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Sample records for repair dna double-strand

  1. Targeting abnormal DNA double strand break repair in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rassool, Feyruz V.; Tomkinson, Alan E.

    2010-01-01

    A major challenge in cancer treatment is the development of therapies that target cancer cells with little or no toxicity to normal tissues and cells. Alterations in DNA double strand break (DSB) repair in cancer cells include both elevated and reduced levels of key repair proteins and changes in the relative contributions of the various DSB repair pathways. These differences can result in increased sensitivity to DSB-inducing agents and increased genomic instability. The development of agent...

  2. Current topics in DNA double-strand break repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Junya; Takata, Minoru; Iwabuchi, Kuniyoshi; Miyagawa, Kiyoshi; Sonoda, Eiichiro; Suzuki, Keiji; Tauchi, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    DNA double strand break (DSB) is one of the most critical types of damage which is induced by ionizing radiation. In this review, we summarize current progress in investigations on the function of DSB repair-related proteins. We focused on recent findings in the analysis of the function of proteins such as 53BP1, histone H2AX, Mus81-Eme1, Fanc complex, and UBC13, which are found to be related to homologous recombination repair or to non-homologous end joining. In addition to the function of these proteins in DSB repair, the biological function of nuclear foci formation following DSB induction is discussed. (author)

  3. Double-Strand DNA Break Repair in Mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickman, Michael S

    2014-10-01

    Discontinuity of both strands of the chromosome is a lethal event in all living organisms because it compromises chromosome replication. As such, a diversity of DNA repair systems has evolved to repair double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs). In part, this diversity of DSB repair systems has evolved to repair breaks that arise in diverse physiologic circumstances or sequence contexts, including cellular states of nonreplication or breaks that arise between repeats. Mycobacteria elaborate a set of three genetically distinct DNA repair pathways: homologous recombination, nonhomologous end joining, and single-strand annealing. As such, mycobacterial DSB repair diverges substantially from the standard model of prokaryotic DSB repair and represents an attractive new model system. In addition, the presence in mycobacteria of a DSB repair system that can repair DSBs in nonreplicating cells (nonhomologous end joining) or when DSBs arise between repeats (single-strand annealing) has clear potential relevance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis pathogenesis, although the exact role of these systems in M. tuberculosis pathogenesis is still being elucidated. In this article we will review the genetics of mycobacterial DSB repair systems, focusing on recent insights.

  4. Colocalization of multiple DNA double-strand breaks at a single Rad52 repair centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisby, M.; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro; Rothstein, R.

    2003-01-01

    DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR) is an essential process for preserving genomic integrity in all organisms. To investigate this process at the cellular level, we engineered a system of fluorescently marked DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to visualize in ...

  5. DNA double strand break repair in a radioresistant cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koval, T.M.; Kazmar, E.R.

    1987-01-01

    TN-368 lepidopteran insect cells are on the order of 100 times more resistant to the lethal effects of ionizing radiation than cultured mammalian cells. DNA double strand breaks (DSB) are believed by many to be the critical molecular lesion leading to cell death. The authors therefore measured the rejoining of DSB in TN-368 and V79 Chinese hamster cells. Cells were irradiated on ice with /sup 137/Cs γ rays at a dose rate of 2.5 Gy/min, incubated for various periods of time, and assayed for DNA DSB using the method of neutral elution. The kinetics of DSB rejoining following a dose of 90.2 Gy are similar for both cell lines. Approximately 80% of the DSB are rejoined in both lines by 1 hr postirradiation. However, no further rejoining occurs in the TN-368 cells through at least 6 hr postirradiation, whereas 90% of the DSB are rejoined in the V79 cells by 2 hr postirradiation. Other studies (from 22.6 to 226 Gy) demonstrate that the amount of rejoining of DSB varies inversely with dose for the V79 cells but remains constant for the TN-368 cells. These findings do not support the hypothesis that unrejoined DNA DSB represent the major lesion resulting in cell death

  6. Visualization of DNA double-strand break repair: From molecules to cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krawczyk, Przemek M.; Stap, Jan; Aten, Jacob A.

    2008-01-01

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) signaling and repair processes are positioned at the crossroad of nuclear pathways that regulate DNA replication, cell division, senescence and apoptosis. Importantly, errors in DSB repair may lead to lethal or potentially tumorigenic chromosome rearrangements.

  7. Normal formation and repair of γ-radiation-induced single and double strand DNA breaks in Down syndrome fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, M.E.; Woods, W.G.

    1982-01-01

    Fibroblasts from patients with Down syndrome (Trisomy 21) were examined for repair capability of γ-radiation-induced single strand and double strand DNA breaks. Formation and repair of DNA breaks were determined by DNA alkaline and non-denaturing elution techniques. Down syndrome fibroblasts were found to repair single strand and double strand breaks as well as fibroblasts from normal controls. (orig.)

  8. Repair and gamma radiation-induced single- and double-strand breaks in DNA of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, S.I.

    1981-01-01

    Studies in the kinetics of repair of γ-radiation-induced single- and double-strand breaks in DNA of E. coli cells showed that double-strand DNA breaks are rejoined by the following two ways. The first way is conditioned by repair of single-strand breaks and represents the repair of ''oblique'' double-strand breaks in DNA, whereas the second way is conditioned by functioning of the recombination mechanisms and, to all appearance, represents the repair of ''direct'' double-strand breaks in DNA

  9. Mouse RAD54 affects DNA double-strand break repair and sister chromatid exchange

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.B. Beverloo (Berna); R.D. Johnson (Roger); M. Jasin (Maria); R. Kanaar (Roland); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); M.L.G. Dronkert (Mies)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractCells can achieve error-free repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homologous recombination through gene conversion with or without crossover. In contrast, an alternative homology-dependent DSB repair pathway, single-strand annealing (SSA), results in deletions. In this study, we

  10. Regulation of DNA double-strand break repair by ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwertman, Petra; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly cytotoxic DNA lesions. The swift recognition and faithful repair of such damage is crucial for the maintenance of genomic stability, as well as for cell and organismal fitness. Signalling by ubiquitin, SUMO and other ubiquitin-like modifiers (UBLs...

  11. Deficiency of Double-Strand DNA Break Repair Does Not Impair Mycobacterium tuberculosis Virulence in Multiple Animal Models of Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Heaton, Brook E.; Barkan, Daniel; Bongiorno, Paola; Karakousis, Petros C.; Glickman, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis persistence within its human host requires mechanisms to resist the effector molecules of host immunity, which exert their bactericidal effects through damaging pathogen proteins, membranes, and DNA. Substantial evidence indicates that bacterial pathogens, including M. tuberculosis, require DNA repair systems to repair the DNA damage inflicted by the host during infection, but the role of double-strand DNA break (DSB) repair systems is unclear. Double-strand DNA bre...

  12. Use of orthogonal field alternational gel electrophoresis (OFAGE) for studying DNA double strand breakage and repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contopoulou, C.R.; Cook, V.; Mortimer, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    The study of DNA double strand breakage and repair has normally been carried by using neutral sucrose gradient or neutral elution techniques. The authors have applied OFAGE procedures to study x-ray induced double strand breaks and repair. Breakage of chromosomes is seen by a decrease in intensity of individual chromosome bands; as expected, this decrease becomes more pronounced as chromosome size increases. The fragments of broken chromosomes appears as a broad smear in the size range 100 kb to 1000 kb. Following repair, these fragments partially disappear and the chromosomal bands increase in intensity. In four repair deficient mutants, rad51, rad52, rad54, rad55, no increase in chromosomal band intensity was seen. These results have been confirmed by blotting for a specific chromosome

  13. Balancing Pathways in DNA Double Strand Break Repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Brandsma (Inger)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractAll information a cell needs to live and survive is stored in the genomic DNA. Maintenance of an intact and uncompromised genome is of vital importance for cell survival. Damaged DNA can block transcription and replication, processes essential for cell viability. Persistent DNA

  14. Defective double-strand DNA break repair and chromosomal translocations by MYC overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Asa; Deb-Basu, Debabrita; Cherry, Athena; Turner, Stephanie; Ford, James; Felsher, Dean W

    2003-08-19

    DNA repair mechanisms are essential for the maintenance of genomic integrity. Disruption of gene products responsible for DNA repair can result in chromosomal damage. Improperly repaired chromosomal damage can result in the loss of chromosomes or the generation of chromosomal deletions or translocations, which can lead to tumorigenesis. The MYC protooncogene is a transcription factor whose overexpression is frequently associated with human neoplasia. MYC has not been previously implicated in a role in DNA repair. Here we report that the overexpression of MYC disrupts the repair of double-strand DNA breaks, resulting in a several-magnitude increase in chromosomal breaks and translocations. We found that MYC inhibited the repair of gamma irradiation DNA breaks in normal human cells and blocked the repair of a single double-strand break engineered to occur in an immortal cell line. By spectral karyotypic analysis, we found that MYC even within one cell division cycle resulted in a several-magnitude increase in the frequency of chromosomal breaks and translocations in normal human cells. Hence, MYC overexpression may be a previously undescribed example of a dominant mutator that may fuel tumorigenesis by inducing chromosomal damage.

  15. Postreplicational formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks in UV-irradiated Escherichia coli uvrB cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Tzuchien V.; Smith, K.C.

    1986-01-01

    The number of DNA double-strand breaks formed in UV-irradiated uvrB recF recB cells correlates with the number of unrepaired DNA daughter-strand gaps, and is dependent on DNA synthesis after UV-irradiation. These results are consistent with the model that the DNA double-strand breaks that are produced in UV-irradiated excision-deficient cells occur as the result of breaks in the parental DNA opposite unrepaired DNA daughter-strand gaps. By employing a temperature-sensitive recA200 mutation, we have devised an improved assay for studying the formation and repair of these DNA double-strand breaks. Possible mechanisms for the postreplication repair of DNA double-strand breaks are discussed. (Auth.)

  16. A role for small RNAs in DNA double-strand break repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, W.; Ba, Z.; Wu, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotes have evolved complex mechanisms to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) through coordinated actions of protein sensors, transducers, and effectors. Here we show that ∼21-nucleotide small RNAs are produced from the sequences in the vicinity of DSB sites in Arabidopsis and in human cells....... We refer to these as diRNAs for DSB-induced small RNAs. In Arabidopsis, the biogenesis of diRNAs requires the PI3 kinase ATR, RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV), and Dicer-like proteins. Mutations in these proteins as well as in Pol V cause significant reduction in DSB repair efficiency. In Arabidopsis, di...

  17. Inhibition of APOBEC3G activity impedes double-stranded DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Ponnandy; Shandilya, Shivender M D; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Nagler, Adi; Schiffer, Celia A; Kotler, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    The cellular cytidine deaminase APOBEC3G (A3G) was first described as an anti-HIV-1 restriction factor, acting by directly deaminating reverse transcripts of the viral genome. HIV-1 Vif neutralizes the activity of A3G, primarily by mediating degradation of A3G to establish effective infection in host target cells. Lymphoma cells, which express high amounts of A3G, can restrict Vif-deficient HIV-1. Interestingly, these cells are more stable in the face of treatments that result in double-stranded DNA damage, such as ionizing radiation and chemotherapies. Previously, we showed that the Vif-derived peptide (Vif25-39) efficiently inhibits A3G deamination, and increases the sensitivity of lymphoma cells to ionizing radiation. In the current study, we show that additional peptides derived from Vif, A3G, and APOBEC3F, which contain the LYYF motif, inhibit deamination activity. Each residue in the Vif25-39 sequence moderately contributes to the inhibitory effect, whereas replacing a single residue in the LYYF motif completely abrogates inhibition of deamination. Treatment of A3G-expressing lymphoma cells exposed to ionizing radiation with the new inhibitory peptides reduces double-strand break repair after irradiation. Incubation of cultured irradiated lymphoma cells with peptides that inhibit double-strand break repair halts their propagation. These results suggest that A3G may be a potential therapeutic target that is amenable to peptide and peptidomimetic inhibition. © 2015 FEBS.

  18. Genetic polymorphisms of DNA double-strand break repair pathway genes and glioma susceptibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Peng; Zou, Peng; Zhao, Lin; Yan, Wei; Kang, Chunsheng; Jiang, Tao; You, Yongping

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variations in DNA double-strand break repair genes can influence the ability of a cell to repair damaged DNA and alter an individual’s susceptibility to cancer. We studied whether polymorphisms in DNA double-strand break repair genes are associated with an increased risk of glioma development. We genotyped 10 potentially functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 7 DNA double-strand break repair pathway genes (XRCC3, BRCA2, RAG1, XRCC5, LIG4, XRCC4 and ATM) in a case–control study including 384 glioma patients and 384 cancer-free controls in a Chinese Han population. Genotypes were determined using the OpenArray platform. In the single-locus analysis there was a significant association between gliomas and the LIG4 rs1805388 (Ex2 +54C>T, Thr9Ile) TT genotype (adjusted OR, 3.27; 95% CI, 1.87-5.71), as well as the TC genotype (adjusted OR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.20-2.18). We also found that the homozygous variant genotype (GG) of XRCC4 rs1805377 (IVS7-1A>G, splice-site) was associated with a significantly increased risk of gliomas (OR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.12-2.80). Interestingly, we detected a significant additive and multiplicative interaction effect between the LIG4 rs1805388 and XRCC4 rs1805377 polymorphisms with an increasing risk of gliomas. When we stratified our analysis by smoking status, LIG4 rs1805388 was associated with an increased glioma risk among smokers. These results indicate for the first time that LIG4 rs1805388 and XRCC4 rs1805377, alone or in combination, are associated with a risk of gliomas

  19. Evidence for multiple repair pathways of double-strand DNA breaks in Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giaccia, A.J.; Weistein, R.; Stamato, T.D.; Roosa, R.

    1984-01-01

    XR-1 is a mutant of the Chinese hamster cell (CHO-K1) which is abnormally sensitive to killing by gamma rays in G/sub 1/ (D37 = 27 rads vs. 318 for parent) and early S phases of the cell cycle but has near normal resistance in late S and early G/sub 2/ (Somatic Cell Genetics, 9:165-173, 1983). Complementation studies between XR-1 and its parent indicate that this sensitivity to gamma rays is a recessive phenotype. Both the XR-1 and its parent cell are able to repair single strand DNA breaks. However, in comparison to its parental cell, the XR-1 cell is markedly deficient in the repair of double strand DNA breaks introduced by gamma irradiation during the sensitive G/sub 1/-early S period, while in the late S-G/sub 2/ resistant period the repair is similar in both cells. This correlation suggests that an unrepaired double strand DNA break is the lethal lesion and that at least two pathways for the repair of these lesions exist in mammalian cells

  20. Inhibition of DNA-double strand break repair by antimony compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Sentaro; Sato, Hiroshi; Kubota, Yoshihisa; Utsumi, Hiroshi; Bedford, Joel S.; Okayasu, Ryuichi

    2002-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), induced by γ-irradiation in Chinese hamster ovary cells, were used to examine whether antimony compounds affect the repair of DNA damage. The cells were first incubated with antimony trichloride or antimony potassium tartrate (both Sb(III)) for 2 h, and then irradiated with γ-rays at a dose of 40 Gy. The DNA DSB was quantified with pulsed field gel electrophoresis immediately after irradiation (non-repair group) as well as at 30 min post-irradiation (repair group). The degree of repair inhibition was determined by the differences in the amount of DNA DSB between non-repair and repair groups. Both antimony compounds inhibited repair of DNA DSB in a dose dependent manner. In trichloride, 0.2 mM antimony significantly inhibited the rejoining of DSB, while 0.4 mM was necessary in potassium antimony tartrate. The mean lethal doses, D 0 , for the treatment with antimony trichloride and antimony potassium tartrate, were approximately 0.21 and 0.12 mM, respectively. This indicates that the repair inhibition by antimony trichloride occurred in the dose range near D 0 , but the antimony potassium tartrate inhibited the repair at doses where most cells lost their proliferating ability. This is the first report to indicate that antimony compounds may inhibit the repair of radiation-induced DNA DSB

  1. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA polymerase IV: possible involvement in double strand break DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leem, S H; Ropp, P A; Sugino, A

    1994-08-11

    We identified and purified a new DNA polymerase (DNA polymerase IV), which is similar to mammalian DNA polymerase beta, from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and suggested that it is encoded by YCR14C (POLX) on chromosome III. Here, we provided a direct evidence that the purified DNA polymerase IV is indeed encoded by POLX. Strains harboring a pol4 deletion mutation exhibit neither mitotic growth defect nor a meiosis defect, suggesting that DNA polymerase IV participates in nonessential functions in DNA metabolism. The deletion strains did not exhibit UV-sensitivity. However, they did show weak sensitivity to MMS-treatment and exhibited a hyper-recombination phenotype when intragenic recombination was measured during meiosis. Furthermore, MAT alpha pol4 delta segregants had a higher frequency of illegitimate mating with a MAT alpha tester strain than that of wild-type cells. These results suggest that DNA polymerase IV participates in a double-strand break repair pathway. A 3.2kb of the POL4 transcript was weakly expressed in mitotically growing cells. During meiosis, a 2.2 kb POL4 transcript was greatly induced, while the 3.2 kb transcript stayed at constant levels. This induction was delayed in a swi4 delta strain during meiosis, while no effect was observed in a swi6 delta strain.

  2. Quantitation of the repair of gamma-radiation-induced double-strand DNA breaks in human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, W.G.

    1981-01-01

    The quantitation and repair of double-strand DNA breaks in human fibroblasts has been determined using a method involving the nondenaturing elution of DNA from a filter. DNA from cells from two human fibroblast lines exposed to γ-radiation from 0 to 10000 rad showed increasing retention on a filter with decreasing radiation dose, and the data suggest a linear relationship between double-strand breaks induced and radiation dose. The ability of normal human fibroblasts to repair double-strand breaks with various doses of radiation was demonstrated, with a tsub(1/2) of 10 min for repair of 5000 rad exposure and 39 min for repair of 10000 rad damage. The kinetics of the DNA rejoining were not linear and suggest that, as in the repair of single-strand breaks, both an initial fast and a later slow mechanism may be involved. (Auth.)

  3. Analysis of DNA double-strand break repair pathways in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugmans, Linda; Kanaar, Roland; Essers, Jeroen

    2007-01-01

    During the last years significant new insights have been gained into the mechanism and biological relevance of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair in relation to genome stability. DSBs are a highly toxic DNA lesion, because they can lead to chromosome fragmentation, loss and translocations, eventually resulting in cancer. DSBs can be induced by cellular processes such as V(D)J recombination or DNA replication. They can also be introduced by exogenous agents DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiation or mitomycin C. During evolution several pathways have evolved for the repair of these DSBs. The most important DSB repair mechanisms in mammalian cells are nonhomologous end-joining and homologous recombination. By using an undamaged repair template, homologous recombination ensures accurate DSB repair, whereas the untemplated nonhomologous end-joining pathway does not. Although both pathways are active in mammals, the relative contribution of the two repair pathways to genome stability differs in the different cell types. Given the potential differences in repair fidelity, it is of interest to determine the relative contribution of homologous recombination and nonhomologous end-joining to DSB repair. In this review, we focus on the biological relevance of DSB repair in mammalian cells and the potential overlap between nonhomologous end-joining and homologous recombination in different tissues

  4. DNA hybrids suggesting a recombination process repairing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks in Ehrlich Ascites tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthel, H.R.

    1984-01-01

    The results presented suggest the possibility of repair of DNA double-strand breaks by recombination, at least in the S and G 2 -phases of the cell cycle, in mammalian cells. Further experiments with synchronized cell cultures will have to show whether this process may also occur in the G 1 -phase of the cell cycle. (orig./AJ) [de

  5. The DNA-dependent protein kinase: a multifunctional protein kinase with roles in DNA double strand break repair and mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jette, Nicholas; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase composed of a large catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and the Ku70/80 heterodimer. Over the past two decades, significant progress has been made in elucidating the role of DNA-PK in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), the major pathway for repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in human cells and recently, additional roles for DNA-PK have been reported. In this review, we will describe the biochemistry, structure and function of DNA-PK, its roles in DNA double strand break repair and its newly described roles in mitosis and other cellular processes. PMID:25550082

  6. APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases in double-strand DNA break repair and cancer promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowarski, Roni; Kotler, Moshe

    2013-06-15

    High frequency of cytidine to thymidine conversions was identified in the genome of several types of cancer cells. In breast cancer cells, these mutations are clustered in long DNA regions associated with single-strand DNA (ssDNA), double-strand DNA breaks (DSB), and genomic rearrangements. The observed mutational pattern resembles the deamination signature of cytidine to uridine carried out by members of the APOBEC3 family of cellular deaminases. Consistently, APOBEC3B (A3B) was recently identified as the mutational source in breast cancer cells. A3G is another member of the cytidine deaminases family predominantly expressed in lymphoma cells, where it is involved in mutational DSB repair following ionizing radiation treatments. This activity provides us with a new paradigm for cancer cell survival and tumor promotion and a mechanistic link between ssDNA, DSBs, and clustered mutations. Cancer Res; 73(12); 3494-8. ©2013 AACR. ©2013 AACR.

  7. Two pathways of DNA double-strand break repair in G1 cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glazunov, A.V.

    1988-01-01

    The G1 cells of the diploid yeast Saccharomyces cerevislae are known to be capable of a slow repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) during holding the cells in a non-nutrient medium. In the present paper, it has been shown that S. cerevislae cells γ-irradiated in the G1 phase of cell cycle are capable of fast repair of DNA DSB; this process is completed within 30-40 min of holding the cells in water at 28 deg C. For this reason, the kinetics of DNA DSB repair during holding the cells in a non-nutrient medium are biphasic, i.e., the first, ''fast'' phase is completed within 30-40 min; wheras the second, ''slow'' one, within 48 h. Mutations rad51, rad52, rad54 and rad55 inhibit the fast repair of DNA DSB, whereas mutations rad50, rad53 and rad57 do not practically influence this process. It has been shown that the observed fast and slow repair of DNA DSB in the G1 diploid cells of S, cerevislae are separate pathways of DNA DSB repair in yeast

  8. γ-ray dose rate effect in DNA double-strand break repair deficient murine cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Liya; Li Peiwen

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the dose rate effect and potentially lethal damage repair in DNA double-strand break repair deficient murine cells (SCID) irradiated by γ-ray. Methods: The wild type (CB.17+/+) and SCID cells were exposed to γ-ray at high and low dose rates. The high dose rate exposure was fractionated into two equal doses at 24 h intervals. The survival rates of irradiated cells were calculated by clone-forming analysis. Results: When γ-ray was given to wild type (CB.17+/+) cells in two fractions at 24 h intervals, the survival rate was significantly higher than that when the same total dose was given singly. In contrast, there was no difference in the survival rates between the single and fractionated exposure in SCID cells. SCID cells were more sensitive than CB.17+/+ cells to both low and high dose rates γ-ray exposure for cell killing. The survival rate by low dose rate exposure was significantly higher than that by high dose rate exposure, not only in CB.17+/+ cells but also in SCID cells. Conclusions: SCID cells are deficient in repairing γ-ray induced double-strand breaks. There is dose rate effect in both SCID and CB.17+/+ cells

  9. Mycobacterial nonhomologous end joining mediates mutagenic repair of chromosomal double-strand DNA breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanou, Nicolas C; Gao, Feng; Bongiorno, Paola; Ehrt, Sabine; Schnappinger, Dirk; Shuman, Stewart; Glickman, Michael S

    2007-07-01

    Bacterial nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) is a recently described DNA repair pathway best characterized in mycobacteria. Bacterial NHEJ proteins LigD and Ku have been analyzed biochemically, and their roles in linear plasmid repair in vivo have been verified genetically; yet the contributions of NHEJ to repair of chromosomal DNA damage are unknown. Here we use an extensive set of NHEJ- and homologous recombination (HR)-deficient Mycobacterium smegmatis strains to probe the importance of HR and NHEJ in repairing diverse types of chromosomal DNA damage. An M. smegmatis Delta recA Delta ku double mutant has no apparent growth defect in vitro. Loss of the NHEJ components Ku and LigD had no effect on sensitivity to UV radiation, methyl methanesulfonate, or quinolone antibiotics. NHEJ deficiency had no effect on sensitivity to ionizing radiation in logarithmic- or early-stationary-phase cells but was required for ionizing radiation resistance in late stationary phase in 7H9 but not LB medium. In addition, NHEJ components were required for repair of I-SceI mediated chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs), and in the absence of HR, the NHEJ pathway rapidly mutates the chromosomal break site. The molecular outcomes of NHEJ-mediated chromosomal DSB repair involve predominantly single-nucleotide insertions at the break site, similar to previous findings using plasmid substrates. These findings demonstrate that prokaryotic NHEJ is specifically required for DSB repair in late stationary phase and can mediate mutagenic repair of homing endonuclease-generated chromosomal DSBs.

  10. The Heterochromatic Barrier to DNA Double Strand Break Repair: How to Get the Entry Visa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron A. Goodarzi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Over recent decades, a deep understanding of pathways that repair DNA double strand breaks (DSB has been gained from biochemical, structural, biophysical and cellular studies. DNA non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ and homologous recombination (HR represent the two major DSB repair pathways, and both processes are now well understood. Recent work has demonstrated that the chromatin environment at a DSB significantly impacts upon DSB repair and that, moreover, dramatic modifications arise in the chromatin surrounding a DSB. Chromatin is broadly divided into open, transcriptionally active, euchromatin (EC and highly compacted, transcriptionally inert, heterochromatin (HC, although these represent extremes of a spectrum. The HC superstructure restricts both DSB repair and damage response signaling. Moreover, DSBs within HC (HC-DSBs are rapidly relocalized to the EC-HC interface. The damage response protein kinase, ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM, is required for HC-DSB repair but is dispensable for the relocalization of HC-DSBs. It has been proposed that ATM signaling enhances HC relaxation in the DSB vicinity and that this is a prerequisite for HC-DSB repair. Hence, ATM is essential for repair of HC-DSBs. Here, we discuss how HC impacts upon the response to DSBs and how ATM overcomes the barrier that HC poses to repair.

  11. Repair pathways for heavy ion-induced complex DNA double strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yajima, Hirohiko; Nakajima, Nakako; Hirakawa, Hirokazu; Murakami, Takeshi; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Fujimori, Akira

    2012-01-01

    DNA double strand break (DSB) induced by ionizing radiation (IR) is a deleterious damage leading to cell death and genome instability if not properly repaired. It is well known that DSB is repaired by two major pathways, non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). It is also known that NHEJ is dominant throughout the cell cycle after X- or gamma-ray irradiation in mammalian cells, Meanwhile, it is thought that heavy-ion radiation (e.g., carbon-ions, iron-ions) gives rise to clustered DNA damages consisting of not only strand breaks but also aberrant bases in the vicinity of DSBs (complex DSBs). Our previous work suggested that the efficiency of NHEJ is diminished for repair of complex DSBs induced by heavy-ion radiation. We thought that this difficulty in NHEJ process associated with heavy ion induced complex DNA damage might be extended to HR process in cells exposed to heavy ions. In order to find out if this notion is true or not, exposed human cells to X-rays and heavy-ions, and studied HR associated processes at the molecular level. Our result indicates that complex DSBs induced by heavy ions effectively evoke DNA end resection activity during the HR process. Together with our results, a relevant recent progress in the field of DNA DSB repair will be discussed. (author)

  12. CD133 positive U87 glioma stem cell radiosensitivity and DNA double-strand break repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ping; Zong Tianzhou; Ji Xiaoqin; Lu Xueguan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To explore the radiosensitivity and DNA double-strand break repair of CD133 + U87 glioma stem cell. Methods: CD133 + and CD133 - cells were isolated from glioma U87 cell lines by flow cytometry sorter system. After irradiated vertically by 4 Gy X-rays, the radiosensitivity of cells was determined by clonogenic assay. The radiation-induced DNA double-strand break repair of CD133 + and CD133 - cells was determined by the neutral comet assay,and the expression of phosphorylated histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) and Rad51 foci were measured by immunofluorescence. Results: The clone forming rate of CD133 + cells was higher than CD133 - cells (t=3.66, P<0.01) with no radiation. The clone forming rate of CD133 + cells irradiated by 4 Gy X-rays has no significant changes compared to that of the non-irradiation cells (t=0.71, P>0.05), but for CD133 - cells, it decreased compared to non-irradiation cells (t=2.91, P<0.05). The tailmoment between CD133 + cells and CD133 - cells had no difference at 0.5 h after irradiation (t=1.44, P>0.05); the tailmoment of CD133 + cells was lower than CD133 - cells at 6 and 24 h after irradiation,respectively (t=5.31 and 8.09, P<0.01). There was no significant difference in the expression of γ-H2AX foci between CD133 + and CD133 - cells at 0.5 and 6 h after irradiation (t=0.12 and 0.99, P>0.05), γ-H2AX foci of CD133 + cells was significantly decreased compared to CD133 - cells at 24 h after irradiation (t=4.99, P<0.01). For Rad 51 foci, there was no difference between CD133 + and CD133 - cells at 0.5 h after irradiation (t=1.12, P>0.05). The expression of Rad 51 foci of CD133 - cells was decreased compared to that of CD133 + cells at 6 and 24 h after irradiation,respectively (t=22.88 and 12.43, P<0.01). And the expression of Rad51 foci of CD133 + cells had no significant changes at 6-24 h after irradiation. Conclusions: Glioma stem cells is more radioresistive than glioma non-stem cells. The probable mechanism is that the DNA double-strand

  13. Mycobacteria exploit three genetically distinct DNA double-strand break repair pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Richa; Barkan, Daniel; Redelman-Sidi, Gil; Shuman, Stewart; Glickman, Michael S

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens rely on their DNA repair pathways to resist genomic damage inflicted by the host. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are especially threatening to bacterial viability. DSB repair by homologous recombination (HR) requires nucleases that resect DSB ends and a strand exchange protein that facilitates homology search. RecBCD and RecA perform these functions in Escherichia coli and constitute the major pathway of error-free DSB repair. Mycobacteria, including the human pathogen M. tuberculosis, elaborate an additional error-prone pathway of DSB repair via non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) catalysed by Ku and DNA ligase D (LigD). Little is known about the relative contributions of HR and NHEJ to mycobacterial chromosome repair, the factors that dictate pathway choice, or the existence of additional DSB repair pathways. Here we demonstrate that Mycobacterium smegmatis has three DSB repair pathway options: HR, NHEJ and a novel mechanism of single-strand annealing (SSA). Inactivation of NHEJ or SSA is compensated by elevated HR. We find that mycobacterial RecBCD does not participate in HR or confer resistance to ionizing radiation (IR), but is required for the RecA-independent SSA pathway. In contrast, the mycobacterial helicase-nuclease AdnAB participates in the RecA-dependent HR pathway, and is a major determinant of resistance to IR and oxidative DNA damage. These findings reveal distinctive features of mycobacterial DSB repair, most notably the dedication of the RecBCD and AdnAB helicase-nuclease machines to distinct repair pathways. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. The Molecular Basis of Double-Strand DNA Break Repair: The Critical Structure of the RAD52/RPA Complex

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jackson, Dobra

    2001-01-01

    .... RAD52 has specific interactions with RAD51, RPA and DNA (1,2,3). The binding of RAD52 to ends of double-strand breaks has been found to be a key initiation step to DNA repair by homologous recombination...

  15. The DNA-dependent protein kinase: a multifunctional protein kinase with roles in DNA double strand break repair and mitosis

    OpenAIRE

    Jette, Nicholas; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2014-01-01

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase composed of a large catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and the Ku70/80 heterodimer. Over the past two decades, significant progress has been made in elucidating the role of DNA-PK in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), the major pathway for repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in human cells and recently, additional roles for DNA-PK have been reported. In this review, we will describe the biochemi...

  16. Pathways for double-strand break repair in genetically unstable Z-DNA-forming sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kha, Diem T; Wang, Guliang; Natrajan, Nithya; Harrison, Lynn; Vasquez, Karen M

    2010-05-14

    DNA can adopt many structures that differ from the canonical B-form, and several of these non-canonical DNA structures have been implicated in genetic instability associated with human disease. Earlier, we found that Z-DNA causes DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in mammalian cells that can result in large-scale deletions and rearrangements. In contrast, the same Z-DNA-forming CG repeat in Escherichia coli resulted in only small contractions or expansions within the repeat. This difference in the Z-DNA-induced mutation spectrum between mammals and bacteria might be due to different mechanisms for DSB repair; in mammalian cells, non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) is a major DSB repair pathway, while E. coli do not contain this system and typically use homologous recombination (HR) to process DSBs. To test the extent to which the different DSB repair pathways influenced the Z-DNA-induced mutagenesis, we engineered bacterial E.coli strains to express an inducible NHEJ system, to mimic the situation in mammalian cells. Mycobacterium tuberculosis NHEJ proteins Ku and ligase D (LigD) were expressed in E.coli cells in the presence or absence of HR, and the Z-DNA-induced mutations were characterized. We found that the presence of the NHEJ mechanism markedly shifted the mutation spectrum from small deletions/insertions to large-scale deletions (from 2% to 24%). Our results demonstrate that NHEJ plays a role in the generation of Z-DNA-induced large-scale deletions, suggesting that this pathway is associated with DNA structure-induced destabilization of genomes from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. DNA Double Strand Break Response and Limited Repair Capacity in Mouse Elongated Spermatids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad A. Ahmed

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Spermatids are extremely sensitive to genotoxic exposures since during spermiogenesis only error-prone non homologous end joining (NHEJ repair pathways are available. Hence, genomic damage may accumulate in sperm and be transmitted to the zygote. Indirect, delayed DNA fragmentation and lesions associated with apoptotic-like processes have been observed during spermatid elongation, 27 days after irradiation. The proliferating spermatogonia and early meiotic prophase cells have been suggested to retain a memory of a radiation insult leading later to this delayed fragmentation. Here, we used meiotic spread preparations to localize phosphorylate histone H2 variant (γ-H2AX foci marking DNA double strand breaks (DSBs in elongated spermatids. This technique enabled us to determine the background level of DSB foci in elongated spermatids of RAD54/RAD54B double knockout (dko mice, severe combined immunodeficiency SCID mice, and poly adenosine diphosphate (ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1 inhibitor (DPQ-treated mice to compare them with the appropriate wild type controls. The repair kinetics data and the protein expression patterns observed indicate that the conventional NHEJ repair pathway is not available for elongated spermatids to repair the programmed and the IR-induced DSBs, reflecting the limited repair capacity of these cells. However, although elongated spermatids express the proteins of the alternative NHEJ, PARP1-inhibition had no effect on the repair kinetics after IR, suggesting that DNA damage may be passed onto sperm. Finally, our genetic mutant analysis suggests that an incomplete or defective meiotic recombinational repair of Spo11-induced DSBs may lead to a carry-over of the DSB damage or induce a delayed nuclear fragmentation during the sensitive programmed chromatin remodeling occurring in elongated spermatids.

  18. SIRT6 stabilizes DNA-dependent protein kinase at chromatin for DNA double-strand break repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCord, Ronald A; Michishita, Eriko; Hong, Tao

    2009-01-01

    -PKcs) to chromatin in response to DNA damage and stabilizes DNA-PKcs at chromatin adjacent to an induced site-specific DSB. Abrogation of these SIRT6 activities leads to impaired resolution of DSBs. Together, these findings elucidate a mechanism whereby regulation of dynamic interaction of a DNA repair factor......-dependent protein kinase) and promotes DNA DSB repair. In response to DSBs, SIRT6 associates dynamically with chromatin and is necessary for an acute decrease in global cellular acetylation levels on histone H3 Lysine 9. Moreover, SIRT6 is required for mobilization of the DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA......, and SIRT6 knockout cells exhibit genomic instability and DNA damage hypersensitivity. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these defects are not fully understood. Here, we show that SIRT6 forms a macromolecular complex with the DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair factor DNA-PK (DNA...

  19. Excess single-stranded DNA inhibits meiotic double-strand break repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Johnson

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available During meiosis, self-inflicted DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs are created by the protein Spo11 and repaired by homologous recombination leading to gene conversions and crossovers. Crossover formation is vital for the segregation of homologous chromosomes during the first meiotic division and requires the RecA orthologue, Dmc1. We analyzed repair during meiosis of site-specific DSBs created by another nuclease, VMA1-derived endonuclease (VDE, in cells lacking Dmc1 strand-exchange protein. Turnover and resection of the VDE-DSBs was assessed in two different reporter cassettes that can repair using flanking direct repeat sequences, thereby obviating the need for a Dmc1-dependent DNA strand invasion step. Access of the single-strand binding complex replication protein A, which is normally used in all modes of DSB repair, was checked in chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments, using antibody against Rfa1. Repair of the VDE-DSBs was severely inhibited in dmc1Delta cells, a defect that was associated with a reduction in the long tract resection required to initiate single-strand annealing between the flanking repeat sequences. Mutants that either reduce Spo11-DSB formation or abolish resection at Spo11-DSBs rescued the repair block. We also found that a replication protein A component, Rfa1, does not accumulate to expected levels at unrepaired single-stranded DNA (ssDNA in dmc1Delta cells. The requirement of Dmc1 for VDE-DSB repair using flanking repeats appears to be caused by the accumulation of large quantities of ssDNA that accumulate at Spo11-DSBs when Dmc1 is absent. We propose that these resected DSBs sequester both resection machinery and ssDNA binding proteins, which in wild-type cells would normally be recycled as Spo11-DSBs repair. The implication is that repair proteins are in limited supply, and this could reflect an underlying mechanism for regulating DSB repair in wild-type cells, providing protection from potentially harmful effects

  20. Repair of DNA double-strand breaks and cell killing by charged particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi-Kasai, K.; Murakami, M.; Itsukaichi, H.; Fukutsu, K.; Yatagai, F.; Kanai, T.; Ohara, H.; Sato, K.

    It has been suggested that it is not simple double-strand breaks (dsb) but the non-reparable breaks which correlate well with the high biological effectiveness of high LET radiations for cell killing. We have compared the effects of charged particles on cell death in 3 pairs of cell lines which are normal or defective in the repair of DNA dsbs. For the cell lines SL3-147, M10, and SX10 which are deficient in DNA dsb repair, RBE values were close to unity for cell killing induced by charged particles with linear energy transfer (LET) up to 200 keV/mum and were even smaller than unity for the LET region greater than 300 keV/mum. The inactivation cross section (ICS) increased with LET for all 3 pairs. The ICS of dsb repair deficient mutants was always larger than that of their parents for all the LET ranges, but with increasing LET the difference in ICS between the mutant and its parent became smaller. Since a small difference in ICS remained at LET of about 300 keV/mum, dsb repair may still take place at this high LET, even if its role is apparently small. These results suggest that the DNA repair system does not play a major role in protection against the attack of high LET radiations and that a main cause of cell death is non-reparable dsb which are produced at a higher yield compared with low LET radiations. No correlation was observed between DNA content or nuclear area and ICS.

  1. Assembly and function of DNA double-strand break repair foci in mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels

    2010-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are among the most cytotoxic types of DNA damage, which if left unrepaired can lead to mutations or gross chromosomal aberrations, and promote the onset of diseases associated with genomic instability such as cancer. One of the most discernible hallmarks...

  2. IDN2 Interacts with RPA and Facilitates DNA Double-Strand Break Repair by Homologous Recombination in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingming; Ba, Zhaoqing; Costa-Nunes, Pedro; Wei, Wei; Li, Lanxia; Kong, Fansi; Li, Yan; Chai, Jijie; Pontes, Olga; Qi, Yijun

    2017-03-01

    Repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is critical for the maintenance of genome integrity. We previously showed that DSB-induced small RNAs (diRNAs) facilitate homologous recombination-mediated DSB repair in Arabidopsis thaliana Here, we show that INVOLVED IN DE NOVO2 (IDN2), a double-stranded RNA binding protein involved in small RNA-directed DNA methylation, is required for DSB repair in Arabidopsis. We find that IDN2 interacts with the heterotrimeric replication protein A (RPA) complex. Depletion of IDN2 or the diRNA binding ARGONAUTE2 leads to increased accumulation of RPA at DSB sites and mislocalization of the recombination factor RAD51. These findings support a model in which IDN2 interacts with RPA and facilitates the release of RPA from single-stranded DNA tails and subsequent recruitment of RAD51 at DSB sites to promote DSB repair. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  3. The contribution of alu elements to mutagenic DNA double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Maria E; White, Travis B; Streva, Vincent A; DeFreece, Cecily B; Hedges, Dale J; Deininger, Prescott L

    2015-03-01

    Alu elements make up the largest family of human mobile elements, numbering 1.1 million copies and comprising 11% of the human genome. As a consequence of evolution and genetic drift, Alu elements of various sequence divergence exist throughout the human genome. Alu/Alu recombination has been shown to cause approximately 0.5% of new human genetic diseases and contribute to extensive genomic structural variation. To begin understanding the molecular mechanisms leading to these rearrangements in mammalian cells, we constructed Alu/Alu recombination reporter cell lines containing Alu elements ranging in sequence divergence from 0%-30% that allow detection of both Alu/Alu recombination and large non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) deletions that range from 1.0 to 1.9 kb in size. Introduction of as little as 0.7% sequence divergence between Alu elements resulted in a significant reduction in recombination, which indicates even small degrees of sequence divergence reduce the efficiency of homology-directed DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Further reduction in recombination was observed in a sequence divergence-dependent manner for diverged Alu/Alu recombination constructs with up to 10% sequence divergence. With greater levels of sequence divergence (15%-30%), we observed a significant increase in DSB repair due to a shift from Alu/Alu recombination to variable-length NHEJ which removes sequence between the two Alu elements. This increase in NHEJ deletions depends on the presence of Alu sequence homeology (similar but not identical sequences). Analysis of recombination products revealed that Alu/Alu recombination junctions occur more frequently in the first 100 bp of the Alu element within our reporter assay, just as they do in genomic Alu/Alu recombination events. This is the first extensive study characterizing the influence of Alu element sequence divergence on DNA repair, which will inform predictions regarding the effect of Alu element sequence divergence on both

  4. Repair response for DNA double-strand damage through ubiquitylation of chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakada, Shinichiro

    2011-01-01

    The chromatin modulation (remodeling) via lysine63 (K63)-linked ubiquitin (U) has been found important in the repair response for DNA double-strand damage, and the sequential signaling events at the damage site are explained. As the first step of the repair, MRN (MRE11, RAD50 and nibrin) complex recognizes the damage site and binds to it followed by many linked reactions by recruited and activated enzymes of various protein kinases and phosphatases, which resulting in the enhanced early signaling. As well, gamma-H2AX (phosphorylated histone H2AX) is yielded by the process, to which phosphorylated MDC1 (mediator of DNA-damage checkpoint 1) binds to produce their complex. Then further binding of RNF8-HERC2-UBC13 (ring finger protein 8, hect domain and RCC1 (CHC1)-like domain, and U conjugating enzyme E2N, respectively) occurs for starting the cumulative ubiquitylation of H2AX via K63 as the middle phase response. Signaling in the late phase occurs on the U chain formed at the damage site by binding of RAP (receptor-associated protein) 80 and other recruited 5 proteins like BRCA1 (breast cancer 1, early onset) to repair DNA by the homologous recombination after 53BP1 (tumor protein p53 binding protein) binding followed by methylation of histone H4. In a case of human compound heterozygous RNF168 defect, RIDDLE syndrome (radiosensitivity, immunodeficiency, dysmorphic features and learning difficulties), cells have no and slight abnormality of G2/M and intra-S checkpoint, respectively. Another defecting case with homozygous nonsense mutation has high radiosensitivity, intra-S checkpoint abnormality and others. Abnormality of immuno-globulins observed in both cases is similar to that in the RNF8-knockout mouse. Many tasks in chromatin ubiquitylation in the repair are still remained to be solved for protection and treatment of related diseases. (T.T.)

  5. In vivo formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks after computed tomography examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löbrich, Markus; Rief, Nicole; Kühne, Martin; Heckmann, Martina; Fleckenstein, Jochen; Rübe, Christian; Uder, Michael

    2005-06-21

    Ionizing radiation can lead to a variety of deleterious effects in humans, most importantly to the induction of cancer. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are among the most significant genetic lesions introduced by ionizing radiation that can initiate carcinogenesis. We have enumerated gamma-H2AX foci as a measure for DSBs in lymphocytes from individuals undergoing computed tomography examination of the thorax and/or the abdomen. The number of DSBs induced by computed tomography examination was found to depend linearly on the dose-length product, a radiodiagnostic unit that is proportional to both the local dose delivered and the length of the body exposed. Analysis of lymphocytes sampled up to 1 day postirradiation provided kinetics for the in vivo loss of gamma-H2AX foci that correlated with DSB repair. Interestingly, in contrast to results obtained in vitro, normal individuals repair DSBs to background levels. A patient who had previously shown severe side effects after radiotherapy displayed levels of gamma-H2AX foci at various sampling times postirradiation that were several times higher than those of normal individuals. Gamma-H2AX and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis of fibroblasts obtained from this patient confirmed a substantial DSB repair defect. Additionally, these fibroblasts showed significant in vitro radiosensitivity. These data show that the in vivo induction and repair of DSBs can be assessed in individuals exposed to low radiation doses, adding a further dimension to DSB repair studies and providing the opportunity to identify repair-compromised individuals after diagnostic irradiation procedures.

  6. More efficient repair of DNA double-strand breaks in skeletal muscle stem cells compared to their committed progeny

    OpenAIRE

    Leyla Vahidi Ferdousi; Pierre Rocheteau; Romain Chayot; Benjamin Montagne; Zayna Chaker; Patricia Flamant; Shahragim Tajbakhsh; Miria Ricchetti

    2014-01-01

    International audience; The loss of genome integrity in adult stem cells results in accelerated tissue aging and is possibly cancerogenic. Adult stem cells in different tissues appear to react robustly to DNA damage. We report that adult skeletal stem (satellite) cells do not primarily respond to radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) via differentiation and exhibit less apoptosis compared to other myogenic cells. Satellite cells repair these DNA lesions more efficiently than their...

  7. Inhibition of APOBEC3G Activity Impedes Double-Strand DNA Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Ponnandy; Shandilya, Shivender; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Nagler, Adi; Schiffer, Celia A.; Kotler, Moshe

    2015-01-01

    The cellular cytidine deaminase APOBEC3G (A3G) was first described as an anti-HIV-1 restriction factor by directly deaminating reverse transcripts of the viral genome. HIV-1 Vif neutralizes the activity of A3G, primarily by mediating degradation of A3G to establish effective infection in host target cells. Lymphoma cells, which express high amounts of A3G, can restrict Vif-deficient HIV-1. Interestingly, these cells are more stable in the face of treatments that result in dsDNA damage, such as ionizing irradiation (IR) and chemotherapies. Previously, we showed that the Vif-derived peptide (Vif25-39) efficiently inhibits A3G deamination, and increases sensitivity of lymphoma cells to IR. In the current study, we show that additional peptides derived from Vif, A3G and A3F, which contain the LYYF motif, inhibit deamination activity. Each residue in the Vif25-39 sequence moderately contributes to the inhibitory effect, while, replacing a single amino acid in the LYYF motif completely abrogate inhibition of deamination. Treatment of A3G-expressing lymphoma cells exposed to ionizing radiation with the new inhibitory peptides reduces double-strand break (DSB) repair after radiation. Incubation of cultured irradiated lymphoma cells with peptides that inhibit DSB repair halts their propagation. These results suggest that A3G may be a potential therapeutic target amenable to peptide and peptidomimetic inhibition. PMID:26460502

  8. An alternative mechanism for radioprotection by dimethyl sulfoxide. Possible facilitation of DNA double-strand break repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashino, Genro; Liu, Yong; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Kinashi, Yuko; Ono, Koji; Tano, Keizo; Watanabe, Masami

    2010-01-01

    The radioprotective effects of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) have been known for many years, and the suppression of hydroxyl (OH) radicals induced by ionizing radiation has been thought to be the main cause of this effect. However, the DMSO concentration used was very high, and might be toxic, in earlier studies. In the present study, we administered a lower, non-toxic concentration (0.5%, id est (i.e.), 64 mM) of DMSO before irradiation and examined its radioprotective effects. Colony formation assay and micronucleus assay showed significant radioprotective effects in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO), but not in xrs5, which is defective in the repair function of DNA double-strand breaks. The levels of phosphorylated H2AX and the formation of 53BP1 foci 15 minutes after irradiation, which might reflect initial DNA double-strand breaks, in DMSO-treated CHO cells were similar to those in non-treated cells, suggesting that the radioprotective effects were not attributable to the suppression of general indirect action in the lower concentration of DMSO. On the other hand, 2 hours after irradiation, the average number of 53BP1 foci, which might reflect residual DNA double-strand breaks, was significantly decreased in DMSO-treated CHO cells compared to non-treated cells. The results indicated that low concentration of DMSO exerts radioprotective effects through the facilitation of DNA double-strand break repair rather than through the suppression of indirect action. (author)

  9. An alternative mechanism for radioprotection by dimethyl sulfoxide; possible facilitation of DNA double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashino, Genro; Liu, Yong; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Kinashi, Yuko; Ono, Koji; Tano, Keizo; Watanabe, Masami

    2010-01-01

    The radioprotective effects of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) have been known for many years, and the suppression of hydroxyl (OH) radicals induced by ionizing radiation has been thought to be the main cause of this effect. However, the DMSO concentration used was very high, and might be toxic, in earlier studies. In the present study, we administered a lower, non-toxic concentration (0.5%, i.e., 64 mM) of DMSO before irradiation and examined its radioprotective effects. Colony formation assay and micronucleus assay showed significant radioprotective effects in CHO, but not in xrs5, which is defective in the repair function of DNA double-strand breaks. The levels of phosphorylated H2AX and the formation of 53BP1 foci 15 minutes after irradiation, which might reflect initial DNA double-strand breaks, in DMSO-treated CHO cells were similar to those in non-treated cells, suggesting that the radioprotective effects were not attributable to the suppression of general indirect action in the lower concentration of DMSO. On the other hand, 2 hours after irradiation, the average number of 53BP1 foci, which might reflect residual DNA double-strand breaks, was significantly decreased in DMSO-treated CHO cells compared to non-treated cells. The results indicated that low concentration of DMSO exerts radioprotective effects through the facilitation of DNA double-strand break repair rather than through the suppression of indirect action.

  10. Phenotypic Analysis of ATM Protein Kinase in DNA Double-Strand Break Formation and Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mian, Elisabeth; Wiesmüller, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) encodes a serine/threonine protein kinase, which is involved in various regulatory processes in mammalian cells. Its best-known role is apical activation of the DNA damage response following generation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). When DSBs appear, sensor and mediator proteins are recruited, activating transducers such as ATM, which in turn relay a widespread signal to a multitude of downstream effectors. ATM mutation causes Ataxia telangiectasia (AT), whereby the disease phenotype shows differing characteristics depending on the underlying ATM mutation. However, all phenotypes share progressive neurodegeneration and marked predisposition to malignancies at the organismal level and sensitivity to ionizing radiation and chromosome aberrations at the cellular level. Expression and localization of the ATM protein can be determined via western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy; however, detection of subtle alterations such as resulting from amino acid exchanges rather than truncating mutations requires functional testing. Previous studies on the role of ATM in DSB repair, which connects with radiosensitivity and chromosomal stability, gave at first sight contradictory results. To systematically explore the effects of clinically relevant ATM mutations on DSB repair, we engaged a series of lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) derived from AT patients and controls. To examine DSB repair both in a quantitative and qualitative manners, we used an EGFP-based assay comprising different substrates for distinct DSB repair mechanisms. In this way, we demonstrated that particular signaling defects caused by individual ATM mutations led to specific DSB repair phenotypes. To explore the impact of ATM on carcinogenic chromosomal aberrations, we monitored chromosomal breakage at a breakpoint cluster region hotspot within the MLL gene that has been associated with therapy-related leukemia. PCR-based MLL-breakage analysis of HeLa cells

  11. A model treating the DNA double-strand break repair inhibition by damage clustering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosemann, M.; Abel, H.; Regel, K.

    1992-01-01

    A microdosimetric model for the interpretation of radiation induced irreparable DNA double-strand breaks was applied to the biological endpoint of chromosomal aberrations. The model explains irreparable DNA double-strand breaks in terms of break clustering in DNA subunits. The model predicts quite good chromosomal aberrations in gamma- and X-ray irradiated V79 cells and human lymphocytes. In the case of α-particle irradiation the presumption had to be made, that only the cells with indirect events in the nucleus (due to delta-electrons) reach the metaphase and are analysed. With the help of this model we are able to explain the peculiar effectiveness of ultrasoft C-X-rays in human lymphocytes. In addition, an interpretation of experiments with accelerated and spatially correlated particles is given. (author)

  12. Trex2 enables spontaneous sister chromatid exchanges without facilitating DNA double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrache, Lavinia C; Hu, Lingchuan; Son, Mi Young; Li, Han; Wesevich, Austin; Scully, Ralph; Stark, Jeremy; Hasty, Paul

    2011-08-01

    Trex2 is a 3' → 5' exonuclease that removes 3'-mismatched sequences in a biochemical assay; however, its biological function remains unclear. To address biology we previously generated trex2(null) mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells and expressed in these cells wild-type human TREX2 cDNA (Trex2(hTX2)) or cDNA with a single-amino-acid change in the catalytic domain (Trex2(H188A)) or in the DNA-binding domain (Trex2(R167A)). We found the trex2(null) and Trex2(H188A) cells exhibited spontaneous broken chromosomes and trex2(null) cells exhibited spontaneous chromosomal rearrangements. We also found ectopically expressed human TREX2 was active at the 3' ends of I-SceI-induced chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs). Therefore, we hypothesized Trex2 participates in DNA DSB repair by modifying 3' ends. This may be especially important for ends with damaged nucleotides. Here we present data that are unexpected and prompt a new model. We found Trex2-altered cells (null, H188A, and R167A) were not hypersensitive to camptothecin, a type-1 topoisomerase inhibitor that induces DSBs at replication forks. In addition, Trex2-altered cells were not hypersensitive to γ-radiation, an agent that causes DSBs throughout the cell cycle. This observation held true even in cells compromised for one of the two major DSB repair pathways: homology-directed repair (HDR) or nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). Trex2 deletion also enhanced repair of an I-SceI-induced DSB by both HDR and NHEJ without affecting pathway choice. Interestingly, however, trex2(null) cells exhibited reduced spontaneous sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) but this was not due to a defect in HDR-mediated crossing over. Therefore, reduced spontaneous SCE could be a manifestation of the same defect that caused spontaneous broken chromosomes and spontaneous chromosomal rearrangements. These unexpected data suggest Trex2 does not enable DSB repair and prompt a new model that posits Trex2 suppresses the formation of broken

  13. Constitutional chromothripsis rearrangements involve clustered double-stranded DNA breaks and nonhomologous repair mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloosterman, Wigard P; Tavakoli-Yaraki, Masoumeh; van Roosmalen, Markus J; van Binsbergen, Ellen; Renkens, Ivo; Duran, Karen; Ballarati, Lucia; Vergult, Sarah; Giardino, Daniela; Hansson, Kerstin; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A L; Jager, Myrthe; van Haeringen, Arie; Ippel, Elly F; Haaf, Thomas; Passarge, Eberhard; Hochstenbach, Ron; Menten, Björn; Larizza, Lidia; Guryev, Victor; Poot, Martin; Cuppen, Edwin

    2012-06-28

    Chromothripsis represents a novel phenomenon in the structural variation landscape of cancer genomes. Here, we analyze the genomes of ten patients with congenital disease who were preselected to carry complex chromosomal rearrangements with more than two breakpoints. The rearrangements displayed unanticipated complexity resembling chromothripsis. We find that eight of them contain hallmarks of multiple clustered double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) on one or more chromosomes. In addition, nucleotide resolution analysis of 98 breakpoint junctions indicates that break repair involves nonhomologous or microhomology-mediated end joining. We observed that these eight rearrangements are balanced or contain sporadic deletions ranging in size between a few hundred base pairs and several megabases. The two remaining complex rearrangements did not display signs of DSBs and contain duplications, indicative of rearrangement processes involving template switching. Our work provides detailed insight into the characteristics of chromothripsis and supports a role for clustered DSBs driving some constitutional chromothripsis rearrangements. Copyright © 2012 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. In vivo formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks after computed tomography examinations

    OpenAIRE

    Löbrich, Markus; Rief, Nicole; Kühne, Martin; Heckmann, Martina; Fleckenstein, Jochen; Rübe, Christian; Uder, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can lead to a variety of deleterious effects in humans, most importantly to the induction of cancer. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are among the most significant genetic lesions introduced by ionizing radiation that can initiate carcinogenesis. We have enumerated γ-H2AX foci as a measure for DSBs in lymphocytes from individuals undergoing computed tomography examination of the thorax and/or the abdomen. The number of DSBs induced by computed tomography examination was fou...

  15. Repair on the go: E. coli maintains a high proliferation rate while repairing a chronic DNA double-strand break.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise Darmon

    Full Text Available DNA damage checkpoints exist to promote cell survival and the faithful inheritance of genetic information. It is thought that one function of such checkpoints is to ensure that cell division does not occur before DNA damage is repaired. However, in unicellular organisms, rapid cell multiplication confers a powerful selective advantage, leading to a dilemma. Is the activation of a DNA damage checkpoint compatible with rapid cell multiplication? By uncoupling the initiation of DNA replication from cell division, the Escherichia coli cell cycle offers a solution to this dilemma. Here, we show that a DNA double-strand break, which occurs once per replication cycle, induces the SOS response. This SOS induction is needed for cell survival due to a requirement for an elevated level of expression of the RecA protein. Cell division is delayed, leading to an increase in average cell length but with no detectable consequence on mutagenesis and little effect on growth rate and viability. The increase in cell length caused by chronic DNA double-strand break repair comprises three components: two types of increase in the unit cell size, one independent of SfiA and SlmA, the other dependent of the presence of SfiA and the absence of SlmA, and a filamentation component that is dependent on the presence of either SfiA or SlmA. These results imply that chronic checkpoint induction in E. coli is compatible with rapid cell multiplication. Therefore, under conditions of chronic low-level DNA damage, the SOS checkpoint operates seamlessly in a cell cycle where the initiation of DNA replication is uncoupled from cell division.

  16. Contribution of sleep to the repair of neuronal DNA double-strand breaks: evidence from flies and mice

    OpenAIRE

    Bellesi, Michele; Bushey, Daniel; Chini, Mattia; Tononi, Giulio; Cirelli, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Exploration of a novel environment leads to neuronal DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). These DSBs are generated by type 2 topoisomerase to relieve topological constrains that limit transcription of plasticity-related immediate early genes. If not promptly repaired, however, DSBs may lead to cell death. Since the induction of plasticity-related genes is higher in wake than in sleep, we asked whether it is specifically wake associated with synaptic plasticity that leads to DSBs, and whether slee...

  17. Induction and repair of DNA double-strand breaks in rat cerebellar cortex exposed to 60Co γ-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanova, T. S.; Zadneprianetc, M. G.; Ježková, L.; Kruglyakova, E. A.; Smirnova, E. V.; Boreyko, A. V.

    2018-01-01

    The induction and repair of DNA double-strand breaks are studied using the immunohistochemical staining procedure of paraffin-embedded rat cerebellum tissues after exposure to γ-rays of 60Co. The dose dependence of radiation-induced colocalized γH2AX/53BP1 foci is studied and its linear character is established. It is shown that these foci are efficiently eliminated 24 h after irradiation.

  18. Beyond repair foci: DNA double-strand break repair in euchromatic and heterochromatic compartments analyzed by transmission electron microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Lorat

    Full Text Available DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs generated by ionizing radiation pose a serious threat to the preservation of genetic and epigenetic information. The known importance of local chromatin configuration in DSB repair raises the question of whether breaks in different chromatin environments are recognized and repaired by the same repair machinery and with similar efficiency. An essential step in DSB processing by non-homologous end joining is the high-affinity binding of Ku70-Ku80 and DNA-PKcs to double-stranded DNA ends that holds the ends in physical proximity for subsequent repair.Using transmission electron microscopy to localize gold-labeled pKu70 and pDNA-PKcs within nuclear ultrastructure, we monitored the formation and repair of actual DSBs within euchromatin (electron-lucent and heterochromatin (electron-dense in cortical neurons of irradiated mouse brain.While DNA lesions in euchromatin (characterized by two pKu70-gold beads, reflecting the Ku70-Ku80 heterodimer are promptly sensed and rejoined, DNA packaging in heterochromatin appears to retard DSB processing, due to the time needed to unravel higher-order chromatin structures. Complex pKu70-clusters formed in heterochromatin (consisting of 4 or ≥ 6 gold beads may represent multiple breaks in close proximity caused by ionizing radiation of highly-compacted DNA. All pKu70-clusters disappeared within 72 hours post-irradiation, indicating efficient DSB rejoining. However, persistent 53BP1 clusters in heterochromatin (comprising ≥ 10 gold beads, occasionally co-localizing with γH2AX, but not pKu70 or pDNA-PKcs, may reflect incomplete or incorrect restoration of chromatin structure rather than persistently unrepaired DNA damage.Higher-order organization of chromatin determines the accessibility of DNA lesions to repair complexes, defining how readily DSBs are detected and processed. DNA lesions in heterochromatin appear to be more complex, with multiple breaks in spatial vicinity inducing

  19. Detection and Repair of Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Double Strand Breaks: New Developments in Nonhomologous End Joining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chen; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2013-01-01

    DNA damage can occur as a result of endogenous metabolic reactions and replication stress or from exogenous sources such as radiation therapy and chemotherapy. DNA double strand breaks are the most cytotoxic form of DNA damage, and defects in their repair can result in genome instability, a hallmark of cancer. The major pathway for the repair of ionizing radiation-induced DSBs in human cells is nonhomologous end joining. Here we review recent advances on the mechanism of nonhomologous end joining, as well as new findings on its component proteins and regulation

  20. Detection and Repair of Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Double Strand Breaks: New Developments in Nonhomologous End Joining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chen [Departments of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Oncology, and Southern Alberta Cancer Research Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary (Canada); Lees-Miller, Susan P., E-mail: leesmill@ucalgary.ca [Departments of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Oncology, and Southern Alberta Cancer Research Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    DNA damage can occur as a result of endogenous metabolic reactions and replication stress or from exogenous sources such as radiation therapy and chemotherapy. DNA double strand breaks are the most cytotoxic form of DNA damage, and defects in their repair can result in genome instability, a hallmark of cancer. The major pathway for the repair of ionizing radiation-induced DSBs in human cells is nonhomologous end joining. Here we review recent advances on the mechanism of nonhomologous end joining, as well as new findings on its component proteins and regulation.

  1. SAMHD1 Sheds Moonlight on DNA Double-Strand Break Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello-Lobato, Maria Jose; Wang, Siyue; Schmidt, Christine Katrin

    2017-12-01

    SAMHD1 (sterile α motif and histidine (H) aspartate (D) domain-containing protein 1) is known for its antiviral activity of hydrolysing deoxynucleotides required for virus replication. Daddacha et al. identify a hydrolase-independent, moonlighting function of SAMHD1 that facilitates homologous recombination of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by promoting recruitment of C-terminal binding protein interacting protein (CTIP), a DNA-end resection factor, to damaged DNA. These findings could benefit anticancer treatment. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa activates the DNA double-strand break signaling and repair pathway in infected cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsen, S.; Collin-Faure, V.; Gidrol, X.; Lemercier, C.

    2013-01-01

    Highly hazardous DNA double-strand breaks can be induced in eukaryotic cells by a number of agents including pathogenic bacterial strains. We have investigated the genotoxic potential of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen causing devastating nosocomial infections in cystic fibrosis or immunocompromised patients. Our data revealed that infection of immune or epithelial cells by P. aeruginosa triggered DNA strand breaks and phosphorylation of histone H2AX (γH2AX), a marker of DNA double-strand breaks. Moreover, it induced formation of discrete nuclear repair foci similar to gamma-irradiation-induced foci, and containing γH2AX and 53BP1, an adaptor protein mediating the DNA-damage response pathway. Gene deletion, mutagenesis, and complementation in P. aeruginosa identified ExoS bacterial toxin as the major factor involved in γH2AX induction. Chemical inhibition of several kinases known to phosphorylate H2AX demonstrated that Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) was the principal kinase in P. aeruginosa-induced H2AX phosphorylation. Finally, infection led to ATM kinase activation by an auto-phosphorylation mechanism. Together, these data show for the first time that infection by P. aeruginosa activates the DNA double-strand break repair machinery of the host cells. This novel information sheds new light on the consequences of P. aeruginosa infection in mammalian cells. As pathogenic Escherichia coli or carcinogenic Helicobacter pylori can alter genome integrity through DNA double-strand breaks, leading to chromosomal instability and eventually cancer, our findings highlight possible new routes for further investigations of P. aeruginosa in cancer biology and they identify ATM as a potential target molecule for drug design. (authors)

  3. Conservation of the rad21 Schizosaccharomyces pombe DNA double-strand break repair gene in mammals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKay, Michael J.; Spek, Peter van der; Kanaar, Roland; Smit, Bep; Bootsma, Dirk; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Genetic factors are likely to be major determinants of human cellular ionizing radiation sensitivity. DNA double strand breaks (dsbs) are significant ionizing radiation-induced lesions; cellular DNA dsb processing is also important in a number of other contexts. To further the understanding of DNA dsb processing in mammalian cells, we cloned and sequenced mammalian homologs of the rad21 Schizosaccharomyces pombe DNA dsb repair gene. Materials and Methods: The genes were cloned by evolutionary walking, exploiting sequence homology between the yeast and mammalian genes. Results: No major motifs indicative of a particular function were present in the predicted amino acid sequences of the mammalian genes. Alignment of the Rad21 amino acid sequence with its putative homologs showed that similarity was distributed across the length of the proteins, with more highly conserved regions at both termini. The mHR21 sp (mouse homolog ofR ad21, S. pombe) and hHR21 sp (humanh omolog of Rad21, S. pombe) predicted proteins were 96% identical, whereas the human and S. pombe proteins were 25% identical and 47% similar. RNA blot analysis showed that mHR21 sp mRNA was abundant in all adult mouse tissues examined, with highest expression in testis and thymus. In addition to a 3.1kb mRNA transcript in all tissues, an additional 2.2kb transcript was present at a high level in post-meiotic spermatids, white expression of the 3.1kb mRNA in testis was confined to the meiotic compartment. hHR21 sp mRNA was cell cycle regulated in human cells, increasing in late S phase to a peak in G2 phase. The level of hHR21 sp transcripts was not altered by exposure of normal diploid fibroblasts to 10 Gy ionizing radiation. In situ hybridization showed mHR21 sp resided on chromosome 15D3, whereashHR21 sp localized to the syntenic 8q24 region. Conclusion: Cloning these novel mammalian genes and characterization of their protein products should contribute to the understanding of cellular

  4. DNA double-strand break repair: a tale of pathway choices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Li; Xingzhi Xu

    2016-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid double-strand breaks (DSBs) are cytotoxic lesions that must be repaired either through homologous recombination (HR) or non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathways.DSB repair is critical for genome integrity,cellular homeostasis and also constitutes the biological foundation for radiotherapy and the majority of chemotherapy.The choice between HR and NHEJ is a complex yet not completely understood process that will entail more future efforts.Herein we review our current understandings about how the choice is made over an antagonizing balance between p53-binding protein 1 and breast cancer 1 in the context of cell cycle stages,downstream effects,and distinct chromosomal histone marks.These exciting areas of research will surely bring more mechanistic insights about DSB repair and be utilized in the clinical settings.

  5. Life forms employ different repair strategies of repair single- and double strand DNA breaks caused by different qualities of radiation: criticality of RecA mediated repair system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharan, R.N.

    2013-01-01

    Different qualities of radiation, either through direct or indirect pathway, induce qualitative different spectrum of damages in DNA, which are also different in in vitro and in vivo systems. The single- and double strand breaks of DNA are of special interest as they lead to serious biological consequences. The implications of such damage to DNA and their processing by various inherent repair pathways together decide the fate of the living form

  6. Photosensitization by iodinated DNA minor groove binding ligands: Evaluation of DNA double-strand break induction and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Benjamin; Ververis, Katherine; Rodd, Annabelle L; Foong, Laura J L; Silva, Fernando M Da; Karagiannis, Tom C

    2011-05-03

    Iodinated DNA minor groove binding bibenzimidazoles represent a unique class of UVA photosensitizer and their extreme photopotency has been previously characterized. Earlier studies have included a comparison of three isomers, referred to as ortho-, meta- and para-iodoHoechst, which differ only in the location of the iodine substituent in the phenyl ring of the bibenzimidazole. DNA breakage and clonogenic survival studies in human erythroleukemic K562 cells have highlighted the higher photo-efficiency of the ortho-isomer (subsequently designated UV(A)Sens) compared to the meta- and para-isomers. In this study, the aim was to compare the induction and repair of DNA double-strand breaks induced by the three isomers in K562 cells. Further, we examined the effects of the prototypical broad-spectrum histone deacetylase inhibitor, Trichostatin A, on ortho-iodoHoechst/UVA-induced double-strand breaks in K562 cells. Using γH2AX as a molecular marker of the DNA lesions, our findings indicate a disparity in the induction and particularly, in the repair kinetics of double-strand breaks for the three isomers. The accumulation of γH2AX foci induced by the meta- and para-isomers returned to background levels within 24 and 48 h, respectively; the number of γH2AX foci induced by ortho-iodoHoechst remained elevated even after incubation for 96 h post-irradiation. These findings provide further evidence that the extreme photopotency of ortho-iodoHoechst is due to not only to the high quantum yield of dehalogenation, but also to the severity of the DNA lesions which are not readily repaired. Finally, our findings which indicate that Trichostatin A has a remarkable potentiating effect on ortho-iodoHoechst/UVA-induced DNA lesions are encouraging, particularly in the context of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, for which a histone deacetylase inhibitor is already approved for therapy. This finding prompts further evaluation of the potential of combination therapies. Copyright © 2011

  7. scid mutation in mice confers hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation and a deficiency in DNA double-strand break repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biedermann, K.A.; Sun, J.R.; Giaccia, A.J.; Tosto, L.M.; Brown, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    C.B-17 severe combined immunodeficient (scid) mice carry the scid mutation and are severely deficient in both T cell- and B cell-mediated immunity, apparently as a result of defective V(D)J joining of the immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor gene elements. In the present studies, we have defined the tissue, cellular, and molecular basis of another characteristic of these mice: their hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation. Bone marrow stem cells, intestinal crypt cells, and epithelial skin cells from scid mice are 2- to 3-fold more sensitive when irradiated in situ than are congenic BALB/c or C.B-17 controls. Two independently isolated embryo fibroblastic scid mouse cell lines display similar hypersensitivities to gamma-rays. In addition, these cell lines are sensitive to cell killing by bleomycin, which also produces DNA strand breaks, but not by the DNA crosslinking agent mitomycin C or UV irradiation. Measurement of the rejoining of gamma-ray-induced DNA double-strand breaks by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis indicates that these animals are defective in this repair system. This suggests that the gamma-ray sensitivity of the scid mouse fibroblasts could be the result of reduced repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Therefore, a common factor may participate in both the repair of DNA double-strand breaks as well as V(D)J rejoining during lymphocyte development. This murine autosomal recessive mutation should prove extremely useful in fundamental studies of radiation-induced DNA damage and repair

  8. Formation of double-strand breaks in DNA of γ-irradiated bacteria depending on the function of fast repair processes of DNA single-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, S.I.; Gaziev, A.I.

    1980-01-01

    The formation of double-strand breaks in DNA of γ-irradiated ( 60 Co)Ex coli bacteria depending on the function of fast repair processes of DNA single-strand breaks, is investigated. The profiles of sedimentation of DNA Ex coli cells, irradiated at 0-2 deg C in the salt medium and in EDTA-borate buffer, are presented. It is shown that when irradiating cells in EDTA-borate buffer, the output of single- and double strand breaks in DNA is much higher than in the case of their irradiation in the minimum salt medium. The dependence of output of single-strand and double-strand breaks depending on the radiatier doze of E coli cells in the salt medium and EDTA-borate buffer, is studied. The supposition is made on the presence of a regulative interaction between the accumulation of DNA single-breaks and their repair with the formation of double-strand breaks. The functionating of fast and superfast repair processes considerably affects the formation of double-strand breaks in DNA of a bacterium cell. A considerable amount of double-breaks registered immediately after irradiation forms due to a close position of single-strand breaks on the opposite DNA strands

  9. Deficiency of double-strand DNA break repair does not impair Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulence in multiple animal models of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Brook E; Barkan, Daniel; Bongiorno, Paola; Karakousis, Petros C; Glickman, Michael S

    2014-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis persistence within its human host requires mechanisms to resist the effector molecules of host immunity, which exert their bactericidal effects through damaging pathogen proteins, membranes, and DNA. Substantial evidence indicates that bacterial pathogens, including M. tuberculosis, require DNA repair systems to repair the DNA damage inflicted by the host during infection, but the role of double-strand DNA break (DSB) repair systems is unclear. Double-strand DNA breaks are the most cytotoxic form of DNA damage and must be repaired for chromosome replication to proceed. M. tuberculosis elaborates three genetically distinct DSB repair systems: homologous recombination (HR), nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), and single-strand annealing (SSA). NHEJ, which repairs DSBs in quiescent cells, may be particularly relevant to M. tuberculosis latency. However, very little information is available about the phenotype of DSB repair-deficient M. tuberculosis in animal models of infection. Here we tested M. tuberculosis strains lacking NHEJ (a Δku ΔligD strain), HR (a ΔrecA strain), or both (a ΔrecA Δku strain) in C57BL/6J mice, C3HeB/FeJ mice, guinea pigs, and a mouse hollow-fiber model of infection. We found no difference in bacterial load, histopathology, or host mortality between wild-type and DSB repair mutant strains in any model of infection. These results suggest that the animal models tested do not inflict DSBs on the mycobacterial chromosome, that other repair pathways can compensate for the loss of NHEJ and HR, or that DSB repair is not required for M. tuberculosis pathogenesis. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Contribution of sleep to the repair of neuronal DNA double-strand breaks: evidence from flies and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellesi, Michele; Bushey, Daniel; Chini, Mattia; Tononi, Giulio; Cirelli, Chiara

    2016-11-10

    Exploration of a novel environment leads to neuronal DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). These DSBs are generated by type 2 topoisomerase to relieve topological constrains that limit transcription of plasticity-related immediate early genes. If not promptly repaired, however, DSBs may lead to cell death. Since the induction of plasticity-related genes is higher in wake than in sleep, we asked whether it is specifically wake associated with synaptic plasticity that leads to DSBs, and whether sleep provides any selective advantage over wake in their repair. In flies and mice, we find that enriched wake, more than simply time spent awake, induces DSBs, and their repair in mice is delayed or prevented by subsequent wake. In both species the repair of irradiation-induced neuronal DSBs is also quicker during sleep, and mouse genes mediating the response to DNA damage are upregulated in sleep. Thus, sleep facilitates the repair of neuronal DSBs.

  11. X-ray induced DNA double strand break production and repair in mammalian cells as measured by neutral filter elution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, M O; Kohn, K W [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA)

    1979-10-01

    A neutral filter elution method was used for detecting DNA double strand breaks in mouse L1210 cells after X-ray. The assay detected the number of double strand breaks induced by as little as 1000 rad of X-ray. The rate of DNA elution through the filters under neutral conditions increased with X-ray dose. Certain conditions for deproteinization, pH, and filter type were shown to increase the assay's sensitivity. Hydrogen peroxide and Bleomycin also induced apparent DNA double strand breaks, although the ratios of double to single strand breaks varied from those produced by X-ray. The introduction of double strand cuts by HpA I restriction endonuclease in DNA lysed on filters resulted in a rapid rate of elution under neutral conditions, implying that the method can detect double strand breaks if they exist in the DNA. The eluted DNA banded with a double stranded DNA marker in cesium chloride. This evidence suggested that the assay detected DNA double strand breaks. L1210 cells were shown to rejoin most of the DNA double strand breaks induced by 5-10 krad of X-ray with a half-time of about 40 minutes. (author).

  12. Targeting DNA double strand break repair with hyperthermia and DNA-PKcs inhibition to enhance the effect of radiation treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oorschot, Bregje; Granata, Giovanna; Di Franco, Simone; Ten Cate, Rosemarie; Rodermond, Hans M; Todaro, Matilde; Medema, Jan Paul; Franken, Nicolaas A P

    2016-10-04

    Radiotherapy is based on the induction of lethal DNA damage, primarily DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). Efficient DSB repair via Non-Homologous End Joining or Homologous Recombination can therefore undermine the efficacy of radiotherapy. By suppressing DNA-DSB repair with hyperthermia (HT) and DNA-PKcs inhibitor NU7441 (DNA-PKcsi), we aim to enhance the effect of radiation.The sensitizing effect of HT for 1 hour at 42°C and DNA-PKcsi [1 μM] to radiation treatment was investigated in cervical and breast cancer cells, primary breast cancer sphere cells (BCSCs) enriched for cancer stem cells, and in an in vivo human tumor model. A significant radio-enhancement effect was observed for all cell types when DNA-PKcsi and HT were applied separately, and when both were combined, HT and DNA-PKcsi enhanced radio-sensitivity to an even greater extent. Strikingly, combined treatment resulted in significantly lower survival rates, 2 to 2.5 fold increase in apoptosis, more residual DNA-DSB 6 h post treatment and a G2-phase arrest. In addition, tumor growth analysis in vivo showed significant reduction in tumor growth and elevated caspase-3 activity when radiation was combined with HT and DNA-PKcsi compared to radiation alone. Importantly, no toxic side effects of HT or DNA-PKcsi were found.In conclusion, inhibiting DNA-DSB repair using HT and DNA-PKcsi before radiotherapy leads to enhanced cytotoxicity in cancer cells. This effect was even noticed in the more radio-resistant BCSCs, which are clearly sensitized by combined treatment. Therefore, the addition of HT and DNA-PKcsi to conventional radiotherapy is promising and might contribute to more efficient tumor control and patient outcome.

  13. Immediate and repair induced DNA double strand breaks in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, P.E.

    1986-01-01

    It seems logical to postulate that double strand breaks (dsb) arising both at the time of irradiation and via repair processes are potentially equally damaging for a cell in terms of the potential to induce chromosomal aberrations. However, in some cell systems the repair of double es or es-ssb sites may run concurrently with the incision so that these lesions do not remain open for long: hence the lack of accumulation of dsb during repair. The rate of incision will thus determine both the accumulation and the probability of exchanges leading to chromosomal aberrations between these and other frank dsb. Rapid incision leading to a large additional pool of dsb appears to be the case in Chinese hamster V79 cells. Some evidence also exists for the conversion of base damage, via dsb, into deletion type chromatid aberrations which accumulate in irradiated G2 human cells treated with ara C. A small fraction of dsb, probably arising both at the time of irradiation as well as enzymatically during repair of base or sugar damage, appears to be either left unrepaired, yielding deletion type chromosomal aberrations, or is misrepaired, yielding exchange aberrations. The induction of these aberrations appears to be of central importance in the biological effects of ionizing radiation such as mutations, oncogenic transformation, and cell death. 52 refs., 5 figs

  14. Mouse embryonic stem cells, but not somatic cells, predominantly use homologous recombination to repair double-strand DNA breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichy, Elisia D; Pillai, Resmi; Deng, Li; Liang, Li; Tischfield, Jay; Schwemberger, Sandy J; Babcock, George F; Stambrook, Peter J

    2010-11-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells give rise to all cell types of an organism. Since mutations at this embryonic stage would affect all cells and be detrimental to the overall health of an organism, robust mechanisms must exist to ensure that genomic integrity is maintained. To test this proposition, we compared the capacity of murine ES cells to repair DNA double-strand breaks with that of differentiated cells. Of the 2 major pathways that repair double-strand breaks, error-prone nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) predominated in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, whereas the high fidelity homologous recombinational repair (HRR) predominated in ES cells. Microhomology-mediated end joining, an emerging repair pathway, persisted at low levels in all cell types examined. The levels of proteins involved in HRR and microhomology-mediated end joining were highly elevated in ES cells compared with mouse embryonic fibroblasts, whereas those for NHEJ were quite variable, with DNA Ligase IV expression low in ES cells. The half-life of DNA Ligase IV protein was also low in ES cells. Attempts to increase the abundance of DNA Ligase IV protein by overexpression or inhibition of its degradation, and thereby elevate NHEJ in ES cells, were unsuccessful. When ES cells were induced to differentiate, however, the level of DNA Ligase IV protein increased, as did the capacity to repair by NHEJ. The data suggest that preferential use of HRR rather than NHEJ may lend ES cells an additional layer of genomic protection and that the limited levels of DNA Ligase IV may account for the low level of NHEJ activity.

  15. Contribution of DNA double-strand break repair gene XRCC3 genotypes to oral cancer susceptibility in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chia-Wen; Chang, Wen-Shin; Liu, Juhn-Cherng; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Bau, Da-Tian

    2014-06-01

    The DNA repair gene X-ray repair cross complementing protein 3 (XRCC3) is thought to play a major role in double-strand break repair and in maintaining genomic stability. Very possibly, defective double-strand break repair of cells can lead to carcinogenesis. Therefore, a case-control study was performed to reveal the contribution of XRCC3 genotypes to individual oral cancer susceptibility. In this hospital-based research, the association of XRCC3 rs1799794, rs45603942, rs861530, rs3212057, rs1799796, rs861539, rs28903081 genotypes with oral cancer risk in a Taiwanese population was investigated. In total, 788 patients with oral cancer and 956 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were genotyped. The results showed that there was significant differential distribution among oral cancer and controls in the genotypic (p=0.001428) and allelic (p=0.0013) frequencies of XRCC3 rs861539. As for the other polymorphisms, there was no difference between case and control groups. In gene-lifestyle interaction analysis, we have provided the first evidence showing that there is an obvious joint effect of XRCC3 rs861539 genotype with individual areca chewing habits on oral cancer risk. In conclusion, the T allele of XRCC3 rs861539, which has an interaction with areca chewing habit in oral carcinogenesis, may be an early marker for oral cancer in Taiwanese. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  16. UVA-induced DNA double-strand breaks result from the repair of clustered oxidative DNA damages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greinert, R.; Volkmer, B.; Henning, S.; Breitbart, E. W.; Greulich, K. O.; Cardoso, M. C.; Rapp, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    UVA (320–400 nm) represents the main spectral component of solar UV radiation, induces pre-mutagenic DNA lesions and is classified as Class I carcinogen. Recently, discussion arose whether UVA induces DNA double-strand breaks (dsbs). Only few reports link the induction of dsbs to UVA exposure and the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Using the Comet-assay and γH2AX as markers for dsb formation, we demonstrate the dose-dependent dsb induction by UVA in G1-synchronized human keratinocytes (HaCaT) and primary human skin fibroblasts. The number of γH2AX foci increases when a UVA dose is applied in fractions (split dose), with a 2-h recovery period between fractions. The presence of the anti-oxidant Naringin reduces dsb formation significantly. Using an FPG-modified Comet-assay as well as warm and cold repair incubation, we show that dsbs arise partially during repair of bi-stranded, oxidative, clustered DNA lesions. We also demonstrate that on stretched chromatin fibres, 8-oxo-G and abasic sites occur in clusters. This suggests a replication-independent formation of UVA-induced dsbs through clustered single-strand breaks via locally generated reactive oxygen species. Since UVA is the main component of solar UV exposure and is used for artificial UV exposure, our results shine new light on the aetiology of skin cancer. PMID:22941639

  17. Effects of 3-Deoxyadenosine (Cordycepin) on the repair of X-ray-induced DNA single- and double-strand breaks in chinese hamster V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, Wakako; Kuwabara, Mikinori; Sato, Fumiaki

    1990-01-01

    The ability of cordycepin to inhibit the repair of DNA strand breaks was examined with X-irradiated Chinese hamster V79 cells in log-phase culture. A filter elution technique revealed that 70 μM cordycepin did not inhibit the repair of single-strand breaks but inhibited the repair of double-strand breaks. These findings confirmed the fact that the increase in the lethality of cordycepin in X-irradiated cultured mammalian cells was attributable to unrepaired DNA double-strand breaks. (author)

  18. Depletion of the type 1 IGF receptor delays repair of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turney, Benjamin W.; Kerr, Martin; Chitnis, Meenali M.; Lodhia, Kunal; Wang, Yong; Riedemann, Johann; Rochester, Mark; Protheroe, Andrew S.; Brewster, Simon F.; Macaulay, Valentine M.

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: IGF-1R depletion sensitizes prostate cancer cells to ionizing radiation and DNA-damaging cytotoxic drugs. This study investigated the hypothesis that IGF-1R regulates DNA double strand break (DSB) repair. Methods: We tested effects of IGF-1R siRNA transfection on the repair of radiation-induced DSBs by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence for γH2AX, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Homologous recombination (HR) was quantified by reporter assays, and cell cycle distribution by flow cytometry. Results: We confirmed that IGF-1R depletion sensitized DU145 and PC3 prostate cancer cells to ionizing radiation. DU145 control transfectants resolved radiation-induced DSBs within 24 h, while IGF-1R depleted cells contained 30–40% unrepaired breaks at 24 h. IGF-1R depletion induced significant reduction in DSB repair by HR, although the magnitude of the repair defect suggests additional contributory factors. Radiation-induced G2-M arrest was attenuated by IGF-1R depletion, potentially suppressing cell cycle-dependent processes required for HR. In contrast, IGF-1R depletion induced only minor radiosensitization in LNCaP cells, and did not influence repair. Cell cycle profiles were similar to DU145, so were unlikely to account for differences in repair responses. Conclusions: These data indicate a role for IGF-1R in DSB repair, at least in part via HR, and support use of IGF-1R inhibitors with DNA damaging cancer treatments.

  19. Depletion of the type 1 IGF receptor delays repair of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, Benjamin W; Kerr, Martin; Chitnis, Meenali M; Lodhia, Kunal; Wang, Yong; Riedemann, Johann; Rochester, Mark; Protheroe, Andrew S; Brewster, Simon F; Macaulay, Valentine M

    2012-06-01

    IGF-1R depletion sensitizes prostate cancer cells to ionizing radiation and DNA-damaging cytotoxic drugs. This study investigated the hypothesis that IGF-1R regulates DNA double strand break (DSB) repair. We tested effects of IGF-1R siRNA transfection on the repair of radiation-induced DSBs by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence for γH2AX, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Homologous recombination (HR) was quantified by reporter assays, and cell cycle distribution by flow cytometry. We confirmed that IGF-1R depletion sensitized DU145 and PC3 prostate cancer cells to ionizing radiation. DU145 control transfectants resolved radiation-induced DSBs within 24 h, while IGF-1R depleted cells contained 30-40% unrepaired breaks at 24 h. IGF-1R depletion induced significant reduction in DSB repair by HR, although the magnitude of the repair defect suggests additional contributory factors. Radiation-induced G2-M arrest was attenuated by IGF-1R depletion, potentially suppressing cell cycle-dependent processes required for HR. In contrast, IGF-1R depletion induced only minor radiosensitization in LNCaP cells, and did not influence repair. Cell cycle profiles were similar to DU145, so were unlikely to account for differences in repair responses. These data indicate a role for IGF-1R in DSB repair, at least in part via HR, and support use of IGF-1R inhibitors with DNA damaging cancer treatments. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. More efficient repair of DNA double-strand breaks in skeletal muscle stem cells compared to their committed progeny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyla Vahidi Ferdousi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The loss of genome integrity in adult stem cells results in accelerated tissue aging and is possibly cancerogenic. Adult stem cells in different tissues appear to react robustly to DNA damage. We report that adult skeletal stem (satellite cells do not primarily respond to radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs via differentiation and exhibit less apoptosis compared to other myogenic cells. Satellite cells repair these DNA lesions more efficiently than their committed progeny. Importantly, non-proliferating satellite cells and post-mitotic nuclei in the fiber exhibit dramatically distinct repair efficiencies. Altogether, reduction of the repair capacity appears to be more a function of differentiation than of the proliferation status of the muscle cell. Notably, satellite cells retain a high efficiency of DSB repair also when isolated from the natural niche. Finally, we show that repair of DSB substrates is not only very efficient but, surprisingly, also very accurate in satellite cells and that accurate repair depends on the key non-homologous end-joining factor DNA-PKcs.

  1. More efficient repair of DNA double-strand breaks in skeletal muscle stem cells compared to their committed progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahidi Ferdousi, Leyla; Rocheteau, Pierre; Chayot, Romain; Montagne, Benjamin; Chaker, Zayna; Flamant, Patricia; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim; Ricchetti, Miria

    2014-11-01

    The loss of genome integrity in adult stem cells results in accelerated tissue aging and is possibly cancerogenic. Adult stem cells in different tissues appear to react robustly to DNA damage. We report that adult skeletal stem (satellite) cells do not primarily respond to radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) via differentiation and exhibit less apoptosis compared to other myogenic cells. Satellite cells repair these DNA lesions more efficiently than their committed progeny. Importantly, non-proliferating satellite cells and post-mitotic nuclei in the fiber exhibit dramatically distinct repair efficiencies. Altogether, reduction of the repair capacity appears to be more a function of differentiation than of the proliferation status of the muscle cell. Notably, satellite cells retain a high efficiency of DSB repair also when isolated from the natural niche. Finally, we show that repair of DSB substrates is not only very efficient but, surprisingly, also very accurate in satellite cells and that accurate repair depends on the key non-homologous end-joining factor DNA-PKcs. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. The influence of bromodeoxyuridine on the induction and repair of DNA double-strand breaks in glioblastoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nusser, N.N.; Bartkowiak, D.; Roettinger, E.M.

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To examine the dose response of DNA damage and its modification by the radiosensitizer, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). The sensitizing mechanism is analyzed with regard to its influence on the induction and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Material and Methods: Cells from three different human glioblastoma lines, A7, LH and U87MG, were X-irradiated with and without exposure to BrdU. DNA fragments were separated by field-inversion gel electrophoresis (FIGE) and quantified by fluorometry immediately and 24 h after irradiation. Results: In all cell lines, the dose response followed a linear-quadratic rather than a purely linear function. BrdU-treated cells exhibited a significantly higher amount of mobile DNA. In repair experiments with and without BrdU, the amount of mobile DNA fell close to control values within 24 h. Conclusions: The linear-quadratic model appropriately describes the X-ray induced fragmentation of DNA. BrdU sensitizing acts predominantly by increasing DNA fragility, and not by impairing damage repair. The amount of DSBs persistent after 24 h of repair is minimal, even after highly cytotoxic doses. However, it appears to depend on the extent of initial damage, causing sensitized cells to retain more DSBs than unsensitized cells. (orig.)

  3. Genetic variation in a DNA double strand break repair gene in saudi population: a comparative study with worldwide ethnic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areeshi, Mohammed Yahya

    2013-01-01

    DNA repair capacity is crucial in maintaining cellular functions and homeostasis. However, it can be altered based on DNA sequence variations in DNA repair genes and this may lead to the development of many diseases including malignancies. Identification of genetic polymorphisms responsible for reduced DNA repair capacity is necessary for better prevention. Homologous recombination (HR), a major double strand break repair pathway, plays a critical role in maintaining the genome stability. The present study was performed to determine the frequency of the HR gene XRCC3 Exon 7 (C18067T, rs861539) polymorphisms in Saudi Arabian population in comparison with epidemiological studies by "MEDLINE" search to equate with global populations. The variant allelic (T) frequency of XRCC3 (C>T) was found to be 39%. Our results suggest that frequency of XRCC3 (C>T) DNA repair gene exhibits distinctive patterns compared with the Saudi Arabian population and this might be attributed to ethnic variation. The present findings may help in high-risk screening of humans exposed to environmental carcinogens and cancer predisposition in different ethnic groups.

  4. Repair of the double-strand breaks produced by /sup 125/I disintegrations in the DNA of micrococcus radiodurans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, D K [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, Ontario. Chalk River Nuclear Labs.

    1978-01-01

    Wild-type M. radiodurans and two radiosensitive mutants were used to study the lethal effects of /sup 125/I disintegrations in their DNA. The relative sensitivities of these three strains to inactivation by ..gamma..-radiation were reflected in their relative sensitivities to inactivation by /sup 125/I decay. The number of double-strand (ds) breaks in the DNA appeared to be similar at levels of ..gamma..-radiation and of /sup 125/I decay that reduced survival to 10%. All three strains of M. radiodurans rapidly repaired ds breaks produced in their DNA by either ..gamma..-radiation or /sup 125/I disintegrations. If one ds break per cell is a lethal event (Krisch. et al., 1975), cells of the three strains tested would die when they had left unrepaired one ds break out of an initial 45, 600 or 1800 ds breaks per single cell.

  5. Ubiquitin-specific protease 5 is required for the efficient repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Nakajima

    Full Text Available During the DNA damage response (DDR, ubiquitination plays an important role in the recruitment and regulation of repair proteins. However, little is known about elimination of the ubiquitination signal after repair is completed. Here we show that the ubiquitin-specific protease 5 (USP5, a deubiquitinating enzyme, is involved in the elimination of the ubiquitin signal from damaged sites and is required for efficient DNA double-strand break (DSB repair. Depletion of USP5 sensitizes cells to DNA damaging agents, produces DSBs, causes delayed disappearance of γH2AX foci after Bleocin treatment, and influences DSB repair efficiency in the homologous recombination pathway but not in the non-homologous end joining pathway. USP5 co-localizes to DSBs induced by laser micro-irradiation in a RAD18-dependent manner. Importantly, polyubiquitin chains at sites of DNA damage remained for longer periods in USP5-depleted cells. Our results show that disassembly of polyubiquitin chains by USP5 at sites of damage is important for efficient DSB repair.

  6. Repair of double-strand breaks in Micrococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrell, A.D.; Dean, C.J.

    1975-01-01

    Micrococcus radiodurans has been shown to sustain double-strand breaks in its DNA after exposure to x-radiation. Following sublethal doses of x-rays (200 krad in oxygen or less), the cells were able to repair these breaks, and an intermediate fast-sedimenting DNA component seemed to be involved in the repair process

  7. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA polymerase IV: possible involvement in double strand break DNA repair.

    OpenAIRE

    Leem, S H; Ropp, P A; Sugino, A

    1994-01-01

    We identified and purified a new DNA polymerase (DNA polymerase IV), which is similar to mammalian DNA polymerase beta, from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and suggested that it is encoded by YCR14C (POLX) on chromosome III. Here, we provided a direct evidence that the purified DNA polymerase IV is indeed encoded by POLX. Strains harboring a pol4 deletion mutation exhibit neither mitotic growth defect nor a meiosis defect, suggesting that DNA polymerase IV participates in nonessential functions in ...

  8. A new model describing the curves for repair of both DNA double-strand breaks and chromosome damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foray, N.; Badie, C.; Alsbeih, G.; Malaise, E.P.; Fertil, B.

    1996-01-01

    A review of reports dealing with fittings of the data for repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and excess chromosome fragments (ECFs) shows that several models are used to fit the repair curves. Since DSBs and ECFs are correleated, it is worth developing a model describing both phenomena. The curve-fitting models used most extensively, the two repair half-times model for DSBs and the monoexponential plus residual model for ECFs, appear to be too inflexible to describe the repair curves for both DSBs and ECFs. We have therefore developed a new concept based on a variable repair half-time. According to this concept, the repair curve is continuously bending and dependent on time and probably reflects a continuous spectrum of damage repairability. The fits of the curves for DSB repair to the variable repair half-time and the variable repair half-time plus residual models were compared to those obtained with the two half-times plus residual and two half-times models. Similarly, the fits of the curves for ECF repair to the variable repair half-time and variable half-time plus residual models were compared to that obtained with the monoexponential plus residual model. The quality of fit and the dependence of adjustable parameters on the portion of the curve fitted were used as comparison criteria. We found that: (a) It is useful to postulate the existence of a residual term for unrepairable lesions, regardless of the model adopted. (b) With the two cell lines tested (a normal and a hypersensitive one), data for both DSBs and ECTs are best fitted to the variable repair half-time plus residual model, whatever the repair time range. 47 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Differences in heavy-ion-induced DNA double-strand breaks in a mouse DNA repair-deficient mutant cell line (SL3-147) before and after chromatin proteolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Masahiro; Eguchi-Kasai, Kiyomi; Sato, Koki; Minohara, Shinichi; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Yatagai, Fumio.

    1995-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks induced by X- or neon beam-irradiation in a DNA double-strand break-repair-deficient mutant cell line (SL3-147) were examined. The increase in the number of DNA double-strand breaks was dose-depend after irradiation with X-rays and neon beams and was enhanced by chromatin-proteolysis treatment before irradiation. These results suggest that the induction of DNA double-strand breaks by ionizing radiation, including heavy-ions, is influenced by the chromatin structure. (author)

  10. RNF4 is required for DNA double-strand break repair in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vyas, R; Kumar, R; Clermont, F

    2013-01-01

    for both homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining repair. To establish a link between Rnf4 and the DNA damage response (DDR) in vivo, we generated an Rnf4 allelic series in mice. We show that Rnf4-deficiency causes persistent ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage and signaling...

  11. Temporal analysis of meiotic DNA double-strand break formation and repair in Drosophila females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, S; McKim, K S

    2006-11-24

    Using an antibody against the phosphorylated form of His2Av (gamma-His2Av), we have described the time course for the series of events leading from the formation of a double-strand break (DSB) to a crossover in Drosophila female meiotic prophase. MEI-P22 is required for DSB formation and localizes to chromosomes prior to gamma-His2Av foci. Drosophila females, however, are among the group of organisms where synaptonemal complex (SC) formation is not dependent on DSBs. In the absence of two SC proteins, C(3)G and C(2)M, the number of DSBs in oocytes is significantly reduced. This is consistent with the appearance of SC protein staining prior to gamma-His2Av foci. However, SC formation is incomplete or absent in the neighboring nurse cells, and gamma-His2Av foci appear with the same kinetics as in oocytes and do not depend on SC proteins. Thus, competence for DSB formation in nurse cells occurs with a specific timing that is independent of the SC, whereas in the oocytes, some SC proteins may have a regulatory role to counteract the effects of a negative regulator of DSB formation. The SC is not sufficient for DSB formation, however, since DSBs were absent from the heterochromatin even though SC formation occurs in these regions. All gamma-His2Av foci disappear before the end of prophase, presumably as repair is completed and crossovers are formed. However, oocytes in early prophase exhibit a slower response to X-ray-induced DSBs compared to those in the late pachytene stage. Assuming all DSBs appear as gamma-His2Av foci, there is at least a 3:1 ratio of noncrossover to crossover products. From a comparison of the frequency of gamma-His2Av foci and crossovers, it appears that Drosophila females have only a weak mechanism to ensure a crossover in the presence of a low number of DSBs.

  12. Xrcc1-dependent and Ku-dependent DNA double-strand break repair kinetics in Arabidopsis plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonnel, Cyril; Gallego, Maria E; White, Charles I

    2010-10-01

    Double-strand breakage (DSB) of DNA involves loss of information on the two strands of the DNA fibre and thus cannot be repaired by simple copying of the complementary strand which is possible with single-strand DNA damage. Homologous recombination (HR) can precisely repair DSB using another copy of the genome as template and non-homologous recombination (NHR) permits repair of DSB with little or no dependence on DNA sequence homology. In addition to the well-characterised Ku-dependent non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway, much recent attention has been focused on Ku-independent NHR. The complex interrelationships and regulation of NHR pathways remain poorly understood, even more so in the case of plants, and we present here an analysis of Ku-dependent and Ku-independent repair of DSB in Arabidopsis thaliana. We have characterised an Arabidopsis xrcc1 mutant and developed quantitative analysis of the kinetics of appearance and loss of γ-H2AX foci as a tool to measure DSB repair in dividing root tip cells of γ-irradiated plants in vivo. This approach has permitted determination of DSB repair kinetics in planta following a short pulse of γ-irradiation, establishing the existence of a Ku-independent, Xrcc1-dependent DSB repair pathway. Furthermore, our data show a role for Ku80 during the first minutes post-irradiation and that Xrcc1 also plays such a role, but only in the absence of Ku. The importance of Xrcc1 is, however, clearly visible at later times in the presence of Ku, showing that alternative end-joining plays an important role in DSB repair even in the presence of active NHEJ. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Writers, Readers, and Erasers of Histone Ubiquitylation in DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smeenk, Godelieve; Mailand, Niels

    2016-01-01

    accurate lesion repair and restoration of genome integrity. In vertebrate cells, ubiquitin-dependent modifications of histones adjacent to DSBs by RNF8, RNF168, and other ubiquitin ligases have a key role in promoting the assembly of repair protein complexes, serving as direct recruitment platforms...... for a range of genome caretaker proteins and their associated factors. These DNA damage-induced chromatin ubiquitylation marks provide an essential component of a histone code for DSB repair that is controlled by multifaceted regulatory circuits, underscoring its importance for genome stability maintenance....... In this review, we provide a comprehensive account of how DSB-induced histone ubiquitylation is sensed, decoded and modulated by an elaborate array of repair factors and regulators. We discuss how these mechanisms impact DSB repair pathway choice and functionality for optimal protection of genome integrity...

  14. Cytotoxicity of 125I decay in the DNA double strand break repair deficient mutant cell line, xrs-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasui, L.S.

    1992-01-01

    Survival of parental Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) K1 cells and the DNA double strand break (DSB) repair deficient mutant, xrs-5 was determined after accumulation of 125 I decays. Both CHO and xrs-5 cells were extremely sensitive to accumulated 125 I decays. D o values for CHO and xrs-5 cells were 40 and approximately 7 decays per cell, respectively. Difference in cell survival between CHO and xrs-5 cells was not due to differences in overall 125 IUdR incorporation, differences in labelling index (LI) or differences in plating efficiency (PE). Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values calculated relative to 137 Cs gamma radiation survival values (D o and D 10 ) were higher in xrs-5 cells compared with CHO cells, although both CHO and xrs-5 cells have high RBE values that correspond to a high sensitivity of CHO and xrs-5 cells to 125 I decay. (Author)

  15. Induction and repair of DNA double strand breaks: The increasing spectrum of non-homologous end joining pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mladenov, Emil; Iliakis, George

    2011-01-01

    A defining characteristic of damage induced in the DNA by ionizing radiation (IR) is its clustered character that leads to the formation of complex lesions challenging the cellular repair mechanisms. The most widely investigated such complex lesion is the DNA double strand break (DSB). DSBs undermine chromatin stability and challenge the repair machinery because an intact template strand is lacking to assist restoration of integrity and sequence in the DNA molecule. Therefore, cells have evolved a sophisticated machinery to detect DSBs and coordinate a response on the basis of inputs from various sources. A central function of cellular responses to DSBs is the coordination of DSB repair. Two conceptually different mechanisms can in principle remove DSBs from the genome of cells of higher eukaryotes. Homologous recombination repair (HRR) uses as template a homologous DNA molecule and is therefore error-free; it functions preferentially in the S and G2 phases. Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), on the other hand, simply restores DNA integrity by joining the two ends, is error prone as sequence is only fortuitously preserved and active throughout the cell cycle. The basis of DSB repair pathway choice remains unknown, but cells of higher eukaryotes appear programmed to utilize preferentially NHEJ. Recent work suggests that when the canonical DNA-PK dependent pathway of NHEJ (D-NHEJ), becomes compromised an alternative NHEJ pathway and not HRR substitutes in a quasi-backup function (B-NHEJ). Here, we outline aspects of DSB induction by IR and review the mechanisms of their processing in cells of higher eukaryotes. We place particular emphasis on backup pathways of NHEJ and summarize their increasing significance in various cellular processes, as well as their potential contribution to carcinogenesis.

  16. The Fanconi anemia group A protein modulates homologous repair of DNA double-strand breaks in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun-Gui; Herceg, Zdenko; Nakanishi, Koji; Demuth, Ilja; Piccoli, Colette; Michelon, Jocelyne; Hildebrand, Gabriele; Jasin, Maria; Digweed, Martin; Wang, Zhao-Qi

    2005-10-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) cells exhibit hypersensitivity to DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs) and high levels of chromosome instability. FA gene products have been shown to functionally or physically interact with BRCA1, RAD51 and the MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 complex, suggesting that the FA complex may be involved in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Here, we have investigated specifically the function of the FA group A protein (FANCA) in the repair of DSBs in mammalian cells. We show that the targeted deletion of Fanca exons 37-39 generates a null for Fanca in mice and abolishes ubiquitination of Fancd2, the downstream effector of the FA complex. Cells lacking Fanca exhibit increased chromosomal aberrations and attenuated accumulation of Brca1 and Rad51 foci in response to DNA damage. The absence of Fanca greatly reduces gene-targeting efficiency in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells and compromises the survival of fibroblast cells in response to ICL agent treatment. Fanca-null cells exhibit compromised homology-directed repair (HDR) of DSBs, particularly affecting the single-strand annealing pathway. These data identify the Fanca protein as an integral component in the early step of HDR of DSBs and thereby minimizing the genomic instability.

  17. Altered Hematopoiesis in Mice Lacking DNA Polymerase μ Is Due to Inefficient Double-Strand Break Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Daniel; Escudero, Beatriz; Ligos, José Manuel; Segovia, Jose Carlos; Estrada, Juan Camilo; Terrados, Gloria; Blanco, Luis; Samper, Enrique; Bernad, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Polymerase mu (Polμ) is an error-prone, DNA-directed DNA polymerase that participates in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair. In vivo, Polμ deficiency results in impaired Vκ-Jκ recombination and altered somatic hypermutation and centroblast development. In Polμ−/− mice, hematopoietic development was defective in several peripheral and bone marrow (BM) cell populations, with about a 40% decrease in BM cell number that affected several hematopoietic lineages. Hematopoietic progenitors were reduced both in number and in expansion potential. The observed phenotype correlates with a reduced efficiency in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair in hematopoietic tissue. Whole-body γ-irradiation revealed that Polμ also plays a role in DSB repair in non-hematopoietic tissues. Our results show that Polμ function is required for physiological hematopoietic development with an important role in maintaining early progenitor cell homeostasis and genetic stability in hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic tissues. PMID:19229323

  18. Role for Artemis nuclease in the repair of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks by alternative end joining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscariello, Mario; Wieloch, Radi; Kurosawa, Aya; Li, Fanghua; Adachi, Noritaka; Mladenov, Emil; Iliakis, George

    2015-07-01

    Exposure of cells to ionizing radiation or radiomimetic drugs generates DNA double-strand breaks that are processed either by homologous recombination repair (HRR), or by canonical, DNA-PKcs-dependent non-homologous end-joining (C-NHEJ). Chemical or genetic inactivation of factors involved in C-NHEJ or HRR, but also their local failure in repair proficient cells, promotes an alternative, error-prone end-joining pathway that serves as backup (A-EJ). There is evidence for the involvement of Artemis endonuclease, a protein deficient in a human radiosensitivity syndrome associated with severe immunodeficiency (RS-SCID), in the processing of subsets of DSBs by HRR or C-NHEJ. It is thought that within HRR or C-NHEJ Artemis processes DNA termini at complex DSBs. Whether Artemis has a role in A-EJ remains unknown. Here, we analyze using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and specialized reporter assays, DSB repair in wild-type pre-B NALM-6 lymphocytes, as well as in their Artemis(-/-), DNA ligase 4(-/-) (LIG4(-/-)), and LIG4(-/-)/Artemis(-/-) double mutant counterparts, under conditions allowing evaluation of A-EJ. Our results substantiate the suggested roles of Artemis in C-NHEJ and HRR, but also demonstrate a role for the protein in A-EJ that is confirmed in Artemis deficient normal human fibroblasts. We conclude that Artemis is a nuclease participating in DSB repair by all major repair pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Recognition, signaling, and repair of DNA double-strand breaks produced by ionizing radiation in mammalian cells: the molecular choreography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Larry H

    2012-01-01

    The faithful maintenance of chromosome continuity in human cells during DNA replication and repair is critical for preventing the conversion of normal diploid cells to an oncogenic state. The evolution of higher eukaryotic cells endowed them with a large genetic investment in the molecular machinery that ensures chromosome stability. In mammalian and other vertebrate cells, the elimination of double-strand breaks with minimal nucleotide sequence change involves the spatiotemporal orchestration of a seemingly endless number of proteins ranging in their action from the nucleotide level to nucleosome organization and chromosome architecture. DNA DSBs trigger a myriad of post-translational modifications that alter catalytic activities and the specificity of protein interactions: phosphorylation, acetylation, methylation, ubiquitylation, and SUMOylation, followed by the reversal of these changes as repair is completed. "Superfluous" protein recruitment to damage sites, functional redundancy, and alternative pathways ensure that DSB repair is extremely efficient, both quantitatively and qualitatively. This review strives to integrate the information about the molecular mechanisms of DSB repair that has emerged over the last two decades with a focus on DSBs produced by the prototype agent ionizing radiation (IR). The exponential growth of molecular studies, heavily driven by RNA knockdown technology, now reveals an outline of how many key protein players in genome stability and cancer biology perform their interwoven tasks, e.g. ATM, ATR, DNA-PK, Chk1, Chk2, PARP1/2/3, 53BP1, BRCA1, BRCA2, BLM, RAD51, and the MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 complex. Thus, the nature of the intricate coordination of repair processes with cell cycle progression is becoming apparent. This review also links molecular abnormalities to cellular pathology as much a possible and provides a framework of temporal relationships. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. DNA repair in modeled microgravity: Double strand break rejoining activity in human lymphocytes irradiated with γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mognato, Maddalena; Girardi, Cristina; Fabris, Sonia; Celotti, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    Cell response to ionising radiation depends, besides on genetic and physiological features of the biological systems, on environmental conditions occurring during DNA repair. Many data showed that microgravity, experienced by astronauts during space flights or modeled on Earth, causes apoptosis, cytoskeletal alteration, cell growth inhibition, increased frequency of mutations and chromosome aberrations. In this study, we analysed the progression of the rejoining of double strand breaks (DSBs) in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) irradiated with γ-rays and incubated in static condition (1g) or in modeled microgravity (MMG). γ-H2AX foci formation and disappearance, monitored during the repair incubation, showed that the kinetics of DSBs rejoining was different in the two gravity conditions. The fraction of foci-positive cells decreased slower in MMG than in 1g at 6 and 24 h after irradiation (P < 0.01) and the mean number of γ-H2AX foci per nucleus was significantly higher in MMG than in 1g at the same time-points (P < 0.001). In the same samples we determined apoptotic level and the rate of DSB rejoining during post-irradiation incubation. A significant induction of apoptosis was observed in MMG at 24 h after irradiation (P < 0.001), whereas at shorter times the level of apoptosis was slightly higher in MMG respect to 1g. In accordance with the kinetics of γ-H2AX foci, the slower rejoining of radiation-induced DSBs in MMG was observed by DNA fragmentation analyses during the repair incubation; the data of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis assay showed that the fraction of DNA released in the gel was significantly higher in PBL incubated in MMG after irradiation with respect to cells maintained in 1g. Our results provide evidences that MMG incubation during DNA repair delayed the rate of radiation-induced DSB rejoining, and increased, as a consequence, the genotoxic effects of ionising radiation.

  1. DNA repair in modeled microgravity: Double strand break rejoining activity in human lymphocytes irradiated with {gamma}-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mognato, Maddalena, E-mail: maddalena.mognato@unipd.it [Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita di Padova, via U. Bassi 58 B, 35121 Padova (Italy); Girardi, Cristina; Fabris, Sonia [Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita di Padova, via U. Bassi 58 B, 35121 Padova (Italy); Celotti, Lucia [Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita di Padova, via U. Bassi 58 B, 35121 Padova (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, INFN, Padova (Italy)

    2009-04-26

    Cell response to ionising radiation depends, besides on genetic and physiological features of the biological systems, on environmental conditions occurring during DNA repair. Many data showed that microgravity, experienced by astronauts during space flights or modeled on Earth, causes apoptosis, cytoskeletal alteration, cell growth inhibition, increased frequency of mutations and chromosome aberrations. In this study, we analysed the progression of the rejoining of double strand breaks (DSBs) in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) irradiated with {gamma}-rays and incubated in static condition (1g) or in modeled microgravity (MMG). {gamma}-H2AX foci formation and disappearance, monitored during the repair incubation, showed that the kinetics of DSBs rejoining was different in the two gravity conditions. The fraction of foci-positive cells decreased slower in MMG than in 1g at 6 and 24 h after irradiation (P < 0.01) and the mean number of {gamma}-H2AX foci per nucleus was significantly higher in MMG than in 1g at the same time-points (P < 0.001). In the same samples we determined apoptotic level and the rate of DSB rejoining during post-irradiation incubation. A significant induction of apoptosis was observed in MMG at 24 h after irradiation (P < 0.001), whereas at shorter times the level of apoptosis was slightly higher in MMG respect to 1g. In accordance with the kinetics of {gamma}-H2AX foci, the slower rejoining of radiation-induced DSBs in MMG was observed by DNA fragmentation analyses during the repair incubation; the data of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis assay showed that the fraction of DNA released in the gel was significantly higher in PBL incubated in MMG after irradiation with respect to cells maintained in 1g. Our results provide evidences that MMG incubation during DNA repair delayed the rate of radiation-induced DSB rejoining, and increased, as a consequence, the genotoxic effects of ionising radiation.

  2. A quantitative model of the major pathways for radiation-induced DNA double-strand break repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, O.V.; Krasavin, E.A.; Lyashko, M.S.; Batmunkh, M.; Sweilam, N.H.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a model approach to simulate the major pathways of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair in mammalian and human cells. The proposed model shows a possible mechanistic explanation of the basic regularities of DSB processing through the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), homologous recombination (HR), and single-strand annealing (SSA). It reconstructs the time-courses of radiation-induced foci specific to particular repair processes including the major intermediate stages. The model is validated for ionizing radiations of a wide range of linear energy transfer (0.2-236 keV/μm) including a relatively broad spectrum of heavy ions. The appropriate set of reaction rate constants was suggested to satisfy the kinetics of DSB rejoining for the considered types of exposure. The simultaneous assessment of three repair pathways allows one to describe their possible biological relations in response to radiation. With the help of the proposed approach, we reproduce several experimental data sets on γ-H2AX foci remaining in different types of cells including those defective in NHEJ, HR, or SSA functions.

  3. Opposing roles of RNF8/RNF168 and deubiquitinating enzymes in ubiquitination-dependent DNA double-strand break response signaling and DNA-repair pathway choice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakada, Shinichiro

    2016-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligases ring finger protein (RNF) 8 and RNF168 transduce the DNA double-strand break (DSB) response (DDR) signal by ubiquitinating DSB sites. The depletion of RNF8 or RNF168 suppresses the accumulation of DNA-repair regulating factors such as 53BP1 and RAP80 at DSB sites, suggesting roles for RNF8- and RNF168-mediated ubiquitination in DSB repair. This mini-review provides a brief overview of the RNF8- and RNF168-dependent DDR-signaling and DNA-repair pathways. The choice of DNA-repair pathway when RNF8- and RNF168-mediated ubiquitination-dependent DDR signaling is negatively regulated by deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) is reviewed to clarify how the opposing roles of RNF8/RNF168 and DUBs regulate ubiquitination-dependent DDR signaling and the choice of DNA-repair pathway

  4. Improving DNA double-strand repair inhibitor KU55933 therapeutic index in cancer radiotherapy using nanoparticle drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xi; Lara, Haydee; Wagner, Kyle T.; Saripalli, Srinivas; Hyder, Syed Nabeel; Foote, Michael; Sethi, Manish; Wang, Edina; Caster, Joseph M.; Zhang, Longzhen; Wang, Andrew Z.

    2015-11-01

    Radiotherapy is a key component of cancer treatment. Because of its importance, there has been high interest in developing agents and strategies to further improve the therapeutic index of radiotherapy. DNA double-strand repair inhibitors (DSBRIs) are among the most promising agents to improve radiotherapy. However, their clinical translation has been limited by their potential toxicity to normal tissue. Recent advances in nanomedicine offer an opportunity to overcome this limitation. In this study, we aim to demonstrate the proof of principle by developing and evaluating nanoparticle (NP) formulations of KU55933, a DSBRI. We engineered a NP formulation of KU55933 using nanoprecipitation method with different lipid polymer nanoparticle formulation. NP KU55933 using PLGA formulation has the best loading efficacy as well as prolonged drug release profile. We demonstrated that NP KU55933 is a potent radiosensitizer in vitro using clonogenic assay and is more effective as a radiosensitizer than free KU55933 in vivo using mouse xenograft models of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Western blots and immunofluorescence showed NP KU55933 exhibited more prolonged inhibition of DNA repair pathway. In addition, NP KU55933 leads to lower skin toxicity than KU55933. Our study supports further investigations using NP to deliver DSBRIs to improve cancer radiotherapy treatment.

  5. The involvement of human RECQL4 in DNA double-strand break repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Karmakar, Parimal; Aamann, Maria Diget

    2010-01-01

    Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS) is an autosomal recessive hereditary disorder associated with mutation in RECQL4 gene, a member of the human RecQ helicases. The disease is characterized by genomic instability, skeletal abnormalities and predisposition to malignant tumors, especially osteosarcomas......-induced DSBs and remains for a shorter duration than WRN and BLM, indicating its distinct role in repair of DSBs. Endogenous RECQL4 also colocalizes with gammaH2AX at the site of DSBs. The RECQL4 domain responsible for its DNA damage localization has been mapped to the unique N-terminus domain between amino...

  6. Impact of charged particle exposure on homologous DNA double-strand break repair in human blood-derived cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie eRall

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation generates DNA double-strand breaks (DSB which, unless faithfully repaired, can generate chromosomal rearrangements in hematopoietic stem and/or progenitor cells (HSPC, potentially priming the cells towards a leukemic phenotype. Using an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP-based reporter system, we recently identified differences in the removal of enzyme-mediated DSB in human HSPC versus mature peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL, particularly regarding homologous DSB repair (HR. Assessment of chromosomal breaks via premature chromosome condensation or γH2AX foci indicated similar efficiency and kinetics of radiation-induced DSB formation and rejoining in PBL and HSPC. Prolonged persistence of chromosomal breaks was observed for higher LET charged particles which are known to induce more complex DNA damage compared to X rays. Consistent with HR deficiency in HSPC observed in our previous study, we noticed here pronounced focal accumulation of 53BP1 after X-ray and carbon ion exposure (intermediate LET in HSPC versus PBL. For higher LET, 53BP1 foci kinetics were similarly delayed in PBL and HSPC suggesting similar failure to repair complex DNA damage. Data obtained with plasmid reporter systems revealed a dose- and LET-dependent HR increase after X-ray, carbon ion and higher LET exposure, particularly in HR-proficient immortalized and primary lymphocytes, confirming preferential use of conservative HR in PBL for intermediate LET damage repair. HR measured adjacent to the leukemia-associated MLL breakpoint cluster sequence in reporter lines revealed dose-dependency of potentially leukemogenic rearrangements underscoring the risk of leukemia-induction by radiation treatment.

  7. NF-κB regulates DNA double-strand break repair in conjunction with BRCA1-CtIP complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volcic, Meta; Karl, Sabine; Baumann, Bernd; Salles, Daniela; Daniel, Peter; Fulda, Simone; Wiesmüller, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    NF-κB is involved in immune responses, inflammation, oncogenesis, cell proliferation and apoptosis. Even though NF-κB can be activated by DNA damage via Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) signalling, little was known about an involvement in DNA repair. In this work, we dissected distinct DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair mechanisms revealing a stimulatory role of NF-κB in homologous recombination (HR). This effect was independent of chromatin context, cell cycle distribution or cross-talk with p53. It was not mediated by the transcriptional NF-κB targets Bcl2, BAX or Ku70, known for their dual roles in apoptosis and DSB repair. A contribution by Bcl-xL was abrogated when caspases were inhibited. Notably, HR induction by NF-κB required the targets ATM and BRCA2. Additionally, we provide evidence that NF-κB interacts with CtIP-BRCA1 complexes and promotes BRCA1 stabilization, and thereby contributes to HR induction. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed accelerated formation of replication protein A (RPA) and Rad51 foci upon NF-κB activation indicating HR stimulation through DSB resection by the interacting CtIP-BRCA1 complex and Rad51 filament formation. Taken together, these results define multiple NF-κB-dependent mechanisms regulating HR induction, and thereby providing a novel intriguing explanation for both NF-κB-mediated resistance to chemo- and radiotherapies as well as for the sensitization by pharmaceutical intervention of NF-κB activation.

  8. Heterochromatinization associated with cell differentiation as a model to study DNA double strand break induction and repair in the context of higher-order chromatin structure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Falk, Martin; Lukášová, Emilie; Štefančíková, Lenka; Baranová, E.; Falková, Iva; Ježková, L.; Davídková, Marie; Bačíková, Alena; Vachelová, Jana; Michaelidesová, Anna; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 83, Jan (2014), s. 177-185 ISSN 0969-8043 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD12039 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : DNA double strand break (DSB) repair * Immature and terminally differentiated granulocytes * gamma H2AX/53BP1 repair foci Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics; BO - Biophysics (UJF-V) Impact factor: 1.231, year: 2014

  9. Caffeine inhibits homology-directed repair of I-SceI-induced DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huichen; Boecker, Wilfried; Wang, Hongyan; Wang, Xiang; Guan, Jun; Thompson, Larry H; Nickoloff, Jac A; Iliakis, George

    2004-01-22

    We recently reported that two Chinese hamster mutants deficient in the RAD51 paralogs XRCC2 and XRCC3 show reduced radiosensitization after treatment with caffeine, thus implicating homology-directed repair (HDR) of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the mechanism of caffeine radiosensitization. Here, we investigate directly the effect of caffeine on HDR initiated by DSBs induced by a rare cutting endonuclease (I-SceI) into one of two direct DNA repeats. The results demonstrate a strong inhibition by caffeine of HDR in wild-type cells, and a substantial reduction of this effect in HDR-deficient XRCC3 mutant cells. Inhibition of HDR and cell radiosensitization to killing shows similar dependence on caffeine concentration suggesting a cause-effect relationship between these effects. UCN-01, a kinase inhibitor that effectively abrogates checkpoint activation in irradiated cells, has only a small effect on HDR, indicating that similar to radiosensitization, inhibition of checkpoint signaling is not sufficient for HDR inhibition. Recombination events occurring during treatment with caffeine are characterized by rearrangements reminiscent to those previously reported for the XRCC3 mutant, and immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrates significantly reduced formation of IR-specific RAD51 foci after caffeine treatment. In summary, our results identify inhibition of HDR as a significant contributor to caffeine radiosensitization.

  10. Genetic polymorphisms in DNA double-strand break repair genes XRCC5, XRCC6 and susceptibility to hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Yang, Yuan; An, Yu; Zhou, Yun; Liu, Yanhong; Yu, Qing; Lu, Daru; Wang, Hongyang; Jin, Li; Zhou, Weiping; Qian, Ji; Shugart, Yin Yao

    2011-04-01

    Environmental risk factors cause DNA damages. Imprecise DNA repair leads to chromosome aberrations, genome destabilization and hepatocarcinogenesis. Ku is a key DNA double-strand break repair protein. We hypothesized that the genetic variants in Ku subunits encoding genes, XRCC5/XRCC6, may contribute to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) susceptibility. We genotyped 13 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in XRCC5 and XRCC6 and evaluated their associations with HCC risk in 689 pathologically confirmed cases and 690 cancer-free controls from a Chinese population. We found that a significantly reduced risk for HCC was associated with XRCC5 rs16855458 [odds ratio (OR)=0.59; 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.43-0.81; CA+AA versus CC] and a significantly increased risk for HCC was associated with XRCC5 rs9288516 (OR=2.02; 95% CI=1.42-2.86; TA+AA versus TT) even after Bonferroni correction (Pcorrected=0.026 and 0.002, respectively). The effects of rs16855458 (OR=0.57; 95% CI=0.37-0.86, P=0.008) and rs9288516 (OR=1.86; 95% CI=1.19-2.90, P=0.007) were more significant in hepatitis B surface antigen-infected subjects than non-infected subjects. The haplotype-based analysis revealed that in XRCC5, AA in block 1 (OR=0.63; 95% CI=0.48-0.83) and CGGTT in block 2 (OR=0.52; 95% CI=0.39-0.69) were associated with decreased HCC risk (Pcorrected=0.013 and analysis. In conclusion, XRCC5 variants may play a role in determining individual's HCC susceptibility, which warranted validation in larger studies.

  11. Hematopoietic Stem Cells from Ts65Dn Mice Are Deficient in the Repair of DNA Double-Strand Breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingying; Chang, Jianhui; Shao, Lijian; Feng, Wei; Luo, Yi; Chow, Marie; Du, Wei; Meng, Aimin; Zhou, Daohong

    2016-06-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a genetic disorder caused by the presence of an extra partial or whole copy of chromosome 21. In addition to musculoskeletal and neurodevelopmental abnormalities, children with DS exhibit various hematologic disorders and have an increased risk of developing acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute megakaryocytic leukemia. Using the Ts65Dn mouse model, we investigated bone marrow defects caused by trisomy for 132 orthologs of the genes on human chromosome 21. The results showed that, although the total bone marrow cellularity as well as the frequency of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) was comparable between Ts65Dn mice and their age-matched euploid wild-type (WT) control littermates, human chromosome 21 trisomy led to a significant reduction in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) numbers and clonogenic function in Ts65Dn mice. We also found that spontaneous DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) were significantly increased in HSCs from the Ts65Dn mice, which was correlated with the significant reduction in HSC clonogenic activity compared to those from WT controls. Moreover, analysis of the repair kinetics of radiation-induced DSBs revealed that HSCs from Ts65Dn mice were less proficient in DSB repair than the cells from WT controls. This deficiency was associated with a higher sensitivity of Ts65Dn HSCs to radiation-induced suppression of HSC clonogenic activity than that of euploid HSCs. These findings suggest that an additional copy of genes on human chromosome 21 may selectively impair the ability of HSCs to repair DSBs, which may contribute to DS-associated hematological abnormalities and malignancies.

  12. Mycobacterial UvrD1 is a Ku-dependent DNA helicase that plays a role in multiple DNA repair events, including double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Krishna Murari; Stephanou, Nicolas C; Gao, Feng; Glickman, Michael S; Shuman, Stewart

    2007-05-18

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other bacterial pathogens have a Ku-dependent nonhomologous end joining pathway of DNA double-strand break repair. Here we identify mycobacterial UvrD1 as a novel interaction partner for Ku in a genome-wide yeast two-hybrid screen. UvrD1 per se is a vigorous DNA-dependent ATPase but a feeble DNA helicase. Ku stimulates UvrD1 to catalyze ATP-dependent unwinding of 3'-tailed DNAs. UvrD1, Ku, and DNA form a stable ternary complex in the absence of ATP. The Ku binding determinants are located in the distinctive C-terminal segment of UvrD1. A second mycobacterial paralog, UvrD2, is a vigorous Ku-independent DNA helicase. Ablation of UvrD1 sensitizes Mycobacterium smegmatis to killing by ultraviolet and ionizing radiation and to a single chromosomal break generated by I-SceI endonuclease. The physical and functional interactions of bacterial Ku and UvrD1 highlight the potential for cross-talk between components of nonhomologous end joining and nucleotide excision repair pathways.

  13. Induction of double-strand breaks in DNA of prokaryotes and eukaryotes and their repair. 1. Application of elastoviscosimetry for studying double-strand breaks in DNA of Escherichia coli induced by. gamma. -irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bresler, S E; Noskin, L A; Suslov, A V [AN SSSR, Leningrad. Inst. Yadernoj Fiziki

    1980-11-01

    It is shown that the method of elastoviscosimetry gives a possibility to record the formation of DNA double-strand breaks in Escherichia coli cells induced by ..gamma.. irradiation at doses close to D/sub 37/. The dependence of changes of elastoviscosity parameter on the dose (tau/sub 0/) passes through the maximum. It is shown that the ascending section of this curve (at minimum ..gamma.. irradiation doses) characterizes the relaxation process of the superspiralised chromosome in nucleotide of the E. coli. This relaxation is observed due to ..gamma.. induced damages which are not double-strand breaks. By the maximum position one can judge on a dose yield of the first DNA double-strand break, the descending part of the dose curve describes the kinetics of accumulation of breaks with the dose increase. The analysis of the data obtained gives the possibility to come to the conclusion that when applying a usual technique of irradiation and lysis of cells not providing for special measures on inhibition of endo-and exonuclease activity in ..gamma.. irradiated cells, the dose yield of double-strand breaks noticeably increases (by 4.2 times). In the case of an essential, though incomplete, inhibition of nuclease activities in ..gamma.. irradiated cells the dose yield of breaks approximately corresponds to the dose curve of inactivation of these cells (D/sub 37/12.5+-3.0 krad, the first double-strand break -at 14.5+-2.4 krad).

  14. Induction of double-strand breaks in DNA of prokaryotes and eukaryotes and their repair. 1. Application of elastoviscosimetry for studying double-strand breaks in DNA of Escherichia coli induced by γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bresler, S.E.; Noskin, L.A.; Suslov, A.V.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that the method of elastoviscosimetry gives a possibility to record the formation of DNA double-strand breaks in Escherichia coli cells induced by γ irradiation at doses close to D 37 . The dependence of changes of elastoviscosity parameter on the dose (tau 0 ) passes through the maximum. It is shown that the ascending section of this curve (at minimum γ irradiation doses) characterizes the relaxation process of the superspiralised chromosome in nucleotide of the E. coli. This relaxation is observed due to γ induced damages which are not double-strand breaks. By the maximum position one can judge on a dose yield of the first DNA double-strand break, the descending part of the dose curve describes the kinetics of accumulation of breaks with the dose increase. The analysis of the data obtained gives the possibility to come to the conclusion that when applying a usual technique of irradiation and lysis of cells not providing for special measures on inhibition of endo-and exonuclease activity in γ irradiated cells, the dose yield of double-strand breaks noticeably increases (by 4.2 times). In the case of an essential, though incomplete, inhibition of nuclease activities in γ irradiated cells the dose yield of breaks approximately corresponds to the dose curve of inactivation of these cells (D 37 12.5+-3.0 krad, the first double-strand break -at 14.5+-2.4 krad)

  15. SCAI promotes DNA double-strand break repair in distinct chromosomal contexts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rebecca Kring; Mund, Andreas; Poulsen, Sara Lund

    2016-01-01

    cell invasion) as a 53BP1-interacting chromatin-associated protein that promotes the functionality of several DSB repair pathways in mammalian cells. SCAI undergoes prominent enrichment at DSB sites through dual mechanisms involving 53BP1-dependent recruitment to DSB-surrounding chromatin and 53BP1...... in repressive chromatin environments. Moreover, we establish an important role of SCAI in meiotic recombination, as SCAI deficiency in mice leads to germ cell loss and subfertility associated with impaired retention of the DMC1 recombinase on meiotic chromosomes. Collectively, our findings uncover SCAI...... as a physiologically important component of both NHEJ- and HR-mediated pathways that potentiates DSB repair efficiency in specific chromatin contexts....

  16. Cascade of chromosomal rearrangements caused by a heterogeneous T-DNA integration supports the double-stranded break repair model for T-DNA integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yufei; Chen, Zhiyu; Zhuang, Chuxiong; Huang, Jilei

    2017-06-01

    Transferred DNA (T-DNA) from Agrobacterium tumefaciens can be integrated into the plant genome. The double-stranded break repair (DSBR) pathway is a major model for T-DNA integration. From this model, we expect that two ends of a T-DNA molecule would invade into a single DNA double-stranded break (DSB) or independent DSBs in the plant genome. We call the later phenomenon a heterogeneous T-DNA integration, which has never been observed. In this work, we demonstrated it in an Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutant seb19. To resolve the chromosomal structural changes caused by T-DNA integration at both the nucleotide and chromosome levels, we performed inverse PCR, genome resequencing, fluorescence in situ hybridization and linkage analysis. We found, in seb19, a single T-DNA connected two different chromosomal loci and caused complex chromosomal rearrangements. The specific break-junction pattern in seb19 is consistent with the result of heterogeneous T-DNA integration but not of recombination between two T-DNA insertions. We demonstrated that, in seb19, heterogeneous T-DNA integration evoked a cascade of incorrect repair of seven DSBs on chromosomes 4 and 5, and then produced translocation, inversion, duplication and deletion. Heterogeneous T-DNA integration supports the DSBR model and suggests that two ends of a T-DNA molecule could be integrated into the plant genome independently. Our results also show a new origin of chromosomal abnormalities. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Hsp90α regulates ATM and NBN functions in sensing and repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennisi, Rosa; Antoccia, Antonio; Leone, Stefano; Ascenzi, Paolo; di Masi, Alessandra

    2017-08-01

    The molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90α) regulates cell proteostasis and mitigates the harmful effects of endogenous and exogenous stressors on the proteome. Indeed, the inhibition of Hsp90α ATPase activity affects the cellular response to ionizing radiation (IR). Although the interplay between Hsp90α and several DNA damage response (DDR) proteins has been reported, its role in the DDR is still unclear. Here, we show that ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated kinase (ATM) and nibrin (NBN), but not 53BP1, RAD50, and MRE11, are Hsp90α clients as the Hsp90α inhibitor 17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) induces ATM and NBN polyubiquitination and proteosomal degradation in normal fibroblasts and lymphoblastoid cell lines. Hsp90α-ATM and Hsp90α-NBN complexes are present in unstressed and irradiated cells, allowing the maintenance of ATM and NBN stability that is required for the MRE11/RAD50/NBN complex-dependent ATM activation and the ATM-dependent phosphorylation of both NBN and Hsp90α in response to IR-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Hsp90α forms a complex also with ph-Ser1981-ATM following IR. Upon phosphorylation, NBN dissociates from Hsp90α and translocates at the DSBs, while phThr5/7-Hsp90α is not recruited at the damaged sites. The inhibition of Hsp90α affects nuclear localization of MRE11 and RAD50, impairs DDR signaling (e.g., BRCA1 and CHK2 phosphorylation), and slows down DSBs repair. Hsp90α inhibition does not affect DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity, which possibly phosphorylates Hsp90α and H2AX after IR. Notably, Hsp90α inhibition causes H2AX phosphorylation in proliferating cells, this possibly indicating replication stress events. Overall, present data shed light on the regulatory role of Hsp90α on the DDR, controlling ATM and NBN stability and influencing the DSBs signaling and repair. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  18. Genes Involved in DNA Double-Strand Break Repair: Implications for Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-10-01

    dependent kinase (p350) as a cietv of America Scholar. W.K.R. is a Howard Hughes Medical Insti- candidate gene for the murine SCID defect. Science 267:1178...Howard Hughes Medical Institute (W. K. R.). 26), are rescued by transfection of Ku86 cDNA (27, 28), and have 2 To whom requests for reprints should be... Jackman . J.. Wang. M. G., McBride. 0. W., and Fornace, 40. Papathanasiou. M. A.. Kerr, N. C. K., Robbins, J. H., McBride. 0. W., Alamo, I., A. J

  19. DNA double strand break repair is enhanced by P53 following induction by DNA damage and is dependent on the C-terminal domain of P53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Tang; Powell, Simon N.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The tumor suppressor gene p53 can mediate cell cycle arrest or apoptosis in response to DNA damage. Accumulating evidence suggests that it may also directly or indirectly influence the DNA repair machinery. In the present study, we investigated whether p53, induced by DNA damage, could enhance the rejoining of double-strand DNA breaks. Materials and Methods: DNA double-strand breaks (dsb) were made by restriction enzyme digestion of a plasmid, between a promoter and a 'reporter' gene: luciferase (LUC) or chloramphenicol acetyl-transferase (CAT). Linear or circular plasmid DNA (LUC or CAT) was co-transfected with circular β-Gal plasmid (to normalize for uptake) into mouse embryonic fibroblasts genetically matched to be (+/+) or (-/-) for p53. Their ability to rejoin linearized plasmid was measured by the luciferase or CAT activity detected in rescued plasmids. The activity detected in cells transfected with linear plasmid was scored relative to the activity detected in cells transfected with circular plasmid. Results: Ionizing radiation (IR, 2 Gy) enhanced the dsb repair activity in wild type p53 cells; however, p53 null cells lose this effect, indicating that the enhancement of dsb repair was p53-dependent. REF cells with dominant-negative mutant p53 showed a similar induction compared with the parental REF cells with wild-type p53. This ala-143 mutant p53 prevents cell cycle arrest and transactivation of p21 WAF1/cip1) following IR, indicating that the p53-dependent enhancement of DNA repair is distinct from transactivation. Immortalized murine embryonic fibroblasts, 10(1)VasK1 cells, which express p53 cDNA encoding a temperature-sensitive mutant in the DNA sequence specific binding domain (ala135 to val135) with an alternatively spliced C-terminal domain (ASp53: amino-acids 360-381) and, 10(1)Val5 cells, which express the normal spliced p53 (NSp53) with the same temperature-sensitive mutant were compared. It was found that 10(1)VasK1 cells showed no DNA

  20. Human RECQ5 helicase promotes repair of DNA double-strand breaks by synthesis-dependent strand annealing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paliwal, S.; Kanagaraj, R.; Sturzenegger, A.; Burdová, Kamila; Janščák, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 4 (2014), s. 2380-2390 ISSN 0305-1048 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/0565; GA ČR GAP305/10/0281 Grant - others:Swiss National Science Foundation(CH) 31003A-129747; Swiss National Science Foundation(CH) 31003A_146206 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Human RECQ5 helicase * DNA double-strand breaks * mitotic homologous recombination Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.112, year: 2014

  1. PFGE analysis of DNA double-strand breaks and DNA repair process in human osteosarcoma cells irradiated by X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Jianping; Majima, H.; Yamaguchi, C.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study the induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in human osteosarcoma cells irradiated by X-ray, the DNA DSBs repair process and the tumour cell radiosensitivity. Methods: Two cell lines of human osteosarcoma, Rho0 and 143. B were used. Initial DNA damage of DSBs by X-ray irradiation was measured using clamped homogeneous electrical field (CHEF) electrophoresis. Results: X-ray-induced DNA DSBs of human osteosarcoma cells after CHEF-electrophoresis increased linearly with the irradiation dose between 0 and 50 Gy. The repair of DNA DSBs in human osteosarcoma cells increased with the post-irradiation incubation time. In contrast to 14.3B cell line at the same dose point, much more DNA DSBs were induced in Rho0 cell line after X-ray irradiation. Conclusion: CHEF pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PEGE) is a sensitive method for the determination of radiation-induced DNA DSBs in high molecular weight DNA of human osteosarcoma cells. Radiation-induced DNA DSBs of osteosarcoma increase with the dose in a linear manner. After incubation, both Rho0 cell line and 143. B cell line can repair the DNA DSBs. Between two cell lines of human osteosarcoma, Rho0 and 143.B, Rho0 cell line is more sensitive to ionizing radiation than 143.B line

  2. Role of XRCC4 phosphorylation by DNA-PK in the regulation of NHEJ repair pathway of DNA double strand break

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Imamichi, Shoji; Fukuchi, Mikoto; Kamdar, Radhika P.; Sicheng, Liu; Wanotayan, Rujira; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) is the predominant pathway of DNA double strand breaks in higher eukaryotes and is active throughout the cell cycle. NHEJ repair includes many factors as Ku70/86, DNA-PKcs, XRCC4-Ligase IV complex and XLF (also known as Cernunnos). In these factors, DNA-PKcs acts as central regulator in NHEJ repair. It recruited at the DNA damages site after DNA damage and after association with Ku its kinase activity is activated. It phosphorylates many of important NHEJ proteins in vitro including XRCC4, Ku 70/86, Artemis, and even DNA-PKcs but till now, very less studies have been done to know the role and significance of phosphorylation in the NHEJ repair. Studies by other researchers identified various phosphorylation sites in XRCC4 by DNA-PK using mass spectrometry but these phosphorylation sites were shown to be dispensable for DSB repair. In the present investigation, we identified 3 serine and one new threonine phosphorylation sites in XRCC4 protein by DNA-PK. In vivo phosphorylation at these sites was verified by generating phosphorylation specific antibodies and the requirement for DNA-PK therein was verified by using DNA-PK inhibitor and DNA-PK proficient and deficient cell lines in response to radiation and zeocin treatment. We have also found that phosphorylation at these sites showed dose dependency in response to radiation treatment. The two serine and one threonine phosphorylation site is also biological important as their mutation into alanine significantly elevated radiosensitivity as measured by colony formation assay. Neutral comet assay showed delayed kinetics in DSB repair of these mutants. Furthermore, we have found a protein, with putative DSB repair function, which interacts with domain including the phosphorylation sites.These results indicate that these phosphorylation sites would mediate functional link between XRCC4 and DNA-PK. (author)

  3. Possible role(s) of nuclear matrix and DNA loop organization in fixation or repair of DNA double-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malyapa, R.S.; Wright, W.D.; Roti Roti, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks produced by ionizing radiation are considered to be a critical radiation-induced lesion responsible, in part, for cell killing. However, the manner in which structures within the nucleus involving DNA organization contribute to the balance between fixation or repair of these critical lesions remains largely obscure. The repair process requires both functional enzymes and substrate availability, i.e., access to and orientation of damage sites. Therefore, the ability to repair damaged DNA could be influenced not only by DNA integrity but also by the spatial organization of DNA. Therefore, the authors investigated the possibility that radiation-induced DNA damage differentially affects DNA supercoiling ability in cells of differing radiosensitivities using radioresistant and radiosensitive mutants of different origins. This study was also designed to determine if differences in the composition of the nuclear matrix exist between cell lines of each origin. Results from these studies indicate that differences in the composition of the nuclear matrix proteins and DNA stability might be related to intrinsic radiation resistance

  4. Fragmentation in DNA double-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Zhiyong; Suzhou Univ., Suzhou; Zhang Lihui; Li Ming; Fan Wo; Xu Yujie

    2005-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks are important lesions induced by irradiations. Random breakage model or quantification supported by this concept is suitable to analyze DNA double strand break data induced by low LET radiation, but deviation from random breakage model is more evident in high LET radiation data analysis. In this work we develop a new method, statistical fragmentation model, to analyze the fragmentation process of DNA double strand breaks. After charged particles enter the biological cell, they produce ionizations along their tracks, and transfer their energies to the cells and break the cellular DNA strands into fragments. The probable distribution of the fragments is obtained under the condition in which the entropy is maximum. Under the approximation E≅E 0 + E 1 l + E 2 l 2 , the distribution functions are obtained as exp(αl + βl 2 ). There are two components, the one proportional to exp(βl 2 ), mainly contributes to the low mass fragment yields, the other component, proportional to exp(αl), decreases slowly as the mass of the fragments increases. Numerical solution of the constraint equations provides parameters α and β. Experimental data, especially when the energy deposition is higher, support the statistical fragmentation model. (authors)

  5. JNK Phosphorylates SIRT6 to Stimulate DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in Response to Oxidative Stress by Recruiting PARP1 to DNA Breaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Van Meter

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of damage caused by oxidative stress has been linked to aging and to the etiology of numerous age-related diseases. The longevity gene, sirtuin 6 (SIRT6, promotes genome stability by facilitating DNA repair, especially under oxidative stress conditions. Here we uncover the mechanism by which SIRT6 is activated by oxidative stress to promote DNA double-strand break (DSB repair. We show that the stress-activated protein kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, phosphorylates SIRT6 on serine 10 in response to oxidative stress. This post-translational modification facilitates the mobilization of SIRT6 to DNA damage sites and is required for efficient recruitment of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1 to DNA break sites and for efficient repair of DSBs. Our results demonstrate a post-translational mechanism regulating SIRT6, and they provide the link between oxidative stress signaling and DNA repair pathways that may be critical for hormetic response and longevity assurance.

  6. An Approach to Detect and Study DNA Double-Strand Break Repair by Transcript RNA Using a Spliced-Antisense RNA Template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Havva; Storici, Francesca

    2018-01-01

    A double-strand break (DSB) is one of the most dangerous DNA lesion, and its repair is crucial for genome stability. Homologous recombination is considered the safest way to repair a DNA DSB and requires an identical or nearly identical DNA template, such as a sister chromatid or a homologous chromosome for accurate repair. Can transcript RNA serve as donor template for DSB repair? Here, we describe an approach that we developed to detect and study DNA repair by transcript RNA. Key features of the method are: (i) use of antisense (noncoding) RNA as template for DSB repair by RNA, (ii) use of intron splicing to distinguish the sequence of the RNA template from that of the DNA that generates the RNA template, and (iii) use of a trans and cis system to study how RNA repairs a DSB in homologous but distant DNA or in its own DNA, respectively. This chapter provides details on how to use a spliced-antisense RNA template to detect and study DSB repair by RNA in trans or cis in yeast cells. Our approach for detection of DSB repair by RNA in cells can be applied to cell types other than yeast, such as bacteria, mammalian cells, or other eukaryotic cells. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. In Vitro Expansion of Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Alters DNA Double Strand Break Repair of Etoposide Induced DNA Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Hare

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are of interest for use in diverse cellular therapies. Ex vivo expansion of MSCs intended for transplantation must result in generation of cells that maintain fidelity of critical functions. Previous investigations have identified genetic and phenotypic alterations of MSCs with in vitro passage, but little is known regarding how culturing influences the ability of MSCs to repair double strand DNA breaks (DSBs, the most severe of DNA lesions. To investigate the response to DSB stress with passage in vitro, primary human MSCs were exposed to etoposide (VP16 at various passages with subsequent evaluation of cellular damage responses and DNA repair. Passage number did not affect susceptibility to VP16 or the incidence and repair kinetics of DSBs. Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ transcripts showed little alteration with VP16 exposure or passage; however, homologous recombination (HR transcripts were reduced following VP16 exposure with this decrease amplified as MSCs were passaged in vitro. Functional evaluations of NHEJ and HR showed that MSCs were unable to activate NHEJ repair following VP16 stress in cells after successive passage. These results indicate that ex vivo expansion of MSCs alters their ability to perform DSB repair, a necessary function for cells intended for transplantation.

  8. In Vitro Expansion of Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Alters DNA Double Strand Break Repair of Etoposide Induced DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Ian; Gencheva, Marieta; Evans, Rebecca; Fortney, James; Piktel, Debbie; Vos, Jeffrey A; Howell, David; Gibson, Laura F

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are of interest for use in diverse cellular therapies. Ex vivo expansion of MSCs intended for transplantation must result in generation of cells that maintain fidelity of critical functions. Previous investigations have identified genetic and phenotypic alterations of MSCs with in vitro passage, but little is known regarding how culturing influences the ability of MSCs to repair double strand DNA breaks (DSBs), the most severe of DNA lesions. To investigate the response to DSB stress with passage in vitro, primary human MSCs were exposed to etoposide (VP16) at various passages with subsequent evaluation of cellular damage responses and DNA repair. Passage number did not affect susceptibility to VP16 or the incidence and repair kinetics of DSBs. Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) transcripts showed little alteration with VP16 exposure or passage; however, homologous recombination (HR) transcripts were reduced following VP16 exposure with this decrease amplified as MSCs were passaged in vitro. Functional evaluations of NHEJ and HR showed that MSCs were unable to activate NHEJ repair following VP16 stress in cells after successive passage. These results indicate that ex vivo expansion of MSCs alters their ability to perform DSB repair, a necessary function for cells intended for transplantation.

  9. DNA double-strand-break complexity levels and their possible contributions to the probability for error-prone processing and repair pathway choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipler, Agnes; Iliakis, George

    2013-09-01

    Although the DNA double-strand break (DSB) is defined as a rupture in the double-stranded DNA molecule that can occur without chemical modification in any of the constituent building blocks, it is recognized that this form is restricted to enzyme-induced DSBs. DSBs generated by physical or chemical agents can include at the break site a spectrum of base alterations (lesions). The nature and number of such chemical alterations define the complexity of the DSB and are considered putative determinants for repair pathway choice and the probability that errors will occur during this processing. As the pathways engaged in DSB processing show distinct and frequently inherent propensities for errors, pathway choice also defines the error-levels cells opt to accept. Here, we present a classification of DSBs on the basis of increasing complexity and discuss how complexity may affect processing, as well as how it may cause lethal or carcinogenic processing errors. By critically analyzing the characteristics of DSB repair pathways, we suggest that all repair pathways can in principle remove lesions clustering at the DSB but are likely to fail when they encounter clusters of DSBs that cause a local form of chromothripsis. In the same framework, we also analyze the rational of DSB repair pathway choice.

  10. Differential gene expression in a DNA double-strand-break repair mutant XRS-5 defective in Ku80. Analysis by cDNA microarray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, John Y.H.; Chen, Lung-Kun; Chang, Jui-Feng [National Yang Ming Univ., Taipei, Taiwan (China). Inst. of Radiological Sciences] (and others)

    2001-12-01

    The ability of cells to rejoin DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) usually correlates with their radiosensitivity. This correlation has been demonstrated in radiosensitive cells, including the Chinese hamster ovary mutant XRS-5. XRS-5 is defective in a DNA end-binding protein, Ku80, which is a component of a DNA-dependent protein kinase complex used for joining strand breaks. However, Ku80-deficient cells are known to be retarded in cell proliferation and growth as well as other yet to be identified defects. Using custom-made 600-gene cDNA microarray filters, we found differential gene expressions between the wild-type and XRS-5 cells. Defective Ku80 apparently affects the expression of several repair genes, including topoisomerase-I and -IIA, ERCC5, MLH1, and ATM. In contrast, other DNA repair-associated genes, such as GADD45A, EGR1 MDM2 and p53, were not affected. In addition, for large numbers of growth-associated genes, such as cyclins and clks, the growth factors and cytokines were also affected. Down-regulated expression was also found in several categories of seemingly unrelated genes, including apoptosis, angiogenesis, kinase and signaling, phosphatase, stress protein, proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressors, transcription and translation factors. A RT-PCR analysis confirmed that the XRS-5 cells used were defective in Ku80 expression. The diversified groups of genes being affected could mean that Ku80, a multi-functional DNA-binding protein, not only affects DNA repair, but is also involved in transcription regulation. Our data, taken together, indicate that there are specific genes being modulated in Ku80- deficient cells, and that some of the DNA repair pathways and other biological functions are apparently linked, suggesting that a defect in one gene could have global effects on many other processes. (author)

  11. Differential gene expression in a DNA double-strand-break repair mutant XRS-5 defective in Ku80. Analysis by cDNA microarray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, John Y.H.; Chen, Lung-Kun; Chang, Jui-Feng

    2001-01-01

    The ability of cells to rejoin DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) usually correlates with their radiosensitivity. This correlation has been demonstrated in radiosensitive cells, including the Chinese hamster ovary mutant XRS-5. XRS-5 is defective in a DNA end-binding protein, Ku80, which is a component of a DNA-dependent protein kinase complex used for joining strand breaks. However, Ku80-deficient cells are known to be retarded in cell proliferation and growth as well as other yet to be identified defects. Using custom-made 600-gene cDNA microarray filters, we found differential gene expressions between the wild-type and XRS-5 cells. Defective Ku80 apparently affects the expression of several repair genes, including topoisomerase-I and -IIA, ERCC5, MLH1, and ATM. In contrast, other DNA repair-associated genes, such as GADD45A, EGR1 MDM2 and p53, were not affected. In addition, for large numbers of growth-associated genes, such as cyclins and clks, the growth factors and cytokines were also affected. Down-regulated expression was also found in several categories of seemingly unrelated genes, including apoptosis, angiogenesis, kinase and signaling, phosphatase, stress protein, proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressors, transcription and translation factors. A RT-PCR analysis confirmed that the XRS-5 cells used were defective in Ku80 expression. The diversified groups of genes being affected could mean that Ku80, a multi-functional DNA-binding protein, not only affects DNA repair, but is also involved in transcription regulation. Our data, taken together, indicate that there are specific genes being modulated in Ku80- deficient cells, and that some of the DNA repair pathways and other biological functions are apparently linked, suggesting that a defect in one gene could have global effects on many other processes. (author)

  12. Sensitization to radiation and alkylating agents by inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase is enhanced in cells deficient in DNA double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löser, Dana A; Shibata, Atsushi; Shibata, Akiko K; Woodbine, Lisa J; Jeggo, Penny A; Chalmers, Anthony J

    2010-06-01

    As single agents, chemical inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) are nontoxic and have clinical efficacy against BRCA1- and BRCA2-deficient tumors. PARP inhibitors also enhance the cytotoxicity of ionizing radiation and alkylating agents but will only improve clinical outcomes if tumor sensitization exceeds effects on normal tissues. It is unclear how tumor DNA repair proficiency affects the degree of sensitization. We have previously shown that the radiosensitizing effect of PARP inhibition requires DNA replication and will therefore affect rapidly proliferating tumors more than normal tissues. Because many tumors exhibit defective DNA repair, we investigated the impact of double-strand break (DSB) repair integrity on the sensitizing effects of the PARP inhibitor olaparib. Sensitization to ionizing radiation and the alkylating agent methylmethane sulfonate was enhanced in DSB repair-deficient cells. In Artemis(-/-) and ATM(-/-) mouse embryo fibroblasts, sensitization was replication dependent and associated with defective repair of replication-associated damage. Radiosensitization of Ligase IV(-/-) mouse embryo fibroblasts was independent of DNA replication and is explained by inhibition of "alternative" end joining. After methylmethane sulfonate treatment, PARP inhibition promoted replication-independent accumulation of DSB, repair of which required Ligase IV. Our findings predict that the sensitizing effects of PARP inhibitors will be more pronounced in rapidly dividing and/or DNA repair defective tumors than normal tissues and show their potential to enhance the therapeutic ratio achieved by conventional DNA-damaging agents.

  13. The Human L1 Element Causes DNA Double-Strand Breaks in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    cancer is complex. However, defects in DNA repair genes in the double-strand break repair pathway are cancer predisposing. My lab has characterized...a new potentially important source of double-strand breaks (DSBs) in human cells and are interested in characterizing which DNA repair genes act on...this particular source of DNA damage. Selfish DNA accounts for 45% of the human genome. We have recently demonstrated that one particular selfish

  14. p53 regulates the repair of DNA double-strand breaks by both homologous and non-homologous recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willers, H.; Powell, S.N.; Dahm-Daphi, J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: p53 is known to suppress spontaneous homologous recombination (HR), while its role in non-homologous recombination (NHR) remains to be clarified. Here, we sought to determine the influence of p53 on the repair of chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs) by HR or NHR using specially designed recombination substrates that integrate into the genome. Isogenic mouse fibroblast pairs with or without expression of exogenous p53 protein were utilized. A reporter plasmid carrying a mutated XGPRT gene was chromosomally integrated and DSBs were generated within the plasmid by the I-SceI endonuclease. Subsequent homology-mediated repair from an episomal donor resulted in XGPRT reconstitution and cellular resistance to a selection antibiotic. Analogously, the repair of chromosomal I-SceI breaks by NHR using another novel reporter plasmid restored XGPRT translation. For p53-null cells, the mean frequency of I-SceI break repair via HR was 5.5 x 10 -4 . The p53-Val135 mutant, which previously has been shown to suppress spontaneous HR by 14-fold employing the same cell system and reporter gene, only caused a 2- to 3-fold suppression of break-induced HR. In contrast, a dramatic effect of p53 on repair via NHR was found. Preliminary sequence analysis indicated that there was at least a 1000-fold reduction of illegitimate repair events resulting in loss of sequence at the break sites. The observed effects were mediated by p53 mutants defective in regulation of the cell-cycle and apoptosis. The main findings were: (1) p53 virtually blocked illegitimate rejoining of chromosomal ends. (2) The suppression of homologous DSB repair was less pronounced than the inhibition of spontaneous HR. We hypothesize that p53 allows to a certain extent error-free homology-dependent repair to proceed, while blocking error-prone NHR. The data support and extent a previous model, in which p53 maintains genomic stability by regulating recombination independently of its transactivation function

  15. A role for the malignant brain tumour (MBT domain protein LIN-61 in DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas M Johnson

    Full Text Available Malignant brain tumour (MBT domain proteins are transcriptional repressors that function within Polycomb complexes. Some MBT genes are tumour suppressors, but how they prevent tumourigenesis is unknown. The Caenorhabditis elegans MBT protein LIN-61 is a member of the synMuvB chromatin-remodelling proteins that control vulval development. Here we report a new role for LIN-61: it protects the genome by promoting homologous recombination (HR for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. lin-61 mutants manifest numerous problems associated with defective HR in germ and somatic cells but remain proficient in meiotic recombination. They are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation and interstrand crosslinks but not UV light. Using a novel reporter system that monitors repair of a defined DSB in C. elegans somatic cells, we show that LIN-61 contributes to HR. The involvement of this MBT protein in HR raises the possibility that MBT-deficient tumours may also have defective DSB repair.

  16. Frequent and efficient use of the sister chromatid for DNA double-strand break repair during budding yeast meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Goldfarb

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Recombination between homologous chromosomes of different parental origin (homologs is necessary for their accurate segregation during meiosis. It has been suggested that meiotic inter-homolog recombination is promoted by a barrier to inter-sister-chromatid recombination, imposed by meiosis-specific components of the chromosome axis. Consistent with this, measures of Holliday junction-containing recombination intermediates (joint molecules [JMs] show a strong bias towards inter-homolog and against inter-sister JMs. However, recombination between sister chromatids also has an important role in meiosis. The genomes of diploid organisms in natural populations are highly polymorphic for insertions and deletions, and meiotic double-strand breaks (DSBs that form within such polymorphic regions must be repaired by inter-sister recombination. Efforts to study inter-sister recombination during meiosis, in particular to determine recombination frequencies and mechanisms, have been constrained by the inability to monitor the products of inter-sister recombination. We present here molecular-level studies of inter-sister recombination during budding yeast meiosis. We examined events initiated by DSBs in regions that lack corresponding sequences on the homolog, and show that these DSBs are efficiently repaired by inter-sister recombination. This occurs with the same timing as inter-homolog recombination, but with reduced (2- to 3-fold yields of JMs. Loss of the meiotic-chromosome-axis-associated kinase Mek1 accelerates inter-sister DSB repair and markedly increases inter-sister JM frequencies. Furthermore, inter-sister JMs formed in mek1Δ mutants are preferentially lost, while inter-homolog JMs are maintained. These findings indicate that inter-sister recombination occurs frequently during budding yeast meiosis, with the possibility that up to one-third of all recombination events occur between sister chromatids. We suggest that a Mek1-dependent reduction in

  17. Acid polypeptides as inhibitors of the repair of double-strand DNA breaks induced by γ-irradiation of Hela cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medvedev, A.I.; Revina, G.I.; Kuzin, A.M.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of natural modificator's synthetic analogue -polyaspartylglytamate (AG) - on the repair of radiation-induced double-strand DNA breaks is studies. The radiation and modificator effects were determined by the criterion of the formation of chromosome recombinations and reproductive death of cells on Hela cell culture and in Chinese hamsters. It is shown that the incubation of Hela cells with AG doubles and triples the degradation effect of rdiation at 50 and 10 Gy doses. When radiation dose equals 1 Gy and repair time is G-22 h, 1.5 - 3 time - increased yield of chromotide and chromosome abberations is detected in Chinese hamster cells in the presence of the modificator during all periods of cell fixation. The effect of radiation mutagenic action enhancement by the modificator is not observed during the incubation of cells with AG 30-45 min after irradiation

  18. Study in regularities in the formation of double stranded DNA breaks in irradiated rat thymocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivannik, B.P.; ProskuryakoV, S.Ya.; Ryabchenko, N.I.

    1979-01-01

    Using low-gradient viscosimetry of neutral detergent nuclear lysates a study was made of postradiation changes in the molecular weight of double-stranded DNA of thymocytes. It was established that 375 eV are needed for one double-stranded break to appear, and a dose of 1 rad is required for 0.275 double-stranded break to occur at the site of DNA with m.w. 10 12 dalton. The repair of double-stranded breaks is only observed when rats are exposed to a dose of 500 R. It is assumed that the absence of repair of double-stranded DNA breaks and the presence of secondary postradiation degradation of DNA are responsible for thymocyte death

  19. Repair kinetics of DNA double-strand breaks and incidence of apoptosis in mouse neural stem/progenitor cells and their differentiated neurons exposed to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwagi, Hiroki; Shiraishi, Kazunori; Sakaguchi, Kenta; Nakahama, Tomoya; Kodama, Seiji

    2018-05-01

    Neuronal loss leads to neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease. Because of their long lifespans, neurons are assumed to possess highly efficient DNA repair ability and to be able to protect themselves from deleterious DNA damage such as DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) produced by intrinsic and extrinsic sources. However, it remains largely unknown whether the DSB repair ability of neurons is more efficient compared with that of other cells. Here, we investigated the repair kinetics of X-ray-induced DSBs in mouse neural cells by scoring the number of phosphorylated 53BP1 foci post irradiation. We found that p53-independent apoptosis was induced time dependently during differentiation from neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) into neurons in culture for 48 h. DSB repair in neurons differentiated from NSPCs in culture was faster than that in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), possibly due to the higher DNA-dependent protein kinase activity, but it was similar to that in NSPCs. Further, the incidence of p53-dependent apoptosis induced by X-irradiation in neurons was significantly higher than that in NSPCs. This difference in response of X-ray-induced apoptosis between neurons and NSPCs may reflect a difference in the fidelity of non-homologous end joining or a differential sensitivity to DNA damage other than DSBs.

  20. Evidence for induction of DNA double strand breaks in the bystander response to targeted soft X-rays in repair deficient CHO cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashino, Genro; Suzuki, Keiji; Prise, K.M.

    2005-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that irradiated cells produce some signals which interact with non-exposed cells in the same population. Here, we analysed the mechanism of such a bystander effect from targeted cells to non-targeted cells. Firstly, in order to investigate the bystander effect in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines we irradiated a single cell within a population and scored the formation of micronuclei. When a single nucleus in the population, of double strand break repair deficient xrs5 cells, was targeted with 1 Gy of Al-K soft X-rays, elevated numbers of micronuclei were induced in the neighbouring unirradiated cells. The induction of micronuclei was also observed when conditioned medium was transferred from irradiated to non-irradiated xrs5 cells. These results suggest that DNA double strand breaks are caused by factors secreted in the medium from irradiated cells. To clarify the involvements of radical species in the bystander response, cells were treated with 0.5%DMSO 1 hour before irradiation and then bystander effects were estimated in xrs5 cells. The results showed clearly that DMSO treatment during X-irradiation suppress the induction of micronuclei in bystander xrs5 cells, when conditioned medium was transferred from irradiated xrs5 cells. Therefore, it is suggested that radical species induced by ionizing radiation are important for producing bystander signals. (author)

  1. Heterochromatinization associated with cell differentiation as a model to study DNA double strand break induction and repair in the context of higher-order chromatin structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, Martin; Lukášová, Emilie; Štefančíková, Lenka; Baranová, Elena; Falková, Iva; Ježková, Lucie; Davídková, Marie; Bačíková, Alena; Vachelová, Jana; Michaelidesová, Anna; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    Cell differentiation is associated with extensive gene silencing, heterochromatinization and potentially decreasing need for repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Differentiation stages of blood cells thus represent an excellent model to study DSB induction, repair and misrepair in the context of changing higher-order chromatin structure. We show that immature granulocytes form γH2AX and 53BP1 foci, contrary to the mature cells; however, these foci colocalize only rarely and DSB repair is inefficient. Moreover, specific chromatin structure of granulocytes probably influences DSB induction. - Highlights: ► DSB repair is absent in mature granulocytes with condensed chromatin. ► Repair proteins and γH2AX appear in immature stages but rarely colocalize. ► γH2AX persist long times in these cells and DSB repair is inefficient. ► Even though, γH2AX foci “move” out of the dense chromatin. ► 53BP1 enters HP1β domains only after their decondensation

  2. ZTF-8 interacts with the 9-1-1 complex and is required for DNA damage response and double-strand break repair in the C. elegans germline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Min Kim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Germline mutations in DNA repair genes are linked to tumor progression. Furthermore, failure in either activating a DNA damage checkpoint or repairing programmed meiotic double-strand breaks (DSBs can impair chromosome segregation. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis for DNA damage response (DDR and DSB repair (DSBR within the germline is highly important. Here we define ZTF-8, a previously uncharacterized protein conserved from worms to humans, as a novel factor involved in the repair of both mitotic and meiotic DSBs as well as in meiotic DNA damage checkpoint activation in the C. elegans germline. ztf-8 mutants exhibit specific sensitivity to γ-irradiation and hydroxyurea, mitotic nuclear arrest at S-phase accompanied by activation of the ATL-1 and CHK-1 DNA damage checkpoint kinases, as well as accumulation of both mitotic and meiotic recombination intermediates, indicating that ZTF-8 functions in DSBR. However, impaired meiotic DSBR progression partially fails to trigger the CEP-1/p53-dependent DNA damage checkpoint in late pachytene, also supporting a role for ZTF-8 in meiotic DDR. ZTF-8 partially co-localizes with the 9-1-1 DDR complex and interacts with MRT-2/Rad1, a component of this complex. The human RHINO protein rescues the phenotypes observed in ztf-8 mutants, suggesting functional conservation across species. We propose that ZTF-8 is involved in promoting repair at stalled replication forks and meiotic DSBs by transducing DNA damage checkpoint signaling via the 9-1-1 pathway. Our findings define a conserved function for ZTF-8/RHINO in promoting genomic stability in the germline.

  3. Feasibility of measuring radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks and their repair by pulsed field gel electrophoresis in freshly isolated cells from the mouse RIF-1 tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waarde, Maria A.W.H. van; Assen, Annette J. van; Konings, Antonius W.T.; Kampinga, Harm H.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the technical feasibility of pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) as a predictive assay for the radio responsiveness of tumors. Induction and repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in a freshly prepared cell suspension from a RIF-1 tumor (irradiated ex vivo) was compared with DSB induction and repair in exponentially growing RIF-1 cells in culture (irradiated in vitro). Methods and Materials: A murine RIF-1 tumor grown in vivo was digested, and cells were exposed to x-rays (ex vivo) at doses of 1 to 75 Gy. DNA damage was measured using CHEF (clamped homogeneous electric fields) electrophoresis. Repair kinetics were studied at 37 deg. C for 4 h after irradiation. Radiosensitivity was determined by clonogenic assay, and cell cycle distributions by flow cytometry. For comparison, a trypsinized suspension of exponentially growing RIF-1 cells in vitro was run parallel with each ex vivo experiment. Results: Induction of DSBs, expressed as % DNA extracted from the plug, was similar in the in vitro and ex vivo irradiated cells. Compared to repair rates in in vitro cultured RIF-1 cells, repair kinetics in a freshly prepared cell suspension from the tumor were decreased, unrelated to differences in radiosensitivity. Differences in repair could not be explained by endogenous DNA degradation, nor by influences of enzymes used for digestion of the tumor. A lower plating efficiency and differences in ploidy (as revealed by flow cytometry) were the only reproducible differences between in vivo and in vitro grown cells that may explain the differences in repair kinetics. Conclusions: The current results do not support the idea that PFGE is a technique robust enough to be a predictive assay for the radiosensitivity of tumor cells

  4. The rate of X-ray-induced DNA double-strand break repair in the embryonic mouse brain is unaffected by exposure to 50 Hz magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodbine, Lisa; Haines, Jackie; Coster, Margaret; Barazzuol, Lara; Ainsbury, Elizabeth; Sienkiewicz, Zenon; Jeggo, Penny

    2015-06-01

    Following in utero exposure to low dose radiation (10-200 mGy), we recently observed a linear induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) and activation of apoptosis in the embryonic neuronal stem/progenitor cell compartment. No significant induction of DSB or apoptosis was observed following exposure to magnetic fields (MF). In the present study, we exploited this in vivo system to examine whether exposure to MF before and after exposure to 100 mGy X-rays impacts upon DSB repair rates. 53BP1 foci were quantified following combined exposure to radiation and MF in the embryonic neuronal stem/progenitor cell compartment. Embryos were exposed in utero to 50 Hz MF at 300 μT for 3 h before and up to 9 h after exposure to 100 mGy X-rays. Controls included embryos exposed to MF or X-rays alone plus sham exposures. Exposure to MF before and after 100 mGy X-rays did not impact upon the rate of DSB repair in the embryonic neuronal stem cell compartment compared to repair rates following radiation exposure alone. We conclude that in this sensitive system MF do not exert any significant level of DNA damage and do not impede the repair of X-ray induced damage.

  5. Mitosis, double strand break repair, and telomeres: a view from the end: how telomeres and the DNA damage response cooperate during mitosis to maintain genome stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesare, Anthony J

    2014-11-01

    Double strand break (DSB) repair is suppressed during mitosis because RNF8 and downstream DNA damage response (DDR) factors, including 53BP1, do not localize to mitotic chromatin. Discovery of the mitotic kinase-dependent mechanism that inhibits DSB repair during cell division was recently reported. It was shown that restoring mitotic DSB repair was detrimental, resulting in repair dependent genome instability and covalent telomere fusions. The telomere DDR that occurs naturally during cellular aging and in cancer is known to be refractory to G2/M checkpoint activation. Such DDR-positive telomeres, and those that occur as part of the telomere-dependent prolonged mitotic arrest checkpoint, normally pass through mitosis without covalent ligation, but result in cell growth arrest in G1 phase. The discovery that suppressing DSB repair during mitosis may function primarily to protect DDR-positive telomeres from fusing during cell division reinforces the unique cooperation between telomeres and the DDR to mediate tumor suppression. © 2014 The Author. Bioessays published by WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  6. DNA double-strand break repair of blood lymphocytes and normal tissues analysed in a preclinical mouse model: implications for radiosensitivity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rübe, Claudia E; Grudzenski, Saskia; Kühne, Martin; Dong, Xiaorong; Rief, Nicole; Löbrich, Markus; Rübe, Christian

    2008-10-15

    Radiotherapy is an effective cancer treatment, but a few patients suffer severe radiation toxicities in neighboring normal tissues. There is increasing evidence that the variable susceptibility to radiation toxicities is caused by the individual genetic predisposition, by subtle mutations, or polymorphisms in genes involved in cellular responses to ionizing radiation. Double-strand breaks (DSB) are the most deleterious form of radiation-induced DNA damage, and DSB repair deficiencies lead to pronounced radiosensitivity. Using a preclinical mouse model, the highly sensitive gammaH2AX-foci approach was tested to verify even subtle, genetically determined DSB repair deficiencies known to be associated with increased normal tissue radiosensitivity. By enumerating gammaH2AX-foci in blood lymphocytes and normal tissues (brain, lung, heart, and intestine), the induction and repair of DSBs after irradiation with therapeutic doses (0.1-2 Gy) was investigated in repair-proficient and repair-deficient mouse strains in vivo and blood samples irradiated ex vivo. gammaH2AX-foci analysis allowed to verify the different DSB repair deficiencies; even slight impairments caused by single polymorphisms were detected similarly in both blood lymphocytes and solid tissues, indicating that DSB repair measured in lymphocytes is valid for different and complex organs. Moreover, gammaH2AX-foci analysis of blood samples irradiated ex vivo was found to reflect repair kinetics measured in vivo and, thus, give reliable information about the individual DSB repair capacity. gammaH2AX analysis of blood and tissue samples allows to detect even minor genetically defined DSB repair deficiencies, affecting normal tissue radiosensitivity. Future studies will have to evaluate the clinical potential to identify patients more susceptible to radiation toxicities before radiotherapy.

  7. Repair of exogenous DNA double-strand breaks promotes chromosome synapsis in SPO11-mutant mouse meiocytes, and is altered in the absence of HORMAD1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carofiglio, Fabrizia; Sleddens-Linkels, Esther; Wassenaar, Evelyne; Inagaki, Akiko; van Cappellen, Wiggert A; Grootegoed, J Anton; Toth, Attila; Baarends, Willy M

    2018-03-01

    Repair of SPO11-dependent DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) via homologous recombination (HR) is essential for stable homologous chromosome pairing and synapsis during meiotic prophase. Here, we induced radiation-induced DSBs to study meiotic recombination and homologous chromosome pairing in mouse meiocytes in the absence of SPO11 activity (Spo11 YF/YF model), and in the absence of both SPO11 and HORMAD1 (Spo11/Hormad1 dko). Within 30 min after 5 Gy irradiation of Spo11 YF/YF mice, 140-160 DSB repair foci were detected, which specifically localized to the synaptonemal complex axes. Repair of radiation-induced DSBs was incomplete in Spo11 YF/YF compared to Spo11 +/YF meiocytes. Still, repair of exogenous DSBs promoted partial recovery of chromosome pairing and synapsis in Spo11 YF/YF meiocytes. This indicates that at least part of the exogenous DSBs can be processed in an interhomolog recombination repair pathway. Interestingly, in a seperate experiment, using 3 Gy of irradiation, we observed that Spo11/Hormad1 dko spermatocytes contained fewer remaining DSB repair foci at 48 h after irradiation compared to irradiated Spo11 knockout spermatocytes. Together, these results show that recruitment of exogenous DSBs to the synaptonemal complex, in conjunction with repair of exogenous DSBs via the homologous chromosome, contributes to homology recognition. In addition, the data suggest a role for HORMAD1 in DNA repair pathway choice in mouse meiocytes. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Homologous recombination contributes to the repair of DNA double-strand breaks induced by high-energy iron ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zafar, Faria; Seidler, Sara B.; Kronenberg, Amy; Schild, David; Wiese, Claudia

    2010-06-29

    To test the contribution of homologous recombinational repair (HRR) in repairing DNA damaged sites induced by high-energy iron ions, we used: (1) HRR-deficient rodent cells carrying a deletion in the RAD51D gene and (2) syngeneic human cells impaired for HRR by RAD51D or RAD51 knockdown using RNA interference. We show that in response to iron ions, HRR contributes to cell survival in rodent cells, and that HRR-deficiency abrogates RAD51 foci formation. Complementation of the HRR defect by human RAD51D rescues both enhanced cytotoxicity and RAD51 foci formation. For human cells irradiated with iron ions, cell survival is decreased, and, in p53 mutant cells, the levels of mutagenesis are increased when HRR is impaired. Human cells synchronized in S phase exhibit more pronounced resistance to iron ions as compared with cells in G1 phase, and this increase in radioresistance is diminished by RAD51 knockdown. These results implicate a role for RAD51-mediated DNA repair (i.e. HRR) in removing a fraction of clustered lesions induced by charged particle irradiation. Our results are the first to directly show the requirement for an intact HRR pathway in human cells in ensuring DNA repair and cell survival in response to high-energy high LET radiation.

  9. Homologous recombination contributes to the repair of DNA double-strand breaks induced by high-energy iron ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, Faria; Seidler, Sara B.; Kronenberg, Amy; Schild, David; Wiese, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    To test the contribution of homologous recombinational repair (HRR) in repairing DNA damaged sites induced by high-energy iron ions, we used: (1) HRR-deficient rodent cells carrying a deletion in the RAD51D gene and (2) syngeneic human cells impaired for HRR by RAD51D or RAD51 knockdown using RNA interference. We show that in response to iron ions, HRR contributes to cell survival in rodent cells, and that HRR-deficiency abrogates RAD51 foci formation. Complementation of the HRR defect by human RAD51D rescues both enhanced cytotoxicity and RAD51 foci formation. For human cells irradiated with iron ions, cell survival is decreased, and, in p53 mutant cells, the levels of mutagenesis are increased when HRR is impaired. Human cells synchronized in S phase exhibit more pronounced resistance to iron ions as compared with cells in G1 phase, and this increase in radioresistance is diminished by RAD51 knockdown. These results implicate a role for RAD51-mediated DNA repair (i.e. HRR) in removing a fraction of clustered lesions induced by charged particle irradiation. Our results are the first to directly show the requirement for an intact HRR pathway in human cells in ensuring DNA repair and cell survival in response to high-energy high LET radiation.

  10. Double-strand break repair-adox: Restoration of suppressed double-strand break repair during mitosis induces genomic instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasawa, Masahiro; Shinohara, Akira; Shinohara, Miki

    2014-12-01

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the severest types of DNA damage. Unrepaired DSBs easily induce cell death and chromosome aberrations. To maintain genomic stability, cells have checkpoint and DSB repair systems to respond to DNA damage throughout most of the cell cycle. The failure of this process often results in apoptosis or genomic instability, such as aneuploidy, deletion, or translocation. Therefore, DSB repair is essential for maintenance of genomic stability. During mitosis, however, cells seem to suppress the DNA damage response and proceed to the next G1 phase, even if there are unrepaired DSBs. The biological significance of this suppression is not known. In this review, we summarize recent studies of mitotic DSB repair and discuss the mechanisms of suppression of DSB repair during mitosis. DSB repair, which maintains genomic integrity in other phases of the cell cycle, is rather toxic to cells during mitosis, often resulting in chromosome missegregation and aberration. Cells have multiple safeguards to prevent genomic instability during mitosis: inhibition of 53BP1 or BRCA1 localization to DSB sites, which is important to promote non-homologous end joining or homologous recombination, respectively, and also modulation of the non-homologous end joining core complex to inhibit DSB repair. We discuss how DSBs during mitosis are toxic and the multiple safeguard systems that suppress genomic instability. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  11. Direct and inverted repeats elicit genetic instability by both exploiting and eluding DNA double-strand break repair systems in mycobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina A Wojcik

    Full Text Available Repetitive DNA sequences with the potential to form alternative DNA conformations, such as slipped structures and cruciforms, can induce genetic instability by promoting replication errors and by serving as a substrate for DNA repair proteins, which may lead to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. However, the contribution of each of the DSB repair pathways, homologous recombination (HR, non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ and single-strand annealing (SSA, to this sort of genetic instability is not fully understood. Herein, we assessed the genome-wide distribution of repetitive DNA sequences in the Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Escherichia coli genomes, and determined the types and frequencies of genetic instability induced by direct and inverted repeats, both in the presence and in the absence of HR, NHEJ, and SSA. All three genomes are strongly enriched in direct repeats and modestly enriched in inverted repeats. When using chromosomally integrated constructs in M. smegmatis, direct repeats induced the perfect deletion of their intervening sequences ~1,000-fold above background. Absence of HR further enhanced these perfect deletions, whereas absence of NHEJ or SSA had no influence, suggesting compromised replication fidelity. In contrast, inverted repeats induced perfect deletions only in the absence of SSA. Both direct and inverted repeats stimulated excision of the constructs from the attB integration sites independently of HR, NHEJ, or SSA. With episomal constructs, direct and inverted repeats triggered DNA instability by activating nucleolytic activity, and absence of the DSB repair pathways (in the order NHEJ>HR>SSA exacerbated this instability. Thus, direct and inverted repeats may elicit genetic instability in mycobacteria by 1 directly interfering with replication fidelity, 2 stimulating the three main DSB repair pathways, and 3 enticing L5 site-specific recombination.

  12. Direct and inverted repeats elicit genetic instability by both exploiting and eluding DNA double-strand break repair systems in mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, Ewelina A; Brzostek, Anna; Bacolla, Albino; Mackiewicz, Pawel; Vasquez, Karen M; Korycka-Machala, Malgorzata; Jaworski, Adam; Dziadek, Jaroslaw

    2012-01-01

    Repetitive DNA sequences with the potential to form alternative DNA conformations, such as slipped structures and cruciforms, can induce genetic instability by promoting replication errors and by serving as a substrate for DNA repair proteins, which may lead to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). However, the contribution of each of the DSB repair pathways, homologous recombination (HR), non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and single-strand annealing (SSA), to this sort of genetic instability is not fully understood. Herein, we assessed the genome-wide distribution of repetitive DNA sequences in the Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Escherichia coli genomes, and determined the types and frequencies of genetic instability induced by direct and inverted repeats, both in the presence and in the absence of HR, NHEJ, and SSA. All three genomes are strongly enriched in direct repeats and modestly enriched in inverted repeats. When using chromosomally integrated constructs in M. smegmatis, direct repeats induced the perfect deletion of their intervening sequences ~1,000-fold above background. Absence of HR further enhanced these perfect deletions, whereas absence of NHEJ or SSA had no influence, suggesting compromised replication fidelity. In contrast, inverted repeats induced perfect deletions only in the absence of SSA. Both direct and inverted repeats stimulated excision of the constructs from the attB integration sites independently of HR, NHEJ, or SSA. With episomal constructs, direct and inverted repeats triggered DNA instability by activating nucleolytic activity, and absence of the DSB repair pathways (in the order NHEJ>HR>SSA) exacerbated this instability. Thus, direct and inverted repeats may elicit genetic instability in mycobacteria by 1) directly interfering with replication fidelity, 2) stimulating the three main DSB repair pathways, and 3) enticing L5 site-specific recombination.

  13. Relative contribution of homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining to DNA double-strand break repair after oxidative stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letavayová, Lucia; Marková, Eva; Hermanská, Katarína; Vlcková, Viera; Vlasáková, Danusa; Chovanec, Miroslav; Brozmanová, Jela

    2006-05-10

    Oxidative damage to DNA seems to be an important factor in developing many human diseases including cancer. It involves base and sugar damage, base-free sites, DNA-protein cross-links and DNA single-strand (SSB) and double-strand (DSB) breaks. Oxidative DSB can be formed in various ways such as their direct induction by the drug or their generation either through attempted and aborted repair of primary DNA lesions or through DNA replication-dependent conversion of SSB. In general, two main pathways are responsible for repairing DSB, homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), with both of them being potential candidates for the repair of oxidative DSB. We have examined relative contribution of HR and NHEJ to cellular response after oxidative stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Therefore, cell survival, mutagenesis and DSB induction and repair in the rad52, yku70 and rad52 yku70 mutants after hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), menadione (MD) or bleomycin (BLM) exposure were compared to those obtained for the corresponding wild type. We show that MD exposure does not lead to observable DSB induction in yeast, suggesting that the toxic effects of this agent are mediated by other types of DNA damage. Although H(2)O(2) treatment generates some DSB, their yield is relatively low and hence DSB may only partially be responsible for toxicity of H(2)O(2), particularly at high doses of the agent. On the other hand, the basis of the BLM toxicity resides primarily in DSB induction. Both HR and NHEJ act on BLM-induced DSB, although their relative participation in the process is not equal. Based on our results we suggest that the complexity and/or the quality of the BLM-induced DSB might represent an obstacle for the NHEJ pathway.

  14. Bi-directional routing of DNA mismatch repair protein human exonuclease 1 to replication foci and DNA double strand breaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liberti, Sascha E; Andersen, Sofie Dabros; Wang, Jing

    2011-01-01

    (PIP-box) region on hEXO1 located in its COOH-terminal ((788)QIKLNELW(795)). This motif is essential for PCNA binding and co-localization during S-phase. Recruitment of hEXO1 to DNA DSB sites is dependent on the MMR protein hMLH1. We show that two distinct hMLH1 interaction regions of hEXO1 (residues...

  15. DNA ligase 1 deficient plants display severe growth defects and delayed repair of both DNA single and double strand breaks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Waterworth, W.M.; Kozák, Jaroslav; Provost, C.M.; Bray, C.M.; Angelis, Karel; West, C.E.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 9, art.no.79 (2009), s. 1-12 ISSN 1471-2229 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0505; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : ARABIDOPSIS-THALIANA * T-DNA * COMET ASSAY Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.774, year: 2009

  16. The RSF1 histone-remodelling factor facilitates DNA double-strand break repair by recruiting centromeric and Fanconi Anaemia proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Pessina

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available ATM is a central regulator of the cellular responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. Here we identify a biochemical interaction between ATM and RSF1 and we characterise the role of RSF1 in this response. The ATM-RSF1 interaction is dependent upon both DSBs and ATM kinase activity. Together with SNF2H/SMARCA5, RSF1 forms the RSF chromatin-remodelling complex. Although RSF1 is specific to the RSF complex, SNF2H/SMARCA5 is a catalytic subunit of several other chromatin-remodelling complexes. Although not required for checkpoint signalling, RSF1 is required for efficient repair of DSBs via both end-joining and homology-directed repair. Specifically, the ATM-dependent recruitment to sites of DSBs of the histone fold proteins CENPS/MHF1 and CENPX/MHF2, previously identified at centromeres, is RSF1-dependent. In turn these proteins recruit and regulate the mono-ubiquitination of the Fanconi Anaemia proteins FANCD2 and FANCI. We propose that by depositing CENPS/MHF1 and CENPX/MHF2, the RSF complex either directly or indirectly contributes to the reorganisation of chromatin around DSBs that is required for efficient DNA repair.

  17. DNA double strand break repair pathway plays a significant role in determining the radiotherapy induced normal tissue toxicity among head-and-neck and breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadashiva, Satish Rao Bola; Mumbrekar, Kamalesh Dattaram; Venkatesh, Goutham Hassan; Fernandes, Donald Jerard; Bejadi, Vadhiraja Manjunath; Kapaettu, Satyamoorthy

    2014-01-01

    The ability to predict individual risk of radiotherapy induced normal tissue complications prior to the therapy may give an opportunity to personalize the treatment aiming improved therapeutic effect and quality of life. Therefore, predicting the risk of developing acute reactions before the initiation of radiation therapy may serve as a potential biomarker. DNA double-strand break (DSB) induction and its repair kinetics in lymphocytes of Head-and-Neck (n = 183) and Breast cancer (n = 132) patients undergoing chemoradiation or radiation therapy alone were analyzed by performing γ-H2AX foci, neutral comet and a modified neutral filter elution assay. Candidate radioresponsive genes like DNA repair, antioxidant pathway, profibrotic cytokine genes were screened for the common variants for their association with normal tissue toxicity outcome. Patients were stratified as non-over responders (NOR) and over responders (OR) based on their Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grading for normal tissue adverse reactions. Our results suggest that DSB repair plays a major role in the development of normal tissue adverse reactions in H and N and Breast cancer patients. The cellular (γ-H2AX analysis) and SNP analysis may have the potential to be developed into a clinically useful predictive assay for identifying the normal tissue over reactors

  18. The Over-expression of the β2 Catalytic Subunit of the Proteasome Decreases Homologous Recombination and Impairs DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Collavoli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available By a human cDNA library screening, we have previously identified two sequences coding two different catalytic subunits of the proteasome which increase homologous recombination (HR when overexpressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we investigated the effect of proteasome on spontaneous HR and DNA repair in human cells. To determine if the proteasome has a role in the occurrence of spontaneous HR in human cells, we overexpressed the β2 subunit of the proteasome in HeLa cells and determined the effect on intrachromosomal HR. Results showed that the overexpression of β2 subunit decreased HR in human cells without altering the cell proteasome activity and the Rad51p level. Moreover, exposure to MG132 that inhibits the proteasome activity reduced HR in human cells. We also found that the expression of the β2 subunit increases the sensitivity to the camptothecin that induces DNA double-strand break (DSB. This suggests that the β2 subunit has an active role in HR and DSB repair but does not alter the intracellular level of the Rad51p.

  19. Studies on the repair of double strand break of DNA and cellular carcinogenesis, and consideration on the concept of extinction of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teraoka, Hirobumi

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the relationship between the repair of double strand break (DSB) of DNA and cellular carcinogenesis mainly on author's investigations, and his recent thought aiming at the extinction of nuclear power. The molecular repairing system is explained about DNA DSB induced by radiation and chemicals. When DSB occurs, nucleosome consisting from 4 core-histones participates to link the broken ends and then repair mechanisms of homologous recombination (HRR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) begin to work. The latter is dominant in mammalians. Thus the genetic defect in these systems of DSB response and repair is a course of disorders such as ataxia telangiectasia (AT) (DSB sensor defect), genetic breast cancer (HRR defect), and radiosensitive-severe combined immunodeficiency (RS-SCID) (NHEJ defect), all of which result in cancer formation. NHEJ repair is known to be error-prone. Against multi-step carcinogenesis where accumulated gene mutations lead to the cancer formation, the author thinks chromosomal instability is one of important carcinogenic causes: the instability can be a trigger of producing cancer stem cells because the cells can be yielded from mouse embryonic stem cells where DSB is shown to participate in the process. Low dose radiation produces a small amount of DSB, to which the repair response is less sensitive at G2/M checkpoint, ultimately leading to genomic instability. Considering effects of the low dose radiation exposure above, and of the internal exposure to 3 H-thymidine beta ray in cells, of indoor Rn participating 16% of lung cancer incidence (Canadian epidemiological data) and so on, together with moral and social responsibility of scientist and technologist, the author says to have attained to the concept of the ''Extinction of Nuclear Power''. (T.T)

  20. A soluble RecN homologue provides means for biochemical and genetic analysis of DNA double-strand break repair in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, Jane I; Wood, Stuart R; Briggs, Geoffrey S; Oldham, Neil J; Lloyd, Robert G

    2009-12-03

    RecN is a highly conserved, SMC-like protein in bacteria. It plays an important role in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks and is therefore a key factor in maintaining genome integrity. The insolubility of Escherichia coli RecN has limited efforts to unravel its function. We overcame this limitation by replacing the resident coding sequence with that of Haemophilus influenzae RecN. The heterologous construct expresses Haemophilus RecN from the SOS-inducible E. coli promoter. The hybrid gene is fully functional, promoting survival after I-SceI induced DNA breakage, gamma irradiation or exposure to mitomycin C as effectively as the native gene, indicating that the repair activity is conserved between these two species. H. influenzae RecN is quite soluble, even when expressed at high levels, and is readily purified. Its analysis by ionisation-mass spectrometry, gel filtration and glutaraldehyde crosslinking indicates that it is probably a dimer under physiological conditions, although a higher multimer cannot be excluded. The purified protein displays a weak ATPase activity that is essential for its DNA repair function in vivo. However, no DNA-binding activity was detected, which contrasts with RecN from Bacillus subtilis. RecN proteins from Aquifex aeolicus and Bacteriodes fragilis also proved soluble. Neither binds DNA, but the Aquifex RecN has weak ATPase activity. Our findings support studies indicating that RecN, and the SOS response in general, behave differently in E. coli and B. subtilis. The hybrid recN reported provides new opportunities to study the genetics and biochemistry of how RecN operates in E. coli.

  1. Effect of Wortmannin on the repair profiles of DNA double-strand breaks in the whole genome and in interstitial telomeric sequences of Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Losada, Raquel; Rivero, Maria Teresa; Slijepcevic, Predrag; Goyanes, Vicente; Fernandez, Jose Luis

    2005-01-01

    The DNA breakage detection-fluorescence in situ hybridization (DBD-FISH) procedure was applied to analyze the effect of Wortmannin (WM) in the rejoining kinetics of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the whole genome and in the long interstitial telomeric repeat sequence (ITRS) blocks from Chinese hamster cell lines. The results indicate that the ITRS blocks from wild-type Chinese hamster cell lines, CHO9 and V79B, exhibit a slower initial rejoining rate of ionizing radiation-induced DSBs than the genome overall. Neither Rad51C nor the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) activities, involved in homologous recombination (HR) and in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathways of DSB repair respectively, influenced the rejoining kinetics within ITRS in contrast to DNA sequences in the whole genome. Nevertheless, DSB removal rate within ITRS was decreased in the absence of Ku86 activity, though at a lower affectation level than in the whole genome, thus homogenizing both rejoining kinetics rates. WM treatment slowed down the DSB rejoining kinetics rate in ITRS, this effect being more pronounced in the whole genome, resulting in a similar pattern to that of the Ku86 deficient cells. In fact, no WM effect was detected in the Ku86 deficient Chinese hamster cells, so probably WM does not add further impairment in DSB rejoining than that resulted as a consequence of absence of Ku activity. The same slowing effect was also observed after treatment of Rad51C and DNA-PKcs defective hamster cells by WM, suggesting that: (1) there is no potentiation of the HR when the NHEJ is impaired by WM, either in the whole genome or in the ITRS, and (2) that this impairment may probably involve more targets than DNA-PKcs. These results suggest that there is an intragenomic heterogeneity in DSB repair, as well as in the effect of WM on this process

  2. Genetic variants in DNA double-strand break repair genes and risk of salivary gland carcinoma: a case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xu

    Full Text Available DNA double strand break (DSB repair is the primary defense mechanism against ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage. Ionizing radiation is the only established risk factor for salivary gland carcinoma (SGC. We hypothesized that genetic variants in DSB repair genes contribute to individual variation in susceptibility to SGC. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a case-control study in which we analyzed 415 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 45 DSB repair genes in 352 SGC cases and 598 controls. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to calculate odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Rs3748522 in RAD52 and rs13180356 in XRCC4 were significantly associated with SGC after Bonferroni adjustment; ORs (95% CIs for the variant alleles of these SNPs were 1.71 (1.40-2.09, P = 1.70 × 10(-7 and 0.58 (0.45-0.74, P = 2.00 × 10(-5 respectively. The genetic effects were modulated by histological subtype. The association of RAD52-rs3748522 with SGC was strongest for mucoepidermoid carcinoma (OR = 2.21, 95% CI: 1.55-3.15, P = 1.25 × 10(-5, n = 74, and the association of XRCC4-rs13180356 with SGC was strongest for adenoid cystic carcinoma (OR = 0.60, 95% CI: 0.42-0.87, P = 6.91 × 10(-3, n = 123. Gene-level association analysis revealed one gene, PRKDC, with a marginally significant association with SGC risk in non-Hispanic whites. To our knowledge, this study is the first to comprehensively evaluate the genetic effect of DSB repair genes on SGC risk. Our results indicate that genetic variants in the DSB repair pathways contribute to inter-individual differences in susceptibility to SGC and show that the impact of genetic variants differs by histological subtype. Independent studies are warranted to confirm these findings.

  3. Enzymatic induction of DNA double-strand breaks in γ-irradiated Escherichia coli K-12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonura, T.; Smith, K.C.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1975-01-01

    The polA1 mutation increases the sensitivity of E. coli K-12 to killing by γ-irradiation in air by a factor of 2.9 and increases the yield of DNA double-strand breaks by a factor of 2.5. These additional DNA double-strand breaks appear to be due to the action of nucleases in the polA1 strain rather than to the rejoining of radiation-induced double-strand breaks in the pol + strain. This conclusion is based upon the observation that γ-irradiation at 3 0 did not affect the yield of DNA double-strand breaks in the pol + strain, but decreased the yield in the polA1 strain by a factor of 2.2. Irradiation of the polA1 strain at 3 0 followed by incubation at 3 0 for 20 min before plating resulted in approximately a 1.5-fold increase in the D 0 . The yield of DNA double-strand breaks was reduced by a factor of 1.5. The pol + strain, however, did not show the protective effect of the low temperature incubation upon either survival or DNA double-strand breakage. We suggest that the increased yield of DNA double-strand breaks in the polA 1 strain may be the result of the unsuccessful excision repair of ionizing radiation-induced dna base damage

  4. The effect of defective DNA double-strand break repair on mutations and chromosome aberrations in the Chinese hamster cell mutant XR-V15B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helbig, R.; Speit, G.; Zdzienicka, M.Z.

    1995-01-01

    The radiosensitive Chinese hamster cell line XR-V15B was used to study the effect of decreased rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) on gene mutations and chromosome aberrations. XR-V15B cells are hypersensitive to the cytotoxic effects of neocarzinostatin (NCS) and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Both mutagens induced more chromosome aberrations in XR-V15B cells than in the parental cell strain. The clastogenic action of NCS was characterized by the induction of predominantly chromosome-type aberrations in cells of both strains, whereas MMS induced mainly chromatid aberrations. The frequency of induced gene mutations at the hprt locus was not increased compared to the parental V79 cells when considering the same survival level. Molecular analysis by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of mutants induced by NCS revealed a high frequency of deletions in cells of both cell lines. Methyl methane-sulfonate induced mainly mutations without visible change in the PCR pattern, which probably represent point mutations. Our findings suggest a link between a defect in DNA DSB repair and increased cytotoxic and clastogenic effects. However, a decreased ability to rejoin DNA DSBs does not seem to influence the incidence and types of gene mutations at the hprt locus induced by NCS and MMS. 28 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  5. A switch from high-fidelity to error-prone DNA double-strand break repair underlies stress-induced mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponder, Rebecca G; Fonville, Natalie C; Rosenberg, Susan M

    2005-09-16

    Special mechanisms of mutation are induced in microbes under growth-limiting stress causing genetic instability, including occasional adaptive mutations that may speed evolution. Both the mutation mechanisms and their control by stress have remained elusive. We provide evidence that the molecular basis for stress-induced mutagenesis in an E. coli model is error-prone DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR). I-SceI-endonuclease-induced DSBs strongly activate stress-induced mutations near the DSB, but not globally. The same proteins are required as for cells without induced DSBs: DSBR proteins, DinB-error-prone polymerase, and the RpoS starvation-stress-response regulator. Mutation is promoted by homology between cut and uncut DNA molecules, supporting a homology-mediated DSBR mechanism. DSBs also promote gene amplification. Finally, DSBs activate mutation only during stationary phase/starvation but will during exponential growth if RpoS is expressed. Our findings reveal an RpoS-controlled switch from high-fidelity to mutagenic DSBR under stress. This limits genetic instability both in time and to localized genome regions, potentially important evolutionary strategies.

  6. HDAC4 and HDAC6 sustain DNA double strand break repair and stem-like phenotype by promoting radioresistance in glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marampon, Francesco; Megiorni, Francesca; Camero, Simona; Crescioli, Clara; McDowell, Heather P; Sferra, Roberta; Vetuschi, Antonella; Pompili, Simona; Ventura, Luca; De Felice, Francesca; Tombolini, Vincenzo; Dominici, Carlo; Maggio, Roberto; Festuccia, Claudio; Gravina, Giovanni Luca

    2017-07-01

    The role of histone deacetylase (HDAC) 4 and 6 in glioblastoma (GBM) radioresistance was investigated. We found that tumor samples from 31 GBM patients, who underwent temozolomide and radiotherapy combined treatment, showed HDAC4 and HDAC6 expression in 93.5% and 96.7% of cases, respectively. Retrospective clinical data analysis demonstrated that high-intensity HDAC4 and/or HDAC6 immunostaining was predictive of poor clinical outcome. In vitro experiments revealed that short hairpin RNA-mediated silencing of HDAC4 or HDAC6 radiosensitized U87MG and U251MG GBM cell lines by promoting DNA double-strand break (DSBs) accumulation and by affecting DSBs repair molecular machinery. We found that HDAC6 knock-down predisposes to radiation therapy-induced U251MG apoptosis- and U87MG autophagy-mediated cell death. HDAC4 silencing promoted radiation therapy-induced senescence, independently by the cellular context. Finally, we showed that p53 WT expression contributed to the radiotherapy lethal effects and that HDAC4 or HDAC6 sustained GBM stem-like radioresistant phenotype. Altogether, these observations suggest that HDAC4 and HDAC6 are guardians of irradiation-induced DNA damages and stemness, thus promoting radioresistance, and may represent potential prognostic markers and therapeutic targets in GBM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Non-homologous end joining is the responsible pathway for the repair of fludarabine-induced DNA double strand breaks in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos-Nebel, Marcelo de; Larripa, Irene; Gonzalez-Cid, Marcela

    2008-01-01

    Fludarabine (FLU), an analogue of adenosine, interferes with DNA synthesis and inhibits the chain elongation leading to replication arrest and DNA double strand break (DSB) formation. Mammalian cells use two main pathways of DSB repair to maintain genomic stability: homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). The aim of the present work was to evaluate the repair pathways employed in the restoration of DSB formed following replication arrest induced by FLU in mammalian cells. Replication inhibition was induced in human lymphocytes and fibroblasts by FLU. DSB occurred in a dose-dependent manner on early/middle S-phase cells, as detected by γH2AX foci formation. To test whether conservative HR participates in FLU-induced DSB repair, we measured the kinetics of Rad51 nuclear foci formation in human fibroblasts. There was no significant induction of Rad51 foci after FLU treatment. To further confirm these results, we analyzed the frequency of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in both human cells. We did not find increased frequencies of SCE after FLU treatment. To assess the participation of NHEJ pathway in the repair of FLU-induced damage, we used two chemical inhibitors of the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), vanillin and wortmannin. Human fibroblasts pretreated with DNA-PKcs inhibitors showed increased levels of chromosome breakages and became more sensitive to cell death. An active role of NHEJ pathway was also suggested from the analysis of Chinese hamster cell lines. XR-C1 (DNA-PKcs-deficient) and XR-V15B (Ku80-deficient) cells showed hypersensitivity to FLU as evidenced by the increased frequency of chromosome aberrations, decreased mitotic index and impaired survival rates. In contrast, CL-V4B (Rad51C-deficient) and V-C8 (Brca2-deficient) cell lines displayed a FLU-resistant phenotype. Together, our results suggest a major role for NHEJ repair in the preservation of genome integrity against FLU-induced DSB

  8. Non-homologous end joining is the responsible pathway for the repair of fludarabine-induced DNA double strand breaks in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos-Nebel, Marcelo de [Departamento de Genetica, Instituto de Investigaciones Hematologicas Mariano R. Castex, Academia Nacional de Medicina, Buenos Aires (Argentina)], E-mail: mnebel@hematologia.anm.edu.ar; Larripa, Irene; Gonzalez-Cid, Marcela [Departamento de Genetica, Instituto de Investigaciones Hematologicas Mariano R. Castex, Academia Nacional de Medicina, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2008-11-10

    Fludarabine (FLU), an analogue of adenosine, interferes with DNA synthesis and inhibits the chain elongation leading to replication arrest and DNA double strand break (DSB) formation. Mammalian cells use two main pathways of DSB repair to maintain genomic stability: homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). The aim of the present work was to evaluate the repair pathways employed in the restoration of DSB formed following replication arrest induced by FLU in mammalian cells. Replication inhibition was induced in human lymphocytes and fibroblasts by FLU. DSB occurred in a dose-dependent manner on early/middle S-phase cells, as detected by {gamma}H2AX foci formation. To test whether conservative HR participates in FLU-induced DSB repair, we measured the kinetics of Rad51 nuclear foci formation in human fibroblasts. There was no significant induction of Rad51 foci after FLU treatment. To further confirm these results, we analyzed the frequency of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in both human cells. We did not find increased frequencies of SCE after FLU treatment. To assess the participation of NHEJ pathway in the repair of FLU-induced damage, we used two chemical inhibitors of the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), vanillin and wortmannin. Human fibroblasts pretreated with DNA-PKcs inhibitors showed increased levels of chromosome breakages and became more sensitive to cell death. An active role of NHEJ pathway was also suggested from the analysis of Chinese hamster cell lines. XR-C1 (DNA-PKcs-deficient) and XR-V15B (Ku80-deficient) cells showed hypersensitivity to FLU as evidenced by the increased frequency of chromosome aberrations, decreased mitotic index and impaired survival rates. In contrast, CL-V4B (Rad51C-deficient) and V-C8 (Brca2-deficient) cell lines displayed a FLU-resistant phenotype. Together, our results suggest a major role for NHEJ repair in the preservation of genome integrity against FLU

  9. 125IdUrd-induced chromosome fragments, assayed by premature chromosome condensation, and DNA double-strand breaks have similar repair kinetics in G1-phase CHO-cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliakis, George; Pantelias, G.E.; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Seaner, Robert

    1987-01-01

    The effect of 125 I-decay on cell lethality, and induction of chromosome and DNA damage, was studied in synchronous non-cycling, G 1 -phase CHO-cells. Neutral filter elution was used to assay repair of DNA double-strand breaks (dsbs), and premature chromosome condensation was used to assay repair of chromosome fragments and induction of ring chromosomes. The results indicate very little repair at the cell survival level (repair of PLD). At the DNA level an efficient repair of DNA dsbs was observed, with kinetics similar to those observed after exposure to X-rays. At the chromosome level a fast repair of prematurely condensed chromosome fragments was observed, with a concomitant increase in the number of ring chromosomes induced. The repair kinetics of chromosome fragments and DNA dsbs were very similar, suggesting that DNA dsbs may underlie chromosome fragmentation. (author)

  10. Repair-induced DNA double strand breaks after ultraviolet-light and either aphidocolin or 1-β-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine/hydroxyurea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, M.O.; Taylor, V.I.

    1983-01-01

    A study was performed to determine whether 'repair-induced double strand breaks' (RDSBs) occur in IMR-90 cells at low u.v. doses and whether the RDSBs are themselves repairable by holding open the excision-repair induced gaps by inhibiting nucleotide polymerization after u.v. light with hydroxyurea/ara C or aphidocolin. The results show as little as 2.5 J.m -2 of u.v. light induces RDSBs during repair incubation when repair inhibitors are present. This suggests that 'hot spots' of high lesion frequency occur and the overlapping excision in these areas will produce RDSBs. Removing aphidocolin showed that RDSBs are only partially repairable with between 15 and 40% of the breaks unrepaired at 24 h. Because the lesions are partially repairable they should not always cause toxicity and may be involved in processes such as mutation, transformation, and chromosome or chromatid type aberrations of the sort associated with human tumors. (author)

  11. The production and repair of double strand breaks in cells from normal humans and patients with ataxia telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehman, A.R.; Stevens, S.

    1977-01-01

    The production and repair of double strand breaks induced by γ-rays in the DNA of human fibroblasts have been measured by sedimentation in sucrose gradients under non-denaturing conditions. Unirradiated DNA formed a rapidly sedimenting gel. Low doses of radiation released freely sedimenting DNA molecules from this gel. Higher doses reduced the rate of sedimentation of the free DNA due to the introduction of double strand breaks. The breakage efficiency was 1 break/1.3x10 10 daltons of DNA/krad. Postirradiation incubation after a high dose of radiation resulted in an increase in molecular weight of the free DNA molecules, and after a low dose the rapidly-sedimenting gel was reformed. These data suggest that double strand breaks are repaired in human fibroblasts. No significant differences were found between fibroblasts from two normal donors and four patients with the radiosensitive disorder, ataxia telangiectasia, in either the production or repair of double strand breaks

  12. Quercetin suppresses DNA double-strand break repair and enhances the radiosensitivity of human ovarian cancer cells via p53-dependent endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong C

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cheng Gong,1 Zongyuan Yang,1 Lingyun Zhang,2 Yuehua Wang,2 Wei Gong,2 Yi Liu3 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 2Department of Oncology, XiangYang Central Hospital, Hubei University of Arts and Science, XiangYang, 3Department of Medicinal Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, Hubei University of Chinese Medicine, Wuhan, China Abstract: Quercetin is proven to have anticancer effects for many cancers. However, the role of tumor suppressor p53 on quercetin’s radiosensitization and regulation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress response in this process remains obscure. Here, quercetin exposure resulted in ER stress, prolonged DNA repair, and the expression of p53 protein; phosphorylation on serine 15 and 20 increased in combination with X-irradiation. Quercetin pretreatment could potentiate radiation-induced cell death. The combination of irradiation and quercetin treatment aggravated DNA damages and caused typical apoptotic cell death; as well the expression of Bax and p21 elevated and the expression of Bcl-2 decreased. Knocking down of p53 could reverse all the above effects under quercetin in combination with radiation. In addition, quercetin-induced radiosensitization was through stimulation of ATM phosphorylation. In human ovarian cancer xenograft model, combined treatment of quercetin and radiation significantly restrained the growth of tumors, accompanied with the activation of p53, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein, and γ-H2AX. Overall, these results indicated that quercetin acted as a promising radiosensitizer through p53-dependent ER stress signals. Keywords: quercetin, p53, endoplasmic reticulum stress, DNA double-strand breaks, eIF-2α (eukaryotic initiation factor 2α, ATM kinase

  13. DNA double-strand breaks & poptosis in the testis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamer, Geert

    2003-01-01

    During spermatogenesis, DNA damage is a naturally occurring event. At a certain stage, during the first meiotic prophase, DNA breaks are endogenously induced and even required for meiotic recombination. We studied these DNA breaks but also used ionizing radiation (IR) to induce DNA double-strand

  14. Differential repair of radiation-induced DNA damage in cells of human squamous cell carcinoma and the effect of caffeine and cysteamine on induction and repair of DNA double-strand breaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smeets, M.F.M.A.; Mooren, E.H.M.; Abdel-Wahab, A.H.A.; Begg, A.C. [Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1994-11-01

    The goal of these experiments was to investigate further the relationship between DNA double-strand breaks and cell killing in human tumor cells, first by comparing different cell lines, and second by radiomodification studies. Field-inversion gel electrophoresis was used to quantify double-strand breaks. Two subclones of the radioresistant human squamous cell carcinoma line SQ20B (SQD9 and SQG6) were compared. These subclones differed in DNA index by a factor of 1.7 but showed the same resistance to radiation as cells of the parental cell line. It was found that, although induction of DSBs was not significantly different in the two cell lines, the t{sub 1/2} of the fast component of repair was significantly shorter for SQD9 cells, leading to greater overall repair which was not reflected in increased survival. Caffeine and cysteamine were tested as modifiers of radiosensitivity, using the radioresistant SQ20B line and the radiosensitive SCC61 cell line. No effect of caffeine was seen when the drug was present only during irradiation. Postirradiation incubations with caffeine, however, resulted in a dose reduction factor greater than 2.0 in cell survival for both cell lines. In contrast, induction of DSBs was reduced by caffeine, and no effect on DSB repair was observed. Cysteamine led to a dose protection factor greater than 1.8 in cell survival in both cell lines. A reduction in induced DSBs was found at high doses corresponding approximately with the increase in cell survival. Over the same (low) dose range, however, the correlation between DSB induction and cell killing was poor. These data indicate that DSB induction does not correlate well with cell killing either for different cell lines, for radiochemical modification (cysteamine) or for some other types of modification (caffeine). 31 refs., 8 figs.

  15. Multiple pathways of DNA double-strand break processing in a mutant Indian muntjac cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouffler, S.D.; Jha, B.; Johnson, R.T.

    1990-01-01

    DNA break processing is compared in the Indian muntjac cell lines, SVM and DM. The initial frequencies and resealing of X-ray generated single- and double-strand breaks are similar in the two cell lines. Inhibiting the repair of UV damage leads to greater double-strand breakage in SVM than in DM, and some of these breaks are not repaired; however, repair-associated single-strand breakage and resealing are normal. Dimethylsulfate also induces excess double-strand breakage in SVM, and these breaks are irreparable. Restricted plasmids are reconstituted correctly in SVM at approximately 30% of the frequency observed in DM. Thus SVM has a reduced capacity to repair certain types of double-strand break. This defect is not due to a DNA ligase deficiency. We conclude that DNA double-strand breaks are repaired by a variety of pathways within mammalian cells and that the structure of the break or its mode of formation determines its subsequent fate

  16. Genetics of x-ray induced double strand break repair in saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budd, M.E.

    1982-07-01

    The possible fates of x-ray-induced double-strand breaks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae were examined. One possible pathway which breaks can follow, the repair pathway, was studied by assaying strains with mutations in the RAD51, RAD54, and RAD57 loci for double-strand break repair. In order of increasing radiation sensitivity one finds: rad57-1(23 0 )> rad51-1(30 0 )> rad54-3(36 0 ). At 36 0 , rad54-3 cells cannot repair double-strand breaks, while 23 0 , they can. Strains with the rad57-1 mutation can rejoin broken chromosomes at both temperatures. However, the low survival at 36 0 shows that the assay is not distinguishing large DNA fragments which allow cell survival from those which cause cell death. A rad51-1 strain could also rejoin broken chromosomes, and was thus capable of incomplete repair. The data can be explained with the hypothesis that rad54-3 cells are blocked in an early step of repair, while rad51-1 and rad57-1 strains are blocked in a later step of repair. The fate of double-strand breaks when they are left unrepaired was investigated with the rad54-3 mutation. If breaks are prevented from entering the RAD54 repair pathway they become uncommitted lesions. These lesions are repaired slower than the original breaks. One possible fate for an uncommitted lesion is conversion into a fixed lesion, which is likely to be an unrepairable or misrepaired double-strand break. The presence of protein synthesis after irradiation increases the probability that a break will enter the repair pathway. Evidence shows that increased probability of repair results from enhanced synthesis of repair proteins shortly after radiation

  17. Transcriptome analyses of rhesus monkey preimplantation embryos reveal a reduced capacity for DNA double-strand break repair in primate oocytes and early embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinyi; Liu, Denghui; He, Dajian; Suo, Shengbao; Xia, Xian; He, Xiechao; Han, Jing-Dong J.; Zheng, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Preimplantation embryogenesis encompasses several critical events including genome reprogramming, zygotic genome activation (ZGA), and cell-fate commitment. The molecular basis of these processes remains obscure in primates in which there is a high rate of embryo wastage. Thus, understanding the factors involved in genome reprogramming and ZGA might help reproductive success during this susceptible period of early development and generate induced pluripotent stem cells with greater efficiency. Moreover, explaining the molecular basis responsible for embryo wastage in primates will greatly expand our knowledge of species evolution. By using RNA-seq in single and pooled oocytes and embryos, we defined the transcriptome throughout preimplantation development in rhesus monkey. In comparison to archival human and mouse data, we found that the transcriptome dynamics of monkey oocytes and embryos were very similar to those of human but very different from those of mouse. We identified several classes of maternal and zygotic genes, whose expression peaks were highly correlated with the time frames of genome reprogramming, ZGA, and cell-fate commitment, respectively. Importantly, comparison of the ZGA-related network modules among the three species revealed less robust surveillance of genomic instability in primate oocytes and embryos than in rodents, particularly in the pathways of DNA damage signaling and homology-directed DNA double-strand break repair. This study highlights the utility of monkey models to better understand the molecular basis for genome reprogramming, ZGA, and genomic stability surveillance in human early embryogenesis and may provide insights for improved homologous recombination-mediated gene editing in monkey. PMID:28223401

  18. In vivo quantification of DNA double strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonsson, M.; Qvarnstroem, F.; Turesson, I.; Johansson, K.-A.; Nyman, J.; Hermansson, I.; Oden, A.; Book, M.

    2003-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) can be introduced in the genome by exposure to exogenous agents such as ionising radiation and radio-mimetic chemicals. The biological importance of these breaks is significant even at low numbers. Inaccurate repair or lack of repair of a single DSB has the potential to kill a cell or lead to tumourigenesis. Thus the induction and repair of DSBs are crucial events in the onset of malignancies. Following the induction of DSBs, the core histone H2AX is rapidly phosphorylated at residue serine 139. This phosphorylated form of H2AX is referred to as gH2AX. Histones wrapped in megabase regions flanking these breaks are involved in this process, which results in the formation of discrete nuclear foci. It has previously been shown that a single DSB is sufficient to produce a detectable focus. So far there has been a lack of methods capable of measuring the amount of DSBs at clinically relevant quantities. Such a method would embrace a wide field of applications. It could be applied as a biological dosimeter when studying carcinogenic effects and provide the basis for an assay predicting individual radiosensitivity. We describe a measurement procedure that detects and quantifies small amounts of DSBs in vivo. This is accomplished using immunofluorescence detection of the molecular marker gH2AX. The gH2AX foci are quantified in histological sections using basic digital image analysis methods as the main component. In a primary assessment of the procedure we analysed the in vivo dose response of prostate cancer patients in clinical practice undergoing radiotherapy. Epidermal nucleated cells in skin biopsies taken 30 minutes following the first single dose delivered show linear dose response for low doses ranging from 0 - 1.2 Gy. The described procedure for double strand break quantification can detect dose changes as low as 0.18 Gy

  19. REV7 counteracts DNA double-strand break resection and affects PARP inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Guotai; Chapman, J. Ross; Brandsma, Inger; Yuan, Jingsong; Mistrik, Martin; Bouwman, Peter; Bartkova, Jirina; Gogola, Ewa; Warmerdam, Daniël; Barazas, Marco; Jaspers, Janneke E.; Watanabe, Kenji; Pieterse, Mark; Kersbergen, Ariena; Sol, Wendy; Celie, Patrick H. N.; Schouten, Philip C.; van den Broek, Bram; Salman, Ahmed; Nieuwland, Marja; de Rink, Iris; de Ronde, Jorma; Jalink, Kees; Boulton, Simon J.; Chen, Junjie; van Gent, Dik C.; Bartek, Jiri; Jonkers, Jos; Borst, Piet; Rottenberg, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Error-free repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is achieved by homologous recombination (HR), and BRCA1 is an important factor for this repair pathway(1). In the absence of BRCA1-mediated HR, the administration of PARP inhibitors induces synthetic lethality of tumour cells of patients with

  20. The role of DNA double-strand breaks in spontaneous homologous recombination in S. cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lettier, Gaëlle; Feng, Q.; Mayolo, A.A. de

    2006-01-01

    of meiosis and result from the induction of a large number of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). By analogy, it is generally believed that the rare spontaneous mitotic HR events are due to repair of DNA DSBs that accidentally occur during mitotic growth. Here we provide the first direct evidence that most...

  1. Signalization and repair of the DNA double-strand breaks of in the cerebral tumors: modulation of the radiation response with the chemotherapy treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcinkova-Bencokova, Z.

    2007-07-01

    There are about 6000 new cases of nervous system tumours each year in France. However, the current radio chemotherapeutic approaches against brain tumours remain still insufficient to produce a satisfactory therapeutic index. In parallel, the knowledge of the early radiobiological events has considerably progressed in the last few years. This thesis aims to provide new insights in the molecular and cellular response of brain tumours to radio chemotherapy. This thesis was divided into four stages. Stage 1: a novel DNA double-strand breaks repair pathway depending on the MRE11 protein but independent of the phosphorylation of H2AX emerged from the study of artefacts of the immunofluorescence technique and a systematic analysis of the radiosensitivity of human cells. Stage 2: the radiobiological features of 3 rodent models of glioma among the most used in preclinical trials and of 7 human glioma cell lines were investigated. Functional impairments of the BRCA1 protein in response to radiation and/or cisplatin were observed in the majority of the models tested, raising the question of the role of this protein in the anti-glioma treatments and in glioma genesis. Stage 3: in order to extend our approach to genetic syndromes associated with cerebral tumours predisposition, the radiobiological characteristics of the fibroblasts resulting from patients suffering from neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), a pathology associated with a strong incidence of peripheral nervous system tumours, were investigated. NF1 appeared to be a syndrome with moderated radiosensitivity, associated with a weak deficiency of DNA end-joining repair but with a strong activity of MRE11. These results enabled us to propose a preliminary model involving both proteins BRCA1 and NF1. Stage 4: considering the role of BRCA1 in the inhibition of some tyrosine kinase activity and in the response to cisplatin, we tested the radiobiological effects of treatments combining radiation, cisplatin and tyrosine kinase

  2. DNA apoptosis and stability in B-cell chronic lymphoid leukaemia: implication of the DNA double-strand breaks repair system by non homologous recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deriano, L.

    2005-01-01

    After an introduction presenting the diagnosis and treatment of chronic lymphoid leukaemia, its molecular and genetic characteristics, and its cellular origin and clonal evolution, this research thesis describes the apoptosis (definition and characteristics, cancer and chemotherapy, apoptotic ways induced by gamma irradiation), the genotoxic stresses, the different repair mechanisms for different damages, and the DNA repair processes. It reports how human chronic lymphocytic leukaemia B cells can escape DNA damage-induced apoptosis through the non-homologous end-joining DNA repair pathway, and presents non-homologous end-joining DNA repair as a potent mutagenic process in human chronic lymphocytic leukaemia B cells

  3. Three methods to determine the yields of DNA double-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erzgraeber, G.; Lapidus, I.L.

    1985-01-01

    A possibility of determining the yield of DNA double-strand breaks in cells of the Chinese hamster (V79-4) by finding the amount of DNA released as a result of breaks and by determining the relative sedimentation velocity of DNA-membrane complexes affected by ionizing radiations with different physical characteristics is discussed. Results of the analysis are compared with the data obtained by a traditional method of sedimentation in the neutral sucrose density gradient. Comparative characterization of the methods is discussed. The yields of DNA double-strand breaks determined by the suggested independent methods are in good agreement, which opens possibilities of studying induction and repair of double-strand breaks by means of simpler and more reliable methods

  4. What is DNA damage? Risk of double-strand break and its individual variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanaoka, Fumio

    2011-01-01

    The author discusses about the title subject in an aspect of possible spreading of Fukushima radioactive substances mainly in eastern north area of Japan where carcinogenic incidence may be increased as the ionizing radiation injures the gene (DNA). At first, explained is that cancer is a disease of genes with infinitive proliferation of cells, there are systems to prevent it by repairing the damaged DNA and by other mechanisms like exclusion of cells damaged too much or killing cancer cells with immunity, and individual difference of the repairing capability exists. DNA is always damaged even under ordinary living conditions by sunlight UV ray, cosmic radiation and chemicals externally and by active oxygen species and thermal water movement internally. Concomitantly, DNA damaged by many mechanisms like deletion, dimmer formation, chemical modification of bases, single and double strand breaks is always repaired by concerned enzymes. Double-strand damage by high-energy radiation like gamma ray is quite risky because its repair sometimes accompanies error as concerned enzymes are from more multiple genes. There are many syndromes derived from gene deficit of those repairing enzymes. The diseases concerned with repair of the double-strand damage teach that fetus and infant are more sensitive to radiation than adult as their young body cells are more actively synthesizing DNA, during which, if DNA is injured by radiation, risk of repairing error is higher as the double strand break more frequently occurs. It cannot be simply said that a certain radiation dose limit is generally permissible. There is an individual difference of radiation sensitivity and a possible method to find out an individual weak to radiation is the lymphocyte screening in vitro using anticancer bleomycin which breaks the double strand. (T.T.)

  5. Individual repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks in lymphocytes. Implications for radiation-induced dermatitis in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melchior, Patrick Wilhelm

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant 'whole breast radiotherapy' (WBRT) is the standard of care after breast conserving surgery in women with breast cancer. Throughout different cancer stages the addition of WBRT leads to significantly improved rates of freedom from local failure and overall survival. WBRT is generally well tolerated. A 5-10%-rate of severe acute or long-term side effects is commonly observed. For both radiation-mediated tumor-cell-elimination and induction of side effects, DNA-double-strand-breaks (DSB) presumably play the decisive role. The intensity of normal tissue reactions in radiotherapy can, in part, be attributed to the intrinsic DSB repair-capacity. In this study in vivo and in vitro experiments are carried through in order to assess DSB repair-kinetics in blood lymphocytes of women with breast cancer. These findings are to be correlated with the degree of radiation-induced normal tissue toxicity. Patients and Methods: Eighteen patients with breast cancer, in whom WBRT was indicated, were examined. A total WBRT dose of 50 Gy (single dose 2 Gy) with an additional boost-radiotherapy to the initial tumor-region to a total dose of 60-66 Gy was administered. DSB repair was determined by means of counting γ-H2AX foci in blood lymphocytes at predefined points in time, i.e. before and 0.5 h; 2.5 h; 5 h and 24 h after in vivo irradiation (1st fraction of WBRT) and before and 0.5 h; 2.5 h and 5 h after in vitro irradiation with increasing radiation doses in the range of 10 - 500 mGy. Acute normal tissue toxicity was scored on the basis of a modified RTOG-classification (main aspects were erythema and dry or moist skin desquamation). Results: DSB repair-halflife-times did not differ between patients with a higher or lower than average incidence of acute side effects. In patients with 'above average' side effects larger irradiation volumes were treated (volume surrounded by the 50%-isodose). Adjusted for these, no single patients showed elevated residual γ-H2AX foci

  6. DNA double strand break repair in mammalian cells: role of MRE11 and BLM proteins at the initiation of Non Homologous End Joining (NHEJ)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabarz, Anastazja

    2011-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are highly cytotoxic lesions, which can lead to genetic rearrangements. Two pathways are responsible for repairing these lesions: homologous recombination (HR) and non homologous end joining (NHEJ). In our laboratory, an intrachromosomal substrate has been established in order to measure the efficiency and the fidelity of NHEJ in living cells (Guirouilh-Barbat 2004). This approach led us to identify a KU-independent alternative pathway, which uses micro homologies in the proximity of the junction to accomplish repair - the alternative NHEJ (Guirouilh-Barbat 2004, Guirouilh-Barbat et Rass 2007). The goal of my thesis consisted in identifying and characterising major actors of this pathway. In the absence of KU, alternative NHEJ would be initiated by ssDNA resection of damaged ends. We showed that the nuclease activity of MRE11 is necessary for this mechanism. MRE11 overexpression leads to a two fold stimulation of NHEJ efficiency, while the extinction of MRE11 by siRNA results in a two fold decrease. Our results demonstrate that the proteins RAD50 and CtIP act in the same pathway as MRE11. Moreover, in cells deficient for XRCC4, MIRIN - an inhibitor of the MRN complex - leads to a decrease in repair efficiency, implicating MRE11 in alternative NHEJ. We also showed that MRE11 can act in an ATM-dependent and independent manner (Rass et Grabarz Nat Struct Mol Biol 2009). The initiation of break resection needs to be pursued by a more extensive degradation of DNA, which is accomplished in yeast by the proteins Exo1 and Sgs1/Dna2. In human cells, in vitro studies have recently proposed a similar model of a two-step break resection. We chose to elucidate the role of one of the human homologs of Sgs1 - the RecQ helicase BLM - in the resection process. Our experiments show, that he absence of BLM decreases the efficiency of end joining by NHEJ, accompanied by an increase in error-prone events, especially long-range deletions (≥200 nt). This

  7. Ku recruits XLF to DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Ken-ichi; Morotomi-Yano, Keiko; Wang, Shih-Ya; Uematsu, Naoya; Lee, Kyung-Jong; Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Weterings, Eric; Chen, David J

    2008-01-01

    XRCC4-like factor (XLF)--also known as Cernunnos--has recently been shown to be involved in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), which is the main pathway for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in mammalian cells. XLF is likely to enhance NHEJ by stimulating XRCC4-ligase IV-mediated joining of DSBs. Here, we report mechanistic details of XLF recruitment to DSBs. Live cell imaging combined with laser micro-irradiation showed that XLF is an early responder to DSBs and that Ku is essential for XLF recruitment to DSBs. Biochemical analysis showed that Ku-XLF interaction occurs on DNA and that Ku stimulates XLF binding to DNA. Unexpectedly, XRCC4 is dispensable for XLF recruitment to DSBs, although photobleaching analysis showed that XRCC4 stabilizes the binding of XLF to DSBs. Our observations showed the direct involvement of XLF in the dynamic assembly of the NHEJ machinery and provide mechanistic insights into DSB recognition.

  8. Double Strand Break Repair, one mechanism can hide another: Alternative non-homologous end joining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rass, E.; Grabarz, A.; Bertrand, P.; Lopez, B.S.

    2012-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks are major cytotoxic lesions encountered by the cells. They can be induced by ionizing radiation or endogenous stress and can lead to genetic instability. Two mechanisms compete for the repair of DNA double strand breaks: homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Homologous recombination requires DNA sequences homology and is initiated by single strand resection. Recently, advances have been made concerning the major steps and proteins involved in resection. NHEJ, in contrast, does not require sequence homology. The existence of a DNA double strand break repair mechanism, independent of KU and ligase IV, the key proteins of the canonical non homologous end joining pathway, has been revealed lately and named alternative non homologous end joining. The hallmarks of this highly mutagenic pathway are deletions at repair junctions and frequent use of distal micro-homologies. This mechanism is also initiated by a single strand resection of the break. The aim of this review is firstly to present recent data on single strand resection, and secondly the alternative NHEJ pathway, including a discussion on the fidelity of NHEJ. Based on current knowledge, canonical NHEJ does not appear as an intrinsically mutagenic mechanism, but in contrast, as a conservative one. The structure of broken DNA ends actually dictates the quality repair of the alternative NHEJ and seems the actual responsible for the mutagenesis attributed beforehand to the canonical NHEJ. The existence of this novel DNA double strand breaks repair mechanism needs to be taken into account in the development of radiosensitizing strategies in order to optimise the efficiency of radiotherapy. (authors)

  9. Meta-analysis of DNA double-strand break response kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kochan, Jakub A.; Desclos, Emilie C. B.; Bosch, Ruben; Meister, Luna; Vriend, Lianne E. M.; Attikum, Haico V.; Krawczyk, Przemek M.

    2017-01-01

    Most proteins involved in the DNA double-strand break response (DSBR) accumulate at the damage sites, where they perform functions related to damage signaling, chromatin remodeling and repair. Over the last two decades, studying the accumulation of many DSBR proteins provided information about their

  10. DNA double-strand break rejoining in human follicular lymphoma and glioblastoma tumor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macann, AMJ; Britten, RA; Poppema, S; Pearcey, R; Rosenberg, E; Allalunis-Turner, MJ; Murray, D

    2000-01-01

    Follicle center cell lymphoma is among the most radioresponsive of human cancers. To assess whether this radioresponsiveness might be a result of a compromised ability of the tumor cells to accomplish the biologically-effective repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), we have measured i) the

  11. Time-lapse crystallography snapshots of a double-strand break repair polymerase in action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamsen, Joonas A; Beard, William A; Pedersen, Lars C; Shock, David D; Moon, Andrea F; Krahn, Juno M; Bebenek, Katarzyna; Kunkel, Thomas A; Wilson, Samuel H

    2017-08-15

    DNA polymerase (pol) μ is a DNA-dependent polymerase that incorporates nucleotides during gap-filling synthesis in the non-homologous end-joining pathway of double-strand break repair. Here we report time-lapse X-ray crystallography snapshots of catalytic events during gap-filling DNA synthesis by pol μ. Unique catalytic intermediates and active site conformational changes that underlie catalysis are uncovered, and a transient third (product) metal ion is observed in the product state. The product manganese coordinates phosphate oxygens of the inserted nucleotide and PP i . The product metal is not observed during DNA synthesis in the presence of magnesium. Kinetic analyses indicate that manganese increases the rate constant for deoxynucleoside 5'-triphosphate insertion compared to magnesium. The likely product stabilization role of the manganese product metal in pol μ is discussed. These observations provide insight on structural attributes of this X-family double-strand break repair polymerase that impact its biological function in genome maintenance.DNA polymerase (pol) μ functions in DNA double-strand break repair. Here the authors use time-lapse X-ray crystallography to capture the states of pol µ during the conversion from pre-catalytic to product complex and observe a third transiently bound metal ion in the product state.

  12. 75 FR 62820 - Screening Framework Guidance for Providers of Synthetic Double-Stranded DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-13

    ... Providers of Synthetic Double- Stranded DNA AGENCY: Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the.... Government has developed Guidance that provides a framework for screening synthetic double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). This document, the Screening Framework Guidance for Providers of Synthetic Double-Stranded DNA...

  13. Mutagenic repair of double-stranded DNA breaks in vaccinia virus genomes requires cellular DNA ligase IV activity in the cytosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luteijn, Rutger David; Drexler, Ingo; Smith, Geoffrey L; Lebbink, Robert Jan; Wiertz, Emmanuel J H J

    2018-04-20

    Poxviruses comprise a group of large dsDNA viruses that include members relevant to human and animal health, such as variola virus, monkeypox virus, cowpox virus and vaccinia virus (VACV). Poxviruses are remarkable for their unique replication cycle, which is restricted to the cytoplasm of infected cells. The independence from the host nucleus requires poxviruses to encode most of the enzymes involved in DNA replication, transcription and processing. Here, we use the CRISPR/Cas9 genome engineering system to induce DNA damage to VACV (strain Western Reserve) genomes. We show that targeting CRISPR/Cas9 to essential viral genes limits virus replication efficiently. Although VACV is a strictly cytoplasmic pathogen, we observed extensive viral genome editing at the target site; this is reminiscent of a non-homologous end-joining DNA repair mechanism. This pathway was not dependent on the viral DNA ligase, but critically involved the cellular DNA ligase IV. Our data show that DNA ligase IV can act outside of the nucleus to allow repair of dsDNA breaks in poxvirus genomes. This pathway might contribute to the introduction of mutations within the genome of poxviruses and may thereby promote the evolution of these viruses.

  14. Nucleic Acid Analogue Induced Transcription of Double Stranded DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    RNA is transcribed from a double stranded DNA template by forming a complex by hybridizing to the template at a desired transcription initiation site one or more oligonucleic acid analogues of the PNA type capable of forming a transcription initiation site with the DNA and exposing the complex...... to the action of a DNA dependant RNA polymerase in the presence of nucleoside triphosphates. Equal length transcripts may be obtained by placing a block to transcription downstream from the initiation site or by cutting the template at such a selected location. The initiation site is formed by displacement...... of one strand of the DNA locally by the PNA hybridization....

  15. DNA Double-Strand Break Rejoining in Complex Normal Tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruebe, Claudia E.; Dong, Xiaorong; Kuehne, Martin; Fricke, Andreas; Kaestner, Lars; Lipp, Peter; Ruebe, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The clinical radiation responses of different organs vary widely and likely depend on the intrinsic radiosensitivities of their different cell populations. Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most deleterious form of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation, and the cells' capacity to rejoin radiation-induced DSBs is known to affect their intrinsic radiosensitivity. To date, only little is known about the induction and processing of radiation-induced DSBs in complex normal tissues. Using an in vivo model with repair-proficient mice, the highly sensitive γH2AX immunofluorescence was established to investigate whether differences in DSB rejoining could account for the substantial differences in clinical radiosensitivity observed among normal tissues. Methods and Materials: After whole body irradiation of C57BL/6 mice (0.1, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 Gy), the formation and rejoining of DSBs was analyzed by enumerating γH2AX foci in various organs representative of both early-responding (small intestine) and late-responding (lung, brain, heart, kidney) tissues. Results: The linear dose correlation observed in all analyzed tissues indicated that γH2AX immunofluorescence allows for the accurate quantification of DSBs in complex organs. Strikingly, the various normal tissues exhibited identical kinetics for γH2AX foci loss, despite their clearly different clinical radiation responses. Conclusion: The identical kinetics of DSB rejoining measured in different organs suggest that tissue-specific differences in radiation responses are independent of DSB rejoining. This finding emphasizes the fundamental role of DSB repair in maintaining genomic integrity, thereby contributing to cellular viability and functionality and, thus, tissue homeostasis

  16. A robust network of double-strand break repair pathways governs genome integrity during C. elegans development.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pontier, D.B.; Tijsterman, M.

    2009-01-01

    To preserve genomic integrity, various mechanisms have evolved to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Depending on cell type or cell cycle phase, DSBs can be repaired error-free, by homologous recombination, or with concomitant loss of sequence information, via nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ)

  17. Application of Laser Micro-irradiation for Examination of Single and Double Strand Break Repair in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holton, Nathaniel W; Andrews, Joel F; Gassman, Natalie R

    2017-09-05

    Highly coordinated DNA repair pathways exist to detect, excise and replace damaged DNA bases, and coordinate repair of DNA strand breaks. While molecular biology techniques have clarified structure, enzymatic functions, and kinetics of repair proteins, there is still a need to understand how repair is coordinated within the nucleus. Laser micro-irradiation offers a powerful tool for inducing DNA damage and monitoring the recruitment of repair proteins. Induction of DNA damage by laser micro-irradiation can occur with a range of wavelengths, and users can reliably induce single strand breaks, base lesions and double strand breaks with a range of doses. Here, laser micro-irradiation is used to examine repair of single and double strand breaks induced by two common confocal laser wavelengths, 355 nm and 405 nm. Further, proper characterization of the applied laser dose for inducing specific damage mixtures is described, so users can reproducibly perform laser micro-irradiation data acquisition and analysis.

  18. Gefitinib radiosensitizes stem-like glioma cells: inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor-Akt-DNA-PK signaling, accompanied by inhibition of DNA double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Khong Bee; Zhu, Congju; Wong, Yin Ling; Gao, Qiuhan; Ty, Albert; Wong, Meng Cheong

    2012-05-01

    We compared radiosensitivity of brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs) with matched nonstem glioma cells, and determined whether gefitinib enhanced BTSC radiosensitivity by inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-Akt-DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) signaling, followed by enhanced DNA double-stand breaks (DSBs) and inhibition of DSB repair. Radiosensitivity of stem-like gliomaspheres and nonstem glioma cells (obtained at patient neurosurgical resection) were evaluated by clonogenic assays, γ-H(2)AX immunostaining and cell cycle distribution. Survival of irradiated and nonirradiated NOD-SCID mice intracranially implanted with stem-like gliomaspheres were monitored. Glioma cells treated with gefitinib, irradiation, or both were assayed for clonogenic survival, γ-H(2)AX immunostaining, DNA-PKcs expression, and phosphorylation of EGFR and Akt. Stem-like gliomaspheres displayed BTSC characteristics of self-renewal; differentiation into lineages of neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes; and initiation of glioma growth in NOD-SCID mice. Irradiation dose-dependently reduced clonogenic survival, induced G(2)/M arrest and increased γ-H(2)AX immunostaining of nonstem glioma cells, but not stem-like gliomaspheres. There was no difference in survival of irradiated and nonirradiated mice implanted with stem-like gliomaspheres. The addition of gefitinib significantly inhibited clonogenic survival, increased γ-H(2)AX immunostaining, and reduced DNA-PKcs expression of irradiated stem-like gliomaspheres, without affecting irradiated-nonstem glioma cells. Gefitinib alone, and when combined with irradiation, inhibited phosphorylation of EGFR (Y1068 and Y1045) and Akt (S473) in stem-like gliomaspheres. In nonstem glioma cells, gefitinib alone inhibited EGFR Y1068 phosphorylation, with further inhibition by combined gefitinib and irradiation. Stem-like gliomaspheres are resistant to irradiation-induced cytotoxicity, G(2)/M arrest, and DNA DSBs, compared with nonstem

  19. Gefitinib Radiosensitizes Stem-Like Glioma Cells: Inhibition of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Akt-DNA-PK Signaling, Accompanied by Inhibition of DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Khong Bee, E-mail: dmskkb@nccs.com.sg [Brain Tumour Research Laboratory, Division of Medical Sciences, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore); Zhu Congju; Wong Yinling; Gao Qiuhan; Ty, Albert; Wong, Meng Cheong [Brain Tumour Research Laboratory, Division of Medical Sciences, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: We compared radiosensitivity of brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs) with matched nonstem glioma cells, and determined whether gefitinib enhanced BTSC radiosensitivity by inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-Akt-DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) signaling, followed by enhanced DNA double-stand breaks (DSBs) and inhibition of DSB repair. Methods and Materials: Radiosensitivity of stem-like gliomaspheres and nonstem glioma cells (obtained at patient neurosurgical resection) were evaluated by clonogenic assays, {gamma}-H{sub 2}AX immunostaining and cell cycle distribution. Survival of irradiated and nonirradiated NOD-SCID mice intracranially implanted with stem-like gliomaspheres were monitored. Glioma cells treated with gefitinib, irradiation, or both were assayed for clonogenic survival, {gamma}-H{sub 2}AX immunostaining, DNA-PKcs expression, and phosphorylation of EGFR and Akt. Results: Stem-like gliomaspheres displayed BTSC characteristics of self-renewal; differentiation into lineages of neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes; and initiation of glioma growth in NOD-SCID mice. Irradiation dose-dependently reduced clonogenic survival, induced G{sub 2}/M arrest and increased {gamma}-H{sub 2}AX immunostaining of nonstem glioma cells, but not stem-like gliomaspheres. There was no difference in survival of irradiated and nonirradiated mice implanted with stem-like gliomaspheres. The addition of gefitinib significantly inhibited clonogenic survival, increased {gamma}-H{sub 2}AX immunostaining, and reduced DNA-PKcs expression of irradiated stem-like gliomaspheres, without affecting irradiated-nonstem glioma cells. Gefitinib alone, and when combined with irradiation, inhibited phosphorylation of EGFR (Y1068 and Y1045) and Akt (S473) in stem-like gliomaspheres. In nonstem glioma cells, gefitinib alone inhibited EGFR Y1068 phosphorylation, with further inhibition by combined gefitinib and irradiation. Conclusions: Stem-like gliomaspheres are

  20. Gefitinib Radiosensitizes Stem-Like Glioma Cells: Inhibition of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Akt-DNA-PK Signaling, Accompanied by Inhibition of DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Khong Bee; Zhu Congju; Wong Yinling; Gao Qiuhan; Ty, Albert; Wong, Meng Cheong

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We compared radiosensitivity of brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs) with matched nonstem glioma cells, and determined whether gefitinib enhanced BTSC radiosensitivity by inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)–Akt-DNA–dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) signaling, followed by enhanced DNA double-stand breaks (DSBs) and inhibition of DSB repair. Methods and Materials: Radiosensitivity of stem-like gliomaspheres and nonstem glioma cells (obtained at patient neurosurgical resection) were evaluated by clonogenic assays, γ-H 2 AX immunostaining and cell cycle distribution. Survival of irradiated and nonirradiated NOD-SCID mice intracranially implanted with stem-like gliomaspheres were monitored. Glioma cells treated with gefitinib, irradiation, or both were assayed for clonogenic survival, γ-H 2 AX immunostaining, DNA-PKcs expression, and phosphorylation of EGFR and Akt. Results: Stem-like gliomaspheres displayed BTSC characteristics of self-renewal; differentiation into lineages of neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes; and initiation of glioma growth in NOD-SCID mice. Irradiation dose-dependently reduced clonogenic survival, induced G 2 /M arrest and increased γ-H 2 AX immunostaining of nonstem glioma cells, but not stem-like gliomaspheres. There was no difference in survival of irradiated and nonirradiated mice implanted with stem-like gliomaspheres. The addition of gefitinib significantly inhibited clonogenic survival, increased γ-H 2 AX immunostaining, and reduced DNA-PKcs expression of irradiated stem-like gliomaspheres, without affecting irradiated-nonstem glioma cells. Gefitinib alone, and when combined with irradiation, inhibited phosphorylation of EGFR (Y1068 and Y1045) and Akt (S473) in stem-like gliomaspheres. In nonstem glioma cells, gefitinib alone inhibited EGFR Y1068 phosphorylation, with further inhibition by combined gefitinib and irradiation. Conclusions: Stem-like gliomaspheres are resistant to irradiation

  1. Induction and repair of DNA double-strand breaks in hippocampal neurons of mice of different age after exposure to 60Co γ-rays in vivo and in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhina, R. A.; Chausov, V. N.; Kuzmina, E. A.; Boreyko, A. V.

    2018-04-01

    One of the central problems of modern radiobiology is the study of DNA damage induction and repair mechanisms in central nervous system cells, in particular, in hippocampal cells. The study of the regularities of molecular damage formation and repair in the hippocampus cells is of special interest, because these cells, unlike most cells of the central nervous system (CNS), keep proliferative activity, i.e. ability to neurogenesis. Age-related changes in hippocampus play an important role, which could lead to radiosensitivity changes in neurons to the ionizing radiation exposure. Regularities in DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) induction and repair in different aged mice hippocampal cells in vivo and in vitro under the action of γ-rays 60Co were studied with DNA comet-assay. The obtained dose dependences of DNA DSB induction are linear both in vivo and in vitro. It is established that in young animals' cells, the degree of DNA damage is higher than in older animals. It is shown that repair kinetics is basically different for exposure in vivo and in vitro.

  2. Double strand break repair: two mechanisms in competition but tightly linked to cell cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delacote, F.

    2002-11-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSB) are highly toxic damage although they can be induced to create genetic diversity. Two distinct pathways can repair DSB: Homologous Recombination (HR) and Non Homologous End Joining (NHEJ). If un- or mis-repaired, this damage can lead to cancer. Thus, it is essential to investigate how these two pathways are regulated for DSB repair. NHEJ inhibition leads to HR DSB repair stimulation. However, this channeling to HR is tightly linked to cell cycle since NHEJ and HR are active in G1/early S and late S/G2, respectively. Our results suggest that G1-unrepaired DSB go through S phase to be repaired by HR in G2. Those results allow a better understanding of DSB repair mechanisms regulation. (author)

  3. A critical role for topoisomerase IIb and DNA double strand breaks in transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderwood, Stuart K

    2016-05-26

    Recent studies have indicated a novel role for topoisomerase IIb in transcription. Transcription of heat shock genes, serum-induced immediate early genes and nuclear receptor-activated genes, each required DNA double strands generated by topoisomerase IIb. Such strand breaks seemed both necessary and sufficient for transcriptional activation. In addition, such transcription was associated with initiation of the DNA damage response pathways, including the activation of the enzymes: ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), DNA-dependent protein kinase and poly (ADP ribose) polymerase 1. DNA damage response signaling was involved both in transcription and in repair of DNA breaks generated by topoisomerase IIb.

  4. Clustering of double strand break-containing chromosome domains is not inhibited by inactivation of major repair proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krawczyk, P. M.; Stap, C.; Van Oven, C.; Hoebe, R.; Aten, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    For efficient repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) cells rely on a process that involves the Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 complex, which may help to protect non-repaired DNA ends from separating until they can be rejoined by DNA repair proteins. It has been observed that as a secondary effect, this process can lead to unintended clustering of multiple, initially separate, DSB-containing chromosome domains. This work demonstrates that neither inactivation of the major repair proteins XRCC3 and the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) nor inhibition of DNA-PK by vanillin influences the aggregation of DSB-containing chromosome domains. (authors)

  5. Radiation induced DNA double-strand breaks in radiology; Strahleninduzierte DNA-Doppelstrangbrueche in der Radiologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuefner, M.A. [Dornbirn Hospital (Austria). Dept. of Radiology; Brand, M.; Engert, C.; Uder, M. [Erlangen University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Schwab, S.A. [Radiologis, Oberasbach (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Shortly after the discovery of X-rays, their damaging effect on biological tissues was observed. The determination of radiation exposure in diagnostic and interventional radiology is usually based on physical measurements or mathematical algorithms with standardized dose simulations. γ-H2AX immunofluorescence microscopy is a reliable and sensitive method for the quantification of radiation induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in blood lymphocytes. The detectable amount of these DNA damages correlates well with the dose received. However, the biological radiation damage depends not only on dose but also on other individual factors like radiation sensitivity and DNA repair capacity. Iodinated contrast agents can enhance the x-ray induced DNA damage level. After their induction DSB are quickly repaired. A protective effect of antioxidants has been postulated in experimental studies. This review explains the principle of the γ-H2AX technique and provides an overview on studies evaluating DSB in radiologic examinations.

  6. Induction and repair of DNA double-strand breaks in blood lymphocytes of patients undergoing {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Matthias S. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Brand, Michael; Wuest, Wolfgang; Anders, Katharina; Uder, Michael; Kuefner, Michael A. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Kuwert, Torsten; Prante, Olaf; Schmidt, Daniela; Maschauer, Simone [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Erlangen (Germany); Semelka, Richard C. [University of North Carolina, Department of Radiology, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2012-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in blood lymphocytes of patients undergoing positron emission tomography (PET)/CT using {gamma}-H2AX immunofluorescence microscopy and to differentiate between {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and CT-induced DNA lesions. This study was approved by the local Ethics Committee and complies with Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) requirements. After written informed consent was obtained, 33 patients underwent whole-body {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT (3 MBq/kg body weight, 170/100 reference mAs at 120 kV). The FDG PET and CT portions were performed as an initial CT immediately followed by the PET. Blood samples were obtained before, at various time points following {sup 18}F-FDG application and up to 24 h after the CT scan. Distinct foci representing DSBs were quantified in isolated lymphocytes using fluorescence microscopy after staining against the phosphorylated histone variant {gamma}-H2AX. The DSB values at the various time points were significantly different (p < 0.001). The median baseline level was 0.08/cell (range 0.06-0.12/cell). Peaks of radiation-induced DSBs were found 30 min after {sup 18}F-FDG administration (median excess foci 0.11/cell, range 0.06-0.27/cell) and 5 min after CT (median excess foci 0.17/cell, range 0.05-0.54/cell). A significant correlation between CT-induced DSBs and dose length product was obtained ({rho} = 0.898, p < 0.001). After 24 h DSB values were still slightly but significantly elevated (median foci 0.11/cell, range 0.10-0.14/cell, p = 0.003) compared to pre-exposure levels. PET/CT-induced DSBs can be monitored using {gamma}-H2AX immunofluorescence microscopy. Peak values may be obtained 30 min after {sup 18}F-FDG injection and 5 min after CT. The radionuclide contributes considerably to the total DSB induction in this setting. (orig.)

  7. A component of DNA double-strand break repair is dependent on the spatial orientation of the lesions within the higher-order structures of chromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, P.J.; Bryant, P.E. (Saint Andrews Univ. (United Kingdom))

    1994-11-01

    By the use of a modified neutral filter elution procedure variations in the repair of DNA dsb have been observed between the ionising radiation sensitive mutant xrs-5 and the parent cell line CHO-K1. Conventional neutral filter elution requires harsh lysis conditions to remove higher-order chromatin structures which interfere with elution of DNA containing dsb. By lysing cells with non-ionic detergent in the presence of 2 mol dm[sup -3] salt, histone-depleted structures that retain the higher-order nuclear matrix organization, including chromatin loops, can be produced. Elution from these structures will only occur if two or more dsb lie within a single-looped domain delineated by points of attachment to the nuclear matrix. Repair experiments indicate that in CHO cells repair of dsb in loops containing multiple dsb are repaired with slow kinetics whilst dsb occurring in loops containing single dsb are repaired with fast kinetics. Xrs-5 cells are defective in the repair of multiply damaged loops. This work indicates that the spatial orientation of dsb in the higher-order structures of chromatin are a possible factor in the repair of these lesions. (Author).

  8. A component of DNA double-strand break repair is dependent on the spatial orientation of the lesions within the higher-order structures of chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, P.J.; Bryant, P.E.

    1994-01-01

    By the use of a modified neutral filter elution procedure variations in the repair of DNA dsb have been observed between the ionising radiation sensitive mutant xrs-5 and the parent cell line CHO-K1. Conventional neutral filter elution requires harsh lysis conditions to remove higher-order chromatin structures which interfere with elution of DNA containing dsb. By lysing cells with non-ionic detergent in the presence of 2 mol dm -3 salt, histone-depleted structures that retain the higher-order nuclear matrix organization, including chromatin loops, can be produced. Elution from these structures will only occur if two or more dsb lie within a single-looped domain delineated by points of attachment to the nuclear matrix. Repair experiments indicate that in CHO cells repair of dsb in loops containing multiple dsb are repaired with slow kinetics whilst dsb occurring in loops containing single dsb are repaired with fast kinetics. Xrs-5 cells are defective in the repair of multiply damaged loops. This work indicates that the spatial orientation of dsb in the higher-order structures of chromatin are a possible factor in the repair of these lesions. (Author)

  9. Numt-mediated double-strand break repair mitigates deletions during primate genome evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einat Hazkani-Covo

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ is the major mechanism of double-strand break repair (DSBR in mammalian cells. NHEJ has traditionally been inferred from experimental systems involving induced double strand breaks (DSBs. Whether or not the spectrum of repair events observed in experimental NHEJ reflects the repair of natural breaks by NHEJ during chromosomal evolution is an unresolved issue. In primate phylogeny, nuclear DNA sequences of mitochondrial origin, numts, are inserted into naturally occurring chromosomal breaks via NHEJ. Thus, numt integration sites harbor evidence for the mechanisms that act on the genome over evolutionary timescales. We have identified 35 and 55 lineage-specific numts in the human and chimpanzee genomes, respectively, using the rhesus monkey genome as an outgroup. One hundred and fifty two numt-chromosome fusion points were classified based on their repair patterns. Repair involving microhomology and repair leading to nucleotide additions were detected. These repair patterns are within the experimentally determined spectrum of classical NHEJ, suggesting that information from experimental systems is representative of broader genetic loci and end configurations. However, in incompatible DSBR events, small deletions always occur, whereas in 54% of numt integration events examined, no deletions were detected. Numts show a statistically significant reduction in deletion frequency, even in comparison to DSBR involving filler DNA. Therefore, numts show a unique mechanism of integration via NHEJ. Since the deletion frequency during numt insertion is low, native overhangs of chromosome breaks are preserved, allowing us to determine that 24% of the analyzed breaks are cohesive with overhangs of up to 11 bases. These data represent, to the best of our knowledge, the most comprehensive description of the structure of naturally occurring DSBs. We suggest a model in which the sealing of DSBs by numts, and probably by other filler

  10. Autophosphorylation of DNA-PKCS regulates its dynamics at DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, Naoya; Weterings, Eric; Yano, Ken-ichi; Morotomi-Yano, Keiko; Jakob, Burkhard; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela; Mari, Pierre-Olivier; van Gent, Dik C; Chen, Benjamin P C; Chen, David J

    2007-04-23

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PK(CS)) plays an important role during the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). It is recruited to DNA ends in the early stages of the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) process, which mediates DSB repair. To study DNA-PK(CS) recruitment in vivo, we used a laser system to introduce DSBs in a specified region of the cell nucleus. We show that DNA-PK(CS) accumulates at DSB sites in a Ku80-dependent manner, and that neither the kinase activity nor the phosphorylation status of DNA-PK(CS) influences its initial accumulation. However, impairment of both of these functions results in deficient DSB repair and the maintained presence of DNA-PK(CS) at unrepaired DSBs. The use of photobleaching techniques allowed us to determine that the kinase activity and phosphorylation status of DNA-PK(CS) influence the stability of its binding to DNA ends. We suggest a model in which DNA-PK(CS) phosphorylation/autophosphorylation facilitates NHEJ by destabilizing the interaction of DNA-PK(CS) with the DNA ends.

  11. Unsuitability of lymphoblastoid cell lines as surrogate of cryopreserved isolated lymphocytes for the analysis of DNA double-strand break repair activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zijno, Andrea [Department of Environment and Primary Prevention, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy); Porcedda, Paola [Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin (Italy); Saini, Francesca [Department of Environment and Primary Prevention, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy); Allione, Alessandra [Institute for Scientific Interchange (ISI) Foundation, Villa Gualino, Turin (Italy); Garofalo, Bruno; Marcon, Francesca [Department of Environment and Primary Prevention, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy); Guarrera, Simonetta [Institute for Scientific Interchange (ISI) Foundation, Villa Gualino, Turin (Italy); Turinetto, Valentina; Minieri, Valentina [Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin (Italy); Funaro, Ada [Department of Genetics, Biology and Biochemistry, University of Turin (Italy); Crebelli, Riccardo [Department of Environment and Primary Prevention, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy); Giachino, Claudia [Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin (Italy); Matullo, Giuseppe, E-mail: giuseppe.matullo@unito.it [Institute for Scientific Interchange (ISI) Foundation, Villa Gualino, Turin (Italy); Department of Genetics, Biology and Biochemistry, University of Turin (Italy)

    2010-02-03

    As first task of a comprehensive investigation on DNA repair genotype-phenotype correlations, the suitability of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) as surrogate of cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in DNA repair phenotypic assays was evaluated. To this aim the amount of DNA damage induced by {gamma}-rays and DNA repair capacity were evaluated in unstimulated (G{sub 0}) and mitogen-simulated (G{sub 2}) PBMC from 20 healthy subjects and in EBV-transformed LCL obtained from the same individuals. Phosphorylation of histone H2AX, micronuclei and chromosomal aberrations were the end-points investigated. The results obtained show higher basal frequencies of binucleated cells bearing micronuclei and nucleoplasmic bridge (NPB) in LCL with respect to PBMC, suggesting that EBV transformation may be associated with chromosomal instability. After irradiation, higher levels of micronuclei were induced in G{sub 0}-treated PBMC compared to cycling LCL; conversely, NPB were more frequent in LCL than in PBMC. Moreover, higher levels of chromosomal aberrations were observed in G{sub 2}-treated PBMC compared to LCL. Concerning {gamma}-H2AX measurements, phosphorylation levels 1 h after treatment and dephosphorylation kinetics were basically similar in LCL and in PBMC. However, while Spearman's test showed a strong correlation between the results obtained in replicated experiments with PBMC, high inter-experimental variability and poor reproducibility was observed in the experiments performed with LCL, possibly due to the intrinsic instability of LCL. In summary, both the analysis of {gamma}-H2AX and the evaluation of chromosome damage highlighted a larger inter-experimental variability in the results obtained with LCL compared to PBMC. Noteworthy, the two set of results proved to lack any significant correlation at the individual level. These results indicate that LCL may be unsuitable for investigating genotype

  12. Efficacy of DNA double-strand breaks repair in breast cancer is decreased in carriers of the variant allele of the UBC9 gene c.73G>A polymorphism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Synowiec, Ewelina [Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Lodz (Poland); Krupa, Renata [Laboratory of DNA Repair, Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, Lodz (Poland); Morawiec, Zbigniew; Wasylecka, Maja [Department of Surgical Oncology, N. Copernicus Hospital, Lodz (Poland); Dziki, Lukasz; Morawiec, Jan [Department of General and Colorectal Surgery, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz (Poland); Blasiak, Janusz [Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Lodz (Poland); Wozniak, Katarzyna, E-mail: wozniak@biol.uni.lodz.pl [Laboratory of DNA Repair, Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, Lodz (Poland)

    2010-12-10

    UBC9 (E2) SUMO conjugating enzyme plays an important role in the maintenance of genome stability and integrity. In the present work we examined the association between the c.73G>A (Val25Met) polymorphism of the UBC9 gene (rs11553473) and efficacy of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) repair (DRE) in breast cancer patients. We determined the level of endogenous (basal) and exogenous (induced by {gamma}-irradiation) DSBs and efficacy of their repair in peripheral blood lymphocytes of 57 breast cancer patients and 70 healthy individuals. DNA damage and repair were studied by neutral comet assay. Genotypes were determined in DNA from peripheral blood lymphocytes by allele-specific PCR (ASO-PCR). We also correlated genotypes with the clinical characteristics of breast cancer patients. We observed a strong association between breast cancer occurrence and the variant allele carried genotypes in patients with elevated level of basal as well as induced DNA damage (OR 6.74, 95% CI 2.27-20.0 and OR 5.33, 95% CI 1.81-15.7, respectively). We also found statistically significant (p < 0.05) difference in DRE related to the c.73G>A polymorphism of the UBC9 gene in breast cancer patients. Carriers of variant allele have decreased DNA DRE as compared to wild type genotype carriers. We did not find any association with the UBC9 gene polymorphism and estrogen and progesterone receptor status. The variant allele of the UBC9 gene polymorphism was strongly inversely related to HER negative breast cancer patients (OR 0.03, 95% CI 0.00-0.23). Our results suggest that the c.73G>A polymorphism of the UBC9 gene may affect DNA DSBs repair efficacy in breast cancer patients.

  13. Efficacy of DNA double-strand breaks repair in breast cancer is decreased in carriers of the variant allele of the UBC9 gene c.73G>A polymorphism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synowiec, Ewelina; Krupa, Renata; Morawiec, Zbigniew; Wasylecka, Maja; Dziki, Lukasz; Morawiec, Jan; Blasiak, Janusz; Wozniak, Katarzyna

    2010-01-01

    UBC9 (E2) SUMO conjugating enzyme plays an important role in the maintenance of genome stability and integrity. In the present work we examined the association between the c.73G>A (Val25Met) polymorphism of the UBC9 gene (rs11553473) and efficacy of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) repair (DRE) in breast cancer patients. We determined the level of endogenous (basal) and exogenous (induced by γ-irradiation) DSBs and efficacy of their repair in peripheral blood lymphocytes of 57 breast cancer patients and 70 healthy individuals. DNA damage and repair were studied by neutral comet assay. Genotypes were determined in DNA from peripheral blood lymphocytes by allele-specific PCR (ASO-PCR). We also correlated genotypes with the clinical characteristics of breast cancer patients. We observed a strong association between breast cancer occurrence and the variant allele carried genotypes in patients with elevated level of basal as well as induced DNA damage (OR 6.74, 95% CI 2.27-20.0 and OR 5.33, 95% CI 1.81-15.7, respectively). We also found statistically significant (p A polymorphism of the UBC9 gene in breast cancer patients. Carriers of variant allele have decreased DNA DRE as compared to wild type genotype carriers. We did not find any association with the UBC9 gene polymorphism and estrogen and progesterone receptor status. The variant allele of the UBC9 gene polymorphism was strongly inversely related to HER negative breast cancer patients (OR 0.03, 95% CI 0.00-0.23). Our results suggest that the c.73G>A polymorphism of the UBC9 gene may affect DNA DSBs repair efficacy in breast cancer patients.

  14. Brca2 C-terminus interacts with Rad51 and contributes to nuclear forcus formation in double-strand break repair of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochiai, Kazuhiko; Morimatsu, Masami; Yoshikawa, Yasunaga; Syuto, Bunei; Hashizume, Kazuyoshi

    2004-01-01

    In humans and mice, the interaction between the breast cancer susceptibility protein, Brca2, and Rad51 recombinase is essential for DNA repair by homologous recombination, the failure of this process can predispose to cancer. Cells with mutated Brca2 are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation (IR) and exhibit defective DNA repair. Using yeast and mammalian two-hybrid assays, we demonstrate that canine Rad51 protein interacts specifically with the C-terminus of canine Brca2. In support of the biological significance of this interaction, we found that radiation-induced focus formation of Rad51 in COS-7 cells was compromised by forced expression of the C-terminus of canine Brca2. A similar result was obtained for the murine C-terminus. These data suggest that the C-terminal domain of canine Brca2 functions to bind Rad51 and that this domain contributes to the IR-induced assembly of the Rad51 complex in vivo. (author)

  15. Protein kinase CK2 localizes to sites of DNA double-strand break regulating the cellular response to DNA damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olsen Birgitte B

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK is a nuclear complex composed of a large catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs and a heterodimeric DNA-targeting subunit Ku. DNA-PK is a major component of the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ repair mechanism, which is activated in the presence of DNA double-strand breaks induced by ionizing radiation, reactive oxygen species and radiomimetic drugs. We have recently reported that down-regulation of protein kinase CK2 by siRNA interference results in enhanced cell death specifically in DNA-PKcs-proficient human glioblastoma cells, and this event is accompanied by decreased autophosphorylation of DNA-PKcs at S2056 and delayed repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Results In the present study, we show that CK2 co-localizes with phosphorylated histone H2AX to sites of DNA damage and while CK2 gene knockdown is associated with delayed DNA damage repair, its overexpression accelerates this process. We report for the first time evidence that lack of CK2 destabilizes the interaction of DNA-PKcs with DNA and with Ku80 at sites of genetic lesions. Furthermore, we show that CK2 regulates the phosphorylation levels of DNA-PKcs only in response to direct induction of DNA double-strand breaks. Conclusions Taken together, these results strongly indicate that CK2 plays a prominent role in NHEJ by facilitating and/or stabilizing the binding of DNA-PKcs and, possibly other repair proteins, to the DNA ends contributing to efficient DNA damage repair in mammalian cells.

  16. Division-induced DNA double strand breaks in the chromosome terminus region of Escherichia coli lacking RecBCD DNA repair enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anurag Kumar Sinha

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Marker frequency analysis of the Escherichia coli recB mutant chromosome has revealed a deficit of DNA in a specific zone of the terminus, centred on the dif/TerC region. Using fluorescence microscopy of a marked chromosomal site, we show that the dif region is lost after replication completion, at the time of cell division, in one daughter cell only, and that the phenomenon is transmitted to progeny. Analysis by marker frequency and microscopy shows that the position of DNA loss is not defined by the replication fork merging point since it still occurs in the dif/TerC region when the replication fork trap is displaced in strains harbouring ectopic Ter sites. Terminus DNA loss in the recB mutant is also independent of dimer resolution by XerCD at dif and of Topo IV action close to dif. It occurs in the terminus region, at the point of inversion of the GC skew, which is also the point of convergence of specific sequence motifs like KOPS and Chi sites, regardless of whether the convergence of GC skew is at dif (wild-type or a newly created sequence. In the absence of FtsK-driven DNA translocation, terminus DNA loss is less precisely targeted to the KOPS convergence sequence, but occurs at a similar frequency and follows the same pattern as in FtsK+ cells. Importantly, using ftsIts, ftsAts division mutants and cephalexin treated cells, we show that DNA loss of the dif region in the recB mutant is decreased by the inactivation of cell division. We propose that it results from septum-induced chromosome breakage, and largely contributes to the low viability of the recB mutant.

  17. Exonuclease 1 is a critical mediator of survival during DNA double strand break repair in nonquiescent hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Amar; Qing, Yulan; Gerson, Stanton L

    2014-02-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) populations require DNA repair pathways to maintain their long-term survival and reconstitution capabilities, but mediators of these processes are still being elucidated. Exonuclease 1 (Exo1) participates in homologous recombination (HR) and Exo1 loss results in impaired 5' HR end resection. We use cultured Exo1(mut) fibroblasts and bone marrow to demonstrate that loss of Exo1 function results in defective HR in cycling cells. Conversely, in Exo1(mut) mice HR is not required for maintenance of quiescent HSCs at steady state, confirming the steady state HSC reliance on nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). Exo1(mut) mice sustained serial repopulation, displayed no defect in competitive repopulation or niche occupancy, and exhibited no increased sensitivity to whole body ionizing radiation. However, when Exo1(mut) HSCs were pushed into cell cycle in vivo with 5-fluorouracil or poly IC, the hematopoietic population became hypersensitive to IR, resulting in HSC defects and animal death. We propose Exo1-mediated HR is dispensable for stem cell function in quiescent HSC, whereas it is essential to HSC response to DNA damage processing after cell cycle entry, and its loss is not compensated by intact NHEJ. In HSCs, the maintenance of stem cell function after DNA damage is dependent on the DNA repair capacity, segregated by active versus quiescent points in cell cycle. © AlphaMed Press.

  18. The ubiquitin-selective segregase VCP/p97 orchestrates the response to DNA double-strand breaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meerang, Mayura; Ritz, Danilo; Paliwal, Shreya

    2011-01-01

    Unrepaired DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) cause genetic instability that leads to malignant transformation or cell death. Cells respond to DSBs with the ordered recruitment of signalling and repair proteins to the site of lesion. Protein modification with ubiquitin is crucial for the signalling ...

  19. Aging impairs double-strand break repair by homologous recombination in Drosophila germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delabaere, Laetitia; Ertl, Henry A; Massey, Dashiell J; Hofley, Carolyn M; Sohail, Faraz; Bienenstock, Elisa J; Sebastian, Hans; Chiolo, Irene; LaRocque, Jeannine R

    2017-04-01

    Aging is characterized by genome instability, which contributes to cancer formation and cell lethality leading to organismal decline. The high levels of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) observed in old cells and premature aging syndromes are likely a primary source of genome instability, but the underlying cause of their formation is still unclear. DSBs might result from higher levels of damage or repair defects emerging with advancing age, but repair pathways in old organisms are still poorly understood. Here, we show that premeiotic germline cells of young and old flies have distinct differences in their ability to repair DSBs by the error-free pathway homologous recombination (HR). Repair of DSBs induced by either ionizing radiation (IR) or the endonuclease I-SceI is markedly defective in older flies. This correlates with a remarkable reduction in HR repair measured with the DR-white DSB repair reporter assay. Strikingly, most of this repair defect is already present at 8 days of age. Finally, HR defects correlate with increased expression of early HR components and increased recruitment of Rad51 to damage in older organisms. Thus, we propose that the defect in the HR pathway for germ cells in older flies occurs following Rad51 recruitment. These data reveal that DSB repair defects arise early in the aging process and suggest that HR deficiencies are a leading cause of genome instability in germ cells of older animals. © 2016 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. A link between double-strand break-related repair and V(D)J recombination: the scid mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrickson, E.A.; Qin, X.Q.; Bump, E.A.; Schatz, D.G.; Oettinger, M.; Weaver, D.T.

    1991-01-01

    We show here that mammalian site-specific recombination and DNA-repair pathways share a common factor. The effects of DNA-damaging agents on cell lines derived from mice homozygous for the scid (severe combined immune deficiency) mutation were studied. Surprisingly, all scid cell lines exhibited a profound hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents that caused double-strand breaks (x-irradiation and bleomycin) but not to other chemicals that caused single-strand breaks or cross-links. Neutral filter elution assays demonstrated that the x-irradiation hypersensitivity could be correlated with a deficiency in repairing double-strand breaks. These data suggest that the scid gene product is involved in two pathways: DNA repair of random double-strand breaks and the site-specific and lymphoid-restricted variable-(diversity)-joining [V(D)J] DNA rearrangement process. We propose that the scid gene product performs a similar function in both pathways and may be a ubiquitous protein

  1. Effects of extracellular and intracellular pH on repair of potentially lethal damage, chromosome aberrations and DNA double-strand breaks in irradiated plateau-phase A549 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayanth, V.R.; Bayne, M.T.; Varnes, M.E.

    1994-01-01

    Plateau-phage A549 cells exhibit a high capacity for repair of potentially lethal radiation damage (PLD). Previously it was found that PLD repair could be partially inhibited by increasing the extracellular pH (pH e ) of the spent medium from its normal value of 6.7-6.8 to 7.6 during postirradiation holding. This study shows that PLD repair is also inhibited by reducing the pH e of the spent medium to 6.0. The effects of altering pH e on rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) as measured by neutral filter elution and on mitotic delay and chromosome aberrations seen after releasing cells from the plateau phase were investigated. Neither increasing nor decreasing the pH e of the spent medium had an effect on radiation-induced mitotic delay. Rejoining of DSBs was significantly inhibited by holding at pH e 6.0 but not affected by holding at pH e 7.6. At 2 h after irradiation about 51% of unrejoined breaks remained at pH e 6.0, compared to about 15% at pH e 6.7 or 7.6. However, holding at pH e 7.6 appeared to cause a marginal change in the kinetics of rejoining of DSBs. Repair of lesions leading to dicentric and acentric chromosome aberrations did not occur when cells were held at pH e 6.0, since less than 10% of these aberrations disappeared from cells held for 24 h before subculture. In contrast, holding plateau-phase cells at pH e 7.6 vs 6.7 caused a small but significant reduction in the disappearance of dicentrics but had no effect on the rate or extent of the disappearance of acentrics. These data have led us to hypothesize that inhibition of PLD repair by holding at pH e 6.0 is related both to inhibition of pH-dependent DNA repair enzymes and to induction of changes in DNA which lead to misrepair when the cells are released from plateau phase. Inhibition of PLD repair by holding at pH e 7.6 is related primarily to changes in DNA structure which promote misrepair. 43 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  2. Double strand breaks in DNA in vivo and in vitro after 60Co-γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huelsewede, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    The questions of what the correlation is between double strand breaks in DNA in the cell and lethal radiation damage and by means of which possible mechanisms DNA double strand breaks could occur were studied. E. coli served as test system. In addition to this the molecular weight of the DNA from irradiated E. coli as a function of the radiation dose under various conditions was measured. This data was compared on the one hand to the survival of the cell and on the other hand to the formation of DNA double strand breaks in an aqueous buffer system, which in its ionic characteristics was similar to cell fluids. (orig./MG) [de

  3. Role of DNA-PK in cellular responses to DNA double-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are probably the most dangerous of the many different types of DNA damage that occur within the cell. DSBs are generated by exogenous agents such as ionizing radiation (IR) or by endogenously generated reactive oxygen species and occur as intermediates during meiotic and V(D)J recombination. The repair of DSBs is of paramount importance to the cell as misrepair of DSBs can lead to cell death or promote tumorigenesis. In eukaryotes there exists two distinct mechanisms for DNA DSB repair: homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). In mammalian cells, however, it is clear that nonhomologous repair of DSBs is highly active and plays a major role in conferring radiation resistance to the cell. The NHEJ machinery minimally consists of the DNA-dependent Protein Kinase (DNA-PK) and a complex of XRCC4 and DNA Ligase IV. The DNA-PK complex is composed of a 470 kDa catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), and the heterodimeric Ku70 and Ku80 DNA end-binding complex. DNA-PKcs is a PI-3 kinase with homology to ATM and ATR in its C-terminal kinase domain. The DNA-PK complex protects and tethers the ends, and directs assembly and, perhaps, the activation of other NHEJ proteins. We have previously demonstrated that the kinase activity of DNA-PK is essential for DNA DSB repair and V(D)J recombination. It is, therefore, of immense interest to determine the in vivo targets of DNA-PKcs and the mechanisms by which phosphorylation of these targets modulates NHEJ. Recent studies have resulted in the identification of a number of protein targets that are phosphorylated by and/or interact with DNA-PKcs. Our laboratory has recently identified autophosphorylation site(s) on DNA-PKcs. We find that phosphorylation at these sites in vivo is an early and essential response to DSBs and demonstrate, for the first time, the localization of DNA-PKcs to the sites of DNA damage in vivo. Furthermore, mutation of these phosphorylation sites in mammalian

  4. Fumarase is involved in DNA double-strand break resection through a functional interaction with Sae2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leshets, Michael; Ramamurthy, Dharanidharan; Lisby, Michael

    2018-01-01

    One of the most severe forms of DNA damage is the double-strand break (DSB). Failure to properly repair the damage can cause mutation, gross chromosomal rearrangements and lead to the development of cancer. In eukaryotes, homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) are the......One of the most severe forms of DNA damage is the double-strand break (DSB). Failure to properly repair the damage can cause mutation, gross chromosomal rearrangements and lead to the development of cancer. In eukaryotes, homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ......) are the main DSB repair pathways. Fumarase is a mitochondrial enzyme which functions in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Intriguingly, the enzyme can be readily detected in the cytosolic compartment of all organisms examined, and we have shown that cytosolic fumarase participates in the DNA damage response...

  5. Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP-1 is not involved in DNA double-strand break recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernet Marie

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cytotoxicity and the rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks induced by γ-rays, H2O2 and neocarzinostatin, were investigated in normal and PARP-1 knockout mouse 3T3 fibroblasts to determine the role of poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP-1 in DNA double-strand break repair. Results PARP-1-/- were considerably more sensitive than PARP-1+/+ 3T3s to induced cell kill by γ-rays and H2O2. However, the two cell lines did not show any significant difference in the susceptibility to neocarzinostatin below 1.5 nM drug. Restoration of PARP-1 expression in PARP-1-/- 3T3s by retroviral transfection of the full PARP-1 cDNA did not induce any change in neocarzinostatin response. Moreover the incidence and the rejoining kinetics of neocarzinostatin-induced DNA double-strand breaks were identical in PARP-1+/+ and PARP-1-/- 3T3s. Poly(ADP-ribose synthesis following γ-rays and H2O2 was observed in PARP-1-proficient cells only. In contrast neocarzinostatin, even at supra-lethal concentration, was unable to initiate PARP-1 activation yet it induced H2AX histone phosphorylation in both PARP1+/+ and PARP-1-/- 3T3s as efficiently as γ-rays and H2O2. Conclusions The results show that PARP-1 is not a major determinant of DNA double-strand break recovery with either strand break rejoining or cell survival as an endpoint. Even though both PARP-1 and ATM activation are major determinants of the cell response to γ-rays and H2O2, data suggest that PARP-1-dependent poly(ADP-ribose synthesis and ATM-dependent H2AX phosphorylation, are not inter-related in the repair pathway of neocarzinostatin-induced DNA double-strand breaks.

  6. Ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand break and repair assessed by γ-H2AX foci analysis in neurons in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Xiaorong; Wu Gang; Ruebe Claudia; Ruebe Christian

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate if the γ-H2AX foci is a precise index for the DSB formation and repair in mature neurons of brain in vivo after clinically relevant doses irradiation. Methods: For the DSB formation experiment, the mature neurons in the neocortex of brain tissue of C57BL/6 mice were analyzed at 10 rain after whole-body irradiation with 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 Gy. For the DSB repair kinetics experiment, the mature neurons in the neocortex of brain tissue of repair-proficient (C57BL/6 mice) and repair-deficient mouse strains (BALB/c, A-T and SCID mice) were analyzed at 0.5, 2.5, 5, 24 and 48 h after whole-body irradiation with 2 Gy. The mature neurons in the neocortex of brain tissue of sham-irradiated mice of each strain served as controls. γ-H2AX immunohistochemistry and γ-H2AX and NeuN double immunofluorescence analysis was used to measure DSBs formation and repair in the mature neurons in the neocortex of brain tissue of the different mouse strains. Results: For the DSB formation experiment, γ-H2AX foci levels with a clear linear close correlation and very low backgrounds in the nuclei in the neocortex of brain tissue were observed. Scoring the loss of γ-H2AX foci allowed us to verify the different, genetically determined DSB repair deficiencies, including the minor impairment of BALB/c mice. Repair-proficient C57BL/6 mice exhibited the fastest decrease in foci number with time, and displayed low levels of residual damage at 24 h and 48 h post-irradiation. In contrast, SCID mice showed highly increased γ-H2AX foci levels at all repair times (0.5 h to 48 h) while A-T mice exhibited a lesser defect which was most significant at later repair times (≥ 5 h). Radiosensitive BALB/c mice exhibited slightly elevated foci numbers compared with C57BL/6 mice at 5 h and 24 h but not at 48 h post-irradiation. Conclusion: Quantifying the γ-H2AX foci in normal tissue represents a sensitivie tool for the detection of induction and repair of radiation-induced DSBs at

  7. A polycomb group protein, PHF1, is involved in the response to DNA double-strand breaks in human cell

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Zehui; Jiang, Jie; Lan, Li; Nakajima, Satoshi; Kanno, Shin-ichiro; Koseki, Haruhiko; Yasui, Akira

    2008-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) represent the most toxic DNA damage arisen from endogenous and exogenous genotoxic stresses and are known to be repaired by either homologous recombination or nonhomologous end-joining processes. Although many proteins have been identified to participate in either of the processes, the whole processes still remain elusive. Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are epigenetic chromatin modifiers involved in gene silencing, cancer development and the maintenance of embry...

  8. Chromosomal Integrity after UV Irradiation Requires FANCD2-Mediated Repair of Double Strand Breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federico, María Belén; Vallerga, María Belén; Radl, Analía; Paviolo, Natalia Soledad; Bocco, José Luis; Di Giorgio, Marina; Soria, Gastón; Gottifredi, Vanesa

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hypersensitivity to inter-strand crosslinks (ICLs). FANCD2, a central factor of the FA pathway, is essential for the repair of double strand breaks (DSBs) generated during fork collapse at ICLs. While lesions different from ICLs can also trigger fork collapse, the contribution of FANCD2 to the resolution of replication-coupled DSBs generated independently from ICLs is unknown. Intriguingly, FANCD2 is readily activated after UV irradiation, a DNA-damaging agent that generates predominantly intra-strand crosslinks but not ICLs. Hence, UV irradiation is an ideal tool to explore the contribution of FANCD2 to the DNA damage response triggered by DNA lesions other than ICL repair. Here we show that, in contrast to ICL-causing agents, UV radiation compromises cell survival independently from FANCD2. In agreement, FANCD2 depletion does not increase the amount of DSBs generated during the replication of UV-damaged DNA and is dispensable for UV-induced checkpoint activation. Remarkably however, FANCD2 protects UV-dependent, replication-coupled DSBs from aberrant processing by non-homologous end joining, preventing the accumulation of micronuclei and chromatid aberrations including non-homologous chromatid exchanges. Hence, while dispensable for cell survival, FANCD2 selectively safeguards chromosomal stability after UV-triggered replication stress.

  9. Chromosomal Integrity after UV Irradiation Requires FANCD2-Mediated Repair of Double Strand Breaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Belén Federico

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi Anemia (FA is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hypersensitivity to inter-strand crosslinks (ICLs. FANCD2, a central factor of the FA pathway, is essential for the repair of double strand breaks (DSBs generated during fork collapse at ICLs. While lesions different from ICLs can also trigger fork collapse, the contribution of FANCD2 to the resolution of replication-coupled DSBs generated independently from ICLs is unknown. Intriguingly, FANCD2 is readily activated after UV irradiation, a DNA-damaging agent that generates predominantly intra-strand crosslinks but not ICLs. Hence, UV irradiation is an ideal tool to explore the contribution of FANCD2 to the DNA damage response triggered by DNA lesions other than ICL repair. Here we show that, in contrast to ICL-causing agents, UV radiation compromises cell survival independently from FANCD2. In agreement, FANCD2 depletion does not increase the amount of DSBs generated during the replication of UV-damaged DNA and is dispensable for UV-induced checkpoint activation. Remarkably however, FANCD2 protects UV-dependent, replication-coupled DSBs from aberrant processing by non-homologous end joining, preventing the accumulation of micronuclei and chromatid aberrations including non-homologous chromatid exchanges. Hence, while dispensable for cell survival, FANCD2 selectively safeguards chromosomal stability after UV-triggered replication stress.

  10. Ionizing-radiation induced DNA double-strand breaks: A direct and indirect lighting up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignard, Julien; Mirey, Gladys; Salles, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by ionizing radiation has been extensively studied by biochemical or cell imaging techniques. Cell imaging development relies on technical advances as well as our knowledge of the cell DNA damage response (DDR) process. The DDR involves a complex network of proteins that initiate and coordinate DNA damage signaling and repair activities. As some DDR proteins assemble at DSBs in an established spatio-temporal pattern, visible nuclear foci are produced. In addition, post-translational modifications are important for the signaling and the recruitment of specific partners at damaged chromatin foci. We briefly review here the most widely used methods to study DSBs. We also discuss the development of indirect methods, using reporter expression or intra-nuclear antibodies, to follow the production of DSBs in real time and in living cells

  11. Dynamic dependence on ATR and ATM for double-strand break repair in human embryonic stem cells and neural descendants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Bret R; Golding, Sarah E; Rao, Raj R; Valerie, Kristoffer

    2010-04-02

    The DNA double-strand break (DSB) is the most toxic form of DNA damage. Studies aimed at characterizing DNA repair during development suggest that homologous recombination repair (HRR) is more critical in pluripotent cells compared to differentiated somatic cells in which nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) is dominant. We have characterized the DNA damage response (DDR) and quality of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), and in vitro-derived neural cells. Resolution of ionizing radiation-induced foci (IRIF) was used as a surrogate for DSB repair. The resolution of gamma-H2AX foci occurred at a slower rate in hESCs compared to neural progenitors (NPs) and astrocytes perhaps reflective of more complex DSB repair in hESCs. In addition, the resolution of RAD51 foci, indicative of active homologous recombination repair (HRR), showed that hESCs as well as NPs have high capacity for HRR, whereas astrocytes do not. Importantly, the ATM kinase was shown to be critical for foci formation in astrocytes, but not in hESCs, suggesting that the DDR is different in these cells. Blocking the ATM kinase in astrocytes not only prevented the formation but also completely disassembled preformed repair foci. The ability of hESCs to form IRIF was abrogated with caffeine and siRNAs targeted against ATR, implicating that hESCs rely on ATR, rather than ATM for regulating DSB repair. This relationship dynamically changed as cells differentiated. Interestingly, while the inhibition of the DNA-PKcs kinase (and presumably non-homologous endjoining [NHEJ]) in astrocytes slowed IRIF resolution it did not in hESCs, suggesting that repair in hESCs does not utilize DNA-PKcs. Altogether, our results show that hESCs have efficient DSB repair that is largely ATR-dependent HRR, whereas astrocytes critically depend on ATM for NHEJ, which, in part, is DNA-PKcs-independent.

  12. 125I-induced DNA double strand breaks: use in calibration of the neutral filter elution technique and comparison with X-ray induced breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, I.R.; Hodgson, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    The neutral filter elution assay, for measurement of DNA double strand breakage, has been calibrated using mouse L cells and Chinese hamster V79 cells labelled with [ 125 I]dUrd and then held at liquid nitrogen temperature to accumulate decays. The basis of the calibration is the observation that each 125 I decay, occurring in DNA, produces a DNA double strand break. Linear relationships between 125 I decays per cell and lethal lesions per cell (minus natural logarithm survival) and the level of elution, were found. Using the calibration data, it was calculated that the yield of DNA double strand breaks after X-irradiation of both cell types was from 6 to 9 x 10 -12 DNA double strand breaks per Gy per dalton of DNA, for doses greater than 6 Gy. Neutral filter elution and survival data for X-irradiated and 125 I-labelled cells suggested that the relationships between lethal lesions and DNA double strand breakage were significantly different for both cell types. An attempt was made to study the repair kinetics for 125 I-induced DNA double strand breaks, but was frustrated by the rapid DNA degradation which occurs in cells that have been killed by the freezing-thawing process. (author)

  13. Microdosimetrical calculations of the rate of repairable DNA - double strand breaks based on a model for the interpretation of experiments with different doses and radiation qualities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosemann, M.; Regel, K.

    1990-01-01

    When comparing various DNA injuries induced by radiation double breaks were shown to play peculiar role in subsequent cell changes such as inactivation, aberrations, mutations and transformations. However it was proved that significant part of radiation-induced double breaks could be repaied within cell. 3 refs

  14. On the mutagenicity of homologous recombination and double-strand break repair in bacteriophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakov, Victor P; Plugina, Lidiya; Shcherbakova, Tamara; Sizova, Svetlana; Kudryashova, Elena

    2011-01-02

    The double-strand break (DSB) repair via homologous recombination is generally construed as a high-fidelity process. However, some molecular genetic observations show that the recombination and the recombinational DSB repair may be mutagenic and even highly mutagenic. Here we developed an effective and precise method for studying the fidelity of DSB repair in vivo by combining DSBs produced site-specifically by the SegC endonuclease with the famous advantages of the recombination analysis of bacteriophage T4 rII mutants. The method is based on the comparison of the rate of reversion of rII mutation in the presence and in the absence of a DSB repair event initiated in the proximity of the mutation. We observed that DSB repair may moderately (up to 6-fold) increase the apparent reversion frequency, the effect of being dependent on the mutation structure. We also studied the effect of the T4 recombinase deficiency (amber mutation in the uvsX gene) on the fidelity of DSB repair. We observed that DSBs are still repaired via homologous recombination in the uvsX mutants, and the apparent fidelity of this repair is higher than that seen in the wild-type background. The mutator effect of the DSB repair may look unexpected given that most of the normal DNA synthesis in bacteriophage T4 is performed via a recombination-dependent replication (RDR) pathway, which is thought to be indistinguishable from DSB repair. There are three possible explanations for the observed mutagenicity of DSB repair: (1) the origin-dependent (early) DNA replication may be more accurate than the RDR; (2) the step of replication initiation may be more mutagenic than the process of elongation; and (3) the apparent mutagenicity may just reflect some non-randomness in the pool of replicating DNA, i.e., preferential replication of the sequences already involved in replication. We discuss the DSB repair pathway in the absence of UvsX recombinase. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Biological defense mechanisms against DNA double-strand break and their possible medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2011-01-01

    Radiation is now widely used for clinical diagnosis and therapeutics. On the other hand, radiation influences various tissues represented by immunological and reproductive systems, and is also recognized as one of the cause of carcinogenesis. Such pleiotropic effects of radiation are mediated through generation of damages on DNA molecule, vitally important genetic macromolecule. Among various types of DNA damages, double-strand break (DSB) is considered most critical and, therefore, responsible for biological effects. DSB is repaired mainly through two pathways: non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). Understanding of these mechanisms has been greatly deepened in past 20 years and is now providing a promising approach toward cancer therapy. We have studied the mechanisms of NHEJ, focusing especially on the role of phosphorylation and the assembly of machinery therein, which will be introduced below. (author)

  16. Torsional regulation of hRPA-induced unwinding of double-stranded DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vlaminck, I.; Vidic, I.; Van Loenhout, M.T.J.; Kanaar, R.; Lebbink, J.H.G.; Dekker, C.

    2010-01-01

    All cellular single-stranded (ss) DNA is rapidly bound and stabilized by single stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs). Replication protein A, the main eukaryotic SSB, is able to unwind double-stranded (ds) DNA by binding and stabilizing transiently forming bubbles of ssDNA. Here, we study the

  17. Accumulation of DNA Double-Strand Breaks in Normal Tissues After Fractionated Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruebe, Claudia E.; Fricke, Andreas; Wendorf, Juliane; Stuetzel, Annika; Kuehne, Martin; Ong, Mei Fang; Lipp, Peter; Ruebe, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: There is increasing evidence that genetic factors regulating the recognition and/or repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are responsible for differences in radiosensitivity among patients. Genetically defined DSB repair capacities are supposed to determine patients' individual susceptibility to develop adverse normal tissue reactions after radiotherapy. In a preclinical murine model, we analyzed the impact of different DSB repair capacities on the cumulative DNA damage in normal tissues during the course of fractionated irradiation. Material and Methods: Different strains of mice with defined genetic backgrounds (SCID -/- homozygous, ATM -/- homozygous, ATM +/- heterozygous, and ATM +/+ wild-type mice) were subjected to single (2 Gy) or fractionated irradiation (5 x 2 Gy). By enumerating γH2AX foci, the formation and rejoining of DSBs were analyzed in organs representative of both early-responding (small intestine) and late-responding tissues (lung, kidney, and heart). Results: In repair-deficient SCID -/- and ATM -/- homozygous mice, large proportions of radiation-induced DSBs remained unrepaired after each fraction, leading to the pronounced accumulation of residual DNA damage after fractionated irradiation, similarly visible in early- and late-responding tissues. The slight DSB repair impairment of ATM +/- heterozygous mice was not detectable after single-dose irradiation but resulted in a significant increase in unrepaired DSBs during the fractionated irradiation scheme. Conclusions: Radiation-induced DSBs accumulate similarly in acute- and late-responding tissues during fractionated irradiation, whereas the whole extent of residual DNA damage depends decisively on the underlying genetically defined DSB repair capacity. Moreover, our data indicate that even minor impairments in DSB repair lead to exceeding DNA damage accumulation during fractionated irradiation and thus may have a significant impact on normal tissue responses in clinical

  18. Quantification and genome-wide mapping of DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grégoire, Marie-Chantal; Massonneau, Julien; Leduc, Frédéric; Arguin, Mélina; Brazeau, Marc-André; Boissonneault, Guylain

    2016-12-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) represent a major threat to the genetic integrity of the cell. Knowing both their genome-wide distribution and number is important for a better assessment of genotoxicity at a molecular level. Available methods may have underestimated the extent of DSBs as they are based on markers specific to those undergoing active repair or may not be adapted for the large diversity of naturally occurring DNA ends. We have established conditions for an efficient first step of DNA nick and gap repair (NGR) allowing specific determination of DSBs by end labeling with terminal transferase. We used DNA extracted from HeLa cells harboring an I-SceI cassette to induce a targeted nick or DSB and demonstrated by immunocapture of 3'-OH that a prior step of NGR allows specific determination of loci-specific or genome wide DSBs. This method can be applied to the global determination of DSBs using radioactive end labeling and can find several applications aimed at understanding the distribution and kinetics of DSBs formation and repair. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. TALEN-Induced Double-Strand Break Repair of CTG Trinucleotide Repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentine Mosbach

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Trinucleotide repeat expansions involving CTG/CAG triplets are responsible for several neurodegenerative disorders, including myotonic dystrophy and Huntington’s disease. Because expansions trigger the disease, contracting repeat length could be a possible approach to gene therapy for these disorders. Here, we show that a TALEN-induced double-strand break was very efficient at contracting expanded CTG repeats in yeast. We show that RAD51, POL32, and DNL4 are dispensable for double-strand break repair within CTG repeats, the only required genes being RAD50, SAE2, and RAD52. Resection was totally abolished in the absence of RAD50 on both sides of the break, whereas it was reduced in a sae2Δ mutant on the side of the break containing the longest repeat tract, suggesting that secondary structures at double-strand break ends must be removed by the Mre11-Rad50 complex and Sae2. Following the TALEN double-strand break, single-strand annealing occurred between both sides of the repeat tract, leading to repeat contraction.

  20. Cisplatin enhances the formation of DNA single- and double-strand breaks by hydrated electrons and hydroxyl radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaee, Mohammad; Sanche, Léon; Hunting, Darel J

    2013-03-01

    The synergistic interaction of cisplatin with ionizing radiation is the clinical rationale for the treatment of several cancers including head and neck, cervical and lung cancer. The underlying molecular mechanism of the synergy has not yet been identified, although both DNA damage and repair processes are likely involved. Here, we investigate the indirect effect of γ rays on strand break formation in a supercoiled plasmid DNA (pGEM-3Zf-) covalently modified by cisplatin. The yields of single- and double-strand breaks were determined by irradiation of DNA and cisplatin/DNA samples with (60)Co γ rays under four different scavenging conditions to examine the involvement of hydrated electrons and hydroxyl radicals in inducing the DNA damage. At 5 mM tris in an N2 atmosphere, the presence of an average of two cisplatins per plasmid increased the yields of single- and double-strand breaks by factors of 1.9 and 2.2, respectively, relative to the irradiated unmodified DNA samples. Given that each plasmid of 3,200 base pairs contained an average of two cisplatins, this represents an increase in radiosensitivity of 3,200-fold on a per base pair basis. When hydrated electrons were scavenged by saturating the samples with N2O, these enhancement factors decreased to 1.5 and 1.2, respectively, for single- and double-strand breaks. When hydroxyl radicals were scavenged using 200 mM tris, the respective enhancement factors were 1.2 and 1.6 for single- and double-strand breaks, respectively. Furthermore, no enhancement in DNA damage by cisplatin was observed after scavenging both hydroxyl radicals and hydrated electrons. These findings show that hydrated electrons can induce both single- and double-strand breaks in the platinated DNA, but not in unmodified DNA. In addition, cisplatin modification is clearly an extremely efficient means of increasing the formation of both single- and double-strand breaks by the hydrated electrons and hydroxyl radicals created by ionizing

  1. γH2AX foci as a marker for DNA double-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deckbar, Dorothee

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The DNA double-strand break (DSB) is the most deleterious lesion of all DNA damages. Left unrepaired or being mis-rejoined it can lead to chromosome aberrations which compromise the genomic stability and carry the potential to initiate carcinogenesis. So DSB repair mechanisms are under intensive investigation for many years. As older techniques had to utilize non-physiological doses to monitor DSB repair, they did not allow repair studies on the cellular level or after in vivo irradiation. But during the last years, an upcoming method allows the detection of a single DSB after physiologically relevant doses. To maintain the genomic integrity after the occurrence of a DSB, cellular mechanisms have evolved that detect and repair DSBs and even halt cell cycle progression to provide time for repair. In these processes, one of the first steps is the phosphorylation of the histone H2AX at serine 139 (γH2AX). Within minutes after DSB induction, large numbers of H2AX molecules are phosphorylated around the break site leading to the accumulation of proteins involved in chromatin remodelling, to damage signal amplification, and eventually to checkpoint activation and DSB repair. The finding that DSB-surrounding proteins can be visualized as foci in immunofluorescence microscopy opened up new opportunities in cancer biology and radiation biology. It was now for the first time possible to measure DSB repair after physiologically relevant doses of ionizing radiation, i.e. after doses used for therapeutic as well as for diagnostic purposes. First reports even describe the measurement of DSB repair after in vivo irradiation in mice and humans. This did not only improve the basic research investigating the mechanisms of DSB repair but also the research on low-dose effects and radiation protection. So the potential of γH2AX foci analysis as a predictive marker for radiosensitivity or radiation induced side effects is actually discussed. (author)

  2. Zinc Finger Nuclease induced DNA double stranded breaks and rearrangements in MLL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do, To Uyen; Ho, Bay; Shih, Shyh-Jen; Vaughan, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A Zinc Finger Nuclease (ZFN) targeting a leukemogenic hot spot for rearrangement in MLL is created. ► The novel ZFN efficiently cleaves MLL exon 13. ► Despite MLL cleavage and evidence of mis-repair, no leukemogenic translocations were produced. ► MLL cleavage alone is insufficient to generate leukemogenic translocations. - Abstract: Radiation treatment or chemotherapy has been linked with a higher risk of secondary cancers such as therapy related Acute Myeloid Leukemia (tAML). Several of these cancers have been shown to be correlated to the introduction of double stranded breaks (DSB) and rearrangements within the Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) gene. We used Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs) to introduce precise cuts within MLL to examine how a single DNA DSB might lead to chromosomal rearrangements. A ZFN targeting exon 13 within the Breakpoint Cluster Region of MLL was transiently expressed in a human lymphoblast cell line originating from a CML patient. Although FISH analysis showed ZFN DSB at this region increased the rate of MLL fragmentation, we were unable to detect leukemogenic rearrangements or translocations via inverse PCR. Interestingly, gene fragmentation as well as small interstitial deletions, insertions and base substitutions increased with the inhibition of DNA-PK, suggesting repair of this particular DSB is linked to non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Although mis-repair of DSBs may be necessary for the initiation of leukemogenic translocations, a MLL targeted DNA break alone is insufficient

  3. Zinc Finger Nuclease induced DNA double stranded breaks and rearrangements in MLL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do, To Uyen [Graduate Group in Immunology, University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Sacramento CA 95817 (United States); Ho, Bay; Shih, Shyh-Jen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Sacramento CA 95817 (United States); Vaughan, Andrew, E-mail: Andrew.vaughan@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Graduate Group in Immunology, University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Sacramento CA 95817 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: ► A Zinc Finger Nuclease (ZFN) targeting a leukemogenic hot spot for rearrangement in MLL is created. ► The novel ZFN efficiently cleaves MLL exon 13. ► Despite MLL cleavage and evidence of mis-repair, no leukemogenic translocations were produced. ► MLL cleavage alone is insufficient to generate leukemogenic translocations. - Abstract: Radiation treatment or chemotherapy has been linked with a higher risk of secondary cancers such as therapy related Acute Myeloid Leukemia (tAML). Several of these cancers have been shown to be correlated to the introduction of double stranded breaks (DSB) and rearrangements within the Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) gene. We used Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs) to introduce precise cuts within MLL to examine how a single DNA DSB might lead to chromosomal rearrangements. A ZFN targeting exon 13 within the Breakpoint Cluster Region of MLL was transiently expressed in a human lymphoblast cell line originating from a CML patient. Although FISH analysis showed ZFN DSB at this region increased the rate of MLL fragmentation, we were unable to detect leukemogenic rearrangements or translocations via inverse PCR. Interestingly, gene fragmentation as well as small interstitial deletions, insertions and base substitutions increased with the inhibition of DNA-PK, suggesting repair of this particular DSB is linked to non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Although mis-repair of DSBs may be necessary for the initiation of leukemogenic translocations, a MLL targeted DNA break alone is insufficient.

  4. Correlation between slowly repairable double-strand breaks and thermal radiosensitization in the human HeLa S3 cell line

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampinga, HH; Hiemstra, YS; Konings, AWT; Dikomey, E

    The effect of heat on double-strand breaks (dsb) repair was compared with thermal radiosensitization using HeLa S3 cells. Cells were exposed to a combined treatment of X-irradiation followed by heat (44 degrees C, 0.5 h) separated by time intervals up to 8h. DNA dsb were measured by PFGE and

  5. Methylproamine protects against ionizing radiation by preventing DNA double-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprung, Carl N.; Vasireddy, Raja S.; Karagiannis, Tom C.; Loveridge, Shanon J.; Martin, Roger F.; McKay, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The majority of cancer patients will receive radiotherapy (RT), therefore, investigations into advances of this modality are important. Conventional RT dose intensities are limited by adverse responses in normal tissues and a primary goal is to ameliorate adverse normal tissue effects. The aim of these experiments is to further our understanding regarding the mechanism of radioprotection by the DNA minor groove binder, methylproamine, in a cellular context at the DNA level. Materials and methods: We used immunocytochemical methods to measure the accumulation of phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX) foci following ionizing radiation (IR) in patient-derived lymphoblastoid cells exposed to methylproamine. Furthermore, we performed pulsed field gel electrophoresis DNA damage and repair assays to directly interrogate the action of methylproamine on DNA in irradiated cells. Results: We found that methylproamine-treated cells had fewer γH2AX foci after IR compared to untreated cells. Also, the presence of methylproamine decreased the amount of lower molecular weight DNA entering the gel as shown by the pulsed field gel electrophoresis assay. Conclusions: These results suggest that methylproamine acts by preventing the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (dsbs) and support the hypothesis that radioprotection by methylproamine is mediated, at least in part, by decreasing initial DNA damage.

  6. The Ku heterodimer and the metabolism of single-ended DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Alessia; Ristic, Dejan; Dionne, Isabelle; Liu, Xiao Z; Wyman, Claire; Wellinger, Raymund J; Petrini, John H J

    2013-06-27

    Single-ended double-strand breaks (DSBs) are a common form of spontaneous DNA break, generated when the replisome encounters a discontinuity in the DNA template. Given their prevalence, understanding the mechanisms governing the fate(s) of single-ended DSBs is important. We describe the influence of the Ku heterodimer and Mre11 nuclease activity on processing of single-ended DSBs. Separation-of-function alleles of yku70 were derived that phenocopy Ku deficiency with respect to single-ended DSBs but remain proficient for NHEJ. The Ku mutants fail to regulate Exo1 activity, and bypass the requirement for Mre11 nuclease activity in the repair of camptothecin-induced single-ended DSBs. Ku mutants exhibited reduced affinity for DNA ends, manifest as both reduced end engagement and enhanced probability of diffusing inward on linear DNA. This study reveals an interplay between Ku and Mre11 in the metabolism of single-ended DSBs that is distinct from repair pathway choice at double-ended DSBs. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Ku Heterodimer and the Metabolism of Single-Ended DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia Balestrini

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Single-ended double-strand breaks (DSBs are a common form of spontaneous DNA break, generated when the replisome encounters a discontinuity in the DNA template. Given their prevalence, understanding the mechanisms governing the fate(s of single-ended DSBs is important. We describe the influence of the Ku heterodimer and Mre11 nuclease activity on processing of single-ended DSBs. Separation-of-function alleles of yku70 were derived that phenocopy Ku deficiency with respect to single-ended DSBs but remain proficient for NHEJ. The Ku mutants fail to regulate Exo1 activity, and bypass the requirement for Mre11 nuclease activity in the repair of camptothecin-induced single-ended DSBs. Ku mutants exhibited reduced affinity for DNA ends, manifest as both reduced end engagement and enhanced probability of diffusing inward on linear DNA. This study reveals an interplay between Ku and Mre11 in the metabolism of single-ended DSBs that is distinct from repair pathway choice at double-ended DSBs.

  8. OsRAD51C Is Essential for Double Strand Break Repair in Rice Meiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding eTang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available RAD51C is one of the RAD51 paralogs that plays an important role in DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination. Here, we identified and characterized OsRAD51C, the rice homolog of human RAD51C. The Osrad51c mutant plant is normal in vegetative growth but exhibits complete male and female sterility. Cytological investigation revealed that homologous pairing and synapsis were severely disrupted. Massive chromosome fragmentation occurred during metaphase I in Osrad51c meiocytes, and was fully suppressed by the CRC1 mutation. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that OsRAD51C localized onto the chromosomes from leptotene to early pachytene during prophase I, and that normal loading of OsRAD51C was dependent on OsREC8, PAIR2, and PAIR3. Additionally, ZEP1 did not localize properly in Osrad51c, indicating that OsRAD51C is required for synaptonemal complex assembly. Our study also provided evidence in support of a functional divergence in RAD51C among organisms.

  9. The Ku Heterodimer and the Metabolism of Single-Ended DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Balestrini (Alessia); D. Ristic (Dejan); I. Dionne (Isabelle); X.Z. Liu (Xiao); C. Wyman (Claire); R.J. Wellinger (Raymund); J.H.J. Petrini (John)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractSingle-ended double-strand breaks (DSBs) are a common form of spontaneous DNA break, generated when the replisome encounters a discontinuity in the DNA template. Given their prevalence, understanding the mechanisms governing the fate(s) of single-ended DSBs is important. We describe the

  10. Chromatin mobility is increased at sites of DNA double-strand breaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krawczyk, P. M.; Borovski, T.; Stap, J.; Cijsouw, T.; ten Cate, R.; Medema, J. P.; Kanaar, R.; Franken, N. A. P.; Aten, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) can efficiently kill cancer cells, but they can also produce unwanted chromosome rearrangements when DNA ends from different DSBs are erroneously joined. Movement of DSB-containing chromatin domains might facilitate these DSB interactions and promote the formation of

  11. DN2 Thymocytes Activate a Specific Robust DNA Damage Response to Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Calvo-Asensio

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available For successful bone marrow transplantation (BMT, a preconditioning regime involving chemo and radiotherapy is used that results in DNA damage to both hematopoietic and stromal elements. Following radiation exposure, it is well recognized that a single wave of host-derived thymocytes reconstitutes the irradiated thymus, with donor-derived thymocytes appearing about 7 days post BMT. Our previous studies have demonstrated that, in the presence of donor hematopoietic cells lacking T lineage potential, these host-derived thymocytes are able to generate a polyclonal cohort of functionally mature peripheral T cells numerically comprising ~25% of the peripheral T cell pool of euthymic mice. Importantly, we demonstrated that radioresistant CD44+ CD25+ CD117+ DN2 progenitors were responsible for this thymic auto-reconstitution. Until recently, the mechanisms underlying the radioresistance of DN2 progenitors were unknown. Herein, we have used the in vitro “Plastic Thymus” culture system to perform a detailed investigation of the mechanisms responsible for the high radioresistance of DN2 cells compared with radiosensitive hematopoietic stem cells. Our results indicate that several aspects of DN2 biology, such as (i rapid DNA damage response (DDR activation in response to ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage, (ii efficient repair of DNA double-strand breaks, and (iii induction of a protective G1/S checkpoint contribute to promoting DN2 cell survival post-irradiation. We have previously shown that hypoxia increases the radioresistance of bone marrow stromal cells in vitro, at least in part by enhancing their DNA double-strand break (DNA DSB repair capacity. Since the thymus is also a hypoxic environment, we investigated the potential effects of hypoxia on the DDR of DN2 thymocytes. Finally, we demonstrate for the first time that de novo DN2 thymocytes are able to rapidly repair DNA DSBs following thymic irradiation in vivo.

  12. On the linearity of the dose-effect relationship of DNA double strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadwick, K.H.; Leenhouts, H.P.

    1994-01-01

    Most radiation biologists believe that DNA double-strand breaks are induced linearly with radiation dose for all types of radiation. Since 1985, with the advent of elution and gel electrophoresis techniques which permit the measurement of DNA double-strand breaks induced in mammalian cells at doses having radiobiological relevance, the true nature of the dose-effect relationship has been brought into some doubt. Many investigators measured curvilinear dose-effect relationships and a few found good correlations between the induction of the DNA double-strand breaks and cell survival. We approach the problem pragmatically by assuming that the induction of DNA double-strand breaks by 125 I Auger electron emitters incorporated into the DNA of the cells is a linear function of the number of 125 I decays, and by comparing the dose-effect relationship for sparsely ionizing radiation against this standard. The conclusion drawn that the curvilinear dose-effect relationships and the correlations with survival are real. (Author)

  13. Dynamic dependence on ATR and ATM for double-strand break repair in human embryonic stem cells and neural descendants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bret R Adams

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The DNA double-strand break (DSB is the most toxic form of DNA damage. Studies aimed at characterizing DNA repair during development suggest that homologous recombination repair (HRR is more critical in pluripotent cells compared to differentiated somatic cells in which nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ is dominant. We have characterized the DNA damage response (DDR and quality of DNA double-strand break (DSB repair in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs, and in vitro-derived neural cells. Resolution of ionizing radiation-induced foci (IRIF was used as a surrogate for DSB repair. The resolution of gamma-H2AX foci occurred at a slower rate in hESCs compared to neural progenitors (NPs and astrocytes perhaps reflective of more complex DSB repair in hESCs. In addition, the resolution of RAD51 foci, indicative of active homologous recombination repair (HRR, showed that hESCs as well as NPs have high capacity for HRR, whereas astrocytes do not. Importantly, the ATM kinase was shown to be critical for foci formation in astrocytes, but not in hESCs, suggesting that the DDR is different in these cells. Blocking the ATM kinase in astrocytes not only prevented the formation but also completely disassembled preformed repair foci. The ability of hESCs to form IRIF was abrogated with caffeine and siRNAs targeted against ATR, implicating that hESCs rely on ATR, rather than ATM for regulating DSB repair. This relationship dynamically changed as cells differentiated. Interestingly, while the inhibition of the DNA-PKcs kinase (and presumably non-homologous endjoining [NHEJ] in astrocytes slowed IRIF resolution it did not in hESCs, suggesting that repair in hESCs does not utilize DNA-PKcs. Altogether, our results show that hESCs have efficient DSB repair that is largely ATR-dependent HRR, whereas astrocytes critically depend on ATM for NHEJ, which, in part, is DNA-PKcs-independent.

  14. Different responses to muon implantation in single- and double-stranded DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, Penny L.; Tani, Akiko; Oganesyan, Vasily S.; Butt, Julea N.; Cottrell, Stephen P.; Jayasooriya, Upali A.

    2006-01-01

    A model-free analysis of the longitudinal muon spin relaxation of muons implanted into single- and double-stranded DNA samples is reported. These samples show distinctly different responses to implanted muons with discontinuities of the integrated asymmetries at temperatures where these molecules are likely to have onset of molecular and electron dynamics

  15. Chlamydomonas chloroplasts can use short dispersed repeats and multiple pathways to repair a double-strand break in the genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odom, Obed W; Baek, Kwang-Hyun; Dani, Radhika N; Herrin, David L

    2008-03-01

    Certain group I introns insert into intronless DNA via an endonuclease that creates a double-strand break (DSB). There are two models for intron homing in phage: synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA) and double-strand break repair (DSBR). The Cr.psbA4 intron homes efficiently from a plasmid into the chloroplast psbA gene in Chlamydomonas, but little is known about the mechanism. Analysis of co-transformants selected using a spectinomycin-resistant 16S gene (16S(spec)) provided evidence for both pathways. We also examined the consequences of the donor DNA having only one-sided or no homology with the psbA gene. When there was no homology with the donor DNA, deletions of up to 5 kb involving direct repeats that flank the psbA gene were obtained. Remarkably, repeats as short as 15 bp were used for this repair, which is consistent with the single-strand annealing (SSA) pathway. When the donor had one-sided homology, the DSB in most co-transformants was repaired using two DNAs, the donor and the 16S(spec) plasmid, which, coincidentally, contained a region that is repeated upstream of psbA. DSB repair using two separate DNAs provides further evidence for the SDSA pathway. These data show that the chloroplast can repair a DSB using short dispersed repeats located proximally, distally, or even on separate molecules relative to the DSB. They also provide a rationale for the extensive repertoire of repeated sequences in this genome.

  16. Molecular characterization of a complex site-specific radiation-induced DNA double-strand break

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, K.; Dizdaroglu, M.; Jaruga, P.; Neumann, R.D.; Winters, T.A.

    2003-01-01

    Radiation lethality is a function of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). Current models propose the lethality of a DSB to be a function of its structural complexity. We present here for the first time a map of damage associated with a site-specific double-strand break produced by decay of 125 I in a plasmid bound by a 125 I-labeled triplex forming oligonucleotide ( 125 I-TFO). The E. coli DNA repair enzymes, endonuclease IV (endo IV), endonuclease III (endo III), and formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg), which recognize AP sites, and pyrimidine and purine base damage respectively, were used as probes in this study. 125 I-TFO bound plasmid was incubated with and without DMSO at -80 deg C for 1 month. No significant difference in DSB yield was observed under these conditions. A 32 base pair fragment from the upstream side of the decay site was isolated by restriction digestion and enzymatically probed to identify damage sites. Endo IV treatment of the 5'-end labeled upper strand indicated clustering of AP sites within 3 bases downstream and 7 bases upstream of the targeted base. Also, repeated experiments consistently detected an AP site 4 bases upstream of the 125 Itarget base. This was further supported by complementary results with the 3'-end labeled upper strand. Endo IV analysis of the lower strand also shows clustering of AP sites near the DSB end. Endo III and Fpg probing demonstrated that base damage is also clustered near the targeted break site. DSBs produced in the absence of DMSO displayed a different pattern of enzyme sensitive damage than those produced in the presence of DMSO. Identification of specific base damage types within the restriction fragment containing the DSB end was achieved with GC/MS. Base damage consisted of 8-hydroguanine, 8-hydroxyadenine, and 5-hydroxycytosine. These lesions were observed at relative yields of 8-hydroguanine and 5-hydroxycytosine to 8-hydroxyadenine of 7.4:1 and 4.7:1, respectively, in the absence

  17. Fine-tuning the ubiquitin code at DNA double-strand breaks: deubiquitinating enzymes at work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta eCitterio

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitination is a reversible protein modification broadly implicated in cellular functions. Signaling processes mediated by ubiquitin are crucial for the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs, one of the most dangerous types of DNA lesions. In particular, the DSB response critically relies on active ubiquitination by the RNF8 and RNF168 ubiquitin ligases at the chromatin, which is essential for proper DSB signaling and repair. How this pathway is fine-tuned and what the functional consequences are of its deregulation for genome integrity and tissue homeostasis are subject of intense investigation. One important regulatory mechanism is by reversal of substrate ubiquitination through the activity of specific deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs, as supported by the implication of a growing number of DUBs in DNA damage response (DDR processes. Here, we discuss the current knowledge of how ubiquitin-mediated signaling at DSBs is controlled by deubiquitinating enzymes, with main focus on DUBs targeting histone H2A and on their recent implication in stem cell biology and cancer.

  18. Ionizing radiation damage to the folded chromosome of Escherichia coli K-12: repair of double-strand breaks in deoxyribonucleic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulmer, M.K.; Gomez, R.F.; Sinskevy, A.J.

    1979-01-01

    The extremely gentle lysis and unfolding procedures that have been developed for the isolation of nucleoid deoxyribonucleic acid yield undamaged, replicating genomes, thus permitting direct measurement of the formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks at biologically significant doses of ionizing radiation. Repair of ionizing radiation damage to folded chromosomes of Escherichia coli K-12 strain AB2497 was observed within 2 to 3 h of post-irradiation incubation in growth medium. Such behavior was not observed after post-irradiation incubation in growth medium of a recA13 strain (strain AB2487). A model based on recombinational repair is proposed to explain the formation of 2,200 to 2,300S material during early stages of incubation and to explain subsequent changes in the gradient profiles. Association of unrepaired DNA with the plasma membrane is proposed to explain the formation of a peak of rapidly sedimenting material (greater than 3,100S) during the later stage of repair. Direct evidence of repair of double-strand breaks during post-irradiation incubation in growth medium was obtained from gradient profiles of DNA from ribonuclease-digested chromosomes. The sedimentation coefficient of broken molecules was restored to the value of unirradiated DNA after 2 to 3 h of incubation, and the fraction of the DNA repaired in this fashion was equal to the fraction of cells that survived at the same dose. An average of 2.7 double-strand breaks per genome per lethal event was observed, suggesting that one to two double-strand breaks per genome are repairable in E. coli K-12 strain AB2497

  19. Functional analysis of the RAD50/MRE11 protein complex through targeted disruption of the murine RAD50 genomic locus: implications for DNA double strand break repair. An astro research fellowship presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Michelle S.; Bladl, Anthony R.; Petrini, John H.J.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The products of the S. cerevisiae genes ScRAD50 and ScMRE11 act in a protein complex and are required for non-homologous end-joining, the predominant mechanism of DNA double strand break (dsb) repair in mammalian cells. Mutation of these genes results in sensitivity to ionizing radiation (IR), a defect in initiation of meiosis, increased and error-prone recombination during mitosis, and overall genomic instability. This resultant phenotype is reminiscent of that seen in mammalian syndromes of genomic instability such as ataxia-telangiectasia and Bloom syndrome, hallmarks of which are radiation sensitivity and predisposition to malignancy. The murine homologues to ScRAD50 and ScMRE11 have recently been identified; both demonstrate impressive primary sequence conservation with their yeast counterparts, and are expected to mediate conserved functions. The roles of muRAD50 in genomic maintenance and in dsb repair will be examined in two parts. The first will include a determination of normal muRAD50 expression patterns. Second, the effects of disruption of the muRAD50 gene will be assessed. A specific targeting event has introduced a conditional murad50 null mutation into the genome of murine embryonic stem (ES) cells. These mutant ES cells are being used to create mutant mice, thus allowing functional characterization of muRAD50 on both the cellular and organismic levels. Such analyses will contribute to the delineation of the mammalian dsb repair pathway and to the cellular response to IR, and will serve as a mammalian model system for genomic instability. Materials and Methods: Wild-type tissue expression patterns and protein-protein interactions were determined by standard biochemical techniques, including immunoprecipitation, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and Western blotting. Molecular cloning techniques were used to create the gene targeting vectors, which were designed to result in either a deletion of exon 1 (equivalent to a null

  20. ATM is required for the repair of Topotecan-induced replication-associated double-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Köcher, Sabrina; Spies-Naumann, Anja; Kriegs, Malte; Dahm-Daphi, Jochen; Dornreiter, Irena

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: DNA replication is a promising target for anti-cancer therapies. Therefore, the understanding of replication-associated DNA repair mechanisms is of great interest. One key factor of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair is the PIK kinase Ataxia-Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) but it is still unclear whether ATM is involved in the repair of replication-associated DSBs. Here, we focused on the involvement of ATM in homology-directed repair (HDR) of indirect DSBs associated with replication. Material and methods: Experiments were performed using ATM-deficient and -proficient human cells. Replication-associated DSBs were induced with Topotecan (TPT) and compared with γ-irradiation (IR). Cell survival was measured by clonogenic assay. Overall DSB repair and HDR were evaluated by detecting residual γH2AX/53BP1 and Rad51 foci, respectively. Cell cycle distribution was analysed by flow cytometry and protein expression by Western blot. Results: ATM-deficiency leads to enhanced numbers of residual DSBs, resulting in a pronounced S/G2-block and decreased survival upon TPT-treatment. In common with IR, persisting Rad51 foci were detected following TPT-treatment. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that ATM is essentially required for the completion of HR-mediated repair of TPT-induced DSBs formed indirectly at replication forks

  1. DNA double-strand breaks as potential indicators for the biological effects of ionising radiation exposure from cardiac CT and conventional coronary angiography: a randomised, controlled study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geisel, Dominik; Zimmermann, Elke; Rief, Matthias; Greupner, Johannes; Hamm, Bernd [Charite Medical School, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Laule, Michael; Knebel, Fabian [Charite Medical School, Department of Cardiology, Berlin (Germany); Dewey, Marc [Charite Medical School, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Charite, Institut fuer Radiologie, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-08-15

    To prospectively compare induced DNA double-strand breaks by cardiac computed tomography (CT) and conventional coronary angiography (CCA). 56 patients with suspected coronary artery disease were randomised to undergo either CCA or cardiac CT. DNA double-strand breaks were assessed in fluorescence microscopy of blood lymphocytes as indicators of the biological effects of radiation exposure. Radiation doses were estimated using dose-length product (DLP) and dose-area product (DAP) with conversion factors for CT and CCA, respectively. On average there were 0.12 {+-} 0.06 induced double-strand breaks per lymphocyte for CT and 0.29 {+-} 0.18 for diagnostic CCA (P < 0.001). This relative biological effect of ionising radiation from CCA was 1.9 times higher (P < 0.001) than the effective dose estimated by conversion factors would have suggested. The correlation between the biological effects and the estimated radiation doses was excellent for CT (r = 0.951, P < 0.001) and moderate to good for CCA (r = 0.862, P < 0.001). One day after radiation, a complete repair of double-strand breaks to background levels was found in both groups. Conversion factors may underestimate the relative biological effects of ionising radiation from CCA. DNA double-strand break assessment may provide a strategy for individualised assessments of radiation. (orig.)

  2. Induction of DNA double-strand breaks in hepatoma cell SMMC-7721 by accelerated carbon ion 12C6+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Suwen; Su Xu; Wang Jufang; Zhao Jing; Li Wenjian

    2004-01-01

    DNA lesions, especially DNA double-strand breaks (dsbs), are looked upon as the dominant molecular effect of radiation action. Dsbs mark the beginning of a cascade of cellular processes that either results in complete repair of the DNA damage or lead to deleterious stages such as mutation, transformation or even cell death. Changing the radiation quality can influence the radiosensitivity of cells in culture. Accelerated particles provide an excellent means of varying the ionization density of the test radiation. With ion beams, the molecular mechanisms underlying the biological consequences of high linear energy transfer (LET) irradiation can be studied and describing radiation action with biophysical models can be tested. In this paper, radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (dsbs) were measured in hepatoma SMMC-7721 cells by means of an experimental approach involving pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and densitometric scanning of ethidium bromide stained gels. With this set-up, the induction of dsbs was investigated in SMMC-7721 cells after irradiation with accelerated carbon ions with specific LET 70 keV/μm. The fraction of DNA retained was taken as quantitative measure to calculate absolute yields of induced DNA dsbs. Experimental data shows that the induction of DNA dsbs increasing with the dose of irradiation. Data are compared with published results on dsbs induction in mammalian cells by radiations of comparable LET

  3. Double strand DNA breaks response in Huntington´s disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šolc, Petr; Valášek, Jan; Rausová, Petra; Juhásová, Jana; Juhás, Štefan; Motlík, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 78, Suppl 2 (2015), s. 15-15 ISSN 1210-7859. [Conference on Animal Models for neurodegenerative Diseases /3./. 08.11.2015-10.11.2015, Liblice] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0124; GA MŠk(CZ) 7F14308 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : Huntington ´s disease * DNA damage * double strand DNA breaks Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  4. Rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks in human fibroblasts and its impairment in one ataxia telangiectasia and two Fanconi strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coquerelle, T.M.; Weibezahn, K.F.

    1981-01-01

    Using the technique of neutral elution through polycarbonate filters as a measure of DNA length, and hence of the number of double-strand breaks incurred as a result of radiation damage, we found that normal human fibroblasts rejoin 50% of all breaks within only 3 min (37 degrees C). This fast rejoining was impaired in fibroblasts from one patient with Ataxia telangiectasia and in fibroblasts from two patients with Fanconi's anemia. Also the number of residual breaks after several hours of repair was higher than in control cells. Other cases with the same diseases were normal in their rejoining of double-strand breaks

  5. Physical and biological parameters affecting DNA double strand break misrejoining in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehne, M.; Rothkamm, K.; Loebrich, M.

    2002-01-01

    In an attempt to investigate the effect of radiation quality, dose and specific repair pathways on correct and erroneous rejoining of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), an assay was applied that allows the identification and quantification of incorrectly rejoined DSB ends produced by ionising radiation. While substantial misrejoining occurs in mammalian cells after high acute irradiation doses, decreasing misrejoining frequencies were observed in dose fractionation experiments with X rays. In line with this finding, continuous irradiation with gamma rays at low dose rate leads to non detectable misrejoining. This indicates that the probability for a DSB to be misrejoined decreases drastically when DSBs are separated in time and space. The same dose fractionation approach was applied to determine DSB misrejoining after a particle exposure. In contrast to the results with X rays, there was no significant decrease in DSB misrejoining with increasing fractionation. This suggests that DSB misrejoining after a irradiation is not significantly affected by a separation of particle tracks. To identify the enzymatic pathways that are involved in DSB misrejoining, cell lines deficient in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) were examined. After high X ray doses, DSB misrejoining is considerable reduced in NHEJ mutants. Low dose rate experiments show elevated DSB misrejoining in NHEJ mutants compared with wild-type cells. The authors propose that NHEJ serves as an efficient pathway for rejoining correct break ends in situations of separated breaks but generates genomic rearrangements if DSBs are close in time and space. (author)

  6. ATM and checkpoint responses to DNA double strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, K.K.

    2003-01-01

    DNA damage checkpoints can be classified into G1/S, intra-S and G2/M checkpoints, so named according to the cell cycle transitions that they regulate. DNA damage incurred during the G1 or G2 phase of the cell cycle leads to growth arrest at the G1/S and G2/M phase boundaries, respectively, whereas genotoxic stress during S phase results in the transient suppression of DNA synthesis. In mammals, ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) is a protein kinase that controls all checkpoint responses to DNA damage. ATM is a versatile kinase which uses various means to regulate a given checkpoint pathway. It has been shown to act upon several proteins within the same pathway, many times controlling several different modifications of the same protein or using several different targets to arrive at the same end point. Some of the ATM targets act as adaptors by recruiting additional substrates for ATM. ATM controls two types of responses in G1. The p53-dependent responses inhibit Cyclin/Cdk activity by transcriptional induction of p21, whereas p53-independent responses inhibit CDKs through degradation of Cdc25A to maintain CdK2 inhibitory phosphorylation. In regulating p53, ATM directly phosphorylates p53 on Ser15, which likely causes p53 transcriptional activation, concurrently activating other kinases that phosphorylate p53 at other sites such as Ser20, which reduces the ability of MDM2 to bind p53, thus promoting its stability. ATM further ensures p53 stability by phosphorylating MDM2. At least six ATM targets, namely CHK2, CHK1, NBS1, BRCA1, SMC1 and FANCD2, have been implicated in the control of S-phase checkpoint. Cdc25A is the downstream effector of CHK1 and CHK2, though the underlying mechanism for control of intra S-phase checkpoint by other targets remain obscure. G2 checkpoint prevents mitotic entry solely through inhibitory phosphorylation of Cdc2/Cdk1. Several ATM targets including CHK1, CHK2, BRCA1, MDC1 and p53BP1 have been implicated in the control of G2/M

  7. Protected DNA strand displacement for enhanced single nucleotide discrimination in double-stranded DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodakov, Dmitriy A; Khodakova, Anastasia S; Huang, David M; Linacre, Adrian; Ellis, Amanda V

    2015-03-04

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are a prime source of genetic diversity. Discriminating between different SNPs provides an enormous leap towards the better understanding of the uniqueness of biological systems. Here we report on a new approach for SNP discrimination using toehold-mediated DNA strand displacement. The distinctiveness of the approach is based on the combination of both 3- and 4-way branch migration mechanisms, which allows for reliable discrimination of SNPs within double-stranded DNA generated from real-life human mitochondrial DNA samples. Aside from the potential diagnostic value, the current study represents an additional way to control the strand displacement reaction rate without altering other reaction parameters and provides new insights into the influence of single nucleotide substitutions on 3- and 4-way branch migration efficiency and kinetics.

  8. Cyclic perylene diimide: Selective ligand for tetraplex DNA binding over double stranded DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasimalla, Suresh; Sato, Shinobu; Takenaka, Fuminori; Kurose, Yui; Takenaka, Shigeori

    2017-12-15

    Synthesized cyclic perylene diimide, cPDI, showed the binding constant of 6.3 × 10 6  M -1 with binding number of n = 2 with TA-core as a tetraplex DNA in 50 mM Tris-HCl buffer (pH = 7.4) containing 100 mM KCl using Schatchard analysis and showed a higher preference for tetraplex DNA than for double stranded DNA with over 10 3 times. CD spectra showed that TA-core induced its antiparallel conformation upon addition of cPDI in the absence or presence of K + or Na + ions. The cPDI inhibits the telomerase activity with IC 50 of 0.3 µM using TRAP assay which is potential anti-cancer drug with low side effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Push back to respond better: regulatory inhibition of the DNA double-strand break response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panier, Stephanie; Durocher, Daniel

    2013-10-01

    Single DNA lesions such as DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) can cause cell death or trigger genome rearrangements that have oncogenic potential, and so the pathways that mend and signal DNA damage must be highly sensitive but, at the same time, selective and reversible. When initiated, boundaries must be set to restrict the DSB response to the site of the lesion. The integration of positive and, crucially, negative control points involving post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation, ubiquitylation and acetylation is key for building fast, effective responses to DNA damage and for mitigating the impact of DNA lesions on genome integrity.

  10. Effects of heavy ions on inactivation and DNA double strand breaks in Deinococcus radiodurans R1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, H; Schafer, M; Schmitz, C; Bucker, H

    1994-10-01

    Inactivation and double strand break (dsb) induction after heavy ion irradiation were studied in stationary phase cells of the highly radiation resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans R1. There is evidence that the radiation sensitivity of this bacterium is nearly independent on energy in the range of up to 15 MeV/u for lighter ions (Ar). The responses to dsb induction for charged particles show direct relationship between increasing radiation dose and residual intact DNA.

  11. Activation of Telomerase by Ionizing Radiation: Differential Response to the Inhibition of DNA Double-Strand Break Repair by Abrogation of Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, by LY294002, or by Wortmannin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuhof, Dirk; Zwicker, Felix; Kuepper, Jan-Heiner; Debus, Juergen; Weber, Klaus-Josef

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Telomerase activity represents a radiation-inducible function, which may be targeted by a double-strand break (DSB)-activated signal transduction pathway. Therefore, the effects of DNA-PK inhibitors (Wortmannin and LY294002) on telomerase upregulation after irradiation were studied. In addition, the role of trans-dominant inhibition of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, which strongly reduces DSB rejoining, was assessed in comparison with 3-aminobenzamide. Methods and Materials: COM3 rodent cells carry a construct for the dexamethasone-inducible overexpression of the DNA-binding domain of PARP1 and exhibit greatly impaired DSB rejoining after irradiation. Telomerase activity was measured using polymerase chain reaction ELISA 1 h after irradiation with doses up to 10 Gy. Phosphorylation status of PKB/Akt and of PKCα/β II was assessed by western blotting. Results: No telomerase upregulation was detectable for irradiated cells with undisturbed DSB rejoining. In contrast, incubation with LY294002 or dexamethasone yielded pronounced radiation induction of telomerase activity that could be suppressed by Wortmannin. 3-Aminobenzamide not only was unable to induce telomerase activity but also suppressed telomerase upregulation upon incubation with LY294002 or dexamethasone. Phospho-PKB was detectable independent of irradiation or dexamethasone pretreatment, but was undetectable upon incubations with LY294002 or Wortmannin, whereas phospho-PKC rested detectable. Conclusions: Telomerase activation postirradiation was triggered by different treatments that interfere with DNA DSB processing. This telomerase upregulation, however, was not reflected by the phosporylation status of the putative mediators of TERT activation, PKB and PKC. Although an involvement of PKB in TERT activation is not supported by the present findings, a respective role of PKC isoforms other than α/β II cannot be ruled out

  12. Polymorphic Variation in Double Strand Break Repair Gene in Indian Population: A Comparative Approach with Worldwide Ethnic Group Variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Raju Kumar; Mittal, Rama Devi

    2018-04-01

    DNA repair capacity is essential in maintaining cellular functions and homeostasis. Identification of genetic polymorphisms responsible for reduced DNA repair capacity may allow better cancer prevention. Double strand break repair pathway plays critical roles in maintaining genome stability. Present study was conducted to determine distribution of XRCC3 Exon 7 (C18067T, rs861539) and XRCC7 Intron 8 (G6721T, rs7003908) gene polymorphisms in North Indian population and compare with different populations globally. The genotype assays were performed in 224 normal healthy individuals of similar ethnicity using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Allelic frequencies of wild type were 79% (C) in XRCC3 Exon 7 C > T and 57% (G) in XRCC7 Intron 8 (G > T) 57% (G) observed. On the other hand, the variant allele frequency were 21% (T) in XRCC3 Exon 7 C > T and 43% (T) in XRCC7 Intron 8 G > T respectively. Major differences from other ethnic populations were observed. Our results suggest that frequency in these DNA repair genes exhibit distinctive pattern in India that could be attributed to ethnicity variation. This could assist in high-risk screening of humans exposed to environmental carcinogens and cancer predisposition in different ethnic groups.

  13. Human Cell Assays for Synthesis-Dependent Strand Annealing and Crossing over During Double-Strand Break Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapotoczny, Grzegorz; Sekelsky, Jeff

    2017-04-03

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the most deleterious types of lesions to the genome. Synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA) is thought to be a major pathway of DSB repair, but direct tests of this model have only been conducted in budding yeast and Drosophila To better understand this pathway, we developed an SDSA assay for use in human cells. Our results support the hypothesis that SDSA is an important DSB repair mechanism in human cells. We used siRNA knockdown to assess the roles of a number of helicases suggested to promote SDSA. None of the helicase knockdowns reduced SDSA, but knocking down BLM or RTEL1 increased SDSA. Molecular analysis of repair products suggests that these helicases may prevent long-tract repair synthesis. Since the major alternative to SDSA (repair involving a double-Holliday junction intermediate) can lead to crossovers, we also developed a fluorescent assay that detects crossovers generated during DSB repair. Together, these assays will be useful in investigating features and mechanisms of SDSA and crossover pathways in human cells. Copyright © 2017 Zapotoczny and Sekelsky.

  14. Human Cell Assays for Synthesis-Dependent Strand Annealing and Crossing over During Double-Strand Break Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Zapotoczny

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs are one of the most deleterious types of lesions to the genome. Synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA is thought to be a major pathway of DSB repair, but direct tests of this model have only been conducted in budding yeast and Drosophila. To better understand this pathway, we developed an SDSA assay for use in human cells. Our results support the hypothesis that SDSA is an important DSB repair mechanism in human cells. We used siRNA knockdown to assess the roles of a number of helicases suggested to promote SDSA. None of the helicase knockdowns reduced SDSA, but knocking down BLM or RTEL1 increased SDSA. Molecular analysis of repair products suggests that these helicases may prevent long-tract repair synthesis. Since the major alternative to SDSA (repair involving a double-Holliday junction intermediate can lead to crossovers, we also developed a fluorescent assay that detects crossovers generated during DSB repair. Together, these assays will be useful in investigating features and mechanisms of SDSA and crossover pathways in human cells.

  15. Measurement of anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies in major immunoglobulin classes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aotsuka, S; Okawa, M; Ikebe, K; Yokohari, R [Division of Clinical Immunology, Clinical Research Institute, National Medical Center Hospital, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan

    1979-07-10

    A solid-phase radioimmunoassay for quantitating anti-double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid antibodies (anti-dsDNA) in IgG, IgM and IgA classes has been devised. A distinct feature of the method is an application of polystyrene tubes coated with poly-L-lysine, through which dsDNA could be bound firmly to a solid phase. Studies on patients sera as well as normal sera revealed that anti-dsDNA was not qualitatively but quantitatively characteristic of systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and that IgG anti-dsDNA levels correlated well with the disease activity.

  16. DNA double-strand break response in stem cells: mechanisms to maintain genomic integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaria, Pratik; Robert, Carine; Rassool, Feyruz V

    2013-02-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) represent the point of origin of all cells in a given organism and must protect their genomes from both endogenous and exogenous genotoxic stress. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the most lethal forms of damage, and failure to adequately repair DSBs would not only compromise the ability of SCs to self-renew and differentiate, but will also lead to genomic instability and disease. Herein, we describe the mechanisms by which ESCs respond to DSB-inducing agents such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ionizing radiation, compared to somatic cells. We will also discuss whether the DSB response is fully reprogrammed in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and the role of the DNA damage response (DDR) in the reprogramming of these cells. ESCs have distinct mechanisms to protect themselves against DSBs and oxidative stress compared to somatic cells. The response to damage and stress is crucial for the maintenance of self-renewal and differentiation capacity in SCs. iPSCs appear to reprogram some of the responses to genotoxic stress. However, it remains to be determined if iPSCs also retain some DDR characteristics of the somatic cells of origin. The mechanisms regulating the genomic integrity in ESCs and iPSCs are critical for its safe use in regenerative medicine and may shed light on the pathways and factors that maintain genomic stability, preventing diseases such as cancer. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biochemistry of Stem Cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The studies of DNA double-strand break (DSB) rejoining and mRNA expression of repair gene XRCCs in malignant transformed cell lines of human bronchial epithelial cells generated by α-particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Jingfen; Sui Jianli; Geng Yu; Zhou Pingkun; Wu Dechang

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the efficiency of γ-ray-induced DNA DSB rejoining and the mRNA expression of DNA repair genes in malignantly transformed cell lines of human bronchial epithelial cells generated by exposure to a-particles. Methods: Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was used to detect DNA. DSBs mRNA expression was analyzed by RT-PCR. Results: The residual DNA DSB damage level after 4hrs repair following 0-150 Gy of γ-irradiation in the malignantly transformed cell lines BERP35T-1 and BERP35T-4 was significantly higher than that in their parental BEP2D cells. The analysis of mRNA level revealed a 2.5-to 6.5-fold down-regulated expression of the DNA repair genes XRCC-2, XRCC-3 and Ku80 (XRCC-5) in BERP35T-1 and BERP35T-4 cells as compared with the parental BEP2D cells. In contrast, the expression of DNA-PKcs(XRCC7) was 2.4-fold up-regulated in the transformed cell line BERP35T-4, in which there was a significantly higher proportion of polyploid cells. Conclusion: This study results show that the deficiency of DNA DSB rejoining and depressed mRNA expression of DNA repair genes could be involved in the malignant transformation process of BEP2D cells induced by exposure to α-particles

  18. Mechanisms of DNA Packaging by Large Double-Stranded DNA Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Venigalla B.; Feiss, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Translocation of viral double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) into the icosahedral prohead shell is catalyzed by TerL, a motor protein that has ATPase, endonuclease, and translocase activities. TerL, following endonucleolytic cleavage of immature viral DNA concatemer recognized by TerS, assembles into a pentameric ring motor on the prohead’s portal vertex and uses ATP hydrolysis energy for DNA translocation. TerL’s N-terminal ATPase is connected by a hinge to the C-terminal endonuclease. Inchworm models propose that modest domain motions accompanying ATP hydrolysis are amplified, through changes in electrostatic interactions, into larger movements of the C-terminal domain bound to DNA. In phage φ29, four of the five TerL subunits sequentially hydrolyze ATP, each powering translocation of 2.5 bp. After one viral genome is encapsidated, the internal pressure signals termination of packaging and ejection of the motor. Current focus is on the structures of packaging complexes and the dynamics of TerL during DNA packaging, endonuclease regulation, and motor mechanics. PMID:26958920

  19. Temperature-dependent conformations of exciton-coupled Cy3 dimers in double-stranded DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kringle, Loni; Sawaya, Nicolas P. D.; Widom, Julia; Adams, Carson; Raymer, Michael G.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Marcus, Andrew H.

    2018-02-01

    Understanding the properties of electronically interacting molecular chromophores, which involve internally coupled electronic-vibrational motions, is important to the spectroscopy of many biologically relevant systems. Here we apply linear absorption, circular dichroism, and two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy to study the polarized collective excitations of excitonically coupled cyanine dimers (Cy3)2 that are rigidly positioned within the opposing sugar-phosphate backbones of the double-stranded region of a double-stranded (ds)-single-stranded (ss) DNA fork construct. We show that the exciton-coupling strength of the (Cy3)2-DNA construct can be systematically varied with temperature below the ds-ss DNA denaturation transition. We interpret spectroscopic measurements in terms of the Holstein vibronic dimer model, from which we obtain information about the local conformation of the (Cy3)2 dimer, as well as the degree of static disorder experienced by the Cy3 monomer and the (Cy3)2 dimer probe locally within their respective DNA duplex environments. The properties of the (Cy3)2-DNA construct we determine suggest that it may be employed as a useful model system to test fundamental concepts of protein-DNA interactions and the role of electronic-vibrational coherence in electronic energy migration within exciton-coupled bio-molecular arrays.

  20. Do chromatin changes around a nascent double strand DNA break spread spherically into linearly non-adjacent chromatin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Velibor

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, a lot has been done in elucidating the sequence of events that occur at the nascent double strand DNA break. Nevertheless, the overall structure formed by the DNA damage response (DDR) factors around the break site, the repair focus, remains poorly understood. Although most of the data presented so far only address events that occur in chromatin in cis around the break, there are strong indications that in mammalian systems it may also occur in trans, analogous to the recent findings showing this if budding yeast. There have been attempts to address the issue but the final proof is still missing due to lack of a proper experimental system. If found to be true, the spatial distribution of DDR factors would have a major impact on the neighboring chromatin both in cis and in trans, significantly affecting local chromatin function; gene transcription and potentially other functions.

  1. Real Estate in the DNA Damage Response: Ubiquitin and SUMO Ligases Home in on DNA Double-Strand Breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantuma, Nico P; Pfeiffer, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitin and the ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO are intimately connected with the cellular response to various types of DNA damage. A striking feature is the local accumulation of these proteinaceous post-translational modifications in the direct vicinity to DNA double-strand breaks, which plays a critical role in the formation of ionizing radiation-induced foci. The functional significance of these modifications is the coordinated recruitment and removal of proteins involved in DNA damage signaling and repair in a timely manner. The central orchestrators of these processes are the ubiquitin and SUMO ligases that are responsible for accurately tagging a broad array of chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins thereby changing their behavior or destination. Despite many differences in the mode of action of these enzymes, they share some striking features that are of direct relevance for their function in the DNA damage response. In this review, we outline the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the recruitment of ubiquitin and SUMO ligases and discuss the importance of chromatin proximity in this process.

  2. How quantum entanglement in DNA synchronizes double-strand breakage by type II restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurian, P; Dunston, G; Lindesay, J

    2016-02-21

    Macroscopic quantum effects in living systems have been studied widely in pursuit of fundamental explanations for biological energy transport and sensing. While it is known that type II endonucleases, the largest class of restriction enzymes, induce DNA double-strand breaks by attacking phosphodiester bonds, the mechanism by which simultaneous cutting is coordinated between the catalytic centers remains unclear. We propose a quantum mechanical model for collective electronic behavior in the DNA helix, where dipole-dipole oscillations are quantized through boundary conditions imposed by the enzyme. Zero-point modes of coherent oscillations would provide the energy required for double-strand breakage. Such quanta may be preserved in the presence of thermal noise by the enzyme's displacement of water surrounding the DNA recognition sequence. The enzyme thus serves as a decoherence shield. Palindromic mirror symmetry of the enzyme-DNA complex should conserve parity, because symmetric bond-breaking ceases when the symmetry of the complex is violated or when physiological parameters are perturbed from optima. Persistent correlations in DNA across longer spatial separations-a possible signature of quantum entanglement-may be explained by such a mechanism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Double-stranded DNA translocase activity of transcription factor TFIIH and the mechanism of RNA polymerase II open complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishburn, James; Tomko, Eric; Galburt, Eric; Hahn, Steven

    2015-03-31

    Formation of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) open complex (OC) requires DNA unwinding mediated by the transcription factor TFIIH helicase-related subunit XPB/Ssl2. Because XPB/Ssl2 binds DNA downstream from the location of DNA unwinding, it cannot function using a conventional helicase mechanism. Here we show that yeast TFIIH contains an Ssl2-dependent double-stranded DNA translocase activity. Ssl2 tracks along one DNA strand in the 5' → 3' direction, implying it uses the nontemplate promoter strand to reel downstream DNA into the Pol II cleft, creating torsional strain and leading to DNA unwinding. Analysis of the Ssl2 and DNA-dependent ATPase activity of TFIIH suggests that Ssl2 has a processivity of approximately one DNA turn, consistent with the length of DNA unwound during transcription initiation. Our results can explain why maintaining the OC requires continuous ATP hydrolysis and the function of TFIIH in promoter escape. Our results also suggest that XPB/Ssl2 uses this translocase mechanism during DNA repair rather than physically wedging open damaged DNA.

  4. Lyn tyrosine kinase promotes silencing of ATM-dependent checkpoint signaling during recovery from DNA double-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumoto, Yasunori; Kuki, Kazumasa; Morii, Mariko; Miura, Takahito; Honda, Takuya; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Hasegawa, Hitomi; Kubota, Sho; Ide, Yudai; Yamaguchi, Noritaka; Nakayama, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Inhibition of Src family kinases decreased γ-H2AX signal. • Inhibition of Src family increased ATM-dependent phosphorylation of Chk2 and Kap1. • shRNA-mediated knockdown of Lyn increased phosphorylation of Kap1 by ATM. • Ectopic expression of Src family kinase suppressed ATM-mediated Kap1 phosphorylation. • Src is involved in upstream signaling for inactivation of ATM signaling. - Abstract: DNA damage activates the DNA damage checkpoint and the DNA repair machinery. After initial activation of DNA damage responses, cells recover to their original states through completion of DNA repair and termination of checkpoint signaling. Currently, little is known about the process by which cells recover from the DNA damage checkpoint, a process called checkpoint recovery. Here, we show that Src family kinases promote inactivation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent checkpoint signaling during recovery from DNA double-strand breaks. Inhibition of Src activity increased ATM-dependent phosphorylation of Chk2 and Kap1. Src inhibition increased ATM signaling both in G2 phase and during asynchronous growth. shRNA knockdown of Lyn increased ATM signaling. Src-dependent nuclear tyrosine phosphorylation suppressed ATM-mediated Kap1 phosphorylation. These results suggest that Src family kinases are involved in upstream signaling that leads to inactivation of the ATM-dependent DNA damage checkpoint

  5. Molecular Basis for DNA Double-Strand Break Annealing and Primer Extension by an NHEJ DNA Polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel C. Brissett

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ is one of the major DNA double-strand break (DSB repair pathways. The mechanisms by which breaks are competently brought together and extended during NHEJ is poorly understood. As polymerases extend DNA in a 5′-3′ direction by nucleotide addition to a primer, it is unclear how NHEJ polymerases fill in break termini containing 3′ overhangs that lack a primer strand. Here, we describe, at the molecular level, how prokaryotic NHEJ polymerases configure a primer-template substrate by annealing the 3′ overhanging strands from opposing breaks, forming a gapped intermediate that can be extended in trans. We identify structural elements that facilitate docking of the 3′ ends in the active sites of adjacent polymerases and reveal how the termini act as primers for extension of the annealed break, thus explaining how such DSBs are extended in trans. This study clarifies how polymerases couple break-synapsis to catalysis, providing a molecular mechanism to explain how primer extension is achieved on DNA breaks.

  6. Carbon ion induced DNA double-strand breaks in melanophore B{sub 16}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zengquan, Wei; Guangming, Zhou; Jufang, Wang; Jing, He; Qiang, Li; Wenjian, Li; Hongmei, Xie; Xichen, Cai; Huang, Tao; Bingrong, Dang; Guangwu, Han [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou (China). Inst. of Modern Physics; Qingxiang, Gao [Lanzhou Univ. (China)

    1997-09-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in melanophore B{sub 16} induced by plateau and extended Bragg peak of 75 MeV/u {sup 12}C{sup 6+} ions were studied by using a technique of inverse pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PIGE). DNA fragment lengths were distributed in two ranges: the larger in 1.4 Mbp-3.2 Mbp and the smaller in less than 1.2 Mbp. It indicates that distribution of DNA fragments induced by heavy ion irradiation is not stochastic and there probably are sensitive sites to heavy ions in DNA molecules of B{sub 16}. Percentage of DNA released from plug (PR) increased and trended towards a quasi-plateau {proportional_to}85% as dose increased. Content of the larger fragments decreased and flattened with increasing dose while content of the smaller ones increased and trended towards saturation. (orig.)

  7. Carbon ion induced DNA double-strand breaks in melanophore B16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Zengquan; Zhou Guangming; Wang Jufang; He Jing; Li Qiang; Li Wenjian; Xie Hongmei; Cai Xichen; Tao Huang; Dang Bingrong; Han Guangwu

    1997-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in melanophore B 16 induced by plateau and extended Bragg peak of 75 MeV/u 12 C 6+ ions were studied by using a technique of inverse pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PIGE). DNA fragment lengths were distributed in two ranges: the larger in 1.4 Mbp-3.2 Mbp and the smaller in less than 1.2 Mbp. It indicates that distribution of DNA fragments induced by heavy ion irradiation is not stochastic and there probably are sensitive sites to heavy ions in DNA molecules of B 16 . Percentage of DNA released from plug (PR) increased and trended towards a quasi-plateau ∝85% as dose increased. Content of the larger fragments decreased and flattened with increasing dose while content of the smaller ones increased and trended towards saturation. (orig.)

  8. Correlation between residual level of DNA double-strand breaks and the radiosensitivity of cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Jianxiang; Sun Weijian; Sui Jianli; Zhou Pingkun

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To understand the variation of the DNA double-strand break rejoining capacity among different cultured cancer cell lines and the primary cancer cells from brain cancer patients, and to explore the predictor of radiotherapy responses of cancers. Methods: DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) were induced by 60 Co γ-irradiation. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to analyze the initial production and rejoining of DNA DSBs. Radiosensitivity was determined by in vitro assay of clonogenic-forming capacity. Results: A wide variation of radiosensitivity, e.g. the survival parameter of Do varied from 0.65 to 2.15 Gy, was displayed among the eight cell lines derived from different type of cancers. Although differential level of initial DNA DSBs induced by 20 Gy γ-rays was observed among various cell lines, it was not correlated with the radiosensitivity. The deficiency of DNA DSB rejoining in radiosensitive cell lines was shown either in the early rapid-rejoining phase (SX-10 cells) or in the late slow-rejoining phase (A2780 cells). A significant relationship was observed between the residual level of DNA DSBs measured at 2 h post-20 Gy irradiation and the cellular radiosensitivity (D 0 or SF 2 ). The kinetic curves of rejoining DNA DSBs in the primary human brain tumor cells indicated a variation on DSB rejoining capacity among different individual tumor. The residual level of DNA DSBs after 2 h of rejoining post 20 Gy irradiation in primary human brain tumor cells is compatible to the results obtained in vitro culture cancer cell lines. Conclusions: The residual level of DNA DSBs is correlated with radioresistance of cancer cells, and the residual DNA damage is a useful parameter in predicting the response of tumor tissue to radiotherapy. (authors)

  9. Calibration of pulsed field gel electrophoresis for measurement of DNA double-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ager, D.D.; Dewey, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) assay was calibrated for the measurement of X-ray induced DNA double-strand breaks in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Calibration was conducted by incorporating [ 125 I] deoxyuridine into DNA, which induces one double-strand break for every disintegration that occurs in frozen cells. Based on the percentage of DNA migrating into the gel, the number of breaks/dalton/Gy was estimated to be (9.3±1.0) x 10 -12 . This value is close to (10 to 12) x 10 -12 determined by neutral filter elution using similar cell lysis procedures at 24 o C and at pH8.0. The estimate is in good agreement with the value of (11.7±2) x 10 -12 breaks/dalton/Gy as measured in Ehrlich ascites tumour cells using the neutral sucrose gradient method (Bloecher 1988), and (6 to 9) x 10 -12 breaks/dalton/Gy as measured in mouse L and Chinese hamster V79 cells using neutral filter elution (Radford and Hodgson 1985). (author)

  10. DNA double strand breaks in the acute phase after synchrotron pencilbeam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Palomo, C; Trippel, M; Schroll, C; Nikkhah, G; Schültke, E; Bräuer-Krisch, E; Requardt, H; Bartzsch, S

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. At the biomedical beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), we have established a method to study pencilbeam irradiation in-vivoin small animal models. The pencilbeam irradiation technique is based on the principle of microbeam irradiation, a concept of spatially fractionated high-dose irradiation. Using γH2AX as marker, we followed the development of DNA double strand breaks over 48 hrs after whole brain irradiation with the pencilbeam technique. Method. Almost square pencilbeams with an individual size of 51 × 50 μm were produced with an MSC collimator using a step and shoot approach, while the animals were moved vertically through the beam. The center-to-center distance (ctc) was 400 μm, with a peak-to-valley dose ratio (PVDR) of about 400. Five groups of healthy adult mice received peak irradiation doses of either 330 Gy or 2,460 Gy and valley doses of 0.82 Gy and 6.15 Gy, respectively. Animals were sacrificed at 2, 12 and 48 hrs after irradiation. Results. DNA double strand breaks are observed in the path of the pencilbeam. The size of the damaged volume undergoes changes within the first 48 hours after irradiation. Conclusions. The extent of DNA damage caused by pencilbeam irradiation, as assessed by H2AX antibody staining, is dose- dependent

  11. Distinct genetic control of homologous recombination repair of Cas9-induced double-strand breaks, nicks and paired nicks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriend, Lianne E. M.; Prakash, Rohit; Chen, Chun-Chin; Vanoli, Fabio; Cavallo, Francesca; Zhang, Yu; Jasin, Maria; Krawczyk, Przemek M.

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are known to be powerful inducers of homologous recombination (HR), but single-strand breaks (nicks) have also been shown to trigger HR. Both DSB- and nick-induced HR ((nick)HR) are exploited in advanced genome-engineering approaches based on the bacterial RNA-guided

  12. Compound Poisson Processes and Clustered Damage of Radiation Induced DNA Double Strand Breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudowska-Nowak, E.; Ritter, S.; Taucher-Scholz, G.; Kraft, G.

    2000-01-01

    Recent experimental data have demonstrated that DNA damage induced by densely ionizing radiation in mammalian cells is distributed along the DNA molecule in the form of clusters. The principal constituent of DNA damage are double-strand breaks (DSB) which are formed when the breaks occur in both DNA strands and are directly opposite or separated by only a few base pairs. DSBs are believed to be most important lesions produced in chromosomes by radiation; interaction between DSBs can lead to cell killing, mutation or carcinogenesis. The paper discusses a model of clustered DSB formation viewed in terms of compound Poisson process along with the predictive essay of the formalism in application to experimental data. (author)

  13. Protection against {sup 131}I-induced Double Strand DNA Breaks in Thyroid Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershman, J.M.; Okunyan, A.; Cannon, S.; Hogen, V. [Endocrinology, UCLA-VA, Los Angeles (United States); Rivina, Y. [Radiation Biology, UCLA, Los Angeles (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Radioiodine-131 (I{sup 131}) released from nuclear reactor accidents has dramatically increased the incidence of papillary thyroid cancer in exposed individuals, especially young children. The accepted measure for prevention of radiation-induced thyroid cancer is potassium iodide tablets that contain 100 mg iodide taken daily to block thyroid uptake of I{sup 131}. The deposition of ionizing radiation in cells results in double-strand DNA breaks (DSB) at fragile sites, and this early event can generate oncogenic rearrangements that eventually cause the cancer. We have developed a thyroid cell model to quantify the mitogenic effect of I{sup 131}. I{sup 131} causes double strand DNA breaks in FRTL-5 cells detected by 53BP1 or gamma H2AX and had no effect on cells that do not transport iodide. Perchlorate, iodide, and thiocyanate protect against DSB induced by I{sup 131}. Preincubation with the anion or radioprotective compounds prevents DSB; delayed addition of the anion is much less effective. These data provide a basis for studies of radioprotection against DSB induced by I{sup 131} in animals in order to refine the prevention of thyroid cancer resulting from nuclear fallout

  14. Genetic recombination induced by DNA double-strand break in bacteriophage T4: nature of the left/right bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakov, Victor P; Shcherbakova, Tamara; Plugina, Lidiya; Sizova, Svetlana; Kudryashova, Elena; Granovsky, Igor

    2008-06-01

    The experimental system combining double-strand breaks (DSBs), produced site-specifically by SegC endonuclease, with the famous advantages of the bacteriophage T4 rII mutant recombination analysis was used here to elucidate the origin of the recombination bias on two sides of the DSB, especially pronounced in gene 39 (topoisomerase II) and gene 59 (41-helicase loader) mutants. Three sources were found to contribute to the bias: (1) the SegC endonuclease may remain bound to the end of the broken DNA and thus protect it from exonuclease degradation; (2) in heteroduplex heterozygotes (HHs), arising as the recombinant products in the left-hand crosses, the transcribed strands are of rII mutant phenotype, so they, in contrast to the right-hand HHs, do not produce plaques on the lawn of the lambda-lysogenic host; and (3) the intrinsic polarity of T4 chromosome, reflected in transcription, may be a cause for discrimination of promoter-proximal and promoter-distal DNA sequences. It is shown that the apparent recombination bias does not imply one-sidedness of the DSB repair but just reflects a different depth of the end processing. It is inferred that the cause, underlying the "intrinsic" bias, might be interference between strand exchange and transcription. Topoisomerase and helicase functions are necessary to turn the process in favor of strand exchange. The idea is substantiated that the double-stranded to single-stranded DNA transition edge (not ss-DNA tip) serves as an actual recombinogenic element.

  15. Age-dependent decline in rejoining of X-ray-induced DNA double-strand breaks in normal human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, P.J.; Lange, C.S.; Bradley, M.O.; Nichols, W.W.

    1989-01-01

    Unstimulated human peripheral bloodlymphocytes (HPBL), separated by density centrifugation from anticoagulated whole blood, were X-irradiated on ice and incubated in medium at 37 0 C for repair times of 15, 30 and 120 min. Blood donors were 18 normotensive, non-smoking Caucasians aged 23-78, free from overt pathology and not taking any medications. Neutral filter elution was used to assay DNA double-strand break (DSB) induction and completeness of DSB rejoining. After 30 or 120 min repair incubation, the percentage of DSBs rejoined by cells from oder donors was less than half the percentage of DSBs rejoined by cells from younger donors. When data from the 3 age groups were pooled, the age-related decline in percent DSBs rejoined was significant for repair times 30 min and 120 min but not for 15 min. These age-related declines were observed even though DNA from older donors sustained fewer strand breaks as demonstrated by the negative correlation between donor age and DSB induction. These results suggest that the efficacy of X-ray-induced DSB repair diminishes with in vivo age in unstimulated HPBL. (author). 38 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 tab

  16. Towards quantitative viromics for both double-stranded and single-stranded DNA viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Roux

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Viruses strongly influence microbial population dynamics and ecosystem functions. However, our ability to quantitatively evaluate those viral impacts is limited to the few cultivated viruses and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA viral genomes captured in quantitative viral metagenomes (viromes. This leaves the ecology of non-dsDNA viruses nearly unknown, including single-stranded DNA (ssDNA viruses that have been frequently observed in viromes, but not quantified due to amplification biases in sequencing library preparations (Multiple Displacement Amplification, Linker Amplification or Tagmentation. Methods Here we designed mock viral communities including both ssDNA and dsDNA viruses to evaluate the capability of a sequencing library preparation approach including an Adaptase step prior to Linker Amplification for quantitative amplification of both dsDNA and ssDNA templates. We then surveyed aquatic samples to provide first estimates of the abundance of ssDNA viruses. Results Mock community experiments confirmed the biased nature of existing library preparation methods for ssDNA templates (either largely enriched or selected against and showed that the protocol using Adaptase plus Linker Amplification yielded viromes that were ±1.8-fold quantitative for ssDNA and dsDNA viruses. Application of this protocol to community virus DNA from three freshwater and three marine samples revealed that ssDNA viruses as a whole represent only a minor fraction (<5% of DNA virus communities, though individual ssDNA genomes, both eukaryote-infecting Circular Rep-Encoding Single-Stranded DNA (CRESS-DNA viruses and bacteriophages from the Microviridae family, can be among the most abundant viral genomes in a sample. Discussion Together these findings provide empirical data for a new virome library preparation protocol, and a first estimate of ssDNA virus abundance in aquatic systems.

  17. DNA-dependent protein kinase (DAN-PK), a key enzyme in the re-ligation of DNA double-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennequin, C.; Averbeck, D.

    1999-01-01

    Repair pathways of DNA are now defined and some important findings have been discovered in the last few years. DNA non-homologous end-joining (NEH) is a crucial process in the repair of radiation-induced double-strand breaks (DSBs). NHEj implies at least three steps: the DNA free-ends must get closer, preparation of the free-ends by exonucleases and then a transient hybridization in a region of DNA with weak homology. DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is the key enzyme in this process. DNA-PK is a nuclear serine/threonine kinase that comprises three components: a catalytic subunit (DNA-PK cs ) and two regulatory subunits, DNA-binding proteins, Ku80 and Ku70. The severe combined immuno-deficient (scid) mice are deficient in DNA-PK cs : this protein is involved both in DNA repair and in the V(D)J recombination of immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor genes. It is a protein-kinase of the P13-kinase family and which can phosphorylate Ku proteins, p53 and probably some other proteins still unknown. DNA-PK is an important actor of DSBs repair (induced by ionising radiations or by drugs like etoposide), but obviously it is not the only mechanism existing in the cell for this function. Some others, like homologous recombination, seem also to have a great importance for cell survival. (authors)

  18. Combined Triplex/Duplex Invasion of Double-Stranded DNA by "Tail-Clamp" Peptide Nucleic Acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentin, Thomas; Larsen, H. J.; Nielsen, Peter E.

    2003-01-01

    as determined by T-m measurements. Binding to double-stranded (ds) DNA occurred by combined triplex and duplex invasion as analyzed by permanganate probing. Furthermore, C-50 measurements revealed that tail-clamp PNAs consistently bound the dsDNA target more efficiently, and kinetics experiments revealed...

  19. Analysis of native cellular DNA after heavy ion irradiation: DNA double-strand breaks in CHO-K1 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilmann, J.; Taucher-Scholz, G.; Kraft, G.

    1994-11-01

    A fast assay for the detection of DNA double-strand breaks was developed involving constant field gel electrophoresis (Taucher-Scholz et al., 1994) and densitometric scanning of agarose gels stained with ethidium bromide. With this technique, DSB induction was investigated after irradiation of CHO cells with carbon ions with LET values between 14 keV/μm and 400 keV/μm. In parallel, a computer code was developed to simulate both the principle of the electrophoretic detection of DNA double-strand breaks and the action of radiations of different ionization density. The results of the experiments and the calculations are presented here and compared with each other. (orig./HSI)

  20. Evaluation of the efficacy of radiation-modifying compounds using γH2AX as a molecular marker of DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Li-Jeen; Orlowski, Christian; Ververis, Katherine; Vasireddy, Raja S; El-Osta, Assam; Karagiannis, Tom C

    2011-01-25

    Radiation therapy is a widely used therapeutic approach for cancer. To improve the efficacy of radiotherapy there is an intense interest in combining this modality with two broad classes of compounds, radiosensitizers and radioprotectors. These either enhance tumour-killing efficacy or mitigate damage to surrounding non-malignant tissue, respectively. Radiation exposure often results in the formation of DNA double-strand breaks, which are marked by the induction of H2AX phosphorylation to generate γH2AX. In addition to its essential role in DDR signalling and coordination of double-strand break repair, the ability to visualize and quantitate γH2AX foci using immunofluorescence microscopy techniques enables it to be exploited as an indicator of therapeutic efficacy in a range of cell types and tissues. This review will explore the emerging applicability of γH2AX as a marker for monitoring the effectiveness of radiation-modifying compounds.

  1. Evidence for induction of DNA double strand breaks in the bystander response to targeted soft X-rays in CHO cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashino, Genro; Prise, Kevin M.; Schettino, Giuseppe; Folkard, Melvyn; Vojnovic, Borivoj; Michael, Barry D.; Suzuki, Keiji; Kodama, Seiji; Watanabe, Masami

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the role of DNA double strand breaks and DNA base damage in radiation-induced bystander responses in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines. Two CHO repair-deficient clones, xrs5 (DNA double strand break repair-deficient) and EM9 (DNA base excision repair-deficient) were used in addition to the wild type (CHO). The Gray Cancer Institute ultrasoft X-ray microprobe is a powerful tool for investigating the bystander response, because it permits the irradiation of only a single nucleus of a cell, as reported previously. In order to investigate the bystander effect in each repair-deficient cell line, we irradiated a single cell within a population and scored the formation of micronuclei. When a single nucleus in the population was targeted with 1 Gy, elevated numbers of micronuclei were induced in the neighbouring unirradiated cells in the EM9 and xrs5 cell lines, whereas induction was not observed in CHO. The induction of micronuclei in xrs5 was significantly higher than that in EM9. Under these conditions, the surviving fraction in the neighbouring cells was significantly lower in xrs5 than in the other cell lines, showing a higher cell killing effect in xrs5. To confirm that bystander factors secreted from irradiated cells caused these effects, we carried out medium transfer experiments using conventional X-irradiation. Medium conditioned for 24 h with irradiated cells was transferred to unirradiated cells and elevated induction of micronuclei was observed in xrs5. These results suggest that DNA double strand breaks rather than base damage are caused by factors secreted in the medium from irradiated cells

  2. Activation of a yeast replication origin near a double-stranded DNA break.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghuraman, M K; Brewer, B J; Fangman, W L

    1994-03-01

    Irradiation in the G1 phase of the cell cycle delays the onset of DNA synthesis and transiently inhibits the activation of replication origins in mammalian cells. It has been suggested that this inhibition is the result of the loss of torsional tension in the DNA after it has been damaged. Because irradiation causes DNA damage at an undefined number of nonspecific sites in the genome, it is not known how cells respond to limited DNA damage, and how replication origins in the immediate vicinity of a damage site would behave. Using the sequence-specific HO endonuclease, we have created a defined double-stranded DNA break in a centromeric plasmid in G1-arrested cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that replication does initiate at the origin on the cut plasmid, and that the plasmid replicates early in the S phase after linearization in vivo. These observations suggest that relaxation of a supercoiled DNA domain in yeast need not inactivate replication origins within that domain. Furthermore, these observations rule out the possibility that the late replication context associated with chromosomal termini is a consequence of DNA ends.

  3. DNA double-strand breaks in human induced pluripotent stem cell reprogramming and long-term in vitro culturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simara, Pavel; Tesarova, Lenka; Rehakova, Daniela; Matula, Pavel; Stejskal, Stanislav; Hampl, Ales; Koutna, Irena

    2017-03-21

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) play roles in both disease modelling and regenerative medicine. It is critical that the genomic integrity of the cells remains intact and that the DNA repair systems are fully functional. In this article, we focused on the detection of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by phosphorylated histone H2AX (known as γH2AX) and p53-binding protein 1 (53BP1) in three distinct lines of hiPSCs, their source cells, and one line of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). We measured spontaneously occurring DSBs throughout the process of fibroblast reprogramming and during long-term in vitro culturing. To assess the variations in the functionality of the DNA repair system among the samples, the number of DSBs induced by γ-irradiation and the decrease over time was analysed. The foci number was detected by fluorescence microscopy separately for the G1 and S/G2 cell cycle phases. We demonstrated that fibroblasts contained a low number of non-replication-related DSBs, while this number increased after reprogramming into hiPSCs and then decreased again after long-term in vitro passaging. The artificial induction of DSBs revealed that the repair mechanisms function well in the source cells and hiPSCs at low passages, but fail to recognize a substantial proportion of DSBs at high passages. Our observations suggest that cellular reprogramming increases the DSB number but that the repair mechanism functions well. However, after prolonged in vitro culturing of hiPSCs, the repair capacity decreases.

  4. Determination and analysis of site-specific 125I decay-induced DNA double-strand break end-group structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Kamal; Weinfeld, Michael; Neumann, Ronald D; Winters, Thomas A

    2007-02-01

    End groups contribute to the structural complexity of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). As such, end-group structures may affect a cell's ability to repair DSBs. The 3'-end groups of strand breaks caused by gamma radiation, or oxidative processes, under oxygenated aqueous conditions have been shown to be distributed primarily between 3'-phosphoglycolate and 3'-phosphate, with 5'-phosphate ends in both cases. In this study, end groups of the high-LET-like DSBs caused by 125I decay were investigated. Site-specific DNA double-strand breaks were produced in plasmid pTC27 in the presence or absence of 2 M DMSO by 125I-labeled triplex-forming oligonucleotide targeting. End-group structure was assessed enzymatically as a function of the DSB end to serve as a substrate for ligation and various forms of end labeling. Using this approach, we have demonstrated 3'-hydroxyl (3'-OH) and 3'-phosphate (3'-P) end groups and 5'-ends (> or = 42%) terminated by phosphate. A 32P postlabeling assay failed to detect 3'-phosphoglycolate in a restriction fragment terminated by the 125I-induced DNA double-strand break, and this is likely due to restricted oxygen diffusion during irradiation as a frozen aqueous solution. Even so, end-group structure and relative distribution varied as a function of the free radical scavenging capacity of the irradiation buffer.

  5. Nitric oxide mediated DNA double strand breaks induced in proliferating bystander cells after {alpha}-particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han Wei [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Chen Shaopeng [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Yu, K.N., E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Wu Lijun [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2010-02-03

    Low-dose {alpha}-particle exposures comprise 55% of the environmental dose to the human population and have been shown to induce bystander responses. Previous studies showed that bystander effect could induce stimulated cell growth or genotoxicity, such as excessive DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), micronuclei (MN), mutation and decreased cell viability, in the bystander cell population. In the present study, the stimulated cell growth, detected with flow cytometry (FCM), and the increased MN and DSB, detected with p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) immunofluorescence, were observed simultaneously in the bystander cell population, which were co-cultured with cells irradiated by low-dose {alpha}-particles (1-10 cGy) in a mixed system. Further studies indicated that nitric oxide (NO) and transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) played very important roles in mediating cell proliferation and inducing MN and DSB in the bystander population through treatments with NO scavenger and TGF-{beta}1 antibody. Low-concentrations of NO, generated by spermidine, were proved to induce cell proliferation, DSB and MN simultaneously. The proliferation or shortened cell cycle in bystander cells gave them insufficient time to repair DSBs. The increased cell division might increase the probability of carcinogenesis in bystander cells since cell proliferation increased the probability of mutation from the mis-repaired or un-repaired DSBs.

  6. Nitric oxide mediated DNA double strand breaks induced in proliferating bystander cells after α-particle irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Wei; Chen Shaopeng; Yu, K.N.; Wu Lijun

    2010-01-01

    Low-dose α-particle exposures comprise 55% of the environmental dose to the human population and have been shown to induce bystander responses. Previous studies showed that bystander effect could induce stimulated cell growth or genotoxicity, such as excessive DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), micronuclei (MN), mutation and decreased cell viability, in the bystander cell population. In the present study, the stimulated cell growth, detected with flow cytometry (FCM), and the increased MN and DSB, detected with p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) immunofluorescence, were observed simultaneously in the bystander cell population, which were co-cultured with cells irradiated by low-dose α-particles (1-10 cGy) in a mixed system. Further studies indicated that nitric oxide (NO) and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) played very important roles in mediating cell proliferation and inducing MN and DSB in the bystander population through treatments with NO scavenger and TGF-β1 antibody. Low-concentrations of NO, generated by spermidine, were proved to induce cell proliferation, DSB and MN simultaneously. The proliferation or shortened cell cycle in bystander cells gave them insufficient time to repair DSBs. The increased cell division might increase the probability of carcinogenesis in bystander cells since cell proliferation increased the probability of mutation from the mis-repaired or un-repaired DSBs.

  7. A polycomb group protein, PHF1, is involved in the response to DNA double-strand breaks in human cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Zehui; Jiang, Jie; Lan, Li; Nakajima, Satoshi; Kanno, Shin-ichiro; Koseki, Haruhiko; Yasui, Akira

    2008-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) represent the most toxic DNA damage arisen from endogenous and exogenous genotoxic stresses and are known to be repaired by either homologous recombination or nonhomologous end-joining processes. Although many proteins have been identified to participate in either of the processes, the whole processes still remain elusive. Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are epigenetic chromatin modifiers involved in gene silencing, cancer development and the maintenance of embryonic and adult stem cells. By screening proteins responding to DNA damage using laser micro-irradiation, we found that PHF1, a human homolog of Drosophila polycomb-like, Pcl, protein, was recruited to DSBs immediately after irradiation and dissociated within 10 min. The accumulation at DSBs is Ku70/Ku80-dependent, and knockdown of PHF1 leads to X-ray sensitivity and increases the frequency of homologous recombination in HeLa cell. We found that PHF1 interacts physically with Ku70/Ku80, suggesting that PHF1 promotes nonhomologous end-joining processes. Furthermore, we found that PHF1 interacts with a number of proteins involved in DNA damage responses, RAD50, SMC1, DHX9 and p53, further suggesting that PHF1, besides the function in PcG, is involved in genome maintenance processes. PMID:18385154

  8. The foci of DNA double strand break-recognition proteins localize with γH2AX after heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Mori, Eiichiro; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2010-01-01

    Recently, there have been many reports concerning proteins which can recognize DNA double strand break (DSBs), and such proteins include histone H2AX phosphorylated at serine 139 (γH2AX), ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) phospho-serine 1981, DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) phospho-threonine 2609, Nijmegen breakage syndrome 1 (NBS1) phospho-serine 343, checkpoint kinase 2 (CHK2), phospho-threonine 68, and structural maintenance of chromosomes 1 (SMC1) phospho-serine 966. Thus, it should be possible to follow the formation of DSBs and their repair using immunohistochemical methods with multiple antibodies to detect these proteins. When normal human fibroblasts (AG1522 cells) were exposed to 3 Gy of X-rays as a control, clearly discernable foci for these proteins were detected, and these foci localized with γH2AX foci. After heat treatment at 45.5 deg C for 20 min, these proteins are partially localized with γH2AX foci. Here we show that there were slight differences in the localization pattern among these proteins, such as a disappearance from the nucleus (phospho-ATM) and translocation to the cytoplasm (phospho-NBS1) at 30 min after heat treatment, and some foci (phospho-DNA-PKcs and phospho-CHK2) appeared at 8 h after heat treatment. These results are discussed from perspectives of heat-induced denaturation of proteins and formation of DSBs. (author)

  9. Dissimilar kinetic behavior of electrically manipulated single- and double-stranded DNA tethered to a gold surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rant, Ulrich; Arinaga, Kenji; Tornow, Marc; Kim, Yong Woon; Netz, Roland R; Fujita, Shozo; Yokoyama, Naoki; Abstreiter, Gerhard

    2006-05-15

    We report on the electrical manipulation of single- and double-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides that are end tethered to gold surfaces in electrolyte solution. The response to alternating repulsive and attractive electric surface fields is studied by time-resolved fluorescence measurements, revealing markedly distinct dynamics for the flexible single-stranded and stiff double-stranded DNA, respectively. Hydrodynamic simulations rationalize this finding and disclose two different kinetic mechanisms: stiff polymers undergo rotation around the anchoring pivot point; flexible polymers, on the other hand, are pulled onto the attracting surface segment by segment.

  10. The adsorption-desorption transition of double-stranded DNA interacting with an oppositely charged dendrimer induced by multivalent anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yangwei; Zhang, Dong; Zhang, Yaoyang; Deng, Zhenyu; Zhang, Linxi

    2014-05-28

    The adsorption-desorption transition of DNA in DNA-dendrimer solutions is observed when high-valence anions, such as hexavalent anions, are added to the DNA-dendrimer solutions. In the DNA-dendrimer solutions with low-valence anions, dendrimers bind tightly with the V-shaped double-stranded DNA. When high-valence anions, such as pentavalent or hexavalent anions, are added to the DNA-dendrimer solutions, the double-stranded DNA chains can be stretched straightly and the dendrimers are released from the double-stranded DNA chains. In fact, adding high-valence anions to the solutions can change the charge spatial distribution in the DNA-dendrimer solutions, and weaken the electrostatic interactions between the positively charged dendrimers and the oppositely charged DNA chains. Adsorption-desorption transition of DNA is induced by the overcharging of dendrimers. This investigation is capable of helping us understand how to control effectively the release of DNA in gene/drug delivery because an effective gene delivery for dendrimers includes non-covalent DNA-dendrimer binding and the effective release of DNA in gene therapy.

  11. Sequence specific electronic conduction through polyion-stabilized double-stranded DNA in nanoscale break junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahapatro, Ajit K; Jeong, Kyung J; Lee, Gil U; Janes, David B

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a study of sequence specific electronic conduction through short (15-base-pair) double-stranded (ds) DNA molecules, measured by immobilizing 3 ' -thiol-derivatized DNAs in nanometre scale gaps between gold electrodes. The polycation spermidine was used to stabilize the ds-DNA structure, allowing electrical measurements to be performed in a dry state. For specific sequences, the conductivity was observed to scale with the surface density of immobilized DNA, which can be controlled by the buffer concentration. A series of 15-base DNA oligonucleotide pairs, in which the centre sequence of five base pairs was changed from G:C to A:T pairs, has been studied. The conductivity per molecule is observed to decrease exponentially with the number of adjacent A:T pairs replacing G:C pairs, consistent with a barrier at the A:T sites. Conductance-based devices for short DNA sequences could provide sensing approaches with direct electrical readout, as well as label-free detection

  12. Thermodynamics for the Formation of Double-Stranded DNA-Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraki, Tomohiro; Tsuzuki, Akiko; Toshimitsu, Fumiyuki; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2016-03-24

    For the first time, the thermodynamics are described for the formation of double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA)-single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) hybrids. This treatment is applied to the exchange reaction of sodium cholate (SC) molecules on SWNTs and the ds-DNAs d(A)20 -d(T)20 and nuclear factor (NF)-κB decoy. UV/Vis/near-IR spectroscopy with temperature variations was used for analyzing the exchange reaction on the SWNTs with four different chiralities: (n,m)=(8,3), (6,5), (7,5), and (8,6). Single-stranded DNAs (ss-DNAs), including d(A)20 and d(T)20, are also used for comparison. The d(A)20-d(T)20 shows a drastic change in its thermodynamic parameters around the melting temperature (Tm ) of the DNA oligomer. No such Tm dependency was measured, owing to high Tm in the NF-κB decoy DNA and no Tm in the ss-DNA. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Tumor-treating fields elicit a conditional vulnerability to ionizing radiation via the downregulation of BRCA1 signaling and reduced DNA double-strand break repair capacity in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanam, Narasimha Kumar; Srinivasan, Kalayarasan; Ding, Lianghao; Sishc, Brock; Saha, Debabrata; Story, Michael D

    2017-03-30

    The use of tumor-treating fields (TTFields) has revolutionized the treatment of recurrent and newly diagnosed glioblastoma (GBM). TTFields are low-intensity, intermediate frequency, alternating electric fields that are applied to tumor regions and cells using non-invasive arrays. The predominant mechanism by which TTFields are thought to kill tumor cells is the disruption of mitosis. Using five non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines we found that there is a variable response in cell proliferation and cell killing between these NSCLC cell lines that was independent of p53 status. TTFields treatment increased the G2/M population, with a concomitant reduction in S-phase cells followed by the appearance of a sub-G1 population indicative of apoptosis. Temporal changes in gene expression during TTFields exposure was evaluated to identify molecular signaling changes underlying the differential TTFields response. The most differentially expressed genes were associated with the cell cycle and cell proliferation pathways. However, the expression of genes found within the BRCA1 DNA-damage response were significantly downregulated (Pionizing radiation resulted in increased chromatid aberrations and a reduced capacity to repair DNA DSBs, which were likely responsible for at least a portion of the enhanced cell killing seen with the combination. These findings suggest that TTFields induce a state of 'BRCAness' leading to a conditional susceptibility resulting in enhanced sensitivity to ionizing radiation and provides a strong rationale for the use of TTFields as a combined modality therapy with radiation or other DNA-damaging agents.

  14. GC-Rich Extracellular DNA Induces Oxidative Stress, Double-Strand DNA Breaks, and DNA Damage Response in Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyuk, Svetlana; Smirnova, Tatiana; Kameneva, Larisa; Porokhovnik, Lev; Speranskij, Anatolij; Ershova, Elizaveta; Stukalov, Sergey; Izevskaya, Vera; Veiko, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Cell free DNA (cfDNA) circulates throughout the bloodstream of both healthy people and patients with various diseases. CfDNA is substantially enriched in its GC-content as compared with human genomic DNA. Exposure of haMSCs to GC-DNA induces short-term oxidative stress (determined with H2DCFH-DA) and results in both single- and double-strand DNA breaks (comet assay and γH2AX, foci). As a result in the cells significantly increases the expression of repair genes (BRCA1 (RT-PCR), PCNA (FACS)) and antiapoptotic genes (BCL2 (RT-PCR and FACS), BCL2A1, BCL2L1, BIRC3, and BIRC2 (RT-PCR)). Under the action of GC-DNA the potential of mitochondria was increased. Here we show that GC-rich extracellular DNA stimulates adipocyte differentiation of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (haMSCs). Exposure to GC-DNA leads to an increase in the level of RNAPPARG2 and LPL (RT-PCR), in the level of fatty acid binding protein FABP4 (FACS analysis) and in the level of fat (Oil Red O). GC-rich fragments in the pool of cfDNA can potentially induce oxidative stress and DNA damage response and affect the direction of mesenchymal stem cells differentiation in human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Such a response may be one of the causes of obesity or osteoporosis.

  15. Elucidaton of DNA methylation changes in response to ionizng radiation induced double strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrlitz, Maren Linda

    2014-01-01

    would be an effect of overexpression or be indicative of a possible function in these nuclear subcompartments is yet to be elucidated. Additionally, by using flow cytometry analysis, exposure to IR and concomitant overexpression of TET2CD-GFP strongly induced 5hmC formation, therefore suggesting a function of TET2 in response to irradiation. Recruitment analysis showed that the TET2 catalytic domain was recruited to UV laser-induced but not X-rays- or heavy ion-induced damage sites. Endogenous TET2, which was analyzed in high TET2 expressing human fibroblasts, was recruited to damage sites after irradiation with heavy ions or X-rays. As 5hmC is the direct product of the catalytic activity of TET enzymes, local 5hmC formation and abundance at damage sites was investigated. It was observed that 5hmC accumulated at heavy ion- as well as X-ray-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). In addition, investigating 5hmC foci over time after irradiation with X-rays revealed that 5hmC formation and kinetics is similar to that of γH2AX foci, whereby every 5hmC focus co-localized with γH2AX. However, this did not hold true for all γH2AX foci, whose total number was always higher than that of 5hmC. Furthermore, 5hmC (and γH2AX) foci formation was almost unaffected by the inhibition of DNA-PKcs' enzymatic activity. Conversely, 5hmC and γH2AX foci persistence was significantly delayed after DNA-PKcs inhibition. Results obtained in this thesis show that DNA methylation changes (5hmC formation) take place within the time frame of one replication cycle after exposure to IR and that these changes can be observed at sites of DSBs. 5hmC at DSBs might be formed by the oxidative function of TET2, which was shown to be recruited to DSBs. However, involvement of the other TET enzymes in 5hmC production cannot be excluded. Therefore, these results suggest a role of 5hmC in the response to IR induced DSBs, whereby the here presented data suggest that the fast, radiation induced demethylation

  16. Elucidaton of DNA methylation changes in response to ionizng radiation induced double strand breaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrlitz, Maren Linda

    2014-07-04

    would be an effect of overexpression or be indicative of a possible function in these nuclear subcompartments is yet to be elucidated. Additionally, by using flow cytometry analysis, exposure to IR and concomitant overexpression of TET2CD-GFP strongly induced 5hmC formation, therefore suggesting a function of TET2 in response to irradiation. Recruitment analysis showed that the TET2 catalytic domain was recruited to UV laser-induced but not X-rays- or heavy ion-induced damage sites. Endogenous TET2, which was analyzed in high TET2 expressing human fibroblasts, was recruited to damage sites after irradiation with heavy ions or X-rays. As 5hmC is the direct product of the catalytic activity of TET enzymes, local 5hmC formation and abundance at damage sites was investigated. It was observed that 5hmC accumulated at heavy ion- as well as X-ray-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). In addition, investigating 5hmC foci over time after irradiation with X-rays revealed that 5hmC formation and kinetics is similar to that of γH2AX foci, whereby every 5hmC focus co-localized with γH2AX. However, this did not hold true for all γH2AX foci, whose total number was always higher than that of 5hmC. Furthermore, 5hmC (and γH2AX) foci formation was almost unaffected by the inhibition of DNA-PKcs' enzymatic activity. Conversely, 5hmC and γH2AX foci persistence was significantly delayed after DNA-PKcs inhibition. Results obtained in this thesis show that DNA methylation changes (5hmC formation) take place within the time frame of one replication cycle after exposure to IR and that these changes can be observed at sites of DSBs. 5hmC at DSBs might be formed by the oxidative function of TET2, which was shown to be recruited to DSBs. However, involvement of the other TET enzymes in 5hmC production cannot be excluded. Therefore, these results suggest a role of 5hmC in the response to IR induced DSBs, whereby the here presented data suggest that the fast, radiation induced

  17. Nanoneedle insertion into the cell nucleus does not induce double-strand breaks in chromosomal DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Seunghwan; Kawamura, Ryuzo; Naka, Ryohei; Silberberg, Yaron R; Nakamura, Noriyuki; Nakamura, Chikashi

    2013-09-01

    An atomic force microscope probe can be formed into an ultra-sharp cylindrical shape (a nanoneedle) using micro-fabrication techniques such as focused ion beam etching. This nanoneedle can be effectively inserted through the plasma membrane of a living cell to not only access the cytosol, but also to penetrate through the nuclear membrane. This technique shows great potential as a tool for performing intranuclear measurements and manipulations. Repeated insertions of a nanoneedle into a live cell were previously shown not to affect cell viability. However, the effect of nanoneedle insertion on the nucleus and nuclear components is still unknown. DNA is the most crucial component of the nucleus for proper cell function and may be physically damaged by a nanoneedle. To investigate the integrity of DNA following nanoneedle insertion, the occurrence of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) was assessed. The results showed that there was no chromosomal DNA damage due to nanoneedle insertion into the nucleus, as indicated by the expression level of γ-H2AX, a molecular marker of DSBs. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Virtual Cross-Linking of the Active Nemorubicin Metabolite PNU-159682 to Double-Stranded DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalabrin, Matteo; Quintieri, Luigi; Palumbo, Manlio; Riccardi Sirtori, Federico; Gatto, Barbara

    2017-02-20

    The DNA alkylating mechanism of PNU-159682 (PNU), a highly potent metabolite of the anthracycline nemorubicin, was investigated by gel-electrophoretic, HPLC-UV, and micro-HPLC/mass spectrometry (MS) measurements. PNU quickly reacted with double-stranded oligonucleotides, but not with single-stranded sequences, to form covalent adducts which were detectable by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (DPAGE). Ion-pair reverse-phase HPLC-UV analysis on CG rich duplex sequences having a 5'-CCCGGG-3' central core showed the formation of two types of adducts with PNU, which were stable and could be characterized by micro-HPLC/MS. The first type contained one alkylated species (and possibly one reversibly bound species), and the second contained two alkylated species per duplex DNA. The covalent adducts were found to produce effective bridging of DNA complementary strands through the formation of virtual cross-links reminiscent of those produced by classical anthracyclines in the presence of formaldehyde. Furthermore, the absence of reactivity of PNU with CG-rich sequence containing a TA core (CGTACG), and the minor reactivity between PNU and CGC sequences (TACGCG·CGCGTA) pointed out the importance of guanine sequence context in modulating DNA alkylation.

  19. DNA double strand breaks and Hsp70 expression in proton irradiated living cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiedler, Anja; Reinert, Tilo; Tanner, Judith; Butz, Tilman

    2007-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in living cells can be directly provoked by ionising radiation. DSBs can be visualized by immunostaining the phosphorylated histone γH2AX. Our concern was to test the feasibility of γH2AX staining for a direct visualization of single proton hits. If single protons produce detectable foci, DNA DSBs could be used as 'biological track detectors' for protons. Ionising radiation can also damage proteins indirectly by inducing free radicals. Heat shock proteins (Hsp) help to refold or even degrade the damaged proteins. The level of the most famous heat shock protein Hsp70 is increased by ionising radiation. We investigated the expression of γH2AX and Hsp70 after cross and line patterned irradiation with counted numbers of 2.25 MeV protons on primary human skin fibroblasts. The proton induced DSBs appear more delocalised than it was expected by the ion hit accuracy. Cooling the cells before the irradiation reduces the delocalisation of DNA DSBs, which is probably caused by the reduced diffusion of DNA damaging agents. Proton irradiation seems to provoke protein damages mainly in the cytoplasm indicated by cytoplasmic Hsp70 aggregates. On the contrary, in control heat shocked cells the Hsp70 was predominantly localized in the cell nucleus. However, the irradiated area could not be recognized, all cells on the Si 3 N 4 window showed a homogenous Hsp70 expression pattern

  20. DNA double strand breaks and Hsp70 expression in proton irradiated living cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedler, Anja [Institute for Experimental Physics II, University of Leipzig (Germany) and Faculty of Biology, Pharmacy and Psychology, University of Leipzig (Germany)]. E-mail: afiedler@uni-leipzig.de; Reinert, Tilo [Institute for Experimental Physics II, University of Leipzig (Germany); Tanner, Judith [Clinic and Polyclinic for Radiation Oncology, University of Halle-Wittenberg (Germany); Butz, Tilman [Institute for Experimental Physics II, University of Leipzig (Germany)

    2007-07-15

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in living cells can be directly provoked by ionising radiation. DSBs can be visualized by immunostaining the phosphorylated histone {gamma}H2AX. Our concern was to test the feasibility of {gamma}H2AX staining for a direct visualization of single proton hits. If single protons produce detectable foci, DNA DSBs could be used as 'biological track detectors' for protons. Ionising radiation can also damage proteins indirectly by inducing free radicals. Heat shock proteins (Hsp) help to refold or even degrade the damaged proteins. The level of the most famous heat shock protein Hsp70 is increased by ionising radiation. We investigated the expression of {gamma}H2AX and Hsp70 after cross and line patterned irradiation with counted numbers of 2.25 MeV protons on primary human skin fibroblasts. The proton induced DSBs appear more delocalised than it was expected by the ion hit accuracy. Cooling the cells before the irradiation reduces the delocalisation of DNA DSBs, which is probably caused by the reduced diffusion of DNA damaging agents. Proton irradiation seems to provoke protein damages mainly in the cytoplasm indicated by cytoplasmic Hsp70 aggregates. On the contrary, in control heat shocked cells the Hsp70 was predominantly localized in the cell nucleus. However, the irradiated area could not be recognized, all cells on the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} window showed a homogenous Hsp70 expression pattern.

  1. Cell lines derived from a Medaka radiation-sensitive mutant have defects in DNA double-strand break responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidaka, Masayuki; Oda, Shoji; Mitani, Hiroshi; Kuwahara, Yoshikazu; Fukumoto, Manabu

    2010-01-01

    It was reported that the radiation-sensitive Medaka mutant 'ric1' has a defect in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by γ-rays during early embryogenesis. To study the cellular response of a ric1 mutant to ionizing radiation (IR), we established the mutant embryonic cell lines RIC1-e9, RIC1-e42, RIC1-e43. Following exposure to γ-irradiation, the DSBs in wild-type cells were repaired within 1 h, while those in RIC1 cells were not rejoined even after 2 h. Cell death was induced in the wild-type cells with cell fragmentation, but only a small proportion of the RIC1 cells underwent cell death, and without cell fragmentation. Although both wild-type and RIC1 cells showed mitotic inhibition immediately after γ-irradiation, cell division was much slower to resume in the wild-type cells (20 h versus 12 h). In both wild-type and RIC1 cells, Ser139 phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX) foci were formed after γ-irradiation, however, the γH2AX foci disappeared more quickly in the RIC1 cell lines. These results suggest that the instability of γH2AX foci in RIC1 cells cause an aberration of the DNA damage response. As RIC1 cultured cells showed similar defective DNA repair as ric1 embryos and RIC1 cells revealed defective cell death and cell cycle checkpoint, they are useful for investigating DNA damage responses in vitro. (author)

  2. Variations in the Processing of DNA Double-Strand Breaks Along 60-MeV Therapeutic Proton Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhary, Pankaj; Marshall, Thomas I. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Currell, Frederick J. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Kacperek, Andrzej [Douglas Cyclotron, Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Bebbington, Wirral (United Kingdom); Schettino, Giuseppe, E-mail: giuseppe.schettino@npl.co.uk [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington (United Kingdom); Prise, Kevin M. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the variations in induction and repair of DNA damage along the proton path, after a previous report on the increasing biological effectiveness along clinically modulated 60-MeV proton beams. Methods and Materials: Human skin fibroblast (AG01522) cells were irradiated along a monoenergetic and a modulated spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) proton beam used for treating ocular melanoma at the Douglas Cyclotron, Clatterbridge Centre for Oncology, Wirral, Liverpool, United Kingdom. The DNA damage response was studied using the 53BP1 foci formation assay. The linear energy transfer (LET) dependence was studied by irradiating the cells at depths corresponding to entrance, proximal, middle, and distal positions of SOBP and the entrance and peak position for the pristine beam. Results: A significant amount of persistent foci was observed at the distal end of the SOBP, suggesting complex residual DNA double-strand break damage induction corresponding to the highest LET values achievable by modulated proton beams. Unlike the directly irradiated, medium-sharing bystander cells did not show any significant increase in residual foci. Conclusions: The DNA damage response along the proton beam path was similar to the response of X rays, confirming the low-LET quality of the proton exposure. However, at the distal end of SOBP our data indicate an increased complexity of DNA lesions and slower repair kinetics. A lack of significant induction of 53BP1 foci in the bystander cells suggests a minor role of cell signaling for DNA damage under these conditions.

  3. Fine resolution mapping of double-strand break sites for human ribosomal DNA units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard J. Pope

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available DNA breakage arises during a variety of biological processes, including transcription, replication and genome rearrangements. In the context of disease, extensive fragmentation of DNA has been described in cancer cells and during early stages of neurodegeneration (Stephens et al., 2011 Stephens et al. (2011 [5]; Blondet et al., 2001 Blondet et al. (2001 [1]. Stults et al. (2009 Stults et al. (2009 [6] reported that human rDNA gene clusters are hotspots for recombination and that rDNA restructuring is among the most common chromosomal alterations in adult solid tumours. As such, analysis of rDNA regions is likely to have significant prognostic and predictive value, clinically. Tchurikov et al. (2015a, 2016 Tchurikov et al. (2015a, 2016 [7,9] have made major advances in this direction, reporting that sites of human genome double-strand breaks (DSBs occur frequently at sites in rDNA that are tightly linked with active transcription - the authors used a RAFT (rapid amplification of forum termini protocol that selects for blunt-ended sites. They reported the relative frequency of these rDNA DSBs within defined co-ordinate ‘windows’ of varying size and made these data (as well as the relevant ‘raw’ sequencing information available to the public (Tchurikov et al., 2015b. Assay designs targeting rDNA DSB hotspots will benefit greatly from the publication of break sites at greater resolution. Here, we re-analyse public RAFT data and make available rDNA DSB co-ordinates to the single-nucleotide level.

  4. Elevated Subclinical Double-Stranded DNA Antibodies and Future Proliferative Lupus Nephritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jessica J.; Prince, Lisa K.; Baker, Thomas P.; Papadopoulos, Patricia; Edison, Jess; Abbott, Kevin C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Elevated anti–double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) antibody and C-reactive protein are associated with proliferative lupus nephritis (PLN). Progression of quantitative anti-dsDNA antibody in patients with PLN has not been compared with that in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) without LN before diagnosis. The temporal relationship between anti-dsDNA antibody and C-reactive protein elevation has also not been evaluated. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This case-control Department of Defense Serum Repository (established in 1985) study compared longitudinal prediagnostic quantitative anti-dsDNA antibody and C-reactive protein levels in 23 patients with biopsy-proven PLN (Walter Reed Army Medical Center, 1993–2009) with levels in 21 controls with SLE but without LN matched for patient age, sex, race, and age of serum sample. The oldest (median, 2601 days; 25%, 1245 days, 75%, 3075 days), the second to last (368; 212, 635 days), and the last (180; 135, 477 days) serum sample before diagnosis were analyzed. Results More patients with PLN had an elevated anti-dsDNA antibody level than did the matched controls at any point (78% versus 5%; P4 years (33% versus 0%; P=0.04) before diagnosis. A rate of increase >1 IU/ml per year (70% versus 0%; P<0.001) was most specific for PLN. The anti-dsDNA antibody levels increased before C-reactive protein did in most patients with an antecedent elevation (92% versus 8%; P<0.001). Conclusions Elevated anti-dsDNA antibody usually precedes both clinical and subclinical evidence of proliferative LN, which suggests direct pathogenicity. Absolute anti-dsDNA antibody level and rate of increase could better establish risk of future PLN in patients with SLE. PMID:23833315

  5. Accelerated heavy ions induced DNA double-strand breaks in yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akpa, T.C.

    1993-01-01

    Yeast cells of strain cerevisiae, were irradiated with monoenergetic heavy ions, X-rays and α particles and assayed for DNA double-strand breaks and cell survival. The method of neutral sucrose gradient velocity sedimentation was used for all heavy-ion experiments because it is a well established technique.The method of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used for X-rays, α particles and argon ions. Results show that within the range of LET of the particles used (300 - 10 5 KeV/μm) the induction cross-section for DNA double-strand break is constant between 300 and around 7000 KeV/μm and increases at higher LET values. The inactivation cross-section follow the same trend. The DSB-induction and inactivation cross-section was shown to be linearly related with a slope of (1.01±0.15)/109 gmol-i. The RBE for DSB -induced decreases with LET and tails off at high LET values also. These results when compared with results from literature shows that the trend of induction is first monotonic rise of rate of DSB-induction up to 100keV/μm, followed by a plateau and a further rise which is due to increased effect of energetic γ-rays formed as shown for survival studies and predicted is possible to separate the cell DNA contents into 13 to 15 chromosome bands. The relative decrease in DNA content of the first band as determined by ethidium bromide-UV fluorescence decreases exponentially. The cross-section for DSB-induction determined by this method are (9.8±0.01)dsb/10 12 gmol - 1 Gy - 1, for 80 kV X-rays in haploid 211 yeast strain; (0.04+0.003)dsb/109gmol - 1μm 2 for Am-radioisotope α particles in haploid cells, (0.184±0.034) dsb/10 9 gmol - 1μm 2 in diploid 211*B cells and (0.55±0.04) dsb/10 9 gmol - 1μm 2 for 7MeV Argon ion in the diploid cells. The values are comparable to those obtained with velocity sedimentation technique. However, the reason for the low value obtained for a particle induced DSB in haploid cells is not clear

  6. Molecular mechanism of protein assembly on DNA double-strand breaks in the non-homologous end-joining pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Ken-ichi; Morotomi-Yano, Keiko; Adachi, Noritaka; Akiyama, Hidenori

    2009-01-01

    Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) is the major repair pathway for DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in mammalian species. Upon DSB induction, a living cell quickly activates the NHEJ pathway comprising of multiple molecular events. However, it has been difficult to analyze the initial phase of DSB responses in living cells, primarily due to technical limitations. Recent advances in real-time imaging and site-directed DSB induction using laser microbeam allow us to monitor the spatiotemporal dynamics of NHEJ factors in the immediate-early phase after DSB induction. These new approaches, together with the use of cell lines deficient in each essential NHEJ factor, provide novel mechanistic insights into DSB recognition and protein assembly on DSBs in the NHEJ pathway. In this review, we provide an overview of recent progresses in the imaging analyses of the NHEJ core factors. These studies strongly suggest that the NHEJ core factors are pre-assembled into a large complex on DSBs prior to the progression of the biochemical reactions in the NHEJ pathway. Instead of the traditional step-by-step assembly model from the static view of NHEJ, a novel model for dynamic protein assembly in the NHEJ pathway is proposed. This new model provides important mechanistic insights into the protein assembly at DSBs and the regulation of DSB repair. (author)

  7. Evaluation of the neutral comet assay for detection of alpha-particle induced DNA-double-strand-breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofbauer, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    Aim of this study was to differentiate DNA-double-strand-breaks from DNA-single-strand-breaks on a single cell level, using the comet assay after α- and γ-irradiation. Americium-241 was used as a alpha-irradiation-source, Caesium-137 was used for γ-irradiation. Because of technical problems with both the neutral and alkaline comet assay after irradiation of gastric cancer cells and human lymphocytes, no definite differentiation of DNA-damage was possible.

  8. Radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in Ehrlich ascites tumour cells and their possible effects on cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloecher, D.

    1981-01-01

    A method to prepare high-molecular, pure DNA with the aid of enzymes, detergents, and heat treatment is presented. A sedimentation technique with neutral density gradients has been introduced which permits mass separation and molecular mass analysis of high-molecular DNA (msub(r) 10 ). Using this method, the induction of DNA double strand breaks (DSB) in the dose range between 10 Gy [de

  9. A mathematical model for the detection mechanism of DNA double-strand breaks depending on autophosphorylation of ATM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouri, Kazunari; Nacher, Jose C; Akutsu, Tatsuya

    2009-01-01

    After IR stress, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) occur and repair proteins (RPs) bind to them, generating DSB-RP complexes (DSBCs), which results in repaired DSBs (RDSBs). In recent experimental studies, it is suggested that the ATM proteins detect these DNA lesions depending on the autophosphorylation of ATM which exists as a dimer before phosphorylation. Interestingly, the ATM proteins can work as a sensor for a small number of DSBs (approximately 18 DSBs in a cell after exposure to IR). Thus the ATM proteins amplify the small input signals based on the phosphorylation of the ATM dimer proteins. The true DSB-detection mechanism depending on ATM autophosphorylation has yet to be clarified. We propose a mathematical model for the detection mechanism of DSBs by ATM. Our model includes both a DSB-repair mechanism and an ATM-phosphorylation mechanism. We model the former mechanism as a stochastic process, and obtain theoretical mean values of DSBs and DSBCs. In the latter mechanism, it is known that ATM autophosphorylates itself, and we find that the autophosphorylation induces bifurcation of the phosphorylated ATM (ATM*). The bifurcation diagram depends on the total concentration of ATM, which makes three types of steady state diagrams of ATM*: monostable, reversible bistable, and irreversible bistable. Bistability exists depending on the Hill coefficient in the equation of ATM autophosphorylation, and it emerges as the total concentration of ATM increases. Combining these two mechanisms, we find that ATM* exhibits switch-like behaviour in the presence of bistability, and the detection time after DNA damage decreases when the total concentration of ATM increases. This work provides a mathematical model that explains the DSB-detection mechanism depending on ATM autophosphorylation. These results indicate that positive auto-regulation works both as a sensor and amplifier of small input signals.

  10. Effect of Chromatin Structure on the Extent and Distribution of DNA Double Strand Breaks Produced by Ionizing Radiation; Comparative Study of hESC and Differentiated Cells Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Priyanka; Panyutin, Irina V; Remeeva, Evgenia; Neumann, Ronald D; Panyutin, Igor G

    2016-01-02

    Chromatin structure affects the extent of DNA damage and repair. Thus, it has been shown that heterochromatin is more protective against DNA double strand breaks (DSB) formation by ionizing radiation (IR); and that DNA DSB repair may proceed differently in hetero- and euchromatin regions. Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) have a more open chromatin structure than differentiated cells. Here, we study the effect of chromatin structure in hESC on initial DSB formation and subsequent DSB repair. DSB were scored by comet assay; and DSB repair was assessed by repair foci formation via 53BP1 antibody staining. We found that in hESC, heterochromatin is confined to distinct regions, while in differentiated cells it is distributed more evenly within the nuclei. The same dose of ionizing radiation produced considerably more DSB in hESC than in differentiated derivatives, normal human fibroblasts; and one cancer cell line. At the same time, the number of DNA repair foci were not statistically different among these cells. We showed that in hESC, DNA repair foci localized almost exclusively outside the heterochromatin regions. We also noticed that exposure to ionizing radiation resulted in an increase in heterochromatin marker H3K9me3 in cancer HT1080 cells, and to a lesser extent in IMR90 normal fibroblasts, but not in hESCs. These results demonstrate the importance of chromatin conformation for DNA protection and DNA damage repair; and indicate the difference of these processes in hESC.

  11. Double-stranded DNA-dependent ATPase Irc3p is directly involved in mitochondrial genome maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedman, Tiina; Gaidutšik, Ilja; Villemson, Karin; Hou, YingJian; Sedman, Juhan

    2014-12-01

    Nucleic acid-dependent ATPases are involved in nearly all aspects of DNA and RNA metabolism. Previous studies have described a number of mitochondrial helicases. However, double-stranded DNA-dependent ATPases, including translocases or enzymes remodeling DNA-protein complexes, have not been identified in mitochondria of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisae. Here, we demonstrate that Irc3p is a mitochondrial double-stranded DNA-dependent ATPase of the Superfamily II. In contrast to the other mitochondrial Superfamily II enzymes Mss116p, Suv3p and Mrh4p, which are RNA helicases, Irc3p has a direct role in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance. Specific Irc3p-dependent mtDNA metabolic intermediates can be detected, including high levels of double-stranded DNA breaks that accumulate in irc3Δ mutants. irc3Δ-related topology changes in rho- mtDNA can be reversed by the deletion of mitochondrial RNA polymerase RPO41, suggesting that Irc3p counterbalances adverse effects of transcription on mitochondrial genome stability. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. De novo-engineered transcription activator-like effector (TALE) hybrid nuclease with novel DNA binding specificity creates double-strand breaks

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2011-01-24

    Site-specific and rare cutting nucleases are valuable tools for genome engineering. The generation of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) promotes homologous recombination in eukaryotes and can facilitate gene targeting, additions, deletions, and inactivation. Zinc finger nucleases have been used to generate DSBs and subsequently, for genome editing but with low efficiency and reproducibility. The transcription activator-like family of type III effectors (TALEs) contains a central domain of tandem repeats that could be engineered to bind specific DNA targets. Here, we report the generation of a Hax3-based hybrid TALE nuclease with a user-selected DNA binding specificity. We show that the engineered TALE nuclease can bind to its target sequence in vitro and that the homodimeric TALE nuclease can cleave double-stranded DNA in vitro if the DNA binding sites have the proper spacing and orientation. Transient expression assays in tobacco leaves suggest that the hybrid nuclease creates DSB in its target sequence, which is subsequently repaired by nonhomologous end-joining repair. Taken together, our data show the feasibility of engineering TALE-based hybrid nucleases capable of generating site-specific DSBs and the great potential for site-specific genome modification in plants and eukaryotes in general.

  13. Small Rad51 and Dmc1 Complexes Often Co-occupy Both Ends of a Meiotic DNA Double Strand Break.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Scott Brown

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Eukaryotic RecA-like proteins Rad51 and Dmc1 cooperate during meiosis to promote recombination between homologous chromosomes by repairing programmed DNA double strand breaks (DSBs. Previous studies showed that Rad51 and Dmc1 form partially overlapping co-foci. Here we show these Rad51-Dmc1 co-foci are often arranged in pairs separated by distances of up to 400 nm. Paired co-foci remain prevalent when DSBs are dramatically reduced or when strand exchange or synapsis is blocked. Super-resolution dSTORM microscopy reveals that individual foci observed by conventional light microscopy are often composed of two or more substructures. The data support a model in which the two tracts of ssDNA formed by a single DSB separate from one another by distances of up to 400 nm, with both tracts often bound by one or more short (about 100 nt Rad51 filaments and also by one or more short Dmc1 filaments.

  14. Radiation dose determines the method for quantification of DNA double strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulat, Tanja; Keta, Olitija; Korićanac, Lela; Žakula, Jelena; Petrović, Ivan; Ristić-Fira, Aleksandra; Todorović, Danijela

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) that trigger phosphorylation of the histone protein H2AX (γH2AX). Immunofluorescent staining visualizes formation of γH2AX foci, allowing their quantification. This method, as opposed to Western blot assay and Flow cytometry, provides more accurate analysis, by showing exact position and intensity of fluorescent signal in each single cell. In practice there are problems in quantification of γH2AX. This paper is based on two issues: the determination of which technique should be applied concerning the radiation dose, and how to analyze fluorescent microscopy images obtained by different microscopes. HTB140 melanoma cells were exposed to γ-rays, in the dose range from 1 to 16 Gy. Radiation effects on the DNA level were analyzed at different time intervals after irradiation by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence microscopy. Immunochemically stained cells were visualized with two types of microscopes: AxioVision (Zeiss, Germany) microscope, comprising an ApoTome software, and AxioImagerA1 microscope (Zeiss, Germany). Obtained results show that the level of γH2AX is time and dose dependent. Immunofluorescence microscopy provided better detection of DSBs for lower irradiation doses, while Western blot analysis was more reliable for higher irradiation doses. AxioVision microscope containing ApoTome software was more suitable for the detection of γH2AX foci. (author)

  15. Radiation dose determines the method for quantification of DNA double strand breaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulat, Tanja; Keta, Olitija; Korićanac, Lela; Žakula, Jelena; Petrović, Ivan; Ristić-Fira, Aleksandra [University of Belgrade, Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Serbia); Todorović, Danijela, E-mail: dtodorovic@medf.kg.ac.rs [University of Kragujevac, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kragujevac (Serbia)

    2016-03-15

    Ionizing radiation induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) that trigger phosphorylation of the histone protein H2AX (γH2AX). Immunofluorescent staining visualizes formation of γH2AX foci, allowing their quantification. This method, as opposed to Western blot assay and Flow cytometry, provides more accurate analysis, by showing exact position and intensity of fluorescent signal in each single cell. In practice there are problems in quantification of γH2AX. This paper is based on two issues: the determination of which technique should be applied concerning the radiation dose, and how to analyze fluorescent microscopy images obtained by different microscopes. HTB140 melanoma cells were exposed to γ-rays, in the dose range from 1 to 16 Gy. Radiation effects on the DNA level were analyzed at different time intervals after irradiation by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence microscopy. Immunochemically stained cells were visualized with two types of microscopes: AxioVision (Zeiss, Germany) microscope, comprising an ApoTome software, and AxioImagerA1 microscope (Zeiss, Germany). Obtained results show that the level of γH2AX is time and dose dependent. Immunofluorescence microscopy provided better detection of DSBs for lower irradiation doses, while Western blot analysis was more reliable for higher irradiation doses. AxioVision microscope containing ApoTome software was more suitable for the detection of γH2AX foci. (author)

  16. Detection of heavy ion induced DNA double-strand breaks using static-field gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taucher-Scholz, G.; Heilmann, J.; Schneider, G.; Kraft, G.

    1994-11-01

    Radiation induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) were measured in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1) using an experimental protocol involving static-field gel electrophoresis following exposure to various accelerated ions. Dose-effect curves were set up and relative biological efficiencies (RBEs) for DSB induction were determined for different radiation qualities. RBEs around 1 were obtained for low energy deuterons (6-7 keV/μm), while for high energy oxygen ions (20 keV/μm) an RBE value slightly greater than 1 was determined. Low energetic oxygen ions (LET ∼ 250 keV/μm) were found to show RBEs substantially below unity, and for higher LET particles (≥ 250 keV/μm) RBEs for DSB induction were generally found to be smaller than 1. The data presented here are in line with the generally accepted view that not induced DSBs, but misrepaired or unrepaired DNA-lesions are related to cellular inactivation. (orig.)

  17. Radiation-induced double-strand breaks in mammalian DNA: influence of temperature and DMSO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmroth, K; Nygren, J; Erkell, L J; Hultborn, R

    2000-11-01

    To investigate the effects of subphysiological irradiation temperature (2 28 degrees C) and the influence of the radical scavenger DMSO on the induction of double-strand breaks (DSB) in chromosomal DNA from a human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) as well as in intact cells. The rejoining of DSB in cells irradiated at 2 degrees C or 37 degrees C was also investigated. Agarose plugs with [14C]thymidine labelled MCF-7 cells were lysed in EDTA-NLS-proteinase-K buffer. The plugs containing chromosomal DNA were irradiated with X-rays under different temperatures and scavenging conditions. Intact MCF-7 cells were irradiated in Petri dishes and plugs were made. The cells were then lysed in EDTA-NLS-proteinase-K buffer. The induction of DSB was studied by constant field gel electrophoresis and expressed as DSB/100/Mbp, calculated from the fraction of activity released into the gel. The induction of DSB in chromosomal DNA was reduced by a decrease in temperature. This protective effect of low temperature was inhibited when the DNA was irradiated in the presence of DMSO. No difference was found when intact cells were irradiated at different temperatures. However, the rapid phase of rejoining was slower in cells irradiated at 37 degrees C than at 2 degrees C. The induction of DSB in naked DNA was reduced by hypothermic irradiation. The temperature had no influence on the induction of DSB in the presence of a high concentration of DMSO, indicating that the temperature effect is mediated via the indirect effects of ionizing radiation. Results are difficult to interpret in intact cells. Rejoining during irradiation at the higher temperature may counteract an increased induction. The difference in rejoining may be interpreted in terms of qualitative differences between breaks induced at the two temperatures.

  18. Transformation frequency of γ irradiated plasmid DNA and the enzymatic double strand break formation by incubation in a protein extract of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, D.; Mark, F.; Ventur, Y.

    1994-01-01

    It was found that incubation of γ-irradiated or DNaseI-treated plasmid DNA in a protein extract of Escherichia coli leads to enzyme-induced formation of double strand breaks (dsb) in competition with repair of precursors of these dsb. A survival curve of the plasmid DNA (as determined by transformation of E. coli) was calculated on the basis of enzyme-induced dsb as well as those produced by irradiation assuming that they are lethal. The calculated D O value was the same as that measured directly by transformation of irradiated plasmid DNA. Two models are presented that fit the experimental survival data as a function of dose. One is based on damage formation in the plasmid DNA including enzymatic conversion of single strand damage into dsb (U-model), the other is an enzymatic repair saturation model based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics. (Author)

  19. Modeling the yield of double-strand breaks due to formation of multiply damaged sites in irradiated plasmid DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xapsos, M.A.; Pogozelski, W.K.

    1996-01-01

    Although double-strand breaks have long been recognized as an important type of DNa lesion, it is well established that this broad class of damage does not correlate well with indicators of the effectiveness of radiation as the cellular level. Assays of double-strand breaks do not distinguish the degree of complexity or clustering of singly damaged sites produced in a single energy deposition event, which is currently hypothesized to be key to understanding cellular end points. As a step toward this understanding, double-strand breaks that are formed proportionally to dose in plasmid DNA are analyzed from the mechanistic aspect to evaluate the yield that arises from multiply damaged sites as hypothesized by Ward (Prog. Nucleic Acid Res. Mol. Biol. 35, 95-125, 1988) and Goodhead (Int. J. Radiat. Biol. 65, 7-17, 1994) as opposed to the yield that arises form single hydroxyl radicals as hypothesized by Siddiqi and Bothe (Radiat. Res. 112, 449-463, 1987). For low-LET radiation such as γ rays, the importance of multiply damaged sites is shown to increase with the solution's hydroxyl radical scavenging capacity. For moderately high-LET radiation such as 100 keV/μm helium ions, a much different behavior is observed. In this case, a large fraction of double-strand breaks are formed as a result of multiply damaged sties over a broad range of scavenging conditions. Results also indicate that the RBE for common cellular end points correlates more closely with the RBE for common cellular end points correlates more closely with the RBE for multiply damaged sites than with the RBE for total double-strand breaks over a range of LET up to at least 100 keV/μm. 22 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Mouse but not human embryonic stem cells are deficient in rejoining of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañuelos, C A; Banáth, J P; MacPhail, S H; Zhao, J; Eaves, C A; O'Connor, M D; Lansdorp, P M; Olive, P L

    2008-09-01

    Mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells will give rise to all of the cells of the adult mouse, but they failed to rejoin half of the DNA double-strand breaks (dsb) produced by high doses of ionizing radiation. A deficiency in DNA-PK(cs) appears to be responsible since mES cells expressed strand breaks more rapidly. Consistent with more rapid dsb rejoining, H2AX(-/-) mES cells also expressed 6 times more DNA-PK(cs) than wild-type mES cells. Similar results were obtained for ATM(-/-) mES cells. Differentiation of mES cells led to an increase in DNA-PK(cs), an increase in dsb rejoining rate, and a decrease in Ku70/80. Unlike mouse ES, human ES cells were proficient in rejoining of dsb and expressed high levels of DNA-PK(cs). These results confirm the importance of homologous recombination in the accurate repair of double-strand breaks in mES cells, they help explain the chromosome abnormalities associated with deficiencies in H2AX and ATM, and they add to the growing list of differences in the way rodent and human cells deal with DNA damage.

  1. Transcription-associated processes cause DNA double-strand breaks and translocations in neural stem/progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwer, Bjoern; Wei, Pei-Chi; Chang, Amelia N; Kao, Jennifer; Du, Zhou; Meyers, Robin M; Alt, Frederick W

    2016-02-23

    High-throughput, genome-wide translocation sequencing (HTGTS) studies of activated B cells have revealed that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) capable of translocating to defined bait DSBs are enriched around the transcription start sites (TSSs) of active genes. We used the HTGTS approach to investigate whether a similar phenomenon occurs in primary neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs). We report that breakpoint junctions indeed are enriched around TSSs that were determined to be active by global run-on sequencing analyses of NSPCs. Comparative analyses of transcription profiles in NSPCs and B cells revealed that the great majority of TSS-proximal junctions occurred in genes commonly expressed in both cell types, possibly because this common set has higher transcription levels on average than genes transcribed in only one or the other cell type. In the latter context, among all actively transcribed genes containing translocation junctions in NSPCs, those with junctions located within 2 kb of the TSS show a significantly higher transcription rate on average than genes with junctions in the gene body located at distances greater than 2 kb from the TSS. Finally, analysis of repair junction signatures of TSS-associated translocations in wild-type versus classical nonhomologous end-joining (C-NHEJ)-deficient NSPCs reveals that both C-NHEJ and alternative end-joining pathways can generate translocations by joining TSS-proximal DSBs to DSBs on other chromosomes. Our studies show that the generation of transcription-associated DSBs is conserved across divergent cell types.

  2. Sibling rivalry: competition between Pol X family members in V(D)J recombination and general double strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nick McElhinny, Stephanie A; Ramsden, Dale A

    2004-08-01

    The nonhomologous end-joining pathway is a major means for repairing double-strand breaks (DSBs) in all mitotic cell types. This repair pathway is also the only efficient means for resolving DSB intermediates in V(D)J recombination, a lymphocyte-specific genome rearrangement required for assembly of antigen receptors. A role for polymerases in end-joining has been well established. They are a major factor in determining the character of repair junctions but, in contrast to 'core' end-joining factors, typically appear to have a subtle impact on the efficiency of end-joining. Recent work implicates several members of the Pol X family in end-joining and suggests surprising complexity in the control of how these different polymerases are employed in this pathway.

  3. Smoking cessation reverses DNA double-strand breaks in human mononuclear cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Ishida

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, which is responsible for a significant proportion of smoking-related deaths. However, the precise mechanism whereby smoking induces this pathology has not been fully delineated. Based on observation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs, the most harmful type of DNA damage, in atherosclerotic lesions, we hypothesized that there is a direct association between smoking and DSBs. The goal of this study was to investigate whether smoking induces DSBs and smoking cessation reverses DSBs in vivo through examination of peripheral mononuclear cells (MNCs. APPROACH AND RESULTS: Immunoreactivity of oxidative modification of DNA and DSBs were increased in human atherosclerotic lesions but not in the adjacent normal area. DSBs in human MNCs isolated from the blood of volunteers can be detected as cytologically visible "foci" using an antibody against the phosphorylated form of the histone H2AX (γ-H2AX. Young healthy active smokers (n = 15 showed increased γ-H2AX foci number when compared with non-smokers (n = 12 (foci number/cell: median, 0.37/cell; interquartile range [IQR], 0.31-0.58 vs. 4.36/cell; IQR, 3.09-7.39, p<0.0001. Smoking cessation for 1 month reduced the γ-H2AX foci number (median, 4.44/cell; IQR, 4.36-5.24 to 0.28/cell; IQR, 0.12-0.53, p<0.05. A positive correlation was noted between γ-H2AX foci number and exhaled carbon monoxide levels (r = 0.75, p<0.01. CONCLUSIONS: Smoking induces DSBs in human MNCs in vivo, and importantly, smoking cessation for 1 month resulted in a decrease in DSBs to a level comparable to that seen in non-smokers. These data reinforce the notion that the cigarette smoking induces DSBs and highlight the importance of smoking cessation.

  4. DNA double-strand breaks induced by high-energy neon and iron ions in human fibroblasts. I. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rydberg, B.; Loebrich, M.; Cooper, P.K.

    1994-01-01

    The relative effectiveness of high-energy neon and iron ions for the production of DNA double-strand breaks was measured in one transformed and one nontransformed human fibroblast cell line using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The DNA released from the gel plug (fraction of activity released: FAR) as well as the size distribution of the DNA entering the gel were used to compare the effects of the heavy-ion exposure with X-ray exposure. Both methods gave similar results, indicating similar distributions of breaks over megabase-pair distances for the heavy ions and the X rays. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) compared to 225 kVp X rays of initially induced DNA double-strand breaks was found to be 0.85 for 425 MeV/u neon ions (LET 32 keV/μm) and 0.42-0.55 for 250-600 MeV/u iron ions (LET 190-350 keV/μm). Postirradiation incubation showed less efficient repair of breaks induced by the neon ions and the 600 MeV/u iron ions compared to X rays. Survival experiments demonstrated RBE values larger than one for cell killing by the heavy ions in parallel experiments (neon: RBE = 1.2, iron: RBE = 2.3-3.0, based on D 10 values). It is concluded that either the initial yield of DNA double-strand breaks induced by the high-energy particles is lower than the yield for X rays, or the breaks induced by heavy ions are present in clusters that cannot be resolved with the technique used. These results are confirmed in the accompanying paper. 48 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Pharmacokinetics and Toxicity in Rats and Monkeys of coDbait: A Therapeutic Double-stranded DNA Oligonucleotide Conjugated to Cholesterol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Schlegel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased DNA repair activity in cancer cells is one of their primary mechanisms of resistance to current radio- and chemotherapies. The molecule coDbait is the first candidate in a new class of drugs that target the double-strand DNA break repair pathways with the aim of overcoming these resistances. coDbait is a 32-base pair (bp double-stranded DNA molecule with a cholesterol moiety covalently attached to its 5′-end to facilitate its cellular uptake. We report here the preclinical pharmacokinetic and toxicology studies of subcutaneous coDbait administration in rodents and monkeys. Maximum plasma concentration occurred between 2 to 4 hours in rats and at 4 hours in monkeys. Increase in mean AUC0–24h was linear with dose reaching 0.5 mg·h/ml for the highest dose injected (32 mg for both rats and monkeys. No sex-related differences in maximum concentration (Cmax nor AUC0–24h were observed. We extrapolated these pharmacokinetic results to humans as the subcutaneous route has been selected for evaluation in clinical trials. Tri-weekly administration of coDbait (from 8 to 32 mg per dose for 4 weeks was overall well tolerated in rats and monkeys as no morbidity/mortality nor changes in clinical chemistry and histopathology parameters considered to be adverse effects have been observed.

  6. MO-AB-BRA-04: Radiation Measurements with a DNA Double-Strand-Break Dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obeidat, M; Cline, K; Stathakis, S; Papanikolaou, N; Rasmussen, K; Gutierrez, A; Ha, CS; Lee, SE; Shim, EY; Kirby, N

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Many types of dosimeters are used to measure radiation, but none of them directly measures the biological effect of this dose. The purpose here is to create a dosimeter that can measure the probability of double-strand breaks (DSB) for DNA, which is directly related to the biological effect of radiation. Methods: The dosimeter has DNA strands, which are labeled on one end with biotin and on the other with fluorescein. The biotin attaches these strands to magnetic beads. We suspended the DNA dosimeter in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) as it matches the internal environment of the body. We placed small volumes (50µL) of the DNA dosimeter into tubes and irradiated these samples in a water-equivalent plastic phantom with several doses (three samples per dose). After irradiating the samples, a magnet was placed against the tubes. The fluorescein attached to broken DNA strands was extracted (called the supernatant) and placed into a different tube. The fluorescein on the unbroken strands remained attached to the beads in the tube and was re-suspended with 50µL of PBS. A fluorescence reader was used to measure the fluorescence for both the re-suspended beads and supernatant. To prove that we are measuring DSB, we tested dosimeter response with two different lengths of attached DNA strands (1 and 4 kilo-base pair). Results: The probability of DSB at the dose levels of 5, 10, 25, and 50 Gy were 0.05, 0.08, 0.12, and 0.19, respectively, while the coefficients of variation were 0.14, 0.07, 0.02, and 0.01, respectively. The 4 kilo-base-pair dosimeter produced 5.3 times the response of the 1 kilo-base-pair dosimeter. Conclusion: The DNA dosimeter yields a measurable response to dose that scales with the DNA strand length. The goal now is to refine the dosimeter fabrication to reproducibly create a low coefficient of variation for the lower doses. This work was supported in part by Yarmouk University (Irbid, Jordan) and CPRIT (RP140105)

  7. MO-AB-BRA-04: Radiation Measurements with a DNA Double-Strand-Break Dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obeidat, M; Cline, K; Stathakis, S; Papanikolaou, N; Rasmussen, K; Gutierrez, A; Ha, CS; Lee, SE; Shim, EY; Kirby, N [University of Texas HSC SA, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Many types of dosimeters are used to measure radiation, but none of them directly measures the biological effect of this dose. The purpose here is to create a dosimeter that can measure the probability of double-strand breaks (DSB) for DNA, which is directly related to the biological effect of radiation. Methods: The dosimeter has DNA strands, which are labeled on one end with biotin and on the other with fluorescein. The biotin attaches these strands to magnetic beads. We suspended the DNA dosimeter in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) as it matches the internal environment of the body. We placed small volumes (50µL) of the DNA dosimeter into tubes and irradiated these samples in a water-equivalent plastic phantom with several doses (three samples per dose). After irradiating the samples, a magnet was placed against the tubes. The fluorescein attached to broken DNA strands was extracted (called the supernatant) and placed into a different tube. The fluorescein on the unbroken strands remained attached to the beads in the tube and was re-suspended with 50µL of PBS. A fluorescence reader was used to measure the fluorescence for both the re-suspended beads and supernatant. To prove that we are measuring DSB, we tested dosimeter response with two different lengths of attached DNA strands (1 and 4 kilo-base pair). Results: The probability of DSB at the dose levels of 5, 10, 25, and 50 Gy were 0.05, 0.08, 0.12, and 0.19, respectively, while the coefficients of variation were 0.14, 0.07, 0.02, and 0.01, respectively. The 4 kilo-base-pair dosimeter produced 5.3 times the response of the 1 kilo-base-pair dosimeter. Conclusion: The DNA dosimeter yields a measurable response to dose that scales with the DNA strand length. The goal now is to refine the dosimeter fabrication to reproducibly create a low coefficient of variation for the lower doses. This work was supported in part by Yarmouk University (Irbid, Jordan) and CPRIT (RP140105)

  8. Human RAD18 interacts with ubiquitylated chromatin components and facilitates RAD9 recruitment to DNA double strand breaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Inagaki

    Full Text Available RAD18 is an ubiquitin ligase involved in replicative damage bypass and DNA double-strand break (DSB repair processes. We found that RPA is required for the dynamic pattern of RAD18 localization during the cell cycle, and for accumulation of RAD18 at sites of γ-irradiation-induced DNA damage. In addition, RAD18 colocalizes with chromatin-associated conjugated ubiquitin and ubiquitylated H2A throughout the cell cycle and following irradiation. This localization pattern depends on the presence of an intact, ubiquitin-binding Zinc finger domain. Using a biochemical approach, we show that RAD18 directly binds to ubiquitylated H2A and several other unknown ubiquitylated chromatin components. This interaction also depends on the RAD18 Zinc finger, and increases upon the induction of DSBs by γ-irradiation. Intriguingly, RAD18 does not always colocalize with regions that show enhanced H2A ubiquitylation. In human female primary fibroblasts, where one of the two X chromosomes is inactivated to equalize X-chromosomal gene expression between male (XY and female (XX cells, this inactive X is enriched for ubiquitylated H2A, but only rarely accumulates RAD18. This indicates that the binding of RAD18 to ubiquitylated H2A is context-dependent. Regarding the functional relevance of RAD18 localization at DSBs, we found that RAD18 is required for recruitment of RAD9, one of the components of the 9-1-1 checkpoint complex, to these sites. Recruitment of RAD9 requires the functions of the RING and Zinc finger domains of RAD18. Together, our data indicate that association of RAD18 with DSBs through ubiquitylated H2A and other ubiquitylated chromatin components allows recruitment of RAD9, which may function directly in DSB repair, independent of downstream activation of the checkpoint kinases CHK1 and CHK2.

  9. DNA double strand breaks but not interstrand crosslinks prevent progress through meiosis in fully grown mouse oocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai Shan Yuen

    Full Text Available There is some interest in how mammalian oocytes respond to different types of DNA damage because of the increasing expectation of fertility preservation in women undergoing chemotherapy. Double strand breaks (DSBs induced by ionizing radiation and agents such as neocarzinostatin (NCS, and interstrand crosslinks (ICLs induced by alkylating agents such as mitomycin C (MMC, are toxic DNA lesions that need to be repaired for cell survival. Here we examined the effects of NCS and MMC treatment on oocytes collected from antral follicles in mice, because potentially such oocytes are readily collected from ovaries and do not need to be in vitro grown to achieve meiotic competency. We found that oocytes were sensitive to NCS, such that this ionizing radiation mimetic blocked meiosis I and caused fragmented DNA. In contrast, MMC had no impact on the completion of either meiosis I or II, even at extremely high doses. However, oocytes treated with MMC did show γ-H2AX foci and following their in vitro maturation and parthenogenetic activation the development of the subsequent embryos was severely compromised. Addition of MMC to 1-cell embryos caused a similarly poor level of development, demonstrating oocytes have eventual sensitivity to this ICL-inducing agent but this does not occur during their meiotic division. In oocytes, the association of Fanconi Anemia protein, FANCD2, with sites of ICL lesions was not apparent until entry into the embryonic cell cycle. In conclusion, meiotic maturation of oocytes is sensitive to DSBs but not ICLs. The ability of oocytes to tolerate severe ICL damage and yet complete meiosis, means that this type of DNA lesion goes unrepaired in oocytes but impacts on subsequent embryo quality.

  10. The occurrence of double strand DNA breaks is not the sole condition for meiotic crossing over in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portin, P; Rantanen, M

    2000-01-01

    Analysis of the interchromosomal effects of In(2L + 2R)Cy, In(3L + 3R)LVM and their joint effect on the frequencies of single and double crossovers in the cv-v-f region of the X chromosome as well as interference showed that both inversions, occurring separately, increased the frequency of single as well as double crossovers and the coefficient of coincidence. However, when the inversions occurred together the frequencies of single crossovers no longer increased, but the frequency of double crossovers, as well as the coefficient of coincidence did increase. These results indicate firstly that the interchromosomal effects influence some precondition of exchange, but that this precondition is not an occurrence of double strand DNA breaks. Thus, the occurrence of double strand DNA breaks is not the sole condition for crossing over in Drosophila melanogaster.

  11. Double-strand break repair and genetic recombination in topoisomerase and primase mutants of bacteriophage T4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakov, Victor P; Kudryashova, Elena

    2014-09-01

    The effects of primase and topoisomerase II deficiency on the double-strand break (DSB) repair and genetic recombination in bacteriophage T4 were studied in vivo using focused recombination. Site-specific DSBs were induced by SegC endonuclease in the rIIB gene of one of the parents. The frequency/distance relationship was determined in crosses of the wild-type phage, topoisomerase II mutant amN116 (gene 39), and primase mutant E219 (gene 61). Ordinary two-factor (i×j) and three-factor (i k×j) crosses between point rII mutations were also performed. These data provide information about the frequency and distance distribution of the single-exchange (splice) and double-exchange (patch) events. In two-factor crosses ets1×i, the topoisomerase and primase mutants had similar recombinant frequencies in crosses at ets1-i distances longer than 1000 bp, comprising about 80% of the corresponding wild-type values. They, however, differ remarkably in crosses at shorter distances. In the primase mutant, the recombinant frequencies are similar to those in the wild-type crosses at distances less than 100 bp, being a bit diminished at longer distances. In two-factor crosses ets1×i of the topoisomerase mutant, the recombinant frequencies were reduced ten-fold at the shortest distances. In three-factor crosses a6 ets1×i, where we measure patch-related recombination, the primase mutant was quite proficient across the entire range of distances. The topoisomerase mutant crosses demonstrated virtually complete absence of rII(+) recombinants at distances up to 33 bp, with the frequencies increasing steadily at longer distances. The data were interpreted as follows. The primase mutant is fully recombination-proficient. An obvious difference from the wild-type state is some shortage of EndoVII function leading to prolonged existence of HJs and thus stretched out ds-branch migration. This is also true for the topoisomerase mutant. However, the latter is deficient in the ss

  12. Influence of reduced glutathione on end-joining of DNA double-strand breaks: Cytogenetical and molecular approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghoshal, Nitin [Molecular Genetics Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology & Bioinformatics, North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong, Meghalaya-793022 (India); Sharma, Sheetal [Department of Biochemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, 560 012 (India); Banerjee, Atanu; Kurkalang, Sillarine [Molecular Genetics Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology & Bioinformatics, North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong, Meghalaya-793022 (India); Raghavan, Sathees C. [Department of Biochemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, 560 012 (India); Chatterjee, Anupam, E-mail: chatterjeeanupam@hotmail.com [Molecular Genetics Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology & Bioinformatics, North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong, Meghalaya-793022 (India)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • DNA lesions induced by Blem and radiation interact well and form higher frequency of exchange aberrations. • Cellular level of glutathione does influence such interaction of DNA lesions. • Oligomer-based cell-free assay system demonstrated better end-joining efficiency at higher level of endogenous GSH. - Abstract: Radiation induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) are the major initial lesions whose misrejoining may lead to exchange aberrations. However, the role of glutathione (GSH), a major cellular thiol, in regulating cell’s sensitivity to DNA damaging agents is not well understood. Influence of endogenous GSH on the efficiency of X-rays and bleomycin (Blem) induced DNA DSBs end-joining has been tested here cytogenetically, in human lymphocytes and Hct116 cells. In another approach, oligomeric DNA (75 bp) containing 5′-compatible and non-compatible overhangs mimicking the endogenous DSB were for rejoining in presence of cell-free extracts from cells having different endogenous GSH levels. Frequency of aberrations, particularly exchange aberrations, was significantly increased when Blem was combined with radiation. The exchange aberration frequency was further enhanced when combined treatment was given at 4 °C since DNA lesions are poorly repaired at 4 °C so that a higher number of DNA breaks persist and interact when shifted from 4 °C to 37 °C. The exchange aberrations increased further when the combined treatment was given to Glutathione-ester (GE) pre-treated cells, indicating more frequent rejoining of DNA lesions in presence of higher cellular GSH. This is further supported by the drastic reduction in frequency of exchange aberrations but significant increase in incidences of deletions when combined treatment was given to GSH-depleted cells. End-joining efficiency of DNA DSBs with compatible ends was better than for non-compatible ends. End-joining efficiency of testicular and MCF7 cell extracts was better than that of lungs and

  13. Molecular biological mechanisms I. DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedl, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    Cells of all living systems possess a variety of mechanisms that allow to repair spontaneous and exogeneously induced DNA damage. DNA repair deficiencies may invoke enhanced sensitivity towards DNA-damaging agents such as ionizing radiation. They may also enhance the risk of cancer development, both spontaneously or after induction. This article reviews several DNA repair mechanisms, especially those dealing with DNA double-strand breaks, and describes hereditary diseases associated with DNA repair defects. (orig.) [de

  14. A method for filling in the cohesive ends of double-stranded DNA using Pfu DNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shaohui; Li, Xin; Ding, Dongfeng; Hou, Jianhua; Jin, Zhaoxia; Yu, Xinchun; Bo, Tao; Li, Weidong; Li, Minggang

    2005-12-01

    The present paper reports a highly efficient method of making blunt ends from cohesive ends of double-stranded DNA. Klenow fragment and Pfu DNA polymerases were used to fill in the cohesive ends. Since the transformation efficiency can directly reflect the filling-in efficiency, similar ligation and transformation conditions were used, and the filling-in efficiency was compared with the corresponding transformation efficiency. The results indicate that the filling-in efficiency of Pfu DNA polymerase was 1.96 times that of Klenow fragment and its efficiency was markedly higher than that of Klenow fragment (P<0.01). The optimization experiments on reaction conditions indicate, when the pH is 8.5 and the temperature is 74 degrees C, that the filling-in efficiency was highest upon using a buffer containing 3 mM MgSO4 and 300 microM dNTP.

  15. GC-Rich Extracellular DNA Induces Oxidative Stress, Double-Strand DNA Breaks, and DNA Damage Response in Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Kostyuk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cell free DNA (cfDNA circulates throughout the bloodstream of both healthy people and patients with various diseases. CfDNA is substantially enriched in its GC-content as compared with human genomic DNA. Principal Findings. Exposure of haMSCs to GC-DNA induces short-term oxidative stress (determined with H2DCFH-DA and results in both single- and double-strand DNA breaks (comet assay and γH2AX, foci. As a result in the cells significantly increases the expression of repair genes (BRCA1 (RT-PCR, PCNA (FACS and antiapoptotic genes (BCL2 (RT-PCR and FACS, BCL2A1, BCL2L1, BIRC3, and BIRC2 (RT-PCR. Under the action of GC-DNA the potential of mitochondria was increased. Here we show that GC-rich extracellular DNA stimulates adipocyte differentiation of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (haMSCs. Exposure to GC-DNA leads to an increase in the level of RNAPPARG2 and LPL (RT-PCR, in the level of fatty acid binding protein FABP4 (FACS analysis and in the level of fat (Oil Red O. Conclusions. GC-rich fragments in the pool of cfDNA can potentially induce oxidative stress and DNA damage response and affect the direction of mesenchymal stem cells differentiation in human adipose—derived mesenchymal stem cells. Such a response may be one of the causes of obesity or osteoporosis.

  16. The logic of DNA replication in double-stranded DNA viruses: insights from global analysis of viral genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazlauskas, Darius; Krupovic, Mart; Venclovas, Česlovas

    2016-06-02

    Genomic DNA replication is a complex process that involves multiple proteins. Cellular DNA replication systems are broadly classified into only two types, bacterial and archaeo-eukaryotic. In contrast, double-stranded (ds) DNA viruses feature a much broader diversity of DNA replication machineries. Viruses differ greatly in both completeness and composition of their sets of DNA replication proteins. In this study, we explored whether there are common patterns underlying this extreme diversity. We identified and analyzed all major functional groups of DNA replication proteins in all available proteomes of dsDNA viruses. Our results show that some proteins are common to viruses infecting all domains of life and likely represent components of the ancestral core set. These include B-family polymerases, SF3 helicases, archaeo-eukaryotic primases, clamps and clamp loaders of the archaeo-eukaryotic type, RNase H and ATP-dependent DNA ligases. We also discovered a clear correlation between genome size and self-sufficiency of viral DNA replication, the unanticipated dominance of replicative helicases and pervasive functional associations among certain groups of DNA replication proteins. Altogether, our results provide a comprehensive view on the diversity and evolution of replication systems in the DNA virome and uncover fundamental principles underlying the orchestration of viral DNA replication. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Induction of DNA double-strand breaks by ionizing radiation of different quality and their relevance for cell inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kampf, G.

    1988-01-01

    By investigation of the production of DNA strand breaks and of DNA release from the nuclear membrane complex in Chinese hamster cells using different radiation qualities from 1 to 360 keV/μm, partly also under hypoxic conditions, and by relating the results to the induction of chromosome aberrations and to cell inactivation it has become possible to find connections between the induction of molecular lesions and the expression of this damage on the cellular level. From the studies follows that DNA pieces are cut off from the nuclear membrane complex by DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). The share and size of the released pieces depends on radiation dose and quality as well as on the oxygen conditions. The lesions can partly be repaired. In connection with the DSB rates the results of the DNA release studies led to the conclusion that the DNA in the cells must be organized in superstructure units (MASSUs) with a DNA mass of about 2 x 10 9 g/mol, which are associated to the nuclear membrane in attachment points. The numerical relations show that for a 37% survival probability about 90 DSB per genome are required with sparsely ionizing radiation; this number declines to about 40 by use of more densely ionizing radiation up to 150 keV/μm, and increases again with further rise of the ionization density. Hence, for cell inactivation not simply a certain number of DSB per cell is required but rather seems their cooperation within a small structure section of the DNA to be relevant. These critical structures are with high probability the MASSUs. An irrepairable release of DNA from such a structure unit can bring about a chromosome break detectable in the metaphase and finally lead to cell inactivation. DSB turned out to be the essential lethal events in bacteria as well. The relatively small differences to the eukaryotic cells in the position of the maximum of radiation sensitivity on the LET scale and in the lesion sensitivity towards DSB let suggest that a common critical

  18. De novo-engineered transcription activator-like effector (TALE) hybrid nuclease with novel DNA binding specificity creates double-strand breaks

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Magdy M.; Li, Lixin; Shamimuzzaman, Md.; Wibowo, Anjar Tri; Fang, Xiaoyun; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2011-01-01

    Site-specific and rare cutting nucleases are valuable tools for genome engineering. The generation of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) promotes homologous recombination in eukaryotes and can facilitate gene targeting, additions, deletions

  19. DNA double-strand breaks measured by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis in irradiated lymphocytes from normal humans and those with Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobi, S.E.; Itzhaki, R.F.

    1993-01-01

    The authors previously found that radiation-induced chromosome aberrations (dicentrics) are more numerous in lymphocytes from Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients than in those from age-matched normal individuals (Tobi et al. 1990). They have examined double-strand breaks (dsb) produced by g amma - irradiation in the DNA of AD and normal lymphocytes by using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The percentage of DNA migrating into the gels is an indirect measure of the number of dsb; DNA content of sequential slices of the gel was assayed by direct fluorometry and the percentage migrating was dose dependent. Results show that the level of damage is similar in AD and normal lymphocytes and preliminary assays of the rate of repair suggest that the half-time is also similar, the value being > 1 h. The latter is consistent with the known rate of rejoining of chromosome fragments in interphase lymphocytes (Pantelias and Maillie 1985). (Author)

  20. Processing of DNA double strand breaks by alternative non-homologous end-joining in hyperacetylated chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manova, Vasilissa; Singh, Satyendra K; Iliakis, George

    2012-08-22

    Mammalian cells employ at least two subpathways of non-homologous end-joining for the repair of ionizing radiation induced DNA double strand breaks: The canonical DNA-PK-dependent form of non-homologous end-joining (D-NHEJ) and an alternative, slowly operating, error-prone backup pathway (B-NHEJ). In contrast to D-NHEJ, which operates with similar efficiency throughout the cell cycle, B-NHEJ operates more efficiently in G2-phase. Notably, B-NHEJ also shows strong and as of yet unexplained dependency on growth activity and is markedly compromised in serum-deprived cells, or in cells that enter the plateau-phase of growth. The molecular mechanisms underpinning this response remain unknown. Since chromatin structure or changes in chromatin structure are prime candidate-B-NHEJ-modulators, we study here the role of chromatin hyperacetylation, either by HDAC2 knockdown or treatment with the HDAC inhibitor TSA, on the repair by B-NHEJ of IR-induced DSBs. siRNA-mediated knockdown of HDAC2 fails to provoke histone hyperacetylation in Lig4-/- MEFs and has no detectable effect on B-NHEJ function. Treatment with TSA that inhibits multiple HDACs causes efficient, reversible chromatin hyperacetylation in Lig4-/- MEFs, as well as in human HCT116 Lig4-/- cells and the human glioma cell line M059K. The IR yield of DSBs in TSA-treated cells remains similar to that of untreated cells despite the expected chromatin relaxation. In addition, chromatin hyperacetylation leaves unchanged repair of DSBs by B-NHEJ in irradiated exponentially growing, or plateau-phase cells. Notably, under the experimental conditions employed here, chromatin hyperacetylation fails to detectably modulate B-NHEJ in M059K cells as well. In summary, the results show that chromatin acetylation or deacetylation does not affect the kinetics of alternative NHEJ in all types of cells examined both in exponentially growing and serum deprived cultures. We conclude that parameters beyond chromatin acetylation determine B

  1. The Mismatch-Binding Factor MutSβ Can Mediate ATR Activation in Response to DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Burdová, Kamila; Mihaljevic, B.; Sturzenegger, A.; Chappidi, N.; Janščák, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 4 (2015), s. 603-614 ISSN 1097-2765 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/10/0281; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-05743S Grant - others:Oncosuisse(CH) KLS-02344-02-2009; Swiss National Science Foundation(CH) 31003A_146206; Novartis Foundation for Medical and Biological Research(CH) 11A16 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated and Rad3-related (ATR) protein kinase * DNA-damage response * DNA Double-Strand Breaks Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 13.958, year: 2015

  2. Single helically folded aromatic oligoamides that mimic the charge surface of double-stranded B-DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziach, Krzysztof; Chollet, Céline; Parissi, Vincent; Prabhakaran, Panchami; Marchivie, Mathieu; Corvaglia, Valentina; Bose, Partha Pratim; Laxmi-Reddy, Katta; Godde, Frédéric; Schmitter, Jean-Marie; Chaignepain, Stéphane; Pourquier, Philippe; Huc, Ivan

    2018-05-01

    Numerous essential biomolecular processes require the recognition of DNA surface features by proteins. Molecules mimicking these features could potentially act as decoys and interfere with pharmacologically or therapeutically relevant protein-DNA interactions. Although naturally occurring DNA-mimicking proteins have been described, synthetic tunable molecules that mimic the charge surface of double-stranded DNA are not known. Here, we report the design, synthesis and structural characterization of aromatic oligoamides that fold into single helical conformations and display a double helical array of negatively charged residues in positions that match the phosphate moieties in B-DNA. These molecules were able to inhibit several enzymes possessing non-sequence-selective DNA-binding properties, including topoisomerase 1 and HIV-1 integrase, presumably through specific foldamer-protein interactions, whereas sequence-selective enzymes were not inhibited. Such modular and synthetically accessible DNA mimics provide a versatile platform to design novel inhibitors of protein-DNA interactions.

  3. Condensin suppresses recombination and regulates double-strand break processing at the repetitive ribosomal DNA array to ensure proper chromosome segregation during meiosis in budding yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Jin, Hui; Yu, Hong-Guo

    2014-01-01

    During meiosis, homologues are linked by crossover, which is required for bipolar chromosome orientation before chromosome segregation at anaphase I. The repetitive ribosomal DNA (rDNA) array, however, undergoes little or no meiotic recombination. Hyperrecombination can cause chromosome missegregation and rDNA copy number instability. We report here that condensin, a conserved protein complex required for chromosome organization, regulates double-strand break (DSB) formation and repair at the rDNA gene cluster during meiosis in budding yeast. Condensin is highly enriched at the rDNA region during prophase I, released at the prophase I/metaphase I transition, and reassociates with rDNA before anaphase I onset. We show that condensin plays a dual role in maintaining rDNA stability: it suppresses the formation of Spo11-mediated rDNA breaks, and it promotes DSB processing to ensure proper chromosome segregation. Condensin is unnecessary for the export of rDNA breaks outside the nucleolus but required for timely repair of meiotic DSBs. Our work reveals that condensin coordinates meiotic recombination with chromosome segregation at the repetitive rDNA sequence, thereby maintaining genome integrity. PMID:25103240

  4. Analysis of DNA Double-Strand Breaks and Cytotoxicity after 7 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Isolated Human Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttek, Karina; Hartig, Roland; Godenschweger, Frank; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Ricke, Jens; Reinhold, Dirk; Speck, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The global use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is constantly growing and the field strengths increasing. Yet, only little data about harmful biological effects caused by MRI exposure are available and published research analyzing the impact of MRI on DNA integrity reported controversial results. This in vitro study aimed to investigate the genotoxic and cytotoxic potential of 7 T ultra-high-field MRI on isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Hence, unstimulated mononuclear blood cells were exposed to 7 T static magnetic field alone or in combination with maximum permissible imaging gradients and radiofrequency pulses as well as to ionizing radiation during computed tomography and γ-ray exposure. DNA double-strand breaks were quantified by flow cytometry and automated microscopy analysis of immunofluorescence stained γH2AX. Cytotoxicity was studied by CellTiter-Blue viability assay and [3H]-thymidine proliferation assay. Exposure of unstimulated mononuclear blood cells to 7 T static magnetic field alone or combined with varying gradient magnetic fields and pulsed radiofrequency fields did not induce DNA double-strand breaks, whereas irradiation with X- and γ-rays led to a dose-dependent induction of γH2AX foci. The viability assay revealed a time- and dose-dependent decrease in metabolic activity only among samples exposed to γ-radiation. Further, there was no evidence for altered proliferation response after cells were exposed to 7 T MRI or low doses of ionizing radiation (≤ 0.2 Gy). These findings confirm the acceptance of MRI as a safe non-invasive diagnostic imaging tool, but whether MRI can induce other types of DNA lesions or DNA double-strand breaks during altered conditions still needs to be investigated. PMID:26176601

  5. Single-Molecule Manipulation of Double-Stranded DNA Using Optical Tweezers: Interaction Studies of DNA with RecA and YOYO-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennink, Martin L.; Scharer, Orlando D.; Kanaar, Ronald; Sakata-Sogawa, Kumiko; Schins, J.M.; Kanger, Johannes S.; de Grooth, B.G.; Greve, Jan

    1999-01-01

    By using optical tweezers and a specially designed flow cell with an integrated glass micropipette, we constructed a setup similar to that of Smith et al. (Science 271:795-799, 1996) in which an individual double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecule can be captured between two polystyrene beads. The first

  6. DNA Double-Strand Breaks Induce the Nuclear Actin Filaments Formation in Cumulus-Enclosed Oocytes but Not in Denuded Oocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hong Sun

    Full Text Available As a gamete, oocyte needs to maintain its genomic integrity and passes this haploid genome to the next generation. However, fully-grown mouse oocyte cannot respond to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs effectively and it is also unable to repair them before the meiosis resumption. To compensate for this disadvantage and control the DNA repair events, oocyte needs the cooperation with its surrounding cumulus cells. Recently, evidences have shown that nuclear actin filament formation plays roles in cellular DNA DSB repair. To explore whether these nuclear actin filaments are formed in the DNA-damaged oocytes, here, we labeled the filament actins in denuded oocytes (DOs and cumulus-enclosed oocytes (CEOs. We observed that the nuclear actin filaments were formed only in the DNA-damaged CEOs, but not in DOs. Formation of actin filaments in the nucleus was an event downstream to the DNA damage response. Our data also showed that the removal of cumulus cells led to a reduction in the nuclear actin filaments in oocytes. Knocking down of the Adcy1 gene in cumulus cells did not affect the formation of nuclear actin filaments in oocytes. Notably, we also observed that the nuclear actin filaments in CEOs could be induced by inhibition of gap junctions. From our results, it was confirmed that DNA DSBs induce the nuclear actin filament formation in oocyte and which is controlled by the cumulus cells.

  7. Double-strand break repair and G2 block in Chinese hamster ovary cells and their radiosensitive mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weibezahn, K.F.; Lohrer, H.; Herrlich, P.

    1985-01-01

    Two X-ray-sensitive mutants of the CHO K1 cell line were examined for their cell-cycle progression after irradiation with γ-rays, and for their ability to rejoin double-strand breaks (DSBs) as detected by neutral filter elution. Both mutants were impaired in DSB rejoining and both were irreversibly blocked in the G 2 phase of the cell cycle as determined by cytofluorometry. From one mutant the authors have isolated several revertants. The revertants stem from genomic DNA transfection experiments and may have been caused by gene uptake. All revertants survived γ-irradiation as did the wild-type CHO line. One of them has been examined for its ability to rejoin DSBs and was found to be similar to the wild type. (Auth.)

  8. Double-strand break repair and G/sub 2/ block in Chinese hamster ovary cells and their radiosensitive mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weibezahn, K F; Lohrer, H; Herrlich, P [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe G.m.b.H. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Genetik und Toxikologie

    1985-05-01

    Two X-ray-sensitive mutants of the CHO K1 cell line were examined for their cell-cycle progression after irradiation with ..gamma..-rays, and for their ability to rejoin double-strand breaks (DSBs) as detected by neutral filter elution. Both mutants were impaired in DSB rejoining and both were irreversibly blocked in the G/sub 2/ phase of the cell cycle as determined by cytofluorometry. From one mutant the authors have isolated several revertants. The revertants stem from genomic DNA transfection experiments and may have been caused by gene uptake. All revertants survived ..gamma..-irradiation as did the wild-type CHO line. One of them has been examined for its ability to rejoin DSBs and was found to be similar to the wild type.

  9. Effect of cellular glutathione content on the induction of DNA double strand breaks by 25 MeV electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankenberg, D.; Kistler, M.; Eckhardt-Schupp, F.

    1987-08-01

    The effect of endogenous glutathione (GSH) on the induction of DNA double strand breaks (dsb) by 25 MeV electrons was investigated using stationary haploid yeast cells defective in ..gamma..-glutamyl-cysteine-synthetase (gsh 1) containing less than 5 per cent of the normal GSH content. In gsh 1 cells the induction of dsb is increased by a factor of 1.5 under oxic and 1.8 under anoxic irradiation conditions whereas the oxygen enhancement ratio was only slightly decreased (1.9) compared to wild-type cells (2.4).

  10. Effect of cellular glutathione content on the induction of DNA double strand breaks by 25 MeV electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankenberg, D.; Kistler, M.; Eckhardt-Schupp, F.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of endogenous glutathione (GSH) on the induction of DNA double strand breaks (dsb) by 25 MeV electrons was investigated using stationary haploid yeast cells defective in γ-glutamyl-cysteine-synthetase (gsh 1) containing less than 5 per cent of the normal GSH content. In gsh 1 cells the induction of dsb is increased by a factor of 1.5 under oxic and 1.8 under anoxic irradiation conditions whereas the oxygen enhancement ratio was only slightly decreased (1.9) compared to wild-type cells (2.4). (author)

  11. Relative frequency of formation of base radioproduct, single and double strand breaks on irradiation of diluted aqueous solution of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryznar, L.; Drasil, V.

    1975-01-01

    Diluted aqueous solution of DNA labelled with 6- 3 H-TdR was irradiated in the absence of oxygen and numbers of formed single and double strand breaks and the 5,6-dihydrothymine (DHT) yield were determined. The results indicate that, under given conditions, a molecule of a base radioproduct is formed approximately 10 times more frequently than one single strand break. The occurence of a single strand break is 20 times higher than that of a double strand break. The DNA labelled with 6- 3 H-TdR was isolated from mice fibroblasts of L-strain according to Marmur (specific activity 3.0 MBq/82 μCi/mg DNA, molecular weight M/sub n/=9.32x10 6 dalton). Solution of DNA was irradiated in the absence of oxygen (180 Gy /1.8x10 4 rads/, absorbed dose rate 0.3 Gy/s). It was lyophilized with an addition of non-labelled thymine, thymidine and DHT and then hydrolysed with 90% formic acid. The dried hydrolysate was chromatographed with irradiated non-labelled thymine added as a carrier. (F.G.)

  12. Human lymphocytes exposed to low doses of ionizing radiations become refractory to high doses of radiation as well as to chemical mutagens that induce double-strand breaks in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, Sheldon; Afzal, Veena; Wiencke, J.K.; Olivieri, G.; Michaeli, A.

    1988-01-01

    The results indicate that prior exposure to 0.01 Gy of X-rays reduces the number of chromosome breaks induced by double-strand breaks, and perhaps even by cross-links, in DNA, but has the opposite effect on breaks induced by the alkylating agent MMS. The results also show that the induced repair mechanism is different from that observed in the adaptive reponse that follows exposure to low doses of alkylating agents. (author)

  13. Coexposure to benzo[a]pyrene plus UVA induced DNA double strand breaks: visualization of Ku assembly in the nucleus having DNA lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyooka, Tatsushi; Ibuki, Yuko; Koike, Manabu; Ohashi, Norio; Takahashi, Sentaro; Goto, Rensuke

    2004-01-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant with potential carcinogenicity. It has been shown that BaP, upon UVA irradiation, synergistically induced oxidative DNA damage, but other DNA damage was not confirmed. In this study, we examined whether coexposure to BaP plus UVA induces double strand breaks (DSBs) using xrs-5 cells, deficient in the repair of DSBs (Ku80 mutant), and whether Ku translocates involving the formation of DSBs. BaP plus UVA had a significant cytotoxic effect on CHO-K1 cells and an even more drastic effect on Ku80-deficient, xrs-5 cells, suggesting that the DSBs were generated by coexposure to BaP plus UVA. The DSBs were repaired in CHO-K1 cells within 30 min, but not in xrs-5 cells, indicating the involvement of a non-homologous end joining, which needs Ku proteins. Furthermore, we succeeded in visualizing that Ku80 rapidly assembled to the exposed region, in which DSBs might be generated, and clarified that the presence of both Ku70 and Ku80 was important for their accumulation

  14. Increased sister chromatid cohesion and DNA damage response factor localization at an enzyme-induced DNA double-strand break in vertebrate cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dodson, Helen

    2009-10-01

    The response to DNA damage in vertebrate cells involves successive recruitment of DNA signalling and repair factors. We used light microscopy to monitor the genetic dependencies of such localization to a single, induced DNA double strand break (DSB) in vertebrate cells. We used an inducible version of the rare-cutting I-SceI endonuclease to cut a chromosomally integrated I-SceI site beside a Tet operator array that was visualized by binding a Tet repressor-GFP fusion. Formation of gamma-H2AX foci at a single DSB was independent of ATM or Ku70. ATM-deficient cells showed normal kinetics of 53Bp1 recruitment to DSBs, but Rad51 localization was retarded. 53Bp1 and Rad51 foci formation at a single DSB was greatly reduced in H2AX-null DT40 cells. We also observed decreased inter-sister chromatid distances after DSB induction, suggesting that cohesin loading at DSBs causes elevated sister chromatid cohesion. Loss of ATM reduced DSB-induced cohesion, consistent with cohesin being an ATM target in the DSB response. These data show that the same genetic pathways control how cells respond to single DSBs and to multiple lesions induced by whole-cell DNA damage.

  15. Differential regulation of the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks in G1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barlow, Jacqueline H; Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney

    2008-01-01

    -induced breaks are recognized by Rfa1 only after the cell enters S phase. This difference is dependent on the DNA end-binding Yku70/Yku80 complex. Cell-cycle regulation is also observed in the DNA damage checkpoint response. Specifically, the 9-1-1 complex is required in G1 cells to recruit the Ddc2 checkpoint...... protein to damaged DNA, while, upon entry into S phase, the cyclin-dependent kinase Cdc28 and the 9-1-1 complex both serve to recruit Ddc2 to foci. Together, these results demonstrate that the DNA repair machinery distinguishes between different types of damage in G1, which translates into different modes...

  16. Replication protein A and γ-H2AX foci assembly is triggered by cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balajee, Adayabalam S.; Geard, Charles R.

    2004-01-01

    Human replication protein A (RPA p34), a crucial component of diverse DNA excision repair pathways, is implicated in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. To evaluate its role in DSB repair, the intranuclear dynamics of RPA was investigated after DNA damage and replication blockage in human cells. Using two different agents [ionizing radiation (IR) and hydroxyurea (HU)] to generate DSBs, we found that RPA relocated into distinct nuclear foci and colocalized with a well-known DSB binding factor, γ-H2AX, at the sites of DNA damage in a time-dependent manner. Colocalization of RPA and γ-H2AX foci peaked at 2 h after IR treatment and subsequently declined with increasing postrecovery times. The time course of RPA and γ-H2AX foci association correlated well with the DSB repair activity detected by a neutral comet assay. A phosphatidylinositol-3 (PI-3) kinase inhibitor, wortmannin, completely abolished both RPA and γ-H2AX foci formation triggered by IR. Additionally, radiosensitive ataxia telangiectasia (AT) cells harboring mutations in ATM gene product were found to be deficient in RPA and γ-H2AX colocalization after IR. Transfection of AT cells with ATM cDNA fully restored the association of RPA foci with γ-H2AX illustrating the requirement of ATM gene product for this process. The exact coincidence of RPA and γ-H2AX in response to HU specifically in S-phase cells supports their role in DNA replication checkpoint control. Depletion of RPA by small interfering RNA (SiRNA) substantially elevated the frequencies of IR-induced micronuclei (MN) and apoptosis in human cells suggestive of a role for RPA in DSB repair. We propose that RPA in association with γ-H2AX contributes to both DNA damage checkpoint control and repair in response to strand breaks and stalled replication forks in human cells

  17. Recent advances in DNA repair and recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanejko, L A; Jones, N J

    1998-09-11

    The subjects of the talks at this 1-day DNA Repair Network meeting, held at City University, London on December 15, 1997, encompassed a range of topics and reflected some of the current areas of research in the United Kingdom. Topics included DNA double-strand break repair, V(D)J recombination, DNA ligases, the RecQ family of helicases and Bloom's syndrome, UVB and immunosuppression, the repair of oxidative damage and mismatch repair mechanisms.

  18. The N-terminus of RPA large subunit and its spatial position are important for the 5'->3' resection of DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammaro, Margaret; Liao, Shuren; McCane, Jill; Yan, Hong

    2015-10-15

    The first step of homology-dependent repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is the resection of the 5' strand to generate 3' ss-DNA. Of the two major nucleases responsible for resection, EXO1 has intrinsic 5'->3' directionality, but DNA2 does not. DNA2 acts with RecQ helicases such as the Werner syndrome protein (WRN) and the heterotrimeric eukaryotic ss-DNA binding protein RPA. We have found that the N-terminus of the RPA large subunit (RPA1N) interacts with both WRN and DNA2 and is essential for stimulating WRN's 3'->5' helicase activity and DNA2's 5'->3' ss-DNA exonuclease activity. A mutant RPA complex that lacks RPA1N is unable to support resection in Xenopus egg extracts and human cells. Furthermore, relocating RPA1N to the middle subunit but not to the small subunit causes severe defects in stimulating DNA2 and WRN and in supporting resection. Together, these findings suggest that RPA1N and its spatial position are critical for restricting the directionality of the WRN-DNA2 resection pathway. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. The N-terminus of RPA large subunit and its spatial position are important for the 5′->3′ resection of DNA double-strand breaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammaro, Margaret; Liao, Shuren; McCane, Jill; Yan, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The first step of homology-dependent repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is the resection of the 5′ strand to generate 3′ ss-DNA. Of the two major nucleases responsible for resection, EXO1 has intrinsic 5′->3′ directionality, but DNA2 does not. DNA2 acts with RecQ helicases such as the Werner syndrome protein (WRN) and the heterotrimeric eukaryotic ss-DNA binding protein RPA. We have found that the N-terminus of the RPA large subunit (RPA1N) interacts with both WRN and DNA2 and is essential for stimulating WRN's 3′->5′ helicase activity and DNA2's 5′->3′ ss-DNA exonuclease activity. A mutant RPA complex that lacks RPA1N is unable to support resection in Xenopus egg extracts and human cells. Furthermore, relocating RPA1N to the middle subunit but not to the small subunit causes severe defects in stimulating DNA2 and WRN and in supporting resection. Together, these findings suggest that RPA1N and its spatial position are critical for restricting the directionality of the WRN-DNA2 resection pathway. PMID:26227969

  20. Either non-homologous ends joining or homologous recombination is required to repair double-strand breaks in the genome of macrophage-internalized Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzostek, Anna; Szulc, Izabela; Klink, Magdalena; Brzezinska, Marta; Sulowska, Zofia; Dziadek, Jaroslaw

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is constantly exposed to a multitude of hostile conditions and is confronted by a variety of potentially DNA-damaging assaults in vivo, primarily from host-generated antimicrobial toxic radicals. Exposure to reactive nitrogen species and/or reactive oxygen species causes different types of DNA damage, including oxidation, depurination, methylation and deamination, that can result in single- or double-strand breaks (DSBs). These breaks affect the integrity of the whole genome and, when left unrepaired, can lead to cell death. Here, we investigated the role of the DSB repair pathways, homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous ends joining (NHEJ), in the survival of Mtb inside macrophages. To this end, we constructed Mtb strains defective for HR (ΔrecA), NHEJ [Δ(ku,ligD)], or both DSB repair systems [Δ(ku,ligD,recA)]. Experiments using these strains revealed that either HR or NHEJ is sufficient for the survival and propagation of tubercle bacilli inside macrophages. Inhibition of nitric oxide or superoxide anion production with L-NIL or apocynin, respectively, enabled the Δ(ku,ligD,recA) mutant strain lacking both systems to survive intracellularly. Complementation of the Δ(ku,ligD,recA) mutant with an intact recA or ku-ligD rescued the ability of Mtb to propagate inside macrophages.

  1. Either non-homologous ends joining or homologous recombination is required to repair double-strand breaks in the genome of macrophage-internalized Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Brzostek

    Full Text Available The intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb is constantly exposed to a multitude of hostile conditions and is confronted by a variety of potentially DNA-damaging assaults in vivo, primarily from host-generated antimicrobial toxic radicals. Exposure to reactive nitrogen species and/or reactive oxygen species causes different types of DNA damage, including oxidation, depurination, methylation and deamination, that can result in single- or double-strand breaks (DSBs. These breaks affect the integrity of the whole genome and, when left unrepaired, can lead to cell death. Here, we investigated the role of the DSB repair pathways, homologous recombination (HR and non-homologous ends joining (NHEJ, in the survival of Mtb inside macrophages. To this end, we constructed Mtb strains defective for HR (ΔrecA, NHEJ [Δ(ku,ligD], or both DSB repair systems [Δ(ku,ligD,recA]. Experiments using these strains revealed that either HR or NHEJ is sufficient for the survival and propagation of tubercle bacilli inside macrophages. Inhibition of nitric oxide or superoxide anion production with L-NIL or apocynin, respectively, enabled the Δ(ku,ligD,recA mutant strain lacking both systems to survive intracellularly. Complementation of the Δ(ku,ligD,recA mutant with an intact recA or ku-ligD rescued the ability of Mtb to propagate inside macrophages.

  2. Binding to the minor groove of the double-strand, tau protein prevents DNA from damage by peroxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yan; Qu, Mei-Hua; Wang, Xing-Sheng; Chen, Lan; Wang, Dong-Liang; Liu, Ying; Hua, Qian; He, Rong-Qiao

    2008-07-02

    Tau, an important microtubule associated protein, has been found to bind to DNA, and to be localized in the nuclei of both neurons and some non-neuronal cells. Here, using electrophoretic mobility shifting assay (EMSA) in the presence of DNA with different chain-lengths, we observed that tau protein favored binding to a 13 bp or a longer polynucleotide. The results from atomic force microscopy also showed that tau protein preferred a 13 bp polynucleotide to a 12 bp or shorter polynucleotide. In a competitive assay, a minor groove binder distamycin A was able to replace the bound tau from the DNA double helix, indicating that tau protein binds to the minor groove. Tau protein was able to protect the double-strand from digestion in the presence of DNase I that was bound to the minor groove. On the other hand, a major groove binder methyl green as a negative competitor exhibited little effect on the retardation of tau-DNA complex in EMSA. This further indicates the DNA minor groove as the binding site for tau protein. EMSA with truncated tau proteins showed that both the proline-rich domain (PRD) and the microtubule-binding domain (MTBD) contributed to the interaction with DNA; that is to say, both PRD and MTBD bound to the minor groove of DNA and bent the double-strand, as observed by electron microscopy. To investigate whether tau protein is able to prevent DNA from the impairment by hydroxyl free radical, the chemiluminescence emitted by the phen-Cu/H(2)O(2)/ascorbate was measured. The emission intensity of the luminescence was markedly decreased when tau protein was present, suggesting a significant protection of DNA from the damage in the presence of hydroxyl free radical.

  3. Low-dose ionizing irradiation triggers a 53BP1 response to DNA double strand breaks in mouse spermatogonial stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Wei; Qi, Lixin; Li, Jiaxuan; Wu, DengIong; Xu, Jun; Zhang, Jinfu

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to examine the effect of low-dose ionizing irradiation on DNA double strand breaks (DSB) in mouse spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) and reveal the underlying pathways for the DNA repair for DSB in SSCs. Eighteen one-month-old mice were divided into 6 groups and sacrificed separately at 45 minutes, 2 hours, 24 hours, 48 hours, and 72 hours after 0.1Gy X-ray irradiation (mice without receiving ionizing irradiation served as control). After perfusion fixation, testes were removed, sectioned, and followed by staining of γH2AX, 53BP1, Caspase 3, and promyelocytic leukemia zinc-finger (PLZF) for analysis among the different groups. The staining was observed by immunofluorescence visualized by confocal laser scanning. After low-dose irradiation, only 53BP1, but not Caspase3 or γH2AX was upregulated in PLZF positive SSCs within 45 minutes. The expression level of 53BP1 gradually decreased 24 hours after irradiation. Moreover, low-dose irradiation had no effect on the cell number and apoptotic status of SSCs. However other spermatogenic cells highly expressed γH2AX shortly after irradiation which was dramatically reduced following the events of DNA repair. It appears that low-dose ionizing irradiation may cause the DNA DSB of mouse spermatogenic cells. 53BP1, but not γH2AX, is involved in the DNA repair for DSB in SSCs. Our data indicates that 53BP1 plays an important role in the pathophysiological repair of DNA DSB in SSCs. This may open a new avenue to understanding the mechanisms of DNA repair of SSCs and male infertility.

  4. Role of DNA repair in repair of cytogenetic damages. Slowly repaired DNA injuries involved in cytogenetic damages repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaichkina, S.I.; Rozanova, O.M.; Aptikaev, G.F.; Ganassi, E.Eh.

    1989-01-01

    Caffeine was used to study the kinetics of cytogenetic damages repair in Chinese hamster fibroblasts. Its half-time (90 min) was shown to correlate with that of repair of slowly repaired DNA damages. The caffeine-induced increase in the number of irreparable DNA damages, attributed to inhibition of double-strand break repair, is in a quantitative correlation with the effect of the cytogenetic damage modification

  5. DNA double strand breaks as the critical type of damage with regard to inactivation of cells through ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankenberg, D.

    1985-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation into the effects of ionizing radiation on eukaryotic cells, aimed at revealing the molecular mechanisms leading to cell inactivation as a result of ionizing radiation. The quantitative determination of radiation-induced double strand breaks (DSB) is done via sedimentation of the DNA released from the cells in a neutral saccharose gradient in a preparative ultracentrifuge. The 'experimental mass spectrum' of DNA molecules thus obtained, the mean number of DSB per cell is calculated using a special computer program which simulates the stochastic induction of DSB in the DNA of non-irradiated cells and links the 'simulated' mass spectrum with the 'experimental' one on the basis of the least square fit. The experimental and theoretical studies with the eukaryote yeast on the whole allow insight into the relation between energy absorption and the inactivation of irradiated cells. (orig./MG) [de

  6. FBH1 co-operates with MUS81 in inducing DNA double-strand breaks and cell death following replication stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugger, Kasper; Chu, Wai Kit; Haahr, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The molecular events occurring following the disruption of DNA replication forks are poorly characterized, despite extensive use of replication inhibitors such as hydroxyurea in the treatment of malignancies. Here, we identify a key role for the FBH1 helicase in mediating DNA double-strand break...... formation following replication inhibition. We show that FBH1-deficient cells are resistant to killing by hydroxyurea, and exhibit impaired activation of the pro-apoptotic factor p53, consistent with decreased DNA double-strand break formation. Similar findings were obtained in murine ES cells carrying...... of replication stress. Our data suggest that FBH1 helicase activity is required to eliminate cells with excessive replication stress through the generation of MUS81-induced DNA double-strand breaks....

  7. Protected DNA strand displacement for enhanced single nucleotide discrimination in double-stranded DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Khodakov, Dmitriy A.; Khodakova, Anastasia S.; Huang, David M.; Linacre, Adrian; Ellis, Amanda V.

    2015-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are a prime source of genetic diversity. Discriminating between different SNPs provides an enormous leap towards the better understanding of the uniqueness of biological systems. Here we report on a new approach for SNP discrimination using toehold-mediated DNA strand displacement. The distinctiveness of the approach is based on the combination of both 3- and 4-way branch migration mechanisms, which allows for reliable discrimination of SNPs within doubl...

  8. DNA repair and radiation sensitivity in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, D.J.C.; Stackhouse, M.; Chen, D.S.

    1993-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces various types of damage in mammalian cells including DNA single-strand breaks, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), DNA-protein cross links, and altered DNA bases. Although human cells can repair many of these lesions there is little detailed knowledge of the nature of the genes and the encoded enzymes that control these repair processes. We report here on the cellular and genetic analyses of DNA double-strand break repair deficient mammalian cells. It has been well established that the DNA double-strand break is one of the major lesions induced by ionizing radiation. Utilizing rodent repair-deficient mutant, we have shown that the genes responsible for DNA double-strand break repair are also responsible for the cellular expression of radiation sensitivity. The molecular genetic analysis of DSB repair in rodent/human hybrid cells indicate that at least 6 different genes in mammalian cells are responsible for the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Mapping and the prospect of cloning of human radiation repair genes are reviewed. Understanding the molecular and genetic basis of radiation sensitivity and DNA repair in man will provide a rational foundation to predict the individual risk associated with radiation exposure and to prevent radiation-induced genetic damage in the human population

  9. End-specific strategies of attachment of long double stranded DNA onto gold-coated nanofiber arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peckys, Diana B; De Jonge, Niels; Simpson, Michael L; McKnight, Timothy E

    2008-01-01

    We report the effective and site-specific binding of long double stranded (ds)DNA to high aspect ratio carbon nanofiber arrays. The carbon nanofibers were first coated with a thin gold layer to provide anchorage for two controllable binding methods. One method was based on the direct binding of thiol end-labeled dsDNA. The second and enhanced method used amine end-labeled dsDNA bound with crosslinkers to a carboxyl-terminated self-assembled monolayer. The bound dsDNA was first visualized with a fluorescent, dsDNA-intercalating dye. The specific binding onto the carbon nanofiber was verified by a high resolution detection method using scanning electron microscopy in combination with the binding of neutravidin-coated fluorescent microspheres to the immobilized and biotinylated dsDNA. Functional activity of thiol end-labeled dsDNA on gold-coated nanofiber arrays was verified with a transcriptional assay, whereby Chinese hamster lung cells (V79) were impaled upon the DNA-modified nanofibers and scored for transgene expression of the tethered template. Thiol end-labeled dsDNA demonstrated significantly higher expression levels than nanofibers prepared with control dsDNA that lacked a gold-binding end-label. Employing these site-specific and robust techniques of immobilization of dsDNA onto nanodevices can be of advantage for the study of DNA/protein interactions and for gene delivery applications.

  10. A Role for BLM in Double-Strand Break Repair Pathway Choice: Prevention of CtIP/Mre11-Mediated Alternative Nonhomologous End-Joining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grabarz, Anastazja; Guirouilh-Barbat, Josée; Barascu, Aurelia

    2013-01-01

    The choice of the appropriate double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway is essential for the maintenance of genomic stability. Here, we show that the Bloom syndrome gene product, BLM, counteracts CtIP/MRE11-dependent long-range deletions (>200 bp) generated by alternative end-joining (A-EJ). BLM...... represses A-EJ in an epistatic manner with 53BP1 and RIF1 and is required for ionizing-radiation-induced 53BP1 focus assembly. Conversely, in the absence of 53BP1 or RIF1, BLM promotes formation of A-EJ long deletions, consistent with a role for BLM in DSB end resection. These data highlight a dual role...... for BLM that influences the DSB repair pathway choice: (1) protection against CtIP/MRE11 long-range deletions associated with A-EJ and (2) promotion of DNA resection. These antagonist roles can be regulated, according to cell-cycle stage, by interacting partners such as 53BP1 and TopIII, to avoid...

  11. Radiosensitization of tumour cell lines by the polyphenol Gossypol results from depressed double-strand break repair and not from enhanced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasten-Pisula, Ulla; Windhorst, Sabine; Dahm-Daphi, Jochen; Mayr, Georg; Dikomey, Ekkehard

    2007-06-01

    New drugs are needed to increase the efficiency of radiotherapy in order to improve the therapeutic outcome of tumour patients. In this respect, the polyphenol Gossypol might be of interest, because of its effect on apoptosis and DNA repair, which is either mediated directly or indirectly via the inositol phosphate metabolism. It was investigated, whether these effects result in enhanced radiosensitivity of tumour cells. Tumour cell lines investigated: A549, FaDu, H1299, MCF7 and Du145. Cell cycle distribution was determined by FACS analysis, apoptosis was measured by DAPI staining and caspase3/7 activity. Double-strand breaks (DSB) were investigated via gammaH2AX-foci and cell survival by colony formation assay. The level of inositol phosphates was determined by HPLC, protein expression by Western blot. In A549 cells, Gossypol at concentrations 1microM strongly affects proliferation with only a modest arrest in the G1-phase, but with no increase in the fraction of apoptotic cells or the number of additional DSB. Additional DSB were only seen in FaDu cells, where Gossypol (2microM) was extremely toxic with a plating efficiency even found to be enhanced by Gossypol. For some tumour cell lines treatment with low concentrations of Gossypol can be used to inhibit DSB repair capacity and with that to increase the cellular radiosensitivity.

  12. Measurement of intracellular DNA double-strand break induction and rejoining along the track of carbon and neon particle beams in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilmann, Johannes; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela; Haberer, Thomas; Scholz, Michael; Kraft, Gerhard

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The study was aimed at the measurement of effect-depth distributions of intracellularly induced DNA damage in water as tissue equivalent after heavy ion irradiation with therapy particle beams. Methods and Materials: An assay involving embedding of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells in large agarose plugs and electrophoretic elution of radiation induced DNA fragments by constant field gel electrophoresis was developed. Double-strand break production was quantified by densitometric analysis of DNA-fluorescence after staining with ethidium-bromide and determination of the fraction of DNA eluted out of the agarose plugs. Intracellular double-strand break induction and the effect of a 3 h rejoining incubation were investigated following irradiation with 250 kV x-rays and 190 MeV/u carbon- and 295 MeV/u neon-ions. Results and Conclusion: While the DNA damage induced by x-irradiation decreased continuously with penetration depth, a steady increase in the yield of double-strand breaks was observed for particle radiation, reaching distinct maxima at the position of the physical Bragg peaks. Beyond this, the extent of radiation damage dropped drastically. From comparison of DNA damage and calculated dose profiles, relative biological efficiencies (RBEs) for both double-strand break induction and unrejoined strand breaks after 3 h were determined. While RBE for the induction of DNA double-strand breaks decreased continuously with penetration depth, RBE maxima greater than unity were found with carbon- and neon-ions for double-strand break rejoining near the maximum range of the particles. The method presented here allows for a fast and accurate determination of depth profiles of relevant radiobiological effects for mixed particle fields in tissue equivalent

  13. Prediction of radiotherapy induced normal tissue adverse reactions: the role of double-strand break repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, B.S. Satish; Mumbrekar, K.D.; Goutham, H.V.; Donald, J.F.; Vadhiraja, M.B.; Satyamoorthy, K.

    2016-01-01

    We aimed at evaluating the predictive potential of DSB repair kinetics (using γH2AX foci assay) in lymphocytes and analysed the genetic variants in the selected radioresponsive candidate genes like XRCC3, LIG4, NBN, CD44, RAD9A, LIG3, SH3GL1, BAXS, XRCC1, MAD2L2 on the individual susceptibility to radiotherapy (RT) induced acute skin reactions among the head and neck cancer (HNC), and breast cancer (BC) patients. All the 183 HNC and 132 BC patients were treated by a 3-dimensional conformal RT technique

  14. Single and double strand breaks induced by 3H incorporated in DNA of cultured human kidney cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tisljar-Lentulis, G.; Henneberg, P.; Mielke, T.; Feinendegen, L.E.

    1978-01-01

    In the course of the investigations of the biological effects of radionuclides incorporated in DNA single (SSB) and double strand breaks (DSB) caused tritium-decay were measured and compared with respective data resulting from 125 I. Tritium bound to thymidine and iododeoxyuridine seems to be more effective than tritium bound to other DNA-precursors. On the basis of decay, methyl- 3 H thymidine appears to be more effective with regard to the production of strand breaks than 3 H in position 6 of the pyrimidine ring. Based on the numbers of strand-breaks per rad, position 6 is more effective in accordance with data obtained by F. Krasin et al. The ratio of SSBs to DSBs per tritium decay appears to be approximately 8 in mammlian cells. Not only SSBs but also DSBs induced by 3 H in mammalian cells are reapairable. (orig./AJ) [de

  15. Investigation on accordance of DNA double-strand break of blood between in vivo and in vitro irradiation using single cell gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qiang; Jiang Enhai; Li Jin; Tang Weisheng; Wang Zhiquan; Zhao Yongcheng; Fan Feiyue

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To observe the consistency of DNA double-strand break between in vivo and in vitro irradiation, as a prophase study in radiation biodosimetry using single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE). Methods: Detect DNA double-strand break after whole-body and in vitro radiation in mice lymphocytes using neutral single cell gel electrophoresis. The comet images were processed by CASP software and all the data were analysed by SPSS12.0. Results: There is no difference between in vivo and in vitro irradiation group in HDNA%, TDNA%, CL, TL, TM and OTM. Conclusion: The result of neutral single cell gel electrophoresis shortly after in vitro irradiation can precisely reflect the DNA double-strand break of lymphocytes in whole-body irradiation. (authors)

  16. Bioelectrochemical sensing of promethazine with bamboo-type multiwalled carbon nanotubes dispersed in calf-thymus double stranded DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primo, Emiliano N; Oviedo, M Belén; Sánchez, Cristián G; Rubianes, María D; Rivas, Gustavo A

    2014-10-01

    We report the quantification of promethazine (PMZ) using glassy carbon electrodes (GCE) modified with bamboo-like multi-walled carbon nanotubes (bCNT) dispersed in double stranded calf-thymus DNA (dsDNA) (GCE/bCNT-dsDNA). Cyclic voltammetry measurements demonstrated that PMZ presents a thin film-confined redox behavior at GCE/bCNT-dsDNA, opposite to the irreversibly-adsorbed behavior obtained at GCE modified with bCNT dispersed in ethanol (GCE/bCNT). Differential pulse voltammetry-adsorptive stripping with medium exchange experiments performed with GCE/bCNT-dsDNA and GCE modified with bCNTs dispersed in single-stranded calf-thymus DNA (ssDNA) confirmed that the interaction between PMZ and bCNT-dsDNA is mainly hydrophobic. These differences are due to the intercalation of PMZ within the dsDNA that supports the bCNTs, as evidenced from the bathochromic displacement of UV-Vis absorption spectra of PMZ and quantum dynamics calculations at DFTB level. The efficient accumulation of PMZ at GCE/bCNT-dsDNA made possible its sensitive quantification at nanomolar levels (sensitivity: (3.50±0.05)×10(8) μA·cm(-2)·M(-1) and detection limit: 23 nM). The biosensor was successfully used for the determination of PMZ in a pharmaceutical product with excellent correlation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. DNA double-strand breaks induced by cavitational mechanical effects of ultrasound in cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukihiro Furusawa

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic technologies pervade the medical field: as a long established imaging modality in clinical diagnostics; and, with the emergence of targeted high intensity focused ultrasound, as a means of thermally ablating tumours. In parallel, the potential of [non-thermal] intermediate intensity ultrasound as a minimally invasive therapy is also being rigorously assessed. Here, induction of apoptosis in cancer cells has been observed, although definitive identification of the underlying mechanism has thus far remained elusive. A likely candidate process has been suggested to involve sonochemical activity, where reactive oxygen species (ROS mediate the generation of DNA single-strand breaks. Here however, we provide compelling new evidence that strongly supports a purely mechanical mechanism. Moreover, by a combination of specific assays (neutral comet tail and staining for γH2AX foci formation we demonstrate for the first time that US exposure at even moderate intensities exhibits genotoxic potential, through its facility to generate DNA damage across multiple cancer lines. Notably, colocalization assays highlight that ionizing radiation and ultrasound have distinctly different signatures to their respective γH2AX foci formation patterns, likely reflecting the different stress distributions that initiated damage formation. Furthermore, parallel immuno-blotting suggests that DNA-PKcs have a preferential role in the repair of ultrasound-induced damage.

  18. Rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks in X-irradiated CHO cells studied by constant- and graded-field gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahm-Daphi, J.; Dikomey, E.

    1996-01-01

    Induction and repair of double-strand breaks (dsb) were measured in exponentially growing CHO-10A cells using the constant- and graded-field gel electrophoresis. Dsb repair was studied after an X-ray dose of 60Gy. The repair curve obtained was biphasic with the respective half-times of τ 1 = 3.8 ± 0.9 and τ 2 = 118 ± 30 min. The number of non-reparable dsb was measured for X-ray doses up to 180 Gy and was found to be only a small fraction (14%) of all non-rejoinable breaks determined previously using the alkaline unwinding technique. The ratio of non-reparable dsb to the number of lethal events calculated from survival curves is 0.14:1. This result indicates that for CHO cells non-reparable dsb represent only a small fraction of lethal damage. This is in line with the cytogenic observation that cell killing mainly results from mis-rejoined events (i.e. exchange aberrations, translocations, interstitial delections). The kinetics of dsb rejoining were found to be independent of the size of the fragments involved (between 1 and 10 Mbp). In addition, the rejoining kinetics of DNA fragments ≤ 1 Mbp did not show the formation of new DNA fragments with time after irradiation indicating the absence of programmed cell death in irradiated CHO cells. (author)

  19. Performance Characteristics of Different Anti-Double-Stranded DNA Antibody Assays in the Monitoring of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mahler

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We sought to evaluate different anti-double-stranded DNA assays for their performance characteristics in monitoring disease activity fluctuations in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Methods. 36 active SLE patients were followed monthly. At each study visit (total n=371, blood was collected and disease activity was scored using the SELENA-SLEDAI (excluding anti-dsDNA or complement components and by a physician’s global assessment (PGA. Four anti-dsDNA tests were compared. Linear mixed-effects models with random intercept and fixed slopes were used to evaluate the relationship between the longitudinal fluctuations of disease activity and anti-dsDNA titers. Results. At enrollment, positivity for QUANTA Lite and high-avidity anti-dsDNA assay was both 64% and significantly lower than anti-dsDNA positivity by QUANTA Flash (83% and CLIFT (96%. Linear mixed-effects modeling indicated that the change in clinical SELENA-SLEDAI scores was associated with the titers of all anti-dsDNA with QUANTA Flash yielding the highest marginal R2 (0.15; p<0.01. QUANTA Flash was the only anti-dsDNA assay significantly associated with the change in PGA (marginal R2=0.05; p<0.01. Conclusion. These data indicate that anti-dsDNA antibodies determined by QUANTA Flash have a value in monitoring SLE disease activity.

  20. Collaborative action of Brca1 and CtIP in elimination of covalent modifications from double-strand breaks to facilitate subsequent break repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoko Nakamura

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Topoisomerase inhibitors such as camptothecin and etoposide are used as anti-cancer drugs and induce double-strand breaks (DSBs in genomic DNA in cycling cells. These DSBs are often covalently bound with polypeptides at the 3' and 5' ends. Such modifications must be eliminated before DSB repair can take place, but it remains elusive which nucleases are involved in this process. Previous studies show that CtIP plays a critical role in the generation of 3' single-strand overhang at "clean" DSBs, thus initiating homologous recombination (HR-dependent DSB repair. To analyze the function of CtIP in detail, we conditionally disrupted the CtIP gene in the chicken DT40 cell line. We found that CtIP is essential for cellular proliferation as well as for the formation of 3' single-strand overhang, similar to what is observed in DT40 cells deficient in the Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 complex. We also generated DT40 cell line harboring CtIP with an alanine substitution at residue Ser332, which is required for interaction with BRCA1. Although the resulting CtIP(S332A/-/- cells exhibited accumulation of RPA and Rad51 upon DNA damage, and were proficient in HR, they showed a marked hypersensitivity to camptothecin and etoposide in comparison with CtIP(+/-/- cells. Finally, CtIP(S332A/-/-BRCA1(-/- and CtIP(+/-/-BRCA1(-/- showed similar sensitivities to these reagents. Taken together, our data indicate that, in addition to its function in HR, CtIP plays a role in cellular tolerance to topoisomerase inhibitors. We propose that the BRCA1-CtIP complex plays a role in the nuclease-mediated elimination of oligonucleotides covalently bound to polypeptides from DSBs, thereby facilitating subsequent DSB repair.

  1. Recruitment of the cohesin loading factor NIPBL to DNA double-strand breaks depends on MDC1, RNF168 and HP1γ in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Yasuyoshi; Suzuki, Keiji; Yamauchi, Motohiro; Mitsutake, Norisato; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → NIPBL is recruited to DSBs. → Localization of NIPBL to DSBs is regulated by MDC1 and RNF168. → HP1γ is required for NIPBL accumulation at DSBs. -- Abstract: The cohesin loading factor NIPBL is required for cohesin to associate with chromosomes and plays a role in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Although the NIPBL homolog Scc2 is recruited to an enzymatically generated DSB and promotes cohesin-dependent DSB repair in yeast, the mechanism of the recruitment remains poorly understood. Here we show that the human NIPBL is recruited to the sites of DNA damage generated by micro-irradiation as well as to the sites of DSBs induced by homing endonuclease, I-PpoI. The recruitment of NIPBL was impaired by RNAi-mediated knockdown of MDC1 or RNF168, both of which also accumulate at DSBs. We also show that the recruitment of NIPBL to the sites of DNA damage is mediated by its C-terminal region containing HEAT repeats and Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) interacting motif. Furthermore, NIPBL accumulation at damaged sites was also compromised by HP1γ depletion. Taken together, our study reveals that human NIPBL is a novel protein recruited to DSB sites, and the recruitment is controlled by MDC1, RNF168 and HP1γ.

  2. Synapsis-Defective Mutants Reveal a Correlation Between Chromosome Conformation and the Mode of Double-Strand Break Repair During Caenorhabditis elegans Meiosis

    OpenAIRE

    Smolikov, Sarit; Eizinger, Andreas; Hurlburt, Allison; Rogers, Eric; Villeneuve, Anne M.; Colaiácovo, Mónica P.

    2007-01-01

    SYP-3 is a new structural component of the synaptonemal complex (SC) required for the regulation of chromosome synapsis. Both chromosome morphogenesis and nuclear organization are altered throughout the germlines of syp-3 mutants. Here, our analysis of syp-3 mutants provides insights into the relationship between chromosome conformation and the repair of meiotic double-strand breaks (DSBs). Although crossover recombination is severely reduced in syp-3 mutants, the production of viable offspri...

  3. Double-strand break repair and colorectal cancer: gene variants within 3' UTRs and microRNAs binding as modulators of cancer risk and clinical outcome.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Naccarati, Alessio; Rosa, F.; Vymetálková, Veronika; Barone, E.; Jirásková, Kateřina; Gaetano, C.; Novotný, J.; Levý, M.; Vodičková, Ludmila; Gemignani, F.; Buchler, T.; Landi, S.; Vodička, Pavel; Pardini, B.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 17 (2016), s. 23156-23169 ISSN 1949-2553 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV15-26535A; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/12/1585; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-14789S Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : 3'UTR polymorphisms * colorectal cancer risk and clinical outcomes * double-strand break repair (DSBR) genes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.168, year: 2016

  4. DNA-incorporated 125I induces more than one double-strand break per decay in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmroth, Kecke; Stenerlöw, Bo

    2005-04-01

    The Auger-electron emitter 125I releases cascades of 20 electrons per decay that deposit a great amount of local energy, and for DNA-incorporated 125I, approximately one DNA double-strand break (DSB) is produced close to the decay site. To investigate the potential of 125I to induce additional DSBs within adjacent chromatin structures in mammalian cells, we applied DNA fragment-size analysis based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of hamster V79-379A cells exposed to DNA-incorporated 125IdU. After accumulation of decays at -70 degrees C in the presence of 10% DMSO, there was a non-random distribution of DNA fragments with an excess of fragments even higher. In contrast, using a conventional low-resolution assay without measurement of smaller DNA fragments, the yield was close to one DSB/decay. We conclude that a large fraction of the DSBs induced by DNA-incorporated 125I are nonrandomly distributed and that significantly more than one DSB/decay is induced in an intact cell. Thus, in addition to DSBs produced close to the decay site, DSBs may also be induced within neighboring chromatin fibers, releasing smaller DNA fragments that are not detected by conventional DSB assays.

  5. Relationship between internal dosimetry and DNA double strand breaks in lymphocytes after radionuclide therapy; Zusammenhang zwischen physikalischer Dosimetrie und DNA Doppelstrangbruechen in Lymphozyten nach Radionuklidtherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberlein, Uta

    2015-09-30

    In radionuclide therapy radiopharmaceuticals are administered mostly systemically. Primarily, beta-emitters are used because of their short range in tissue. As a result the radiopharmaceutical distributes within the human body and accumulates in organs and target structures. Thus, the body is irradiated internally, in contrast to external irradiation in radiotherapy. The pattern of the activity distribution within the human body is determined by the physical and chemical properties of the radiopharmaceutical. Furthermore, the amount of activity and its accumulation in organs or tissues is essential for the calculation of the absorbed dose which defines the energy deposited in the body by ionizing radiation. During internal or external irradiation, patients are exposed to ionizing radiation which does not only destroy the malignant cells but also damages healthy tissue and cells. This is mainly caused by direct and indirect interaction of the radiation with the DNA which damages the DNA structure. Most frequently, there are single strand breaks and base damages. DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are rare; nevertheless, they are the most critical lesions for cells as repairing the damage is difficult. Unrepaired or misrepaired DNA could cause mutations, chromosomal aberrations or lead to cell death. The formation of a DNA DSB in nuclear chromatin results in the rapid phosphorylation of the histone H2 variant H2AX, then called gamma-H2AX. Furthermore, DSBs also recruit the damage sensor 53BP1 to the chromatin surrounding the DSBs, which leads to 53BP1 and gamma-H2AX co-localization in the chromatin surrounding a DSB. By immunofluorescence staining with gamma-H2AX and 53BP1 antibodies those biomarkers can be addressed by microscopically visible DNA damage protein foci, this is also known as the DNA damage focus assay. With progression of DSB repair, gamma-H2AX and 53BP1 foci disappear. It is assumed that one focus corresponds to one DSB. Therefore, the number of foci per

  6. Application of laser-accelerated protons to the demonstration of DNA double-strand breaks in human cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogo, A.; Sato, K.; Nishikino, M.; Mori, M.; Teshima, T.; Numasaki, H.; Murakami, M.; Demizu, Y.; Akagi, S.; Nagayama, S.; Ogura, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Orimo, S.; Nishiuchi, M.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Ikegami, M.; Tampo, M.; Sakaki, H.; Suzuki, M.; Daito, I.; Oishi, Y.; Sugiyama, H.; Kiriyama, H.; Okada, H.; Kanazawa, S.; Kondo, S.; Shimomura, T.; Nakai, Y.; Tanoue, M.; Sasao, H.; Wakai, D.; Bolton, P. R.; Daido, H.

    2009-05-01

    We report the demonstrated irradiation effect of laser-accelerated protons on human cancer cells. In vitro (living) A549 cells are irradiated with quasimonoenergetic proton bunches of 0.8-2.4 MeV with a single bunch duration of 15 ns. Irradiation with the proton dose of 20 Gy results in a distinct formation of γ-H2AX foci as an indicator of DNA double-strand breaks generated in the cancer cells. This is a pioneering result that points to future investigations of the radiobiological effects of laser-driven ion beams. Unique high-current and short-bunch features make laser-driven proton bunches an excitation source for time-resolved determination of radical yields.

  7. Detection of DNA Double Strand Breaks by γH2AX Does Not Result in 53bp1 Recruitment in Mouse Retinal Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte Müller

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Gene editing is an attractive potential treatment of inherited retinopathies. However, it often relies on endogenous DNA repair. Retinal DNA repair is incompletely characterized in humans and animal models. We investigated recruitment of the double stranded break (DSB repair complex of γH2AX and 53bp1 in both developing and mature mouse neuroretinas. We evaluated the immunofluorescent retinal expression of these proteins during development (P07-P30 in normal and retinal degeneration models, as well as in potassium bromate induced DSB repair in normal adult (3 months retinal explants. The two murine retinopathy models used had different mutations in Pde6b: the severe rd1 and the milder rd10 models. Compared to normal adult retina, we found increased numbers of γH2AX positive foci in all retinal neurons of the developing retina in both model and control retinas, as well as in wild type untreated retinal explant cultures. In contrast, the 53bp1 staining of the retina differed both in amount and character between cell types at all ages and in all model systems. There was strong pan nuclear staining in ganglion, amacrine, and horizontal cells, and cone photoreceptors, which was attenuated. Rod photoreceptors did not stain unequivocally. In all samples, 53bp1 stained foci only rarely occurred. Co-localization of 53bp1 and γH2AX staining was a very rare event (< 1% of γH2AX foci in the ONL and < 3% in the INL, suggesting the potential for alternate DSB sensing and repair proteins in the murine retina. At a minimum, murine retinal DSB repair does not appear to follow canonical pathways, and our findings suggests further investigation is warranted.

  8. Adaptation of the neutral bacterial comet assay to assess antimicrobial-mediated DNA double-strand breaks in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    SOLANKY, DIPESH; HAYDEL, SHELLEY E.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the mechanism of action of a natural antibacterial clay mineral mixture, designated CB, by investigating the induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in Escherichia coli. To quantify DNA damage upon exposure to soluble antimicrobial compounds, we modified a bacterial neutral comet assay, which primarily associates the general length of an electrophoresed chromosome, or comet, with the degree of DSB-associated DNA damage. To appropriately account for antimicrobial-mediated strand fragmentation, suitable control reactions consisting of exposures to water, ethanol, kanamycin, and bleomycin were developed and optimized for the assay. Bacterial exposure to the CB clay resulted in significantly longer comet lengths, compared to water and kanamycin exposures, suggesting that the induction of DNA DSBs contributes to the killing activity of this antibacterial clay mineral mixture. The comet assay protocol described herein provides a general technique for evaluating soluble antimicrobial-derived DNA damage and for comparing DNA fragmentation between experimental and control assays. PMID:22940101

  9. X-ray-induced DNA double-strand breaks after angiographic examinations of different anatomic regions; Strahleninduzierte DNA-Doppelstrangbrueche nach Angiografien verschiedener Koerperregionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuefner, M.A.; Schwab, S.A.; Azoulay, S.; Heckmann, M.; Heinrich, M.C.; Uder, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen (Germany). Radiologisches Inst.; Grudzenski, S.; Lobrich, M. [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany). Strahlenbiologie und DNA-Reparatur

    2009-04-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in blood lymphocytes as markers of the biological radiation effects in angiography patients. Materials and Methods: The method is based on the phosphorylation of the histone variant H 2AX ({gamma}-H2AX) after formation of DSBs. Blood samples were collected before and up to 24 hours after exposure of 31 patients undergoing angiographies of different body regions. Blood lymphocytes were isolated, fixed, and stained with a specific {gamma}-H2AX antibody. Distinct foci representing DSBs were enumerated using fluorescence microscopy. Additional in-vitro experiments (10 - 100 mGy) were performed for evaluation of DBS repair. Results: 15 minutes after the end of fluoroscopy values between 0.01 and 1.50 DSBs per cell were obtained. The DNA damage level normalized to the dose area product was 0.099 (cardiac angiographies), 0.053 (abdominal angiographies), 0.023 (pelvic/leg angiographies) and 0.004 excess foci/cell/mGym{sup 2} (cerebrovascular angiographies). A linear correlation was found between {gamma}-H2AX foci levels and the dose area product (abdomen: R2 = 0.96; pelvis/legs: R2 = 0.71). In-vivo on average 46 % of DSBs disappeared within 1 hour and 70 % within 2.5 hours. Conclusion: {gamma}-H2AX immunofluorescence microscopy is a sensitive and reliable method for the determination of X-ray-induced DSBs during angiography. The DNA damage level depends on the dose, the exposed anatomic region, and the duration/fractionation of the X-ray exposure. (orig.)

  10. Arabidopsis DNA polymerase lambda mutant is mildly sensitive to DNA double strand breaks but defective in integration of a transgene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Furukawa, T.; Angelis, Karel; Britt, A.B.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, MAY 27 (2015) ISSN 1664-462X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-06595S Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : DNA polymerase * DNA repair * Non homologous end joining Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.495, year: 2015

  11. DNA double-strand braks serve as a major factor for the expression of Arabidopsis Argonaute 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Beom; Chung, Moon Soo; Lee, Gun Woong; Chung, Byung Yeoup [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Argonaute 2 (AtAGO2) is a well characterized effector protein in Arabidopsis for its functionalities associated with DNA double-strand break (DSB)-induced small RNAs (diRNAs) and for its inducible expression upon γ-irradiation. However, its transcriptional regulation depending on the recovery time after the irradiation and on the specific response to DSBs has been poorly understood. We analyzed the 1,313 bp promoter sequence of the AtAGO2 gene (1.3kb{sub pro}) to characterize the transcriptional regulation of AtAGO2 at various recovery times after γ-irradiation. A stable transformant harboring 1.3kbpro fused with GUS gene showed that the AtAGO2 is highly expressed in response to γ-irradiation, after which the expression of the gene is gradually decreased until 5 days of DNA damage recovery. We also confrm that the AtAGO2 expression patterns are similar to that of γ-irradiation after the treatments of radiomimetic genotoxins (bleomycin and zeocin). However, methyl methanesulfonate and mitomycin C, which are associated with the inhibition of DNA replication, do not induce the expression of the AtAGO2, suggesting that the expression of the AtAGO2 is closely related with DNA DSBs rather than DNA replication.

  12. Cell-type specific role of the RNA-binding protein, NONO, in the DNA double-strand break response in the mouse testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuyi; Shu, Feng-Jue; Li, Zhentian; Jaafar, Lahcen; Zhao, Shourong; Dynan, William S

    2017-03-01

    The tandem RNA recognition motif protein, NONO, was previously identified as a candidate DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair factor in a biochemical screen for proteins with end-joining stimulatory activity. Subsequent work showed that NONO and its binding partner, SFPQ, have many of the properties expected for bona fide repair factors in cell-based assays. Their contribution to the DNA damage response in intact tissue in vivo has not, however, been demonstrated. Here we compare DNA damage sensitivity in the testes of wild-type mice versus mice bearing a null allele of the NONO homologue (Nono gt ). In wild-type mice, NONO protein was present in Sertoli, peritubular myoid, and interstitial cells, with an increase in expression following induction of DNA damage. As expected for the product of an X-linked gene, NONO was not detected in germ cells. The Nono gt/0 mice had at most a mild testis developmental phenotype in the absence of genotoxic stress. However, following irradiation at sublethal, 2-4 Gy doses, Nono gt/0 mice displayed a number of indicators of radiosensitivity as compared to their wild-type counterparts. These included higher levels of persistent DSB repair foci, increased numbers of apoptotic cells in the seminiferous tubules, and partial degeneration of the blood-testis barrier. There was also an almost complete loss of germ cells at later times following irradiation, evidently arising as an indirect effect reflecting loss of stromal support. Results demonstrate a role for NONO protein in protection against direct and indirect biological effects of ionizing radiation in the whole animal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Induction of DNA double-strand breaks by restriction enzymes in X-ray-sensitive mutant Chinese hamster ovary cells measured by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinashi, Yuko; Nagasawa, Hatsumi; Little, J.B.; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Iliakis, G.E.

    1995-01-01

    This investigation was designed to determine whether the cytotoxic effects of different restriction endonucleases are related to the number and type of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) they produce. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) K1 and xrs-5 cells, a radiosensitive mutant of CHO K1, were exposed to restriction endonucleases HaeIII, HinfI, PvuII and BamHI by electroporation. These enzymes represent both blunt and sticky end cutters with differing recognition sequence lengths. The number of DSBs was measured by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Two forms of PFGE were employed: asymmetric field-inversion gel electrophoresis (AFIGE) for measuring the kinetics of DNA breaks by enzyme digestion and clamped homogeneous gel electrophoresis (CHEF) for examining the size distributions of damaged DNA. The amount of DNA damage induced by exposure to all four restriction enzymes was significantly greater in xrs-5 compared to CHO K1 cells, consistent with the reported DSB repair deficiency in these cells. Since restriction endonucleases produce DSBs alone as opposed to the various types of DNA damage induced by X rays, these results confirm that the repair defect in this mutant involves the rejoining of DSBs. Although the cutting frequency was directly related to the length of the recognition sequence for four restriction enzymes, there was no simple correlation between the cytotoxic effect and the amount of DNA damage produced by each enzyme in either cell line. This finding suggests that the type or nature of the cutting sequence itself may play a role in restriction enzyme-induced cell killing. 32 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  14. Detecting DNA double-stranded breaks in mammalian genomes by linear amplification-mediated high-throughput genome-wide translocation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiazhi; Meyers, Robin M; Dong, Junchao; Panchakshari, Rohit A; Alt, Frederick W; Frock, Richard L

    2016-05-01

    Unbiased, high-throughput assays for detecting and quantifying DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) across the genome in mammalian cells will facilitate basic studies of the mechanisms that generate and repair endogenous DSBs. They will also enable more applied studies, such as those to evaluate the on- and off-target activities of engineered nucleases. Here we describe a linear amplification-mediated high-throughput genome-wide sequencing (LAM-HTGTS) method for the detection of genome-wide 'prey' DSBs via their translocation in cultured mammalian cells to a fixed 'bait' DSB. Bait-prey junctions are cloned directly from isolated genomic DNA using LAM-PCR and unidirectionally ligated to bridge adapters; subsequent PCR steps amplify the single-stranded DNA junction library in preparation for Illumina Miseq paired-end sequencing. A custom bioinformatics pipeline identifies prey sequences that contribute to junctions and maps them across the genome. LAM-HTGTS differs from related approaches because it detects a wide range of broken end structures with nucleotide-level resolution. Familiarity with nucleic acid methods and next-generation sequencing analysis is necessary for library generation and data interpretation. LAM-HTGTS assays are sensitive, reproducible, relatively inexpensive, scalable and straightforward to implement with a turnaround time of <1 week.

  15. Iodination as a probe for small regions of disrupted secondary structure in double-stranded DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Frank; Nes, Ingolf F.; Wells, Robert D.

    1976-01-01

    Conditions were established where the thallium-catalyzed iodination of random coil DNA proceeded 100–200 times faster than for native DNA. This reaction was explored as a probe for localized regions of disrupted base pairs in duplex DNA. A heteroduplex was constructed between DNA fragments produced...

  16. Importance of the efficiency of double-stranded DNA formation in cDNA synthesis for the imprecision of microarray expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thormar, Hans G; Gudmundsson, Bjarki; Eiriksdottir, Freyja; Kil, Siyoen; Gunnarsson, Gudmundur H; Magnusson, Magnus Karl; Hsu, Jason C; Jonsson, Jon J

    2013-04-01

    The causes of imprecision in microarray expression analysis are poorly understood, limiting the use of this technology in molecular diagnostics. Two-dimensional strandness-dependent electrophoresis (2D-SDE) separates nucleic acid molecules on the basis of length and strandness, i.e., double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), and RNA·DNA hybrids. We used 2D-SDE to measure the efficiency of cDNA synthesis and its importance for the imprecision of an in vitro transcription-based microarray expression analysis. The relative amount of double-stranded cDNA formed in replicate experiments that used the same RNA sample template was highly variable, ranging between 0% and 72% of the total DNA. Microarray experiments showed an inverse relationship between the difference between sample pairs in probe variance and the relative amount of dsDNA. Approximately 15% of probes showed between-sample variation (P cDNA synthesized can be an important component of the imprecision in T7 RNA polymerase-based microarray expression analysis. © 2013 American Association for Clinical Chemistry

  17. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in lymphoma patients is associated with a decrease in the double strand break repair capacity of peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacoste, Sandrine; Bhatia, Smita; Chen, Yanjun; Bhatia, Ravi; O'Connor, Timothy R

    2017-01-01

    Patients who undergo autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (aHCT) for treatment of a relapsed or refractory lymphoma are at risk of developing therapy related- myelodysplasia/acute myeloid leukemia (t-MDS/AML). Part of the risk likely resides in inherent interindividual differences in their DNA repair capacity (DRC), which is thought to influence the effect chemotherapeutic treatments have on the patient's stem cells prior to aHCT. Measuring DRC involves identifying small differences in repair proficiency among individuals. Initially, we investigated the cell model in healthy individuals (primary lymphocytes and/or lymphoblastoid cell lines) that would be appropriate to measure genetically determined DRC using host-cell reactivation assays. We present evidence that interindividual differences in DRC double-strand break repair (by non-homologous end-joining [NHEJ] or single-strand annealing [SSA]) are better preserved in non-induced primary lymphocytes. In contrast, lymphocytes induced to proliferate are required to assay base excision (BER) or nucleotide excision repair (NER). We established that both NHEJ and SSA DRCs in lymphocytes of healthy individuals were inversely correlated with the age of the donor, indicating that DSB repair in lymphocytes is likely not a constant feature but rather something that decreases with age (~0.37% NHEJ DRC/year). To investigate the predictive value of pre-aHCT DRC on outcome in patients, we then applied the optimized assays to the analysis of primary lymphocytes from lymphoma patients and found that individuals who later developed t-MDS/AML (cases) were indistinguishable in their DRC from controls who never developed t-MDS/AML. However, when DRC was investigated shortly after aHCT in the same individuals (21.6 months later on average), aHCT patients (both cases and controls) showed a significant decrease in DSB repair measurements. The average decrease of 6.9% in NHEJ DRC observed among aHCT patients was much higher

  18. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in lymphoma patients is associated with a decrease in the double strand break repair capacity of peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Lacoste

    Full Text Available Patients who undergo autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (aHCT for treatment of a relapsed or refractory lymphoma are at risk of developing therapy related- myelodysplasia/acute myeloid leukemia (t-MDS/AML. Part of the risk likely resides in inherent interindividual differences in their DNA repair capacity (DRC, which is thought to influence the effect chemotherapeutic treatments have on the patient's stem cells prior to aHCT. Measuring DRC involves identifying small differences in repair proficiency among individuals. Initially, we investigated the cell model in healthy individuals (primary lymphocytes and/or lymphoblastoid cell lines that would be appropriate to measure genetically determined DRC using host-cell reactivation assays. We present evidence that interindividual differences in DRC double-strand break repair (by non-homologous end-joining [NHEJ] or single-strand annealing [SSA] are better preserved in non-induced primary lymphocytes. In contrast, lymphocytes induced to proliferate are required to assay base excision (BER or nucleotide excision repair (NER. We established that both NHEJ and SSA DRCs in lymphocytes of healthy individuals were inversely correlated with the age of the donor, indicating that DSB repair in lymphocytes is likely not a constant feature but rather something that decreases with age (~0.37% NHEJ DRC/year. To investigate the predictive value of pre-aHCT DRC on outcome in patients, we then applied the optimized assays to the analysis of primary lymphocytes from lymphoma patients and found that individuals who later developed t-MDS/AML (cases were indistinguishable in their DRC from controls who never developed t-MDS/AML. However, when DRC was investigated shortly after aHCT in the same individuals (21.6 months later on average, aHCT patients (both cases and controls showed a significant decrease in DSB repair measurements. The average decrease of 6.9% in NHEJ DRC observed among aHCT patients was

  19. Rapid Recruitment of BRCA1 to DNA Double-Strand Breaks Is Dependent on Its Association with Ku80▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Leizhen; Lan, Li; Hong, Zehui; Yasui, Akira; Ishioka, Chikashi; Chiba, Natsuko

    2008-01-01

    BRCA1 is the first susceptibility gene to be linked to breast and ovarian cancers. Although mounting evidence has indicated that BRCA1 participates in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways, its precise mechanism is still unclear. Here, we analyzed the in situ response of BRCA1 at DSBs produced by laser microirradiation. The amino (N)- and carboxyl (C)-terminal fragments of BRCA1 accumulated independently at DSBs with distinct kinetics. The N-terminal BRCA1 fragment accumulated immediately after laser irradiation at DSBs and dissociated rapidly. In contrast, the C-terminal fragment of BRCA1 accumulated more slowly at DSBs but remained at the sites. Interestingly, rapid accumulation of the BRCA1 N terminus, but not the C terminus, at DSBs depended on Ku80, which functions in the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway, independently of BARD1, which binds to the N terminus of BRCA1. Two small regions in the N terminus of BRCA1 independently accumulated at DSBs and interacted with Ku80. Missense mutations found within the N terminus of BRCA1 in cancers significantly changed the kinetics of its accumulation at DSBs. A P142H mutant failed to associate with Ku80 and restore resistance to irradiation in BRCA1-deficient cells. These might provide a molecular basis of the involvement of BRCA1 in the NHEJ pathway of the DSB repair process. PMID:18936166

  20. Nbs1 ChIP-Seq Identifies Off-Target DNA Double-Strand Breaks Induced by AID in Activated Splenic B Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyne Khair

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID is required for initiation of Ig class switch recombination (CSR and somatic hypermutation (SHM of antibody genes during immune responses. AID has also been shown to induce chromosomal translocations, mutations, and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs involving non-Ig genes in activated B cells. To determine what makes a DNA site a target for AID-induced DSBs, we identify off-target DSBs induced by AID by performing chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP for Nbs1, a protein that binds DSBs, followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-Seq. We detect and characterize hundreds of off-target AID-dependent DSBs. Two types of tandem repeats are highly enriched within the Nbs1-binding sites: long CA repeats, which can form Z-DNA, and tandem pentamers containing the AID target hotspot WGCW. These tandem repeats are not nearly as enriched at AID-independent DSBs, which we also identified. Msh2, a component of the mismatch repair pathway and important for genome stability, increases off-target DSBs, similar to its effect on Ig switch region DSBs, which are required intermediates during CSR. Most of the off-target DSBs are two-ended, consistent with generation during G1 phase, similar to DSBs in Ig switch regions. However, a minority are one-ended, presumably due to conversion of single-strand breaks to DSBs during replication. One-ended DSBs are repaired by processes involving homologous recombination, including break-induced replication repair, which can lead to genome instability. Off-target DSBs, especially those present during S phase, can lead to chromosomal translocations, deletions and gene amplifications, resulting in the high frequency of B cell lymphomas derived from cells that express or have expressed AID.

  1. Direct evidence for sequence-dependent attraction between double-stranded DNA controlled by methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jejoong; Kim, Hajin; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Ha, Taekjip

    2016-03-22

    Although proteins mediate highly ordered DNA organization in vivo, theoretical studies suggest that homologous DNA duplexes can preferentially associate with one another even in the absence of proteins. Here we combine molecular dynamics simulations with single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments to examine the interactions between duplex DNA in the presence of spermine, a biological polycation. We find that AT-rich DNA duplexes associate more strongly than GC-rich duplexes, regardless of the sequence homology. Methyl groups of thymine acts as a steric block, relocating spermine from major grooves to interhelical regions, thereby increasing DNA-DNA attraction. Indeed, methylation of cytosines makes attraction between GC-rich DNA as strong as that between AT-rich DNA. Recent genome-wide chromosome organization studies showed that remote contact frequencies are higher for AT-rich and methylated DNA, suggesting that direct DNA-DNA interactions that we report here may play a role in the chromosome organization and gene regulation.

  2. Investigation of DNA double strand breaks induced by α particle and 7Li ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong Fuquan; Cai Minghui; Zhao Kui; Guo Jiyu; Ni Meinan; Sui Li; Yang Mingjian; Zhan Yong

    2006-01-01

    α particles and Lithium ions were produced by 241 Am radiation source and HI-13 tandem accelerator at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) respectively to simulate ionizing radiation in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) process. Plasmid DNA in aqueous solution was irradiated and the DNA fragments were imaged by AFM. The image software ImageJ was used to measure the length of DNA fragments. The length distribution and conformation changes of DNA fragments were assessed. Our results showed that the mean length of DNA fragments as well as the fraction of linear and open circle DNA molecules decreased by dose. At higher dose, Lithium ions induced more pronounced relative biological effects than α particles. (author)

  3. Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase is activated by double-stranded DNA-induced oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Shu, Chang; Yi, Guanghui; Chaton, Catherine T; Shelton, Catherine L; Diao, Jiasheng; Zuo, Xiaobing; Kao, C Cheng; Herr, Andrew B; Li, Pingwei

    2013-12-12

    Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) is a cytosolic DNA sensor mediating innate antimicrobial immunity. It catalyzes the synthesis of a noncanonical cyclic dinucleotide, 2',5' cGAMP, that binds to STING and mediates the activation of TBK1 and IRF-3. Activated IRF-3 translocates to the nucleus and initiates the transcription of the IFN-β gene. The structure of mouse cGAS bound to an 18 bp dsDNA revealed that cGAS interacts with dsDNA through two binding sites, forming a 2:2 complex. Enzyme assays and IFN-β reporter assays of cGAS mutants demonstrated that interactions at both DNA binding sites are essential for cGAS activation. Mutagenesis and DNA binding studies showed that the two sites bind dsDNA cooperatively and that site B plays a critical role in DNA binding. The structure of mouse cGAS bound to dsDNA and 2',5' cGAMP provided insight into the catalytic mechanism of cGAS. These results demonstrated that cGAS is activated by dsDNA-induced oligomerization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. An empirical model for the induction of double strand breaks in DNA by the indirect' action of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watt, D.E.; Hill, S.J.A.

    1994-01-01

    For calculation of radiation effects at low doses near environmental levels it is necessary to model both ''direct'' and ''indirect'' effects along single charged particle tracks in the equilibrium spectrum generated by the radiation field. The modelling approach used here to determine the ''indirect'' contribution to the damage to the DNA in mammalian cells is first to study the transition of damage from the solid to liquid phases at different concentrations of enzyme targets (known to be inactivated by single target, single hit kinetics). The respective contributions from direct and indirect action can then be separated. Results obtained in this laboratory for the inactivation of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase have been supplemented by data taken from the literature. A simple model of the radiation action has been derived. It succeeds in correlating all the data within the range of concentrations, radical scavenger, and LET used. From the results, information is obtained on the role of the dose rate; on diffusion lengths, on the type of radical predominantly responsible (OH·) for the inactivation and on scavenging of radicals. Since water radicals are thought to be the main cause of indirect damage in mammalian cells it is a simple step to deduce from the enzyme results the probability of induction of single and double strand breaks in the DNA by making the assumption that basically the same radical kinetics are involved and then applying Poisson probabilities. (author)

  5. p53 binding protein 1 foci as a biomarker of DNA double strand breaks induced by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, C.K.M.; Wong, M.Y.P.; Lam, R.K.K.; Ho, J.P.Y.; Chiu, S.K.; Yu, K.N.

    2011-01-01

    Foci of p53 binding protein 1 (53 BP1) have been used as a biomarker of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in cells induced by ionizing radiations. 53 BP1 was shown to relocalize into foci shortly after irradiation, with the number of foci closely paralleling the number of DNA DSBs. However, consensus on criteria in terms of the numbers of 53 BP1 foci to define cells damaged by direct irradiation or by bystander signals has not been reached, which is partly due to the presence of 53 BP1 also in normal cells. The objective of the present work was to study the changes in the distribution of cells with different numbers of 53 BP1 foci in a cell population after low-dose ionizing irradiation (<0.1 Gy) provided by alpha particles, with a view to propose feasible criteria for defining cells damaged by direct irradiation or by bystander signals. It was proposed that the change in the percentage of cells with 1-3 foci should be used for such purposes. The underlying reasons were discussed.

  6. A novel automatic quantification method for high-content screening analysis of DNA double strand-break response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jingwen; Lin, Jie; Zhang, Pengquan; Yang, Songnan; Sa, Yu; Feng, Yuanming

    2017-08-29

    High-content screening is commonly used in studies of the DNA damage response. The double-strand break (DSB) is one of the most harmful types of DNA damage lesions. The conventional method used to quantify DSBs is γH2AX foci counting, which requires manual adjustment and preset parameters and is usually regarded as imprecise, time-consuming, poorly reproducible, and inaccurate. Therefore, a robust automatic alternative method is highly desired. In this manuscript, we present a new method for quantifying DSBs which involves automatic image cropping, automatic foci-segmentation and fluorescent intensity measurement. Furthermore, an additional function was added for standardizing the measurement of DSB response inhibition based on co-localization analysis. We tested the method with a well-known inhibitor of DSB response. The new method requires only one preset parameter, which effectively minimizes operator-dependent variations. Compared with conventional methods, the new method detected a higher percentage difference of foci formation between different cells, which can improve measurement accuracy. The effects of the inhibitor on DSB response were successfully quantified with the new method (p = 0.000). The advantages of this method in terms of reliability, automation and simplicity show its potential in quantitative fluorescence imaging studies and high-content screening for compounds and factors involved in DSB response.

  7. High-affinity triplex targeting of double stranded DNA using chemically modified peptide nucleic acid oligomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mads E; Bentin, Thomas; Nielsen, Peter E

    2009-01-01

    While sequence-selective dsDNA targeting by triplex forming oligonucleotides has been studied extensively, only very little is known about the properties of PNA-dsDNA triplexes-mainly due to the competing invasion process. Here we show that when appropriately modified using pseudoisocytosine subs...

  8. Coalescence of DNA Double Strand Breaks Induced by Galactic Cosmic Radiation is Modulated by Genetics in 15 Inbred Strains of Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penninckx, Sebastien; Ray, Shayoni; Staatz, Kevin; Degorre, Charlotte; Guiet, Elodie; Viger, Louise; Snijders, Antoine M.; Mao, Jian-Hua; Karpen, Gary; Costes, Sylvain V.

    2018-01-01

    In this manuscript we address the challenges associated with the ability to predict radiation sensitivity associated with exposure to either cosmic radiation or X-rays in a population study, by monitoring DNA damage sensing protein 53BP1 forming small nuclear radiation-induced foci (RIF) as a surrogate biomarker of DNA double strand breaks (DSB). 76 primary skin fibroblasts were isolated from 10 collaborative cross strains and five reference inbred mice (C57Bl/6, BALB/CByJ, B6C3, C3H and CBA/CaJ) and exposed to three different charged nuclei of increasing LET (350 MeV/n Si, 350 MeV/n Ar and 600 MeV/n Fe) and X-ray. Our data brings strong evidence against the classic "contact-first" model where DSBs are assumed to be immobile and repaired at the lesion site. In contrast, our model suggests nearby DSBs move into single repair unit characterized by large RIF before the repair machinery kicks in. Such model has the advantage of being much more efficient molecularly but is poorly suited to deal with cosmic radiation, where energy is concentrated along the particle trajectory, inducing a large density of DSBs along each particle track. In accordance with this model, RIF quantification after X-ray exposition showed a saturated dose response for early time points post-irradiation for all strains. Similarly, the high-LET response showed that RIF number matched the number of track per cell, not the number of expected DSB per cell (1). At the temporal level, we noted that the percentage of unrepaired high-LET tracks over a 48 hour time-course increased with LET, confirming that the DNA repair process becomes more difficult as more DSB coalesce into single RIF. There was also good agreement between persistent RIF levels measured in-vitro in the primary skin cultures and survival levels of T-cells and B-cells collected in blood samples from 10 CC strains 24 hours after 0.1 Gy whole-body dose of X-ray. This suggests that persistent RIF 24 hour post-IR is a good surrogate in

  9. Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase is Activated by Double-stranded DNA-Induced Oligomerization

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xin; Shu, Chang; Yi, Guanghui; Chaton, Catherine T.; Shelton, Catherine L.; Diao, Jiasheng; Zuo, Xiaobing; Kao, C Cheng; Herr, Andrew B.; Li, Pingwei

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) is a cytosolic DNA sensor mediating innate antimicrobial immunity. It catalyzes the synthesis of a noncanonical cyclic dinucleotide 2′,5′ cGAMP that binds to STING and mediates the activation of TBK1 and IRF-3. Activated IRF-3 translocates to the nucleus and initiates the transcription of the IFN-β gene. The structure of mouse cGAS bound to an 18 bp dsDNA revealed that cGAS interacts with dsDNA through two binding sites, forming a 2:2 complex. Enzyme assays and ...

  10. Production of DNA Double Strand Breaks in Human Cells due to Acute Exposure to Tritiated Water (HTO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonen, R.; German, U.; Alfassi, Z. B.; Priel, E.

    2014-01-01

    The average and maximum energies of the beta emission from 3H are 5.69 keV and 18.6 keV respectively. The average range in water (or soft tissues), around 0.5 1/4m (500 nm), is considerably less than the typical diameter of a cell (10-30 1/4m), and even of a cell nucleus (5-10 1/4m), thus the micro-location of the tritium atom may well be crucial in determining its biochemical consequences. Due to the high ionization density of the beta particles emitted by tritium (about 400 ion pairs/1/4m) possible interaction of tritium beta radiation with DNA may play a significant role. Tritiated water (HTO) is the main chemical form in which tritium is found in the environment. In the body it may be retained as organically bound tritium (OBT), binding to biological molecules or remaining as OBT with various degrees of solubility. OBT can be retained in the human body much longer than HTO and therefore the dose arising from OBT can reach 50% of the total tritium dose . Histones are major protein components of chromatin. They function as spools around which DNA winds and play an important role in the regulation of gene expression. In the absence of histones, the DNA in chromosomes would be unmanageably long, as human cells each have about 1.8 m of DNA. During mitosis, DNA is duplicated and condensed, resulting in about 120 1/4m of chromosomes. It was recently reported that the phosphorylation of histone H2AX on serine residue 139 (D 3 -H2AX) is associated with Double Strand Breaks (DSB) sites in DNA), which indicates the possibility of research based on the detection of DSBs in DNA. The phosphorylated megabase chromatin domain surrounding the DSB can be immunostained and visualized as discrete foci by fluorescence microscopy, as each DNA DSB formed produces a visible D 3 -H2AX focus. Since 1 Gy of radiation produces approximately 60 DSBs/cell, doses of a few mGy should be distinguishable from the background, and it was recently shown that the exposure to 1 mGy of X-rays induces

  11. Mitochondrial DNA double-strand breaks in oligodendrocytes cause demyelination, axonal injury, and CNS inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Pernille M.; Pinto, Milena; Patel, Shreyans

    2017-01-01

    with time of induction. In addition, after short transient induction of mtDNA DSBs, PLP:mtPstI mice showed an exacerbated response to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Together, our data demonstrate that mtDNA damage can cause primary oligodendropathy, which in turn triggers demyelination, proving...... forms, which are not accurately reproduced in the models currently available. For this reason, the PLP: mtPstI mouse represents a unique and much needed platform for testing remyelinating therapies....

  12. The mechanism of double-stranded DNA sensing through the cGAS-STING pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Chang; Li, Xin; Li, Pingwei

    2014-12-01

    Microbial nucleic acids induce potent innate immune responses by stimulating the expression of type I interferons. Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) is a cytosolic dsDNA sensor mediating the innate immunity to microbial DNA. cGAS is activated by dsDNA and catalyze the synthesis of a cyclic dinucleotide cGAMP with 2',5' and 3',5'phosphodiester linkages. cGAMP binds to the adaptor STING located on the endoplasmic reticulum membrane and mediates the recruitment and activation of the protein kinase TBK1 and transcription factor IRF3. Phosphorylated IRF3 translocates to the nucleus and initiates the transcription of the IFN-β gene. The crystal structures of cGAS and its complex with dsDNA, STING and its complex with various cyclic dinucleotides have been determined recently. Here we summarize the results from these structural studies and provide an overview about the mechanism of cGAS activation by dsDNA, the catalytic mechanism of cGAS, and the structural basis of STING activation by cGAMP. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. hnRNP-U is a specific DNA-dependent protein kinase substrate phosphorylated in response to DNA double-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berglund, Fredrik M.; Clarke, Paul R.

    2009-01-01

    Cellular responses to DNA damage are orchestrated by the large phosphoinositol-3-kinase related kinases ATM, ATR and DNA-PK. We have developed a cell-free system to dissect the biochemical mechanisms of these kinases. Using this system, we identify heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U (hnRNP-U), also termed scaffold attachment factor A (SAF-A), as a specific substrate for DNA-PK. We show that hnRNP-U is phosphorylated at Ser59 by DNA-PK in vitro and in cells in response to DNA double-strand breaks. Phosphorylation of hnRNP-U suggests novel functions for DNA-PK in the response to DNA damage.

  14. Synapsis-defective mutants reveal a correlation between chromosome conformation and the mode of double-strand break repair during Caenorhabditis elegans meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolikov, Sarit; Eizinger, Andreas; Hurlburt, Allison; Rogers, Eric; Villeneuve, Anne M; Colaiácovo, Mónica P

    2007-08-01

    SYP-3 is a new structural component of the synaptonemal complex (SC) required for the regulation of chromosome synapsis. Both chromosome morphogenesis and nuclear organization are altered throughout the germlines of syp-3 mutants. Here, our analysis of syp-3 mutants provides insights into the relationship between chromosome conformation and the repair of meiotic double-strand breaks (DSBs). Although crossover recombination is severely reduced in syp-3 mutants, the production of viable offspring accompanied by the disappearance of RAD-51 foci suggests that DSBs are being repaired in these synapsis-defective mutants. Our studies indicate that once interhomolog recombination is impaired, both intersister recombination and nonhomologous end-joining pathways may contribute to repair during germline meiosis. Moreover, our studies suggest that the conformation of chromosomes may influence the mode of DSB repair employed during meiosis.

  15. Do Exogenous DNA Double-Strand Breaks Change Incomplete Synapsis and Chiasma Localization in the Grasshopper Stethophyma grossum?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela Calvente

    Full Text Available Meiotic recombination occurs as a programmed event that initiates by the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs that give rise to the formation of crossovers that are observed as chiasmata. Chiasmata are essential for the accurate chromosome segregation and the generation of new combinations of parental alleles. Some treatments that provoke exogenous DSBs also lead to alterations in the recombination pattern of some species in which full homologous synapsis is achieved at pachytene. We have carried out a similar approach in males of the grasshopper Stethophyma grossum, whose homologues show incomplete synapsis and proximal chiasma localization. After irradiating males with γ rays we have studied the distribution of both the histone variant γ-H2AX and the recombinase RAD51. These proteins are cytological markers of DSBs at early prophase I. We have inferred synaptonemal complex (SC formation via identification of SMC3 and RAD 21 cohesin subunits. Whereas thick and thin SMC3 filaments would correspond to synapsed and unsynapsed regions, the presence of RAD21 is only restricted to synapsed regions. Results show that irradiated spermatocytes maintain restricted synapsis between homologues. However, the frequency and distribution of chiasmata in metaphase I bivalents is slightly changed and quadrivalents were also observed. These results could be related to the singular nuclear polarization displayed by the spermatocytes of this species.

  16. Do Exogenous DNA Double-Strand Breaks Change Incomplete Synapsis and Chiasma Localization in the Grasshopper Stethophyma grossum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvente, Adela; Santos, Juan Luis; Rufas, Julio S

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic recombination occurs as a programmed event that initiates by the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that give rise to the formation of crossovers that are observed as chiasmata. Chiasmata are essential for the accurate chromosome segregation and the generation of new combinations of parental alleles. Some treatments that provoke exogenous DSBs also lead to alterations in the recombination pattern of some species in which full homologous synapsis is achieved at pachytene. We have carried out a similar approach in males of the grasshopper Stethophyma grossum, whose homologues show incomplete synapsis and proximal chiasma localization. After irradiating males with γ rays we have studied the distribution of both the histone variant γ-H2AX and the recombinase RAD51. These proteins are cytological markers of DSBs at early prophase I. We have inferred synaptonemal complex (SC) formation via identification of SMC3 and RAD 21 cohesin subunits. Whereas thick and thin SMC3 filaments would correspond to synapsed and unsynapsed regions, the presence of RAD21 is only restricted to synapsed regions. Results show that irradiated spermatocytes maintain restricted synapsis between homologues. However, the frequency and distribution of chiasmata in metaphase I bivalents is slightly changed and quadrivalents were also observed. These results could be related to the singular nuclear polarization displayed by the spermatocytes of this species.

  17. Age-dependent change of HMGB1 and DNA double-strand break accumulation in mouse brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enokido, Yasushi; Yoshitake, Ayaka; Ito, Hikaru; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2008-01-01

    HMGB1 is an evolutionarily conserved non-histone chromatin-associated protein with key roles in maintenance of nuclear homeostasis; however, the function of HMGB1 in the brain remains largely unknown. Recently, we found that the reduction of nuclear HMGB1 protein level in the nucleus associates with DNA double-strand break (DDSB)-mediated neuronal damage in Huntington's disease [M.L. Qi, K. Tagawa, Y. Enokido, N. Yoshimura, Y. Wada, K. Watase, S. Ishiura, I. Kanazawa, J. Botas, M. Saitoe, E.E. Wanker, H. Okazawa, Proteome analysis of soluble nuclear proteins reveals that HMGB1/2 suppress genotoxic stress in polyglutamine diseases, Nat. Cell Biol. 9 (2007) 402-414]. In this study, we analyze the region- and cell type-specific changes of HMGB1 and DDSB accumulation during the aging of mouse brain. HMGB1 is localized in the nuclei of neurons and astrocytes, and the protein level changes in various brain regions age-dependently. HMGB1 reduces in neurons, whereas it increases in astrocytes during aging. In contrast, DDSB remarkably accumulates in neurons, but it does not change significantly in astrocytes during aging. These results indicate that HMGB1 expression during aging is differentially regulated between neurons and astrocytes, and suggest that the reduction of nuclear HMGB1 might be causative for DDSB in neurons of the aged brain

  18. Pleolipoviridae, a newly proposed family comprising archaeal pleomorphic viruses with single-stranded or double-stranded DNA genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietilä, Maija K; Roine, Elina; Sencilo, Ana; Bamford, Dennis H; Oksanen, Hanna M

    2016-01-01

    Viruses infecting archaea show a variety of virion morphotypes, and they are currently classified into more than ten viral families or corresponding groups. A pleomorphic virus morphotype is very common among haloarchaeal viruses, and to date, several such viruses have been isolated. Here, we propose the classification of eight such viruses and formation of a new family, Pleolipoviridae (from the Greek pleo for more or many and lipos for lipid), containing three genera, Alpha-, Beta-, and Gammapleolipovirus. The proposal is currently under review by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV). The members of the proposed family Pleolipoviridae infect halophilic archaea and are nonlytic. They share structural and genomic features and differ from any other classified virus. The virion of pleolipoviruses is composed of a pleomorphic membrane vesicle enclosing the genome. All pleolipoviruses have two major structural protein species, internal membrane and spike proteins. Although the genomes of the pleolipoviruses are single- or double-stranded, linear or circular DNA molecules, they share the same genome organization and gene synteny and show significant similarity at the amino acid level. The canonical features common to all members of the proposed family Pleolipoviridae show that they are closely related and thus form a new viral family.

  19. Twist–radial normal mode analysis in double-stranded DNA chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torrellas, Germán; Maciá, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    We study the normal modes of a duplex DNA chain at low temperatures. We consider the coupling between the hydrogen-bond radial oscillations and the twisting motion of each base pair within the Peyrard–Bishop–Dauxois model. The coupling is mediated by the stacking interaction between adjacent base pairs along the helix. We explicitly consider different mass values for different nucleotides, extending previous works. We disclose several resonance conditions of interest, determined by the fine-tuning of certain model parameters. The role of these dynamical effects on the DNA chain charge transport properties is discussed.

  20. ZIP4H (TEX11 deficiency in the mouse impairs meiotic double strand break repair and the regulation of crossing over.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie A Adelman

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We have recently shown that hypomorphic Mre11 complex mouse mutants exhibit defects in the repair of meiotic double strand breaks (DSBs. This is associated with perturbation of synaptonemal complex morphogenesis, repair and regulation of crossover formation. To further assess the Mre11 complex's role in meiotic progression, we identified testis-specific NBS1-interacting proteins via two-hybrid screening in yeast. In this screen, Zip4h (Tex11, a male germ cell specific X-linked gene was isolated. Based on sequence and predicted structural similarity to the S. cerevisiae and A. thaliana Zip4 orthologs, ZIP4H appears to be the mammalian ortholog. In S. cerevisiae and A. thaliana, Zip4 is a meiosis-specific protein that regulates the level of meiotic crossovers, thus influencing homologous chromosome segregation in these organisms. As is true for hypomorphic Nbs1 (Nbs1(DeltaB/DeltaB mice, Zip4h(-/Y mutant mice were fertile. Analysis of spermatocytes revealed a delay in meiotic double strand break repair and decreased crossover formation as inferred from DMC1 and MLH1 staining patterns, respectively. Achiasmate chromosomes at the first meiotic division were also observed in Zip4h(-/Y mutants, consistent with the observed reduction in MLH1 focus formation. These results indicate that meiotic functions of Zip4 family members are conserved and support the view that the Mre11 complex and ZIP4H interact functionally during the execution of the meiotic program in mammals.

  1. The yield of DNA double strand breaks determined after exclusion of those forming from heat-labile lesions predicts tumor cell radiosensitivity to killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yanlei; Li, Fanghua; Mladenov, Emil; Iliakis, George

    2015-09-01

    The radiosensitivity to killing of tumor cells and in-field normal tissue are key determinants of radiotherapy response. In vitro radiosensitivity of tumor- and normal-tissue-derived cells often predicts radiation response, but high determination cost in time and resources compromise utility as routine response-predictor. Efforts to use induction or repair of DNA double-strand-breaks (DSBs) as surrogate-predictors of cell radiosensitivity to killing have met with limited success. Here, we re-visit this issue encouraged by our recent observations that ionizing radiation (IR) induces not only promptly-forming DSBs (prDSBs), but also DSBs developing after irradiation from the conversion to breaks of thermally-labile sugar-lesions (tlDSBs). We employ pulsed-field gel-electrophoresis and flow-cytometry protocols to measure total DSBs (tDSB=prDSB+tlDSBs) and prDSBs, as well as γH2AX and parameters of chromatin structure. We report a fully unexpected and in many ways unprecedented correlation between yield of prDSBs and radiosensitivity to killing in a battery of ten tumor cell lines that is not matched by yields of tDSBs or γH2AX, and cannot be explained by simple parameters of chromatin structure. We propose the introduction of prDSBs-yield as a novel and powerful surrogate-predictor of cell radiosensitivity to killing with potential for clinical application. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. TH-CD-201-11: Optimizing the Response and Cost of a DNA Double-Strand Break Dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obeidat, M; Cline, K; Stathakis, S; Papanikolaou, N; Rasmussen, K; Gutierrez, A; Ha, CS; Lee, SE; Shim, EY; Kirby, N [University of Texas HSC SA, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A DNA double-strand break (DSB) dosimeter was developed to measure the biological effect of radiation. The goal here is to refine the fabrication method of this dosimeter to reproducibly create a low coefficient of variation (CoV) and reduce the cost for the dosimeter. Methods: Our dosimeter consists of 4 kilo-base pair DNA strands (labeled on one end with biotin and on the other with fluorescein) attached to streptavidin magnetic beads. The final step of the DNA dosimeter fabrication is to suspend these attached beads in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). The amount of PBS used to suspend the attached beads and the relative volume of the DNA strands to the beads both affect the CoV and dosimeter cost. We diluted the beads attached with DNA in different volumes of PBS (100, 200, and 400 µL) to create different concentrations of the DNA dosimeter. Then we irradiated these dosimeters (50 µL samples) in a water-equivalent plastic phantom at 25 and 50 Gy (three samples per dose) and calculated the CoV for each dosimeter concentration. Also, we used different masses of DNA strands (1, 2, 8, 16, 24, and 32 µg) to attach to the same volume of magnetic beads (100 µL) to explore how this affects the cost of the dosimeter. Results: The lowest CoV was produced for the highest concentration of dosimeter (100 µL of PBS), which created CoV of 2.0 and 1.0% for 25 and 50 Gy, respectively. We found that the lowest production cost for the dosimeter occurs by attaching 16 µg of DNA strands with 100 µL of beads. Conclusion: : We optimized the fabrication of the DNA dosimeter to produce low CoV and cost, but we still need to explore ways to further improve the dosimeter for use at lower doses. This work was supported in part by Yarmouk University (Irbid, Jordan) and CPRIT (RP140105)

  3. The cumulative burden of double-stranded DNA virus detection after allogeneic HCT is associated with increased mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Joshua A; Mayer, Bryan T; Xie, Hu; Leisenring, Wendy M; Huang, Meei-Li; Stevens-Ayers, Terry; Milano, Filippo; Delaney, Colleen; Sorror, Mohamed L; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Nichols, Garrett; Zerr, Danielle M; Jerome, Keith R; Schiffer, Joshua T; Boeckh, Michael

    2017-04-20

    Strategies to prevent active infection with certain double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) viruses after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) are limited by incomplete understanding of their epidemiology and clinical impact. We retrospectively tested weekly plasma samples from allogeneic HCT recipients at our center from 2007 to 2014. We used quantitative PCR to test for cytomegalovirus, BK polyomavirus, human herpesvirus 6B, HHV-6A, adenovirus, and Epstein-Barr virus between days 0 and 100 post-HCT. We evaluated risk factors for detection of multiple viruses and association of viruses with mortality through day 365 post-HCT with Cox models. Among 404 allogeneic HCT recipients, including 125 cord blood, 125 HLA-mismatched, and 154 HLA-matched HCTs, detection of multiple viruses was common through day 100: 90% had ≥1, 62% had ≥2, 28% had ≥3, and 5% had 4 or 5 viruses. Risk factors for detection of multiple viruses included cord blood or HLA-mismatched HCT, myeloablative conditioning, and acute graft-versus-host disease ( P values < .01). Absolute lymphocyte count of <200 cells/mm 3 was associated with greater virus exposure on the basis of the maximum cumulative viral load area under the curve (AUC) ( P = .054). The maximum cumulative viral load AUC was the best predictor of early (days 0-100) and late (days 101-365) overall mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 1.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] [1.25, 1.49], and aHR = 1.04, 95% CI [1.0, 1.08], respectively) after accounting for immune reconstitution and graft-versus-host disease. In conclusion, detection of multiple dsDNA viruses was frequent after allogeneic HCT and had a dose-dependent association with increased mortality. These data suggest opportunities to improve outcomes with better antiviral strategies. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  4. MeHg Developing Exposure Causes DNA Double-Strand Breaks and Elicits Cell Cycle Arrest in Spinal Cord Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana F. Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The neurotoxicity caused by methylmercury (MeHg is well documented; however, the developmental neurotoxicity in spinal cord is still not fully understood. Here we investigated whether MeHg affects the spinal cord layers development. Chicken embryos at E3 were treated in ovo with 0.1 μg MeHg/50 μL saline solution and analyzed at E10. Thus, we performed immunostaining using anti-γ-H2A.X to recognize DNA double-strand breaks and antiphosphohistone H3, anti-p21, and anti-cyclin E to identify cells in proliferation and cell cycle proteins. Also, to identify neuronal cells, we used anti-NeuN and anti-βIII-tubulin antibodies. After the MeHg treatment, we observed the increase on γ-H2A.X in response to DNA damage. MeHg caused a decrease in the proliferating cells and in the thickness of spinal cord layers. Moreover, we verified that MeHg induced an increase in the number of p21-positive cells but did not change the cyclin E-positive cells. A significantly high number of TUNEL-positive cells indicating DNA fragmentation were observed in MeHg-treated embryos. Regarding the neuronal differentiation, MeHg induced a decrease in NeuN expression and did not change the expression of βIII-tubulin. These results showed that in ovo MeHg exposure alters spinal cord development by disturbing the cell proliferation and death, also interfering in early neuronal differentiation.

  5. Mobile phone radiofrequency exposure has no effect on DNA double strand breaks (DSB) in human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danese, Elisa; Lippi, Giuseppe; Buonocore, Ruggero; Benati, Marco; Bovo, Chiara; Bonaguri, Chiara; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Brocco, Giorgio; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Montagnana, Martina

    2017-07-01

    The use of mobile phones has been associated with an increased risk of developing certain type of cancer, especially in long term users. Therefore, this study was aimed to investigate the potential genotoxic effect of mobile phone radiofrequency exposure on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro. The study population consisted in 14 healthy volunteers. After collection of two whole blood samples, the former was placed in a plastic rack, 1 cm from the chassis of a commercial mobile phone (900 MHz carrier frequency), which was activated by a 30-min call. The second blood sample was instead maintained far from mobile phones or other RF sources. The influence of mobile phone RF on DNA integrity was assessed by analyzing γ-H2AX foci in lymphocytes using immunofluorescence staining kit on AKLIDES. No measure of γ-H2AX foci was significantly influenced by mobile phone RF exposure, nor mobile phone exposure was associated with significant risk of genetic damages in vitro (odds ratio comprised between 0.27 and 1.00). The results of this experimental study demonstrate that exposure of human lymphocytes to a conventional 900 MHz RF emitted by a commercial mobile phone for 30 min does not significantly impact DNA integrity.

  6. Optimization of Neutral Comet Assay for studying DNA double-strand breaks in pea and wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivelina Nikolova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes an adaptation of the Comet assay under neutral conditions for mono- and dicotyledonous plants pea (Pisum sativum L. and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.. Modifications concern lysis and electrophoresis steps, respectively. Electrophoresis was carried out varying the intensity of the electric field. A linear relationship between the percentages of DNA in the tail from control background with alteration of intensity was found. Trypan blue dye exclusion test was used in order to determine the intactness of nuclear membrane of the isolated nuclei from both plant model systems. Assessment was conducted on non-irradiated and irradiated nuclei on a monolayer with three doses of UVC. It was found that the share of intact nuclei (trypan blue negative ones is about 95% in controls. Gradual dose-related increase of damaged nuclei was observed in both species, reaching statistical significance only at the higher dose applied.

  7. TU-H-CAMPUS-TeP2-04: Measurement of Stereotactic Output Factors with DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, K; Obeidat, M; Stathakis, S; Kabat, C; Markovic, M; Papanikolaou, N; Rasmussen, K; Gutierrez, A; Ha, C; Lee, S; Shim, E; Kirby, N [University of Texas HSC SA, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy treatment is specified by radiation dose prescriptions, but biological DNA damage actually controls treatment effectiveness. It is impractical to directly measure dose in the clinic, so we measure quantities, such as collected charge, and calculate the relationship to dose. At small fields, such as those in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), charged-particle equilibrium (CPE) breaks down and the accuracy of the measurement for delivered dose decreases. By measuring DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) directly, we believe treatment accuracy could improve by providing a more meaningful measurement. Methods: A DNA dosimeter, consisting of magnetic streptavidin beads attached to 4 kilobase pair DNA strands labeled with biotin and fluorescein amidite (FAM) on opposing ends, was suspended in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Twenty µL samples were placed in plastic micro-capillary tubes inside a water tank setup and irradiated with 10 cm, 3 cm, 1.25 cm, 0.75 cm, and 0.5 cm radiation field sizes, where the three smallest sizes were cones. After irradiation, the dosimeters were mechanically separated into beads (intact DNA) and supernatant (broken DNA/FAM) using a magnet. The fluorescence was read and the probability of DSB was calculated. This was used to calculate the output factor for an SRS beam and compared to that measured using a diode detector. Results: The output factors relative to a 10 cm field were 0.89±0.07, 0.76±0.08, 0.59±0.04, and 0.78±0.12 for the field sizes of 3 cm, 1.25 cm, 0.75 cm, and 0.5 cm, respectively. Some of the diode measurements do not fall within these uncertainties. Conclusion: This was the first attempt to measure output factors in a water tank with the DNA dosimeter. Although differences compared to the diode were observed, the uncertainty analysis ignored systematic errors. For future work, we will repeat this experiment to quantify and correct systematic errors, such as those caused by positional alignment and sample

  8. A structural model of the genome packaging process in a membrane-containing double stranded DNA virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Hong

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Two crucial steps in the virus life cycle are genome encapsidation to form an infective virion and genome exit to infect the next host cell. In most icosahedral double-stranded (ds DNA viruses, the viral genome enters and exits the capsid through a unique vertex. Internal membrane-containing viruses possess additional complexity as the genome must be translocated through the viral membrane bilayer. Here, we report the structure of the genome packaging complex with a membrane conduit essential for viral genome encapsidation in the tailless icosahedral membrane-containing bacteriophage PRD1. We utilize single particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM and symmetry-free image reconstruction to determine structures of PRD1 virion, procapsid, and packaging deficient mutant particles. At the unique vertex of PRD1, the packaging complex replaces the regular 5-fold structure and crosses the lipid bilayer. These structures reveal that the packaging ATPase P9 and the packaging efficiency factor P6 form a dodecameric portal complex external to the membrane moiety, surrounded by ten major capsid protein P3 trimers. The viral transmembrane density at the special vertex is assigned to be a hexamer of heterodimer of proteins P20 and P22. The hexamer functions as a membrane conduit for the DNA and as a nucleating site for the unique vertex assembly. Our structures show a conformational alteration in the lipid membrane after the P9 and P6 are recruited to the virion. The P8-genome complex is then packaged into the procapsid through the unique vertex while the genome terminal protein P8 functions as a valve that closes the channel once the genome is inside. Comparing mature virion, procapsid, and mutant particle structures led us to propose an assembly pathway for the genome packaging apparatus in the PRD1 virion.

  9. A structural model of the genome packaging process in a membrane-containing double stranded DNA virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Chuan; Oksanen, Hanna M; Liu, Xiangan; Jakana, Joanita; Bamford, Dennis H; Chiu, Wah

    2014-12-01

    Two crucial steps in the virus life cycle are genome encapsidation to form an infective virion and genome exit to infect the next host cell. In most icosahedral double-stranded (ds) DNA viruses, the viral genome enters and exits the capsid through a unique vertex. Internal membrane-containing viruses possess additional complexity as the genome must be translocated through the viral membrane bilayer. Here, we report the structure of the genome packaging complex with a membrane conduit essential for viral genome encapsidation in the tailless icosahedral membrane-containing bacteriophage PRD1. We utilize single particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) and symmetry-free image reconstruction to determine structures of PRD1 virion, procapsid, and packaging deficient mutant particles. At the unique vertex of PRD1, the packaging complex replaces the regular 5-fold structure and crosses the lipid bilayer. These structures reveal that the packaging ATPase P9 and the packaging efficiency factor P6 form a dodecameric portal complex external to the membrane moiety, surrounded by ten major capsid protein P3 trimers. The viral transmembrane density at the special vertex is assigned to be a hexamer of heterodimer of proteins P20 and P22. The hexamer functions as a membrane conduit for the DNA and as a nucleating site for the unique vertex assembly. Our structures show a conformational alteration in the lipid membrane after the P9 and P6 are recruited to the virion. The P8-genome complex is then packaged into the procapsid through the unique vertex while the genome terminal protein P8 functions as a valve that closes the channel once the genome is inside. Comparing mature virion, procapsid, and mutant particle structures led us to propose an assembly pathway for the genome packaging apparatus in the PRD1 virion.

  10. Stripped-down DNA repair in a highly reduced parasite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fast Naomi M

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Encephalitozoon cuniculi is a member of a distinctive group of single-celled parasitic eukaryotes called microsporidia, which are closely related to fungi. Some of these organisms, including E. cuniculi, also have uniquely small genomes that are within the prokaryotic range. Thus, E. cuniculi has undergone a massive genome reduction which has resulted in a loss of genes from diverse biological pathways, including those that act in DNA repair. DNA repair is essential to any living cell. A loss of these mechanisms invariably results in accumulation of mutations and/or cell death. Six major pathways of DNA repair in eukaryotes include: non-homologous end joining (NHEJ, homologous recombination repair (HRR, mismatch repair (MMR, nucleotide excision repair (NER, base excision repair (BER and methyltransferase repair. DNA polymerases are also critical players in DNA repair processes. Given the close relationship between microsporidia and fungi, the repair mechanisms present in E. cuniculi were compared to those of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ascertain how the process of genome reduction has affected the DNA repair pathways. Results E. cuniculi lacks 16 (plus another 6 potential absences of the 56 DNA repair genes sought via BLASTP and PSI-BLAST searches. Six of 14 DNA polymerases or polymerase subunits are also absent in E. cuniculi. All of these genes are relatively well conserved within eukaryotes. The absence of genes is not distributed equally among the different repair pathways; some pathways lack only one protein, while there is a striking absence of many proteins that are components of both double strand break repair pathways. All specialized repair polymerases are also absent. Conclusion Given the large number of DNA repair genes that are absent from the double strand break repair pathways, E. cuniculi is a prime candidate for the study of double strand break repair with minimal machinery. Strikingly, all of the

  11. Effects of DNA double-strand and single-strand breaks on intrachromosomal recombination events in cell-cycle-arrested yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galli, A.; Schiestl, R.H.

    1998-01-01

    Intrachromosomal recombination between repeated elements can result in deletion (DEL recombination) events. We investigated the inducibility of such intrachromosomal recombination events at different stages of the cell cycle and the nature of the primary DNA lesions capable of initiating these events. Two genetic systems were constructed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that select for DEL recombination events between duplicated alleles of CDC28 and TUB2. We determined effects of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and single-strand breaks (SSBs) between the duplicated alleles on DEL recombination when induced in dividing cells or cells arrested in G1 or G2. Site-specific DSBs and SSBs were produced by overexpression of the I-Sce I endonuclease and the gene II protein (gIIp), respectively. I-Sce I-induced DSBs caused an increase in DEL recombination frequencies in both dividing and cell-cycle-arrested cells, indicating that G1- and G2-arrested cells are capable of completing DSB repair. In contrast, gIIp-induced SSBs caused an increase in DEL recombination frequency only in dividing cells. To further examine these phenomena we used both γ-irradiation, inducing DSBs as its most relevant lesion, and UV, inducing other forms of DNA damage. UV irradiation did not increase DEL recombination frequencies in G1 or G2, whereas γ-rays increased DEL recombination frequencies in both phases. Both forms of radiation, however, induced DEL recombination in dividing cells. The results suggest that DSBsbut not SSBs induce