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  1. Endogenous DNA Damage and Repair Enzymes

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    Arne Klungland

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Tomas Lindahl completed his medical studies at Karolinska Institute in 1970. Yet, his work has always been dedicated to unraveling fundamental mechanisms of DNA decay and DNA repair. His research is characterized with groundbreaking discoveries on the instability of our genome, the identification of novel DNA repair activities, the characterization of DNA repair pathways, and the association to diseases, throughout his 40 years of scientific career.

  2. Putative Enzymes of UV Photoproduct Repair

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    Cynthia J. Sakofsky

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine the biological relevance of two S. acidocaldarius proteins to the repair of UV photoproducts, the corresponding genes (Saci_1227 and Saci_1096 were disrupted, and the phenotypes of the resulting mutants were examined by various genetic assays. The disruption used integration by homologous recombination of a functional but heterologous pyrE gene, promoted by short sequences attached to both ends via PCR. The phenotypic analyses of the disruptants confirmed that ORF Saci_1227 encodes a DNA photolyase which functions in vivo, but they could not implicate ORF Saci_1096 in repair of UV- or other externally induced DNA damage despite its similarity to genes encoding UV damage endonucleases. The success of the gene-disruption strategy, which used 5′ extensions of PCR primers to target cassette integration, suggests potential advantages for routine construction of Sulfolobus strains.

  3. Rubisco Activases: AAA+ Chaperones Adapted to Enzyme Repair.

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    Bhat, Javaid Y; Thieulin-Pardo, Gabriel; Hartl, F Ulrich; Hayer-Hartl, Manajit

    2017-01-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), the key enzyme of the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle of photosynthesis, requires conformational repair by Rubisco activase for efficient function. Rubisco mediates the fixation of atmospheric CO 2 by catalyzing the carboxylation of the five-carbon sugar ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP). It is a remarkably inefficient enzyme, and efforts to increase crop yields by bioengineering Rubisco remain unsuccessful. This is due in part to the complex cellular machinery required for Rubisco biogenesis and metabolic maintenance. To function, Rubisco must undergo an activation process that involves carboxylation of an active site lysine by a non-substrate CO 2 molecule and binding of a Mg 2+ ion. Premature binding of the substrate RuBP results in an inactive enzyme. Moreover, Rubisco can also be inhibited by a range of sugar phosphates, some of which are "misfire" products of its multistep catalytic reaction. The release of the inhibitory sugar molecule is mediated by the AAA+ protein Rubisco activase (Rca), which couples hydrolysis of ATP to the structural remodeling of Rubisco. Rca enzymes are found in the vast majority of photosynthetic organisms, from bacteria to higher plants. They share a canonical AAA+ domain architecture and form six-membered ring complexes but are diverse in sequence and mechanism, suggesting their convergent evolution. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding the structure and function of this important group of client-specific AAA+ proteins.

  4. Mechanism of Enzyme Repair by the AAA+ Chaperone Rubisco Activase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Javaid Y; Miličić, Goran; Thieulin-Pardo, Gabriel; Bracher, Andreas; Maxwell, Andrew; Ciniawsky, Susanne; Mueller-Cajar, Oliver; Engen, John R; Hartl, F Ulrich; Wendler, Petra; Hayer-Hartl, Manajit

    2017-09-07

    How AAA+ chaperones conformationally remodel specific target proteins in an ATP-dependent manner is not well understood. Here, we investigated the mechanism of the AAA+ protein Rubisco activase (Rca) in metabolic repair of the photosynthetic enzyme Rubisco, a complex of eight large (RbcL) and eight small (RbcS) subunits containing eight catalytic sites. Rubisco is prone to inhibition by tight-binding sugar phosphates, whose removal is catalyzed by Rca. We engineered a stable Rca hexamer ring and analyzed its functional interaction with Rubisco. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange and chemical crosslinking showed that Rca structurally destabilizes elements of the Rubisco active site with remarkable selectivity. Cryo-electron microscopy revealed that Rca docks onto Rubisco over one active site at a time, positioning the C-terminal strand of RbcL, which stabilizes the catalytic center, for access to the Rca hexamer pore. The pulling force of Rca is fine-tuned to avoid global destabilization and allow for precise enzyme repair. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. N-Butyrate alters chromatin accessibility to DNA repair enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that the complex nature of mammalian chromatin can result in the concealment of DNA damage from repair enzymes and their co-factors. Recently it has been proposed that the acetylation of histone proteins in chromatin may provide a surveillance system whereby damaged regions of DNA become exposed due to changes in chromatin accessibility. This hypothesis has been tested by: (i) using n-butyrate to induce hyperacetylation in human adenocarcinoma (HT29) cells; (ii) monitoring the enzymatic accessibility of chromatin in permeabilised cells; (iii) measuring u.v. repair-associated nicking of DNA in intact cells and (iv) determining the effects of n-butyrate on cellular sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. The results indicate that the accessibility of chromatin to Micrococcus luteus u.v. endonuclease is enhanced by greater than 2-fold in n-butyrate-treated cells and that there is a corresponding increase in u.v. repair incision rates in intact cells exposed to the drug. Non-toxic levels of n-butyrate induce a block to G1 phase transit and there is a significant growth delay on removal of the drug. Resistance of HT29 cells to u.v.-radiation and adriamycin is enhanced in n-butyrate-treated cells whereas X-ray sensitivity is increased. Although changes in the responses of cells to DNA damaging agents must be considered in relation to the effects of n-butyrate on growth rate and cell-cycle distribution, the results are not inconsistent with the proposal that increased enzymatic-accessibility/repair is biologically favourable for the resistance of cells to u.v.-radiation damage. Overall the results support the suggested operation of a histone acetylation-based chromatin surveillance system in human cells

  6. Evolution of Outer Retinal Folds Occurring after Vitrectomy for Retinal Detachment Repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dell'Omo, Roberto; Tan, H. Stevie; Schlingemann, Reinier O.; Bijl, Heico M.; Lesnik Oberstein, Sarit Y.; Barca, Francesco; Mura, Marco

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE. To assess the evolution of outer retinal folds (ORFs) occurring after repair of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) using spectral domain-optical coherence tomography (sd-OCT) and fundus autofluorescence (FAF), and to discuss their pathogenesis. METHODS. Twenty patients were operated on

  7. Inhibition and kinetic studies of lignin degrading enzymes of Ganoderma boninense by naturally occurring phenolic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surendran, Arthy; Siddiqui, Yasmeen; Saud, Halimi Mohd; Ali, Nusaibah Syd; Manickam, Sivakumar

    2018-05-22

    Lignolytic (Lignin degrading) enzyme, from oil palm pathogen Ganoderma boninense Pat. (Syn G. orbiforme (Ryvarden), is involved in the detoxification and the degradation of lignin in the oil palm and is the rate-limiting step in the infection process of this fungus. Active inhibition of lignin degrading enzymes secreted by G. boninense by various naturally occurring phenolic compounds and estimation of efficiency on pathogen suppression was aimed at. In our work, ten naturally occurring phenolic compounds were evaluated for their inhibitory potential towards the lignolytic enzymes of G.boninense. Additionally, the lignin degrading enzymes were characterised. Most of the peholic compounds exhibited an uncompetitive inhibition towards the lignin degrading enzymes. Benzoic acid was the superior inhibitor to the production of lignin degrading enzymes, when compared between the ten phenolic compounds. The inhibitory potential of the phenolic compounds toward the lignin degrading enzymes are higher than that of the conventional metal ion inhibitor. The lignin degrading enzymes were stable in a wide range of pH but were sensitive to higher to temperature. The study demonstrated the inhibitor potential of ten naturally occurring phenolic compounds toward the lignin degrading enzymes of G. boninense with different efficacies. The study has shed a light towards a new management strategy to control BSR in oil palm. It serves as replacement for the existing chemical control. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Divergent Requirement for a DNA Repair Enzyme during Enterovirus Infections.

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    Maciejewski, Sonia; Nguyen, Joseph H C; Gómez-Herreros, Fernando; Cortés-Ledesma, Felipe; Caldecott, Keith W; Semler, Bert L

    2015-12-29

    Viruses of the Enterovirus genus of picornaviruses, including poliovirus, coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), and human rhinovirus, commandeer the functions of host cell proteins to aid in the replication of their small viral genomic RNAs during infection. One of these host proteins is a cellular DNA repair enzyme known as 5' tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2). TDP2 was previously demonstrated to mediate the cleavage of a unique covalent linkage between a viral protein (VPg) and the 5' end of picornavirus RNAs. Although VPg is absent from actively translating poliovirus mRNAs, the removal of VPg is not required for the in vitro translation and replication of the RNA. However, TDP2 appears to be excluded from replication and encapsidation sites during peak times of poliovirus infection of HeLa cells, suggesting a role for TDP2 during the viral replication cycle. Using a mouse embryonic fibroblast cell line lacking TDP2, we found that TDP2 is differentially required among enteroviruses. Our single-cycle viral growth analysis shows that CVB3 replication has a greater dependency on TDP2 than does poliovirus or human rhinovirus replication. During infection, CVB3 protein accumulation is undetectable (by Western blot analysis) in the absence of TDP2, whereas poliovirus protein accumulation is reduced but still detectable. Using an infectious CVB3 RNA with a reporter, CVB3 RNA could still be replicated in the absence of TDP2 following transfection, albeit at reduced levels. Overall, these results indicate that TDP2 potentiates viral replication during enterovirus infections of cultured cells, making TDP2 a potential target for antiviral development for picornavirus infections. Picornaviruses are one of the most prevalent groups of viruses that infect humans and livestock worldwide. These viruses include the human pathogens belonging to the Enterovirus genus, such as poliovirus, coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), and human rhinovirus. Diseases caused by enteroviruses pose a major problem

  9. Divergent Requirement for a DNA Repair Enzyme during Enterovirus Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Maciejewski

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Viruses of the Enterovirus genus of picornaviruses, including poliovirus, coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3, and human rhinovirus, commandeer the functions of host cell proteins to aid in the replication of their small viral genomic RNAs during infection. One of these host proteins is a cellular DNA repair enzyme known as 5′ tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2. TDP2 was previously demonstrated to mediate the cleavage of a unique covalent linkage between a viral protein (VPg and the 5′ end of picornavirus RNAs. Although VPg is absent from actively translating poliovirus mRNAs, the removal of VPg is not required for the in vitro translation and replication of the RNA. However, TDP2 appears to be excluded from replication and encapsidation sites during peak times of poliovirus infection of HeLa cells, suggesting a role for TDP2 during the viral replication cycle. Using a mouse embryonic fibroblast cell line lacking TDP2, we found that TDP2 is differentially required among enteroviruses. Our single-cycle viral growth analysis shows that CVB3 replication has a greater dependency on TDP2 than does poliovirus or human rhinovirus replication. During infection, CVB3 protein accumulation is undetectable (by Western blot analysis in the absence of TDP2, whereas poliovirus protein accumulation is reduced but still detectable. Using an infectious CVB3 RNA with a reporter, CVB3 RNA could still be replicated in the absence of TDP2 following transfection, albeit at reduced levels. Overall, these results indicate that TDP2 potentiates viral replication during enterovirus infections of cultured cells, making TDP2 a potential target for antiviral development for picornavirus infections.

  10. Mitochondrial Targeted Endonuclease III DNA Repair Enzyme Protects against Ventilator Induced Lung Injury in Mice

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    Masahiro Hashizume

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial targeted DNA repair enzyme, 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1, was previously reported to protect against mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA damage and ventilator induced lung injury (VILI. In the present study we determined whether mitochondrial targeted endonuclease III (EndoIII which cleaves oxidized pyrimidines rather than purines from damaged DNA would also protect the lung. Minimal injury from 1 h ventilation at 40 cmH2O peak inflation pressure (PIP was reversed by EndoIII pretreatment. Moderate lung injury due to ventilation for 2 h at 40 cmH2O PIP produced a 25-fold increase in total extravascular albumin space, a 60% increase in W/D weight ratio, and marked increases in MIP-2 and IL-6. Oxidative mtDNA damage and decreases in the total tissue glutathione (GSH and the GSH/GSSH ratio also occurred. All of these indices of injury were attenuated by mitochondrial targeted EndoIII. Massive lung injury caused by 2 h ventilation at 50 cmH2O PIP was not attenuated by EndoIII pretreatment, but all untreated mice died prior to completing the two hour ventilation protocol, whereas all EndoIII-treated mice lived for the duration of ventilation. Thus, mitochondrial targeted DNA repair enzymes were protective against mild and moderate lung damage and they enhanced survival in the most severely injured group.

  11. Molecular dynamics of formation of TD lesioned DNA complexed with repair enzyme - onset of the enzymatic repair process

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    Pinak, Miroslav [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1999-12-01

    To describe the first step of the enzymatic repair process (formation of complex enzyme-DNA), in which the thymine dimer (TD) part is removed from DNA, the 500 picosecond (ps) molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of TD lesioned DNA and part of repair enzyme cell (inclusive of catalytic center - Arg-22, Glu-23, Arg-26 and Thr-2) was performed. TD is UV originated lesion in DNA and T4 Endonuclease V is TD specific repair enzyme. Both molecules were located in the same simulation cell and their relative movement was examined. During the simulation the research was focused on the role of electrostatic energy in formation of complex enzyme-DNA. It is found, that during the first 100 ps of MD, the part of enzyme approaches the DNA surface at the TD lesion, interacts extensively by electrostatic and van der Walls interactions with TD part of DNA and forms complex that lasts stabile for 500 ps of MD. In the beginning of MD, the positive electrostatic interaction energy between part of enzyme and TD ({approx} +10 kcal/mol) drives enzyme towards the DNA molecule. Water-mediated hydrogen bonds between enzyme and DNA help to keep complex stabile. As a reference, the MD simulation of the identical system with native DNA molecule (two native thymines (TT) instead of TD) was performed. In this system the negative electrostatic interaction energy between part of enzyme and TT ({approx} -11 kcal/mol), in contrary to the positive one in the system with TD, doesn't drive enzyme towards DNA and complex is not formed. (author)

  12. Molecular dynamics of formation of TD lesioned DNA complexed with repair enzyme - onset of the enzymatic repair process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinak, Miroslav

    1999-12-01

    To describe the first step of the enzymatic repair process (formation of complex enzyme-DNA), in which the thymine dimer (TD) part is removed from DNA, the 500 picosecond (ps) molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of TD lesioned DNA and part of repair enzyme cell (inclusive of catalytic center - Arg-22, Glu-23, Arg-26 and Thr-2) was performed. TD is UV originated lesion in DNA and T4 Endonuclease V is TD specific repair enzyme. Both molecules were located in the same simulation cell and their relative movement was examined. During the simulation the research was focused on the role of electrostatic energy in formation of complex enzyme-DNA. It is found, that during the first 100 ps of MD, the part of enzyme approaches the DNA surface at the TD lesion, interacts extensively by electrostatic and van der Walls interactions with TD part of DNA and forms complex that lasts stabile for 500 ps of MD. In the beginning of MD, the positive electrostatic interaction energy between part of enzyme and TD (∼ +10 kcal/mol) drives enzyme towards the DNA molecule. Water-mediated hydrogen bonds between enzyme and DNA help to keep complex stabile. As a reference, the MD simulation of the identical system with native DNA molecule (two native thymines (TT) instead of TD) was performed. In this system the negative electrostatic interaction energy between part of enzyme and TT (∼ -11 kcal/mol), in contrary to the positive one in the system with TD, doesn't drive enzyme towards DNA and complex is not formed. (author)

  13. Computational studies of radiation and oxidative damage to DNA and its recognition by repair enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinak, M. [Center for Promotion of Computational Science and Engineering, Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is used to study the time evolution of the recognition processes and to construct a model of the specific DNA-repair enzyme' complexes. MD simulations of the following molecules were performed: DNA dodecamer with thymine dimer (TD), DNA 30-mer with thymine glycol (TG), and respective specific repair enzymes T4 Endonuclease V and Endonuclease III. Both DNA lesions are experimentally suggested to be mutagenic and carcinogenic unless properly recognized and repaired by repair enzymes. In the case of TD, there is detected a strong kink around the TD site, that is not observed in native DNA. In addition there is observed a different value of electrostatic energy at the TD site - negative '-9 kcal/mol', in contrast to the nearly neutral value of the native thymine site. These two factors - structural changes and specific electrostatic energy - seem to be important for proper recognition of a TD damaged site and for formation of DNA-enzyme complex. Formation of this complex is the onset of the repair of DNA. In the case of TG damaged DNA the structural characteristics of the TG were calculated (charges, bond lengths, bond angles, etc.). The formed TG was used to replace the native thymine and then submitted to the simulation in the system with a repair enzyme with Endonuclease III for the purpose of the study of the formation of the DNA-enzyme complex. (author)

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations of deoxyribonucleic acids and repair enzyme T4 endonuclease V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinak, Miroslav

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) and specific repair enzyme T4 endonuclease V. Namely research described here is focused on the examination of specific recognition process, in which this repair enzyme recognizes the damaged site on the DNA molecule-thymine dimer (TD). TD is frequent DNA damage induced by UV radiation in sun light and unless properly repaired it may be mutagenic or lethal for cell, and is also considered among the major causes of skin cancer. T4 endonuclease V is a DNA specific repair enzyme from bacteriophage T4 that catalyzes the first reaction step of TD repair pathway. MD simulations of three molecules - native DNA dodecamer (12 base pairs), DNA of the same sequence of nucleotides as native one but with TD, and repair enzyme T4 endonuclease V - were performed for 1 ns individually for each molecule. Simulations were analyzed to determine the role of electrostatic interaction in the recognition process. It is found that electrostatic energies calculated for amino acids of the enzyme have positive values of around +15 kcal/mol. The electrostatic energy of TD site has negative value of approximately -9 kcal/mol, different from the nearly neutral value of the respective thymines site of the native DNA. The electrostatic interaction of TD site with surrounding water environment differs from the electrostatic interaction of other nucleotides. Differences found between TD site and respective thymines site of native DNA indicate that the electrostatic energy is an important factor contributing to proper recognition of TD site during scanning process in which enzyme scans the DNA. In addition to the electrostatic energy, the important factor in recognition process might be structural complementarity of enzyme and bent DNA with TD. There is significant kink formed around TD site, that is not observed in native DNA. (author)

  15. Post-irradiation inactivation, protection, and repair of the sulfhydryl enzyme malate synthase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durchschlag, H.; Zipper, P.

    1985-01-01

    Malate synthase from baker's yeast, a trimeric sulfhydryl enzyme with one essential sulfhydryl group per subunit, was inactivated by 2 kGy X-irradiation in air-saturated aqueous solution (enzyme concentration: 0.5 mg/ml). The radiation induced changes of enzymic activity were registered at about 0,30,60 h after irradiation. To elucidate the role of OH - , O 2 , and H 2 O 2 in the X-ray inactivation of the enzyme, experiments were performed in the absence of presence of different concentrations of specific additives (formate, superoxide dismutase, catalase). These additives were added to malate synthase solutions before or after X-irradiation. Moreover, repairs of inactivated malate synthase were initiated at about 0 or 30 h after irradiation by means of the sulfhydryl agent dithiothreitol. Experiments yielded the following results: 1. Irradiation of malate synthase in the absence of additives inactivated the enzyme immediately to a residual activity Asub(r)=3% (corresponding to a D 37 =0.6 kGy), and led to further slow inactivation in the post-irradiation phase. Repairs, initiated at different times after irradiation, restored enzymic activity considerably. The repair initiated at t=0 led to Asub(r)=21%; repairs started later on resulted in somewhat lower activities. The decay of reparability, however, was found to progress more slowly than post-irradiation inactivation itself. After completion of repair the activities of repaired samples did not decrease significantly. 2. The presence of specific additives during irradiation caused significant protective effects against primary inactivation. The protection by formate was very pronounced (e.g., Asub(r)=72% and D 37 =6 kGy for 100 mM formate). The presence of catalytic amounts of superoxide dismutase and/or catalase exhibited only minor effects, depending on the presence and concentration of formate. (orig.)

  16. Effects of naturally occurring coumarins on hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes inmice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleiner, Heather E.; Xia, Xiaojun; Sonoda, Junichiro; Zhang, Jun; Pontius, Elizabeth; Abey, Jane; Evans, Ronald M.; Moore, David D.; DiGiovanni, John

    2008-01-01

    Cytochromes P450 (P450s) and glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) constitute two important enzyme families involved in carcinogen metabolism. Generally, P450s play activation or detoxifying roles while GSTs act primarily as detoxifying enzymes. We previously demonstrated that oral administration of the linear furanocoumarins, isopimpinellin and imperatorin, modulated P450 and GST activities in various tissues of mice. The purpose of the present study was to compare a broader range of naturally occurring coumarins (simple coumarins, and furanocoumarins of the linear and angular type) for their abilities to modulate hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes when administered orally to mice. We now report that all of the different coumarins tested (coumarin, limettin, auraptene, angelicin, bergamottin, imperatorin and isopimpinellin) induced hepatic GST activities, whereas the linear furanocoumarins possessed the greatest abilities to induce hepatic P450 activities, in particular P450 2B and 3A. In both cases, this corresponded to an increase in protein expression of the enzymes. Induction of P4502B10, 3A11, and 2C9 by xenobiotics often is a result of activation of the pregnane X receptor (PXR) and/or constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). Using a pregnane X receptor reporter system, our results demonstrated that isopimpinellin activated both PXR and its human ortholog SXR by recruiting coactivator SRC-1 in transfected cells. In CAR transfection assays, isopimpinellin counteracted the inhibitory effect of androstanol on full-length mCAR, a Gal4-mCAR ligand-binding domain fusion, and restored coactivator binding. Orally administered isopimpinellin induced hepatic mRNA expression of Cyp2b10, Cyp3a11, and GSTa in CAR(+/+) wild-type mice. In contrast, the induction of Cyp2b10 mRNA by isopimpinellin was attenuated in the CAR(-/-) mice, suggesting that isopimpinellin induces Cyp2b10 via the CAR receptor. Overall, the current data indicate that naturally occurring coumarins have

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation studies of radiation damaged DNA. Molecules and repair enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinak, Miroslav

    2004-12-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) studies on several radiation damages to DNA and their recognition by repair enzymes are introduced in order to describe the stepwise description of molecular process observed at radiation lesion sites. MD studies were performed on pyrimidine (thymine dimer, thymine glycol) and purine (8-oxoguanine) lesions using an MD simulation code AMBER 5.0. The force field was modified for each lesion. In all cases the significant structural changes in the DNA double helical structure were observed; a) the breaking of hydrogen bond network between complementary bases and resulting opening of the double helix (8-oxoguanine); b) the sharp bending of the DNA helix centered at the lesion site (thymine dimer, thymine glycol); and c) the flipping-out base on the strand complementary to the lesion (8-oxoguanine). These changes were related to the overall collapsing double helical structure around the lesion and might facilitate the docking of the repair enzyme into the DNA and formation of DNA-enzyme complex. In addition to the structural changes, at lesion sites there were found electrostatic interaction energy values different from those at native sites (thymine dimer -10 kcal/mol, thymine glycol -26 kcal/mol, 8-oxoguanine -48 kcal/mol). These values of electrostatic energy may discriminate lesion from values at native sites (thymine 0 kcal/mol, guanine -37 kcal/mol) and enable a repair enzyme to recognize a lesion during scanning DNA surface. The observed specific structural conformation and energetic properties at the lesions sites are factors that guide a repair enzyme to discriminate lesions from non-damaged native DNA segments. (author)

  18. Association of thymine glycol lesioned DNA with repair enzyme endonuclease III-molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinak, Miroslav

    2001-07-01

    The 2 nanoseconds molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has been performed for the system consisting of repair enzyme and DNA 30-mer with native thymine at position 16 replaced by thymine glycol (TG) solvated in water environment. After 950 picoseconds of MD the enzyme and DNA associated together to form complex that lasted stable up to 2 ns when simulation was terminated. At the contact area of enzyme and DNA there is glutamic acid located as close as 1.6 A to the C3' atom of phosphodiester bond of TG. Initial B-DNA molecule was bent and kinked at the TG during MD. This distortion caused that phosphodiester bond was easier accessible by amino acids of enzyme. The negative value of electrostatic energy (-26 kcal/mol) discriminates TG from nearly neutral native thymine and contributes to the specific recognition of this lesion. Higher number of close water molecules at TG site before formation of complex (compared with other nucleotides) indicates that glycosyl bond of the lesion is easily approached by repair enzyme during scanning of DNA surface and suggests the importance of specific hydration at the lesion during recognition process. (author)

  19. Association of thymine glycol lesioned DNA with repair enzyme endonuclease III-molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinak, Miroslav [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-07-01

    The 2 nanoseconds molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has been performed for the system consisting of repair enzyme and DNA 30-mer with native thymine at position 16 replaced by thymine glycol (TG) solvated in water environment. After 950 picoseconds of MD the enzyme and DNA associated together to form complex that lasted stable up to 2 ns when simulation was terminated. At the contact area of enzyme and DNA there is glutamic acid located as close as 1.6 A to the C3' atom of phosphodiester bond of TG. Initial B-DNA molecule was bent and kinked at the TG during MD. This distortion caused that phosphodiester bond was easier accessible by amino acids of enzyme. The negative value of electrostatic energy (-26 kcal/mol) discriminates TG from nearly neutral native thymine and contributes to the specific recognition of this lesion. Higher number of close water molecules at TG site before formation of complex (compared with other nucleotides) indicates that glycosyl bond of the lesion is easily approached by repair enzyme during scanning of DNA surface and suggests the importance of specific hydration at the lesion during recognition process. (author)

  20. Comparative Study between topical applications liposomally entrapped DNA repair enzymes and thymidine dinucleotide as radioprotectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabon, M.H.; El-Bedewi, A.F.

    2005-01-01

    The delivery of active agents to the skin by liposome carriers received great interest during the last three decades. This is based on their potential to enclose various types of biological materials and to deliver them to diverse cell types. Recent work suggests that liposomes as vehicles for topical drug delivery may be superior to conventional preparations. Also, topical application of DNA repair enzymes to irradiated skin increases the rate of repair of DNA potentially damaged cells. Moreover, thymidine dinucleotide is a new skin photo-protective agent against non-ionizing radiation through induction of DNA repair. Gamma irradiation can produce DNA damage in human skin. DNA mutations have an important role in the development of skin cancer and precancerous skin lesions. Albino rats were irradiated with Cobalt-60 gamma radiation with different doses (0.5, 1.5, 3 Gy), and were treated by either thymidine dinucleotide or liposomally entrapped DNA repair enzymes topically 24 hours before irradiation. Evaluation was done histopathologically by H and E stain. Computerized image analyzer using Masson's trichrome stain was also done. Gamma radiation produced epidermal thinning and dermal inflammatory cells together with collagen fragmentation and clumping in a dose-dependent manner. Comparing between both thymidine dinucleotide and liposomally entrapped DNA repair enzymes pretreated and irradiated rats. Low dose irradiation (0.5 Gy) together with previous drugs showed preservation of epidermis with no inflammatory cells and also it maintained the normal architecture of collagen bundles. However, they were ineffective with higher doses. In conclusion our results may suggest that the effects of gamma radiation on the skin at low dose could be minimized by the use of these drugs before exposure

  1. Inhibition and kinetic studies of cellulose- and hemicellulose-degrading enzymes of Ganoderma boninense by naturally occurring phenolic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surendran, A; Siddiqui, Y; Ali, N S; Manickam, S

    2018-06-01

    Ganoderma sp, the causal pathogen of the basal stem rot (BSR) disease of oil palm, secretes extracellular hydrolytic enzymes. These play an important role in the pathogenesis of BSR by nourishing the pathogen through the digestion of cellulose and hemicellulose of the host tissue. Active suppression of hydrolytic enzymes secreted by Ganoderma boninense by various naturally occurring phenolic compounds and estimation of their efficacy on pathogen suppression is focused in this study. Ten naturally occurring phenolic compounds were assessed for their inhibitory effect on the hydrolytic enzymes of G. boninense. The enzyme kinetics (V max and K m ) and the stability of the hydrolytic enzymes were also characterized. The selected compounds had shown inhibitory effect at various concentrations. Two types of inhibitions namely uncompetitive and noncompetitive were observed in the presence of phenolic compounds. Among all the phenolic compounds tested, benzoic acid was the most effective compound suppressive to the growth and production of hydrolytic enzymes secreted by G. boninense. The phenolic compounds as inhibitory agents can be a better replacement for the metal ions which are known as conventional inhibitors till date. The three hydrolytic enzymes were stable in a wide range of pH and temperature. These findings highlight the efficacy of the applications of phenolic compounds to control Ganoderma. The study has proved a replacement for chemical controls of G. boninense with naturally occurring phenolic compounds. © 2018 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Biochemical Characterization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA Repair Enzymes – Nfo, XthA and Nei2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sailau Abeldenov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tuberculosis (TB is a human disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb. Treatment of TB requires long-term courses of multi-drug therapies to eliminate subpopulations of bacteria, which sometimes persist against antibiotics. Therefore, understanding of the mechanism of Mtb antibiotic-resistance is extremely important. During infection, Mtb overcomes a variety of body defense mechanisms, including treatment with the reactive species of oxygen and nitrogen. The bases in DNA molecule are susceptible to the damages caused by reactive forms of intermediate compounds of oxygen and nitrogen. Most of this damage is repaired by the base excision repair (BER pathway. In this study, we aimed to biochemically characterize three Mtb DNA repair enzymes of BER pathway. Methods: XthA, nfo, and nei genes were identified in mycobacteria by homology search of genomic sequences available in the GenBank database. We used standard methods of genetic engineering  to clone and sequence Mtb genes, which coded Nfo, XthA and Nei2 repair enzymes. The protein products of Mtb genes were expressed and purified in Escherichia coli using affinity tags. The enzymatic activity of purified Nfo, XthA, and Nei2 proteins were measured using radioactively labeled DNA substrates containing various modified residues. Results: The genes end (Rv0670, xthA (Rv0427c, and nei (Rv3297 were PCR amplified using genomic DNA of Mtb H37Rv with primers that contain specific restriction sites. The amplified products were inserted into pET28c(+ expression vector in such a way that the recombinant proteins contain C-terminal histidine tags. The plasmid constructs were verified by sequencing and then transformed into the Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3 strain. Purification of recombinant proteins was performed using Ni2+ ions immobilized affinity column, coupled with the fast performance liquid chromatography machine AKTA. Identification of the isolated proteins was performed by

  3. Oncometabolite D-2-Hydroxyglutarate Inhibits ALKBH DNA Repair Enzymes and Sensitizes IDH Mutant Cells to Alkylating Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pu; Wu, Jing; Ma, Shenghong; Zhang, Lei; Yao, Jun; Hoadley, Katherine A; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Perou, Charles M; Guan, Kun-Liang; Ye, Dan; Xiong, Yue

    2015-12-22

    Chemotherapy of a combination of DNA alkylating agents, procarbazine and lomustine (CCNU), and a microtubule poison, vincristine, offers a significant benefit to a subset of glioma patients. The benefit of this regimen, known as PCV, was recently linked to IDH mutation that occurs frequently in glioma and produces D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2-HG), a competitive inhibitor of α-ketoglutarate (α-KG). We report here that D-2-HG inhibits the α-KG-dependent alkB homolog (ALKBH) DNA repair enzymes. Cells expressing mutant IDH display reduced repair kinetics, accumulate more DNA damages, and are sensitized to alkylating agents. The observed sensitization to alkylating agents requires the catalytic activity of mutant IDH to produce D-2-HG and can be reversed by the deletion of mutant IDH allele or overexpression of ALKBH2 or AKLBH3. Our results suggest that impairment of DNA repair may contribute to tumorigenesis driven by IDH mutations and that alkylating agents may merit exploration for treating IDH-mutated cancer patients. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. MD study of pyrimidine base damage on DNA and its recognition by repair enzyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinak, M.

    2000-01-01

    The molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was used on the study of two specific damages of pyrimidine bases of DNA. Pyrimidine bases are major targets either of free radicals induced by ionizing radiation in DNA surrounding environment or UV radiation. Thymine dimer (TD) is UV induced damage, in which two neighboring thymines in one strand are joined by covalent bonds of C(5)-C(5) and C(6)-C(6) atoms of thymines. Thymine glycol (TG) is ionizing radiation induced damage in which the free water radical adds to unsaturated bond C(5)-C(6) of thymine. Both damages are experimentally suggested to be mutagenetic and carcinogenic unless properly repaired by repair enzymes. In the case of MD of TD, there is detected strong kink around the TD site that is not observed in native DNA. In addition there is observed the different value of electrostatic energy at the TD site - negative '-10 kcal/mol', in contrary to nearly neutral value of native thymine site. Structural changes and specific electrostatic energy - seems to be important for proper recognition of TD damaged site, formation of DNA-enzyme complex and thus for subsequent repair of DNA. In the case of TG damaged DNA there is major structural distortion at the TG site, mainly the increased distance between TG and the C5' of adjacent nucleotide. This enlarged gap between the neighboring nucleotides may prevent the insertion of complementary base during replication causing the replication process to stop. In which extend this structural feature together with energy properties of TG contributes to the proper recognition of TG by repair enzyme Endonuclease III is subject of further computational MD study. (author)

  5. Regulatory mechanisms of RNA function: emerging roles of DNA repair enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobert, Laure; Nilsen, Hilde

    2014-07-01

    The acquisition of an appropriate set of chemical modifications is required in order to establish correct structure of RNA molecules, and essential for their function. Modification of RNA bases affects RNA maturation, RNA processing, RNA quality control, and protein translation. Some RNA modifications are directly involved in the regulation of these processes. RNA epigenetics is emerging as a mechanism to achieve dynamic regulation of RNA function. Other modifications may prevent or be a signal for degradation. All types of RNA species are subject to processing or degradation, and numerous cellular mechanisms are involved. Unexpectedly, several studies during the last decade have established a connection between DNA and RNA surveillance mechanisms in eukaryotes. Several proteins that respond to DNA damage, either to process or to signal the presence of damaged DNA, have been shown to participate in RNA quality control, turnover or processing. Some enzymes that repair DNA damage may also process modified RNA substrates. In this review, we give an overview of the DNA repair proteins that function in RNA metabolism. We also discuss the roles of two base excision repair enzymes, SMUG1 and APE1, in RNA quality control.

  6. A Sustainable One-Pot, Two-Enzyme Synthesis of Naturally Occurring Arylalkyl Glucosides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bassanini, I.; Krejzová, Jana; Panzeri, W.; Monti, D.; Křen, Vladimír; Riva, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 9 (2017), s. 2040-2045 ISSN 1864-5631 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD15085 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : enzyme catalysis * glycosylation * green chemistry Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 7.226, year: 2016

  7. Strategies for protection and experiments on repair of irradiated sulfhydryl enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durchschlag, H.; Zipper, P.

    1991-01-01

    The investigation of sulfur-containing biomolecules, especially of sulfhydryl proteins, is of particular interest in radiation biology. Sulfhydryl enzymes are useful objects for studying both structural and functional changes caused by radiation. In this context oxidation of enzyme sulfhydryl, inactivation (continuing in the post-irradiation phase), subunit cross-linking, enzyme aggregation, fragmentation, unfolding etc. may be mentioned. For their studies the authors used primarily malate synthase (MS), an enzyme with essential sulfhydryl, which was X-irradiated in aqueous solution in the absence or presence of a variety of additives (thiols, antioxienzymes, typical radical scavengers, inorganic salts, buffer components, substrates, products, substrate and product analogues). Radiation-induced effects were registered during irradiation, after stop of irradiation, and in the post-radiation (p.r.) phase 30 or 60 h p.r. using, e.g., small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), polyacrylamide gel electrophoreses (PAGEs), and activity measurements. Repair experiments were initiated by p.r. addition of dithiothreitol (DTT). For comparison, some of the experiments were also carried out with two additional sulfhydryl enzymes (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)) and two disulfide containing proteins (ribonuclease A, serum albumin). 9 refs., 6 figs

  8. Yeast redoxyendonuclease, a DNA repair enzyme similar to Escherichia coli endonuclease III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gossett, J.; Lee, K.; Cunningham, R.P.; Doetsch, P.W.

    1988-01-01

    A DNA repair endonuclease (redoxyendonuclease) was isolated from bakers' yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). The enzyme has been purified by a series of column chromatography steps and cleaves OsO 4 -damaged, double-stranded DNA at sites of thymine glycol and heavily UV-irradiated DNA at sites of cytosine, thymine, and guanine photoproducts. The base specificity and mechanism of phosphodiester bond cleavage for the yeast redoxyendonuclease appear to be identical with those of Escherichia coli endonuclease III when thymine glycol containing, end-labeled DNA fragments of defined sequence are employed as substrates. Yeast redoxyendonuclease has an apparent molecular size of 38,000-42,000 daltons and is active in the absence of divalent metal cations. The identification of such an enzyme in yeast may be of value in the elucidation of the biochemical basis for radiation sensitivity in certain yeast mutants

  9. Action of some drugs on enzymes involved in DNA-repair and semiconservative DNA-synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wawra, E.; Klein, W.; Kocsis, F.; Weniger, P.

    1975-07-01

    Different antirheumatic and cytostatic drugs had been tested by measurement of the thymidine incorporation into DNA of spleen cells under conditions, under which either DNA-synthesis or repair after gamma- or UV-irradiation takes place. There are substances, which inhibit either only the semiconservative DNA-synthesis (vinblastine, isonicotinic acid hydracide) or only DNA-repair after gamma-irradiation (mixture of penicillin-G and procaine-penicillin-G) or both (cyclophosphamide, phenylbutazone, procarbazine, nalidixic acid). Vincristine shows no effect on the thymidine incorporation in DNA, but by density gradient centrifugation it has been found that it influences the ligase reaction. Two DNA polymerases had been isolated from spleen cells, one of the low molecular and one of the high molecular weight type. The influences of the described drugs on these enzymes and on a deoxyribonuclease I from beef pancreas have been tested in ''in vitro'' systems. In all cases, it has been found that there is no effect or only a very small one, compared with the action of well known inhibitors as e.g. ethidium bromide and p-chloromercuribenzoate, and this cannot be responsible for the suppressions found in DNA-repair and semiconservative DNA-synthesis. (author)

  10. Assay of repair enzyme activity by reactivation of ultraviolet-irradiated infective viral DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oeda, K; Nakatsu, Y; Sekiguchi, M [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan).Faculty of Science

    1980-05-01

    Treatment of OeX174 replicative form (RF) DNA, pre-exposed to ultraviolet light, with T4 endonuclease V led to a marked increase of infectivity of the RF when the activity was assayed on CaCl/sub 2/-treated cells of Escherichia coli strain defective in uvrA gene. The reaction was specific and the extent of the reactivation was proportional to the concentration of the enzyme. Based on this finding, we developed a procedure to assay endonuclease activities specific for ultraviolet-damaged DNA, that might be involved in the incision step of excision repair of pyrimidine dimers. To find conditions suitable for accurate and rapid assays, we examined conditions affecting transfection with OeX174 RF. The maximum transfection was achieved when more than 2 x 10/sup 8/ CaCl/sub 2/-treated cells, which had been prepared from bacteria harvested during the early or mid-logarithmic phase of growth in L broth, were incubated with the DNA at 0/sup 0/C for 20 min in 50 mM CaCl/sub 2/. Incubation of the cell-DNA mixture at 37/sup 0/C decreased the transfection efficiency to about 30% of the optimal level; thus, heat shock, a step regarded as necessary in the conventional CaCl/sub 2/ methods for transfection and transformation, was eliminated. The CaCl/sub 2/-treated cells remained viable and competent after storage at -20/sup 0/C in a solution containing 15% glycerol. By using the procedure thus established, repair endonuclease activities in crude extracts of T4-infected E. coli and of Micrococcus luteus were determined. The procedure should be of use in assaying and purifying repair enzymes of other organisms.

  11. Deficient expression of DNA repair enzymes in early progression to sporadic colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Cancers often arise within an area of cells (e.g. an epithelial patch) that is predisposed to the development of cancer, i.e. a "field of cancerization" or "field defect." Sporadic colon cancer is characterized by an elevated mutation rate and genomic instability. If a field defect were deficient in DNA repair, DNA damages would tend to escape repair and give rise to carcinogenic mutations. Purpose To determine whether reduced expression of DNA repair proteins Pms2, Ercc1 and Xpf (pairing partner of Ercc1) are early steps in progression to colon cancer. Results Tissue biopsies were taken during colonoscopies of 77 patients at 4 different risk levels for colon cancer, including 19 patients who had never had colonic neoplasia (who served as controls). In addition, 158 tissue samples were taken from tissues near or within colon cancers removed by resection and 16 tissue samples were taken near tubulovillous adenomas (TVAs) removed by resection. 568 triplicate tissue sections (a total of 1,704 tissue sections) from these tissue samples were evaluated by immunohistochemistry for 4 DNA repair proteins. Substantially reduced protein expression of Pms2, Ercc1 and Xpf occurred in field defects of up to 10 cm longitudinally distant from colon cancers or TVAs and within colon cancers. Expression of another DNA repair protein, Ku86, was infrequently reduced in these areas. When Pms2, Ercc1 or Xpf were reduced in protein expression, then either one or both of the other two proteins most often had reduced protein expression as well. The mean inner colon circumferences, from 32 resections, of the ascending, transverse and descending/sigmoid areas were measured as 6.6 cm, 5.8 cm and 6.3 cm, respectively. When combined with other measurements in the literature, this indicates the approximate mean number of colonic crypts in humans is 10 million. Conclusions The substantial deficiencies in protein expression of DNA repair proteins Pms2, Ercc1 and Xpf in about 1 million

  12. Effect of specific enzyme inhibitors on replication, total genome DNA repair and on gene-specific DNA repair after UV irradiation in CHO cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, J.C.; Stevsner, Tinna; Bohr, Vilhelm A. (National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD (USA). Division of Cancer Treatment, Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology); Mattern, M.R. (Smith Kline Beecham Pharmaceuticals, King of Prussia, PA (USA). Department of Biomolecular Discovery)

    1991-09-01

    The effects were studied of some specific enzyme inhibitors on DNA repair and replication after UV damage in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The DNA repair was studied at the level of the average, overall genome and also in the active dihydrofolate reductase gene. Replication was measured in the overall genome. The inhibitors were tested of DNA poly-merase {alpha} and {delta} (aphidicolin), of poly(ADPr) polymerase (3-aminobenzamide), of ribonucleotide reductase (hydroxyurea), of topo-isomerase I (camptothecin), and of topoisomerase II (merbarone, VP-16). In addition, the effects were tested of the potential topoisomerase I activator, {beta}-lapachone. All of these compounds inhibited genome replication and all topoisomerase inhibitors affected the overall genome repair; {beta}-lapachone stimulated it. None of these compounds had any effect on the gene-specific repair. (author). 36 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs.

  13. Computational study of hydration at the TD damaged site of DNA in complex with repair enzyme T4 endonuclease V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinak, Miroslav

    2000-02-01

    An analysis of the distribution of water around DNA surface focusing on the role of the distribution of water molecules in the proper recognition of damaged site by repair enzyme T4 Endonuclease V was performed. The native DNA dodecamer, dodecamer with the thymine dimer (TD) and complex of DNA and part of repair enzyme T4 Endonuclease V were examined throughout the 500 ps of molecular dynamics simulation. During simulation the number of water molecules close to the DNA atoms and the residence time were calculated. There is an increase in number of water molecules lying in the close vicinity to TD if compared with those lying close to two native thymines (TT). Densely populated area with water molecules around TD is one of the factors detected by enzyme during scanning process. The residence time was found higher for molecule of the complex and the six water molecules were found occupying the stabile positions between the TD and catalytic center close to atoms P, C3' and N3. These molecules originate water mediated hydrogen bond network that contribute to the stability of complex required for the onset of repair process. (author)

  14. Computational study of hydration at the TD damaged site of DNA in complex with repair enzyme T4 endonuclease V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinak, Miroslav [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-02-01

    An analysis of the distribution of water around DNA surface focusing on the role of the distribution of water molecules in the proper recognition of damaged site by repair enzyme T4 Endonuclease V was performed. The native DNA dodecamer, dodecamer with the thymine dimer (TD) and complex of DNA and part of repair enzyme T4 Endonuclease V were examined throughout the 500 ps of molecular dynamics simulation. During simulation the number of water molecules close to the DNA atoms and the residence time were calculated. There is an increase in number of water molecules lying in the close vicinity to TD if compared with those lying close to two native thymines (TT). Densely populated area with water molecules around TD is one of the factors detected by enzyme during scanning process. The residence time was found higher for molecule of the complex and the six water molecules were found occupying the stabile positions between the TD and catalytic center close to atoms P, C3' and N3. These molecules originate water mediated hydrogen bond network that contribute to the stability of complex required for the onset of repair process. (author)

  15. Enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  16. Altering Cell Survival by Modulating Levels of Mitochondrial DNA Repair Enzymes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shokolenko, Inna

    2002-01-01

    .... Our previous results demonstrated that stable expression of E.coli Exonuclease III in mitochondria of breast cancer cells diminishes mtDNA repair capacity following oxidative stress, which leads to a decrease in long-term cell survival...

  17. Emerging roles of the nucleolus in regulating the DNA damage response: the noncanonical DNA repair enzyme APE1/Ref-1 as a paradigmatical example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniali, Giulia; Lirussi, Lisa; Poletto, Mattia; Tell, Gianluca

    2014-02-01

    An emerging concept in DNA repair mechanisms is the evidence that some key enzymes, besides their role in the maintenance of genome stability, display also unexpected noncanonical functions associated with RNA metabolism in specific subcellular districts (e.g., nucleoli). During the evolution of these key enzymes, the acquisition of unfolded domains significantly amplified the possibility to interact with different partners and substrates, possibly explaining their phylogenetic gain of functions. After nucleolar stress or DNA damage, many DNA repair proteins can freely relocalize from nucleoli to the nucleoplasm. This process may represent a surveillance mechanism to monitor the synthesis and correct assembly of ribosomal units affecting cell cycle progression or inducing p53-mediated apoptosis or senescence. A paradigm for this kind of regulation is represented by some enzymes of the DNA base excision repair (BER) pathway, such as apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1). In this review, the role of the nucleolus and the noncanonical functions of the APE1 protein are discussed in light of their possible implications in human pathologies. A productive cross-talk between DNA repair enzymes and proteins involved in RNA metabolism seems reasonable as the nucleolus is emerging as a dynamic functional hub that coordinates cell growth arrest and DNA repair mechanisms. These findings will drive further analyses on other BER proteins and might imply that nucleic acid processing enzymes are more versatile than originally thought having evolved DNA-targeted functions after a previous life in the early RNA world.

  18. Predictors of ventricular tachyarrhythmia occurring late after intracardiac repair of tetralogy of Fallot: combination of QRS duration change rate and tricuspid regurgitation pressure gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masashi; Sugimoto, Ai; Tsuchida, Masanori

    2017-01-01

    Background To determine potential predictors of ventricular tachyarrhythmia and sudden cardiac death (SCD) occurring late after repair of tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). Methods Since 1964, 415 patients had undergone total repair for TOF at Niigata University Hospital. Of these, 89 patients who were followed for more than 10 years at our institute were retrospectively reviewed. Results The mean follow-up period was 24.3 years. During the study period, one patient died of cerebral bleeding, and two patients had SCD. The overall survival rates at 20, 30, and 40 years were 100%, 94.6%, and 94.6%, respectively. Eight (9.0%) patients required re-intervention during the late period associated with right ventricular outflow (n=4), tricuspid valve (n=3), aortic valve (n=2), and others (n=2). Ten (11.2%) patients had a history of ventricular tachycardia (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF), and six underwent implantation of an implantable cardiac defibrillator. Multivariate analysis selected the change rate of QRS duration [ms/year; odds ratio (OR), 2.44; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.28–4.65; P=0.007] and the pressure gradient at tricuspid valve regurgitation on echocardiography (OR, 1.12; 95% CI: 1.02–1.22; P=0.017) as risk factors for VT/VF or SCD. Trans-annular patch (TAP) repair was not an independent risk factor for ventricular arrhythmia. Conclusions The combination of rapid change rate of QRS duration and higher-pressure gradient at tricuspid regurgitation were risk factors for ventricular tachyarrhythmia late after TOF repair. Adequate surgical or catheter intervention for pressure and volume load in the right ventricle might decrease the prevalence of VT/VF and SCD. PMID:29312717

  19. Opposing roles of RNF8/RNF168 and deubiquitinating enzymes in ubiquitination-dependent DNA double-strand break response signaling and DNA-repair pathway choice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakada, Shinichiro

    2016-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligases ring finger protein (RNF) 8 and RNF168 transduce the DNA double-strand break (DSB) response (DDR) signal by ubiquitinating DSB sites. The depletion of RNF8 or RNF168 suppresses the accumulation of DNA-repair regulating factors such as 53BP1 and RAP80 at DSB sites, suggesting roles for RNF8- and RNF168-mediated ubiquitination in DSB repair. This mini-review provides a brief overview of the RNF8- and RNF168-dependent DDR-signaling and DNA-repair pathways. The choice of DNA-repair pathway when RNF8- and RNF168-mediated ubiquitination-dependent DDR signaling is negatively regulated by deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) is reviewed to clarify how the opposing roles of RNF8/RNF168 and DUBs regulate ubiquitination-dependent DDR signaling and the choice of DNA-repair pathway

  20. Recombinational repair: workshop summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard-Flanders, P.

    1983-01-01

    Recombinational repair may or may not be synonymous with postreplication repair. Considerable progress has been made in the study of the relevant enzymes, particularly those from bacteria. In this workshop we focus on the recombination enzyme RecA protein. What structural changes take place in the protein and in DNA during repair. How does homologous pairing take place. How is ATP hydrolysis coupled to the stand exchange reaction and the formation of heteroduplx DNA. Turning to another enzyme needed for certain kinds of bacterial recombination, we will ask whether the purified recB protein and recC protein complement each other and are sufficient for exonuclease V activity. In higher cells, we would like to know whether sister exchanges, which occur in bacteria after uv irradiation, are also seen in animal cells

  1. A plant gene for photolyase: an enzyme catalyzing the repair of UV-light-induced DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batschauer, A.

    1993-01-01

    Photolyases are thought to be critical components of the defense of plants against damage to DNA by solar ultraviolet light, but nothing is known about their molecular or enzymatic nature. The molecular cloning of a photolyase from mustard (Sinapis alba) described here is intended to increase the knowledge about this important repair mechanism in plant species at a molecular level. The gene encodes a polypeptide of 501 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 57 kDa. There is a strong sequence similarity to bacterial and yeast photolyases, with a close relationship to enzymes with a deazaflavin chromophor. The plant photolyase is shown to be functional in Escherichia coli which also indicates conservation of photolyases during evolution. It is demonstrated that photolyase expression in plants is light induced, thus providing good evidence for the adaptation of plants to their environment in order to diminish the harmful effects of sunlight. (author)

  2. Islet expression of the DNA repair enzyme 8-oxoguanosine DNA glycosylase (Ogg1 in human type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Kun-Ho

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has become increasingly clear that β-cell failure plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Free-radical mediated β-cell damage has been intensively studied in type 1 diabetes, but not in human type 2 diabetes. Therefore, we studied the protein expression of the DNA repair enzyme Ogg1 in pancreases from type 2 diabetics. Ogg1 was studied because it is the major enzyme involved in repairing 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanosine DNA adducts, a lesion previously observed in a rat model of type 2 diabetes. Moreover, in a gene expression screen, Ogg1 was over-expressed in islets from a human type 2 diabetic. Methods Immunofluorescent staining of Ogg1 was performed on pancreatic specimens from healthy controls and patients with diabetes for 2–23 years. The intensity and islet area stained for Ogg1 was evaluated by semi-quantitative scoring. Results Both the intensity and the area of islet Ogg1 staining were significantly increased in islets from the type 2 diabetic subjects compared to the healthy controls. A correlation between increased Ogg1 fluorescent staining intensity and duration of diabetes was also found. Most of the staining observed was cytoplasmic, suggesting that mitochondrial Ogg1 accounts primarily for the increased Ogg1 expression. Conclusion We conclude that oxidative stress related DNA damage may be a novel important factor in the pathogenesis of human type 2 diabetes. An increase of Ogg1 in islet cell mitochondria is consistent with a model in which hyperglycemia and consequent increased β-cell oxidative metabolism lead to DNA damage and the induction of Ogg1 expression.

  3. Inactivation of the HR6B ubiquitin-conjugating DNA repair enzyme in mice causes male sterility associated with chromatin modification.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. van Klaveren; J. de Wit (Jan); C.G. van Gurp; M.H.M. Koken (Marcel); M. Vermey; J.H. van Roijen (Jan Herman); J.T.M. Vreeburg (Jan); W.M. Baarends (Willy); D. Bootsma (Dirk); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); H.P. Roest (Henk)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe ubiquitin-conjugating yeast enzyme RAD6 and its human homologs hHR6A and hHR6B are implicated in postreplication repair and damage-induced mutagenesis. The yeast protein is also required for sporulation and may modulate chromatin structure via histone ubiquitination. We report the

  4. Is engineering O{sub 2}-tolerant hydrogenases just a matter of reproducing the active sites of the naturally occurring O{sub 2}-resistant enzymes?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leroux, Fanny; Liebgott, Pierre-Pol; Kpebe, Arlette; Leger, Christophe; Rousset, Marc; Dementin, Sebastien [CNRS, Laboratoire de Bioenergetique et Ingenierie des Proteines, Institut de Microbiologie de la Mediterranee, 31 chemin Joseph Aiguier, 13402 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Cournac, Laurent; Richaud, Pierre [CEA, DSV, IBEB, Laboratoire de Bioenergetique et Biotechnologie des Bacteries et Microalgues, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Aix-Marseille Universite, 3 place Victor-Hugo, 13331 Marseille (France); CNRS, UMR Biologie Vegetale et Microbiologie Environnementales, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Burlat, Benedicte; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Bertrand, Patrick [CNRS, Laboratoire de Bioenergetique et Ingenierie des Proteines, Institut de Microbiologie de la Mediterranee, 31 chemin Joseph Aiguier, 13402 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Aix-Marseille Universite, 3 place Victor-Hugo, 13331 Marseille (France)

    2010-10-15

    Reproducing the naturally occurring O{sub 2}-tolerant hydrogenases is a potential strategy to make the oxygen sensitive enzymes, produced by organisms of biotechnological interest, more resistant. The search for resistance ''hotspots'' that could be transposed into sensitive hydrogenases is underway. Here, we replaced two residues (Y77 and V78) of the oxygen sensitive [NiFe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio fructosovorans with Gly and with Cys, respectively, to copy the active site pocket of the resistant membrane-bound [NiFe] enzyme from Ralstonia eutropha and we examined how this affected oxygen sensitivity. The results are discussed in the light of a short review of the recent results dealing with the reactivity of hydrogenases towards oxygen. (author)

  5. DNA Damage: Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Study on the Oxygen Binding and Substrate Hydroxylation Step in AlkB Repair Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesne, Matthew G; Latifi, Reza; Gonzalez-Ovalle, Luis E; Kumar, Devesh; de Visser, Sam P

    2014-01-01

    AlkB repair enzymes are important nonheme iron enzymes that catalyse the demethylation of alkylated DNA bases in humans, which is a vital reaction in the body that heals externally damaged DNA bases. Its mechanism is currently controversial and in order to resolve the catalytic mechanism of these enzymes, a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) study was performed on the demethylation of the N1-methyladenine fragment by AlkB repair enzymes. Firstly, the initial modelling identified the oxygen binding site of the enzyme. Secondly, the oxygen activation mechanism was investigated and a novel pathway was found, whereby the catalytically active iron(IV)–oxo intermediate in the catalytic cycle undergoes an initial isomerisation assisted by an Arg residue in the substrate binding pocket, which then brings the oxo group in close contact with the methyl group of the alkylated DNA base. This enables a subsequent rate-determining hydrogen-atom abstraction on competitive σ-and π-pathways on a quintet spin-state surface. These findings give evidence of different locations of the oxygen and substrate binding channels in the enzyme and the origin of the separation of the oxygen-bound intermediates in the catalytic cycle from substrate. Our studies are compared with small model complexes and the effect of protein and environment on the kinetics and mechanism is explained. PMID:24339041

  6. Dumbbell DNA-templated CuNPs as a nano-fluorescent probe for detection of enzymes involved in ligase-mediated DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Taiping; He, Xiaoxiao; He, Dinggeng; Ye, Xiaosheng; Shangguan, Jingfang; Liu, Jinquan; Yuan, Baoyin; Wang, Kemin

    2017-08-15

    DNA repair processes are responsible for maintaining genome stability. Ligase and polynucleotide kinase (PNK) have important roles in ligase-mediated DNA repair. The development of analytical methods to monitor these enzymes involved in DNA repair pathways is of great interest in biochemistry and biotechnology. In this work, we reported a new strategy for label-free monitoring PNK and ligase activity by using dumbbell-shaped DNA templated copper nanoparticles (CuNPs). In the presence of PNK and ligase, the dumbbell-shaped DNA probe (DP) was locked and could resist the digestion of exonucleases and then served as an efficient template for synthesizing fluorescent CuNPs. However, in the absence of ligase or PNK, the nicked DP could be digested by exonucleases and failed to template fluorescent CuNPs. Therefore, the fluorescence changes of CuNPs could be used to evaluate these enzymes activity. Under the optimal conditions, highly sensitive detection of ligase activity of about 1U/mL and PNK activity down to 0.05U/mL is achieved. To challenge the practical application capability of this strategy, the detection of analyte in dilute cells extracts was also investigated and showed similar linear relationships. In addition to ligase and PNK, this sensing strategy was also extended to the detection of phosphatase, which illustrates the versatility of this strategy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Archaeal DNA Polymerase-B as a DNA Template Guardian: Links between Polymerases and Base/Alternative Excision Repair Enzymes in Handling the Deaminated Bases Uracil and Hypoxanthine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Abellón-Ruiz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In Archaea repair of uracil and hypoxanthine, which arise by deamination of cytosine and adenine, respectively, is initiated by three enzymes: Uracil-DNA-glycosylase (UDG, which recognises uracil; Endonuclease V (EndoV, which recognises hypoxanthine; and Endonuclease Q (EndoQ, (which recognises both uracil and hypoxanthine. Two archaeal DNA polymerases, Pol-B and Pol-D, are inhibited by deaminated bases in template strands, a feature unique to this domain. Thus the three repair enzymes and the two polymerases show overlapping specificity for uracil and hypoxanthine. Here it is demonstrated that binding of Pol-D to primer-templates containing deaminated bases inhibits the activity of UDG, EndoV, and EndoQ. Similarly Pol-B almost completely turns off EndoQ, extending earlier work that demonstrated that Pol-B reduces catalysis by UDG and EndoV. Pol-B was observed to be a more potent inhibitor of the enzymes compared to Pol-D. Although Pol-D is directly inhibited by template strand uracil, the presence of Pol-B further suppresses any residual activity of Pol-D, to near-zero levels. The results are compatible with Pol-D acting as the replicative polymerase and Pol-B functioning primarily as a guardian preventing deaminated base-induced DNA mutations.

  8. DNA repair enzyme APE1 from evolutionarily ancient Hydra reveals redox activity exclusively found in mammalian APE1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekhale, Komal; Haval, Gauri; Perween, Nusrat; Antoniali, Giulia; Tell, Gianluca; Ghaskadbi, Surendra; Ghaskadbi, Saroj

    2017-11-01

    Only mammalian apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease1 (APE1) has been reported to possess both DNA repair and redox activities. C terminal of the protein is required for base excision repair, while the redox activity resides in the N terminal due to cysteine residues at specific positions. APE1s from other organisms studied so far lack the redox activity in spite of having the N terminal domain. We find that APE1 from the Cnidarian Hydra exhibits both endonuclease and redox activities similar to mammalian APE1. We further show the presence of the three indispensable cysteines in Hydra APE1 for redox activity by site directed mutagenesis. Importance of redox domain but not the repair domain of APE1 in regeneration has been demonstrated by using domain-specific inhibitors. Our findings clearly demonstrate that the redox function of APE1 evolved very early in metazoan evolution and is not a recent acquisition in mammalian APE1 as believed so far. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Combustion products of 1,3-butadiene inhibit catalase activity and induce expression of oxidative DNA damage repair enzymes in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Christopher H; Catallo, W James; Wilson, Vincent L; Mitchell, James B

    2009-10-01

    1,3-Butadiene, an important petrochemical, is commonly burned off when excess amounts need to be destroyed. This combustion process produces butadiene soot (BDS), which is composed of a complex mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in particulates ranging in size from enzyme inactivation due to protein amino acid oxidation and (2) induce oxidative DNA damage in NHBE cells. Thus, our aims were to determine the effect of butadiene soot ethanol extract (BSEE) on both enzyme activity and the expression of proteins involved in the repair of oxidative DNA damage. Catalase was found to be sensitive to BDS as catalase activity was potently diminished in the presence of BSEE. Using Western analysis, both the alpha isoform of human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (alpha-hOGG1) and human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE-1) were shown to be significantly overexpressed as compared to untreated controls after exposure of NHBE cells to BSEE. Our results indicate that BSEE is capable of effectively inactivating the antioxidant enzyme catalase, presumably via oxidation of protein amino acids. The presence of oxidized biomolecules may partially explain the extranuclear fluorescence that is detected when NHBE cells are treated with an organic extract of BDS. Overexpression of both alpha-hOGG1 and APE-1 proteins following treatment of NHBE cells with BSEE suggests that this mixture causes oxidative DNA damage.

  10. Conserved structural chemistry for incision activity in structurally non-homologous apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease APE1 and endonuclease IV DNA repair enzymes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Shin, David S.; Mol, Clifford D.; Izum, Tadahide; Arvai, Andrew S.; Mantha, Anil K.; Szczesny, Bartosz; Ivanov, Ivaylo N.; Hosfield, David J.; Maiti, Buddhadev; Pique, Mike E.; Frankel, Kenneth A.; Hitomi, Kenichi; Cunningham, Richard P.; Mitra, Sankar; Tainer, John A.

    2013-03-22

    Non-coding apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites in DNA form spontaneously and as DNA base excision repair intermediates are the most common toxic and mutagenic in vivo DNA lesion. For repair, AP sites must be processed by 5' AP endonucleases in initial stages of base repair. Human APE1 and bacterial Nfo represent the two conserved 5' AP endonuclease families in the biosphere; they both recognize AP sites and incise the phosphodiester backbone 5' to the lesion, yet they lack similar structures and metal ion requirements. Here, we determined and analyzed crystal structures of a 2.4 ? resolution APE1-DNA product complex with Mg(2+) and a 0.92 Nfo with three metal ions. Structural and biochemical comparisons of these two evolutionarily distinct enzymes characterize key APE1 catalytic residues that are potentially functionally similar to Nfo active site components, as further tested and supported by computational analyses. We observe a magnesium-water cluster in the APE1 active site, with only Glu-96 forming the direct protein coordination to the Mg(2+). Despite differences in structure and metal requirements of APE1 and Nfo, comparison of their active site structures surprisingly reveals strong geometric conservation of the catalytic reaction, with APE1 catalytic side chains positioned analogously to Nfo metal positions, suggesting surprising functional equivalence between Nfo metal ions and APE1 residues. The finding that APE1 residues are positioned to substitute for Nfo metal ions is supported by the impact of mutations on activity. Collectively, the results illuminate the activities of residues, metal ions, and active site features for abasic site endonucleases.

  11. Metabolite damage and repair in metabolic engineering design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiayi; Jeffryes, James G; Henry, Christopher S; Bruner, Steven D; Hanson, Andrew D

    2017-11-01

    The necessarily sharp focus of metabolic engineering and metabolic synthetic biology on pathways and their fluxes has tended to divert attention from the damaging enzymatic and chemical side-reactions that pathway metabolites can undergo. Although historically overlooked and underappreciated, such metabolite damage reactions are now known to occur throughout metabolism and to generate (formerly enigmatic) peaks detected in metabolomics datasets. It is also now known that metabolite damage is often countered by dedicated repair enzymes that undo or prevent it. Metabolite damage and repair are highly relevant to engineered pathway design: metabolite damage reactions can reduce flux rates and product yields, and repair enzymes can provide robust, host-independent solutions. Herein, after introducing the core principles of metabolite damage and repair, we use case histories to document how damage and repair processes affect efficient operation of engineered pathways - particularly those that are heterologous, non-natural, or cell-free. We then review how metabolite damage reactions can be predicted, how repair reactions can be prospected, and how metabolite damage and repair can be built into genome-scale metabolic models. Lastly, we propose a versatile 'plug and play' set of well-characterized metabolite repair enzymes to solve metabolite damage problems known or likely to occur in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology projects. Copyright © 2017 International Metabolic Engineering Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Metabolite damage and repair in metabolic engineering design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jiayi; Jeffryes, James G.; Henry, Christopher S.; Bruner, Steven D.; Hanson, Andrew D.

    2017-11-01

    The necessarily sharp focus of metabolic engineering and metabolic synthetic biology on pathways and their fluxes has tended to divert attention from the damaging enzymatic and chemical side-reactions that pathway metabolites can undergo. Although historically overlooked and underappreciated, such metabolite damage reactions are now known to occur throughout metabolism and to generate (formerly enigmatic) peaks detected in metabolomics datasets. It is also now known that metabolite damage is often countered by dedicated repair enzymes that undo or prevent it. Metabolite damage and repair are highly relevant to engineered pathway design: metabolite damage reactions can reduce flux rates and product yields, and repair enzymes can provide robust, host-independent solutions. Herein, after introducing the core principles of metabolite damage and repair, we use case histories to document how damage and repair processes affect efficient operation of engineered pathways - particularly those that are heterologous, non-natural, or cell-free. We then review how metabolite damage reactions can be predicted, how repair reactions can be prospected, and how metabolite damage and repair can be built into genome-scale metabolic models. Lastly, we propose a versatile 'plug and play' set of well-characterized metabolite repair enzymes to solve metabolite damage problems known or likely to occur in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology projects.

  13. Serum angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 is an independent risk factor for in-hospital mortality following open surgical repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Wanpin; Wang, Yan; Yao, Kai; Wang, Zheng; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Open surgical repair (OSR) is a conventional surgical method used in the repair a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA); however, OSR results in high perioperative mortality rates. The level of serum angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) has been reported to be an independent risk factor for postoperative in-hospital mortality following major cardiopulmonary surgery. In the present study, the association of serum ACE2 levels with postoperative in-hospital mortality was investigated in patients undergoing OSR for ruptured AAA. The study enrolled 84 consecutive patients underwent OSR for ruptured AAA and were subsequently treated in the intensive care unit. Patients who succumbed postoperatively during hospitalization were defined as non-survivors. Serum ACE2 levels were measured in all patients prior to and following the surgery using ELISA kits. The results indicated that non-survivors showed significantly lower mean preoperative and postoperative serum ACE2 levels when compared with those in survivors. Multivariate logistic regression analysis also showed that, subsequent to adjusting for potential confounders, the serum ACE2 level on preoperative day 1 showed a significant negative association with the postoperative in-hospital mortality. This was confirmed by multivariate hazard ratio analysis, which showed that, subsequent to adjusting for the various potential confounders, the risk of postoperative in-hospital mortality remained significantly higher in the two lowest serum ACE2 level quartiles compared with that in the highest quartile on preoperative day 1. In conclusion, the present study provided the first evidence supporting that the serum ACE2 level is an independent risk factor for the in-hospital mortality following OSR for ruptured AAA. Furthermore, low serum ACE2 levels on preoperative day 1 were found to be associated with increased postoperative in-hospital mortality. Therefore, the serum ACE2 level on preoperative day 1 may be a potential

  14. Preventive Long-Term Effects of a Topical Film-Forming Medical Device with Ultra-High UV Protection Filters and DNA Repair Enzyme in Xeroderma Pigmentosum: A Retrospective Study of Eight Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Giustini

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Skin cancer is common in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP due to a DNA repair mechanisms genetic defect. Ultraviolet (UV exposure is the main cause of increased incidence of actinic keratosis (AK, basal cell carcinoma (BCC and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC observed in XP subjects. Photoprotection is therefore a mandatory strategy in order to reduce skin damage. A topical DNA repair enzyme has been shown to slow down the development of skin lesions in XP. However, there are no data regarding the effects of photoprotection combined with DNA repair strategies in this clinical setting. A film-forming medical device containing the DNA repair enzyme photolyase and very high-protection UV filters (Eryfotona AK-NMSC, Ery is currently available. We report retrospective data regarding the use of Ery in 8 patients (5 women, 3 men with a diagnosis of XP treated for at least 12 consecutive months, comparing the rate of new skin lesions (AK, BCC and SCC during active treatment with Ery and during 12 months just before the use of the product. New AK, BCC and SCC mean lesion numbers during the 1-year Ery treatment were 5, 3 and 0, respectively in comparison with 14, 6.8 and 3 lesions, respectively during the 1-year pre-treatment period. Ery use was associated with a 65% reduction in appearance of new AK lesions and with 56 and 100% reductions in the incidence of new BCC and SCC lesions, respectively. These data suggest that topical use of photoprotection and DNA repair enzyme could help lower skin cancer lesions in XP. Control prospective trials are advisable in this clinical setting.

  15. Inhibition by hyperthermia of repair synthesis and chromatin reassembly of ultraviolet-induced damage to DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodell, W.J.; Cleaver, J.E.; Roti Roti, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    The authors have investigated the effects of hyperthermia treatment on sequential steps of the repair of UV-induced DNA damage in HeLa cells. DNA repair synthesis was inhibited by 40% after 15 min of hyperthermia treatment at 45 0 C; greater inhibition of repair synthesis occurred with prolonged incubation at 45 0 C. Enzymatic digestion of repair-labeled DNA with Exonuclease III indicated that once DNA repair was initiated, the DNA repair patch was synthesized to completion and that ligation of the DNA repair patch occurred. Thus, the observed inhibition of UV-induced DNA repair synthesis by hyperthermia treatment may be the result of inhibition of enzymes involved in the initiating steps(s) of DNA repair. DNA repair patches synthesized in UV-irradiated cells labeled at 37 0 C with[ 3 H]Thd were 2.2-fold more sensitive to micrococcal nuclease digestion than was parental DNA; if the length of the labeling period was prolonged, the nuclease sensitivity of the repair patch synthesized approached that of the parental DNA. DNA repair patches synthesized at 45 0 C, however, remained sensitive to micrococcal nuclease digestion even after long labeling periods, indicating that heat treatment inhibits the reassembly of the DNA repair patch into nucleosomal structures. 23 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  16. Co-expression of antioxidant enzymes with expression of p53, DNA repair, and heat shock protein genes in the gamma ray-irradiated hermaphroditic fish Kryptolebias marmoratus larvae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, Jae-Sung [Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bo-Mi; Kim, Ryeo-Ok [Department of Chemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Jung Soo [Pathology Team, National Fisheries Research and Development Institute, Busan 619-902 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Il-Chan [Division of Life Sciences, Korea Polar Research Institute, Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young-Mi, E-mail: ymlee70@smu.ac.kr [Department of Green Life Science, College of Convergence, Sangmyung University, Seoul 110-743 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae-Seong, E-mail: jslee2@hanyang.ac.kr [Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: •Novel identification of DNA repair-related genes in fish. •Investigation of whole expression profiling of DNA repair genes upon gamma radiation. •Analysis of effects of gamma radiation on antioxidant system and cell stress proteins. •Usefulness of verification of pathway-based profiling for mechanistic understanding. -- Abstract: To investigate effects of gamma ray irradiation in the hermaphroditic fish, Kryptolebias marmoratus larvae, we checked expression of p53, DNA repair, and heat shock protein genes with several antioxidant enzyme activities by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and biochemical methods in response to different doses of gamma radiation. As a result, the level of gamma radiation-induced DNA damage was initiated after 4 Gy of radiation, and biochemical and molecular damage became substantial from 8 Gy. In particular, several DNA repair mechanism-related genes were significantly modulated in the 6 Gy gamma radiation-exposed fish larvae, suggesting that upregulation of such DNA repair genes was closely associated with cell survival after gamma irradiation. The mRNA expression of p53 and most hsps was also significantly upregulated at high doses of gamma radiation related to cellular damage. This finding indicates that gamma radiation can induce oxidative stress with associated antioxidant enzyme activities, and linked to modulation of the expression of DNA repair-related genes as one of the defense mechanisms against radiation damage. This study provides a better understanding of the molecular mode of action of defense mechanisms upon gamma radiation in fish larvae.

  17. Drought occurence

    Science.gov (United States)

    John W. Coulston

    2007-01-01

    Why Is Drought Important? Drought is an important forest disturbance that occurs regularly in the Western United States and irregularly in the Eastern United States (Dale and others 2001). Moderate drought stress tends to slow plant growth while severedrought stress can also reduce photosynthesis (Kareiva and others 1993). Drought can also interact with...

  18. Endogenous DNA Damage and Repair Enzymes: -A short summary of the scientific achievements of Tomas Lindahl, Nobel Laureate in Chemistry 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klungland, Arne; Yang, Yun-Gui

    2016-06-01

    Tomas Lindahl completed his medical studies at Karolinska Institute in 1970. Yet, his work has always been dedicated to unraveling fundamental mechanisms of DNA decay and DNA repair. His research is characterized with groundbreaking discoveries on the instability of our genome, the identification of novel DNA repair activities, the characterization of DNA repair pathways, and the association to diseases, throughout his 40 years of scientific career. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. The journey of DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Natalie

    2015-12-01

    21 years ago, the DNA Repair Enzyme was declared "Molecule of the Year". Today, we are celebrating another "year of repair", with the 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry being awarded to Aziz Sancar, Tomas Lindahl and Paul Modrich for their collective work on the different DNA repair pathways.

  20. Mitochondrial base excision repair assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maynard, Scott; de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten

    2010-01-01

    The main source of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage is reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during normal cellular metabolism. The main mtDNA lesions generated by ROS are base modifications, such as the ubiquitous 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) lesion; however, base loss and strand breaks may also occur....... Many human diseases are associated with mtDNA mutations and thus maintaining mtDNA integrity is critical. All of these lesions are repaired primarily by the base excision repair (BER) pathway. It is now known that mammalian mitochondria have BER, which, similarly to nuclear BER, is catalyzed by DNA...... glycosylases, AP endonuclease, DNA polymerase (POLgamma in mitochondria) and DNA ligase. This article outlines procedures for measuring oxidative damage formation and BER in mitochondria, including isolation of mitochondria from tissues and cells, protocols for measuring BER enzyme activities, gene...

  1. Radiobiological significance of DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzin, A.M.

    1978-01-01

    A short outline is given on the history of the problem relating to the repair of radiation injuries, specifically its molecular mechanisms. The most urgent problems which currently confront the researchers are noted. This is a further study on the role of DNA repair in post-radiation recovery, search for ways to activate and suppress DNA repair, investigations into the activity balance of various repair enzymes as well as the problem of errors in the structure of repairing DNA. An important role is attached to the investigations of DNA repair in solving a number of practical problems

  2. DNA repair in ultraviolet-irradiated spores of Bacillus subtilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, T.C.V.

    1976-01-01

    It has been shown previously by others that at least two independent repair mechanisms are present in Bacillus subtilis for removing ''spore photoproduct'' from DNA of ultraviolet (254 nm)-irradiated spores after germination. One of these, designated as ''spore repair,'' is shown in this study to restore ''spore photoproduct'' to two thymine residues, leaving the DNA backbone intact at the end of the process in vivo. The circumstances under which this repair can occur and some characteristics of its energy requirements have been clarified. The second repair process is identified as excision repair, which can excise both ''spore photoproduct'' from DNA of irradiated spores and cyclobutane-type pyrimidine dimers from DNA of irradiated vegetative cells. In this study it is shown that the gene hcr 1 affects an enzyme activity for the incision step initiating this repair, while the gene hcr 42 affects a step subsequent to incision in the mechanism. In addition a third, independent repair system, termed ''germinative excision repair,'' is discovered and shown to be specific for excising only cyclobutane-type pyrimidine dimers but not ''spore photoproduct.'' This repair system is responsible for the observed high ultraviolet-resistance and temporary capacity for host cell reactivation on recently germinated spores of Bacillus subtilis HCR - strains

  3. MMS2, Encoding a ubiquitin-conjugating-enzyme-like protein, is a member of the yeast error-free postreplication repair pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broomfield, S.; Chow, B.L.; Xiao, W.

    1998-01-01

    Among the three Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA repair epistasis groups, the RAD6 group is the most complicated and least characterized, primarily because it consists of two separate repair pathways: an error-free postreplication repair pathway, and a mutagenesis pathway. The rad6 and rad18 mutants are defective in both pathways, and the rev3 mutant affects only the mutagenesis pathway, but a yeast gene that is involved only in error-free postreplication repair has not been reported. We cloned the MMS2 gene from a yeast genomic library by functional complementation of the mms2-1 mutant [Prakash, L. and Prakash, S. (1977) Genetics 86, 33-55]. MMS2 encodes a 137-amino acid, 15.2-kDa protein with significant sequence homology to a conserved family of ubiquitin-conjugating (Ubc) proteins. However, Mms2 does not appear to possess Ubc activity. Genetic analyses indicate that the mms2 mutation is hypostatic to rad6 and rad18 but is synergistic with the rev3 mutation, and the mms2 mutant is proficient in UV-induced mutagenesis. These phenotypes are reminiscent of a pol30-46 mutant known to be impaired in postreplication repair. The mms2 mutant also displayed a REV3-dependent mutator phenotype, strongly suggesting that the MMS2 gene functions in the error-free postreplication repair pathway, parallel to the REV3 mutagenesis pathway. Furthermore, with respect to UV sensitivity, mms2 was found to be hypostatic to the rad6 delta 1-9 mutation, which results in the absence of the first nine amino acids of Rad6. On the basis of these collective results, we propose that the mms2 null mutation and two other allele-specific mutations, rad6 delta 1-9 and pol30-46, define the error-free mode of DNA postreplication repair, and that these mutations may enhance both spontaneous and DNA damage-induced mutagenesis

  4. The journey of DNA repair

    OpenAIRE

    Saini, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    21 years ago, the DNA Repair Enzyme was declared “Molecule of the Year”. Today, we are celebrating another “year of repair”, with the 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry being awarded to Aziz Sancar, Tomas Lindahl and Paul Modrich for their collective work on the different DNA repair pathways.

  5. Clinical response to chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer was not associated with several polymorphisms in detoxification enzymes and DNA repair genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadat, Mostafa; Khalili, Maryam; Nasiri, Meysam; Rajaei, Mehrdad; Omidvari, Shahpour; Saadat, Iraj

    2012-03-02

    The main aim of the present study was to investigate the association between several genetic polymorphisms (in glutathione S-transferase members and DNA repair genes) and clinical response to chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer. A sequential series of 101 patients were prospectively included in this study. Clinical assessment of treatment was accomplished by comparing initial tumor size with preoperative tumor size using revised RECIST guideline (version 1.1). Clinical response was regarded as a response or no response. There was no difference between non-responders and responders for the prevalence of genotypes of the study polymorphisms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. DNA Repair Systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DNA molecule which makes it ideal for storage and propagation of genetic information. ... of these errors are broadly referred to as DNA repair. DNA can ... changes occur in the human genome per day. ..... nails, frequent physical and mental.

  7. DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setlow, R.

    1978-01-01

    Some topics discussed are as follows: difficulty in extrapolating data from E. coli to mammalian systems; mutations caused by UV-induced changes in DNA; mutants deficient in excision repair; other postreplication mechanisms; kinds of excision repair systems; detection of repair by biochemical or biophysical means; human mutants deficient in repair; mutagenic effects of UV on XP cells; and detection of UV-repair defects among XP individuals

  8. Post-translational protein modifications in type 1 diabetes: a role for the repair enzyme protein-L-isoaspartate (D-aspartate) O-methyltransferase?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wägner, A M; Cloos, P; Bergholdt, R

    2007-01-01

    that recognises and repairs isomerised Asn and Asp residues in proteins. The aim of this study was to assess the role of PIMT in the development of type 1 diabetes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Immunohistochemical analysis of 59 normal human tissues was performed with a monoclonal PIMT antibody. CGP3466B, which induces...... expression of Pcmt1, was tested on MIN6 and INS1 cells, to assess its effect on Pcmt1 mRNA and PIMT levels (RT-PCR and western blot) and apoptosis. Forty-five diabetes-prone BioBreeding (BB) Ottawa Karlsburg (OK) rats were randomised to receive 0, 14 or 500 microg/kg (denoted as the control, low......-dose and high-dose group, respectively) of CGP3466B from week 5 to week 20. RESULTS: A high level of PIMT protein was detected in beta cells. CGP3466B induced a two- to threefold increase in Pcmt1 mRNA levels and reduced apoptosis by 10% in MIN6 cells. No significant effect was seen on cytokine...

  9. Division-induced DNA double strand breaks in the chromosome terminus region of Escherichia coli lacking RecBCD DNA repair enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anurag Kumar Sinha

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Marker frequency analysis of the Escherichia coli recB mutant chromosome has revealed a deficit of DNA in a specific zone of the terminus, centred on the dif/TerC region. Using fluorescence microscopy of a marked chromosomal site, we show that the dif region is lost after replication completion, at the time of cell division, in one daughter cell only, and that the phenomenon is transmitted to progeny. Analysis by marker frequency and microscopy shows that the position of DNA loss is not defined by the replication fork merging point since it still occurs in the dif/TerC region when the replication fork trap is displaced in strains harbouring ectopic Ter sites. Terminus DNA loss in the recB mutant is also independent of dimer resolution by XerCD at dif and of Topo IV action close to dif. It occurs in the terminus region, at the point of inversion of the GC skew, which is also the point of convergence of specific sequence motifs like KOPS and Chi sites, regardless of whether the convergence of GC skew is at dif (wild-type or a newly created sequence. In the absence of FtsK-driven DNA translocation, terminus DNA loss is less precisely targeted to the KOPS convergence sequence, but occurs at a similar frequency and follows the same pattern as in FtsK+ cells. Importantly, using ftsIts, ftsAts division mutants and cephalexin treated cells, we show that DNA loss of the dif region in the recB mutant is decreased by the inactivation of cell division. We propose that it results from septum-induced chromosome breakage, and largely contributes to the low viability of the recB mutant.

  10. My journey to DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Tomas

    2013-02-01

    I completed my medical studies at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm but have always been devoted to basic research. My longstanding interest is to understand fundamental DNA repair mechanisms in the fields of cancer therapy, inherited human genetic disorders and ancient DNA. I initially measured DNA decay, including rates of base loss and cytosine deamination. I have discovered several important DNA repair proteins and determined their mechanisms of action. The discovery of uracil-DNA glycosylase defined a new category of repair enzymes with each specialized for different types of DNA damage. The base excision repair pathway was first reconstituted with human proteins in my group. Cell-free analysis for mammalian nucleotide excision repair of DNA was also developed in my laboratory. I found multiple distinct DNA ligases in mammalian cells, and led the first genetic and biochemical work on DNA ligases I, III and IV. I discovered the mammalian exonucleases DNase III (TREX1) and IV (FEN1). Interestingly, expression of TREX1 was altered in some human autoimmune diseases. I also showed that the mutagenic DNA adduct O(6)-methylguanine (O(6)mG) is repaired without removing the guanine from DNA, identifying a surprising mechanism by which the methyl group is transferred to a residue in the repair protein itself. A further novel process of DNA repair discovered by my research group is the action of AlkB as an iron-dependent enzyme carrying out oxidative demethylation. Copyright © 2013. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. A hypothesis: factor VII governs clot formation, tissue repair and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Lewis S

    2007-01-01

    A hypothesis: thrombin is a "Universal Enzyme of Energy Transduction" that employs ATP energy in flowing blood to activate biochemical reactions and cell effects in both hemostasis and tissue repair. All cells possess PAR-1 (thrombin) receptors and are affected by thrombin elevations, and thrombin effects on individual cell types are determined by their unique complement of PAR-1 receptors. Disruption of the vascular endothelium (VE) activates a tissue repair mechanism (TRM) consisting of the VE, tissue factor (TF), and circulating Factors VII, IX and X that governs localized thrombin elevations to activate clot formation and cellular effects that repair tissue damage. The culmination of the repair process occurs with the restoration of the VE followed by declines in thrombin production that causes Apoptosis ("programmed cell death") in wound-healing fibroblasts, which functions as a mechanism to draw wound edges together. The location and magnitude of TRM activity governs the location and magnitude of Factor VIII activity and clot formation, but the large size of Factor VIII prevents it from penetrating the clot formed by its activity, so that its effects are self-limiting. Factors VII, IX and X function primarily as tissue repair enzymes, while Factor VIII and Factor XIII are the only serine protease enzymes in the "Coagulation Cascade" that are exclusively associated with hemostasis.

  12. Inactivation of ultraviolet repair in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum cells by methyl methanesulfonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleaver, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    Excision repair of ultraviolet damage in the DNA of normal and xeroderma pigmentosum (Groups C, D, and variant) cells was inactivated by exposure of cells to methyl methanesulfonate immediately before irradiation independent of the presence of 0 to 10% fetal calf serum. The inactivation could be represented by a semilog relationship between the amount of repair and methyl methanesulfonate concentration up to approximately 5 mM. The inactivation can be considered to occur as the result of alkylation of a large (about 10(6) daltons) repair enzyme complex, and the dose required to reduce repair to 37% for most cells types was between 4 and 7 mM. No consistent, large difference in sensitivity to methyl methanesulfonate was found in any xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group compared to normal cells, implying that reduced repair in these groups may be caused by small inherited changes in the amino acid composition (i.e., point mutations or small deletions) rather than by losses of major components of the repair enzyme complex

  13. Repair by genetic recombination in bacteria: overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard-Flanders, P.

    1975-01-01

    DNA molecules that have been damaged in both strands at the same level are not subject to repair by excision but instead can be repaired through recombination with homologous molecules. Examples of two-strand damage include postreplication gaps opposite pyrimidine dimers, two-strand breaks produced by x-rays, and chemically induced interstrand cross-links. In ultraviolet-irradiated bacteria, and newly synthesized DNA is of length equal to the interdimer spacing. With continued incubation, this low-molecular-weight DNA is joined into high-molecular-weight chains (postreplication repair), a process associated with sister exchanges in bacteria. Recombination is initiated by pyrimidine dimers opposite postreplication gaps and by interstrand cross-links that have been cut by excision enzymes. The free ends at the resulting gaps presumably initiate the exchanges. Postreplication repair in Escherichia coli occurs in recB - and recC - but is greatly slowed in recF - mutants. RecB and recC are the structural genes for exonuclease V, which digests two-stranded DNA by releasing oligonucleotides first from one strand and then from the other. The postreplication sister exchanges in ultraviolet-irradiated bacteria result in the distribution of pyrimidine dimers between parental and daughter strands, indicating that long exchanges involving both strands of each duplex occur. The R1 restriction endonuclease from E. coli has been used to cut the DNA of a bacterial drug-resistance transfer factor with one nuclease-sensitive site, and also DNA from the frog Xenopus enriched for ribosomal 18S and 28S genes. The fragments were annealed with the cut plasmid DNA and ligated, producing a new larger plasmid carrying the eukaryotic rDNA and able to infect and replicate in E. coli

  14. Distribution of ultraviolet-induced DNA repair synthesis in nuclease sensitive and resistant regions of human chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smerdon, M.J.; Tlsty, T.D.; Lieberman, M.W.

    1978-01-01

    The distribution of ultraviolet radiation (uv) induced DNA repair synthesis within chromatin was examined in cultured human diploid fibroblasts (IMR-90). Measurement of the time course of repair synthesis yielded two distinct phases: An initial rapid phase (fast repair) which occurs during the first 2 to 3 h after damage and a slower phase (slow repair) associated with a tenfold decrease in the rate of nucleotide incorporation, which persists for at least 35 h after damage. Staphylococcal nuclease digests of nuclei from cells damaged with uv and labeled during the fast-repair phase revealed a marked preference of fast-repair synthesis for the nuclease-sensitive regions. A new method was developed to analyze the digestion data and showed that approximately 50% of the nucleotides incorporated during the fast-repair phase are located in staphylococcal nuclease-sensitive regions, which comprise about 30% of the genome. Calculations from these data indicate that in the staphylococcal nuclease-sensitive regions the number of newly inserted nucleotides per unit DNA is about twice that of resistant regions. These results were supported by electrophoresis studies which demonstrated a decreased representation of fast-repair synthesis in core particle DNA. In contrast, the distribution within chromatin of nucleotides incorporated during the slow-repair phase was found to be much more homogeneous with about 30% of the repair sites located in 25% of the genome. Digestion studieswith DNase I indicated a slight preference of repair synthesis for regions sensitive to this enzyme; however, no marked difference between the distributions of fast- and slow-repair synthesis was observed. This study provides evidence that the structural constraints placed upon DNA in chromatin also place constraints upon uv-induced DNA repair synthesis in human cells

  15. DNA Repair Systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thanks to the pioneering research work of Lindahl, Sancar, Modrich and their colleagues, we now have an holistic awareness of how DNA damage occurs and how the damage is rectified in bacteria as well as in higher organisms including human beings. A comprehensive understanding of DNA repair has proven crucial ...

  16. Pancreatic Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Us DONATE NOW GENERAL DONATION PURPLESTRIDE Pancreatic enzymes Home Facing Pancreatic Cancer Living with Pancreatic Cancer ... and see a registered dietitian. What are pancreatic enzymes? Pancreatic enzymes help break down fats, proteins and ...

  17. Biological radiolesions and repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laskowski, W.

    1981-01-01

    In 7 chapters, the book answers the following questions: 1) What reactions are induced in biological matter by absorption of radiation energy. 2) In what parts of the cell do the radiation-induced reactions with detectable biological effects occur. 3) In which way are these cell components changed by different qualities of radiation. 4) What are the cell mechanisms by which radiation-induced changes can be repaired. 5) What is the importance of these repair processes for man, his life and evolution. At the end of each chapter, there is a bibliography of relevant publications in this field. (orig./MG) [de

  18. Meningocele repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is surgery to repair birth defects of the spine and spinal membranes. Meningocele and myelomeningocele ... is covered by a sterile dressing. Your child may then be transferred to a neonatal intensive ...

  19. Co-Occurring Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the mental health field. Alcohol and Drug Abuse, Addiction and Co-occurring Disorders: Co-occurring Disorders and ... 500 Montgomery Street, Suite 820 Alexandria, VA 22314 Phone (703) 684.7722 Toll Free (800) 969.6642 ...

  20. DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Zeeland, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    In this chapter a series of DNA repair pathways are discussed which are available to the cell to cope with the problem of DNA damaged by chemical or physical agents. In the case of microorganisms our knowledge about the precise mechanism of each DNA repair pathway and the regulation of it has been improved considerably when mutants deficient in these repair mechanisms became available. In the case of mammalian cells in culture, until recently there were very little repair deficient mutants available, because in almost all mammalian cells in culture at least the diploid number of chromosomes is present. Therefore the frequency of repair deficient mutants in such populations is very low. Nevertheless because replica plating techniques are improving some mutants from Chinese hamsters ovary cells and L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells are now available. In the case of human cells, cultures obtained from patients with certain genetic diseases are available. A number of cells appear to be sensitive to some chemical or physical mutagens. These include cells from patients suffering from xeroderma pigmentosum, Ataxia telangiectasia, Fanconi's anemia, Cockayne's syndrome. However, only in the case of xeroderma pigmentosum cells, has the sensitivity to ultraviolet light been clearly correlated with a deficiency in excision repair of pyrimidine dimers. Furthermore the work with strains obtained from biopsies from man is difficult because these cells generally have low cloning efficiencies and also have a limited lifespan in vitro. It is therefore very important that more repair deficient mutants will become available from established cell lines from human or animal origin

  1. Involvement of DNA polymerase δ in DNA repair synthesis in human fibroblasts at late times after ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dresler, S.L.; Gowans, B.J.; Robinson-Hill, R.M.; Hunting, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    DNA repair synthesis following UV irradiation of confluent human fibroblasts has a biphasic time course with an early phase of rapid nucleotide incorporation and a late phase of much slower nucleotide incorporation. The biphasic nature of this curve suggests that two distinct DNA repair systems may be operative. Previous studies have specifically implicated DNA polymerase δ as the enzyme involved in DNA repair synthesis occurring immediately after UV damage. In this paper, the authors describe studies of DNA polymerase involvement in DNA repair synthesis in confluent human fibroblasts at late times after UV irradiation. Late UV-induced DNA repair synthesis in both intact and permeable cells was found to be inhibited by aphidicolin, indicating the involvement of one of the aphidicolin-sensitive DNA polymerases, α or δ. In permeable cells, the process was further analyzed by using the nucleotide analogue (butylphenyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine 5'-triphosphate, which inhibits DNA polymerase α several hundred times more strongly than it inhibits DNA polymerase δ. The (butylphenyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine 5'-triphosphate inhibition curve for late UV-induced repair synthesis was very similar to that for polymerase δ. It appears that repair synthesis at late time after UV irradiation, like repair synthesis at early times, is mediated by DNA polymerase δ

  2. Modern problems of DNA repair in mammalian cells and some unsettled questions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaziev, A.I.

    1978-01-01

    A comparison of DNA repair process in the cells of mammals and E. coli revealed no principal differences in the enzymic mechanisms of DNA repair in the cells of higher and lower organisms. It has been found that when given is the same number of impairments in the section of DNA chain in the cells of mammals and bacteria the regeneration in the former occurs more slowly than in the latter. Low rate elimination of impairments of DNA in the cells of mammals is due to a more complex intracellular and permolecular organization. It is stressed that the investigation into the mechanisms of fixing impairments in case of postreplication DNA repair is a very important and unresolved problem, especially in terms of radiation mutagenesis and cancerogenesis. Much thought is given to the problem of repairing double stranded ruptures of DNA. It is proposed that DNA repair should be considered not only in terms of functioning of enzymes in DNA metabolism, but also permolecular organization of genome in the cell

  3. A history of the DNA repair and mutagenesis field: The discovery of base excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, Errol C

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the early history of the discovery of an DNA repair pathway designated as base excision repair (BER), since in contrast to the enzyme-catalyzed removal of damaged bases from DNA as nucleotides [called nucleotide excision repair (NER)], BER involves the removal of damaged or inappropriate bases, such as the presence of uracil instead of thymine, from DNA as free bases. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Role of deoxyribonucleic acid polymerases and deoxyribonucleic acid ligase in x-ray-induced repair synthesis in toluene-treated Escherichia coli K-12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billen, D.; Hellermann, G.R.

    1976-01-01

    Toluene-treated Escherichia coli mutants have been used to study the roles of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) polymerases I, II, and III, and of DNA ligase in repair synthesis and strand rejoining following X-irradiation. In cells possessing all three DNA polymerases, both a greater amount of repair synthesis (''exaggerated'' repair synthesis) and failure of ligation are observed when DNA ligase activity is inhibited. In a mutant lacking the polymerizing activity of DNA polymerase I, exaggerated repair synthesis is not observed, and strand rejoining does not occur even if DNA ligase is fully activated. In a mutant possessing the polymerizing activity of DNA polymerase I but lacking its 5' → 3' exonuclease activity, exaggerated repair synthesis is minimal. After irradiation, DNA polymerases II and III are capable of carrying out an adenosine 5'-triphosphate-dependent repair synthesis, but rejoining of strand breaks does not occur and exaggerated synthesis is not seen whether DNA ligase is active or not. These results suggest that DNA polymerase I and DNA ligase act together to limit repair synthesis after X irradiation and that both are necessary in toluene-treated cells for strand rejoining. DNA polymerases II and III apparently cannot complete chain elongation and gap filling, and therefore repair carried out by these enzymes does not respond to ligase action

  5. Repair process and a repaired component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, III, Herbert Chidsey; Simpson, Stanley F.

    2018-02-20

    Matrix composite component repair processes are disclosed. The matrix composite repair process includes applying a repair material to a matrix composite component, securing the repair material to the matrix composite component with an external securing mechanism and curing the repair material to bond the repair material to the matrix composite component during the securing by the external securing mechanism. The matrix composite component is selected from the group consisting of a ceramic matrix composite, a polymer matrix composite, and a metal matrix composite. In another embodiment, the repair process includes applying a partially-cured repair material to a matrix composite component, and curing the repair material to bond the repair material to the matrix composite component, an external securing mechanism securing the repair material throughout a curing period, In another embodiment, the external securing mechanism is consumed or decomposed during the repair process.

  6. Motorcycle Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Jim; Bundy, Mike

    This motorcycle repair curriculum guide contains the following ten areas of study: brake systems, clutches, constant mesh transmissions, final drives, suspension, mechanical starting mechanisms, electrical systems, fuel systems, lubrication systems, and overhead camshafts. Each area consists of one or more units of instruction. Each instructional…

  7. Double silencing of relevant genes suggests the existence of the direct link between DNA replication/repair and central carbon metabolism in human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Aneta; Fornalewicz, Karolina; Mocarski, Łukasz; Łyżeń, Robert; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2018-04-15

    Genetic evidence for a link between DNA replication and glycolysis has been demonstrated a decade ago in Bacillus subtilis, where temperature-sensitive mutations in genes coding for replication proteins could be suppressed by mutations in genes of glycolytic enzymes. Then, a strong influence of dysfunctions of particular enzymes from the central carbon metabolism (CCM) on DNA replication and repair in Escherichia coli was reported. Therefore, we asked if such a link occurs only in bacteria or it is a more general phenomenon. Here, we demonstrate that effects of silencing (provoked by siRNA) of expression of genes coding for proteins involved in DNA replication and repair (primase, DNA polymerase ι, ligase IV, and topoisomerase IIIβ) on these processes (less efficient entry into the S phase of the cell cycle and decreased level of DNA synthesis) could be suppressed by silencing of specific genes of enzymes from CMM. Silencing of other pairs of replication/repair and CMM genes resulted in enhancement of the negative effects of lower expression levels of replication/repair genes. We suggest that these results may be proposed as a genetic evidence for the link between DNA replication/repair and CMM in human cells, indicating that it is a common biological phenomenon, occurring from bacteria to humans. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Turbine repair process, repaired coating, and repaired turbine component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rupak; Delvaux, John McConnell; Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2015-11-03

    A turbine repair process, a repaired coating, and a repaired turbine component are disclosed. The turbine repair process includes providing a turbine component having a higher-pressure region and a lower-pressure region, introducing particles into the higher-pressure region, and at least partially repairing an opening between the higher-pressure region and the lower-pressure region with at least one of the particles to form a repaired turbine component. The repaired coating includes a silicon material, a ceramic matrix composite material, and a repaired region having the silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material. The repaired turbine component a ceramic matrix composite layer and a repaired region having silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material.

  9. Conformational Analysis of DNA Repair Intermediates by Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Su; Horning, David P.; Szostak, Jack W.; Chaput, John C.

    2009-01-01

    DNA repair enzymes are essential for maintaining the integrity of the DNA sequence. Unfortunately, very little is known about how these enzymes recognize damaged regions along the helix. Structural analysis of cellular repair enzymes bound to DNA reveals that these enzymes are able to recognize DNA in a variety of conformations. However, the prevalence of these deformations in the absence of enzymes remains unclear, as small populations of DNA conformations are often difficult to detect by NM...

  10. Enzyme Informatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderson, Rosanna G.; Ferrari, Luna De; Mavridis, Lazaros; McDonagh, James L.; Mitchell, John B. O.; Nath, Neetika

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, sequencing, structural biology and bioinformatics have completely revolutionised biomolecular science, with millions of sequences and tens of thousands of three dimensional structures becoming available. The bioinformatics of enzymes is well served by, mostly free, online databases. BRENDA describes the chemistry, substrate specificity, kinetics, preparation and biological sources of enzymes, while KEGG is valuable for understanding enzymes and metabolic pathways. EzCatDB, SFLD and MACiE are key repositories for data on the chemical mechanisms by which enzymes operate. At the current rate of genome sequencing and manual annotation, human curation will never finish the functional annotation of the ever-expanding list of known enzymes. Hence there is an increasing need for automated annotation, though it is not yet widespread for enzyme data. In contrast, functional ontologies such as the Gene Ontology already profit from automation. Despite our growing understanding of enzyme structure and dynamics, we are only beginning to be able to design novel enzymes. One can now begin to trace the functional evolution of enzymes using phylogenetics. The ability of enzymes to perform secondary functions, albeit relatively inefficiently, gives clues as to how enzyme function evolves. Substrate promiscuity in enzymes is one example of imperfect specificity in protein-ligand interactions. Similarly, most drugs bind to more than one protein target. This may sometimes result in helpful polypharmacology as a drug modulates plural targets, but also often leads to adverse side-effects. Many cheminformatics approaches can be used to model the interactions between druglike molecules and proteins in silico. We can even use quantum chemical techniques like DFT and QM/MM to compute the structural and energetic course of enzyme catalysed chemical reaction mechanisms, including a full description of bond making and breaking. PMID:23116471

  11. Mitochondrial DNA repair and aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandavilli, Bhaskar S.; Santos, Janine H.; Van Houten, Bennett

    2002-01-01

    The mitochondrial electron transport chain plays an important role in energy production in aerobic organisms and is also a significant source of reactive oxygen species that damage DNA, RNA and proteins in the cell. Oxidative damage to the mitochondrial DNA is implicated in various degenerative diseases, cancer and aging. The importance of mitochondrial ROS in age-related degenerative diseases is further strengthened by studies using animal models, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila and yeast. Research in the last several years shows that mitochondrial DNA is more susceptible to various carcinogens and ROS when compared to nuclear DNA. DNA damage in mammalian mitochondria is repaired by base excision repair (BER). Studies have shown that mitochondria contain all the enzymes required for BER. Mitochondrial DNA damage, if not repaired, leads to disruption of electron transport chain and production of more ROS. This vicious cycle of ROS production and mtDNA damage ultimately leads to energy depletion in the cell and apoptosis

  12. Mitochondrial DNA repair and aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandavilli, Bhaskar S.; Santos, Janine H.; Van Houten, Bennett

    2002-11-30

    The mitochondrial electron transport chain plays an important role in energy production in aerobic organisms and is also a significant source of reactive oxygen species that damage DNA, RNA and proteins in the cell. Oxidative damage to the mitochondrial DNA is implicated in various degenerative diseases, cancer and aging. The importance of mitochondrial ROS in age-related degenerative diseases is further strengthened by studies using animal models, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila and yeast. Research in the last several years shows that mitochondrial DNA is more susceptible to various carcinogens and ROS when compared to nuclear DNA. DNA damage in mammalian mitochondria is repaired by base excision repair (BER). Studies have shown that mitochondria contain all the enzymes required for BER. Mitochondrial DNA damage, if not repaired, leads to disruption of electron transport chain and production of more ROS. This vicious cycle of ROS production and mtDNA damage ultimately leads to energy depletion in the cell and apoptosis.

  13. Enzymes in Fermented Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giyatmi; Irianto, H E

    Fermented fish products are very popular particularly in Southeast Asian countries. These products have unique characteristics, especially in terms of aroma, flavor, and texture developing during fermentation process. Proteolytic enzymes have a main role in hydrolyzing protein into simpler compounds. Fermentation process of fish relies both on naturally occurring enzymes (in the muscle or the intestinal tract) as well as bacteria. Fermented fish products processed using the whole fish show a different characteristic compared to those prepared from headed and gutted fish. Endogenous enzymes like trypsin, chymotrypsin, elastase, and aminopeptidase are the most involved in the fermentation process. Muscle tissue enzymes like cathepsins, peptidases, transaminases, amidases, amino acid decarboxylases, glutamic dehydrogenases, and related enzymes may also play a role in fish fermentation. Due to the decreased bacterial number during fermentation, contribution of microbial enzymes to proteolysis may be expected prior to salting of fish. Commercial enzymes are supplemented during processing for specific purposes, such as quality improvement and process acceleration. In the case of fish sauce, efforts to accelerate fermentation process and to improve product quality have been studied by addition of enzymes such as papain, bromelain, trypsin, pepsin, and chymotrypsin. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Oxidative DNA damage & repair: An introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadet, Jean; Davies, Kelvin J A

    2017-06-01

    This introductory article should be viewed as a prologue to the Free Radical Biology & Medicine Special Issue devoted to the important topic of Oxidatively Damaged DNA and its Repair. This special issue is dedicated to Professor Tomas Lindahl, co-winner of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his seminal discoveries in the area repair of oxidatively damaged DNA. In the past several years it has become abundantly clear that DNA oxidation is a major consequence of life in an oxygen-rich environment. Concomitantly, survival in the presence of oxygen, with the constant threat of deleterious DNA mutations and deletions, has largely been made possible through the evolution of a vast array of DNA repair enzymes. The articles in this Oxidatively Damaged DNA & Repair special issue detail the reactions by which intracellular DNA is oxidatively damaged, and the enzymatic reactions and pathways by which living organisms survive such assaults by repair processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The mechanism of the glycosylase reaction with hOGG1 base-excision repair enzyme: concerted effect of Lys249 and Asp268 during excision of 8-oxoguanine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šebera, Jakub; Hattori, Y.; Sato, D.; Řeha, David; Nencka, Radim; Kohno, T.; Kojima, C.; Tanaka, Y.; Sychrovský, Vladimír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 9 (2017), s. 5231-5242 ISSN 0305-1048 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-27676S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : 8-oxoguanine * hOGG1 * QM/MM * NMR * base-excision repair Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 10.162, year: 2016 https://academic.oup.com/nar/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/nar/gkx157

  16. The time course of repair of ultraviolet-induced DNA damage; implications for the structural organization of repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, A.; Squires, S.

    1986-01-01

    Alternative molecular mechanisms can be envisaged for the cellular repair of UV-damaged DNA. In the 'random collision' model, DNA damage distributed throughout the genome is recognised and repaired by a process of random collision between DNA damage and repair enzymes. The other model assumes a 'processive' mechanism, whereby DNA is scanned for damage by a repair complex moving steadily along its length. Random collision should result in a declining rate of repair with time as the concentration of lesions in the DNA falls; but the processive model predicts a constant rate until scanning is complete. The authors have examined the time course of DNA repair in human fibroblasts given low doses of UV light. Using 3 distinct assays, the authors find no sign of a constant repair rate after 4 J/m 2 or less, even when the first few hours after irradiation are examined. Thus DNA repair is likely to depend on random collision. (Auth.)

  17. Brain aneurysm repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aneurysm repair; Dissecting aneurysm repair; Endovascular aneurysm repair - brain; Subarachnoid hemorrhage - aneurysm ... Your scalp, skull, and the coverings of the brain are opened. A metal clip is placed at ...

  18. DNA repair , cell repair and radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhestyanikov, V.D.

    1983-01-01

    Data obtained in laboratory of radiation cytology and literature data testifying to a considerable role of DNA repair in cell sensitivity to radiation and chemical DNA-tropic agents have been considered. Data pointing to the probability of contribution of inducible repair of DNA into plant cells sensitivity to X-rays are obtained. Certain violations of DNA repair do not result in the increase of radiosensitivity. It is assumed that in the cases unknown mechanisms of DNA repair operate

  19. Repair-modification of radiodamaged genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volpe, P.; Institute of Experimental Medicine, Rome; Eremenko, T.

    1995-01-01

    It is proposed that through repair-modification, the modified base 5mC may have facilitated the divergent evolution of coding (hypomethylated exon) and uncoding (hypermethylated promoter and intron) sequences in eukaryotic genes. The radioinduced repair patches appearing in regions lacking 5mC are fully reconstructed by excision-repair, whereas those appearing in regions containing 5mC are incompletely reconstructed by this conventional mechanism. Such a second class of repair patches may, however, become fully reconstructed, in the S phase, by repair-modification. In fact, while DNA polymerase β - which is a key enzyme of excision-repair - is active through the whole interphase. DNA methylase - which is responsible for post-synthetic DNA modification - is essentially active in S. Uncoupling of these two enzyme systems, outside S, might explain why in unsynchronised cells repair patches of non-replicating strands are hypomethylated when compared with specific methylation of replicating strands. In other words, excision-repair would always be able to re-establish the primary ATGC language of both damaged unmethylated and methylated regions, while repair-modification would be able to re-establish the modified ATGC(5mC) language of the damaged methylated regions, only in S, but not in G 1 or G 2 . In these two phases, when DNA methylation is inversely correlated with pre-mRNA transcription (as in the case of many tissue-specific genes), such demethylation might induce a silent transcriptional unit to become active. (Author)

  20. Measurement of enzyme activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, T K; Keshwani, M M

    2009-01-01

    To study and understand the nature of living cells, scientists have continually employed traditional biochemical techniques aimed to fractionate and characterize a designated network of macromolecular components required to carry out a particular cellular function. At the most rudimentary level, cellular functions ultimately entail rapid chemical transformations that otherwise would not occur in the physiological environment of the cell. The term enzyme is used to singularly designate a macromolecular gene product that specifically and greatly enhances the rate of a chemical transformation. Purification and characterization of individual and collective groups of enzymes has been and will remain essential toward advancement of the molecular biological sciences; and developing and utilizing enzyme reaction assays is central to this mission. First, basic kinetic principles are described for understanding chemical reaction rates and the catalytic effects of enzymes on such rates. Then, a number of methods are described for measuring enzyme-catalyzed reaction rates, which mainly differ with regard to techniques used to detect and quantify concentration changes of given reactants or products. Finally, short commentary is given toward formulation of reaction mixtures used to measure enzyme activity. Whereas a comprehensive treatment of enzymatic reaction assays is not within the scope of this chapter, the very core principles that are presented should enable new researchers to better understand the logic and utility of any given enzymatic assay that becomes of interest.

  1. Digestive enzymes of some earthworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, P C; Dash, M C

    1980-10-15

    4 species of tropical earthworms differed with regard to enzyme activity. The maximum activity of protease and of cellulase occurred in the posterior region of the gut of the earthworms. On the average Octochaetona surensis shows maximum activity and Drawida calebi shows minimum activity for all the enzymes studied.

  2. Preterm newborns show slower repair of oxidative damage and paternal smoking associated DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vande Loock, Kim; Ciardelli, Roberta; Decordier, Ilse; Plas, Gina; Haumont, Dominique; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline

    2012-09-01

    Newborns have to cope with hypoxia during delivery and a sudden increase in oxygen at birth. Oxygen will partly be released as reactive oxygen species having the potential to cause damage to DNA and proteins. In utero, increase of most (non)-enzymatic antioxidants occurs during last weeks of gestation, making preterm neonates probably more sensitive to oxidative stress. Moreover, it has been hypothesized that oxidative stress might be the common etiological factor for certain neonatal diseases in preterm infants. The aim of this study was to assess background DNA damage; in vitro H(2)O(2) induced oxidative DNA damage and repair capacity (residual DNA damage) in peripheral blood mononucleated cells from 25 preterm newborns and their mothers. In addition, demographic data were taken into account and repair capacity of preterm was compared with full-term newborns. Multivariate linear regression analysis revealed that preterm infants from smoking fathers have higher background DNA damage levels than those from non-smoking fathers, emphasizing the risk of paternal smoking behaviour for the progeny. Significantly higher residual DNA damage found after 15-min repair in preterm children compared to their mothers and higher residual DNA damage after 2 h compared to full-term newborns suggest a slower DNA repair capacity in preterm children. In comparison with preterm infants born by caesarean delivery, preterm infants born by vaginal delivery do repair more slowly the in vitro induced oxidative DNA damage. Final impact of passive smoking and of the slower DNA repair activity of preterm infants need to be confirmed in a larger study population combining transgenerational genetic and/or epigenetic effects, antioxidant levels, genotypes, repair enzyme efficiency/levels and infant morbidity.

  3. Conformational change in human DNA repair enzyme O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase upon alkylation of its active site by SN1 (indirect-acting) and SN2 (direct-acting) alkylating agents: breaking a "salt-link".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, H K; Teo, A K; Ali, R B; Lim, A; Ayi, T C; Yarosh, D B; Li, B F

    1996-09-24

    Human O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) repairs DNA by transferring alkyl (R-) adducts from O6-alkylguanine (6RG) in DNA to its own cysteine residue at codon 145 (formation of R-MGMT). We show here that R-MGMT in cell extracts, which is sensitive to protease V8 cleavage at the glutamic acid residues at codons 30 (E30) and 172 (E172), can be specifically immunoprecipitated with an MGMT monoclonal antibody, Mab.3C7. This Mab recognizes an epitope of human MGMT including the lysine 107 (K107) which is within the most basic region that is highly conserved among mammalian MGMTs. Surprisingly, the K107L mutant protein is repair-deficient and readily cleaved by protease V8 similar to R-MGMT. We propose that R-MGMT adopted an altered conformation which exposed the Mab.3C7 epitope and rendered that protein sensitive to protease V8 attack. This proposal could be explained by the disruption of a structural "salt-link" within the molecule based on the available structural and biochemical data. The specific binding of Mab.3C7 to R-MGMT has been compared with the protease V8 method in the detection of R-MGMT in extracts of cells treated with low dosages of methyliodide (SN2) and O6-benzylguanine. Their identical behaviors in producing protease V8 sensitive R-MGMT and Mab.3C7 immunoprecipitates suggest that probably methyl iodide (an ineffective agent in producing 6RG in DNA) can directly alkylate the active site of cellular MGMT similar to O6-benzylguanine. The effectiveness of MeI in producing R-MGMT, i.e., inactivation of cellular MGMT, indicates that this agent can increase the effectiveness of environmental and endogenously produced alkylating carcinogens in producing the mutagenic O6-alkylguanine residues in DNA in vivo.

  4. Computational enzyme design: transitioning from catalytic proteins to enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Wai Shun; Siegel, Justin B

    2014-08-01

    The widespread interest in enzymes stem from their ability to catalyze chemical reactions under mild and ecologically friendly conditions with unparalleled catalytic proficiencies. While thousands of naturally occurring enzymes have been identified and characterized, there are still numerous important applications for which there are no biological catalysts capable of performing the desired chemical transformation. In order to engineer enzymes for which there is no natural starting point, efforts using a combination of quantum chemistry and force-field based protein molecular modeling have led to the design of novel proteins capable of catalyzing chemical reactions not catalyzed by naturally occurring enzymes. Here we discuss the current status and potential avenues to pursue as the field of computational enzyme design moves forward. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Predictors of hepatitis B cure using gene therapy to deliver DNA cleavage enzymes: a mathematical modeling approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua T Schiffer

    Full Text Available Most chronic viral infections are managed with small molecule therapies that inhibit replication but are not curative because non-replicating viral forms can persist despite decades of suppressive treatment. There are therefore numerous strategies in development to eradicate all non-replicating viruses from the body. We are currently engineering DNA cleavage enzymes that specifically target hepatitis B virus covalently closed circular DNA (HBV cccDNA, the episomal form of the virus that persists despite potent antiviral therapies. DNA cleavage enzymes, including homing endonucleases or meganucleases, zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs, TAL effector nucleases (TALENs, and CRISPR-associated system 9 (Cas9 proteins, can disrupt specific regions of viral DNA. Because DNA repair is error prone, the virus can be neutralized after repeated cleavage events when a target sequence becomes mutated. DNA cleavage enzymes will be delivered as genes within viral vectors that enter hepatocytes. Here we develop mathematical models that describe the delivery and intracellular activity of DNA cleavage enzymes. Model simulations predict that high vector to target cell ratio, limited removal of delivery vectors by humoral immunity, and avid binding between enzyme and its DNA target will promote the highest level of cccDNA disruption. Development of de novo resistance to cleavage enzymes may occur if DNA cleavage and error prone repair does not render the viral episome replication incompetent: our model predicts that concurrent delivery of multiple enzymes which target different vital cccDNA regions, or sequential delivery of different enzymes, are both potentially useful strategies for avoiding multi-enzyme resistance. The underlying dynamics of cccDNA persistence are unlikely to impact the probability of cure provided that antiviral therapy is given concurrently during eradication trials. We conclude by describing experiments that can be used to validate the model, which

  6. Oxidatively-induced DNA damage and base excision repair in euthymic patients with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylan, Deniz; Tuna, Gamze; Kirkali, Güldal; Tunca, Zeliha; Can, Güneş; Arat, Hidayet Ece; Kant, Melis; Dizdaroglu, Miral; Özerdem, Ayşegül

    2018-05-01

    Oxidatively-induced DNA damage has previously been associated with bipolar disorder. More recently, impairments in DNA repair mechanisms have also been reported. We aimed to investigate oxidatively-induced DNA lesions and expression of DNA glycosylases involved in base excision repair in euthymic patients with bipolar disorder compared to healthy individuals. DNA base lesions including both base and nucleoside modifications were measured using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with isotope-dilution in DNA samples isolated from leukocytes of euthymic patients with bipolar disorder (n = 32) and healthy individuals (n = 51). The expression of DNA repair enzymes OGG1 and NEIL1 were measured using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The levels of malondialdehyde were measured using high performance liquid chromatography. Seven DNA base lesions in DNA of leukocytes of patients and healthy individuals were identified and quantified. Three of them had significantly elevated levels in bipolar patients when compared to healthy individuals. No elevation of lipid peroxidation marker malondialdehyde was observed. The level of OGG1 expression was significantly reduced in bipolar patients compared to healthy individuals, whereas the two groups exhibited similar levels of NEIL1 expression. Our results suggest that oxidatively-induced DNA damage occurs and base excision repair capacity may be decreased in bipolar patients when compared to healthy individuals. Measurement of oxidatively-induced DNA base lesions and the expression of DNA repair enzymes may be of great importance for large scale basic research and clinical studies of bipolar disorder. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Repair of DNA damage in Deinococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    The repair of DNA lesions in Deinococcus radiodurans was examined with particular reference to DNA excision repair of ultraviolet light (UV) induced pyrimidine dimers. The characteristics of excision repair via UV endonucleases α and β in vivo varied with respect to (a) the substrate range of the enzymes, (b) the rate of repair of DNA damage (c) the requirement for a protein synthesised in response to DNA damage to attenuate exonuclease action at repairing regions. UV endonuclease α is postulated to incise DNA in a different manner from UV endonuclease β thus defining the method of subsequent repair. Several DNA damage specific endonuclease activities independent of α and β are described. Mutations of the uvsA, uvsF and uvsG genes resulted in an increase in single-strand breaks in response to DNA damage producing uncontrolled DNA degradation. Evidence is presented that these genes have a role in limiting the access of UV endonuclease β to DNA lesions. uvsF and uvsG are also shown to be linked to the mtoA gene. Mutation of uvsH and reo-1 produces further distinct phenotypes which are discussed. An overall model of excision repair of DNA damage in Deinococcus radiodurans is presented. (author)

  8. DNA repair and its coupling to DNA replication in eukaryotic cells. [UV, x ray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleaver, J.E.

    1978-01-01

    This review article with 184 references presents the view that mammalian cells have one major repair system, excision repair, with many branches (nucleotide excision repair, base excision repair, crosslink repair, etc.) and a multiplicity of enzymes. Any particular carcinogen makes a spectrum of damaged sites and each kind of damage may be repaired by one or more branches of excision repair. Excision repair is rarely complete, except at very low doses, and eukaryotic cells survive and replicate DNA despite the presence of unrepaired damage. An alteration in a specific biochemical pathway seen in damaged or mutant cells will not always be the primary consequence of damage or of the biochemical defect of the cells. Detailed kinetic data are required to understand comprehensively the various facets of excision repair and replication. Correlation between molecular events of repair and cytological and cellular changes such as chromosomal damage, mutagenesis, transformation, and carcinogenesis are also rudimentary.

  9. Rapid road repair vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mara, Leo M.

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed is a rapid road repair vehicle capable of moving over a surface to be repaired at near normal posted traffic speeds to scan for and find an the high rate of speed, imperfections in the pavement surface, prepare the surface imperfection for repair by air pressure and vacuum cleaning, applying a correct amount of the correct patching material to effect the repair, smooth the resulting repaired surface, and catalog the location and quality of the repairs for maintenance records of the road surface. The rapid road repair vehicle can repair surface imperfections at lower cost, improved quality, at a higher rate of speed than was was heretofor possible, with significantly reduced exposure to safety and health hazards associated with this kind of road repair activities in the past.

  10. Studies on DNA repair in Bacillus subtilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Tadashi; Kada, Tsuneo

    1977-01-01

    An enzyme which enhances the priming activity of γ-irradiated DNA for type I DNA polymerase (EC 2.7.7.7) was identified and partially purified from extracts of Bacillus subtilis cells. The enzyme preferentially degraded γ-irradiated DNA into acid-soluble materials. DNA preparations treated with heat, ultraviolet light, pancreatic DNAase (EC 3.1.4.5) or micrococcal DNAase (EC 3.1.4.7) were not susceptible to the enzyme. However, sonication rendered DNA susceptible to the enzyme to some extent. From these results, it is supposed that this enzyme may function by 'cleaning' damaged terminals produced by γ-irradiation to serve as effective primer of sites for repair synthesis by the type I DNA polymerase

  11. Cloning of Salmonella typhimurium DNA encoding mutagenic DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, S.M.; Sedgwick, S.G.

    1989-01-01

    Mutagenic DNA repair in Escherichia coli is encoded by the umuDC operon. Salmonella typhimurium DNA which has homology with E. coli umuC and is able to complement E. coli umuC122::Tn5 and umuC36 mutations has been cloned. Complementation of umuD44 mutants and hybridization with E. coli umuD also occurred, but these activities were much weaker than with umuC. Restriction enzyme mapping indicated that the composition of the cloned fragment is different from the E. coli umuDC operon. Therefore, a umu-like function of S. typhimurium has been found; the phenotype of this function is weaker than that of its E. coli counterpart, which is consistent with the weak mutagenic response of S. typhimurium to UV compared with the response in E. coli

  12. Repair response for DNA double-strand damage through ubiquitylation of chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakada, Shinichiro

    2011-01-01

    The chromatin modulation (remodeling) via lysine63 (K63)-linked ubiquitin (U) has been found important in the repair response for DNA double-strand damage, and the sequential signaling events at the damage site are explained. As the first step of the repair, MRN (MRE11, RAD50 and nibrin) complex recognizes the damage site and binds to it followed by many linked reactions by recruited and activated enzymes of various protein kinases and phosphatases, which resulting in the enhanced early signaling. As well, gamma-H2AX (phosphorylated histone H2AX) is yielded by the process, to which phosphorylated MDC1 (mediator of DNA-damage checkpoint 1) binds to produce their complex. Then further binding of RNF8-HERC2-UBC13 (ring finger protein 8, hect domain and RCC1 (CHC1)-like domain, and U conjugating enzyme E2N, respectively) occurs for starting the cumulative ubiquitylation of H2AX via K63 as the middle phase response. Signaling in the late phase occurs on the U chain formed at the damage site by binding of RAP (receptor-associated protein) 80 and other recruited 5 proteins like BRCA1 (breast cancer 1, early onset) to repair DNA by the homologous recombination after 53BP1 (tumor protein p53 binding protein) binding followed by methylation of histone H4. In a case of human compound heterozygous RNF168 defect, RIDDLE syndrome (radiosensitivity, immunodeficiency, dysmorphic features and learning difficulties), cells have no and slight abnormality of G2/M and intra-S checkpoint, respectively. Another defecting case with homozygous nonsense mutation has high radiosensitivity, intra-S checkpoint abnormality and others. Abnormality of immuno-globulins observed in both cases is similar to that in the RNF8-knockout mouse. Many tasks in chromatin ubiquitylation in the repair are still remained to be solved for protection and treatment of related diseases. (T.T.)

  13. Hyperactivation of PARP triggers nonhomologous end-joining in repair-deficient mouse fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie R Gassman

    Full Text Available Regulation of poly(ADP-ribose (PAR synthesis and turnover is critical to determining cell fate after genotoxic stress. Hyperactivation of PAR synthesis by poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1 occurs when cells deficient in DNA repair are exposed to genotoxic agents; however, the function of this hyperactivation has not been adequately explained. Here, we examine PAR synthesis in mouse fibroblasts deficient in the base excision repair enzyme DNA polymerase β (pol β. The extent and duration of PARP-1 activation was measured after exposure to either the DNA alkylating agent, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS, or to low energy laser-induced DNA damage. There was strong DNA damage-induced hyperactivation of PARP-1 in pol β nullcells, but not in wild-type cells. In the case of MMS treatment, PAR synthesis did not lead to cell death in the pol β null cells, but instead resulted in increased PARylation of the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ protein Ku70 and increased association of Ku70 with PARP-1. Inhibition of the NHEJ factor DNA-PK, under conditions of MMS-induced PARP-1 hyperactivation, enhanced necrotic cell death. These data suggest that PARP-1 hyperactivation is a protective mechanism triggering the classical-NHEJ DNA repair pathway when the primary alkylated base damage repair pathway is compromised.

  14. Collision Repair Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Collision Repair Campaign targets meaningful risk reduction in the Collision Repair source category to reduce air toxic emissions in their communities. The Campaign also helps shops to work towards early compliance with the Auto Body Rule.

  15. Retinal detachment repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medicines Problems breathing You may not recover full vision. ... detachments can be repaired. Failure to repair the retina always results in loss of vision to some degree. After surgery, the quality of ...

  16. Effects of radiations on DNA and repair of the damage. Progress report, May 1, 1976--March 31, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, F.

    1977-01-01

    Last year's report that repair of DNA double-strand breaks from gamma rays occurs in E. coli was verified by additional experiments. Such repair requires recA function and the presence of another DNA molecule of the same base sequence, so it may involve a recombination-like event. Ultraviolet light acting on DNA containing bromouracil produces double-strand breaks by single photochemical events, and a single model can explain this as well as other results. Strains of E. coli which are unusually mutable by bromouracil--uvrE, mutL, mutR, mutS, are defective in mismatch repair. This strengthens the suggestion in last year's report that such mutagenesis occurs when enzymes responsible for the removal of mismatched bases are unable to remove all the mismatches. Ultraviolet mutagenesis of lambda phage may be a useful model for the study of mutagenesis in cells, because the effects of lesions in the gene mutated (i.e., in the phage) and changes in enzyme systems (by treating the host cells) can be examined separately. Quantitative data support this approach

  17. Enhanced DNA repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers changes the biological response to UV-B radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarosh, Daniel B

    2002-11-30

    The goal of DNA repair enzyme therapy is the same as that for gene therapy: to rescue a defective proteome/genome by introducing a substitute protein/DNA. The danger of inadequate DNA repair is highlighted in the genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum. These patients are hypersensitive to sunlight and develop multiple cutaneous neoplasms very early in life. The bacterial DNA repair enzyme T4 endonuclease V was shown over 25 years ago to be capable of reversing the defective repair in xeroderma pigmentosum cells. This enzyme, packaged in an engineered delivery vehicle, has been shown to traverse the stratum corneum, reach the nuclei of living cells of the skin, and enhance the repair of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD). In such a system, changes in DNA repair, mutagenesis, and cell signaling can be studied without manipulation of the genome.

  18. The nucleosome: orchestrating DNA damage signaling and repair within chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Poonam; Miller, Kyle M

    2016-10-01

    DNA damage occurs within the chromatin environment, which ultimately participates in regulating DNA damage response (DDR) pathways and repair of the lesion. DNA damage activates a cascade of signaling events that extensively modulates chromatin structure and organization to coordinate DDR factor recruitment to the break and repair, whilst also promoting the maintenance of normal chromatin functions within the damaged region. For example, DDR pathways must avoid conflicts between other DNA-based processes that function within the context of chromatin, including transcription and replication. The molecular mechanisms governing the recognition, target specificity, and recruitment of DDR factors and enzymes to the fundamental repeating unit of chromatin, i.e., the nucleosome, are poorly understood. Here we present our current view of how chromatin recognition by DDR factors is achieved at the level of the nucleosome. Emerging evidence suggests that the nucleosome surface, including the nucleosome acidic patch, promotes the binding and activity of several DNA damage factors on chromatin. Thus, in addition to interactions with damaged DNA and histone modifications, nucleosome recognition by DDR factors plays a key role in orchestrating the requisite chromatin response to maintain both genome and epigenome integrity.

  19. Laparoscopic repair of large suprapubic hernias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikar, Hasan Ediz; Çetin, Kenan; Eyvaz, Kemal; Kaptanoglu, Levent; Küçük, Hasan Fehmi

    2017-09-01

    Suprapubic hernia is the term to describe ventral hernias located less than 4 cm above the pubic arch in the midline. Hernias with an upper margin above the arcuate line encounter technical difficulties, and the differences in repair methods forced us to define them as large suprapubic hernias. To present our experience with laparoscopic repair of large suprapubic hernias that allows adequate mesh overlap. Nineteen patients with suprapubic incisional hernias who underwent laparoscopic repair between May 2013 and January 2015 were included in the study. Patients with laparoscopic extraperitoneal repair who had a suprapubic hernia with an upper margin below the arcuate line were excluded. Two men and 17 women, with a mean age of 58.2, underwent laparoscopic repair. Most of the incisions were midline vertical (13/68.4%). Twelve (63.1%) of the patients had previous incisional hernia repair (PIHR group); the mean number of previous incisional hernia repair was 1.4. Mean defect size of the PIHR group was higher than in patients without previous repair - 107.3 cm 2 vs. 50.9 cm 2 (p < 0.05). Mean operating time of the PIHR group was higher than in patients without repair - 126 min vs. 77.9 min (p < 0.05). Although all complications occurred in the PIHR group, there was no statistically significant difference. Laparoscopic repair of large suprapubic hernias can be considered as the first option in treatment. The low recurrence rates reported in the literature and the lack of recurrence, as observed in our study, support this view.

  20. Repair of dense connective tissues via biomaterial-mediated matrix reprogramming of the wound interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Feini; Pintauro, Michael P; Haughan, Joanne E; Henning, Elizabeth A; Esterhai, John L; Schaer, Thomas P; Mauck, Robert L; Fisher, Matthew B

    2015-01-01

    Repair of dense connective tissues in adults is limited by their intrinsic hypocellularity and is exacerbated by a dense extracellular matrix (ECM) that impedes cellular migration to and local proliferation at the wound site. Conversely, healing in fetal tissues occurs due in part to an environment conducive to cell mobility and division. Here, we investigated whether the application of a degradative enzyme, collagenase, could reprogram the adult wound margin to a more fetal-like state, and thus abrogate the biophysical impediments that hinder migration and proliferation. We tested this concept using the knee meniscus, a commonly injured structure for which few regenerative approaches exist. To focus delivery and degradation to the wound interface, we developed a system in which collagenase was stored inside poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) electrospun nanofibers and released upon hydration. Through a series of in vitro and in vivo studies, our findings show that partial digestion of the wound interface improves repair by creating a more compliant and porous microenvironment that expedites cell migration to and/or proliferation at the wound margin. This innovative approach of targeted manipulation of the wound interface, focused on removing the naturally occurring barriers to adult tissue repair, may find widespread application in the treatment of injuries to a variety of dense connective tissues. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The cutting edges in DNA repair, licensing, and fidelity: DNA and RNA repair nucleases sculpt DNA to measure twice, cut once.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutakawa, Susan E; Lafrance-Vanasse, Julien; Tainer, John A

    2014-07-01

    To avoid genome instability, DNA repair nucleases must precisely target the correct damaged substrate before they are licensed to incise. Damage identification is a challenge for all DNA damage response proteins, but especially for nucleases that cut the DNA and necessarily create a cleaved DNA repair intermediate, likely more toxic than the initial damage. How do these enzymes achieve exquisite specificity without specific sequence recognition or, in some cases, without a non-canonical DNA nucleotide? Combined structural, biochemical, and biological analyses of repair nucleases are revealing their molecular tools for damage verification and safeguarding against inadvertent incision. Surprisingly, these enzymes also often act on RNA, which deserves more attention. Here, we review protein-DNA structures for nucleases involved in replication, base excision repair, mismatch repair, double strand break repair (DSBR), and telomere maintenance: apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), Endonuclease IV (Nfo), tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase (TDP2), UV Damage endonuclease (UVDE), very short patch repair endonuclease (Vsr), Endonuclease V (Nfi), Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1), exonuclease 1 (Exo1), RNase T and Meiotic recombination 11 (Mre11). DNA and RNA structure-sensing nucleases are essential to life with roles in DNA replication, repair, and transcription. Increasingly these enzymes are employed as advanced tools for synthetic biology and as targets for cancer prognosis and interventions. Currently their structural biology is most fully illuminated for DNA repair, which is also essential to life. How DNA repair enzymes maintain genome fidelity is one of the DNA double helix secrets missed by James Watson and Francis Crick, that is only now being illuminated though structural biology and mutational analyses. Structures reveal motifs for repair nucleases and mechanisms whereby these enzymes follow the old carpenter adage: measure twice, cut once. Furthermore, to measure

  2. 'Regular' and 'emergency' repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luchnik, N.V.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments on the combined action of radiation and a DNA inhibitor using Crepis roots and on split-dose irradiation of human lymphocytes lead to the conclusion that there are two types of repair. The 'regular' repair takes place twice in each mitotic cycle and ensures the maintenance of genetic stability. The 'emergency' repair is induced at all stages of the mitotic cycle by high levels of injury. (author)

  3. Repair of human DNA: radiation and chemical damage in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regan, J.D.; Setlow, R.B.

    1976-01-01

    We present the experimental evidence we have gathered, using a particular assay for DNA repair in human cells, the photolysis of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) incorporated during repair. This assay characterizes the sequence of repair events that occur in human cells after radiation, both ultraviolet and ionizing, and permits an estimation of the size of the average repaired region after these physical insults to DNA. We will discuss chemical insults to DNA and attempt to liken the repair processes after chemical damages of various kinds to those repair processes that occur in human DNA after damage from physical agents. We will also show results indicating that, under certain conditions, repair events resembling those seen after uv-irradiation can be observed in normal human cells after ionizing radiation. Furthermore the XP cells, defective in the repair of uv-induced DNA damage, show defective repair of these uv-like DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation

  4. DNA repair and radiation sensitivity in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, D.J.C.; Stackhouse, M.; Chen, D.S.

    1993-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces various types of damage in mammalian cells including DNA single-strand breaks, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), DNA-protein cross links, and altered DNA bases. Although human cells can repair many of these lesions there is little detailed knowledge of the nature of the genes and the encoded enzymes that control these repair processes. We report here on the cellular and genetic analyses of DNA double-strand break repair deficient mammalian cells. It has been well established that the DNA double-strand break is one of the major lesions induced by ionizing radiation. Utilizing rodent repair-deficient mutant, we have shown that the genes responsible for DNA double-strand break repair are also responsible for the cellular expression of radiation sensitivity. The molecular genetic analysis of DSB repair in rodent/human hybrid cells indicate that at least 6 different genes in mammalian cells are responsible for the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Mapping and the prospect of cloning of human radiation repair genes are reviewed. Understanding the molecular and genetic basis of radiation sensitivity and DNA repair in man will provide a rational foundation to predict the individual risk associated with radiation exposure and to prevent radiation-induced genetic damage in the human population

  5. DNA excision repair in permeable human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, W.K.; Bodell, W.J.; Cleaver, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    U.v. irradiation of confluent human fibroblasts activated DNA repair, aspects of which were characterized in the cells after they were permeabilized. Incubation of intact cells for 20 min between irradiation and harvesting was necessary to obtain a maximum rate of reparative DNA synthesis. Cells harvested immediately after irradiation before repair was initiated displayed only a small stimulation of DNA synthesis, indicating that permeable cells have a reduced capacity to recognize pyrimidine dimers and activate repair. The distribution of sizes of DNA strands labeled during 10 min of reparative DNA synthesis resembled that of parental DNA. However, during a 60-min incubation of permeable cells at 37 degrees C, parental DNA and DNA labeled by reparative DNA synthesis were both cleaved to smaller sizes. Cleavage also occurred in unirradiated cells, indicating that endogenous nuclease was active during incubation. Repair patches synthesized in permeable cells displayed increased sensitivity to digestion by micrococcal nuclease. However, the change in sensitivity during a chase with unlabeled DNA precursors was small, suggesting that reassembly of nucleosome structure at sites of repair was impaired. To examine whether this deficiency was due to a preponderance of incomplete or unligated repair patches, 3H-labeled (repaired) DNA was purified, then digested with exonuclease III and nuclease S1 to probe for free 3' ends and single-stranded regions. About 85% of the [3H]DNA synthesized during a 10-min pulse resisted digestion, suggesting that a major fraction of the repair patches that were filled were also ligated. U.v. light-activated DNA synthesis in permeable cells, therefore, appears to represent the continuation of reparative gap-filling at sites of excision repair activated within intact cells. Gap-filling and ligation were comparatively efficient processes in permeable cells

  6. Repair kinetics in tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thames, H.D.

    1989-01-01

    Monoexponential repair kinetics is based on the assumption of a single, dose-independent rate of repair of sublethal injury in the target cells for tissue injury after exposure to ionizing radiation. Descriptions of the available data based on this assumption have proved fairly successful for both acutely responding (skin, lip mucosa, gut) and late-responding (lung, spinal cord) normal tissues. There are indications of biphasic exponential repair in both categories, however. Unfortunately, the data usually lack sufficient resolution to permit unambiguous determination of the repair rates. There are also indications that repair kinetics may depend on the size of the dose. The data are conflicting on this account, however, with suggestions of both faster and slower repair after larger doses. Indeed, experiments that have been explicitly designed to test this hypothesis show either no effect (gut, spinal cord), faster repair after higher doses (lung, kidney), or slower repair after higher doses (skin). Monoexponential repair appears to be a fairly accurate description that provides an approximation to a more complicated picture, the elucidation of whose details will, however, require very careful and extensive experimental study. (author). 30 refs.; 1 fig

  7. Oxidation mechanisms occurring in wines

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Carla Maria; Ferreira, António César Silva; Freitas, Victor De; Silva, Artur M. S.

    2011-01-01

    The present review aims to show the state of the art on the oxidation mechanisms occurring in wines, as well as the methods to monitor, classify and diagnose wine oxidation. Wine oxidation can be divided in enzymatic oxidation and non-enzymatic oxidation. Enzymatic oxidation almost entirely occurs in grape must and is largely correlated with the content of hydroxycinnamates, such as caffeoyltartaric acid and paracoumaroyltartaric acid, and flavan-3-ols. Non-enzymatic oxidation, al...

  8. X-ray diffraction based residual stress analysis of repair welds of CrMo steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, Sanjay; Sujith, S.; Jayakumar, T.

    1996-01-01

    Premature failure of weldments is often reported in the industry. Once failure occurs, the common practice now a days is either to replace the whole component or repair the failed region by welding. Since repairing rather than replacing is more economical, the process of repair welding assumes technological significance. However, it is necessary to realise the problems associated with repair-welding. During most of the repair welding cases, after repair weldments are hard and brittle. In many cases it is not possible to give post weld heat treatment (PWHT). This demands better welding techniques for repair without affecting the microstructure. Repair welding requires adoption of special procedure and parameters to obtain acceptable properties of the repair welded regions. In this paper different repair welding methods have been compared from residual stress and hardness point of view. (author)

  9. Thymus repair compared with hemopoiesis repair in spleen after protracted irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackova, N.

    1987-01-01

    Matured female mice of ICR strain were irradiated from a 60 Co source with a daily dose rate of 5 Gy till total accumulated dose of 10 Gy for 2 days. Animals were examined in various intervals within 42 days after irradiation. The results revealed that protracted irradiation will induce a massive injury to hemopoiesis. The first repair processes occurred in thymus and were characterized by two phases. The first repair wave peaked about the day 10 and the second about the day 30 after irradiation. The repair processes observed in the red pulp of the spleen reached their highest intensity approximately between the days 14-16 after irradiation. (author)

  10. Watching Individual Enzymes at Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Kerstin; Rocha, Susana; De Cremer, Gert; Roeffaers, Maarten B. J.; Uji-i, Hiroshi; Hofkens, Johan

    Single-molecule fluorescence experiments are a powerful tool to analyze reaction mechanisms of enzymes. Because of their unique potential to detect heterogeneities in space and time, they have provided unprecedented insights into the nature and mechanisms of conformational changes related to the catalytic reaction. The most important finding from experiments with single enzymes is the generally observed phenomenon that the catalytic rate constants fluctuate over time (dynamic disorder). These fluctuations originate from conformational changes occurring on time scales, which are similar to or slower than that of the catalytic reaction. Here, we summarize experiments with enzymes that show dynamic disorder and introduce new experimental strategies showing how single-molecule fluorescence experiments can be applied to address other open questions in medical and industrial enzymology, such as enzyme inactivation processes, reactant transfer in cascade reactions, and the mechanisms of interfacial catalysis.

  11. Protein damage and repair controlling seed vigor and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogé, Laurent; Broyart, Caroline; Collet, Boris; Godin, Béatrice; Jallet, Denis; Bourdais, Gildas; Job, Dominique; Grappin, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The formation of abnormal isoaspartyl residues derived from aspartyl or asparaginyl residues is a major source of spontaneous protein misfolding in cells. The repair enzyme protein L: -isoaspartyl methyltransferase (PIMT) counteracts such damage by catalyzing the conversion of abnormal isoaspartyl residues to their normal aspartyl forms. Thus, this enzyme contributes to the survival of many organisms, including plants. Analysis of the accumulation of isoaspartyl-containing proteins and its modulation by the PIMT repair pathway, using germination tests, immunodetection, enzymatic assays, and HPLC analysis, gives new insights in understanding controlling mechanisms of seed longevity and vigor.

  12. Effects of radiations on DNA and repair of the damage. Progress report, May 1, 1974--June 30, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, F.

    1977-01-01

    Repair of DNA double-strand breaks produced by gamma rays takes place in E. coli. Such repair requires recA function and the presence of another DNA molecule of the same base sequence, so it may involve a recombination-like event. Ultraviolet light acting on DNA containing bromouracil produces doublestrand breaks by single photochemical events, and a simple model can explain this, as well as other results. Bromouracil mutagenesis of either E. coli or lambda phage does not involve the recA or red functions. Bromouracil mutagenesis is greatly increased in E. coli mutants such as uvrE, mutL, mutR and mutS, which are defective in mismatch repair. This, and other results, suggest that bromouracil mutagenesis occurs when cell enzymes fail to remove mismatched bases. Ultraviolet mutagenesis of lambda phage may be a useful model for the study of mutagenesis in cells, because the effects of lesions in the gene mutated (i.e. in the phage) and changes in enzyme systems (by treating the host cells) can be examined separately. Quantitative data support this approach

  13. Enzyme detection by microfluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic-implemented methods of detecting an enzyme, in particular a DNA-modifying enzyme, are provided, as well as methods for detecting a cell, or a microorganism expressing said enzyme. The enzyme is detected by providing a nucleic acid substrate, which is specifically targeted...... by that enzyme...

  14. DNA methylation in human fibroblasts following DNA damage and repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastan, M.B.

    1984-01-01

    Methylation of deoxycytidine (dCyd) incorporated by DNA excision repair synthesis in human diploid fibroblasts following damage with ultraviolet radiation (UV), N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, or N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene was studied utilizing [6- 3 H]dCyd to label repaired DNA specifically and high performance liquid chromatographic analysis to quantify the percentage of deoxycytidine converted to 5-methyldeoxycytidine (m 5 dCyd). In confluent, nondividing cells, methylation in repair patches induced by all three agents is slow and incomplete. Whereas after DNA replication a level of 3.4% m 5 dCyd is reached in less than 2 hours, following UV-stimulated repair synthesis in confluent cells it takes about 3 days to reach a level of approx.2.0% m 5 dCyd in the repair patch. This undermethylation of repair patches occurs throughout the genome. In cells from cultures in logarithmic-phase growth, m 5 dCyd formation in UV-induced repair patches occurs faster and to a greater extent, reaching a level of approx.2.7% in 10-20 hours. Pre-existing hypomethylated repair patches in confluent cells are methylated further when the cells are stimulated to divide; however, the repair patch may still not be fully methylated before cell division occurs. Thus DNA damage and repair may lead to heritable loss of methylation at some sites. The distribution within chromatin of m 5 dCyd in repair patches was also investigated. Over a wide range of extents of digestion by staphylococcal nuclease or deoxyribonuclease I, the level of hypomethylation in repaired DNA in nuclease sensitive and resistant regions of chromatin was constant relative to the genomic level of methylation in these regions. Similar conclusions were reached in experiments with isolated mononucleosomes

  15. Snowmobile Repair. Teacher Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Stephen S.; Conrad, Rex

    This teacher's guide contains 14 units on snowmobile repair: (1) introduction to snowmobile repair; (2) skis, front suspension, and steering; (3) drive clutch; (4) drive belts; (5) driven clutch; (6) chain drives; (7) jackshafts and axles; (8) rear suspension; (9) tracks; (10) shock absorbers; (11) brakes; (12) engines; (13) ignition and…

  16. DNA repair genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimyo, Mitsuoki

    1995-01-01

    Fission yeast S. pombe is assumed to be a good model for cloning of human DNA repair genes, because human gene is normally expressed in S. pombe and has a very similar protein sequence to yeast protein. We have tried to elucidate the DNA repair mechanisms of S. pombe as a model system for those of mammals. (J.P.N.)

  17. Elevated Liver Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms Elevated liver enzymes By Mayo Clinic Staff Elevated liver enzymes may indicate inflammation or damage to cells in the liver. Inflamed or ... than normal amounts of certain chemicals, including liver enzymes, into the bloodstream, which can result in elevated ...

  18. Multiple effects of fluorescent light on repair of ultraviolet-induced DNA lesions in cultured goldfish cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Nobuhiro; Mitani, Hiroshi; Shima, Akihiro

    1995-01-01

    It is known that fluorescent light illumination prior to UV irradiation (FL preillumination) of cultured fish cells increases photorepair (PR) ability. In the present study, it was found that FL preillumination also enhanced UV resistance of logarithmically growing cells in the dark. This enhancement of UV resistance differs from induction of PR because it was not suppressed by cyclohexamide (CH) and it occurred immediately after FL preillumination. The effects of FL preillumination on repair of UV-induced DNA lesions in the dark were examined by an endonuclease-sensitive site assay to measure the repair of cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimers, and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to quantitate the repair of (6-4) photoproducts. It was found that excision repair ability for (6-4) photoproducts in the genome overall was increased by FL preillumination. Moreover, a decrease in (6-4) photoproducts by FL illumination immediately after UV irradiation of the cells was found, the decrement being enhanced by FL preillumination with or without CH. (author)

  19. Does a role for selenium in DNA damage repair explain apparent controversies in its use in chemoprevention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    The trace element selenium is an essential micronutrient that has received considerable attention for its potential use in the prevention of cancer. In spite of this interest, the mechanism(s) by which selenium might function as a chemopreventive remain to be determined. Considerable experimental evidence indicates that one possible mechanism by which selenium supplementation may exert its benefits is by enhancing the DNA damage repair response, and this includes data obtained using cultured cells, animal models as well as in human clinical studies. In these studies, selenium supplementation has been shown to be beneficial in reducing the frequency of DNA adducts and chromosome breaks, consequentially reducing the likelihood of detrimental mutations that ultimately contribute to carcinogenesis. The benefits of selenium can be envisioned as being due, at least in part, to it being a critical constituent of selenoproteins such as glutathione peroxidases and thioredoxin reductases, proteins that play important roles in antioxidant defence and maintaining the cellular reducing environment. Selenium, therefore, may be protective by preventing DNA damage from occurring as well as by increasing the activity of repair enzymes such as DNA glycosylases and DNA damage repair pathways that involve p53, BRCA1 and Gadd45. An improved understanding of the mechanism of selenium’s impact on DNA repair processes may help to resolve the apparently contradicting data obtained from decades of animal work, human epidemiology and more recently, clinical supplementation studies. PMID:23204505

  20. Multiple effects of fluorescent light on repair of ultraviolet-induced DNA lesions in cultured goldfish cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Nobuhiro; Mitani, Hiroshi; Shima, Akihiro [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Lab. of Radiation Biology

    1995-01-01

    It is known that fluorescent light illumination prior to UV irradiation (FL preillumination) of cultured fish cells increases photorepair (PR) ability. In the present study, it was found that FL preillumination also enhanced UV resistance of logarithmically growing cells in the dark. This enhancement of UV resistance differs from induction of PR because it was not suppressed by cyclohexamide (CH) and it occurred immediately after FL preillumination. The effects of FL preillumination on repair of UV-induced DNA lesions in the dark were examined by an endonuclease-sensitive site assay to measure the repair of cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimers, and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to quantitate the repair of (6-4) photoproducts. It was found that excision repair ability for (6-4) photoproducts in the genome overall was increased by FL preillumination. Moreover, a decrease in (6-4) photoproducts by FL illumination immediately after UV irradiation of the cells was found, the decrement being enhanced by FL preillumination with or without CH. (author).

  1. DNA repair protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjergbæk, Lotte

    In its 3rd edition, this Methods in Molecular Biology(TM) book covers the eukaryotic response to genomic insult including advanced protocols and standard techniques in the field of DNA repair. Offers expert guidance for DNA repair, recombination, and replication. Current knowledge of the mechanisms...... that regulate DNA repair has grown significantly over the past years with technology advances such as RNA interference, advanced proteomics and microscopy as well as high throughput screens. The third edition of DNA Repair Protocols covers various aspects of the eukaryotic response to genomic insult including...... recent advanced protocols as well as standard techniques used in the field of DNA repair. Both mammalian and non-mammalian model organisms are covered in the book, and many of the techniques can be applied with only minor modifications to other systems than the one described. Written in the highly...

  2. Radiation damage and repair in cells and cell components. Final report. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluke, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of research into the direct action of ionizing radiation, especially the effect of radiation temperature, primarily upon enzymes, into induced repair, and into S.O.S.-related phenomena, is presented

  3. Alkylation induced cerebellar degeneration dependent on Aag and Parp1 does not occur via previously established cell death mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie M Margulies

    Full Text Available Alkylating agents are ubiquitous in our internal and external environments, causing DNA damage that contributes to mutations and cell death that can result in aging, tissue degeneration and cancer. Repair of methylated DNA bases occurs primarily through the base excision repair (BER pathway, a multi-enzyme pathway initiated by the alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (Aag, also known as Mpg. Previous work demonstrated that mice treated with the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS undergo cerebellar degeneration in an Aag-dependent manner, whereby increased BER initiation by Aag causes increased tissue damage that is dependent on activation of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (Parp1. Here, we dissect the molecular mechanism of cerebellar granule neuron (CGN sensitivity to MMS using primary ex vivo neuronal cultures. We first established a high-throughput fluorescent imaging method to assess primary neuron sensitivity to treatment with DNA damaging agents. Next, we verified that the alkylation sensitivity of CGNs is an intrinsic phenotype that accurately recapitulates the in vivo dependency of alkylation-induced CGN cell death on Aag and Parp1 activity. Finally, we show that MMS-induced CGN toxicity is independent of all the cellular events that have previously been associated with Parp-mediated toxicity, including mitochondrial depolarization, AIF translocation, calcium fluxes, and NAD+ consumption. We therefore believe that further investigation is needed to adequately describe all varieties of Parp-mediated cell death.

  4. Alkylation induced cerebellar degeneration dependent on Aag and Parp1 does not occur via previously established cell death mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margulies, Carrie M; Chaim, Isaac Alexander; Mazumder, Aprotim; Criscione, June; Samson, Leona D

    2017-01-01

    Alkylating agents are ubiquitous in our internal and external environments, causing DNA damage that contributes to mutations and cell death that can result in aging, tissue degeneration and cancer. Repair of methylated DNA bases occurs primarily through the base excision repair (BER) pathway, a multi-enzyme pathway initiated by the alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (Aag, also known as Mpg). Previous work demonstrated that mice treated with the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) undergo cerebellar degeneration in an Aag-dependent manner, whereby increased BER initiation by Aag causes increased tissue damage that is dependent on activation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (Parp1). Here, we dissect the molecular mechanism of cerebellar granule neuron (CGN) sensitivity to MMS using primary ex vivo neuronal cultures. We first established a high-throughput fluorescent imaging method to assess primary neuron sensitivity to treatment with DNA damaging agents. Next, we verified that the alkylation sensitivity of CGNs is an intrinsic phenotype that accurately recapitulates the in vivo dependency of alkylation-induced CGN cell death on Aag and Parp1 activity. Finally, we show that MMS-induced CGN toxicity is independent of all the cellular events that have previously been associated with Parp-mediated toxicity, including mitochondrial depolarization, AIF translocation, calcium fluxes, and NAD+ consumption. We therefore believe that further investigation is needed to adequately describe all varieties of Parp-mediated cell death.

  5. Removal of oxygen free-radical-induced 5′,8-purine cyclodeoxynucleosides from DNA by the nucleotide excision-repair pathway in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuraoka, Isao; Bender, Christina; Romieu, Anthony; Cadet, Jean; Wood, Richard D.; Lindahl, Tomas

    2000-01-01

    Exposure of cellular DNA to reactive oxygen species generates several classes of base lesions, many of which are removed by the base excision-repair pathway. However, the lesions include purine cyclodeoxynucleoside formation by intramolecular crosslinking between the C-8 position of adenine or guanine and the 5′ position of 2-deoxyribose. This distorting form of DNA damage, in which the purine is attached by two covalent bonds to the sugar-phosphate backbone, occurs as distinct diastereoisomers. It was observed here that both diastereoisomers block primer extension by mammalian and microbial replicative DNA polymerases, using DNA with a site-specific purine cyclodeoxynucleoside residue as template, and consequently appear to be cytotoxic lesions. Plasmid DNA containing either the 5′R or 5′S form of 5′,8-cyclo-2-deoxyadenosine was a substrate for the human nucleotide excision-repair enzyme complex. The R diastereoisomer was more efficiently repaired than the S isomer. No correction of the lesion by direct damage reversal or base excision repair was detected. Dual incision around the lesion depended on the core nucleotide excision-repair protein XPA. In contrast to several other types of oxidative DNA damage, purine cyclodeoxynucleosides are chemically stable and would be expected to accumulate at a slow rate over many years in the DNA of nonregenerating cells from xeroderma pigmentosum patients. High levels of this form of DNA damage might explain the progressive neurodegeneration seen in XPA individuals. PMID:10759556

  6. Laparoscopic hernia repair and bladder injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalessandri, K M; Bhoyrul, S; Mulvihill, S J

    2001-01-01

    Bladder injury is a complication of laparoscopic surgery with a reported incidence in the general surgery literature of 0.5% and in the gynecology literature of 2%. We describe how to recognize and treat the injury and how to avoid the problem. We report two cases of bladder injury repaired with a General Surgical Interventions (GSI) trocar and a balloon device used for laparoscopic extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair. One patient had a prior appendectomy; the other had a prior midline incision from a suprapubic prostatectomy. We repaired the bladder injury, and the patients made a good recovery. When using the obturator and balloon device, it is important to stay anterior to the preperitoneal space and bladder. Prior lower abdominal surgery can be considered a relative contraindication to extraperitoneal laparoscopic hernia repair. Signs of gas in the Foley bag or hematuria should alert the surgeon to a bladder injury. A one- or two-layer repair of the bladder injury can be performed either laparoscopically or openly and is recommended for a visible injury. Mesh repair of the hernia can be completed provided no evidence exists of urinary tract infection. A Foley catheter is placed until healing occurs.

  7. The induction and repair of cyclobutane thymidine dimers in human skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roza, L.; Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam; Vermeulen, W.; Schans, G.P. van der; Lohman, P.H.M.

    1987-01-01

    The most important detrimental effect of ultraviolet radiation (UV) on the living cell, so far known, is the induction of damage in the DNA. The major photoproducts induced in DNA by UV-C (200-280 nm) and UV-B (280-315 nm) are the cyclobutane-type pyrimidine dimers, which have been implicated in UV-induced mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. Dimer lesions in DNA of cells may be repaired in the dark by a multi-enzyme process (excision repair), or via a light dependent enzymatic reaction known as photoreactivation (phr) which is specific for pyrimidine dimers. Although phr has been found to occur in a wide range of organisms, studies on the presence of phr in mammalian cells have yielded conflicting results. To investigate repair of pyrimidine dimers in human skin cells irradiated in vivo, a specific and sensitive detection method was developed based on a monoclonal antibody directed against thymidine dimers. Application together with a fluorescent immunostaining permits the direct detection of thymidine dimers in human skin cells. The method is used in studies aimed at a better understanding of the role of these lesions in the process of carcinogenesis. A report is given on the isolation and characterization of the antibodies, and their application in a study on the induction of pyrimidine dimers in human skin and on photorepair in cultured cells. 10 refs.; 2 figs

  8. DNA modification by sulfur mustards and nitrosoureas and repair of these lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludlum, D.B.; Papirmeister, B.; Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD)

    1986-01-01

    The nature and significance of DNA modifications caused by chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) is compared with those produced by chloroethyl cyclohexyl nitrosourea (CCNU). This comparison illustrates the differences in the kind of biological response which can arise from DNA modification by different agents and the role of DNA repair in determining this response. In particular, the ability of tumor cells to become resistant to therapeutic agents has some important implications for the ability of cells in general to tolerate environmental mutagens. DNA modification by CEES and CCNU can be viewed in the context of DNA modification caused by compounds which naturally react with DNA. For example, cycasin and S-adenosylmethionine both methylate DNA. Not surprisingly, a variety of repair mechanisms has evolved which serve to maintain the integrity of DNA in the presence of such naturally-occurring DNA modifiers. The ability of these enzymes to repair other DNA lesions is currently under active investigation as described here. 19 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  9. New Technology in Automotive Body Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maze, Ronald W.

    1980-01-01

    The use of plastic and fiberglass materials in the manufacture of automobiles has caused a revolution in the field of collision work. Changes have occurred in tools, techniques, materials, and in the training for auto body repair. The skills necessary for employment in this field are now easier and faster to acquire. (CT)

  10. Effects of low dose radiation on repair processes in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuschl, H.; Altmann, H.; Kovac, R.; Topaloglou, A.; Egg, D.; Guenther, R.

    1978-10-01

    DNA excision repair was investigated in lymphocytes of persons occupationally exposed to low dose radiation of 222 Rn. Autoradiographic studies of unscheduled DNA synthesis and measurement of 3 H-thymidine incorporation by repair replication into double stranded and single-strand containing DNA fractions obtained by BND cellulose chromatography seem to indicate a stimulatory effect of repeated low dose radiation on repair enzymes. (author)

  11. Fungal cryptochrome with DNA repair activity reveals an early stage in cryptochrome evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Tagua, Victor G.; Pausch, Marcell; Eckel, Maike; Gutiérrez, Gabriel; Miralles-Durán, Alejandro; Sanz, Catalina; Eslava, Arturo P.; Pokorny, Richard; Corrochano, Luis M.; Batschauer, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    DASH (Drosophila, Arabidopsis, Synechocystis, Human)-type cryp- tochromes (cry-DASH) belong to a family of flavoproteins acting as repair enzymes for UV-B–induced DNA lesions (photolyases) or as UV-A/blue light photoreceptors (cryptochromes). They are present in plants, bacteria, various vertebrates, and fungi and were originally considered as sensory photoreceptors because of their incapability to repair cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) lesions in duplex DNA. However, cry-DASH can repair C...

  12. Remote repair of the dissolvers in Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otani, Yosikuni

    1985-01-01

    In the Tokai fuel reprocessing plant, there occurred failures (pinholes) in two dissolver tanks successively in 1982 and 1983. These dissolvers are set under high radiation field, not permitting access of the personnel. So, repair works were carried out after development of the remotely operated repair system. For repair of the failed dissolver tanks, after tests and studies, the means was employed of grinding off the wall surface to small depth and then forming over it a corrosion resistant sealing layer by padding welding. The repair system which enabled the repair and the inspection in the cell by remote operation consisted of six devices including polishing, welding, dye penetration test, etc. Repair works on the dissolvers took two months and a half from September 1983. (Mori, K.)

  13. Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses the broad problems presented by Naturally Occuring Radioactive Materials (NORM). Technologically Enhanced naturally occuring radioactive material includes any radionuclides whose physical, chemical, radiological properties or radionuclide concentration have been altered from their natural state. With regard to NORM in particular, radioactive contamination is radioactive material in an undesired location. This is a concern in a range of industries: petroleum; uranium mining; phosphorus and phosphates; fertilizers; fossil fuels; forestry products; water treatment; metal mining and processing; geothermal energy. The author discusses in more detail the problem in the petroleum industry, including the isotopes of concern, the hazards they present, the contamination which they cause, ways to dispose of contaminated materials, and regulatory issues. He points out there are three key programs to reduce legal exposure and problems due to these contaminants: waste minimization; NORM assesment (surveys); NORM compliance (training)

  14. Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, P. [ed.

    1997-02-01

    This paper discusses the broad problems presented by Naturally Occuring Radioactive Materials (NORM). Technologically Enhanced naturally occuring radioactive material includes any radionuclides whose physical, chemical, radiological properties or radionuclide concentration have been altered from their natural state. With regard to NORM in particular, radioactive contamination is radioactive material in an undesired location. This is a concern in a range of industries: petroleum; uranium mining; phosphorus and phosphates; fertilizers; fossil fuels; forestry products; water treatment; metal mining and processing; geothermal energy. The author discusses in more detail the problem in the petroleum industry, including the isotopes of concern, the hazards they present, the contamination which they cause, ways to dispose of contaminated materials, and regulatory issues. He points out there are three key programs to reduce legal exposure and problems due to these contaminants: waste minimization; NORM assesment (surveys); NORM compliance (training).

  15. Naturally occurring radionuclides in food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djujic, I.

    1995-01-01

    The naturally occurring radionuclides are the major source of radiation exposure to humans. The principal way of natural radiation exposure is the inhalation of 222 Rn decay products (about 85% of the total). The remainder is equally divided between internally deposited radionuclides, cosmic and terrestrial sources. In the present study, the content of 40 K, 210 Pb, 226 Ra, 230 Th, 232 Th and 238 U in representative food samples (milk, pork, beef, potatoes, wheat and corn flour) and samples of different food items that do not represent entire national production but provide interesting additional data for approximative calculation of naturally occurring radionuclide intake is presented. Daily weight of food eaten, participation of food groups, as well as daily intake by food of mentioned naturally occurring radionuclides in the Serbian diet was obtained on the base of house hold budget surveys. The result obtained for daily intake estimates in mBq for Serbian population are 78.1 ( 40 K), 38.2( 210 Pb), 52.3( 226 Ra), 2.0( 230 Th) and 12.5( 238 U). (author)

  16. Uracil excision repair in Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell-free extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Bharti, Sanjay Kumar; Varshney, Umesh

    2011-05-01

    Uracil excision repair is ubiquitous in all domains of life and initiated by uracil DNA glycosylases (UDGs) which excise the promutagenic base, uracil, from DNA to leave behind an abasic site (AP-site). Repair of the resulting AP-sites requires an AP-endonuclease, a DNA polymerase, and a DNA ligase whose combined activities result in either short-patch or long-patch repair. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, has an increased risk of accumulating uracils because of its G + C-rich genome, and its niche inside host macrophages where it is exposed to reactive nitrogen and oxygen species, two major causes of cytosine deamination (to uracil) in DNA. In vitro assays to study DNA repair in this important human pathogen are limited. To study uracil excision repair in mycobacteria, we have established assay conditions using cell-free extracts of M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis (a fast-growing mycobacterium) and oligomer or plasmid DNA substrates. We show that in mycobacteria, uracil excision repair is completed primarily via long-patch repair. In addition, we show that M. tuberculosis UdgB, a newly characterized family 5 UDG, substitutes for the highly conserved family 1 UDG, Ung, thereby suggesting that UdgB might function as backup enzyme for uracil excision repair in mycobacteria. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Illustrating Enzyme Inhibition Using Gibbs Energy Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearne, Stephen L.

    2012-01-01

    Gibbs energy profiles have great utility as teaching and learning tools because they present students with a visual representation of the energy changes that occur during enzyme catalysis. Unfortunately, most textbooks divorce discussions of traditional kinetic topics, such as enzyme inhibition, from discussions of these same topics in terms of…

  18. Iatrogenic Urethral Defect Repairment: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulas Fidan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available    Iatrogenic urethral defect is a complication that occurs after vaginal surgical procedures. Many surgical methods according to place of defect are described in case of injury of urethra. In this article, we reported the repairment of distal urethral defect with the help of greft taken from labia minor. This defect is made by the excision of the granulation tissue that occurred after chronic paraurethral  gland infection.

  19. DNA repair in human cells: Methods for the determination of calmodulin involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charp, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    Exposure of DNA to either physical or chemical agents can result in the formation of a number of different lesions which must be repaired enzymatically in order for DNA to carry on normal replication and transcription. In most cases, the enzymes involved in this repair of damaged DNA include endonucleases, exonucleases, glycosylases, polymerases, and ligases. Each group of enzymes is involved in precise steps in DNA repair. Exposure to physical agents such as ultraviolet light (UV) at a wavelength of 254 nm is repaired by two distinct and different mechanisms. One mode of enzymatic repair of pyrimidine dimers is accomplished in situ by photoreactivation of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers by photoreactivating light. The second mode of enzymatic repair is the excision repair of pyrimidine dimers involving several different enzymes including endonuclease, exonuclease, and DNA ligase. A summary of the sequence of enzymatic steps involved is shown. It has been observed that specific drugs which bind to and alter the action of calmodulin in cells block DNA synthesis. This suggests that calmodulin may play a role both in normal DNA replication and repair. Others using an indirect method measuring the degree of DNA nucleoid sedimentation, showed that the specific anti-calmodulin agent W-13 slowed the rate of DNA repair. Others showed that DNA synthesis in T51B rat liver cells could be blocked with the addition of either chlorpromazine or trifluoperazine

  20. A comparison of the DNA and chromosome repair kinetics after #betta# irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hittelman, W.N.; Pollard, M.

    1982-01-01

    The kinetics of repair at the chromosome and DNA levels were compared after #betta# irradiation of Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO). Induction and repair of DNA damage were measured by the alkaline and neutral elution techniques, while chromosome damage and repair were determined by the technique of premature chromosome condensation. During and after #betta# irradiation, significant DNA repair occurred within 2 min. This fast repair could be inhibited by EDTA and pyrophosphate and probably reflected polynucleotide ligase activity. A slower component of DNA repair was detected between 15 and 60 min after irradiation, by which time most of the DNA had been repaired. In contrast, chromosome repair was not detectable until 45 min after irradiation, and nearly half of the chromatid breaks were repaired by 60 min. Cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein synthesis, prevented chromosome break repair, yet had no effect on the immediate formation of chromatid exchanges or DNA repair. These results suggest the following: (1) the rapidly repairing DNA lesions are not important in the repair of chromosomes; (2) chromosome damage involves only a minority of the DNA lesions measured by alkaline and neutral DNA elution; and (3) chromosome repair may involve more than simply the repair of damaged DNA that can be detected by the alkaline and neutral elution assays

  1. Repairing fuel for reinsertion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krukshenk, A.

    1986-01-01

    Eqiupment for nuclear reactor fuel assembly repairing produced by Westinghouse and Brawn Bovery companies is described. Repair of failed fuel assemblies replacement of defect fuel elements gives a noticeable economical effect. Thus if the cost of a new fuel assembly is 450-500 thousand dollars, the replacement of one fuel element in it costs approximately 40-60 thousand dollars. In simple cases repairing includes either removal of failed fuel elements from a fuel assembly and its reinsertion with the rest of fuel elements into the reactor core (reactor refueling), or replacement of unfailed fuel elements from one fuel assembly to a new one (fuel assembly overhaul and reconditioning)

  2. DNA repair in neurons: So if they don't divide what's to repair?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishel, Melissa L.; Vasko, Michael R.; Kelley, Mark R.

    2007-01-01

    Neuronal DNA repair remains one of the most exciting areas for investigation, particularly as a means to compare the DNA repair response in mitotic (cancer) vs. post-mitotic (neuronal) cells. In addition, the role of DNA repair in neuronal cell survival and response to aging and environmental insults is of particular interest. DNA damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as generated by mitochondrial respiration includes altered bases, abasic sites, and single- and double-strand breaks which can be prevented by the DNA base excision repair (BER) pathway. Oxidative stress accumulates in the DNA of the human brain over time especially in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and is proposed to play a critical role in aging and in the pathogenesis of several neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease, ALS, and Alzheimer's diseases. Because DNA damage accumulates in the mtDNA more than nuclear DNA, there is increased interest in DNA repair pathways and the consequence of DNA damage in the mitochondria of neurons. The type of damage that is most likely to occur in neuronal cells is oxidative DNA damage which is primarily removed by the BER pathway. Following the notion that the bulk of neuronal DNA damage is acquired by oxidative DNA damage and ROS, the BER pathway is a likely area of focus for neuronal studies of DNA repair. BER variations in brain aging and pathology in various brain regions and tissues are presented. Therefore, the BER pathway is discussed in greater detail in this review than other repair pathways. Other repair pathways including direct reversal, nucleotide excision repair (NER), mismatch repair (MMR), homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining are also discussed. Finally, there is a growing interest in the role that DNA repair pathways play in the clinical arena as they relate to the neurotoxicity and neuropathy associated with cancer treatments. Among the numerous side effects of cancer treatments, major clinical effects

  3. Studies of DNA repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. I. Characterization of a new allele of RAD6. II. Investigation of events in the first cell cycle after DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolthwright-Fasse, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    Studies in two independent, but related, areas of DNA repair have been carried out in the eucaryotic yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The first is the characterization of a new allele in the RAD6 gene suggesting that the gene is multifunctional. The second is the utilization of photoreactivation as a probe of events occurring during the first cell cycle after DNA damage. Strains carrying the new allele, designated rad6-4, of the RAD6 locus are about as sensitive to uv and ionizing radiation as those carrying rad6-1 or rad6-3. Although rad6-4 may well be a missense mutation, the data suggest that the RAD6 gene is multifunctional. One function is necessary to recover from DNA damage in an error-free manner, and the other is concerned with mutagenic processes and sporulation. The loss of photoreversibility (LOP) of ultraviolet induced mutations to arginine independence in an excision defective strain carrying arg4-17 examines the events occurring in the first cell cycle. The post uv protein synthesis causes pyrimidine dimmers to become inaccessible to the photoreactivating enzyme in some unknown manner. There is no evidence indicating whether the normal function of the protein is involved in excision repair, or in one of the two repair processes believed to be inducible; induced mutagenesis or recombinational repair

  4. DNA double-strand-break complexity levels and their possible contributions to the probability for error-prone processing and repair pathway choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipler, Agnes; Iliakis, George

    2013-09-01

    Although the DNA double-strand break (DSB) is defined as a rupture in the double-stranded DNA molecule that can occur without chemical modification in any of the constituent building blocks, it is recognized that this form is restricted to enzyme-induced DSBs. DSBs generated by physical or chemical agents can include at the break site a spectrum of base alterations (lesions). The nature and number of such chemical alterations define the complexity of the DSB and are considered putative determinants for repair pathway choice and the probability that errors will occur during this processing. As the pathways engaged in DSB processing show distinct and frequently inherent propensities for errors, pathway choice also defines the error-levels cells opt to accept. Here, we present a classification of DSBs on the basis of increasing complexity and discuss how complexity may affect processing, as well as how it may cause lethal or carcinogenic processing errors. By critically analyzing the characteristics of DSB repair pathways, we suggest that all repair pathways can in principle remove lesions clustering at the DSB but are likely to fail when they encounter clusters of DSBs that cause a local form of chromothripsis. In the same framework, we also analyze the rational of DSB repair pathway choice.

  5. Differential dormancy of co-occurring copepods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohman, Mark D.; Drits, Aleksandr V.; Elizabeth Clarke, M.; Plourde, Stéphane

    1998-08-01

    Four species of planktonic calanoid copepods that co-occur in the California Current System ( Eucalanus californicus Johnson, Rhincalanus nasutus Giesbrecht, Calanus pacificus californicus Brodsky, and Metridia pacifica Brodsky) were investigated for evidence of seasonal dormancy in the San Diego Trough. Indices used to differentiate actively growing from dormant animals included developmental stage structure and vertical distribution; activity of aerobic metabolic enzymes (Citrate Synthase and the Electron Transfer System complex); investment in depot lipids (wax esters and triacylglycerols); in situ grazing activity from gut fluorescence; and egg production rates in simulated in situ conditions. None of the 4 species exhibited a canonical calanoid pattern of winter dormancy - i.e., synchronous developmental arrest as copepodid stage V, descent into deep waters, reduced metabolism, and lack of winter reproduction. Instead, Calanus pacificus californicus has a biphasic life history in this region, with an actively reproducing segment of the population in surface waters overlying a deep dormant segment in winter. Eucalanus californicus is dormant as both adult females and copepodid V's, although winter females respond relatively rapidly to elevated food and temperature conditions; they begin feeding and producing eggs within 2-3 days. Rhincalanus nasutus appears to enter dormancy as adult females, although the evidence is equivocal. Metridia pacifica shows no evidence of dormancy, with sustained active feeding, diel vertical migration behavior, and elevated activity of metabolic enzymes in December as well as in June. The four species also differ markedly in water content, classes of storage lipids, and specific activity of Citrate Synthase. These results suggest that copepod dormancy traits and structural composition reflect diverse adaptations to regional environmental conditions rather than a uniform, canonical series of traits that remain invariant among taxa

  6. Early occurring and continuing effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, B.R.; Hahn, F.F.

    1985-01-01

    This chapter deals with health-risk estimates for early and continuing effects of exposure to ionizing radiations that could be associated with light water nuclear power plants accidents. Early and continuing effects considered are nonneoplastic diseases and symptoms that normally occur soon after radiation exposure, but may also occur after years have passed. They are generally associated with relatively high (greater than 1 Gy) doses. For most of the effects considered, there is a practical dose threshold. Organs of primary interest, because of their high sensitivity or the likelihood of receiving a large radiation dose, are bone marrow, gastrointestinal tract, thyroid glands, lungs, skin, gonads, and eyes. In utero exposure of the fetus is also considered. New data and modeling techniques available since publication of the Reactor Safety Study (WASH 1400, 1975) were used along with data cited in the Study to develop improved health-risk models for morbidity and mortality. The new models are applicable to a broader range of accident scenarios, provide a more detailed treatment of dose protraction effects, and include morbidity effects not considered in the Reactor Safety Study. 115 references, 20 figures, 19 tables

  7. Naturally-occurring alpha activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayneord, W V

    1960-12-01

    In view of the difficulties of assessing the significance of man-made radioactivity it is important to study for comparison the background of natural radioactivity against which the human race has evolved and lives. It is also important to define the present levels of activity so that it will be possible to detect and study as quickly as possible any changes which may occur owing to the release into the environment of new radioactive materials. Moreover, by the study of the behaviour of natural radioactivity light may be shed upon that of the artificially produced isotopes and a number of analogies traced between the two groups. These concepts have led to studies of naturally-occurring radioactive materials alongside a programme of research into fission products in food, water and air, as well as studies of the metabolism of both sets of materials in the human body. Since the last report there has been a useful increase in our knowledge of natural radioactivity in the biosphere, and its levels relative to the new man-made activities. These studies have necessitated technical developments, particularly in the methods of measuring and identifying alpha-ray emitters, to which group many of the more important natural radioactive materials belong.

  8. Smoking increases the risk of early meniscus repair failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Ryan; Schmitt, Laura C; Flanigan, David C; Magnussen, Robert A

    2016-05-01

    The goal of this study is to determine whether patients who smoke cigarettes at the time of surgery are at significantly increased risk of early meniscus repair failure relative to non-smokers. Retrospective chart review identified 64 current smokers within a series of 444 consecutive patients who underwent meniscus repair during a 7 years period. Fifty-two of these 64 smokers were available for follow-up and were matched by age, sex, and ACL status with non-smokers from the same cohort. Records of these 104 patients with a total of 120 meniscus repairs were reviewed to identify meniscus repair failure (defined as repeat surgery on the index meniscus) during the median 13-month (range: 3-79 months) follow-up period. The smoking and non-smoking groups were similar in age, sex, ACL status, BMI, meniscus repair technique, and meniscus involved. Meniscus repair failure occurred in 19 of the 112 menisci in 104 patients, for an overall failure risk of 17 %. Of the 19 failures, 14 occurred in 79 repaired medial menisci (18 % failure risk) and 5 occurred in 33 repaired lateral menisci (15 % failure risk). Meniscus repair failure occurred in significantly more smokers (15 failures in 56 menisci in 52 patients -27 % failure risk) than non-smokers (4 failures in 56 menisci in 52 patients -7 % failure risk) (p = 0.0076). Smoking is associated with significantly increased risk of early meniscus repair failure as defined by the incidence of repeat surgery on the index meniscus. III.

  9. A self-repairing polymer waveguide sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Young J; Peters, Kara J

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents experimental demonstrations of a self-repairing strain sensor waveguide created by self-writing in a photopolymerizable resin system. The sensor is fabricated between two multi-mode optical fibers via lightwaves in the ultraviolet (UV) wavelength range and operates as a sensor through interrogation of the power transmitted through the waveguide in the infrared (IR) wavelength range. After failure of the sensor occurs due to loading, the waveguide re-bridges the gap between the two optical fibers through the UV resin. The response of the original sensor and the self-repaired sensor to strain are measured and show similar behaviors

  10. DNA repair is indispensable for survival after acute inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Jennifer A.; Meira, Lisiane B.; Lee, Chun-Yue I.; Moroski-Erkul, Catherine A.; Abolhassani, Nona; Taghizadeh, Koli; Eichinger, Lindsey W.; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Nordstrand, Line M.; Klungland, Arne; Samson, Leona D.

    2012-01-01

    More than 15% of cancer deaths worldwide are associated with underlying infections or inflammatory conditions, therefore understanding how inflammation contributes to cancer etiology is important for both cancer prevention and treatment. Inflamed tissues are known to harbor elevated etheno-base (ε-base) DNA lesions induced by the lipid peroxidation that is stimulated by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) released from activated neutrophils and macrophages. Inflammation contributes to carcinogenesis in part via RONS-induced cytotoxic and mutagenic DNA lesions, including ε-base lesions. The mouse alkyl adenine DNA glycosylase (AAG, also known as MPG) recognizes such base lesions, thus protecting against inflammation-associated colon cancer. Two other DNA repair enzymes are known to repair ε-base lesions, namely ALKBH2 and ALKBH3; thus, we sought to determine whether these DNA dioxygenase enzymes could protect against chronic inflammation-mediated colon carcinogenesis. Using established chemically induced colitis and colon cancer models in mice, we show here that ALKBH2 and ALKBH3 provide cancer protection similar to that of the DNA glycosylase AAG. Moreover, Alkbh2 and Alkbh3 each display apparent epistasis with Aag. Surprisingly, deficiency in all 3 DNA repair enzymes confers a massively synergistic phenotype, such that animals lacking all 3 DNA repair enzymes cannot survive even a single bout of chemically induced colitis. PMID:22684101

  11. Principles of ubiquitin and SUMO modifications in DNA repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergink, Steven; Jentsch, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    With the discovery in the late 1980s that the DNA-repair gene RAD6 encodes a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, it became clear that protein modification by ubiquitin conjugation has a much broader significance than had previously been assumed. Now, two decades later, ubiquitin and its cousin SUMO are

  12. Summary of the guideline on underwater laser beam repair welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Hiroya; Yoda, Masaki; Motora, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    It is known that stress corrosion cracking (SCC) might occur at the weld of a reactor pressure vessel or core internals. Underwater laser beam clad welding for mitigation of SCC has been already established and the guideline 'Underwater laser beam clad welding' was published. Moreover, the guideline 'Seal welding' was also published as a repair method for SCC. In addition to these guidelines, the guideline 'Underwater laser beam repair welding' was newly published in November, 2012 for the repair welding after completely removing a SCC crack occurred in weld or base metal. This paper introduces the summary of this guideline. (author)

  13. Brain aneurysm repair - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000123.htm Brain aneurysm repair - discharge To use the sharing features ... this page, please enable JavaScript. You had a brain aneurysm . An aneurysm is a weak area in ...

  14. Ventral hernia repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... incarcerated) in the hernia and become impossible to push back in. This is usually painful. The blood supply ... you are lying down or that you cannot push back in. Risks The risks of ventral hernia repair ...

  15. Omphalocele repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100033.htm Omphalocele repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... Go to slide 4 out of 4 Overview Omphalocele is an abdominal wall defect at the base ...

  16. Celebrating DNA's Repair Crew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Thomas A

    2015-12-03

    This year, the Nobel Prize in Chemistry has been awarded to Tomas Lindahl, Aziz Sancar, and Paul Modrich for their seminal studies of the mechanisms by which cells from bacteria to man repair DNA damage that is generated by normal cellular metabolism and stress from the environment. These studies beautifully illustrate the remarkable power of DNA repair to influence life from evolution through disease susceptibility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Naturally occurring methyl salicylate glycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Ping; Liu, Zizhen; Xie, Meng; Jiang, Rui; Liu, Weirui; Wang, Xiaohong; Meng, Shen; She, Gaimei

    2014-01-01

    As an important part of non steroids anti-inflammation drug (NSAIDs), salicylate has developed from natural substance salicylic acid to natrium salicylicum, to aspirin. Now, methyl salicylate glycoside, a new derivative of salicylic acid, is modified with a -COOH group integrated one methyl radical into formic ether, and a -OH linked with a monosaccharide, a disaccharide or a trisaccharide unit by glycosidic linkage. It has the similar pharmacological activities, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antipyretic and antithrombotic as the previous salicylates' without resulting in serious side effects, particularly the gastrointestinal toxicity. Owing to the superiority of those significant bioactivities, methyl salicylate glycosides have became a hot research area in NSAIDs for several years. This paper compiles all 9 naturally occurring methyl salicylate glycosides, their distribution of the resource and pharmacological mechanism, which could contribute to the new drug discovery.

  18. Chronic pain after childhood groin hernia repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasvang, Eske Kvanner; Kehlet, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In contrast to the well-described 10% risk of chronic pain affecting daily activities after adult groin hernia repair, chronic pain after childhood groin hernia repair has never been investigated. Studies of other childhood surgery before the age of 3 months suggest a risk of increased...... pain responsiveness later in life, but its potential relationship to chronic pain in adult life is unknown. METHODS: This was a nationwide detailed questionnaire study of chronic groin pain in adults having surgery for a groin hernia repair before the age of 5 years (n = 1075). RESULTS: The response...... rate was 63.3%. In the 651 patients available for analysis, pain from the operated groin was reported by 88 (13.5%) patients whereof 13 (2.0%) patients reported frequent and moderate or severe pain. Pain occurred primarily when exercising sports or other leisure activities. Patients operated on before...

  19. Molecular mechanisms of DNA repair inhibition by caffeine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selby, C.P.; Sancar, A. (Univ. of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Caffeine potentiates the mutagenic and lethal effects of genotoxic agents. It is thought that this is due, at least in some organisms, to inhibition of DNA repair. However, direct evidence for inhibition of repair enzymes has been lacking. Using purified Escherichia coli DNA photolyase and (A)BC excinuclease, we show that the drug inhibits photoreactivation and nucleotide excision repair by two different mechanisms. Caffeine inhibits photoreactivation by interfering with the specific binding of photolyase to damaged DNA, and it inhibits nucleotide excision repair by promoting nonspecific binding of the damage-recognition subunit, UvrA, of (A)BC excinuclease. A number of other intercalators, including acriflavin and ethidium bromide, appear to inhibit the excinuclease by a similar mechanism--that is, by trapping the UvrA subunit in nonproductive complexes on undamaged DNA.

  20. What occurred in the reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Described is what occurred in the reactors of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant at the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami (Mar. 11, 2011) from the aspect of engineering science. The tsunami attacked the Plant 1 hr after the quake. The Plant had reactors in buildings no.1-4 at 10 m height from the normal sea level which was flooded by 1.5-5.5 m high wave. All reactors in no.1-6 in the Plant were the boiling water type, and their core nuclear reactions were stopped within 3 sec due to the first quake by control rods inserted automatically. Reactors in no.1-5 lost their external AC power sources by the breakdown and subsequent submergence (no.1-4) of various equipments and in no.1, 2 and 4, the secondary DC power was then lost by the battery death. Although the isolation condenser started to cool the reactor in no.1 after DC cut, its valve was then kept closed to heat up the reactor, leading to the reaction of heated Zr in the fuel tube and water to yield H 2 which was accumulated in the building: the cause of hydrogen explosion on 12th. The reactor in no.2 had the reactor core isolation cooling system (RCIC) which operated normally for few hrs, then probably stopped to heat up the reactor, resulting in meltdown of the core but no explosion occurred because of the opened door of the blowout panel on the wall by the blast of no.1 explosion. The reactor in no.3 had RCIC and high pressure coolant injection system, but their works stopped to result in the core damage and H 2 accumulation leading to the explosion on 14th. The reactor in no.4 had not been operated because of its periodical annual examination, but was explored on 15th, of which cause was thought to be due to backward flow of H 2 from no.3. Finally, the author discusses about this accident from the industrial aspect of the design of safety level (defense in depth) on international views, and problems and tasks given. (T.T.)

  1. Plasma membrane wounding and repair in pulmonary diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Xiaofei; Hubmayr, Rolf D; Li, Changgong; Zhao, Xiaoli

    2017-03-01

    Various pathophysiological conditions such as surfactant dysfunction, mechanical ventilation, inflammation, pathogen products, environmental exposures, and gastric acid aspiration stress lung cells, and the compromise of plasma membranes occurs as a result. The mechanisms necessary for cells to repair plasma membrane defects have been extensively investigated in the last two decades, and some of these key repair mechanisms are also shown to occur following lung cell injury. Because it was theorized that lung wounding and repair are involved in the pathogenesis of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), in this review, we summarized the experimental evidence of lung cell injury in these two devastating syndromes and discuss relevant genetic, physical, and biological injury mechanisms, as well as mechanisms used by lung cells for cell survival and membrane repair. Finally, we discuss relevant signaling pathways that may be activated by chronic or repeated lung cell injury as an extension of our cell injury and repair focus in this review. We hope that a holistic view of injurious stimuli relevant for ARDS and IPF could lead to updated experimental models. In addition, parallel discussion of membrane repair mechanisms in lung cells and injury-activated signaling pathways would encourage research to bridge gaps in current knowledge. Indeed, deep understanding of lung cell wounding and repair, and discovery of relevant repair moieties for lung cells, should inspire the development of new therapies that are likely preventive and broadly effective for targeting injurious pulmonary diseases. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Earl occurring and continuing effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, B.R.; Hahn, F.F.

    1989-01-01

    This chapter develops health-risk models for early and continuing effects of exposure to beta or gamma radiation that could be associated with light water nuclear power plant accidents. The main purpose of the chapter is to provide details on each health-risk model and on the data used. Early and continuing effects considered are prodromal symptoms and nonneoplastic diseases that usually occur soon after a brief radiation exposure. These effects are generally associated with relatively high (greater than 1 Gy) absorbed organ doses. For most of the effects considered, there is an absorbed organ dose threshold below which no effects are seen. Some information is provided on health effects observed in victims of the Chernobyl power plant accident. Organs of primary interest, because of their high sensitivity or their potential for receiving large doses, are bone marrow, gastrointestinal tract, thyroid glands, lungs, skin, gonads, and eyes. Exposure of the fetus is also considered. Additional data and modeling techniques available since publication of the Reactor Safety Study were used to obtain models for morbidity and mortality

  3. Does overtraining occur in triathletes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Margaritis

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available 1. Objective: Long distance triathlon training is characterized by considerably high volume training loads. This volume can provoke an overtraining state. The aim of the study was to determine whether overtraining occurs in well-trained male triathletes in relation with their volume training loads. 2. Experimental design: A questionnaire investigation was completed two days before the Nice long-distance triathlon (October 1995: 4-km swim, 120-km bike ride and 30-km run. 3. Participants: Ninety-three well-trained male triathletes who took part in the triathlon race. 4. Measures: A questionnaire to relate clinical symptoms, which are known to appear in case of overtraining, was collected. 5. Results: 39.8% of the questioned triathletes reported a decrease in triathlon performances within the last month preceding the race. Moreover, these triathletes exhibited significantly more overtraining-relied symptoms than the others (5.9±3.8 vs 3.4±2.6, P<0.05. Surprisingly, the occurrence of overtraining in triathletes appears not to depend on the volume training loads. 6. Conclusions: These results suggest that overtraining has to be considered in the case of triathletes. This preliminary study evidences the need for further investigation in order to monitor triathletes training respond and prevent overtraining.

  4. Human inherited diseases with altered mechanisms for DNA repair and mutagenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleaver, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    A variety of human diseases involving clinical symptoms of increased cancer risk, and disorders of the central nervous system, and of hematopoietic, immunological, ocular, and cutaneous tissues and embryological development have defects in biochemical pathways for excision repair of damaged DNA. Excision repair has multiple branches by which damaged nucleotides, bases, and cross-links are excised and requires cofactors that control the access of repair enzymes to damage in DNA in chromatin. Diseases in which repair defects are a consistent feature of their biochemistry include xeroderma pigmentosum, ataxia telangiectasia and Fanconi's anemia.

  5. Laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair: lessons learned from 3,100 hernia repairs over 15 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulucq, Jean-Louis; Wintringer, Pascal; Mahajna, Ahmad

    2009-03-01

    Two revolutions in inguinal hernia repair surgery have occurred during the last two decades. The first was the introduction of tension-free hernia repair by Liechtenstein in 1989 and the second was the application of laparoscopic surgery to the treatment of inguinal hernia in the early 1990s. The purposes of this study were to assess the safety and effectiveness of laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal (TEP) repair and to discuss the technical changes that we faced on the basis of our accumulative experience. Patients who underwent an elective inguinal hernia repair at the Department of Abdominal Surgery at the Institute of Laparoscopic Surgery (ILS), Bordeaux, between June 1990 and May 2005 were enrolled retrospectively in this study. Patient demographic data, operative and postoperative course, and outpatient follow-up were studied. A total of 3,100 hernia repairs were included in the study. The majority of the hernias were repaired by TEP technique; the repair was done by transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) repair in only 3%. Eleven percent of the hernias were recurrences after conventional repair. Mean operative time was 17 min in unilateral hernia and 24 min in bilateral hernia. There were 36 hernias (1.2%) that required conversion: 12 hernias were converted to open anterior Liechtenstein and 24 to laparoscopic TAPP technique. The incidence of intraoperative complications was low. Most of the patients were discharged at the second day of the surgery. The overall postoperative morbidity rate was 2.2%. The incidence of recurrence rate was 0.35%. The recurrence rate for the first 200 repairs was 2.5%, but it decreased to 0.47% for the subsequent 1,254 hernia repairs According to our experience, in the hands of experienced laparoscopic surgeons, laparoscopic hernia repair seems to be the favored approach for most types of inguinal hernias. TEP is preferred over TAPP as the peritoneum is not violated and there are fewer intra-abdominal complications.

  6. The two faces of endogenous DNA editing enzymes: Promoting ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The two faces of endogenous DNA editing enzymes: Promoting gene mutations as well as genome repair. Type B lymphocytes are a specific type of white blood cell within our immune system. They produce and export antibodies which seek out, attach to, and neutralize microbes and toxins. A unique way that B ...

  7. Relationship of DNA repair processes to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in mammalian cells. Progress report, November 1, 1979-October 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, H.H.

    1980-10-01

    The objective of this research is to determine the role of DNA repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in mammalian cells. Use of the host-cell reactivation viral suicide enrichment procedure was initiated in the isolation of repair-deficient mutants. Lightly mutagenized BHK cells were infected with irradiated Herpes simplex virus (HSV); several radiation-sensitive strains were isolated among the survivors of the infection. The characterization of these strains is progressing and the enrichments are continuing. That alterations in the frequency of mutation of C3H/10T 1/2 cells, occurring as a result of holding the cells in a confluent state following treatment with ethylmethane sulfonate, parallel the alterations in the frequency of neoplastic transformation was found. The repair capabilities of BHK cells were found to be intermediate in comparison to repair-proficient and -deficient human cells with regard to the reactivation of HSV treated with various inactivating agents. The effect of confluency and of low serum levels on DNA synthesis, as well as the response to the cytotoxic effects of MNNG and acriflavin were determined in BHK cells in preparation for the investigation of the role of DNA repair in mutagenesis and transformation. It was also found that C3H/10T 1/2 cells partially recover from the toxic effects of 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide if they are held in a confluent state for 6 to 22 hrs following treatment. Addition of catalase did not alleviate the toxic effects of 4-NQO. The cells contain a relatively high endogenous level of this enzyme

  8. Relationship of DNA repair processes to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in mammalian cells. Progress report, November 1, 1979-October 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, H.H.

    1980-10-01

    The objective of this research is to determine the role of DNA repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in mammalian cells. Use of the host-cell reactivation viral suicide enrichment procedure was initiated in the isolation of repair-deficient mutants. Lightly mutagenized BHK cells were infected with irradiated Herpes simplex virus (HSV); several radiation-sensitive strains were isolated among the survivors of the infection. The characterization of these strains is progressing and the enrichments are continuing. That alterations in the frequency of mutation of C3H/10T 1/2 cells, occurring as a result of holding the cells in a confluent state following treatment with ethylmethane sulfonate, parallel the alterations in the frequency of neoplastic transformation was found. The repair capabilities of BHK cells were found to be intermediate in comparison to repair-proficient and -deficient human cells with regard to the reactivation of HSV treated with various inactivating agents. The effect of confluency and of low serum levels on DNA synthesis, as well as the response to the cytotoxic effects of MNNG and acriflavin were determined in BHK cells in preparation for the investigation of the role of DNA repair in mutagenesis and transformation. It was also found that C3H/10T 1/2 cells partially recover from the toxic effects of 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide if they are held in a confluent state for 6 to 22 hrs following treatment. Addition of catalase did not alleviate the toxic effects of 4-NQO. The cells contain a relatively high endogenous level of this enzyme. (ERB)

  9. Ceramic restoration repair: report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Henrique Araújo Raposo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The esthetic and functional rehabilitation of patients with multiple missing teeth can be performed with several techniques and materials. Ceramic restorations provide reliable masticatory function and good esthetics. However, fracture can occur in some cases due to their brittle behavior. In some cases, the replacement of an extensive prosthesis is a problem due to the high treatment cost. In this paper, two cases are presented, in which fractures occurred in extensive metal-ceramic fixed partial dentures, and their replacement was not possible. Ceramic repair was chosen and the sequences of treatment with and without presence of the ceramic fragment are also discussed. The cases illustrate that, in some situations, fractured metal-ceramic partial dentures can be successfully repaired when prosthetic replacement is not a choice. Prosthodontists must use alternatives that allow a reliable repair to extensive metal-ceramic fixed partial dentures. Surface preparation of the ceramic with hydrofluoric acid in conjunction with a silane coupling agent is essential for a predictable bonding of composite resin. The repair performed with composite resin is an esthetic and functional alternative when extensive fixed partial dentures cannot be replaced.

  10. Enzyme inhibition by iminosugars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López, Óscar; Qing, Feng-Ling; Pedersen, Christian Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Imino- and azasugar glycosidase inhibitors display pH dependant inhibition reflecting that both the inhibitor and the enzyme active site have groups that change protonation state with pH. With the enzyme having two acidic groups and the inhibitor one basic group, enzyme-inhibitor complexes...

  11. Meniscal repair devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, F A; Herbert, M A

    2000-09-01

    Meniscal repair devices not requiring accessory incisions are attractive. Many factors contribute to their clinical effectiveness including their biomechanical characteristics. This study compared several new meniscal repair devices with standard meniscal suture techniques. Using a porcine model, axis-of-insertion loads were applied to various meniscal sutures and repair devices. A single device or stitch was placed in a created meniscal tear and a load applied. Both loads and modes of failure were recorded. The load-to-failure data show stratification into 4 distinct statistical groups. Group A, 113 N for a double vertical stitch; group B, 80 N for a single vertical stitch; group C, 57 N for the BioStinger, 56 N for a horizontal mattress stitch, and 50 N for the T-Fix stitch; and group D, 33 N for the Meniscus Arrow (inserted by hand or gun), 32 N for the Clearfix screw, 31 N for the SDsorb staple, 30 N for the Mitek meniscal repair system, and 27 N for the Biomet staple. The failure mechanism varied. Sutures broke away from the knot. The Meniscus Arrow and BioStinger pulled through the inner rim with the crossbar intact. The Clearfix screw failed by multiple mechanisms, whereas 1 leg of the SDsorb staple always pulled out of the outer rim. The Mitek device usually failed by pullout from the inner rim. The Biomet staple always broke at the crosshead or just below it. Although the surgeon should be aware of the material properties of the repair technique chosen for a meniscal repair, this information is only an indication of device performance and may not correlate with clinical healing results.

  12. DNA repair and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathore, Shakuntla; Joshi, Pankaj Kumar; Gaur, Sudha

    2012-01-01

    DNA repair refers to a collection of processes by which a cell identifies and corrects damage to the DNA molecule that encode it's genome. In human cells, both normal metabolic activities and environmental factors such as UV light and radiation can cause DNA damage, resulting in as many one million individual molecular lesions per day. Many of these lesions cause structural damage to the DNA molecule and can alter or eliminate the cell's ability to transcribe the gene that the affected DNA encodes. Other lesions include potentially harmful mutation in cell's genome which affect the survival of it's daughter cells after it undergoes mitosis. As a consequence, the DNA repair process is constantly active as it responds to damage in the DNA structure. Inherited mutation that affect DNA repair genes are strongly associated with high cancer risks in humans. Hereditary non polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is strongly associated with specific mutation in the DNA mismatch repair pathway. BRCA1, BRCA2 two famous mutation conferring a hugely increased risk of breast cancer on carrier, are both associated with a large number of DNA repair pathway, especially NHEJ and homologous recombination. Cancer therapy procedures such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy work by overwhelming the capacity of the cell to repair DNA damage, resulting in cell death. Cells that are most rapidly dividing most typically cancer cells are preferentially affected. The side effect is that other non-cancerous but rapidly dividing cells such as stem cells in the bone marrow are also affected. Modern cancer treatment attempt to localize the DNA damage to cells and tissue only associated with cancer, either by physical means (concentrating the therapeutic agent in the region of the tumor) or by biochemical means (exploiting a feature unique to cancer cells in the body). (author)

  13. Imaging and management of complications of open surgical repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayeemuddin, M.; Pherwani, A.D.; Asquith, J.R.

    2012-01-01

    Open repair is still considered the reference standard for long-term repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). In contrast to endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), patients with open surgical repair of AAA are not routinely followed up with imaging. Although complications following EVAR are widely recognized and routinely identified on follow-up imaging, complications also do occur following open surgical repair. With frequent use of multi-slice computed tomography (CT) angiography (CTA) in vascular patients, there is now improved recognition of the potential complications following open surgical repair. Many of these complications are increasingly being managed using endovascular techniques. The aim of this review is to illustrate a variety of potential complications that may occur following open surgical repair and to demonstrate their management using both surgical and endovascular techniques.

  14. Repair of DNA-polypeptide crosslinks by human excision nuclease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Joyce T.; Sancar, Aziz

    2006-03-01

    DNA-protein crosslinks are relatively common DNA lesions that form during the physiological processing of DNA by replication and recombination proteins, by side reactions of base excision repair enzymes, and by cellular exposure to bifunctional DNA-damaging agents such as platinum compounds. The mechanism by which pathological DNA-protein crosslinks are repaired in humans is not known. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of recognition and repair of protein-DNA and oligopeptide-DNA crosslinks by the human excision nuclease. Under our assay conditions, the human nucleotide excision repair system did not remove a 16-kDa protein crosslinked to DNA at a detectable level. However, 4- and 12-aa-long oligopeptides crosslinked to the DNA backbone were recognized by some of the damage recognition factors of the human excision nuclease with moderate selectivity and were excised from DNA at relatively efficient rates. Our data suggest that, if coupled with proteolytic degradation of the crosslinked protein, the human excision nuclease may be the major enzyme system for eliminating protein-DNA crosslinks from the genome. damage recognition | nucleotide excision repair

  15. The development of a remote repair system for deep water pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazer, Ian; Giles, John [Stolt Offshore MS Ltd., Aberdeen (United Kingdom)

    2000-07-01

    The ability to maintain a high level of flexibility within the contingency plans for sub sea pipeline repair is a critical issue normally achieved by basing the repair plans on diver intervention. This allows the pipeline operator flexibility to respond to particular repair situations as they occur, minimize up front planning and optimize the investment in repair equipment and stock. However for deep water pipelines all intervention must be performed by remote methods, which require the development of suitable equipment and more detailed repair procedures. This paper describes the development of a remotely operated pipeline repair system capable of working down to 3000 m and allowing a relatively high level of flexibility with minimum investment in repair stock. The repair system is based upon the Modular Advanced Tie-In System (MATIS) which has been successfully developed for the tie-in of deep water flow lines. The MATIS repair system is based on the use of standard flanges to replace a damaged section of pipe with a spool piece in a similar manner to a hyperbaric welded repair. Various repair scenarios are discussed in the paper together with the equipment and the procedures used to perform the repair. The paper will also discuss the other remote repair options such as hot tapping and friction stitch welding. (author)

  16. Current concepts in repair of extremity venous injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Timothy K; Clouse, W Darrin

    2016-04-01

    Extremity venous injury management remains controversial. The purpose of this communication is to offer perspective as well as experiential and technical insight into extremity venous injury repair. Available literature is reviewed and discussed. Historical context is provided. Indication, the decision process for repair, including technical conduct, is delineated. In particular, the authors' experiences in both civilian and wartime injury are used for perspective. Extremity venous injury repair was championed within data from the Vietnam Vascular Registry. However, patterns of extremity venous injury differ between combat and civilian settings. Since Vietnam, civilian descriptive series opine the benefits and potential complications associated with both venous injury repair and ligation. These surround extremity edema, chronic venous insufficiency, thromboembolism, and limb loss. Whereas no clear superiority in either approach has been identified to date, there appears to be no increased risk of pulmonary embolism or chronic venous changes with repair. Newer data from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and meta-analysis have reinforced this and also have suggested limb salvage benefit for extremity venous repair in combined arterial and venous injuries in modern settings. The patient's physiologic state and associated injury drive five triage categories suggesting vein injury management. Vein repair thrombosis occurs in a significant proportion, yet many recanalize and possibly have a positive impact on limb venous return. Further, early decompression favors reduced blood loss, acute edema, and inflammation, supporting collateral development. Large soft tissue injury minimizing collateral capacity increases the importance of repair. Constructs of repair are varied with modest differences in patency. Venous shunting is feasible, but specific roles remain nebulous. An aggressive posture toward extremity venous injury repair seems justified today because of the likely

  17. Composite Repair System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — GTL has developed an innovative composite repair methodology known as the Composite Repair System (CRS). In this phase I effort, CRS is being developed for the...

  18. About the Collision Repair Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA developed the Collision Repair Campaign to focus on meaningful risk reduction in the Collision Repair source sector to complement ongoing community air toxics work and attain reductions at a faster rate.

  19. Vesicovaginal Fistula Repair During Pregnancy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vesicovaginal Fistula Repair During Pregnancy: A Case Report ... Abstract. We report a repair of Vesicovaginal fistula during pregnancy that was aimed at preventing another spontaneous ... practices that encourage teenage marriage and girl.

  20. Ship Repair Workflow Cost Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McDevitt, Mike

    2003-01-01

    The effects of intermittent work patterns and funding on the costs of ship repair and maintenance were modeled for the San Diego region in 2002 for Supervisor of Shipbuilding and Repair (SUPSHIP) San Diego...

  1. Ability of Bacillus subtilis protoplasts to repair irradiated bacteriophage deoxyribonucleic acid via acquired and natural enzymatic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasbin, R.E.; Andersen, B.J.; Sutherland, B.M.

    1981-01-01

    A novel form of enzyme therapy was achieved by utilizing protoplasts of Bacillus subtilis. Photoreactivating enzyme of Escherichia coli was successfully inserted into the protoplasts of B. subtilis treated with polyethylene glycol. This enzyme was used to photoreactivate ultraviolet-damaged bacteriophage deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Furthermore, in polyethylene glycol-treated protoplasts, ultraviolet-irradiated transfecting bacteriophage DNA was shown to be a functional substrate for the host DNA excision repair system. Previous results (R.E. Yasbin, J.D. Fernwalt, and P.I. Fields, J. Bacteriol.; 137: 391-396) showed that ultraviolet-irradiated bacteriophage DNA could not be repaired via the excision repair system of competent cells. Therefore, the processing of bacteriophage DNA by protoplasts and by competent cells must be different. This sensitive protoplast assay can be used to identify and to isolate various types of DNA repair enzymes

  2. Dynamic regulation of cerebral DNA repair genes by psychological stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, Kristin; Aalling, Nadia; Wörtwein, Gitta

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal genotoxic insults from oxidative stress constitute a putative molecular link between stress and depression on the one hand, and cognitive dysfunction and dementia risk on the other. Oxidative modifications to DNA are repaired by specific enzymes; a process that plays a critical role...... restraint stress (6h/day) or daily handling (controls), and sacrificed after 1, 7 or 21 stress sessions. The mRNA expression of seven genes (Ogg1, Ape1, Ung1, Neil1, Xrcc1, Ercc1, Nudt1) involved in the repair of oxidatively damaged DNA was determined by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction...

  3. Deficiency of UV-induced excision repair in human thymocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gensler, H.L.; Lindberg, R.E.; Pinnas, J.L.; Jones, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    The capacity of human thymocytes and of differentiated lymphocytes circulating in peripheral blood to perform unscheduled DNA synthesis (a measure of nucleotide excision repair) after UV irradiation was measured by radioautographic analysis. Only 4% of immature T lymphocytes, but 68% of circulating lymphocytes exhibited unscheduled DNA synthesis. When UV sensitivity of peripheral blood lymphocytes and thymocytes from the same donor were compared, the thymocytes, in each case, were significantly more UV sensitive than were the circulating lymphocytes. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from subjects undergoing halothane and morphine anesthesia during surgery showed 56% less excision repair capacity than those from unanesthetized donors. The difference occurred in the number of cells capable of repair rather than in the extent of repair synthesis per cell. Ultraviolet-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis occurred in only 3% of the thymocytes removed from rats killed by cervical dislocation. Therefore, the deficiency of excision repair was observed in rat thymocytes which had not been affected by anesthesia or surgical trauma. The results indicate that immature T-cells are deficient in nucleotide excision repair whereas the majority of mature peripheral blood lymphocytes exhibit such repair. (author)

  4. Social repair of relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahnøe, Kristian Relsted

    2017-01-01

    organisations, friends and family, and communities. These social relations are viewed as the foundation of citizenship as experienced and practised. Focusing on how two dimensions of lived citizenship, namely rights-responsibilities and belonging, are affected by the social repairs, the chapter shows how...

  5. Comprehensive Small Engine Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hires, Bill; And Others

    This curriculum guide contains the basic information needed to repair all two- and four-stroke cycle engines. The curriculum covers four areas, each consisting of one or more units of instruction that include performance objectives, suggested activities for teacher and students, information sheets, assignment sheets, job sheets, visual aids,…

  6. Patent urachus repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools About MedlinePlus Show Search Search MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Patent urachus repair - series—Normal anatomy URL of this ...

  7. Patent urachus repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools About MedlinePlus Show Search Search MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Patent urachus repair URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ ...

  8. Aircraft Propeller Hub Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muth, Thomas R [ORNL; Peter, William H [ORNL

    2015-02-13

    The team performed a literature review, conducted residual stress measurements, performed failure analysis, and demonstrated a solid state additive manufacturing repair technique on samples removed from a scrapped propeller hub. The team evaluated multiple options for hub repair that included existing metal buildup technologies that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has already embraced, such as cold spray, high velocity oxy-fuel deposition (HVOF), and plasma spray. In addition the team helped Piedmont Propulsion Systems, LLC (PPS) evaluate three potential solutions that could be deployed at different stages in the life cycle of aluminum alloy hubs, in addition to the conventional spray coating method for repair. For new hubs, a machining practice to prevent fretting with the steel drive shaft was recommended. For hubs that were refurbished with some material remaining above the minimal material condition (MMC), a silver interface applied by an electromagnetic pulse additive manufacturing method was recommended. For hubs that were at or below the MMC, a solid state additive manufacturing technique using ultrasonic welding (UW) of thin layers of 7075 aluminum to the hub interface was recommended. A cladding demonstration using the UW technique achieved mechanical bonding of the layers showing promise as a viable repair method.

  9. Role of DNA repair in repair of cytogenetic damages. Slowly repaired DNA injuries involved in cytogenetic damages repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaichkina, S.I.; Rozanova, O.M.; Aptikaev, G.F.; Ganassi, E.Eh.

    1989-01-01

    Caffeine was used to study the kinetics of cytogenetic damages repair in Chinese hamster fibroblasts. Its half-time (90 min) was shown to correlate with that of repair of slowly repaired DNA damages. The caffeine-induced increase in the number of irreparable DNA damages, attributed to inhibition of double-strand break repair, is in a quantitative correlation with the effect of the cytogenetic damage modification

  10. Modes of DNA repair and replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanawalt, P.; Kondo, S.

    1979-01-01

    Modes of DNA repair and replication require close coordination as well as some overlap of enzyme functions. Some classes of recovery deficient mutants may have defects in replication rather than repair modes. Lesions such as the pyrimidine dimers produced by ultraviolet light irradiation are the blocks to normal DNA replication in vivo and in vitro. The DNA synthesis by the DNA polymerase 1 of E. coli is blocked at one nucleotide away from the dimerized pyrimidines in template strands. Thus, some DNA polymerases seem to be unable to incorporate nucleotides opposite to the non-pairing lesions in template DNA strands. The lesions in template DNA strands may block the sequential addition of nucleotides in the synthesis of daughter strands. Normal replication utilizes a constitutive ''error-free'' mode that copies DNA templates with high fidelity, but which may be totally blocked at a lesion that obscures the appropriate base pairing specificity. It might be expected that modified replication system exhibits generally high error frequency. The error rate of DNA polymerases may be controlled by the degree of phosphorylation of the enzyme. Inducible SOS system is controlled by recA genes that also control the pathways for recombination. It is possible that SOS system involves some process other than the modification of a blocked replication apparatus to permit error-prone transdimer synthesis. (Yamashita, S.)

  11. Cleft lip and palate repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002979.htm Cleft lip and palate repair To use the sharing features on this ... Cheiloplasty; Cleft rhinoplasty; Palatoplasty; Tip rhinoplasty Patient Instructions Cleft lip and palate repair - discharge Images Cleft lip repair - series References ...

  12. DNA repair in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regan, J.D.; Carrier, W.L.; Kusano, I.; Furuno-Fukushi, I.; Dunn, W.C. Jr.; Francis, A.A.; Lee, W.H.

    1982-01-01

    Our primary objective is to elucidate the molecular events in human cells when cellular macromolecules such as DNA are damaged by radiation or chemical agents. We study and characterize (i) the sequence of DNA repair events, (ii) the various modalities of repair, (iii) the genetic inhibition of repair due to mutation, (iv) the physiological inhibition of repair due to mutation, (v) the physiological inhibition of repair due to biochemical inhibitors, and (vi) the genetic basis of repair. Our ultimate goals are to (i) isolate and analyze the repair component of the mutagenic and/or carcinogenic event in human cells, and (ii) elucidate the magnitude and significance of this repair component as it impinges on the practical problems of human irradiation or exposure to actual or potential chemical mutagens and carcinogens. The significance of these studies lies in (i) the ubiquitousness of repair (most organisms, including man, have several complex repair systems), (ii) the belief that mutagenic and carcinogenic events may arise only from residual (nonrepaired) lesions or that error-prone repair systems may be the major induction mechanisms of the mutagenic or carcinogenic event, and (iii) the clear association of repair defects and highly carcinogenic disease states in man [xeroderma pigmentosum (XP)

  13. Panchromatic cooperative hyperspectral adaptive wide band deletion repair method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bitao; Shi, Chunyu

    2018-02-01

    In the hyperspectral data, the phenomenon of stripe deletion often occurs, which seriously affects the efficiency and accuracy of data analysis and application. Narrow band deletion can be directly repaired by interpolation, and this method is not ideal for wide band deletion repair. In this paper, an adaptive spectral wide band missing restoration method based on panchromatic information is proposed, and the effectiveness of the algorithm is verified by experiments.

  14. Aspects of DNA repair and nucleotide pool imbalance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holliday, R.

    1985-01-01

    Evidence that optimum repair depends on adequate pools of deoxynucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs) comes from the study of pyrimidine auxotrophs of Ustilago maydis. These strains are sensitive to UV light and X-rays, and for pyr1-1 it has been shown that the intracellular concentration of dTTP is reduced about 7-fold. The survival curve of pyr1-1 after UV-treatment, and split dose experiments with wild-type cells, provide evidence for an inducible repair mechanism, which probably depends on genetic recombination. Although inducible repair saves cellular resources, it has the disadvantage of becoming ineffective at doses which are high enough to inactivate the repressed structural gene(s) for repair enzymes. It is clear that a wide variety of repair mechanisms have evolved to remove lesions which arise either spontaneously or as a result of damage from external agents. Nevertheless, it would be incorrect to assume that all species require all possible pathways of repair. It is now well established that the accuracy of DNA and protein synthesis depends on proof-reading or editing mechanisms. Optimum accuracy levels will evolve from the balance between error avoidance in macromolecular synthesis and physiological efficiency in growth and propagation.

  15. A novel method for monitoring functional lesion-specific recruitment of repair proteins in live cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodrick, Jordan; Gupta, Suhani; Khatkar, Pooja; Dave, Kalpana; Levashova, Darya; Choudhury, Sujata; Elias, Hadi; Saha, Tapas; Mueller, Susette; Roy, Rabindra

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A method of monitoring lesion-specific recruitment of proteins in vivo is described. • Recruitment of repair enzymes to abasic sites is monitored by co-localization. • Repair protein recruitment is consistent with known protein–protein relationships. • Cells demonstrated complete repair of abasic sites by 90 min. - Abstract: DNA–protein relationships have been studied by numerous methods, but a particular gap in methodology lies in the study of DNA adduct-specific interactions with proteins in vivo, which particularly affects the field of DNA repair. Using the repair of a well-characterized and ubiquitous adduct, the abasic (AP) site, as a model, we have developed a comprehensive method of monitoring DNA lesion-specific recruitment of proteins in vivo over time. We utilized a surrogate system in which a Cy3-labeled plasmid containing a single AP-site was transfected into cells, and the interaction of the labeled DNA with BER enzymes, including APE1, Polβ, LIG1, and FEN1, was monitored by immunofluorescent staining of the enzymes by Alexafluor-488-conjugated secondary antibody. The recruitment of enzymes was characterized by quantification of Cy3-Alexafluor-488 co-localization. To validate the microscopy-based method, repair of the transfected AP-site DNA was also quantified at various time points post-transfection using a real time PCR-based method. Notably, the recruitment time kinetics for each enzyme were consistent with AP-site repair time kinetics. This microscopy-based methodology is reliable in detecting the recruitment of proteins to specific DNA substrates and can be extended to study other in vivo DNA–protein relationships in any DNA sequence and in the context of any DNA structure in transfectable proliferating or quiescent cells. The method may be applied to a variety of disciplines of nucleic acid transaction pathways, including repair, replication, transcription, and recombination

  16. A novel method for monitoring functional lesion-specific recruitment of repair proteins in live cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodrick, Jordan; Gupta, Suhani; Khatkar, Pooja; Dave, Kalpana; Levashova, Darya; Choudhury, Sujata; Elias, Hadi; Saha, Tapas; Mueller, Susette; Roy, Rabindra, E-mail: rr228@georgetown.edu

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • A method of monitoring lesion-specific recruitment of proteins in vivo is described. • Recruitment of repair enzymes to abasic sites is monitored by co-localization. • Repair protein recruitment is consistent with known protein–protein relationships. • Cells demonstrated complete repair of abasic sites by 90 min. - Abstract: DNA–protein relationships have been studied by numerous methods, but a particular gap in methodology lies in the study of DNA adduct-specific interactions with proteins in vivo, which particularly affects the field of DNA repair. Using the repair of a well-characterized and ubiquitous adduct, the abasic (AP) site, as a model, we have developed a comprehensive method of monitoring DNA lesion-specific recruitment of proteins in vivo over time. We utilized a surrogate system in which a Cy3-labeled plasmid containing a single AP-site was transfected into cells, and the interaction of the labeled DNA with BER enzymes, including APE1, Polβ, LIG1, and FEN1, was monitored by immunofluorescent staining of the enzymes by Alexafluor-488-conjugated secondary antibody. The recruitment of enzymes was characterized by quantification of Cy3-Alexafluor-488 co-localization. To validate the microscopy-based method, repair of the transfected AP-site DNA was also quantified at various time points post-transfection using a real time PCR-based method. Notably, the recruitment time kinetics for each enzyme were consistent with AP-site repair time kinetics. This microscopy-based methodology is reliable in detecting the recruitment of proteins to specific DNA substrates and can be extended to study other in vivo DNA–protein relationships in any DNA sequence and in the context of any DNA structure in transfectable proliferating or quiescent cells. The method may be applied to a variety of disciplines of nucleic acid transaction pathways, including repair, replication, transcription, and recombination.

  17. Component Repair Times Obtained from MSPI Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eide, Steven A.; Cadwallader, Lee

    2015-01-01

    Information concerning times to repair or restore equipment to service given a failure is valuable to probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs). Examples of such uses in modern PRAs include estimation of the probability of failing to restore a failed component within a specified time period (typically tied to recovering a mitigating system before core damage occurs at nuclear power plants) and the determination of mission times for support system initiating event (SSIE) fault tree models. Information on equipment repair or restoration times applicable to PRA modeling is limited and dated for U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. However, the Mitigating Systems Performance Index (MSPI) program covering all U.S. commercial nuclear power plants provides up-to-date information on restoration times for a limited set of component types. This paper describes the MSPI program data available and analyzes the data to obtain median and mean component restoration times as well as non-restoration cumulative probability curves. The MSPI program provides guidance for monitoring both planned and unplanned outages of trains of selected mitigating systems deemed important to safety. For systems included within the MSPI program, plants monitor both train UA and component unreliability (UR) against baseline values. If the combined system UA and UR increases sufficiently above established baseline results (converted to an estimated change in core damage frequency or CDF), a ''white'' (or worse) indicator is generated for that system. That in turn results in increased oversight by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and can impact a plant's insurance rating. Therefore, there is pressure to return MSPI program components to service as soon as possible after a failure occurs. Three sets of unplanned outages might be used to determine the component repair durations desired in this article: all unplanned outages for the train type that includes the component of

  18. Component Repair Times Obtained from MSPI Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eide, Steven A. [Curtiss-Wright/Scietech, Ketchum, ID (United States); Cadwallader, Lee [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Information concerning times to repair or restore equipment to service given a failure is valuable to probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs). Examples of such uses in modern PRAs include estimation of the probability of failing to restore a failed component within a specified time period (typically tied to recovering a mitigating system before core damage occurs at nuclear power plants) and the determination of mission times for support system initiating event (SSIE) fault tree models. Information on equipment repair or restoration times applicable to PRA modeling is limited and dated for U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. However, the Mitigating Systems Performance Index (MSPI) program covering all U.S. commercial nuclear power plants provides up-to-date information on restoration times for a limited set of component types. This paper describes the MSPI program data available and analyzes the data to obtain median and mean component restoration times as well as non-restoration cumulative probability curves. The MSPI program provides guidance for monitoring both planned and unplanned outages of trains of selected mitigating systems deemed important to safety. For systems included within the MSPI program, plants monitor both train UA and component unreliability (UR) against baseline values. If the combined system UA and UR increases sufficiently above established baseline results (converted to an estimated change in core damage frequency or CDF), a “white” (or worse) indicator is generated for that system. That in turn results in increased oversight by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and can impact a plant’s insurance rating. Therefore, there is pressure to return MSPI program components to service as soon as possible after a failure occurs. Three sets of unplanned outages might be used to determine the component repair durations desired in this article: all unplanned outages for the train type that includes the component of interest, only

  19. Enzymes for improved biomass conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunecky, Roman; Himmel, Michael E.

    2016-02-02

    Disclosed herein are enzymes and combinations of the enzymes useful for the hydrolysis of cellulose and the conversion of biomass. Methods of degrading cellulose and biomass using enzymes and cocktails of enzymes are also disclosed.

  20. Repair technology for steam generator tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Ho; Jung, Hyun Kyu; Jung, Seung Ho; Kim, Chang Hoi; Jung, Young Moo; Seo, Yong Chil; Kim, Jung Su; Seo, Moo Hong

    2001-02-01

    The most commonly used sleeving materials are thermally treated Alloy 600 and thermally treated Alloy 690 Alloy. Currently, thermally treated Alloy 690 and Alloy 800 are being offered although Alloy 800 has not been licensed in the US. To install sleeve, joint strength, leak tightness, PWSCC resistance, evaluation on process parameter range and the effect of equipments and procedures on repair plan and radiation damage have to be investigated before sleeving. ABB CE provides three type of leak tight Alloy 690 TIG welded and PLUSS sleeve. Currently, Direct Tube Repair technique using Nd:YAG laser has been developed by ABB CE and Westinghouse. FTI has brazed and kinetic sleeve designs for recirculating steam generator and hydraulic and rolled sleeve designs for one-through steam generators. Westinghouse provides HEJ, brazed and laser welded sleeve design. When sleeve is installed in order to repair the damaged S/G tubes, it is certain that defects can be occurred due to the plastic induced stress and thermal stress. Therefore it is important to minimize the residual stress. FTI provides the electrosleeve technique as a future repair candidate using electroplating.

  1. Repair technology for steam generator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Ho; Jung, Hyun Kyu; Jung, Seung Ho; Kim, Chang Hoi; Jung, Young Moo; Seo, Yong Chil; Kim, Jung Su; Seo, Moo Hong

    2001-02-01

    The most commonly used sleeving materials are thermally treated Alloy 600 and thermally treated Alloy 690 Alloy. Currently, thermally treated Alloy 690 and Alloy 800 are being offered although Alloy 800 has not been licensed in the US. To install sleeve, joint strength, leak tightness, PWSCC resistance, evaluation on process parameter range and the effect of equipments and procedures on repair plan and radiation damage have to be investigated before sleeving. ABB CE provides three type of leak tight Alloy 690 TIG welded and PLUSS sleeve. Currently, Direct Tube Repair technique using Nd:YAG laser has been developed by ABB CE and Westinghouse. FTI has brazed and kinetic sleeve designs for recirculating steam generator and hydraulic and rolled sleeve designs for one-through steam generators. Westinghouse provides HEJ, brazed and laser welded sleeve design. When sleeve is installed in order to repair the damaged S/G tubes, it is certain that defects can be occurred due to the plastic induced stress and thermal stress. Therefore it is important to minimize the residual stress. FTI provides the electrosleeve technique as a future repair candidate using electroplating

  2. Biomaterials based strategies for rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Song; Su, Wei; Shah, Vishva; Hobson, Divia; Yildirimer, Lara; Yeung, Kelvin W K; Zhao, Jinzhong; Cui, Wenguo; Zhao, Xin

    2017-09-01

    Tearing of the rotator cuff commonly occurs as among one of the most frequently experienced tendon disorders. While treatment typically involves surgical repair, failure rates to achieve or sustain healing range from 20 to 90%. The insufficient capacity to recover damaged tendon to heal to the bone, especially at the enthesis, is primarily responsible for the failure rates reported. Various types of biomaterials with special structures have been developed to improve tendon-bone healing and tendon regeneration, and have received considerable attention for replacement, reconstruction, or reinforcement of tendon defects. In this review, we first give a brief introduction of the anatomy of the rotator cuff and then discuss various design strategies to augment rotator cuff repair. Furthermore, we highlight current biomaterials used for repair and their clinical applications as well as the limitations in the literature. We conclude this article with challenges and future directions in designing more advanced biomaterials for augmentation of rotator cuff repair. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Repair mechanisms and exposure standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, W.A.

    1978-01-01

    The following topics are discussed; public policy for setting radiation standards; use of linear, nonthreshold theory in setting radiation standards; dose-rate dependence; occupational exposure to radiation; radon inhalation from radium in the soil in the vicinity of the phosphate industry; relation of repair mechanisms for cell survival to cancer induction; application of information on genetic repair to humans and to cancer induction; importance of repair processes in radiation protection standards; corrective factors for repair processes; relation of repair processes to age, sex, and other factors; and population distribution in radiosensitivity

  4. Guardians of the mycobacterial genome: A review on DNA repair systems in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amandeep

    2017-12-01

    The genomic integrity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is continuously threatened by the harsh survival conditions inside host macrophages, due to immune and antibiotic stresses. Faithful genome maintenance and repair must be accomplished under stress for the bacillus to survive in the host, necessitating a robust DNA repair system. The importance of DNA repair systems in pathogenesis is well established. Previous examination of the M. tuberculosis genome revealed homologues of almost all the major DNA repair systems, i.e. nucleotide excision repair (NER), base excision repair (BER), homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). However, recent developments in the field have pointed to the presence of novel proteins and pathways in mycobacteria. Homologues of archeal mismatch repair proteins were recently reported in mycobacteria, a pathway previously thought to be absent. RecBCD, the major nuclease-helicase enzymes involved in HR in E. coli, were implicated in the single-strand annealing (SSA) pathway. Novel roles of archeo-eukaryotic primase (AEP) polymerases, previously thought to be exclusive to NHEJ, have been reported in BER. Many new proteins with a probable role in DNA repair have also been discovered. It is now realized that the DNA repair systems in M. tuberculosis are highly evolved and have redundant backup mechanisms to mend the damage. This review is an attempt to summarize our current understanding of the DNA repair systems in M. tuberculosis.

  5. FGF2 mediates DNA repair in epidermoid carcinoma cells exposed to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, Melanie; Hafner, Sophie; Moratille, Sandra; Vaigot, Pierre; Rigaud, Odile; Martin, Michele T.; Mine, Solene

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) is a well-known survival factor. However, its role in DNA repair is poorly documented. The present study was designed to investigate in epidermoid carcinoma cells the potential role of FGF2 in DNA repair. The side population (SP) with cancer stem cell-like properties and the main population (MP) were isolated from human A431 squamous carcinoma cells. Radiation-induced DNA damage and repair were assessed using the alkaline comet assay. FGF2 expression was quantified by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). SP cells exhibited rapid repair of radiation induced DNA damage and a high constitutive level of nuclear FGF2. Blocking FGF2 signaling abrogated the rapid DNA repair. In contrast, in MP cells, a slower repair of damage was associated with low basal expression of FGF2. Moreover, the addition of exogenous FGF2 accelerated DNA repair in MP cells. When irradiated, SP cells secreted FGF2, whereas MP cells did not. FGF2 was found to mediate DNA repair in epidermoid carcinoma cells. We postulate that carcinoma stem cells would be intrinsically primed to rapidly repair DNA damage by a high constitutive level of nuclear FGF2. In contrast, the main population with a low FGF2 content exhibits a lower repair rate which can be increased by exogenous FGF2. (authors)

  6. Immobilized enzymes and cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucke, C; Wiseman, A

    1981-04-04

    This article reviews the current state of the art of enzyme and cell immobilization and suggests advances which might be made during the 1980's. Current uses of immobilized enzymes include the use of glucoamylase in the production of glucose syrups from starch and glucose isomerase in the production of high fructose corn syrup. Possibilities for future uses of immobilized enzymes and cells include the utilization of whey and the production of ethanol.

  7. Profiling the orphan enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of Next Generation Sequencing generates an incredible amount of sequence and great potential for new enzyme discovery. Despite this huge amount of data and the profusion of bioinformatic methods for function prediction, a large part of known enzyme activities is still lacking an associated protein sequence. These particular activities are called “orphan enzymes”. The present review proposes an update of previous surveys on orphan enzymes by mining the current content of public databases. While the percentage of orphan enzyme activities has decreased from 38% to 22% in ten years, there are still more than 1,000 orphans among the 5,000 entries of the Enzyme Commission (EC) classification. Taking into account all the reactions present in metabolic databases, this proportion dramatically increases to reach nearly 50% of orphans and many of them are not associated to a known pathway. We extended our survey to “local orphan enzymes” that are activities which have no representative sequence in a given clade, but have at least one in organisms belonging to other clades. We observe an important bias in Archaea and find that in general more than 30% of the EC activities have incomplete sequence information in at least one superkingdom. To estimate if candidate proteins for local orphans could be retrieved by homology search, we applied a simple strategy based on the PRIAM software and noticed that candidates may be proposed for an important fraction of local orphan enzymes. Finally, by studying relation between protein domains and catalyzed activities, it appears that newly discovered enzymes are mostly associated with already known enzyme domains. Thus, the exploration of the promiscuity and the multifunctional aspect of known enzyme families may solve part of the orphan enzyme issue. We conclude this review with a presentation of recent initiatives in finding proteins for orphan enzymes and in extending the enzyme world by the discovery of new

  8. DNA repair deficiency in neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Dennis Kjølhede; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Stevnsner, Tinna V.

    2011-01-01

    Deficiency in repair of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage has been linked to several neurodegenerative disorders. Many recent experimental results indicate that the post-mitotic neurons are particularly prone to accumulation of unrepaired DNA lesions potentially leading to progressive...... neurodegeneration. Nucleotide excision repair is the cellular pathway responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA damage and deficiency in such repair is found in a number of diseases with neurodegenerative phenotypes, including Xeroderma Pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome. The main pathway for repairing oxidative...... base lesions is base excision repair, and such repair is crucial for neurons given their high rates of oxygen metabolism. Mismatch repair corrects base mispairs generated during replication and evidence indicates that oxidative DNA damage can cause this pathway to expand trinucleotide repeats, thereby...

  9. Enhancement of ultraviolet-DNA repair in denV gene transfectants and T4 endonuclease V-liposome recipients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kibitel, J.T.; Yee, V.; Yarosh, D.B.

    1991-01-01

    The phage T4 denV gene, coding for the pyrimidine-dimer specific T4 endonuclease V, was transfected into human repair-proficient fibroblasts, repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts, and wild type CHO hamster cells. Transfectants maintained denV DNA and expressed denV mRNA. Purified T4 endonuclease V encapsulated in liposomes was also used to treat repair-proficient and -deficient human cells. The denV transfected clones and liposome-treated cells showed increased unscheduled DNA synthesis and enhanced removal of pyrimidine dimers compared to controls. Both denV gene transfection and endonuclease V liposome treatment enhanced post-UV survival in xeroderma pigmentosum cells but had no effect on survival in repair-proficient human or hamster cells. The results demonstrate that an exogenous DNA repair enzyme can correct the DNA repair defect in xeroderma pigmentosum cells and enhance DNA repair in normal cells. (author)

  10. Handbook of Equipment Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-14

    state of leapin- fn’rw.rd. Tn recent years, many mechanical repair workers often write and ask us to reprint the book. In our consideration, however...ast 4iron 1. .-eat _--OSIS-RTS 5.5 . . 4-5 t4- cast -3.01 -6 ~.0 ’ ɘ.᝱ 5,,:e j?24 2 * 10- 5 aron C l 50 S lcon : Ielt rSSIS-RQTS-s;.4 u a 2.47 5at- .0

  11. Naturally occurring soil salinity does not reduce N-transforming enzymes or organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil salinity can negatively affect plant production and important biogeochemical cycles which are mainly carried out by soil microbes. The objective of this study was to contribute new information on soil biological N transformations by examining the impact primary salinity reduction has on a) the ...

  12. DNA repair: Dynamic defenders against cancer and aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuss, Jill O.; Cooper, Priscilla K.

    2006-04-01

    (UV) component of sunlight. NER can be divided into two classes based on where the repair occurs. NER occurring in DNA that is not undergoing transcription (i.e., most of the genome) is called global genome repair (GGR or GGNER), while NER taking place in the transcribed strand of active genes is called transcription-coupled repair (TCR or TC-NER). We will explore NER in more detail below. Mismatch repair (MMR) is another type of excision repair that specifically removes mispaired bases resulting from replication errors. DNA damage can also result in breaks in the DNA backbone, in one or both strands. Single-strand breaks (SSBs) are efficiently repaired by a mechanism that shares common features with the later steps in BER. Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are especially devastating since by definition there is no intact complementary strand to serve as a template for repair, and even one unrepaired DSB can be lethal [3]. In cells that have replicated their DNA prior to cell division, the missing information can be supplied by the duplicate copy, or sister chromatid, and DSBs in these cells are faithfully repaired by homologous recombination involving the exchange of strands of DNA between the two copies. However, most cells in the body are non-dividing, and in these cells the major mechanism for repairing DSBs is by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), which as the name implies involves joining two broken DNA ends together without a requirement for homologous sequence and which therefore has a high potential for loss of genetic information.

  13. The impact of cofactors and inhibitors on DNA repair synthesis after γ-irradiation in semi-permeable Escherichia coli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaertner, C.

    1981-01-01

    The DNA-repair synthesis in tuluol-permeable E. coli cells after γ-irradiation has been investigated in dependence on the co-facotrs. ATB and NAD by means of enzyme kinetics. A partly repair-deficient mutants were taken into consideration which are well characterized in view of molecular biology; they showed which enzyme functions participate in the γ-induced DNA repair synthesis. The inhibition of the DNA-repair synthesis by the intercalary substances Adriamycin and Proflavin has been described and compared with the survival rates after irradiation and after combined treatment by irradiation and intercalary agents. (orig./AJ) [de

  14. Repairing methods of steam turbine blades using welding procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazur, Z.; Cristalinas, V.; Kubiak, J.

    1995-01-01

    The steam turbine blades are subjected to the natural permanent wear or damage, which may be of mechanical or metallurgical origin. The typical damage occurring during the lifetime of turbine blading may be erosion, corrosion, foreign objects damage, rubbing and cracking caused by high cycle fatigue and creep crack growth. The nozzle and diaphragm vanes (stationary blades) of the steam turbine are elements whose damage is commonly occurring and they require special repair processes. The damage of the blade trailing edge of nozzle and diaphragm vanes, due to the former causes, may be refurbished by welding deposits or stainless steel inserts welded to the blades. Both repair methods of the stationary steam turbine blades are presented. The results of the blades refurbishment are an increase of the turbine availability, reliability and efficiency, and a decrease of the risk that failure will occur. Also, the repair cost versus the spare blades cost represent significant reduction of expenditure. 7 refs

  15. Chronic Degeneration Leads to Poor Healing of Repaired Massive Rotator Cuff Tears in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killian, Megan L; Cavinatto, Leonardo M; Ward, Samuel R; Havlioglu, Necat; Thomopoulos, Stavros; Galatz, Leesa M

    2015-10-01

    trabecular structure, and the repair had decreased strength, stiffness, and toughness, compared with the acute injury and repair group. Chronic degenerative changes in rotator cuff muscles, tendons, and bone led to inferior healing characteristics after repair compared with acute injuries and repair. The changes were not reversible after repair in the time course studied, consistent with clinical impressions. High retear rates after rotator cuff repair are associated with tear size and chronicity. Understanding the mechanisms behind this association may allow for targeted tissue therapy for tissue degeneration that occurs in the setting of chronic tears. © 2015 The Author(s).

  16. Artificial Enzymes, "Chemzymes"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Jeannette; Rousseau, Cyril Andre Raphaël; Pedersen, Lavinia Georgeta M

    2008-01-01

    Enzymes have fascinated scientists since their discovery and, over some decades, one aim in organic chemistry has been the creation of molecules that mimic the active sites of enzymes and promote catalysis. Nevertheless, even today, there are relatively few examples of enzyme models that successf......Enzymes have fascinated scientists since their discovery and, over some decades, one aim in organic chemistry has been the creation of molecules that mimic the active sites of enzymes and promote catalysis. Nevertheless, even today, there are relatively few examples of enzyme models...... that successfully perform Michaelis-Menten catalysis under enzymatic conditions (i.e., aqueous medium, neutral pH, ambient temperature) and for those that do, very high rate accelerations are seldomly seen. This review will provide a brief summary of the recent developments in artificial enzymes, so called...... "Chemzymes", based on cyclodextrins and other molecules. Only the chemzymes that have shown enzyme-like activity that has been quantified by different methods will be mentioned. This review will summarize the work done in the field of artificial glycosidases, oxidases, epoxidases, and esterases, as well...

  17. Magnetically responsive enzyme powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pospiskova, Kristyna, E-mail: kristyna.pospiskova@upol.cz [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Palacky University, Slechtitelu 11, 783 71 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Safarik, Ivo, E-mail: ivosaf@yahoo.com [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Palacky University, Slechtitelu 11, 783 71 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Department of Nanobiotechnology, Institute of Nanobiology and Structural Biology of GCRC, Na Sadkach 7, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic)

    2015-04-15

    Powdered enzymes were transformed into their insoluble magnetic derivatives retaining their catalytic activity. Enzyme powders (e.g., trypsin and lipase) were suspended in various liquid media not allowing their solubilization (e.g., saturated ammonium sulfate and highly concentrated polyethylene glycol solutions, ethanol, methanol, 2-propanol) and subsequently cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. Magnetic modification was successfully performed at low temperature in a freezer (−20 °C) using magnetic iron oxides nano- and microparticles prepared by microwave-assisted synthesis from ferrous sulfate. Magnetized cross-linked enzyme powders were stable at least for two months in water suspension without leakage of fixed magnetic particles. Operational stability of magnetically responsive enzymes during eight repeated reaction cycles was generally without loss of enzyme activity. Separation of magnetically modified cross-linked powdered enzymes from reaction mixtures was significantly simplified due to their magnetic properties. - Highlights: • Cross-linked enzyme powders were prepared in various liquid media. • Insoluble enzymes were magnetized using iron oxides particles. • Magnetic iron oxides particles were prepared by microwave-assisted synthesis. • Magnetic modification was performed under low (freezing) temperature. • Cross-linked powdered trypsin and lipase can be used repeatedly for reaction.

  18. Targeted enzyme prodrug therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellmann, N; Deckert, P M; Bachran, D; Fuchs, H; Bachran, C

    2010-09-01

    The cure of cancer is still a formidable challenge in medical science. Long-known modalities including surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy are successful in a number of cases; however, invasive, metastasized and inaccessible tumors still pose an unresolved and ongoing problem. Targeted therapies designed to locate, detect and specifically kill tumor cells have been developed in the past three decades as an alternative to treat troublesome cancers. Most of these therapies are either based on antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, targeted delivery of cytotoxic drugs or tumor site-specific activation of prodrugs. The latter is a two-step procedure. In the first step, a selected enzyme is accumulated in the tumor by guiding the enzyme or its gene to the neoplastic cells. In the second step, a harmless prodrug is applied and specifically converted by this enzyme into a cytotoxic drug only at the tumor site. A number of targeting systems, enzymes and prodrugs were investigated and improved since the concept was first envisioned in 1974. This review presents a concise overview on the history and latest developments in targeted therapies for cancer treatment. We cover the relevant technologies such as antibody-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (ADEPT), gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) as well as related therapies such as clostridial- (CDEPT) and polymer-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (PDEPT) with emphasis on prodrug-converting enzymes, prodrugs and drugs.

  19. Peroxidase enzymes regulate collagen extracellular matrix biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeNichilo, Mark O; Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Rayner, Timothy E; Borowicz, Romana A; Greenwood, John E; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    Myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase are heme-containing enzymes often physically associated with fibrotic tissue and cancer in various organs, without any direct involvement in promoting fibroblast recruitment and extracellular matrix (ECM) biosynthesis at these sites. We report herein novel findings that show peroxidase enzymes possess a well-conserved profibrogenic capacity to stimulate the migration of fibroblastic cells and promote their ability to secrete collagenous proteins to generate a functional ECM both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic studies conducted using cultured fibroblasts show that these cells are capable of rapidly binding and internalizing both myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase. Peroxidase enzymes stimulate collagen biosynthesis at a post-translational level in a prolyl 4-hydroxylase-dependent manner that does not require ascorbic acid. This response was blocked by the irreversible myeloperoxidase inhibitor 4-amino-benzoic acid hydrazide, indicating peroxidase catalytic activity is essential for collagen biosynthesis. These results suggest that peroxidase enzymes, such as myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase, may play a fundamental role in regulating the recruitment of fibroblast and the biosynthesis of collagen ECM at sites of normal tissue repair and fibrosis, with enormous implications for many disease states where infiltrating inflammatory cells deposit peroxidases. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Endovascular repair of blunt popliteal arterial injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Shan; Zhang, Xiquan; Chen, Zhong; Zhu, Wei; Pan, Xiaolin [Dept. of nterventional Vascular, The 148th Hospital of Chinese People' s Liberation Army, Zibo (China); Dong, Peng; Sun, Yequan [Dept. of Medical Imaging, Weifang Medical University, Weifang (China); Qi, Deming [Dept. of Medical Imaging, Qilu Medical University, Zibo (China)

    2016-09-15

    To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of endovascular repair for blunt popliteal arterial injuries. A retrospective analysis of seven patients with clinical suspicion of popliteal arterial injuries that were confirmed by arteriography was performed from September 2009 to July 2014. Clinical data included demographics, mechanism of injury, type of injury, location of injury, concomitant injuries, time of endovascular procedures, time interval from trauma to blood flow restoration, instrument utilized, and follow-up. All patients were male (mean age of 35.9 ± 10.3 years). The type of lesion involved intimal injury (n = 1), partial transection (n = 2), complete transection (n = 2), arteriovenous fistula (n = 1), and pseudoaneurysm (n = 1). All patients underwent endovascular repair of blunt popliteal arterial injuries. Technical success rate was 100%. Intimal injury was treated with a bare-metal stent. Pseudoaneurysm and popliteal artery transections were treated with bare-metal stents. Arteriovenous fistula was treated with bare-metal stent and coils. No perioperative death and procedure-related complication occurred. The average follow-up was 20.9 ± 2.3 months (range 18–24 months). One patient underwent intra-arterial thrombolysis due to stent thrombosis at 18 months after the procedure. All limbs were salvaged. Stent migration, deformation, or fracture was not found during the follow-up. Endovascular repair seems to be a viable approach for patients with blunt popliteal arterial injuries, especially on an emergency basis. Endovascular repair may be effective in the short-term. Further studies are required to evaluate the long-term efficacy of endovascular repair.

  1. Improved criteria for the repair of fabrication flaws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doctor, S.R.; Schuster, G.J.; Simonen, F.A.

    2003-01-01

    Section III of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for nuclear power plant components requires radiographic examinations (RT) of welds and requires repairs for RT indications that exceed code acceptable sizes. This paper describes research that has generated data on welding flaws, which indicated that the largest flaws occur in repaired welds. The fabrication flaws were detected in material removed from cancelled nuclear power plants using high sensitivity Nondestructive Examination (NDE) and validated by complementary NDE and destructive testing. Evidence suggests that repairs are often for small and benign RT indications at locations buried within the vessel or pipe wall. Probabilistic fracture mechanics calculations are described in this paper to predict the increases in vessel failure probabilities caused by the repair-induced flaws. Calculations address failures of embrittled vessel welds for pressurized thermal shock (PTS) transients. In this case small flaws, which are relatively common, can cause brittle fracture, such that the rarely encountered repair flaws of large sizes gave only modestly increased failure probabilities. The paper recommends the use of more discriminating ultrasonic examinations in place of RT examinations along with repair criteria based on a fitness-for-purpose approach that minimize the number of unjustified repairs. (author)

  2. Development of underwater YAG laser repair welding robots for tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miwa, Yasuhiro; Satoh, Syuichi; Ito, Kosuke; Kochi, Tsutomu; Kojima, Toshio; Ohwaki, Katsura; Morita, Ichiro

    1999-01-01

    A remote-controlled repair welding robot which uses YAG laser welding technology in underwater environment was developed. This is an underwater robot technology combined with a laser welding technology. This report will describe the structure and performance of this robot, and the welding test results. The repair welding robot consists of two parts. The one is driving equipment, and the other is welding unit. It can swim in the tank, move around the tank wall, and stay on the welding area. After that it starts YAG laser repair welding. The target of this technology is inner surface repair of some tanks made of austenitic stainless steel, for example RW (Radioactive Waste) tanks. A degradation by General Corrosion and so on might be occurred at inner surface of these tanks in BWR type nuclear power plants. If the damaged area is wide, repair welding works are done. Some workers go into the tank and set up scaffolding after full drainage. In many cases it spends too much time for draining water and repair welding preparation. If the repair welding works can be done in underwater environment, the outage period will be reduced. This is a great advantage. (author)

  3. The repair of damage to DNA in different cell types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karran, P.

    1974-01-01

    DNA single strand breaks induced by either X-ray irradiation or by methyl methanesulphonate (MMS) were studied in different lymphoid cell populations directly taken from the animal and maintained in tissue culture merely for the duration of the experiment. The results obtained from these cell populations were compared with those obtained with L5178Y cells maintained in tissue culture. All cell types studied were found to possess at least one class of enzymes required for repair of DNA damage, namely those enzymes involved in the rejoining of X-ray induced by MMS is different in each cell type. Repair replication was at much reduced levels and the endonucleolytic degradation was at much reduced levels and the endonucleolytic degradation was initiated at lower MMS concentration in the lymphoid cells as compared to L5178Y cells. It is suggested that the overall ''repair capacity'' of a population may be related to the number of cells in a cycle which, moreover, might be the only ones to have the ability to repair damage to DNA induced by MMS (G.G.)

  4. DNA repair in mammalian cells exposed to combinations of carcinogenic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setlow, R.B.; Ahmed, F.E.

    1979-01-01

    Cells defective in one or more aspects of repair are killed and often mutagenized more readily than normal cells by DNA damaging agents, and humans whose cells are deficient in repair are at an increased carcinogenic risk compared to normal individuals. The excision repair of uv induced pyrimidine dimers is a well studied system, but the details of the steps in this repair system are far from being understood in human cells. We know that there are a number of chemicals that mimic uv in that normal human cells repair DNA damage from both these agents and from uv by a long patch excision repair system, and that xeroderma pigmentosum cells defective in repair of uv are also defective in the repair of damage from these chemicals. The chemicals we have investigated are AAAF, 4-NQO, DMBA-epoxide, and ICR-170. We describe experiments, using several techniques, in which DNA excision repair is measured after treatment of various human cell strains with combinations of uv and these agents. If two agents have a common rate limiting step then, at doses high enough to saturate the repair system, one would expect the observed repair after a treatment with a combination of agents to be equal to that from one agent alone. Such is not the case for normal human or excision-deficient XP cells. In the former repair is additive and in the latter repair is usually appreciably less than that observed with either agent alone. Models that attempt to explain these surprising results involve complexes of enzymes and cofactors

  5. Maintenance and repair of LMFBR steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verriere, P.; Alanche, J.; Minguet, J.L.

    1984-06-01

    After some general remarks on the French fast neutron system, this paper presents the state of the program for the construction of fast reactor in France. Then, the general design of Super Phenix 1 steam generator components is outlined and, the in-service monitoring systems and protective devices with which they are equiped are briefly described. The methods used, in the event of leakage, for leak location, steam generator inspection, steam generator repair and putting the affected loop back into service, are discussed. There are two main lines of research, relating respectively to the means of water leak detection in sodium and the inspection arrangements that will be used either periodically, or following a sodium-water reaction. Finally, after a brief description of the steam generator, this paper describes the four incidents (leaks) that occurred on the Phenix steam generator in the course of 1982 and 1983, and the subsequent repair operations

  6. Improving Aviation Depot Level Repairable (AVDLR) Inventory and Repair Management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baird, Dennis

    1997-01-01

    .... Additionally, research was conducted to document the management process for determining repair requirements at the Naval Inventory Control Point Philadelphia and how those requirements are accepted...

  7. Base excision repair activities differ in human lung cancer cells and corresponding normal controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karahalil, Bensu; Bohr, Vilhelm A; De Souza-Pinto, Nadja C

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative damage to DNA is thought to play a role in carcinogenesis by causing mutations, and indeed accumulation of oxidized DNA bases has been observed in samples obtained from tumors but not from surrounding tissue within the same patient. Base excision repair (BER) is the main pathway...... for the repair of oxidized modifications both in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. In order to ascertain whether diminished BER capacity might account for increased levels of oxidative DNA damage in cancer cells, the activities of BER enzymes in three different lung cancer cell lines and their non......-cancerous counterparts were measured using oligonucleotide substrates with single DNA lesions to assess specific BER enzymes. The activities of four BER enzymes, OGG1, NTH1, UDG and APE1, were compared in mitochondrial and nuclear extracts. For each specific lesion, the repair activities were similar among the three...

  8. Protozoan ALKBH8 Oxygenases Display both DNA Repair and tRNA Modification Activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zdżalik, Daria; Vågbø, Cathrine B; Kirpekar, Finn

    2014-01-01

    The ALKBH family of Fe(II) and 2-oxoglutarate dependent oxygenases comprises enzymes that display sequence homology to AlkB from E. coli, a DNA repair enzyme that uses an oxidative mechanism to dealkylate methyl and etheno adducts on the nucleobases. Humans have nine different ALKBH proteins, ALKBH......1-8 and FTO. Mammalian and plant ALKBH8 are tRNA hydroxylases targeting 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-modified uridine (mcm5U) at the wobble position of tRNAGly(UCC). In contrast, the genomes of some bacteria encode a protein with strong sequence homology to ALKBH8, and robust DNA repair activity...... was previously demonstrated for one such protein. To further explore this apparent functional duality of the ALKBH8 proteins, we have here enzymatically characterized a panel of such proteins, originating from bacteria, protozoa and mimivirus. All the enzymes showed DNA repair activity in vitro, but...

  9. On-bead fluorescent DNA nanoprobes to analyze base excision repair activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gines, Guillaume; Saint-Pierre, Christine; Gasparutto, Didier, E-mail: didier.gasparutto@cea.fr

    2014-02-17

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •On magnetic beads fluorescent enzymatic assays. •Simple, easy, non-radioactive and electrophoresis-free functional assay. •Lesion-containing hairpin DNA probes are selective for repair enzymes. •The biosensing platform allows the measurement of DNA repair activities from purified enzymes or within cell free extracts. -- Abstract: DNA integrity is constantly threatened by endogenous and exogenous agents that can modify its physical and chemical structure. Changes in DNA sequence can cause mutations sparked by some genetic diseases or cancers. Organisms have developed efficient defense mechanisms able to specifically repair each kind of lesion (alkylation, oxidation, single or double strand break, mismatch, etc). Here we report the adjustment of an original assay to detect enzymes’ activity of base excision repair (BER), that supports a set of lesions including abasic sites, alkylation, oxidation or deamination products of bases. The biosensor is characterized by a set of fluorescent hairpin-shaped nucleic acid probes supported on magnetic beads, each containing a selective lesion targeting a specific BER enzyme. We have studied the DNA glycosylase alkyl-adenine glycosylase (AAG) and the human AP-endonuclease (APE1) by incorporating within the DNA probe a hypoxanthine lesion or an abasic site analog (tetrahydrofuran), respectively. Enzymatic repair activity induces the formation of a nick in the damaged strand, leading to probe's break, that is detected in the supernatant by fluorescence. The functional assay allows the measurement of DNA repair activities from purified enzymes or in cell-free extracts in a fast, specific, quantitative and sensitive way, using only 1 pmol of probe for a test. We recorded a detection limit of 1 μg mL{sup −1} and 50 μg mL{sup −1} of HeLa nuclear extracts for APE1 and AAG enzymes, respectively. Finally, the on-bead assay should be useful to screen inhibitors of DNA repair

  10. On-bead fluorescent DNA nanoprobes to analyze base excision repair activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gines, Guillaume; Saint-Pierre, Christine; Gasparutto, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •On magnetic beads fluorescent enzymatic assays. •Simple, easy, non-radioactive and electrophoresis-free functional assay. •Lesion-containing hairpin DNA probes are selective for repair enzymes. •The biosensing platform allows the measurement of DNA repair activities from purified enzymes or within cell free extracts. -- Abstract: DNA integrity is constantly threatened by endogenous and exogenous agents that can modify its physical and chemical structure. Changes in DNA sequence can cause mutations sparked by some genetic diseases or cancers. Organisms have developed efficient defense mechanisms able to specifically repair each kind of lesion (alkylation, oxidation, single or double strand break, mismatch, etc). Here we report the adjustment of an original assay to detect enzymes’ activity of base excision repair (BER), that supports a set of lesions including abasic sites, alkylation, oxidation or deamination products of bases. The biosensor is characterized by a set of fluorescent hairpin-shaped nucleic acid probes supported on magnetic beads, each containing a selective lesion targeting a specific BER enzyme. We have studied the DNA glycosylase alkyl-adenine glycosylase (AAG) and the human AP-endonuclease (APE1) by incorporating within the DNA probe a hypoxanthine lesion or an abasic site analog (tetrahydrofuran), respectively. Enzymatic repair activity induces the formation of a nick in the damaged strand, leading to probe's break, that is detected in the supernatant by fluorescence. The functional assay allows the measurement of DNA repair activities from purified enzymes or in cell-free extracts in a fast, specific, quantitative and sensitive way, using only 1 pmol of probe for a test. We recorded a detection limit of 1 μg mL −1 and 50 μg mL −1 of HeLa nuclear extracts for APE1 and AAG enzymes, respectively. Finally, the on-bead assay should be useful to screen inhibitors of DNA repair activities

  11. Biomaterial-mediated strategies targeting vascularization for bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, José R; García, Andrés J

    2016-04-01

    Repair of non-healing bone defects through tissue engineering strategies remains a challenging feat in the clinic due to the aversive microenvironment surrounding the injured tissue. The vascular damage that occurs following a bone injury causes extreme ischemia and a loss of circulating cells that contribute to regeneration. Tissue-engineered constructs aimed at regenerating the injured bone suffer from complications based on the slow progression of endogenous vascular repair and often fail at bridging the bone defect. To that end, various strategies have been explored to increase blood vessel regeneration within defects to facilitate both tissue-engineered and natural repair processes. Developments that induce robust vascularization will need to consolidate various parameters including optimization of embedded therapeutics, scaffold characteristics, and successful integration between the construct and the biological tissue. This review provides an overview of current strategies as well as new developments in engineering biomaterials to induce reparation of a functional vascular supply in the context of bone repair.

  12. When is cartilage repair successful?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raudner, M.; Roehrich, S.; Zalaudek, M.; Trattnig, S.; Schreiner, M.M.

    2017-01-01

    Focal cartilage lesions are a cause of long-term disability and morbidity. After cartilage repair, it is crucial to evaluate long-term progression or failure in a reproducible, standardized manner. This article provides an overview of the different cartilage repair procedures and important characteristics to look for in cartilage repair imaging. Specifics and pitfalls are pointed out alongside general aspects. After successful cartilage repair, a complete, but not hypertrophic filling of the defect is the primary criterion of treatment success. The repair tissue should also be completely integrated to the surrounding native cartilage. After some months, the transplants signal should be isointense compared to native cartilage. Complications like osteophytes, subchondral defects, cysts, adhesion and chronic bone marrow edema or joint effusion are common and have to be observed via follow-up. Radiological evaluation and interpretation of postoperative changes should always take the repair method into account. (orig.) [de

  13. DNA repair in neurons: So if they don't divide what's to repair?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fishel, Melissa L. [Department of Pediatrics (Section of Hematology/Oncology), Herman B Wells Center for Pediatric Research, Indiana University School of Medicine, 1044 W. Walnut, Room 302C, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Vasko, Michael R. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Indiana University School of Medicine, 1044 W. Walnut St., Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Kelley, Mark R. [Department of Pediatrics (Section of Hematology/Oncology), Herman B Wells Center for Pediatric Research, Indiana University School of Medicine, 1044 W. Walnut, Room 302C, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States) and Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Indiana University School of Medicine, 1044 W. Walnut St., Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States) and Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, 1044 W. Walnut, Room 302C, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States)]. E-mail: mkelley@iupui.edu

    2007-01-03

    Neuronal DNA repair remains one of the most exciting areas for investigation, particularly as a means to compare the DNA repair response in mitotic (cancer) vs. post-mitotic (neuronal) cells. In addition, the role of DNA repair in neuronal cell survival and response to aging and environmental insults is of particular interest. DNA damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as generated by mitochondrial respiration includes altered bases, abasic sites, and single- and double-strand breaks which can be prevented by the DNA base excision repair (BER) pathway. Oxidative stress accumulates in the DNA of the human brain over time especially in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and is proposed to play a critical role in aging and in the pathogenesis of several neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease, ALS, and Alzheimer's diseases. Because DNA damage accumulates in the mtDNA more than nuclear DNA, there is increased interest in DNA repair pathways and the consequence of DNA damage in the mitochondria of neurons. The type of damage that is most likely to occur in neuronal cells is oxidative DNA damage which is primarily removed by the BER pathway. Following the notion that the bulk of neuronal DNA damage is acquired by oxidative DNA damage and ROS, the BER pathway is a likely area of focus for neuronal studies of DNA repair. BER variations in brain aging and pathology in various brain regions and tissues are presented. Therefore, the BER pathway is discussed in greater detail in this review than other repair pathways. Other repair pathways including direct reversal, nucleotide excision repair (NER), mismatch repair (MMR), homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining are also discussed. Finally, there is a growing interest in the role that DNA repair pathways play in the clinical arena as they relate to the neurotoxicity and neuropathy associated with cancer treatments. Among the numerous side effects of cancer treatments, major

  14. The inhibition of DNA repair by aphidicolin or cytosine arabinoside in X-irradiated normal and xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, R.; Crocombe, K.; Mirzayans, R.

    1981-01-01

    Normal and excision-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts were X-irradiated and the influence on DNA repair of either the repair inhibitor cytosine arabinoside or the specific inhibitor of DNA polymerase α, aphidicolin, investigated. The data indicated that the repair of a certain fraction of X-ray-induced lesions can be inhibited in both cell lines by both compounds. Thus, as aphidicolin blocks the operation of polymerase α, this enzyme must be involved in an excision repair pathway operating in both normal and excision-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum cells. (orig.)

  15. Engineered Heart Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, B; Zimmermann, W-H

    2017-08-01

    There is a pressing need for the development of advanced heart failure therapeutics. Current state-of-the-art is protection from neurohumoral overstimulation, which fails to address the underlying cause of heart failure, namely loss of cardiomyocytes. Implantation of stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes via tissue-engineered myocardium is being advanced to realize the remuscularization of the failing heart. Here, we discuss pharmacological challenges pertaining to the clinical translation of tissue-engineered heart repair with a focus on engineered heart muscle (EHM). © 2017 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  16. Antioxidant effect of naturally occurring xanthines on the oxidative damage of DNA bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, A.J.S.C.; Telo, J.P.; Pereira, H.F.; Patrocinio, P.F.; Dias, R.M.B.

    1999-01-01

    The repair of the oxidised radicals of adenine and guanosine by several naturally occurring xanthines was studied. Each pair of DNA purine/xanthine was made to react with the sulphate radical and the decrease of the concentration of both compounds was measured by HPLC as a function of irradiation time. The results show that xanthine efficiently prevents the oxidation of the two DNA purines. Theophylline and para-xanthine repair the oxidizes radical of adenine but not the one from guanosine. Theobromine and caffeine to do not show any protecting effect. An order of the oxidation potentials of all the purines studied is proposed. (authors)

  17. Recombinant methods for screening human DNA excision repair proficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Athas, W.F.

    1988-01-01

    A method for measuring DNA excision repair in response to ultraviolet radiation (UV)-induced DNA damage has been developed, validated, and field-tested in cultured human lymphocytes. The methodology is amenable to population-based screening and should facilitate future epidemiologic studies seeking to investigate associations between excision repair proficiency and cancer susceptibility. The impetus for such endeavors derives from the belief that the high incidence of skin cancer in the genetic disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) primarily is a result of the reduced capacity of patients cells to repair UV-induced DNA damage. For assay, UV-irradiated non-replicating recombinant plasmid DNA harboring a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) indicator gene is introduced into lymphocytes using DEAE-dextran short-term transfection conditions. Exposure to UV induces transcriptionally-inactivating DNA photoproducts in the plasmid DNA which inactivate CAT gene expression. Excision repair of the damaged CAT gene is monitored indirectly as a function of reactivated CAT enzyme activity following a 40 hour repair/expression incubation period

  18. Role of repair saturation in the response of plateau-phase Chinese hamster ovary cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braby, L.A.; Nelson, J.M.; Metting, N.F.

    1987-01-01

    Two repair rates are seen in split-dose experiments on starved plateau-phase CHO cells. It has been assumed that this indicates two different processes repairing two distinct types of sublethal damage. However results of experiments at different dose levels are not consistent with models that assume that the damage is entirely sublethal. Another hypothesis that has been considered is the saturation of a repair mechanism having a limited pool of repair enzymes. Such saturation phenomena have been observed in biochemical repair studies and have thus formed the basis for a model of cellular response, which was shown to be capable of producing dose response curves in good agreement with experimental observations. This model can be extended to account for both dose-rate and split-dose effects

  19. Cell-free assay measuring repair DNA synthesis in human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciarrocchi, G.; Linn, S.

    1978-01-01

    Osmotic disruption of confluent cultured human fibroblasts that have been irradiated or exposed to chemical carcinogens allows the specific measurement of repair DNA synthesis using dTTP as a precursor. Fibroblasts similarly prepared from various xeroderma pigmentosum cell lines show the deficiencies of uv-induced DNA synthesis predicted from in vivo studies, while giving normal responses to methylmethanesulfonate. A pyrimidine-dimer-specific enzyme, T4 endonuclease V, stimulated the rate of uv-induced repair synthesis with normal and xeroderma pigmentosum cell lines. This system should prove useful for identifying agents that induce DNA repair, and cells that respond abnormally to such induction. It should also be applicable to an in vitro complementation assay with repair-defective cells and proteins obtained from repair-proficient cells. Finally, by using actively growing fibroblasts and thymidine in the system, DNA replication can be measured and studied in vitro

  20. Analysis of DNA vulnerability to damage, repair and degradation in tissues of irradiated animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryabchenko, N.I.; Ivannik, B.P.

    1982-01-01

    Single-strand and paired ruptures of DNA were found to result in appearance of locally denaturated areas in its secondary structure and to disordered protein-DNA interaction. It was shown with the use of the viscosimeter method of measuring the molecular mass of single stranded high-polymeric DNA that cells of various tissues by the intensity of DNA repair can be divided into two groups, rapid- and slow-repair ones. Tissue specificity of enzyme function of the repair systems and systems responsible for post-irradiation DNA degradation depends on the activity of endonucleases synthesized by the cells both in health and in their irradiation-induced synthesis

  1. Natural Transformation of Campylobacter jejuni Occurs Beyond Limits of Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegge, Christina S.; Brøndsted, Lone; Ligowska-Marzęta, Małgorzata; Ingmer, Hanne

    2012-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a human bacterial pathogen. While poultry is considered to be a major source of food borne campylobacteriosis, C. jejuni is frequently found in the external environment, and water is another well-known source of human infections. Natural transformation is considered to be one of the main mechanisms for mediating transfer of genetic material and evolution of the organism. Given the diverse habitats of C. jejuni we set out to examine how environmental conditions and physiological processes affect natural transformation of C. jejuni. We show that the efficiency of transformation is correlated to the growth conditions, but more importantly that transformation occurs at growth-restrictive conditions as well as in the late stationary phase; hence revealing that growth per se is not required for C. jejuni to be competent. Yet, natural transformation of C. jejuni is an energy dependent process, that occurs in the absence of transcription but requires an active translational machinery. Moreover, we show the ATP dependent ClpP protease to be important for transformation, which possibly could be associated with reduced protein glycosylation in the ClpP mutant. In contrast, competence of C. jejuni was neither found to be involved in DNA repair following DNA damage nor to provide a growth benefit. Kinetic studies revealed that several transformation events occur per cell cycle indicating that natural transformation of C. jejuni is a highly efficient process. Thus, our findings suggest that horizontal gene transfer by natural transformation takes place in various habitats occupied by C. jejuni. PMID:23049803

  2. Enzymic lactose hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J J; Brand, J C

    1980-01-01

    Acid or enzymic hydrolysis can be used to hydrolyze lactose. Advantages of both are compared and details of enzymic hydrolysis using yeast or fungal enzymes given. The new scheme outlined involves recycling lactase. Because lactose and lactase react to ultrafiltration (UF) membranes differently separation is possible. Milk or milk products are ultrafiltered to separate a concentrate from a lactose-rich permeate which is treated with lactase in a reactor until hydrolysis reaches a required level. The lactase can be removed by UF as it does not permeate the membrane, and it is recycled back to the reactor. Permeate from the second UF stage may or may not be recombined with the concentrate from the first stage to produce a low lactose product (analysis of a typical low-lactose dried whole milk is given). Batch or continuous processes are explained and a batch process without enzyme recovery is discussed. (Refs. 4).

  3. Indicators: Sediment Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sediment enzymes are proteins that are produced by microorganisms living in the sediment or soil. They are indicators of key ecosystem processes and can help determine which nutrients are affecting the biological community of a waterbody.

  4. Enzyme Vs. Extremozyme -32 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Enzymes are biocatalytic protein molecules that enhance the rates of ... to physical forces (hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic 1, electrostatic and Van der ... conformation. In 1995 ... surface against 14.7% in Klenow poll (some of the hydrophobic.

  5. Promoting peripheral myelin repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ye; Notterpek, Lucia

    2016-09-01

    Compared to the central nervous system (CNS), peripheral nerves have a remarkable ability to regenerate and remyelinate. This regenerative capacity to a large extent is dependent on and supported by Schwann cells, the myelin-forming glial cells of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). In a variety of paradigms, Schwann cells are critical in the removal of the degenerated tissue, which is followed by remyelination of newly-regenerated axons. This unique plasticity of Schwann cells has been the target of myelin repair strategies in acute injuries and chronic diseases, such as hereditary demyelinating neuropathies. In one approach, the endogenous regenerative capacity of Schwann cells is enhanced through interventions such as exercise, electrical stimulation or pharmacological means. Alternatively, Schwann cells derived from healthy nerves, or engineered from different tissue sources have been transplanted into the PNS to support remyelination. These transplant approaches can then be further enhanced by exercise and/or electrical stimulation, as well as by the inclusion of biomaterial engineered to support glial cell viability and neurite extension. Advances in our basic understanding of peripheral nerve biology, as well as biomaterial engineering, will further improve the functional repair of myelinated peripheral nerves. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Mapping of repair genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, Tadaaki

    1985-01-01

    Chromosome mapping of repair genes involved in U.V. sensitivity is reported. Twenty-three of 25 hybrid cells were resistant to U.V. light. Survival curves of 2 U.V.-resistant cell strains, which possessed mouse chromosomes and human chromosome No.7 - 16, were similar to those of wild strain (L5178Y). On the other hand, survival curves of U.V.-sensitive hybrid cells was analogous to those of Q31. There was a definitive difference in the frequency of inducible chromosome aberrations between U.V. resistant and sensitive mouse-human hybrid cells. U.V.-resistant cell strains possessed the ability of excision repair. Analysis of karyotype in hybrid cells showed that the difference in U.V. sensitivity is dependent upon whether or not human chromosome No.13 is present. Synteny test on esterase D-determining locus confirmed that there is an agreement between the presence of chromosome No.13 and the presence of human esterase D activity. These results led to a conclusion that human genes which compensate recessive character of U.V.-sensitive mutant strain, Q31, with mouse-human hybrid cells are located on the locus of chromosome No.13. (Namekawa, K.)

  7. Overproduction of ligninolytic enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elisashvili, Vladimir; Kachlishvili, Eva; Torok, Tamas

    2014-06-17

    Methods, compositions, and systems for overproducing ligninolytic enzymes from the basidiomycetous fungus are described herein. As described, the method can include incubating a fungal strain of Cerrena unicolor IBB 303 in a fermentation system having growth medium which includes lignocellulosic material and then cultivating the fungal strain in the fermentation system under conditions wherein the fungus expresses the ligninolytic enzymes. In some cases, the lignocellulosic material is mandarin peel, ethanol production residue, walnut pericarp, wheat bran, wheat straw, or banana peel.

  8. Frequency of intrachromosomal homologous recombination induced by UV radiation in normally repairing and excision repair-deficient human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimura, T.; Maher, V.M.; McCormick, J.J.; Godwin, A.R.; Liskay, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    To investigate the role of DNA damage and nucleotide excision repair in intrachromosomal homologous recombination, a plasmid containing duplicated copies of the gene coding for hygromycin resistance was introduced into the genome of a repair-proficient human cell line, KMST-6, and two repair-deficient lines, XP2OS(SV) from xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A and XP2YO(SV) from complementation group F. Neither hygromycin-resistance gene codes for a functional enzyme because each contains an insertion/deletion mutation at a unique site, but recombination between the two defective genes can yield hygromycin-resistant cells. The rates of spontaneous recombination in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum cell strains containing the recombination substrate were found to be similar. The frequency of UV-induced recombination was determined for three of these cell strains. At low doses, the group A cell strain and the group F cell strain showed a significant increase in frequency of recombinants. The repair-proficient cell strain required 10-to 20-fold higher doses of UV to exhibit comparable increases in frequency of recombinants. These results suggest that unexcised DNA damage, rather than the excision repair process per se, stimulates such recombination

  9. Histone H2AX in DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewandowska, H.; Szumiel, I.

    2002-01-01

    The paper reviews the recent reports on the role of the phosphorylated histone H2AX (γ-H2AX). The modification of this histone is an important part of the cellular response to the induction of DNA double strand brakes (DSB) by ionising radiation and other DSB-generating factors. In irradiated cells the modification is carried out mainly by ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) kinase, the enzyme that starts the alarm signalling upon induction of DSB.γ-H2AX molecules are formed within 1-3 min after irradiation and form foci at the sites of DSB. This seems to be necessary for the recruitment of repair factors that are later present in foci of damaged nuclei. Modification of a constant percentage of H2AX molecules per DSB takes place, corresponding to chromatin domains of megabase of DNA. (author)

  10. The body as a resource for other-initiation of repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyses how the human body serves as a resource for other initiation of repair. It describes how a hand gesture, a cupped hand behind the ear, is oriented to as a repair initiation in a foreign language classroom. The gesture typically occurs in the absence of speech and is treated...

  11. Histone Variant Regulates DNA Repair via Chromatin Condensation | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Activating the appropriate DNA repair pathway is essential for maintaining the stability of the genome after a break in both strands of DNA. How a pathway is selected, however, is not well understood. Since these double strand breaks (DSBs) occur while DNA is packaged as chromatin, changes in its organization are necessary for repair to take place. Numerous alterations have

  12. Aorto-enteric Fistula 15 Years After Uncomplicated Endovascular Aortic Repair with Unforeseen Onset of Endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadhim, M M K; Rasmussen, J B G; Eiberg, J P

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Aorto-enteric fistula after endovascular aortic repair is an exceedingly rare but serious condition. Report A rare case of a fistula between the excluded aortic sac and the transverse colon 15 years after endovascular aortic repair is described. Onset was endocarditis without...... such as endocarditis, which in this case probably occurred as metastatic sepsis from endograft infection....

  13. Radar rainfall image repair techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M. Wesson

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available There are various quality problems associated with radar rainfall data viewed in images that include ground clutter, beam blocking and anomalous propagation, to name a few. To obtain the best rainfall estimate possible, techniques for removing ground clutter (non-meteorological echoes that influence radar data quality on 2-D radar rainfall image data sets are presented here. These techniques concentrate on repairing the images in both a computationally fast and accurate manner, and are nearest neighbour techniques of two sub-types: Individual Target and Border Tracing. The contaminated data is estimated through Kriging, considered the optimal technique for the spatial interpolation of Gaussian data, where the 'screening effect' that occurs with the Kriging weighting distribution around target points is exploited to ensure computational efficiency. Matrix rank reduction techniques in combination with Singular Value Decomposition (SVD are also suggested for finding an efficient solution to the Kriging Equations which can cope with near singular systems. Rainfall estimation at ground level from radar rainfall volume scan data is of interest and importance in earth bound applications such as hydrology and agriculture. As an extension of the above, Ordinary Kriging is applied to three-dimensional radar rainfall data to estimate rainfall rate at ground level. Keywords: ground clutter, data infilling, Ordinary Kriging, nearest neighbours, Singular Value Decomposition, border tracing, computation time, ground level rainfall estimation

  14. Anterior cruciate ligament repair - past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, Piyush; Horriat, Saman; Anand, Bobby S

    2018-06-15

    This article provides a detailed narrative review on the history and current concepts surrounding ligamentous repair techniques in athletic patients. In particular, we will focus on the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) as a case study in ligament injury and ligamentous repair techniques. PubMed (MEDLINE), EMBASE and Cochrane Library databases for papers relating to primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction were searched by all participating authors. All relevant historical papers were included for analysis. Additional searches of the same databases were made for papers relating to biological enhancement of ligament healing. The poor capacity of the ACL to heal is one of the main reasons why the current gold standard surgical treatment for an ACL injury in an athletic patient is ACL reconstruction with autograft from either the hamstrings or patella tendon. It is hypothesised that by preserving and repairing native tissues and negating the need for autograft that primary ACL repair may represent a key step change in the treatment of ACL injuries. The history of primary ACL repair will be discussed and the circumstances that led to the near-abandonment of primary ACL repair techniques will be reviewed. There has been a recent resurgence in interest with regards to primary ACL repair. Improvements in imaging now allow for identification of tear location, with femoral-sided injuries, being more suitable for repair. We will discuss in details strategies for improving the mechanical and biological environment in order to allow primary healing to occur. In particular, we will explain mechanical supplementation such as Internal Brace Ligament Augmentation and Dynamic Intraligamentary Stabilisation techniques. These are novel techniques that aim to protect the primary repair by providing a stabilising construct that connects the femur and the tibia, thus bridging the repair. In addition, biological supplementation is being investigated as an adjunct and we will

  15. Handbook of adhesive bonded structural repair

    CERN Document Server

    Wegman, Raymond F

    1992-01-01

    Provides repair methods for adhesive bonded and composite structures; identifies suitable materials and equipment for repairs; describes damage evaluation criteria and techniques, and methods of inspection before and after repair.

  16. [Constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongmans, M.C.J.; Gidding, C.E.M.; Loeffen, J.; Wesseling, P.; Mensenkamp, A.; Hoogerbrugge, N.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Constitutional mismatch repair deficiency (CMMR-D) syndrome is characterised by a significantly increased risk for developing cancer in childhood. It arises when both parents have a mutation in the same mismatch repair gene and pass it on to their child. CASE DESCRIPTION: An 8-year-old

  17. Clamp wins pipe repair prize

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2001-04-01

    This paper describes the permanent pipeline repair system, developed by Tekmar, which is powered by seawater hydraulics and is easily installed and tested by any workclass remotely operated vehicle (rov). Details are given of the two main components of the system, namely, the diverless high pressure split repair clamp and the rov-operated tool to install it.

  18. Nucleotide excision repair in yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, Patrick van

    2012-01-01

    Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) is a conserved DNA repair pathway capable of removing a broad spectrum of DNA damage. In human cells a defect in NER leads to the disorder Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an excellent model organism to study the mechanism of NER. The

  19. Arthroscopic repair of chronic lateral ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corte-Real, Nuno M; Moreira, Rodrigo M

    2009-03-01

    The current "gold standard'' for treatment of chronic lateral ankle instability is the Broström-Gould procedure. Most authors recommend this type of operation even after an arthroscopic inspection of the joint. We review our results with an arthroscopic method of lateral ankle ligament repair. A method of arthroscopic lateral ligament repair with an anchor placed in the fibula is described. We used this technique on 31 consecutive patients (28 were available for followup). Twenty-one patients had work or traffic accidents, four suffered casual falls. and three had sport-related lesions. The patients were evaluated after 24.5 month average followup. The average postoperative AOFAS score was 85.3 (82.3 in the workers-compensation group and 94.4 in the others) and average satisfaction was 3.8 (3.5 to workers-compensation and 4.6 for the others). Complications occurred in nine patients (29%), but only three cases had ongoing problems. We had two recurrences (another sprain without instability on the stress radiograph). Three patients had some wound healing problems and three had injuries of the superficial peroneal nerve, one of which is persistent. One patient developed a deep venous thrombosis postoperatively. With this method, we achieved good clinical results. We had several complications but most of them were minor. It was a simple procedure with less morbidity to most patients. We believe it produced an anatomical repair of the lateral ligament with clinical and functional results similar to other techniques.

  20. Procedures for maintenance and repairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickel, E.

    1981-01-01

    After a general review of the operation experience in the history of more than 12 operating years, the organization in the plant will be shown with special aspect to quality assurance, capacity of the workshops and connected groups as radiation protection, chemical laboratories etc. The number, time intervals and manpower effort for the repeating tests will be discussed. Reasons and examples for back-fitting activities in the plant are given. Besides special repair and maintenance procedures as repair of the steam generators, in-service inspection of the reactor pressure vessel, repair of a feed-water pipe and repair of the core structure in the pressure vessel, the general system to handle maintenance and repair-work in the KWO-plant will be shown. This includes also the detailed planning of the annual refueling and revision of the plant. (orig./RW)

  1. Nanomaterials with enzyme-like characteristics (nanozymes): next-generation artificial enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hui; Wang, Erkang

    2013-07-21

    Over the past few decades, researchers have established artificial enzymes as highly stable and low-cost alternatives to natural enzymes in a wide range of applications. A variety of materials including cyclodextrins, metal complexes, porphyrins, polymers, dendrimers and biomolecules have been extensively explored to mimic the structures and functions of naturally occurring enzymes. Recently, some nanomaterials have been found to exhibit unexpected enzyme-like activities, and great advances have been made in this area due to the tremendous progress in nano-research and the unique characteristics of nanomaterials. To highlight the progress in the field of nanomaterial-based artificial enzymes (nanozymes), this review discusses various nanomaterials that have been explored to mimic different kinds of enzymes. We cover their kinetics, mechanisms and applications in numerous fields, from biosensing and immunoassays, to stem cell growth and pollutant removal. We also summarize several approaches to tune the activities of nanozymes. Finally, we make comparisons between nanozymes and other catalytic materials (other artificial enzymes, natural enzymes, organic catalysts and nanomaterial-based catalysts) and address the current challenges and future directions (302 references).

  2. Disruption of Maternal DNA Repair Increases Sperm-DerivedChromosomal Aberrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, Francesco; Essers, Jeroun; Kanaar, Roland; Wyrobek,Andrew J.

    2007-02-07

    The final weeks of male germ cell differentiation occur in aDNA repair-deficient environment and normal development depends on theability of the egg to repair DNA damage in the fertilizing sperm. Geneticdisruption of maternal DNA double-strand break repair pathways in micesignificantly increased the frequency of zygotes with chromosomalstructural aberrations after paternal exposure to ionizing radiation.These findings demonstrate that radiation-induced DNA sperm lesions arerepaired after fertilization by maternal factors and suggest that geneticvariation in maternal DNA repair can modulate the risk of early pregnancylosses and of children with chromosomal aberrations of paternalorigin.

  3. The Seed Repair Response during Germination: Disclosing Correlations between DNA Repair, Antioxidant Response, and Chromatin Remodeling in Medicago truncatula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pagano

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This work provides novel insights into the effects caused by the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA during Medicago truncatula seed germination, with emphasis on the seed repair response. Seeds treated with H2O and TSA (10 and 20 μM were collected during imbibition (8 h and at the radicle protrusion phase. Biometric data showed delayed germination and impaired seedling growth in TSA-treated samples. Comet assay, performed on radicles at the protrusion phase and 4-days old M. truncatula seedlings, revealed accumulation of DNA strand breaks upon exposure to TSA. Activation of DNA repair toward TSA-mediated genotoxic damage was evidenced by the up-regulation of MtOGG1(8-OXOGUANINE GLYCOSYLASE/LYASE gene involved in the removal of oxidative DNA lesions, MtLIGIV(LIGASE IV gene, a key determinant of seed quality, required for the rejoining of DNA double strand breaks and TDP(TYROSYL-DNA PHOSPHODIESTERASE genes encoding the multipurpose DNA repair enzymes tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterases. Since radical scavenging can prevent DNA damage, the specific antioxidant activity (SAA was measured by DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and Folin-Ciocalteu reagent assays. Fluctuations of SAA were observed in TSA-treated seeds/seedlings concomitant with the up-regulation of antioxidant genes MtSOD(SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE, MtAPX(ASCORBATE PEROXIDASE and MtMT2(TYPE 2 METALLOTHIONEIN. Chromatin remodeling, required to facilitate the access of DNA repair enzymes at the damaged sites, is also part of the multifaceted seed repair response. To address this aspect, still poorly explored in plants, the MtTRRAP(TRANSFORMATION/TRANSACTIVATION DOMAIN-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN gene was analyzed. TRRAP is a transcriptional adaptor, so far characterized only in human cells where it is needed for the recruitment of histone acetyltransferase complexes to chromatin during DNA repair. The MtTRRAP gene and the predicted interacting partners MtHAM2 (HISTONE ACETYLTRANSFERASE OF

  4. Human diseases with genetically altered DNA repair processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleaver, J.E.; Bootsma, D.; Friedberg, E.

    1975-01-01

    DNA repair of single-strand breaks (produced by ionizing radiation) and of base damage (produced by ultraviolet (uv) light) are two repair mechanisms that most mammalian cells possess. Genetic defects in these repair mechanisms are exemplified by cells from the human premature-aging disease, progeria, which fail to rejoin single-strand breaks, and the skin disease, xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), which exhibits high actinic carcinogenesis and involves failure to repair base damage. In terms of the response of XP cells, many chemical carcinogens can be classified as either x-ray-like (i.e., they cause damage that XP cells can repair) or uv-like (i.e., they cause damage that XP cells cannot repair). The first group contains some of the more strongly carcinogenic chemicals (e.g., alkylating agents). XP occurs in at least two clinical forms, and somatic cell hybridization indicates at least three complementation groups. In order to identify cell lines from various different laboratories unambiguously, a modified nomenclature of XP lines is proposed. (U.S.)

  5. Human diseases with genetically altered DNA repair processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleaver, J.E.; Bootsma, D.; Friedberg, E.

    1975-01-01

    DNA repair of single-strand breaks (produced by ionizing radiation) and of base damage (produced by ultraviolet (UV) light) are two repair mechanisms that most mammalian cells possess. Genetic defects in these repair mechanisms are exemplified by cells from the human premature-aging disease, progeria, which fail to rejoin single-strand breaks, and the skin disease, xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), which exhibits high actinic carcinogenesis and involves failure to repair base damage. In terms of the response of XP cells, many chemical carcinogens can be classified as either X-ray-like (i.e., they cause damage that XP cells can repair) or UV-like (i.e., they cause damage that XP cells cannot repair). The first group contains some of the more strongly carcinogenic chemicals (e.g., alkylating agents). XP occurs in at least two clinical forms, and somatic cell hybridization indicates at least three complementation groups. In order to identify cell lines from various different laboratories unambiguously, a modified nomenclature of XP lines is proposed

  6. Xeroderma Pigmentosum: defective DNA repair causes skin cancer and neurodegeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robbins, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum is a rare autosomal recessive disease with numerous malignancies on sun-exposed areas of the skin and eye because of an inability to repair DNA damage inflicted by harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation of the sun. Because it is the only disease in which cancer is known to result from defective DNA repair, XP has received intense clinical and biochemical study during the last two decades. Furthermore, some patients with XP develop a primary neuronal degeneration, probably due to the inability of nerve cells to repair damage to their DNA caused by intraneuronal metabolites and physicochemical events that mimic the effects of UV radiation. Studies of XP neurodegeneration and DNA-repair defects have led to the conclusion that efficient DNA repair is required to prevent premature death of human nerve cells. Since XP neurodegeneration has similarities to premature death of nerve cells that occurs in such neurodegenerative disorders, XP may be the prototype for these more common neurodegenerations. Recent studies indicate that these degenerations also may have DNA-repair defects

  7. Prognostic factors in sensory recovery after digital nerve repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulut, Tuğrul; Akgün, Ulaş; Çıtlak, Atilla; Aslan, Cihan; Şener, Ufuk; Şener, Muhittin

    2016-01-01

    The prognostic factors that affect sensory nerve recovery after digital nerve repair are variable because of nonhomogeneous data, subjective tests, and different assessment/scoring methods. The aim of this study was to evaluate the success of sensory nerve recovery after digital nerve repair and to investigate the prognostic factors in sensorial healing. Ninety-six digital nerve repairs of 63 patients were retrospectively evaluated. All nerves were repaired with end-to-end neurorraphy. The static two-point discrimination (s2PD) and Semmes Weinstein monofilament (SWM) tests were performed to evaluate sensory recovery. The association between prognostic factors such as gender, age, involved digit, time from injury to repair, length of follow-up, smoking, concomitant injuries, type of injury, and sensory recovery results were assessed. The s2PD test demonstrated excellent results in 26 nerves (27%), good results in 61 nerves (64%), and poor results in 9 nerves (9%). The results of the SWM test according to Imai classification showed that 31 nerves (32%) were normal, light touch was diminished in 38 nerves (40%), protective sensation was diminished in 17 nerves (18%), loss of protective sensation occurred in 5 nerves (5%), and 5 nerves (5%) were anesthetic. There was a negative relationship between age, smoking, concomitant injuries, and sensory recovery. Our results demonstrate that concomitant tendon, bone and vascular injuries, older age, and smoking were associated with worse sensory nerve recovery results. However, all digital nerve injuries should be repaired, regardless of these prognostic factors.

  8. Lack of effect of inhibitors of DNA synthesis/repair on the ionizing radiation-induced chromosomal damage in G[sub 2] stage of ataxia telangiectasia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoccia, A. (Univ. ' La Sapienza' , Rome (Italy). Dipt. di Genetica e Biologia Molecolare); Palitti, F.; Raggi, T. (Univ. del Tuscia, Viterbo (Italy). Dipt. di Agrobiologia ed Agrochimica); Catena, C. (ENEA, Casaccia (Italy). Centro Ricerche Energia); Tanzarella, C. (Rome Univ. 3 (Italy). Dipt. di Biologia)

    1994-09-01

    The relationship between the repair processes occurring at the G[sub 2] phase of the cell cycle and cytogenetic damage in ataxia telangiectasia (AT) cells was studied. Lymphoblastoid cells derived from normal, heterozygote AT (HzAT) and three AT patients were exposed to X-rays or fission neutrons and post-treated with inhibitors of DNA synthesis/repair, such as inhibitors of DNA polymerases [alpha], [sigma] and [epsilon] (cytosine arabinoside, ara-C; aphidicolin, APC; buthylphenyl-guanine, BuPdG) or ribonucleotide reductase (hydroxyurea HU). A strong increase of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations was observed in normal and HzAT cells post-treated with ara-C, APC and HU, but not in the presence of BuPdG. No enhancing effect was observed in cells derived from AT patients, except for HU post-irradiation treatment. These results suggest that the enzymes that can be inhibited by these agents are not directly involved in the repair of radiation damage induced in G[sub 2] cells from AT patients, indicating that probably the AT cells that we used lack the capability to transform the primary DNA lesions into reparable products, or that AT cells might contain a mutated form of DNA polymerase resistant to the inhibitors. (author).

  9. Wound repair in Pocillopora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Villalobos, Jenny Carolina; Work, Thierry M.; Calderon-Aguileraa, Luis Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Corals routinely lose tissue due to causes ranging from predation to disease. Tissue healing and regeneration are fundamental to the normal functioning of corals, yet we know little about this process. We described the microscopic morphology of wound repair in Pocillopora damicornis. Tissue was removed by airbrushing fragments from three healthy colonies, and these were monitored daily at the gross and microscopic level for 40 days. Grossly, corals healed by Day 30, but repigmentation was not evident at the end of the study (40 d). On histology, from Day 8 onwards, tissues at the lesion site were microscopically indistinguishable from adjacent normal tissues with evidence of zooxanthellae in gastrodermis. Inflammation was not evident. P. damicornis manifested a unique mode of regeneration involving projections of cell-covered mesoglea from the surface body wall that anastomosed to form gastrovascular canals.

  10. Repairing Nanoparticle Surface Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Emanuele; Kodger, Thomas E; Crisp, Ryan W; Timmerman, Dolf; MacArthur, Katherine E; Heggen, Marc; Schall, Peter

    2017-10-23

    Solar devices based on semiconductor nanoparticles require the use of conductive ligands; however, replacing the native, insulating ligands with conductive metal chalcogenide complexes introduces structural defects within the crystalline nanostructure that act as traps for charge carriers. We utilized atomically thin semiconductor nanoplatelets as a convenient platform for studying, both microscopically and spectroscopically, the development of defects during ligand exchange with the conductive ligands Na 4 SnS 4 and (NH 4 ) 4 Sn 2 S 6 . These defects can be repaired via mild chemical or thermal routes, through the addition of L-type ligands or wet annealing, respectively. This results in a higher-quality, conductive, colloidally stable nanomaterial that may be used as the active film in optoelectronic devices. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  11. Reward optimization of a repairable system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, I.T. [Departamento de Matematicas, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de la Universidad, s/n. 10071 Caceres (Spain)]. E-mail: inmatorres@unex.es; Perez-Ocon, R. [Departamento de Estadistica e Investigacion Operativa, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Granada, Avenida de Severo Ochoa, s/n. 18071 Granada (Spain)]. E-mail: rperezo@ugr.es

    2006-03-15

    This paper analyzes a system subject to repairable and non-repairable failures. Non-repairable failures lead to replacement of the system. Repairable failures, first lead to repair but they lead to replacement after a fixed number of repairs. Operating and repair times follow phase type distributions (PH-distributions) and the pattern of the operating times is modelled by a geometric process. In this context, the problem is to find the optimal number of repairs, which maximizes the long-run average reward per unit time. To this end, the optimal number is determined and it is obtained by efficient numerical procedures.

  12. Reward optimization of a repairable system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, I.T.; Perez-Ocon, R.

    2006-01-01

    This paper analyzes a system subject to repairable and non-repairable failures. Non-repairable failures lead to replacement of the system. Repairable failures, first lead to repair but they lead to replacement after a fixed number of repairs. Operating and repair times follow phase type distributions (PH-distributions) and the pattern of the operating times is modelled by a geometric process. In this context, the problem is to find the optimal number of repairs, which maximizes the long-run average reward per unit time. To this end, the optimal number is determined and it is obtained by efficient numerical procedures

  13. Random-walk enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Chi H.; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A.; Goodman, Myron F.

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C →U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics.

  14. Tissue repair capacity and repair kinetics deduced from multifractionated or continuous irradiation regimens with incomplete repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thames, H.D. Jr.; Peters, L.J.

    1984-01-01

    A model is proposed for cell survival after multiple doses, when the interfraction interval is insufficient for complete Elkind repair. In the limit of ever-increasing number of ever-smaller fractional doses, the model transforms into the accumulation model of survival after continuous irradiation. When adapted to describe tissue responses to isoeffective multifractionated regimens, wherein repair is incomplete, a generalization of the usually linear plot of reciprocal total dose versus dose per fraction is obtained, in which downward curvature is evident. There is an advantage in studying tissue responses to multifractionated regimens with incomplete repair in the interfraction intervals, or continuous exposures at various dose rates since, in addition to determination of repair capacity, there is an estimate of repair kinetics. Results of analyses of previously published data are presented as illustration. Estimated from the response of three acutely responding normal tissues in the mouse (jejunum, colon and bone marrow), repair halftimes ranged from 0.3-0.9 h and values of β/delta were approximately 0.1 Gy -1 . From the response of mouse lung (LD50 for pneumonitis) to multifractionated regimens with incomplete repair, the repair halftime was estimated at 1.5 h and β/delta was 0.27 Gy -1 . In the rat spinal cord β/delta was 0.7 Gy -1 and Tsub(1/2) was 1.5 h. (U.K.)

  15. Repair of damaged supraglottic airway devices: A novel method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapoor Dheeraj

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Damage of laryngeal mask airway and other supraglottic airway devices has always been a matter of concern. Although manufacturer recommends maximum 40 uses of LMA (and its congeners but damage before 40 uses needs to be evaluated. We hereby, describe a novel method of repair of supraglottic devices when damage occurs at mask inflation line or pilot balloon valve assembly.

  16. Junctional ectopic tachycardia following repair of congenital heart ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Postoperative junctional ectopic tachycardia (JET) is a rare and transient phenomenon occurring after repair of congenital heart defects. Report on this arrhythmia in the subregion is rare. We set out to determine the incidence of this arrhythmia and review the treatment and outcomes of treatment in our centre.

  17. Preferential repair of nuclear matrix associated DNA in xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullenders, L.H.F.; Kesteren, A.C. van; Bussmann, C.J.M.; Zeeland, A.A. van; Natarajan, A.T.

    1984-01-01

    The distribution of ultraviolet-induced DNA repair patches in the genome of xeroderma pigmentosum cells of complementation group C was investigated by determining the molecular weight distribution of repair labeled DNA and prelabeled DNA in alkaline sucrose gradients after treatment with the dimer-specific endonuclease V of bacteriophage T 4 . The results suggest that DNA-repair synthesis in xeroderma pigmentosum cells of complementation group C occurs in localized regions of the genome. Analysis of the spatial distribution of ultraviolet-induced repair patches in DNA loops attached to the nuclear matrix revealed that in xeroderma pigmentosum cells of complementation group C repair patches are preferentially situated near the attachment sites of DNA loops at the nuclear matrix. In normal human fibroblasts the authors observed no enrichment of repair-labeled DNA at the nuclear matrix and repair patches appeared to be distributed randomly along the DNA loops. The enrichment of repair-labeled DNA at the nuclear matrix in xeroderma pigmentosum cells of complementation group C may indicate that the residual DNA-repair synthesis in these cells occurs preferentially in regions of the genome. (Auth.)

  18. Penatalaksanaan Repair Palatoplasty dengan Teknik Furlow Double Opposing Z Plasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingky Krisna Arindra

    2015-06-01

    metode Furlow double opposing z plasty dengan kombinasi insisi lateral, dan didapatkan hasil menutupnya celah di palatum mole sampai dengan uvula. Telah dilakukan operasi repair palatoplasi dengan metode Furlow double opposing z plasty. Teknik ini dilakukan untuk menghindari insisi yang terlalu luas dikarenakan terdapatnya jaringan fibrous yang tebal pada mukosa palatum pasca operasi sebelumnya. Tujuan studi kasus adalah untuk mengetahui kemampuan teknik Furlow Double Opposing Z Plasty sebagai prosedur repair palatoplasty.   Repair Palatoplasty Management with Furlow Double Opposing Z Plasty Technique. Cases of cleft lip and palate are one of the deformity disorders that often occur. There are variety of clinical appearance ranging from incomplete to complete cases. Clinical appearance with different width requires proper surgical technique. Patients with cleft lip and palate had undergone surgical intervention, so that they needed surgical correction to repair the result or failure of the previous surgery. A Four year old boy complain there was cleft on the soft palate. The patient was diagnosed with labiognatopalatoscisis. The patient had undergone two stages of cleft lip surgery and twice of cleft palate surgery with pushback method and repair with z plasty, however the result was unsatisfactory. Further, the patient underwent repair palatoplasty surgery with Furlow double opposing z plasty method combined with lateral relaxing insicion. The result in the post surgery was the closure of cleft soft palate up to uvula. Repair palataplasty surgery has been done with Furlow double opposing z plasty method. This technique could avoid extended incision due to thick fibrous tissue on the palatum mucosa as the result of serial previous surgery. The aim of this case case study is to determine the technical capabilities of Furlow Double Opposing Z Plasty as palatoplasty repair procedure.

  19. Repair of manufacturing defects in the armor of plasma facing units of the ITER Divertor Dome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litunovsky, Nikolay; Alekseenko, Evgeny; Kuznetsov, Vladimir; Lyanzberg, Dmitriy; Makhankov, Aleksey; Rulev, Roman

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Sporadic manufacturing defects in ITER Divertor Dome PFUs may be repaired. • We have developed a repair technique for ITER Divertor Dome PFUs. • Armor repair technique for ITER Divertor Dome PFUs is successfully tested. -- Abstract: The paper describes the repair procedure developed for removal of manufacturing defects occurring sporadically during armoring of plasma facing units (PFUs) of the ITER Divertor Dome. Availability of armor repair technique is prescribed by the procurement arrangement for the ITER Divertor Dome concluded in 2009 between the ITER Organization and the ITER Domestic Agency of Russia. The paper presents the detailed description of the procedure, data on its effect on the joints of the rest part of the armor and on the grain structure of the PFU heat sink. The results of thermocycling of large-scale Dome PFU mock-ups manufactured with demonstration of armor repair are also given

  20. Repair of manufacturing defects in the armor of plasma facing units of the ITER Divertor Dome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litunovsky, Nikolay, E-mail: nlitunovsky@sintez.niiefa.spb.su; Alekseenko, Evgeny; Kuznetsov, Vladimir; Lyanzberg, Dmitriy; Makhankov, Aleksey; Rulev, Roman

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Sporadic manufacturing defects in ITER Divertor Dome PFUs may be repaired. • We have developed a repair technique for ITER Divertor Dome PFUs. • Armor repair technique for ITER Divertor Dome PFUs is successfully tested. -- Abstract: The paper describes the repair procedure developed for removal of manufacturing defects occurring sporadically during armoring of plasma facing units (PFUs) of the ITER Divertor Dome. Availability of armor repair technique is prescribed by the procurement arrangement for the ITER Divertor Dome concluded in 2009 between the ITER Organization and the ITER Domestic Agency of Russia. The paper presents the detailed description of the procedure, data on its effect on the joints of the rest part of the armor and on the grain structure of the PFU heat sink. The results of thermocycling of large-scale Dome PFU mock-ups manufactured with demonstration of armor repair are also given.

  1. Inhibition of DNA-double strand break repair by antimony compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Sentaro; Sato, Hiroshi; Kubota, Yoshihisa; Utsumi, Hiroshi; Bedford, Joel S.; Okayasu, Ryuichi

    2002-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), induced by γ-irradiation in Chinese hamster ovary cells, were used to examine whether antimony compounds affect the repair of DNA damage. The cells were first incubated with antimony trichloride or antimony potassium tartrate (both Sb(III)) for 2 h, and then irradiated with γ-rays at a dose of 40 Gy. The DNA DSB was quantified with pulsed field gel electrophoresis immediately after irradiation (non-repair group) as well as at 30 min post-irradiation (repair group). The degree of repair inhibition was determined by the differences in the amount of DNA DSB between non-repair and repair groups. Both antimony compounds inhibited repair of DNA DSB in a dose dependent manner. In trichloride, 0.2 mM antimony significantly inhibited the rejoining of DSB, while 0.4 mM was necessary in potassium antimony tartrate. The mean lethal doses, D 0 , for the treatment with antimony trichloride and antimony potassium tartrate, were approximately 0.21 and 0.12 mM, respectively. This indicates that the repair inhibition by antimony trichloride occurred in the dose range near D 0 , but the antimony potassium tartrate inhibited the repair at doses where most cells lost their proliferating ability. This is the first report to indicate that antimony compounds may inhibit the repair of radiation-induced DNA DSB

  2. Augmented Versus Nonaugmented Repair of Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Jun; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Quan; Lin, Xiang-Jin

    2017-04-01

    Although simple end-to-end repair of the Achilles tendon is common, many augmented repair protocols have been implemented for acute Achilles tendon rupture. However, whether augmented repair is better than nonaugmented repair of an acute Achilles tendon rupture is still unknown. To conduct a meta-analysis to determine whether augmented surgical repair of an acute Achilles tendon rupture improved subjective patient satisfaction without an increase in rerupture rates. Secondary outcomes assessed included infections, ankle range of motion, calf muscle strength, and minor complications. Meta-analysis. A systematic literature search of peer-reviewed articles was conducted to identify all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing augmented repair and nonaugmented repair for acute Achilles tendon rupture from January 1980 to August 2016 in the electronic databases of PubMed, Web of Science (SCI-E/SSCI/A&HCI), and EMBASE. The keywords (Achilles tendon rupture) AND (surg* OR operat* OR repair* OR augment* OR non-augment* OR end-to-end OR sutur*) were combined, and results were limited to human RCTs and controlled clinical trials published in the English language. Four RCTs involving 169 participants were eligible for inclusion; 83 participants were treated with augmented repair and 86 were treated with nonaugmented repair. Augmented repair led to similar responses when compared with nonaugmented repair for acute Achilles tendon rupture (93% vs 90%, respectively; P = .53). The rerupture rates showed no significant difference for augmented versus nonaugmented repair (7.2% vs 9.3%, respectively; P = .69). No differences in superficial and deep infections occurred in augmented (7 infections) and nonaugmented (8 infections) repair groups during postoperative follow-up ( P = .89). The average incisional infection rate was 8.4% with augmented repair and 9.3% with nonaugmented repair. No significant differences in other complications were found between augmented (7.2%) and

  3. Testing of self-repairing composite airplane components by use of CAI and the release of the repair chemicals from carefully inserted small tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dry, Carolyn

    2007-04-01

    The research on self repair of airplane components, under an SBIR phase II with Wright Patterson Air Force Base, has investigated the attributes and best end use applications for such a technology. These attributes include issues related to manufacturability, cost, potential benefits such as weight reduction, and cost reduction. The goal of our research has been to develop self-repairing composites with unique strength for air vehicles. Our revolutionary approach involves the autonomous release of repair chemicals from within the composite matrix itself. The repair agents are contained in hollow, structural fibers that are embedded within the matrix. Under stress, the composite senses external environmental factors and reacts by releasing the repair agents from within the hollow vessels. This autonomous response occurs wherever and whenever cracking, debonding or other matrix damage transpires. Superior performance over the life of the composite is achieved through this self-repairing mechanism. The advantages to the military would be safely executed missions, fewer repairs and eventually lighter vehicles. In particular the research has addressed the issues by correlating the impact of the various factors, such as 1) delivery vessel placement, shape/size and effect on composite strength, chemicals released and their effect on the matrix, release trigger and efficacy and any impact on matrix properties 2) impact of composite processing methods that involve heat and pressure on the repair vessels. Our self repairing system can be processed at temperatures of 300-350F, repairs in less than 30 seconds and does not damage the composite by repair fiber insertion or chemical release. Scaling up and manufacture of components has revealed that anticipating potential problems allowed us to avoid those associated with processing temperatures and pressures. The presentation will focus on compression after impact testing and the placement of repair fibers/tubes into prepreg

  4. Increased rate of repair of ultraviolet-induced DNA strand breaks in mitogen stimulated lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamlet, S.M.; Lavin, M.F.; Jennings, P.A. (Queensland Univ., St. Lucia (Australia). Dept. of Biochemistry; Queensland Univ., St. Lucia (Australia). Dept. of Veterinary Pathology; Queensland Univ. St. Lucia (Australia). Dept. of Public Health)

    1982-05-01

    Previous results have shown that phytohaemagglutinin-stimulated bovine lymphocytes exhibit a peak of ultraviolet-induced DNA repair synthesis 3 to 4 days after addition of mitogen. The level of repair synthesis was approximately tenfold higher than that in unstimulated lymphocytes. These studies have been extended to examine the rate of repair of strand breaks in U.V.-irradiated bovine lymphocytes. The extent of breakage of DNA was shown to be the same in mitogen-stimulated and unstimulated lymphocytes from two breeds of cattle, when determined by sedimentation of nucleoids on sucrose gradients. However, in mitogen-stimulated cells the time taken to repair DNA strand breaks was 6 hours compared with 12 hours in stationary phase lymphocytes after a U.V. dose of 5 J/m/sup 2/. These results suggest that the increased rate of repair of strand breaks is due to the induction of enzymes involved at the post-incision stage of DNA repair. Thus the increased level of repair synthesis observed in earlier work correlates with an increased rate of repair of DNA strand breaks in phytohaemagglutinin-stimulated bovine lymphocytes.

  5. Increased rate of repair of ultraviolet-induced DNA strand breaks in mitogen stimulated lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamlet, S.M.; Lavin, M.F.; Jennings, P.A.; Queensland Univ., St. Lucia; Queensland Univ. St. Lucia

    1982-01-01

    Previous results have shown that phytohaemagglutinin-stimulated bovine lymphocytes exhibit a peak of ultraviolet-induced DNA repair synthesis 3 to 4 days after addition of mitogen. The level of repair synthesis was approximately tenfold higher than that in unstimulated lymphocytes. These studies have been extended to examine the rate of repair of strand breaks in U.V.-irradiated bovine lymphocytes. The extent of breakage of DNA was shown to be the same in mitogen-stimulated and unstimulated lymphocytes from two breeds of cattle, when determined by sedimentation of nucleoids on sucrose gradients. However, in mitogen-stimulated cells the time taken to repair DNA strand breaks was 6 hours compared with 12 hours in stationary phase lymphocytes after a U.V. dose of 5 J/m 2 . These results suggest that the increased rate of repair of strand breaks is due to the induction of enzymes involved at the post-incision stage of DNA repair. Thus the increased level of repair synthesis observed in earlier work correlates with an increased rate of repair of DNA strand breaks in phytohaemagglutinin-stimulated bovine lymphocytes. (author)

  6. Analysis of failed rotator cuff repair – Retrospective survey of revisions after open rotator cuff repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupert Schupfner

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Rotator cuff defects are frequently occurring shoulder pathologies associated with pain and movement impairment. Aims The aim of the study was to analyse the pathologies that lead to operative revisions after primary open rotator cuff repair. Methods In 216 patients who underwent primary rotator cuff repair and later required operative revision between 1996 to 2005, pathologies found intraoperatively during the primary operation and during revision surgery were collected, analysed and compared. Results The average age at the time of revision surgery was 54.3 years. The right shoulder (61.6 per cent was more often affected than the left, males (63.4 per cent more often than females. At primary operation – apart from rotator cuff repair – there were the following surgical procedures performed: 190 acromioplasty, 86 Acromiclavicular joint resections, 68 tenodesis, 40 adhesiolysis and 1 tenotomy. If an ACJ-resection had been performed in the primary operation, ACJ-problems were rare in revision surgery (p<0.01. Primary gleno-humeral adhesions were associated with a significant rise in re-tearing rate (p=0.049. Primary absence of adhesions went along with a significant lower rate of adhesions found at revision (p=0.018. Primary performed acromioplasty had no influence on re-tearing rate (p=0.408 or on the rate of subacromial impingement at revision surgery (p=0.709. Conclusion To avoid operative revision after rotator cuff repair relevant copathologies of the shoulder have to be identified before or during operation and treated accordingly. Therefore, even during open rotator cuff repair, the surgeon should initially start with arthroscopy of the shoulder joint and subacromial space to recognise co-pathologies.

  7. Translational control of an intestinal microvillar enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E M; Cowell, G M; Sjöström, H

    1986-01-01

    The rates of biosynthesis of adult and foetal pig small-intestinal aminopeptidase N (EC 3.4.11.2) were compared to determine at which level the expression of the microvillar enzyme is developmentally controlled. In organ-cultured explants, the rate of biosynthesis of foetal aminopeptidase N is only...... about 3% of the adult rate. The small amount synthesized occurs in a high-mannose-glycosylated, membrane-bound, form that is processed to the mature, complex-glycosylated, form at a markedly slower rate than that of the adult enzyme. Extracts of total RNA from adult and foetal intestine contained...

  8. Extracellular enzyme kinetics scale with resource availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinsabaugh, Robert L.; Belnap, Jayne; Findlay, Stuart G.; Follstad Shah, Jennifer J.; Hill, Brian H.; Kuehn, Kevin A.; Kuske, Cheryl; Litvak, Marcy E.; Martinez, Noelle G.; Moorhead, Daryl L.; Warnock, Daniel D.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial community metabolism relies on external digestion, mediated by extracellular enzymes that break down complex organic matter into molecules small enough for cells to assimilate. We analyzed the kinetics of 40 extracellular enzymes that mediate the degradation and assimilation of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus by diverse aquatic and terrestrial microbial communities (1160 cases). Regression analyses were conducted by habitat (aquatic and terrestrial), enzyme class (hydrolases and oxidoreductases) and assay methodology (low affinity and high affinity substrates) to relate potential reaction rates to substrate availability. Across enzyme classes and habitats, the scaling relationships between apparent Vmax and apparent Km followed similar power laws with exponents of 0.44 to 0.67. These exponents, called elasticities, were not statistically distinct from a central value of 0.50, which occurs when the Km of an enzyme equals substrate concentration, a condition optimal for maintenance of steady state. We also conducted an ecosystem scale analysis of ten extracellular hydrolase activities in relation to soil and sediment organic carbon (2,000–5,000 cases/enzyme) that yielded elasticities near 1.0 (0.9 ± 0.2, n = 36). At the metabolomic scale, the elasticity of extracellular enzymatic reactions is the proportionality constant that connects the C:N:P stoichiometries of organic matter and ecoenzymatic activities. At the ecosystem scale, the elasticity of extracellular enzymatic reactions shows that organic matter ultimately limits effective enzyme binding sites. Our findings suggest that one mechanism by which microbial communities maintain homeostasis is regulating extracellular enzyme expression to optimize the short-term responsiveness of substrate acquisition. The analyses also show that, like elemental stoichiometry, the fundamental attributes of enzymatic reactions can be extrapolated from biochemical to community and ecosystem scales.

  9. Residual stress by repair welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochizuki, Masahito; Toyoda, Masao

    2003-01-01

    Residual stress by repair welds is computed using the thermal elastic-plastic analysis with phase-transformation effect. Coupling phenomena of temperature, microstructure, and stress-strain fields are simulated in the finite-element analysis. Weld bond of a plate butt-welded joint is gouged and then deposited by weld metal in repair process. Heat source is synchronously moved with the deposition of the finite-element as the weld deposition. Microstructure is considered by using CCT diagram and the transformation behavior in the repair weld is also simulated. The effects of initial stress, heat input, and weld length on residual stress distribution are studied from the organic results of numerical analysis. Initial residual stress before repair weld has no influence on the residual stress after repair treatment near weld metal, because the initial stress near weld metal releases due to high temperature of repair weld and then stress by repair weld regenerates. Heat input has an effect for residual stress distribution, for not its magnitude but distribution zone. Weld length should be considered reducing the magnitude of residual stress in the edge of weld bead; short bead induces high tensile residual stress. (author)

  10. Matrix Metalloproteinase Enzyme Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Goruroglu Ozturk

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases play an important role in many biological processes such as embriogenesis, tissue remodeling, wound healing, and angiogenesis, and in some pathological conditions such as atherosclerosis, arthritis and cancer. Currently, 24 genes have been identified in humans that encode different groups of matrix metalloproteinase enzymes. This review discuss the members of the matrix metalloproteinase family and their substrate specificity, structure, function and the regulation of their enzyme activity by tissue inhibitors. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(2.000: 209-220

  11. DNA damage and repair in age-related macular degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szaflik, Jacek P. [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Warsaw and Samodzielny Publiczny Szpital Okulistyczny, Sierakowskiego 13, 03-710 Warsaw (Poland); Janik-Papis, Katarzyna; Synowiec, Ewelina; Ksiazek, Dominika [Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Lodz (Poland); Zaras, Magdalena [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Warsaw and Samodzielny Publiczny Szpital Okulistyczny, Sierakowskiego 13, 03-710 Warsaw (Poland); Wozniak, Katarzyna [Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Lodz (Poland); Szaflik, Jerzy [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Warsaw and Samodzielny Publiczny Szpital Okulistyczny, Sierakowskiego 13, 03-710 Warsaw (Poland); Blasiak, Janusz, E-mail: januszb@biol.uni.lodz.pl [Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Lodz (Poland)

    2009-10-02

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a retinal degenerative disease that is the main cause of vision loss in individuals over the age of 55 in the Western world. Clinically relevant AMD results from damage to the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells thought to be mainly caused by oxidative stress. The stress also affects the DNA of RPE cells, which promotes genome instability in these cells. These effects may coincide with the decrease in the efficacy of DNA repair with age. Therefore individuals with DNA repair impaired more than average for a given age may be more susceptible to AMD if oxidative stress affects their RPE cells. This may be helpful in AMD risk assessment. In the present work we determined the level of basal (measured in the alkaline comet assay) endogenous and endogenous oxidative DNA damage, the susceptibility to exogenous mutagens and the efficacy of DNA repair in lymphocytes of 100 AMD patients and 110 age-matched individuals without visual disturbances. The cells taken from AMD patients displayed a higher extent of basal endogenous DNA damage without differences between patients of dry and wet forms of the disease. DNA double-strand breaks did not contribute to the observed DNA damage as checked by the neutral comet assay and pulsed field gel electrophoresis. The extent of oxidative modification to DNA bases was grater in AMD patients than in the controls, as probed by DNA repair enzymes NTH1 and Fpg. Lymphocytes from AMD patients displayed a higher sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and UV radiation and repaired lesions induced by these factors less effectively than the cells from the control individuals. We postulate that the impaired efficacy of DNA repair may combine with enhanced sensitivity of RPE cells to blue and UV lights, contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD.

  12. DNA damage and repair in age-related macular degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szaflik, Jacek P.; Janik-Papis, Katarzyna; Synowiec, Ewelina; Ksiazek, Dominika; Zaras, Magdalena; Wozniak, Katarzyna; Szaflik, Jerzy; Blasiak, Janusz

    2009-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a retinal degenerative disease that is the main cause of vision loss in individuals over the age of 55 in the Western world. Clinically relevant AMD results from damage to the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells thought to be mainly caused by oxidative stress. The stress also affects the DNA of RPE cells, which promotes genome instability in these cells. These effects may coincide with the decrease in the efficacy of DNA repair with age. Therefore individuals with DNA repair impaired more than average for a given age may be more susceptible to AMD if oxidative stress affects their RPE cells. This may be helpful in AMD risk assessment. In the present work we determined the level of basal (measured in the alkaline comet assay) endogenous and endogenous oxidative DNA damage, the susceptibility to exogenous mutagens and the efficacy of DNA repair in lymphocytes of 100 AMD patients and 110 age-matched individuals without visual disturbances. The cells taken from AMD patients displayed a higher extent of basal endogenous DNA damage without differences between patients of dry and wet forms of the disease. DNA double-strand breaks did not contribute to the observed DNA damage as checked by the neutral comet assay and pulsed field gel electrophoresis. The extent of oxidative modification to DNA bases was grater in AMD patients than in the controls, as probed by DNA repair enzymes NTH1 and Fpg. Lymphocytes from AMD patients displayed a higher sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and UV radiation and repaired lesions induced by these factors less effectively than the cells from the control individuals. We postulate that the impaired efficacy of DNA repair may combine with enhanced sensitivity of RPE cells to blue and UV lights, contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD.

  13. Monogenic diseases of DNA repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keijzers, Guido; Bakula, Daniela; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Maintaining the stability of the genome is essential for all organisms, and it is not surprising that damage to DNA has been proposed as an explanation for multiple chronic diseases.1-5 Conserving a pristine genome is therefore of central importance to our health. To overcome the genotoxic stress...... of a growing number of human diseases. Notably, many of these monogenic DNA-repair disorders display features of accelerated aging, supporting the notion that genome maintenance is a key factor for organismal longevity. This review focuses on the physiological consequences of loss of DNA repair, particularly...... in the context of monogenic DNA-repair diseases....

  14. Repairing and Upgrading Your PC

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Repairing and Upgrading Your PC delivers start-to-finish instructions, simple enough for even the most inexperienced PC owner, for troubleshooting, repairing, and upgrading your computer. Written by hardware experts Robert Bruce Thompson and Barbara Fritchman Thompson, this book covers it all: how to troubleshoot a troublesome PC, how to identify which components make sense for an upgrade, and how to tear it all down and put it back together. This book shows how to repair and upgrade all of your PC's essential components.

  15. Modified repair in patients with Ebstein's anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagdyman, Nicole; Ewert, Peter; Komoda, Takeshi; Alexi-Meskisvili, Vladimir; Weng, Yuguo; Berger, Felix; Hetzer, Roland

    2010-05-01

    Since 1988, a modified repair technique has been used at the authors' institution to treat patients with Ebstein's anomaly. This technique restructures the valve mechanism at the level of the true tricuspid annulus by using the most mobile leaflet for valve closure, without plication of the atrialized chamber. A total of 19 patients had additional attachment of the anterior right ventricular wall to the interventricular septum (Sebening's stitch) and reconstruction of the tricuspid valve as a double-orifice valve. The long-term results of the study are presented. Between 1988 and 2008, tricuspid valve repair was performed in 50 patients with Ebstein's anomaly (33 females, 17 males; median age 22 years; range: 0.6 to 60 years), at the authors' institution. The median follow up was 68 months (range: 5 to 238) months. Details of the survival rate, reoperations, NYHA class, maximal VO2, right ventricular function (velocity-time integral pulmonary artery (VTI-PA)), and tricuspid valve insufficiency were documented. No patient deaths occurred during surgery; the early mortality was 7.1%, and late mortality 2.4%. Those patients who died were all aged > 50 years, and in NYHA class III or IV. No additional patient deaths have occurred since 2004. Four reoperations were necessary. Both, the NYHA class and tricuspid valve insufficiency were improved significantly (from 3.1 to 1.8; p tricuspid repair, without plication of the right ventricle, even in cases where tricuspid valve replacement was discussed. Modifications seemed to support these results. Surgery in older patients with a progressive NYHA class seemed to carry a higher operative mortality.

  16. DNA Polymerases λ and β: The Double-Edged Swords of DNA Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Mentegari

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available DNA is constantly exposed to both endogenous and exogenous damages. More than 10,000 DNA modifications are induced every day in each cell’s genome. Maintenance of the integrity of the genome is accomplished by several DNA repair systems. The core enzymes for these pathways are the DNA polymerases. Out of 17 DNA polymerases present in a mammalian cell, at least 13 are specifically devoted to DNA repair and are often acting in different pathways. DNA polymerases β and λ are involved in base excision repair of modified DNA bases and translesion synthesis past DNA lesions. Polymerase λ also participates in non-homologous end joining of DNA double-strand breaks. However, recent data have revealed that, depending on their relative levels, the cell cycle phase, the ratio between deoxy- and ribo-nucleotide pools and the interaction with particular auxiliary proteins, the repair reactions carried out by these enzymes can be an important source of genetic instability, owing to repair mistakes. This review summarizes the most recent results on the ambivalent properties of these enzymes in limiting or promoting genetic instability in mammalian cells, as well as their potential use as targets for anticancer chemotherapy.

  17. DNA Polymerases λ and β: The Double-Edged Swords of DNA Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentegari, Elisa; Kissova, Miroslava; Bavagnoli, Laura; Maga, Giovanni; Crespan, Emmanuele

    2016-08-31

    DNA is constantly exposed to both endogenous and exogenous damages. More than 10,000 DNA modifications are induced every day in each cell's genome. Maintenance of the integrity of the genome is accomplished by several DNA repair systems. The core enzymes for these pathways are the DNA polymerases. Out of 17 DNA polymerases present in a mammalian cell, at least 13 are specifically devoted to DNA repair and are often acting in different pathways. DNA polymerases β and λ are involved in base excision repair of modified DNA bases and translesion synthesis past DNA lesions. Polymerase λ also participates in non-homologous end joining of DNA double-strand breaks. However, recent data have revealed that, depending on their relative levels, the cell cycle phase, the ratio between deoxy- and ribo-nucleotide pools and the interaction with particular auxiliary proteins, the repair reactions carried out by these enzymes can be an important source of genetic instability, owing to repair mistakes. This review summarizes the most recent results on the ambivalent properties of these enzymes in limiting or promoting genetic instability in mammalian cells, as well as their potential use as targets for anticancer chemotherapy.

  18. The surface science of enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, Thomas Holm; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2002-01-01

    One of the largest challenges to science in the coming years is to find the relation between enzyme structure and function. Can we predict which reactions an enzyme catalyzes from knowledge of its structure-or from its amino acid sequence? Can we use that knowledge to modify enzyme function......? To solve these problems we must understand in some detail how enzymes interact with reactants from its surroundings. These interactions take place at the surface of the enzyme and the question of enzyme function can be viewed as the surface science of enzymes. In this article we discuss how to describe...... catalysis by enzymes, and in particular the analogies between enzyme catalyzed reactions and surface catalyzed reactions. We do this by discussing two concrete examples of reactions catalyzed both in nature (by enzymes) and in industrial reactors (by inorganic materials), and show that although analogies...

  19. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 Section... inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.” (a... killing or growth inhibition of repair deficient bacteria in a set of repair proficient and deficient...

  20. Magnetically responsive enzyme powders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pospišková, K.; Šafařík, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 380, APR 2015 (2015), s. 197-200 ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13021 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : enzyme powders * cross-linking * magnetic modification * magnetic separation * magnetic iron oxides particles * microwave-assisted synthesis Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.357, year: 2015

  1. Enzyme with rhamnogalacturonase activity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kofod, L.V.; Andersen, L.N.; Dalboge, H.; Kauppinen, M.S.; Christgau, S.; Heldt-Hansen, H.P.; Christophersen, C.; Nielsen, P.M.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Schols, H.A.

    1998-01-01

    An enzyme exhibiting rhamnogalacturonase activity, capable of cleaving a rhamnogalacturonan backbone in such a manner that galacturonic acids are left as the non-reducing ends, and which exhibits activity on hairy regions from a soy bean material and/or on saponified hairy regions from a sugar beet

  2. Implantable enzyme amperometric biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotanen, Christian N; Moussy, Francis Gabriel; Carrara, Sandro; Guiseppi-Elie, Anthony

    2012-05-15

    The implantable enzyme amperometric biosensor continues as the dominant in vivo format for the detection, monitoring and reporting of biochemical analytes related to a wide range of pathologies. Widely used in animal studies, there is increasing emphasis on their use in diabetes care and management, the management of trauma-associated hemorrhage and in critical care monitoring by intensivists in the ICU. These frontier opportunities demand continuous indwelling performance for up to several years, well in excess of the currently approved seven days. This review outlines the many challenges to successful deployment of chronically implantable amperometric enzyme biosensors and emphasizes the emerging technological approaches in their continued development. The foreign body response plays a prominent role in implantable biotransducer failure. Topics considering the approaches to mitigate the inflammatory response, use of biomimetic chemistries, nanostructured topographies, drug eluting constructs, and tissue-to-device interface modulus matching are reviewed. Similarly, factors that influence biotransducer performance such as enzyme stability, substrate interference, mediator selection and calibration are reviewed. For the biosensor system, the opportunities and challenges of integration, guided by footprint requirements, the limitations of mixed signal electronics, and power requirements, has produced three systems approaches. The potential is great. However, integration along the multiple length scales needed to address fundamental issues and integration across the diverse disciplines needed to achieve success of these highly integrated systems, continues to be a challenge in the development and deployment of implantable amperometric enzyme biosensor systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Advances in enzyme bioelectrochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDRESSA R. PEREIRA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Bioelectrochemistry can be defined as a branch of Chemical Science concerned with electron-proton transfer and transport involving biomolecules, as well as electrode reactions of redox enzymes. The bioelectrochemical reactions and system have direct impact in biotechnological development, in medical devices designing, in the behavior of DNA-protein complexes, in green-energy and bioenergy concepts, and make it possible an understanding of metabolism of all living organisms (e.g. humans where biomolecules are integral to health and proper functioning. In the last years, many researchers have dedicated itself to study different redox enzymes by using electrochemistry, aiming to understand their mechanisms and to develop promising bioanodes and biocathodes for biofuel cells as well as to develop biosensors and implantable bioelectronics devices. Inside this scope, this review try to introduce and contemplate some relevant topics for enzyme bioelectrochemistry, such as the immobilization of the enzymes at electrode surfaces, the electron transfer, the bioelectrocatalysis, and new techniques conjugated with electrochemistry vising understand the kinetics and thermodynamics of redox proteins. Furthermore, examples of recent approaches in designing biosensors and biofuel developed are presented.

  4. Cold-Adapted Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georlette, D.; Bentahir, M.; Claverie, P.; Collins, T.; D'amico, S.; Delille, D.; Feller, G.; Gratia, E.; Hoyoux, A.; Lonhienne, T.; Meuwis, M.-a.; Zecchinon, L.; Gerday, Ch.

    In the last few years, increased attention has been focused on enzymes produced by cold-adapted micro-organisms. It has emerged that psychrophilic enzymes represent an extremely powerful tool in both protein folding investigations and for biotechnological purposes. Such enzymes are characterised by an increased thermosensitivity and, most of them, by a higher catalytic efficiency at low and moderate temperatures, when compared to their mesophilic counterparts. The high thermosensitivity probably originates from an increased flexibility of either a selected area of the molecular edifice or the overall protein structure, providing enhanced abilities to undergo conformational changes during catalysis at low temperatures. Structure modelling and recent crystallographic data have allowed to elucidate the structural parameters that could be involved in this higher resilience. It was demonstrated that each psychrophilic enzyme adopts its own adaptive strategy. It appears, moreover, that there is a continuum in the strategy of protein adaptation to temperature, as the previously mentioned structural parameters are implicated in the stability of thermophilic proteins. Additional 3D crystal structures, site-directed and random mutagenesis experiments should now be undertaken to further investigate the stability-flexibility-activity relationship.

  5. Embedded enzymes catalyse capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentish, Sandra

    2018-05-01

    Membrane technologies for carbon capture can offer economic and environmental advantages over conventional amine-based absorption, but can suffer from limited gas flux and selectivity to CO2. Now, a membrane based on enzymes embedded in hydrophilic pores is shown to exhibit combined flux and selectivity that challenges the state of the art.

  6. Photoperiodism and Enzyme Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, Orlando; Morel, Claudine

    1974-01-01

    Metabolic readjustments after a change from long days to short days appear, in Kalanchoe blossfeldiana, to be achieved through the operation of two main mechanisms: variation in enzyme capacity, and circadian rhythmicity. After a lag time, capacity in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and capacity in aspartate aminotransferase increase exponentially and appear to be allometrically linked during 50 to 60 short days; then a sudden fall takes place in the activity of the former. Malic enzyme and alanine aminotransferase behave differently. Thus, the operation of the two sections of the pathway (before and after the malate step) give rise to a continuously changing functional compartmentation in the pathway. Circadian rhythmicity, on the other hand, produces time compartmentation through phase shifts and variation in amplitude, independently for each enzyme. These characteristics suggest that the operation of a so-called biological clock would be involved. We propose the hypothesis that feedback regulation would be more accurate and efficient when applied to an already oscillating, clock-controlled enzyme system. PMID:16658749

  7. ISFET based enzyme sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schoot, Bart H.; Bergveld, Piet

    1987-01-01

    This paper reviews the results that have been reported on ISFET based enzyme sensors. The most important improvement that results from the application of ISFETs instead of glass membrane electrodes is in the method of fabrication. Problems with regard to the pH dependence of the response and the

  8. Common cellular events occur during wound healing and organ regeneration in the sea cucumber Holothuria glaberrima

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Arrarás José E

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All animals possess some type of tissue repair mechanism. In some species, the capacity to repair tissues is limited to the healing of wounds. Other species, such as echinoderms, posses a striking repair capability that can include the replacement of entire organs. It has been reported that some mechanisms, namely extracellular matrix remodeling, appear to occur in most repair processes. However, it remains unclear to what extent the process of organ regeneration, particularly in animals where loss and regeneration of complex structures is a programmed natural event, is similar to wound healing. We have now used the sea cucumber Holothuria glaberrima to address this question. Results Animals were lesioned by making a 3–5 mm transverse incision between one of the longitudinal muscle pairs along the bodywall. Lesioned tissues included muscle, nerve, water canal and dermis. Animals were allowed to heal for up to four weeks (2, 6, 12, 20, and 28 days post-injury before sacrificed. Tissues were sectioned in a cryostat and changes in cellular and tissue elements during repair were evaluated using classical dyes, immmuohistochemistry and phalloidin labeling. In addition, the temporal and spatial distribution of cell proliferation in the animals was assayed using BrdU incorporation. We found that cellular events associated with wound healing in H. glaberrima correspond to those previously shown to occur during intestinal regeneration. These include: (1 an increase in the number of spherule-containing cells, (2 remodeling of the extracellular matrix, (3 formation of spindle-like structures that signal dedifferentiation of muscle cells in the area flanking the lesion site and (4 intense cellular division occurring mainly in the coelomic epithelium after the first week of regeneration. Conclusion Our data indicate that H. glaberrima employs analogous cellular mechanisms during wound healing and organ regeneration. Thus, it is possible

  9. Measurement of enzyme-sensitive sites in uv- or. gamma. -irradiated human cells using Micrococcus luteus extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paterson, M C; Smith, B P; Smith, P J

    1979-01-01

    The study of DNA damage and its enzymatic repair has undergone rapid expansion in recent years. Laboratory observations at the molecular level have been facilitated greatly by the availability of a battery of physicochemical techniques capable of monitoring hallmarks of different repair mechanisms. One technique exploits the unique ability of certain putative repair enzymes (endonucleases and DNA glycosylases of prokaryotic origin) to selectively attack DNA at sites containing altered base or sugar residues; the sites are subsequently observed as single-strand break, by velocity sedimentatn of the DNA in an alkaline sucrose gradient. Incubation of carcinogen-treated cell cultures for varying times, followed by enzymatic analysis of their radionuclide-labeled DNA, yields the time course of disappearace of such sites; this is taken as an indirect expression of the kinetics of lesion repair. Although there are several variations of the enzymatic assay two basic protocols are in current use. The only major difference is the way in which the damaged DNA is treated with the lesion-detecting enzyme(s). In one protocol this is achieved by rendering the cells porous to extracellular proteins prior to incubation with the test enzyme(s). In the second protocol the damaged DNA is extracted from the cells and is then exposed to the lesion-recognizing enzyme(s) in vitro. The enzymatic assay developed in our laboratory follows this second protocol, and the procedure is described.

  10. Repair of lesser tuberosity osteotomy for shoulder arthroplasty: biomechanical evaluation of the Backpack and Dual Row techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckman, Daniel S; Hoover, Stephen A; Weinhold, Paul S; Spang, Jeffrey T; Creighton, R Alexander

    2011-04-01

    Subscapularis dysfunction following total shoulder arthroplasty can result in permanent loss of function. The lesser tuberosity osteotomy (LTO) has been proposed as a method which utilizes bone-to-bone healing to improve subscapularis function. This study evaluates the biomechanical properties of two described techniques for LTO repair. We hypothesized that a Dual Row repair would be stronger and demonstrate less cyclic displacement than a Backpack repair. Ten matched pairs of cadaveric humeri were dissected, leaving the subscapularis intact, and a lesser tuberosity osteotomy was performed. Matched shoulders were randomized to either a Backpack repair or a Dual Row repair. Repairs were subjected to cyclic loading to 180 N for 500 cycles, followed by ramp-up loading to ultimate failure. Clinical failure was defined as displacement >5 mm after 500 cycles. Displacement after 500 cycles was significantly greater for the Backpack repair (6.9 mm) than for the Dual Row repair (4.6 mm) (P = .007). Most displacement occurred on the first cycle (Backpack, 4.6 mm; Dual Row, 2.1 mm) (P Row repair (3/10). Ultimate tensile strength was significantly greater for the Dual Row repair (632.3 N) than for the Backpack repair (510.9 N) (P = .01). The Dual Row technique is significantly stronger and demonstrates less cyclic displacement than the Backpack technique. Clinical studies are needed to determine the impact of LTO repair technique on subscapularis function following shoulder arthroplasty. Copyright © 2011. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  11. Pyrimidine dimer formation and repair in human skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, B.M.; Harber, L.C.; Kochevar, I.E.

    1980-01-01

    Cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimers have been detected in the DNA of human skin following in vivo irradiation with suberythermal doses of ultraviolet (UV) radiation from FS-20 sun lamp fluorescent tubes. Dimers were assayed by treatment of extracted DNA with Micrococus luteus UV-specific endonuclease, alkaline agarose electrophoresis, and ethidum bromide staining. This technique, in contrast to conventional dimer assays, can be used with nonradioactive DNA and is optimal at low UV light doses. These data suggest that some dimer disappearance by excision repair occurs within 20 min of UV irradiation and that photoreactivation of dimers can make a contribution to the total repair process

  12. The Enzyme Function Initiative†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlt, John A.; Allen, Karen N.; Almo, Steven C.; Armstrong, Richard N.; Babbitt, Patricia C.; Cronan, John E.; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Imker, Heidi J.; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Minor, Wladek; Poulter, C. Dale; Raushel, Frank M.; Sali, Andrej; Shoichet, Brian K.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2011-01-01

    The Enzyme Function Initiative (EFI) was recently established to address the challenge of assigning reliable functions to enzymes discovered in bacterial genome projects; in this Current Topic we review the structure and operations of the EFI. The EFI includes the Superfamily/Genome, Protein, Structure, Computation, and Data/Dissemination Cores that provide the infrastructure for reliably predicting the in vitro functions of unknown enzymes. The initial targets for functional assignment are selected from five functionally diverse superfamilies (amidohydrolase, enolase, glutathione transferase, haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase, and isoprenoid synthase), with five superfamily-specific Bridging Projects experimentally testing the predicted in vitro enzymatic activities. The EFI also includes the Microbiology Core that evaluates the in vivo context of in vitro enzymatic functions and confirms the functional predictions of the EFI. The deliverables of the EFI to the scientific community include: 1) development of a large-scale, multidisciplinary sequence/structure-based strategy for functional assignment of unknown enzymes discovered in genome projects (target selection, protein production, structure determination, computation, experimental enzymology, microbiology, and structure-based annotation); 2) dissemination of the strategy to the community via publications, collaborations, workshops, and symposia; 3) computational and bioinformatic tools for using the strategy; 4) provision of experimental protocols and/or reagents for enzyme production and characterization; and 5) dissemination of data via the EFI’s website, enzymefunction.org. The realization of multidisciplinary strategies for functional assignment will begin to define the full metabolic diversity that exists in nature and will impact basic biochemical and evolutionary understanding, as well as a wide range of applications of central importance to industrial, medicinal and pharmaceutical efforts. PMID

  13. The Enzyme Function Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlt, John A; Allen, Karen N; Almo, Steven C; Armstrong, Richard N; Babbitt, Patricia C; Cronan, John E; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Imker, Heidi J; Jacobson, Matthew P; Minor, Wladek; Poulter, C Dale; Raushel, Frank M; Sali, Andrej; Shoichet, Brian K; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2011-11-22

    The Enzyme Function Initiative (EFI) was recently established to address the challenge of assigning reliable functions to enzymes discovered in bacterial genome projects; in this Current Topic, we review the structure and operations of the EFI. The EFI includes the Superfamily/Genome, Protein, Structure, Computation, and Data/Dissemination Cores that provide the infrastructure for reliably predicting the in vitro functions of unknown enzymes. The initial targets for functional assignment are selected from five functionally diverse superfamilies (amidohydrolase, enolase, glutathione transferase, haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase, and isoprenoid synthase), with five superfamily specific Bridging Projects experimentally testing the predicted in vitro enzymatic activities. The EFI also includes the Microbiology Core that evaluates the in vivo context of in vitro enzymatic functions and confirms the functional predictions of the EFI. The deliverables of the EFI to the scientific community include (1) development of a large-scale, multidisciplinary sequence/structure-based strategy for functional assignment of unknown enzymes discovered in genome projects (target selection, protein production, structure determination, computation, experimental enzymology, microbiology, and structure-based annotation), (2) dissemination of the strategy to the community via publications, collaborations, workshops, and symposia, (3) computational and bioinformatic tools for using the strategy, (4) provision of experimental protocols and/or reagents for enzyme production and characterization, and (5) dissemination of data via the EFI's Website, http://enzymefunction.org. The realization of multidisciplinary strategies for functional assignment will begin to define the full metabolic diversity that exists in nature and will impact basic biochemical and evolutionary understanding, as well as a wide range of applications of central importance to industrial, medicinal, and pharmaceutical efforts.

  14. Thermodynamic activity-based intrinsic enzyme kinetic sheds light on enzyme-solvent interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosch, Jan-Hendrik; Wagner, David; Nistelkas, Vasilios; Spieß, Antje C

    2017-01-01

    The reaction medium has major impact on biocatalytic reaction systems and on their economic significance. To allow for tailored medium engineering, thermodynamic phenomena, intrinsic enzyme kinetics, and enzyme-solvent interactions have to be discriminated. To this end, enzyme reaction kinetic modeling was coupled with thermodynamic calculations based on investigations of the alcohol dehydrogenase from Lactobacillus brevis (LbADH) in monophasic water/methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) mixtures as a model solvent. Substrate concentrations and substrate thermodynamic activities were varied separately to identify the individual thermodynamic and kinetic effects on the enzyme activity. Microkinetic parameters based on concentration and thermodynamic activity were derived to successfully identify a positive effect of MTBE on the availability of the substrate to the enzyme, but a negative effect on the enzyme performance. In conclusion, thermodynamic activity-based kinetic modeling might be a suitable tool to initially curtail the type of enzyme-solvent interactions and thus, a powerful first step to potentially understand the phenomena that occur in nonconventional media in more detail. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:96-103, 2017. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  15. Drill machine guidance using natural occurring radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, H.D.; Schroeder, R.L.; Williams, B.J.

    1980-01-01

    A drilling machine guidance system is described which uses only the naturally occuring radiation within the seam or stratum of interest. The apparatus can be used for guiding horizontal drilling machines through coal seams and the like. (U.K.)

  16. Multiple Primary Cancers: Simultaneously Occurring Prostate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-05-20

    May 20, 2016 ... occurring prostate cancer and other primary tumors-our experience and literature ..... thyroid cancers, pancreatic tumors, renal cancers, and melanoma. ... Hsing AW, Yeboah E, Biritwum R, Tettey Y, De Marzo AM,. Adjei A, et ...

  17. DNA damage and repair activity after broccoli intake in young healthy smokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riso, Patrizia; Martini, Daniela; Møller, Peter

    2010-01-01

    compounds, including smokers. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of broccoli intake on biomarkers of DNA damage and repair. Twenty-seven young healthy smokers consumed a portion of steamed broccoli (250 g/day) or a control diet for 10 days each within a crossover design with a washout period...... mRNA expression levels of repair and defence enzymes: 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1), nucleoside diphosphate linked moiety X-type motif 1 (NUDT1) and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1). After broccoli consumption, the level of oxidised DNA lesions decreased by 41% (95% confidence interval: 10%, 72......%) and the resistance to H(2)O(2)-induced DNA strand breaks increased by 23% (95% CI: 13%, 34%). Following broccoli intake, a higher protection was observed in subjects with glutathione S-transferase (GST) M1-null genotype. The expression level and activity of repair enzymes was unaltered. In conclusion, broccoli...

  18. Innovative repair of subsidence damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marino, G.G.

    1992-01-01

    In order to improve handling of subsidence damages the Illinois Mine Subsidence Insurance Fund supported the development of novel cost-effective methods of repair. The research in developing the repairs was directed towards the most common and costly damages that had been observed. As a result repair techniques were designed for structurally cracked foundations in the tension zone; structurally cracked foundations in the compression zone; and damaged or undamaged tilted foundations. When appropriate the postulated methods would result in: 1. significant cost savings (over conventional procedures); 2. a structural capacity greater than when the foundation was uncracked; and 3. an aesthetic appeal. All the postulated repair methodologies were laboratory and/or field tested. This paper will summarize the essentials of each technique developed and the test results

  19. Umbilical hernia repair - series (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatment. The indications for umbilical hernia repair include: incarcerated (strangulated) umbilical hernia defects not spontaneously closed by 4 to 5 years of age children under 2 with very large defects unacceptable to ...

  20. Mammalian DNA Repair. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Richard D.

    2003-01-24

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Mammalian DNA Repair was held at Harbortown Resort, Ventura Beach, CA. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  1. Canadian company innovates dam repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2000-01-01

    Successful repair without any downtime, of the Sabana Yegua power and irrigation structure in the western Dominican Republic by Aquatic Sciences Ltd., a St. Catherine, Ontario-based underwater specialist company, is discussed. The structure was damaged by Hurricane George last when when rising water levels damaged a major valve in the control gate chamber. The repair strategy designed by Aquatic Sciences used a remotely operated vehicle with a mechanical arm for minor tasks which placed a specially-made plug into the inlet pipe. The work was completed in one week, saving the utility company a great deal of money by making it possible to make the repairs remotely in the gate chamber without having to drain the tunnel, as would have been necessary had the repair been completed manually. The remotely operated vehicles use a scanning sonar as well as light to find their way. They are particularly well adapted to work underwater under low-visibility conditions

  2. Betonreparationers holdbarhed (Durability of Concrete Repairs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brimnes, Eydbjørn; Dali, Bogi í; Larsen, Erik Stoklund

    1999-01-01

    Concrete repairs on 11 pillars on bridges built in the sixties and repaired 8 to 9 years ago have been examined. Especially the chloride penetration in the repair concrete have been measured. Chloride penetration in the repair concrete is much lower than in the original concrete....

  3. 40 CFR 63.1005 - Leak repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Leak repair. 63.1005 Section 63.1005... Standards for Equipment Leaks-Control Level 1 § 63.1005 Leak repair. (a) Leak repair schedule. The owner or operator shall repair each leak detected no later than 15 calendar days after it is detected, except as...

  4. 40 CFR 63.1024 - Leak repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Leak repair. 63.1024 Section 63.1024... Standards for Equipment Leaks-Control Level 2 Standards § 63.1024 Leak repair. (a) Leak repair schedule. The owner or operator shall repair each leak detected as soon as practical, but not later than 15 calendar...

  5. 40 CFR 65.105 - Leak repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Leak repair. 65.105 Section 65.105... FEDERAL AIR RULE Equipment Leaks § 65.105 Leak repair. (a) Leak repair schedule. The owner or operator shall repair each leak detected as soon as practical but not later than 15 calendar days after it is...

  6. Laparoscopic Repair of Inguinal Hernias

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, Jonathan; Duh, Quan-Yang

    2011-01-01

    For patients with recurrent inguinal hernia, or bilateral inguinal hernia, or for women, laparoscopic repair offers significant advantages over open techniques with regard to recurrence risk, pain, and recovery. For unilateral first-time hernias, either laparoscopic or open repair with mesh can offer excellent results. The major drawback of laparoscopy is that the technique requires a significant number of cases to master. For surgeons in group practice, it makes sense to have one surgeon in ...

  7. Repair Types, Procedures - Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Affordable Combat Aircraft, AGARD - CP -600, 1997. [17] Helbling J, Grover R and Ratwani M. M “Analysis and Structural Test of Composite Reinforcement to...considered suitable for the composite patch repair of aluminum structure. Ductile adhesives such as FM- 73 are preferred over brittle adhesives Repair Types...zone. A proper cure cycle is followed as prescribed by the adhesive manufacturer. For FM- 73 adhesive cure at 2500F (1210C) for 120 minutes is

  8. Laparoscopic repair of postoperative perineal hernia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Perineal hernias are infrequent complications following abdominoperineal operations. Various approaches have been described for repair of perineal hernias including open transabdominal, transperineal or combined abdominoperineal repairs. The use of laparoscopic transabdominal repair of perineal hernias is not well-described. We present a case report demonstrating the benefits of laparoscopic repair of perineal hernia following previous laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection (APR) using a nonabsorbable mesh to repair the defect. We have demonstrated that the use of laparoscopy with repair of the pelvic floor defect using a non absorbable synthetic mesh offers an excellent alternative with many potential advantages over open transabdominal and transperineal repairs.

  9. Overlapping sphincteroplasty and posterior repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Andrea K; Myers, Erinn M; Lippmann, Quinn K; Matthews, Catherine A

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge of how to anatomically reconstruct extensive posterior-compartment defects is variable among gynecologists. The objective of this video is to demonstrate an effective technique of overlapping sphincteroplasty and posterior repair. In this video, a scripted storyboard was constructed that outlines the key surgical steps of a comprehensive posterior compartment repair: (1) surgical incision that permits access to posterior compartment and perineal body, (2) dissection of the rectovaginal space up to the level of the cervix, (3) plication of the rectovaginal muscularis, (4) repair of internal and external anal sphincters, and (5) reconstruction of the perineal body. Using a combination of graphic illustrations and live video footage, tips on repair are highlighted. The goals at the end of repair are to: (1) have improved vaginal caliber, (2) increase rectal tone along the entire posterior vaginal wall, (3) have the posterior vaginal wall at a perpendicular plane to the perineal body, (4) reform the hymenal ring, and (5) not have an overly elongated perineal body. This video provides a step-by-step guide on how to perform an overlapping sphincteroplasty and posterior repair.

  10. Scarf Repair of Composite Laminates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Zonghong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of composite materials, such as carbon-fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP composites, aero-structures has led to an increased need of advanced assembly joining and repair technologies. Adhesive bonded repairs as an alternative to recover full or part of initial strength were investigated. Tests were conducted with the objective of evaluating the effectiveness of techniques used for repairing damage fiber reinforced laminated composites. Failure loads and failure modes were generated and compared with the following parameters: scarf angles, roughness of grind tool and number of external plies. Results showed that scarf angle was the critical parameter and the largest tensile strength was observed with the smallest scarf angle. Besides, the use of external plies at the outer surface could not increase the repairs efficiency for large scarf angle. Preparing the repair surfaces by sanding them with a sander ranging from 60 to 100 grit number had significant effect on the failure load. These results allowed the proposal of design principles for repairing CFRP structures.

  11. Artificial-Crack-Behavior Test Evaluation of the Water-Leakage Repair Materials Used for the Repair of Water-Leakage Cracks in Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Yeon Kim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available There are no existing standard test methods at home and abroad that can verify the performance of water leakage repair materials, and it is thus very difficult to perform quality control checks in the field of water leakage repair. This study determined that the key factors that have the greatest impact on the water leakage repair materials are the micro-behaviors of cracks, and proposed an artificial-crack-behavior test method for the performance verification of the repair materials. The performance of the 15 kinds of repair materials that are currently being used in the field of water leakage repair was evaluated by applying the proposed test method. The main aim of such a test method is to determine if there is water leakage by injecting water leakage repair materials into a crack behavior test specimen with an artificial 5-mm crack width, applying a 2.5 mm vertical behavior load at 100 cycles, and applying 0.3 N/mm2 constant water pressure. The test results showed that of the 15 kinds of repair materials, only two effectively sealed the crack and thus stopped the water leakage. The findings of this study confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed artificial-crack-behavior test method and suggest that it can be used as a performance verification method for checking the responsiveness of the repair materials being used in the field of water leakage repair to the repetitive water leakage behaviors that occur in concrete structures. The study findings further suggest that the use of the proposed test method makes it possible to quantify the water leakage repair quality control in the field.

  12. Substrate-driven chemotactic assembly in an enzyme cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xi; Palacci, Henri; Yadav, Vinita; Spiering, Michelle M.; Gilson, Michael K.; Butler, Peter J.; Hess, Henry; Benkovic, Stephen J.; Sen, Ayusman

    2018-03-01

    Enzymatic catalysis is essential to cell survival. In many instances, enzymes that participate in reaction cascades have been shown to assemble into metabolons in response to the presence of the substrate for the first enzyme. However, what triggers metabolon formation has remained an open question. Through a combination of theory and experiments, we show that enzymes in a cascade can assemble via chemotaxis. We apply microfluidic and fluorescent spectroscopy techniques to study the coordinated movement of the first four enzymes of the glycolysis cascade: hexokinase, phosphoglucose isomerase, phosphofructokinase and aldolase. We show that each enzyme independently follows its own specific substrate gradient, which in turn is produced by the preceding enzymatic reaction. Furthermore, we find that the chemotactic assembly of enzymes occurs even under cytosolic crowding conditions.

  13. Aging and DNA repair capability. [Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tice, R R

    1977-01-01

    A review of the literature on DNA repair processes in relation to aging is presented under the following headings: DNA repair processes; age-related occurrence of unrepaired DNA lesions; DNA repair capability as a function of age; tissue-specific DNA repair capability; acceleration of the aging process by exposure to DNA damaging agents; human genetic syndromes; and longevity and DNA repair processes. (HLW)

  14. Immunocosmeceuticals: An emerging trend in repairing human hair damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthika Selvan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hair is one of the most important portions for beauty care and in recent years grooming and cosmetic treatment of hair has drastically risen. Substantially, it may deteriorate and weaken the hair by modification of keratin protein. This makes the hair dry, brittle and split vend occurs due to loss of hair strength and the damage further increases with cosmetic treatments. The various poor ingredients are being used for repairing which have extremely poor compatibility with hair. Now the hair care products can be introduced with an active ingredient comprising a yolk derived anti-hair antibody immunoglobin obtained from egg of chickens immunized with damaged hair as antigen. This immuno-cosmeceuticals can repair the hair damage and imparts flexibility and smoothness to the hair. These effects are not lost by the ordinary shampooing. This article focuses on the characteristic of human hair, its damaging processes and the effects of immuno-cosmeceuticals for repairing the hair damage.

  15. Opportunity-based age replacement policy with minimal repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jhang, J.P.; Sheu, S.H.

    1999-01-01

    This paper proposes an opportunity-based age replacement policy with minimal repair. The system has two types of failures. Type I failures (minor failures) are removed by minimal repairs, whereas type II failures are removed by replacements. Type I and type II failures are age-dependent. A system is replaced at type II failure (catastrophic failure) or at the opportunity after age T, whichever occurs first. The cost of the minimal repair of the system at age z depends on the random part C(z) and the deterministic part c(z). The opportunity arises according to a Poisson process, independent of failures of the component. The expected cost rate is obtained. The optimal T * which would minimize the cost rate is discussed. Various special cases are considered. Finally, a numerical example is given

  16. Hip arthroscopy with labral repair for femoroacetabular impingement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dippmann, Christian; Thorborg, Kristian; Kraemer, Otto

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine the progression of clinical outcomes 3, 6 and 12 months after hip arthroscopy with labral repair for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). METHODS: From May 2009 to December 2011, 87 consecutive patients [55 females (median age 38, range 17-63) and 32...... males (median age 38, range 15-59)] underwent hip arthroscopy and labral repair, by the same experienced surgeon. Standardised, but unstructured, post-operative rehabilitation instructions were provided. Function and pain were evaluated using modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS) and visual analogue scale...... months with no additional changes from 6 to 12 months [22.6 (2.6)-27.9 (2.6), (n.s.)]. CONCLUSIONS: Improvements in function (mHHS) and pain (VAS) were seen in patients after hip arthroscopy with labral repair for FAI at 3, 6, and 12 months. While significant improvements occurred from 3 to 6 months...

  17. The Roles of Several Residues of Escherichia coli DNA Photolyase in the Highly Efficient Photo-Repair of Cyclobutane Pyrimidine Dimers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Xu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli DNA photolyase is an enzyme that repairs the major kind of UV-induced lesions, cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD in DNA utilizing 350–450 nm light as energy source. The enzyme has very high photo-repair efficiency (the quantum yield of the reaction is ~0.85, which is significantly greater than many model compounds that mimic photolyase. This suggests that some residues of the protein play important roles in the photo-repair of CPD. In this paper, we have focused on several residues discussed their roles in catalysis by reviewing the existing literature and some hypotheses.

  18. Resistance to radiation, recombination, repair of DNA and chromosome organisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, H.L.

    1981-01-01

    The model advanced here proposes that death is caused by destructive lesions, mainly double-strand breaks, in all the inter-repairable copies so close together that recombination repair cannot function. Death is related to the exponential of dose where r is the number of copies of the genome. A graph of ln(-ln survival) against ln dose is used to produce a linear dose-survival relationship, the slope of which gives the number of inter-repairable copies of the genome (= number of hits per lethal event). In Ustilago maydis it seems that unless all the chromatids are broken within a few thousand base pairs all ds breaks are repaired. The size of this critical target is similar to the size of a gene. Meiotic pairing in fungi starts outside the genes, and it is therefore suggested that specific pairing sites between genes define the ends of the targets. The model also describes the radiation-induced death of Micrococcus radiodurans and Sacchromyces cerevisiae. Cultured mammalian cells also show a linear ln(-ln survival)/ln dose relationship with a slope of 1.5 showing that both 1st and 2nd order killing occured. Sublethal radiation induces recombination in heterozygous diploid U. maydis proportional to the square of the dose. Sister-chromatid repair is preferred. Polyploid yeast can only use pairs of chromosomes for repair, showing that chromosome pairing is required for recombination repair, and mitotic pairing is restricted to bivalents in the same way that meiotic pairing is. (orig./AJ)

  19. Resistance to radiation, recombination, repair of DNA and chromosome organisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, H L [East Anglia Univ., Norwich (UK). School of Biological Sciences

    1981-01-01

    The model advanced here proposes that death is caused by destructive lesions, mainly double-strand breaks, in all the inter-repairable copies so close together that recombination repair cannot function. Death is related to the exponential of dose where r is the number of copies of the genome. A graph of ln(-ln survival) against ln dose is used to produce a linear dose-survival relationship, the slope of which gives the number of inter-repairable copies of the genome (= number of hits per lethal event). In Ustilago maydis it seems that unless all the chromatids are broken within a few thousand base pairs all ds breaks are repaired. The size of this critical target is similar to the size of a gene. Meiotic pairing in fungi starts outside the genes, and it is therefore suggested that specific pairing sites between genes define the ends of the targets. The model also describes the radiation-induced death of Micrococcus radiodurans and Sacchromyces cerevisiae. Cultured mammalian cells also show a linear ln(-ln survival)/ln dose relationship with a slope of 1.5 showing that both 1st and 2nd order killing occured. Sublethal radiation induces recombination in heterozygous diploid U. maydis proportional to the square of the dose. Sister-chromatid repair is preferred. Polyploid yeast can only use pairs of chromosomes for repair, showing that chromosome pairing is required for recombination repair, and mitotic pairing is restricted to bivalents in the same way that meiotic pairing is.

  20. Methylation of deoxycytidine incorporated by excision-repair synthesis of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastan, M.B.; Gowans, B.J.; Lieberman, M.W.

    1982-01-01

    Methylation of deoxycytidine incorporated by DNA excision-repair was studied in human diploid fibroblasts following damage with ultraviolet radiation, N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, or N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene. In confluent, nondividing cells, methylation in repair patches induced by all three agents is slow and incomplete. Whereas after DNA replication in logarithmic-phase cultures a steady state level of 3.4% 5-methylcytosine is reached in less than 2 hr after cells are labeled with 6- 3H-deoxycytidine, following ultraviolet-stimulated repair synthesis in confluent cells it takes about 3 days to reach a level of approximately 2.0% 5-methylcytosine in the repair patch. In cells from cultures in logarithmic-phase growth, 5-methylcytosine formation in ultraviolet-induced repair patches occurs faster and to a greater extent, reaching a level of approximately 2.7% in 10-20 hr. Preexisting hypomethylated repair patches in confluent cells are methylated further when the cells are stimulated to divide; however, the repair patch may still not be fully methylated before cell division occurs. Thus DNA damage and repair may lead to heritable loss of methylation at some sites

  1. New paradigms in the repair of oxidative damage in human genome: mechanisms ensuring repair of mutagenic base lesions during replication and involvement of accessory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Arijit; Yang, Chunying; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Mitra, Sankar; Hegde, Muralidhar L

    2015-05-01

    Oxidized bases in the mammalian genome, which are invariably mutagenic due to their mispairing property, are continuously induced by endogenous reactive oxygen species and more abundantly after oxidative stress. Unlike bulky base adducts induced by UV and other environmental mutagens in the genome that block replicative DNA polymerases, oxidatively damaged bases such as 5-hydroxyuracil, produced by oxidative deamination of cytosine in the template strand, do not block replicative polymerases and thus need to be repaired prior to replication to prevent mutation. Following up our earlier studies, which showed that the Nei endonuclease VIII like 1 (NEIL1) DNA glycosylase, one of the five base excision repair (BER)-initiating enzymes in mammalian cells, has enhanced expression during the S-phase and higher affinity for replication fork-mimicking single-stranded (ss) DNA substrates, we recently provided direct experimental evidence for NEIL1's role in replicating template strand repair. The key requirement for this event, which we named as the 'cow-catcher' mechanism of pre-replicative BER, is NEIL1's non-productive binding (substrate binding without product formation) to the lesion base in ss DNA template to stall DNA synthesis, causing fork regression. Repair of the lesion in reannealed duplex is then carried out by NEIL1 in association with the DNA replication proteins. NEIL1 (and other BER-initiating enzymes) also interact with several accessory and non-canonical proteins including the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U and Y-box-binding protein 1 as well as high mobility group box 1 protein, whose precise roles in BER are still obscure. In this review, we have discussed the recent advances in our understanding of oxidative genome damage repair pathways with particular focus on the pre-replicative template strand repair and the role of scaffold factors like X-ray repairs cross-complementing protein 1 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 and other accessory

  2. Determination of natural occurring radionuclides concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stajic, J.; Markovic, V.; Krstic, D.; Nikezic, D.

    2011-01-01

    Tobacco smoke contains certain concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides from radioactive chains of uranium and thorium - 214 Pb, 214 Bi, 228 Ac, 208 Tl, 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K. Inhaling of tobacco smoke leads to internal exposure of man. In order to estimate absorbed dose of irradiation it is necessary to determine concentrations of radionuclides present in the tobacco leaves. In this paper specific activities of naturally occurring radionuclides were measured in tobacco samples from cigarettes which are used in Serbia. [sr

  3. Micrococcus luteus correndonucleases. III. Evidence for involvement in repair in vivo of two endonucleases specific for DNA containing pyrimidine dimers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riazuddin, S.; Grossman, L.; Mahler, I.

    1977-01-01

    Involvement of Py--Py correndonucleases I and II in repair of ultraviolet radiation damage in vivo by Micrococcus luteus has been demonstrated by their absence in the ultraviolet-sensitive mutant DB-7 derived by treatment of the wild type parent with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. The necessity for their combined action in DNA repair in M. luteus is shown by: (a) reactivation of ultraviolet-damaged phiX174 RFI DNA in incision-defective hosts after in vivo treatment with both enzymes, (b) correlation between survival after ultraviolet irradiation and the level of the two enzymes, and (c) increased levels of repair synthesis after ultraviolet irradiation of toluenized cells DB-400 with wild type correndonuclease levels when compared with the transformant DB-200 and the mutant DB-7, which lack one or both enzymes

  4. Microbial Enzyme Activity and Carbon Cycling in Grassland Soil Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, S. D.; Jastrow, J. D.

    2004-12-01

    Extracellular enzymes are necessary to degrade complex organic compounds present in soils. Using physical fractionation procedures, we tested whether old soil carbon is spatially isolated from degradative enzymes across a prairie restoration chronosequence in Illinois, USA. We found that carbon-degrading enzymes were abundant in all soil fractions, including macroaggregates, microaggregates, and the clay fraction, which contains carbon with a mean residence time of ~200 years. The activities of two cellulose-degrading enzymes and a chitin-degrading enzyme were 2-10 times greater in organic matter fractions than in bulk soil, consistent with the rapid turnover of these fractions. Polyphenol oxidase activity was 3 times greater in the clay fraction than in the bulk soil, despite very slow carbon turnover in this fraction. Changes in enzyme activity across the restoration chronosequence were small once adjusted for increases in soil carbon concentration, although polyphenol oxidase activity per unit carbon declined by 50% in native prairie versus cultivated soil. These results are consistent with a `two-pool' model of enzyme and carbon turnover in grassland soils. In light organic matter fractions, enzyme production and carbon turnover both occur rapidly. However, in mineral-dominated fractions, both enzymes and their carbon substrates are immobilized on mineral surfaces, leading to slow turnover. Soil carbon accumulation in the clay fraction and across the prairie restoration chronosequence probably reflects increasing physical isolation of enzymes and substrates on the molecular scale, rather than the micron to millimeter scale.

  5. Predictive factors for cerebrovascular accidents after thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariscalco, Giovanni; Piffaretti, Gabriele; Tozzi, Matteo; Bacuzzi, Alessandro; Carrafiello, Giampaolo; Sala, Andrea; Castelli, Patrizio

    2009-12-01

    Cerebrovascular accidents are devastating and worrisome complications after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. The aim of this study was to determine cerebrovascular accident predictors after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Between January 2001 and June 2008, 76 patients treated with thoracic endovascular aortic repair were prospectively enrolled. The study cohort included 61 men; mean age was 65.4 +/- 16.8 years. All patients underwent a specific neurologic assessment on an hourly basis postoperatively to detect neurologic deficits. Cerebrovascular accidents were diagnosed on the basis of physical examination, tomography scan or magnetic resonance imaging, or autopsy. Cerebrovascular accidents occurred in 8 (10.5%) patients, including 4 transient ischemic attack and 4 major strokes. Four cases were observed within the first 24-hours. Multivariable analysis revealed that anatomic incompleteness of the Willis circle (odds ratio [OR] 17.19, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.10 to 140.66), as well as the presence of coronary artery disease (OR 6.86, 95 CI% 1.18 to 40.05), were independently associated with postoperative cerebrovascular accident development. Overall hospital mortality was 9.2%, with no significant difference for patients hit by cerebrovascular accidents (25.0% vs 7.3%, p = 0.102). Preexisting coronary artery disease, reflecting a severe diseased aorta and anomalies of Willis circle are independent cerebrovascular accident predictors after thoracic endovascular aortic repair procedures. A careful evaluation of the arch vessels and cerebral vascularization should be mandatory for patients suitable for thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

  6. Fabrication Flaw Density and Distribution in Weld Repairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doctor, Steven R.

    2009-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing a generalized flaw distribution for the population of nuclear reactor pressure vessels and for piping welds in the U. S. operating reactors. The purpose of the generalized flaw distribution is to predict component-specific flaw densities. The estimates of fabrication flaws are intended for use in fracture mechanics structural integrity assessments. Structural integrity assessments, such as estimating the frequency of loss-of-coolant accidents, are performed by computer codes that require, as input, accurate estimates of flaw densities. Welds from four different cancelled reactor pressure vessels and a collection of archived pipes have been studied to develop empirical estimates of fabrication flaw densities. This paper describes the fabrication flaw distribution and characterization in the repair weld metal of vessels and piping. This work indicates that large flaws occur in these repairs which are complex in composition and sometimes include cracks on the ends of the repair cavities. Parametric analysis using an exponential fit is performed on the data. Construction records where available were reviewed. It is difficult to make conclusions due to the limited number of construction records reviewed. However, the records reviewed to date show a significant change in repair frequency over the years when the components in this study were fabricated. A description of repair flaw morphology is provided with a discussion of fracture mechanics significance.

  7. Thermal segregation of asphalt material in road repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Byzyka

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results from a field study of asphaltic pavement patching operations performed by three different contractors working in a total of ten sites. It forms part of an ongoing research programme towards improving the performance of pothole repairs. Thermal imaging technology was used to record temperatures of the patching material throughout the entire exercise, from the stage of material collection, through transportation to repair site, patch forming, and compaction. Practical complications occurring during patch repairs were also identified. It was found that depending on the weather conditions, duration of the travel and poor insulation of the transported hot asphalt mix, its temperature can drop as high as 116.6 °C over the period that the reinstatement team travel to the site and prepare the patch. This impacting is on the durability and performance of the executed repairs. Cold spots on the asphalt mat and temperature differentials between the new hot-fill asphalt mix and existing pavement were also identified as poorly compacted areas that were prone to premature failure. For example, over the five-minute period, the temperature at one point reduced by 33% whereas the temperatures of nearby areas decreased by 65% and 71%. A return visit to the repair sites, three months later, revealed that locations where thermal segregation was noted, during the patching operation, had failed prematurely.

  8. A bivariate optimal replacement policy for a multistate repairable system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yuanlin; Yam, Richard C.M.; Zuo, Ming J.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a deteriorating simple repairable system with k+1 states, including k failure states and one working state, is studied. It is assumed that the system after repair is not 'as good as new' and the deterioration of the system is stochastic. We consider a bivariate replacement policy, denoted by (T,N), in which the system is replaced when its working age has reached T or the number of failures it has experienced has reached N, whichever occurs first. The objective is to determine the optimal replacement policy (T,N)* such that the long-run expected profit per unit time is maximized. The explicit expression of the long-run expected profit per unit time is derived and the corresponding optimal replacement policy can be determined analytically or numerically. We prove that the optimal policy (T,N)* is better than the optimal policy N* for a multistate simple repairable system. We also show that a general monotone process model for a multistate simple repairable system is equivalent to a geometric process model for a two-state simple repairable system in the sense that they have the same structure for the long-run expected profit (or cost) per unit time and the same optimal policy. Finally, a numerical example is given to illustrate the theoretical results

  9. Similar distributions of repaired sites in chromatin of normal and xeroderma pigmentosum variant cells damaged by ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleaver, J.E.

    1979-01-01

    Excision repair of damage from ultraviolet light in both normal and xeroderma pigmentosum variant fibroblasts at early times after irradiation occurred preferentially in regions of DNA accessible to micrococcal nuclease digestion. These regions are predominantly the linker regions between nucleosomes in chromatin. The alterations reported at polymerization and ligation steps of excision repair in the variant are therefore not associated with changes in the relative distributions of repair sites in linker and core particle regions of DNA. (Auth.)

  10. 49 CFR 1242.42 - Administration, repair and maintenance, machinery repair, equipment damaged, dismantling retired...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... repair, equipment damaged, dismantling retired property, fringe benefits, other casualties and insurance, lease rentals, joint facility rents, other rents, depreciation, joint facility, repairs billed to others... maintenance, machinery repair, equipment damaged, dismantling retired property, fringe benefits, other...

  11. Repair of closely opposed cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimers in UV-sensitive human diploid fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, L.H.; Reynolds, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    An enzyme-sensitive site assay has been used to examine the fate of closely opposed pyrimidine dimers in fibroblasts from individuals afflicted with various genetic disorders that confer increased cellular sensitivity to UV radiation. The disappearance of bifilar enzyme-sensitive sites was found to be normal in cells from individuals with Fanconi's anemia, Cockayne's syndrome, dyskeratosis congenita and the variant form of xeroderma pigmentosum. The rate of bifilar enzyme-sensitive site removal in XP cells assigned to complementation group C was reduced by an amount similar to that observed for the repair of isolated dimers. Our results indicate that the initiation of repair at closely opposed dimers is slow in XP-C cells but normal in all other cells examined. (Auth.)

  12. A new dimension in improved radiation protection by enhanced DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riklis, E.

    1997-01-01

    Radioprotection and photo protection were dependent until now on measures to reduce the amount of damage formed by ionizing and ultraviolet radiations. In both cases the measures are not completely satisfactory: the classical radioprotectors are toxic arid exert serious side effects, and afford a protection factor not higher than around 2. The sunscreens filters are effective for certain wavelength ranges only, and not enough is known about the possible effects of the filters when they absorb light and turn into other chemical entities. Both approaches do not give an answer to damages which are formed in spite of the partial reduction of damage. A new approach offered here is dealing with the damage on a cellular / molecular level, by enhancing the activity of the natural repair enzymes whose task is to remove radiation and photoproducts, rejoin DNA strand breaks and repair the DNA. A combination of vitamins and antioxidants is fulfilling these tasks and provides protection from both ionizing and ultraviolet radiations by enhancing several folds the repair of DNA in living cells. Such a combination which contains the repair enhancers niacinamide and nordihydroguaiaretic acid is employed in preparations named EDNAR ( Enhanced DNA Repair, Patent pending) which demonstrate excellent results of enhancing DNA repair as measured by repair synthesis, and protecting the skin from sunburns as well as skin burns following radiotherapy. These lotions and creams, when not containing any chemical filters yet demonstrating a protective effect, may be called 'the sunscreens without sunscreens'. (author)

  13. Detection of Harmonic Occurring using Kalman Filtering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussain, Dil Muhammad Akbar; Shoro, Ghulam Mustafa; Imran, Raja Muhammed

    2014-01-01

    /current characteristic. These harmonics are not to be allowed to grow beyond a certain limit to avoid any grave consequence to the customer’s main supply. Filters can be implemented at the power source or utility location to eliminate these harmonics. In this paper we detect the instance at which these harmonics occur...

  14. Formal synthesis of naturally occurring norephedrine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A concise and simple synthesis of 1-hydroxy-phenethylamine derivatives has been achieved following classical organic transformations using commercially available chiral pools. The said derivatives were explored for the synthesis of naturally occurring bio-active small molecules. Formal synthesis of norephedrine, virolin ...

  15. Percieved functions of naturally occurring autobiographical memories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treebak, L. S.; Henriksen, J. R.; Lundhus, S.

    2005-01-01

    The main empirical reference on functions of autobiographical memories is still Hyman & Faries (1992) who used the cue-word-method and retrospective judgements. We used diaries to sample naturally occurring autobiographical memories and participants? perceived use of these. Results partly replicate...

  16. A naturally occurring trap for antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eades, J.; Morita, N.; Ito, T.M.

    1993-05-01

    The phenomenon of delayed annihilation of antiprotons in helium is the first instance of a naturally occurring trap for antimatter in ordinary matter. Recent studies of this effect at CERN are summarized, and plans are described for laser excitation experiments to test its interpretation in terms of metastable exotic helium atom formation. (author)

  17. Jerky periods: myoclonus occurring solely during menses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijink, Arthur W. G.; Gelauff, Jeannette M.; van der Salm, Sandra M. A.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur

    2013-01-01

    In this case report, we describe an unusual case of a patient with myoclonus only occurring during menses. A 41-year-old female, known to have neurological sequelae after a car accident 1 year earlier, presented with myoclonic movements of the right arm and hand only during menses. Brain magnetic

  18. Mitochondrial Enzyme Plays Critical Role in Chemotherapy-Induced Heart Damage | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is an effective drug for treating cancers ranging from leukemia and lymphoma to solid tumors, such as breast cancer. DOX kills dividing cells in two ways: inserting between the base pairs of DNA and trapping a complex of DNA and an enzyme that cuts DNA, topoisomerase 2α, preventing DNA repair. However, DOX also causes congestive heart failure in about 30

  19. Unscheduled DNA synthesis in xeroderma pigmentosum cells after microinjection of yeast photoreactivating enzyme.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C.M. Zwetsloot; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); W. Vermeulen (Wim); A.P.M. Eker (André); D. Bootsma (Dirk)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractPhotoreactivating enzyme (PRE) from yeast causes a light-dependent reduction of UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) when injected into the cytoplasm of repair-proficieint human fibroblasts (Zwetsloot et al., 1985). This result indicates that the exogenous PRE monomerizers

  20. Phosphorylation of linker histones regulates ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horn, P.J.; Carruthers, L.M.; Logie, C.; Hill, D.A.; Solomon, M.J.; Wade, P.A.; Imbalzano, A.N.; Hansen, J.; Peterson, C.L.

    2002-01-01

    Members of the ATP-dependent family of chromatin remodeling enzymes play key roles in the regulation of transcription, development, DNA repair and cell cycle control. We find that the remodeling activities of the ySWI/SNF, hSWI/SNF, xMi-2 and xACF complexes are nearly abolished by incorporation of

  1. Preferential flow occurs in unsaturated conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Because it commonly generates high-speed, high-volume flow with minimal exposure to solid earth materials, preferential flow in the unsaturated zone is a dominant influence in many problems of infiltration, recharge, contaminant transport, and ecohydrology. By definition, preferential flow occurs in a portion of a medium – that is, a preferred part, whether a pathway, pore, or macroscopic subvolume. There are many possible classification schemes, but usual consideration of preferential flow includes macropore or fracture flow, funneled flow determined by macroscale heterogeneities, and fingered flow determined by hydraulic instability rather than intrinsic heterogeneity. That preferential flow is spatially concentrated associates it with other characteristics that are typical, although not defining: it tends to be unusually fast, to transport high fluxes, and to occur with hydraulic disequilibrium within the medium. It also has a tendency to occur in association with large conduits and high water content, although these are less universal than is commonly assumed. Predictive unsaturated-zone flow models in common use employ several different criteria for when and where preferential flow occurs, almost always requiring a nearly saturated medium. A threshold to be exceeded may be specified in terms of the following (i) water content; (ii) matric potential, typically a value high enough to cause capillary filling in a macropore of minimum size; (iii) infiltration capacity or other indication of incipient surface ponding; or (iv) other conditions related to total filling of certain pores. Yet preferential flow does occur without meeting these criteria. My purpose in this commentary is to point out important exceptions and implications of ignoring them. Some of these pertain mainly to macropore flow, others to fingered or funneled flow, and others to combined or undifferentiated flow modes.

  2. NRSA enzyme decomposition model data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Microbial enzyme activities measured at more than 2000 US streams and rivers. These enzyme data were then used to predict organic matter decomposition and microbial...

  3. Cellulase enzyme and biomass utilization

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-03

    Jun 3, 2009 ... human population grows and economic development. However, the current .... conditions and the production cost of the related enzyme system. Therefore ... Given the importance of this enzyme to these so many industries,.

  4. DNA repair by the Ada protein of E. coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karran, P.; Hall, J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the Ada protein of E. coli which exemplifies the highly specialized nature of the enzymes which have evolved to repair DNA. According to the authors, this protein exhibits not only novel mechanistic features but also provides an apparently unique example of a strategy for controlling gene expression in E. coli. They report that knowledge of the properties and mode of action of the Ada protein has afforded insight into how human cells are affected by alkylating agents, including those used in chemotherapy

  5. Excision repair in ataxia telangiectasia, Fanconi's anemia, Cockayne syndrome, and Bloom's syndrome after treatment with ultraviolet radiation and N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, F.E.; Setlow, R.B.

    1978-01-01

    Excision repair of damage due to ultraviolet radiation, N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene and a combination of both agents was studied in normal human fibroblasts and various cells from cancer prone patients (ataxia telangiectasia, Fanconi's anemia, Cockayne syndrome and Bloom's syndrome). Three methods giving similar results were used: unscheduled DNA synthesis by radioautography, photolysis of bromodeoxyuridine incorporated into parental DNA during repair, and loss of sites sensitive to an ultraviolet endonuclease. All cell lines were proficient in repair of ultraviolet and acetoxy acetylaminofluorene damage and at saturation doses of both agents repair was additive. We interpret these data as indicating that the rate limiting step in excision repair of ultraviolet and acetoxy acetylaminofluorene is different and that there are different enzyme(s) working on incision of both types of damages. (Auth.)

  6. Repair of 3-methyladenine and abasic sites by base excision repair mediates glioblastoma resistance to temozolomide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobola, Michael S.; Kolstoe, Douglas D.; Blank, A. [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Chamberlain, Marc C. [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Department of Neurology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Silber, John R., E-mail: jrsilber@u.washington.edu [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-11-30

    Alkylating agents have long played a central role in the adjuvant therapy of glioblastoma (GBM). More recently, inclusion of temozolomide (TMZ), an orally administered methylating agent with low systemic toxicity, during and after radiotherapy has markedly improved survival. Extensive in vitro and in vivo evidence has shown that TMZ-induced O{sup 6}-methylguanine (O{sup 6}-meG) mediates GBM cell killing. Moreover, low or absent expression of O{sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), the sole human repair protein that removes O{sup 6}-meG from DNA, is frequently associated with longer survival in GBMs treated with TMZ, promoting interest in developing inhibitors of MGMT to counter resistance. However, the clinical efficacy of TMZ is unlikely to be due solely to O{sup 6}-meG, as the agent produces approximately a dozen additional DNA adducts, including cytotoxic N3-methyladenine (3-meA) and abasic sites. Repair of 3-meA and abasic sites, both of which are produced in greater abundance than O{sup 6}-meG, is mediated by the base excision repair (BER) pathway, and occurs independently of removal of O{sup 6}-meG. These observations indicate that BER activities are also potential targets for strategies to potentiate TMZ cytotoxicity. Here we review the evidence that 3-meA and abasic sites mediate killing of GBM cells. We also present in vitro and in vivo evidence that alkyladenine-DNA glycosylase, the sole repair activity that excises 3-meA from DNA, and Ape1, the major human abasic site endonuclease, mediate TMZ resistance in GBMs and represent potential anti-resistance targets.

  7. Imaging of cartilage repair procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanghvi, Darshana; Munshi, Mihir; Pardiwala, Dinshaw

    2014-01-01

    The rationale for cartilage repair is to prevent precocious osteoarthritis in untreated focal cartilage injuries in the young and middle-aged population. The gamut of surgical techniques, normal postoperative radiological appearances, and possible complications have been described. An objective method of recording the quality of repair tissue is with the magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) score. This scoring system evaluates nine parameters that include the extent of defect filling, border zone integration, signal intensity, quality of structure and surface, subchondral bone, subchondral lamina, and records presence or absence of synovitis and adhesions. The five common techniques of cartilage repair currently offered include bone marrow stimulation (microfracture or drilling), mosaicplasty, synthetic resorbable scaffold grafts, osteochondral allograft transplants, and autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). Complications of cartilage repair procedures that may be demonstrated on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) include plug loosening, graft protuberance, graft depression, and collapse in mosaicplasty, graft hypertrophy in ACI, and immune response leading to graft rejection, which is more common with synthetic grafts and cadaveric allografts

  8. Reprogramming Cells for Brain Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randall D. McKinnon

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available At present there are no clinical therapies that can repair traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury or degenerative brain disease. While redundancy and rewiring of surviving circuits can recover some lost function, the brain and spinal column lack sufficient endogenous stem cells to replace lost neurons or their supporting glia. In contrast, pre-clinical studies have demonstrated that exogenous transplants can have remarkable efficacy for brain repair in animal models. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs can provide paracrine factors that repair damage caused by ischemic injury, and oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC grafts give dramatic functional recovery from spinal cord injury. These studies have progressed to clinical trials, including human embryonic stem cell (hESC-derived OPCs for spinal cord repair. However, ESC-derived allografts are less than optimal, and we need to identify a more appropriate donor graft population. The cell reprogramming field has developed the ability to trans-differentiate somatic cells into distinct cell types, a technology that has the potential to generate autologous neurons and glia which address the histocompatibility concerns of allografts and the tumorigenicity concerns of ESC-derived grafts. Further clarifying how cell reprogramming works may lead to more efficient direct reprogram approaches, and possibly in vivo reprogramming, in order to promote brain and spinal cord repair.

  9. Role of nuclear hexokinase II in DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, S.; Bhatt, A.N.; Dwarakanath, B.S.; Kalaiarasan, P.; Brahmachari, V.

    2012-01-01

    A common signature of many cancer cells is a high glucose catabolic rate primarily due to the over expression of Type II hexokinase (HKII; responsible for the phosphorylation of glucose), generally known as cytosolic and mitochondrial bound enzyme that also suppresses cell death. Although, nuclear localization and transcriptional regulation of HKII has been reported in yeast; we and few others have recently demonstrated its nuclear localization in malignant cell lines. Interestingly, modification of a human glioma cell line (BMG-1) for enhancing glycolysis through mitochondrial respiration (OPMBMG cells) resulted in a higher nuclear localization of HKII as compared to the parental cells with concomitant increase in DNA repair and radio-resistance. Further, the glucose phosphorylation activity of the nuclear HKII was nearly 2 folds higher in the relatively more radioresistant HeLa cells (human cervical cancer cell line) as compared to MRC-5 cells (human normal lung fibroblast cell line). Therefore, we hypothesize that nuclear HKII facilitates DNA repair, in a hither to unknown mechanism, that may partly contribute to the enhanced resistance of highly glycolytic cells to radiation. Sequence alignment studies suggest that the isoenzymes, HKI and HKII share strong homology in the kinase active site, which is also found in few protein kinases. Interestingly HKI has been shown to phosphorylate H2A in-vitro. Further, in-silico protein-protein interaction data suggest that HKII can interact with several DNA repair proteins including ATM. Taken together; available experimental evidences as well as in-silico predictions strongly suggest that HKII may play a role in DNA repair by phosphorylation of certain DNA repair proteins. (author)

  10. Coordinating repair of oxidative DNA damage with transcription and replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, P.K.

    2003-01-01

    Transcription-coupled repair (TCR) preferentially removes DNA lesions from template strands of active genes. Defects in TCR, which acts both on lesions removed by nucleotide excision repair (NER) and on oxidative lesions removed by base excision repair (BER), underlie the fatal developmental disorder Cockayne syndrome. Although its detailed mechanism remains unknown, TCR involves recognition of a stalled RNA polymerase (RNAP), removal or remodeling of RNAP to allow access to the lesion, and recruitment of repair enzymes. At a minimum, these early steps require a non-enzymatic function of the multifunctional repair protein XPG, the CSB protein with ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling activity, and the TFIIH complex (including the XPB and XPD helicases) that is also required for basal transcription initiation and NER. XPG exists in the cell in a complex with TFIIH, and in vitro evidence has suggested that it interacts with CSB. To address the mechanism of TCR, we are characterizing protein-DNA and protein-protein interactions of XPG. We show that XPG preferentially binds to double-stranded DNA containing bubbles resembling in size the unpaired regions associated with transcription. Two distinct domains of XPG are required for the observed strong binding specificity and stability. XPG both interacts directly with CSB and synergistically binds with it to bubble DNA, and it strongly stimulates the bubble DNA-dependent ATPase activity of CSB. Significantly for TCR, XPG also interacts directly with RNAP II, binds both the protein and nucleic acid components (the R-loop) of a stalled RNA polymerase, and forms a ternary complex with CSB and the stalled RNAP. These results are consistent with the model that XPG and CSB jointly interact with the DNA/chromatin structure in the vicinity of the stalled transcriptional apparatus and with the transcriptional machinery itself to remodel the chromatin and either move or remodel the blocked RNA polymerase to expose the lesion

  11. Network analysis of metabolic enzyme evolution in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kraulis Per

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The two most common models for the evolution of metabolism are the patchwork evolution model, where enzymes are thought to diverge from broad to narrow substrate specificity, and the retrograde evolution model, according to which enzymes evolve in response to substrate depletion. Analysis of the distribution of homologous enzyme pairs in the metabolic network can shed light on the respective importance of the two models. We here investigate the evolution of the metabolism in E. coli viewed as a single network using EcoCyc. Results Sequence comparison between all enzyme pairs was performed and the minimal path length (MPL between all enzyme pairs was determined. We find a strong over-representation of homologous enzymes at MPL 1. We show that the functionally similar and functionally undetermined enzyme pairs are responsible for most of the over-representation of homologous enzyme pairs at MPL 1. Conclusions The retrograde evolution model predicts that homologous enzymes pairs are at short metabolic distances from each other. In general agreement with previous studies we find that homologous enzymes occur close to each other in the network more often than expected by chance, which lends some support to the retrograde evolution model. However, we show that the homologous enzyme pairs which may have evolved through retrograde evolution, namely the pairs that are functionally dissimilar, show a weaker over-representation at MPL 1 than the functionally similar enzyme pairs. Our study indicates that, while the retrograde evolution model may have played a small part, the patchwork evolution model is the predominant process of metabolic enzyme evolution.

  12. On the Temperature Dependence of Enzyme-Catalyzed Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcus, Vickery L; Prentice, Erica J; Hobbs, Joanne K; Mulholland, Adrian J; Van der Kamp, Marc W; Pudney, Christopher R; Parker, Emily J; Schipper, Louis A

    2016-03-29

    One of the critical variables that determine the rate of any reaction is temperature. For biological systems, the effects of temperature are convoluted with myriad (and often opposing) contributions from enzyme catalysis, protein stability, and temperature-dependent regulation, for example. We have coined the phrase "macromolecular rate theory (MMRT)" to describe the temperature dependence of enzyme-catalyzed rates independent of stability or regulatory processes. Central to MMRT is the observation that enzyme-catalyzed reactions occur with significant values of ΔCp(‡) that are in general negative. That is, the heat capacity (Cp) for the enzyme-substrate complex is generally larger than the Cp for the enzyme-transition state complex. Consistent with a classical description of enzyme catalysis, a negative value for ΔCp(‡) is the result of the enzyme binding relatively weakly to the substrate and very tightly to the transition state. This observation of negative ΔCp(‡) has important implications for the temperature dependence of enzyme-catalyzed rates. Here, we lay out the fundamentals of MMRT. We present a number of hypotheses that arise directly from MMRT including a theoretical justification for the large size of enzymes and the basis for their optimum temperatures. We rationalize the behavior of psychrophilic enzymes and describe a "psychrophilic trap" which places limits on the evolution of enzymes in low temperature environments. One of the defining characteristics of biology is catalysis of chemical reactions by enzymes, and enzymes drive much of metabolism. Therefore, we also expect to see characteristics of MMRT at the level of cells, whole organisms, and even ecosystems.

  13. Repair of DNA treated with γ-irradiation and chemical carcinogens. Final report, June 1, 1981-May 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldthwait, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    Work done in the past three years has been on DNA repair, on genetic transposition and on the effect of carcinogens on alu sequence transcription. DNA repair work was completed on β-propiolactone DNA adducts, on procaryotic and eucaryotic enzymes capable of removal of 3-methyladenine from DNA, and on in vitro repair of neucleosomal core particle DNA and chromatin DNA. Attempts were made to isolate a human transposable element through the isolation of double stranded RNA and probing of a human library. Experiments were also done to determine whether carcinogens altered the expression of alu sequences in human DNA

  14. Radiation-induced thymine base damage and its excision repair in active and inactive chromatin of HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, M.S.; Locher, S.E.; Hariharan, P.V.

    1985-01-01

    The extent of production and excision repair of 5,6-dihydroxydihydrothymine type base (t') damage was determined in transcriptionally active and inactive chromatin of HeLa cells after exposure to 6.8 MeV electrons. It was observed that not only the yield but also rate of repair of t' products was greater in the active chromatin compared to the inactive chromatin of HeLa cells. The results strongly indicate that the conformation of chromatin is an important factor in determining the sensitivity to radiation damage and accessibility to enzymes required for repair of such damage. (author)

  15. Differential repair of etheno-DNA adducts by bacterial and human AlkB proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdżalik, Daria; Domańska, Anna; Prorok, Paulina; Kosicki, Konrad; van den Born, Erwin; Falnes, Pål Ø; Rizzo, Carmelo J; Guengerich, F Peter; Tudek, Barbara

    2015-06-01

    AlkB proteins are evolutionary conserved Fe(II)/2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases, which remove alkyl and highly promutagenic etheno(ɛ)-DNA adducts, but their substrate specificity has not been fully determined. We developed a novel assay for the repair of ɛ-adducts by AlkB enzymes using oligodeoxynucleotides with a single lesion and specific DNA glycosylases and AP-endonuclease for identification of the repair products. We compared the repair of three ɛ-adducts, 1,N(6)-ethenoadenine (ɛA), 3,N(4)-ethenocytosine (ɛC) and 1,N(2)-ethenoguanine (1,N(2)-ɛG) by nine bacterial and two human AlkBs, representing four different structural groups defined on the basis of conserved amino acids in the nucleotide recognition lid, engaged in the enzyme binding to the substrate. Two bacterial AlkB proteins, MT-2B (from Mycobacterium tuberculosis) and SC-2B (Streptomyces coelicolor) did not repair these lesions in either double-stranded (ds) or single-stranded (ss) DNA. Three proteins, RE-2A (Rhizobium etli), SA-2B (Streptomyces avermitilis), and XC-2B (Xanthomonas campestris) efficiently removed all three lesions from the DNA substrates. Interestingly, XC-2B and RE-2A are the first AlkB proteins shown to be specialized for ɛ-adducts, since they do not repair methylated bases. Three other proteins, EcAlkB (Escherichia coli), SA-1A, and XC-1B removed ɛA and ɛC from ds and ssDNA but were inactive toward 1,N(2)-ɛG. SC-1A repaired only ɛA with the preference for dsDNA. The human enzyme ALKBH2 repaired all three ɛ-adducts in dsDNA, while only ɛA and ɛC in ssDNA and repair was less efficient in ssDNA. ALKBH3 repaired only ɛC in ssDNA. Altogether, we have shown for the first time that some AlkB proteins, namely ALKBH2, RE-2A, SA-2B and XC-2B can repair 1,N(2)-ɛG and that ALKBH3 removes only ɛC from ssDNA. Our results also suggest that the nucleotide recognition lid is not the sole determinant of the substrate specificity of AlkB proteins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B

  16. Natural occurring radioactive substances. Vol. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emara, A E [National Center for radiation Research and Technology Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive substances produced by cosmic rays of those of terrestrial origin are surveyed. The different radioactive decay series are discussed. Special emphasis is given to the element radium as regards its properties and distribution in different environmental samples. The properties of naturally occurring k-40 and its distribution in different natural media are also outlined. Induced radionuclides which are formed as a result of the interaction of cosmic rays with the constituents of the atmosphere are mentioned. In this respect the intensity of natural background radiation and the dose at different locations and levels is surveyed. Some regions of exceptionally high radioactivity which result in high exposure rates are mentioned. Monazite deposits and water springs are mentioned in some detail. The Oklo phenomenon as a natural reactor is also discussed. 8 tabs.

  17. Natural occurring radioactive substances. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emara, A.E.

    1996-01-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive substances produced by cosmic rays of those of terrestrial origin are surveyed. The different radioactive decay series are discussed. Special emphasis is given to the element radium as regards its properties and distribution in different environmental samples. The properties of naturally occurring k-40 and its distribution in different natural media are also outlined. Induced radionuclides which are formed as a result of the interaction of cosmic rays with the constituents of the atmosphere are mentioned. In this respect the intensity of natural background radiation and the dose at different locations and levels is surveyed. Some regions of exceptionally high radioactivity which result in high exposure rates are mentioned. Monazite deposits and water springs are mentioned in some detail. The Oklo phenomenon as a natural reactor is also discussed. 8 tabs

  18. Naturally occurring cobalamins have antimalarial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemaly, Susan M; Chen, Chien-Teng; van Zyl, Robyn L

    2007-05-01

    The acquisition of resistance by malaria parasites towards existing antimalarials has necessitated the development of new chemotherapeutic agents. The effect of vitamin B(12) derivatives on the formation of beta-haematin (synthetic haemozoin) was determined under conditions similar to those in the parasitic food vacuole (using chloroquine, a known inhibitor of haemozoin formation for comparison). Adenosylcobalamin (Ado-cbl), methylcobalamin (CH(3)-cbl) and aquocobalamin (H(2)O-cbl) were approximately forty times more effective inhibitors of beta-haematin formation than chloroquine, cyanocobalamin (CN-cbl) was slightly more inhibitory than chloroquine, while dicyanocobinamide had no effect. It is proposed that the cobalamins exert their inhibitory effect on beta-haematin formation by pi-interactions of their corrin ring with the Fe(III)-protoporphyrin ring and by hydrogen-bonding using their 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole/ribose/sugar side-chain. The antimalarial activity for the cobalamins (Ado-cbl>CH(3)-cbl>H(2)O-cbl>CN-cbl) was found to be less than that for chloroquine or quinine. Ado-cbl, CH(3)-cbl and CN-cbl do not accumulate in the parasite food vacuole by pH trapping, but H(2)O-cbl does. Unlike humans, the malaria parasite has only one enzyme that uses cobalamin as a cofactor, namely methionine synthase, which is important for growth and metabolism. Thus cobalamins in very small amounts are necessary for Plasmodium falciparum growth but in larger amounts they display antimalarial properties.

  19. An in vitro assay to study the recruitment and substrate specificity of chromatin modifying enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vermeulen Michiel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-translational modifications of core histones play an important role in regulating fundamental biological processes such as DNA repair, transcription and replication. In this paper, we describe a novel assay that allows sequential targeting of distinct histone modifying enzymes to immobilized nucleosomal templates using recombinant chimeric targeting molecules. The assay can be used to study the histone substrate specificity of chromatin modifying enzymes as well as whether and how certain enzymes affect each other's histone modifying activities. As such the assay can help to understand how a certain histone code is established and interpreted.

  20. Jerky Periods - Myoclonus Occurring Solely During Menses

    OpenAIRE

    Arthur W. Buijink; Jeannette M. Gelauff; Sandra M. van der Salm; Marina A. Tijssen; Anne-Fleur van Rootselaar

    2013-01-01

    Background: In this case report, we describe an unusual case of a patient with myoclonus only occurring during menses. Case Report: A 41-year-old female, known to have neurological sequelae after a car accident 1 year earlier, presented with myoclonic movements of the right arm and hand only during menses. Brain magnetic resonance imaging is compatible with head trauma. Electromyography shows brief irregular bursts with a duration of about 20 ms. Discussion: This appears to be the first descr...

  1. The Nucleolus: In Genome Maintenance and Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsekrekou, Maria; Stratigi, Kalliopi; Chatzinikolaou, Georgia

    2017-07-01

    The nucleolus is the subnuclear membrane-less organelle where rRNA is transcribed and processed and ribosomal assembly occurs. During the last 20 years, however, the nucleolus has emerged as a multifunctional organelle, regulating processes that go well beyond its traditional role. Moreover, the unique organization of rDNA in tandem arrays and its unusually high transcription rates make it prone to unscheduled DNA recombination events and frequent RNA:DNA hybrids leading to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). If not properly repaired, rDNA damage may contribute to premature disease onset and aging. Deregulation of ribosomal synthesis at any level from transcription and processing to ribosomal subunit assembly elicits a stress response and is also associated with disease onset. Here, we discuss how genome integrity is maintained within nucleoli and how such structures are functionally linked to nuclear DNA damage response and repair giving an emphasis on the newly emerging roles of the nucleolus in mammalian physiology and disease.

  2. DNA repair in PHA stimulated human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catena, C.; Mattoni, A.

    1984-01-01

    Damage an repair of radiation induced DNA strand breaks were measured by alkaline lysis and hydroxyapatite chromatography. PHA stimulated human lymphocytes show that the rejoining process is complete within the first 50 min., afterwords secondary DNA damage and chromatid aberration. DNA repair, in synchronized culture, allows to evaluate individual repair capacity and this in turn can contribute to the discovery of individual who, although they do not demonstrate apparent clinical signs, are carriers of DNA repair deficiency. Being evident that a correlation exists between DNA repair capacity and carcinogenesis, the possibility of evaluating the existent relationship between DNA repair and survival in tumor cells comes therefore into discussion

  3. Role of DNA repair in repair of cytogenetic damages. Contribution of repair of single-strand DNA breaks to cytogenetic damages repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozanova, O.M.; Zaichkina, S.I.; Aptikaev, G.F.; Ganassi, E.Eh.

    1989-01-01

    The comparison was made between the results of the effect of poly(ADP-ribosylation) ingibitors (e.g. nicotinamide and 3-aminobenzamide) and a chromatin proteinase ingibitor, phenylmethylsulfonylfluoride, on the cytogenetic damages repair, by a micronuclear test, and DNA repair in Chinese hamster fibroblasts. The values of the repair half-periods (5-7 min for the cytogenetic damages and 5 min for the rapidly repaired DNA damages) and a similar modyfying effect with regard to radiation cytogenetic damages and kynetics of DNA damages repair were found to be close. This confirms the contribution of repair of DNA single-strand breaks in the initiation of structural damages to chromosomes

  4. Incore inspection and repairing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Arata; Kimura, Motohiko

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a device for inspecting and repairing the inside of a reactor container even if it is narrow, with no trouble by using a swimming-type operation robot. Namely, the device of the present invention conducts inspection and repairing operations for the inside of the reactor by introducing a swimming type operation robot into the reactor container. The swimming-type operation robot comprises a robot main body having a propeller, a balancer operably disposed to the robot main body and an inspection and repairing unit attached detachable to the balancer. In the device of the present invention, since the inspection and preparing unit is attached detachably to the swimming robot, a robot which transports tools is formed as a standard product. As a result, the production cost can be reduced, and the reliability of products can be improved. Appropriate operations can be conducted by using best tools. (I.S.)

  5. Immobilization of enzymes using non-ionic colloidal liquid aphrons (CLAs): Surface and enzyme effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Keeran; Xi, Jingshu; Stuckey, David C

    2015-12-01

    The use of non-ionic colloidal liquid aphrons (CLAs) as a support for enzyme immobilisation was investigated. Formulation required the mixing of an aqueous-surfactant solution with a relatively non-polar solvent-surfactant solution, forming a solvent droplet surrounded by a thin stabilised aqueous film (soapy shell). Studies utilising anionic surfactants have showed increased retention, however, very little have been understood about the forces governing immobilisation. This study seeks to determine the effects of enzyme properties on CLA immobilisation by examining a non-ionic/non-polar solvent system comprised of two non-ionic surfactants, Tween 20 and 80, mineral oil and the enzymes lipase, aprotinin and α-chymotrypsin. From these results it was deduced that hydrophobic interactions strongly governed immobilisation. Confocal Scanning Laser Microscopy (CSLM) revealed that immobilisation was predominantly achieved by surface adsorption attributed to hydrophobic interactions between the enzyme and the CLA surface. Enzyme surface affinity was found to increase when added directly to the formulation (pre-manufacture addition), as opposed to the bulk continuous phase (post-manufacture addition), with α-chymotrypsin and aprotinin being the most perturbed, while lipase was relatively unaffected. The effect of zeta potential on immobilisation showed that enzymes adsorbed better closer to their pI, indicating that charge minimisation was necessary for immobilisation. Finally, the effect of increasing enzyme concentration in the aqueous phase resulted in an increase in adsorption for all enzymes due to cooperativity between protein molecules, with saturation occurring faster at higher adsorption rates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Repair-induced DNA double strand breaks after ultraviolet-light and either aphidocolin or 1-β-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine/hydroxyurea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, M.O.; Taylor, V.I.

    1983-01-01

    A study was performed to determine whether 'repair-induced double strand breaks' (RDSBs) occur in IMR-90 cells at low u.v. doses and whether the RDSBs are themselves repairable by holding open the excision-repair induced gaps by inhibiting nucleotide polymerization after u.v. light with hydroxyurea/ara C or aphidocolin. The results show as little as 2.5 J.m -2 of u.v. light induces RDSBs during repair incubation when repair inhibitors are present. This suggests that 'hot spots' of high lesion frequency occur and the overlapping excision in these areas will produce RDSBs. Removing aphidocolin showed that RDSBs are only partially repairable with between 15 and 40% of the breaks unrepaired at 24 h. Because the lesions are partially repairable they should not always cause toxicity and may be involved in processes such as mutation, transformation, and chromosome or chromatid type aberrations of the sort associated with human tumors. (author)

  7. Primary unilateral cleft lip repair

    OpenAIRE

    Adenwalla, H. S.; Narayanan, P. V.

    2009-01-01

    The unilateral cleft lip is a complex deformity. Surgical correction has evolved from a straight repair through triangular and quadrilateral repairs to the Rotation Advancement Technique of Millard. The latter is the technique followed at our centre for all unilateral cleft lip patients. We operate on these at five to six months of age, do not use pre-surgical orthodontics, and follow a protocol to produce a notch-free vermillion. This is easy to follow even for trainees. We also perform clos...

  8. The effect of caffeine on repair in chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, H.; Rehn, M.M.; Johnson, B.A.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of caffeine on repair was studied in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Treatment of UV-irradiated wild-type (UVS + ) cells with a sublethal level of caffeine caused a significant increase in survival compared to untreated UV-irradiated cells. Caffeine did not affect survival in the repair-deficient strain UVSE1, which is deficient in repair of UV-induced damage carried out by enzymes associated with recombination during meiosis. A significant increase in survival in the presence of caffeine was observed in the repair-deficient strain UVSE4 in which recombination during meiosis is not affected. Treatment of zygotes homozygous for UVS + , UVSE1, or UVSE4 with sublethal levels of caffeine caused marked increases in recombination frequency in UVS + and UVSE4 zygotes and no increase in recombination in UVSE1 zygotes. These results indicate that caffeine increases recombination in normal strains. Increased opportunity for recombination caused by caffeine would not result in increased recombination frequency in the UVSE1 strain, assuming limited-recombination enzyme activity in this strain. The observed increase in survival following UV-irradiation in the presence of caffeine in strains having normal recombination would therefore be associated with a caffeine-induced increase in opportunities for recombination repair. (orig.)

  9. Influence of LET on repair of DNA damages in Deinococcus radiodurans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Y; Tanaka, A; Kikuchi, M; Shimizu, T; Watanabe, H [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Cao, J P; Taucher-Scholz, G

    1997-03-01

    Inactivation caused by heavy ions was studied in dry cells of radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. All survival curves were characterized by a large shoulder of the curves. No final slopes of the exponential part of survival curves for heavy ion irradiation were steeper than that for 2.0 MeV electron irradiation. The plots of RBE versus LET showed no obvious peaks, suggesting that this bacterium can repair not only DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) but also clustered damage in DNA which may be induced by heavy ions. The genomic DNA of D. radiodurans was cleaved into large fragments with restriction enzyme Not I after post-irradiation incubation and the fragments were separated using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). DSBs induction and rejoining process were analyzed by detection of the reappearance of ladder pattern of DNA fragments. The required repair time after heavy ions irradiation was longer than the repair time for electrons at the same dose of irradiation, however, the rate of repair enzyme induction was almost similar to each other between electrons and heavy ions, suggesting that the same repair system is likely to be used after both low and high LET irradiations. (author)

  10. Enzyme recycling in lignocellulosic biorefineries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henning; Pinelo, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    platform. Cellulases are the most important enzymes required in this process, but the complex nature of lignocellulose requires several other enzymes (hemicellulases and auxiliary enzymes) for efficient hydrolysis. Enzyme recycling increases the catalytic productivity of the enzymes by reusing them...... for several batches of hydrolysis, and thereby reduces the overall cost associated with the hydrolysis. Research on this subject has been ongoing for many years and several promising technologies and methods have been developed and demonstrated. But only in a very few cases have these technologies been...... upscaled and tested in industrial settings, mainly because of many difficulties with recycling of enzymes from the complex lignocellulose hydrolyzate at industrially relevant conditions, i.e., high solids loadings. The challenges are associated with the large number of different enzymes required...

  11. Characterising Complex Enzyme Reaction Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handan Melike Dönertaş

    Full Text Available The relationship between enzyme-catalysed reactions and the Enzyme Commission (EC number, the widely accepted classification scheme used to characterise enzyme activity, is complex and with the rapid increase in our knowledge of the reactions catalysed by enzymes needs revisiting. We present a manual and computational analysis to investigate this complexity and found that almost one-third of all known EC numbers are linked to more than one reaction in the secondary reaction databases (e.g., KEGG. Although this complexity is often resolved by defining generic, alternative and partial reactions, we have also found individual EC numbers with more than one reaction catalysing different types of bond changes. This analysis adds a new dimension to our understanding of enzyme function and might be useful for the accurate annotation of the function of enzymes and to study the changes in enzyme function during evolution.

  12. Jerky periods: myoclonus occurring solely during menses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buijink, Arthur W G; Gelauff, Jeannette M; van der Salm, Sandra M A; Tijssen, Marina A J; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur

    2013-01-01

    In this case report, we describe an unusual case of a patient with myoclonus only occurring during menses. A 41-year-old female, known to have neurological sequelae after a car accident 1 year earlier, presented with myoclonic movements of the right arm and hand only during menses. Brain magnetic resonance imaging is compatible with head trauma. Electromyography shows brief irregular bursts with a duration of about 20 ms. This appears to be the first description of myoclonus appearing only during menses. We suggest a cortical origin for myoclonus.

  13. Jerky Periods - Myoclonus Occurring Solely During Menses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur W. Buijink

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: In this case report, we describe an unusual case of a patient with myoclonus only occurring during menses. Case Report: A 41-year-old female, known to have neurological sequelae after a car accident 1 year earlier, presented with myoclonic movements of the right arm and hand only during menses. Brain magnetic resonance imaging is compatible with head trauma. Electromyography shows brief irregular bursts with a duration of about 20 ms. Discussion: This appears to be the first description of myoclonus appearing only during menses. We suggest a cortical origin for myoclonus.

  14. Plasma membrane disruption: repair, prevention, adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Paul L.; Steinhardt, Richard A.

    2003-01-01

    Many metazoan cells inhabit mechanically stressful environments and, consequently, their plasma membranes are frequently disrupted. Survival requires that the cell rapidly repair or reseal the disruption. Rapid resealing is an active and complex structural modification that employs endomembrane as its primary building block, and cytoskeletal and membrane fusion proteins as its catalysts. Endomembrane is delivered to the damaged plasma membrane through exocytosis, a ubiquitous Ca2+-triggered response to disruption. Tissue and cell level architecture prevent disruptions from occurring, either by shielding cells from damaging levels of force, or, when this is not possible, by promoting safe force transmission through the plasma membrane via protein-based cables and linkages. Prevention of disruption also can be a dynamic cell or tissue level adaptation triggered when a damaging level of mechanical stress is imposed. Disease results from failure of either the preventive or resealing mechanisms.

  15. Stalled repair of lesions when present within a clustered DNA damage site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomax, M.E.; Cunniffe, S.; O'Neill, P.

    2003-01-01

    Ionising radiation produces clustered DNA damages (two or more lesions within one or two helical turns of the DNA) which could challenge the repair mechanism(s) of the cell. Using purified base excision repair (BER) enzymes and synthetic oligonucleotides a number of recent studies have established the excision of a lesion within clustered damage sites is compromised. Evidence will be presented that the efficiency of repair of lesions within a clustered DNA damage site is reduced, relative to that of the isolated lesions, since the lifetime of both lesions is extended by up to four fold. Simple clustered damage sites, comprised of single-strand breaks, abasic sites and base damages, one or five bases 3' or 5' to each other, were synthesised in oligonucleotides and repair carried out in mammalian cell nuclear extracts. The rate of repair of the single-strand break/abasic site within these clustered damage sites is reduced, mainly due to inhibition of the DNA ligase. The mechanism of repair of the single-strand break/abasic site shows some asymmetry. Repair appears to be by the short-patch BER pathway when the lesions are 5' to each other. In contrast, when the lesions are 3' to each other repair appears to proceed along the long-patch BER pathway. The lesions within the cluster are processed sequentially, the single-strand break/abasic site being repaired before excision of 8-oxoG, limiting the formation of double-strand breaks to <2%. Stalled processing of clustered DNA damage extends the lifetime of the lesions to an extent that could have biological consequences, e.g. if the lesions are still present during transcription and/or at replication mutations could arise

  16. Effect of repair resin type and surface treatment on the repair strength of heat-polymerized denture base resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkurt, Murat; Yeşil Duymuş, Zeynep; Gundogdu, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Acrylic resin denture fracture is common in prosthodontic practice. When fractured denture bases are repaired, recurrent fractures frequently occur at the repair surface interface or adjacent areas. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface treatments on the flexural strength of the acrylic resin denture base repaired with heat-polymerized acrylic resin, autopolymerizing resin, and light-polymerized acrylic resin. Ninety-six specimens of heat-polymerized acrylic resin were prepared according to the American Dental Association Specification No. 12 (65.0 × 10.0 × 2.5 mm) and sectioned into halves to create a repair gap (3.0 × 10 × 2.5 mm). The sectioned specimens were divided into 3 groups according to their repair materials. The specimens from each group were divided into 4 subgroups according to their surface treatments: a control group without any surface treatment; an experimental group treated with methyl methacrylate monomer (MMA group); an experimental group treated with airborne-particle abrasion with aluminum oxide particles of 250-μm particle size (abrasion group); and an experimental group treated with erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser (laser group). After the surface treatments, the 3 materials were placed into the repair gaps and then polymerized. After all of the specimens had been ground and polished, they were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 1 week and subjected to a 3-point bend test. Data were analyzed with a 2-way analysis of variance, and the Tukey honestly significant difference test was performed to identify significant differences (α=.05). The effects of the surface treatments and repair resins on the surface of the denture base resin were examined with scanning electron microscopy. Significant differences were found among the groups in terms of repair resin type (P<.001). All surface-treated specimens had higher flexural strength than controls, except the surface treated with the methyl

  17. Computational enzyme design approaches with significant biological outcomes: progress and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiaoman; Zhang, Ziding; Song, Jiangning

    2012-01-01

    Enzymes are powerful biocatalysts, however, so far there is still a large gap between the number of enzyme-based practical applications and that of naturally occurring enzymes. Multiple experimental approaches have been applied to generate nearly all possible mutations of target enzymes, allowing the identification of desirable variants with improved properties to meet the practical needs. Meanwhile, an increasing number of computational methods have been developed to assist in the modificati...

  18. Nipah virus entry can occur by macropinocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pernet, Olivier; Pohl, Christine; Ainouze, Michelle; Kweder, Hasan; Buckland, Robin

    2009-01-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a zoonotic biosafety level 4 paramyxovirus that emerged recently in Asia with high mortality in man. NiV is a member, with Hendra virus (HeV), of the Henipavirus genus in the Paramyxoviridae family. Although NiV entry, like that of other paramyxoviruses, is believed to occur via pH-independent fusion with the host cell's plasma membrane we present evidence that entry can occur by an endocytic pathway. The NiV receptor ephrinB2 has receptor kinase activity and we find that ephrinB2's cytoplasmic domain is required for entry but is dispensable for post-entry viral spread. The mutation of a single tyrosine residue (Y304F) in ephrinB2's cytoplasmic tail abrogates NiV entry. Moreover, our results show that NiV entry is inhibited by constructions and drugs specific for the endocytic pathway of macropinocytosis. Our findings could potentially permit the rapid development of novel low-cost antiviral treatments not only for NiV but also HeV.

  19. Leachability of naturally occurring radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desideri, D.; Feduzi, L.; Meli, M.A.; Roselli, C.

    2006-01-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) are present in the environment and can be concentrated by technical activities, particularly those involving natural resources. These NORM deposits are highly stable and very insoluble under environmental conditions at the earth's surface. However, reducing or oxidant conditions or pH changes may enable a fraction of naturally occurring radionuclides to eventually be released to the environment. Leachability of 210 Pb and 210 Po was determined in three samples coming from a refractories production plant (dust, sludge, finished product), in one dust sample from a steelwork and in one ash sample coming from an electric power station. A sequential extraction method consisting of five operationally-defined fractions was used. The average leaching potential observed in the samples from the refractory industry is very low (mean values: 5.8% for 210 Pb and 1.7% for 210 Po). The 210 Pb and 210 Po leachability increases for the ash sample coming from an electric power plant using carbon (17.8% for 210 Pb and 10.0% for 210 Po); for the dust sample coming from a steelwork, the percent soluble fraction is 41.1% for 210 Pb and 8.5% for 210 Po. For all samples the results obtained show that 210 Pb is slightly more soluble than 210 Po. (author)

  20. In Vitro Comparison of the Bond Strength between Ceramic Repair Systems and Ceramic Materials and Evaluation of the Wettability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocaağaoğlu, Hasan; Manav, Taha; Albayrak, Haydar

    2017-04-01

    When fracture of an all-ceramic restoration occurs, it can be necessary to repair without removing the restoration. Although there are many studies about the repair of metal-ceramic restorations, there are few about all-ceramic restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength between ceramic repair systems and esthetic core materials and to evaluate the wettability of all-ceramic core materials. Disk-like specimens (N = 90) made of three dental ceramic infrastructure materials (zirconia ceramic, alumina ceramic, glass ceramic) were polished with silicon carbide paper, prepared for bonding (abrasion with 30 μm diamond rotary cutting instrument). Thirty specimens of each infrastructure were obtained. Each infrastructure group was divided into three subgroups; they were bonded using 3 repair systems: Bisco Intraoral Repair Kit, Cimara & Cimara Zircon Repair System, and Clearfil Repair System. After 1200 thermocycles, shear bond strength was measured in a universal testing machine at a 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed. In addition, the contact angle values of the infrastructures after surface treatments were examined for wettability. Data were analyzed by using ANOVA and Tukey post hoc tests. Although there were no significant differences among the repair systems (p > 0.05) in the glass ceramic and zirconia groups, a significant difference was found among the repair systems in alumina infrastructure (p 0.05); however, a statistically significant difference was found among the repair systems (p < 0.05). No difference was found among the infrastructures and repair systems in terms of contact angle values. Cimara & Cimara Zircon Repair System had higher bond strength values than the other repair systems. Although no difference was found among the infrastructures and repair systems, contact wettability angle was decreased by surface treatments compared with polished surfaces. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  1. Effects of radiations on DNA and repair of the damage. Progress report, March 1, 1975--March 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, F.

    1976-01-01

    It was established that repair of radioinduced double-strand breaks in the DNA of E. coli AB2497 takes place. This repair can be eliminated by growing the cells in poor media so there is only 1+ genome/cell. There is no measurable repair in AB2487 recA - (otherwise isogenic with AB2497) or NH4803 recA - recB - cells. These results strongly suggest that DNA double-strand break repair occurs by a process involving recombination of the broken pieces with a homologous double hexix

  2. Additive manufacturing for in situ repair of osteochondral defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, Daniel L; Lipton, Jeffrey I; Bonassar, Lawrence J; Lipson, Hod

    2010-01-01

    Tissue engineering holds great promise for injury repair and replacement of defective body parts. While a number of techniques exist for creating living biological constructs in vitro, none have been demonstrated for in situ repair. Using novel geometric feedback-based approaches and through development of appropriate printing-material combinations, we demonstrate the in situ repair of both chondral and osteochondral defects that mimic naturally occurring pathologies. A calf femur was mounted in a custom jig and held within a robocasting-based additive manufacturing (AM) system. Two defects were induced: one a cartilage-only representation of a grade IV chondral lesion and the other a two-material bone and cartilage fracture of the femoral condyle. Alginate hydrogel was used for the repair of cartilage; a novel formulation of demineralized bone matrix was used for bone repair. Repair prints for both defects had mean surface errors less than 0.1 mm. For the chondral defect, 42.8 ± 2.6% of the surface points had errors that were within a clinically acceptable error range; however, with 1 mm path planning shift, an estimated ∼75% of surface points could likely fall within the benchmark envelope. For the osteochondral defect, 83.6 ± 2.7% of surface points had errors that were within clinically acceptable limits. In addition to implications for minimally invasive AM-based clinical treatments, these proof-of-concept prints are some of the only in situ demonstrations to-date, wherein the substrate geometry was unknown a priori. The work presented herein demonstrates in situ AM, suggests potential biomedical applications and also explores in situ-specific issues, including geometric feedback, material selection and novel path planning techniques.

  3. Microbial nitrilases: versatile, spiral forming, industrial enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuku, R N; Brady, D; Benedik, M J; Sewell, B T

    2009-03-01

    The nitrilases are enzymes that convert nitriles to the corresponding acid and ammonia. They are members of a superfamily, which includes amidases and occur in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The superfamily is characterized by having a homodimeric building block with a alpha beta beta alpha-alpha beta beta alpha sandwich fold and an active site containing four positionally conserved residues: cys, glu, glu and lys. Their high chemical specificity and frequent enantioselectivity makes them attractive biocatalysts for the production of fine chemicals and pharmaceutical intermediates. Nitrilases are also used in the treatment of toxic industrial effluent and cyanide remediation. The superfamily enzymes have been visualized as dimers, tetramers, hexamers, octamers, tetradecamers, octadecamers and variable length helices, but all nitrilase oligomers have the same basic dimer interface. Moreover, in the case of the octamers, tetradecamers, octadecamers and the helices, common principles of subunit association apply. While the range of industrially interesting reactions catalysed by this enzyme class continues to increase, research efforts are still hampered by the lack of a high resolution microbial nitrilase structure which can provide insights into their specificity, enantioselectivity and the mechanism of catalysis. This review provides an overview of the current progress in elucidation of structure and function in this enzyme class and emphasizes insights that may lead to further biotechnological applications.

  4. Outreach Materials for the Collision Repair Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Collision Repair Campaign offers outreach materials to help collision repair shops reduce toxic air exposure. Materials include a DVD, poster, training video, and materials in Spanish (materiales del outreach en español).

  5. Intern's Experiences with Episiotomy and its Repair

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    repair is inadequately done, it may leave the woman suffering from perineal pain and other long term conditions with serious impact on the .... The maternity section had an average of ... with the job of performing episiotomy repair necessitating.

  6. Nucleotide excision repair in the test tube.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.G.J. Jaspers (Nicolaas); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe eukaryotic nucleotide excision-repair pathway has been reconstituted in vitro, an achievement that should hasten the full enzymological characterization of this highly complex DNA-repair pathway.

  7. Aging impairs double-strand break repair by homologous recombination in Drosophila germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delabaere, Laetitia; Ertl, Henry A; Massey, Dashiell J; Hofley, Carolyn M; Sohail, Faraz; Bienenstock, Elisa J; Sebastian, Hans; Chiolo, Irene; LaRocque, Jeannine R

    2017-04-01

    Aging is characterized by genome instability, which contributes to cancer formation and cell lethality leading to organismal decline. The high levels of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) observed in old cells and premature aging syndromes are likely a primary source of genome instability, but the underlying cause of their formation is still unclear. DSBs might result from higher levels of damage or repair defects emerging with advancing age, but repair pathways in old organisms are still poorly understood. Here, we show that premeiotic germline cells of young and old flies have distinct differences in their ability to repair DSBs by the error-free pathway homologous recombination (HR). Repair of DSBs induced by either ionizing radiation (IR) or the endonuclease I-SceI is markedly defective in older flies. This correlates with a remarkable reduction in HR repair measured with the DR-white DSB repair reporter assay. Strikingly, most of this repair defect is already present at 8 days of age. Finally, HR defects correlate with increased expression of early HR components and increased recruitment of Rad51 to damage in older organisms. Thus, we propose that the defect in the HR pathway for germ cells in older flies occurs following Rad51 recruitment. These data reveal that DSB repair defects arise early in the aging process and suggest that HR deficiencies are a leading cause of genome instability in germ cells of older animals. © 2016 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. The temporal outcomes of open versus arthroscopic knotted and knotless rotator cuff repair over 5 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena, Thomas R; Lam, Patrick H; Millar, Neal L

    2015-01-01

    Background The present study aimed to determine how repair technique influenced structural and clinical outcomes at 5 years post-surgery. Methods Three cohorts of patients had repair of a symptomatic rotator cuff tear using (i) an open double-row mattress repair technique (n = 25); (ii) arthroscopic single-row simple suture knotted technique (n = 25); or (iii) arthroscopic single-row inverted mattress knotless technique (n = 36) by one surgeon. Standardized patient- and examiner-determined outcomes were obtained pre-operatively and postoperatively with a validated protocol, ultrasound were also performed at the same time. Results Retear occurred more often after open repair (48%) at 5 years than after arthroscopic knotted (33%) and arthroscopic knotless (26%) repair. Retear was associated with increasing age, pre-operative tear size and weaker pre-operative and 5 years postoperative cuff strength. Between 2 years and 5 years, the open repair group experienced an increase in the frequency of pain during activity, as well as in the difficulty experienced and the severity of pain during overhead activities (p repair group. Conclusions At 5-year follow-up, arthroscopic rotator cuff repair techniques resulted in fewer retears and better outcomes compared to an open double-row technique. PMID:27582985

  9. The repair-fixation model: general aspects and the influence of radiation quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefer, J.; Loebrich, M.

    1992-01-01

    To explain the shape of cell survival curves after radiation action it is assumed that initial lesions are transient in nature and subject to repair or fixation. Since the underlying processes are controlled by enzymes, Michaelis-Menten kinetics are assumed. No qualitative differences between repair and fixation are postulated, the only differences being the kinetic parameters. This model yields a mathematical expression which is formally equivalent to the ''lethal-potentially-lethal'' (LPL) model. It is demonstrated that both mammalian as well as microbial survival data can be fitted. The inclusion of linear energy transfer (LET) effects is shown to be possible and is discussed qualitatively. (author)

  10. Immunochemical approach to the study of DNA repair. Proposed technical program and technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    A simple immunochemical assay to quantify DNA lesions is being developed in order to facilitate the study of DNA repair. Antibodies have been raised to 5,6-dihydroxy-dihydrothymine and to thymine dimers and these have been used to measure DNA damages produced by osmium tetroxide and ultraviolet light, respectively. An enzyme immunoassay has been developed and the sensitivity of this method will be compared to physical, enzymatic, and chemical methods using PM2 bacteriophage DNA. Finally DNA repair will be assayed in several model systems

  11. Serum aminoterminal type III procollagen peptide reflects repair after acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L T; Hørslev-Petersen, K; Toft, P

    1990-01-01

    similar to changes observed during wound healing in humans. PIIINP is cleaved off procollagen type III during the biosynthesis of type III collagen, which characterizes the early stages of repair and inflammation. Our findings suggest that serum PIIINP reflects the repair processes and scar formation...... following acute myocardial infarction. The serum PIIINP alterations in acute myocardial infarction differ essentially from the changes in myocardial enzymes reflecting myocardial injury. Serum PIIINP may therefore provide new and clinically relevant information on the healing of myocardial infarction....

  12. The Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway: structural and functional insights into a complex disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walden, Helen; Deans, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in any of at least sixteen FANC genes (FANCA-Q) cause Fanconi anemia, a disorder characterized by sensitivity to DNA interstrand crosslinking agents. The clinical features of cytopenia, developmental defects, and tumor predisposition are similar in each group, suggesting that the gene products participate in a common pathway. The Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway consists of an anchor complex that recognizes damage caused by interstrand crosslinks, a multisubunit ubiquitin ligase that monoubiquitinates two substrates, and several downstream repair proteins including nucleases and homologous recombination enzymes. We review progress in the use of structural and biochemical approaches to understanding how each FANC protein functions in this pathway.

  13. PARP-1: Friend or Foe of DNA Damage and Repair in Tumorigenesis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swindall, Amanda F.; Stanley, Jennifer A.; Yang, Eddy S.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species can result in DNA damage within cells and subsequently increase risk for carcinogenesis. This may be averted by repair of DNA damage through the base or nucleotide excision repair (BER/NER) pathways. PARP, a BER protein, is known for its role in DNA-repair. However, multiple lesions can occur within a small range of DNA, known as oxidative clustered DNA lesions (OCDLs), which are difficult to repair and may lead to the more severe DNA double-strand break (DSB). Inefficient DSB repair can then result in increased mutagenesis and neoplastic transformation. OCDLs occur more frequently within a variety of tumor tissues. Interestingly, PARP is highly expressed in several human cancers. Additionally, chronic inflammation may contribute to tumorigenesis through ROS-induced DNA damage. Furthermore, PARP can modulate inflammation through interaction with NFκB and regulating the expression of inflammatory signaling molecules. Thus, the upregulation of PARP may present a double-edged sword. PARP is needed to repair ROS-induced DNA lesions, but PARP expression may lead to increased inflammation via upregulation of NFκB signaling. Here, we discuss the role of PARP in the repair of oxidative damage versus the formation of OCDLs and speculate on the feasibility of PARP inhibition for the treatment and prevention of cancers by exploiting its role in inflammation

  14. PARP-1: Friend or Foe of DNA Damage and Repair in Tumorigenesis?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swindall, Amanda F.; Stanley, Jennifer A. [Department of Radiation Oncology Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, 176F HSROC Suite 2232B, 1700 6th Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35249 (United States); Yang, Eddy S., E-mail: eyang@uab.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, 176F HSROC Suite 2232B, 1700 6th Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35249 (United States); Department of Cell, Developmental and Integrative Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35249 (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35249 (United States)

    2013-07-26

    Oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species can result in DNA damage within cells and subsequently increase risk for carcinogenesis. This may be averted by repair of DNA damage through the base or nucleotide excision repair (BER/NER) pathways. PARP, a BER protein, is known for its role in DNA-repair. However, multiple lesions can occur within a small range of DNA, known as oxidative clustered DNA lesions (OCDLs), which are difficult to repair and may lead to the more severe DNA double-strand break (DSB). Inefficient DSB repair can then result in increased mutagenesis and neoplastic transformation. OCDLs occur more frequently within a variety of tumor tissues. Interestingly, PARP is highly expressed in several human cancers. Additionally, chronic inflammation may contribute to tumorigenesis through ROS-induced DNA damage. Furthermore, PARP can modulate inflammation through interaction with NFκB and regulating the expression of inflammatory signaling molecules. Thus, the upregulation of PARP may present a double-edged sword. PARP is needed to repair ROS-induced DNA lesions, but PARP expression may lead to increased inflammation via upregulation of NFκB signaling. Here, we discuss the role of PARP in the repair of oxidative damage versus the formation of OCDLs and speculate on the feasibility of PARP inhibition for the treatment and prevention of cancers by exploiting its role in inflammation.

  15. Effect of multiple repairs in girth welds of pipelines on the mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega, O.E.; Hallen, J.M.; Villagomez, A.; Contreras, A.

    2008-01-01

    This work presents the results of multiple weld repairs in the same area in seamless API X-52 microalloyed steel pipe. Four conditions of shielded metal arc welding repairs and one as-welded specimen of the girth weld were characterized to determine changes in the microstructure, grain size in the heat affected zone, and to evaluate their effect on the mechanical properties of the weld joints. The mechanical properties by means of tension tests, Charpy-V impact resistance and Vickers hardness of the welds were analyzed. The results indicate that significant changes are not generated in the microstructural constituents of the heat affected zone. Grain growth in the heat affected zone at the specimen mid-thickness with the number of repairs was observed. Tensile strength of the weld joints meets the requirement of the API 1104 standard even after the fourth weld repair. Significant reduction in Charpy-V impact resistance with the number of weld repairs was found when the notch location was in the intersection of the fusion line with the specimen mid-thickness. A significant increase in the Vickers hardness of the heat affected zone occurred after the first repair and a gradual decrease in the Vickers hardness occurred as the number of repairs increases

  16. Is forebrain neurogenesis a potential repair mechanism after stroke?

    OpenAIRE

    Inta, Dragos; Gass, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The use of adult subventricular zone (SVZ) neurogenesis as brain repair strategy after stroke represents a hot topic in neurologic research. Recent radiocarbon-14 dating has revealed a lack of poststroke neurogenesis in the adult human neocortex; however, adult neurogenesis has been shown to occur, even under physiologic conditions, in the human striatum. Here, these results are contrasted with experimental poststroke neurogenesis in the murine brain. Both in humans and in rodents, the SVZ ge...

  17. Regression Models for Repairable Systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novák, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 4 (2015), s. 963-972 ISSN 1387-5841 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Reliability analysis * Repair models * Regression Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 0.782, year: 2015 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2015/SI/novak-0450902.pdf

  18. Microwave Oven Repair. Teacher Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smreker, Eugene

    This competency-based curriculum guide for teachers addresses the skills a technician will need to service microwave ovens and to provide customer relations to help retain the customer's confidence in the product and trust in the service company that performs the repair. The guide begins with a task analysis, listing 20 cognitive tasks and 5…

  19. Cloning human DNA repair genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeggo, P.A.; Carr, A.M.; Lehmann, A.R.

    1994-01-01

    Many human genes involved in the repair of UV damage have been cloned using different procedures and they have been of great value in assisting the understanding of the mechanism of nucleotide excision-repair. Genes involved in repair of ionizing radiation damage have proved more difficult to isolate. Positional cloning has localized the XRCC5 gene to a small region of chromosome 2q33-35, and a series of yeast artificial chromosomes covering this region have been isolated. Very recent work has shown that the XRCC5 gene encodes the 80 kDa subunit of the Ku DNA-binding protein. The Ku80 gene also maps to this region. Studies with fission yeast have shown that radiation sensitivity can result not only from defective DNA repair but also from abnormal cell cycle control following DNA damage. Several genes involved in this 'check-point' control in fission yeast have been isolated and characterized in detail. It is likely that a similar checkpoint control mechanism exists in human cells. (author)

  20. Pure robotic retrocaval ureter repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok k. Hemal

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To demonstrate the feasibility of pure robotic retrocaval ureter repair. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A 33 year old female presented with right loin pain and obstruction on intravenous urography with the classical "fish-hook" appearance. She was counseled on the various methods of repair and elected to have a robot assisted repair. The following steps are performed during a pure robotic retrocaval ureter repair. The patient is placed in a modified flank position, pneumoperitoneum created and ports inserted. The colon is mobilized to expose the retroperitoneal structures: inferior vena cava, right gonadal vein, right ureter, and duodenum. The renal pelvis and ureter are mobilized and the renal pelvis transected. The ureter is transposed anterior to the inferior vena cava and a pyelopyelostomy is performed over a JJ stent. RESULTS: This patient was discharged on postoperative day 3. The catheter and drain tube were removed on day 1. Her JJ stent was removed at 6 weeks postoperatively. The postoperative intravenous urography at 3 months confirmed normal drainage of contrast medium. CONCLUSION: Pure robotic retrocaval ureter is a feasible procedure; however, there does not appear to be any great advantage over pure laparoscopy, apart from the ergonomic ease for the surgeon as well the simpler intracorporeal suturing.

  1. Discrete time analysis of a repairable machine

    OpenAIRE

    Alfa, Attahiru Sule; Castro, I. T.

    2002-01-01

    We consider, in discrete time, a single machine system that operates for a period of time represented by a general distribution. This machine is subject to failures during operations and the occurrence of these failures depends on how many times the machine has previously failed. Some failures are repairable and the repair times may or may not depend on the number of times the machine was previously repaired. Repair times also have a general distribution. The operating times...

  2. Molecular biological mechanisms I. DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedl, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    Cells of all living systems possess a variety of mechanisms that allow to repair spontaneous and exogeneously induced DNA damage. DNA repair deficiencies may invoke enhanced sensitivity towards DNA-damaging agents such as ionizing radiation. They may also enhance the risk of cancer development, both spontaneously or after induction. This article reviews several DNA repair mechanisms, especially those dealing with DNA double-strand breaks, and describes hereditary diseases associated with DNA repair defects. (orig.) [de

  3. Repair of steam turbines by welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohnstedt, H.J.; Loebert, P.

    1987-01-01

    In some cases, turbine parts can be repaired by welding, even rotating parts such as the shaft or the blades. Practical examples of successful repair work are explained, as for instance: welding of the last web of the turbine wheel of two MD-rotors, repair of erosion damage on turbine blades, of solid-matter erosion on a medium-pressure blading, or welding repair of a high-pressure turbine casing. (DG) [de

  4. Recent advances in DNA repair and recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanejko, L A; Jones, N J

    1998-09-11

    The subjects of the talks at this 1-day DNA Repair Network meeting, held at City University, London on December 15, 1997, encompassed a range of topics and reflected some of the current areas of research in the United Kingdom. Topics included DNA double-strand break repair, V(D)J recombination, DNA ligases, the RecQ family of helicases and Bloom's syndrome, UVB and immunosuppression, the repair of oxidative damage and mismatch repair mechanisms.

  5. Welding repair of the steam and gas turbines rotors made of Cr-Mo-V steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazur, Z.; Kubiak, J.; Hernandez, A.

    1999-01-01

    An analysis of typical steam turbine and gas turbine rotor failures is carried out. On the base of the rotors different failure causes and their mode of occurring, an evaluation of the weldability of the Cr-Mo-V steels and the classification of the common turbine rotors repair possibilities is presented. The developing of specific in-situ welding repair process of the damaged 20.65 MW gas turbine rotor is described. After repair, the rotor was put back into service. (Author) 15 refs

  6. Wegener's granulomatosis occurring de novo during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfhaily, F; Watts, R; Leather, A

    2009-01-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is rarely diagnosed during the reproductive years and uncommonly manifests for the first time during pregnancy. We report a case of de novo WG presenting at 30 weeks gestation with classical symptoms of WG (ENT, pulmonary). The diagnosis was confirmed by radiological, laboratory, and histological investigations. With a multidisciplinary approach, she had a successful vaginal delivery of a healthy baby. She was treated successfully by a combination of steroids, azathioprine and intravenous immunoglobulin in the active phase of disease for induction of remission and by azathioprine and steroids for maintenance of remission. The significant improvement in her symptoms allowed us to continue her pregnancy to 37 weeks when delivery was electively induced. Transplacental transmission of PR3-ANCA occurred but the neonate remained well. This case of de novo WG during pregnancy highlights the seriousness of this disease and the challenge in management of such patients.

  7. Localization of ultraviolet-induced excision repair in the nucleus and the distribution of repair events in higher order chromatin loops in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullenders, L.H.F.; Zeeland, A.A. van; Natarajan, A.T.

    1987-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that eukaryotic DNA is arranged in highly supercoiled domains or loops, and that the repeating loops are constrained by attachment to a nuclear skeletal structure termed the nuclear matrix. We have investigated whether the repair of DNA damage occurs in the nuclear matrix compartment. Normal human fibroblasts, ultraviolet (u.v.)-irradiated with 30 J m/sup -2/ and post-u.v. incubated in the presence of hydroxyurea, did not show any evidence for the occurrence of repair synthesis at the nuclear matrix. 5 J m/sup -2/ repair synthesis seems to initiate at the nuclear matrix, although only part of the total repair could be localized there. In u.v.-irradiated (30 J m/sup -2/) normal human fibroblast post-u.v. incubated in the presence of hydroxyurea and arabinsosylcytosine for 2h, multiple single-stranded regions are generated in a DNA loop as a result of the inhibition of the excision repair process. Preferential repair of certain domains in the chromatin was shown to occur in xeroderma pigmentosum cells of complementation group C (XP-C) in contrast to XP-D cells and Syrian hamster embryonic cells.

  8. The localization of ultraviolet-induced excision repair in the nucleus and the distribution of repair events in higher order chromatin loops in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullenders, L.H.F.; Zeeland, A.A. van; Natarajan, A.T.

    1987-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that eukaryotic DNA is arranged in highly supercoiled domains or loops, and that the repeating loops are constrained by attachment to a nuclear skeletal structure termed the nuclear matrix. We have investigated whether the repair of DNA damage occurs in the nuclear matrix compartment. Normal human fibroblasts, ultraviolet (u.v.)-irradiated with 30 J m -2 and post-u.v. incubated in the presence of hydroxyurea, did not show any evidence for the occurrence of repair synthesis at the nuclear matrix. 5 J m -2 repair synthesis seems to initiate at the nuclear matrix, although only part of the total repair could be localized there. In u.v.-irradiated (30 J m -2 ) normal human fibroblast post-u.v. incubated in the presence of hydroxyurea and arabinsosylcytosine for 2h, multiple single-stranded regions are generated in a DNA loop as a result of the inhibition of the excision repair process. Preferential repair of certain domains in the chromatin was shown to occur in xeroderma pigmentosum cells of complementation group C (XP-C) in contrast to XP-D cells and Syrian hamster embryonic cells. (author)

  9. Evaluation of possible occurrence of mutation in MMR repair system genes in resistant and sensitiveclinical strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosisby using sequencing method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AmirPoyan Afzali

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background:during recent years, the incidence and spread of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium causing tuberculosis, has set this disease in World Health Organizationpriorities alignment of diseases like AIDS and hepatitis. Study of close examination of resistant and susceptible clinical strains genotypes is necessary to overcome drug resistance. Among the numerous repair systems, only there are limited number of encoding genes of DNA repair enzymes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Commonly these genes have been conserved and any changes among them likely increasethe mutation occurance due to the impossibility of correctionof spontaneous mutations insensitive strains of this bacteria.mut genes encodeDNA repairable enzymes.This study investigated the mutations in these genes and the effect of these mutations on tuberculosis drug resistance. Materials&Methods: In this study,of 29 available specimens,we were selected 8 susceptible strains and 21 resistantstrains andafter ordering appropriate primers and performing the proliferation reaction two types of amplicons produced which includingfragments of genes mut T2 and mut T4 and they were sent inorder to sequencing. Results:The results of chain reactionprimer represents an appropriate choice of primerswhich were investigated. Sequencing results showed that overall 73% of resistant strains that had been selected for study of mutT4gene, have no mutations in codons 48of mutT4 gene, and 70% of resistant strains have no GGA >>> CGA mutation at codon 58 of mutT2 gene. Conclusion: One of the strategies to overcome tuberculosis drug resistance is a close examination of genotypes of resistant and susceptible clinical strains. Results of this study was performedby examining changes in mut T2 and mut T4 gene sequence. The mutation in mut T2 always associated with mutation in mut T4, in this way, the first mutation may occurs in mut T4and after that, the second mutationmay occurs in mut T

  10. NAMPT and NAMPT-controlled NAD Metabolism in Vascular Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei; Li, Wen-Lin; Liu, Jian-Min; Miao, Chao-Yu

    2016-06-01

    Vascular repair plays important roles in postischemic remodeling and rehabilitation in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease, such as stroke and myocardial infarction. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), a well-known coenzyme involved in electron transport chain for generation of adenosine triphosphate, has emerged as an important controller regulating various biological signaling pathways. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is the rate-limiting enzyme for NAD biosynthesis in mammals. NAMPT may also act in a nonenzymatic manner, presumably mediated by unknown receptor(s). Rapidly accumulating data in the past decade show that NAMPT and NAMPT-controlled NAD metabolism regulate fundamental biological functions in endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, and endothelial progenitor cells. The NAD-consuming proteins, including sirtuins, poly-ADP-ribose polymerases (PARPs), and CD38, may contribute to the regulatory effects of NAMPT-NAD axis in these cells and vascular repair. This review discusses the current data regarding NAMPT and NAMPT-controlled NAD metabolism in vascular repair and the clinical potential translational application of NAMPT-related products in treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease.

  11. Measuring the Enzyme Activity of Arabidopsis Deubiquitylating Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowska, Kamila; Nagel, Marie-Kristin; Isono, Erika

    2016-01-01

    Deubiquitylating enzymes, or DUBs, are important regulators of ubiquitin homeostasis and substrate stability, though the molecular mechanisms of most of the DUBs in plants are not yet understood. As different ubiquitin chain types are implicated in different biological pathways, it is important to analyze the enzyme characteristic for studying a DUB. Quantitative analysis of DUB activity is also important to determine enzyme kinetics and the influence of DUB binding proteins on the enzyme activity. Here, we show methods to analyze DUB activity using immunodetection, Coomassie Brilliant Blue staining, and fluorescence measurement that can be useful for understanding the basic characteristic of DUBs.

  12. Use of Drosophila to study DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, J.B.; Harris, P.V.; Sakaguchi, K.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses Drosophila, the premier metazoan organism for analyzing many fundamental features of eukaryotic gene regulation. The authors present adaptations of several approaches for studying DNA repair to an analysis of repair-defective mutants in Drosophila. A current understanding of Drosophila DNA repair is described

  13. 30 CFR 56.6801 - Vehicle repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vehicle repair. 56.6801 Section 56.6801 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Vehicle repair. Vehicles containing explosive material and oxidizers shall not be taken into a repair...

  14. The two faces of plan repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Krogt, R.P.J.; De Weerdt, M.M.

    2004-01-01

    Plan repair has two faces. Alternately, a plan repair method looks like a planning method, or looks like a method that does exactly the opposite, i.e., removing actions from a plan. We propose a general framework for plan repair that shows the relation between these two alternating steps. Any plan

  15. 30 CFR 57.14104 - Tire repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tire repairs. 57.14104 Section 57.14104 Mineral... Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14104 Tire repairs. (a) Before a tire is removed from a vehicle for tire repair, the valve core shall be partially removed to allow for gradual deflation and then...

  16. 30 CFR 56.14104 - Tire repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tire repairs. 56.14104 Section 56.14104 Mineral... Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14104 Tire repairs. (a) Before a tire is removed from a vehicle for tire repair, the valve core shall be partially removed to allow for gradual deflation and then...

  17. The effect of double-row fixation on initial repair strength in rotator cuff repair: a biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Steven W; Meier, Jeffrey D

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the initial mechanical strength of 3 rotator cuff repair techniques. A total of 30 fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders were prepared, and full-thickness supraspinatus tears were created. Specimens were randomized and placed into 3 groups: (1) transosseous suture technique (group I: TOS, n = 10, 6F/4M), (2) single-row suture anchor fixation (group II: SRSA, n = 10, 6F/4M), and (3) double-row suture anchor fixation (group III: DRSA, n = 10, 6F/4M). Each specimen underwent cyclic load testing from 5 N to 180 N at a rate of 33 mm/sec. The test was stopped when complete failure (repair site gap of 10 mm) or a total of 5,000 cycles was attained. Group I (TOS) failed at an average of 75.3 +/- 22.49 cycles, and group II (SRSA) at an average of 798.3 +/- 73.28 cycles; group III (DRSA) had no failures because all samples were stopped when 5,000 cycles had been completed. Fixation strength of the DRSA technique proved to be significantly greater than that of SRSA (P row suture anchor fixation was significantly stronger than was single-row repair. Therefore, double-row fixation may be superior to other techniques in that it provides a substantially stronger repair that could lead to improved biologic healing. A high incidence of incomplete healing occurs in rotator cuff repair. Use of double-row fixation may help the clinician to address some deficiencies in current methods by increasing the strength of the repair, potentially leading to improved healing rates.

  18. The role of DNA base excision repair in brain homeostasis and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akbari, Mansour; Morevati, Marya; Croteau, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Chemical modification and spontaneous loss of nucleotide bases from DNA are estimated to occur at the rate of thousands per human cell per day. DNA base excision repair (BER) is a critical mechanism for repairing such lesions in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Defective expression or function of p...... energy homeostasis, mitochondrial function and cellular bioenergetics, with especially strong influence on neurological function. Further studies in this area could lead to novel approaches to prevent and treat human neurodegenerative disease....

  19. Repair of large abdominal wall defects with expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, J J; Salky, B A; Gelernt, I M; Kreel, I

    1987-01-01

    Most abdominal wall incisional hernias can be repaired by primary closure. However, where the defect is large or there is tension on the closure, the use of a prosthetic material is indicated. Expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) patches were used to repair incisional hernias in 28 patients between November 1983 and December 1986. Twelve of these patients (43%) had a prior failure of a primary repair. Reherniation occurred in three patients (10.7%). Wound infections developed in two patients (7.1%), both of whom had existing intestinal stomas, one with an intercurrent pelvic abscess. The prosthetic patch was removed in the patient with the abscess, but the infection was resolved in the other without sequelae. Septic complications did not occur after any operations performed in uncontaminated fields. None of the patients exhibited any undue discomfort, wound pain, erythema, or induration. Complications related to adhesions, erosion of the patch material into the viscera, bowel obstruction, or fistula formation did not occur. Based on this clinical experience, the authors believe that the PTFE patch appears to represent an advance in synthetic abdominal wall substitutes. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2(left)., Fig. 3(right). PMID:3689012

  20. Application of Laser Micro-irradiation for Examination of Single and Double Strand Break Repair in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holton, Nathaniel W; Andrews, Joel F; Gassman, Natalie R

    2017-09-05

    Highly coordinated DNA repair pathways exist to detect, excise and replace damaged DNA bases, and coordinate repair of DNA strand breaks. While molecular biology techniques have clarified structure, enzymatic functions, and kinetics of repair proteins, there is still a need to understand how repair is coordinated within the nucleus. Laser micro-irradiation offers a powerful tool for inducing DNA damage and monitoring the recruitment of repair proteins. Induction of DNA damage by laser micro-irradiation can occur with a range of wavelengths, and users can reliably induce single strand breaks, base lesions and double strand breaks with a range of doses. Here, laser micro-irradiation is used to examine repair of single and double strand breaks induced by two common confocal laser wavelengths, 355 nm and 405 nm. Further, proper characterization of the applied laser dose for inducing specific damage mixtures is described, so users can reproducibly perform laser micro-irradiation data acquisition and analysis.

  1. Australian Apprentice & Trainee Statistics: Automotive Repairs and Service Trades, 1995 to 1999. Australian Vocational Education & Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research, Leabrook (Australia).

    Statistics regarding Australians participating in apprenticeships and traineeships in the automotive repairs and service trades in 1995-1999 were reviewed to provide an indication of where skill shortages may be occurring or will likely occur in relation to the following occupations: motor mechanic, automotive electrician, and panel beater. The…

  2. Enzyme Molecules in Solitary Confinement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaela B. Liebherr

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Large arrays of homogeneous microwells each defining a femtoliter volume are a versatile platform for monitoring the substrate turnover of many individual enzyme molecules in parallel. The high degree of parallelization enables the analysis of a statistically representative enzyme population. Enclosing individual enzyme molecules in microwells does not require any surface immobilization step and enables the kinetic investigation of enzymes free in solution. This review describes various microwell array formats and explores their applications for the detection and investigation of single enzyme molecules. The development of new fabrication techniques and sensitive detection methods drives the field of single molecule enzymology. Here, we introduce recent progress in single enzyme molecule analysis in microwell arrays and discuss the challenges and opportunities.

  3. DGAT enzymes and triacylglycerol biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Chi-Liang Eric; Stone, Scot J.; Koliwad, Suneil; Harris, Charles; Farese, Robert V.

    2008-01-01

    Triacylglycerols (triglycerides) (TGs) are the major storage molecules of metabolic energy and FAs in most living organisms. Excessive accumulation of TGs, however, is associated with human diseases, such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, and steatohepatitis. The final and the only committed step in the biosynthesis of TGs is catalyzed by acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) enzymes. The genes encoding two DGAT enzymes, DGAT1 and DGAT2, were identified in the past decade, and the use of molecular tools, including mice deficient in either enzyme, has shed light on their functions. Although DGAT enzymes are involved in TG synthesis, they have distinct protein sequences and differ in their biochemical, cellular, and physiological functions. Both enzymes may be useful as therapeutic targets for diseases. Here we review the current knowledge of DGAT enzymes, focusing on new advances since the cloning of their genes, including possible roles in human health and diseases. PMID:18757836

  4. Enzyme stabilization for pesticide degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivers, D.B.; Frazer, F.R. III; Mason, D.W.; Tice, T.R.

    1988-01-01

    Enzymes offer inherent advantages and limitations as active components of formulations used to decontaminate soil and equipment contaminated with toxic materials such as pesticides. Because of the catalytic nature of enzymes, each molecule of enzyme has the potential to destroy countless molecules of a contaminating toxic compound. This degradation takes place under mild environmental conditions of pH, temperature, pressure, and solvent. The basic limitation of enzymes is their degree of stability during storage and application conditions. Stabilizing methods such as the use of additives, covalent crosslinking, covalent attachment, gel entrapment, and microencapsulation have been directed developing an enzyme preparation that is stable under extremes of pH, temperature, and exposure to organic solvents. Initial studies were conducted using the model enzymes subtilisin and horseradish peroxidase.

  5. Photodynamic DNA damage induced by phycocyanin and its repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pádula

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we analyzed DNA damage induced by phycocyanin (PHY in the presence of visible light (VL using a set of repair endonucleases purified from Escherichia coli. We demonstrated that the profile of DNA damage induced by PHY is clearly different from that induced by molecules that exert deleterious effects on DNA involving solely singlet oxygen as reactive species. Most of PHY-induced lesions are single strand breaks and, to a lesser extent, base oxidized sites, which are recognized by Nth, Nfo and Fpg enzymes. High pressure liquid chromatography coupled to electrochemical detection revealed that PHY photosensitization did not induce 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo at detectable levels. DNA repair after PHY photosensitization was also investigated. Plasmid DNA damaged by PHY photosensitization was used to transform a series of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA repair mutants. The results revealed that plasmid survival was greatly reduced in rad14 mutants, while the ogg1 mutation did not modify the plasmid survival when compared to that in the wild type. Furthermore, plasmid survival in the ogg1 rad14 double mutant was not different from that in the rad14 single mutant. The results reported here indicate that lethal lesions induced by PHY plus VL are repaired differently by prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Morever, nucleotide excision repair seems to play a major role in the recognition and repair of these lesions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  6. Repair of model compounds of photoinduced lesions in DNA. Electrochemical approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boussicault, F.

    2006-09-01

    The goal of this work is to better understand the repair mechanism of photoinduced lesions in DNA (cyclobutane dimers and pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone adducts) by photolyase redox enzymes, using tools and concepts of molecular electrochemistry. Thanks to the study of model compounds of cyclobutane lesions by cyclic voltametry, we have been able to mimic the key step of the enzymatic repair (dissociative electron transfer) and to monitor the repair of model compounds by Escherichia coli DNA photolyase. From these results, we have discussed the repair mechanism, especially the stepwise or concerted character of the process. Repair mechanism of (6-4) adducts is not known now, but a possible pathway implies an electron transfer coupled to the cleavage of two bonds in the closed form of the lesions (oxetanes). Voltammetric study of reduction and oxidation of model oxetanes and their repair by E. coli DNA photolyase gave some experimental evidence confirming the proposed mechanism and allowing a better understanding of it. (author)

  7. Introduction to naturally occurring radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egidi, P.

    1997-01-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) is everywhere; we are exposed to it every day. It is found in our bodies, the food we eat, the places where we live and work, and in products we use. Some industrial practices involving natural resources concentrate these radionuclides to a degree that they may pose risk to humans and the environment if they are not controlled. This session will concentrate on diffuse sources of technologically-enhanced (TE) NORM, which are generally large-volume, low-activity waste streams produced by industries such as mineral mining, ore benefication, production of phosphate Fertilizers, water treatment and purification, and oil and gas production. The majority of radionuclides in TENORM are found in the uranium and thorium decay chains. Radium and its subsequent decay products (radon) are the principal radionuclides used in characterizing the redistribution of TENORM in the environment by human activity. We will briefly review other radionuclides occurring in nature (potassium and rubidium) that contribute primarily to background doses. TENORM is found in many waste streams; for example, scrap metal, sludges, slags, fluids, and is being discovered in industries traditionally not thought of as affected by radionuclide contamination. Not only the forms and volumes, but the levels of radioactivity in TENORM vary. Current discussions about the validity of the linear no dose threshold theory are central to the TENORM issue. TENORM is not regulated by the Atomic Energy Act or other Federal regulations. Control and regulation of TENORM is not consistent from industry to industry nor from state to state. Proposed regulations are moving from concentration-based standards to dose-based standards. So when is TENORM a problem? Where is it a problem? That depends on when, where, and whom you talk to exclamation point We will start by reviewing background radioactivity, then we will proceed to the geology, mobility, and variability of these

  8. Introduction to naturally occurring radioactive material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egidi, P.

    1997-08-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) is everywhere; we are exposed to it every day. It is found in our bodies, the food we eat, the places where we live and work, and in products we use. We are also bathed in a sea of natural radiation coming from the sun and deep space. Living systems have adapted to these levels of radiation and radioactivity. But some industrial practices involving natural resources concentrate these radionuclides to a degree that they may pose risk to humans and the environment if they are not controlled. Other activities, such as flying at high altitudes, expose us to elevated levels of NORM. This session will concentrate on diffuse sources of technologically-enhanced (TE) NORM, which are generally large-volume, low-activity waste streams produced by industries such as mineral mining, ore benefication, production of phosphate Fertilizers, water treatment and purification, and oil and gas production. The majority of radionuclides in TENORM are found in the uranium and thorium decay chains. Radium and its subsequent decay products (radon) are the principal radionuclides used in characterizing the redistribution of TENORM in the environment by human activity. We will briefly review other radionuclides occurring in nature (potassium and rubidium) that contribute primarily to background doses. TENORM is found in many waste streams; for example, scrap metal, sludges, slags, fluids, and is being discovered in industries traditionally not thought of as affected by radionuclide contamination. Not only the forms and volumes, but the levels of radioactivity in TENORM vary. Current discussions about the validity of the linear no dose threshold theory are central to the TENORM issue. TENORM is not regulated by the Atomic Energy Act or other Federal regulations. Control and regulation of TENORM is not consistent from industry to industry nor from state to state. Proposed regulations are moving from concentration-based standards to dose

  9. Establishing Maximal Medical Improvement After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuke, William A; Leroux, Timothy S; Gregory, Bonnie P; Black, Austin; Forsythe, Brian; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N

    2018-03-01

    As health care transitions from a pay-for-service to a pay-for-performance infrastructure, the value of orthopaedic care must be defined accurately. Significant efforts have been made in defining quality and cost in arthroplasty; however, there remains a lag in ambulatory orthopaedic care. Two-year follow-up has been a general requirement for reporting outcomes after rotator cuff repair. However, this time requirement has not been established scientifically and is of increasing importance in the era of value-based health care. Given that arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is a common ambulatory orthopaedic procedure, the purpose of this study was to establish a time frame for maximal medical improvement (the state when improvement has stabilized) after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Systematic review. A systematic review of the literature was conducted, identifying studies reporting sequential patient-reported outcomes up to a minimum of 2 years after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The primary clinical outcome was patient-reported outcomes at 3-month, 6-month, 1-year, and 2-year follow-up. Secondary clinical outcomes included range of motion, strength, retears, and complications. Clinically significant improvement was determined between various time intervals by use of the minimal clinically important difference. The review included 19 studies including 1370 patients who underwent rotator cuff repair. Clinically significant improvement in patient-reported outcomes was seen up to 1 year after rotator cuff repair, but no clinical significance was noted from 1 year to 2 years. The majority of improvement in strength and range of motion was seen up to 6 months, but no clinically meaningful improvement was seen thereafter. All reported complications and the majority of retears occurred within 6 months after rotator cuff repair. After rotator cuff repair, a clinically significant improvement in patient-reported outcomes, range of motion, and strength was seen up to 1

  10. Direct comparison of enzyme histochemical and immunohistochemical methods to localize an enzyme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.

    2002-01-01

    Immunohistochemical localization of enzymes is compared directly with localization of enzyme activity with (catalytic) enzyme histochemical methods. The two approaches demonstrate principally different aspects of an enzyme. The immunohistochemical method localizes the enzyme protein whether it is

  11. Fungi of genus Alternaria occurring on tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Marcinkowska

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Tomato early blight in central Poland was caused by Alternaria solani (A. porri f. sp., solani and A. alernata (A. tenuis. A. alternata was isolated more often than A. solani. All isolates of A. solani in controlled conditions killed tomato seedlings, while pathogenic isolates of A. alternata caused only slight seedling blight. In greenhouse tests A. solani proved to be strongly pathogenic for leaves and stems of tomato but A. alternata was weakly pathogenic. The latter species attacked only injured fruits while, A. solanicould penetrate through undamaged peel of fruits. Both of these species caused the same type of symptoms; the differences consisted only in intensification of disease symptoms. During 1974 and 1975 field tomatoes were moderately attacked by early blight. Thebest development of this disease occurred by the turn of August and September. Determinate variety 'New Yorker' was distinguished by more severe infection of stem parts of tomato whereas the fruits of a stock variety 'Apollo' were more strongly attacked.

  12. Uranium occurence in California near Bucaramanga (Columbia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heider Polania, J.

    1980-01-01

    The mining district of California, Bucaramanga, is on the west side of the Cordillera Oriental in the Santander massif region. The oldest rocks of the area form a complex of metamorphites and migmatites of the predevonic age. Amphibolite various types of paragneiss and orthogneiss are represented. Several stages of metamorphism can be documented in some rocks, as well as double anatexis. Triassic to jurassic quarz diorites and leukogranites show wide distribution. Porphyric rocks of granodioritic to granitic composition, to which the uranium mineralization is mainly bonded, intruded into the sediments of the lower cretaceous. Atomic absorption spectral analyses were carried out for the elements Cu, Zn and Li, as well as the uranium contents of some samples using fluorimetry. Uranium is primarily bonded to pitch blende and coffinite. The latter mostly occur in fine distribution grown in quarz and belong to the most recent mineralization phase. Autunite, meta-autunite, torbernite, meta-torbernite, zeunerite, meta-zeunerite and meta uranocircite detected as secondary uranium minerals. (orig./HP) [de

  13. Bioassay of naturally occurring allelochemicals for phytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leather, G R; Einhellig, F A

    1988-10-01

    The bioassay has been one of the most widely used tests to demonstrate allelopathic activity. Often, claims that a particular plant species inhibits the growth of another are based entirely on the seed germination response to solvent extracts of the suspected allelopathic plant; few of these tests are of value in demonstrating allelopathy under natural conditions. The veracity of the bioassay for evaluating naturally occurring compounds for phytotoxicity depends upon the physiological and biochemical response capacity of the bioassay organism and the mechanism(s) of action of the allelochemicals. The possibility that more than one allelochemical, acting in concert at very low concentrations, may be responsible for an observed allelopathic effect makes it imperative that bioassays be extremely sensitive to chemical growth perturbation agents. Among the many measures of phytotoxicity of allelochemicals, the inhibition (or stimulation) of seed germination, radicle elongation, and/or seedling growth have been the parameters of choice for most investigations. Few of these assays have been selected with the view towards the possible mechanism of the allelopathic effect.

  14. Effects of extracellular and intracellular pH on repair of potentially lethal damage, chromosome aberrations and DNA double-strand breaks in irradiated plateau-phase A549 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayanth, V.R.; Bayne, M.T.; Varnes, M.E.

    1994-01-01

    Plateau-phage A549 cells exhibit a high capacity for repair of potentially lethal radiation damage (PLD). Previously it was found that PLD repair could be partially inhibited by increasing the extracellular pH (pH e ) of the spent medium from its normal value of 6.7-6.8 to 7.6 during postirradiation holding. This study shows that PLD repair is also inhibited by reducing the pH e of the spent medium to 6.0. The effects of altering pH e on rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) as measured by neutral filter elution and on mitotic delay and chromosome aberrations seen after releasing cells from the plateau phase were investigated. Neither increasing nor decreasing the pH e of the spent medium had an effect on radiation-induced mitotic delay. Rejoining of DSBs was significantly inhibited by holding at pH e 6.0 but not affected by holding at pH e 7.6. At 2 h after irradiation about 51% of unrejoined breaks remained at pH e 6.0, compared to about 15% at pH e 6.7 or 7.6. However, holding at pH e 7.6 appeared to cause a marginal change in the kinetics of rejoining of DSBs. Repair of lesions leading to dicentric and acentric chromosome aberrations did not occur when cells were held at pH e 6.0, since less than 10% of these aberrations disappeared from cells held for 24 h before subculture. In contrast, holding plateau-phase cells at pH e 7.6 vs 6.7 caused a small but significant reduction in the disappearance of dicentrics but had no effect on the rate or extent of the disappearance of acentrics. These data have led us to hypothesize that inhibition of PLD repair by holding at pH e 6.0 is related both to inhibition of pH-dependent DNA repair enzymes and to induction of changes in DNA which lead to misrepair when the cells are released from plateau phase. Inhibition of PLD repair by holding at pH e 7.6 is related primarily to changes in DNA structure which promote misrepair. 43 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  15. Enzyme Mimics: Advances and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuah, Evelyn; Toh, Seraphina; Yee, Jessica; Ma, Qian; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-06-13

    Enzyme mimics or artificial enzymes are a class of catalysts that have been actively pursued for decades and have heralded much interest as potentially viable alternatives to natural enzymes. Aside from having catalytic activities similar to their natural counterparts, enzyme mimics have the desired advantages of tunable structures and catalytic efficiencies, excellent tolerance to experimental conditions, lower cost, and purely synthetic routes to their preparation. Although still in the midst of development, impressive advances have already been made. Enzyme mimics have shown immense potential in the catalysis of a wide range of chemical and biological reactions, the development of chemical and biological sensing and anti-biofouling systems, and the production of pharmaceuticals and clean fuels. This Review concerns the development of various types of enzyme mimics, namely polymeric and dendrimeric, supramolecular, nanoparticulate and proteinic enzyme mimics, with an emphasis on their synthesis, catalytic properties and technical applications. It provides an introduction to enzyme mimics and a comprehensive summary of the advances and current standings of their applications, and seeks to inspire researchers to perfect the design and synthesis of enzyme mimics and to tailor their functionality for a much wider range of applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Phage lytic enzymes: a history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudil, David

    2015-02-01

    There are many recent studies regarding the efficacy of bacteriophage-related lytic enzymes: the enzymes of 'bacteria-eaters' or viruses that infect bacteria. By degrading the cell wall of the targeted bacteria, these lytic enzymes have been shown to efficiently lyse Gram-positive bacteria without affecting normal flora and non-related bacteria. Recent studies have suggested approaches for lysing Gram-negative bacteria as well (Briersa Y, et al., 2014). These enzymes include: phage-lysozyme, endolysin, lysozyme, lysin, phage lysin, phage lytic enzymes, phageassociated enzymes, enzybiotics, muralysin, muramidase, virolysin and designations such as Ply, PAE and others. Bacteriophages are viruses that kill bacteria, do not contribute to antimicrobial resistance, are easy to develop, inexpensive to manufacture and safe for humans, animals and the environment. The current focus on lytic enzymes has been on their use as anti-infectives in humans and more recently in agricultural research models. The initial translational application of lytic enzymes, however, was not associated with treating or preventing a specific disease but rather as an extraction method to be incorporated in a rapid bacterial detection assay (Bernstein D, 1997).The current review traces the translational history of phage lytic enzymes-from their initial discovery in 1986 for the rapid detection of group A streptococcus in clinical specimens to evolving applications in the detection and prevention of disease in humans and in agriculture.

  17. Variations in Velopharyngeal Structure in Adults With Repaired Cleft Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Jamie L; Kotlarek, Katelyn J; Sutton, Bradley P; Kuehn, David P; Jaskolka, Michael S; Fang, Xiangming; Point, Stuart W; Rauccio, Frank

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine differences in velopharyngeal structures between adults with repaired cleft palate and normal resonance and adults without cleft palate. Thirty-six English-speaking adults, including 6 adults (2 males and 4 females) with repaired cleft palate (M = 32.5 years of age, SD = 17.4 years) and 30 adults (15 males and 15 females) without cleft palate (M = 23.3 years of age, SD = 4.1 years), participated in the study. Fourteen velopharyngeal measures were obtained on magnetic resonance images and compared between groups (cleft and noncleft). After adjusting for body size and sex effects, there was a statistically significant difference between groups for 10 out of the 14 velopharyngeal measures. Compared to those without cleft palate, participants with repaired cleft palate had a significantly shorter hard palate height and length, shorter levator muscle length, shorter intravelar segment, more acute levator angles of origin, shorter and thinner velum, and greater pharyngeal depth. Although significant differences were evident in the cleft palate group, individuals displayed normal resonance. These findings suggest that a wide variability in velopharyngeal anatomy can occur in the presence of normal resonance, particularly for those with repaired cleft palate. Future research is needed to understand how anatomic variability impacts function, such as during speech.

  18. Repair of Clustered Damage and DNA Polymerase Iota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belousova, E A; Lavrik, O I

    2015-08-01

    Multiple DNA lesions occurring within one or two turns of the DNA helix known as clustered damage are a source of double-stranded DNA breaks, which represent a serious threat to the cells. Repair of clustered lesions is accomplished in several steps. If a clustered lesion contains oxidized bases, an individual DNA lesion is repaired by the base excision repair (BER) mechanism involving a specialized DNA polymerase after excising DNA damage. Here, we investigated DNA synthesis catalyzed by DNA polymerase iota using damaged DNA templates. Two types of DNA substrates were used as model DNAs: partial DNA duplexes containing breaks of different length, and DNA duplexes containing 5-formyluracil (5-foU) and uracil as a precursor of apurinic/apyrimidinic sites (AP) in opposite DNA strands. For the first time, we showed that DNA polymerase iota is able to catalyze DNA synthesis using partial DNA duplexes having breaks of different length as substrates. In addition, we found that DNA polymerase iota could catalyze DNA synthesis during repair of clustered damage via the BER system by using both undamaged and 5-foU-containing templates. We found that hPCNA (human proliferating cell nuclear antigen) increased efficacy of DNA synthesis catalyzed by DNA polymerase iota.

  19. Remote repair robots for dissolvers in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Sen; Hirose, Yasuo; Kawamura, Hironobu; Minato, Akira; Ozaki, Norihiko.

    1984-01-01

    In nuclear facilities, for the purpose of the reduction of radiation exposure of workers, the shortening of working time and the improvement of capacity ratio of the facilities, the technical development of various devices for remote maintenance and inspection has been advanced so far. This time, an occasion came to inspect and repair the pinhole defects occurred in spent fuel dissolving tanks in the reprocessing plant of Tokai Establishment, Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp. However, since the radiation environmental condition and the restricting condition due to the object of repair were extremely severe, it was impossible to cope with them using conventional robot techniques. Consequently, a repair robot withstanding high level radiation has been developed anew, which can work by totally remote operation in the space of about 270 mm inside diameter and about 6 m length. The repair robot comprises a periscope reflecting mirror system, a combined underwater and atmospheric use television, a grinder, a welder, a liquid penetrant tester and an ultrasonic flaw detector. The key points of the development were the parts withstanding high level radiation and the selection of materials, to make the mechanism small size and the realization of totally remote operation. (Kako, I.)

  20. Chromosome End Repair and Genome Stability in Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susannah F. Calhoun

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum replicates within circulating red blood cells, where it is subjected to conditions that frequently cause DNA damage. The repair of DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs is thought to rely almost exclusively on homologous recombination (HR, due to a lack of efficient nonhomologous end joining. However, given that the parasite is haploid during this stage of its life cycle, the mechanisms involved in maintaining genome stability are poorly understood. Of particular interest are the subtelomeric regions of the chromosomes, which contain the majority of the multicopy variant antigen-encoding genes responsible for virulence and disease severity. Here, we show that parasites utilize a competitive balance between de novo telomere addition, also called “telomere healing,” and HR to stabilize chromosome ends. Products of both repair pathways were observed in response to DSBs that occurred spontaneously during routine in vitro culture or resulted from experimentally induced DSBs, demonstrating that both pathways are active in repairing DSBs within subtelomeric regions and that the pathway utilized was determined by the DNA sequences immediately surrounding the break. In combination, these two repair pathways enable parasites to efficiently maintain chromosome stability while also contributing to the generation of genetic diversity.

  1. Polyester composite versus PTFE in laparoscopic ventral hernia repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon, Modesto J; Telem, Dana A; Chin, Edward; Weber, Kaare; Divino, Celia M; Nguyen, Scott Q

    2011-01-01

    Both polyester composite (POC) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) mesh are commonly used for laparoscopic ventral hernia repair. However, sparse information exists comparing perioperative and long-term outcome by mesh repair. A prospective database was utilized to identify 116 consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopic ventral hernia repair at The Mount Sinai Hospital from 2004-2009. Patients were grouped by type of mesh used, PTFE versus POC, and retrospectively compared. Follow-up at a mean of 12 months was achieved by telephone interview and office visit. Of the 116 patients, 66 underwent ventral hernia repair with PTFE and 50 with POC mesh. Patients were well matched by patient demographics. No difference in mean body mass index (BMI) was demonstrated between the PTFE and POC group (31.8 vs. 32.5, respectively; P=NS). Operative time was significantly longer in the PTFE group (136 vs.106 minutes, PPTFE group and none in the POC group (P NS). No other major complications occurred in the immediate postoperative period (30 days). At a mean follow-up of 12 months, no significant difference was demonstrated between the PTFE and POC groups in hernia recurrence (3% vs. 2%), wound complications (1% vs. 0%), mesh infection, requiring removal (3% vs. 0%), bowel obstruction (3% vs. 2%), or persistent pain or discomfort (28% vs. 32%), respectively (P=NS). Our study demonstrated no significant association between types of mesh used and postoperative complications. In the 12-month follow-up, no differences were noted in hernia recurrence.

  2. DNA-radiosensitivity and repair in mammolian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proskuryakov, S.Ya.; Ivannik, B.P.; Ryabchenko, N.I.

    1979-01-01

    Determination was made of the formation and repair of single-stranded DNA breaks (SB) in cells of rat thymus and liver and Ehrlich's ascites tumor (EAT) with the use of the method of low-gradient viscosimetry of alkaline cell lysates. The radiochemical yield of single-stranded breaks (Gsub(SB)) induced by irradiation of animals is 41.2 eV/break for hepatocytes, 96.8 eV/break, for thymocytes, and 129.7 eV/break, for EAT cells. The half-recovery time of single-stranded DNA breaks for cells of thymus and EAT exposed in vivo is 16.0 and 5.1 s -1 , correspondingly. In hepatocytes exposed in vivo and in vitro no repairs occurs for 3 h. Under conditions of inhibition of SB repair, when suspensions of thymocytes and hepatocytes were exposed in vitro at 4 deg C, Gsub(SB) is 35.5 and 38.7 eV/break, respectively. The analysis of the data obtained prompts the conclusion that under in vivo conditions, there is a correlation between DNA radiosensitivity and the rate of repair processes

  3. Indentation damage and crack repair in human enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, C; Arola, D; Ossa, A

    2013-05-01

    Tooth enamel is the hardest and most highly mineralized tissue in the human body. While there have been a number of studies aimed at understanding the hardness and crack growth resistance behavior of this tissue, no study has evaluated if cracks in this tissue undergo repair. In this investigation the crack repair characteristics of young human enamel were evaluated as a function of patient gender and as a function of the distance from the Dentin Enamel Junction (DEJ). Cracks were introduced via microindentation along the prism direction and evaluated as a function of time after the indentation. Microscopic observations indicated that the repair of cracks began immediately after crack initiation and reaches saturation after approximately 48 h. During this process he crack length decreased up to 10% of the initial length, and the largest degree of reduction occurred in the deep enamel, nearest the DEJ. In addition, it was found that the degree of repair was significantly greater in the enamel of female patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Indentation Damage and Crack Repair in Human Enamel*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, C.; Arola, D.; Ossa, A.

    2013-01-01

    Tooth enamel is the hardest and most highly mineralized tissue in the human body. While there have been a number of studies aimed at understanding the hardness and crack growth resistance behavior of this tissue, no study has evaluated if cracks in this tissue undergo repair. In this investigation the crack repair characteristics of young human enamel were evaluated as a function of patient gender and as a function of the distance from the Dentin Enamel Junction (DEJ). Cracks were introduced via microindentation along the prism direction and evaluated as a function of time after the indentation. Microscopic observations indicated that the repair of cracks began immediately after crack initiation and reaches saturation after approximately 48 hours. During this process he crack length decreased up to 10% of the initial length, and the largest degree of reduction occurred in the deep enamel, nearest the DEJ. In addition, it was found that the degree of repair was significantly greater in the enamel of female patients. PMID:23541701

  5. DNA repair in lens cells during chick embryo development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Counis, M.F.; Chaudun, E.; Simonneau, L.; Courtois, Y.

    1979-01-01

    When chick lens epithelium is cultured in vitro, differentiation into lens fiber cells is accompanied by DNA degradation. This phenomenon of terminal differentiation was studied in the epithelium from embryos at the 6th and 11th days of development. DNA size and the ability of the cells to repair DNA damage induced by X-rays were analysed in alkaline sucrose gradients. In the 6-day epithelium a rapid degradation and complete lack of DNA repair were recorded. Similar observations have been made in previous studies on the 11-day sample, but here degradation is progressive and occurs after a lag of several days. In the younger epithelium, internal irradiation by [ 3 H)thymidine also had a drastic effect resembling that caused by X-rays. In order to assess the process of differentiation in the experimental system the synthesis of delta- and αcrystallins was monitored. Stage-related modifications in the rates of synthesis were recorded. The results confirm that the DNA repair system is impaired during terminal differentiation. The differences observed between the two stages may reflect either a developmental modification in DNA repair mechanisms or a change in the relative proportions of differentiating cells. An hypothesis is proposed in support of the latter case. (Auth.)

  6. [The rise of enzyme engineering in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gaoxiang

    2015-06-01

    Enzyme engineering is an important part of the modern biotechnology. Industrial biocatalysis is considered the third wave of biotechnology following pharmaceutical and agricultural waves. In 25 years, China has made a mighty advances in enzyme engineering research. This review focuses on enzyme genomics, enzyme proteomics, biosynthesis, microbial conversion and biosensors in the Chinese enzyme engineering symposiums and advances in enzyme preparation industry in China.

  7. Soluble inhibitors/deactivators of cellulase enzymes from lignocellulosic biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngmi; Ximenes, Eduardo; Mosier, Nathan S; Ladisch, Michael R

    2011-04-07

    Liquid hot water, steam explosion, and dilute acid pretreatments of lignocellulose generate soluble inhibitors which hamper enzymatic hydrolysis as well as fermentation of sugars to ethanol. Toxic and inhibitory compounds will vary with pretreatment and include soluble sugars, furan derivatives (hydroxymethyl fulfural, furfural), organic acids (acetic, formic and, levulinic acid), and phenolic compounds. Their effect is seen when an increase in the concentration of pretreated biomass in a hydrolysis slurry results in decreased cellulose conversion, even though the ratio of enzyme to cellulose is kept constant. We used lignin-free cellulose, Solka Floc, combined with mixtures of soluble components released during pretreatment of wood, to prove that the decrease in the rate and extent of cellulose hydrolysis is due to a combination of enzyme inhibition and deactivation. The causative agents were extracted from wood pretreatment liquid using PEG surfactant, activated charcoal or ethyl acetate and then desorbed, recovered, and added back to a mixture of enzyme and cellulose. At enzyme loadings of either 1 or 25mg protein/g glucan, the most inhibitory components, later identified as phenolics, decreased the rate and extent of cellulose hydrolysis by half due to both inhibition and precipitation of the enzymes. Full enzyme activity occurred when the phenols were removed. Hence detoxification of pretreated woods through phenol removal is expected to reduce enzyme loadings, and therefore reduce enzyme costs, for a given level of cellulose conversion. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Is laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair more effective than open repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, O.; Green, A.; Joy, M.; Wong, C.H.; Malik, M

    2011-01-01

    To systematically review randomized controlled trials, (RCT) evidence comparing Lichtenstein to total extraperitoneal (TEP) hernia repair in terms of clinical and cost effectiveness. Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at University of Abderdeen, U.K. Methodology: A comprehensive online literature search was undertaken using databases such as MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE and Springerlink. Studies were then short listed according to the selection criteria (RCT with over 100 subject and English language publications from 1995 onwards) and appraised using the SIGN Methodology Checklist. A meta analysis of the data was also performed using RevMan software. Results: Analysis of reported data shows that TEP has less postoperative pain and return to work than Lichtenstein method. Operation time is shown to be longer in the TEP but this difference is shortened with increasing surgeon experience. The meta-analysis of the data on complications shows that there are no significant differences between the two types of procedures. TEP causes more short-term recurrences which are attributed to the learning curve effect. Long term recurrence rates on the other hand show no significant differences. At present TEP is slightly more expensive than Lichtenstein repair. Conclusion: Both TEP and Lichtenstein repair are clinically effective procedures. The choice between them should be made on a case-by-case basis; which depends on the patient's preference and characteristics such as age, work and health status. (author)

  9. Enzyme structure, enzyme function and allozyme diversity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In estimates of population genetic diversity based on allozyme heterozygosity, some enzymes are regularly more variable than others. Evolutionary theory suggests that functionally less important molecules, or parts of molecules, evolve more rapidly than more important ones; the latter enzymes should then theoretically be ...

  10. Relationship between DNA replication and DNA repair in human lymphocytes proliferating in vitro in the presence and in absence of mutagen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szyfter, K.; Wielgosz, M.Sz.; Kujawski, M.; Jaloszynski, P.; Zajaczek, S.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of mutagens on DNA replication and DNA repair were studied in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) obtained from 21 healthy subjects, 2 samples from healthy heterozygote of ''Xeroderma pigmentosum'' (XP) and 2 samples from patient with clinically recognised XP. Inter-individual variations were found in DNA replication and in the level of spontaneous DNA repair measured under standard culture condition. Exposure of human PBL proliferating in vitro to B(a)P was followed by a partial inhibition of replicative DNA synthesis in all subjects and by an induction of DNA repair in healthy subjects. In XP patients DNA repair synthesis remained at the level attributed to spontaneous DNA repair. The response to mutagen varied individually. Results were analysed statistically. It was established that the studied indices of DNA synthesis correlate well with each other. The highest correlation was found between the levels of spontaneous and B(a)P-induced DNA repair. It is concluded that the level of spontaneous DNA repair is predictive for an estimation of cells ability to repair DNA damage. Inter-individual variations in the inhibition of DNA replication and in DNA repair synthesis are also dependent on the type of mutagen as shown by effects of other mutagens. Different effects of mutagen exposure on the inhibition of DNA replicative synthesis and induction of DNA repair can be explained by genetically controlled differences in the activity of enzymes responsible for mutagen processing and lesion removal. (author). 37 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  11. Theoretical approach of complex DNA lesions: from formation to repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bignon, Emmanuelle

    2017-01-01

    This thesis work is focused on the theoretical modelling of DNA damages, from formation to repair. Several projects have been led in this framework, which can be sorted into three different parts. One on hand, we studied complex DNA reactivity. It included a study about 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-guanine (8oxoG) mechanisms of formation, a project concerning the UV-induced pyrimidine 6-4 pyrimidone (6-4PP) endogenous photo-sensitizer features, and another one about DNA photo-sensitization by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (i.e. ketoprofen and ibuprofen). On the other hand, we investigated mechanical properties of damaged DNA. The structural signature of a DNA lesion is of major importance for their repair, unfortunately only few NMR and X-ray structures of such systems are available. In order to gain insights into their dynamical structure, we investigated a series of complex damages: clustered abasic sites, interstrand cross-links, and the 6-4PP photo-lesion. Likewise, we studied the interaction modes DNA with several polyamines, which are well known to interact with the double helix, but also with the perspective to model DNA-protein cross-linking. The third part concerned the study of DNA interactions with repair enzymes. In line with the structural study about clustered abasic sites, we investigated the dynamics of the same system, but this time interacting with the APE1 endonuclease. We also studied interactions between the Fpg glycosylase with an oligonucleotides containing tandem 8-oxoG on one hand and 8-oxoG - abasic site as multiply damaged sites. Thus, we shed new lights on damaged DNA reactivity, structure and repair, which provides perspectives for biomedicine and life's mechanisms understanding as we begin to describe nucleosomal DNA. (author)

  12. Naturally occurring flavonoids against human norovirus surrogates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaowei; D'Souza, Doris H

    2013-06-01

    Naturally occurring plant-derived flavonoids are reported to have antibacterial, antiviral, and pharmacological activities. The objectives of this study were to determine the antiviral effects of four flavonoids (myricetin, L-epicatechin, tangeretin, and naringenin) on the infectivity of food borne norovirus surrogates after 2 h at 37 °C. The lab-culturable surrogates, feline calicivirus (FCV-F9) at titers of ~7 log₁₀ PFU/ml (high titer) or ~5 log₁₀ PFU/ml (low titer) and murine norovirus (MNV-1) at ~5 log₁₀ PFU/ml, were mixed with equal volumes of myricetin, L-epicatechin, tangeretin, or naringenin at concentrations of 0.5 or 1 mM, and incubated for 2 h at 37 °C. Treatments of viruses were neutralized in cell culture medium containing 10 % heat-inactivated fetal bovine serum, serially diluted, and plaque assayed. Each treatment was replicated thrice and assayed in duplicate. FCV-F9 (low titer) was not found to be reduced by tangeretin or naringenin, but was reduced to undetectable levels by myricetin at both concentrations. Low titer FCV-F9 was also decreased by 1.40 log₁₀ PFU/ml with L-epicatechin at 0.5 mM. FCV-F9 at high titers was decreased by 3.17 and 0.72 log₁₀ PFU/ml with myricetin and L-epicatechin at 0.5 mM, and 1.73 log10 PFU/ml with myricetin at 0.25 mM, respectively. However, MNV-1 showed no significant inactivation by the four tested treatments. The antiviral effects of the tested flavonoids are dependent on the virus type, titer, and dose. Further research will focus on understanding the antiviral mechanism of myricetin and L-epicatechin.

  13. Metabolic modulation of mammalian DNA excision repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrader, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    First, ultraviolet light (UVL)- and dimethylsulfate (DMS)-induced excision repair was examined in quiescent and lectin-stimulated bovine lymphocytes. Upon mitogenic stimulation, UVL-induced repair increased by a factor of 2 to 3, and reached this maximum 2 days before the onset of DNA replication. However, DMS-induced repair increased sevenfold in parallel with DNA replication. Repair patch sizes were smaller for DMS-induced damage reflecting patches of 7 nucleotides in quiescent lymphocytes compared to 20 nucleotides induced by UVL. The patch size increased during lymphocyte stimulation until one day prior to the peak of DNA replication when patch sizes of 45 and 35 nucleotides were produced in response to UVL- and DMS-induced damage, respectively. At the peak of DNA replication, the patch sizes were equal for both damaging agents at 34 nucleotides. In the second study, a small amount of repair replication was observed in undamaged quiescent and concanavalin A-stimulated bovine lymphocytes as well as in human T98G glioblastoma cells. Repair incorporation doubled in the presence of hydroxyurea. Thirdly, the enhanced repair replication induced by the poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor, 3-aminobenzamide, (3-AB), could not be correlated either with an increased rate of repair in the presence of 3-AB or with the use of hydroxyurea in the repair protocol. Finally, treatment of unstimulated lymphocytes with hyperthermia was accompanied by decreased repair replication while the repair patches remained constant at 20 nucleotides.

  14. Complex networks under dynamic repair model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaoqi, Fu; Ying, Wang; Kun, Zhao; Yangjun, Gao

    2018-01-01

    Invulnerability is not the only factor of importance when considering complex networks' security. It is also critical to have an effective and reasonable repair strategy. Existing research on network repair is confined to the static model. The dynamic model makes better use of the redundant capacity of repaired nodes and repairs the damaged network more efficiently than the static model; however, the dynamic repair model is complex and polytropic. In this paper, we construct a dynamic repair model and systematically describe the energy-transfer relationships between nodes in the repair process of the failure network. Nodes are divided into three types, corresponding to three structures. We find that the strong coupling structure is responsible for secondary failure of the repaired nodes and propose an algorithm that can select the most suitable targets (nodes or links) to repair the failure network with minimal cost. Two types of repair strategies are identified, with different effects under the two energy-transfer rules. The research results enable a more flexible approach to network repair.

  15. Current Biomechanical Concepts for Rotator Cuff Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    For the past few decades, the repair of rotator cuff tears has evolved significantly with advances in arthroscopy techniques, suture anchors and instrumentation. From the biomechanical perspective, the focus in arthroscopic repair has been on increasing fixation strength and restoration of the footprint contact characteristics to provide early rehabilitation and improve healing. To accomplish these objectives, various repair strategies and construct configurations have been developed for rotator cuff repair with the understanding that many factors contribute to the structural integrity of the repaired construct. These include repaired rotator cuff tendon-footprint motion, increased tendon-footprint contact area and pressure, and tissue quality of tendon and bone. In addition, the healing response may be compromised by intrinsic factors such as decreased vascularity, hypoxia, and fibrocartilaginous changes or aforementioned extrinsic compression factors. Furthermore, it is well documented that torn rotator cuff muscles have a tendency to atrophy and become subject to fatty infiltration which may affect the longevity of the repair. Despite all the aforementioned factors, initial fixation strength is an essential consideration in optimizing rotator cuff repair. Therefore, numerous biomechanical studies have focused on elucidating the strongest devices, knots, and repair configurations to improve contact characteristics for rotator cuff repair. In this review, the biomechanical concepts behind current rotator cuff repair techniques will be reviewed and discussed. PMID:23730471

  16. Alterations of the Deltoid Muscle After Open Versus Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Nam Su; Cha, Sang Won; Rhee, Yong Girl

    2015-12-01

    Open repair can be more useful than arthroscopic repair for immobile and severely retracted, large to massive rotator cuff tears. However, it is not known whether the deltoid muscle is altered after open repair or to what extent the deltoid origin remains detached after surgery. To compare postoperative alterations of the deltoid muscle in open versus arthroscopic repair for severely retracted, large to massive rotator cuff tears. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Enrolled in this study were 135 patients who underwent surgical repair for severely retracted, large to massive rotator cuff tears and who had routine follow-up MRIs at least 6 months after surgery. Open repairs were performed in 56 cases and arthroscopic repairs in 79 cases. The detachment and thickness of the deltoid muscle at its proximal origin were recorded in 5 zones on MRI. The alterations of the deltoid muscle and postoperative integrity of the repaired rotator cuff were evaluated. Partial detachment of the deltoid occurred in 1 patient (1.8%) in the open group and in 2 patients (2.5%) in the arthroscopic group (P = .80). All the partial detachments occurred in zones 2 and 3. Attenuation of the proximal origin of the deltoid was found in 3 patients (5.4%) in the open group and in 4 patients (5.1%) in the arthroscopic group (P = .87). Atrophy of the deltoid muscle was shown in 3 patients (5.4%) in the open group and 4 patients (5.1%) in the arthroscopic group (P = .61). The retear rate of the repaired cuff was 30.4% (17/56) in the open group and 38.0% (30/79) in the arthroscopic group (P = .74). Between open and arthroscopic repair for severely retracted, large to massive rotator cuff tears, there was no significant difference in detachment of the deltoid origin and alterations of the deltoid muscle after repair. Postoperative alterations of the deltoid occurred in arthroscopic surgery as well as in open surgery. For immobile massive rotator cuff tear, open repair is an acceptable technique

  17. Immobilized enzymes: understanding enzyme - surface interactions at the molecular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoarau, Marie; Badieyan, Somayesadat; Marsh, E Neil G

    2017-11-22

    Enzymes immobilized on solid supports have important and industrial and medical applications. However, their uses are limited by the significant reductions in activity and stability that often accompany the immobilization process. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of the molecular level interactions between proteins and supporting surfaces that contribute to changes in stability and activity. This understanding has been facilitated by the application of various surface-sensitive spectroscopic techniques that allow the structure and orientation of enzymes at the solid/liquid interface to be probed, often with monolayer sensitivity. An appreciation of the molecular interactions between enzyme and surface support has allowed the surface chemistry and method of enzyme attachement to be fine-tuned such that activity and stability can be greatly enhanced. These advances suggest that a much wider variety of enzymes may eventually be amenable to immobilization as green catalysts.

  18. Stability of Enzymes in Granular Enzyme Products for Laundry Detergents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biran, Suzan; Bach, Poul; Simonsen, Ole

    Enzymes have long been of interest to the detergent industry due to their ability to improve the cleaning efficiency of synthetic detergents, contribute to shortening washing times, and reduce energy and water consumption, provision of environmentally friendlier wash water effluents and fabric care....... However, incorporating enzymes in detergent formulations gives rise to numerous practical problems due to their incompatibility with and stability against various detergent components. In powdered detergent formulations, these issues can be partly overcome by physically isolating the enzymes in separate...... particles. However, enzymes may loose a significant part of their activity over a time period of several weeks. Possible causes of inactivation of enzymes in a granule may be related to the release of hydrogen peroxide from the bleaching chemicals in a moisture-containing atmosphere, humidity, autolysis...

  19. Enzymes in Human Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallas, David C; German, J Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Milk proteins are a complex and diverse source of biological activities. Beyond their function, intact milk proteins also act as carriers of encrypted functional sequences that, when released as peptides, exert biological functions, including antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activity, which could contribute to the infant's competitive success. Research has now revealed that the release of these functional peptides begins within the mammary gland itself. A complex array of proteases produced in mother's milk has been shown to be active in the milk, releasing these peptides. Moreover, our recent research demonstrates that these milk proteases continue to digest milk proteins within the infant's stomach, possibly even to a larger extent than the infant's own proteases. As the neonate has relatively low digestive capacity, the activity of milk proteases in the infant may provide important assistance to digesting milk proteins. The coordinated release of these encrypted sequences is accomplished by selective proteolytic action provided by an array of native milk proteases and infant-produced enzymes. The task for scientists is now to discover the selective advantages of this protein-protease-based peptide release system. © 2017 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Post-irradiation repairing processes of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and catalase from Hansenula Polymorpha yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postolache, Carmen; Postolache, Cristian; Dinu, Diana; Dinischiotu, Anca; Sahini, Victor Emanuel

    2002-01-01

    The post-irradiation repairing mechanisms of two Hansenula Polymorpha yeast enzymes, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and catalase, were studied. The kinetic parameters of the selected enzymes were investigated over one month since the moment of γ-irradiation with different doses in the presence of oxygen. Dose dependent decrease of initial reaction rates was noticed for both enzymes. Small variation of initial reaction rate was recorded for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase over one month, with a decreasing tendency. No significant electrophoretic changes of molecular forms of this enzyme were observed after irradiation. Continuous strong decrease of catalase activity was evident for the first 20 days after irradiation. Partial recovery process of the catalytic activity was revealed by this study. (authors)