocular muscle surgery - discharge ... You or your child had eye muscle repair surgery to correct eye muscle ... term for crossed eyes is strabismus. Children most often ...

  11. Ventral hernia repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007661.htm Ventral hernia repair To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Ventral hernia repair is surgery to repair a ventral hernia. ...

  12. Brain aneurysm repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aneurysm repair; Dissecting aneurysm repair; Endovascular aneurysm repair - brain; Subarachnoid hemorrhage - aneurysm ... Your scalp, skull, and the coverings of the brain are opened. A metal clip is placed at ...

  13. ROCLA robots repaired after tough times

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The team of five welders and five mechanics, represented by Pascal Mésenge (right) and Fabrice Multon (left), worked during two week-ends to repair the two ROCLA. At the centre, Oliver Boettcher, technical manager for the robot. The two LHC magnet transport robots ROCLA have recently been repaired after cracks were found in the welds of their load-bearing structure. The Safety Commission suspended the use of one robot and limited the operation conditions of the other. These vehicles are used intensively for the transport of the LHC cryodipoles between the test and the assembly facilities SM18 and SMA18. As a consequence, a speedy solution had to be implemented to minimize the potential disruption to the LHC schedule. Appropriate CERN resources were immediately focused on the problem. As soon as TS/MME had designed a reinforced gantry support, the necessary raw material was ordered. Less than 10 days were required to get the two ROCLA robots operating again. This included 2 full weekends, many extra hours a...

  14. Science drivers and requirements for an Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST): Implications for technology development and synergies with other future facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Postman, Marc; Sembach, Kenneth; Giavalisco, Mauro; Traub, Wesley; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Calzetti, Daniela; Oegerle, William; Rich, R Michael; Stahl, H Phillip; Tumlinson, Jason; Mountain, Matt; Soummer, Rémi; Hyde, Tupper; 10.1117/12.857044

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) is a concept for an 8-meter to 16-meter UVOIR space observatory for launch in the 2025-2030 era. ATLAST will allow astronomers to answer fundamental questions at the forefront of modern astronphysics, including "Is there life elsewhere in the Galaxy?" We present a range of science drivers that define the main performance requirements for ATLAST (8 to 16 milliarcsec angular resolution, diffraction limited imaging at 0.5 {\\mu}m wavelength, minimum collecting area of 45 square meters, high sensitivity to light wavelengths from 0.1 {\\mu}m to 2.4 {\\mu}m, high stability in wavefront sensing and control). We will also discuss the synergy between ATLAST and other anticipated future facilities (e.g., TMT, EELT, ALMA) and the priorities for technology development that will enable the construction for a cost that is comparable to current generation observatory-class space missions.

  15. Repairing sealing surfaces on aluminum castings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    Approach using stylus nickel plating instead of copper and cadmium plating has simplified repair procedure. Damaged sealing surfaces are stylus nickelplated in one step. Superficial scratches and porous areas are removed more easily from repaired surface by simply lapping sealing areas to required finish. Although method is aimed for aerospace components, it may be easily incorporated into conventional aluminumcasting technology. One-step repair can be considered for cast-aluminum automobile and aircraft engines to reduce time and costs.

  16. Role of ubiquitination in meiotic recombination repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Programmed and unprogrammed double-strand breaks (DSBs) often arise from such physiological requirements as meiotic recombination, and exogenous insults, such as ionizing radiation (IR). Due to deleterious impacts on genome stability, DSBs must be appropriately processed and repaired in a regulatory manner. Recent investigations have indicated that ubiquitination is a critical factor in DNA damage response and meiotic recombination repair. This review summarizes the effects of proteins and complexes associated with ubiquitination with regard to homologous recombination (HR)-dependent DSB repair.

  17. Systems Maintenance Automated Repair Tasks (SMART)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuh, Joseph; Mitchell, Brent; Locklear, Louis; Belson, Martin A.; Al-Shihabi, Mary Jo Y.; King, Nadean; Norena, Elkin; Hardin, Derek

    2010-01-01

    SMART is a uniform automated discrepancy analysis and repair-authoring platform that improves technical accuracy and timely delivery of repair procedures for a given discrepancy (see figure a). SMART will minimize data errors, create uniform repair processes, and enhance the existing knowledge base of engineering repair processes. This innovation is the first tool developed that links the hardware specification requirements with the actual repair methods, sequences, and required equipment. SMART is flexibly designed to be useable by multiple engineering groups requiring decision analysis, and by any work authorization and disposition platform (see figure b). The organizational logic creates the link between specification requirements of the hardware, and specific procedures required to repair discrepancies. The first segment in the SMART process uses a decision analysis tree to define all the permutations between component/ subcomponent/discrepancy/repair on the hardware. The second segment uses a repair matrix to define what the steps and sequences are for any repair defined in the decision tree. This segment also allows for the selection of specific steps from multivariable steps. SMART will also be able to interface with outside databases and to store information from them to be inserted into the repair-procedure document. Some of the steps will be identified as optional, and would only be used based on the location and the current configuration of the hardware. The output from this analysis would be sent to a work authoring system in the form of a predefined sequence of steps containing required actions, tools, parts, materials, certifications, and specific requirements controlling quality, functional requirements, and limitations.

  18. 一种基于需求追踪的Web应用测试脚本修复方法%A WEB APPLICATION TEST SCRIPT REPAIR METHOD BASED ON REQUIREMENT TRACEABILITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张海攀; 吴毅坚; 赵文耘

    2015-01-01

    Thanks to the technique of automated testing, test engineers can be free from time-consuming, repetitive manual test by writing automation test scripts.However, when the UI of GUI-based applications or Web applications evolved, the test engineers have to check and repair the failing test scripts which interact with applications by performing actions on their UI element.In this paper, we propose a requirement traceability-based test script repair method which helps to trace the influence scope of the evolution of UI elements.We analyse the common types of UI evolution in Web applications that are prone to cause test script failure, meanwhile we propose the QTP software test script repair rules for each type under the model framework.Based on that we develop an automatic repair tool for failing scripts, and conduct a case study to demonstrate the feasibility of our approach.%自动化测试技术通过测试脚本使测试人员无需重复耗时乏味的手工黑盒测试。然而随着软件界面的演化,通常会导致基于界面元素的测试脚本失效,测试人员不得不手工检测和修复失效的脚本。提出一种基于需求追踪的测试脚本修复方法,辅助追踪界面元素的演化的影响范围。分析Web应用中常见的容易导致测试脚本失效的界面元素演化类型,针对每种类型给出在模型框架下QTP软件测试脚本修复规则。在此基础上,开发了一个自动修复失效脚本工具,通过一个案例,展示了该方法的可行性。

  19. The UBC Domain Is Required for BRUCE to Promote BRIT1/MCPH1 Function in DSB Signaling and Repair Post Formation of BRUCE-USP8-BRIT1 Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Chunmin; Che, Lixiao; Du, Chunying

    2015-01-01

    BRUCE is implicated in the regulation of DNA double-strand break response to preserve genome stability. It acts as a scaffold to tether USP8 and BRIT1, together they form a nuclear BRUCE-USP8-BRIT1 complex, where BRUCE holds K63-ubiquitinated BRIT1 from access to DSB in unstressed cells. Following DSB induction, BRUCE promotes USP8 mediated deubiquitination of BRIT1, a prerequisite for BRIT1 to be released from the complex and recruited to DSB by binding to γ-H2AX. BRUCE contains UBC and BIR domains, but neither is required for the scaffolding function of BRUCE mentioned above. Therefore, it remains to be determined whether they are required for BRUCE in DSB response. Here we show that the UBC domain, not the BIR domain, is required for BRUCE to promote DNA repair at a step post the formation of BRUCE-USP8-BRIT1 complex. Mutation or deletion of the BRUCE UBC domain did not disrupt the BRUCE-USP8-BRIT1 complex, but impaired deubiquitination and consequent recruitment of BRIT1 to DSB. This leads to impaired chromatin relaxation, decreased accumulation of MDC1, NBS1, pATM and RAD51 at DSB, and compromised homologous recombination repair of DNA DSB. These results demonstrate that in addition to the scaffolding function in complex formation, BRUCE has an E3 ligase function to promote BRIT1 deubiquitination by USP8 leading to accumulation of BRIT1 at DNA double-strand break. These data support a crucial role for BRUCE UBC activity in the early stage of DSB response.

  20. Bond strength of repaired amalgam restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Rosalia; Mondragon, Eduardo; Shen, Chiayi

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated the interfacial flexural strength (FS) of amalgam repairs and the optimal combination of repair materials and mechanical retention required for a consistent and durable repair bond. Amalgam bricks were created, each with 1 end roughened to expose a fresh surface before repair. Four groups followed separate repair protocols: group 1, bonding agent with amalgam; group 2, bonding agent with composite resin; group 3, mechanical retention (slot) with amalgam; and group 4, slot with bonding agent and amalgam. Repaired specimens were stored in artificial saliva for 1, 10, 30, 120, or 360 days before being loaded to failure in a 3-point bending test. Statistical analysis showed significant changes in median FS over time in groups 2 and 4. The effect of the repair method on the FS values after each storage period was significant for most groups except the 30-day storage groups. Amalgam-amalgam repair with adequate condensation yielded the most consistent and durable bond. An amalgam bonding agent could be beneficial when firm condensation on the repair surface cannot be achieved or when tooth structure is involved. Composite resin can be a viable option for amalgam repair in an esthetically demanding region, but proper mechanical modification of the amalgam surface and selection of the proper bonding system are essential.

  1. Damage diagnosis and compatible repair mortars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hees, R.P.J. van

    1999-01-01

    Mortars for repair and maintenance of historic masonry have to meet specific requirements. Several authors have made contributions, however many cases of failure show that there still is quite a lack of knowledge on the compatibility of repair mortars for historic masonry. The diagnosis of the cause

  2. Repairs the added value of being wrong

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Grammatical structures connect systems of thought and articulation, the conditions of which hardly seem to fit each other. Repairs are productive mechanisms that solve translation problems between modules or levels by adapting derivations or representations to requirements that have to be met unconditionally. Compensating for derivational and interpretive defects, repairs

  3. The PCNA interaction protein box sequence in Rad54 is an integral part of its ATPase domain and is required for efficient DNA repair and recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca C Burgess

    Full Text Available Rad54 is an ATP-driven translocase involved in the genome maintenance pathway of homologous recombination (HR. Although its activity has been implicated in several steps of HR, its exact role(s at each step are still not fully understood. We have identified a new interaction between Rad54 and the replicative DNA clamp, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA. This interaction was only mildly weakened by the mutation of two key hydrophobic residues in the highly-conserved PCNA interaction motif (PIP-box of Rad54 (Rad54-AA. Intriguingly, the rad54-AA mutant cells displayed sensitivity to DNA damage and showed HR defects similar to the null mutant, despite retaining its ability to interact with HR proteins and to be recruited to HR foci in vivo. We therefore surmised that the PCNA interaction might be impaired in vivo and was unable to promote repair synthesis during HR. Indeed, the Rad54-AA mutant was defective in primer extension at the MAT locus as well as in vitro, but additional biochemical analysis revealed that this mutant also had diminished ATPase activity and an inability to promote D-loop formation. Further mutational analysis of the putative PIP-box uncovered that other phenotypically relevant mutants in this domain also resulted in a loss of ATPase activity. Therefore, we have found that although Rad54 interacts with PCNA, the PIP-box motif likely plays only a minor role in stabilizing the PCNA interaction, and rather, this conserved domain is probably an extension of the ATPase domain III.

  4. National Icing Facilities Requirements Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    82177 ;ooirions of 3ubpart E of this ,, ’, , /! nd,’ntcd or provided for determining o;., ’rmwlt’o of i,- o ritioa(l parto of vhe rotorcraft. ,,o re-ti...common with little turbulence (stratiform type cloud formation), while clear ice predominates when turbulence and vertical velocities are present...The advantages of this type of aircraft lies in its ability to operate from confined or unimproved areas in its vertical takeoff and land- ing

  5. Capacitated two-indenture models for repairable item systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijm, Willem H.M.; Avsar, Zeynep Müge

    2003-01-01

    A two-indenture maintenance system is considered for a number of identical installations, in use at a single site. The installations are considered as assemblies that are made up of a number of repairable components. A component repair center and an assembly facility are both modeled as product form

  6. Capacitated two-indenture models for repairable item systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijm, Willem H.M.; Avsar, Z.M.; van Houtum, Geert-Jan

    2001-01-01

    A two-indenture maintenance system is considered for a number of identical installations, in use at a single site. The installations are considered as assemblies that are made up of a number of repairable components. A component repair center and an assembly facility are both modeled as product form

  7. Cortical Button Fixation: A Better Patellar Tendon Repair?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ode, Gabriella E; Piasecki, Dana P; Habet, Nahir A; Peindl, Richard D

    2016-10-01

    Patellar tendon ruptures require surgical repair to optimize outcomes, but no consensus exists regarding the ideal repair technique. Cortical button fixation is a secure method for tendon repair that has not been studied in patellar tendons. Cortical button repair is biomechanically superior to the standard transpatellar repair and biomechanically equivalent to suture anchor repair. Controlled laboratory study. Twenty-three fresh-frozen cadaveric knees were used to compare 3 techniques of patellar tendon repair after a simulated rupture at the inferior pole of the patella. Repairs were performed at 45° of flexion using a standard transpatellar suture repair (n = 7), polyetheretherketone (PEEK) suture anchor repair (n = 8), or cortical button repair (n = 8). All specimens were tested on a custom apparatus to simulate cyclic open kinetic chain quadriceps contraction from extension to 90(o) of flexion. Outcomes of gap formation up to 250 cycles, maximum load to failure, and mode of failure were evaluated. Cortical button repair had significantly less gap formation than anchor repair after 1 cycle (P button repair sustained significantly higher loads to failure than anchor repair and suture repair (P button repairs either failed through the suture (n = 5), secondary failure of the patellar tendon (n = 2), or subsidence of the button through the anterior cortex of the patella (n = 1). Patellar tendon repair using cortical button fixation demonstrated mechanical advantages over suture repair and anchor repair in cadaveric specimens. Cortical button fixation showed less cyclic gap formation and withstood at least twice the load to failure of the construct. The biomechanical superiority of cortical button fixation may impart clinical advantages in accelerating postoperative rehabilitation. © 2016 The Author(s).

  8. DNA repair. [UV radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setlow, R.

    1978-01-01

    Some topics discussed are as follows: difficulty in extrapolating data from E. coli to mammalian systems; mutations caused by UV-induced changes in DNA; mutants deficient in excision repair; other postreplication mechanisms; kinds of excision repair systems; detection of repair by biochemical or biophysical means; human mutants deficient in repair; mutagenic effects of UV on XP cells; and detection of UV-repair defects among XP individuals. (HLW)

  9. Etiology, Diagnosis, and Management of Failed SLAP Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Brian C; Brockmeier, Stephen F; Miller, Mark D

    2014-09-01

    In general, favorable outcomes have been achieved with arthroscopic repair of superior labral anterior-posterior (SLAP) tears. However, some patients remain dissatisfied or suffer further injury after SLAP repair and may seek additional treatment to alleviate their symptoms. The cause of persistent pain or recurrent symptoms after repair is likely multifactorial; therefore, careful preoperative workup is required to elucidate the cause of pain. Review of the details of previous surgical procedures is crucial because certain fixation methods are prone to failure or can cause additional injury. Failed SLAP repair can be managed with nonsurgical or surgical options. Nonsurgical modalities include physical therapy and strengthening programs, anti-inflammatory agents, and activity modification. Surgical options include revision SLAP repair and biceps tenotomy or tenodesis with or without revision SLAP repair. Outcomes after surgical management of failed SLAP repair are inferior to those of primary repair. Select patients may be better served by primary biceps tenodesis rather than SLAP repair.

  10. 49 CFR 232.303 - General requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... tested, inspected, and operate as intended; and (5) Brake indicators, on cars so equipped, are accurate... is considered a shop or repair track only for each car receiving major repairs on such trackage and not for a car receiving only minor repairs; and (v) The facilities and tracks identified in paragraphs...

  11. 46 CFR 170.005 - Vessel alteration or repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vessel alteration or repair. 170.005 Section 170.005... REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL INSPECTED VESSELS General Provisions § 170.005 Vessel alteration or repair. (a) Alterations and repairs to inspected vessels must be done— (1) Under the direction of the Officer in...

  12. 40 CFR 1033.815 - Maintenance, operation, and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maintenance, operation, and repair... Maintenance, operation, and repair. All persons who own, operate, or maintain locomotives are subject to this... components of the diagnostics system itself. For most repairs, this paragraph (b) requires that...

  13. Budget estimates: Fiscal year 1994. Volume 2: Construction of facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The Construction of Facilities (CoF) appropriation provides contractual services for the repair, rehabilitation, and modification of existing facilities; the construction of new facilities and the acquisition of related collateral equipment; the acquisition or condemnation of real property; environmental compliance and restoration activities; the design of facilities projects; and advanced planning related to future facilities needs. Fiscal year 1994 budget estimates are broken down according to facility location of project and by purpose.

  14. Waste sampling and characterization facility (WSCF) maintenance implementation plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinemann, J.L.

    1997-08-13

    This Maintenance Implementation Plan (MIP) is written to satisfy the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 4330.4B, Maintenance Management Program that specifies the general policy and objectives for the establishment of the DOE controlled maintenance programs. These programs provide for the management and performance of cost effective maintenance and repair of the DOE property, which includes facilities. This document outlines maintenance activities associated with the facilities operated by Waste Management Hanford, Inc. (WMH). The objective of this MIP is to provide baseline information for the control and execution of WMH Facility Maintenance activities relative to the requirements of Order 4330.4B, assessment of the WMH maintenance programs, and actions necessary to maintain compliance with the Order. Section 2.0 summarizes the history, mission and description of the WMH facilities. Section 3.0 describes maintenance scope and requirements, and outlines the overall strategy for implementing the maintenance program. Specific elements of DOE Order 4330.4B are addressed in Section 4.0, listing the objective of each element, a discussion of the WMH compliance methodology, and current implementation requirements with references to WMH and HNF policies and procedures. Section 5.0 addresses deviations from policy requirements, and Section 6.0 is a schedule for specific improvements in support of this MIP.

  15. Complex networks repair strategies: Dynamic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chaoqi; Wang, Ying; Gao, Yangjun; Wang, Xiaoyang

    2017-09-01

    Network repair strategies are tactical methods that restore the efficiency of damaged networks; however, unreasonable repair strategies not only waste resources, they are also ineffective for network recovery. Most extant research on network repair focuses on static networks, but results and findings on static networks cannot be applied to evolutionary dynamic networks because, in dynamic models, complex network repair has completely different characteristics. For instance, repaired nodes face more severe challenges, and require strategic repair methods in order to have a significant effect. In this study, we propose the Shell Repair Strategy (SRS) to minimize the risk of secondary node failures due to the cascading effect. Our proposed method includes the identification of a set of vital nodes that have a significant impact on network repair and defense. Our identification of these vital nodes reduces the number of switching nodes that face the risk of secondary failures during the dynamic repair process. This is positively correlated with the size of the average degree and enhances network invulnerability.

  16. MODEL OF FEES CALCULATION FOR ACCESS TO TRACK INFRASTRUCTURE FACILITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Mishchenko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of the article is to develop a one- and two-element model of the fees calculation for the use of track infrastructure of Ukrainian railway transport. Methodology. On the basis of this one can consider that when planning the planned preventive track repair works and the amount of depreciation charges the guiding criterion is not the amount of progress it is the operating life of the track infrastructure facilities. The cost of PPTRW is determined on the basis of the following: the classification track repairs; typical technological processes for track repairs; technology based time standards for PPTRW; costs for the work of people, performing the PPTRW, their hourly wage rates according to the Order 98-Ts; the operating cost of machinery; regulated list; norms of expenditures and costs of materials and products (they have the largest share of the costs for repairs; railway rates; average distances for transportation of materials used during repair; standards of general production expenses and the administrative costs. Findings. The models offered in article allow executing the objective account of expenses in travelling facilities for the purpose of calculation of the proved size of indemnification and necessary size of profit, the sufficient enterprises for effective activity of a travelling infrastructure. Originality. The methodological bases of determination the fees (payments for the use of track infrastructure on one- and two-element base taking into account the experience of railways in the EC countries and the current transport legislation were grounded. Practical value. The article proposes the one- and two-element models of calculating the fees (payments for the TIF use, accounting the applicable requirements of European transport legislation, which provides the expense compensation and income formation, sufficient for economic incentives of the efficient operation of the TIE of Ukrainian railway transport.

  17. Facilities & Leadership

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The facilities web service provides VA facility information. The VA facilities locator is a feature that is available across the enterprise, on any webpage, for the...

  18. Biochemistry Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Biochemistry Facility provides expert services and consultation in biochemical enzyme assays and protein purification. The facility currently features 1) Liquid...

  19. Pectus excavatum repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002949.htm Pectus excavatum repair To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pectus excavatum repair is surgery to correct pectus excavatum . This ...

  20. 14 CFR 145.105 - Change of location, housing, or facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Change of location, housing, or facilities..., Materials, and Data § 145.105 Change of location, housing, or facilities. (a) A certificated repair station... certificated repair station must operate while it is changing its location, housing, or facilities. ...

  1. RAB-5- and RAB-11-dependent vesicle-trafficking pathways are required for plasma membrane repair after attack by bacterial pore-forming toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los, Ferdinand C O; Kao, Cheng-Yuan; Smitham, Jane; McDonald, Kent L; Ha, Christine; Peixoto, Christina A; Aroian, Raffi V

    2011-02-17

    Pore-forming toxins (PFTs) secreted by pathogenic bacteria are the most common bacterial protein toxins and are important virulence factors for infection. PFTs punch holes in host cell plasma membranes, and although cells can counteract the resulting membrane damage, the underlying mechanisms at play remain unclear. Using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model, we demonstrate in vivo and in an intact epithelium that intestinal cells respond to PFTs by increasing levels of endocytosis, dependent upon RAB-5 and RAB-11, which are master regulators of endocytic and exocytic events. Furthermore, we find that RAB-5 and RAB-11 are required for protection against PFT and to restore integrity to the plasma membrane. One physical mechanism involved is the RAB-11-dependent expulsion of microvilli from the apical side of the intestinal epithelial cells. Specific vesicle-trafficking pathways thus protect cells against an attack by PFTs on plasma membrane integrity, via altered plasma membrane dynamics.

  2. 30 CFR 57.6800 - Storage facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Storage facilities. 57.6800 Section 57.6800...-Surface and Underground § 57.6800 Storage facilities. When repair work which could produce a spark or flame is to be performed on a storage facility— (a) The explosive material shall be moved to another...

  3. Biologics for tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docheva, Denitsa; Müller, Sebastian A; Majewski, Martin; Evans, Christopher H

    2015-04-01

    Tendon injuries are common and present a clinical challenge to orthopedic surgery mainly because these injuries often respond poorly to treatment and require prolonged rehabilitation. Therapeutic options used to repair ruptured tendons have consisted of suture, autografts, allografts, and synthetic prostheses. To date, none of these alternatives has provided a successful long-term solution, and often the restored tendons do not recover their complete strength and functionality. Unfortunately, our understanding of tendon biology lags far behind that of other musculoskeletal tissues, thus impeding the development of new treatment options for tendon conditions. Hence, in this review, after introducing the clinical significance of tendon diseases and the present understanding of tendon biology, we describe and critically assess the current strategies for enhancing tendon repair by biological means. These consist mainly of applying growth factors, stem cells, natural biomaterials and genes, alone or in combination, to the site of tendon damage. A deeper understanding of how tendon tissue and cells operate, combined with practical applications of modern molecular and cellular tools could provide the long awaited breakthrough in designing effective tendon-specific therapeutics and overall improvement of tendon disease management.

  4. When "Other" Initiate Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schegloff, Emanuel A.

    2000-01-01

    Elaborates on the locus of other-initiated repair, and reports on a number of environments in which others initiate repair turns later than the one directly following the trouble-source turn. Describes several ways that other initiation of repair, which occurs in next-turn position, may be delayed within that position. (Author/VWL)

  5. Chromatin structure and DNA damage repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinant Christoffel

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The integrity of the genome is continuously challenged by both endogenous and exogenous DNA damaging agents. These damaging agents can induce a wide variety of lesions in the DNA, such as double strand breaks, single strand breaks, oxidative lesions and pyrimidine dimers. The cell has evolved intricate DNA damage response mechanisms to counteract the genotoxic effects of these lesions. The two main features of the DNA damage response mechanisms are cell-cycle checkpoint activation and, at the heart of the response, DNA repair. For both damage signalling and repair, chromatin remodelling is most likely a prerequisite. Here, we discuss current knowledge on chromatin remodelling with respect to the cellular response to DNA damage, with emphasis on the response to lesions resolved by nucleotide excision repair. We will discuss the role of histone modifications as well as their displacement or exchange in nucleotide excision repair and make a comparison with their requirement in transcription and double strand break repair.

  6. Stochastic Modelling Of The Repairable System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzejczak Karol

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available All reliability models consisting of random time factors form stochastic processes. In this paper we recall the definitions of the most common point processes which are used for modelling of repairable systems. Particularly this paper presents stochastic processes as examples of reliability systems for the support of the maintenance related decisions. We consider the simplest one-unit system with a negligible repair or replacement time, i.e., the unit is operating and is repaired or replaced at failure, where the time required for repair and replacement is negligible. When the repair or replacement is completed, the unit becomes as good as new and resumes operation. The stochastic modelling of recoverable systems constitutes an excellent method of supporting maintenance related decision-making processes and enables their more rational use.

  7. Mechanisms of assembly of the enzyme-ssDNA complexes required for recombination-dependent DNA synthesis and repair in bacteriophage T4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrical, S.; Hempstead, K.; Morrical, M. [Univ. of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT (United States)

    1994-12-31

    During late stages of bacteriophage T4 infection in E. coli, the initiation of phage DNA replication is dependent on the homologous recombination activity of the T4 uvsX protein. In vitro, uvsX protein initiates DNA synthesis on a duplex template by inserting the 3{prime} end of a homologous ssDNA molecule into the duplex. The resulting D-loop structure serves as a primer-template junction for the assembly of the T4 replication fork. Two key steps in this initiation process are (A) the assembly of uvsX-ssDNA complexes necessary for recombination activity and for the priming of lead-strand DNA synthesis, and (B) the assembly of the T4 primosome (gp41 helicase/gp61 primase complex) onto the single-stranded template for lagging-strand synthesis. Our laboratory is focusing on the mechanisms of these two different but related enzyme-ssDNA assembly processes. In this extended abstract, we describe recent efforts in our laboratory to elucidate the mechanism by which the gp41 helicase enzyme is assembled onto gp32-covered ssDNA, a process requiring the activity of a special helicase assembly factor, the T4 gp59 protein.

  8. Closed loop two-echelon repairable item systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjers, L.; van Ommeren, Jan C.W.; Zijm, Willem H.M.; Liberopoulos, G.; Papadopoulos, C.T.; Tan, B.; MacGregor Smith, J.; Gershwin, S.B.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we consider closed loop two-echelon epairable item systems with repair facilities both at a number of local service centers (called bases) and at a central location (the depot). The goal of the system is to maintain a number of production facilities (one at each base) in optimal

  9. Construction, repair and maintenance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinger, R. [Terasen Pipelines, Calgary, AB (Canada); Wong, P. [KC Integrity Corp., Calgary, AB (Canada); Yeomans, M.; Glover, A. [TransCanada PipeLines Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    The presentations by Working Group 4 focused on construction, repair and maintenance of pipelines with particular reference to high-strength steels and their applications for natural gas transmission pipelines. Discussions focused on how technology can be used to provide cost-effective design and construction solutions for long distance pipelines in a manner that does not compromise safety and reliability. The role that carbon plays in increasing the toughness of steel was also discussed. A few fundamental changes in steel production technology and a reduction in carbon content can result in a simultaneous increase in strength and toughness of steels. The cost impact of this technology was summarized. It was concluded that high strength steels offer effective solutions to deliver cost-effective pipelines to transport natural gas from northern basins. This session also presented pipeline routes that transport diluted bitumens from the Athabasca Oil Sands Project and the Muskeg River Mine to upgrader facilities in Alberta. Construction issues included design conservatism, water course crossings, winter construction, winter ditching, and public consultation. Examples of high strength steel pipe applications were also included with reference to experience gained by TransCanada and Corridor Pipeline. tabs., figs.

  10. The use of suture anchors to repair the ruptured quadriceps tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnell, Brandon D; Whitener, George B; Rubright, James H; Creighton, R Alexander; Logel, Kevin J; Wood, Mark L

    2007-07-01

    Quadriceps tendon rupture is an incapacitating injury that usually requires surgical repair. Traditional repair methods involve transpatellar suture tunnels, but recent reports have introduced the idea of using suture anchors to repair the ruptured tendon. We present 5 cases of our technique of using suture anchors to repair the ruptured quadriceps tendon.

  11. Groin hernia repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, Henrik; Aasvang, Eske

    2005-01-01

    The choice of anesthesia for groin hernia repair is between general, regional (epidural or spinal), and local anesthesia. Existing data from large consecutive patient series and randomized studies have shown local anesthesia to be the method of choice because it can be performed by the surgeon......, does not necessarily require an attending anesthesiologist, translates into the shortest recovery (bypassing the postanesthesia care unit), has the lowest cost, and has the lowest postoperative morbidity regarding risk of urinary retention. Spinal anesthesia has no documented benefits for this small...... scientific data to support the choice of anesthesia, large epidemiologic and nationwide information from databases show an undesirable high (about 10-20%) use of spinal anesthesia and low (about 10%) use of local infiltration anesthesia. Surgeons and anesthesiologists should therefore adjust their anesthesia...

  12. Percutaneous mitral valve repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillinov, A Marc; Liddicoat, John R

    2006-01-01

    Surgical mitral valve repair is the procedure of choice to treat mitral regurgitation of all etiologies. Whereas annuloplasty is the cornerstone of mitral valve repair, a variety of other surgical techniques are utilized to correct dysfunction of the leaflets and subvalvular apparatus; in most cases, surgical repair entails application of multiple repair techniques in each patient. Preclinical studies and early human experience have demonstrated that some of these surgical repair techniques can be performed using percutaneous approaches. Specifically, there has been great progress in the development of novel technology to facilitate percutaneous annuloplasty and percutaneous edge-to-edge repair. The objectives of this report were to (1) discuss the surgical foundations for these percutaneous approaches; (2) review device design and experimental and clinical results of percutaneous valve repair; and (3) address future directions, including the key challenges of patient selection and clinical trial design.

  13. Biologics for tendon repair

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Tendon injuries are common and present a clinical challenge to orthopedic surgery mainly because these injuries often respond poorly to treatment and require prolonged rehabilitation. Therapeutic options used to repair ruptured tendons have consisted of suture, autografts, allografts, and synthetic prostheses. To date, none of these alternatives has provided a successful long-term solution, and often the restored tendons do not recover their complete strength and functionality. Unfortunately,...

  14. Shuttle Repair Tools Automate Vehicle Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Successfully building, flying, and maintaining the space shuttles was an immensely complex job that required a high level of detailed, precise engineering. After each shuttle landed, it entered a maintenance, repair, and overhaul (MRO) phase. Each system was thoroughly checked and tested, and worn or damaged parts replaced, before the shuttle was rolled out for its next mission. During the MRO period, workers needed to record exactly what needed replacing and why, as well as follow precise guidelines and procedures in making their repairs. That meant traceability, and with it lots of paperwork. In 2007, the number of reports generated during electrical system repairs was getting out of hand-placing among the top three systems in terms of paperwork volume. Repair specialists at Kennedy Space Center were unhappy spending so much time at a desk and so little time actually working on the shuttle. "Engineers weren't spending their time doing technical work," says Joseph Schuh, an electrical engineer at Kennedy. "Instead, they were busy with repetitive, time-consuming processes that, while important in their own right, provided a low return on time invested." The strain of such inefficiency was bad enough that slow electrical repairs jeopardized rollout on several occasions. Knowing there had to be a way to streamline operations, Kennedy asked Martin Belson, a project manager with 30 years experience as an aerospace contractor, to co-lead a team in developing software that would reduce the effort required to document shuttle repairs. The result was System Maintenance Automated Repair Tasks (SMART) software. SMART is a tool for aggregating and applying information on every aspect of repairs, from procedures and instructions to a vehicle s troubleshooting history. Drawing on that data, SMART largely automates the processes of generating repair instructions and post-repair paperwork. In the case of the space shuttle, this meant that SMART had 30 years worth of operations

  15. Repair welding of fusion reactor components. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, B.A.; Wang, C.A.

    1997-09-30

    The exposure of metallic materials, such as structural components of the first wall and blanket of a fusion reactor, to neutron irradiation will induce changes in both the material composition and microstructure. Along with these changes can come a corresponding deterioration in mechanical properties resulting in premature failure. It is, therefore, essential to expect that the repair and replacement of the degraded components will be necessary. Such repairs may require the joining of irradiated materials through the use of fusion welding processes. The present ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) conceptual design is anticipated to have about 5 km of longitudinal welds and ten thousand pipe butt welds in the blanket structure. A recent study by Buende et al. predict that a failure is most likely to occur in a weld. The study is based on data from other large structures, particularly nuclear reactors. The data used also appear to be consistent with the operating experience of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). This reactor has a fuel pin area comparable with the area of the ITER first wall and has experienced one unanticipated fuel pin failure after two years of operation. The repair of irradiated structures using fusion welding will be difficult due to the entrapped helium. Due to its extremely low solubility in metals, helium will diffuse and agglomerate to form helium bubbles after being trapped at point defects, dislocations, and grain boundaries. Welding of neutron-irradiated type 304 stainless steels has been reported with varying degree of heat-affected zone cracking (HAZ). The objectives of this study were to determine the threshold helium concentrations required to cause HAZ cracking and to investigate techniques that might be used to eliminate the HAZ cracking in welding of helium-containing materials.

  16. Modularization and installation, maintenance, and repair aspects of GASP technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dick, P. (Goodfellow Associates Ltd. (GB))

    1992-03-01

    This paper reports that the Goodfellow Assocs. Susbsea Processing (GASP) project addressed most of the major problem posed by the development of remote, small, marginal, or satellite oil and natural gas fields in deep waters. It considered a number of field development scenarios and , in particular, reviewed cases for fields situated up to 30 km from a platform- or shore-based processing facility. During the design of the resultant modularized GASP system, it was determined that an inspection, maintenance, and repair (IMR) philosophy needed to be developed. The number of field development scenarios involved, the different module dimensions and weights, and the remote driverless activities required in deeper waters resulted in a separate project, Maintenance and Retrieval Equipment (MARE).

  17. Repair of Electronics for Long Duration Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettegrew, Richard D.; Easton, John; Struk, Peter

    2007-01-01

    To reduce mission risk, long duration spaceflight and exploration activities will require greater degrees of self-sufficiency with regards to repair capability than have ever been employed before in space exploration. The current repair paradigm of replacing Orbital Replacement Units (ORUs) of malfunctioning avionics and electronic hardware will be impractical, since carrying all of the spares that could possibly be needed for a long duration mission would require upmass and volume at unprecedented and unacceptable levels. A strategy of component-level repair for electronics, however, could significantly reduce the mass and volume necessary for spares and enhance mission safety via a generic contingency capability. This approach is already used to varying degrees by the U.S. Navy, where vessels at sea experience some similar constraints such as the need for self sufficiency for moderately long time periods, and restrictions on volume of repair spares and infrastructure. The concept of conducting component-level repairs of electronics in spacecraft requires the development of design guidelines for future avionics (to enable repair), development of diagnostic techniques to allow an astronaut to pinpoint the faulty component aboard a vastly complex vehicle, and development of tools and methodologies for dealing with the physical processes of replacing the component. This physical process includes tasks such as conformal coating removal and replacement, component removal, replacement, and alignment--all in the difficulty of a reduced gravity environment. Further, the gravitational effects on the soldering process must be characterized and accounted for to ensure reliability of the newly repaired components. The Component-Level Electronics-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) project under the NASA Supportability program was established to develop and demonstrate the practicality of this repair approach. CLEAR involves collaborative efforts between NASA s Glenn Research Center

  18. Fabrication Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Fabrication Facilities are a direct result of years of testing support. Through years of experience, the three fabrication facilities (Fort Hood, Fort Lewis, and...

  19. Optimality in DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Morgiane; Fryett, Matthew; Miller, Samantha; Booth, Ian; Grebogi, Celso; Moura, Alessandro

    2012-01-07

    DNA within cells is subject to damage from various sources. Organisms have evolved a number of mechanisms to repair DNA damage. The activity of repair enzymes carries its own risk, however, because the repair of two nearby lesions may lead to the breakup of DNA and result in cell death. We propose a mathematical theory of the damage and repair process in the important scenario where lesions are caused in bursts. We use this model to show that there is an optimum level of repair enzymes within cells which optimises the cell's response to damage. This optimal level is explained as the best trade-off between fast repair and a low probability of causing double-stranded breaks. We derive our results analytically and test them using stochastic simulations, and compare our predictions with current biological knowledge.

  20. Using an international workshop to develop functional requirements and a Biohazard Assessment Protocol (BAP) with which to develop a preferred concept for a Mars Sample Return (MSR) Sample Receiving Facility (SRF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrublevskis, John; Guest, Michael; Bennett, Allan; Walker, James; Smith, Caroline; Baker, Robert; Grant, Colin

    COSPAR Planetary Protection Policy places very stringent requirements on Sample Return missions and `breaking the chain of contact' between Earth and the celestial body from which the sample is returned. This must be continued after return to Earth and -at the same time-any contamination or damage to the sample must be avoided until such time as it can be confirmed as not presenting a biohazard and available for subsequent curation and scientific investigation. Such a facility has never before been built and an investigation has been made to determine the requirements for a Mars Sample Return (MSR) Sample Receiving Facility (SRF) from first principles based on a Biohazard Assessment Protocol (BAP) rather than the modification of an existing BSL-4 facility. This approach fully takes in to account cleanliness requirements to avoid sample contamination. This paper will present the results from the first part of an ESA funded study, which derived the top level functional requirements by reviewing published scientific literature from all expert domains i.e.; biocontainment, science curation, space technology, infrastructure and equipment. These functional requirements were then examined by invited attendees from all expert domains in a 2 day international workshop. From the results of the international workshop an existing Biohazard Assessment Protocol (BAP) was modified and a trade off was conducted to derive a preferred concept which allowed early indications of future technological direction of study. The results of the MSR SRF study by SEA (as well as the results of another parallel study) will be taken into account by ESA to define the requirements for a follow-on procurement action in the future. There will be a review of the results from both studies and an agreement on the requirements based on these parallel studies. Therefore, the views expressed herein should not be taken to reflect the official opinion of the European Space Agency.

  1. Facility Microgrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.

    2005-05-01

    Microgrids are receiving a considerable interest from the power industry, partly because their business and technical structure shows promise as a means of taking full advantage of distributed generation. This report investigates three issues associated with facility microgrids: (1) Multiple-distributed generation facility microgrids' unintentional islanding protection, (2) Facility microgrids' response to bulk grid disturbances, and (3) Facility microgrids' intentional islanding.

  2. Sister chromatid gene conversion is a prominent double-strand break repair pathway in mammalian cells

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Roger D.; Jasin, Maria

    2000-01-01

    In mammalian cells, repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) occurs by both homologous and non-homologous mechanisms. By definition, homologous recombination requires a template with sufficient sequence identity to the damaged molecule in order to direct repair. We now show that the sister chromatid acts as a repair template in a substantial proportion of DSB repair events. The outcome of sister chromatid repair is primarily gene conversion unassociated with reciprocal exchange. This contras...

  3. 76 FR 21425 - Rocky Mountain Railcar and Repair, Inc.-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-Line of Railroad in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-15

    ... Surface Transportation Board Rocky Mountain Railcar and Repair, Inc.--Acquisition and Operation Exemption--Line of Railroad in Tooele County, UT Rocky Mountain Railcar and Repair, Inc. (Rocky Mountain), a... line. \\1\\ Rocky Mountain states that it currently operates a railcar repair facility, but that it...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trattnig, Siegfried; Winalski, Carl S.; Marlovits, Stephan; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Welsch, Goetz H.; Potter, Hollis G.

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage lesions are a common pathology of the knee joint, and many patients may benefit from cartilage repair surgeries that offer the chance to avoid the development of osteoarthritis or delay its progression. Cartilage repair surgery, no matter the technique, requires a noninvasive, standardized, and high-quality longitudinal method to assess the structure of the repair tissue. This goal is best fulfilled by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The present article provides an overview of the current state of the art of MRI of cartilage repair. In the first 2 sections, preclinical and clinical MRI of cartilage repair tissue are described with a focus on morphological depiction of cartilage and the use of functional (biochemical) MR methodologies for the visualization of the ultrastructure of cartilage repair. In the third section, a short overview is provided on the regulatory issues of the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) regarding MR follow-up studies of patients after cartilage repair surgeries. PMID:26069565

  5. Survey of European and Major ISC Facilities for Supporting Mars and Sample Return Mission Aerothermodynamics and Tests Required for Thermal Protection System and Dynamic Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathilde Bugel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the frame of future sample return missions to Mars, asteroids, and comets, investigated by the European Space Agency, a review of the actual aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics capabilities in Europe for Mars entry of large vehicles and high-speed Earth reentry of sample return capsule has been undertaken. Additionally, capabilities in Canada and Australia for the assessment of dynamic stability, as well as major facilities for hypersonic flows available in ISC, have been included. This paper provides an overview of European current capabilities for aerothermodynamics and testing of thermal protection systems. This assessment has allowed the identification of the needs in new facilities or upgrade of existing ground tests for covering experimentally Mars entries and Earth high-speed reentries as far as aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics, and thermal protection system testing are concerned.

  6. Discussion of facilities management as an academic discipline: To what extent are the general requirements met and what does it mean?

    OpenAIRE

    Junghans, Antje; Olsson, Nils

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore what an academic discipline is and to apply and discuss this definition using facilities management as an example. The paper addresses an academic world that is facing the challenge of developing research and education in response to emerging disciplines and dealing with changes in the higher education system. Institutions are also confronted with the aim of the European Commission to “enhance the performance and international ...

  7. Repairs of composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Hee Seok

    Repair on damaged composite panels was conducted. To better understand adhesively bonded repair, the study investigates the effect of design parameters on the joint strength. The design parameters include bondline length, thickness of adherend and type of adhesive. Adhesives considered in this study were tested to measure their tensile material properties. Three types of adhesively bonded joints, single strap, double strap, and single lap joint were considered under changing bondline lengths, thickness of adherend and type of adhesive. Based on lessons learned from bonded joints, a one-sided patch repair method for composite structures was conducted. The composite patch was bonded to the damaged panel by either film adhesive FM-73M or paste adhesive EA-9394 and the residual strengths of the repaired specimens were compared under varying patch sizes. A new repair method using attachments has been suggested to enhance the residual strength. Results obtained through experiments were analyzed using finite element analysis to provide a better repair design and explain the experimental results. It was observed that the residual strength of the repaired specimen was affected by patch length. Method for rapid repairs of damaged composite structures was investigated. The damage was represented by a circular hole in a composite laminated plate. Pre-cured composite patches were bonded with a quick-curing commercial adhesive near (rather than over) the hole. Tensile tests were conducted on specimens repaired with various patch geometries. The test results showed that, among the methods investigated, the best repair method restored over 90% of the original strength of an undamaged panel. The interfacial stresses in the adhesive zone for different patches were calculated in order to understand the efficiencies of the designs of these patch repairs. It was found that the composite patch that yielded the best strength had the lowest interfacial peel stress between the patch and

  8. Conceptual layout design of CFETR Hot Cell Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Zheng, E-mail: gongz@mail.ustc.edu.cn [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Qi, Minzhong, E-mail: qiminzhong@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Cheng, Yong, E-mail: chengyong@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Song, Yuntao, E-mail: songyt@ipp.ac.cn [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • This article proposed a conceptual layout design for CFETR. • The design principles are to support efficient maintenance to ensure the realization of high duty time. • The preliminary maintenance process and logistics are described in detail. • Life cycle management, maneuverability, risk and safety are in the consideration of design. - Abstract: CFETR (China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor) is new generation of Tokomak device beyond EAST in China. An overview of hot cell layout design for CFETR has been proposed by ASIPP&USTC. Hot Cell, as major auxiliary facility, not only plays a pivotal role in supporting maintenance to meet the requirements of high duty time 0.3–0.5 but also supports installation and decommissioning. Almost all of the Tokomak devices are lateral handling internal components like ITER and JET, but CFETR maintain the blanket module from 4 vertical ports, which is quite a big challenge for the hot cell layout design. The activated in-vessel components and several diagnosis instruments will be repaired and refurbished in the Hot Cell Facility, so the appropriate layout is very important to the Hot Cell Facility to ensure the high duty time, it is divided into different parts equipped with a variety of RH equipment and diagnosis devices based on the functional requirements. The layout of the Hot Cell Facility should make maintenance process more efficient and reliable, and easy to service and rescue when a sudden events taking place, that is the capital importance issue considered in design.

  9. Repairable-conditionally repairable damage model based on dual Poisson processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, B K; Persson, L M; Edgren, M R; Hedlöf, I; Brahme, A

    2003-09-01

    The advent of intensity-modulated radiation therapy makes it increasingly important to model the response accurately when large volumes of normal tissues are irradiated by controlled graded dose distributions aimed at maximizing tumor cure and minimizing normal tissue toxicity. The cell survival model proposed here is very useful and flexible for accurate description of the response of healthy tissues as well as tumors in classical and truly radiobiologically optimized radiation therapy. The repairable-conditionally repairable (RCR) model distinguishes between two different types of damage, namely the potentially repairable, which may also be lethal, i.e. if unrepaired or misrepaired, and the conditionally repairable, which may be repaired or may lead to apoptosis if it has not been repaired correctly. When potentially repairable damage is being repaired, for example by nonhomologous end joining, conditionally repairable damage may require in addition a high-fidelity correction by homologous repair. The induction of both types of damage is assumed to be described by Poisson statistics. The resultant cell survival expression has the unique ability to fit most experimental data well at low doses (the initial hypersensitive range), intermediate doses (on the shoulder of the survival curve), and high doses (on the quasi-exponential region of the survival curve). The complete Poisson expression can be approximated well by a simple bi-exponential cell survival expression, S(D) = e(-aD) + bDe(-cD), where the first term describes the survival of undamaged cells and the last term represents survival after complete repair of sublethal damage. The bi-exponential expression makes it easy to derive D(0), D(q), n and alpha, beta values to facilitate comparison with classical cell survival models.

  10. A3 Altitude Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulreix, Lionel J.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation shows drawings, diagrams and photographs of the A3 Altitude Test Facility. It includes a review of the A3 Facility requirements, and drawings of the various sections of the facility including Engine Deck and Superstructure, Test Cell and Thrust Takeout, Structure and Altitude Support Systems, Chemical Steam generators, and the subscale diffuser. There are also pictures of the construction site, and the facility under construction. A Diagram of the A3 Steam system schematic is also shown

  11. Diverless pipeline repair system for deep water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spinelli, Carlo M. [Eni Gas and Power, Milan (Italy); Fabbri, Sergio; Bachetta, Giuseppe [Saipem/SES, Venice (Italy)

    2009-07-01

    SiRCoS (Sistema Riparazione Condotte Sottomarine) is a diverless pipeline repair system composed of a suite of tools to perform a reliable subsea pipeline repair intervention in deep and ultra deep water which has been on the ground of the long lasting experience of Eni and Saipem in designing, laying and operating deep water pipelines. The key element of SiRCoS is a Connection System comprising two end connectors and a repair spool piece to replace a damaged pipeline section. A Repair Clamp with elastomeric seals is also available for pipe local damages. The Connection System is based on pipe cold forging process, consisting in swaging the pipe inside connectors with suitable profile, by using high pressure seawater. Three swaging operations have to be performed to replace the damaged pipe length. This technology has been developed through extensive theoretical work and laboratory testing, ending in a Type Approval by DNV over pipe sizes ranging from 20 inches to 48 inches OD. A complete SiRCoS system has been realised for the Green Stream pipeline, thoroughly tested in workshop as well as in shallow water and is now ready, in the event of an emergency situation.The key functional requirements for the system are: diverless repair intervention and fully piggability after repair. Eni owns this technology and is now available to other operators under Repair Club arrangement providing stand-by repair services carried out by Saipem Energy Services. The paper gives a description of the main features of the Repair System as well as an insight into the technological developments on pipe cold forging reliability and long term duration evaluation. (author)

  12. 30 CFR 800.17 - Bonding requirements for underground coal mines and long-term coal-related surface facilities and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... mines, for which a permit is required. Specific reclamation techniques required for underground mines... liability period shall extend until all reclamation, restoration, and abatement work under the permit has... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bonding requirements for underground coal mines...

  13. Transcription-coupled DNA repair in prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Ann; Spivak, Graciela; Hanawalt, Philip C

    2012-01-01

    Transcription-coupled repair (TCR) is a subpathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER) that acts specifically on lesions in the transcribed strand of expressed genes. First reported in mammalian cells, TCR was then documented in Escherichia coli. In this organism, an RNA polymerase arrested at a lesion is displaced by the transcription repair coupling factor, Mfd. This protein recruits the NER lesion-recognition factor UvrA, and then dissociates from the DNA. UvrA binds UvrB, and the assembled UvrAB* complex initiates repair. In mutants lacking active Mfd, TCR is absent. A gene transcribed by the bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase in E. coli also requires Mfd for TCR. The CSB protein (missing or defective in cells of patients with Cockayne syndrome, complementation group B) is essential for TCR in humans. CSB and its homologs in higher eukaryotes are likely functional equivalents of Mfd. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. 48 CFR 846.472-1 - Repairs of $1,000 or less.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Repairs of $1,000 or less... less. (a) Generally, the management broker must make any required inspections for repairs of $1,000 or less. A qualified fee or staff inspector must make any required inspection for repairs of $1,000...

  15. Reliability analysis of two unit parallel repairable industrial system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit Kumar Kakkar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to present a reliability and profit analysis of a two-dissimilar parallel unit system under the assumption that operative unit cannot fail after post repair inspection and replacement and there is only one repair facility. Failure and repair times of each unit are assumed to be uncorrelated. Using regenerative point technique various reliability characteristics are obtained which are useful to system designers and industrial managers. Graphical behaviors of mean time to system failure (MTSF and profit function have also been studied. In this paper, some important measures of reliability characteristics of a two non-identical unit standby system model with repair, inspection and post repair are obtained using regenerative point technique.

  16. Workshop on DNA repair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.R. Lehmann (Alan); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); A.A. van Zeeland (Albert); C.M.P. Backendorf (Claude); B.A. Bridges; A. Collins; R.P.D. Fuchs; G.P. Margison; R. Montesano; E. Moustacchi; A.T. Natarajan; M. Radman; A. Sarasin; E. Seeberg; C.A. Smith; M. Stefanini (Miria); L.H. Thompson; G.P. van der Schans; C.A. Weber (Christine); M.Z. Zdzienika

    1992-01-01

    textabstractA workshop on DNA repair with emphasis on eukaryotic systems was held, under the auspices of the EC Concerted Action on DNA Repair and Cancer, at Noordwijkerhout (The Netherlands) 14-19 April 1991. The local organization of the meeting was done under the auspices of the Medical Genetic C

  17. Laparoscopic lumbar hernia repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Atul K; Ternovits, Craig A; Speck, Karen E; Pritchard, F Elizabeth; Tichansky, David S

    2006-04-01

    Lumbar hernias are rare clinical entities that often pose a challenge for repair. Because of the surrounding anatomy, adequate surgical herniorraphy is often difficult. Minimally invasive surgery has become an option for these hernias. Herein, we describe two patients with lumbar hernias (one with a recurrent traumatic hernia and one with an incisional hernia). Both of these hernias were successfully repaired laparoscopically.

  18. Attitudes, practice, and experience of German dentists regarding repair restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzow, Philipp; Hoffmann, Robin; Tschammler, Claudia; Kruppa, Jochen; Rödig, Tina; Wiegand, Annette

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to perform a representative survey among German dentists about attitudes, practice, and experience regarding single-tooth repair restorations. An anonymous questionnaire was designed and mailed to all registered dentists in Lower Saxony (n = 6600). Twenty-eight percent were returned (n = 1852), and n = 1805 could be analyzed. Statistical analyses were done by Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, Kruskal-Wallis tests, and ordered logistic regressions (p materials. Frequency of performing repair restorations was partially associated to dentist-related factors. The decision for repairing a restoration was dependent on several tooth- and restoration-associated variables. The main indications for repair were the partial loss of restoration or adjacent tooth structure as well as chipping and endodontic access cavities of crowns. Repair restorations were mostly done with composite using various different preconditioning techniques. Overall patients' acceptance was reported to be high. Most of the dentists considered repair restorations as permanent restoration with a moderate to high longevity. Estimated success of repair restorations depended significantly on the dentists' experiences (frequency and techniques of repair restorations). Repair restorations were often performed and were well accepted by dentists and patients, but indications for repair restorations as well as applied materials and techniques varied distinctly. Repairs of single-tooth restorations are well accepted and frequently performed, but indications, techniques, and materials require further research.

  19. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the fast flux test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickels, J M; Dahl, N R

    1992-11-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in US Department of Energy Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could affect employee or public safety or the environment. A Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determination was performed during calendar year 1991 and the evaluation requires the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements.

  20. DNA repair protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjergbæk, Lotte

    In its 3rd edition, this Methods in Molecular Biology(TM) book covers the eukaryotic response to genomic insult including advanced protocols and standard techniques in the field of DNA repair. Offers expert guidance for DNA repair, recombination, and replication. Current knowledge of the mechanisms...... that regulate DNA repair has grown significantly over the past years with technology advances such as RNA interference, advanced proteomics and microscopy as well as high throughput screens. The third edition of DNA Repair Protocols covers various aspects of the eukaryotic response to genomic insult including...... recent advanced protocols as well as standard techniques used in the field of DNA repair. Both mammalian and non-mammalian model organisms are covered in the book, and many of the techniques can be applied with only minor modifications to other systems than the one described. Written in the highly...

  1. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling by the Cockayne syndrome B DNA repair-transcription-coupling factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Citterio (Elisabetta); V. van den Boom (Vincent); G. Schnitzler; R. Kanaar (Roland); E. Bonte (Edgar); R.E. Kingston; W. Vermeulen (Wim); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe Cockayne syndrome B protein (CSB) is required for coupling DNA excision repair to transcription in a process known as transcription-coupled repair (TCR). Cockayne syndrome patients show UV sensitivity and severe neurodevelopmental abnormalities. CSB is a

  2. Variable gravity research facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Sean; Ancheta, Stan; Beine, Donna; Cink, Brian; Eagon, Mark; Eckstein, Brett; Luhman, Dan; Mccowan, Daniel; Nations, James; Nordtvedt, Todd

    1988-01-01

    Spin and despin requirements; sequence of activities required to assemble the Variable Gravity Research Facility (VGRF); power systems technology; life support; thermal control systems; emergencies; communication systems; space station applications; experimental activities; computer modeling and simulation of tether vibration; cost analysis; configuration of the crew compartments; and tether lengths and rotation speeds are discussed.

  3. Optimal Strategy for Inspection and Repair of Structural Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    1987-01-01

    A new strategy for inspection and repair of structural elements and systems is presented. The total cost of inspection and repair is minimized with the constraints that the reliability of elements and/or of the structural system are acceptable. The design variables are the time intervals between...... inspections and the quality of the inspections. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the performance of the strategy. The strategy can be used for any engineering system where inspection and repair are required....

  4. Technique for and an anatomic guide to forearm tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Jeremy M; Hollister, Anne M; Rush, David A; Avallone, Thomas J; Shi, Runhua; Jordan, Jenee' C

    2011-06-01

    Forearm lacerations involving muscle bellies are usually treated by repairing muscle fascia. Repair of tendons themselves is stronger and restores normal muscle anatomy better. Tendon repair requires good knowledge of forearm muscle and tendon anatomy. We have made cadaver measurements to produce graphical maps of locations of individual muscles tendons of origin and insertion, some practical guides for finding tendon ends and a simple grasping stitch for intramuscular tendons.

  5. Repairing the wooden frame of chambers in coking furnaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nador, Y.; Iruti, M.; Komiya, S.; Matsuno, T.; Ogavakhara, F.

    1983-02-12

    A method and device are proposed for hot repair of the door frames of coking chanbers. The repair is conducted prior to discharge of the coke from the chamber without its cooling or a reduction in temperature. After the doors are removed, a screening plate fettled with a heat insulation material on the chamber side is introduced into the frame, it is attached to the door frame and the required repair is conducted.

  6. Wind Energy Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurie, Carol

    2017-02-01

    This book takes readers inside the places where daily discoveries shape the next generation of wind power systems. Energy Department laboratory facilities span the United States and offer wind research capabilities to meet industry needs. The facilities described in this book make it possible for industry players to increase reliability, improve efficiency, and reduce the cost of wind energy -- one discovery at a time. Whether you require blade testing or resource characterization, grid integration or high-performance computing, Department of Energy laboratory facilities offer a variety of capabilities to meet your wind research needs.

  7. Wind Energy Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

    2017-02-01

    This book takes readers inside the places where daily discoveries shape the next generation of wind power systems. Energy Department laboratory facilities span the United States and offer wind research capabilities to meet industry needs. The facilities described in this book make it possible for industry players to increase reliability, improve efficiency, and reduce the cost of wind energy -- one discovery at a time. Whether you require blade testing or resource characterization, grid integration or high-performance computing, Department of Energy laboratory facilities offer a variety of capabilities to meet your wind research needs.

  8. Auditing radiation sterilization facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Jeffrey A.

    The diversity of radiation sterilization systems available today places renewed emphasis on the need for thorough Quality Assurance audits of these facilities. Evaluating compliance with Good Manufacturing Practices is an obvious requirement, but an effective audit must also evaluate installation and performance qualification programs (validation_, and process control and monitoring procedures in detail. The present paper describes general standards that radiation sterilization operations should meet in each of these key areas, and provides basic guidance for conducting QA audits of these facilities.

  9. Dry Well Storage Facility conceptual design study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-02-01

    The Dry Well Storage Facility described is assumed to be located adjacent to or near a Spent Fuel Receiving and Packaging Facility and/or a Packaged Fuel Transfer Facility. Performance requirements, quality levels and codes and standards, schedule and methods of performance, special requirements, quality assurance program, and cost estimate are discussed. Appendices on major mechanical equipment and electric power requirements are included.

  10. Experimenting with Science Facility Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, Eric

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the modern school science facility and how computers and teaching methods are changing their design. Issues include power, lighting, and space requirements; funding for planning; architect assessment; materials requirements for work surfaces; and classroom flexibility. (GR)

  11. PROVIDING INDUSTRIAL SAFETY IN THE DESIGN OF CHEMICAL FACILITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Danilova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Designing of chemical destination requires developers’ particular, careful approach, as malfunctions are dangerous for the whole area in which the facility is located. Efficient and uninterrupted operation of a chemical entity assumes certain tasks, and at the design stage, and during the construction, reconstruction, repair, and maintenance. When designing a crucial question: placing equipment in the technological scheme (nature and the order and connection of separate devices; determine the input parameters of raw materials; establishment of technological parameters of the system; determine the structural characteristics of the devices of the system; selection of process parameters in devices that affect the speed of the process, output and product quality. The main document containing the requirements of industrial safety, chemical and other dangerous objects is the Federal Law of July 21, 1997 № 116-FZ "On industrial safety of hazardous production facilities", as amended on December 31, 2014. It defines and regulates the framework for ensuring the safe operation of hazardous production facilities. The most important part in the development and design of hazardous chemicals is the examination of industrial safety, which is held on the basis of the principles of independence, objectivity, comprehensiveness and completeness of the research carried out by using modern science and technology. Design of chemical facilities is a complex, multifactorial and time-consuming process, which should be regarded as a series of socio-organizational and engineering stages. It is a systematic approach to solving design problems and control of all stages of the life cycle of chemical facilities will provide a high level of safe operation of industrial facilities.

  12. Augmented Reality Repair Guidance System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidharth Bhatia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The daily life of a common man revolves around various forms of appliances/gadgets he uses throughout the day such as a mobile phone, laptop, printer, microwave oven, washing machine, etc. Although these appliances/gadgets are taken by most of the people for granted, the problem occurs when any of these things do not work as they are expected to. Getting them to the repair shops for every small glitch is expensive as well as time consuming. Although most of the companies which produce these appliances/gadgets do supply them with basic manuals, which deal with how to solve these minor issues, but reading them and at the same time repairing the corresponding appliance/gadget can be a frustrating task at times. These problems can be reduced to a large extent if some kind of live guidance is available. In this paper we propose a method to do so with the help of an augmented reality based system that will guide the user to carry out small scale repair jobs on these gadgets. All that is required is a decent webcam and a computing device, with a processor of 1 GHz or more and a display screen.

  13. Salvage hypospadias repairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sripathi V

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Review of our experience and to develop an algorithm for salvage procedures in the management of hypospadias cripples and treatment of urethral strictures following hypospadias repair. Methods: This is a retrospective review of hypospadias surgeries over a 41-month period. Out of a total 168 surgeries, 20 were salvage/re-operative repairs. In three children a Duplay repair was feasible, while in four others a variety of single-stage repairs could be done. The repair was staged in seven children - buccal mucosal grafts (BMGs in five, buccal mucosal tube in one, and skin graft in one. Five children with dense strictures were managed by dorsal BMG inlay grafting in one, vascularized tunical onlay grafting on the ventrum in one, and a free tunical patch in one. Three children were treated by internal urethrotomy and stenting for four weeks with a poor outcome. Results: The age of children ranged from 1.5-15 years (mean 4.5. Follow-up ranged from 3 months to 3.5 years. Excellent results were obtained in 10 children (50% with a well-surfaced erect penis and a slit-like meatus. Glans closure could not be achieved and meatus was coronal in three. Two children developed fistulae following a Duplay repair and following a staged BMG. Three repairs failed completely - a composite repair broke down, a BMG tube stenosed with a proximal leak, and a stricture recurred with loss of a ventral free tunical graft. Conclusions: In salvage procedures performed on hypospadias cripples, a staged repair with buccal mucosa as an inlay in the first stage followed by tubularization 4-6 months later provides good results. A simple algorithm to plan corrective surgery in failed hypospadias cases and obtain satisfactory results is devised.

  14. The impact of heterochromatin on DSB repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodarzi, Aaron A; Noon, Angela T; Jeggo, Penny A

    2009-06-01

    DNA NHEJ (non-homologous end-joining) is the major DNA DSB (double-strand break) repair pathway in mammalian cells. Although NHEJ-defective cell lines show marked DSB-repair defects, cells defective in ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) repair most DSBs normally. Thus NHEJ functions independently of ATM signalling. However, approximately 15% of radiation-induced DSBs are repaired with slow kinetics and require ATM and the nuclease Artemis. DSBs persisting in the presence of an ATM inhibitor, ATMi, localize to heterochromatin, suggesting that ATM is required for repairing DSBs arising within or close to heterochromatin. Consistent with this, we show that siRNA (small interfering RNA) of key heterochromatic proteins, including KAP-1 [KRAB (Krüppel-associated box) domain-associated protein 1], HP1 (heterochromatin protein 1) and HDAC (histone deacetylase) 1/2, relieves the requirement for ATM for DSB repair. Furthermore, ATMi addition to cell lines with genetic alterations that have an impact on heterochromatin, including Suv39H1/2 (suppressor of variegation 3-9 homologue 1/2)-knockout, ICFa (immunodeficiency, centromeric region instability, facial anomalies syndrome type a) and Hutchinson-Guilford progeria cell lines, fails to have an impact on DSB repair. KAP-1 is a highly dose-dependent, transient and ATM-specific substrate, and mutation of the ATM phosphorylation site on KAP-1 influences DSB repair. Collectively, the findings show that ATM functions to overcome the barrier to DSB repair posed by heterochromatin. However, even in the presence of ATM, gamma-H2AX (phosphorylated histone H2AX) foci form on the periphery rather than within heterochromatic centres. Finally, we show that KAP-1's association with heterochromatin is diminished as cells progress through mitosis. We propose that KAP-1 is a critical heterochromatic factor that undergoes specific modifications to promote DSB repair and mitotic progression in a manner that allows localized and transient

  15. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) Requirements for Space Station Accommodations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, D. A.; Clayton, M. J.; Runge, F. C.

    1985-01-01

    Top level requirements for assembly and integration of the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) Observatory at the Space Station are examined. Concepts are currently under study for LDR which will provide a sequel to the Infrared Astronomy Satellite and the Space Infrared Telescope Facility. LDR will provide a spectacular capability over a very broad spectral range. The Space Station will provide an essential facility for the initial assembly and check out of LDR, as well as a necessary base for refurbishment, repair and modification. By providing a manned platform, the Space Station will remove the time constraint on assembly associated with use of the Shuttle alone. Personnel safety during necessary EVA is enhanced by the presence of the manned facility.

  16. Repair and regeneration in endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, L M; Rosenberg, P A

    2011-10-01

    The ideal objective of treatment of established diseases, including irreversible pulpitis and apical periodontitis, is to achieve wound healing. Wound healing can result in repair or regeneration. The ultimate goal of wound healing is to restore the original architecture and biological function of the injured tissue or organ. Although humans are equipped with powerful innate and adaptive immune defence mechanisms, many intrinsic and extrinsic factors can affect wound healing. Complete regeneration following injury in humans can occur only in the pre-natal foetus within 24 weeks of gestation. Post-natal wounds including irreversible pulpitis or apical periodontitis always heal by repair or by a combination of repair and regeneration. Somatic cells, such as fibroblasts, macrophages, cementoblasts and osteoblasts, in the pulp and periapical tissues have limited potential for regeneration following injury and lack of telomerase. Wound healing of irreversible pulpitis and apical periodontitis requires recruitment and differentiation of progenitor/stem cells into tissue-committed somatic cells. Stem cell differentiation is regulated by intrinsic factors and extrinsic micro-environmental cues. Functionality of stem cells appears to show an age-related decline because of the change in intrinsic properties and diminished signals within the extrinsic local and systemic environment that modulate the function of stem cells or their progeny. Infection induces an immuno-inflammatory response and tissue destruction, which hinders the potential of tissue regeneration. Therefore, prevention, early detection and treatment of inflammation/infection of pulpal and periapical disease can enhance regeneration and minimize the repair of pulpal and periapical tissues after endodontic therapy. © 2011 International Endodontic Journal.

  17. Hypospadias Repair: A Single Centre Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoor Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To determine the demographics and analyze the management and factors influencing the postoperative complications of hypospadias repair. Settings. Hayatabad Medical Complex Peshawar, Pakistan, from January 2007 to December 2011. Material and Methods. All male patients presenting with hypospadias irrespective of their ages were included in the study. The data were acquired from the hospital’s database and analyzed with Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS. Results. A total of 428 patients with mean age of 8.12 ± 5.04 SD presented for hypospadias repair. Midpenile hypospadias were the most common. Chordee, meatal abnormalities, cryptorchidism, and inguinal hernias were observed in 74.3%, 9.6%, 2.8%, and 2.1% cases, respectively. Two-stage (Bracka and TIP (tubularized incised urethral plate repairs were performed in 76.2% and 20.8% of cases, respectively. The most common complications were edema and urethrocutaneous fistula (UCF. The complications were significantly lower in the hands of specialists than residents (P-value = 0.0086. The two-stage hypospadias repair resulted in higher complications frequency than single-stage repair (P value = 0.0001. Conclusion. Hypospadias surgery has a long learning curve because it requires a great deal of temperament, surgical skill and acquaintance with magnifications. Single-stage repair should be encouraged wherever applicable due to its lower postoperative complications.

  18. Regulatory Challenges for Cartilage Repair Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Kevin B; Stiegman, Glenn

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, few Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved options exist for the treatment of focal cartilage and osteochondral lesions. Developers of products for cartilage repair face many challenges to obtain marketing approval from the FDA. The objective of this review is to discuss the necessary steps for FDA application and approval for a new cartilage repair product. FDA Guidance Documents, FDA Panel Meetings, scientific organization recommendations, and clinicaltrials.gov were reviewed to demonstrate the current thinking of FDA and the scientific community on the regulatory process for cartilage repair therapies. Cartilage repair therapies can receive market approval from FDA as medical devices, drugs, or biologics, and the specific classification of product can affect the nonclinical, clinical, and regulatory strategy to bring the product to market. Recent FDA guidance gives an outline of the required elements to bring a cartilage repair product to market, although these standards are often very general. As a result, companies have to carefully craft their study patient population, comparator group, and clinical endpoint to best showcase their product's attributes. In addition, regulatory strategy and manufacturing process validation need to be considered early in the clinical study process to allow for timely product approval following the completion of clinical study. Although the path to regulatory approval for a cartilage repair therapy is challenging and time-consuming, proper clinical trial planning and attention to the details can eventually save companies time and money by bringing a product to the market in the most expeditious process possible.

  19. Modernizing sports facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dustin, R. [McKenney`s, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Modernization and renovation of sports facilities challenge the design team to balance a number of requirements: spectator and owner expectations, existing building and site conditions, architectural layouts, code and legislation issues, time constraints and budget issues. System alternatives are evaluated and selected based on the relative priorities of these requirements. These priorities are unique to each project. At Alexander Memorial Coliseum, project schedules, construction funds and facility usage became the priorities. The ACC basketball schedule and arrival of the Centennial Olympics dictated the construction schedule. Initiation and success of the project depended on the commitment of the design team to meet coliseum funding levels established three years ago. Analysis of facility usage and system alternative capabilities drove the design team to select a system that met the project requirements and will maximize the benefits to the owner and spectators for many years to come.

  20. Report: EPA Has Not Met Statutory Requirements for Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal Facility Inspections, but Inspection Rates Are High

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #16-P-0104, March 11, 2016. Although the EPA’s overall inspection completion rate is high, the agency did not fully meet the legal requirement for inspecting 100 percent of operating TSDFs for fiscal year 2014.

  1. Suppressed expression of non-DSB repair genes inhibits gamma-radiation-induced cytogenetic repair and cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H; Emami, Kamal; Hammond, Dianne; Casey, Rachael; Mehta, Satish K; Jeevarajan, Antony S; Pierson, Duane L; Wu, Honglu

    2008-11-01

    successful DSB repair requires both DSB repair mechanisms and non-DSB repair systems. These results reveal that many genes play previously unrecognized roles in multiple DNA repair responses, all of which are required for successful repair of IR-induced damage.

  2. Choreography of oxidative damage repair in mammalian genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Sankar; Izumi, Tadahide; Boldogh, Istvan; Bhakat, Kishor K; Hill, Jeff W; Hazra, Tapas K

    2002-07-01

    The lesions induced by reactive oxygen species in both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes include altered bases, abasic (AP) sites, and single-strand breaks, all repaired primarily via the base excision repair (BER) pathway. Although the basic BER process (consisting of five sequential steps) could be reconstituted in vitro with only four enzymes, it is now evident that repair of oxidative damage, at least in mammalian cell nuclei, is more complex, and involves a number of additional proteins, including transcription- and replication-associated factors. These proteins may be required in sequential repair steps in concert with other cellular changes, starting with nuclear targeting of the early repair enzymes in response to oxidative stress, facilitation of lesion recognition, and access by chromatin unfolding via histone acetylation, and formation of metastable complexes of repair enzymes and other accessory proteins. Distinct, specific subclasses of protein complexes may be formed for repair of oxidative lesions in the nucleus in transcribed vs. nontranscribed sequences in chromatin, in quiescent vs. cycling cells, and in nascent vs. parental DNA strands in replicating cells. Characterizing the proteins for each repair subpathway, their signaling-dependent modifications and interactions in the nuclear as well as mitochondrial repair complexes, will be a major focus of future research in oxidative damage repair.

  3. Mfd as a central partner of transcription coupled repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnet, Jordan; Grange, Wilfried; Strick, Terence R; Joly, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Transcription-coupled repair (TCR) is one of the key of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathways required to preserve genome integrity. Although understanding TCR is still a major challenge, recent single-molecule experiments have brought new insights into the initial steps of TCR leading to new perspectives.

  4. Progress of peripheral nerve repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈峥嵘

    2002-01-01

    Study on repair of peripheral nerve injury has been proceeding over a long period of time. With the use of microsurgery technique since 1960s,the quality of nerve repair has been greatly improved. In the past 40 years, with the continuous increase of surgical repair methods, more progress has been made on the basic research of peripheral nerve repair.

  5. Achilles tendon repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilles tendon rupture-surgery; Percutaneous Achilles tendon rupture repair ... To fix your torn Achilles tendon, the surgeon will: Make a cut down the back of your heel Make several small cuts rather than one large cut ...

  6. Diaphragmatic hernia repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... presentations/100014.htm Diaphragmatic hernia repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... Overview The chest cavity includes the heart and lungs. The abdominal cavity includes the liver, the stomach, ...

  7. Eye muscle repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100062.htm Eye muscle repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... the eyeball to the eye socket. The external muscles of the eye are found behind the conjunctiva. ...

  8. Tracheoesophageal fistula repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100103.htm Tracheoesophageal fistula repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Esophagus Disorders Fistulas Tracheal Disorders A.D.A.M., Inc. is ...

  9. Inguinal hernia repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100027.htm Inguinal hernia repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... to slide 4 out of 4 Overview A hernia occurs when part of an organ protrudes through ...

  10. Pectus excavatum repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100035.htm Pectus excavatum repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... Go to slide 4 out of 4 Overview Pectus excavatum is a deformity of the front of the ...

  11. Hiatal hernia repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... presentations/100028.htm Hiatal hernia repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on ... Overview The esophagus runs through the diaphragm to the stomach. It functions to carry food from the mouth ...

  12. Repairing ceramic insulating tiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, B. R.; Laymance, E. L.

    1980-01-01

    Fused-silica tiles containing large voids or gauges are repaired without adhesives by plug insertion method. Tiles are useful in conduits for high-temperature gases, in furnaces, and in other applications involving heat insulation.

  13. Rotator cuff repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100229.htm Rotator cuff repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... to slide 4 out of 4 Overview The rotator cuff is a group of muscles and tendons that ...

  14. Cleft lip repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100010.htm Cleft lip repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... abnormal opening in the middle of the upper lip. A cleft palate is an opening in the roof of ...

  15. Repairing Multiple Failures with Coordinated and Adaptive Regenerating Codes

    CERN Document Server

    Kermarrec, Anne-Marie; Scouarnec, Nicolas Le

    2011-01-01

    Erasure correcting codes are widely used to ensure data persistence in distributed storage systems. This paper addresses the repair of such codes in the presence of simultaneous failures. It is crucial to maintain the required redundancy over time to prevent permanent data losses. We go beyond existing work (i.e., regenerating codes by Dimakis et al.) and propose coordinated regenerating codes allowing devices to coordinate during simultaneous repairs thus reducing the costs further. We provide closed form expressions of the communication costs of our new codes depending on the number of live devices and the number of devices being repaired. We prove that deliberately delaying repairs does not bring additional gains in itself. This means that regenerating codes are optimal as long as each failure can be repaired before a second one occurs. Yet, when multiple failures are detected simultaneously, we prove that our coordinated regenerating codes are optimal and outperform uncoordinated repairs (with respect to ...

  16. Grey Repairable System Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Renkuan Guo; Charles Ernie Love

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we systematically discuss the basic concepts of grey theory, particularly the grey differential equation and its mathematical foundation, which is essentially unknown in the reliability engineering community. Accordingly,we propose a small-sample based approach to estimate repair improvement effects by partitioning system stopping times into intrinsic functioning times and repair improvement times. An industrial data set is used for illustrative purposes in a stepwise manner.

  17. Laparoscopic repair of large incisional hernias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Harris H; Nottingham, James M; Bynoe, Raymond P; Yost, Michael J

    2002-06-01

    Incisional hernias after abdominal operations are a significant cause of long-term morbidity and have been reported to occur in 3 to 20 per cent of laparotomy incisions. Traditional primary suture closure repair is plagued with up to a 50 per cent recurrence rate. With the introduction of prosthetic mesh repair recurrence decreased, but complications with mesh placement emerged ushering in the development of laparoscopic incisional herniorrhaphy. The records of patients who underwent laparoscopic incisional hernia repair between June 1, 1995 and September 1, 2001 were reviewed. Patient demographics, hernia defect size, recurrence, operative time, and procedure-related complications were evaluated. Fifty patients (22 male and 28 female, mean age 57 years with range of 24-83) were scheduled for laparoscopic incisional hernia repair between June 1, 1995 and September 1, 2001. The average patient was obese with a mean body mass index of 35.8 kg/m2 (range 16-57 kg/m2). Two patients (4%) had primary ventral hernias. Forty-eight patients (96%) had incisional hernias with 22 (46%) of these previously repaired with prosthetic mesh. Mean defect size was 206.1 cm2 (range 48-594 cm2). The average mesh size was 510.2 cm2 (range 224-1050 cm2). Gore-Tex DualMesh and Bard Composite Mesh were used in 84 and 16 per cent of the repairs, respectively. Mean operating time was 97 minutes. There were no deaths. Complications were seen in 12 per cent patients (six occurrences) and included two small bowel enterotomies, a symptomatic seroma requiring aspirate, a mesh reaction requiring a short course of intravenous antibiotics, and trocar site pain (two patients). There were no recurrences during a mean follow-up of 41 months (range 3-74 months). We conclude that laparoscopic incisional herniorrhaphy offers a safe and effective repair for large primary and recurrent ventral hernia with low morbidity.

  18. 9 CFR 590.534 - Freezing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Freezing facilities. 590.534 Section..., and Facility Requirements § 590.534 Freezing facilities. (a) Freezing rooms, either on or off the... as set forth in § 590.536. Use of off-premise freezing facilities is permitted only when prior...

  19. 45 CFR 1170.32 - Existing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Existing facilities. 1170.32 Section 1170.32... ASSISTED PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES Accessibility § 1170.32 Existing facilities. (a) Accessibility. A recipient... require a recipient to make each of its existing facilities or every part of a facility accessible to and...

  20. 43 CFR 17.217 - Existing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Existing facilities. 17.217 Section 17.217... facilities. (a) Accessibility. A recipient shall operate each program or activity so that when each part is... not require a recipient to make each of its existing facilities or every part of a facility...

  1. Integrating NEPA (National Environmental Policy Act) and CERCLA (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act) requirements during remedial responses at DOE facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, M.B.; Smith, E.D.; Sharples, F.E.; Eddlemon, G.K.

    1990-07-01

    US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.4, issued October 6, 1989, calls for integrating the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) with those of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) for DOE remedial actions under CERCLA. CERCLA requires that decisions on site remediation be made through a formal process called a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS). According to the DOE order, integration is to be accomplished by conducting the NEPA and CERCLA environmental planning and review procedures concurrently. The primary instrument for integrating the processes is to be the RI/FS process, which will be supplemented as needed to meet the procedural and documentational requirements of NEPA. The final product of the integrated process will be a single, integrated set of documents; namely, an RI report and an FS-EIS that satisfy the requirements of both NEPA and CERCLA. The contents of the report include (1) an overview and comparison of the requirements of the two processes; (2) descriptions of the major tasks included in the integrated RI/FS-EIS process; (3) recommended contents for integrated RI/FS-EIS documents; and (4)a discussion of some potential problems in integrating NEPA and CERCLA that fall outisde the scope of the RI/FS-EIS process, with suggestions for resolving some of these problems. 15 refs.

  2. Rilem TC 203-RHM: Repair mortars for historic masonry. Repair mortars for historic masonry: From problem to intervention: a decision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hees, R.P.J. van; Groot, C.; Hughes, J.J.; Balen, K. van; Bicer-Simsir, B.; Binda, L.; Elsen, J.; Konow, T. von; Lindqvist, J.E.; Maurenbrecher, P.; Papayanni, I.; Subercaseaux, M.; Tedeschi, C.; Toumbakari, E.E.; Thompson, M.

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on repair or replacement mortars for historical buildings. Both the decision process and questions arising are dealt with, in order to better define and illustrate technical requirements for mortars to be used for the repair or restoration of monuments and historic buildings (ma

  3. DUPIC facility engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. S.; Choi, J. W.; Go, W. I.; Kim, H. D.; Song, K. C.; Jeong, I. H.; Park, H. S.; Im, C. S.; Lee, H. M.; Moon, K. H.; Hong, K. P.; Lee, K. S.; Suh, K. S.; Kim, E. K.; Min, D. K.; Lee, J. C.; Chun, Y. B.; Paik, S. Y.; Lee, E. P.; Yoo, G. S.; Kim, Y. S.; Park, J. C.

    1997-09-01

    In the early stage of the project, a comprehensive survey was conducted to identify the feasibility of using available facilities and of interface between those facilities. It was found out that the shielded cell M6 interface between those facilities. It was found out that the shielded cell M6 of IMEF could be used for the main process experiments of DUPIC fuel fabrication in regard to space adequacy, material flow, equipment layout, etc. Based on such examination, a suitable adapter system for material transfer around the M6 cell was engineered. Regarding the PIEF facility, where spent PWR fuel assemblies are stored in an annex pool, disassembly devices in the pool are retrofitted and spent fuel rod cutting and shipping system to the IMEF are designed and built. For acquisition of casks for radioactive material transport between the facilities, some adaptive refurbishment was applied to the available cask (Padirac) based on extensive analysis on safety requirements. A mockup test facility was newly acquired for remote test of DUPIC fuel fabrication process equipment prior to installation in the M6 cell of the IMEF facility. (author). 157 refs., 57 tabs., 65 figs.

  4. A cryogenic test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veenendaal, Ian

    The next generation, space-borne instruments for far infrared spectroscopy will utilize large diameter, cryogenically cooled telescopes in order to achieve unprecedented sensitivities. Low background, ground-based cryogenic facilities are required for the cryogenic testing of materials, components and subsystems. The Test Facility Cryostat (TFC) at the University of Lethbridge is a large volume, closed cycle, 4K cryogenic facility, developed for this purpose. This thesis discusses the design and performance of the facility and associated external instrumentation. An apparatus for measuring the thermal properties of materials is presented, and measurements of the thermal expansion and conductivity of carbon fibre reinforced polymers (CFRPs) at cryogenic temperatures are reported. Finally, I discuss the progress towards the design and fabrication of a demonstrator cryogenic, far infrared Fourier transform spectrometer.

  5. Cold vacuum drying facility 90% design review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Neill, C.T.

    1997-05-02

    This document contains review comment records for the CVDF 90% design review. Spent fuels retrieved from the K Basins will be dried at the CVDF. It has also been recommended that the Multi-Conister Overpacks be welded, inspected, and repaired at the CVD Facility before transport to dry storage.

  6. Competition between replicative and translesion polymerases during homologous recombination repair in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P Kane

    Full Text Available In metazoans, the mechanism by which DNA is synthesized during homologous recombination repair of double-strand breaks is poorly understood. Specifically, the identities of the polymerase(s that carry out repair synthesis and how they are recruited to repair sites are unclear. Here, we have investigated the roles of several different polymerases during homologous recombination repair in Drosophila melanogaster. Using a gap repair assay, we found that homologous recombination is impaired in Drosophila lacking DNA polymerase zeta and, to a lesser extent, polymerase eta. In addition, the Pol32 protein, part of the polymerase delta complex, is needed for repair requiring extensive synthesis. Loss of Rev1, which interacts with multiple translesion polymerases, results in increased synthesis during gap repair. Together, our findings support a model in which translesion polymerases and the polymerase delta complex compete during homologous recombination repair. In addition, they establish Rev1 as a crucial factor that regulates the extent of repair synthesis.

  7. Mammography Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mammography Facility Database is updated periodically based on information received from the four FDA-approved accreditation bodies: the American College of...

  8. Health Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, such as birthing centers and psychiatric care centers. When you ...

  9. Canyon Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — B Plant, T Plant, U Plant, PUREX, and REDOX (see their links) are the five facilities at Hanford where the original objective was plutonium removal from the uranium...

  10. Nucleotide excision repair genes are expressed at low levels and are not detectably inducible in Caenorhabditis elegans somatic tissues, but their function is required for normal adult life after UVC exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, Windy A. [Biomolecular Screening Branch, National Toxicology Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Crocker, Tracey L. [Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Rodriguez, Ana M. [Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Leung, Maxwell C.K. [Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Wade Lehmann, D. [Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Freedman, Jonathan H. [Laboratory of Molecular Toxicology, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Van Houten, Ben [Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Meyer, Joel N., E-mail: joel.meyer@duke.edu [Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States)

    2010-01-05

    We performed experiments to characterize the inducibility of nucleotide excision repair (NER) in Caenorhabditis elegans, and to examine global gene expression in NER-deficient and -proficient strains as well as germline vs. somatic tissues, with and without genotoxic stress. We also carried out experiments to elucidate the importance of NER in the adult life of C. elegans under genotoxin-stressed and control conditions. Adult lifespan was not detectably different between wild-type and NER-deficient xpa-1 nematodes under control conditions. However, exposure to 6 J/m{sup 2}/day of ultraviolet C radiation (UVC) decreased lifespan in xpa-1 nematodes more than a dose of 100 J/m{sup 2}/day in wild-type. Similar differential sensitivities were observed for adult size and feeding. Remarkably, global gene expression was nearly identical in young adult wild-type and xpa-1 nematodes, both in control conditions and 3 h after exposure to 50 J/m{sup 2} UVC. Neither NER genes nor repair activity were detectably inducible in young adults that lacked germ cells and developing embryos (glp-1 strain). However, expression levels of dozens of NER and other DNA damage response genes were much (5-30-fold) lower in adults lacking germ cells and developing embryos, suggesting that somatic and post-mitotic cells have a much lower DNA repair ability. Finally, we describe a refinement of our DNA damage assay that allows damage measurement in single nematodes.

  11. Discourse of Requirement for Facility&Environment in Medical Device Quality System%浅析医疗器械质量管理体系对厂房设施和环境的要求

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕宏光

    2012-01-01

      本文简单介绍了中国医疗器械质量管理体系规范、欧盟医疗器械指令、ISO13485标准和美国FDA对厂房设施和环境的要求,并进行了简单的比较,目的是为医疗器械制造商在理解相关法规时,提供借鉴。%  In this paper, it simply introduce requirement for facility and environment separate in China medical device Quality System Regulation, Europe medical device Directive, ISO13485 standard and FDA medical device Quality system regulation. The comparison is made to help medical device industry understand the regulation requirement.

  12. Discourse of Requirement for Facility & Environment in Medical Device Quality System%浅析医疗器械质量体系对厂房设施和环境的要求

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕宏光

    2012-01-01

    Requirement for facility and environment of FDA, regulation of China medical device Quality System, Europe medical device Directive and ISO13485 standard are introduced. The comparison is made to help domestic medical device industry understand the regulation requirement.%介绍了中国医疗器械质量体系规范、欧盟医疗器械指令、ISO13485 标准和美国FDA 对厂房设施和环境的要求,并进行了简单的比较,为我国医疗器械制造商在理解相关法规时提供借鉴.

  13. Repairable chip bonding/interconnect process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.; Contolini, Robert J.; Malba, Vincent; Riddle, Robert A.

    1997-01-01

    A repairable, chip-to-board interconnect process which addresses cost and testability issues in the multi-chip modules. This process can be carried out using a chip-on-sacrificial-substrate technique, involving laser processing. This process avoids the curing/solvent evolution problems encountered in prior approaches, as well is resolving prior plating problems and the requirements for fillets. For repairable high speed chip-to-board connection, transmission lines can be formed on the sides of the chip from chip bond pads, ending in a gull wing at the bottom of the chip for subsequent solder.

  14. Histone displacement during nucleotide excision repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinant, C.; Bartek, J.; Bekker-Jensen, S.

    2012-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is an important DNA repair mechanism required for cellular resistance against UV light and toxic chemicals such as those found in tobacco smoke. In living cells, NER efficiently detects and removes DNA lesions within the large nuclear macromolecular complex called...... of histone variants and histone displacement (including nucleosome sliding). Here we review current knowledge, and speculate about current unknowns, regarding those chromatin remodeling activities that physically displace histones before, during and after NER. © 2012 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel...

  15. Flexor tendon repair: a comparative study between a knotless barbed suture repair and a traditional four-strand monofilament suture repair.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Joyce, C W

    2014-01-01

    We compared the tensile strength of a novel knotless barbed suture method with a traditional four-strand Adelaide technique for flexor tendon repairs. Forty fresh porcine flexor tendons were transected and randomly assigned to one of the repair groups before repair. Biomechanical testing demonstrated that the tensile strengths between both tendon groups were very similar. However, less force was required to create a 2 mm gap in the four-strand repair method compared with the knotless barbed technique. There was a significant reduction in the cross-sectional area in the barbed suture group after repair compared with the Adelaide group. This would create better gliding within the pulley system in vivo and could decrease gapping and tendon rupture.

  16. Regulatory facility guide for Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, S.S.; Bock, R.E.; Francis, M.W.; Gove, R.M.; Johnson, P.E.; Kovac, F.M.; Mynatt, J.O. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Rymer, A.C. [Transportation Consulting Services, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1994-02-28

    The Regulatory Facility Guide (RFG) has been developed for the DOE and contractor facilities located in the state of Ohio. It provides detailed compilations of international, federal, and state transportation-related regulations applicable to shipments originating at destined to Ohio facilities. This RFG was developed as an additional resource tool for use both by traffic managers who must ensure that transportation operations are in full compliance with all applicable regulatory requirements and by oversight personnel who must verify compliance activities.

  17. Internal audit of costs on fixed assets repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Yu. Samchyk

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the approaches to the process and methods of expenditure audit on repair and modernization of fixed assets and the author considers that there is no single approach to understanding the issue. The author improves the organizational and methodological support of internal audit of expenditures on the fixed assets repair and modernization that forms the accurate information for management repair and modernization of fixed assets. The paper specifies the goals and objectives of internal expenditures on repair and modernization of fixed assets, depending on the sources of such facilities to the company, allowing the author to determine the documentary control methods to be applied by an auditor to perform each task. The article determines the areas of risk components of internal control that can lead to ineffective implementation of authority by officials of an enterprise in the process of fixed assets repair, which can cause inefficient use of resources and, consequently, decrease in the efficiency of the work of fixed assets repair and modernization. The author proposes the list of auditor’s questions to assess the internal control system in the repair of fixed assets and these questions will help identify the significant drawbacks of control means.

  18. Detecting and Correcting Speech Repairs

    CERN Document Server

    Heeman, P A; Heeman, Peter; Allen, James

    1994-01-01

    Interactive spoken dialog provides many new challenges for spoken language systems. One of the most critical is the prevalence of speech repairs. This paper presents an algorithm that detects and corrects speech repairs based on finding the repair pattern. The repair pattern is built by finding word matches and word replacements, and identifying fragments and editing terms. Rather than using a set of prebuilt templates, we build the pattern on the fly. In a fair test, our method, when combined with a statistical model to filter possible repairs, was successful at detecting and correcting 80\\% of the repairs, without using prosodic information or a parser.

  19. Repair Optimal Erasure Codes through Hadamard Designs

    CERN Document Server

    Papailiopoulos, Dimitris S; Cadambe, Viveck R

    2011-01-01

    In distributed storage systems that employ erasure coding, the issue of minimizing the total {\\it communication} required to exactly rebuild a storage node after a failure arises. This repair bandwidth depends on the structure of the storage code and the repair strategies used to restore the lost data. Designing high-rate maximum-distance separable (MDS) codes that achieve the optimum repair communication has been a well-known open problem. In this work, we use Hadamard matrices to construct the first explicit 2-parity MDS storage code with optimal repair properties for all single node failures, including the parities. Our construction relies on a novel method of achieving perfect interference alignment over finite fields with a finite file size, or number of extensions. We generalize this construction to design $m$-parity MDS codes that achieve the optimum repair communication for single systematic node failures and show that there is an interesting connection between our $m$-parity codes and the systematic-...

  20. Interparietal hernias after open retromuscular hernia repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell, A M

    2008-12-01

    The retromuscular or sublay repair of ventral hernias, popularized by Rives and Stoppa, requires that a layer of tissue be reapproximated dorsal to the mesh to separate the bowel from the prosthetic. This is the first report of two patients who developed bowel obstruction resulting from interparietal incarceration between the posterior rectus sheath and the prosthetic graft through a defect in this dorsal layer. Both patients underwent open retromuscular hernia repair, one with lightweight polypropylene mesh, the other with human acellular dermal matrix. Postoperatively (day 3 and day 42, respectively), the patients developed signs of bowel obstruction. Computed tomography demonstrated the herniation of the small bowel into the potential space between the prosthesis and the posterior rectus sheath. The first patient underwent successful laparoscopic repair, while the second patient had an open operation to reduce the incarcerated bowel and repair the defect. In the patient convalescing from an uneventful retromuscular hernia repair who develops signs and symptoms of a bowel obstruction, there should be a high index of suspicion that an interparietal hernia may have formed, with the small bowel herniated into the surgically created space between the prosthetic and the posterior rectus sheath.

  1. Cleft Lip Repair, Nasoalveolar Molding, and Primary Cleft Rhinoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuskute, Aditi A; Tollefson, Travis T

    2016-11-01

    Cleft lip and palate are the fourth most common congenital birth defect. Management requires multidisciplinary care owing to the complexity of these clefts on midface growth, dentition, Eustachian tube function, and lip and nasal cosmesis. Repair requires planning, but can be performed systematically to reduce variability of outcomes. The use of primary rhinoplasty at the time of cleft lip repair can improve nose symmetry and reduce nasal deformity. Use of nasoalveolar molding ranging from lip taping to the use of preoperative infant orthopedics has played an important role in improving functional and cosmetic results of cleft lip repair.

  2. Designer's guidebook for first wall/blanket/shield assembly, maintenance, and repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-12-30

    This is the initial issue of the guidebook. Since a guidebook of this type must incorporate information concerning a wide range of subjects, much additional data will eventually be included. The guidebook will document, in summary and easily referenceable form, data, designs, design concepts, design guidelines and background information useful to the FWBS and to the Maintenance System designer. In providing guidelines for the AMR of the FWBS, the guidebook must, of necessity, include guidelines for all aspects of maintenance associated with the FWBS. These include most maintenance operations within the reactor room necessary to gain access, identify faults, and handle equipment related to FWBS maintenance. In addition, the guidelines include those required to define facility requirements for handling and repair of FWBS and related reactor components external to the reactor room. Particular emphasis is given to remote maintenance design and operations.

  3. Laparoscopic Incisional Hernia Repair in Obese Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopic incisional hernia repair is coming to the forefront as a preferred method of repair due to the advantages offered by minimally invasive techniques. To evaluate safety and feasibility of this approach in obese patients when performed by a general surgeon trained in basic laparoscopy with no prior experience in this technique, we reviewed our early experience in the first 18 patients. Methods: All patients with incisional hernias presenting to a single surgeon from 2000 to 2002 were offered laparoscopic repair. Patients were informed about the limited experience of the surgeon in this particular field. Those who consented were repaired laparoscopically using a standard 4-port technique, one 12-mm port and three 5-mm ports. All patients with body mass index ≥30 were included in this review. A retrospective review of the data included demographics, operative time, blood loss, hospital stay, postoperative complications, and patient satisfaction. Results: Nineteen laparoscopic repairs were completed in 18 patients. No conversions to open repair were necessary. All patients were females except for 2. All hernia sacs were left in place, some of which were empty while others required extensive lysis of adhesions to release sac contents. Mean fascial defect was 102.5 cm2. One defect was closed primarily without mesh, while the rest were closed using Composix mesh in 1 and Dual Plus Gore-Tex mesh in the rest. Three patients were discharged from the recovery room. Mean follow-up was 24 months. No wound or mesh infections occurred. Eight patients had no complications. Eight patients had asymptomatic seromas. Two patients had hematomas; none of them required drainage. One patient had nonspecific dizziness. One patient presented with bowel obstruction secondary to early recurrence (within a week). The repair was salvaged laparoscopically. Upon evaluation by telephone calls, all patients indicated extreme satisfaction with the results

  4. In-situ crack repair by laser cladding

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Rooyen, C

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available sealing is achieved, an overlay layer of typically 1 mm thickness is cladded for improved pitting corrosion resistance. Crack sealing is considered to be a temporary repair technique. In-situ repair requires that the equipment should be mobile... 10 2 3 9 10 deg 10 deg 10 deg Table 1: Typical process parameters for crack sealing 2.2 Overlay cladding Overlay cladding of the sealed cracks is required to improve pitting corrosion...

  5. EVA Training and Development Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupples, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Overview: Vast majority of US EVA (ExtraVehicular Activity) training and EVA hardware development occurs at JSC; EVA training facilities used to develop and refine procedures and improve skills; EVA hardware development facilities test hardware to evaluate performance and certify requirement compliance; Environmental chambers enable testing of hardware from as large as suits to as small as individual components in thermal vacuum conditions.

  6. Empowering Facilities Teams through Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Facilities departments at colleges and universities are facing the same challenge: how not to do just the most projects, but also the right projects with the limited funds they are given. In order to make the best decisions, they need more control over the capital planning process, which requires accurate, current facility condition data. Each…

  7. Empowering Facilities Teams through Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Facilities departments at colleges and universities are facing the same challenge: how not to do just the most projects, but also the right projects with the limited funds they are given. In order to make the best decisions, they need more control over the capital planning process, which requires accurate, current facility condition data. Each…

  8. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 327 Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-11-01

    The 327 Facility [Post-Irradiation Testing Laboratory] provides office and laboratory space for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) scientific and engineering staff conducting multidisciplinary research in the areas of post-irradiated fuels and structural materials. The facility is designed to accommodate the use of radioactive and hazardous materials in the conduct of these activities. This report summarizes the airborne emissions and liquid effluents and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

  9. Groin hernia repair in young males: mesh or sutured repair?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, T; Bay-Nielsen, M; Kehlet, H

    2010-01-01

    Large-scale data for the optimal inguinal hernia repair in younger men with an indirect hernia is not available. We analysed nationwide data for risk of reoperation in younger men after a primary repair using a Lichtenstein operation or a conventional non-mesh hernia repair....

  10. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    MB, Roberts AB, Wakersfield LM, de Crombrugghe B. Some recent advances in the chemistry and biology of trans- forming growth factor-beta. J Cell Biol...animal facility and had access to food and water as required. 59 Copyright © 2015 American Society of Plastic Surgeons. Unauthorized reproduction...s): F1 Art : PRS182917 Input-nlm 69 Manuscript 3: Large Gap Nerve Reconstruction Using Acellular Nerve Allografts And Photochemical Tissue

  11. A new incision for unilateral cleft lip repair developed using animated simulation of repair on computer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahay A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Unilateral cleft lip repair continues to leave behind some amount of dissatisfaction, as a scope for further improvement is always felt. Most surgeons do not like to deviate from the standard Millard′s/ triangular techniques, or their minor modifications, as no one likes to experiment on the face for fear of unfavourable outcomes. The computer can be utilized as a useful tool in the analysis and planning of surgery and new methods can be developed and attempted subsequently with greater confidence. Aim: We decided to see if an improved lip repair could be developed with the use of computers. Materials and Methods: Analysis of previous lip repairs was done to determine where an improvement was required. Movement of tissues, by simulating an ideal repair, using image warping software, on digital images of cleft lip was studied in animation sequences. A repair which could reproduce these movements was planned. A new incision emerged, which had combined the principles of Millard′s and Randall / Tennyson repairs, with additional features. The new method was performed on 30 cases. Conclusions: The results were encouraging as the shortcomings of these methods were minimized, and the advantages maximized.

  12. Cleft lip and palate repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002979.htm Cleft lip and palate repair To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cleft lip and cleft palate repair is surgery to fix birth defects ...

  13. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007392.htm Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair is surgery to fix a widened part ...

  14. Asian Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahata, M.

    2011-04-01

    Asian underground facilities are reviewed. The YangYang underground Laboratory in Korea and the Kamioka observatory in Japan are operational and several astrophysical experiments are running. Indian Neutrino Observatory(INO) and China JinPing Underground Laboratory (CJPL) are under construction and underground experiments are being prepared. Current activities and future prospects at those underground sites are described.

  15. Nanomaterials promise better bone repair

    OpenAIRE

    Qifei Wang; Jianhua Yan; Junlin Yang; Bingyun Li

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials mimicking the nano-features of bones and offering unique smart functions are promising for better bone fracture repair. This review provides an overview of the current state-of-the-art research in developing and using nanomaterials for better bone fracture repair. This review begins with a brief introduction of bone fracture repair processes, then discusses the importance of vascularization, the role of growth factors in bone fracture repair, and the failure of bone fracture rep...

  16. Laparoscopic repair of femoral hernia

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xue-Fei; Liu, Jia-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia is mini-invasive and has confirmed effects. Femoral hernia could be repaired through the laparoscopic procedures for inguinal hernia. These procedures have clear anatomic view in the operation and preoperatively undiagnosed femoral hernia could be confirmed and treated. Lower recurrence ratio was reported in laparoscopic procedures compared with open procedures for repair of femoral hernia. The technical details of laparoscopic repair of femoral hernia, ...

  17. Aircraft Propeller Hub Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muth, Thomas R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Peter, William H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-02-13

    The team performed a literature review, conducted residual stress measurements, performed failure analysis, and demonstrated a solid state additive manufacturing repair technique on samples removed from a scrapped propeller hub. The team evaluated multiple options for hub repair that included existing metal buildup technologies that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has already embraced, such as cold spray, high velocity oxy-fuel deposition (HVOF), and plasma spray. In addition the team helped Piedmont Propulsion Systems, LLC (PPS) evaluate three potential solutions that could be deployed at different stages in the life cycle of aluminum alloy hubs, in addition to the conventional spray coating method for repair. For new hubs, a machining practice to prevent fretting with the steel drive shaft was recommended. For hubs that were refurbished with some material remaining above the minimal material condition (MMC), a silver interface applied by an electromagnetic pulse additive manufacturing method was recommended. For hubs that were at or below the MMC, a solid state additive manufacturing technique using ultrasonic welding (UW) of thin layers of 7075 aluminum to the hub interface was recommended. A cladding demonstration using the UW technique achieved mechanical bonding of the layers showing promise as a viable repair method.

  18. Analysis Methods and Requirements of Japan VCCI-Registered Measurement Facilities%解渎日本VCCI认证实验室场地注册方法和要求

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖猛; 王春霞

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents how to be VCCl-registered measurement facilities.Basic condition and appli cation procedure to be a member of VCCI is introduced,finally technical requirements and matters need at- tention are analyzed in detail according to every test item.%该文就如何成为VCCI认可的测试实验室进行¨鞫述,介绍了VCCI的基本情况和实验室的会员资格申请程序,最后重点分析了每一个测试项目场地注册的技术要求以及注意事项。

  19. Current options in local anesthesia for groin hernia repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulacoglu, Hakan; Alptekin, Alp

    2011-01-01

    Inguinal hernia repair is one of the most common procedures in general surgery. All anesthetic methods can be used in inguinal hernia repairs. Local anesthesia for groin hernia repair had been introduced at the very beginning of the last century, and gained popularity following the success reports from the Shouldice Hospital, and the Lichtenstein Hernia Institute. Today, local anesthesia is routinely used in specialized hernia clinics, whereas its use is still not a common practice in general hospitals, in spite of its proven advantages and recommendations by current hernia repair guidelines. In this review, the technical options for local anaesthesia in groin hernia repairs, commonly used local anaesthetics and their doses, potential complications related to the technique are evaluated. A comparison of local, general and regional anesthesia methods is also presented. Local anaesthesia technique has a short learning curve requiring simple training. It is easy to learn and apply, and its use is in open anterior repairs a nice way for health care economics. Local anesthesia has been shown to have certain advantages over general and regional anesthesia in inguinal hernia repairs. It is more economic and requires a shorter time in the operating room and shorter stay in the institution. It causes less postoperative pain, requires less analgesic consumption; avoids nausea, vomiting, and urinary retention. Patients can mobilize and take oral liquids and solid foods much earlier. Most importantly, local anesthesia is the most suitable type of anesthesia in elder, fragile patients and patients with ASA II-IV scores.

  20. Human factors design guidelines for maintainability of Department of Energy nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bongarra, J.P. Jr.; VanCott, H.P.; Pain, R.F.; Peterson, L.R.; Wallace, R.I.

    1985-06-18

    Intent of these guidelines is to provide design and design review teams of DOE nuclear facilities with human factors principles to enhance the design and aid in the inspection of DOE nuclear facilities, systems, and equipment. These guidelines are concerned with design features of DOE nuclear facilities which can potentially affect preventive and corrective maintenance of systems within DOE nuclear facilities. Maintenance includes inspecting, checking, troubleshooting, adjusting, replacing, repairing, and servicing activities. Other factors which influence maintainability such as repair and maintenance suport facilities, maintenance information, and various aspects of the environment are also addressed.

  1. On Constrained Facility Location Problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Lin Li; Peng Zhang; Da-Ming Zhu

    2008-01-01

    Given m facilities each with an opening cost, n demands, and distance between every demand and facility,the Facility Location problem finds a solution which opens some facilities to connect every demand to an opened facility such that the total cost of the solution is minimized. The k-Facility Location problem further requires that the number of opened facilities is at most k, where k is a parameter given in the instance of the problem. We consider the Facility Location problems satisfying that for every demand the ratio of the longest distance to facilities and the shortest distance to facilities is at most w, where w is a predefined constant. Using the local search approach with scaling technique and error control technique, for any arbitrarily small constant ∈ > 0, we give a polynomial-time approximation algorithm for the ω-constrained Facility Location problem with approximation ratio 1 + √ω + 1 + ∈, which significantly improves the previous best known ratio (ω + 1)/α for some 1 ≤α≤ 2, and a polynomial-time approximation algorithm for the ω-constrained κ-Facility Location problem with approximation ratio ω + 1 + ∈. On the aspect of approximation hardness, we prove that unless NP (C) DTIME(nO(loglogn)), the ω-constrained Facility Location problem cannot be approximated within 1 + √ω-1,which slightly improves the previous best known hardness result 1.243 + 0.316 ln(ω - 1). The experimental results on the standard test instances of Facility Location problem show that our algorithm also has good performance in practice.

  2. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the tank farm facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crummel, G.M.

    1998-05-18

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements.

  3. Geothermal Loop Experimental Facility. Quarterly report, October-December 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastas, G.; Bischoff, W.S.; Bishop, H.K.

    1979-01-01

    The Geothermal Loop Experimental Facility (GLEF) was modified in April 1978 from a four stage flash/binary process to a two stage cycle for the extraction of energy from a high temperature, high salinity, liquid-dominated resource. The overhaul and cleaning during October and pigging problems which led to a limited shutdown in December are discussed. Reservoir assessment, including production and injection wells, are discussed. Results of tests that were accomplished are included. Laboratory data obtained for steam, brine, binary and cooling water, and scale are indicated. Any equipment that required repairs or modifications to equipment and the clarifier/media filter are discussed. The status of the feasibility and surge studies is covered. (MHR)

  4. Study on applying technology of utilizing long-term materials for corrosion facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Chul; Park, Young Kyu; Baek, Soo Gon; Lee, Jong Sub [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yong Soo [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Won Suk [Inha University (Korea, Republic of); Song, Rhyo Seong [Hankuk Aviation, University (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-31

    Nowadays, as the pollution in seawater is escalating rapidly because of fast industrialization, corrosion rate and repairing frequency of seawater facilities in power plant are increasing. In addition, new construction is restricted with narrow limits due to the deterioration of social condition, asking for extension of facility life and repairing frequency. The objectives of this study are to select the appropriate new high corrosion resistance materials and apply them in the field, to make the corrosion data base in accordance with their usage conditions and to predict the remaining life and optimum repairing period by predicting the life of facilities. (author). 77 refs., 54 figs.

  5. The Effects of Continuous and Interrupted Episiotomy Repair on Pain Severity and Rate of Perineal Repair: A Controlled Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Hasanpoor

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Perineal pain is the most common complaint after episiotomy. It imposes extra pressure on mothers who attempt to adapt to their new conditions. Therefore, the present study was performed to compare pain severity and perineal repair in two episiot-omy repair methods. Methods: In this clinical trial, 100 primiparous women who re-ferred to hospitals of Tabriz (Iran for delivery were randomly allocated into two groups of 50 to undergo either continuous or interrupted episiotomy repair. A visual analogue scale (VAS was used to evaluate pain severity 12-18 hours after episiotomy repair and also 10 days after delivery. Perineal repair rate was also assessed using the REEDA (redness, edema, ecchymosis, discharge, and approximation scoring scale. The obtained data was analyzed in SPSS15. Results: Statistical tests did not show significant differ-ences between the 2 groups in pain severity variations or REEDA scores at 12-18 hours and the 10th day after delivery. However, the mean required time for repair and the num-ber of used threads were significantly lower in the continuous repair group (p < 0.001. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that pain severity and episiotomy repair rate were similar in the two methods. Nevertheless, shorter time of repair and fewer threads were required using the continuous repair method. Therefore, this method would provide better services for mothers and reduce the required time, energy, and costs.

  6. Glenoid labral repair in Major League Baseball pitchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricchetti, E T; Weidner, Z; Lawrence, J T R; Sennett, B J; Huffman, G R

    2010-04-01

    Little is known about outcomes of glenoid labral repair in Major League Baseball (MLB) pitchers. We hypothesized that following repair, pitching performance would not be significantly different from an uninjured cohort. Fifty-one pitchers were identified who pitched in at least one MLB game prior to undergoing isolated glenoid labral repair. For the three years prior to and following surgery, demographic and performance variables were analyzed for an association with labral injury and repair, and compared to a control cohort of MLB pitchers without history of repair. Following surgery, 72.5% of pitchers returned to MLB at a mean of 13.1 months with no significant change in performance. Starting pitchers had a higher risk of labral injury requiring repair (p< or =0.05). Pitchers that returned to play averaged more innings pitched in the seasons prior to surgery and had a higher body mass index than those that did not return to play (p< or =0.05). Approximately 70% of MLB pitchers undergoing labral repair can be expected to return to competition postoperatively with no significant change in performance. Starting pitchers are more likely to undergo repair, but pitchers with greater preoperative innings pitched per season have a greater likelihood of returning to play.

  7. A new barbed device for repair of flexor tendons.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hirpara, K M

    2012-02-01

    We split 100 porcine flexor tendons into five groups of 20 tendons for repair. Three groups were repaired using the Pennington modified Kessler technique, the cruciate or the Savage technique, one using one new device per tendon and the other with two new devices per tendon. Half of the tendons received supplemental circumferential Silfverskiold type B cross-stitch. The repairs were loaded to failure and a record made of their bulk, the force required to produce a 3 mm gap, the maximum force applied before failure and the stiffness. When only one device was used repairs were equivalent to the Pennington modified Kessler for all parameters except the force to produce a 3 mm gap when supplemented with a circumferential repair, which was equivalent to the cruciate. When two devices were used the repair strength was equivalent to the cruciate repair, and when the two-device repair was supplemented with a circumferential suture the force to produce a 3 mm gap was equivalent to that of the Savage six-strand technique.

  8. 44 CFR 206.226 - Restoration of damaged facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... funding for and require restoration of a destroyed facility at a new location when: (i) The facility is... facilities. 206.226 Section 206.226 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY... § 206.226 Restoration of damaged facilities. Work to restore eligible facilities on the basis of...

  9. Damage tolerance of bonded composite aircraft repairs for metallic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Randal John

    This thesis describes the development and validation of methods for damage tolerance substantiation of bonded composite repairs applied to cracked plates. This technology is used to repair metal aircraft structures, offering improvements in fatigue life, cost, manufacturability, and inspectability when compared to riveted repairs. The work focuses on the effects of plate thickness and bending on repair life, and covers fundamental aspects of fracture and fatigue of cracked plates and bonded joints. This project falls under the UBC Bonded Composite Repair Program, which has the goal of certification and widespread use of bonded repairs in civilian air transportation. This thesis analyses the plate thickness and transverse stress effects on fracture of repaired plates and the related problem of induced geometrically nonlinear bending in unbalanced (single-sided) repairs. The author begins by developing a classification scheme for assigning repair damage tolerance substantiation requirements based upon stress-based adhesive fracture/fatigue criteria and the residual strength of the original structure. The governing equations for bending of cracked plates are then reformulated and line-spring models are developed for linear and nonlinear coupled bending and extension of reinforced cracks. The line-spring models were used to correct the Wang and Rose energy method for the determination of the long-crack limit stress intensity, and to develop a new interpolation model for repaired cracks of arbitrary length. The analysis was validated using finite element models and data from mechanical tests performed on hybrid bonded joints and repair specimens that are representative of an in-service repair. This work will allow designers to evaluate the damage tolerance of the repaired plate, the adhesive, and the composite patch, which is an airworthiness requirement under FAR (Federal Aviation Regulations) 25.571. The thesis concludes by assessing the remaining barriers to

  10. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the plutonium uranium extraction facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegand, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years.

  11. Reconstitution and structure of a bacterial Pnkp1RnlHen1 RNA repair complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Pei; Selvadurai, Kiruthika; Huang , Raven H. (UIUC)

    2016-01-22

    Ribotoxins cleave essential RNAs for cell killing, and RNA repair neutralizes the damage inflicted by ribotoxins for cell survival. We report a new bacterial RNA repair complex that performs RNA repair linked to immunity. This new RNA repair complex is a 270-kDa heterohexamer composed of three proteins—Pnkp1, Rnl and Hen1—that are required to repair ribotoxin-cleaved RNA in vitro. The crystal structure of the complex reveals the molecular architecture of the heterohexamer as two rhomboid-shaped ring structures of Pnkp1–Rnl–Hen1 heterotrimer fused at the Pnkp1 dimer interface. The four active sites required for RNA repair are located on the inner rim of each ring. Furthermore, the architecture and the locations of the active sites of the Pnkp1–Rnl–Hen1 heterohexamer suggest an ordered series of repair reactions at the broken RNA ends that confer immunity to recurrent damage.

  12. Nanomaterials promise better bone repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qifei Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials mimicking the nano-features of bones and offering unique smart functions are promising for better bone fracture repair. This review provides an overview of the current state-of-the-art research in developing and using nanomaterials for better bone fracture repair. This review begins with a brief introduction of bone fracture repair processes, then discusses the importance of vascularization, the role of growth factors in bone fracture repair, and the failure of bone fracture repair. Next, the review discusses the applications of nanomaterials for bone fracture repair, with a focus on the recent breakthroughs such as nanomaterials leading to precise immobilization of growth factors at the molecular level, promoting vascularization without the use of growth factors, and re-loading therapeutic agents after implantation. The review concludes with perspectives on challenges and future directions for developing nanomaterials for improved bone fracture repair.

  13. General data relating to the arrangements for disposal of radioactive waste required under Article 37 of the Euratom Treaty. Decommissioning of the nuclear facilities at Risoe National Laboratory, Denmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-03-01

    This document submitted by the Danish Government has been produced to satisfy the requirements of Article 37 of the Euratom Treaty as recommended by the Commission of the European Communities (Annex 2 of Commission Recommendation 1999/829/Euratom of 6 December 1999). The above Recommendations include the dismantling of nuclear reactors and reprocessing plants in the list of operations to which Article 37 applies. Under paragraph 5.1 of the Recommendation, a submission of General Data in respect of such dismantling operations is only necessary when the proposed authorised limits and other requirements are less restrictive than those in force when the plant was operational. However, in the case of Risoe National Laboratory, no previous submission of general data has been made under Article 37 and no Opinion given by the Commission on a plan for the disposal of radioactive waste. For this reason, general data are submitted in respect of the proposed dismantling operations, even though no change to a less restrictive authorisation is envisaged at this time. This submission is for the decommissioning of the nuclear facilities at Risoe National Laboratory, which are owned by the Danish Government and managed by a Board of Governors for the Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation. (BA)

  14. Nonterrestrial utilization of materials: Automated space manufacturing facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Four areas related to the nonterrestrial use of materials are included: (1) material resources needed for feedstock in an orbital manufacturing facility, (2) required initial components of a nonterrestrial manufacturing facility, (3) growth and productive capability of such a facility, and (4) automation and robotics requirements of the facility.

  15. Facilities evaluation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloan, P.A.; Edinborough, C.R.

    1992-04-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is a program of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development whose mission is to evaluate different new and existing technologies and determine how well they address DOE community waste remediation problems. Twenty-three Technical Task Plans (TTPs) have been identified to support this mission during FY-92; 10 of these have identified some support requirements when demonstrations take place. Section 1 of this report describes the tasks supported by BWID, determines if a technical demonstration is proposed, and if so, identifies the support requirements requested by the TTP Principal Investigators. Section 2 of this report is an evaluation identifying facility characteristics of existing Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) facilities that may be considered for use in BWID technology demonstration activities.

  16. Biology of biological meshes used in hernia repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novitsky, Yuri W

    2013-10-01

    Successful repair of most hernias requires the use of a prosthetic implant for reinforcement of the defect. Because of the need for prosthetic implants to resist infections as well to support repairs in contaminated or potentially contaminated fields, biological meshes have been developed to take the place of nondegradable synthetic meshes in cases where mesh infection is of high concern. The ideal is a biological matrix that resists infection while providing durable reinforcement of a hernia repair. This article reviews the validity of assumptions that support the purported notion of the biological behavior of biological meshes.

  17. Emission Facilities - Erosion & Sediment Control Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — An Erosion and Sediment Control Facility is a DEP primary facility type related to the Water Pollution Control program. The following sub-facility types related to...

  18. 9 CFR 590.538 - Defrosting facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Defrosting facilities. 590.538 Section 590.538 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EGG..., and Facility Requirements § 590.538 Defrosting facilities. (a) Approved metal defrosting tanks or vats...

  19. 7 CFR 51.57 - Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Facilities. 51.57 Section 51.57 Agriculture... Requirements for Plants Operating Under Continuous Inspection on A Contract Basis § 51.57 Facilities. Each packing plant shall be equipped with adequate sanitary facilities and accommodations, including but not...

  20. 20 CFR 404.1623 - Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Facilities. 404.1623 Section 404.1623...- ) Determinations of Disability Administrative Responsibilities and Requirements § 404.1623 Facilities. (a) Space... determinations. (b) Location of facilities. Subject to appropriate Federal funding, the State will determine the...

  1. 18 CFR 154.307 - Joint facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Joint facilities. 154... Changes § 154.307 Joint facilities. The Statements required by § 154.312 must show all costs (investment... in the subject rate change and are associated with joint facilities. The methods used in making such...

  2. 42 CFR 493.1101 - Standard: Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard: Facilities. 493.1101 Section 493.1101... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Facility Administration for Nonwaived Testing § 493.1101 Standard: Facilities. (a) The laboratory must be constructed, arranged, and maintained to...

  3. 34 CFR 104.22 - Existing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing facilities. 104.22 Section 104.22 Education... Accessibility § 104.22 Existing facilities. (a) Accessibility. A recipient shall operate its program or activity.... This paragraph does not require a recipient to make each of its existing facilities or every part of a...

  4. 9 CFR 117.2 - Animal facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Animal facilities. 117.2 Section 117.2 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES... Animal facilities. Animal facilities shall comply with the requirements provided in part 108 of this...

  5. 28 CFR 42.521 - Existing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing facilities. 42.521 Section 42...-Implementation of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 Accessibility § 42.521 Existing facilities. (a... section does not require a recipient to make each of its existing facilities or every part of a...

  6. 24 CFR 891.675 - Prohibited facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prohibited facilities. 891.675... and Individuals-Section 162 Assistance § 891.675 Prohibited facilities. The requirements for prohibited facilities for 202/162 projects are provided in § 891.315, except that Section 202/162...

  7. Mission analysis report - deactivation facilities at Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, D.P.

    1996-09-27

    This document examines the portion of the Hanford Site Cleanup Mission that deals with facility deactivation. How facilities get identified for deactivation, how they enter EM-60 for deactivation, programmatic alternatives to perform facility deactivation, the deactivation process itself, key requirements and objectives associated with the deactivation process, and deactivation planning are discussed.

  8. 49 CFR 180.212 - Repair of seamless DOT 3-series specification cylinders and seamless UN pressure receptacles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CONTINUING QUALIFICATION AND MAINTENANCE OF PACKAGINGS Qualification, Maintenance and Use of Cylinders § 180.212 Repair of seamless DOT 3-series specification... pressure receptacle unless— (i) The repair facility holds an approval issued under the provisions in §...

  9. Facility Requirements for Integrated Learning Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knirk, Frederick G.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses features in the physical environment that need to be considered for integrated learning systems (ILSs). Highlights include ergonomics; lighting, including contrast and colors; space, furniture, and equipment, including keyboard, monitor, software, and printer; ambient noise and acoustics; temperature, humidity, and air quality control;…

  10. 9 CFR 381.36 - Facilities required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... laundry service for inspectors' outer work clothing, or disposable outer work garments designed for one... shall be designed with a 42-inch high rail on the back side and with 1/2-inch foot bumpers on both sides... enough for the inspector to sit on a stool and to change stations during breaks or station rotation. (v...

  11. Facility decontamination technology workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-10-01

    Purpose of the meeting was to provide a record of experience at nuclear facilities, other than TMI-2, of events and incidents which have required decontamination and dose reduction activities, and to furnish GPU and others involved in the TMI-2 cleanup with the results of that decontamination and dose reduction technology. Separate abstracts were prepared for 24 of the 25 papers; the remaining paper had been previously abstracted. (DLC)

  12. Space station automation study: Automation requirements derived from space manufacturing concepts. Volume 1: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    The electroepitaxial process and the Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) circuits (chips) facilities were chosen because each requires a very high degree of automation, and therefore involved extensive use of teleoperators, robotics, process mechanization, and artificial intelligence. Both cover a raw materials process and a sophisticated multi-step process and are therfore highly representative of the kinds of difficult operation, maintenance, and repair challenges which can be expected for any type of space manufacturing facility. Generic areas were identified which will require significant further study. The initial design will be based on terrestrial state-of-the-art hard automation. One hundred candidate missions were evaluated on the basis of automation portential and availability of meaning ful knowldege. The design requirements and unconstrained design concepts developed for the two missions are presented.

  13. Parabolic resection for mitral valve repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Daniel H; Drake, Charles G; Recchia, Dino

    2010-02-01

    Parabolic resection, named for the shape of the cut edges of the excised tissue, expands on a common 'trick' used by experienced mitral surgeons to preserve tissue and increase the probability of successful repair. Our objective was to describe and clinically analyze this simple modification of conventional resection. Thirty-six patients with mitral regurgitation underwent valve repair using parabolic resection in combination with other techniques. Institution specific mitral data, Society of Thoracic Surgeons data and preoperative, post-cardiopulmonary bypass (PCPB) and postoperative echocardiography data were collected and analyzed. Preoperative echocardiography demonstrated mitral regurgitation ranging from moderate to severe. PCPB transesophageal echocardiography demonstrated no regurgitation or mild regurgitation in all patients. Thirty-day surgical mortality was 2.8%. Serial echocardiograms demonstrated excellent repair stability. One patient (2.9%) with rheumatic disease progressed to moderate regurgitation 33 months following surgery. Echocardiography on all others demonstrated no or mild regurgitation at a mean follow-up of 22.8+/-12.8 months. No patient required mitral reintervention. Longitudinal analysis demonstrated 80% freedom from cardiac death, reintervention and greater than moderate regurgitation at four years following repair. Parabolic resection is a simple technique that can be very useful during complex mitral reconstruction. Early and intermediate echocardiographic studies demonstrate excellent results.

  14. PRP and Metaplasia in repaired tendon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kamal Seyed-Forootan; Hamid Karimi; Ahmad-Reza Dayani

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate effects ofPRP injection in strengthening of repaired tendon.Methods:This study was conducted in animal lab of our hospital on20 rats.The animals were divided into two groups randomly and distal third of leftAchillis tendons were cut and then repaired with Vicryl2/0.The first group was control group and in the second group0.5 cc ofPRP was injected into the repair site.After4 weeks all of the rats were executed and70% of tendons were sent randomly for tensilometry and the force that required to rupture the tendons were measured.In next stage the tendons were sent for pathological exam.Results:The force that was needed to rupture the tendon were not significantly different in the two groups.Neovascularization were more prevalent inPRP group but not statistically significant.There were two cases ofCartilage Metaplasia inPRP group.Conclusion:It seems that usingPRP has no effect on strengthening the tendons repair and may have some adverse effects.It usage needs further studies to evaluate their probable adverse side effects.

  15. A Percutaneous Knotless Technique for SLAP Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennent, Duncan; Pearse, Eyiyemi

    2016-02-01

    We describe a percutaneous technique for repair of type II SLAP lesions. Through the Neviaser portal, a spinal needle is used to pass a FiberStick suture (Arthrex, Naples, FL) through the labrum to create 2 mattress sutures that are secured with PushLock anchors (Arthrex). This technique is simple, reproducible, and knotless and requires no cannulas. At the end of the procedure, minimal suture material remains in the joint.

  16. Conceptual design criteria for facilities for geologic disposal of radioactive wastes in salt formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    The facility design requirements and criteria discussed are: general codes, standards, specifications, and regulations; site criteria; land improvements criteria, low-level waste facility criteria; canistered waste facility criteria; support facilities criteria; and utilities and services criteria. (LK)

  17. Theme: Laboratory Facilities Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Glen M.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Includes "Laboratory Facilities Improvement" (Miller); "Remodeling Laboratories for Agriscience Instruction" (Newman, Johnson); "Planning for Change" (Mulcahy); "Laboratory Facilities Improvement for Technology Transfer" (Harper); "Facilities for Agriscience Instruction" (Agnew et al.); "Laboratory Facility Improvement" (Boren, Dwyer); and…

  18. Test facilities for VINCI®

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greuel, Dirk; Schäfer, Klaus; Schlechtriem, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    With the replacement of the current upper-stage ESC-A of the Ariane 5 launcher by an enhanced cryogenic upper-stage, ESA's Ariane 5 Midterm Evolution (A5-ME) program aims to raise the launcher's payload capacity in geostationary transfer orbit from 10 to 12 tons, an increase of 20 %. Increasing the in-orbit delivery capability of the A5-ME launcher requires a versatile, high-performance, evolved cryogenic upper-stage engine suitable for delivering multiple payloads to all kinds of orbits, ranging from low earth orbit to geostationary transfer orbit with increased perigee. In order to meet these requirements the re-ignitable liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen expander cycle engine VINCI® currently under development is designated to power the future upper stage, featuring a design performance of 180 kN of thrust and 464 s of specific impulse. Since 2010 development tests for the VINCI® engine have been conducted at the test benches P3.2 and P4.1 at DLR test site in Lampoldshausen under the ESA A5-ME program. For the VINCI® combustion chamber development the P3.2 test facility is used, which is the only European thrust chamber test facility. Originally erected for the development of the thrust chamber of the Vulcain engine, in 2003 the test facility was modified that today it is able to simulate vacuum conditions for the ignition and startup of the VINCI® combustion chamber. To maintain the test operations under vacuum conditions over an entire mission life of the VINCI® engine, including re-ignition following long and short coasting phases, between 2000 and 2005 the test facility P4.1 was completely rebuilt into a new high-altitude simulation facility. During the past two P4.1 test campaigns in 2010 and 2011 a series of important milestones were reached in the development of the VINCI® engine. In preparation for future activities within the frame of ESA's A5-ME program DLR has already started the engineering of a stage test facility for the prospective upper stage

  19. 29 CFR 776.30 - Construction performed on temporarily idle facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... that the repair or maintenance of a covered facility (including its machinery, tools, dies, and other... Bodden v. McCormick Shipping Corp., 188 F. (2d) 733. 54 Maneja v. Waialua Agricultural Co., 349 U.S....

  20. Facility Modernization Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, D; Ackley, R

    2007-05-10

    Modern and technologically up-to-date facilities and systems infrastructure are necessary to accommodate today's research environment. In response, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has a continuing commitment to develop and apply effective management models and processes to maintain, modernize, and upgrade its facilities to meet the science and technology mission. The Facility Modernization Pilot Study identifies major subsystems of facilities that are either technically or functionally obsolete, lack adequate capacity and/or capability, or need to be modernized or upgraded to sustain current operations and program mission. This study highlights areas that need improvement, system interdependencies, and how these systems/subsystems operate and function as a total productive unit. Although buildings are 'grandfathered' in and are not required to meet current codes unless there are major upgrades, this study also evaluates compliance with 'current' building, electrical, and other codes. This study also provides an evaluation of the condition and overall general appearance of the structure.

  1. Perspective Application Directions of Fiber Optic Lasers in the Repair and Renewal Operations on the Linear Part of Main Gas Pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanov Vadim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Large number of main pipelines requires today an immediate repair. Equipment producing entertainments supply the market with more and more new and advanced devices. However, their use does not always allow reducing the repair work period. That way it is appropriate to develop the alternative repair methods that allow reducing the labor intensity as well as the cost of repair and renewal operations. One of the promising areas is the laser technologies application in the repair process.

  2. Endovascular repair of blunt popliteal arterial injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Shan; Zhang, Xiquan; Chen, Zhong; Zhu, Wei; Pan, Xiaolin [Dept. of nterventional Vascular, The 148th Hospital of Chinese People' s Liberation Army, Zibo (China); Dong, Peng; Sun, Yequan [Dept. of Medical Imaging, Weifang Medical University, Weifang (China); Qi, Deming [Dept. of Medical Imaging, Qilu Medical University, Zibo (China)

    2016-09-15

    To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of endovascular repair for blunt popliteal arterial injuries. A retrospective analysis of seven patients with clinical suspicion of popliteal arterial injuries that were confirmed by arteriography was performed from September 2009 to July 2014. Clinical data included demographics, mechanism of injury, type of injury, location of injury, concomitant injuries, time of endovascular procedures, time interval from trauma to blood flow restoration, instrument utilized, and follow-up. All patients were male (mean age of 35.9 ± 10.3 years). The type of lesion involved intimal injury (n = 1), partial transection (n = 2), complete transection (n = 2), arteriovenous fistula (n = 1), and pseudoaneurysm (n = 1). All patients underwent endovascular repair of blunt popliteal arterial injuries. Technical success rate was 100%. Intimal injury was treated with a bare-metal stent. Pseudoaneurysm and popliteal artery transections were treated with bare-metal stents. Arteriovenous fistula was treated with bare-metal stent and coils. No perioperative death and procedure-related complication occurred. The average follow-up was 20.9 ± 2.3 months (range 18–24 months). One patient underwent intra-arterial thrombolysis due to stent thrombosis at 18 months after the procedure. All limbs were salvaged. Stent migration, deformation, or fracture was not found during the follow-up. Endovascular repair seems to be a viable approach for patients with blunt popliteal arterial injuries, especially on an emergency basis. Endovascular repair may be effective in the short-term. Further studies are required to evaluate the long-term efficacy of endovascular repair.

  3. Laparoscopic Repair of Morgagni Hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ilker murat arer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Morgagni hernia is a congenital herniation of abdominal contents into the thoracic cavity through a retrosternal diaphragmatic defect and make up about 1 % - 5 % of all types of congenital diaphragmatic hernias. Surgical repair of Morgagni hernias is usually indicated when patients are symptomatic and have a high risk of strangulation or incarceration of the contained viscera. 71-year-old male patient admitted to emergency department with a 2-day history of abdominal pain, vomiting and obstipation. Laparoscopic repair for Morgagni hernia was performed. Laparoscopic repair for Morgagni hernia with mesh repair is secure, satisfactory and easily performed. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(Suppl 1: 71-74

  4. Combinatorial Reliability and Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-07-01

    Press, Oxford, 1987. [2] G. Gordon and L. Traldi, Generalized activities and the Tutte polynomial , Discrete Math. 85 (1990), 167-176. [3] A. B. Huseby, A...particular, Satyanarayana and Tindell introduced a notion of (K,j)-domination in their study of a K-terminal version of the chromatic polynomial [6], and it...G)) graphs. He also intends to look into the properties of the polynomial that gives the expected number of needed repairs of a K-terminal network

  5. Mammalian mismatch repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Javier; Jiricny, Josef

    2012-01-01

    A considerable surge of interest in the mismatch repair (MMR) system has been brought about by the discovery of a link between Lynch syndrome, an inherited predisposition to cancer of the colon and other organs, and malfunction of this key DNA metabolic pathway. This review focuses on recent...... advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of canonical MMR, which improves replication fidelity by removing misincorporated nucleotides from the nascent DNA strand. We also discuss the involvement of MMR proteins in two other processes: trinucleotide repeat expansion and antibody maturation...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage Repair: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trattnig, Siegfried; Winalski, Carl S; Marlovits, Stephan; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Welsch, Goetz H; Potter, Hollis G

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage lesions are a common pathology of the knee joint, and many patients may benefit from cartilage repair surgeries that offer the chance to avoid the development of osteoarthritis or delay its progression. Cartilage repair surgery, no matter the technique, requires a noninvasive, standardized, and high-quality longitudinal method to assess the structure of the repair tissue. This goal is best fulfilled by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The present article provides an overview of the current state of the art of MRI of cartilage repair. In the first 2 sections, preclinical and clinical MRI of cartilage repair tissue are described with a focus on morphological depiction of cartilage and the use of functional (biochemical) MR methodologies for the visualization of the ultrastructure of cartilage repair. In the third section, a short overview is provided on the regulatory issues of the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) regarding MR follow-up studies of patients after cartilage repair surgeries.

  7. Web-ADARE: A Web-Aided Data Repairing System

    KAUST Repository

    Gu, Binbin

    2017-03-08

    Data repairing aims at discovering and correcting erroneous data in databases. In this paper, we develop Web-ADARE, an end-to-end web-aided data repairing system, to provide a feasible way to involve the vast data sources on the Web in data repairing. Our main attention in developing Web-ADARE is paid on the interaction problem between web-aided repairing and rule-based repairing, in order to minimize the Web consultation cost while reaching predefined quality requirements. The same interaction problem also exists in crowd-based methods but this is not yet formally defined and addressed. We first prove in theory that the optimal interaction scheme is not feasible to be achieved, and then propose an algorithm to identify a scheme for efficient interaction by investigating the inconsistencies and the dependencies between values in the repairing process. Extensive experiments on three data collections demonstrate the high repairing precision and recall of Web-ADARE, and the efficiency of the generated interaction scheme over several baseline ones.

  8. Repairing Peripheral Nerves: Is there a Role for Carbon Nanotubes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oprych, Karen M; Whitby, Raymond L D; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V; Tomlins, Paul; Adu, Jimi

    2016-06-01

    Peripheral nerve injury continues to be a major global health problem that can result in debilitating neurological deficits and neuropathic pain. Current state-of-the-art treatment involves reforming the damaged nerve pathway using a nerve autograft. Engineered nerve repair conduits can provide an alternative to the nerve autograft avoiding the inevitable tissue damage caused at the graft donor site. Commercially available nerve repair conduits are currently only considered suitable for repairing small nerve lesions; the design and performance of engineered conduits requires significant improvements to enable their use for repairing larger nerve defects. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are an emerging novel material for biomedical applications currently being developed for a range of therapeutic technologies including scaffolds for engineering and interfacing with neurological tissues. CNTs possess a unique set of physicochemical properties that could be useful within nerve repair conduits. This progress report aims to evaluate and consolidate the current literature pertinent to CNTs as a biomaterial for supporting peripheral nerve regeneration. The report is presented in the context of the state-of-the-art in nerve repair conduit design; outlining how CNTs may enhance the performance of next generation peripheral nerve repair conduits.

  9. Spectrocolorimetric evaluation of repaired articular cartilage after a microfracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dohi Yoshihiro

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In clinical practice, surgeons differentiate color changes in repaired cartilage compared with surrounding intact cartilage, but cannot quantify these color changes. Objective assessments are required. A spectrocolorimeter was used to evaluate whether intact and repaired cartilage can be quantified. Findings We investigated the use of a spectrocolorimeter and the application of two color models (L* a* b* colorimetric system and spectral reflectance distribution to describe and quantify articular cartilage. In this study, we measured the colors of intact and repaired cartilage after a microfracture. Histologically, the repaired cartilage was a mixture of fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage. In the L* a* b* colorimetric system, the L* and a* values recovered to close to the values of intact cartilage, whereas the b* value decreased over time after the operation. Regarding the spectral reflectance distribution at 12 weeks after the operation, the repaired cartilage had a higher spectral reflectance ratio than intact cartilage between wavelengths of 400 to 470 nm. Conclusion This study reports the first results regarding the relationship between spectrocolorimetric evaluation and the histological findings of repair cartilage after a microfracture. Our findings demonstrate the ability of spectrocolorimetric measurement to judge the repair cartilage after treatment on the basis of objective data such as the L*, a* and b* values and the SRP as a coincidence index of the spectral reflectance curve.

  10. Novel Repair Concept for Composite Materials by Repetitive Geometrical Interlock Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Zaremba

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Material adapted repair technologies for fiber-reinforced polymers with thermosetting matrix systems are currently characterized by requiring major efforts for repair preparation and accomplishment in all industrial areas of application. In order to allow for a uniform distribution of material and geometrical parameters over the repair zone, a novel composite interlock repair concept is introduced, which is based on a repair zone with undercuts prepared by water-jet technology. The presented numerical and experimental sensitivity analyses make a contribution to the systematic development of the interlock repair technology with respect to material and geometrical factors of influence. The results show the ability of the novel concept for a reproducible and automatable composite repair.

  11. Facility effluent monitoring plan for 242-A evaporator facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crummel, G.M.; Gustavson, R.D.

    1995-02-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U.S. Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could affect employee or public safety or the environment. A facility effluent monitoring plan determination was performed during Calendar Year 1991 and the evaluation showed the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-1. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated, as a minimum, every three years.

  12. The National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, G H; Moses, E I; Wuest, C R

    2004-06-03

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility that, when completed in 2008, will contain a 192-beam, 1.8- Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-meter-diameter target chamber and room for 100 diagnostics. NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system and will provide a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's energetic laser beams will compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. Other NIF experiments will study physical processes at temperatures approaching 10{sup 8} K and 10{sup 11} bar; conditions that exist naturally only in the interior of stars and planets. NIF has completed the first phases of its laser commissioning program. The first four beams of NIF have generated 106 kilojoules in 23-ns pulses of infrared light and over 16 kJ in 3.5- ns pulses at the third harmonic (351 nm). NIF's target experimental systems are being commissioned and experiments have begun. This paper provides a detailed look the NIF laser systems, laser and optical performance, and results from recent laser commissioning shots. We follow this with a discussion of NIF's high-energy-density and inertial fusion experimental capabilities, the first experiments on NIF, and plans for future capabilities of this unique facility.

  13. Programming of adaptive repair process chains using repair features and function blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunter Spöcker

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The current trends of product customization and repair of high value parts with individual defects demand automation and a high degree of flexibility of the involved manufacturing process chains. To determine the corresponding requirements this paper gives an overview of manufacturing process chains by distinguishing between horizontal and vertical process chains. The established way of modeling and programming processes with CAx systems and existing approaches is shown. Furthermore, the different types of possible adaptions of a manufacturing process chain are shown and considered as a cascaded control loop. Following this it is discussed which key requirements of repair process chains are unresolved by existing approaches. To overcome the deficits this paper introduces repair features which comprise the idea of geometric features and defines analytical auxiliary geometries based on the measurement input data. This meets challenges normally caused by working directly on reconstructed geometries in the form of triangulated surfaces which are prone to artifacts. Embedded into function blocks, this allows the use of traditional approaches for manufacturing process chains to be applied to adaptive repair process chains.

  14. DNA replication, repair, and repair tests. [Rat; human leukocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, B.

    1980-09-01

    The rate of inhibition and recovery of DNA synthesis can be used in a rapid assay system to detect genotoxic potentials of chemicals. Also, the observation that an agent stimulates DNA repair in a test system indicates its ability to cause damage in DNA. Different experimental approaches to the study of repair synthesis are discussed.

  15. Indoor Lighting Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Koji; Saito, Yoshinori; Ichikawa, Shigenori; Kawauchi, Takao; Tanaka, Tsuneo; Hirano, Rika; Tazuke, Fuyuki

    According to the statistics on building construction floor area from the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism, the total floor area of building construction started in Japan in 2007 was 160,991 thousand square meters, or 14.8% less than the area of the previous year, and the reduction was the first reduction in the past five years. The office markets in Tokyo and Nagoya were active, as represented by the supplies of skyscrapers, and energy saving measures, such as the adoption of high efficiency lighting equipment, the control for initial stage illuminance, daylight harvesting, and the use of occupancy sensors, were well established. In the field of public construction, including museums, multi-purpose halls, and religious buildings, the total area of the new construction was 10.8% less than the total for the previous year, and this reduction was a continuation of an eleven-year trend. In spaces with high ceiling, the innovation for easy replacement of light sources used with reflection mirror systems and optical fibers was noted. Hospitals adapted to the expectation for improved services in their selection of lighting facilities to improve the residential environment for patients while taking into consideration the needs of the aging population, by their use of devices in corridors to help maintain a continuity of light. In libraries, a pendant system was developed to illuminate both ceilings and book shelves. In the field of theaters and halls, the time limit for repairing existing systems had come for the large facilities that were opened during the theater and hall construction boom of the 1960s through 1980s, and around 26 renovations were done. Almost all the renovations were conversions to intelligent dimming systems and lighting control desks. In the field of stores and commercial facilities, the atmosphere and glitter of the selling floor was produced by new light sources, such as ceramic metal halide lamps and LEDs, which have high

  16. Kvitebjoern gas pipeline repair - baptism of remote pipeline repair system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gjertveit, Erling

    2010-07-01

    On the 1st of November 2007, severe anchor damage was discovered on the 30 inch Kvitebjoern gas export pipeline. The damage constituted a localised dent and a 17deg buckle, but no leakage. Statoil has invested in building an effective repair contingency structure for the large pipeline network on the Norwegian Continental shelf, with particular focus on the large gas export pipelines. The repair method for the Kvitebjoern pipeline was remotely operated using two Morgrip couplings and a spool. The installation used the purpose built Pipeline Repair System stored at Killingoey and couplings produced and tested back in 2005. This presentation will cover the initial damage investigations, the temporary operational phase, the repair preparations, the actual repair and lessons learned. (Author)

  17. RESTORING A DAMAGED 16-YEAR -OLD INSULATING POLYMER CONCRETE DIKE OVERLAY: REPAIR MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGIES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUGAMA,T.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this program was to design and formulate organic polymer-based material systems suitable for repairing and restoring the overlay panels of insulating lightweight polymer concrete (ILPC) from the concrete floor and slope wall of a dike at KeySpan liquefied natural gas (LNG) facility in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, NY, just over sixteen years ago. It also included undertaking a small-scale field demonstration to ensure that the commercial repairing technologies were applicable to the designed and formulated materials.

  18. DNA repair: Dynamic defenders against cancer and aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuss, Jill O.; Cooper, Priscilla K.

    2006-04-01

    (UV) component of sunlight. NER can be divided into two classes based on where the repair occurs. NER occurring in DNA that is not undergoing transcription (i.e., most of the genome) is called global genome repair (GGR or GGNER), while NER taking place in the transcribed strand of active genes is called transcription-coupled repair (TCR or TC-NER). We will explore NER in more detail below. Mismatch repair (MMR) is another type of excision repair that specifically removes mispaired bases resulting from replication errors. DNA damage can also result in breaks in the DNA backbone, in one or both strands. Single-strand breaks (SSBs) are efficiently repaired by a mechanism that shares common features with the later steps in BER. Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are especially devastating since by definition there is no intact complementary strand to serve as a template for repair, and even one unrepaired DSB can be lethal [3]. In cells that have replicated their DNA prior to cell division, the missing information can be supplied by the duplicate copy, or sister chromatid, and DSBs in these cells are faithfully repaired by homologous recombination involving the exchange of strands of DNA between the two copies. However, most cells in the body are non-dividing, and in these cells the major mechanism for repairing DSBs is by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), which as the name implies involves joining two broken DNA ends together without a requirement for homologous sequence and which therefore has a high potential for loss of genetic information.

  19. Regulation of nucleotide excision repair through ubiquitination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Li; Audesh Bhat; Wei Xiao

    2011-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the most versatile DNA-repair pathway in all organisms.While bacteria require only three proteins to complete the incision step of NER,eukaryotes employ about 30 proteins to complete the same step.Here we summarize recent studies demonstrating that ubiquitination,a post-translational modification,plays critical roles in regulating the NER activity either dependent on or independent of ubiquitin-proteolysis.Several NER components have been shown as targets of ubiquitination while others are actively involved in the ubiquitination process.We argue through this analysis that ubiquitination serves to coordinate various steps of NER and meanwhile connect NER with other related pathways to achieve the efficient global DNA-damage response.

  20. Emergent cardiopulmonary bypass during pectus excavatum repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Craner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pectus excavatum is a chest wall deformity that produces significant cardiopulmonary disability and is typically seen in younger patients. Minimally invasive repair of pectus excavatum or Nuss procedure has become a widely accepted technique for adult and pediatric patients. Although it is carried out through a thoracoscopic approach, the procedure is associated with a number of potential intraoperative and post-operative complications. We present a case of cardiac perforation requiring emergent cardiopulmonary bypass in a 29-year-old male with Marfan syndrome and previous mitral valve repair undergoing a Nuss procedure for pectus excavatum. This case illustrates the importance of vigilance and preparation by the surgeons, anesthesia providers as well as the institution to be prepared with resources to handle the possible complications. This includes available cardiac surgical backup, perfusionist support and adequate blood product availability.