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Sample records for repair congenital heart

  1. Pregnancy after fontan repair of complex congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoare, J V; Radford, D

    2001-11-01

    We describe four successful pregnancies in three women who had previously had a Fontan repair for congenital heart disease. Each pregnancy resulted in a live birth and there was no maternal mortality The infants were premature, being delivered at 26, 30 and 35 weeks, and weighing 1,020, 1,333 and 1,930 g respectively The fourth infant was born at 32 weeks and no birthweight is available. Maternal complications occurred and were those anticipated after a Fontan repair. Two mothers required treatment for supraventricular arrhythmias (atrial flutter and fibrillation). Ventricular failure was present in two mothers and required ongoing drug treatment. Raised systemic venous pressures caused peripheral oedema in two mothers and hepatomegaly and ascites in one mother. The physiology, potential complications, anaesthetic concerns and drug treatment in pregnancy after Fontan repair are discussed.

  2. Exercise Performance in Children and Young Adults After Complete and Incomplete Repair of Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Omer; Katz, Uriel; Reuveny, Ronen; Williams, Craig A; Dubnov-Raz, Gal

    2015-12-01

    Few previous studies have addressed exercise capacity in patients with corrected congenital heart disease (CHD) and significant anatomical residua. The aim of this study was to determine the aerobic fitness and peak cardiac function of patients with corrected CHD with complete or incomplete repairs, as determined by resting echocardiography. Children, adolescents and young adults (heart defect had decreased aerobic fitness, with evidence of impaired peak cardiac function and lower pulmonary perfusion. Patients that had undergone a complete repair had decreased aerobic fitness attributed only to deconditioning. These newly identified differences explain why in previous studies, the lowest fitness was seen in patients with the most hemodynamically significant heart malformations.

  3. Assessment of right ventricular systolic function by echocardiography after surgical repair of congenital heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khraiche, Diala; Ben Moussa, Nidhal

    2016-02-01

    Postoperative impairment of right ventricular (RV) systolic function can appear after surgical repair of complex congenital heart defects, such as tetralogy of Fallot; it is caused by chronic volume and/or pressure overload due to pulmonary regurgitation and/or stenosis. RV dysfunction is strongly associated with prognosis in these patients. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is the gold standard for quantification of RV volumes and ejection fraction in patients with congenital heart diseases; however, it is costly and is not widely available. Echocardiography is the imaging modality that is most available and most frequently used to assess RV systolic function. However, RV ejection fraction cannot be measured accurately by standard two-dimensional echocardiography because of its pyramidal shape. Surrogate parameters of RV systolic function are mostly used in routine practice. New techniques of two-dimensional strain and three-dimensional quantification of RV volumes and ejection fraction have been developed in recent years. The aim of this article is to show the pertinence of each variable of RV systolic function measured by echocardiography in patients with repaired congenital heart disease and residual chronic RV overload.

  4. Congenital heart defects and medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehin, Connie; Ragsdale, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Radiologic technologists perform imaging studies that are useful in the diagnosis of congenital heart defects in infants and adults. These studies also help to monitor congenital heart defect repairs in adults. This article describes the development and functional anatomy of the heart, along with the epidemiology and anatomy of congenital heart defects. It also discusses the increasing population of adults who have congenital heart defects and the most effective modalities for diagnosing, evaluating, and monitoring congenital heart defects.

  5. Congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001114.htm Congenital heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a problem with the heart's structure ...

  6. Assessment of Pulmonary Artery Stiffness of Repaired Congenital Heart Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Namheon; Banerjee, Rajit; Taylor, Michael; Hor, Kan

    2012-10-01

    Surgical correction or palliation of congenital heart disease (CHD) often requires augmenting the main pulmonary artery (MPA) with non-native material or placing a cylindrical graft. The degree to which this intervention affects PA compliance is largely unknown. In this study, the MPA stiffness characteristics were assessed by its compliance, distensibility, and pressure-strain modulus. Coregistered velocity encoded phase-contrast MRI and cardiac catheterization data were available for a cohort of repaired CHD patients (n=8) and controls (n=3). All patients were repaired with either an RV-PA conduit or a RV outflow tract patch. We measured the MPA area change by MRI and MPA pressure during the cath. The measurements were taken through or just distal to the conduit. The MPA compliance and distensibility for the patients were significantly lower than the controls: compliance (9.8±10.8 vs 28.3±7.7mm^2/mmHg, p<0.05), distensibility (2.2±1.5 vs 6.6±2.1%Area change/mmHg, p=0.05). The patients had a significantly higher pressure-strain modulus (152.3±116.4mmHg, p<0.05) than the controls (35.8±10.6mmHg). The abnormally elevated PA stiffness due to the rigidity of the conduit or patch material may cause a compliance mismatch resulting in high stress levels contributing to the observed progressive PA dilatation. This may be a factor in the progressive RV dilatation seen in this cohort of repaired CHD patients.

  7. Feasibility of exercise stress echocardiography and myocardial response in patients with repaired congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Babar S; Lunze, Fatima I; Alvi, Najveen; Shafer, Keri M; Rhodes, Jonathan

    2017-06-01

    Exercise stress echocardiography (ESE) can unmask ventricular dysfunction in asymptomatic patients with congenital heart disease (CHD), but its acquisition and interpretation is often challenging, and the method has not been validated in CHD. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of ESE using Doppler imaging and to assess myocardial response to exercise in patients with biventricular (BiV) and univentricular (UniV) circulation after CHD repair. In this single-center prospective study, we recruited 55 participants (17 females), median age 14 years (8-22 years). Our analysis categorized participants in these three groups: with structurally normal hearts as controls (n=21), with BiV circulation (n=20) and with UniV circulation (n=14). We acquired ESE images of the systemic ventricle including pulsed-wave flow and spectral tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) of lateral free wall before and immediately after standard, symptom-limited exercise tests on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. During ESE we obtained inflow E-wave and TDI systolic (S') and early diastolic (E') velocities in 93% to 100% of participants at rest and in 90% to 100% of participants post exercise. Feasibility to obtain Doppler imaging parameter was the same across study groups. The myocardial response to exercise was increase in heart rate (HR), S' and inflow E-wave velocity in all participants. Patients with BiV circulation had preserved ventricular function at rest. While patients with UniV circulation had low S', E', and E-wave velocities at rest in comparison to controls and to BiV group (all Pincreases in HR, S' velocity and inflow E-wave velocity post exercise, with magnitudes of these increases higher in controls than in the BiV and UniV group. The S' and E' velocities were strongly associated with lower percent predicted peak oxygen consumption VO2 (rs=0.614 and rs=0.64, respectively, both Pexercise in patients after biventricular and univentricular CHD repair. Although patients with Bi

  8. Congenital Heart Disease in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and genetics may play a role. Why congenital heart disease resurfaces in adulthood Some adults may find that ... in following adults with congenital heart disease. Congenital heart disease and pregnancy Women with congenital heart disease who ...

  9. What Are Congenital Heart Defects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are Congenital Heart Defects? Congenital (kon-JEN-ih-tal) heart defects are problems ... carry blood to the heart or the body Congenital heart defects change the normal flow of blood through the ...

  10. Factors Influencing Adaptation and Performance at Physical Exercise in Complex Congenital Heart Diseases after Surgical Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. P. Bassareo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last thirty years, steady progress in the diagnostic tools and care of subjects affected by congenital heart diseases (CHD has resulted in a significant increase in their survival to adulthood, even for those affected by complex CHD. Based on these premises, a number of teenagers and adults affected by corrected (surgically or through interventional techniques CHD ask to be allowed to undertake sporting activities, both at a recreational and competitive level. The purpose of this review is to examine the mechanisms influencing the adaption at physical exercise of patients suffering from complex CHD. The conclusion is that even if there are some modest risks with exercise, they should be seen in perspective, and the life-long benefits of regular exercise on general health, mood, and well-being should be emphasized.

  11. Perventricular device closure of residual muscular ventricular septal defects after repair of complex congenital heart defects in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Da; Tao, Kaiyu; An, Qi; Luo, Shuhua; Gan, Changping; Lin, Ke

    2013-01-01

    Residual muscular ventricular septal defects are surgical challenges, especially after the repair of complex congenital heart defects. We investigated perventricular device closure as a salvage technique in pediatric patients who had postoperative residual muscular ventricular septal defects. From February 2009 through June 2011, 14 pediatric patients at our hospital had residual muscular ventricular septal defects after undergoing surgical repair of complex congenital heart defects. Ten patients met our criteria for perventricular device closure of the residual defects: significant left-to-right shunting (Qp/Qs >1.5) or substantial hemodynamic instability (a defect ≥2 mm in size). The patients' mean age was 20.4 ± 13.5 months, and their mean body weight was 10 ± 3.1 kg. The median diameter of the residual defects was 4.2 mm (range, 2.5-5.1 mm). We deployed a total of 11 SQFDQ-II Muscular VSD Occluders (Shanghai Shape Memory Alloy Co., Ltd.; Shanghai, China) in the 10 patients, in accord with conventional techniques of perventricular device closure. The mean procedural duration was 31.1 ±9.1 min. We recorded the closure and complication rates perioperatively and during a 12-month follow-up period. Complete closure was achieved in 8 patients; 2 patients had persistent trivial residual shunts. No deaths, conduction block, device embolism, or other complications occurred throughout the study period. We conclude that perventricular device closure is a safe, effective salvage treatment for postoperative residual muscular ventricular septal defects in pediatric patients. Long-term studies with larger cohorts might further confirm this method's feasibility.

  12. Increased Atrial β-Adrenergic Receptors and GRK-2 Gene Expression Can Play a Fundamental Role in Heart Failure After Repair of Congenital Heart Disease with Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Marcela Silva; Carmona, Fabio; Vicente, Walter V A; Manso, Paulo H; Mata, Karina M; Celes, Mara Rúbia; Campos, Erica C; Ramos, Simone G

    2017-04-01

    Surgeries to correct congenital heart diseases are increasing in Brazil and worldwide. However, even with the advances in surgical techniques and perfusion, some cases, especially the more complex ones, can develop heart failure and death. A retrospective study of patients who underwent surgery for correction of congenital heart diseases with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in a university tertiary-care hospital that died, showed infarction in different stages of evolution and scattered microcalcifications in the myocardium, even without coronary obstruction. CPB is a process routinely used during cardiac surgery for congenital heart disease. However, CPB has been related to increased endogenous catecholamines that can lead to major injuries in cardiomyocytes. The mechanisms involved are not completely understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the alterations induced in the β-adrenergic receptors and GRK-2 present in atrial cardiomyocytes of infants with congenital heart disease undergoing surgical repair with CPB and correlate the alterations with functional and biochemical markers of ischemia/myocardial injury. The study consisted of right atrial biopsies of infants undergoing surgical correction in HC-FMRPUSP. Thirty-three cases were selected. Atrial biopsies were obtained at the beginning of CPB (group G1) and at the end of CPB (group G2). Real-time PCR, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence analysis were conducted to evaluate the expression of β1, β2-adrenergic receptors, and GRK-2 in atrial myocardium. Cardiac function was evaluated by echocardiography and biochemical analysis (N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-ProBNP), lactate, and cardiac troponin I). We observed an increase in serum lactate, NT-proBNP, and troponin I at the end of CPB indicating tissue hypoxia/ischemia. Even without major clinical consequences in cardiac function, these alterations were followed by a significant increase in gene expression of β1 and β2 receptors and

  13. Congenital Heart Defects (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Congenital Heart Defects KidsHealth > For Parents > Congenital Heart Defects A A A What's in this article? How ... a Problem en español Anomalías cardíacas congénitas A congenital heart defect is a problem in the heart's structure that ...

  14. Congenital heart defect - corrective surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hypoplastic left heart repair; Tetralogy of Fallot repair; Coarctation of the aorta repair; Atrial septal defect repair; ... done in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Coarctation of the aorta repair: Coarctation of the aorta ...

  15. Adults with Congenital Heart Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Updated:Aug 29,2017 ... the list below to learn more. Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Introduction Introduction: Adults with ...

  16. Optimizing paced ventricular function in patients with and without repaired congenital heart disease by contractility-guided lead implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpawich, Peter P; Singh, Harinder; Zelin, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the concept of optimizing ventricular pacing in regard to functional cardiac response. Lead implant based on physiologic variables of contractility at various sites was performed in patients with and without congenital heart disease (CHD). Since right ventricular apical pacing may adversely alter contractility and myocellular function, septal and outflow tract pacing have been advocated. However, there are few studies in the young and essentially none in those with CHD. A total of 113 consecutive patients with and without repaired CHD, aged two to 51 (median 16), some with preexisting epicardial pacemakers, underwent transvenous pacemaker implant using standard sensing/pacing indices plus measurements of pressures, QRS, and contractility responses at each of five predefined potential ventricular implant sites: apex, inflow-, low-, mid-, and infundibular/outflow-septal with each patient serving as his/her own control. Implant was at the site of best contractility with active-fixation, low-threshold steroid-eluting leads. Measured contractility indices varied up to 31% (mean 12%) between sites per patient. Septal regions (mid-, inflow-, and low-) were associated with the most optimal and right ventricular epicardial showed the worst contractility (P implant sites are patient and CHD variable. Current lead designs ensure chronic stability/performance regardless of site. Proactive contractility-guided pacing implant can optimize chronic paced ventricular function. ©2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Congenital heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    950283 Surgical treatment of congenital coronaryartery fistula.CAO Qingheng(曹庆亨),et al.DeptCardiovasc Surg,Shanghai Chest Hosp,Shanghai,200030.Shanghai Med J 1995;18(1):10-12.From October 1957 through December 1990,twenty-five patients with congenital coronary artery fistula(CCAF),including 3 cases complicated with giantcoronary artery aneurysms,underwent surgical repair.The ages ranged from 4 to 47 years (mean 19.8years).CCAF originated from the right coronaryartery in 17 cases (68.0%) and terminated into RA,RV,pulmonary artery (PA) or LV,in 8 cases (32.

  18. Congenital Heart Information Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Uwe Baemayr for The Congenital Heart Information Network Exempt organization under Section 501(c)3. Copyright ©1996 - 2016 C.H.I.N. All rights reserved TX4-390-685 Original site design and HTML by Panoptic Communications

  19. Congenital heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    970296 Evaluating the degree of pulmonary vascularlesions in congenital heart disease with selective pul-monary angiography. PAN Shiwei(潘世伟), et al.Fuwai Hosp, CAMS & PUMC, Beijing, 100037. Chin JCardiol 1997; 25(1): 39-41. Objective: To evaluate the degree of pulmonary vas-

  20. Types of Congenital Heart Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart develops. Examples of Simple Congenital Heart Defects Holes in the Heart (Septal Defects) The septum is ... Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA NO FEAR ACT OIG CONTACT US National Institutes of Health ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: critical congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions critical congenital heart disease critical congenital heart disease Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) is a term that refers to a ...

  2. Sports participation in adults with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Opic (Petra); E.M.W.J. Utens (Elisabeth); J.A.A.E. Cuypers (Judith); M. Witsenburg (Maarten); A.E. van den Bosch (Annemien); Domburg, R.V. (Ron Van); A.J.J.C. Bogers (Ad); H. Boersma (Eric); Pelliccia, A. (Antonio); J.W. Roos-Hesselink (Jolien)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: It is unclearwhether sports participation in adultswith repaired congenital heart disease is safe and has benefits. Methods: Congenital heart disease (ConHD) patients who underwent corrective surgery for Atrial Septal Defect, Ventricular Septal Defect, Pulmonary Stenosis, Tet

  3. Congenital Heart Disease: Causes, Diagnosis, Symptoms, and Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, RongRong; Liu, Min; Lu, Lei; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-07-01

    The congenital heart disease includes abnormalities in heart structure that occur before birth. Such defects occur in the fetus while it is developing in the uterus during pregnancy. About 500,000 adults have congenital heart disease in USA (WebMD, Congenital heart defects medications, www.WebMD.com/heart-disease/tc/congenital-heart-defects-medications , 2014). 1 in every 100 children has defects in their heart due to genetic or chromosomal abnormalities, such as Down syndrome. The excessive alcohol consumption during pregnancy and use of medications, maternal viral infection, such as Rubella virus, measles (German), in the first trimester of pregnancy, all these are risk factors for congenital heart disease in children, and the risk increases if parent or sibling has a congenital heart defect. These are heart valves defects, atrial and ventricular septa defects, stenosis, the heart muscle abnormalities, and a hole inside wall of the heart which causes defect in blood circulation, heart failure, and eventual death. There are no particular symptoms of congenital heart disease, but shortness of breath and limited ability to do exercise, fatigue, abnormal sound of heart as heart murmur, which is diagnosed by a physician while listening to the heart beats. The echocardiogram or transesophageal echocardiogram, electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, cardiac catheterization, and MRI methods are used to detect congenital heart disease. Several medications are given depending on the severity of this disease, and catheter method and surgery are required for serious cases to repair heart valves or heart transplantation as in endocarditis. For genetic study, first DNA is extracted from blood followed by DNA sequence analysis and any defect in nucleotide sequence of DNA is determined. For congenital heart disease, genes in chromosome 1 show some defects in nucleotide sequence. In this review the causes, diagnosis, symptoms, and treatments of congenital heart disease are described.

  4. Evaluation of Swallowing in Infants with Congenital Heart Defect

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira,Karine da Rosa; Firpo,Cora; Gasparin, Marisa; Teixeira,Adriane Ribeiro; Dornelles, Silvia; Bacaltchuk,Tzvi; Levy, Deborah Salle

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Surgical repair of congenital heart disease in the first years of life compromises the coordination of the suction, breathing, and swallowing functions. Objective To describe the alterations in swallowing found in infants with congenital heart defect during their hospitalization. Methods Prospective, cross-sectional study in a reference hospital for heart disease. The sample consisted of 19 postsurgical patients who underwent an evaluation of swallowing. The infants included were...

  5. Simultaneous repair of pectus excavatum associated with congenital heart disease%漏斗胸合并先心病同期手术治疗14例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡庆华; 龙隆; 罗万俊; 蒋海河; 张卫星; 陈胜喜

    2014-01-01

    Objective To summarize clinical experience and effects of simultaneous repair of pectus ex-cavatum associated with congenital heart disease. Methods From 2000 to 2012,we repaired pectus excava-tum and congenital heart defects simultaneously in 14 children ,aged from 3 years to 14 years old,10 male and 4 female,using 3 different surgical procedures.Surgical approaches,complications,postoperative effects and follow -up results were retrospectively analyzed. Results All operations went well,and there were no major complications except pleural effusion in one patient and delayed wound healing in another one.Patients were followed up 6 months to 5 years,and their clinical results were quite satisfactory. Conclusion Choosing ap-propriate surgical procedures based on patients'conditions and wishes as well as operator's experience,simulta-neous repair of pectus excavatum and heart defects can be done with minimal complications and satisfactory long-term results.%目的总结同期手术矫治漏斗胸合并先心病的临床经验和疗效。方法2000年至2012年我们采用3种不同术式同期手术矫治漏斗胸合并先心病患儿14例,其中男10例,女4例,年龄3~14岁。回顾性分析患儿手术方法、并发症、术后疗效及随访情况。结果14例患儿手术顺利,术后除1例胸腔积液和1例伤口延期愈合外,无其它并发症,随访6个月至5年,心内修补和漏斗胸矫治均疗效满意。结论根据患儿病情、意愿和术者经验选择合理的手术方式,同期矫治漏斗胸合并先心病,并发症少,远期疗效满意。

  6. Care and Treatment for Congenital Heart Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Care and Treatment for Congenital Heart Defects Updated:Oct 26,2015 Not all people with ... supports you in your pursuit of heart health. Congenital Heart Defects • Home • About Congenital Heart Defects • The Impact of ...

  7. [Genetics of congenital heart diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Damien

    2017-06-01

    Developmental genetics of congenital heart diseases has evolved from analysis of serial slices in embryos towards molecular genetics of cardiac morphogenesis with a dynamic view of cardiac development. Genetics of congenital heart diseases has also changed from formal genetic analysis of familial recurrences or population-based analysis to screening for mutations in candidates genes identified in animal models. Close cooperation between molecular embryologists, pathologists involved in heart development and pediatric cardiologists is crucial for further increase of knowledge in the field of cardiac morphogenesis and genetics of cardiac defects. The genetic model for congenital heart disease has to be revised to favor a polygenic origin rather than a monogenic one. The main mechanism is altered genic dosage that can account for heart diseases in chromosomal anomalies as well as in point mutations in syndromic and isolated congenital heart diseases. The use of big data grouping information from cardiac development, interactions between genes and proteins, epigenetic factors such as chromatin remodeling or DNA methylation is the current source for improving our knowledge in the field and to give clues for future therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Five Facts about Congenital Heart Defects

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    ... Button Past Emails CDC Features Five Facts about Congenital Heart Defects Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Congenital heart defects are the most common types of birth defects. ...

  9. Genetic Counseling for Congenital Heart Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Genetic Counseling for Congenital Heart Defects Updated:Oct 26,2015 ... with congenital heart disease considers having children. Genetic counseling can help answer these questions and address your ...

  10. Hemodynamic effects of sustained postoperative cardiac resynchronization therapy in infants after repair of congenital heart disease: Results of a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, Mark K; Schwartz, Steven M; Zhang, Hargen; Chiu-Man, Christine; Manlhiot, Cedric; Ilina, Maria V; Arsdell, Glen Van; Kirsh, Joel A; McCrindle, Brian W; Stephenson, Elizabeth A

    2017-02-01

    It is unknown whether continuous cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) can lead to sustained improvement in hemodynamics after surgery for congenital heart disease (CHD). We investigated whether CRT improves cardiac index (CI) and blood pressure in infants after biventricular repair of CHD. We randomized infants younger than 4 months after biventricular CHD surgery to standard care or standard care plus CRT for 48 hours or until extubation if sooner. Change in the primary outcome of CI and blood pressure over time was compared between groups. For subgroup analysis, QRS duration was considered prolonged if greater than the 98th percentile. Forty-two patients were randomized: 21 controls and 21 patients receiving CRT (median weight 4 kg). There were no identified adverse events from pacing. The change in CI over time was not different between patients receiving CRT and controls, but trended toward improvement in patients with wide QRS who received CRT (n = 9) vs controls with wide QRS (n = 8) (+1.65 (0.86) L/(min·m(2)); P = .06). Controls with wide QRS experienced the smallest increase in CI (0.33 L/(min·m(2))). Blood pressure was significantly higher in infants with wide QRS who received CRT than in controls (+7.14 (3.08) mm Hg; P = .02). Serum lactate level, catecholamine use, ventilation time, and length of intensive care unit stay were similar between the 2 groups. CRT improved blood pressure and a trend toward higher CI in infants after repair of biventricular CHD with prolonged QRS duration. These findings warrant further study of CRT to improve postoperative recovery in infants with electrical dyssynchrony. Copyright © 2016 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Signs and Symptoms of Congenital Heart Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Congenital Heart Defects? Many congenital heart defects cause few or no signs and symptoms. A ... lips, and fingernails) Fatigue (tiredness) Poor blood circulation Congenital heart defects don't cause chest pain or other painful ...

  12. A Child with Lung Hypoplasia, Congenital Heart Disease, Hemifacial Microsomia, and Inguinal Hernia: Ipsilateral Congenital Malformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengming Fan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 3-year-old Chinese boy was diagnosed with ipsilateral congenital malformations: right lung hypoplasia, dextroversion of heart, atrial septal defect, hepatic vein drainage directly into the right atrium, facial asymmetry, right microtia and congenital deafness, and indirect inguinal hernia. He underwent indirect inguinal hernia repair at the age of 2. Although without any facial plastic surgery performed, he underwent a repair of atrial septal defect and recovered uneventfully. At 6-month follow-up, the patient was free from any symptom of dyspnea; his heart function returned to the first grade.

  13. A Child with Lung Hypoplasia, Congenital Heart Disease, Hemifacial Microsomia, and Inguinal Hernia: Ipsilateral Congenital Malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chengming; Huang, Can; Liu, Jijia; Yang, Jinfu

    2015-01-01

    A 3-year-old Chinese boy was diagnosed with ipsilateral congenital malformations: right lung hypoplasia, dextroversion of heart, atrial septal defect, hepatic vein drainage directly into the right atrium, facial asymmetry, right microtia and congenital deafness, and indirect inguinal hernia. He underwent indirect inguinal hernia repair at the age of 2. Although without any facial plastic surgery performed, he underwent a repair of atrial septal defect and recovered uneventfully. At 6-month follow-up, the patient was free from any symptom of dyspnea; his heart function returned to the first grade. PMID:26294998

  14. Echocardiographic evaluation of coronary arteries in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Grace; Miller, Michelle S

    2015-12-01

    Among populations of patients with the congenital heart disease, there is considerable diversity in the anatomy of the coronary arteries. Understanding these anatomical differences is vitally important in directing interventions and surgical repair. In this report, the authors describe the echocardiographic evaluation of the variants of coronary artery anatomy in the following lesions: transposition of the great arteries, congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries, double-inlet left ventricle, common arterial trunk, tetralogy of Fallot, and double-outlet right ventricle.

  15. Evaluation of swallowing in infants with congenital heart defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Karine da Rosa; Firpo, Cora; Gasparin, Marisa; Teixeira, Adriane Ribeiro; Dornelles, Silvia; Bacaltchuk, Tzvi; Levy, Deborah Salle

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Surgical repair of congenital heart disease in the first years of life compromises the coordination of the suction, breathing, and swallowing functions. Objective To describe the alterations in swallowing found in infants with congenital heart defect during their hospitalization. Methods Prospective, cross-sectional study in a reference hospital for heart disease. The sample consisted of 19 postsurgical patients who underwent an evaluation of swallowing. The infants included were younger than 7 months and had a diagnosis of congenital heart defect and suspected swallowing difficulties. Results Of the 19 infants with congenital heart defect, the median age was 3.2 months. A significant association was found between suction rhythm and dysphagia (p = 0.036) and between oral-motor oral feeding readiness and dysphagia (p = 0.014). Conclusions The data suggest that dysphagia often occurs after surgery in infants with congenital heart defect. Infants with congenital heart defect had very similar behavior to preterm infants in terms of oral feeding readiness.

  16. Evaluation of Swallowing in Infants with Congenital Heart Defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira, Karine da Rosa

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Surgical repair of congenital heart disease in the first years of life compromises the coordination of the suction, breathing, and swallowing functions. Objective To describe the alterations in swallowing found in infants with congenital heart defect during their hospitalization. Methods Prospective, cross-sectional study in a reference hospital for heart disease. The sample consisted of 19 postsurgical patients who underwent an evaluation of swallowing. The infants included were younger than 7 months and had a diagnosis of congenital heart defect and suspected swallowing difficulties. Results Of the 19 infants with congenital heart defect, the median age was 3.2 months. A significant association was found between suction rhythm and dysphagia (p = 0.036 and between oral-motor oral feeding readiness and dysphagia (p = 0.014. Conclusions The data suggest that dysphagia often occurs after surgery in infants with congenital heart defect. Infants with congenital heart defect had very similar behavior to preterm infants in terms of oral feeding readiness.

  17. Grown Up Congenital Heart Diseases (GUCH: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajmer Singh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The survival of children with congenital heart disease into adulthood has increased. These patients may require primary cardiac surgical repair, repair after prior palliation, revision of repair for residual lesion, or non-cardiac surgery. Preoperative cardiac evaluation consists of review of laboratory data, echocardiography, cardiac MRI, CT, cardiopulmonary exercise testing, arrhythmia monitoring, and cardiac catheterization. Perioperative complications are more frequently seen in high-risk patients i.e. those with pulmonary hypertension, cyanosis, heart failure, and poor general health. Guidelines for the management of patients with grown up congenital heart (GUCH diseases suggest that such patients are best treated in dedicated tertiary care centres by a multidisciplinary team, knowledgeable about the anatomy and pathophysiology of the lesion.

  18. History of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroudis, Constantine; Williams, William G

    2015-10-01

    The Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society is a group of over 100 pediatric heart surgeons representing 72 institutions that specialize in the treatment of patients with congenital heart defects. The Society began in 1972 and incorporated as a not-for-profit charitable organization in 2004. It has become the face and voice of congenital heart surgery in North America. In 1985, the Society established a data center for multicenter clinical research studies to encourage congenital heart professionals to participate in improving outcomes for our patients. The goals of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society are to stimulate the study of congenital cardiac physiology, pathology, and management options which are instantiated in data collection, multi-institutional studies, and scientific meetings. Honest and open discussion of problems with possible solutions to the challenges facing congenital heart professionals have been the strength of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society. It is imperative for the growth of an organization to know from where it came in order to know to where it is going. The purpose of this article is to review the history of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Heart transplantation in adult congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchill, Luke J

    2016-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) in adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) is vastly different to that observed in acquired heart disease. Unlike acquired HF in which pharmacological strategies are the cornerstone for protecting and improving ventricular function, ACHD-related HF relies heavily upon structural and other interventions to achieve these aims. patients with ACHD constitute a small percentage of the total adult heart transplant population (∼3%), although the number of ACHD heart transplant recipients is growing rapidly with a 40% increase over the last two decades. The worldwide experience to date has confirmed heart transplantation as an effective life-extending treatment option in carefully selected patients with ACHD with end-stage cardiac disease. Opportunities for improving outcomes in patients with ACHD-related HF include (i) earlier recognition and referral to centres with combined expertise in ACHD and HF, (ii) increased awareness of arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death risk in this population, (iii) greater collaboration between HF and ACHD specialists at the time of heart transplant assessment, (iv) expert surgical planning to reduce ischaemic time and bleeding risk at the time of transplant, (v) tailored immunosuppression in the post-transplant period and (vi) development and validation of ACHD-specific risk scores to predict mortality and guide patient selection. The purpose of this article is to review current approaches to diagnosing and treating advanced HF in patients with ACHD including indications, contraindications and clinical outcomes after heart transplantation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  20. Challenges Faced by Parents of Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Challenges Faced by Parents of Children with Congenital Heart Disease Page Content ​​​The first thing most parents want ... common and expected. About Congenital Heart Defects Congenital Heart Disease (CHD) is the most common type of birth ...

  1. Mortality in adult congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheugt, Carianne L.; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; van der Velde, Enno T.; Meijboom, Folkert J.; Pieper, Petronella G.; van Dijk, Arie P. J.; Vliegen, Hubert W.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Mortality in adults with congenital heart disease is known to be increased, yet its extent and the major mortality risks are unclear. The Dutch CONCOR national registry for adult congenital heart disease was linked to the national mortality registry. Cox's regression was used to assess mortality pre

  2. Mortality in adult congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.L. Verheugt (Carianne); C.S.P.M. Uiterwaal (Cuno); E.T. van der Velde (Enno); F.J. Meijboom (Folkert); P.G. Pieper (Petronella); A.P.J. van Dijk (Arie); H.W. Vliegen (Hubert); D.E. Grobbee (Diederick); B.J.M. Mulder (Barbara)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAimsMortality in adults with congenital heart disease is known to be increased, yet its extent and the major mortality risks are unclear.Methods and resultsThe Dutch CONCOR national registry for adult congenital heart disease was linked to the national mortality registry. Cox's regressio

  3. Mortality in adult congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.L. Verheugt (Carianne); C.S.P.M. Uiterwaal (Cuno); E.T. van der Velde (Enno); F.J. Meijboom (Folkert); P.G. Pieper (Petronella); A.P.J. van Dijk (Arie); H.W. Vliegen (Hubert); D.E. Grobbee (Diederick); B.J.M. Mulder (Barbara)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAimsMortality in adults with congenital heart disease is known to be increased, yet its extent and the major mortality risks are unclear.Methods and resultsThe Dutch CONCOR national registry for adult congenital heart disease was linked to the national mortality registry. Cox's

  4. Mortality in adult congenital heart disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheugt, C.L.; Uiterwaal, C.S.; Velde, E.T. van der; Meijboom, F.J.; Pieper, P.G.; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Vliegen, H.W.; Grobbee, D.E.; Mulder, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: Mortality in adults with congenital heart disease is known to be increased, yet its extent and the major mortality risks are unclear. METHODS AND RESULTS: The Dutch CONCOR national registry for adult congenital heart disease was linked to the national mortality registry. Cox's regression was

  5. Heart transplantation in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houyel, Lucile; To-Dumortier, Ngoc-Tram; Lepers, Yannick; Petit, Jérôme; Roussin, Régine; Ly, Mohamed; Lebret, Emmanuel; Fadel, Elie; Hörer, Jürgen; Hascoët, Sébastien

    2017-02-22

    With the advances in congenital cardiac surgery and postoperative care, an increasing number of children with complex congenital heart disease now reach adulthood. There are already more adults than children living with a congenital heart defect, including patients with complex congenital heart defects. Among these adults with congenital heart disease, a significant number will develop ventricular dysfunction over time. Heart failure accounts for 26-42% of deaths in adults with congenital heart defects. Heart transplantation, or heart-lung transplantation in Eisenmenger syndrome, then becomes the ultimate therapeutic possibility for these patients. This population is deemed to be at high risk of mortality after heart transplantation, although their long-term survival is similar to that of patients transplanted for other reasons. Indeed, heart transplantation in adults with congenital heart disease is often challenging, because of several potential problems: complex cardiac and vascular anatomy, multiple previous palliative and corrective surgeries, and effects on other organs (kidney, liver, lungs) of long-standing cardiac dysfunction or cyanosis, with frequent elevation of pulmonary vascular resistance. In this review, we focus on the specific problems relating to heart and heart-lung transplantation in this population, revisit the indications/contraindications, and update the long-term outcomes.

  6. 2013 update on congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, heart failure, and heart transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subirana, M Teresa; Barón-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Manito, Nicolás; Oliver, José M; Ripoll, Tomás; Lambert, Jose Luis; Zunzunegui, José L; Bover, Ramon; García-Pinilla, José Manuel

    2014-03-01

    This article presents the most relevant developments in 2013 in 3 key areas of cardiology: congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, and heart failure and transplant. Within the area of congenital heart disease, we reviewed contributions related to sudden death in adult congenital heart disease, the importance of specific echocardiographic parameters in assessing the systemic right ventricle, problems in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot and indication for pulmonary valve replacement, and confirmation of the role of specific factors in the selection of candidates for Fontan surgery. The most recent publications in clinical cardiology include a study by a European working group on correct diagnostic work-up in cardiomyopathies, studies on the cost-effectiveness of percutaneous aortic valve implantation, a consensus document on the management of type B aortic dissection, and guidelines on aortic valve and ascending aortic disease. The most noteworthy developments in heart failure and transplantation include new American guidelines on heart failure, therapeutic advances in acute heart failure (serelaxin), the management of comorbidities such as iron deficiency, risk assessment using new biomarkers, and advances in ventricular assist devices. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. [Sex differences in congenital heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubry, P; Demian, H

    2016-12-01

    Gender influences the clinical presentation and the management of some acquired cardiovascular diseases, such as coronary artery disease, resulting in different outcomes. Differences between women and men are also noticed in congenital heart disease. They are mainly related to the prevalence and severity of some congenital heart defects at birth, and in adulthood to the prognosis, incidence of Eisenmenger syndrome and risks of pregnancy. The role of gender on the risk of operative mortality of congenital heart surgery remains debated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. DNA methylation abnormalities in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Juhé, Clara; Cuscó, Ivon; Homs, Aïda; Flores, Raquel; Torán, Núria; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart defects represent the most common malformation at birth, occurring also in ∼50% of individuals with Down syndrome. Congenital heart defects are thought to have multifactorial etiology, but the main causes are largely unknown. We have explored the global methylation profile of fetal heart DNA in comparison to blood DNA from control subjects: an absolute correlation with the type of tissue was detected. Pathway analysis revealed a significant enrichment of differential methylation at genes related to muscle contraction and cardiomyopathies in the developing heart DNA. We have also searched for abnormal methylation profiles on developing heart-tissue DNA of syndromic and non-syndromic congenital heart defects. On average, 3 regions with aberrant methylation were detected per sample and 18 regions were found differentially methylated between groups. Several epimutations were detected in candidate genes involved in growth regulation, apoptosis and folate pathway. A likely pathogenic hypermethylation of several intragenic sites at the MSX1 gene, involved in outflow tract morphogenesis, was found in a fetus with isolated heart malformation. In addition, hypermethylation of the GATA4 gene was present in fetuses with Down syndrome with or without congenital heart defects, as well as in fetuses with isolated heart malformations. Expression deregulation of the abnormally methylated genes was detected. Our data indicate that epigenetic alterations of relevant genes are present in developing heart DNA in fetuses with both isolated and syndromic heart malformations. These epimutations likely contribute to the pathogenesis of the malformation by cis-acting effects on gene expression.

  9. Stroke Recurrence in Congenital Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2012-01-01

    Researchers at the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada identified 135 patients with congenital heart disease diagnosed with arterial ischemic stroke during 1992-2008 and registered in the Canadian Pediatric Stroke Registry-Toronto site.

  10. Congenital Heart Defects and Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Congenital Heart Defects and Physical Activity Updated:Apr 19,2016 Exercise Is for Everyone ... almost all patients do some form of regular physical activity. There are a few exceptions, so it's good ...

  11. Prenatal diagnosis of congenital complete heart block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Patrícia; Carriço, Ana; Ramalho, Carla; Matias, Alexandra; Monterroso, José; Areias, José Carlos

    2007-06-01

    Congenital complete heart block (CHB) is a conduction defect with an incidence in the general population of 1/15,000 to 1/22,000 live births. It is frequently associated with structural heart defects or maternal autoimmune disease. We describe a case of CHB associated with maternal systemic lupus erythematosus and review our previous cases and experience of CHB.

  12. Pregnancy in women with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greutmann, Matthias; Pieper, Petronella G.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart defects are the most common birth defects. Major advances in open-heart surgery have led to rapidly evolving cohorts of adult survivors and the majority of affected women now survive to childbearing age. The risk of cardiovascular complications during pregnancy and peripartum depend

  13. Anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A S; Idorn, L; Nørager, B

    2015-01-01

    Adults with congenital heart disease are a growing population. One of the major challenges in the care of these patients is to prevent thromboembolic episodes. Despite relative young age and no typical cardiovascular risk factors, this cohort has a high prevalence of thrombotic events....... It is difficult to use treatment algorithms from the general adult population with acquired heart disease in this heterogeneous population due to special conditions such as myocardial scarring after previous surgery, atypical atrial flutter, prothrombotic conditions and the presence of interatrial shunts....... Furthermore, there is a lack of scientific evidence regarding how to prevent thromboembolic events with anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature pertaining to anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease and hence enable...

  14. Towards defining heart failure in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolger, Aidan P; Gatzoulis, Michael A

    2004-12-01

    Injury to the myocardium disrupts geometric integrity and results in changes to intracardiac pressure, wall stress and tension, and the pattern of blood flow through the heart. Significant disruption to pump function results in heart failure which is defined in terms of symptoms: breathlessness and fatigue, signs of salt and water retention, and neurohormonal activation. This syndrome most commonly occurs in the context of injury due to ischaemic heart disease and dilated cardiomyopathy but because patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) are born with sometimes gross distortions of cardiac anatomy they too are subject to the forces that drive heart failure. This paper explores the available data relating to the clinical and neurohormonal manifestations of heart failure in patients with congenital heart disease and describes how, by additionally exploring events at a cellular level, we may be able to arrive at a definition of heart failure relevant to this population.

  15. Adult congenital heart disease and pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Shaline; Ginns, Jonathan N

    2014-08-01

    Adults with congenital heart disease now form the largest group of women with cardiac disease becoming pregnant in the developed world. This is both a mark of impressive steps forward in the management of congenital heart disease and also a challenge to the medical community to develop systems of care that will best serve these women and their babies. Each woman with congenital heart disease presents a unique pattern of challenges for the cardiologist, obstetrician, and anesthesiologist, and their care should be tailored to deal with their individual circumstances. As this population of patients continues to grow, we must continue to learn and improve our diagnostic tools and management strategies to refine their care. This review intends to focus on reviewing the outcomes in this set of patients and also an approach to the assessment and the management of these patients, primarily for an audience of obstetricians, pediatricians, and anesthesiologists. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Marital stability and congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbert, A R; Newburger, J W; Fyler, D C

    1982-06-01

    The incidence of divorce or legal separation was studied in 438 families of children born with heart disease who entered the New England Regional Infant Cardiac Program between 1968 and 1973. The parents were interviewed when the children were 5 1/2 years old. The rate of divorce in 438 families of children with critical congenital heart disease was not significantly different from the rate in two comparison groups: (1) 25 families of children whose cardiac defect was spontaneously cured, and (2) 26 families of children catheterized in infancy for suspected cardiac defect but who were found to be free of heart disease. Rates of divorce or legal separation for the three groups were: critical congenital heart disease, 12.1%, spontaneously cured, 4.2% free of heart disease, 11.5% these rates were not significantly different. The average national divorce rate was 20.3% for the same period.

  17. Air pollution and congenital heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agay-Shay, Keren; Friger, Michael; Linn, Shai; Peled, Ammatzia; Amitai, Yona; Peretz, Chava

    2013-07-01

    Environmental factors such as ambient air pollution have been associated with congenital heart defects. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between gestational exposure to air pollution and the risk of congenital heart defects. We conducted a registry-based cohort study with a total of 135,527 live- and still-births in the Tel-Aviv region during 2000-2006. We used a Geographic Information System-based spatiotemporal approach with weekly inverse distance weighting modeling to evaluate associations between gestational exposure to ambient air pollution during weeks 3-8 of pregnancy and the risk for congenital heart defects. The following pollutants were studied: carbon monoxide, nitrogen-dioxide, ozone, sulfur-dioxide and particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 10 μm and 2.5 μm (PM10, PM2.5 respectively). Logistic models, adjusted for socio-demographic covariates were used to evaluate the associations. We found that maternal exposure to increased concentrations of PM10 was associated with multiple congenital heart defects (adjusted OR 1.05, 95% CI: 1.01 to 1.10 for 10 μg/m(3) increment). An inverse association was observed between concentrations of PM2.5 and isolated patent ductus arteriosus (adjusted OR 0.78, 95% CI: 0.68 to 0.91 for 5 µg/m(3) increment). Sensitivity analyses showed that results were consistent. Generally there were no evidence for an association between gaseous air pollutants and congenital heart defects.Our results for PM10 and congenital heart defects confirm results from previous studies. The results for PM2.5 need further investigations.

  18. Diagnosis and treatment of congenital heart defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peuster, M.; Beerbaum, P.; Meyer, H. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Bad Oeyenhausen (Germany). Herz- und Diabeteszentrum NRW

    2004-07-01

    The Clinic for Congenital Heart Defects in Bad Oeynhausen, Germany, specializes in the interdisciplinary care of children and adolescents with congenital heart defects. The available expertise covers all aspects of diagnosis and treatment, as well as clinical research at the highest level. The clinic has a complete array of imaging systems, including a Philips Integris BV5000 Biplane cath lab system, Philips Gyroscan Intera CV MR system, ultrasound and PET systems. The range of available equipment makes it possible to select the most appropriate imaging modality for each situation, with particular reference to the need to minimize the overall radiation exposure. (orig.)

  19. Recurrent congenital fibrosarcoma with heart metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohi, Olli; Vornanen, Martine; Kähkönen, Marketta; Vettenranta, Kim; Parto, Katriina; Arola, Mikko

    2012-07-01

    Congenital fibrosarcomas are malignant tumors that arise in soft tissues. In infants this unique tumor does not commonly metastasize, even though there may be local recurrences. We report here a boy who had congenital fibrosarcoma in his right foot, which was completely excised at the age of 3 days. Four months later, a solitary encapsulated metastasis emerged in thoracic chest wall, which was operated. During adjuvant chemotherapy he developed histologically confirmed fibrosarcoma metastases in the heart. After extended treatment with cyclophosphamide/topotecan and gemcitabine/docetaxel, the heart tumors disappeared and he has been in complete remission for 3 years.

  20. Phase-contrast MRI and applications in congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, A., E-mail: adgoldberg@geisinger.edu [Department of Radiology, Geisinger Health System, Danville, PA (United States); Jha, S. [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-05-15

    A review of phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging techniques, with specific application to congenital heart disease, is presented. Theory, pitfalls, advantages, and specific examples of multiple, well-described congenital heart disease presentations are discussed.

  1. A systematic review of trends and patterns of congenital heart ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lists of selected articles for studies on patterns of congenital heart disease among children in Nigeria between 1964 and .... diagnosis, number of cases of congenital heart diseases ..... of 6% increase in the burden of VSD for every time pe-.

  2. Congenital Heart Disease: Vascular Risk Factors and Medication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.P.M. Smedts (Dineke)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCongenital heart disease (CHD) is among the most common congenital abnormalities and involves structural anomalies of the heart and/or related major blood vessels. Congenital heart disease arises in the fi rst trimester of pregnancy, occurring often and in many forms. The reported CHD bi

  3. Congenital heart disease in young adulthood and beyond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheugt, C.L.

    2009-01-01

    Over 95% of children with congenital heart defects now reach adulthood and the number of adults with congenital heart disease is estimated to be at least 1.2 million in Europe alone. Despite major developments in diagnostic methods and treatment of congenital heart disease, cure is rarely achieved.

  4. Congenital Heart Disease and General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.B. de Koning (Wilfred)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe treatment of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) has progressed vastly over the last five decennia. In the Netherlands, around 200,000 children are born each year, around 1,800 of whom have a CHD. This incidence – 6 – 8 per thousand live births – is reported to be similar ro

  5. Congenital Heart Defects and CCHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... procedures with catheters (thin, flexible tubes) can fix medium and large ASDs. Heart surgery may be needed ... parts. Conditions in your everyday life (lifestyle and environment) Some things in your life and environment (where ...

  6. [Relationship between congenital heart disease and bronchial dysplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Shuang-Lin; Li, Ya-Jun; Huang, Ting; Tan, Li-Hua; Mei, Xi-Long; Sun, Jian-Ning

    2011-11-01

    To study the relationship of the incidence of bronchial dysplasia (bronchial anomalous origin and bronchial stenosis) with congenital heart disease. A total of 185 children with congenital heart disease or bronchial dysplasia were enrolled. Bronchial dysplasia was identified by the 64-MSCT conventional scanning or thin slice scanning with three-dimensional reconstruction. Forty-five children (25.3%) had coexisting bronchial dysplasia and congenital heart disease. The incidence rate of bronchial dysplasia in children with congenital heart disease associated with ventricular septal defect was higher than in those without ventricular septal defect (33.7% vs 15.0%; Pdysplasia between the children with congenital heart disease who had a large vascular malformation and who did not. Bronchial dysplasia often occurs in children with congenital heart disease. It is necessary to perform a tracheobronchial CT scanning with three-dimensional reconstruction to identify tracheobronchial dysplasia in children with congenital heart disease, especially associated with ventricular septal defect.

  7. Implantation of total artificial heart in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Iki; Morales, David S L

    2014-07-18

    In patients with end-stage heart failure (HF), a total artificial heart (TAH) may be implanted as a bridge to cardiac transplant. However, in congenital heart disease (CHD), the malformed heart presents a challenge to TAH implantation. In the case presented here, a 17 year-old patient with congenital transposition of the great arteries (CCTGA) experienced progressively worsening HF due to his congenital condition. He was hospitalized multiple times and received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). However, his condition soon deteriorated to end-stage HF with multisystem organ failure. Due to the patient's grave clinical condition and the presence of complex cardiac lesions, the decision was made to proceed with a TAH. The abnormal arrangement of the patient's ventricles and great arteries required modifications to the TAH during implantation. With the TAH in place, the patient was able to return home and regain strength and physical well-being while awaiting a donor heart. He was successfully bridged to heart transplantation 5 months after receiving the device. This report highlights the TAH is feasible even in patients with structurally abnormal hearts, with technical modification.

  8. Tracheal quadrifurcation associated with congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Ahmad, Ozaire [Narayana Multispeciality Hospital and Mazumdar Shaw Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Bangalore (India)

    2015-08-15

    Tracheal anomalies are known in association with congenital cardiac defects. Some of the well-described anomalies include accessory (displaced) tracheal bronchus with variants, tracheal trifurcation and accessory cardiac bronchus. Here we describe a case of tracheal quadrifurcation associated with complex congenital heart disease. Illustration of complex airway anatomy was simplified by the use of multidetector CT using a variety of image display options. Awareness of this complex anomaly will expand our knowledge of tracheal anomalies and equip the anesthesia and surgical team for better airway management. (orig.)

  9. Congenital medium sternal cleft with partial ectopia cordis repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Paulo Rego; Antunes, Sónia; Couto, Alexandra; Santos, Gonçalo Cassiano; Leal, Luis Gagp; Magalhães, Manuel Pedro

    2009-01-01

    Congenital sternal malformation is a rare anomaly often diagnosed as an asymptomatic condition at birth. The authors report a clinical case of a full-term female neonate with congenital sternal cleft and partial ectopia cordis. Successful surgical repair was accomplished at 6 days of age. When surgery is performed shortly after birth, the procedure is easier and better results are achieved.

  10. 循证护理在先天性心脏病修补术围手术期的应用%The Application of Evidence-Based Nursing in Perioperative Period of Repair Surgery of Congenital Heart Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖平; 金素; 詹会智; 罗良琴; 阳亚男

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the application effect of evidence-based nursing in perioperative period of repair surgery of con-genital heart disease. Methods 130 children with congenital heart disease receiving repair surgery during the period from June, 2010 to Jan., 2014 were randomly divided into 2 groups:observation group and control group, 65 cases in each;evidence-based nursing was per-formed to cases in observation group while routine nursing to cases in control group;the effect of surgery, the time length of hospitaliza-tion and the occurrence of complication in the 2 groups were comparatively studied. Results The cure rate in observation group was much higher than that in control group;the time of hospitalization in observation group was shorter than that in control group;the case number of cardiac function grade Level I in observation group was bigger than that in control group (P<0.05);the total occurrence of complications in observation group was 24.62%, much lower than that in control group (69.23%);the occurrence of pulmonary hyperten-sion, arrhythmia, thrombosis and other complications in observation group was much lower than that in control group (P<0.05). Conclu-sions The application of evidence-based nursing in perioperative period of repair surgery of congenital heart disease can effectively de-crease the occurrence of complications and raise the success rate of the surgery.%目的:分析循证护理在先天性心脏病修补术围手术期的应用效果。方法对2010年6月~2014年1月我院行心脏修补术的130例先天性心脏病患儿随机分为对照组和观察组各65例。对照组采用常规护理,观察组则根据循证医学模式进行循证护理。比较两组间手术效果、住院时间差异及并发症发生率差异。结果观察组患者治愈率显著高于对照组,住院时间显著短于对照组,心功能等级为Ⅰ级的病例数亦显著高于对照组(P<0.05)。观察组总并发症发生率为24

  11. Gender and outcome in adult congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheugt, Carianne L.; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; van der Velde, Enno T.; Meijboom, Folkert J.; Pieper, Petronella G.; Vliegen, Hubert W.; van Dijk, Arie P. J.; Bouma, Berto J.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Background - Gender differences in prognosis have frequently been reported in cardiovascular disease but less so in congenital heart disease. We investigated whether gender is associated with outcome in adult patients with congenital heart disease. Methods and Results - From the CONgenital CORvitia

  12. Gender and outcome in adult congenital heart disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheugt, C.L.; Uiterwaal, C.S.; Velde, E.T. van der; Meijboom, F.J.; Pieper, P.G.; Vliegen, H.W.; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Bouma, B.J.; Grobbee, D.E.; Mulder, B.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gender differences in prognosis have frequently been reported in cardiovascular disease but less so in congenital heart disease. We investigated whether gender is associated with outcome in adult patients with congenital heart disease. METHODS AND RESULTS: From the CONgenital CORvitia

  13. Recurrent congenital heart block in neonatal lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Maria C; Gómez-Puerta, José A; Albert, Dimpna; Ferrer, Queralt; Girona, Josep

    2007-07-01

    Congenital heart block (CHB) is the main complication of neonatal lupus (NL) and is strongly associated with the presence of anti-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La antibodies. The recurrence of CHB in subsequent pregnancies in mothers with these antibodies is uncommon, occurring in approximately 15% of cases. We describe here a case of recurrent CHB in a previously asymptomatic mother with Sjögren syndrome and discuss the current strategies for the prevention and treatment of CHB in NL.

  14. Correção simultânea de defeito congênito intracardíaco e pectus excavatum Simultaneous repair of congenital heart defect and pectus excavatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Roberto Breda

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Relatamos tratamento simultâneo de pectus excavatum e defeito congênito intracardíaco representado por comunicação interatrial ostium secundum. Paciente do sexo masculino, 8 anos de idade, com diagnóstico clínico e ecocardiográfico de comunicação interatrial, associada à deformidade da parede torácica tipo pectus excavatum. Foi encaminhado para operação com correção simultânea do defeito congênito intracardíaco associado ao reparo do pectus. O tratamento operatório simultâneo do pectus excavatum e defeitos congênitos intracardíacos torna difícil o acesso ao coração. Foi feita a correção simultânea dessas alterações, com satisfatório resultado, sobretudo estético, para o paciente.The author describes the simultaneous treatment of pectus excavatum and congenital intracardiac defect (atrial septal defect represented by the interatrial foramen secundum. An 8-year-old boy, with clinical and echocardiography diagnosis of atrial septal defect associated with pectus excavatum was referred to a simultaneous surgical treatment of both abnormalities. The simultaneous surgical treatment of both pectus excavatum and congenital intracardiac defects make it difficult to access the heart. In this case, the simultaneous surgical treatment of atrial septal defect and pectus excavatum was a valuable alternative to surgical repair of both abnormalities, mainly due to its cosmetic outcome.

  15. Genetics of Congenital Heart Disease: Past and Present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntean, Iolanda; Togănel, Rodica; Benedek, Theodora

    2016-11-02

    Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital anomaly, representing an important cause of infant morbidity and mortality. Congenital heart disease represents a group of heart anomalies that include septal defects, valve defects, and outflow tract anomalies. The exact genetic, epigenetic, or environmental basis of congenital heart disease remains poorly understood, although the exact mechanism is likely multifactorial. However, the development of new technologies including copy number variants, single-nucleotide polymorphism, next-generation sequencing are accelerating the detection of genetic causes of heart anomalies. Recent studies suggest a role of small non-coding RNAs, micro RNA, in congenital heart disease. The recently described epigenetic factors have also been found to contribute to cardiac morphogenesis. In this review, we present past and recent genetic discoveries in congenital heart disease.

  16. Virtual Surgery in Congenital Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thomas Sangild; Mosegaard, Jesper; Kislinskiy, Stefan

    2014-01-01

     Teaching, diagnosing, and planning of therapy in patients with complex structural cardiovascular heart disease require profound understanding of the three-dimensional (3D) nature of cardiovascular structures in these patients. To obtain such understanding, modern imaging modalities provide high...... et al., Cardiol Young 13:451–460, 2003). In combination with the availability of virtual models of congenital heart disease (CHD), techniques for computer- based simulation of cardiac interventions have enabled early clinical exploration of the emerging concept of virtual surgery (Sorensen et al...

  17. Virtual Surgery in Congenital Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thomas Sangild; Mosegaard, Jesper; Kislinskiy, Stefan

    2014-01-01

     Teaching, diagnosing, and planning of therapy in patients with complex structural cardiovascular heart disease require profound understanding of the three-dimensional (3D) nature of cardiovascular structures in these patients. To obtain such understanding, modern imaging modalities provide high...... et al., Cardiol Young 13:451–460, 2003). In combination with the availability of virtual models of congenital heart disease (CHD), techniques for computer- based simulation of cardiac interventions have enabled early clinical exploration of the emerging concept of virtual surgery (Sorensen et al...

  18. Early extubation after congenital heart surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirza Halimić

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite recent advances in anesthesia, cardiopulmonary bypass and surgical techniques, children undergoing congenital heart surgery require postoperativemechanical ventilation. Early extubation was definedas ventilation shorter than 12 hours. Aim of this study is to identify factors associated with successful early extubation after pediatric cardiac surgery.Methods: The study was performed during period from January 2006 to January 2011 at Pediatric Clinic and Heart Center University Clinical center Sarajevo. One hundred children up to 5 years of age, who have had congenital heart disease, with left–right shunt and obstructive heart disease were included in the study. Patients were divided into two groups: Group I - patients extubated within 12 hours after surgery and Group II - patients extubated 12 or more hours after surgery. Results: The most frequently encountered preoperative variables were age with odds ratio 4% 95%CI (1-7%, Down's syndrome 8.5 95%CI (1.6-43.15, failure to thrive 4.3 95%CI( 1-18. Statistically significant postoperative data included lung disease (reactive airways, pneumonia, atelectasis, pneumothorax and with odds ratio 35.1 95 %CI (4-286 and blood transfusion with odds ratio 4.6 95%CI (2-12. Blood transfusion (p=0.002 (Wald=9.2 95%CI (2-12, during as well as after operation procedure has statistically significant influence on prediction time of extubation. Proven markers were age with cut of 21.5 months (sensitivity 74% and specificity 70% and extracorporeal circulation (ECC with cut-of 45.5 minutes (sensitivity 71% and specificity 65%.Conclusion: Early extubation is possible in many children undergoing congenital heart surgery. Younger age and prolonged ECC time are markers associated with prolonged mechanical ventilation.

  19. Adult Congenital Heart Disease: Scope of the Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor Dray, Efrat; Marelli, Ariane J

    2015-11-01

    This article reviews the changing epidemiology of congenital heart disease summarizing its impact on the demographics of the congenital heart disease population and the progress made in order to improve outcomes in this patient population. Birth prevalence of congenital heart disease can be modified by many factors. As a result of decreasing mortality and increasing survival in all forms of congenital heart disease, the median age of patients has increased and adults now compose two-thirds of patients with congenital heart disease. Disease burden and resulting health services utilization increase significantly across the lifespan. Bridging the gap between policy and quality of care can be improved by referral to specialized adult congenital heart disease centers and planning delivery of specialized services that are commensurate with population needs, program accreditation criteria and certified training of designated workforce.

  20. Ocular pathology in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, A M; Bitar, F F; Traboulsi, E I; Kassak, K M; Obeid, M Y; Megarbane, A; Salti, H I

    2005-01-01

    To describe the ocular findings in subjects with congenital heart disease (CHD). In a prospective study, the same observer examined 240 consecutive patients with CHD admitted to the medical centre. Two independent geneticists performed identification of syndromes. The commonest anatomic cardiac anomalies were ventricular or atrial septal defects (62), tetralogy of Fallot (39), pulmonary stenosis (25), and transposition of the great arteries (24). The heart lesions were divided physiologically into volume overload (90), cyanotic (87), and obstructive (63). In all, 105 syndromic subjects included the velocardiofacial syndrome (18), Down's syndrome (17), CHARGE association (6), DiGeorge syndrome (5), Williams syndrome (3), Edwards syndrome (3), Noonan syndrome (3), VACTERL association (2), and Patau syndrome (trisomy 13) (2). The paediatric team recognized 51 patients as syndromic. Two independent geneticists recognized additional 54 patients as syndromic. Positive eye findings were present in 55% (132) and included retinal vascular tortuosity (46), optic disc hypoplasia (30), trichomegaly (15), congenital ptosis (12), strabismus (11), retinal haemorrhages (8), prominent eyes (7), and congenital cataract (6). There was a strong correlation between the retinal vascular tortuosity and both a low haematocrit (P=0.000) and a low arterial oxygen saturation (P=0.002). Patients with CHD are at a high risk for ocular pathology and need screening for various ocular abnormalities.

  1. Heart Transplantation in Congenital Heart Disease: In Whom to Consider and When?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine H. Attenhofer Jost

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to impressive improvements in surgical repair options, even patients with complex congenital heart disease (CHD may survive into adulthood and have a high risk of end-stage heart failure. Thus, the number of patients with CHD needing heart transplantation (HTx has been increasing in the last decades. This paper summarizes the changing etiology of causes of death in heart failure in CHD. The main reasons, contraindications, and risks of heart transplantation in CHD are discussed and underlined with three case vignettes. Compared to HTx in acquired heart disease, HTx in CHD has an increased risk of perioperative death and rejection. However, outcome of HTx for complex CHD has improved over the past 20 years. Additionally, mechanical support options might decrease the waiting list mortality in the future. The number of patients needing heart-lung transplantation (especially for Eisenmenger’s syndrome has decreased in the last years. Lung transplantation with intracardiac repair of a cardiac defect is another possibility especially for patients with interatrial shunts. Overall, HTx will remain an important treatment option for CHD in the near future.

  2. Associated noncardiac congenital anomalies among cases with congenital heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Claude; Dott, Beatrice; Alembik, Yves; Roth, Marie-Paule

    2015-02-01

    Cases with congenital heart defects (CHD) often have other associated anomalies. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the prevalence and the types of associated anomalies in CHD in a defined population. The anomalies associated with CHD were collected in all live births, stillbirths and terminations of pregnancy during 26 years in 346,831 consecutive pregnancies of known outcome in the area covered by our population based registry of congenital anomalies. Of the 4005 cases with CHD born during this period (total prevalence of 115.5 per 10,000), 1055 (26.3%) had associated major anomalies. There were 354 (8.8%) cases with chromosomal abnormalities including 218 trisomies 21, and 99 (2.5%) nonchromosomal recognized dysmorphic conditions. There were no predominant recognized dysmorphic conditions, but VACTERL association. However, other recognized dysmorphic conditions were registered including Noonan syndrome, fetal alcohol syndrome, and skeletal dysplasias. Six hundred and two (15.0%) of the cases had non syndromic, non chromosomal multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). Anomalies in the urinary tract, the musculoskeletal, the digestive, and the central nervous systems were the most common other anomalies. Prenatal diagnosis was obtained in 18.7% of the pregnancies. In conclusion the overall prevalence of associated anomalies, which was one in four infants, emphasizes the need for a thorough investigation of cases with CHD. A routine screening for other anomalies may be considered in infants and in fetuses with CHD. One should be aware that the anomalies associated with CHD can be classified into a recognizable anomaly, syndrome or pattern in one out of nine cases with CHD.

  3. Cyanotic congenital heart disease and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarp, Julie Bjerre; Jensen, Annette Schophuus; Engstrøm, Thomas; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Søndergaard, Lars

    2017-06-01

    Improved treatment options in paediatric cardiology and congenital heart surgery have resulted in an ageing population of patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD). The risk of acquired heart disease such as atherosclerosis increases with age.Previous studies have speculated whether patients with CCHD are protected against atherosclerosis. Results have shown that the coronary arteries of patients with CCHD are free from plaques and stenosis. Decreased carotid intima-media thickness and low total plasma cholesterol may indicate a reduced risk of later development of atherosclerosis. However, the evidence is still sparse and questionable, and a reasonable explanation for the decreased risk of developing atherosclerosis in patients with CCHD is still missing.This review provides an overview of what is known about the prevalence and potential causes of the reduced risk of atherosclerosis in patients with CCHD. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Anatomical assessment of congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, John C

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac MRI (CMR) is replacing diagnostic cardiac catheterization as the modality of choice for anatomic and functional characterization of congenital heart disease (CHD) when echocardiographic imaging is insufficient. In this manuscript, we discuss the principles of anatomic imaging of CHD, placing emphasis on the appropriate choice and modification of pulse sequences necessary to evaluate infants and small children. Clinical examples are provided to illustrate the relative strengths and shortcomings of different CMR imaging techniques. Although cardiovascular function and flow techniques are not described, their role in evaluating the severity of anatomic defects is emphasized. Anatomic characterization represents the first component of a carefully-planned, integrated CMR assessment of CHD.

  5. Cardiac transplantation for pediatric patients. With inoperable congenital heart disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Shaffer, K M; Denfield, S W; Schowengerdt, K O; Towbin, J A; Radovancević, B; Frazier, O. H.; Price, J K; Gajarski, R J

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies have reported the expanding use of transplantation as the definitive option for pediatric patients with inoperable congenital heart disease. This study compares perioperative risk factors and outcomes in pediatric patients who received heart transplants for congenital heart disease with those in pediatric patients who received heart transplants for cardiomyopathy. Retrospective data collected on 40 consecutive pediatric patients undergoing cardiac transplantation from 1 January...

  6. Keeping children with congenital heart disease healthy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Cathy S

    2011-01-01

    Keeping children with congenital heart disease healthy is vital to their long-term survival and quality of life. Nurse practitioners are in an excellent position to keep these sometimes fragile children healthy before, between, and after their cardiac surgeries. Primary care visits should address developmental morbidity. Referral for in-depth evaluations and intervention should be initiated for children with hemodynamically significant heart disease. Infants may also experience poor feeding. Nutritional guidance may include fortifying formulas or enteral tube feedings. Attention to immunization status and prevention of winter illnesses and endocarditis may reduce complications in this high-risk group of children. Copyright © 2011 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Nutrition in neonatal congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan CT

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Conall T Morgan,1 Anne Marie Shine,2 Colin J McMahon1 1Department of Pediatric Cardiology, 2Department of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, Our Lady's Children's Hospital Crumlin, Dublin, Republic of Ireland Abstract: There are 40,000 infants born in the USA with congenital heart disease annually. Achievement of adequate oral nutrition is difficult in this population. Malnutrition is common. Single ventricle physiology, the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis, and cardiopulmonary bypass prevent the establishment of normal oral feeding patterns. Improved nutrition results in improved surgical outcomes, lower mortality, and shorter hospital stay. In this review, we discuss the challenges this population faces. Keywords: necrotizing enterocolitis, malnutrition, growth failure, hypoplastic left heart

  8. Adult Congenital Heart Disease with Focus on Pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.P.E. Ruys (Titia)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe prevalence of Congenital Heart Disease (CHD) has been described to be 8,2 per 1000 live births in European countries.(1) Congenital heart disease is a collective term for a large number of different diagnoses with different anatomical substrate, complexity and prognosis. The most

  9. Adult Congenital Heart Disease with Focus on Pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.P.E. Ruys (Titia)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe prevalence of Congenital Heart Disease (CHD) has been described to be 8,2 per 1000 live births in European countries.(1) Congenital heart disease is a collective term for a large number of different diagnoses with different anatomical substrate, complexity and prognosis. The most com

  10. Cancer risk among patients with congenital heart defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Morten; Garne, Ester; Sværke, Claus

    2013-01-01

    -based interventions, the standardised incidence ratio was 1.45 (95% confidence interval: 0.86-2.29). Conclusion The overall risk of cancer among congenital heart defect patients without Down's syndrome was not statistically significantly elevated. Cancer risk in the congenital heart defect cohort as a whole...

  11. Cardiac MRI in children and adolescents who have undergone surgical repair of right-sided congenital heart disease. Automated left ventricular volumes and function analysis and effects of different manual adjustments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rompel, O.; Janka, R.; May, M.S.; Lell, M.M.; Uder, M.; Hammon, M. [University Hospital Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Gloeckler, M.; Dittrich, S. [University Hospital Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Pediatric Cardiology; Cesnjevar, R. [University Hospital Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery

    2015-12-15

    To evaluate automated segmentation and the effects of different manual adjustments regarding left ventricular parameter quantification in cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) data on children and adolescents who have undergone surgical repair of right-sided congenital heart disease (CHD). Dedicated software (syngo.via, Siemens AG) was used to automatically segment and/or manually adjust the end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), stroke volume (SV), myocardial mass (MM) and ejection fraction (EF) before/after manual apex/base adjustment (ADJ-step 1) and after manual apex/base/myocardial contour adjustment (ADJ-step 2; reference standard). MR data of 40 patients (13.1 ± 3.1y, 4-17y) with repaired CHD with decreased pulmonary blood flow (CHD-DPBF) were evaluated. Intra- and inter-rater reliability was determined for 10 randomly selected patients. The software correctly detected the left ventricle in 38/40 (95 %) patients. EDV after automated segmentation: 119.1 ± 44.0ml; after ADJ-step 1: 115.8 ± 39.5 ml; after ADJ-step 2: 116.2 ± 39.4 ml. The corresponding results for ESV were 52.0 ± 18.5/49.6 ± 16.9/49.7 ± 16.4 ml; for SV 67.1 ± 28.5/66.2 ± 25.4/66.5 ± 25.5 ml; for EF 55.5 ± 7.3/56.7 ± 6.6/56.7 ± 6.3%; for MM 83.7 ± 35.9/76.2 ± 28.3/74.6 ± 27.2 g. Significant differences were found for ESV/MM/EF comparing the automated segmentation results with these after ADJ-step 1 and ADJ-step 2. No significant differences were found when comparing all results of ADJ-step 1 and ADJ-step 2 or when comparing EDV/SV results. Intra- and inter-rater reliability was excellent. The mean time effort was 63.4 ± 6.9 s for the automated segmentation, 74.2 ± 8.9 s for ADJ-step 1 and 269.5 ± 39.4 s for ADJ-step 2. Automated left ventricular volumes and function analysis in children and adolescents with surgically treated CHD proved to be feasible with excellent intra- and inter-rater reliability. Automated segmentation with manual apex/base adjustment provided

  12. Incidence of congenital heart disease in Beijing, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xue-yong; LI Xiao-feng; L(U) Xiao-dong; LIU Ying-long

    2009-01-01

    Background The incidence of congenital heart disease has been studied in developed countries for many years, but rarely in the mainland of China. Fetal echocardiographic screening for congenital heart disease was first performed in Beijing in the early 2000s, but the impact was not clear. The current study was undertaken to determine the incidence of congenital heart disease in Beijing, China and to estimate the impact of fetal echocardiography on the incidence of liveborn congenital heart disease.Methods The study involved all infants with congenital heart disease among the 84 062 total births in Beijing during the period of January 1 and December 31, 2007. An echocardiographic examination was performed on every baby suspected to have congenital heart disease, prenatally or/and postnatally.Results A total of 686 infants were shown to have congenital heart disease among 84 062 total births. The overall incidence was 8.2/1000 total births. Mothers of 128 of 151 babies diagnosed prenatally were chosen to terminate the pregnancy. Two of the 151 infants died in utero. A specific lesion was identified for each infant and the frequencies of lesions were determined for each class of infants (total births, stillbirths and live births). The incidence of congenital heart disease in stillbirths and live births was 168.8/1000 and 6.7/1000, respectively. The difference between the incidence of total birth and the incidence of live birth was statistically significant (P<0.001).Conclusions The incidence of liveborn congenital heart disease in Beijing is within the range reported in developed countries. Fetal echocardiography reduce significantly the incidence of livebom congenital heart disease.

  13. Xenopus: An Emerging Model for Studying Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenbrun, Erin; Tandon, Panna; Amin, Nirav M.; Waldron, Lauren; Showell, Chris; Conlon, Frank L.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart defects affect nearly 1% of all newborns and are a significant cause of infant death. Clinical studies have identified a number of congenital heart syndromes associated with mutations in genes that are involved in the complex process of cardiogenesis. The African clawed frog, Xenopus, has been instrumental in studies of vertebrate heart development and provides a valuable tool to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying human congenital heart diseases. In this review, we discuss the methodologies that make Xenopus an ideal model system to investigate heart development and disease. We also outline congenital heart conditions linked to cardiac genes that have been well-studied in Xenopus and describe some emerging technologies that will further aid in the study of these complex syndromes. PMID:21538812

  14. Postnatal Cardiac Autonomic Nervous Control in Pediatric Congenital Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ineke Nederend

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital defect. During childhood, survival is generally good but, in adulthood, late complications are not uncommon. Abnormal autonomic control in children with congenital heart disease may contribute considerably to the pathophysiology of these long term sequelae. This narrative review of 34 studies aims to summarize current knowledge on function of the autonomic nervous system in children with a congenital heart defect. Large scale studies that measure both branches of the nervous system for prolonged periods of time in well-defined patient cohorts in various phases of childhood and adolescence are currently lacking. Pending such studies, there is not yet a good grasp on the extent and direction of sympathetic and parasympathetic autonomic function in pediatric congenital heart disease. Longitudinal studies in homogenous patient groups linking autonomic nervous system function and clinical outcome are warranted.

  15. Evaluation of congenital heart disease by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, A. de; Roest, A.A.W. [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging has proven to be useful in the assessment of patients with complex congenital heart disease and in the post-surgical follow-up of patients with corrected congenital heart disease. A thorough understanding of the congenital cardiac malformations that can be encountered is needed and the use of the sequential segmental analysis helps to standardize the evaluation and diagnosis of (complex) congenital heart disease. After surgical correction of congenital heart defects, patients must be followed over extended periods of time, because morphological and functional abnormalities may still be present or may develop. The use of echocardiography may be hampered in these patients as scar tissue and thorax deformities limit the acoustic window. Magnetic resonance imaging has proven to be advantageous in the follow-up of these post-surgical patients and with the use of several different techniques the morphological as well as functional abnormalities can be evaluated and followed over time. (orig.)

  16. Berlin Heart EXCOR use in patients with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, David L S; Zafar, Farhan; Almond, Christopher S; Canter, Charles; Fynn-Thompson, Francis; Conway, Jennifer; Adachi, Iki; Lorts, Angela

    2017-02-08

    Management of mechanical circulatory support in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) is challenging due to physiologic variations and anatomic limitations to device placement. In this study we examine the use of Berlin Heart EXCOR in CHD patients. CHD patients were identified from the EXCOR Pediatric Study data set (2007 to 2010). Mortality and serious adverse events were compared between CHD and non-CHD cohorts, and predictors of poor outcomes in the CHD cohort were identified. CHD was present in 29% (n = 59, 18 with 1-ventricle physiology) of all EXCOR patients (N = 204). Successful bridge (transplant or wean) was less likely in CHD patients compared with non-CHD patients (48% vs 80%; p 1 year) were successfully bridged. Pre-implant congenital heart surgery (CHS) and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) on the same admission occurred in 60% of children ≤1 year of age (83% of neonates, 50% of infants), with 8% survival. Regardless of age, patients who did not have CHS and ECMO had 61% survival. Smaller pump, pre-implant bilirubin >1.2 mg/dl and renal dysfunction were independently associated with mortality. End-organ function at implant reliably predicts adverse outcomes and should be considered when making implant decisions. EXCOR use in neonates and infants with CHD should be approached cautiously. If patients have undergone pre-implant CHS and ECMO, EXCOR support may not provide any survival benefit. EXCOR support in non-infants with CHD is challenging but can be consistently successful with appropriate patient selection. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Relationship between TBX20 gene polymorphism and congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X F; Zhang, Y F; Zhao, C F; Liu, M M; Si, J P; Fang, Y F; Xing, W W; Wang, F L

    2016-06-02

    Congenital heart disease in children is a type of birth defect. Previous studies have suggested that the transcription factor, TBX20, is involved in the occurrence and development of congenital heart disease in children; however, the specific regulatory mechanisms are yet to be evaluated. Hence, this study aimed to evaluate the relationship between the TBX20 polymorphism and the occurrence and development of congenital heart disease. The TBX20 gene sequence was obtained from the NCBI database and the polymorphic locus candidate was predicted. Thereafter, the specific gene primers were designed for the restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction (RFLP-PCR) of DNA extracted from the blood of 80 patients with congenital heart disease and 80 controls. The results of the PCR were subjected to correlation analysis to identify the differences between the amplicons and to determine the relationship between the TBX20 gene polymorphism and congenital heart disease. One of the single nucleotide polymorphic locus was found to be rs3999950: c.774T>C (Ala265Ala). The TC genotype frequency in the patients was higher than that in the controls, similar to that for the C locus. The odds ratio of the TC genotypes was above 1, indicating that the presence of the TC genotype increases the incidence of congenital heart diseases. Thus, rs3999950 may be associated with congenital heart disease, and TBX20 may predispose children to the defect.

  18. Congenital heart disease in Mexico: advances of the regionalization project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Colmenero, Juan; Cervantes-Salazar, Jorge; Curi-Curi, Pedro; Ramírez-Marroquín, Samuel

    2013-04-01

    Consistent with the mission of the World Society for Pediatric and Congenital Heart Surgery to promote health care for children with congenital heart disease all around the world, a Mexican Association of Specialists in Congenital Heart Disease (abbreviated in Spanish as AMECC) was created in Mexico in 2008. Our efforts were coordinated with those of the National Health Secretary with the objective being implementation of a national plan for regionalization of care for patients with congenital heart disease. To improve our knowledge related to technologic and human resources for management of congenital heart disease, we developed a national survey. Finally, a national database was created for collecting all Mexican centers' information related to congenital heart disease care in order to quantify the advances related to the proposed plans. The database utilized international consensus nomenclature. The aim of this article is to show the sequence of our actions in relation to direct accomplishments and the current status of congenital heart disease care in Mexico. This article emphasizes the main aspects of these actions: regionalization project implementation, national survey results, and cardiovascular pediatric surgical database creation. Knowledge of outcomes related to successful actions would be useful for those countries that face similar challenges and may lead them to consider adoption of similar measures with the respective adjustments to their own reality.

  19. Sleep-Disordered Breathing in Patients with Pulmonary Valve Incompetence Complicating Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Susan; Ahmad, Waheed; Bailey, Amy; Hatton, Rachael; Boyle, Andrew; Collins, Nicholas

    2016-12-01

    Long standing pulmonary regurgitation results in deleterious effects on right heart size and function with late consequences of right heart volume overload including ventricular dilatation, propensity to arrhythmia and right heart failure. As sleep disordered breathing may predispose to elevations in pulmonary vascular resistance and associated negative effects on right ventricular function, we sought to assess this in patients with underlying congenital heart disease. We performed a pilot study to evaluate the incidence of sleep-disordered breathing in a patient population with a history of long standing pulmonary valve incompetence in patients with congenital heart disease using overnight oximetry. Patients with a background of tetralogy of Fallot repair or residual pulmonary incompetence following previous pulmonary valve intervention for congenital pulmonary stenosis were included. Twenty-two patients underwent overnight oximetry. The mean age of the cohort was 34.3 ± 15.2 years with no patients observed to have severe underlying pulmonary hypertension. Abnormal overnight oximetry was seen in 13/22 patients (59.1%) with 2/22 (9.1%) patients considered to have severe abnormalities. An important proportion of patients with a background of pulmonary incompetence complicating congenital heart disease are prone to the development of sleep-disordered breathing as assessed by overnight oximetry. Further study into the prevalence and mechanisms of sleep-disordered breathing in a larger cohort are warranted. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Myocardial factor revisited: The importance of myocardial fibrosis in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broberg, Craig S; Burchill, Luke J

    2015-06-15

    Pioneers in congenital heart surgery observed that exercise capacity did not return to normal levels despite successful surgical repair, leading some to cite a "myocardial factor" playing a role. They conjectured that residual alterations in myocardial function would be significant for patients' long-term outlook. In fulfillment of their early observations, today's adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) population shows well-recognized features of heart failure, even among patients without clear residual anatomic or hemodynamic abnormalities, demonstrating the vital role of the myocardium in their morbidity and mortality. Whereas the 'myocardial factor' was an elusive concept in the early history of congenital heart care, we now have imaging techniques to detect and quantify one such factor--myocardial fibrosis. Understanding the importance of myocardial fibrosis as a final common pathway in a variety of congenital lesions provides a framework for both the study and treatment of clinical heart failure in this context. While typical heart failure pharmacology should reduce or attenuate fibrogenesis, efforts to show meaningful improvements with standard pharmacotherapy in ACHD repeatedly fall short. This paper considers the importance of myocardial fibrosis and function, the current body of evidence for myocardial fibrosis in ACHD, and its implications for research and treatment.

  1. Video. Laparoscopic repair of congenital bilateral Morgagni hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Saurabh; Oelschlager, Brant K

    2011-06-01

    Morgagni hernia is a rare type of congenital diaphragmatic hernia found in the anterior aspect of the diaphragm. It typically presents in the pediatric population and rarely is diagnosed in adults. Only 3% of diaphragmatic hernias are the Morgagni type, and only 4% of these are found to present bilaterally. Surgical repair of Morgagni hernia has been performed through various approaches including open, laparoscopic, thoracotomy, and video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS), all with and without mesh. The optimal method of surgical repair is not known due to the rarity of this condition and the limitations of setting up a prospective, randomized trial to evaluate the different methods. Laparoscopic repair with mesh has been described with good short-term results. Few case reports exist in the world literature describing laparoscopic repair of a bilateral Morgagni hernia with mesh. At the University of Washington, the authors present a video showing their technique for laparoscopic repair of a congenital, bilateral Morgagni type hernia with mesh.

  2. Congenital heart disease and chromossomopathies detected by the karyotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Trevisan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To review the relationship between congenital heart defects and chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype.DATA SOURCES: Scientific articles were searched in MEDLINE database, using the descriptors "karyotype" OR "chromosomal" OR "chromosome" AND "heart defects, congenital". The research was limited to articles published in English from 1980 on.DATA SYNTHESIS: Congenital heart disease is characterized by an etiologically heterogeneous and not well understood group of lesions. Several researchers have evaluated the presence of chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype in patients with congenital heart disease. However, most of the articles were retrospective studies developed in Europe and only some of the studied patients had a karyotype exam. In this review, only one study was conducted in Latin America, in Brazil. It is known that chromosomal abnormalities are frequent, being present in about one in every ten patients with congenital heart disease. Among the karyotype alterations in these patients, the most important is the trisomy 21 (Down syndrome. These patients often have associated extra-cardiac malformations, with a higher risk of morbidity and mortality, which makes heart surgery even more risky.CONCLUSIONS: Despite all the progress made in recent decades in the field of cytogenetic, the karyotype remains an essential tool in order to evaluate patients with congenital heart disease. The detailed dysmorphological physical examination is of great importance to indicate the need of a karyotype.

  3. Postoperative tricuspid regurgitation after adult congenital heart surgery is associated with adverse clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Matthew J; Ginns, Jonathan N; Ye, Siqin; Chai, Paul; Quaegebeur, Jan M; Bacha, Emile; Rosenbaum, Marlon S

    2016-02-01

    Many patients with adult congenital heart disease will require cardiac surgery during their lifetime, and some will have concomitant tricuspid regurgitation. However, the optimal management of significant tricuspid regurgitation at the time of cardiac surgery remains unclear. We assessed the determinants of adverse outcomes in patients with adult congenital heart disease and moderate or greater tricuspid regurgitation undergoing cardiac surgery for non-tricuspid regurgitation-related indications. All adult patients with congenital heart disease and greater than moderate tricuspid regurgitation who underwent cardiac surgery for non-tricuspid regurgitation-related indications were included in a retrospective study at the Schneeweiss Adult Congenital Heart Center. Cohorts were defined by the type of tricuspid valve intervention at the time of surgery. The primary end point of interest was a composite of death, heart transplantation, and reoperation on the tricuspid valve. A total of 107 patients met inclusion criteria, and 17 patients (17%) reached the primary end point. A total of 68 patients (64%) underwent tricuspid valve repair, 8 patients (7%) underwent tricuspid valve replacement, and 31 patients (29%) did not have a tricuspid valve intervention. By multivariate analysis, moderate or greater postoperative tricuspid regurgitation was associated with a hazard ratio of 6.12 (1.84-20.3) for the primary end point (P = .003). In addition, failure to perform a tricuspid valve intervention at the time of surgery was associated with an odds ratio of 4.17 (1.26-14.3) for moderate or greater postoperative tricuspid regurgitation (P = .02). Moderate or greater postoperative tricuspid regurgitation was associated with an increased risk of death, transplant, or reoperation in adult patients with congenital heart disease undergoing cardiac surgery for non-tricuspid regurgitation-related indications. Concomitant tricuspid valve intervention at the time of cardiac surgery should

  4. Genes in congenital heart disease: atrioventricular valve formation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joziasse, I.C.; van de Smagt, J.J.; Smith, K.; Bakkers, J.; Sieswerda, G.J.; Mulder, B.J.M.; Doevendans, P.A.

    2008-01-01

    Through the use of animal studies, many candidate genes (mainly encoding transcriptional factors and receptors) have been implicated in the development of congenital heart disease. Thus far, only a minority of these genes have been shown to carry mutations associated with congenital disease in human

  5. Spectrum of congenital heart diseases in children with Down ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABEOLUGBENGAS

    Key words:Down syndrome, congenital heart diseases, pattern, Sokoto ... Research Journal of Health Sciences subscribed to terms and conditions of Open Access publication. Articles are .... information such as age, gender, mobile phone.

  6. Congenital Heart Diseases in Adults: A Review of Echocardiogram ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Congenital Heart Diseases in Adults: A Review of Echocardiogram Records in Enugu, South‑East Nigeria. ... Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research ... Enugu, and to determine whether there are any gender differences in frequency.

  7. Underlying congenital heart disease in Nigerian children with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Pneumonia is a common cause of childhood morbidity and mortality globally. Some congenital heart disease(CHD) may predispose their sufferer to bronchopneumonia. ... Children with CHD were 3 and 256 times more likely to

  8. The Spectrum of Paediatric Congenital Heart Disease at The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    January 2013 Volume 10 Issue 1. 8. The ANNALS of ... Congenital Heart Disease (CHD) is a significant cause of morbidity and ... selected CHD lesions was examined and compared with .... time of conception and that the prevalence of severe.

  9. Physical rehabilitation of congenital heart disease as a social problem

    OpenAIRE

    Іrina Kulchenko

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: to attract the attention to the problem of physical rehabilitation of congenital heart diseases. Material and Methods: analyzed the domestic and foreign scientific and methodological literature on the problems of the physical rehabilitation of congenital heart disease. Results: in the domestic literature lacks modern works on the subject. Foreign literature sources indicate the positive impact of the programs of physical rehabilitation on exercise tolerance, health and quality of lif...

  10. Changing demographics of pulmonary arterial hypertension in congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.J.M. Mulder

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is a serious complication of congenital heart disease (CHD. Without early surgical repair, around one-third of paediatric CHD patients develop significant PAH. Recent data from the Netherlands suggest that >4% of adult CHD patients have PAH, with higher rates in those with septal defects. A spectrum of cardiac defects is associated with PAH-CHD, although most cases develop as a consequence of large systemic-to-pulmonary shunts. Eisenmenger's syndrome, characterised by reversed pulmonary-to-systemic (right-to-left shunt, represents the most advanced form of PAH-CHD and affects as many as 50% of those with PAH and left-to-right shunts. It is associated with the poorest outcome among patients with PAH-CHD. 40 yrs ago, ∼50% of children with CHD requiring intervention died within the first year, and <15% survived to adulthood. Subsequent advances in paediatric cardiology have seen most patients with CHD survive to adulthood, with resulting shifts in the demographics of CHD and PAH-CHD. The number of adults presenting with CHD is increasing and, although mortality is decreasing, morbidity is increasing as older patients are at increased risk of arrhythmia, heart failure, valve regurgitation and PAH. Data show that probability of PAH increases with age in patients with cardiac defects.

  11. Management of supraventricular arrhythmias in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasmer, Kristina; Eckardt, Lars

    2016-10-15

    Supraventricular arrhythmias are a frequent complication in adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD). The prevalence increases with time since surgery, complexity of the underlying defect, type of repair and older age at surgery. Arrhythmias are the most frequent reason for hospital admission and along with heart failure the leading cause of death. The arrhythmia-associated increase in morbidity and mortality makes their management a key task in patients with ACHD. Intra-atrial re-entry is the most frequent arrhythmia mechanism. Less common arrhythmia mechanisms are supraventricular tachycardias in the presence of an accessory pathway, atrioventricular nodal re-entrant tachycardia or focal tachycardias. Patient management includes stroke prevention, acute termination and prevention of arrhythmia recurrence. Acute treatment depends on patients' symptoms. In cases of haemodynamic instability, immediate cardioversion is warranted. For stable patients, acute treatment includes rate control and termination by antiarrhythmic drugs or electrical cardioversion. Following a symptomatic arrhythmia, catheter ablation or treatment with antiarrhythmic drugs is recommended to prevent recurrences. Advances in mapping and ablation technology are now associated with high success rates of catheter ablation. In patients with a complex substrate recurrence rates of 50% remain high. However, in the presence of side effects and complications associated with long-term antiarrhythmic drug therapy, redo procedures are encouraged by current guidelines. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  12. Device complications in adult congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Robert M; Dewland, Thomas A; Moyers, Brian; Vittinghoff, Eric; Tanel, Ronn E; Marcus, Gregory M; Tseng, Zian H

    2015-02-01

    Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) are increasingly implanted in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD), but little is known about implant-related complications and mortality. The purpose of this study was to compare pacemaker and ICD implantation complication rates between adults with and those without CHD using a comprehensive, statewide database. We used the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project database to identify initial transvenous pacemaker and ICD implantations and implant-related complications in California hospitals from January 1, 2005, to December 31, 2011. We calculated relative risks of implant-related complications by comparing those with and those without CHD using Poisson regression with robust standard errors, adjusting for age and medical comorbidities. We identified 105,852 patients undergoing pacemaker implantation, 1465 with noncomplex CHD and 66 with complex CHD. CHD was not associated with increased risk of pacemaker implant-related complications: adjusted risk ratio (aRR) 0.92, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.74-1.14, P = .45. We identified 32,948 patients undergoing ICD implantation, 815 with noncomplex CHD and 87 with complex CHD. Patients with CHD had increased risk of ICD implant-related complications: aRR 1.36, 95% CI 1.05-1.76, P = .02. Patients with complex CHD had greater increased risk of ICD implant-related complications: aRR 2.14, 95% CI 1.16-3.95, P = .02. In patients receiving devices, CHD was associated with a trend toward lower 30-day in-hospital mortality after pacemaker (P = .07) and ICD (P = .19) implantation. Among adult patients undergoing device implantation in California, CHD was associated with increased risk of ICD implant-related complications, but not pacemaker implant-related complications or higher 30-day in-hospital mortality. Copyright © 2015 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Right Ventricular Adaptation in Congenital Heart Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrijs Bartelds

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the last four decades, enormous progress has been made in the treatment of congenital heart diseases (CHD; most patients now survive into adulthood, albeit with residual lesions. As a consequence, the focus has shifted from initial treatment to long-term morbidity and mortality. An important predictor for long-term outcome is right ventricular (RV dysfunction, but knowledge on the mechanisms of RV adaptation and dysfunction is still scarce. This review will summarize the main features of RV adaptation to CHD, focusing on recent knowledge obtained in experimental models of the most prevalent abnormal loading conditions, i.e., pressure load and volume load. Models of increased pressure load for the RV have shown a similar pattern of responses, i.e., increased contractility, RV dilatation and hypertrophy. Evidence is accumulating that RV failure in response to increased pressure load is marked by progressive diastolic dysfunction. The mechanisms of this progressive dysfunction are insufficiently known. The RV response to pressure load shares similarities with that of the LV, but also has specific features, e.g., capillary rarefaction, oxidative stress and inflammation. The contribution of these pathways to the development of failure needs further exploration. The RV adaptation to increased volume load is an understudied area, but becomes increasingly important in the growing groups of survivors of CHD, especially with tetralogy of Fallot. Recently developed animal models may add to the investigation of the mechanisms of RV adaptation and failure, leading to the development of new RV-specific therapies.

  14. Familial congenital heart disease in Bandung, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Endah Rahayuningsih

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Congenital heart disease (CHD may occur in several members of a family. Studies have shown that familial genetic factor play a role in CHD.Objective To identify familial recurrences of CHD in families with at least one member treated for CHD in Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital, Bandung Indonesia.Methods In this descriptive study, subjects were CHD patients hospitalized or treated from January 2005 to December 2011. We constructed family pedigrees for five families.Results During the study period, there were 1,779 patients with CHD. We found 5 families with 12 familial CHD cases, consisting of 8 boys and 4 girls. Defects observed in these 12 patients were tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries, persistent ductus arteriosus, ventricular septal defect, tricuspid atresia, pulmonary stenosis, and dilated cardiomyopathy. Persistent ductus arteriosus was the most frequently observed defect (4 out of 12 subjects. None of the families had a history of consanguinity. The recurrence risk of CHD among siblings was calculated to be 0.67%, and the recurrence risk of CHD among cousins was 0.16%.Conclusion Familial CHD may indicate the need for genetic counseling and further pedigree analysis.

  15. Familial congenital heart disease in Bandung, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Endah Rahayuningsih

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Congenital heart disease (CHD may occur in several members of a family. Studies have shown that familial genetic factor play a role in CHD. Objective To identify familial recurrences of CHD in families with at least one member treated for CHD in Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital, Bandung Indonesia. Methods In this descriptive study, subjects were CHD patients hospitalized or treated from January 2005 to December 2011. We constructed family pedigrees for five families. Results During the study period, there were 1,779 patients with CHD. We found 5 families with 12 familial CHD cases, consisting of 8 boys and 4 girls. Defects observed in these 12 patients were tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries, persistent ductus arteriosus, ventricular septal defect, tricuspid atresia, pulmonary stenosis, and dilated cardiomyopathy. Persistent ductus arteriosus was the most frequently observed defect (4 out of 12 subjects. None of the families had a history of consanguinity. The recurrence risk of CHD among siblings was calculated to be 0.67%, and the recurrence risk of CHD among cousins was 0.16%. Conclusion Familial CHD may indicate the need for genetic counseling and further pedigree analysis. [Paediatr Indones. 2013;53:173-6.

  16. Assessment of Diastolic Function in Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panesar, Dilveer Kaur; Burch, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Diastolic function is an important component of left ventricular (LV) function which is often overlooked. It can cause symptoms of heart failure in patients even in the presence of normal systolic function. The parameters used to assess diastolic function often measure flow and are affected by the loading conditions of the heart. The interpretation of diastolic function in the context of congenital heart disease requires some understanding of the effects of the lesions themselves on these parameters. Individual congenital lesions will be discussed in this paper. Recently, load-independent techniques have led to more accurate measurements of ventricular compliance and remodeling in heart disease. The combination of inflow velocities and tissue Doppler measurements can be used to estimate diastolic function and LV filling pressures. This review focuses on diastolic function and assessment in congenital heart disease.

  17. Repair of congenital diaphragmatic hernias through umbilical skin incisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, Shuichiro; Usui, Noriaki; Kamiyama, Masafumi; Masahata, Kazunori; Nara, Keigo; Ueno, Takehisa; Soh, Hideki; Oue, Takaharu; Fukuzawa, Masahiro

    2013-05-01

    The use of thoracoscopy and laparoscopy in the treatment of congenital diaphragmatic hernias (CDHs) has been recently reported; however, the use of these procedures still remains controversial due to CO2 insufflation and limited working space. In addition, because of difficult techniques, it has not been widely accepted. Among CDH patients, mild cases whose lung is not hypoplastic, and not associated with persistent pulmonary hypertension of the neonate (PPHN) often develop small defects in the diaphragm that can be repaired using "direct closure." Because direct closure does not require as wide an operative field as that needed for patch closure, we repaired CDH through umbilical skin windows in two neonates with mild CDH to minimize the wounds. With the creation of additional radical small incisions, the surgeries were successfully performed without any intra- or postoperative complications, and the wounds were cosmetically pleasing. The repair of CDHs through umbilical skin windows is a feasible and useful approach in neonates with mild CDH.

  18. Epicardium-Derived Heart Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke M. Smits

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, cell replacement therapy has emerged as a potential approach to treat patients suffering from myocardial infarction (MI. The transplantation or local stimulation of progenitor cells with the ability to form new cardiac tissue provides a novel strategy to overcome the massive loss of myocardium after MI. In this regard the epicardium, the outer layer of the heart, is a tractable local progenitor cell population for therapeutic pursuit. The epicardium has a crucial role in formation of the embryonic heart. After activation and migration into the developing myocardium, epicardial cells differentiate into several cardiac cells types. Additionally, the epicardium provides instructive signals for the growth of the myocardium and coronary angiogenesis. In the adult heart, the epicardium is quiescent, but recent evidence suggests that it becomes reactivated upon damage and recapitulates at least part of its embryonic functions. In this review we provide an update on the current knowledge regarding the contribution of epicardial cells to the adult mammalian heart during the injury response.

  19. Congenital heart defects in children with oral clefts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahvi H.

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available   Background: Oral clefts are among the most common congenital anomalies. Infants with oral clefts often have other associated congenital defects, especially congenital heart defects. The reported incidences and the types of associated malformations and congenital heart defects vary between different studies. The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence of associated congenital heart defects in children with oral clefts. Methods: All infants with cleft lip and palate referred to the Children's Medical Center and Bahramy; the teaching Hospitals of the Tehran University of Medical Sciences from 1991 to 2005 were prospectively enrolled in this study group. All patients were examined and noted by an academic cleft team contain; a pediatrician and a pediatric surgeon, and received cardiac consultation and echocardiography by a pediatric cardiologist. non cardiac associated anomalies, still born and patients without echocardiography were excluded from the study.  Data including age, gender, exposure to contagions and high risk elements ,consanguinity and familial history of oral cleft, type of oral cleft, results of cardiac consultation and echocardiography and associated cardiac anomalies were cumulated and analyzed by SSPS version 13.5Results: Among the 284 infants with oral clefts, 162 were male (57% and 122 were female (43%. Seventy-nine patients (27.8% had cleft lip, 84 (29.5% had cleft palate and 121 (42.6% had both cleft lip and palate. Of all the patients, 21.1% had congenital heart defects. the most common type Of these congenital heart defects(28.3%  was atrial septal defect.Conclusions: For patients with cleft lip and palate, we recommend preoperative cardiac consultation, careful examination and routine echocardiography for associated cardiac anomalies, as well as appropriate management and prophylactic antibiotic therapy for those with associated congenital heart anomaly.

  20. Spectrum of congenital heart diseases in Kashmir, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Mohd; Chowdhary, J; Khajuria, K; Reyaz, A M

    2009-12-01

    A retrospective analysis of case-records data of 53,653 patients (0-18 years) over a two and half year period was conducted to ascertain the spectrum of congenital heart diseases. Two hundred and twenty one patients were found having congenital heart diseases; a prevalence of 4.1/1000. Ventricular septal defect (VSD) was the most frequent lesion seen in 69 (31.2%), followed by patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in 36 (16.3%) children. Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) was the most frequent cyanotic heart disease seen in 17 (7.8%) patients.

  1. Cardiac resynchronization therapy in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janoušek, Jan; Kubuš, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an established treatment option for adult patients suffering heart failure due to idiopathic or ischemic cardiomyopathy associated with electromechanical dyssynchrony. There is limited evidence suggesting similar efficacy of CRT in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). Due to the heterogeneity of structural and functional substrates, CRT implantation techniques are different with a thoracotomy or hybrid approach prevailing. Efficacy of CRT in CHD seems to depend on the anatomy of the systemic ventricle with best results achieved in systemic left ventricular patients upgraded to CRT from conventional pacing. Indications for CRT in patients with CHD were recently summarized in the Pediatric and Congenital Electrophysiology Society (PACES) and the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) Expert Consensus Statement on the Recognition and Management of Arrhythmias in Adult Congenital Heart Disease and are presented in the text.

  2. Intrauterine Tobacco Smoke Exposure and Congenital Heart Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest, Sharron; Priest, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Tobacco use and second-hand smoke exposure during pregnancy are linked to a host of deleterious effects on the pregnancy, fetus, and infant. Health outcomes improve when women quit smoking at any time during the pregnancy. However, the developing heart is vulnerable to noxious stimuli in the early weeks of fetal development, a time when many women are not aware of being pregnant. Congenital heart defects are the most common birth defects. Research shows an association between maternal tobacco exposure, both active and passive, and congenital heart defects. This article presents recent evidence supporting the association between intrauterine cigarette smoke exposure in the periconceptional period and congenital heart defects and discusses clinical implications for practice for perinatal and neonatal nurses.

  3. Prenatal diagnosis of congenital fetal heart abnormalities and clinical analysis*

    OpenAIRE

    Li,Hui; Wei, Jun; Ma, Ying; Shang, Tao

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the value of detecting fetal congenital heart disease (CHD) using the five transverse planes technique of fetal echocardiography. Methods: Nine hundred and eighty-two high-risk pregnancies for fetal CHD were included in this study, the fetal heart was scanned with the five transverse planes technique of fetal echocardiography described by Yagel, autopsy was conducted when pregnancy was terminated. Blood from fetal heart was collected for fetal chromosome analysis. A close ...

  4. 77. Ultrasonography assessment of congenital renal anomalies in children with congenital heart diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Hamadah

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound (US assessment of renal anomalies in children requiring pediatric cardiac surgery is not a standard practice. This study aimed to study the role of bedside US performed by intensivists to detect occult renal anomalies associated with congenital heart disease (CHD. Prospective descriptive study for 100 consecutive children with CHD admitted to Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (PCICU from Januarry 1st, 2015 through June, July 2015. Ultrasound of kidneys was performed initially by trained pediatric cardiac intensivists to ascertain the presence of both kidneys in renal fossae and to check for gross kidney anomalies. After screening of 100 consecutive children with CHD with renal US, we identified in 94 cases (94% normal right and left kidney in the standard sonographer shape in the renal fossae. In 6 cases further investigation revealed ectopic kidney in 3 patients (50%, solitary functional kidney in 2 patients (33.4% and bilateral grade IV hydronephrosis in one patient (16.6%. Urinary tract infection developed peri-operatively in 66% of the cases with kidney anomalies. No significant renal impairment was noted in these patients post-surgery. We observed no specific association between the type of renal anomaly and specific CHD. Renal US in children with CHD demonstrated prevalence of associated congenital renal anomalies in 6% of children undergoing cardiac surgery. The presence of occult kidney anomalies did not impact the kidney function or the short term outcome after cardiac repair except for an increased risk of urosepsis. Performing renal US should be a standard practice in all children with CHD.

  5. Current Surgical Outcomes of Congenital Heart Surgery for Patients With Down Syndrome in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoashi, Takaya; Hirahara, Norimichi; Murakami, Arata; Hirata, Yasutaka; Ichikawa, Hajime; Kobayashi, Junjiro; Takamoto, Shinichi

    2017-09-12

    Current surgical outcomes of congenital heart surgery for patients with Down syndrome are unclear.Methods and Results:Of 29,087 operations between 2008 and 2012 registered in the Japan Congenital Cardiovascular Surgery Database (JCCVSD), 2,651 were carried out for patients with Down syndrome (9%). Of those, 5 major biventricular repair procedures [ventricular septal defect repair (n=752), atrioventricular septal defect repair (n=452), patent ductus arteriosus closure (n=184), atrial septal defect repair (n=167), tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) repair (n=108)], as well as 2 major single ventricular palliations [bidirectional Glenn (n=21) and Fontan operation (n=25)] were selected and their outcomes were compared. The 90-day and in-hospital mortality rates for all 5 major biventricular repair procedures and bidirectional Glenn were similarly low in patients with Down syndrome compared with patients without Down syndrome. On the other hand, mortality after Fontan operation in patients with Down syndrome was significantly higher than in patients without Down syndrome (42/1,558=2.7% vs. 3/25=12.0%, P=0.005). Although intensive management of pulmonary hypertension is essential, analysis of the JCCVSD revealed favorable early prognostic outcomes after 5 major biventricular procedures and bidirectional Glenn in patients with Down syndrome. Indication of the Fontan operation for patients with Down syndrome should be carefully decided.

  6. Congenital Heart Disease in Adolescents With Gluteal Muscle Contracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Tian; Zhang, Xin-tao; Zha, Zhen-gang; Zhang, Wen-tao

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Gluteal muscle contracture (GMC), presented with hip abduction and external rotation when crouching, is common in several ethnicities, particularly in Chinese. It remains unclear that the reasons why these children are weak and have no choice to accept repeated intramuscular injection. Here, we found some unique cases which may be useful to explain this question. We describe a series of special GMC patients, who are accompanied with congenital heart disease (CHD). These cases were first observed in preoperative examinations of a patient with atrial septal defect (ASD), which was proved by chest X-ray and cardiac ultrasound. From then on, we gradually identified additional 3 GMC patients with CHD. The original patient with ASD was sent to cardiosurgery department to repair atrial septal first and received arthroscopic surgery later. While the other 3 were cured postoperative of ventricular septal defect (VSD), tetralogy of fallot (TOF), patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), respectively, and had surgery directly. The study gives us 3 proposals: (1) as to CHD children, it is essential to decrease the use of intramuscular injection, (2) paying more attention to cardiac examination especially cardiac ultrasound in perioperative period, and (3) taking 3D-CT to reconstruct gluteal muscles for observing contracture bands clearly in preoperation. However, more larger series of patients are called for to confirm these findings. PMID:25654394

  7. Congenital heart disease in adolescents with gluteal muscle contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Tian; Zhang, Xin-tao; Zha, Zhen-gang; Zhang, Wen-tao

    2015-02-01

    Gluteal muscle contracture (GMC), presented with hip abduction and external rotation when crouching, is common in several ethnicities, particularly in Chinese. It remains unclear that the reasons why these children are weak and have no choice to accept repeated intramuscular injection. Here, we found some unique cases which may be useful to explain this question. We describe a series of special GMC patients, who are accompanied with congenital heart disease (CHD). These cases were first observed in preoperative examinations of a patient with atrial septal defect (ASD), which was proved by chest X-ray and cardiac ultrasound. From then on, we gradually identified additional 3 GMC patients with CHD. The original patient with ASD was sent to cardiosurgery department to repair atrial septal first and received arthroscopic surgery later. While the other 3 were cured postoperative of ventricular septal defect (VSD), tetralogy of fallot (TOF), patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), respectively, and had surgery directly. The study gives us 3 proposals: (1) as to CHD children, it is essential to decrease the use of intramuscular injection, (2) paying more attention to cardiac examination especially cardiac ultrasound in perioperative period, and (3) taking 3D-CT to reconstruct gluteal muscles for observing contracture bands clearly in preoperation. However, more larger series of patients are called for to confirm these findings.

  8. Congenital superior sternal cleft repair using our modified Sally technique: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Kuwata

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of an 8-month-old male neonate who underwent reconstructive surgery for a congenital superior sternal cleft to decrease the risk of commotio cordis. With regard to use of the Sally technique for the repair of a relatively wide cleft (4 × 4 cm, we were concerned about respiratory problems caused by compression following closure of the sternal halves. By closing the sternal halves imperfectly, elevation of intrapleural pressure can be avoided to some extent. By bridging the surplus resected cartilage from the lower sternum over the gap of the upper sternum, the heart is protected by more rigid material. We recommend our modified Sally technique because it is both flexible and effective for sternal cleft repair.

  9. Heart failure treatment in adults with congenital heart disease: where do we stand in 2014?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Eric V; Valente, Anne Marie

    2014-09-01

    Heart failure (HF) is the leading cause of death in adults with repaired congenital heart disease (CHD). However there is currently little evidence to guide treatment strategies in this growing group of patients. Unlike the majority of HF, which is usually caused by LV systolic or diastolic dysfunction, CHD-HF is more often a consequence of RV disease, valve dysfunction, shunting or pulmonary hypertension. It is therefore not appropriate to extrapolate from the acquired HF literature and apply it to this heterogeneous population of CHD patients. Additionally, patients with CHD have been excluded from most large trials of medical or device therapy of HF, which has resulted in small retrospective and underpowered studies in the CHD population. This article critically reviews the current knowledge about CHD-HF, paying particular attention to medical therapy in different CHD populations, cardiac resynchronisation therapy and implantable cardiac defibrillators, and the challenges of heart transplantation and mechanical circulatory support in CHD patients. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. Gluten Sensitivity among Egyptian Infants with Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Alameey, Inas R.; Ahmed, Hanaa H.; Tawfik, Sawsan M.; Hassaballa, Fawzia; Gawad, Ayman M. Abdel; Eltahlawy, Eman

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gastrointestinal symptoms are a common feature in infants with congenital heart disease. AIM: This study was designed to evaluate age-dependent serum levels of antigliadin antibodies among malnourished Egyptian infants with congenital heart disease (CHD) and gastrointestinal symptoms. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: This case-control study conducted on 60 infants with established congenital heart disease. They were subdivided into cyanotic and acyanotic groups, and each group includes 30 patients compared with thirty apparently healthy infants of matched age, sex, and social class. Serum antigliadin antibodies levels were measured using ELISA. RESULTS: The mean age of introduction of cereals in the diet and appearance of gastrointestinal symptoms were six months. On comparison with controls, patients showed highly significant higher serum levels of antigliadin antibodies (P Gluten containing foods should never be introduced before the end of the six months. PMID:28293318

  11. Neurological status of children with congenital heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M T; Hussain, M Z; Bhuiyan, M R; Roy, G R; Barua, C; Kabir, A

    2014-07-01

    Congenital heart defect (CHD) is the most common birth defect & a significant cause of childhood morbidity & mortality. Structural brain abnormalities are more common in children with CHD than general population. This study details the cognitive, motor and behavioral development of a child with congenital heart disease who is on medical management. In this retrospective descriptive study, abnormalities in neurobehavioral status of infant & children (6-42 months of age) with CHD, who are on medical management were assessed by a standardized neurobehavioral assessment test, BSID-II. Fifty-eight children were included, who were diagnosed as a case of congenital heart disease & confirmed by Colour Doppler echocardiography in the Paediatric Cardiology Department of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Bangladesh. Mean age of the children was 23±13 months (range, 6 to 42 months); M:F = 1:1.9. Among them 22(37.9%) had cyanotic and 36(62.1%) had acyanotic congenital heart disease. Neurobehavioral and neurologic abnormalities were documented in a significant number of children. BSID-II showed 23(39.7%) had delayed metal development, 24(41.4%) had motor impairment and 16(27.6%) had non-optimal behavioral performance. Interestingly, infant and young children with acyanotic congenital heart defects were more likely to demonstrate severe neurologic compromise than were those with cyanotic defects. Findings of this study suggest that the prevalence of neurobehavioral abnormalities in infants and young children with congenital heart defects has been under predicted & indicates that delay in closure (surgery/device) puts the patient at an increased risk of neuro-developmental insult.

  12. The tricuspid valve in adult congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginns, Jonathan; Ammash, Naser; Bernier, Pierre-Luc

    2014-01-01

    The tricuspid valve is frequently affected in adults with congenital heart disease but is also frequently overlooked. Disease of this valve can occur primarily or develop secondary to changes in the right ventricle caused by other disease states. The embryology and anatomy of the tricuspid valve are important to understanding pathogenesis of valve dysfunction in congenital heart disease. Clinical findings can be subtle. Multimodality imaging may be necessary to fully assess the cause and impact of tricuspid valve lesions. More research is needed in pathophysiology, imaging, and treatment in this area. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Echocardiography for the Assessment of Congenital Heart Defects in Calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Katharyn Jean; Schwarzwald, Colin Claudio

    2016-03-01

    Congenital heart disease should be considered when evaluating calves with chronic respiratory signs, failure to thrive, poor growth, or if a murmur is heard on physical examination. Echocardiography is currently the gold standard for diagnosing congenital heart defects. A wide variety of defects, either alone or in combination with a ventricular septal defect, are possible. A standardized approach using sequential segmental analysis is required to fully appreciate the nature and severity of more complex malformations. The prognosis for survival varies from guarded to poor and depends on the hemodynamic relevance of the defects and the degree of cardiac compensation.

  14. Popular Hybrid Congenital Heart Procedures without Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Aamisha; Amin, Zahid

    2017-01-01

    As surgical and catheter interventions advance, patients with congenital heart disease are now offered alternative treatment options that cater to their individual needs. Furthermore, collaboration between interventional cardiologists and cardiac surgeons have led to the development of hybrid procedures, using the best techniques of each respective field to treat these complex cardiac entities from initial treatment in the pediatric patient to repeat intervention in the adult. We present a review of the increased popularity and trend in hybrid procedures in congenital heart disease without the use of cardiopulmonary bypass.

  15. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driessen, Mieke M.P. [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); The Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of the Netherlands (ICIN) - Netherlands Heart Institute, PO Box 19258, Utrecht (Netherlands); Breur, Johannes M.P.J. [Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Budde, Ricardo P.J.; Oorschot, Joep W.M. van; Leiner, Tim [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kimmenade, Roland R.J. van; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Meijboom, Folkert J. [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advances have enabled faster and more robust cardiovascular magnetic resonance with improved image quality and spatial as well as temporal resolution. This review aims to provide an overview of advances in cardiovascular magnetic resonance hardware and acquisition techniques relevant to both pediatric and adult patients with congenital heart disease and discusses the techniques used to assess function, anatomy, flow and tissue characterization. (orig.)

  16. Early complications of stenting in patients with congenital heart disease : a multicentre study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gameren, Menno; Witsenburg, Maarten; Takkenberg, Johanna J. M.; Boshoff, Derize; Mertens, Luc; van Oort, Anton M.; de Wolf, DanieL; Freund, Matthias; Sreeram, Narayanswani; Bokenkamp, Regina; Talsma, Melle D.; Gewillig, Marc

    2006-01-01

    Aims Stenting has become an established interventional cardiology procedure for congenital heart disease. Although most stent procedures are completed successfully, complications may occur. This multicentre study evaluated early complications after stenting in patients with congenital heart disease,

  17. The emerging burden of hospital admissions of adults with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheugt, Carianne L.; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; van der Velde, Enno T.; Meijboom, Folkert J.; Pieper, Petronella G.; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj; Plokker, Herbert W. M.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    Objective To assess the extent and the characteristics of hospital admissions in registered adult patients with congenital heart disease. Design Observational cohort study. Setting The Netherlands. Patients 5798 adult patients with congenital heart disease from the Dutch CONCOR national registry

  18. The emerging burden of hospital admissions of adults with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheugt, C.L.; Uiterwaal, C.S.P.M.; van der Velde, E.T.; Meijboom, F.J.; Pieper, P.G.; Sieswerda, G.T.; Plokker, H.W.M.; Grobbee, D.E.; Mulder, B.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess the extent and the characteristics of hospital admissions in registered adult patients with congenital heart disease. Design Observational cohort study. Setting The Netherlands. Patients 5798 adult patients with congenital heart disease from the Dutch CONCOR national registry

  19. Prevalence of Congenital Heart Diseases in Children with Congenital Hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abdel Megied Abo El-Magd

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to assess the prevalence of cardiac anomalies in primary congenital hypothyroidism (PCH patients. Fifty patients with PCH recruited after diagnosis by ultrasonography or scintigraphy (64% Dysgenesis, 36% Dyshormonogenesis. The prevalence of cardiac anomalies was 18%, with renal anomalies being 8%. There was no significant difference in the longitudinal follow-up of growth and sexual maturation between a hypothyroid with and without anomalies. Statistically significant difference was found with replacement therapy of both groups. Hence, echocardiography should be done to screen this birth defect as soon as possible so as to prevent or delay the possible complications. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2013; 2(2.000: 85-91

  20. Congenital Heart Disease and Impacts on Child Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Alievi Mari

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To evaluate the child development and evaluate a possible association with the commitment by biopsychosocial factors of children with and without congenital heart disease. Methods: Observational study of case-control with three groups: Group 1 - children with congenital heart disease without surgical correction; Group 2 - children with congenital heart disease who underwent surgery; and Group 3 - healthy children. Children were assessed by socio-demographic and clinical questionnaire and the Denver II Screening Test. Results: One hundred and twenty eight children were evaluated, 29 in Group 1, 43 in Group 2 and 56 in Group 3. Of the total, 51.56% are girls and ages ranged from two months to six years (median 24.5 months. Regarding the Denver II, the children with heart disease had more "suspicious" and "suspect/abnormal" ratings and in the group of healthy children 53.6% were considered with "normal" development (P≤0.0001. The biopsychosocial variables that were related to a possible developmental delay were gender (P=0.042, child's age (P=0.001 and income per capita (P=0.019. Conclusion: The results suggest that children with congenital heart disease are likely to have a developmental delay with significant difference between children who have undergone surgery and those awaiting surgery under clinical follow-up.

  1. Acquired heart conditions in adults with congenital heart disease: a growing problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutarel, Oktay

    2014-09-01

    The number of adults with congenital heart disease is increasing due to the great achievements in the field of paediatric cardiology, congenital heart surgery and intensive care medicine over the last decades. Mortality has shifted away from the infant and childhood period towards adulthood. As congenital heart disease patients get older, a high prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors is encountered similar to the general population. Consequently, the contribution of acquired morbidities, especially acquired heart conditions to patient outcome, is becoming increasingly important. Therefore, to continue the success story of the last decades in the treatment of congenital heart disease and to further improve the outcome of these patients, more attention has to be given to the prevention, detection and adequate therapy of acquired heart conditions. The aim of this review is to give an overview about acquired heart conditions that may be encountered in adults with congenital heart disease. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. Nutritional Approach of Pediatric Patients Diagnosed with Congenital Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Togănel Rodica

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart defects are among the most frequent anomalies present at birth, representing a heterogeneous group of malformations, both in terms of pathogenesis and clinical significance of the lesion. Failure to grow is well documented in infants with complex congenital heart defects; the presence of associated chromosomal abnormalities, cyanosis, and cardiac failure adds to the complexity and challenge. Malnutrition etiology can be grouped into the following three categories: inadequate intake, inefficient absorption and utilization, and/or increased energy needs. The consequences of malnutrition are both short and long term, timely nutritional intervention being necessary in order to maintain an adequate nutritional state. Because there are several types of congenital heart defects and multiple mechanisms by which they produce failure to thrive, no single strategy will be adequate to treat all cases. Medical complications such as chylotorax, necrotizing enterocolitis, laryngeal and neurological dysfunction play a major role in the requisite nutrition therapy in infants with congenital heart defect; limited access to human milk and parenteral concerns, as well as stress about feeding are also factors that can contribute to poor outcomes concerning nutrition and growth. Protocols are being considered and designed, and a systematic approach is always needed. The quality of life for patient and family, as well as getting the child back on track for age-appropriate development are always at the fore-front of each care plan.

  3. Non-congenital heart disease associated pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Ivy, D D; Feinstein, J. A.; Humpl, T; Rosenzweig, E. B.

    2009-01-01

    Recognition of causes of pulmonary hypertension other than congenital heart disease is increasing in children. Diagnosis and treatment of any underlying cause of pulmonary hypertension is crucial for optimal management of pulmonary hypertension. This article discusses the available knowledge regarding several disorders associated with pulmonary hypertension in children: idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis, pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, he...

  4. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, Mieke M P; Breur, Johannes M. P. J.; Budde, Ricardo P J; van Oorschot, Joep W M; van Kimmenade, Roland R J; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj.; Meijboom, Folkert J; Leiner, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advan

  5. Educational assessment of the adult with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, M J

    1994-06-01

    Adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) have specific educational needs that are influenced by a variety of factors. This article identifies and discusses learning needs and factors that impact educational outcomes for the adult CHD patient population. Assessment techniques and an assessment tool are presented to guide the nurse through the process of assessing an adult patient seeking health care for this disease.

  6. Prepregnancy Diabetes and Offspring Risk of Congenital Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øyen, Nina; Diaz, Lars Jorge; Leirgul, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Maternal diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of offspring congenital heart defects (CHD); however, the causal mechanism is poorly understood. We further investigated this association in a Danish nationwide cohort. METHODS AND RESULTS: In a national cohort study, we...

  7. Coping Behaviors of Parents with Children with Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobino, Jane

    The study addresses parental coping patterns of children with congenital heart disease in the state of Hawaii. Attention was given to geography and ethnicity as well as parental and child characteristics as factors impacting on the coping pattern. Telephone interviews with parents (N=32) obtained data concerning parent characteristics, their…

  8. [Anti-Ro/SSA antibodies in congenital heart block].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios Prieto, Ernesto; Martínez Ceccopieri, David Alejandro; Panduro Barón, J Guadalupe; Fajardo Dueñas, Sergio

    2012-06-01

    Describe a case of a female patient having anti-Ro/SSA antibodies without any other risk factor or collagen disease. In her first pregnancy a congenital heart block and hydrops in the fetus were diagnosed, and these caused stillbirth. In a second pregnancy an in utero treatment resulted in the succesful delivery of a normal child.

  9. Sexual functioning is impaired in adults with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Opic (Petra); J.W. Roos-Hesselink (Jolien); J.A.A.E. Cuypers (Judith); M. Witsenburg (Maarten); A.E. van den Bosch (Annemien); R.T. van Domburg (Ron); A.J.J.C. Bogers (Ad); E.M.W.J. Utens (Elisabeth)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: To investigate the overall sexual functioning and disease specific sexual problems in congenital heart disease (ConHD) patients, for both genders and different cardiac diagnostic groups, and compare these with Dutch normative data. Also disease specific sexual problems were

  10. Prepregnancy Diabetes and Offspring Risk of Congenital Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øyen, Nina; Diaz, Lars Jorge; Leirgul, Elisabeth;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Maternal diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of offspring congenital heart defects (CHD); however, the causal mechanism is poorly understood. We further investigated this association in a Danish nationwide cohort. METHODS AND RESULTS: In a national cohort study, we...

  11. Sotalol for atrial tachycardias after surgery for congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BeaufortKrol, GCM; BinkBoelkens, MTE

    1997-01-01

    Atrial tachycardias, in particular atrial flutter after surgery for congenital heart disease, is associated with a high mortality. Treatment with various antiarrhythmic drugs and/or antitachycardia pacemakers is not very successful. Sotalol, a Class III drug, has shown to be a promising drug in adul

  12. Basic imaging in congenital heart disease. 3rd Ed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swischuk, L.E.; Sapire, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    The book retains its previous format with chapters on embryology, plain film interpretation, classification of pulmonary vascular patterns, cardiac malpositions and vascular anomalies, and illustrative cases. The book is organized with an abundance of illustrative figures, diagrams, and image reproductions. These include plain chest radiographs, angiograms, echocardiograms, and MR images. The authors present the pathophysiology and imaging of congenital heart lesions.

  13. Chance of surgery in adult congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheugt, Carianne L.; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; Vaartjes, Ilonca; van der Velde, Enno T.; Zomer, A. C.; Meijboom, Folkert J.; Pieper, Petronella G.; Post, Marco C.; Vliegen, Hubert W.; Hazekamp, Mark G.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    Background: Young patients with congenital heart disease reaching adulthood face mandatory transition to adult cardiology. Their new cardiologist needs to assess the chances of major future events such as surgery. Using a large national registry, we assessed if patient characteristics at the age of

  14. Hirschsprung’s disease and associated congenital heart defects: a prospective observational study from a single institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia eTuo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: to define the prevalence and characteristics of associated congenital heart diseases in patients with Hirschsprung’s disease.Method: all patients with a histological diagnosis of Hirschsprung’s disease admitted to our hospital between January 2010 and December 2013 were included in this prospective observational study and underwent cardiovascular screening. Cardiac anatomy was assessed by a segmental echocardiographic approach. Measurements of aortic root and left ventricular dimensions, wall thickness and function were obtained. Congenital heart diseases requiring a percutaneous or surgical intervention were described as major hearts diseases.Results: 133 consecutive patients were enrolled at median age of 2.3 years. Eleven patients (8.3% presented an associated heart disease. Moreover five patients had mild dilatation of aortic root. 6/11 (4.5% patients had a major congenital heart diseases requiring surgical repair. Conclusions: prevalence of associated congenital heart diseases was slightly higher than in previous papers, and mostly represented by septal defects. 4/6 patients with major heart disease had also a chromosomal anomaly. If we do not consider the subpopulation of patients with a chromosomal anomaly, cardiac defects were present in 3.8% of the patients. Based on these results we suggest to perform routine echocardiogram in all Hirschsprung patients, with or without associated chromosomal syndromes.

  15. Anaesthetic Management of a Case with Congenital Complete Heart Block Posted for Lower Segment Caesarean Section

    OpenAIRE

    Varsha T; Vaijanath; Chandra Sekhar CN

    2017-01-01

    Complete heart block in pregnancy is relatively a rare problem. It may be congenital or acquired. Congenital complete heart block may be asymptomatic. Acquired causes may be secondary to cardiac surgery, rheumatic heart disease, infectious disorders. The goal in perioperative anaesthetic management of a case with complete heart block is to preserve the heart rate and maintain hemodynamic stability. Herein, we report the anaesthetic management of a case with congenital complete hea...

  16. False heart rate feedback and the perception of heart symptoms in patients with congenital heart disease and anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karsdorp, P.A.; Kindt, M.; Rietveld, S.; Everaerd, W.; Mulder, B.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the mechanisms explaining an increased perception of heart symptoms in congenital heart disease (ConHD). In the present study, it was suggested that a combination of high trait anxiety and disease history increases the perception of heart symptoms. Purpose: It was

  17. [Pulmonary hypertension associated with congenital heart disease and Eisenmenger syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Colmenero, Juan; Sandoval Zárate, Julio; Beltrán Gámez, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a common complication of congenital heart disease (CHD). Congenital cardiopathies are the most frequent congenital malformations. The prevalence in our country remains unknown, based on birthrate, it is calculated that 12,000 to 16,000 infants in our country have some cardiac malformation. In patients with an uncorrected left-to-right shunt, increased pulmonary pressure leads to vascular remodeling and endothelial dysfunction secondary to an imbalance in vasoactive mediators which promotes vasoconstriction, inflammation, thrombosis, cell proliferation, impaired apotosis and fibrosis. The progressive rise in pulmonary vascular resistance and increased pressures in the right heart provocated reversal of the shunt may arise with the development of Eisenmenger' syndrome the most advanced form de Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease. The prevalence of Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with CHD has fallen in developed countries in recent years that is not yet achieved in developing countries therefore diagnosed late as lack of hospital infrastructure and human resources for the care of patients with CHD. With the development of targeted medical treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension, the concept of a combined medical and interventional/surgical approach for patients with Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with CHD is a reality. We need to know the pathophysiological factors involved as well as a careful evaluation to determine the best therapeutic strategy. Copyright © 2014 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  18. Echocardiographic evaluation of right ventricular function in congenital heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yiu-fai Cheung

    2014-01-01

    Objective This review aims to provide an overview of conventional and novel indices used in clinical and research arenas for evaluation of right ventricular (RV) function in congenital heart diseases with a dual-chambered circulation.Data sources Articles cited in this review were selected using PubMed search of publications in English with no date limits.The search terms included "echocardiography","right ventricle","RV function","cardiac function",and "congenital heart disease".Key references were also searched for additional publications.Study selection Articles related to description of echocardiographic techniques in the evaluation of subpulmonary or systemic RV function and their applications in congenital cardiac malformations were retrieved and reviewed.Results Three approaches have been used to evaluate subpulmonary and systemic RV function:(1) assessment of changes in RV size in the cardiac cycle,(2) determination of Doppler-derived velocities and systolic and diastolic time intervals,and (3) quantification of myocardial velocities and deformation.Conclusions Conventional and novel echocardiographic techniques enable the evaluation of subpulmonary and systemic RV function.Novel echocardiographic techniques have further allowed quantification of RV volumes and direct interrogation of myocardial deformation.These new techniques show promise in a more comprehensive evaluation beyond "eye-bailing" of RV function in the growing population of adolescent and adult congenital heart patients.

  19. Congenital Heart Defects in Adults : A Field Guide for Cardiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romfh, Anitra; Pluchinotta, Francesca Romana; Porayette, Prashob; Valente, Anne Marie; Sanders, Stephen P

    2012-06-15

    Advances in cardiology and cardiac surgery allow a large proportion of patients with congenital heart defects to survive into adulthood. These patients frequently develop complications characteristic of the defect or its treatment. Consequently, adult cardiologists participating in the care of these patients need a working knowledge of the more common defects. Occasionally, patients with congenital heart defects such as atrial septal defect, Ebstein anomaly or physiologically corrected transposition of the great arteries present for the first time in adulthood. More often patients previously treated in pediatric cardiology centers have transitioned to adult congenital heart disease centers for ongoing care. Some of the more important defects in this category are tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries, functionally single ventricle defects, and coarctation. Through this field guide, we provide an overview of the anatomy of selected defects commonly seen in an adult congenital practice using pathology specimens and clinical imaging studies. In addition, we describe the physiology, clinical presentation to the adult cardiologist, possible complications, treatment options, and outcomes.

  20. Living with a Congenital Heart Defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the dentist also can help prevent IE. Birth Control and Pregnancy Women who have heart defects should ... with their doctors about the safest type of birth control for them. Many of these women can safely ...

  1. Anesthesia for the adult patient with an unrepaired congenital cyanotic heart defect: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, Marianne S

    2012-06-01

    Adult congenital heart disease, previously considered a rare comorbidity, is increasingly becoming a reality for today's anesthesia providers. Improvements in prenatal diagnosis, sophisticated surgical techniques and equipment, advances in pediatric critical care, enhanced efficacy of cardiovascular pharmacologic agents, and an overall increase in postrepair survival rates have resulted in an estimated population of approximately 800,000 adults with congenital heart disease. Despite successful surgical repair or palliation, these individuals present the anesthesia provider with a multitude of challenges. Individualized care of these fragile patients should be approached with a keen understanding of the patient's underlying cardiac anomaly. This case report chronicles the anesthetic care of a 36-year-old woman presenting for left-sided ureteroscopy with laser lithotripsy and stent placement. Her medical history was remarkable for the presence of complex congenital heart disease consisting of multiple anomalies: a double-outlet right ventricle, transposition of the great arteries, pulmonary stenosis, atrial septal defect, and a hypoplastic left ventricle with concomitant mitral valve atresia. General anesthesia was successfully administered, with meticulous attention given to maintenance of systemic vascular resistance to minimize shunting, oxygenation, administration of preprocedure antibiotics, and judicious replacement of intravenous fluids via air-filtered tubing.

  2. Complete congenital heart block in autoimmune hepatitis (SLA-positive).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knolle, P; Mayet, W; Lohse, A W; Treichel, U; Meyer zum Büschenfelde, K H; Gerken, G

    1994-08-01

    Complete congenital heart block is a serious complication of neonatal lupus erythematosus which most often occurs in children of mothers suffering from connective tissue disease. We report the occurrence of complete congenital heart block associated with autoimmune hepatitis (SLA-positive). A 32-year-old woman was treated for more than 10 years for autoimmune hepatitis (SLA-/ANA-positive) and remained in clinical remission under immunosuppressive therapy. She showed an MHC-haplotype typical for autoimmune hepatitis (A1, B8, DR3). After a normal first pregnancy, an emergency caesarean section was performed in the 32nd week of her second pregnancy because of fetal bradycardia. The child died a few hours after delivery of complete congenital AV-block. Retrospective analysis of the maternal serum showed the emergence of SS-A/Ro-antibodies prior to the second pregnancy. The maternal serum antibodies were reactive with the 52 kD SS-A/Ro-antigen, as demonstrated by immunoblot employing recombinant SSA/Ro-antigen. The occurrence of complete congenital heart block has been shown to be associated with the presence of SS-A/Ro antibodies as well as the MHC-haplotype DR3. With respect to this genetic linkage, pregnant patients with autoimmune hepatitis and the MHC-haplotype DR3 should be examined for the presence of SS-A/Ro-antibodies. They should be closely followed during pregnancy to enable early detection of the development of congenital heart block, as prevention by plasmapheresis plus dexamethasone may be possible at an early stage.

  3. Hematologic Abnormalities in Cyanotic Congenital Heart Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheila Chamanian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patients with cyanotic heart disease may have an acceptable quality of life. However, they are invariably prone to several complications. The aim of this study is search about hematologic abnormalities in cyanotic congenital heart disease patients. Materials and Methods:  In this cross sectional study every cyanotic congenital heart disease patients who was referred to the adult congenital heart disease clinic was selected and asked of any possible hyperviscosity symptoms, gingival bleeding, Epistaxis, hemoptysis, hypermenorrhagia and gouty arthritis irrespective of their age, gender and primary diagnosis in a six-month period. In this regard, 02 saturation was obtained via pulse oximetry, an abdominal ultrasound was done in order to discover any gallstones and lab tests including CBC, coagulation parameters (bleeding time(BT,clotting time(CT, prothrombin time(PT,international ratio( INR, Ferritin, blood urea nitrogen (BUN and creatinine (Cr were provided as well. Results:  A total of 69 patients were enrolled in the present study. The mean age of the patients was 22.44±5.72 with a minimum of 15 and the maximum of 46 years old. Twenty two (34.4% of them were female and 45(65.6% were male. Conclusion: Our patients had less hyperuricemia, there is no correlation between hyperviscosity symptoms and haematocrit level and an inverse correlation between the Ferritin level and hyperviscosity symptoms were seen.  

  4. Radionuclide angiocardiography in the diagnosis of congenital heart disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, R.H.; Austin, E.H.; Peter, C.A.; Sabiston, D.C. Jr.

    1981-06-01

    Radionuclide angiocardiography provides a noninvasive assessment of cardiac function and blood flow through the heart and lungs. During the past three years, this procedure has been used at the Duke University Medical Center for evaluation of 343 patients with congenital heart disorders. A review of this experience shows tat the resulting data were frequently useful in the surgical management of these patients. In patients with abnormal blood flow patterns, noninvasive imaging of blood flow was useful before and after operative correction. Radionuclide measurements of left-to-right intracardiac shunts were sufficiently accurate for use in the initial evaluation of patients with murmurs and to document the absence of shunt after operative closure of intracardiac septal defects. Moreover, measurements of right-to-left cardiac shunts were of benefit in the management of children with cyanotic heart disease. Measurements of left ventricular function obtained during rest and exercise were most useful in patients with origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery and in patients with congenital valvular insufficiency. This experience demonstrates that radionuclide angiocardiography provides important measurements of central hemodynamics and cardiac function which are useful in the management of patients with congenital heart disorders.

  5. Unnatural history of the right ventricle in patients with congenitally malformed hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Leo; Cohen, Meryl S; Anderson, Robert H; Redington, Andrew N; Nykanen, David G; Penny, Daniel J; Deanfield, John E; Eidem, Benjamin W

    2010-12-01

    The long-term outcome of patients with congenitally malformed hearts involving abnormal right ventricular morphology and haemodynamics is variable. In most instances, the patients are at risk for right ventricular failure, in part due to morphological differences between the right and left ventricles and their response to chronic volume and pressure overload. In patients after repair of tetralogy of Fallot, and after balloon valvotomy for valvar pulmonary stenosis, pulmonary regurgitation is the most significant risk factor for right ventricular dysfunction. In patients with a dominant right ventricle after Fontan palliation, and in those with systemic right ventricles in association with surgically or congenitally corrected transposition, the right ventricle is not morphologically capable of dealing with chronic exposure to the high afterload of the systemic circulation. In patients with Ebstein's malformation of the tricuspid valve, the degree of atrialisation of the right ventricle determines how well the right ventricle will function as the pump for the pulmonary vascular bed.

  6. Living with a Congenital Heart Defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as “blue baby”. In the 1960s in India, open heart surgeries were unheard of. Uncorrected, this ... of Birth Defects, Blood Disorders & Disabilities Information For… Media Policy Makers Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) ...

  7. Cardiac CT angiography in children with congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siripornpitak, Suvipaporn, E-mail: ssiripornpitak@yahoo.com [Division of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Pornkul, Ratanaporn [Division of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Khowsathit, Pongsak [Pediatric Cardiac Unit, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Layangool, Thanarat; Promphan, Worakan [Pediatric Cardiology Unit, Queen Sirikit National Institute of Child Health, Bangkok (Thailand); Pongpanich, Boonchob [Pediatric Cardiac Unit, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2013-07-15

    Cardiac imaging plays an important role in both congenital and acquired heart diseases. Cardiac computed tomography (angiography) cCT(A) is a non-invasive, increasingly popular, complementary modality to echocardiography in evaluation of congenital heart diseases (CHD) in children. Despite radiation exposure, cCT(A) is now commonly used for evaluation of the complex CHD, giving information of both intra-cardiac and extra-cardiac anatomy, coronary arteries, and vascular structures. This review article will focus on the fundamentals and essentials for performing cCT(A) in children, including radiation dose awareness, basic techniques, and strengths and weaknesses of cCT(A) compared with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI), and applications. The limitations of this modality will also be discussed, including the CHD for which cMRI may be substituted.

  8. Assessing the influence of consanguinity on congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan H Bittles

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous articles have been published linking consanguineous marriage to an elevated prevalence of congenital heart disease, with ventricular septal defects and atrial septal defects the most commonly cited disorders. While initially persuasive, on closer examination many of these studies have fundamental shortcomings in their design and in the recruitment of study subjects and controls. Improved matching of cases and controls, to include recognition of the long-established community boundaries within which most marriages are contracted, and the assessment of consanguinity within specific levels and types of marital union would improve and help to focus the study outcomes. At the same time, major discrepancies between studies in their reported prevalence and types of congenital heart disease suggest an urgent need for greater standardization in the classification and reporting of these disorders.

  9. 10.7.Congenital heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930270 Clinical analysis of rupture of aorticsinus aneurysm in 30 cases.ZHANG Yuwei (张玉威),et al.Instit Cardiovasc Dis,Dept Med,Shenyang Milit General Hosp,PLA.Chin Cir J1993;8(1):30—31.Rupture of aortic sinus aneurysm is a rarecongenital heart disease.It is sometimes misdi-agnosed and treated because of no typical symp-toms and signs.30 cases with rupture of a-neurysm of aortic sinus were studied.Clinicaldata suggested that the disease could be firstlynoticed when the healthy male aged 20~40years developed suddenly chest pain or extreme-ly uncomfortable feeling with gradually increas-ing heart dysfunction low—frequency harsh andsuperficial continuous precordial murmurs.Chest X-ray exhibited enlargement of heartand asymmetry of pulmonary plethora.ECG

  10. Practical stepwise approach to rhythm disturbances in congenital heart diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Huh, June

    2010-01-01

    Patients with congenital heart diseases (CHD) are confronted with early- and late-onset complications, such as conduction disorders, arrhythmias, myocardial dysfunction, altered coronary flow, and ischemia, throughout their lifetime despite successful hemodynamic and/or anatomical correction. Rhythm disturbance is a well-known and increasingly frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with CHD. Predisposing factors to rhythm disturbances include underlying cardiac defects, hemodyn...

  11. Postoperative cardiac arrest in children with congenital heart abnormalities

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The exact survival rates and markers of survival after postoperative cardiac arrest in children with congenital heart abnormalities are unknown. METHODS In this one-year study, we identified children younger than seven years of age with postoperative cardiac arrest in our pediatric cardiac intensive care unit database. Parameters from perioperative, pre-arrest, and resuscitation periods were analyzed for these patients. Comparisons were made between survivors and non-survivors afte...

  12. A review of the economics of adult congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seckeler, Michael D; Thomas, Ian D; Andrews, Jennifer; Joiner, Keith; Klewer, Scott E

    2016-01-01

    Adults living with congenital heart disease (CHD) now outnumber children with the disease. Thanks to medical advances over the past 75 years, many of these fatal childhood heart problems have changed to chronic medical conditions. As the population of adults with CHD increases, they will require increasingly complex medical, surgical and catheter-based therapies. In addition, social burdens including education, employment and insurability, which increase the societal costs of adult CHD, are now being recognized for adults living with CHD. This review summarizes the available literature on the economics of adult CHD.

  13. Haploinsufficiency of TAB2 causes congenital heart defects in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thienpont, Bernard; Zhang, Litu; Postma, Alex V;

    2010-01-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are the most common major developmental anomalies and the most frequent cause for perinatal mortality, but their etiology remains often obscure. We identified a locus for CHDs on 6q24-q25. Genotype-phenotype correlations in 12 patients carrying a chromosomal deletion...... in cardiac development was further supported by its conserved expression in the developing human and zebrafish heart. Moreover, a critical, dosage-sensitive role during development was demonstrated by the cardiac defects observed upon titrated knockdown of tab2 expression in zebrafish embryos...

  14. Prevalence of Dyslipidemia in Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuenmayor, Gabriela; Redondo, Ana Carolina Costa; Shiraishi, Karen Saori [Hospital do Coração - Associação do Sanatório Sírio, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Souza, Rogerio [Hospital do Coração - Associação do Sanatório Sírio, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Instituto do Coração, Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Elias, Patrícia Figueiredo; Jatene, Ieda Biscegli, E-mail: ijatene@hcor.com.br [Hospital do Coração - Associação do Sanatório Sírio, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-09-15

    Dyslipidemia is one of the main risk factors associated with cardiovascular diseases. Few data on the impacts of congenital heart diseases are available with regard to the prevalence of dyslipidemia in children. Our study evaluated the lipid profile in children with congenital heart disease at a referral center. From January 2011 to July 2012, 52 pediatric patients had their lipid, metabolic and clinical profiles traced. The mean age was 10.4 ± 2.8 years and male/female rate of 1.38:1. Our population had 53.8% patients with high levels of total cholesterol and 13.4% (CI 95 %, from 6.6 to 25.2%) of them also presenting LDL levels ≥ 130 mg/dL, which characterizes dyslipidemia. The group of dyslipidemic patients presented only two obese individuals. Our data show that the presence of congenital heart disease does not lead to higher risk associated with the prevalence of dyslipidemia. Therefore, the screening of this specific population should follow the regular pediatric guidelines, which are also independent of the nutritional status of the children tested.

  15. Risk Adjustment for Congenital Heart Surgery Score as a Risk Factor for Candidemia in Children Undergoing Congenital Heart Defect Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo Motta, Fabio; Dalla-Costa, Libera Maria; Dominguez Muro, Marisol; Lenzi, Andrea; Picharski, Gledson Luiz; Burger, Marion

    2016-11-01

    Candida species are the primary cause of invasive fungal infection in hospitalized children. There are few data on risk factors for postoperative candidemia in pediatric patients with congenital heart defects. This study aimed to identify risk factors for candidemia in patients with congenital heart defects who underwent cardiac surgery. This was a case-control study conducted in patients admitted to a pediatric cardiology intensive care unit from January 2006 to December 2013. Candidemia cases were matched with control patients without candidemia. Multivariate analyses were conducted to determine predictive probabilities for the incidence of candidemia at a risk higher than 10%. Thirty patients diagnosed with candidemia (incidence: 0.7 cases/1000 patient days) were matched with 75 controls. Risk factors independently associated with candidemia included Risk Adjustment for Congenital Heart Surgery (RACHS-1) category ≥3 [odds ratio (OR) = 3.165, 95% confidence interval: 1.377-8.467], use of acid suppression therapy (OR = 1.9, 95% confidence interval: 0.949-3.979) and thrombocytopenia (OR = 2.2, 95% confidence interval: 1.2-4.2). Predictive probabilities ranged from 11% (only in RACHS-1 category ≥3) to 58% (combined RACHS-1 ≥3, thrombocytopenia and acid suppression therapy use). The case fatality rate within 30 days after candidemia was 50%. This is the first report using the RACHS-1 category as a risk factor for invasive candidiasis in patients with congenital heart defects in the pediatric intensive care unit. Further studies must be conducted to validate the risk factors for candidemia in this pediatric population.

  16. Congenital heart disease in the newborn requiring early intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sin Weon Yun

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Although antenatal diagnostic technique has considerably improved, precise detection and proper management of the neonate with congenital heart disease (CHD is always a great concern to pediatricians. Congenital cardiac malformations vary from benign to serious conditions such as complete transposition of the great arteries (TGA, critical pulmonary and aortic valvular stenosis/atresia, hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS, obstructed total anomalous pulmonary venous return (TAPVR, which the baby needs immediate diagnosis and management for survival. Unfortunately, these life threatening heart diseases may not have obvious evidence early after birth, most of the clinical and physical findings are nonspecific and vague, which makes the diagnosis difficult. High index of suspicion and astute acumen are essential to decision making. When patent ductus arteriosus (PDA is opened widely, many serious malformations may not be noticed easily in the early life, but would progress as severe acidosis/shock/cyanosis or even death as PDA constricts after few hours to days. Ductus dependent congenital cardiac lesions can be divided into the ductus dependent systemic or pulmonary disease, but physiologically quite different from each other and treatment strategy has to be tailored to the clinical status and cardiac malformations. Inevitably early presentation is often regarded as a medical emergency. Differential diagnosis with inborn error metabolic disorders, neonatal sepsis, persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN and other pulmonary conditions are necessary. Urgent identification of the newborn at such high risk requires timely referral to a pediatric cardiologist, and timely intervention is the key in reducing mortality and morbidity. This following review deals with the clinical presentations, investigative modalities and approach to management of congenital cardiac malformations presenting in the early life.

  17. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia: To repair on or off extracorporeal membrane oxygenation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Keijzer (Richard); D.E. Wilschut (Dorien); R.J.M. Houmes (Robert Jan); K. van de Ven (Kees); L. de Jongste-van den Hout (Lieke); I. Sluijter (Ilona); P. Rycus (Peter); N.M.A. Bax (Klaas); D. Tibboel (Dick)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) can be repaired on or off extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). In many centers, operating off ECMO is advocated to prevent bleeding complications. We aimed to compare surgery-related bleeding complications between repair on or off

  18. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia: To repair on or off extracorporeal membrane oxygenation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Keijzer (Richard); D.E. Wilschut (Dorien); R.J.M. Houmes (Robert Jan); K. van de Ven (Kees); L. de Jongste-van den Hout (Lieke); I. Sluijter (Ilona); P. Rycus (Peter); N.M.A. Bax (Klaas); D. Tibboel (Dick)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) can be repaired on or off extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). In many centers, operating off ECMO is advocated to prevent bleeding complications. We aimed to compare surgery-related bleeding complications between repair on or off

  19. Urine β 2-Microglobolin in the Patients with Congenital Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Noor Mohammad Noori; Simin Sadeghi; Iraj Shahramian; Kambiz Keshavarz

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to evaluate the renal tubular function in the patients with congenital heart disease using β2-microglobulin. Methods: In this case-control study, based on oxymetry, the patients with congenital heart disease were divided into two groups of cyanotic (n=20) and acyanotic (n=20). Congenital heart disease was diagnosed by echocardiography. Healthy individuals within the same age and sex groups were used as controls. Na+, β2-micro globulin, creatinine (Cr), and β2-...

  20. Haemodynamic findings on cardiac CT in children with congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    In patients with congenital heart disease, haemodynamic findings demonstrated on cardiac CT might provide useful hints for understanding the haemodynamics of cardiac defects. In contrast to morphological features depicted on cardiac CT, such haemodynamic findings on cardiac CT have not been comprehensively reviewed in patients with congenital heart disease. This article describes normal haemodynamic phenomena of cardiovascular structures and various abnormal haemodynamic findings with their mechanisms and clinical significance on cardiac CT in patients with congenital heart disease. (orig.)

  1. Thoracoscopic repair of a large neonatal congenital diaphragmatic hernia using Gerota's fascia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzawa, Hiroaki; Tamaki, Akihiko; Takemoto, Jyunkichi; Morita, Keiichi; Endo, Kosuke; Iwade, Tamaki; Yuichi, Okata; Bitoh, Yuko; Yokoi, Akiko; Maeda, Kosaku

    2015-05-01

    A large congenital diaphragmatic hernia needing patch repair has a high risk of recurrence. Thus, managing these large congenital diaphragmatic hernias under thoracoscopy has become a problem. Here, a large congenital diaphragmatic hernia that was repaired using Gerota's fascia under thoracoscopy is reported. In the present case, it was impossible to close the hernia directly under thoracoscopy because the hernia was too large. Gerota's fascia was raised up by the left kidney and used for the repair. The left colon adhering to Gerota's fascia was mobilized, and a large space was made under thoracoscopy. Gerota's fascia was fixed to the diaphragmatic defect. The patient's postoperative course was good, and there was no recurrence. This technique could be one option for repairing a large hernia under thoracoscopy.

  2. [Computerized tomography in the diagnosis of congenital heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarenko, V N; Iurpol'skaia, L A

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the work was to evaluate the possibility to use CT techniques (SCT and MRT) for the diagnosis of congenital heart disease. A total of 426 patient aged 0-54 years were examined (171 by MRT and 255 by SCT. SCT of the heart with bolus injection of a contrast medium was performed on an Evolution C-150 superfast tomograph in the step-scanning regime and prospective synchronization with ECG (slice thickness 1.5-3 mm). Fasting SCT was used to examine children in the first year of life during quiet (unforced) breathing. Contrast material (Omnipack-300, 350; Visipack-270, 320) was administered at a dose of 1.5-2.0 ml/ kg b.w. at 0.2-0.6 ml/s. MRT was performed using a conventional MR tomograph with a 1 T field and pulsed spin-echo sequences synchronized with ECG for obtaining the anatomic picture and gradient echo-signals (cine-MRT) for the assessment of functional parameters (slice thickness 4-7 mm). Babies were examined under medicamentous sedation. All images were treated and analysed using an Advantage Windows 2.0 workstation and a program package for heart image analysis. A rational procedure of CT and image analysis was developed in the course of the study. It provided data on the formation of all segments and intercommunications of the heart, mutual localization of its cavities and major vessels, permitted to perform morphometry of selected cardiac structures and detect anatomic defects. The informative and diagnostic value of methods for comprehensive evaluation of the heart and mediastinum in patients with congenital heart disease was assessed. Methods of choice for the diagnosis of abnormalities and follow-up of the patients in different periods after surgery were identified.

  3. Pregnancy after biventricular repair for pulmonary atresia with ventricular septal defect.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drenthen, W.; Pieper, P.G.; Zoon, N.; Roos-Hesselink, J.W.; Voors, A.A.; Mulder, B.J.M.; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Sollie, K.M.; Vliegen, H.W.; Ebels, T.; Veldhuisen, D.J. van

    2006-01-01

    Information on pregnancy and delivery in women with biventricular repair for isolated noncomplex pulmonary atresia with a ventricular septal defect (PAVSD) is limited. Using a nationwide congenital heart disease registry (CONgenital CORvitia [CONCOR]), 9 women with biventricular repair for PAVSD

  4. [Congenital sick sinus syndrome in a healthy heart: case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Ameur, Youssef; Hmam, Mohamed; Battikh, Kaïes; Mlika, Azmi; Terras, Mouna; Longo, Salma; Kraïem, Sondes; Slimane, Mohamed L

    2003-06-01

    Isolated congenital sick sinusal syndrome on non harmed heart is a rare affection. Its association with an atrio-ventricular block is exceptional. The authors report a case of a 19 year-old patient, with an early history of bradycardia, hospitalised for effort intolerance. His electrocardiogram reveals a high degree sino-atrial block replaced by a junctional rhythm at 30/mn. During Treadmill test, the sinusal acceleration is satisfactory and an effort atrio-ventricular block was present. He later had a definitive stimulation under DDDR. This report shows that the sinusal node, in the same way as the atrio-ventricular node may be injured by congenital dysimmunitary process. The coexistence of these two conductive troubles worsen the prognosis and should lead more often to the practice of definitive stimulation by the only mode DDDR.

  5. Autonomic regulation in fetuses with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Saira; Wilpers, Abigail; Myers, Michael; Nugent, J David; Fifer, William P; Williams, Ismée A

    2015-03-01

    Exposure to antenatal stressors affects autonomic regulation in fetuses. Whether the presence of congenital heart disease (CHD) alters the developmental trajectory of autonomic regulation is not known. This prospective observational cohort study aimed to further characterize autonomic regulation in fetuses with CHD; specifically hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), transposition of the great arteries (TGA), and tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). From 11/2010 to 11/2012, 92 fetuses were enrolled: 41 controls and 51 with CHD consisting of 19 with HLHS, 12 with TGA, and 20 with TOF. Maternal abdominal fetal electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings were obtained at 3 gestational ages: 19-27 weeks (F1), 28-33 weeks (F2), and 34-38 weeks (F3). Fetal ECG was analyzed for mean heart rate along with 3 measures of autonomic variability of the fetal heart rate: interquartile range, standard deviation, and root mean square of the standard deviation of the heart rate (RMSSD), a measure of parasympathetic activity. During F1 and F2 periods, HLHS fetuses demonstrated significantly lower mean HR than controls (pHeart rate variability at F3, as measured by standard deviation, interquartile range, and RMSSD was lower in HLHS than controls (p<0.05). Other CHD subgroups showed a similar, though non-significant trend towards lower variability. Autonomic regulation in CHD fetuses differs from controls, with HLHS fetuses most markedly affected. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Ambient air pollution and congenital heart defects in Lanzhou, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lan; Qiu, Jie; Zhang, Yaqun; Qiu, Weitao; He, Xiaochun; Wang, Yixuan; Sun, Qingmei; Li, Min; Zhao, Nan; Cui, Hongmei; Liu, Sufen; Tang, Zhongfeng; Chen, Ya; Yue, Li; Da, Zhenqiang; Xu, Xiaoying; Huang, Huang; Liu, Qing; Bell, Michelle L.; Zhang, Yawei

    2015-07-01

    Congenital heart defects are the most prevalent type of birth defects. The association of air pollution with congenital heart defects is not well understood. We investigated a cohort of 8969 singleton live births in Lanzhou, China during 2010-2012. Using inverse distance weighting, maternal exposures to particulate matter with diameters ≤10 μm (PM10), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) were estimated as a combination of monitoring station levels for time spent at home and in a work location. We used logistic regression to estimate the associations, adjusting for maternal age, education, income, BMI, disease, folic acid intake and therapeutic drug use, and smoking; season of conception, fuel used for cooking and temperature. We found significant positive associations of Patent Ductus Arteriosus (PDA) with PM10 during the 1st trimester, 2nd trimester and the entire pregnancy (OR 1st trimester = 3.96, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.36, 11.53; OR 2nd trimester = 3.59, 95% CI: 1.57, 8.22; OR entire pregnancy = 2.09, 95% CI: 1.21, 3.62, per interquartile range (IQR) increment for PM10 (IQR = 71.2, 61.6, and 27.4 μg m-3, respectively)), and associations with NO2 during 2nd trimester and the entire pregnancy (OR 2nd trimester = 1.92, 95% CI: 1.11, 3.34; OR entire pregnancy = 2.32, 95% Cl: 1.14, 4.71, per IQR increment for NO2 (IQR = 13.4 and 10.9 μg m-3, respectively)). The associations for congenital malformations of the great arteries and pooled cases showed consistent patterns. We also found positive associations for congenital malformations of cardiac septa with PM10 exposures in the 2nd trimester and the entire pregnancy, and SO2 exposures in the entire pregnancy. Results indicate a health burden from maternal exposures to air pollution, with increased risk of congenital heart defects.

  7. Fetal echocardiographic screening in twins for congenital heart diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hui; MENG Tao; SHANG Tao; GUAN Yun-ping; ZHOU Wei-wei; YANG Guang; BI Li-hua

    2007-01-01

    Background Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common congenital disorder at birth. Yagel and colleagues's method of heart examination has been proved valuable in finding CHD prenatally in single pregnancies. The aim of this study was to analyze the frequency of CHD in twin pregnancies and the sensitivity of the method.Methods A total of 1103 pregnant women with twins were enrolled in this study, including 127 cases with high-risk for CHD. Five transverse ultrasound measurements were used for fetal heart examination, including the upper abdomen view, four-chamber view, five-chamber view, pulmonary artery bifurcation view, and three-vessel view. In the fetuses who were diagnosed with CHD and whose parents requested termination of the pregnancy, autopsy of the fetal heart was performed after an abortion, and a blood sample was collected from the heart for chromosome evaluation. In the other fetuses, a close follow-up was conducted by echocardiography within one year after birth.Results Antenatally, CHD was found in 12 twins, of which 4 were from the high-risk group (3.15%), and 8 from the low-risk group (0.82%). In 2 pairs of the twins, the two fetuses had a same kind of CHD (one pair had tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), another pair had rhabdomyoma). Another pair had different types of anomaly (one fetus had TOF, and the other duodenal atresia with a normal heart). Termination of pregnancy was performed in these three pairs and the autopsy of the fetal heart confirmed the ultrasound findings. In the other 9 pairs, CHD was detected in one fetus, and a normal heart in the others. In the cases who received chromosome evaluation, 2 had abnormal chromosomes. During the follow-up after birth, heart examinations confirmed the prenatal diagnosis in 7 of the 9. The diagnosis of CHD was missed antenatally in 2 pairs of twins. In both the cases, one fetus was normal, and the other was confirmed as having CHD after birth (small ventricle septum defect in one, and persistent

  8. Pulse oximetry for screening critical congenital heart disease in newborns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Cui-ying; WU Shu-yan; YOU Ke-li; CHEN Guan-di; LI Zhi-gang

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulse oximetry screening (POS) has been proposed as an effective,noninvasive,inexpensive tool allowing earlier diagnosis of critical congenital heart disease (CCHD).However,most neonates are discharged from the hospital without this evaluation in China.This study aimed at assessing the feasibility of POS for newborns in detecting CCHD in the department of obstetrics and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).Methods POS was performed in 355 neonates born in the department of obstetrics or admitted to the NICU between January 2015 and June 2015.These neonates were divided into normal group,mild congenital heart disease group (MCHD) and CCHD group,according to the result of echocardiography or computerized tomography (CT).The gestational age,birth weight and arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) were compared among the three groups.The SpO2 value and diagnosis time of the CCHD cases were classified and analyzed.Results The premature birth and low birth weight were the high risk factors of mild congenital heart disease.There was no difference (P > 0.05) in SpO2 between the MCHD group and the normal group.Significant difference in the SpO2 appeared between the CCHD group and the normal group (P < 0.05).Combination of POS and clinical examination can reduce the missing diagnosis rate in screening for CCHD.Conclusions POS incurs very low cost and risk of harm and is not required for special gaining,therefore,an effective way to identify CCHD in neonates.

  9. Containing costs in the treatment of congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, J D; George, L; Lamberti, J J; Lodge, F A; Pappelbaum, S J; Turner, S W; Mathewson, J W; Kirkpatrick, S E

    1984-07-01

    In the Congenital Heart Program at San Diego Children's Hospital, alterations in medical practice have reduced costs without impairing quality or access. Pediatric cardiac catheterization was done in 483 consecutive elective patients without overnight hospital stay. Hospital readmission was required in one patient for psoas tendinitis. Avoiding overnight hospital stay minimized attendant risks of hospital care, lessened psychosocial trauma and reduced the average hospital bill by $493 (29%). Hospital stay was also reduced for elective surgical correction of congenital heart disease on a case-by-case basis. Review of 151 consecutive cases (1978 through 1982) showed a decrease in both preoperative days in hospital and postoperative days in an intensive care unit. The duration of the postoperative stay was shortened from 6.8 days in 1978-1979 to 4.4 days in 1982 (P <.05). No increase in morbidity and no mortality resulted from the shortened perioperative hospital stay. Financial savings from this process averaged $991 per procedure.Diagnostic tests were reassessed and many precatheterization laboratory tests were eliminated. Without change in new patients seen or surgical volume, the use of cardiac catheterization decreased from 241 procedures in 1981 to 161 in 1982 and the number of operations without catheterization increased (11 to 22, 1981 to 1982). No increase in surgical morbidity or mortality was found comparing those diagnosed only by echocardiography with those who had preoperative cardiac catheterization. The decrease of 80 catheterizations in one year resulted in a savings of $188,800.True cost containment (reducing cost without reducing quality) can be accomplished in congenital heart programs. Similar cost containments in other disciplines may also be achieved.

  10. Planar Cell Polarity Signaling Pathway in Congenital Heart Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Wu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease (CHD is a common cardiac disorder in humans. Despite many advances in the understanding of CHD and the identification of many associated genes, the fundamental etiology for the majority of cases remains unclear. The planar cell polarity (PCP signaling pathway, responsible for tissue polarity in Drosophila and gastrulation movements and cardiogenesis in vertebrates, has been shown to play multiple roles during cardiac differentiation and development. The disrupted function of PCP signaling is connected to some CHDs. Here, we summarize our current understanding of how PCP factors affect the pathogenesis of CHD.

  11. Perinatal and Delivery Management of Infants with Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanapo, Laura; Moon-Grady, Anita J; Donofrio, Mary T

    2016-03-01

    Advances in fetal echocardiography have improved prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart disease (CHD) and allowed better delivery and perinatal management. Some newborns with CHD require urgent intervention after delivery. In these cases, delivery close to a pediatric cardiac center may be considered, and the presence of a specialized cardiac team in the delivery room or urgent transport of the infant should be planned in advance. Delivery planning, monitoring in labor, rapid intervention at birth if needed, and avoidance of iatrogenic preterm delivery have the potential to improve outcomes for infants with prenatally diagnosed CHD.

  12. "CONGENTIAL PANHYPOPITUITARISM ASSOCIATED WITH IMPAIRED LIVER FUNCTION TESTS AND CONGENITAL HEART DISEASE"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Khalili-Matinzadeh

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The term congenital hypopituitarism defines deficiency of all of the pituitary hormones. Hypoglycemia and microphallus (in males are common findings, and some infants have shown evidence of the neonatal hepatitis syndrome. We report a case of congenital panhypopituitarism with deficiency of six major hormones and association with severe hypoglycemia, impaired liver function tests and congenital heart disease.

  13. The epidemiology of heart failure in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Fred H; Marelli, Ariane J

    2014-01-01

    The impact of lifelong exposure to myocardial dysfunction in populations with congenital heart disease (CHD) is becoming increasingly recognized. Most children born with CHD now reach adulthood and the long-term sequelae of treatment are contributing to substantial comorbidity. The combination of structural changes present at birth with changes resulting from cardiac surgery can result in heart failure. This article reports on the current state of knowledge on the epidemiology of heart failure in this patient population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Q and A: Birth Control for Women with Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Your Heart / Health Information / Birth Control Birth Control for Women with Congenital Heart Disease Of ... woman and/or the baby. For these women, birth control is more than just a method to ...

  15. Clinical features of adult patients with Eisenmenger syndrome associated with different types of congenital heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈果

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical features and hemodynamics of adult patients with Eisenmenger syndrome in different types of congenital heart diseases (CHD) .Methods Patients with Eisenmenger syndrome with different types of CHD diagnosed by right heart

  16. Intrapartum electrocardiogram alteration in fetuses with congenital heart disease: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Estelle; Bornallet, Géraldine; Gaucherand, Pascal; Doret, Muriel

    2015-11-01

    To assess if the fetal electrocardiogram especially ST segment is modified by congenital heart diseases: modifications in frequencies of the different ST events and modifications in signal quality. A retrospective case-control study, comparing frequencies of the different ST events and the quality of the signal between fetuses with congenital heart diseases and fetuses without congenital heart disease. From 2000 to 2011, fifty-eight fetuses with congenital heart disease had their heart rate recording using a STAN device during labor. Control group was fetuses who were born just before a case and had a STAN as a second line for intrapartum surveillance. Cases and controls were matched on parity, gestational age at birth, presence of growth restriction and umbilical artery pH. Frequencies of the different ST event and quality of the signal were first analyzed for the global labor recording, and then separately for the first and the second phase of labor. No statistically significant difference in ST event frequencies between fetuses with congenital heart disease and the control group was found. Regarding the quality of the signal, 11.49% (±18.82) of recording time is a signal loss for fetus with congenital heart disease whereas only 5.18% (±10.67) for the control group (p=0.028). This is the first study investigating for intrapartum electrocardiogram modification in fetus with congenital heart disease. Congenital heart diseases do not modify frequencies of ST events. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Mortality from congenital abnormality in Malaysia 1991-1997: the effect of economic development on death due to congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, J J

    2001-06-01

    An analysis was done of available data from the Department of Statistics Malaysia, on the type of congenital abnormality contributing to death, to determine whether progress in health care over recent years was associated with any decline in mortality from congenital abnormality. A significant decline in death due to congenital abnormality was observed between 1991 and 1996. This was attributable to a decline in deaths due to congenital heart disease occurring because of improvements in cardiac surgical services for infants. In 1997 death due to congenital heart disease increased significantly. This could be attributed to improvements in the diagnosis of congenital heart disease in the neonate.

  18. Studies of Genes Involved in Congenital Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar K. Ghosh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease (CHD affects the intricate structure and function of the heart and is one of the leading causes of death in newborns. The genetic basis of CHD is beginning to emerge. Our laboratory has been engaged in identifying mutations in genes linked to CHD both in families and in sporadic cases. Over the last two decades, we have employed linkage analysis, targeted gene sequencing and genome wide association studies to identify genes involved in CHDs. Cardiac specific genes that encode transcription factors and sarcomeric proteins have been identified and linked to CHD. Functional analysis of the relevant mutant proteins has established the molecular mechanisms of CHDs in our studies.

  19. Congenital Heart Disease in an Infant with 49,XXXXY Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Argun

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available 49,XXXXY syndrome which is characterized with the addition of three extra X chromosomes to 46,XY is the rarest sex chromosome aneuploidy syndrome. Its classical findings were defined as a triad of mental retardation, hypogonadism and radioulnar synostosis. In 49,XXXXY syndrome, congenital heart defects like patent ductus arteriosus, atrial septal defect, ventricular septal defect, pulmonary stenosis, Fallot’s tetralogy have been reported. We present a case diagnosed in the newborn stage with low birth weight, short stature, dysmorphic craniofacial findings and hypoplastic male genitalia who was found to have severe pulmonary hypertension and medium patent ductus arteriosus when admitted at 4 months of age with heart failure and who underwent transcathater ductus closure with Amplatzer Duct Occluder I. To our knowledge, our case is the first reported 49,XXXXY syndrome with patent ductus arteriosus closed with the transcathater route.

  20. Congenital heart disease in India: a status report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Anita

    2005-07-01

    Pediatric cardiac care in India is still in its infancy. We have no data on congenital heart disease (CHD) prevalence at birth or on proportional mortality from CHD. The resources are not only limited but also are at times improperly utilized. There are very few specialized pediatric cardiology training programs, those that are, are concentrated in certain regions of India and are often imparted through combined adult and pediatric programs. The existing number of trained personnel for pediatric cardiology and pediatric cardiac surgery is inadequate. Above all there is no national policy for pediatric heart care. Increasing awareness of the problem amongst the pediatricians through CMEs, seminars, symposia is likely to be most helpful in early diagnosis and timely referral of cases. Training programs exclusively dedicated to pediatric cardiology and pediatric cardiac surgery need to be established in centres with good standards of pediatric cardiac care.

  1. Cell lineages, growth and repair of the mouse heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lescroart, Fabienne; Meilhac, Sigolène M

    2012-01-01

    The formation of the heart involves diversification of lineages which differentiate into distinct cardiac cell types or contribute to different regions such as the four cardiac chambers. The heart is the first organ to form in the embryo. However, in parallel with the growth of the organism, before or after birth, the heart has to adapt its size to maintain pumping efficiency. The adult heart has only a mild regeneration potential; thus, strategies to repair the heart after injury are based on the mobilisation of resident cardiac stem cells or the transplantation of external sources of stem cells. We discuss current knowledge on these aspects and raise questions for future research.

  2. [Cardiopulmonary stress testing in children who have had congenital heart disease surgery. Physical exercise recommendations during school hours].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Grima, Ricard; Doñate, Maite; Borrás, Xavier; Rissech, Miquel; Puig, Teresa; Albert, Dimpna C; Bartrons, Joaquim; Gran, Ferran; Manso, Begoña; Ferrer, Queralt; Girona, Josep; Casaldáliga, Jaume; Subirana, Maite

    2011-09-01

    To analyze and discover if stress testing with exhaled gases in children who have had congenital heart surgery is useful so we could make physical exercise recommendations according to heart disease, type of surgery performed, present hemodynamic state and level of exercise practiced. Prospective study of 108 children, who performed stress testing with exhaled gases, electrocardiogram monitoring and blood pressure. A questionnaire was used to obtain variables concerning heart disease, surgery, present functional condition and level of exercise practiced. Exercise recommendations were given after stress testing, and after a year 35 patients answered a questionnaire. There were significant differences between lesion severity and heart rate at rest and during effort, systolic pressure at rest and during effort, oxygen uptake, oxygen pulse, carbon dioxide production and test duration. A relationship was observed between level of weekly exercise and greater oxygen uptake and test duration, but this was not observed with the underlying heart disease. We observed that best performance occurred with fast repairing for 59 children with cyanotic heart disease. Increased exercise level was recommended for 48 children. The cardiopulmonary function study allows us to examine the physical performance of children who have had congenital heart surgery and provides us with important data so that we can recommend better physical exercise planning. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease

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    Michele D'Alto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is a common complication of congenital heart disease (CHD, with most cases occurring in patients with congenital cardiac shunts. In patients with an uncorrected left-to-right shunt, increased pulmonary pressure leads to vascular remodelling and dysfunction, resulting in a progressive rise in pulmonary vascular resistance and increased pressures in the right heart. Eventually, reversal of the shunt may arise, with the development of Eisenmenger's syndrome, the most advanced form of PAH-CHD. The prevalence of PAH-CHD has fallen in developed countries over recent years and the number of patients surviving into adulthood has increased markedly. Today, the majority of PAH-CHD patients seen in clinical practice are adults, and many of these individuals have complex disease or received a late diagnosis of their defect. While there have been advances in the management and therapy in recent years, PAH-CHD is a heterogeneous condition and some subgroups, such as those with Down's syndrome, present particular challenges. This article gives an overview of the demographics, pathophysiology and treatment of PAH-CHD and focuses on individuals with Down's syndrome as an important and challenging patient group.

  4. Employment characteristics of a complex adult congenital heart disease cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickup, L; Gaffey, T; Clift, P; Bowater, S; Thorne, S; Hudsmith, L

    2017-08-01

    Due to advances in surgical techniques and subsequent management, there have been remarkable improvements in the survival of patients with congenital heart disease. In particular, larger numbers of patients with complex disease are now living into adulthood and are entering the workforce. To establish the types of employment complex adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) patients are engaged in, based on the largest cohort of patients with a single-ventricle circulation in the UK. Records of all patients with a univentricular (Fontan) circulation at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital were reviewed. Employment status was categorized according to the Standard Occupational Classification criteria (2010). A total of 210 patient records were reviewed. There was the same proportion of professionals in our cohort compared to the rest of the UK (20% versus 20%). There were greater proportions working in the caring, leisure and other service occupations (15% versus 9%), the elementary occupations (17% versus 11%), sales and customer service occupations (14% versus 8%) and administrative and secretarial occupations (12% versus 11%). The reverse trend was observed for associate professions and technical occupations (7% versus 14%), skilled trades (10% versus 11%), process, plant and machine operatives (3% versus 6%) and managers, directors and senior officials (2% versus 10%). The data show that ACHD patients with a single ventricle are engaged in a diverse range of occupations. It is essential that early education and employment advice are given to this cohort to maximize future employment potential.

  5. Adolescents and Adults with Congenital Heart Diseases in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asim Al-Balushi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of our study was to examine the spectrum, demographics, and mortality rate among adolescents and adults with congenital heart diseases (CHD in Oman. Methods: Data was collected retrospectively from the Royal Hospital, Muscat, electronic health records for all patients with a diagnosis of CHD aged 13 years and above. Data was analyzed according to the type of CHD and in-hospital mortality was assessed using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Results: A total of 600 patients with CHD were identified, among them 145 (24% were aged 18 years or below. The median age was 24 years. The majority of patients had a simple form of CHD. Atrial and ventricular septal defects together constituted 62.8% of congenital heart diseases. Most patients were clustered in Muscat (32% and the Batinah regions (31.1% of Oman. Patients with tetralogy of Fallot and Fontan had shorter survival time than recorded in the published literature. Conclusion: Mostly simple forms of CHD in younger patients was observed. The survival rate was significantly shortened in more complex lesions compared to simple lesions. A national data registry for CHD is needed to address the morbidities and mortality associated with the disease.

  6. Congenital heart defects in oculodentodigital dysplasia: Report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Kosuke; Lippa, Andrew M; Wilkens, Alisha; Feret, Holly A; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Zackai, Elaine H

    2013-12-01

    Oculodentodigital dysplasia is caused by mutations in the GJA1 gene. Oculodentodigital dysplasia presents with a spectrum of clinical features including craniofacial, ocular, dental, and limb anomalies. Although recent findings implicate the major role of GJA1 during cardiac organogenesis, congenital heart defects are infrequently reported in oculodentodigital dysplasia. Here we report on two patients with GJA1 mutations presenting with cardiac malformations and type III syndactyly. Patient 1 presented with pulmonary atresia, an intact septum, right ventricular hypoplasia and tricuspid stenosis. The infant had a small nose, thin columella and bilateral 4-5 syndactyly of the fingers. A de novo c.226C>T (p.Arg76Cys) mutation was identified. Patient 2 presented at 6 months with a ventricular septal defect. The child had hypoplastic alae nasi with a thin columella and bilateral 4-5 syndactyly of the digits. A de novo missense mutation, c.145C>G (p.Gln49Glu) was found. Our two patients underscore the importance of cardiac evaluations as part of the initial workup for patients with findings of oculodentodigital dysplasia. Conversely, those patients with type III syndactyly and congenital heart defect should be screened for GJA1 mutations. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. [Assessment of exercise capacity in congenital heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzo-López, Raquel; González-Represas, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    For many years, the treatment of congenital heart diseases has been a field in which, based on the seriousness of these conditions, treatment options were viewed with the greatest deference. This has conditioned, in many cases, the interventions to be undertaken in each. In this sense, exercise was thought to have a negative impact and thus the practise of almost any physical activity was limited. Although there has recently been a change in the paradigm with respect to exercise, this idea continues to hold sway. For many cardiopathies, the information obtained through a stress test is essential in order to implement and supervise an exercise program. The aim of this study is to analyze the parameters within the stress test which allow for an adequate stratification of the risk to subjects with congenital heart diseases who undertake exercise, as well as their values in accordance with the type of pathology, the gravity of such, and the age of the patients. Furthermore, these parameters will be analyzed for both their survival markers and the protocols that can best be adjusted for patients with these characteristic. Copyright © 2015 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  8. Risks and Benefits of Exercise Training in Adults With Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaix, Marie-A; Marcotte, François; Dore, Annie; Mongeon, François-Pierre; Mondésert, Blandine; Mercier, Lise-Andrée; Khairy, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Exercise capacity in adults with various forms of congenital heart disease is substantially lower than that of the general population. Although the underlying congenital heart defect, and its sequelae, certainly contribute to observed exercise limitations, there is evidence suggesting that deconditioning and a sedentary lifestyle are important implicated factors. The prevalence of acquired cardiovascular comorbidities is on the increase in the aging population with congenital heart disease, such that obesity and a sedentary lifestyle confer increased risk. Health fears and misconceptions are common barriers to regular physical activity in adults with congenital heart disease, despite evidence linking lower functional capacity to poor outcomes, and data supporting the safety and efficacy of exercise in bestowing numerous physical and psychosocial rewards. With few exceptions, adults with congenital heart disease should be counselled to exercise regularly. In this contemporary review, we provide a practical approach to assessing adults with congenital heart disease before exercise training. We examine available evidence supporting the safety and benefits of exercise training. Risks associated with exercise training in adults with congenital heart disease are discussed, particularly with regard to sudden cardiac death. Finally, recommendations for exercise training are provided, with consideration for the type of congenital heart disease, the nature (ie, static vs dynamic) and intensity (ie, low, medium, high) of the physical activity, and associated factors such as systemic ventricular dysfunction and residual defects. Further research is required to determine optimal exercise regimens and to identify effective strategies to implement exercise training as a key determinant of healthy living.

  9. Congenital Heart Disease: Guidelines of Care for Children with Special Health Care Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnesota State Dept. of Health, Minneapolis. Services for Children with Handicaps.

    These guidelines were written to help families coordinate the health care that may be needed by a child with congenital heart disease. The booklet begins with general information about congenital heart disease. It then discusses the goals of health care, the health care team, the importance of periodic health care, and record keeping procedures.…

  10. Congenital heart defects in europe: prevalence and perinatal mortality, 2000 to 2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolk, Helen; Loane, Maria; Garne, Ester

    2011-01-01

    This study determines the prevalence of Congenital Heart Defects (CHD), diagnosed prenatally or in infancy, and fetal and perinatal mortality associated with CHD in Europe.......This study determines the prevalence of Congenital Heart Defects (CHD), diagnosed prenatally or in infancy, and fetal and perinatal mortality associated with CHD in Europe....

  11. Turning 18 with congenital heart disease : prediction of infective endocarditis based on a large population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheugt, Carianne L.; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; van der Velde, Enno T.; Meijboom, Folkert J.; Pieper, Petronella G.; Veen, Gerrit; Stappers, Jan L. M.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Aims The risk of infective endocarditis (IE) in adults with congenital heart disease is known to be increased, yet empirical risk estimates are lacking. We sought to predict the occurrence of IE in patients with congenital heart disease at the transition from childhood into adulthood. Methods and re

  12. Increased prevalence of congenital heart defects in monozygotic and dizygotic twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herskind, Anne Maria; Almind Pedersen, Dorthe; Christensen, Kaare

    2013-01-01

    Smaller studies and many case series reports indicate that congenital heart defects may be more common in monochorionic twins than in dichorionic twins and singletons.......Smaller studies and many case series reports indicate that congenital heart defects may be more common in monochorionic twins than in dichorionic twins and singletons....

  13. Lactacidosis in the neonate is minimized by prenatal detection of congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheijen, PM; Lisowski, LA; Stoutenbeek, P; Hitchcock, JF; Bennink, GBWE; Meijboom, EJ

    2002-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the impact of prenatal detection of congenital heart disease on preventing severe preoperative lactacidosis. Design Patients operated upon for congenital heart disease during the first 31 days of life (n=209) were studied retrospectively, 21 were diagnosed prenatally and 18

  14. Imaging techniques for visualizing and phenotyping congenital heart defects in murine models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoqin; Tobita, Kimimasa; Francis, Richard J B; Lo, Cecilia W

    2013-06-01

    Mouse model is ideal for investigating the genetic and developmental etiology of congenital heart disease. However, cardiovascular phenotyping for the precise diagnosis of structural heart defects in mice remain challenging. With rapid advances in imaging techniques, there are now high throughput phenotyping tools available for the diagnosis of structural heart defects. In this review, we discuss the efficacy of four different imaging modalities for congenital heart disease diagnosis in fetal/neonatal mice, including noninvasive fetal echocardiography, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), micro-magnetic resonance imaging (micro-MRI), and episcopic fluorescence image capture (EFIC) histopathology. The experience we have gained in the use of these imaging modalities in a large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen have validated their efficacy for congenital heart defect diagnosis in the tiny hearts of fetal and newborn mice. These cutting edge phenotyping tools will be invaluable for furthering our understanding of the developmental etiology of congenital heart disease.

  15. Recurrent Pneumonia and a Normal Heart: Late Complication after Repair of Hemianomalous Pulmonary Venous Drainage—A Cautionary Tale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryanne Caruana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemianomalous pulmonary venous drainage with intact atrial septum is a rare congenital anomaly and reports of its surgical repair and the long-term complications related to the correction are only infrequently encountered in the literature. We report the case of a patient with hemianomalous pulmonary venous drainage and intact atrial septum who underwent surgical repair using a pericardial baffle and creation of an “atrial septal defect” aged 15 years. Dyspnoea and recurrent chest infections started 7 months after surgery when he was seen by a respiratory physician without cardiac followup. He presented again aged 28 years with a recurrent pneumonia investigated over 6 weeks and heart pronounced normal from examination and echocardiography. Correct diagnosis was made in Grown Up Congenital Heart (GUCH clinic stimulating review of data and catheterisation with pulmonary artery angiography which confirmed it. We feel that this case highlights the importance of specialist care and followup for GUCH patients.

  16. Genetic counseling in the adult with congenital heart disease: what is the role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchill, Luke; Greenway, Steven; Silversides, Candice K; Mital, Seema

    2011-08-01

    New discoveries using high-resolution methods for detecting genetic aberrations indicate that the genetic contribution to congenital heart disease has been significantly underestimated in the past. DNA diagnostics have become more accessible and genetic test results are increasingly being used to guide clinical management. Adult congenital heart disease specialists seeking to counsel adults with congenital heart disease about the genetic aspects of their condition face the challenge of keeping abreast of new genetic techniques and discoveries. The emphasis of this review is on the genetic basis of structural cardiovascular defects. A framework for identifying adult congenital heart disease patients most likely to benefit from genetic testing is suggested, along with a summary of current techniques for genetic testing. The clinical and ethical challenges associated with genetic counseling are highlighted. Finally, emerging technologies and future directions in genetics and adult congenital heart disease are discussed.

  17. [Perspectives in the management of congenital heart defects in adult patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartyánszky, István; Varga, Sándor; Havasi, Kálmán; Babik, Barna; Katona, Márta; Bogáts, Gábor

    2015-01-18

    Due to improving results in congenital heart surgery, the number of adult patients with congenital heart defect is increasing. The question is: what kind of problems can be managed in this patient-group? The authors review the different problems of management of congenital heart defects in adults based on national and international literature data. Simple defects recognised in adults, postoperative residual problems, changing of small grafts and valves, correction of primary or operated coarctation aortae can be usually managed without problems. A very close follow-up is necessary to establish the correct period for heart transplantation in patients with transposition of great arteries with Senning/Mustard operation, and univentricular heart corrected with "Fontan-circulation" type surgical procedure. The authors conclude that although the number of patients increases, only a few congenital heart diseases may cause problems. It seems important (1) to monitor asymptomatic patient who underwent operation (Fallot-IV, Ross procedure, etc.), (2) follow up regularly patients who underwent Senning/Mustard procedure (magnetic resonance imaging, echocardiography, brain natriuretic peptide measurement), (3) define the proper period of preparation for heart transplantation of patients with a univentricular heart, with special attention to the possibility of multiorgan (lung, liver, etc.) failure. Due to the improvement of foetal diagnosis of congenital heart defects, the number of patients with complex congenital heart defects is decreasing. The standard management of these patients could be primary heart transplantation in infancy.

  18. Vital Signs Changes in Post-Operative Corrective Surgery for Cyanotic and Noncyanotic Congenital Heart Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Amoozegar

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Post open cardiac surgery is associated with rises in fever, blood pressure and heart rate. The objective of the present study was to determine the changes in temperature, blood pressure and heart rate in first week after open cardiac surgery of non-complicated cyanotic and noncyanotic congenital heart diseases.Patients and Methods: Temperature, blood pressure and heart rate were obtained from 100 patients with different congenital heart disease after open cardiac surgery. The patients divided in two groups, 40 cyanotic CHD and 60 noncyanotic CHD.Result: Half of patients had fever in first day after surgery. Cyanotic patients became afebrile earlier than noncyanotic group. Cyanotic patients had higher heart rate and lower blood pressure than noncyanotic group.Conclusion: The study suggests that post open heart surgery body temperature, blood pressure and heart rate are different in patients with cyanotic and non cyanotic congenital heart diseases.

  19. Spectrum of Congenital Heart Diseases in Eastern Nepal: A tertiary care hospital experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Shah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Congenital heart diseases are neglected especially in world’s poorest nations and appear to be ignored and unexplored dimension of health. The exact prevalence and spectrum of congenital heart diseases in Nepal is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to describe the local experience on the magnitude and the pattern of congenital heart disease in order to increase the awareness of the public and health policy makers on its burden in Nepal.Materials & Methods: This is an observational hospital based study carried out in a tertiary care hospital in Eastern Nepal. The duration of this study was from April 2015 to July 2016. The echocardiography reports of all patients clinically suspected of having congenital heart disease were retrieved, and their diagnostic details were extracted. Only patients of day one of life to 14 years of age were included. Congenital heart diseases like bicuspid aortic valve, mitral valve prolapse and various inherited cardiomyopathies were excluded.Results: A total of 330 echocardiograms were performed for clinically suspected congenital heart disease.  The mean age of study population was 22.31±34.08 months with male to female ratio of 1.2:1. 23% of clinically suspected congenital heart disease cases turned out to have normal echocardiography. Acyanotic congenital heart disease was most common (81.5% followed by cyanotic congenital heart disease (14.2% and obstructive congenital heart disease (4.3%. Atrial septal defect was found to be the most common form of acyanotic congenital heart disease (52% which was followed by ventricular septal defect (28.8% and patent ductus arteriosus (14.8%. Tetralogy of Fallot and double outlet right ventricle were the most common form of cyanotic CHD representing 44.4% of all cyanotic patients. Pulmonary stenosis was the most common obstructive congenital heart disease observed in this study population (63.6%. Rarer entities, like d-transposition of great

  20. Retrospective review of congenital heart disease in 976 dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, P; Domenech, O; Silva, J; Vannini, S; Bussadori, R; Bussadori, C

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of epidemiology is important for recognition of cardiovascular malformations. Review the incidence of congenital heart defects in dogs in Italy and assess breed and sex predispositions. Nine hundred and seventy-six dogs diagnosed with congenital heart disease (CHD) of 4,480 dogs presented to Clinica Veterinaria Gran Sasso for cardiovascular examination from 1997 to 2010. A retrospective analysis of medical records regarding signalment, history, clinical examination, radiography, electrocardiography, echocardiography, angiography, and postmortem examination was performed. Breed and sex predisposition were assessed with the odds ratio test. CHD was observed in 21.7% of cases. A total of 1,132 defects were observed with single defects in 832 cases (85%), 2 concurrent defects in 132 cases (14%), and 3 concurrent defects in 12 cases (1%). The most common defects were pulmonic stenosis (PS; 32.1%), subaortic stenosis (SAS; 21.3%), and patent ductus arteriosus (20.9%), followed by ventricular septal defect (VSD; 7.5%), valvular aortic stenosis (AS; 5.7%), and tricuspid dysplasia (3.1%). SAS, PS, and VSD frequently were associated with other defects. Several breed and sex predispositions were identified. The results of this study are in accordance with previous studies, with slight differences. The breed and sex predilections identified may be of value for the diagnosis and screening of CHD in dogs. Additionally, the relatively high percentage of concurrent heart defects emphasizes the importance of accurate and complete examinations for identification. Because these data are from a cardiology referral center, a bias may exist. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  1. Thoracoscopic Patch Repair of Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia in a Neonate using Spiral Tacks: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario A Riquelme

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of congenital diaphragmatic hernia that was successfully treated with spi-ral tacks using thoracoscopy. A newborn female was diagnosed with a diaphragmatic hernia at 20 weeks of gestation. The defect was surgically repaired by thoracoscopy and primary closure. On postoperative day 25, she developed respiratory distress. Chest x-ray showed a recurrence and was taken to the OR for surgical repair with spiral tacks.

  2. Altering hemodynamics leads to congenital heart defects (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Stephanie M.; McPheeters, Matthew T.; Wang, Yves T.; Gu, Shi; Doughman, Yong Qiu; Strainic, James P.; Rollins, Andrew M.; Watanabe, Michiko; Jenkins, Michael W.

    2016-03-01

    The role of hemodynamics in early heart development is poorly understood. In order to successfully assess the impact of hemodynamics on development, we need to monitor and perturb blood flow, and quantify the resultant effects on morphology. Here, we have utilized cardiac optical pacing to create regurgitant flow in embryonic hearts and OCT to quantify regurgitation percentage and resultant morphology. Embryonic quail in a shell-less culture were optically paced at 3 Hz (well above the intrinsic rate or 1.33-1.67 Hz) on day 2 of development (3-4 weeks human) for 5 minutes. The pacing fatigued the heart and led to a prolonged period (> 1 hour) of increased regurgitant flow. Embryos were kept alive until day 3 (cardiac looping - 4-5 weeks human) or day 8 (4 chambered heart - 8 weeks human) to quantify resultant morphologic changes with OCT. All paced embryos imaged at day 3 displayed cardiac defects. The extent of regurgitant flow immediately after pacing was correlated with cardiac cushion size 24-hours post pacing (p-value congenital heart defects (CHDs) including 11/18 with valve defects, 5/18 with ventricular septal defects and 5/18 with hypoplastic right ventricles. Our data suggests that regurgitant flow leads to smaller cushions, which develop into abnormal valves and septa. Our model produces similar phenotypes as found in our fetal alcohol syndrome and velo-cardio-facial/DiGeorge syndrome models suggesting that hemodynamics plays a role in these syndromes as well. Utilizing OCT and optical pacing to understand hemodynamics in development is an important step towards determining CHD mechanisms and ultimately developing earlier treatments.

  3. Cardiac biomarkers in children with congenital heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masaya Sugimoto; Seiko Kuwata; Clara Kurishima; Jeong Hye Kim; Yoich Iwamoto; Hideaki Senzaki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Most congenital heart diseases (CHDs) have specific hemodynamics, including volume and pressure overload, as well as cyanosis and pulmonary hypertension, associated with anatomical abnormalities. Such hemodynamic abnormalities can cause activation of neurohormones, inflammatory cytokines, fibroblasts, and vascular endothelial cells, which in turn contribute to the development of pathologic conditions such as cardiac hypertrophy,fi brosis, and cardiac cell damages and death. Measuring biomarker levels facilitates the prediction of these pathological changes, and provides information about the stress placed on the myocardial cells, the severity of the damage, the responses of neurohumoral factors, and the remodeling of the ventricle. Compared to the ample information on cardiac biomarkers in adult heart diseases, data from children with CHD are still limited. Data sources: We reviewed cardiac biomarkers-specifi cally focusing on troponin as a biomarker of myocardial damage, amino-terminal procollagen type III peptide (PIIIP) as a biomarker of myocardialfi brosis and stromal remodeling, and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP)/N-terminal proBNP as biomarkers of cardiac load and heart failure, by introducing relevant publications, including our own, on pediatric CHD patients as well as adults. Results: Levels of highly sensitive troponin I are elevated in patients with atrial septal defects (ASDs) and ventricular septal defects (VSDs). PIIIP levels are also elevated in patients with ASD, VSD, pulmonary stenosis, and Tetralogy of Fallot. Measurement of BNP and N-terminal proBNP levels shows good correlation with heart failure score in children. Conclusions: In the treatment of children with CHD requiring delicate care, it is vital to know the specifi c degree of myocardial damage and severity of heart failure. Cardiac biomarkers are useful tools for ascertaining the condition of CHDs with ease and are likely to be useful in determining the appropriate care of

  4. Transcriptional atlas of cardiogenesis maps congenital heart disease interactome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xing; Martinez-Fernandez, Almudena; Hartjes, Katherine A; Kocher, Jean-Pierre A; Olson, Timothy M; Terzic, Andre; Nelson, Timothy J

    2014-07-01

    Mammalian heart development is built on highly conserved molecular mechanisms with polygenetic perturbations resulting in a spectrum of congenital heart diseases (CHD). However, knowledge of cardiogenic ontogeny that regulates proper cardiogenesis remains largely based on candidate-gene approaches. Mapping the dynamic transcriptional landscape of cardiogenesis from a genomic perspective is essential to integrate the knowledge of heart development into translational applications that accelerate disease discovery efforts toward mechanistic-based treatment strategies. Herein, we designed a time-course transcriptome analysis to investigate the genome-wide dynamic expression landscape of innate murine cardiogenesis ranging from embryonic stem cells to adult cardiac structures. This comprehensive analysis generated temporal and spatial expression profiles, revealed stage-specific gene functions, and mapped the dynamic transcriptome of cardiogenesis to curated pathways. Reconciling known genetic underpinnings of CHD, we deconstructed a disease-centric dynamic interactome encoded within this cardiogenic atlas to identify stage-specific developmental disturbances clustered on regulation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), BMP signaling, NF-AT signaling, TGFb-dependent EMT, and Notch signaling. Collectively, this cardiogenic transcriptional landscape defines the time-dependent expression of cardiac ontogeny and prioritizes regulatory networks at the interface between health and disease. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Prenatal diagnosis of congenital fetal heart abnormalities and clinical analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hui; WEI Jun; MA Ying; SHANG Tao

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the value of detecting fetal congenital heart disease (CHD) using the five transverse planes technique of fetal echocardiography. Methods: Nine hundred and eighty-two high-risk pregnancies for fetal CHD were included in this study, the fetal heart was scanned with the five transverse planes technique of fetal echocardiography described by yagel, autopsy was conducted when pregnancy was terminated. Blood from fetal heart was collected for fetal chromosome analysis. A close follow-up was given for normal fetal heart pregnancies and neconatal echocardiography was performed to check the accuracy of prenatal diagnosis. Results: (1) Forty-six cases(4.68%) were found to have fetal heart abnormalities in this study, 69.56% of them were diagnosed by single four-chamber view, another 30.43% fetal CHD were found by combining other views; (2) Fotry-one parents of prenatal fetuses with CHD chose to terminate pregnancy, thirty-two of them gave consent to conduct autopsy, 93.75% of which yielded unanimous conclusion between prenatal fetal echocardiography and autopsy; (3) Thirty-two of 46 cases underwent fetal chromosome analysis, 8 cases (25%) were found to have abnormal chromosome; (4) Five cases were found to have right ventricle and atrium a little bigger than those on the left side, with the unequal condition being the same after birth, but there were no clinical manifestations and they are healthy for the time being; (5) Nine hundred and thirty-six cases were not found with abnormality in this study, but one case was diagnosed with ventricular septal defect after birth, one case was diagnosed with patent ductus arteriosus, one case had atrial septal defect after birth. Conclusions: (1) The detected CHD rate was 4.68% by screening fetal heart with five transverse planes according to Yagel's description of high risk population basis for CHD. The coinciding rate of prenatal diagnosis and autopsy was 93.75%; (2) The sensitivity of detecting fetal heart

  6. Anaesthetic management of patients with congenital heart disease presenting for non-cardiac surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohindra R

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of congenital heart disease is about one percent of all live births in the United States. Treatment is being performed at a younger age and these children are showing improved survival. It is not unusual for children with congenital heart disease to present for non-cardiac surgery. Their management depends on their age, type of lesion, extent of corrective procedure, the presence of complications and other congenital anomalies. Each patient needs a detailed pre-operative evaluation to understand the abnormal anatomy and physiology, and related anaesthetic implications. No anaesthetic agent is an absolute contraindication, although drugs beneficial for one lesion may be detrimental for another. Regional anaesthesia has also been safely used in children with congenital heart disease. However the anaesthesiologist must have a detailed understanding of the pathophysiology of the lesion and the pharmacology of drugs being used to be able to provide safe anaesthesia for children with congenital heart disease.

  7. Mutations of connexin43 in fetuses with congenital heart malformations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ping; XIE Li-jian; HUANG Guo-ying; ZHAO Xiao-qing; CHANG Cai

    2005-01-01

    Background Gap junction channels formed by connexin43 (Cx43) protein are important in cardiac morphogenesis, and Cx43 gene is thought to be associated with congenital heart malformation (CHM). This study was undertaken to detect the mutations of Cx43 in fetuses with CHM.Methods Cx43 extron DNA was amplified by PCR from 16 fetuses with a variety of CHM. The PCR products were analyzed by SSCP and DNA sequencing. Thirty children who had no CHM were selected as controls. Results Eight homozygous mutations of Cx43 were observed in a fetus with double outlet right ventricule (DORV), five of the 8 mutations were missense mutations including Arg239Trp, Ser251Thr, Ala253Pro, Pro283Leu and Thr290Asn, and the remaining 3 were silent polymorphisms including Gly252Gly, Pro256Pro and Thr275Thr. No mutations were found in other fetuses and the control group.Conclusions Mutations of Cx43 may be associated with congenital conotruncal anomalies. PCR-SSCP is an effective method for screening the mutations of Cx43.

  8. Dental health and management for children with congenital heart disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    FitzGerald, Kirsten

    2012-02-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is one of the most common developmental anomalies. Children with CHD are at increased risk of developing oral disease, and are at increased risk from the systemic effects of oral disease. Recent changes in guidelines related to prophylaxis against infective endocarditis have highlighted the importance of establishing and maintaining oral health for this group of patients. The management of children with CHD can be complex and, unfortunately, many of these children do not receive the care they require. The challenges that these children pose are discussed, and suggestions are made for the appropriate management of these patients and the key role that all those working in primary dental care have to play.

  9. The team approach to pregnancy and congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafka, Henryk; Johnson, Mark R; Gatzoulis, Michael A

    2006-11-01

    The successful pediatric management of congenital heart disease has resulted in increasing numbers of these patients in the reproductive age group and increasing clinical challenges for their physicians. These challenges can be met successfully, with improved results for mother and child, through a concerted comprehensive team approach that relies on a thorough understanding of the patient's underlying cardiac pathology and its anticipated interaction with the pregnancy, and ongoing close evaluation and communication with a team of trained and experienced specialist, including (but not limited to) cardiologist, obstetricians, anesthetists, pediatricians, clinical nurse specialists, and clinical geneticists. Such teams are not always available locally and it will be necessary to refer medium- and high-risk patients to a specialized tertiary care center.

  10. Of mice and men: molecular genetics of congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Troels Askhøj; Troelsen, Karin de Linde Lind; Larsen, Lars Allan

    2014-04-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) affects nearly 1 % of the population. It is a complex disease, which may be caused by multiple genetic and environmental factors. Studies in human genetics have led to the identification of more than 50 human genes, involved in isolated CHD or genetic syndromes, where CHD is part of the phenotype. Furthermore, mapping of genomic copy number variants and exome sequencing of CHD patients have led to the identification of a large number of candidate disease genes. Experiments in animal models, particularly in mice, have been used to verify human disease genes and to gain further insight into the molecular pathology behind CHD. The picture emerging from these studies suggest that genetic lesions associated with CHD affect a broad range of cellular signaling components, from ligands and receptors, across down-stream effector molecules to transcription factors and co-factors, including chromatin modifiers.

  11. Dental health and management for children with congenital heart disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    FitzGerald, Kirsten

    2010-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is one of the most common developmental anomalies. Children with CHD are at increased risk of developing oral disease, and are at increased risk from the systemic effects of oral disease. Recent changes in guidelines related to prophylaxis against infective endocarditis have highlighted the importance of establishing and maintaining oral health for this group of patients. The management of children with CHD can be complex and, unfortunately, many of these children do not receive the care they require. The challenges that these children pose are discussed, and suggestions are made for the appropriate management of these patients and the key role that all those working in primary dental care have to play.

  12. The role of the nurse practitioner in congenital heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    Pediatric nurse practitioners are often members of the interdisciplinary team caring for children with congenital heart disease. The collaborative practice model, in which a physician-led team of physicians, nurse practitioners, and other clinicians work together to provide comprehensive, quality patient care, has had positive benefits for patients and their families, physicians, and nurses. The acute care pediatric nurse practitioner combines advanced training in assessment, diagnosis, and management of common pediatric health problems with advanced nursing expertise in patient education, counseling, and health promotion to meet the specialized needs of children with complex acute and chronic illnesses. This article focuses on the development and current practice of pediatric nurse practitioners in acute care settings and concludes with a discussion of the role of nurse practitioners on the postoperative cardiac surgery service at Children's Hospital, Boston.

  13. Congenital heart disease in adults and its problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teddy Ontoseno

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available There were 40 adult congenital heart disease (CHD patients seen in the Cardiology Division during 1 year (February 1993 - February 1994. The most frequently seen defect was atrial septal defect; however there were also cases with patent ductus arteriosus, pulmonary stenosis, ventricular septal defect, and tetralogy of Fallot. Hemodynamic disorder, serious hindrance to education achievement, and occupational threat due to limited physical capabilities as well as malnutrition are some of prominent issues to be closely anticipated. In general the older the patients the more serious hemodynamic disorder they suffer due CHD. It is worth thinking how to improve the quality of life of CHD patients who succeed to live their adult lives and minimize any possible fatal complication risks.

  14. Urine β 2-Microglobolin in the Patients with Congenital Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Mohammad Noori

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study aimed to evaluate the renal tubular function in the patients with congenital heart disease using β2-microglobulin. Methods: In this case-control study, based on oxymetry, the patients with congenital heart disease were divided into two groups of cyanotic (n=20 and acyanotic (n=20. Congenital heart disease was diagnosed by echocardiography. Healthy individuals within the same age and sex groups were used as controls. Na+, β2-micro globulin, creatinine (Cr, and β2-microglobulin/Cr ratio were measured in random urine samples and the results were compared to the same parameters in the control group using Tukey, One-Way ANOVA, and X2 tests. Results: Based on the study results, urine sodium in the patients with cyanotic heart disease was significantly different from that of the controls (P=0.023. The results also revealed a significant difference between the two groups with congenital heart disease regarding urine β2-microglobulin (P=0.045. In addition, the patients with cyanotic heart disease were significantly different from those with acyanotic heart disease and the controls regarding urine β2-micro globulin/Cr ratio (P=0.012 and P=0.026, respectively. Conclusions: The results of this study demonstrated that renal tubular dysfunction began in the patients with congenital heart disease, especially in those with cyanotic congenital heart disease. Besides, early diagnosis before cardiac surgery leads to better control of renal tubular disease.

  15. Ethnic and socioeconomic variation in incidence of congenital heart defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Rachel L; Ridout, Deborah; Crowe, Sonya; Bull, Catherine; Wray, Jo; Tregay, Jenifer; Franklin, Rodney C; Barron, David J; Cunningham, David; Parslow, Roger C; Brown, Katherine L

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Ethnic differences in the birth prevalence of congenital heart defects (CHDs) have been reported; however, studies of the contemporary UK population are lacking. We investigated ethnic variations in incidence of serious CHDs requiring cardiac intervention before 1 year of age. Methods All infants who had a cardiac intervention in England and Wales between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2010 were identified in the national congenital heart disease surgical audit and matched with paediatric intensive care admission records to create linked individual child records. Agreement in reporting of ethnic group by each audit was evaluated. For infants born 1 January 2006 to 31 December 2009, we calculated incidence rate ratios (IRRs) for CHDs by ethnicity and investigated age at intervention, antenatal diagnosis and area deprivation. Results We identified 5350 infants (2940 (55.0%) boys). Overall CHD incidence was significantly higher in Asian and Black ethnic groups compared with the White reference population (incidence rate ratios (IRR) (95% CIs): Asian 1.5 (1.4 to 1.7); Black 1.4 (1.3 to 1.6)); incidence of specific CHDs varied by ethnicity. No significant differences in age at intervention or antenatal diagnosis rates were identified but affected children from non-White ethnic groups were more likely to be living in deprived areas than White children. Conclusions Significant ethnic variations exist in the incidence of CHDs, including for specific defects with high infant mortality. It is essential that healthcare provision mitigates ethnic disparity, including through timely identification of CHDs at screening, supporting parental choice and effective interventions. Future research should explore the factors underlying ethnic variation and impact on longer-term outcomes. PMID:27986699

  16. Utilisation of three-dimensional printed heart models for operative planning of complex congenital heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejník, Peter; Nosal, Matej; Havran, Tomas; Furdova, Adriana; Cizmar, Maros; Slabej, Michal; Thurzo, Andrej; Vitovic, Pavol; Klvac, Martin; Acel, Tibor; Masura, Jozef

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of the three-dimensional (3D) printing of cardiovascular structures. To explore whether utilisation of 3D printed heart replicas can improve surgical and catheter interventional planning in patients with complex congenital heart defects. Between December 2014 and November 2015 we fabricated eight cardiovascular models based on computed tomography data in patients with complex spatial anatomical relationships of cardiovascular structures. A Bland-Altman analysis was used to assess the accuracy of 3D printing by comparing dimension measurements at analogous anatomical locations between the printed models and digital imagery data, as well as between printed models and in vivo surgical findings. The contribution of 3D printed heart models for perioperative planning improvement was evaluated in the four most representative patients. Bland-Altman analysis confirmed the high accuracy of 3D cardiovascular printing. Each printed model offered an improved spatial anatomical orientation of cardiovascular structures. Current 3D printers can produce authentic copies of patients` cardiovascular systems from computed tomography data. The use of 3D printed models can facilitate surgical or catheter interventional procedures in patients with complex congenital heart defects due to better preoperative planning and intraoperative orientation.

  17. Forkhead box transcription factors in embryonic heart development and congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic heart development is a very complicated process regulated precisely by a network composed of many genes and signaling pathways in time and space. Forkhead box (Fox, FOX) proteins are a family of transcription factors characterized by the presence of an evolutionary conserved "forkhead"or "winged-helix" DNA-binding domain and able to organize temporal and spatial gene expression during development. They are involved in a wide variety of cellular processes, such as cell cycle progression, proliferation, differentiation, migration, metabolism and DNA damage response. An abundance of studies in model organisms and systems has established that Foxa2, Foxc1/c2, Foxh1 and Foxm1, Foxos and Foxps are important components of the signaling pathways that instruct cardiogenesis and embryonic heart development, playing paramount roles in heart development. The previous studies also have demonstrated that mutations in some of the forkhead box genes and the aberrant expression of forkhead box gene are heavily implicated in the congenital heart disease (CHD) of humans. This review primarily focuses on the current understanding of heart development regulated by forkhead box transcription factors and molecular genetic mechanisms by which forkhead box factors modulate heart development during embryogenesis and organogenesis. This review also summarizes human CHD related mutations in forkhead box genes as well as the abnormal expression of forkhead box gene, and discusses additional possible regulatory mechanisms of the forkhead box genes during embryonic heart development that warrant further investigation.

  18. Predictive value of B-type natriuretic peptide level on the postoperative course of infants with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahum, Elhanan; Pollak, Uri; Dagan, Ovdi; Amir, Gabriel; Frenkel, George; Birk, Einat

    2013-05-01

    B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) has been shown to have prognostic value for morbidity and mortality after cardiac surgery. Less is known about its prognostic value in infants. To investigate the predictive value of BNP levels regarding the severity of the postoperative course in infants undergoing surgical repair of congenital heart disease. We conducted a prospective comparative study. Plasma BNP levels in infants aged 1-12 months with congenital heart disease undergoing complete repair were measured preoperatively and 8, 24 and 48 hours postoperatively. Demographic and clinical data included postoperative inotropic support and lactate level, duration of mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit (ICU) and hospitalization stay. Cardiac surgery was performed in 19 infants aged 1-12 months. Preoperative BNP level above 170 pg/ml had a positive predictive value of 100% for inotropic score > or = 7.5 at 24 hours (specificity 100%, sensitivity 57%) and 48 hours (specificity 100%, sensitivity 100%), and was associated with longer ICU stay (P = 0.05) and a trend for longer mechanical ventilation (P = 0.12). Similar findings were found for 8 hours postoperative BNP above 1720 pg/ml. BNP level did not correlate with measured fractional shortening. In infants undergoing heart surgery, preoperative and 8 hour BNP levels were predictive of inotropic support and longer ICU stay. These findings may have implications for preplanning ICU loads in clinical practice. Further studies with larger samples are needed.

  19. The Importance of Nomenclature for Congenital Heart Disease: Implications for Research and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Matthew J; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany J; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Reller, Mark D; Mahle, William T; Botto, Lorenzo D; Tolbert, Paige E; Jacobs, Marshall L; Lacour-Gayet, Francois G; Tchervenkov, Christo I; Mavroudis, Constantine; Correa, Adolfo

    2013-01-01

    Background Administrative databases are often used for congenital heart disease research and evaluation, with little validation of the accuracy of the diagnostic codes. Methods Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program surveillance records were reviewed and classified using a version of the International Pediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code. Using this clinical nomenclature as the referent, we report the sensitivity and false positive fraction (1 – positive predictive value) of the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification diagnosis codes for tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries, and hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Results We identified 4918 infants and foetuses with congenital heart disease from the surveillance records. Using only the International Classification of Diseases diagnosis codes, there were 280 records with tetralogy, 317 records with transposition, and 192 records with hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Based on the International Pediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code, 330 records were classified as tetralogy, 163 records as transposition, and 179 records as hypoplastic left heart syndrome. The sensitivity of International Classification of Diseases diagnosis codes was 83% for tetralogy, 100% for transposition, and 95% for hypoplastic left heart syndrome. The false positive fraction was 2% for tetralogy, 49% for transposition, and 11% for hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Conclusions Analyses based on International Classification of Diseases diagnosis codes may have substantial misclassification of congenital heart disease. Isolating the major defect is difficult, and certain codes do not differentiate between variants that are clinically and developmentally different. PMID:19063779

  20. Orthotropic heart transplantation for adult congenital heart disease: a case with heterotaxy and dextrocardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Hikaru; Fukushima, Norihide; Ichikawa, Hajime; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2017-01-01

    A 41-year-old male with heterotaxy (left isomerism) and dextrocardia composed by single ventricle, absent inferior vena cava, bilateral superior vena cava (SVC), common atrioventricular valve has received orthotopic heart transplantation (HTx) after long waiting period as Status-1. Reconstructions of bilateral SVC and hepatic vein route were successful without use of prosthetic material, and the donor heart was placed in the left mediastinum. In spite of satisfactory early recovery, the patient expired 4 months after transplantation mainly from fungal infection which developed following humoral rejection. HTx for adult patients with complex congenital heart disease is demanding in technical as well as pre- and post-transplant management, and indication should be critically determined.

  1. Congenital heart disease and rheumatic heart disease in Africa: recent advances and current priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zühlke, Liesl; Mirabel, Mariana; Marijon, Eloi

    2013-11-01

    Africa has one of the highest prevalence of heart diseases in children and young adults, including congenital heart disease (CHD) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). We present here an extensive review of recent data from the African continent highlighting key studies and information regarding progress in CHD and RHD since 2005. Main findings include evidence that the CHD burden is underestimated mainly due to the poor outcome of African children with CHD. The interest in primary prevention for RHD has been recently re-emphasised, and new data are available regarding echocardiographic screening for subclinical RHD and initiation of secondary prevention. There is an urgent need for comprehensive service frameworks to improve access and level of care and services for patients, educational programmes to reinforce the importance of prevention and early diagnosis and a relevant research agenda focusing on the African context.

  2. Congenital heart anomaly in newborns with congenital diaphragmatic hernia: a single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruano, R; Javadian, P; Kailin, J A; Maskatia, S A; Shamshirsaz, A A; Cass, D L; Zamora, I J; Sangi-Haghpeykar, H; Lee, T C; Ayres, N A; Mehollin-Ray, A; Cassady, C I; Fernandes, C; Welty, S; Belfort, M A; Olutoye, O O

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the impact of the presence of a congenital heart anomaly (CHA) and its potential contribution to morbidity and mortality in infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). In this retrospective cohort study, prenatal and postnatal data of all newborns diagnosed with CDH between January 2004 and December 2012 in a single center were reviewed. Cases were classified into two groups: those with 'isolated' CDH and those with both CDH and CHA. Patients with CHA were further subclassified into those with a major or minor CHA based on the Risk Adjustment for Congenital Heart Surgery-1 (RACHS-1), and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons-European Association for Cardiothoracic Surgery (STS-EACTS) scoring systems. Patients with associated non-cardiac anomalies, including 'syndromic cases', were excluded from the analysis. Primary and secondary outcomes were survival up to 1 year of age and a need for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), respectively. Of the 180 infants with CDH, 41 were excluded because of the presence of non-cardiac associated anomalies, 118 had isolated CDH and 21 had CDH with CHA (16 with minor and five with major CHA). Receiver-operating characteristics curve analysis demonstrated that the best cut-off for survival was when the score for CHA was ≤ 2 for both RACHS-1 (area under the curve (AUC), 0.74 (P = 0.04); sensitivity, 80.0%; specificity, 87.5%) and STS-EACTS (AUC, 0.83 (P = 0.03); sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 87.5%). Survival rate at 1 year was significantly lower in those with CHD and a major CHA (40.0%; P = 0.04) than in those with isolated CDH (77.1%) and those with CDH and a minor CHA (81.3%). We found no significant differences among the groups with regard to the need for ECMO. In general, a milder form of CHA does not appear to have a negative impact on the survival of infants with CDH. However, mortality appears to be significantly higher in infants with CDH and a major form of CHA. The scoring systems

  3. Hypoalbuminaemia predicts outcome in adult patients with congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempny, Aleksander; Diller, Gerhard-Paul; Alonso-Gonzalez, Rafael; Uebing, Anselm; Rafiq, Isma; Li, Wei; Swan, Lorna; Hooper, James; Donovan, Jackie; Wort, Stephen J; Gatzoulis, Michael A; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Background In patients with acquired heart failure, hypoalbuminaemia is associated with increased risk of death. The prevalence of hypoproteinaemia and hypoalbuminaemia and their relation to outcome in adult patients with congenital heart disease (ACHD) remains, however, unknown. Methods Data on patients with ACHD who underwent blood testing in our centre within the last 14 years were collected. The relation between laboratory, clinical or demographic parameters at baseline and mortality was assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Results A total of 2886 patients with ACHD were included. Mean age was 33.3 years (23.6–44.7) and 50.1% patients were men. Median plasma albumin concentration was 41.0 g/L (38.0–44.0), whereas hypoalbuminaemia (disease complexity, hypoalbuminaemia remained a significant predictor of death. Conclusions Hypoalbuminaemia is common in patients with ACHD and is associated with a threefold increased risk of risk of death. Hypoalbuminaemia, therefore, should be included in risk-stratification algorithms as it may assist management decisions and timing of interventions in the growing ACHD population. PMID:25736048

  4. Growth curves in Down syndrome with congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline D’Azevedo Sica

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Introduction: To assess dietary habits, nutritional status and food frequency in children and adolescents with Down syndrome (DS and congenital heart disease (CHD. Additionally, we attempted to compare body mass index (BMI classifications according to the World Health Organization (WHO curves and curves developed for individuals with DS. Method: Cross-sectional study including individuals with DS and CHD treated at a referral center for cardiology, aged 2 to 18 years. Weight, height, BMI, total energy and food frequency were measured. Nutritional status was assessed using BMI for age and gender, using curves for evaluation of patients with DS and those set by the WHO. Results: 68 subjects with DS and CHD were evaluated. Atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD was the most common heart disease (52.9%. There were differences in BMI classification between the curves proposed for patients with DS and those proposed by the WHO. There was an association between consumption of vitamin E and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Conclusion: Results showed that individuals with DS are mostly considered normal weight for age, when evaluated using specific curves for DS. Reviews on specific curves for DS would be the recommended practice for health professionals so as to avoid precipitated diagnosis of overweight and/or obesity in this population.

  5. Prognosis of the Newborns with Congenital Heart Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbar Molaei

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Congenital heart disease (CHD is defined as problems affecting the heart of the fetus. According to previous studies, the incidence rate varies from 4-12 in 1000 live births. This study aimed to evaluate the demographic characteristics, clinical presentations, and findings that have impact on the prognosis of newborns hospitalized in Tabriz children Hospital, northwest of Iran. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 82 neonates with CHD admitted in Tabriz children Hospital, northwest of Iran from December 2011 to December 2012. Demographic characteristics, main complaints, symptoms, clinical presentations, associated anomalies, diagnoses, and also the correlation between the treatment process and mortality were evaluated. All data were analyzed using SPSS™ version 16 statistical software. Results: A total of 82 neonates with CHD were enrolled. The mean age and birth weight were 8.54 days and 2828.17 grams, respectively. The most common chief complaint was respiratory distress (58 cases, 70.73%. The most common diagnosis was d-transposition of great arteries and the most frequent therapeutic procedure was medical therapy in combination with mechanical ventilation (31 cases, 37.8%. 10 neonates (12.1% had complications while seizure was the most common complication of the study (4 case, 4.87%. Of 82 newborns in this study, 30 patients (36.6% died of which 13 cases (43.33% had DTGA; the most common therapeutic procedure was mechanical ventilation plus medical therapy which was performed in 22 patients (73.33%. In our study, no significant correlation could be observed between age, sex or weight of neonates and final outcome. Conclusion: Mortality of neonates with critical CHD is high. Also, the neonates treated with more invasive methods have higher mortality rates. It is obvious that both early detection and timely management affect ultimate prognosis of these patients. Hence, prenatal (fetal echocardiography and

  6. Can folic acid protect against congenital heart defects in Down syndrome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Willemijn M.; Werler, Martha M.; Louik, Carol; Hernandez-Diaz, Sonia; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T. W.; Mitchell, Allen A.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several studies have suggested a protective effect of folic acid (FA) on congenital heart anomalies. Down syndrome (DS) infants are known to have a high frequency of heart anomalies. Not all children with DS suffer from heart anomalies, which raises the question whether maternal factors

  7. Peripheral oxygen saturation, heart rate, and blood pressure during dental treatment of children with cyanotic congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra, Rosane Menezes Faria; Neves, Itamara Lucia Itagiba; Neves, Ricardo Simões; Atik, Edmar; Santos, Ubiratan de Paula

    2014-01-01

    In this observational study, we evaluated the peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2), heart rate, and blood pressure of children with cyanotic congenital heart disease who were undergoing dental extraction. Forty-four patients between the ages of 6 and 12 years who underwent upper primary tooth extraction were included in the study. Of these, 20 patients were in the cyanotic congenital heart disease group and 24 were in the control group. Peripheral oxygen saturation, heart rate, and systolic blood pressure in the cyanotic congenital heart disease group varied quite significantly during the treatment protocol (pheart disease using a standardized protocol in decentralized offices without the support of a surgical center is safe.

  8. Myoblast transplantation can repair heart damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jonathan Dinsmore; Nabil Dib

    2006-01-01

    Myocardial regeneration is an exciting new frontier for the treatment of heart disease. Many approaches are currently being tested. The use of autologous skeletal myoblasts has been the earliest, with over 10 years of research having been conducted.Current progress in the area of skeletal myoblasts for cardiac regeneration is presented. Reviewed is work from both pre-clinical and clinical studies. Work in this area continues to progress and definitive studies to assess efficacy of myoblasts for heart failure either have been initiated or will be initiated shortly. One result that is clear is that myoblasts can survive and form myotubes and myofibers in the area of myocardial infarction. In the early clinical trials, arrhythmia was a concern. However, further studies have shown that the risk was assumed prematurely based on limited human studies. Myoblasts, therefore, provide a highly promising treatment for heart disease. (J Geriatr Cardiol 2006;3 :168-70.)

  9. Use of composite polyester/collagen mesh in the repair of recurrent congenital diaphragmatic hernias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin C. Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Case 1 is an 18 year-old woman with a third recurrence of a left congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH. She had previously undergone a primary repair of a recurrence via laparotomy and an additional repair of a second recurrence with PTFE mesh via a thoracotomy. Following her third recurrence she underwent successful laparoscopic repair utilizing composite polyester/collagen (Parietex™ Composite, Covidien, Sofradim, France mesh. Six years following surgery, she has carried a pregnancy to term and has not recurred. Case 2 is a 5 month-old infant who presented with a recurrent right-sided CDH. She initially underwent primary repair via thoracotomy along with a right pneumonectomy at an outside institution. She presented with incarceration of her liver, hepatic venous thrombosis, mediastinal shift, and respiratory distress. She underwent successful repair with composite mesh through a right thoracoabdominal incision. At 8 months post-operatively, she has no evidence of recurrence in spite of the expected mediastinal deviation to the right and right thoracic volume loss as a result of being status post right pneumonectomy. Recurrences occur in a significant number of patients following repair of congenital diaphragmatic hernia, particularly cases in which a mesh implant are utilized. Historically, PTFE has been the product of choice for a diaphragmatic implant by pediatric surgeons. However, this product does not incorporate into surrounding tissues which theoretically places patients at risk for recurrence. Polyester/collagen composite mesh has been used for decades in adults undergoing complex groin and ventral hernia repairs with excellent results. However, its use for congenital diaphragmatic hernias has not been previously described. We present the successful utilization of this product in two cases which were at extremely high risk for future recurrence. Additional investigations should be done and long term follow up regarding application of

  10. Canadian Cardiovascular Society 2009 Consensus Conference on the management of adults with congenital heart disease: Complex congenital cardiac lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Silversides, Candice K.; Oechslin, Erwin; Schwerzmann, Markus; Muhll, Isabelle Vonder; Khairy, Paul; Horlick, Eric; Landzberg, Mike; Meijboom, Folkert; Warnes, Carole; Therrien, Judith

    2010-01-01

    With advances in pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery, the population of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased. In the current era, there are more adults with CHD than children. This population has many unique issues and needs. They have distinctive forms of heart failure and their cardiac disease can be associated with pulmonary hypertension, thromboemboli, complex arrhythmias and sudden death. Medical aspects that need to be considered relate to the long-term and mult...

  11. Myocardial Architecture, Mechanics, and Fibrosis in Congenital Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Ghonim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease (CHD is the most common category of birth defect, affecting 1% of the population and requiring cardiovascular surgery in the first months of life in many patients. Due to advances in congenital cardiovascular surgery and patient management, most children with CHD now survive into adulthood. However, residual and postoperative defects are common resulting in abnormal hemodynamics, which may interact further with scar formation related to surgical procedures. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR has become an important diagnostic imaging modality in the long-term management of CHD patients. It is the gold standard technique to assess ventricular volumes and systolic function. Besides this, advanced CMR techniques allow the acquisition of more detailed information about myocardial architecture, ventricular mechanics, and fibrosis. The left ventricle (LV and right ventricle have unique myocardial architecture that underpins their mechanics; however, this becomes disorganized under conditions of volume and pressure overload. CMR diffusion tensor imaging is able to interrogate non-invasively the principal alignments of microstructures in the left ventricular wall. Myocardial tissue tagging (displacement encoding using stimulated echoes and feature tracking are CMR techniques that can be used to examine the deformation and strain of the myocardium in CHD, whereas 3D feature tracking can assess the twisting motion of the LV chamber. Late gadolinium enhancement imaging and more recently T1 mapping can help in detecting fibrotic myocardial changes and evolve our understanding of the pathophysiology of CHD patients. This review not only gives an overview about available or emerging CMR techniques for assessing myocardial mechanics and fibrosis but it also describes their clinical value and how they can be used to detect abnormalities in myocardial architecture and mechanics in CHD patients.

  12. Computational modelling for congenital heart disease: how far are we from clinical translation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biglino, Giovanni; Capelli, Claudio; Bruse, Jan; Bosi, Giorgia M; Taylor, Andrew M; Schievano, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Computational models of congenital heart disease (CHD) have become increasingly sophisticated over the last 20 years. They can provide an insight into complex flow phenomena, allow for testing devices into patient-specific anatomies (pre-CHD or post-CHD repair) and generate predictive data. This has been applied to different CHD scenarios, including patients with single ventricle, tetralogy of Fallot, aortic coarctation and transposition of the great arteries. Patient-specific simulations have been shown to be informative for preprocedural planning in complex cases, allowing for virtual stent deployment. Novel techniques such as statistical shape modelling can further aid in the morphological assessment of CHD, risk stratification of patients and possible identification of new ‘shape biomarkers’. Cardiovascular statistical shape models can provide valuable insights into phenomena such as ventricular growth in tetralogy of Fallot, or morphological aortic arch differences in repaired coarctation. In a constant move towards more realistic simulations, models can also account for multiscale phenomena (eg, thrombus formation) and importantly include measures of uncertainty (ie, CIs around simulation results). While their potential to aid understanding of CHD, surgical/procedural decision-making and personalisation of treatments is undeniable, important elements are still lacking prior to clinical translation of computational models in the field of CHD, that is, large validation studies, cost-effectiveness evaluation and establishing possible improvements in patient outcomes. PMID:27798056

  13. Congenital Heart Defects in Europe Prevalence and Perinatal Mortality, 2000 to 2005

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolk, Helen; Loane, Maria; Garne, Ester

    2011-01-01

    Background-This study determines the prevalence of Congenital Heart Defects (CHD), diagnosed prenatally or in infancy, and fetal and perinatal mortality associated with CHD in Europe. Methods and Results-Data were extracted from the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies central database for

  14. Homocysteine related Nutritional and Genetic Risk Factors for Human Congenital Heart Defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Verkleij-Hagoort (Anna)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractCongenital heart defects (CHDs) belong to the most common group of major congenital malformations in newborns. Most CHDs are considered complex diseases with a multifactorial aetiology, which are thought to result from interactions between genetic and environmental factors. This thesis p

  15. The origin of congenital heart defects and the epigenetic programming of the healthy child

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.A. Obermann-Borst (Sylvia)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBirth defects are a global burden affecting 7% of births worldwide. Congenital heart defects (CHD) are the most common congenital malformation with approximately 1 million children born each year. It is not only the most frequent group of birth defects in human, but also the leading caus

  16. Pregnancy-related Health Behavior of Women with Congenital Heart Disease : Room for Behavioral Change Interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moons, Philip; Budts, Werner; Costermans, Els; Huyghe, Els; Pieper, Petronella G.; Drenthen, Wim

    2009-01-01

    Background. Pregnancy in women with congenital heart disease is associated with maternal and neonatal complications. In order to reduce risks for unfavorable outcomes, pregnant women need to adopt specific health behaviors. We investigated the pregnancy-related health behavior of women with congenit

  17. Routine prenatal screening for congenital heart disease: what can be expected? A decision-analytic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Buskens (Erik); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); J. Hess (Jakob); J.W. Wladimiroff (Juriy); D.E. Grobbee (Diederick)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES: This study assessed the potential impact of fetal ultrasound screening on the number of newborns affected by cardiac anomalies. METHODS: A decision model was developed that included the prevalence and history of congenital heart disease, characte

  18. A case of successfully managed pregnancy in a patient with complex cyanotic congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J Y; Tan, W K; Tan, E L; Tan, J L; Tan, L K

    2017-06-01

    Medical advances have increased survival of patients with congenital heart disease. However, cardiac disease in pregnancy carries significant maternal and fetal risks, posing enormous challenges to obstetricians. Cyanotic congenital heart disease is associated with maternal complications such as arrhythmias, thromboembolic events and death. Fetal complications include small for gestational age, miscarriage and prematurity. Cyanotic congenital heart disease patients who continue their pregnancies require holistic multidisciplinary team care with early and coordinated planning for delivery. Management of such patients include early counseling regarding pregnancy-associated risks, close monitoring of their cardiac function and regular scanning for fetal assessment. Choice of anesthesia for these patients requires meticulous planning to achieve a favorable balance between systemic and pulmonary vascular resistance, ensuring minimal change in right-to-left shunting. We report a case of a successfully managed pregnancy in a patient with complex congenital heart disease and a single ventricle of left ventricle morphology.

  19. Theory of mind deficit in adult patients with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiavarino, Claudia; Bianchino, Claudia; Brach-Prever, Silvia; Riggi, Chiara; Palumbo, Luigi; Bara, Bruno G; Bosco, Francesca M

    2015-10-01

    This article provides the first assessment of theory of mind, that is, the ability to reason about mental states, in adult patients with congenital heart disease. Patients with congenital heart disease and matched healthy controls were administered classical theory of mind tasks and a semi-structured interview which provides a multidimensional evaluation of theory of mind (Theory of Mind Assessment Scale). The patients with congenital heart disease performed worse than the controls on the Theory of Mind Assessment Scale, whereas they did as well as the control group on the classical theory-of-mind tasks. These findings provide the first evidence that adults with congenital heart disease may display specific impairments in theory of mind. © The Author(s) 2013.

  20. CONGENITAL COMPLETE HEART BLOCK IN DOWN SYNDROME: A RARE CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwanath

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Down syndrome ( T risomy 21 is the commonest disorder among chromosomal anomalies having incidence of 1:650 – 1:1000 live births. [1] The clinical manifestations of Down syndrome are numerous and can present in any body system. Down association of congenital heart disease is well known. Among all cases of congenital heart diseases, 4% - 10% are with Down syndrome, and 40% - 60% of Down syndrome patients have congenital heart disease. The most common congenital cardiac anomaly in Down syndrome is Atrioventricular septal defects, followed by patent ductus arteriosus and atrial septal defects. Oth er forms of complex heart disease can occur including overriding aorta and Tetralogy of fallot. [2] The pure Conduction defect are very rare to have association with the Down syndrome and is not reported in infancy so far.

  1. Fibrinogen function is impaired in whole blood from patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A S; Johansson, P I; Bochsen, Louise;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD) have haemostatic abnormities associated with bleeding and thrombo-embolic events. The haemostatic abnormalities are not fully understood, but recent studies indicate that elevated haematocrit and fibrinogen function may...

  2. Retroaortic left innominate vein – Incidence, association with congenital heart defects, embryology, and clinical significance

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    In a retrospective analysis of echocardiograms, the incidence of retroaortic innominate vein was found to be 0.55% amongst children with congenital heart disease. It was most commonly associated with tetralogy of Fallot and right aortic arch.

  3. Routine prenatal screening for congenital heart disease: what can be expected? A decision-analytic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Buskens (Erik); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); J. Hess (Jakob); J.W. Wladimiroff (Juriy); D.E. Grobbee (Diederick)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES: This study assessed the potential impact of fetal ultrasound screening on the number of newborns affected by cardiac anomalies. METHODS: A decision model was developed that included the prevalence and history of congenital heart disease, characte

  4. Pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma in cyanotic congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opotowsky, Alexander R; Moko, Lilamarie E; Ginns, Jonathan; Rosenbaum, Marlon; Greutmann, Matthias; Aboulhosn, Jamil; Hageman, Abbie; Kim, Yuli; Deng, Lisa X; Grewal, Jasmine; Zaidi, Ali N; Almansoori, Ghadeera; Oechslin, Erwin; Earing, Michael; Landzberg, Michael J; Singh, Michael N; Wu, Fred; Vaidya, Anand

    2015-04-01

    Aberrant cellular oxygen sensing is a leading theory for development of pheochromocytoma (PHEO) and paraganglioma (PGL). The objective of the study was to test the hypothesis that chronic hypoxia in patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD) increases the risk for PHEO-PGL. We investigated the association between CCHD and PHEO-PGL with two complementary studies: study 1) an international consortium was established to identify congenital heart disease (CHD) patients with a PHEO-PGL diagnosis confirmed by pathology or biochemistry and imaging; study 2) the 2000-2009 Nationwide Inpatient Survey, a nationally representative discharge database, was used to determine population-based cross-sectional PHEO-PGL frequency in hospitalized CCHD patients compared with noncyanotic CHD and those without CHD using multivariable logistic regression adjusted for age, sex, and genetic PHEO-PGL syndromes. In study 1, we identified 20 PHEO-PGL cases, of which 18 had CCHD. Most presented with cardiovascular or psychiatric symptoms. Median cyanosis duration for the CCHD PHEO-PGL cases was 20 years (range 1-57 y). Cases were young at diagnosis (median 31.5 y, range 15-57 y) and 7 of 18 had multiple tumors (two bilateral PHEO; six multifocal or recurrent PGL), whereas 11 had single tumors (seven PHEO; four PGL). PGLs were abdominal (13 of 17) or head/neck (4 of 17). Cases displayed a noradrenergic biochemical phenotype similar to reported hypoxia-related PHEO-PGL genetic syndromes but without clinical signs of such syndromes. In study 2, hospitalized CCHD patients had an increased likelihood of PHEO-PGL (adjusted odds ratio 6.0, 95% confidence interval 2.6-13.7, P < .0001) compared with those without CHD; patients with noncyanotic CHD had no increased risk (odds ratio 0.9, P = .48). There is a strong link between CCHD and PHEO-PGL. Whether these rare diseases coassociate due to hypoxic stress, common genetic or developmental factors, or some combination requires further

  5. Congenital heart disease. Evaluation of anatomy and function by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebergen, S.A.; Roos, A. de [Dept. of Radiology, Leiden Univ. Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2000-06-01

    With the increasing number of patients surviving after therapeutic intervention for congenital heart disease (CHD), accurate and frequent follow-up of their morphologic and functional cardiovascular status is required, preferably with a noninvasive imaging technique. Echocardiography, either transthoracic or transesophageal, has been the first choice for this purpose, and will probably keep that status, at least in a large segment of the CHD spectrum. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an established method for high-resolution visualization of cardiovascular morphology. In the past decade, newer MRI techniques have been developed that allow functional evaluation of CHD patients. Particularly the introduction of breath-hold imaging, contrast-enhanced MRA and user-friendly computer software for image analysis may move functional MRI of CHD from the science laboratory to clinical use. It is already evident that MRI is superior to echocardiography in certain areas of limited echocardiographic acces, such as the pulmonary artery branches and the aortic arch in adult patients. But MRI has also a unique potential for accurate volumetric analysis of ventricular function and cardiovascular blood flow, without any geometric assumptions. If supported by increased cooperation between cardiologists and radiologists, MRI will grow into a useful noninvasive imaging tool that, together with echocardiography, will obviate the need for invasive catheter studies for diagnostic purposes. (orig.) [German] Weltweit werden jaehrlich etwa 1,5 Millionen Kinder mit kongenitalen Herzerkrankungen (CHD, congenital heart disease) geboren. Durch Verbesserung der verschiedenen chirurgischen und interventionellen Techniken ist die Ueberlebensrate von CHD-Patienten drastisch gestiegen. Immer mehr Patienten mit postoperativen Residuen, Folgezustaenden und Komplikationen benoetigen eine umfassende Nachsorge. Die Darstellung und Quantifizierung morphologischer und funktioneller kardiovaskulaerer

  6. Bioengineering and Stem Cell Technology in the Treatment of Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosman, Alexis; Edel, Michael J.; Blue, Gillian; Dilley, Rodney J.; Harvey, Richard P.; Winlaw, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart disease places a significant burden on the individual, family and community despite significant advances in our understanding of aetiology and treatment. Early research in ischaemic heart disease has paved the way for stem cell technology and bioengineering, which promises to improve both structural and functional aspects of disease. Stem cell therapy has demonstrated significant improvements in cardiac function in adults with ischaemic heart disease. This finding, together with promising case studies in the paediatric setting, demonstrates the potential for this treatment in congenital heart disease. Furthermore, induced pluripotent stems cell technology, provides a unique opportunity to address aetiological, as well as therapeutic, aspects of disease. PMID:26239354

  7. Matrix metalloproteinases as candidate biomarkers in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggen, Vivan J M; Eindhoven, Jannet A; van den Bosch, Annemien E; Witsenburg, Maarten; Cuypers, Judith A A E; Langstraat, Jannette S; Boersma, Eric; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W

    2016-07-01

    Context Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are associated with diastolic dysfunction and heart failure in acquired heart disease. Objective To investigate the role of MMPs as novel biomarkers in clinically stable adults with congenital heart disease. Methods We measured serum MMP-2, -3, -9 and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 in 425 patients and analysed the association with cardiac function and exercise capacity. Results MMP-2 was significantly associated with exercise capacity, ventilatory efficiency and left ventricular deceleration time, independently of age, sex, body surface area and NT-proBNP. Conclusion MMP-2 may provide new information in the clinical evaluation of adults with congenital heart disease.

  8. Cervical repair of congenital tracheoesophageal fistula: Complications lurking!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conforti, Andrea; Iacusso, Chiara; Valfrè, Laura; Trozzi, Marilena; Bottero, Sergio; Bagolan, Pietro

    2016-10-01

    Esophageal atresia (EA) and tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) consist of a spectrum of rare congenital abnormalities. Although EA surgical treatment is well established, the outcome of EA with proximal fistula (type B and D EA) or isolated H-type fistula (type E EA) is poorly explored. These forms of EA shared a common surgical step: the need of a cervical approach to close the fistula. Therefore, the aim of present study is to evaluate postoperative outcomes of patients treated for Gross type B-D and E EA, on regards of their cervical surgery. A retrospective case series analysis of all patients affected by type B-D and E EA, and admitted to our tertiary care center between January 2003 and December 2014 was performed. All patients underwent preoperative flexible laryngo-tracheobronchoscopy (LTBS) as part of our standardized preoperative diagnostic assessment to define the diagnosis, evaluate preoperative vocal cord motility and to cannulate the fistula when required. Fistula closure was always performed through a right cervical access. Analysis of all cases and comparison between type B-D and E EA were performed. Mann-Whitney test, Chi-squared test and unpaired t test were used as appropriate; pfistula, and vocal cord motility, even in asymptomatic patients, to rule out any possible intraoperative "surprise" and any vocal cord abnormality and to possibly define its pathogenesis (congenital vs. iatrogenic). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Congenital heart disease: Recent technical advances in three-dimensional echocardiography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsenty, Clement; Hadeed, Khaled; Acar, Philippe

    2017-05-01

    The recent technical advances allow the use in practice of three-dimensional echocardiography in children especially through the new high frequency matrix probe. It is difficult or even impossible to hold breathing during children' acquisition so to avoid motion full volume artifact, one beat and live 3D modes are suitable. 3D echocardiography is more accurate than 2D to assess the size, location, and relationship with surrounding structures of atrial and ventricular septal defects and thus helps in the therapeutic decision. 3D echocardiography enables to guide precisely percutaneous procedure. The morphology of the valve leaflets, chordal support apparatus, papillary muscle and the annulus are particularly well described in 3D and allows assessment of the regurgitation before repair and after as well for the common valve of the atrioventricular septal defect or in the Ebstein anomaly. Complex heart diseases such as double outlet right ventricle are suitable to a tridimensional assessment to plan surgical strategy. 3D printing, fusion imaging in cathlab and automated volume quantification embody recent innovations of new techniques in congenital heart disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Addressing sexual health in congenital heart disease: when being the same isn't the same.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomba, Rohit S; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Pelech, Andrew N

    2015-01-01

    A larger number of individuals born with congenital heart disease is living into adolescence and young adulthood. With this comes the responsibility to counsel these patients regarding their sexual and reproductive health. This study utilizes representative data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey to compare sexual measures including percentage of that sexually active, age of first sexual activity, number of sexual partners, condom use, and history of sexually transmitted diseases in those with and without congenital heart disease. A total of 1086 patients (1057 without congenital heart disease and 29 with congenital heart disease) were included in this study. Likelihood of being sexually active, age of first sexual intercourse, and condom use did not differ significantly between the two groups after multivariate analysis. Incidence of sexually transmitted disease did not differ between the two groups after multivariate analysis except for genital warts. There are no major differences in sexual measures between those with and without congenital heart disease. The absence of significant differences in sexual measures in those with congenital heart disease compared with the general population places this group of individuals at increased health risk known to occur with pregnancy.

  11. Congenital heart defects in two siblings in an Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkus, Mehmet Necdet; Argin, Atilla

    2010-04-01

    Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous, autosomal dominant disorder characterized by anomalies of the anterior segment of the eye, face, teeth, and umbilicus. Many other extraocular findings, including congenital heart defects, have been reported in association with this syndrome. It has been suggested by some investigators that the coexistence of Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome and congenital heart defects is not a chance event but it represents a distinct entity. We report a family in which four members in three generations have typical ocular features of Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome. Two of them, who are siblings, also have congenital heart defects. The congenital heart defect was bicuspid aortic valve anomaly with severe stenosis and mild regurgitation in one sibling and ostium secundum atrial septal defect in the other. To our knowledge, the combination of congenital heart defects with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome in siblings has not been reported previously. Our observation further strengthens the notion that Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome associated with congenital heart defects is not a chance event.

  12. 3D Printing to Guide Ventricular Assist Device Placement in Adults With Congenital Heart Disease and Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqi, Kanwal M; Saeed, Omar; Zaidi, Ali; Sanz, Javier; Nielsen, James C; Hsu, Daphne T; Jorde, Ulrich P

    2016-04-01

    As the population of adults with congenital heart disease continues to grow, so does the number of these patients with heart failure. Ventricular assist devices are underutilized in adults with congenital heart disease due to their complex anatomic arrangements and physiology. Advanced imaging techniques that may increase the utilization of mechanical circulatory support in this population must be explored. Three-dimensional printing offers individualized structural models that would enable pre-surgical planning of cannula and device placement in adults with congenital cardiac disease and heart failure who are candidates for such therapies. We present a review of relevant cardiac anomalies, cases in which such models could be utilized, and some background on the cost and procedure associated with this process.

  13. Contemporary cardiac surgery for adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beurtheret, Sylvain; Tutarel, Oktay; Diller, Gerhard Paul; West, Cathy; Ntalarizou, Evangelia; Resseguier, Noémie; Papaioannou, Vasileios; Jabbour, Richard; Simpkin, Victoria; Bastin, Anthony J; Babu-Narayan, Sonya V; Bonello, Beatrice; Li, Wei; Sethia, Babulal; Uemura, Hideki; Gatzoulis, Michael A; Shore, Darryl

    2017-08-01

    Advances in early management of congenital heart disease (CHD) have led to an exponential growth in adults with CHD (ACHD). Many of these patients require cardiac surgery. This study sought to examine outcome and its predictors for ACHD cardiac surgery. This is an observational cohort study of prospectively collected data on 1090 consecutive adult patients with CHD, undergoing 1130 cardiac operations for CHD at the Royal Brompton Hospital between 2002 and 2011. Early mortality was the primary outcome measure. Midterm to longer-term survival, cumulative incidence of reoperation, other interventions and/or new-onset arrhythmia were secondary outcome measures. Predictors of early/total mortality were identified. Age at surgery was 35±15 years, 53% male, 52.3% were in New York Heart Association (NYHA) class I, 37.2% in class II and 10.4% in class III/IV. Early mortality was 1.77% with independent predictors NYHA class ≥ III, tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) <15 mm and female gender. Over a mean follow-up of 2.8±2.6 years, 46 patients died. Baseline predictors of total mortality were NYHA class ≥ III, TAPSE <15 mm and non-elective surgery. The number of sternotomies was not independently associated with neither early nor total mortality. At 10 years, probability of survival was 94%. NYHA class among survivors was significantly improved, compared with baseline. Contemporary cardiac surgery for ACHD performed at a single, tertiary reference centre with a multidisciplinary approach is associated with low mortality and improved functional status. Also, our findings emphasise the point that surgery should not be delayed because of reluctance to reoperate only. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. Fetal Growth and Neurodevelopmental Outcome in Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fifer, William P.; Andrews, Howard

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated differences in growth between fetuses with and without congenital heart disease (CHD) and tested associations between growth and early childhood neurodevelopment (ND). In this prospective cohort study, fetuses with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), transposition of the great arteries (TGA), and tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) and controls had biparietal diameter (BPD), head (HC) and abdominal circumference (AC), femur length (FL), and estimated fetal weight (EFW) recorded serially during pregnancy at 18and controls were assessed using–26 weeks GA (F1), at 27–33 weeks GA (F2), and at 34–40 weeks GA (F3). CHD subjects underwent Bayley Scales of Infant Development-III ND testing at 18 months. Differences between CHD fetuses and controls were assessed using t tests and generalized linear modeling. Correlations between biometry and ND informed regression modeling. We enrolled 41 controls and 68 fetuses with CHD (N = 24 HLHS, N = 21 TGA, N = 23 TOF), 46 of whom had ND scores available. At 18–26 weeks, CHD fetuses were smaller than controls in all biometric parameters. Differences in growth rates were observed for HC, BPD, and AC, but not for FL or EFW. Cognitive score correlated with HC/AC at F2 (r = −0.33, P = 0.04) and mean HC/AC across gestation (r = −0.35, P = 0.03). Language correlated with FL/BPD at F2 (r = 0.34, P = 0.04). In stepwise linear regression, mean HC/AC predicted Cognition (B = −102, P = 0.026, R2 = 0.13) and FL/BPD at F2 predicted Language score (B = 127, P = 0.03, R2 = 0.12). Differences in growth between CHD fetuses and controls can be measured early in pregnancy. In CHD fetuses, larger abdominal relative to head circumference is associated with better 18-month neurodevelopment. PMID:25753684

  15. Remission of congenital complete heart block without anti-Ro/La antibodies: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souvik Mitra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-Ro/La negative congenital heart block (CHB is uncommon. We report one such case of CHB, with no associated structural heart disease or maternal autoantibodies. The heart block reverted to sinus rhythm spontaneously at two weeks of age, and the patient remains in sinus rhythm at a one year followup. Whether patients with antibody negative complete heart block have a different clinical course is conjectural.

  16. Remission of congenital complete heart block without anti-Ro/La antibodies: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Souvik; Saha, Anindya Kumar; Sardar, Syamal Kumar; Singh, Arun Kumarendu

    2013-07-01

    Anti-Ro/La negative congenital heart block (CHB) is uncommon. We report one such case of CHB, with no associated structural heart disease or maternal autoantibodies. The heart block reverted to sinus rhythm spontaneously at two weeks of age, and the patient remains in sinus rhythm at a one year followup. Whether patients with antibody negative complete heart block have a different clinical course is conjectural.

  17. Genetic testing in congenital heart disease:A clinical approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marie A Chaix; Gregor Andelfinger; Paul Khairy

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease(CHD) is the most common type of birth defect. Traditionally, a polygenic model defined by the interaction of multiple genes and environmental factors was hypothesized to account for different forms of CHD. It is now understood that the contribution of genetics to CHD extends beyond a single unified paradigm. For example, monogenic models and chromosomal abnormalities have been associated with various syndromic and non-syndromic forms of CHD. In such instances, genetic investigation and testing may potentially play an important role in clinical care. A family tree with a detailed phenotypic description serves as the initial screening tool to identify potentially inherited defects and to guide further genetic investigation. The selection of a genetic test is contingent upon the particular diagnostic hypothesis generated by clinical examination. Genetic investigation in CHD may carry the potential to improve prognosis by yielding valuable information with regards to personalized medical care, confidence in the clinical diagnosis, and/or targeted patient followup. Moreover, genetic assessment may serve as a tool to predict recurrence risk, define the pattern of inheritance within a family, and evaluate the need for further family screening. In some circumstances, prenatal or preimplantation genetic screening could identify fetuses or embryos at high risk for CHD. Although genetics may appear to constitute a highly specialized sector of cardiology, basic knowledge regarding inheritance patterns, recurrence risks, and available screening and diagnostic tools, including their strengths and limitations, could assist the treating physician in providing sound counsel.

  18. Cornelia de Lange syndrome: Congenital heart disease in 149 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayerza Casas, Ariadna; Puisac Uriol, Beatriz; Teresa Rodrigo, María Esperanza; Hernández Marcos, María; Ramos Fuentes, Feliciano J; Pie Juste, Juan

    2017-06-16

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is produced by mutations in genes that encode regulatory or structural proteins of the cohesin complex. Congenital heart disease (CHD) is not a major criterion of the disease, but it affects many individuals. The objective of this study was to study the incidence and type of CHD in patients with CdLS. Cardiological findings were evaluated in 149 patients with CdLS and their possible relationship with clinical and genetic variables. A percentage of 34.9 had CHD (septal defects 50%, pulmonary stenosis 27%, aortic coarctation 9.6%). The presence of CHD was related with neonatal hospitalisation (P=.04), hearing loss (P=.002), mortality (P=.09) and lower hyperactivity (P=.02), it being more frequent in HDAC8+ patients (60%), followed by NIPBL+ (33%) and SMC1A+ (28.5%). While septal defects predominate in NIPBL+, pulmonary stenosis is more common in HDAC8+. Patients with CdLS have a high incidence of CHD, which varies according to the affected gene, the most frequent findings being septal defects and pulmonary stenosis. Perform a cardiologic study in all these patients is suggested. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Prevalence of congenital heart diseases in oral cleft patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, M M; Rocha, C M G; Katina, T; Caldas, M; Codorniz, A; Medeiros, C

    2003-01-01

    To establish the prevalence of congenital heart diseases (CHDs) in cleft patients, the type of cleft and the presence of a syndrome were coded in 220 patients. A Doppler echocardiogram with color-flow mapping (DE) was obtained in all patients. Mean age was 112.0 +/- 101.2 months (range, 1-576 months), and 56.8% (125) were males. Cleft lip and palate occurred in 144 patients (65.5%), cleft lip in 40 (18.2%), and cleft palate in 36 (16.4%). Cleft palates were more frequent among females. Twenty-four CHDs were diagnosed in 21 of 220 patients (9.5%): 7 mitral valve prolapses, 6 atrial septal defects, 4 patent ductus arteriosus, 3 ventricular septal defects, 2 cases of tetralogy of Fallot, 1 pulmonary stenosis, and 1 bicuspid aortic valve. The presence of CHD did not correlate with the type of cleft. Syndromes occurred in 28 patients (12.7%), and this association was higher among patients with a cleft palate.

  20. Lessons Learned From Newborn Screening for Critical Congenital Heart Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oster, Matthew E; Aucott, Susan W; Glidewell, Jill; Hackell, Jesse; Kochilas, Lazaros; Martin, Gerard R; Phillippi, Julia; Pinto, Nelangi M; Saarinen, Annamarie; Sontag, Marci; Kemper, Alex R

    2016-05-01

    Newborn screening for critical congenital heart defects (CCHD) was added to the US Recommended Uniform Screening Panel in 2011. Within 4 years, 46 states and the District of Columbia had adopted it into their newborn screening program, leading to CCHD screening being nearly universal in the United States. This rapid adoption occurred while there were still questions about the effectiveness of the recommended screening protocol and barriers to follow-up for infants with a positive screen. In response, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention partnered with the American Academy of Pediatrics to convene an expert panel between January and September 2015 representing a broad array of primary care, neonatology, pediatric cardiology, nursing, midwifery, public health, and advocacy communities. The panel's goal was to review current practices in newborn screening for CCHD and to identify opportunities for improvement. In this article, we describe the experience of CCHD screening in the United States with regard to: (1) identifying the target lesions for CCHD screening; (2) optimizing the algorithm for screening; (3) determining state-level challenges to implementation and surveillance of CCHD; (4) educating all stakeholders; (5) performing screening using the proper equipment and in a cost-effective manner; and (6) implementing screening in special settings such as the NICU, out-of-hospital settings, and areas of high altitude.

  1. Epidemiology of adult congenital heart disease: demographic variations worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, B J M

    2012-12-01

    The population of adults with a congenital heart defect (CHD) is increasing, due to improved survival after cardiac surgery. To accommodate the specialised care for these patients, a profound interest in the epidemiology of CHD is required. The exact size of the current population of adults with CHD is unknown, but the best available evidence suggests that currently overall prevalence of CHD in the adult population is about 3000 per million. Regional differences in CHD prevalence have been described, due to both variations in incidence and in mortality. Knowledge of demographic variations of CHD may lead to new aetiological insights and may be useful for preventive therapies. Socioeconomic status, education, urbanisation, climatological factors, ethnicity and patient-related factors, such as comorbidity, lifestyle and healthcare-seeking behaviour, may play a role in CHD incidence and mortality. The higher risk of several major cardiac outcomes in males with CHD might well explain at least partly the increased mortality rate in men. Regional differences in quality of life among CHD patients have been reported and although methodological differences may play a role, sociocultural differences warrant further attention. Socioeconomic outcomes in CHD patients, such as lower education, more unemployment and less relationships, might have a different impact on quality of life in different cultures. To gain more insight into demographic differences around the world large international multicentre studies on the epidemiology of CHD are needed.

  2. Prenatal Diagnosis of Non-Syndromic Congenital Heart Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailes, Elizabeth C.; Gilboa, Suzanne M.; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Johnson, Candice Y.; Hobbs, Charlotte A.; Correa, Adolfo; Honein, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Congenital heart defects (CHDs) occur in nearly 1% of live births. We sought to assess factors associated with prenatal CHD diagnosis in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study (NBDPS). Methods We analyzed data from mothers with CHD-affected pregnancies from 1998–2005. Prenatal CHD diagnosis was defined as affirmative responses to questions about abnormal prenatal ultrasounds and/or fetal echocardiography obtained during a structured telephone interview. Results Fifteen percent (1,097/7,299) of women with CHD-affected pregnancies (excluding recognized syndromes and single-gene disorders) reported receiving a prenatal CHD diagnosis. Prenatal CHD diagnosis was positively associated with advanced maternal age, family history of CHD, type 1 or type 2 diabetes, twin or higher order gestation, CHD complexity and presence of extracardiac defects. Prenatal CHD diagnosis was inversely associated with maternal Hispanic race/ethnicity, prepregnancy overweight or obesity, and pre-existing hypertension. Prenatal CHD diagnosis varied by time to NBDPS interview and NBDPS study site. Conclusions Further work is warranted to identify reasons for the observed variability in maternal reports of prenatal CHD diagnosis and the extent to which differences in health literacy or health system factors such as access to specialized prenatal care and/or fetal echocardiography may account for such variability. PMID:24222433

  3. Academic proficiency in children after early congenital heart disease surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulkey, Sarah B; Swearingen, Christopher J; Melguizo, Maria S; Reeves, Rachel N; Rowell, Jacob A; Gibson, Neal; Holland, Greg; Bhutta, Adnan T; Kaiser, Jeffrey R

    2014-02-01

    Children with early surgery for congenital heart disease (CHD) are known to have impaired neurodevelopment; their performance on school-age achievement tests and their need for special education remains largely unexplored. The study aimed to determine predictors of academic achievement at school age and placement in special education services among early CHD surgery survivors. Children with CHD surgery at codes. Predictors for achieving proficiency in literacy and mathematics and the receipt of special education were determined. Two hundred fifty-six children who attended Arkansas public schools and who had surgery as infants were included; 77.7 % had either school-age achievement-test scores or special-education codes of mental retardation or multiple disabilities. Scores on achievement tests for these children were 7-13 % lower than those of Arkansas students (p < 0.01). They had an eightfold increase in receipt of special education due to multiple disabilities [odds ratio (OR) 10.66, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 4.23-22.35] or mental retardation (OR 4.96, 95 % CI 2.6-8.64). Surgery after the neonatal period was associated with decreased literacy proficiency, and cardiopulmonary bypass during the first surgery was associated with decreased mathematics proficiency. Children who had early CHD surgery were less proficient on standardized school assessments, and many received special education. This is concerning because achievement-test scores at school age are "real-world" predictors of long-term outcomes.

  4. Laparoscopic repair of congenital pleuroperitoneal hernia using a polypropylene mesh in a dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.F. Hartmann

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Pleuroperitoneal hernias are the most uncommon type of diaphragmatic hernias in dogs and cats. The treatment of choice is surgery and may involve the use of prosthetic implant through celiotomy. In the current report, laparoscopic repair of a congenital pleuroperitoneal hernia using polypropylene mesh in a dog is described. The surgery was feasible. Appropriate reduction of the hernia was carried out and no complications were noted.

  5. Problem: Heart Valve Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cholesterol Tools & Resources Congenital Defects Children & Adults About Congenital Heart Defects The Impact of Congenital Heart Defects Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & ...

  6. Healthy Heart Quizzes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cholesterol Tools & Resources Congenital Defects Children & Adults About Congenital Heart Defects The Impact of Congenital Heart Defects Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & ...

  7. Problem: Heart Valve Regurgitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cholesterol Tools & Resources Congenital Defects Children & Adults About Congenital Heart Defects The Impact of Congenital Heart Defects Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & ...

  8. Travel and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cholesterol Tools & Resources Congenital Defects Children & Adults About Congenital Heart Defects The Impact of Congenital Heart Defects Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & ...

  9. Medico-legal aspects of congenital heart diseases in buying and selling of pets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passantino, Annamaria; Pugliese, Michela; Quartarone, Valeria; Russo, Natalia; Bussadori, Roberto; Guercio, Bartolomeo

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The veterinarian should be able to assess congenital and inherited malformations such as heart defects because they may be object of legal disputes. In this study, the authors report some cases of congenital heart defects in pets (dogs and cats) to clarify whether or not they may be considered a redhibitory defect. Materials and Methods: A total of 28 medical records of pets referred with suspected congenital heart disease were examined. All patients aged between 3 and 24 months underwent clinical examination, chest X-ray examination, electrocardiogram, and echocardiography and angiocardiography when necessary. Results: Congenital heart diseases or associated cardiac malformations were confirmed. Considering the above congenital diseases as redhibitory defect and the rights of the owners from a strictly legal viewpoint, 9 owners demanded an estimatory action and 11 a redhibitory action; 1 owner decided to demand the reimbursement of veterinary expenses because the animal died; 7 owners took no legal action but requested surgical intervention. Conclusions: Until more appropriate and detailed legislation on the buying and selling of pet animals is put in place; the authors propose to include in the contract a temporal extension of the guarantee relating to congenital heart disease, which can often become evident later. PMID:28246457

  10. Medico-legal aspects of congenital heart diseases in buying and selling of pets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria Passantino

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The veterinarian should be able to assess congenital and inherited malformations such as heart defects because they may be object of legal disputes. In this study, the authors report some cases of congenital heart defects in pets (dogs and cats to clarify whether or not they may be considered a redhibitory defect. Materials and Methods: A total of 28 medical records of pets referred with suspected congenital heart disease were examined. All patients aged between 3 and 24 months underwent clinical examination, chest X-ray examination, electrocardiogram, and echocardiography and angiocardiography when necessary. Results: Congenital heart diseases or associated cardiac malformations were confirmed. Considering the above congenital diseases as redhibitory defect and the rights of the owners from a strictly legal viewpoint, 9 owners demanded an estimatory action and 11 a redhibitory action; 1 owner decided to demand the reimbursement of veterinary expenses because the animal died; 7 owners took no legal action but requested surgical intervention. Conclusions: Until more appropriate and detailed legislation on the buying and selling of pet animals is put in place; the authors propose to include in the contract a temporal extension of the guarantee relating to congenital heart disease, which can often become evident later.

  11. Cardiac intensive care of the adult with congenital heart disease: basic principles in the management of common problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, James; Lanzberg, Michael; Franklin, Wayne; Webb, Gary; Chang, Anthony C

    2011-07-01

    Although there has been an intense interest in the care of the adult with congenital heart disease (ACHD), these guidelines are usually not focused on the concepts of immediate postoperative care. The 2 most common perioperative complications are heart failure and atrial dysrhythmias. The broad etiological categories for ACHD and heart failure include primary pump failure (systolic dysfunction) and hypertrophy (diastolic dysfunction) of the right, left, or single ventricle. Some conditions with a pressure-loaded systemic right ventricle as well as patients with a functionally single ventricle may be particularly prone to develop heart failure; in others, right heart failure may occur in patients with Ebstein anomaly or with tetralogy of Fallot after corrective repair but with varying degrees of pulmonary insufficiency, and left heart failure can be a result of mitral or aortic insufficiency. The management of postoperative atrial tachycardia in the ACHD patient actually begins prior to surgery. Assessment of arrhythmia history, complete determination of risk, inducibility and arrhythmia substrate, preoperative planning of pacing sites, and optimal pacing strategies all assist to bring about optimal postoperative outcomes. Ideal perioperative care of the ACHD involves a multidisciplinary team of pediatric and adult cardiologists, pediatric and adult intensivists, cardiac surgeons, and nursing staff along with a myriad of adult subspecialists such as pulmonology, nephrology, endocrinology, and others including psychiatry.

  12. Development of pediatric and congenital heart surgery in latin america: accomplishments and remaining challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutzer, Christian; Capelli, Horacio; Sandoval, Nestor; Jatene, Marcelo; Kreutzer, Guillermo

    2011-04-01

    In the last 70 years, congenital heart surgery has dramatically evolved, and Latin America has completed this journey with unique regional features. Since the first ligation of a patent arterial duct by Enrique Finochietto in 1941 in Buenos Aires, the development of congenital heart surgery was deeply influenced by funding restrictions and scarcity of technology. However, the determined work of cardiovascular surgery pioneers as Hugo Filipozzi, Euriclides Zerbini, and Adib Jatene in Brazil; Helmut Jaeger in Chile; Hugo Baz and Clemente Robles in Mexico; Alberto Bejarano in Colombia; and Mario Brea and Fernando Tricerri in Argentina made cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass available by the late 1950s. In the following five decades new generations of cardiovascular surgeons received the legacy of these outstanding leaders and made several important contributions to the field in tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries, tricuspid atresia, single ventricle, truncus arteriosus, heart transplantation, and many others. Many centers in Latin America routinely perform congenital heart disease surgery with excellent results, covering the entire spectrum from the newborn to the adult congenital heart patient. The most important challenge that remains is to provide access to care to all children with congenital heart disease in Latin America, since currently only 42% of them receive surgical treatment.

  13. Mobile health in adults with congenital heart disease: Current use and future needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuuring, M.J.; A. Backx (Ad); Zwart, R.; Veelenturf, A.H.; D. Robbers-Visser (Daniëlle); M. Groenink (Maarten); A. Abu-Hanna (Ameen); N. Bruining (Nico); M.P. Schijven; B.J.M. Mulder (Barbara); B.J. Bouma (Berto)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractObjective Many adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) are affected lifelong by cardiac events, particularly arrhythmias and heart failure. Despite the care provided, the cardiac event rate remains high. Mobile health (mHealth) brings opportunities to enhance daily monitoring and henc

  14. Utilization of stem cells to treat congenital heart disease: hype and hope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peral, Susana Cantero; Burkhart, Harold M; Nelson, Timothy J

    2014-10-01

    Surgical advances over the past few decades have transformed the clinical management of congenital heart disease, such as hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Congenital heart disease affects more than 1% of liveborn infants and accounts for more than 2.5 million affected children per year worldwide. The cost and availability of complex medical management for these children becomes bluntly realized when heart failure progresses and only palliative options remain. Cell-based cardiac regeneration has been the focus of intensive efforts in adult heart disease for more than a decade and now has promise for pediatrics. Innate cardiac regeneration in the pediatric setting is measurable and potentially modifiable in the early stages of development. Repurposing cell-based manufactured products to promote cardiac regeneration in congenital heart disease has demonstrated significant improvement in cases of dilated cardiomyopathy and structural heart disease in infants. A focus on preemptive cardiac regeneration in the pediatric setting may offer new insights into the timing of surgery, location of cell-based delivery, and type of cell-based regeneration that could further inform acquired cardiac disease applications. The concept of cell-based pediatric cardiac regenerative surgery could transform the management of congenital heart disease when cost-effective strategies produce a valuable adjunctive solution to improve outcomes of cardiac surgery.

  15. Mobile health in adults with congenital heart disease: Current use and future needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuuring, M.J.; A. Backx (Ad); Zwart, R.; Veelenturf, A.H.; D. Robbers-Visser (Daniëlle); M. Groenink (Maarten); A. Abu-Hanna (Ameen); N. Bruining (Nico); M.P. Schijven; B.J.M. Mulder (Barbara); B.J. Bouma (Berto)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractObjective Many adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) are affected lifelong by cardiac events, particularly arrhythmias and heart failure. Despite the care provided, the cardiac event rate remains high. Mobile health (mHealth) brings opportunities to enhance daily monitoring and

  16. PERITONEAL DIALYSIS AFTER REPAIR OF CONGENITAL HEART DISEASE IN CHILDREN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗新锦; 许建屏; 沈向东; 陈霞

    2003-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the effect of peritoneal dialysis on fluid balance and outcome in childrenwho receive cardiac operation.Methods. From July to Dec. 2000, 12(2.08%) patients of 576 consecutive children who underwentheart operation required peritoneal dialysis because of acute renal failure. The mean age of these 12 pa-tients was (2.9±2.0) years (range, 5 months~7 years) and the mean body weight was (12±3) kg (range,7.4~18.5 kg ).Results. The interval between the operation and the initiation of peritoneal dialysis was (21.2±11.4)hours (4.4~42 hours). The duration of peritoneal dialysis was (6.3±4.8) days (0.47~15 days). Mortality inthese 12 patients was 25%. Fluid removed by peritoneal dialysis was(34.7±17.8) ml@kg1@day-1@ Asymop-tomatic hypokalemia, thrombocytopenia and hyperglycemia were frequent complications, which were easilymanaged. Hemodynamics and pulmonary function improved during the study period.Conclusion. The early initiation of peritoneal dialysis is an effective and safe method totreat acute renal failure after cardiac operation in children.

  17. Congenital massive hiatus hernia type IV; initial experience with laparoscopic repair in young infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataineh, Z A; Rousan, L A; Abu Baker, A; Wahdow, H; Kiwan, R N; Saleem, M M

    2014-06-01

    Congenital massive hiatus hernia (CMHH) is an uncommon disorder during childhood. It can be associated with grave complications especially if presented in the highest grade; type IV, when the hernia contains other intra-peritoneal organ beside the stomach through a large hiatus defect. The insidious form of clinical presentation can be deceptive in diagnosis and may mimic congenital diaphragmatic hernia or other chest pathologies. The basic principle of surgical repair is to reduce the herniated organs, excise the hernia sac, and repair the crural defect and to add anti-reflux procedure with or without gastropexy. Traditionally, this has been done by open approach. Nowadays, the minimally invasive approach is the preferred method of treatment. A sixteen-month-old boy with history of recurrent respiratory symptoms was diagnosed with CMHH type IV for which laparoscopic repair was performed. Few reports in using minimally invasive technique in the management of CMHH in the pediatric age group are present in the literature, to the best of our knowledge type IV had never been described in young infants. We present a new case repaired by laparoscope in a young infant with CMHH type IV from the Middle East.

  18. Congenital heart disease and its journey from dental plaque to arterial plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinathi Reddy Kankara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease is mostly found in children, approximately around 7–10% from overall heart diseases. The etiology is multifactorial but reported associations include untreated maternal diabetes, phenylketonuria, intake of retinoic acid last but not least is oral pathogens present in periodontopathic bacteria. The main objective of this article is to explain about different mechanisms by which it is associated with dental, periodontal manifestations. It also explains about two patients who reported to our hospital with congenital heart disease and their dental and periodontal management.

  19. Anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease: The who, the when and the how?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, A S; Idorn, L; Nørager, B; Vejlstrup, N; Sondergaard, L

    2015-03-01

    Adults with congenital heart disease are a growing population. One of the major challenges in the care of these patients is to prevent thromboembolic episodes. Despite relative young age and no typical cardiovascular risk factors, this cohort has a high prevalence of thrombotic events. It is difficult to use treatment algorithms from the general adult population with acquired heart disease in this heterogeneous population due to special conditions such as myocardial scarring after previous surgery, atypical atrial flutter, prothrombotic conditions and the presence of interatrial shunts. Furthermore, there is a lack of scientific evidence regarding how to prevent thromboembolic events with anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature pertaining to anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease and hence enable recommendations for which patients are likely to benefit from which anticoagulation treatments, when they should be considered and how these would be carried out.

  20. Familial TAB2 microdeletion and congenital heart defects including unusual valve dysplasia and tetralogy of fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Karin; Applegate, Carolyn; Wang, Tao; Batista, Denise A S

    2015-11-01

    Haploinsufficiency of TAB2 was recently implicated as a cause for a variety of congenital heart defects. Reported cases have genomic deletions of 2-10 Mbs including TAB2 at 6q24-25 are almost always de novo and show variable cardiac and extra cardiac phenotype. We report on an inherited, 281 kb deletion in a three generation family. This is the smallest reported deletion involving TAB2 that segregates with congenital heart defects. Three affected individuals in this family present with myxomatous cardiac valves in addition to structural heart defects commonly associated with TAB2 deletions. Findings from this family support a key role of TAB2 haploinsufficiency in congenital heart defects and expand the phenotypic spectrum of TAB2-microdeletion syndrome. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Congenital Heart Defects and Receipt of Special Education Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Autry, Andrew; Razzaghi, Hilda; Boyle, Coleen A; Mahle, William T; Van Naarden Braun, Kim; Correa, Adolfo

    2015-09-01

    We investigated the prevalence of receipt of special education services among children with congenital heart defects (CHDs) compared with children without birth defects. Children born from 1982 to 2004 in metropolitan Atlanta with CHDs (n = 3744) were identified from a population-based birth defect surveillance program; children without birth defects (n = 860 715) were identified from birth certificates. Cohorts were linked to special education files for the 1992-2012 school years to identify special education services. Children with noncardiac defects or genetic syndromes were excluded; children with CHDs were classified by presence or absence of critical CHDs (ie, CHDs requiring intervention by age one year). We evaluated the prevalence of receipt of special education services and prevalence rate ratios using children without birth defects as a reference. Compared with children without birth defects, children with CHDs were 50% more likely to receive special education services overall (adjusted prevalence rate ratio [aPRR] = 1.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4-1.7). Specifically, they had higher prevalence of several special education categories including: intellectual disability (aPRR = 3.8; 95% CI: 2.8-5.1), sensory impairment (aPRR = 3.0; 95% CI: 1.8-5.0), other health impairment (aPRR = 2.8; 95% CI: 2.2-3.5), significant developmental delay (aPRR = 1.9; 95% CI: 1.3-2.8), and specific learning disability (aPRR = 1.4; 95% CI: 1.1-1.7). For most special education services, the excess prevalence did not vary by presence of critical CHDs. Children with CHDs received special education services more often than children without birth defects. These findings highlight the need for special education services and the importance of developmental screening for all children with CHDs. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  2. Sense of coherence in young people with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apers, Silke; Luyckx, Koen; Goossens, Eva; Rassart, Jessica; Budts, Werner; Moons, Philip

    2015-05-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) have been found to play a role in the development of clinical complications. Hence, it is crucial to understand why some patients do well in terms of PROs and others do not and to identify these groups of patients. Sense of coherence (SOC), capturing a person's outlook on life, is associated with PROs in adolescents with congenital heart disease (CHD). Therefore, we (1) examine how SOC develops in young people with CHD, (2) identify subgroups of SOC development, and (3) characterize subgroups in terms of demographic and clinical variables and PROs. In this 4-wave longitudinal study, 429 adolescents with CHD (53.4% boys; median age = 16.3 years) completed assessments of SOC (SOC-13). PROs included quality of life (linear analog scale), loneliness (UCLA-8), depression (CES-D), and perceived health (PedsQL). Latent class growth analysis was used to identify clinically meaningful subgroups of SOC development. Patients with CHD had a moderate SOC that slightly decreased over the first 18 months. Four subgroups of SOC development emerged: Consistently High (27%), Intermediate Stable (41%), Intermediate Decreasing (25%), and Chronically Low (7%). Subgroups differed in terms of sex and PROs, but not in terms of age, disease complexity, primary diagnosis, or surgical history. Patients with a strong and stable SOC over time showed a better adaptation than patients with a lower and/or decreasing SOC. Our results can guide the identification of patients at risk for adverse health outcomes and the development of interventions to enhance optimal living in patients with CHD.

  3. Body mass index in adult congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brida, Margarita; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Kempny, Alexander; Liodakis, Emmanouil; Alonso-Gonzalez, Rafael; Swan, Lorna; Uebing, Anselm; Baumgartner, Helmut; Gatzoulis, Michael A; Diller, Gerhard-Paul

    2017-08-01

    Abnormal body mass index (BMI) is associated with higher mortality in various cardiovascular cohorts. The prognostic implications of BMI in adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD) are unknown. We aim to assess the distribution of BMI and its association with symptoms and survival in the ACHD population. We included 3069 ACHD patients (median age 32.6 years) under follow-up at our institution between 2001 and 2015. Patients were classified based on BMI as underweight (30), and symptoms, exercise capacity and mortality were assessed. Overall, 6.2% of patients were underweight, 51.1% had normal weight, 28.2% were overweight and 14.6% were obese. Higher BMI values were associated with lower all-cause and cardiac mortality on univariable Cox analysis, and this effect persisted after adjustment for age, defect complexity, cyanosis and objective exercise capacity. Higher BMI was especially associated with better prognosis in symptomatic ACHD patients (HR 0.94 (95% CI 0.90 to 0.98), p=0.002) and those with complex underlying cardiac defects (HR 0.96 (95% CI 0.91 to 0.997), p=0.048) In patients with a complex cardiac defect who had repeated weight measurements, weight loss was also associated with a worse survival (HR 1.82 (95% CI 1.02 to 3.24), p=0.04). ACHD patients with a higher BMI had a lower mortality. The association between BMI and mortality was especially pronounced in symptomatic patients with complex underlying cardiac defects, suggesting that cardiac cachexia may play a role. Indeed, weight loss in complex ACHD patients was linked to an even higher mortality. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. IS LOW BIRTH WEIGHT ASSOCIATED WITH CONGENITAL HEART DISEASE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nutan Nalini

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Daily we see lots of still birth cases and the agony associated with it after carrying the fetus for so many months with the negative outcome it is quite disheartening. Malnutrition is quite rampant in the country as far as the females are concerned and in the name of the religion and rituals, it complicates the issue further. If the mother is malnourished, the chance of low birth weight baby is high. OBJECTIVES To correlate the prevalence of cardiac anomalies in low birth weight fetuses. MATERIAL AND METHOD The study was carried out in 40 stillbirth fetuses with detailed account of nutritional status of the mother, consanguinity, history of previous pregnancies, miscarriages, socio-economic status and exposure to drugs/radiation. The number of cases with fetus having cardiac anomalies was quite significant. RESULTS Out of total 40 stillbirth fetuses, 29 (72.5% stillbirths were from less than 2.5kg and 11 (27.5% were from more than 2.5kg. Cardiac anomalies were present in 16 and 02 cases respectively. Fused heart-01, mesocardia-01, Dextrocardia with CORV-02, Interrupted aortic arch-02, Abnormal origin of right subclavian artery-01, Tetralogy of Fallot-01, VSD-07, ASD-01, transposition of great vessels-01, persistent truncus arteriosus with tricuspid atresia, elongated hypertrophied abnormally positioned Rt. Atrium, rudimentary Rt. Ventricle-01, mal-attachment of ductus arteriosus-03, double superior vena cava-01, dilated caval system-01. CONCLUSION Considering the high incidence of cardiac anomalies in fetuses of low birth weight, we must try to create awareness and support the expectant mothers to avoid the low birth weight babies and thus the congenital anomalies.

  5. Anthropometric profiles of children with congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damayanti R. Sjarif

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Undernutrition is a common cause of morbidity in children with CHD. Previous data from developing country showed prevalence of preoperative undernutrition in children with CHD was up to 45%. The aim of this study are to determine the anthropometric profiles and prevalence of undernutrition in children with CHD by using the anthropometric measurement.Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in children aged 0-2 years old with CHD in Cipto Mangunkusumo hospital. All patients underwent an anthropometric evaluation (weight, length and head circumference at presentation. Undernutrition, failure to thrive /FTT, short stature and microcephaly were determined according to WHO, weight-for-length, weight-for-age at 2 points, length-for-age, head circumference-for-age z-score < -2SD accordingly.Results: We had total of 95 patients, 73 patients with acyanotic and 22 patients with cyanotic lesions. Prevalence of undernutrition in CHD was 51.1%, with 22.3% severe undernutrition. FTT was found in 64.9%, short stature in 49.5% and microcephaly in  37% patients. FTT was found higher in acyanotic (72.2% compared to cyanotic lesions (42.9%. In acyanotic, weight was affected more than length (72.2% vs 49.3%. In cyanotic, weight and length affected equally (42.9% vs 54.5%. Diet counseling were done in patients with undernutrition. Medicines, transcatheter or surgery intervention were indicated in selected patients.Conclusions: Prevalence of FTT was higher than undernutrition in children with CHD. FTT was found higher in acyanotic lesions. In acyanotic, weight was affected more than length. In cyanotic, weight and length affected equally. (Med J Indones 2011; 20:40-5Keywords: congenital heart disease, failure to thrive, short stature, undernutrition

  6. Congenital Heart Defects and Receipt of Special Education Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Autry, Andrew; Razzaghi, Hilda; Boyle, Coleen A.; Mahle, William T.; Van Naarden Braun, Kim; Correa, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND We investigated the prevalence of receipt of special education services among children with congenital heart defects (CHDs) compared with children without birth defects. METHODS Children born from 1982 to 2004 in metropolitan Atlanta with CHDs (n = 3744) were identified from a population-based birth defect surveillance program; children without birth defects (n = 860 715) were identified from birth certificates. Cohorts were linked to special education files for the 1992–2012 school years to identify special education services. Children with noncardiac defects or genetic syndromes were excluded; children with CHDs were classified by presence or absence of critical CHDs (ie, CHDs requiring intervention by age one year). We evaluated the prevalence of receipt of special education services and prevalence rate ratios using children without birth defects as a reference. RESULTS Compared with children without birth defects, children with CHDs were 50% more likely to receive special education services overall (adjusted prevalence rate ratio [aPRR] = 1.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4–1.7). Specifically, they had higher prevalence of several special education categories including: intellectual disability (aPRR = 3.8; 95% CI: 2.8–5.1), sensory impairment (aPRR = 3.0; 95% CI: 1.8–5.0), other health impairment (aPRR = 2.8; 95% CI: 2.2–3.5), significant developmental delay (aPRR = 1.9; 95% CI: 1.3–2.8), and specific learning disability (aPRR = 1.4; 95% CI: 1.1–1.7). For most special education services, the excess prevalence did not vary by presence of critical CHDs. CONCLUSIONS Children with CHDs received special education services more often than children without birth defects. These findings highlight the need for special education services and the importance of developmental screening for all children with CHDs. PMID:26283775

  7. Fluid overload in infants following congenital heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazle, Matthew A; Gajarski, Robert J; Yu, Sunkyung; Donohue, Janet; Blatt, Neal B

    2013-01-01

    To describe postoperative fluid overload patterns and correlate degree of fluid overload with intensive care morbidity and mortality in infants undergoing congenital heart surgery. Prospective, observational study. Fluid overload (%) was calculated by two methods: 1) (Total fluid in - Total fluid out)/(Preoperative weight) × 100; and 2) (Current weight - Preoperative weight)/(Preoperative weight) × 100. Composite poor outcome included: need for renal replacement therapy, upper quartile time to extubation or intensive care length of stay (> 6.5 and 9.9 days, respectively), or death ≤ 30 days after surgery. University hospital pediatric cardiac ICU. Forty-nine infants heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass during the period of July 2009 to July 2010. None. Patients had a median age of 53 days (21 neonates) and mean weight of 4.5 ± 1.3 kg. Forty-two patients (86%) developed acute kidney injury by meeting at least Acute Kidney Injury Network and Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes stage 1 criteria (serum creatinine rise of 50% or ≥ 0.3mg/dL). The patients with adverse outcomes (n = 17, 35%) were younger (7 [5 - 10] vs. 98 [33 - 150] days, p = 0.001), had lower preoperative weight (3.7 ± 0.7 vs. 4.9 ± 1.4 kg, p = 0.0002), higher postoperative mean peak serum creatinine (SCr) (0.9 ± 0.3 vs. 0.6 ± 0.3mg/dL, p = 0.005), and higher mean maximum fluid overload by both method 1 (12% ± 10% vs. 6% ± 4%, p = 0.03) and method 2 (24% ± 15% vs. 14% ± 8%, p = 0.02). Predictors of a poor outcome from multivariate analyses were cardiopulmonary bypass time, use of circulatory arrest, and increased vasoactive medication requirements postoperatively. Early postoperative fluid overload is associated with suboptimal outcomes in infants following cardiac surgery. Because the majority of patients developed kidney injury without needing renal replacement therapy, fluid overload may be an important risk factor for adverse outcomes with all degrees of acute kidney injury.

  8. Mitochondrial DNA repair: a novel therapeutic target for heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-García, José

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondria play a crucial role in a variety of cellular processes ranging from energy metabolism, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Ca(2+) handling to stress responses, cell survival and death. Malfunction of the organelle may contribute to the pathogenesis of neuromuscular, cancer, premature aging and cardiovascular diseases (CVD), including myocardial ischemia, cardiomyopathy and heart failure (HF). Mitochondria contain their own genome organized into DNA-protein complexes, called "mitochondrial nucleoids," along with multiprotein machineries, which promote mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication, transcription and repair. Although the mammalian organelle possesses almost all known nuclear DNA repair pathways, including base excision repair, mismatch repair and recombinational repair, the proximity of mtDNA to the main sites of ROS production and the lack of protective histones may result in increased susceptibility to various types of mtDNA damage. These include accumulation of mtDNA point mutations and/or deletions and decreased mtDNA copy number, which will impair mitochondrial function and finally, may lead to CVD including HF.

  9. A contemporary, single-institutional experience of surgical versus expectant management of congenital heart disease in trisomy 13 and 18 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, John P; Weiderhold, Allison; Louis, Clauden; Shaughnessy, Conner; Peer, Syed M; Zurakowski, David; Jonas, Richard A; Nath, Dilip S

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine a large institutional experience of patients with trisomy 13 and trisomy 18 in the setting of comorbid congenital heart disease and present the outcomes of surgical versus expectant management. It is a retrospective single-institution cohort study. Institutional review board approved this study. Thirteen consecutive trisomy 18 patients and three consecutive trisomy 13 patients (sixteen patients in total) with comorbid congenital heart disease who were evaluated by our institution's Division of Cardiovascular Surgery between January 2008 and December 2013 were included in the study. The primary outcome measures evaluated were operative mortality (for patients who received surgical management), overall mortality (for patients who received expectant management), and total length of survival during follow-up. Of the thirteen trisomy 18 patients, seven underwent surgical management and six received expectant management. With surgical management, operative mortality was 29 %, and 80 % of patients were alive after a median follow-up of 116 days. With expectant management, 50 % of patients died before hospital discharge. Of the three patients with trisomy 13, one patient underwent surgical management and two received expectant management. The patient who received surgical management with complete repair was alive at last follow-up over 2 years after surgery; both patients managed expectantly died before hospital discharge. Trisomy 13 and trisomy 18 patients with comorbid congenital heart disease can undergo successful cardiac surgical intervention. In this population, we advocate that nearly all patients with cardiovascular indications for operative congenital heart disease intervention should be offered complete surgical repair over palliative approaches for moderately complex congenital cardiac anomalies.

  10. Doppler ultrasound evaluation of cerebral blood flow pattern in neonates with congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Hoon [Yongdong Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Mi Young; Kim, Yang Min; Lee, Soo Hyun; Kim, Soo Jin; Kim, Woong Han [Sejong General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-03-15

    To evaluate intracerebral resistive index (RI) values in neonates with congenital heart disease and to investigate their changes after the corrective surgery of the congenital heart disease. Sixty nine neonates with congenital heart disease who underwent brain ultrasonography were included. Resistive index values were obtained at the genu portion of the anterior cerebral arteries through the anterior fontanelles. The patients were divided into 4 groups according to the presence of associated patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) and intracranial RI values. We evaluated the types of congenital heart disease that could influence RI values. Resistive index values were statistically higher in patients with PDA than in patients without PDA (p<0.05). RI values were higher in cases of large PDA with left-to-right shunt, but within the normal range in cases of small or nearly closing PDA or large PDA with bidirectional blood flow or with right-to-left shunt. For those patients without PDA, RI values were higher when patients had pulmonary atresia with multiple collateral vessels into the lung or when truncus arteriosus was present. RI values were also high in patients with hypoplastic left heart syndrome. RI values were normalized after the ligation of PDA, but patients with hypoplastic left heart syndrome showed persistently high RI values even after the Norwood's operation with Blalock-Taussig shunt. RI values are influenced by various congenital heart diseases except PDA. Therefore, the presences of the congenital heart disease and its hemodynamic changes should be taken into consideration in the evaluation of the intracranial RI values using Doppler ultrasonography.

  11. Determination of the prevalence of congenital heart disease in the patients admitted to the heart clinic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shokoufeh Ahmadipour; Behzad Mohammadpour Ahranjani; Sara Daeichin; Zahra Mirbeig Sabzevari

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the prevalence of congenital heart disease (CHD) among the patients who refferred to the heart clinic so as to make an early and correct diagnosis. Methods: In this descriptive-cross sectional study, all the patients admitted to the heart clinic who had symptoms or signs ofCHDwere included. The data were collected in one year based on the medical records. The main variables consisted of age, gender, history of folic acid consumption by the mother in pregnancy, clinical signs, symptoms and so on. Results: Among the 763 admitted patients, 498 were males and the rest were females. Infants were the most common group and teenagers were the least one. The most common findings for which the patients had been referred were chest pain and a murmur heard during a normal physical examination. Based on the echocardiography findings, ventricular and atrial septal defects were the most common ones. The history of folic acid consumption was negative in 168 mothers within their pregnancy. Conclusions: Since the causes and risk factors in the incidence ofCHD in children are numerous, we recommended that the information about these diseases should be given to the community and strengthen the referral system, design registration system ofCHD set up in the country round.

  12. A plant-derived remedy for repair of infarcted heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Cheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Myocardial infarction (MI due to coronary artery disease remains one of the leading causes of premature death. Replacement of infarcted heart tissue with regenerating myocardium from endogenous progenitor pools or exogenously introduced stem cells remains a therapeutic ideal. Their impracticality mainly lies in their low efficiency in cardiogenic differentiation (CD. Our recent studies with an acute MI animal model have already demonstrated the therapeutic effect of the MeOH extract of Geum japonicum (EGJ, providing clear evidence of myocardial regeneration. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The present study further isolated the active component contained in EGJ using bioassay-guided isolation and investigated its efficacy in the treatment of infarcted heart in animal MI models. We demonstrated that substantial repair of infarcted heart in animal MI models by EGJ can be mimicked by the isolated candidate compound (cardiogenin in MI animal models. Clear evidence of newly regenerated endogenous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs derived cardiomyocytes was observed throughout the infarct zone, accompanied by significantly improved functional performance of the heart. Transplantation of MSCs pretreated with EGJ or cardiogenin into a MI animal model also resulted in substantial regeneration of functional myocardium, implying that the activated MSCs carry all the necessary blueprints for myocardial regeneration. Signaling pathways specific to cell survival, CD identified in embryonic heart induction and angiogenesis were activated in both cardiogenin-treated MSCs and cardiogenin-induced regenerating myocardium. CONCLUSIONS: This study has demonstrated the therapeutic effects of cardiogenin in infarcted heart repair, and identified the associated signalling pathways for effective cardiogenic differentiation of MSCs, cell survival and angiogenesis. These findings should enable new treatment strategies for MI to be developed immediately.

  13. Vitamin D Kinetics and Parathyroid Gland Function in Patients with Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Gaku; Inai, Kei; Shimada, Eriko; Nakanishi, Toshio

    2016-12-01

    It has been recently reported that vitamin D deficiency may contribute to systemic illnesses that accompany chronic heart failure. These reports also suggest the serum levels of parathormone, which activates vitamin D in the liver, can be a useful marker of heart failure. This study was designed to evaluate the clinical implications of vitamin D and parathormone levels in patients with congenital heart diseases and chronic heart failure. We measured 25-hydroxyvitamin D and parathormone serum levels in 103 adult patients with congenital heart diseases (age range 20-89 years). Of 103 patients, 54 were in New York Heart Association functional classes II or III. Their clinical data regarding cardiothoracic ratio, fractional shortening of the systemic ventricle, brain natriuretic peptide plasma levels, and pulse oximetry were also evaluated. Of 54 patients with chronic heart failure, 50 (93%) exhibited vitamin D deficiency (25-hydroxyvitamin D serum levels 65 pg/mL). These two parameters were inversely correlated. In multivariate analyses including age, gender, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, parathormone, pulse oximetry, cardiothoracic ratio, calcium, phosphorus, glomerular filtration rate, albumin, creatine kinase, end-diastolic diameter and fractional shortening of the systemic ventricle, and ratio of early diastolic transmitral flow velocity to mitral annular velosity, only the parathormone serum levels (P < .01) remained independently associated with brain natriuretic peptide plasma levels. Moreover, in multivariate analyses including the same variables minus parathormone serum levels, both pulse oximetry (P < .01) and glomerular filtration rate (P < .01) remained independently associated with parathormone levels. Vitamin D deficiency and secondary hyperparathyroidism are common in patients with congenital heart diseases and heart failure. Serum parathormone and 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels correlated with several clinical heart failure markers, suggesting that

  14. Congenital heart defect in a patient with deletion of chromosome 7q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiller, G E; Watson, M S; Duncan, L M; Dowton, S B

    1988-02-01

    We describe a premature male infant with a terminal deletion of 7q [del(7) (pter----q34:)]. Manifestations include low birth weight, hypertelorism, bilateral cleft lip and palate, cryptorchidism, and a complex congenital heart defect. The latter consisted of hypoplasia of the main pulmonary artery, absent pulmonary valve, ventricular septal defect, and anomalous right pulmonary artery. We briefly review the spectrum of heart defects seen with chromosome 7 deletions, and comment on the incidence of this unusual heart lesion.

  15. Quality of Life and Congenital Heart Disease in Childhood and Adolescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertoletti, Juliana [Instituto de Cardiologia/Fundação Universitária de Cardiologia - IC/FUC, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Marx, Giovana Caroline; Hattge, Sérgio Pedro Júnior [Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Pellanda, Lucia Campos, E-mail: lupellanda@gmail.com [Instituto de Cardiologia/Fundação Universitária de Cardiologia - IC/FUC, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2014-02-15

    Advances in cardiac surgery techniques and early diagnosis have enabled the increased survival of individuals with congenital heart disease. The investigation of the quality of life in children and adolescents with congenital heart disease provides complementary information to clinical data that can assist in decision making on the part of health professionals. Although many studies have been conducted to investigate the quality of life of children and adolescents with congenital heart disease, the results prove to be contradictory; while some studies show that congenital heart disease can impact the quality of life, others describe a better perception of quality of life among children and adolescents who suffer from the disease when compared with healthy control subjects. The purpose of this study is to review the literature on the assessment of health related quality of life in children and adolescents with congenital heart disease, in order to systematize the existing knowledge on this topic today. It is observed that research seeks to investigate aspects of personality in cardiac patients, their coping strategies used and perceived social support, aiming at better understanding the association of these variables with the level of quality of life in this population.

  16. Quality of Life and Congenital Heart Disease in Childhood and Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoletti, Juliana; Marx, Giovana Caroline; Hattge, Sérgio Pedro; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2014-01-01

    Advances in cardiac surgery techniques and early diagnosis have enabled the increased survival of individuals with congenital heart disease. The investigation of the quality of life in children and adolescents with congenital heart disease provides complementary information to clinical data that can assist in decision making on the part of health professionals. Although many studies have been conducted to investigate the quality of life of children and adolescents with congenital heart disease, the results prove to be contradictory; while some studies show that congenital heart disease can impact the quality of life, others describe a better perception of quality of life among children and adolescents who suffer from the disease when compared with healthy control subjects. The purpose of this study is to review the literature on the assessment of health related quality of life in children and adolescents with congenital heart disease, in order to systematize the existing knowledge on this topic today. It is observed that research seeks to investigate aspects of personality in cardiac patients, their coping strategies used and perceived social support, aiming at better understanding the association of these variables with the level of quality of life in this population. PMID:24676375

  17. Common variation in ISL1 confers genetic susceptibility for human congenital heart disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen N Stevens

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease (CHD is the most common birth abnormality and the etiology is unknown in the overwhelming majority of cases. ISLET1 (ISL1 is a transcription factor that marks cardiac progenitor cells and generates diverse multipotent cardiovascular cell lineages. The fundamental role of ISL1 in cardiac morphogenesis makes this an exceptional candidate gene to consider as a cause of complex congenital heart disease. We evaluated whether genetic variation in ISL1 fits the common variant-common disease hypothesis. A 2-stage case-control study examined 27 polymorphisms mapping to the ISL1 locus in 300 patients with complex congenital heart disease and 2,201 healthy pediatric controls. Eight genic and flanking ISL1 SNPs were significantly associated with complex congenital heart disease. A replication study analyzed these candidate SNPs in 1,044 new cases and 3,934 independent controls and confirmed that genetic variation in ISL1 is associated with risk of non-syndromic congenital heart disease. Our results demonstrate that two different ISL1 haplotypes contribute to risk of CHD in white and black/African American populations.

  18. The effect of a resilience improvement program for adolescents with complex congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sunhee; Lee, Junga; Choi, Jae Young

    2017-04-01

    Adolescents with congenital heart disease need to increase their resilience in the face of challenges in order to preserve their health and quality of life. This study aimed to develop a resilience improvement program for adolescents with congenital heart disease and also to evaluate any change in resilience and quality of life as a measure of the effectiveness of the resilience improvement programs. A nonequivalent control group pretest-posttest study was designed. Twenty-five adolescents who attended the first resilience improvement program were included in the experimental group, and 31 adolescents who took part in the second program were placed in the control group. Adolescents with congenital heart disease completed a self-report questionnaire on three separate occasions: the pretest, the first posttest and the second posttest. The self-report questionnaire included general characteristics and instruments to measure resilience and quality of life. For the longitudinal analysis, generalized estimating equations were used to evaluate the difference in the estimated average trajectories of resilience and quality of life changes. Independent predictors of resilience improvement in adolescents with congenital heart disease were the experimental group ( p=0.02) and middle and high school students ( p=0.02). Quality of life was not associated with membership in the experimental group. However, males scored higher than females on quality of life measures ( p=0.02). It is essential for healthcare providers to apply various programs, including those targeted at accepting illness, improving autonomy and independently managing disease, to adolescents with congenital heart disease.

  19. Isolation and characterization of cardiogenic, stem-like cardiac precursors from heart samples of patients with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazizadeh, Zaniar; Vahdat, Sadaf; Fattahi, Faranak; Fonoudi, Hananeh; Omrani, Gholamreza; Gholampour, Maziar; Aghdami, Nasser

    2015-09-15

    Regenerative therapies based on resident human cardiac progenitor cells (hCPCs) are a promising alternative to medical treatments for patients with myocardial infarction. However, hCPCs are rare in human heart and finding efficient source and proper surface marker for isolation of these cells would make them a good candidate for therapy. We have isolated 5.34∗10(6)±2.04∗10(5)/g viable cells from 35 heart tissue samples of 23 patients with congenital heart disease obtained during their heart surgery along with 6 samples from 3 normal subjects during cardiac biopsy. According to FACS analysis, younger ages, atrial specimen and disease with increased pulmonary vascular resistance were associated with higher percentage of c-kit(+) (CD117) hCPCs. Analysis for other stemness markers revealed increased CD133(+) cells in the hearts of patients with congenital heart disease. By using both immune-labeling and PCR, we demonstrated that these cells express key cardiac lineage and endothelial transcription factors and structural proteins during in vitro differentiation and do express stemness transcription factors in undifferentiated state. Another novel datum of potentially relevant interest is their ability in promoting greater myocardial regeneration and better survival in rat model of myocardial infarction following transplantation. Our results could provide evidence for conditions associated with enriched hCPCs in patients with congenital heart disease. Moreover, we showed presence of a significant number of CD133 expressing cardiogenic stem-like cardiac precursors in the heart of patients with congenital heart disease, which could be isolated and stored for future regenerative therapies in these patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Iloprost for children with pulmonary hypertension after surgery to correct congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhuoming; Zhu, Limin; Liu, Xinrong; Gong, Xiaolei; Gattrell, William; Liu, Jinfen

    2015-06-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) can cause pulmonary hypertension (PH) in children, and surgery to correct CHD may be complicated by postoperative pulmonary hypertensive crises (PHC). Clinical data regarding the use of inhaled iloprost to treat children with PH are scarce. Our aim was to determine the efficacy and safety of iloprost in children with PH following surgery to correct CHD. This was a randomized, placebo-controlled study of 22 children (median age 7 months) undergoing surgery to achieve biventricular repair. The combined clinical endpoint was a decrease of more than 20% in the ratio of systolic pulmonary arterial pressure to systolic arterial pressure or pulmonary resistance to systemic resistance, with no PHC or death. Patients were randomized to receive low-dose iloprost (30 ng/kg/min), high-dose iloprost (50 ng/kg/min), or placebo, for 10 min every 2 hr in the first 48 hr after surgery. PHC were experienced by two patients who received placebo and one patient treated with high-dose iloprost. The combined clinical endpoint was reached by six patients administered low-dose iloprost (P = 0.005) and four administered high-dose iloprost (P = 0.077), compared with none in the placebo group. Patients treated with iloprost showed a significant reduction from baseline in mean pulmonary vascular resistance index (-2.2 Wood units, P iloprost to treat children with PH following surgery to correct CHD. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Pulmonary hypertension in adults with congenital heart disease and Eisenmenger syndrome: current advanced management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alto, Michele; Diller, Gerhard-Paul

    2014-09-01

    The presence of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) increases morbidity and reduces survival in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). PAH-CHD is a heterogeneous condition, depending on the type of the underlying defect and previous repair strategies. There is growing evidence of the benefits of PAH-specific therapy in the PAH-CHD population, but despite recent advances mortality rates remain relatively high. In the last years, an increasing focus has been placed on patients with PAH-CHD and net left-to-right shunt. Currently, there are limited data to guide the management of these patients and uncertainty on the cut-off values for eventual defect closure. Pregnancy conveys significant risks in PAH-CHD patients: appropriate counselling and care, including psychological support and a multidisciplinary team, should be part of the routine management of women with PAH-CHD of reproductive age. Some subgroups, such as patients with Down's syndrome, Fontan circulation and 'segmental' pulmonary hypertension, present particular challenges in terms of management and therapy. The current review focuses on contemporary treatment strategies in PAH-CHD patients with particular emphasis on challenging patient groups and conditions.

  2. Observed Prevalence of Congenital Heart Defects From a Surveillance Study in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yali; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Correa, Adolfo; Li, Song; Feng, Xinheng; Gindler, Jacqueline; Lin, Hui; Webb, Catherine; Li, Wei; Trines, Jean; Berry, Robert J.; Yeung, Lorraine; Luo, Ying; Jiang, Meifang; Chen, Hua; Sun, Xiamei; Li, Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence of major and minor congenital heart defects among fetuses and neonates using sonography in a general population of 4 areas surrounding Shanghai, China. Methods Pregnant women were recruited between April 2004 and December 2005 in Jiaxing City, Suzhou City, Changshu County, and Haining County. All participants could have 3 sonographic examinations performed by specially trained physicians regardless of medical indication: a fetal sonographic screen and fetal echocardiography between 20 and 28 weeks’ gestation and neonatal echocardiography. Diagnoses of congenital heart defects were made on the basis of review of all available scans by an international group of experts in pediatric cardiology. Prevalence rates were calculated per 1000 births. Results Among 4006 scanned fetuses and neonates, there were 75 congenital heart defects, including 12 major defects. The observed prevalence for all congenital heart defects was 18.7 (95% confidence interval, 14.8–23.5) per 1000 births, and the prevalence for major defects was 3.0 (95% confidence interval, 1.6–5.2) per 1000 births. The most common defects were ventricular septal defects (n = 47 [62.7%]), atrial septal defects (n = 14 [18.7%]), tetralogy of Fallot (n = 4 [5.3%]), and hypoplastic left heart syndrome (n = 3 [4.0%]). Conclusions The prevalence of all congenital heart defects in the 4 areas of China studied was higher than that reported in other countries, with ventricular septal defects being the most frequent defects. Our data likely reflect a better estimate of the total prevalence of congenital heart defects in China than reported previously. PMID:21705732

  3. Surgical technique for heart transplantation: a strategy for congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinpour, Amir-Reza; González-Calle, Antonio; Adsuar-Gómez, Alejandro; Cuerpo, Gregorio; Greco, Rubén; Borrego-Domínguez, José Miguel; Ordoñez, Antonio; Wallwork, John

    2013-10-01

    The standard techniques for orthotopic heart transplantation often require certain adjustments when the procedure is carried out for complex congenital heart disease. This is because of both the unusual anatomy and possible distortions caused by previous surgery. Such technical adjustments have been described in various published reports over the years. Those reports, when combined, do cover the full spectrum of the technical difficulties that may be encountered, whether the defects are in their original form or altered by surgery, such that no cardiac malformation or distortion would prohibit transplantation. However, those reports are comprehensive only when combined. None of the individual reports addresses all the possible technical challenges. Consequently, the available information is somewhat fragmented. In addition, the generic aspect of the described technical strategies is not always given the emphasis that it deserves. Indeed, occasionally a technique may be presented as a specific solution for a specific malformation, without necessarily pointing out that the same technique may be applied to other hearts with different overall pathologies but which share that specific malformation. The aim of this review article was to combine all the available published information in one article in a manner that constructs a simple but comprehensive and generic system of decision-making that may be applied to any heart in order to determine the exact technical adjustments needed for transplantation in each case. Such a strategy is possible for two reasons. First, only a few anatomical sites are technically significant, namely the points of anastomosis between the donor's organ and the recipient. The rest of the intracardiac morphology does not affect the operation and may be ignored. Second, each of those anatomical sites can present difficulties in only a few ways, and each of those few difficulties has a well-described and published solution already. Therefore, the

  4. Relationship Between Polymorphism of Methylenetetrahydrofolate Dehydrogenase and Congenital Heart Defect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JUN CHENG; WEN-LI ZHU; JING-JING DAO; SHU-QING LI; YONG LI

    2005-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between G1958A gene polymorphism of methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (MTHFD) and occurrence of congenital heart disease (CHD) in North China. Methods One hundred and ninety-two CHD patients and their parents were included in this study as case group in Liaoning Province by birth defect registration cards, and 124 healthy subjects (age and gender matched) and their parents were simultaneously selected from the same geographic area as control. Their gene polymorphism of MTHFD G1958A locus was examined with PCR-RFLP, and serum folic acid and homocysteine (Hcy) levels were tested with radio-immunoassay and fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA). Results There existed gene polymorphism at MTHFD G1958A locus in healthy subjects living in North China. The percentages of GG, GA, and AA genotype were 57.98%, 35.57%, and 6.45% respectively, and the A allele frequency was 24.23%, which was significantly different from Western population. No difference was observed when comparing genotype distribution and allele frequency between the case and control groups, so was the result from the comparison between genders. The A allele frequency of arterial septal defect patients' mothers (10.87%) was significantly lower than that of controls (28.15%) (P=0.014), with OR=0.31 (95% CI: 0.09-0.84), and no difference in the other subgroups. The percentage of at least one parent carrying A allele in arterial septal defect subgroup (43.48%) was significantly lower than that in controls (69.64%) (P=0.017), with OR=0.34 (95% CI: 0.12-0.92). The analysis of genetic transmission indicated that there was no transmission disequillibrium in CHD nuclear families. Their serum folic acid level was significantly higher than that of controls (P=0.000), and Hcy level of the former was higher than that of the latter with no statistical significance (P>0.05). Serum Hcy and folic acid levels of mothers with gene mutation were lower than those of mothers

  5. NORMOTHERMIA FOR PEDIATRIC AND CONGENITAL HEART SURGERY: AN EXPANDED HORIZON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mahir eShamsuddin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB in pediatric cardiac surgery is generally performed with hypothermia, flow reduction and hemodilution. From 10/2013 to 12/2014 55 patients, median age 6 years (range 2 months to 52 years, median weight 18.5kg (range 3.2 to 57 kg, underwent surgery with normothermic high flow CPB in a new unit.There were no early or late deaths. Fifty patients (90.9% were extubated within 3 hrs, 3 (5.5% within 24 hrs and 2 (3.6% within 48 hrs. Twentyfour patients (43.6% didn’t require inotropic support, 31 (56.4% received dopamine or dobutamine: 21 ≤5 mcg/kg/min, 8 5-10 mcg/kg/min, and 2 >10 mcg/kg/min. Two patients (6.5% required noradrenaline 0.05-0.1 mcg/kg/min.On arrival to ICU and after 3 and 6 hrs and 8:00 am the next morning, mean lactate levels were 1.9±09, 2.0±1.2, 1.6±0.8 and 1.4±0.7 mmol/L (0.6-5.2 mmol/L respectively. From arrival to ICU to 8:00 am the next morning mean urine output was 3.8±1.5 mL/kg/hr (0.7-7.6 mL/kg/hr, and mean chest drainage was 0.6±0.5 mL/kg/hr (0.1-2.3 mL/kg/hr. Mean ICU and hospital stay were 2.7±1.4 days (2-8 days and 7.2±2.2 days (4-15 days respectively. In conclusion, normothermic high flow CPB allows pediatric and congenital heart surgery with favorable outcomes even in a new unit. The immediate post-operative period is characterized by low requirement for inotropic and respiratory support, low lactate production, adequate urine output, minimal drainage from the chest drains, shorter ICU and hospital stay.

  6. Late Detection of Critical Congenital Heart Disease Among US Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Cora; Ailes, Elizabeth; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Oster, Matthew E.; Olney, Richard S.; Cassell, Cynthia H.; Fixler, David E.; Carmichael, Suzan L.; Shaw, Gary M.; Gilboa, Suzanne M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) was added to the Recommended Uniform Screening Panel for Newborns in the United States in 2011. Many states have recently adopted or are considering requirements for universal CCHD screening through pulse oximetry in birth hospitals. Limited previous research is directly applicable to the question of how many US infants with CCHD might be identified through screening. OBJECTIVES To estimate the proportion of US infants with late detection of CCHD (>3 days after birth) based on existing clinical practice and to investigate factors associated with late detection. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Descriptive and multivariable analysis. Data were obtained from a multisite population-based study of birth defects in the United States, the National Birth Defects Prevention Study (NBDPS). We included all live-born infants with estimated dates of delivery from January 1, 1998, through December 31, 2007, and nonsyndromic, clinically verified CCHD conditions potentially detectable through screening via pulse oximetry. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The main outcome measure was the proportion of infants with late detection of CCHD through echocardiography or at autopsy under the assumption that universal screening at birth hospitals might reduce the number of such late diagnoses. Secondary outcome measures included prevalence ratios for associations between selected demographic and clinical factors and late detection of CCHD. RESULTS Of 3746 live-born infants with nonsyndromic CCHD, late detection occurred in 1106 (29.5% [95%CI, 28.1%–31.0%]), including 6 (0.2%) (0.1% –0.4%) first receiving a diagnosis at autopsy more than 3 days after birth. Late detection varied by CCHD type from 9 of 120 infants (7.5%[95%CI, 3.5%–13.8%]) with pulmonary atresia to 497 of 801 (62.0% [58.7%–65.4%]) with coarctation of the aorta. In multivariable analysis, late detection varied significantly by CCHD type and study site, and infants with

  7. Deletion of a single-copy DAAM1 gene in congenital heart defect: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao Bihui

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With an increasing incidence of congenital heart defects (CHDs in recent years, genotype-phenotype correlation and array-based methods have contributed to the genome-wide analysis and understanding of genetic variations in the CHD population. Here, we report a copy number deletion of chromosomal 14q23.1 in a female fetus with complex congenital heart defects. This is the first description of DAAM1 gene deletion associated with congenital heart anomalies. Case Presentation Compared with the control population, one CHD fetus showed a unique copy number deletion of 14q23.1, a region that harbored DAAM1 and KIAA0666 genes. Conclusions Results suggest that the copy number deletion on chromosome 14q23.1 may be critical for cardiogenesis. However, the exact relationship and mechanism of how DAAM1 and KIAA0666 deletion contributes to the onset of CHD is yet to be determined.

  8. Transitioning the young adult with congenital heart disease for life-long medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Susan M; Landzberg, Michael J

    2004-12-01

    Guidelines for the successful orchestration of transitioning of the adolescent and young and older adult patient with congenital heart disease to a health care system appropriate for their long-term congenital heart disease care and counseling appear necessary to improve patient and family confidence, education, therapy, life quality, and survival outcomes. Schema for care organization and delivery for adult patients with congenital heart disease remain primitive and largely unimplemented. The presence of a strong central care oversight organization and the establishment of a multi-institutional database to assist in assessment of care outcomes and guidelines appears requisite to these needs and for the establishment of transitioning guidelines for these patients as they assume a greater and deeper shared control of their futures with their caregivers.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease at 0.3 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malmgren, N.

    1995-11-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate the potential of static MR imaging in congenital heart disease. The diagnosis of vascular rings, causing significant respiratory morbidity, previously required invasive methods for diagnosis. In aberrant left pulmonary artery, an uncommon anomaly, MR imaging at 0.3 T provided complete anatomic information. Complex congenital heart malformation is a diagnostic challenge. MR imaging at 0.3 T was efficient in defining most of the components of complex disease. It is especially valuable for imaging of extracardiac structures, which can be difficult to evaluate using echocardiography. MR imaging is an important complement to echocardiography. Improved equipment with sophisticated dynamic applications using high magnetic field strength is now available. The anatomical evaluation of congenital heart anomalies is however still based on static images, and low field magnets will certainly be used even in the future. 141 refs, 11 figs, 8 tabs.

  10. DISTRIBUTION OF CONGENITAL HEART DISEASES AT TERTIARY CARE CENTER: SINGLE CENTER EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishali

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The current study was undertaken at a tertiary care center, Bhopal, MP, India, with the objective of establishing frequency of occurrence of congenital heart diseases by echocardiography. MATERIALS AND METHOD 10,000 consecutive cases undergoing Echo Color Doppler in the Cardiology Department Hamidia Hospital, Bhopal, between 1st Jan 2009 and July 2011 were analysed. Echo CD was performed by consultant cardiologist using Acuson Aspen Color Doppler machine following the ASE guidelines. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS In the present study out of 10,000consecutive cases undergoing echo 648 were identified to having congenital heart diseases. Isolated VSD (30.5%, isolated ASD (23.6% PDA (9% and TOF (8.3% were commonest defect observed. Most common congenital heart disease found in the present study is VSD and is most prevalent in males and is highest among 0-5 yrs.

  11. Down syndrome: Molecular mapping of the congenital heart disease and duodenal stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korenburg, J.R. (University of California, Los Angeles (United States)); Bradley, C.; Disteche, C.M. (University of Washington, Seattle (United States))

    1992-02-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a major cause of congenital heart and gut disease and mental retardation. DS individuals also have characteristic facies, hands, and dermatoglyphics, in addition to abnormalities of the immune system, and increased risk of leukemia, and an Alzheimer-like dementia. Although their molecular basis is unknown, recent work on patients with DS and partial duplications of chromosome 21 has suggested small chromosomal regions located in band q22 that are likely to contain the genes for some of these features. The authors now extend these analyses to define molecular markers for the congenital heart disease, the duodenal stenosis, and an 'overlap' region for the facial and some of the skeletal features. They report the clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular analysis of two patients. These studies provide the molecular basis for the construction of a DS phenotypic map and focus the search for genes responsible for the physical features, congenital heart disease, and duodenal stenosis of DS.

  12. The present and future of interventional catheterization for congenital heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Over the past decade, the focus of the pediatric catheterization laboratory has changed dramatically from its primary function of providing diagnosis to offering treatment.Since Rashkind first described the technique for atrial septostomy in the setting of complete transposition of the great arteries in 1966, therapeutic catheterization techniques have replaced conventional surgery, including both corrective and palliative surgeries, for many lesions. Interventional catheterization has become an important modality in the treatment of congenital heart disease. In addition, in the staged management of complex congenital heart disease, better outcomes have been acquired by combined surgical and interventional catheterization strategies. Although great advances have been made in the therapeutic catheterization for congenital heart disease in some Chinese medical centers, there is considerable difference in both clinical applications and basic researches between China and other developed countries. Thus, it is very important to expand this advanced technique aggressively but carefully.

  13. Peripheral oxygen saturation, heart rate, and blood pressure during dental treatment of children with cyanotic congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Menezes Faria Dutra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: In this observational study, we evaluated the peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2, heart rate, and blood pressure of children with cyanotic congenital heart disease who were undergoing dental extraction. METHODS: Forty-four patients between the ages of 6 and 12 years who underwent upper primary tooth extraction were included in the study. Of these, 20 patients were in the cyanotic congenital heart disease group and 24 were in the control group. RESULTS: Peripheral oxygen saturation, heart rate, and systolic blood pressure in the cyanotic congenital heart disease group varied quite significantly during the treatment protocol (p<0.05, with values of 80.5% (±7.6 to 82.8% (±7.8, 95.3 beats per minute (bpm (±11.3 to 101.3 bpm (±9.8, and 93.6 mm Hg (±13,3 to 103.8 mm Hg (±12.7, respectively. The variations in the control group during the procedure were also significant. CONCLUSIONS: The changes observed during the study protocol, although statistically significant, were mild and lacked clinical relevance. The results indicate that dental treatment of children with cyanotic heart disease using a standardized protocol in decentralized offices without the support of a surgical center is safe.

  14. Delivery of care for adult patients with congenital heart disease in Europe: Results from the Euro Heart Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Moons (Philip); P.M. Engelfriet (Peter); H. Kaemmerer (Harald); F.J. Meijboom (Folkert); E.N. Oechslin (Erwin); B.J.M. Mulder (Barbara)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractAims: The increasing number of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has prompted the development of recommendations for the management of these patients and for the organization of their healthcare. The aim of this report is to describe the delivery of care in Europe for adults wit

  15. Treatments and outcomes of subglottic stenosis in children after surgical repairing congenital heart disease%先天性心脏病术后并发声门下狭窄治疗方法的探讨及中期随访

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔彦芹; 李伟; 李建斌; 周娜; 王燕飞; 陈欣欣

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the treatments and outcomes of children complicated with subglottic stenosis after surgical repairing congenital heart disease (CHD).Methods A total of 34 cases complicated with subglottic stenosis after CHD surgery from July 1,2010 to June 30,2013 were retrospectively analyzed.There were 19 boys and 15 girls with an average age of 7.8 ± 1.6 months and an average weight of 5.5 ± 3.0 kilogram.According to the Cotton's subglottic stenosis grading system,the degrees were Ⅰ (n =5),Ⅱ (n =12),Ⅲ (n =17) and Ⅳ (n =0).They were divided into two groups of A (intubation,n =8) and B (non-intubation,n =26) according to treatment plan.Group A had endotracheal intubation implanted for over 24 h after endotracheal tube dilatation or subglottic stenosis surgery.Systemic infusion of dexamethasone was used for 1 week.Group B had an immediate extubation after dilatation.Dexamethasone infusion and budesonide atomization were administered for 1 week.Chi-square or Fisher's exact test was used to compare the profiles of readmission,re-stenosis rate and mortality for two groups.Statistical analysis was performed with 16.0 SPSS software.P<0.05 was considered statistically significant.Results All patients completed treatment.The median follow-up period was 15 months.The readmission rate(11.5% vs 75.0%),re-stenosis rate (11.5% vs 87.5%)and mortality (3.8% vs 37.5%) of group B were significantly lower than those of group A.And the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05).Conclusions Subglottic stenosis is a rare postoperative complication of congenital heart disease.Early diagnosis and proper interventions yield a good prognosis.Tracheal extubation immediately after dilatation with endotracheal tube to treat subglottic stenosis is both simple and suitable for wider popularization at primary hospitals.%目的 探讨先天性心脏病患儿术后并发声门下狭窄(subglottic stenosis,SGS)的治疗及预后.方法 回顾性分析2010

  16. Transfer to Adult Care--Experiences of Young Adults with Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asp, Ann; Bratt, Ewa-Lena; Bramhagen, Ann-Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    More than 90% of children born with congenital heart disease survive into adulthood due to successes of cardiac surgery and medical management. Interviews with 16 young adults with congenital heart disease to explore their experiences of transfer from pediatric to adult care were performed. The analysis identified five themes; Feeling secure during the transfer process, Experiencing trust in the care, Expecting to be involved, Assuming responsibility for one's health is a process and Lack of knowledge leads to uncertainty. In conclusion; a structured and gradual transfer process was necessary to enable the informants to shoulder the responsibility for self-care.

  17. MR evaluation of cardiovascular physiology in congenital heart disease: flow and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Oliver M; Higgins, Charles B

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has become the method of choice in the evaluation of a number of questions in congenital heart disease. In addition to morphology, modern CMR techniques allow the visualization of function and flow in a temporally resolved manner. Among the pathologies where these methods play a major role are shunts, septal defects, aortic coarctation, anomalies of the pulmonary arteries, and valvular regurgitation. This paper explains the basics of functional and flow encoded CMR and discusses their application in the assessment of several types of congenital heart disease.

  18. Treacher Collins syndrome with multiple congenital heart defects after paroxetine exposure: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinlen, N; Zenciroğlu, A; Dilli, D; Aydin, B; Beken, S; Okumuş, N

    2014-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development with an incidence of I in 40,000 to in 70,000 live births. It is characterized by abnormalities of the pinnae which are frequently associated with atresia of the external auditory canals and anomalies of the middle ear ossicles. Rarely congenital heart defects can be present. Prenatal paroxetine exposure may enhance the risks of major malformation, particularly cardiac defects. This article reports a newborn, whose mother used paroxetine during pregnancy, presenting with multiple congenital heart defects associated to typical physical characteristics of Treacher Collins syndrome.

  19. Assessment of adult congenital heart disease with multi-detector computed tomography - beyond coronary lumenography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicol, E.D. [Department of Radiology, Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom) and Department of Cardiology, Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: e.nicol@rbht.nhs.uk; Gatzoulis, M. [Adult Congenital Heart Centre and Centre for Pulmonary Hypertension, Royal Brompton Hospital and National Heart and Lung Institute, London (United Kingdom); Padley, S.P.G. [Department of Radiology, Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Rubens, M. [Department of Radiology, Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-06-15

    Adult congenital heart disease is an increasingly prevalent condition with more than 135,000 patients affected in England alone. With this increased patient population and an increase in interventional procedures being performed on them, traditional imaging techniques such as cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) may be unavailable locally or contra-indicated. Cardiac multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is rapidly emerging as an alternative imaging method for the investigation of these patients and this review highlights the broad application of cardiac MDCT to this population and makes recommendations on the stardardized reporting of complex congenital heart disease.

  20. Psychosocial aspects of congenital heart disease in adulthood: A longitudinal cohort study of 20-33 years follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.H.M. van Rijen (Susan)

    2003-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Adults with congenital heart disease form a rather new phenomenon. Improvements in surgical techniques over the last decades have lead to lower mortality rates for children born with a congenital heart disease, enabling more of them to grow into adulthood

  1. Psychosocial aspects of congenital heart disease in adulthood: A longitudinal cohort study of 20-33 years follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.H.M. van Rijen (Susan)

    2003-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Adults with congenital heart disease form a rather new phenomenon. Improvements in surgical techniques over the last decades have lead to lower mortality rates for children born with a congenital heart disease, enabling more of them to grow into adulthood (Sparacino, 19

  2. Psychosocial aspects of congenital heart disease in adulthood: A longitudinal cohort study of 20-33 years follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.H.M. van Rijen (Susan)

    2003-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Adults with congenital heart disease form a rather new phenomenon. Improvements in surgical techniques over the last decades have lead to lower mortality rates for children born with a congenital heart disease, enabling more of them to grow into adulthood (Sparacino, 19

  3. The evolving role of the total artificial heart in the management of end-stage congenital heart disease and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Thomas D; Jefferies, John L; Zafar, Farhan; Lorts, Angela; Morales, David L S

    2015-01-01

    Advances in medical therapies have yielded improvement in morbidity and a decrease in mortality for patients with congenital heart disease, both surgically palliated and uncorrected. An unintended consequence is a cohort of adolescent and adult patients with heart failure who require alternative therapies. One intriguing option is placement of a total artificial heart (TAH) either as a bridge to transplant or as a destination therapy. Of the 1091 Jarvik-7 type TAH (Symbion, CardioWest and SynCardia) placed between 1985 and 2012, only 24 have been performed in patients with congenital heart disease, and a total of 51 were placed in patients younger than 21. At our institution, the SynCardia TAH was implanted in a 19-year-old patient with cardiac allograft failure because of chronic rejection and related multisystem organ failure including need for hemodialysis. Over the next year, she was nutritionally and physically rehabilitated, as were her end organs, allowing her to come off dialysis, achieve normal renal function and eventually be successfully transplanted. Given the continued growth of adolescent and adult congenital heart disease populations with end-stage heart failure, the TAH may offer therapeutic options where previously there were few. In addition, smaller devices such as the SynCardia 50/50 will open the door for applications in smaller children. The Freedom Driver offers the chance for patients to leave the hospital with a TAH, as does the AbioCor, which is a fully implantable TAH option. In this report, we review the history of the TAH and potential applications in adolescent patients and congenital heart disease.

  4. Congenital Heart Disease Requiring Maintenance of Ductus Arteriosus in Critically Ill Newborns Admitted at A Tertiary Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cucerea Manuela

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Congenital heart diseases (CHD have been reported to be responsible for 30 to 50% of infant mortality caused by congenital disabilities. In critical cases, survival of newborns with CHD depends on the patency of the ductus arteriosus (PDA, for maintaining the systemic or pulmonary circulation. The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy and side effects of PGE (prostaglandin E administration in newborns with critical congenital heart disease requiring maintenance of the ductus arteriosus.

  5. Ethanol exposure alters early cardiac function in the looping heart: a mechanism for congenital heart defects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunamuni, Ganga; Gu, Shi; Doughman, Yong Qiu; Peterson, Lindsy M; Mai, Katherine; McHale, Quinn; Jenkins, Michael W; Linask, Kersti K; Rollins, Andrew M; Watanabe, Michiko

    2014-02-01

    Alcohol-induced congenital heart defects are frequently among the most life threatening and require surgical correction in newborns. The etiology of these defects, collectively known as fetal alcohol syndrome, has been the focus of much study, particularly involving cellular and molecular mechanisms. Few studies have addressed the influential role of altered cardiac function in early embryogenesis because of a lack of tools with the capability to assay tiny beating hearts. To overcome this gap in our understanding, we used optical coherence tomography (OCT), a nondestructive imaging modality capable of micrometer-scale resolution imaging, to rapidly and accurately map cardiovascular structure and hemodynamics in real time under physiological conditions. In this study, we exposed avian embryos to a single dose of alcohol/ethanol at gastrulation when the embryo is sensitive to the induction of birth defects. Late-stage hearts were analyzed using standard histological analysis with a focus on the atrio-ventricular valves. Early cardiac function was assayed using Doppler OCT, and structural analysis of the cardiac cushions was performed using OCT imaging. Our results indicated that ethanol-exposed embryos developed late-stage valvuloseptal defects. At early stages, they exhibited increased regurgitant flow and developed smaller atrio-ventricular cardiac cushions, compared with controls (uninjected and saline-injected embryos). The embryos also exhibited abnormal flexion/torsion of the body. Our evidence suggests that ethanol-induced alterations in early cardiac function have the potential to contribute to late-stage valve and septal defects, thus demonstrating that functional parameters may serve as early and sensitive gauges of cardiac normalcy and abnormalities.

  6. FOX gene cluster defects in alveolar capillary dysplasia associated with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laux, Daniela; Malan, Valérie; Bajolle, Fanny; Boudjemline, Younes; Amiel, Jeanne; Bonnet, Damien

    2013-10-01

    The objective was to report two new patients with the diagnosis of alveolar capillary dysplasia and congenital heart disease, to describe the associated cardiac defects seen in these cases and in the literature, and to consider recent genetic advances concerning the FOX transcription factor gene cluster in chromosome 16q24.1q24.2. We retrospectively analysed the records of all patients with congenital heart disease and alveolar capillary dysplasia seen in the Pediatric Cardiology Department between 2005 and 2010. We reviewed all literature published in the English language relating to cases of alveolar capillary dysplasia and congenital heart disease. Two infants with alveolar capillary dysplasia and cardiac malformation were identified: one had an atrioventricular septal defect and a de novo balanced reciprocal translocation t(1;16)(q32;q24), the second infant had a ventricular septal defect. Analysis of 31 cases of the literature including these new cases showed a predominant association of alveolar capillary dysplasia with obstructive left heart disease (35%), as well as an atrioventricular septal defect (29%). FOX gene cluster defects were identified in eight of these patients. Genetic background of alveolar capillary dysplasia is discussed in the light of the balanced reciprocal translocation t(1;16)(q32;q24) identified in the first child of this report. Alveolar capillary dysplasia should be suspected in neonates with congenital heart disease and unexpectedly elevated pulmonary vascular resistances, especially in cases of obstructive left heart disease or atrioventricular septal defect. Detecting FOX gene cluster defects should be considered in infants with alveolar capillary dysplasia with or without congenital heart disease.

  7. Development and evaluation of a computer-based educational program for adults with congenitally malformed hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönning, Helén; Nielsen, Niels Erik; Strömberg, Anna; Thilen, Ulf; Swahn, Eva

    2013-02-01

    There is a lack of educational material for adults with congenitally malformed hearts. Computer-based education has shown to have significant effects on knowledge and management of chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a computer-based educational program for adults with congenitally malformed hearts. The program was developed by a multidisciplinary team. Data were collected by questionnaires, observations, and structured interviews. The final product was a computer-based educational program consisting of ten separate modules, one for each particular malformation. The program was experienced as stimulating and easy to use. The appearance and quantity of the text was graded as good and the content as relevant and very useful. This is the first computer-based program developed for adults with congenitally malformed hearts. The evaluation found the program to have great potential as an important tool for improving care. Further studies are needed to test the outcomes of the program on knowledge, perceived control over the heart condition, anxiety/depression. and health-related quality of life. The program may be used as a complement to verbal information and every adult with a congenitally malformed hearts can receive individualized information from a personal CD.

  8. All about Heart Rate (Pulse)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cholesterol Tools & Resources Congenital Defects Children & Adults About Congenital Heart Defects The Impact of Congenital Heart Defects Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & ...

  9. Long-Term Nationwide Follow-Up Study of Simple Congenital Heart Disease Diagnosed in Otherwise Healthy Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Videbæk, Jørgen; Laursen, Henning Bækgaard; Olsen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Systematic follow-up is currently not recommended for patients with simple congenital heart disease; however, only a few data exist on the long-term prognosis of simple congenital heart disease. METHODS AND RESULTS: We undertook a nationwide follow-up study of a cohort of 1241 simple ...... with simple congenital heart disease in the 1960s have substantially increased long-term mortality and cardiac morbidity compared with the general population. Further studies on the effectiveness of systematic medical follow-up programs appear warranted.......BACKGROUND: Systematic follow-up is currently not recommended for patients with simple congenital heart disease; however, only a few data exist on the long-term prognosis of simple congenital heart disease. METHODS AND RESULTS: We undertook a nationwide follow-up study of a cohort of 1241 simple...

  10. Congenital Heart Diseases in the Newborns of Diabetic Mothers: an Echocardiographic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Rahimpour

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite the discovery of insulin and current improvement in diabetics care, congenital malformations in diabetics are still more frequent than in the general population. The aim of this study was to identify congenital heart dieases (CHD in the newborns of diabetic mothers (IDMS. Methods: In our prospective study, color doppler echocardiography was performed in 75 consecutive full- term newborns of diabetic mothers by GE Vivid3 echocardiographic device. Newborns were classified into two subgroups according to the type of the mothers’ diabetes: pre-gestational and gestational. They were also those were classified into three subgroups according to their birth weight: appropriate, large and small for gestational age. Data analysis was made by Fisher exact test and Chi-Square test. Results: Forty nine (65% and thirty six (35% of subjects were infants of gestational (IGDM and pre-gestational diabetic mothers (IPDM, respectively. Fifty five Newborns (73% were apropriate, fourteen (19% were large and six (8% were small for gestational age. The most common echocardiographic findings included: patent ductus arteriosus (PDA: 54.7%, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCMP: 24%, ventricular septal defect (VSD: 4%, atrial septal defect (ASD: 2.7%, transposition of great arteries (TGA: 1.3% and coarctation of the Aorta (COA: 1.3%. Overall incidence of congenital heart diseases was 9.3 after exclusion of PDA and HCMP cases. The incidence of congenital heart diseases was higher in macrosomic than nonmacrosomic infants of diabetic mothers (P<0.001. Congenital heart diseases were more common in infants of pre-gestational than gestational diabetic mothers (P=0.004. Conclusion: Our results showed that diabetic mothers are at increased risk of giving birth to a newborn with congenital heart disease, and transthoracic echocardiography is recommended for all infants of diabetic mothers.

  11. Management of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension due to congenital heart disease: recent advances and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blok, Ilja M; van Riel, Annelieke C M J; Mulder, Barbara J M; Bouma, Berto J

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a serious complication of adult congenital heart disease associated with systemic-to-pulmonary shunts. Although early shunt closure restricts development of pulmonary arterial hypertension, patients remain at risk even after repair. The development of pulmonary arterial hypertension is associated with a markedly increased morbidity and mortality. It is important to identify patients with a poor prognosis using disease specific markers. Echocardiography and biomarkers arise as practical tools to determine the risk of mortality. Although pulmonary arterial hypertension cannot be cured, four classes of disease-targeting therapies are currently available and several promising therapies are being studied. There is a shift in drug studies towards more clinically relevant endpoints such as time to clinical worsening and morbidity and mortality events.

  12. Stem cell death and survival in heart regeneration and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelwahid, Eltyeb; Kalvelyte, Audrone; Stulpinas, Aurimas; de Carvalho, Katherine Athayde Teixeira; Guarita-Souza, Luiz Cesar; Foldes, Gabor

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are major causes of mortality and morbidity. Cardiomyocyte apoptosis disrupts cardiac function and leads to cardiac decompensation and terminal heart failure. Delineating the regulatory signaling pathways that orchestrate cell survival in the heart has significant therapeutic implications. Cardiac tissue has limited capacity to regenerate and repair. Stem cell therapy is a successful approach for repairing and regenerating ischemic cardiac tissue; however, transplanted cells display very high death percentage, a problem that affects success of tissue regeneration. Stem cells display multipotency or pluripotency and undergo self-renewal, however these events are negatively influenced by upregulation of cell death machinery that induces the significant decrease in survival and differentiation signals upon cardiovascular injury. While efforts to identify cell types and molecular pathways that promote cardiac tissue regeneration have been productive, studies that focus on blocking the extensive cell death after transplantation are limited. The control of cell death includes multiple networks rather than one crucial pathway, which underlies the challenge of identifying the interaction between various cellular and biochemical components. This review is aimed at exploiting the molecular mechanisms by which stem cells resist death signals to develop into mature and healthy cardiac cells. Specifically, we focus on a number of factors that control death and survival of stem cells upon transplantation and ultimately affect cardiac regeneration. We also discuss potential survival enhancing strategies and how they could be meaningful in the design of targeted therapies that improve cardiac function.

  13. Pulmonary Right Ventricular Resynchronization in Congenital Heart Disease: Acute Improvement in Right Ventricular Mechanics and Contraction Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janoušek, Jan; Kovanda, Jan; Ložek, Miroslav; Tomek, Viktor; Vojtovič, Pavel; Gebauer, Roman; Kubuš, Peter; Krejčíř, Miroslav; Lumens, Joost; Delhaas, Tammo; Prinzen, Frits

    2017-09-01

    Electromechanical discoordination may contribute to long-term pulmonary right ventricular (RV) dysfunction in patients after surgery for congenital heart disease. We sought to evaluate changes in RV function after temporary RV cardiac resynchronization therapy. Twenty-five patients aged median 12.0 years after repair of tetralogy of Fallot and similar lesions were studied echocardiographically (n=23) and by cardiac catheterization (n=5) after primary repair (n=4) or after surgical RV revalvulation for significant pulmonary regurgitation (n=21). Temporary RV cardiac resynchronization therapy was applied in the presence of complete right bundle branch block by atrial-synchronized RV free wall pacing in complete fusion with spontaneous ventricular depolarization using temporary electrodes. The q-RV interval at the RV free wall pacing site (mean 77.2% of baseline QRS duration) confirmed pacing from a late activated RV area. RV cardiac resynchronization therapy carried significant decrease in QRS duration (Pright bundle branch block QRS morphology, increase in RV filling time (P=0.002), pulmonary artery velocity time integral (P=0.006), and RV maximum +dP/dt (Pright bundle branch block, RV cardiac resynchronization therapy carried multiple positive effects on RV mechanics, synchrony, and contraction efficiency. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Noteworthy Literature in 2015: Anesthesia for Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twite, Mark; Ing, Richard J

    2016-03-01

    This article is a review of the literature published during the 12 months of 2015, which is of interest to the congenital cardiac anesthesiologist. While the review is not exhaustive, it identifies 7 themes in the literature for 2015 and cites 78 peer-reviewed publications.

  15. Community-based case-control study of childhood stroke risk associated with congenital heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, CK; Sidney, S.; Fullerton, HJ

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc. BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE - : A better understanding of the stroke risk factors in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) could inform stroke prevention strategies. We analyzed pediatric stroke associated with CHD in a large community-based case-control study. METHODS - : From 2.5 million children (aged 30-fold (odds ratio, 31; confidence interval 4-241) increased risk of stroke in children with CHD when compared with controls. After excluding periop...

  16. Clinical Observation of Concomitant Congenital Heart Disease and Anomaly of the Urinary System in Adolescent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.P. Limarenko

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the clinical observation of multiple malformations in a child: combination of congenital heart disease with an anomaly of the urinary system on the background of undifferentiated connective tissue dysplasia syndrome of maximum severity. This case report is of interest to pediatricians. Children with defects of the heart and urinary system often have other malformations, so in these patients it is important to conduct a full multisystem examination.

  17. Rib-muscle pedicle flap for the repair of congenital tracheal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willner, A; Velez, F J

    1994-08-01

    Congenital tracheal stenosis (CTS) is an uncommon congenital anomaly that presents early in life with symptoms of biphasic stridor. Most cases require surgical correction. Techniques have included dilation, resection of the involved segment, and tracheoplasty. Today pericardium and costal cartilage are the most frequently used materials for tracheoplasty, but patients still often encounter problems with the graft, with the procedure, or with late complications. This preliminary study was undertaken to determine the feasibility of a rib-intercostal muscle pedicle flap for the treatment of CTS. Tracheoplasties were performed on seven 3.5- to 5.5-kg piglets with a pedicled segment of the right fourth rib via a lateral thoracotomy incision. The method was found to be technically feasible, and pedicles of greater than 2.5 cm were easily developed. The repair provided good structural support and an airtight seal at high ventilator pressures. Histologic examination after 2 weeks showed the flap to be incorporating into the native trachea and to be without degenerative changes. This "vital" composite flap has several real and theoretic advantages over current methods of repair and may prove to be valuable in the treatment of CTS. The clinical application of this myo-osseous pedicle graft in the treatment of patients with stenoses not amenable to surgical resection and primary anastomosis should be explored.

  18. Canadian Cardiovascular Society 2009 Consensus Conference on the management of adults with congenital heart disease: complex congenital cardiac lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silversides, Candice K; Salehian, Omid; Oechslin, Erwin; Schwerzmann, Markus; Vonder Muhll, Isabelle; Khairy, Paul; Horlick, Eric; Landzberg, Mike; Meijboom, Folkert; Warnes, Carole; Therrien, Judith

    2010-03-01

    With advances in pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery, the population of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased. In the current era, there are more adults with CHD than children. This population has many unique issues and needs. They have distinctive forms of heart failure and their cardiac disease can be associated with pulmonary hypertension, thromboemboli, complex arrhythmias and sudden death. Medical aspects that need to be considered relate to the long-term and multisystemic effects of single ventricle physiology, cyanosis, systemic right ventricles, complex intracardiac baffles and failing subpulmonary right ventricles. Since the 2001 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference report on the management of adults with CHD, there have been significant advances in the field of adult CHD. Therefore, new clinical guidelines have been written by Canadian adult CHD physicians in collaboration with an international panel of experts in the field. Part III of the guidelines includes recommendations for the care of patients with complete transposition of the great arteries, congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries, Fontan operations and single ventricles, Eisenmenger's syndrome, and cyanotic heart disease. Topics addressed include genetics, clinical outcomes, recommended diagnostic workup, surgical and interventional options, treatment of arrhythmias, assessment of pregnancy risk and follow-up requirements. The complete document consists of four manuscripts, which are published online in the present issue of The Canadian Journal of Cardiology. The complete document and references can also be found at www.ccs.ca or www.cachnet.org.

  19. Stem cell therapy and tissue engineering for correction of congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avolio, Elisa; Caputo, Massimo; Madeddu, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    This review article reports on the new field of stem cell therapy and tissue engineering and its potential on the management of congenital heart disease. To date, stem cell therapy has mainly focused on treatment of ischemic heart disease and heart failure, with initial indication of safety and mild-to-moderate efficacy. Preclinical studies and initial clinical trials suggest that the approach could be uniquely suited for the correction of congenital defects of the heart. The basic concept is to create living material made by cellularized grafts that, once implanted into the heart, grows and remodels in parallel with the recipient organ. This would make a substantial improvement in current clinical management, which often requires repeated surgical corrections for failure of implanted grafts. Different types of stem cells have been considered and the identification of specific cardiac stem cells within the heterogeneous population of mesenchymal and stromal cells offers opportunities for de novo cardiomyogenesis. In addition, endothelial cells and vascular progenitors, including cells with pericyte characteristics, may be necessary to generate efficiently perfused grafts. The implementation of current surgical grafts by stem cell engineering could address the unmet clinical needs of patients with congenital heart defects. PMID:26176009

  20. The Clinical and Molecular Relations Between Idiopathic Preterm Labor and Maternal Congenital Heart Defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Laat, Monique W. M.; Pieper, Petronella G.; Oudijk, Martijn A.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; Christoffels, Vincent M.; Afink, Gijs B.; Postma, Alex V.; Ris-Stalpers, Carrie

    2013-01-01

    Preterm labor (PTL) is an important cause of preterm delivery. The trigger initiating the process toward overt labor and parturition is poorly understood and the molecular basis remains an enigma. It recently emerged that the overall occurrence of PTL in pregnant women with congenital heart disease

  1. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in congenital heart disease : An epidemiologic perspective from a Dutch registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duffels, M. G. J.; Engelfriet, P. M.; Berger, R. M. F.; van Loon, R. L. E.; Hoendermis, E.; Vriend, J. W. J.; Bresser, P.; Mulder, B. J. M.; van der Velde, Enno T.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) associated with congenital heart disease is usually the result of a large systemic-topulmonary shunt, and often leads to right ventricular failure and early death. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of PAH among adult patients

  2. Outcome of implantable cardioverter defibrillators in adults with congenital heart disease : a multi-centre study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yap, Sing-Chien; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.; Hoendermis, Elke S.; Budts, Werner; Vliegen, Hubert W.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; van Dijk, Arie P. J.; Schalij, Martin J.; Drenthen, Willem

    2007-01-01

    Aims To investigate outcome and complications of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) and to identify predictors of (in-) appropriate shocks. Methods and results Sixty-four CHD patients >= 18 years at first ICD implantation [63% tetralogy of Fa

  3. Amplitude integrated electroencephalographic activity in infants with congenital heart disease before surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Horst, H-J.; Mud, M.; Roofthooft, M. T. R.; Bos, A. F.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Infants with congenital heart disease (CHD) are at risk for brain injury. An accurate tool to monitor brain function is amplitude integrated EEG (aEEG). It records both background patterns and electrographic seizure activity (EA). Aims: Our aim was to determine aEEG patterns in infants w

  4. Menstrual cycle and its disorders in women with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drenthen, Willem; Hoendermis, Elke S.; Moons, Philip; Heida, Karst Y.; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.; Mulder, Barbara J.M.; Van Dijk, Arie P.J.; Vliegen, Hubert W.; Sollie, Krystyna M.; Berger, Rolf M.F.; Lely, A. Titia; Canobbio, Mary M.; Pieper, Petronella G.; Berger, Rudolphus

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the age at menarche, the prevalence of menstrual cycle (interval) disorders, and determinants in women with congenital heart disease (CHD). DESIGN: Using two CHD registries, 1802 (82%) of the 2196 women with CHD contacted (aged 18-58 years) provided written informed consen

  5. Outcome of pregnancy in women with congenital heart disease - A literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drenthen, Willem; Pieper, Petronella G.; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.; van Lottum, Willem A.; Voors, Adriaan A.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; van Dijk, Arie P. J.; Vliegen, Hubert W.; Yap, Sing C.; Moons, Philip; Ebels, Tjark; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.

    2007-01-01

    A search of peer-reviewed literature was conducted to identify reports that provide data on complications associated with pregnancy in women with structural congenital heart disease (CHD). This review describes the outcome of 2,491 pregnancies, including 377 miscarriages (15%) and 114 elective abort

  6. Time Course of Atrial Fibrillation in Patients With Congenital Heart Defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teuwen, Christophe P.; Ramdjan, Tanwier T. T. K.; Gotte, Marco; Brundel, Bianca J. J. M.; Evertz, Reinder; Vriend, Joris W. J.; Molhoek, Sander G.; Dorman, Henderikus G. R.; van Opstal, Jurren M.; Konings, Thelma C.; van der Voort, Pepijn; Delacretaz, Etienne; Houck, Charlotte; Yaksh, Ameeta; Jansz, Luca. J.; Witsenburg, Maarten; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.; Triedman, John K.; Bogers, Ad J. J. C.; de Groot, Natasja M. S.

    2015-01-01

    Background The incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) is rising in the aging patients with congenital heart defects (CHD). However, studies reporting on AF in patients with CHD are scarce. The aim of this multicenter study was to examine in a large cohort of patients with a variety of CHD: (1) the ag

  7. Contemporary prevalence of pulmonary arterial hypertension in adult congenital heart disease following the updated clinical classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riel, A.C. van; Schuuring, M.J.; Hessen, I.D. van; Zwinderman, A.H.; Cozijnsen, L.; Reichert, C.L.; Hoorntje, J.C.A.; Wagenaar, L.J.; Post, M.C.; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Hoendermis, E.S.; Mulder, B.J.; Bouma, B.J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aging congenital heart disease (CHD) population is prone to develop a variety of sequelae, including pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Previous prevalence estimates are limited in applicability due to the use of tertiary centers, or database encoding only. We aimed to investigat

  8. Nurse specialists in adult congenital heart disease: The current status in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moons, P.; Scholte op Reimer, W.; De Geest, S.; Fridlund, B.; Heikkila, J.; Jaarsma, Trijntje (Tiny); Martensson, J.; Smith, K; Stewart, S.; Stromberg, A; Thompson, D.R.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: Recommendations for the management of adults with congenital heart disease indicate that specialist referral centres should employ nurse specialists who are trained and educated in the care for these patients. We surveyed the involvement, education and activities of nurse specialists in the car

  9. Remifentanil infusion for cardiac catheterization in children with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foubert, L; Reyntjens, K; De Wolf, D; Suys, B; Moerman, A; Mortier, E

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac catheterization of children with congenital heart disease is increasingly being performed under general anesthesia. Haemodynamic stability during anesthesia and fast and adequate recovery after the procedure is crucial in these patients. We performed a pilot study to evaluate hem

  10. Risk Factors for Gross Motor Dysfunction in Infants with Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Suzanne H.; Eldridge, Bev J.; Galea, Mary P.; Harris, Susan R.

    2011-01-01

    Infants with congenital heart disease (CHD) that is severe enough to require early surgery are at risk for cognitive and motor delays, as well as musculoskeletal impairments, and are best managed by an interdisciplinary team during their hospital stay and after discharge. The purpose of this article is to review some of the risk factors associated…

  11. Risk Factors for Gross Motor Dysfunction in Infants with Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Suzanne H.; Eldridge, Bev J.; Galea, Mary P.; Harris, Susan R.

    2011-01-01

    Infants with congenital heart disease (CHD) that is severe enough to require early surgery are at risk for cognitive and motor delays, as well as musculoskeletal impairments, and are best managed by an interdisciplinary team during their hospital stay and after discharge. The purpose of this article is to review some of the risk factors associated…

  12. Health-related fitness profiles in adolescents with complex congenital heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Susanne Hwiid; Wetterslev, Jørn; Søndergaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study investigates whether subgroups of different health-related fitness (HrF) profiles exist among girls and boys with complex congenital heart disease (ConHD) and how these are associated with lifestyle behaviors. METHODS: We measured the cardiorespiratory fitness, muscle strength...

  13. Understanding age-based transition needs: Perspectives from adolescents and adults with congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this study was to explore the transition process in congenital heart disease (CHD) care through the perceived needs and concerns of adolescents (pretransition) and the experiential insight from adults (post-transition), in order to inform future transition initiatives and information ...

  14. Explanatory Value of the Ability Index as Assessed by Cardiologists and Patients with Congenital Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrader, Anne-Marie Voss; Lisby, Karen H; King, Catriona;

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. The Ability Index was developed to classify patients with congenital heart disease into four functional classes. Functional class is typically determined by the cardiologist, based on data from a clinical interview. The validity of the Ability Index as assessed by the patient has...

  15. Physical Activity and Sport Participation in Youth with Congenital Heart Disease: Perceptions of Children and Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moola, Fiona; Faulkner, Guy E. J.; Kirsh, Joel A.; Kilburn, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    This study explored perceptions toward physical activity and sport in the lives of youth with congenital heart disease. Thirteen cardiac participants were interviewed in the presence of their parents, and a process of inductive analysis was conducted. Sport was not considered a valued pursuit despite the belief that it is essential for the…

  16. Long-Term Prostaglandin E1 Infusion for Newborns with Critical Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aykanat, Alper; Yavuz, Taner; Özalkaya, Elif; Topçuoğlu, Sevilay; Ovalı, Fahri; Karatekin, Güner

    2016-01-01

    Prostaglandin E1 is crucial for keeping the patent ductus arteriosus in critical congenital heart disease for the survival and palliation of particularly prematurely born babies until a cardiosurgical intervention is available. In this study, the side effects of prostaglandin E1 in newborns with critical congenital heart disease and clinical outcomes were evaluated. Thirty-five newborns diagnosed with critical congenital heart disease were treated with prostaglandin E1 between January 2012 and September 2014 at our hospital. Patient charts were examined for prostaglandin E1 side effects (metabolic, gastric outlet obstruction, apnea), clinical status, and prognosis. Acquired data were analyzed in the SPSS 20.0 program. Patients with birth weight under 2500 g needed more days of prostaglandin E1 infusion than ones with birthweight over 2500 g (P = 0.016). The ratio of patients with birth weight under 2500 g who received prostaglandin E1 longer than 7 days was higher than the patients with birth weight over 2500 g (P = 0.02). Eighteen side effects were encountered in 11 of 35 patients (31%). Of these side effects, 1 patient had 4, 4 patients had 2, and 6 patients had only 1 side effect. Discontinuation of the therapy was never needed. Prostaglandin E1 is an accepted therapy modality for survival and outcome in critical congenital heart disease in particularly low-birth-weight babies until a surgical intervention is available. Side effects are not less encountered but are almost always manageable, and discontinuation is not needed.

  17. The haematocrit - an important factor causing impaired haemostasis in patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A S; Johansson, P I; Idorn, L;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease(CCHD) have haemostatic abnormalities, which result in an increased risk of bleeding. The cause is unknown, but recent studies have indicated that an elevated haematocrit, which is present in cyanotic patients, could be an important factor...

  18. Osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome with congenital heart disease: a new association.

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    We report a sibship of two brothers and one sister with the osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome and congenital heart disease. They presented in infancy with visual impairment and psychomotor retardation. Major features included bilateral cataracts, generalised osteopenia, severe platyspondyly, borderline mental retardation, muscular hypotonia, joint laxity, and ventricular septal defect. Parental consanguinity and affected sibs of both sexes strongly suggested autosomal recessive inheritance. ...

  19. Time Course of Atrial Fibrillation in Patients With Congenital Heart Defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teuwen, C.P.; Ramdjan, T.T.; Gotte, M.; Brundel, B.J.; Evertz, R.; Vriend, J.W.; Molhoek, S.G.; Dorman, H.G.; Opstal, J.M. van; Konings, T.C.; Voort, P. van der; Delacretaz, E.; Houck, C.; Yaksh, A.; Jansz, L.J.; Witsenburg, M.; Roos-Hesselink, J.W.; Triedman, J.K.; Bogers, A.J.; Groot, N.M. de

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) is rising in the aging patients with congenital heart defects (CHD). However, studies reporting on AF in patients with CHD are scarce. The aim of this multicenter study was to examine in a large cohort of patients with a variety of CHD: (1) the a

  20. Time Course of Atrial Fibrillation in Patients with Congenital Heart Defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teuwen, Christophe P; Ramdjan, Tanwier T T K; Götte, Marco; Brundel, Bianca J J M; Evertz, Reinder; Vriend, Joris W J; Molhoek, Sander G; Dorman, H G Reinhart; van Opstal, Jurren M; Konings, Thelma C; van der Voort, Pepijn; Delacrétaz, Etienne; Houck, Charlotte; Yaksh, Ameeta; Jansz, Luca J; Witsenburg, Maarten; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W; Triedman, John K; Bogers, Ad J J C; de Groot, Natasja M S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: -The incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) is rising in the aging patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). However, studies reporting on AF in CHD patients are scarce. The aim of this multicenter study was to examine in a large cohort of patients with a variety of CHD 1) the age of

  1. Exercise in children with common congenital heart lesions: balancing benefits with risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, Melanie; Selvadurai, Hiran; Sherwood, Megan; Fitzgerald, Dominic A

    2013-10-01

    Children with corrected common congenital heart lesions are often withheld from regular exercise by their parents. While there are some modest risks with exercise, they should be seen in perspective, and the life-long benefits of regular exercise on general health, mood and well-being should be emphasised.

  2. Clinical classification in pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, Willemijn M H; Douwes, Johannes M; Ploegstra, Mark-Jan; Krishnan, Usha; Roofthooft, Marcel; Hillege, Hans L; Ivy, D Dunbar; Rosenzweig, Erika B; Berger, Rolf M F

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a frequent cause of pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), with diverse etiology and outcome. We aimed to describe phenotypic heterogeneity in pediatric PAH associated with CHD (PAH-CHD), assess the applicability of the Nice CHD classification, and explore

  3. Menstrual cycle and its disorders in women with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drenthen, Willem; Hoendermis, Elke S.; Moons, Philip; Heida, Karst Y.; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.; Mulder, Barbara J.M.; Van Dijk, Arie P.J.; Vliegen, Hubert W.; Sollie, Krystyna M.; Berger, Rolf M.F.; Lely, A. Titia; Canobbio, Mary M.; Pieper, Petronella G.; Berger, Rudolphus

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the age at menarche, the prevalence of menstrual cycle (interval) disorders, and determinants in women with congenital heart disease (CHD). DESIGN: Using two CHD registries, 1802 (82%) of the 2196 women with CHD contacted (aged 18-58 years) provided written informed

  4. Menstrual cycle and its disorders in women with congenital heart disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drenthen, W.; Hoendermis, E.S.; Moons, P.; Heida, K.Y.; Roos-Hesselink, J.W.; Mulder, B.J.M.; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Vliegen, H.W.; Sollie, K.M.; Berger, R.M.; Lely, A.T.; Canobbio, M.M.; Pieper, P.G.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the age at menarche, the prevalence of menstrual cycle (interval) disorders, and determinants in women with congenital heart disease (CHD). DESIGN: Using two CHD registries, 1802 (82%) of the 2196 women with CHD contacted (aged 18-58 years) provided written informed

  5. Dietary intake of B-vitamins in mothers born a child with a congenital heart defect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkleij-Hagoort, A.C.; Vries, de J.H.M.; Ursem, N.T.C.; Jonge, de R.; Hop, W.C.J.; Steegers-Theunissen, R.P.M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Periconceptional use of multivitamins reduces the risk of a child with a congenital heart defect (CHD). Data on the impact of maternal diet, however, are lacking. AIM OF THE STUDY: We investigated the association between the maternal dietary intake of B-vitamins and having a child with a

  6. The Clinical and Molecular Relations Between Idiopathic Preterm Labor and Maternal Congenital Heart Defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Laat, Monique W. M.; Pieper, Petronella G.; Oudijk, Martijn A.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; Christoffels, Vincent M.; Afink, Gijs B.; Postma, Alex V.; Ris-Stalpers, Carrie

    2013-01-01

    Preterm labor (PTL) is an important cause of preterm delivery. The trigger initiating the process toward overt labor and parturition is poorly understood and the molecular basis remains an enigma. It recently emerged that the overall occurrence of PTL in pregnant women with congenital heart disease

  7. Effect of Congenital Heart Defects on Language Development in Toddlers with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visootsak, J.; Hess, B.; Bakeman, R.; Adamson, L. B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Down syndrome (DS, OMIM #190685) is the most commonly identified genetic form of intellectual disability with congenital heart defect (CHD) occurring in 50% of cases. With advances in surgical techniques and an increasing lifespan, this has necessitated a greater understanding of the neurodevelopmental consequences of CHDs. Herein, we…

  8. Screening of 99 Danish patients with congenital heart disease for GATA4 mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Litu; Tümer, Zeynep; Jacobsen, Joes Ramsøe;

    2006-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) affects nearly 1% of the population, but only few genes involved in human CHD are presently known. Germ-line mutations in the zinc finger transcription factor GATA4 have been associated with familial cases of atrial and ventricular septal defects and pulmonary...

  9. Efficacy of Antiarrhythmic Drugs in Adults With Congenital Heart Disease and Supraventricular Tachycardias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koyak, Zeliha; Kroon, Bart; de Groot, Joris R.; Wagenaar, Lodewijk J.; van Dijk, Arie P.; Mulder, Bart A.; Van Gelder, Isabelle C.; Post, Marco C.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; Bouma, Berto J.

    2013-01-01

    Supraventricular tachycardias (SVTs) are a major cause of morbidity in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD). Few data exist on safety and efficacy of antiarrhythmic drugs in this population. Our aim was to determine the efficacy of antiarrhythmic drugs in adults with CHD and first-onset SVT on

  10. Are Grown-ups with Congenital Heart Disease Willing to Participate in an Exercise Program?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dontje, Manon L.; Feenstra, Marlies; de Greef, Mathieu H. G.; Nieuwland, Wybe; Hoendermis, Elke S.

    2014-01-01

    ObjectiveTo examine the willingness of grown-ups with congenital heart disease (GUCH) to participate in the GUCH Training Program-Individualised (GTI), an exercise program specifically designed for GUCH, and to identify factors affecting their willingness to participate. Design and SettingIn this cr

  11. Complications of pacemaker therapy in adults with congenital heart disease: A multicenter study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opic, P.; Kranenburg, M. van; Yap, S.C.; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Budts, W.; Vliegen, H.W.; Erven, L. van; Can, A.; Sahin, G.; Theuns, D.A.; Witsenburg, M.; Roos-Hesselink, J.W.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study aims to investigate indications and complications of permanent cardiac pacing in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD). METHODS AND RESULTS: Two-hundred and seventy-four CHD patients were identified who underwent permanent pacemaker implantation between 1972 and 2009. The

  12. Dietary intake of B-vitamins in mothers born a child with a congenital heart defect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkleij-Hagoort, A.C.; Vries, de J.H.M.; Ursem, N.T.C.; Jonge, de R.; Hop, W.C.J.; Steegers-Theunissen, R.P.M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Periconceptional use of multivitamins reduces the risk of a child with a congenital heart defect (CHD). Data on the impact of maternal diet, however, are lacking. AIM OF THE STUDY: We investigated the association between the maternal dietary intake of B-vitamins and having a child with a

  13. Menstrual cycle and its disorders in women with congenital heart disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drenthen, W.; Hoendermis, E.S.; Moons, P.; Heida, K.Y.; Roos-Hesselink, J.W.; Mulder, B.J.M.; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Vliegen, H.W.; Sollie, K.M.; Berger, R.M.; Lely, A.T.; Canobbio, M.M.; Pieper, P.G.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the age at menarche, the prevalence of menstrual cycle (interval) disorders, and determinants in women with congenital heart disease (CHD). DESIGN: Using two CHD registries, 1802 (82%) of the 2196 women with CHD contacted (aged 18-58 years) provided written informed consen

  14. Long-term tricuspid valve prosthesis-related complications in patients with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Slooten, Ymkje J.; Freling, Hendrik G.; van Melle, Joost P.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; Jongbloed, Monique R. M.; Ebels, Tjark; Voors, Adriaan A.; Pieper, Petronella G.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In patients with acquired valvar disease, morbidity and mortality rates after tricuspid valve replacement (TVR) are high. However, in adult patients with congenital heart disease, though data concerning outcome after TVR are scarce, even poorer results are suggested in patients with Ebst

  15. Problems of the neonates with congenital heart disease requiring early interventions: a regional report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Muhittin; Aldudak, Bedri; Akar, Melek; Akdeniz, Osman; Tüzün, Heybet; Çelebi, Vefik

    2015-01-01

    Aim: In this study, it was aimed to determine the problems of the neonates who were diagnosed with congenital heart disease requiring early intervention in our hospital. Material and Methods: The files of the newborn babies with congenital heart disease requiring early intervention who were admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit of our hospital between January 2011 and January 2013 were evaluated retrospectively. In all cases, echocardiography and ‘’Score for Neonatal Acute Physiology-II” (SNAP-II) scoring were performed within the first day of admission. The data were interpreted using Number Cruncher Statistical System 2007 software. The statistical significance was set at palprostadil and age were not related to mortality. Three patients were discharged following planning of elective surgery and 60 patients were referred to a tertiary center by air ambulance. Conclusions: The results of our study indicated that prenatal diagnosis could not be made in neonates with congenital heart disease requiring intervention in our region. The mortality rates of these patients were related to the severity of the clinical status at presentation rather than to the age, gender and type of congenital heart disease. The mortality was much higher in the patients who developed circulatory failure. Most of the patients who survived were sent by air ambulance to the centers where the intervention was to be performed. PMID:26568691

  16. Acute Kidney Injury and Fluid Overload in Neonates Following Surgery for Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piggott, Kurt D; Soni, Meshal; Decampli, William M; Ramirez, Jorge A; Holbein, Dianna; Fakioglu, Harun; Blanco, Carlos J; Pourmoghadam, Kamal K

    2015-07-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) and fluid overload have been shown to increase morbidity and mortality. The reported incidence of AKI in pediatric patients following surgery for congenital heart disease is between 15% and 59%. Limited data exist looking at risk factors and outcomes of AKI or fluid overload in neonates undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease. Neonates aged 6 to 29 days who underwent surgery for congenital heart disease and who were without preoperative kidney disease were included in the study. The AKI was determined utilizing the Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria. Ninety-five neonates were included in the study. The incidence of neonatal AKI was 45% (n = 43), of which 86% had stage 1 AKI. Risk factors for AKI included cardiopulmonary bypass time, selective cerebral perfusion, preoperative aminoglycoside use, small kidneys by renal ultrasound, and risk adjustment for congenital heart surgery category. There were eight mortalities (five from stage 1 AKI group, three from stage 2, and zero from stage 3). Fluid overload and AKI both increased hospital length of stay and postoperative ventilator days. To avoid increased risk of morbidity and possibly mortality, every attempt should be made to identify and intervene on those risk factors, which may be modifiable or identifiable preoperatively, such as small kidneys by renal ultrasound. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Cardiac surgery in grown-up congenital heart patients. Will the surgical workload increase?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klcovansky, J.; Søndergård, Lars; Helvind, M.

    2008-01-01

    The number of patients with grown-up congenital heart (GUCH) disease is steadily increasing. Although there is agreement that the medical service for GUCH patients should be expanded in coming years, it is still unknown whether this should also include the surgical service. In an attempt to eluci...

  18. Mortality in adult congenital heart disease : Are national registries reliable for cause of death?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zomer, A. Carla; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; van der Velde, Enno T.; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Mariman, Edwin C. M.; Verheugt, Carianne L.; Vaartjes, Ilonca; Pieper, Petronella G.; Meijboom, Folkert J.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Statistics on cause-specific mortality are important for prognostic research. The aim of this study was to assess the utility of the national mortality registry in research on causes of death in adult patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). Methods: The CONCOR registry of over

  19. Prevalence of non-cardiovascular findings on CT angiography in children with congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, Archana [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); St. Christopher' s Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hellinger, Jeffrey C. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); New York Cardiovascular Institute at Lenox Hill Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Servaes, Sabah; Keller, Marc S. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Schwartz, Mathew C. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Levine Children' s Hospital, Sanger Heart and Vascular Institute, Charlotte, NC (United States); Epelman, Monica [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Nemours Children' s Health System/Nemours Children' s Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging/Radiology, Orlando, FL (United States)

    2017-03-15

    CT angiography is gaining broader acceptance in the evaluation of children with known or suspected congenital heart disease. These studies include non-cardiovascular structures such as the mediastinum, lung parenchyma and upper abdominal organs. It is important to inspect all these structures for potential abnormalities that might be clinically important and, in some cases, may impact care plans. To determine the prevalence of non-cardiovascular findings in CT angiography of children with congenital heart disease. During 28 months, 300 consecutive children (170 males; mean age: 7.1 years, age range: 6 h-26 years), referred from a tertiary pediatric cardiology center, underwent clinically indicated CT angiography to evaluate known or suspected congenital heart disease. Slightly more than half (n = 169) of the patients were postoperative or post-intervention. Examinations were retrospectively reviewed, and non-cardiovascular findings were recorded and tabulated by organ system, congenital heart disease and operative procedure in conjunction with outcomes from medical charts. Non-cardiovascular findings were identified in 83% (n = 250 / 300) of the studies for a total of 857 findings. In 221 patients (n = 73.7% of 300) a total of 813 non-cardiovascular findings were clinically significant, while in 9.7% (n = 29 / 300) of patients, 5.1% (n = 44 / 857) of the findings were nonsignificant. In 38.3% (n = 115 / 300) of patients with significant non-cardiovascular pathology, the findings were unexpected and directly impacted patient care plans. Commonly involved organs with non-cardiovascular findings were the lungs with 280 non-cardiovascular findings in 176 / 300 (58.7%) of patients, the airway with 139 non-cardiovascular findings in 103 / 300 (34.3%) of patients and the liver with 108 non-cardiovascular findings in 72 / 300 (24.0%) of patients. Syndromic associations were noted in 22% (n = 66 / 300) of the patients. Non-cardiovascular findings are common in children with

  20. Tube Thoracostomy at the Time of Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia Repair: Reassessing the Risks and Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlager, Avraham; Arps, Kelly; Siddharthan, Ragavan; Clifton, Matthew S

    2017-03-01

    Postoperative pneumothorax and effusion remain a concern following congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) repair. Despite a recent trend away from intraoperative thoracostomy, few studies have actually compared outcomes with and without a chest tube. Rationale commonly cited for the more minimalistic approach include the presumed low likelihood of postoperative complications, potential risk of patch infection, and prolonged intubation. We evaluate these theories, as well as the implications of intraoperative chest tube (IOCT) placement. We performed a retrospective chart review of 174 patients who underwent CDH repair at our academic children's hospital from 2004 to 2015. We compared incidence of clinically significant pleural events between patients who received an IOCT (n = 49) and those who did not (NIOCT, n = 124). We also evaluated time to extubation and rate of patch infections. Clinically significant pneumothorax or effusion occurred in 28% of NIOCT patients versus 10% of IOCT patients (P = .01). After thoracoscopic repair, time to extubation averaged 5.2 days in IOCT patients, 5.4 days in NIOCT patients with no postoperative complications, and 6.4 days in NIOCT patients requiring postoperative intervention. After open repair, time to extubation averaged 13.8, 13.6, and 22.5 days, respectively. There were no documented patch infections. Chest tube placement during CDH repair is associated with significantly lower incidence of clinically significant pleural complications, does not delay extubation, and results in shorter ventilator times than cases that require postoperative intervention. Patch infections are extremely rare. There is no evidence that chest tube placement increases this risk.

  1. CT imaging in congenital heart disease: an approach to imaging and interpreting complex lesions after surgical intervention for tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries, and single ventricle heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, B Kelly; Lesser, John R

    2013-01-01

    Echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging are the most commonly performed diagnostic studies in patients with congenital heart disease. A small percentage of patients with congenital heart disease will be referred to cardiac CT subsequent to echocardiography when magnetic resonance imaging is insufficient, contraindicated, or considered high risk. The most common complex lesions referred for CT at our institution are tetralogy of Fallot, transposition complexes, and single ventricle heart disease. This review discusses the most common surgical procedures performed in these patients and the technical considerations for optimal image acquisition on the basis of the prior procedure and the individual patient history. Cardiac CT can provide the functional and anatomic information required for decision making in complex congenital heart disease. Image interpretation is aided by knowledge of the common approaches to operative repair and the residual hemodynamic abnormalities. Acquisition and interpretation that is both individualized to the patient's underlying disease and the specific clinical question is likely to maintain diagnostic accuracy while decreasing the potential risk of cardiac CT.

  2. Consensus on timing of intervention for common congenital heart diseases: part I - acyanotic heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, P Syamasundar

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this review/editorial is to discuss how and when to treat the most common acyanotic congenital heart defects (CHD); the discussion of cyanotic heart defects will be presented in a subsequent editorial. By and large, the indications and timing of intervention are decided by the severity of the lesion. Balloon pulmonary valvuloplasty is the treatment of choice for valvar pulmonary stenosis and the indication for intervention is peak-to-peak systolic pressure gradient >50 mmHg across the pulmonary valve. For aortic valve stenosis, balloon aortic valvuloplasty appears to be the first therapeutic procedure of choice; the indications for balloon dilatation of aortic valve are peak-to-peak systolic pressure gradient across the aortic valve in excess of 70 mmHg irrespective of the symptoms or a gradient ≥ 50 mmHg with either symptoms or electrocardiographic ST-T wave changes indicative of myocardial perfusion abnormality. The indications for intervention in coarctation of the aorta are significant hypertension and/or congestive heart failure along with a pressure gradient in excess of 20 mmHg across the coarctation; the type of intervention varies with age at presentation and the anatomy of coarctation: surgical intervention for neonates and young infants, balloon angioplasty for discrete native coarctation in children, and stents in adolescents and adults. Long segment coarctations or those associated with hypoplasia of the isthmus or transverse aortic arch require surgical treatment in younger children and stents in adolescents and adults. For post-surgical aortic recoarctation, balloon angioplasty in young children and stents in adolescents and adults are treatment options. Transcatheter closure methods are currently preferred for ostium secundum atrial septal defects (ASDs); the indications for occlusion are right ventricular volume overload by echocardiogram. Ostium primum, sinus venosus and coronary sinus ASDs require surgical closure. For all ASDs

  3. Virtual cardiotomy based on 3-D MRI for preoperative planning in congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerensen, Thomas Sangild [University of Aarhus, Department of Computer Science, Aarhus N (Denmark); University of Aarhus, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus (Denmark); Beerbaum, Philipp; Razavi, Reza; Greil, Gerald Franz [King' s College London School of Medicine, Division of Imaging Sciences, London (United Kingdom); Guy' s and St. Thomas' Hospital, Department of Paediatric Cardiology, London (United Kingdom); Mosegaard, Jesper [Alexandra Institute, Aarhus (Denmark); Rasmusson, Allan [University of Aarhus, Department of Computer Science, Aarhus N (Denmark); Schaeffter, Tobias [King' s College London School of Medicine, Division of Imaging Sciences, London (United Kingdom); Austin, Conal [Guy' s and St. Thomas' Hospital, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-15

    Patient-specific preoperative planning in complex congenital heart disease may be greatly facilitated by virtual cardiotomy. Surgeons can perform an unlimited number of surgical incisions on a virtual 3-D reconstruction to evaluate the feasibility of different surgical strategies. To quantitatively evaluate the quality of the underlying imaging data and the accuracy of the corresponding segmentation, and to qualitatively evaluate the feasibility of virtual cardiotomy. A whole-heart MRI sequence was applied in 42 children with congenital heart disease (age 3{+-}3 years, weight 13{+-}9 kg, heart rate 96{+-} 21 bpm). Image quality was graded 1-4 (diagnostic image quality {>=}2) by two independent blinded observers. In patients with diagnostic image quality the segmentation quality was also graded 1-4 (4 no discrepancies, 1 misleading error). The average image quality score was 2.7 - sufficient for virtual reconstruction in 35 of 38 patients (92%) older than 1 month. Segmentation time was 59{+-}10 min (average quality score 3.5). Virtual cardiotomy was performed in 19 patients. Accurate virtual reconstructions of patient-specific cardiac anatomy can be produced in less than 1 h from 3-D MRI. The presented work thus introduces a new, clinically feasible noninvasive technique for improved preoperative planning in complex cases of congenital heart disease. (orig.)

  4. Brain volumes predict neurodevelopment in adolescents after surgery for congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Rhein, Michael; Buchmann, Andreas; Hagmann, Cornelia; Huber, Reto; Klaver, Peter; Knirsch, Walter; Latal, Beatrice

    2014-01-01

    Patients with complex congenital heart disease are at risk for neurodevelopmental impairments. Evidence suggests that brain maturation can be delayed and pre- and postoperative brain injury may occur, and there is limited information on the long-term effect of congenital heart disease on brain development and function in adolescent patients. At a mean age of 13.8 years, 39 adolescent survivors of childhood cardiopulmonary bypass surgery with no structural brain lesions evident through conventional cerebral magnetic resonance imaging and 32 healthy control subjects underwent extensive neurodevelopmental assessment and cerebral magnetic resonance imaging. Cerebral scans were analysed quantitatively using surface-based and voxel-based morphometry. Compared with control subjects, patients had lower total brain (P = 0.003), white matter (P = 0.004) and cortical grey matter (P = 0.005) volumes, whereas cerebrospinal fluid volumes were not different. Regional brain volume reduction ranged from 5.3% (cortical grey matter) to 11% (corpus callosum). Adolescents with cyanotic heart disease showed more brain volume loss than those with acyanotic heart disease, particularly in the white matter, thalami, hippocampi and corpus callosum (all P-values Brain volume reduction correlated significantly with cognitive, motor and executive functions (grey matter: P < 0.05, white matter: P < 0.01). Our findings suggest that there are long-lasting cerebral changes in adolescent survivors of cardiopulmonary bypass surgery for congenital heart disease and that these changes are associated with functional outcome.

  5. Congenital heart disease protein 5 associates with CASZ1 to maintain myocardial tissue integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojka, Stephen; Amin, Nirav M; Gibbs, Devin; Christine, Kathleen S; Charpentier, Marta S; Conlon, Frank L

    2014-08-01

    The identification and characterization of the cellular and molecular pathways involved in the differentiation and morphogenesis of specific cell types of the developing heart are crucial to understanding the process of cardiac development and the pathology associated with human congenital heart disease. Here, we show that the cardiac transcription factor CASTOR (CASZ1) directly interacts with congenital heart disease 5 protein (CHD5), which is also known as tryptophan-rich basic protein (WRB), a gene located on chromosome 21 in the proposed region responsible for congenital heart disease in individuals with Down's syndrome. We demonstrate that loss of CHD5 in Xenopus leads to compromised myocardial integrity, improper deposition of basement membrane, and a resultant failure of hearts to undergo cell movements associated with cardiac formation. We further report that CHD5 is essential for CASZ1 function and that the CHD5-CASZ1 interaction is necessary for cardiac morphogenesis. Collectively, these results establish a role for CHD5 and CASZ1 in the early stages of vertebrate cardiac development. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Cardiac Hemodynamics in the Pathogenesis of Congenital Heart Disease and Aortic Valve Calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Vishal

    2011-11-01

    An improved understanding of the roles of hemodynamic forces play in cardiac development and the pathogenesis of cardiac disease will have significant scientific and clinical impact. I will focus on the role of fluid dynamics in congenital heart disease and aortic valve calcification. Congenital heart defects are the most common form of birth defect. Aortic valve calcification/stenosis is the third leading cause of adult heart disease and the most common form of acquired valvular disease in developed countries. Given the high incidence of these diseases and their associated morbidity and mortality, the potential translational impact of an improved understanding of cardiac hemodynamic forces is very large. Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Rady Children's Hospital, San Diego

  7. Anaesthetic considerations in children with congenital heart disease undergoing non-cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagdish Menghraj Shahani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to provide an updated and comprehensive review on current perioperative anaesthetic management of paediatric patients with congenital heart disease (CHD coming for non-cardiac surgery. Search of terms such as "anaesthetic management," "congenital heart disease" and "non-cardiac surgery" was carried out in KKH eLibrary, PubMed, Medline and Google, focussing on significant current randomised control trials, case reports, review articles and editorials. Issues on how to tailor perioperative anaesthetic management on cases with left to right shunt, right to left shunt and complex heart disease are discussed in this article. Furthermore, the author also highlights special considerations such as pulmonary hypertension, neonates with CHD coming for extracardiac surgery and the role of regional anaesthesia in children with CHD undergoing non-cardiac operation.

  8. Cardiovascular cast model fabrication and casting effectiveness evaluation in fetus with severe congenital heart disease or normal heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Cao, Hai-yan; Xie, Ming-xing; He, Lin; Han, Wei; Hong, Liu; Peng, Yuan; Hu, Yun-fei; Song, Ben-cai; Wang, Jing; Wang, Bin; Deng, Cheng

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the application and effectiveness of vascular corrosion technique in preparing fetal cardiovascular cast models, 10 normal fetal heart specimens with other congenital disease (control group) and 18 specimens with severe congenital heart disease (case group) from induced abortions were enrolled in this study from March 2013 to June 2015 in our hospital. Cast models were prepared by injecting casting material into vascular lumen to demonstrate real geometries of fetal cardiovascular system. Casting effectiveness was analyzed in terms of local anatomic structures and different anatomical levels (including overall level, atrioventricular and great vascular system, left-sided and right-sided heart), as well as different trimesters of pregnancy. In our study, all specimens were successfully casted. Casting effectiveness analysis of local anatomic structures showed a mean score from 1.90±1.45 to 3.60±0.52, without significant differences between case and control groups in most local anatomic structures except left ventricle, which had a higher score in control group (P=0.027). Inter-group comparison of casting effectiveness in different anatomical levels showed no significant differences between the two groups. Intra-group comparison also revealed undifferentiated casting effectiveness between atrioventricular and great vascular system, or left-sided and right-sided heart in corresponding group. Third-trimester group had a significantly higher perfusion score in great vascular system than second-trimester group (P=0.046), while the other anatomical levels displayed no such difference. Vascular corrosion technique can be successfully used in fabrication of fetal cardiovascular cast model. It is also a reliable method to demonstrate three-dimensional anatomy of severe congenital heart disease and normal heart in fetus.

  9. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database: 2016 Update on Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Marshall L; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Pasquali, Sara K; Hill, Kevin D; Hornik, Christoph; O'Brien, Sean M; Shahian, David M; Habib, Robert H; Edwards, Fred H

    2016-09-01

    The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (STS CHSD) is the largest congenital and pediatric cardiac surgical clinical data registry in the world. With more than 400,000 total operations from nearly all centers performing pediatric and congenital heart operations in North America, the STS CHSD is an unparalleled platform for clinical investigation, outcomes research, and quality improvement activities in this subspecialty. In 2015, several major original publications reported analyses of data in the CHSD pertaining to specific diagnostic and procedural groups, age-defined cohorts, or the entire population of patients in the database. Additional publications reported the most recent development, evaluation, and application of metrics for quality measurement and reporting of pediatric and congenital heart operation outcomes. This use of the STS CHSD for outcomes research and for quality measurement continues to expand as database participation and the available wealth of data in it continue to grow. This article reviews outcomes research and quality improvement articles published in 2015 based on STS CHSD data.

  10. Recent advances in congenital heart disease genomics [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Wilsdon

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital abnormality, and advances in medical care mean that this population of individuals is surviving for longer than ever before. It represents a significant healthcare challenge, as many patients require life-long care and individuals may ask about the likelihood of their children being affected. Whilst a number of genes have been identified previously from investigation of families with Mendelian inheritance patterns, sequencing the DNA from large cohorts of individuals with congenital heart disease is now providing fresh insights into the genetics of these conditions. This research has enabled novel gene discovery and uncovered the different genetic mechanisms underlying both isolated congenital heart disease and that which occurs in association with other medical problems. This article discusses the most recent advances in this field and the implications for patient care. In addition, we consider the challenges facing researchers in this field and emphasise the need for close working relationships between clinicians and researchers.

  11. Ultrasound findings in fetal congenital heart block associated with maternal anti-Ro/SSA and Anti-La/SSB antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jasmine; Clark, Toshi J; Tan, Justin H; Delaney, Shani; Jolley, Jennifer A

    2015-03-01

    We present the sonographic features of a second-trimester fetus diagnosed with a bradyarrhythmia at 19 weeks' gestation. The mother carried a diagnosis of Sjögren syndrome, including the presence of SSA and SSB antibodies. Ultrasound M-mode and fetal echocardiogram revealed the etiology of the bradycardia to be a complete fetal congenital heart block, likely due to transplacental passage of autoimmune anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB antibodies. Consequential to the congenital heart block, the fetus developed hydrops fetalis at 21 weeks' gestational age. We discuss the 2 major etiologies of congenital heart block and the implications in subsequent pregnancies.

  12. Case Report: Emergency awake craniotomy for cerebral abscess in a patient with unrepaired cyanotic congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassl, Jens; Tobler, Daniel; Zumofen, Daniel; Steiner, Luzius A.; Goettel, Nicolai

    2017-01-01

    We report the case of a 39-year-old male with complex cyanotic congenital heart disease undergoing emergency craniotomy for a cerebral abscess. Maintenance of intraoperative hemodynamic stability and adequate tissue oxygenation during anesthesia may be challenging in patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease. In this case, we decided to perform the surgery as an awake craniotomy after interdisciplinary consensus. We discuss general aspects of anesthetic management during awake craniotomy and specific concerns in the perioperative care of patients with congenital heart disease. PMID:27928498

  13. Anesthetic management of a 2-day-old with complete congenital heart block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Khanna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Maternal connective tissue disorders such as Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (most common, Sjogren′s syndrome, mixed connective tissue disorders may lead to the rare condition of complete congenital heart block in the neonate. Rare fetal syndromes such as myocarditis, 18p syndrome, mucopolysaccharidoses and mitochondrial diseases are other causes. The mortality rate of this condition is inversely propotional to the age of presentation being 6 % in the neonatal age group. As the cardiac output in the neonate is heart rate dependent, it is crucial to maintain the heart rate in these patients. Pharamacological interventions with dopamine, isoprenaline, epinephrine and atropine are known for their variable response. Although permanent pacing is the most reliable mode of management, the access to it is often not readily available, especially in the developing countries. In such cases temporary pacing methods become lifesaving. Of all the modalities of temporary pacing (transcutaneous, transesophageal and transvenous transcutaneous pacing is the most readily available and immediate mode. In this case report we present a two day old neonate with isolated complete congenital heart block and a resting heart rate of 50-55/min in immediate need of palliative surgery for trachea-esophageal fistula (TEF. With pharmacological intervention the heart rate could only be raised to 75-80/min. The surgery was successfully carried out using transcutaneous pacing to maintain a heart rate of 100/min.

  14. Whole heart cine MR imaging of pulmonary veins in patients with congenital heart disease. Comparison with Spin Echo MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsui, Hideaki [Yamagata City Hospital Saiseikan (Japan); Saito, Haruo; Ishibashi, Tadashi; Takahashi, Shoki; Zuguchi, Masayuki; Yamada, Shogo

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the accuracy of Whole Heart Cine (WHC) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the depiction of pulmonary veins (PVs) in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) compared to that of spin echo (SE) MR imaging. Among our 35 patients, 4 patients had anomalous PV return. Detectability of four PVs on each MR examination images were evaluated. MR imaging is an effective modality for the clarification of PVs, and WHC MR imaging is more useful in delineating PV anomalies than SE MR imaging. (author)

  15. Contraceptive Use and Unintended Pregnancy in Women With Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindley, Kathryn J; Madden, Tessa; Cahill, Alison G; Ludbrook, Philip A; Billadello, Joseph J

    2015-08-01

    To identify patterns of contraceptive use and pregnancy in an academic adult congenital cardiology practice. In this cross-sectional study, from October 2013 through March 2014, 100 women with congenital heart disease aged 18-45 years were recruited from an academic congenital heart disease clinic and administered a survey regarding pregnancy history, contraception use, and understanding of pregnancy-related and contraceptive-related risk. The primary outcome was current use of long-acting reversible contraception, including intrauterine devices or subdermal implants. Of 83 sexually active women, 63 (75.9%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 65.3-85.1) reported currently using any contraceptive method, including 30 of 83 (36.1%, 95% CI 25.9-47.4) using tier I methods (typical-use failure rates of less than 1% per year) and 20 of 83 (24.1%, 95% CI 15.4-34.7) using tier II methods (typical-use failure rates of 6-12% per year). Nine of 83 (10.8%, 95% CI 5.1-19.6) reported currently using long-acting reversible contraception. Sixty-four of 141 total pregnancies (45.4%, 95% CI 31.9-58.9) were self-reported by participants as "unexpected" rather than "planned." Only one (1.6%, 95% CI 0-4.6) of the 64 unintended pregnancies occurred when the woman was using a tier I method of contraception at the time of conception. Most women with congenital heart disease of childbearing age are sexually active. The high incidence of unintended pregnancy in this group may be related to underuse of highly effective methods of contraception. Specific counseling on tier I methods may reduce unintended pregnancies in women with congenital heart disease. III.

  16. Comparative study on cerebral injury after open heart surgery in patients with congenital and rheumatic heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yong; XIAO Ying-bin; CHEN Lin; ZHONG Qian-jin; WANG Xue-feng

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To comparatively study the different effects of open heart surgery on brain tissues of patients with congenital and rheumatic heart disease. Methods: Forty patients with congenital heart disease (CHD, CHD group, n=20) or rheumatic heart disease (RHD, RHD group, n=20) underwent on-pump (cardiopulmonary bypass, CPB) heart-beating open heart surgery. Blood samples before CPB, and 20 minutes, 1 hour, 24 hours and 7 days after CPB were collected, and the levels of neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and protein S-100b in the plasma were determined with enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. All the patients were examined with electroencephalogram (EEG) before and 1 week after operation. The changes of NSE, S-100b and EEG compared to verify the difference of postoperative cerebral injury between CHD cases and RHD cases. Results: The plasma level of S-100b increased significantly 20 minutes after CPB and was still higher than the preoperative level at 24 hours after operation in both groups (P<0.01). The plasma level of NSE increased more significantly in the CHD group than in the RHD group 20 minutes after CPB and it returned to the normal level 24 hours after CPB in the CHD group but remained at a high level in the RHD group (P<0.01). The levels of NSE and S-100b returned to the normal levels on the 7th day after CPB. Abnormal EEG was found in 75% of the patients in the CHD group and 60% in the RHD group. Conclusions: On-pump heart-beating open heart surgery can cause certain cerebral injury in the patients with CHD or RHD. The injury was more severe and recovered more quickly in the CHD group than in the RHD group.

  17. Clinical results of combined palliative procedures for cyanotic congenital heart defects with intractable hypoplasia of pulmonary arteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Xiang-ming; ZHU Yao-bin; SU Jun-wu; ZHANG Jing; LI Zhi-qiang; XU Yao-qiang; LI Xiao-feng

    2013-01-01

    .78) mm2/m2.The pre-and post-operational pulmonary indices were (20.87±9.43) vs.(32.6±11.7) mm2/m2.They were all significantly increased (P <0.001).The diameter of the pulmonary artery increased after the modified Blalock-Taussig shunt ((5.51±0.94) mm2/m2 pre-operation vs.(7.01±1.97) mm2/m2 post-operation),the modified Waterston shunt ((5.70±3.96) mm2/m2 pre-operation vs.(9.17±3.62) mm2/m2 post-operation) and the Melbourne shunt ((2.17±0.41) mm2/m2 pre-operation vs.(7.35±2.49) mm2/m2 post-operation) (all P <0.05).Bilateral pulmonary arteries developed well as compared to their pro-operation development.Hemoglobin decreased from (194±27) to (174±24) g/L (P <0.05) and peripheral oxygen saturation increased from (65±11)% to (84±6)% (P <0.001).During the follow-up of 27 to 49 months,ultimate complete repair was performed in four cases and one patient underwent a Glenn procedure.Conclusions The procedures should be considered on a case to case basis in patients having hypoplasia of the pulmonary arteries with cyanotic congenital heart defects.Combined palliative operations could be an adequate strategic treatment.

  18. The emerging burden of hospital admissions of adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheugt, Carianne L; Uiterwaal, Cuno S P M; van der Velde, Enno T; Meijboom, Folkert J; Pieper, Petronella G; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj; Plokker, Herbert W M; Grobbee, Diederick E; Mulder, Barbara J M

    2010-06-01

    To assess the extent and the characteristics of hospital admissions in registered adult patients with congenital heart disease. Observational cohort study. The Netherlands. 5798 adult patients with congenital heart disease from the Dutch CONCOR national registry linked to the Dutch National Medical Registration (Prismant). All hospital admissions from the years 2001 up until 2006. During 28 990 patient-years, 2908 patients (50%) were admitted to hospital. Median age at admission was 39 years (range 18-86 years); 46% were male. Admission rate in CONCOR patients was high among all ages (range 11-68%) and exceeded that of the general Dutch population two to three times; this difference was most pronounced in the older age groups. Altogether there were 8916 admissions, 5411 (61%) of which were for cardiovascular indications. Among cardiovascular admissions, referrals for arrhythmias were most common (31%). Of 4926 interventions, 2459 (50%) were cardiovascular, most often reparative interventions or cardioversion (53%). Most non-cardiovascular admissions were obstetric. Among defects, univentricular heart and tricuspid atresia had the highest incidence and duration of admission. Healthcare utilisation in registered and medically supervised adult patients with congenital heart disease is high and increases with age. Admission rates are at least two times higher than in the general population, and most marked in the older age groups. With the ageing of this population, a major increase in healthcare utilisation is imminent in the near future. Timely preparation of healthcare resources is crucial to sustain optimal care.

  19. Increasing Prevalence of Atrial Fibrillation and Permanent Atrial Arrhythmias in Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labombarda, Fabien; Hamilton, Robert; Shohoudi, Azadeh; Aboulhosn, Jamil; Broberg, Craig S; Chaix, Marie A; Cohen, Scott; Cook, Stephen; Dore, Annie; Fernandes, Susan M; Fournier, Anne; Kay, Joseph; Macle, Laurent; Mondésert, Blandine; Mongeon, François-Pierre; Opotowsky, Alexander R; Proietti, Anna; Rivard, Lena; Ting, Jennifer; Thibault, Bernard; Zaidi, Ali; Khairy, Paul

    2017-08-15

    Atrial arrhythmias are the most common complication encountered in the growing and aging population with congenital heart disease. This study sought to assess the types and patterns of atrial arrhythmias, associated factors, and age-related trends. A multicenter cohort study enrolled 482 patients with congenital heart disease and atrial arrhythmias, age 32.0 ± 18.0 years, 45.2% female, from 12 North American centers. Qualifying arrhythmias were classified by a blinded adjudicating committee. The most common presenting arrhythmia was intra-atrial re-entrant tachycardia (IART) (61.6%), followed by atrial fibrillation (28.8%), and focal atrial tachycardia (9.5%). The proportion of arrhythmias due to IART increased with congenital heart disease complexity from 47.2% to 62.1% to 67.0% in patients with simple, moderate, and complex defects, respectively (p = 0.0013). Atrial fibrillation increased with age to surpass IART as the most common arrhythmia in those ≥50 years of age (51.2% vs. 44.2%; p heart disease, with a predominantly paroxysmal pattern. However, atrial fibrillation increases in prevalence and atrial arrhythmias progressively become permanent as the population ages. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Congenital heart disease in the offspring and maternal habits and home exposures during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikkanen, J; Heinonen, O P

    1992-11-01

    To test the effect of maternal habits and home exposures during early pregnancy on the occurrence of congenital heart disease in the offspring, 406 cases and 756 controls were studied. The cases included all cardiovascular malformations detected in Finland during 1982-1983, while the healthy controls were randomly selected from all babies born during the same period. Case and control mothers were interviewed after delivery using a structured and pre-tested questionnaire. Maternal overall drug consumption during the first trimester was as prevalent among case mothers (13.3%) as controls (14.6%). Neither was the risk of congenital heart disease associated with maternal use of contraceptive pills, salicylates, diazepam, or sweetening agents separately. Maternal exposures to disinfectants, dyes, lacquers, paints, pesticides, or glues at home were equally prevalent in case and control groups. Several earlier miscarriages was a predictor of an infant born with congenital heart disease (OR = 2.7, CI95 = 1.4-5.3). Maternal ultrasound examination was performed during the first 16 weeks of pregnancy more often among the case group (28.3%) than among the control group (22.0%). However, the association between ultrasound examination and the risk of congenital heart disease in the offspring was not statistically significant (OR = 1.2, 95% confidence interval 0.9-1.7) when adjusted for confounding factors such as the threat of miscarriage in logistic regression analysis. It is concluded that maternal ultrasound examination, intake of some common drugs, and exposure to a number of environmental factors at home during early pregnancy are probably not harmful for the developing fetal heart.

  1. Feasibility and observer reproducibility of speckle tracking echocardiography in congenital heart disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhles, Palwasha; van den Bosch, Annemien E; Vletter-McGhie, Jackie S; Van Domburg, Ron T; Ruys, Titia P E; Kauer, Floris; Geleijnse, Marcel L; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W

    2013-09-01

    The twisting motion of the heart has an important role in the function of the left ventricle. Speckle tracking echocardiography is able to quantify left ventricular (LV) rotation and twist. So far this new technique has not been used in congenital heart disease patients. The aim of our study was to investigate the feasibility and the intra- and inter-observer reproducibility of LV rotation parameters in adult patients with congenital heart disease. The study population consisted of 66 consecutive patients seen in the outpatient clinic (67% male, mean age 31 ± 7.7 years, NYHA class 1 ± 0.3) with a variety of congenital heart disease. First, feasibility was assessed in all patients. Intra- and inter-observer reproducibility was assessed for the patients in which speckle tracking echocardiography was feasible. Adequate image quality, for performing speckle echocardiography, was found in 80% of patients. The bias for the intra-observer reproducibility of the LV twist was 0.0°, with 95% limits of agreement of -2.5° and 2.5° and for interobserver reproducibility the bias was 0.0°, with 95% limits of agreement of -3.0° and 3.0°. Intra- and inter-observer measurements showed a strong correlation (0.86 and 0.79, respectively). Also a good repeatability was seen. The mean time to complete full analysis per subject for the first and second measurement was 9 and 5 minutes, respectively. Speckle tracking echocardiography is feasible in 80% of adult patients with congenital heart disease and shows excellent intra- and inter-observer reproducibility. © 2013, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Clinical utility of ductus venosus flow in fetuses with right-sided congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Bhawna; Krishnan, Anita; Donofrio, Mary T

    2014-09-01

    Abnormal ductus venosus flow is associated with fetal compromise and can be present in right-sided congenital heart disease. We hypothesized that the ductus venosus flow pattern in fetuses with obstructive right-sided congenital heart disease will have abnormal flow at baseline. Those with nonobstructive disease will have normal flow at baseline. We further hypothesized that abnormal ductus venosus flow will predict fetal compromise. We conducted a retrospective review of fetuses with right-sided congenital heart disease. Ductus venosus measurements included the presence of atrial reversal, velocity time integral, and peak velocity index. Fetuses were separated into those with obstructive (group 1) and nonobstructive (group 2) lesions. Compromise was defined as fetal distress (pericardial effusion, hydrops, or left ventricular dilatation/dysfunction) or death (fetal/neonatal mortality). Sixty fetuses with right-sided congenital heart disease were identified (mean gestational age ± SD, 24.2 ± 5.4 weeks; group 1, n = 45; group 2, n = 15). Ductus venosus reversal was more often present (49% versus 13%; P = .017), and the peak velocity index was significantly higher (1.39 ± 0.67 versus 0.98 ± 0.33; P= .026) in group 1. In group 1, ductus venosus reversal was more often present (93% versus 32%; P heart disease have ductus venosus reversal at baseline; an abnormal peak velocity index can be used to predict compromise. Fetuses with nonobstructive disease rarely have ductus venosus reversal; the peak velocity index cannot be used to predict outcomes in this group. © 2014 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  3. Successful cardiac transplantation outcomes in patients with adult congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menachem, Jonathan N; Golbus, Jessica R; Molina, Maria; Mazurek, Jeremy A; Hornsby, Nicole; Atluri, Pavan; Fuller, Stephanie; Birati, Edo Y; Kim, Yuli Y; Goldberg, Lee R; Wald, Joyce W

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of our study is (1) to characterise patients with congenital heart disease undergoing heart transplantation by adult cardiac surgeons in a large academic medical centre and (2) to describe successful outcomes associated with our multidisciplinary approach to the evaluation and treatment of adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD) undergoing orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT). Heart failure is the leading cause of death in patients with ACHD leading to increasing referrals for OHT. The Penn Congenital Transplant Database comprises a cohort of patients with ACHD who underwent OHT between March 2010 and April 2016. We performed a retrospective cohort study of the 20 consecutive patients. Original cardiac diagnoses include single ventricle palliated with Fontan (n=8), dextro-transposition of the great arteries after atrial switch (n=4), tetralogy of Fallot (n=4), pulmonary atresia (n=1), Ebstein anomaly (n=1), unrepaired ventricular septal defect (n=1) and Noonan syndrome with coarctation of the aorta (n=1). Eight patients required pretransplant inotropes and two required pretransplant mechanical support. Nine patients underwent heart-liver transplant and three underwent heart-lung transplant. Three patients required postoperative mechanical circulatory support. Patients were followed for an average of 38 months as of April 2016, with 100% survival at 30 days and 1 year and 94% overall survival (19/20 patients). ACHD-OHT patients require highly specialised, complex and multidisciplinary healthcare. The success of our programme is attributed to using team-based, patient-centred care including our multidisciplinary staff and specialists across programmes and departments. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Protect Your Heart in the Heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cholesterol Tools & Resources Congenital Defects Children & Adults About Congenital Heart Defects The Impact of Congenital Heart Defects Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & ...

  5. When a Heart Murmur Signals Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cholesterol Tools & Resources Congenital Defects Children & Adults About Congenital Heart Defects The Impact of Congenital Heart Defects Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & ...

  6. Eponymous cardiovascular surgeries for congenital heart diseases--imaging review and historical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buethe, Ji; Ashwath, Ravi C; Rajiah, Prabhakar

    2015-01-01

    Advances in pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgical techniques over the past few decades have revolutionized the management of the patients with congenital heart disease, and many now survive into adulthood. Several eponymous surgical procedures performed for congenital heart disease have been named after eminent surgeons. In this article, we provide a short biography of the surgeons associated with these eponymous surgical procedures along with their other important scientific contributions. This is followed by a review of these surgical procedures and their most common complications. Imaging appearances of these surgical procedures along with common complications are described and illustrated, with particular emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging. The surgical procedures described in this review include Blalock-Taussig, Potts, Waterston, Glenn, Fontan, Kawashima, Norwood, Sano, Damus-Kaye-Stansel, Mustard, Senning, Jatene, LeCompte, Rastelli, Rashkind, Ross, and Waldenhausen.

  7. Genetic counseling for young adults who have a congenital heart defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittemore, R

    1986-01-01

    Early individual guidance is needed for all adolescents and young adults with congenital heart defects. This should include not only a personal interest in the individual but also an attempt to identify concerns about sex education, smoking, drugs and the risks of pregnancy and possible inheritance. In a prospective study of 252 women with various cardiac malformations, the incidence of congenital heart defects in their progeny was 15.7% (13% exclusive of genetic syndromes and those with a positive family history). In those with a positive family history or a genetic syndrome the incidence was 56% in the offspring. Genetic syndromes with cardiac components are increasingly apparent. The role of teratogens such as medications, illicit drugs, and environmental exposure play a not yet clearly defined role. Careful discussion with potential parents, giving facts but with a positive approach, is an obligation of every physician.

  8. A Primer on Computational Simulation in Congenital Heart Disease for the Clinician

    CERN Document Server

    Clementel, Irene Vignon; Feinstein, Jeffrey A; 10.1016/j.ppedcard.2010.09.002

    2011-01-01

    Interest in the application of engineering methods to problems in congenital heart disease has gained increased popularity over the past decade. The use of computational simulation to examine common clinical problems including single ventricle physiology and the associated surgical approaches, the effects of pacemaker implantation on vascular occlusion, or delineation of the biomechanical effects of implanted medical devices is now routinely appearing in clinical journals within all pediatric cardiovascular subspecialties. In practice, such collaboration can only work if both communities understand each other's methods and their limitations. This paper is intended to facilitate this communication by presenting in the context of congenital heart disease (CHD) the main steps involved in performing computational simulation-from the selection of an appropriate clinical question/problem to understanding the computational results, and all of the "black boxes" in between. We examine the current state of the art and ...

  9. Detection of critical congenital heart defects: Review of contributions from prenatal and newborn screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olney, Richard S; Ailes, Elizabeth C; Sontag, Marci K

    2015-04-01

    In 2011, statewide newborn screening programs for critical congenital heart defects began in the United States, and subsequently screening has been implemented widely. In this review, we focus on data reports and collection efforts related to both prenatal diagnosis and newborn screening. Defect-specific, maternal, and geographic factors are associated with variations in prenatal detection, so newborn screening provides a population-wide safety net for early diagnosis. A new web-based repository is collecting information on newborn screening program policies, quality indicators related to screening programs, and specific case-level data on infants with these defects. Birth defects surveillance programs also collect data about critical congenital heart defects, particularly related to diagnostic timing, mortality, and services. Individuals from state programs, federal agencies, and national organizations will be interested in these data to further refine algorithms for screening in normal newborn nurseries, neonatal intensive care settings, and other special populations; and ultimately to evaluate the impact of screening on outcomes.

  10. Single ventricle, bicuspid aorta and interatrial wall aneurysm as a rare complex adult congenital heart disease: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Berisha, Blerim; Krasniqi, Xhevdet; Thaqi, Agim; Gashi, Masar; Ko?inaj, Dardan

    2009-01-01

    Background Single ventricle, bicuspid aortic valve and interatrial wall aneurysm in adulthood are a rare and unique case in medical literature. This presented case with congenital heart disease has never been treated surgically and clinical consequences seriously presented in adulthood. Case presentation A 27 year old man with complex congenital heart disease presented. At the age of six, the single ventricle was ultrasonographly diagnosed, but at age 27 clinical consequences started to be se...

  11. Screening of congenital heart disease patients using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karina Meden; El-Segaier, Milad; Fernlund, Eva;

    2012-01-01

    Recurrent copy number variants (CNVs) are found in a significant proportion of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) and some of these CNVs are associated with other developmental defects. In some syndromic patients, CHD may be the first presenting symptom, thus screening of patients...... that the MLPA assay detects clinically relevant CNVs and suggest that it could be used within pediatric cardiology as a first tier screen to detect clinically relevant CNVs and identify syndromic patients at an early stage....

  12. Risk Factors for post-Cardiac Surgery Diaphragmatic Paralysis in Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Akbariasbagh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Injured phrenic nerve secondary to cardiac surgeries is the most common cause of diaphragmatic paralysis (DP in infants. The aim of this study was to determine the risk factors for DP caused by congenital heart defect corrective surgeries in pediatrics.Methods: This cross-sectional study, conducted in a 2-year period (2006–2008, included 451 children with congenital heart diseases admitted to the Pediatric Cardiac Surgery Ward of Imam Khomeini Hospital. The diaphragmatic function was examined via fluoroscopy, and the frequency of DP and its relevant parameters were evaluated.Results: Of the 451 patients, comprising 268 males and 183 females at an age range of 3 days to 204 months (28.2 ± 33.4 months, 25 (5.5% infants (60% male and 40% female, age range = 15 days to 132 months, 41.2 ± 28.1 months had DP as follows: 48% unilateral right-sided and 36% unilateral left-sided. Additionally, 68% had cyanotic congenital heart disease and 84% had DP following total correction surgery.  The highest prevalence rates of DP resulting in phrenic hemiparesis were observed after arterial switch operation, Fontan procedure, and Blalock–Taussig shunt surgery, respectively. Thirteen (52% of the 25 DP patients underwent surgical diaphragmatic plication because of severe respiratory distress and dependency on mechanical ventilation, and most of the cases of plication underwent arterial switch operation. The rate of mortality was 24% (6 patients.Conclusion: DP with a prevalence of 5.5% was one of the most common complications secondary to cardiac surgeries in the infants included in the present study. Effective factors were age, weight, cyanotic congenital heart defects, and previous cardiac surgery. Diaphragmatic plication improved prognosis in severe cases.

  13. Diagnosis of Congenital Heart Malformations – Possibilities for the Employment of Telepathology

    OpenAIRE

    Cornelia Tennstedt; Kathrin Sunkel-Wehrstedt; Martin Vogel; Peter Hufnagl

    2000-01-01

    Goal: In a study of 10 autopsy cases with congenital cardiac malformations we investigated whether obtaining a second opinion by means of telepathology could satisfy quality standards for the diagnosis of cardiac malformations and what the advantages and disadvantages of such a procedure might be. Material: The investigatory samples were 10 formalin‐fixed hearts with complex malformations from 9 fetuses and one newborn on which autopsies had been performed at the Pathological Institute of the...

  14. Pediatric and congenital heart transplant: twenty-year experience in a tertiary Brazilian Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Leonardo Augusto Miana; Estela Azeka; Luiz Fernando Canêo; Aída Luisa Turquetto; Carla Tanamati; Juliano Gomes Penha; Alexandre Cauduro; Marcelo Biscegli Jatene

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiac transplantation remains the gold standard for end-stage cardiomyopathies and congenital heart defects in pediatric patients. Objective: This study aims to report on 20 years of experience since the first case and evaluate our results. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of the database and outpatient follow-up. Between October 1992 and April 2012, 109 patients underwent 114 transplants. 51.8% of them being female. The age of patients ranged from 12 days to...

  15. OntoDiagram: Automatic Diagram Generation for Congenital Heart Defects in Pediatric Cardiology

    OpenAIRE

    Vishwanath, Kartik; Viswanath, Venkatesh; Drake, William; Lee, Yugyung

    2005-01-01

    In pediatric cardiology as well as many other medical specialties, the accurate portrayal of a large volume of patient information is crucial to providing good patient care. Our research aims at utilizing clinical and spatial ontologies representing the human heart, to automatically generate a Mullins-like diagram [6] based on a patient's information in the cardiology databases. Our ontology allows an intuitive way of modeling congenital defects with the structure of the hum...

  16. Screening for congenital heart defects by transabdominal ultrasound - role of early gestational screening and importance of operator training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkola, Taisto; Ojala, Tiina H; Ulander, Veli-Matti; Jaeggi, Edgar; Pitkänen, Olli M

    2015-03-01

    The majority of congenital heart defects occur without identifiable risk factors. Detection rates are therefore highly dependent on the experience and expertise of the obstetrical screening operator. In the first trimester, the risk of congenital heart defects increases with increasing nuchal thickness (≥2.5 mm detects 44% of major congenital heart defects), but because of the number of false positives, the positive predictive value is only a few percent. The anatomy of major congenital heart defects may be delineated in less than half of the fetuses during early second trimester. The reported yield of congenital heart defects detection during the mid-gestational routine obstetrical screening has improved over time and detection rates up to 85% of major congenital heart defects have been reported when outflow tract and three-vessel views are included in conjunction with the four-chamber view. Improved detection rates have been achieved following screening operator training interventions combined with a low referral threshold to obtain a detailed fetal echocardiographic study.

  17. Ophthalmic Evaluation of Children from the Tibet Plateau with Congenital Heart Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guiqin Wang; Qian Shi; Lin Sun; Jing Wang; Lei Li; Tianchang Li; Wei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose:.To perform ophthalmic examinations to evaluate the ocular characteristics of children living in the Tibet plateau and diagnosed with congenital heart disease.Methods:.Children with congenital heart disease underwent a conventional ocular examination including distant acuity test, slit-lamp examination,.fundus examination,.non-contact in-traocular pressure measurement,.measurement of corneal thickness, and fundus photography.Results: Forty-two Tibetan children, aged between 4 and 18 years and diagnosed with congenital heart disease,.were en-rolled in this study..The percentage of low visual acuity was 4.76%, mean intraocular pressure was (13.67±2.15) mmHg, average corneal thickness was (492.55±33.79) μm,.96.43%had an anterior chamber depth of 1 / 2 corneal thickness (CT), and 35.7% had an obvious fundus vascular tortuosity.Conclusion:.This study adds to the understanding of the ocu-lar status of the population living in the Tibet plateau, thereby offering clinical evidence for the prevention and treatment of eye diseases in this area. (Eye Science 2014; 29:134-137)

  18. VACCINATION OF PREMATURE INFANTS AND CHILDREN WITH CONGENITAL HEART DISEASE IN IRKUTSK USING CONJUGATED PNEUMOCOCCAL VACCINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Il'ina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Study aim: analyzing the results of pneumococcal infection vaccination conducted to reduce infantile morbidity and mortality in 2011-2012 at the expenses of the Irkutsk municipal budget. Patients and methods. Vaccination using the 7- and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugated vaccine was conducted for more than 700 risk group children: premature infants, children with congenital heart diseases or bronchopulmonary dysplasia from 2 months to 2 years of age. 193 vaccinated children had been observed for 1.5 years. 30% of premature infants and 46% of children with congenital heart diseases were vaccinated using the PCV7/PCV13 vaccine at the age of 2-6 months, 52 and 40% - at the age of 7-11 months, accordingly. The PCV7/PCV13 vaccine was administered together with other vaccines of the national preventive vaccination calendar in 65% of cases. Results. Rate of general post-vaccinal reactions (body temperature increase from 37.6 to 38.0oC – 4%; no local reactions were registered. No other unfavorable phenomena were noted in the post-vaccinal period. No cases of pneumonia, meningitis, acute otitis media and bronchoobstructive syndrome were registered within the observation period. Conclusions: pneumococcal infection vaccination of premature infants with congenital heart diseases and bronchopulmonary dysplasia conducted in Irkutsk proved high efficacy and safety of the used vaccine – PCV7/PCV13. 

  19. The maternal-age-associated risk of congenital heart disease is modifiable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulkey, Claire E; Regmi, Suk D; Magnan, Rachel A; Danzo, Megan T; Luther, Herman; Hutchinson, Alayna K; Panzer, Adam A; Grady, Mary M; Wilson, David B; Jay, Patrick Y

    2015-04-09

    Maternal age is a risk factor for congenital heart disease even in the absence of any chromosomal abnormality in the newborn. Whether the basis of this risk resides with the mother or oocyte is unknown. The impact of maternal age on congenital heart disease can be modelled in mouse pups that harbour a mutation of the cardiac transcription factor gene Nkx2-5 (ref. 8). Here, reciprocal ovarian transplants between young and old mothers establish a maternal basis for the age-associated risk in mice. A high-fat diet does not accelerate the effect of maternal ageing, so hyperglycaemia and obesity do not simply explain the mechanism. The age-associated risk varies with the mother's strain background, making it a quantitative genetic trait. Most remarkably, voluntary exercise, whether begun by mothers at a young age or later in life, can mitigate the risk when they are older. Thus, even when the offspring carry a causal mutation, an intervention aimed at the mother can meaningfully reduce their risk of congenital heart disease.

  20. The Influence of Fluid Overload on the Length of Mechanical Ventilation in Pediatric Congenital Heart Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Tatiana Z A L; O'Hearn, Katie; Reddy, Deepti; Menon, Kusum

    2015-12-01

    Fluid overload and prolonged mechanical ventilation lead to worse outcomes in critically ill children. However, the association between these variables in children following congenital heart surgery is unknown. The objectives of this study were to describe the association between fluid overload and duration of mechanical ventilation, oxygen requirement and radiologic findings of pulmonary and chest wall edema. This study is a retrospective chart review of patients who underwent congenital heart surgery between June 2010 and December 2013. Univariate and multivariate associations between maximum cumulative fluid balance and length of mechanical ventilation and OI were tested using the Spearman correlation test and multiple linear regression models, respectively. There were 85 eligible patients. Maximum cumulative fluid balance was associated with duration of mechanical ventilation (adjusted analysis beta coefficient = 0.53, CI 0.38-0.66, P Fluid overload is associated with prolonged duration of mechanical ventilation and PICU length of stay after congenital heart surgery. Fluid overload was also associated with physiological markers of respiratory restriction. A randomized controlled trial of a restrictive versus liberal fluid replacement strategy is necessary in this patient population, but in the meantime, accumulating observational evidence suggests that cautious use of fluid in the postoperative care may be warranted.

  1. [Association between fluid overload and acute renal injury after congenital heart disease surgery in infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, De-Qiang; Chen, Zi-Li; Dai, Wei; Chen, Feng

    2017-04-01

    To study the association between fluid overload and acute kidney injury (AKI) after congenital heart disease surgery in infants. A retrospective analysis was performed on 88 infants aged less than 6 months who underwent a radical surgery for congenital heart disease. The treatment outcomes were compared between the infants with AKI after surgery and those without. The effect of cumulative fluid overload on treatment outcomes 2 days after surgery was analyzed. The risk factors for the development of AKI after surgery were assessed by logistic regression analysis. Compared with those without AKI after surgery, the patients with AKI had younger age, lower body weights, higher serum creatinine levels and higher vasoactive-inotropic score, as well as longer durations of intraoperative extracorporeal circulation and aortic occlusion (Pfluid overload 2 and 3 days after surgery (Pfluid overload and low cardiac output syndrome were major risk factors for the development of AKI after surgery. The children with cumulative fluid overload >5% at 2 days after surgery had a higher incidence rate of low cardiac output syndrome, a longer duration of mechanical ventilation, a longer length of stay in the ICU, a longer length of hospital stay, and a higher mortality rate (Pfluid overload after surgery for congenital heart disease tend to develop AKI, and fluid overload may be associated with poor outcomes after surgery.

  2. Chiari s Network: Association with Other Congenital Heart Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasim Husrevsahi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study was performed to assess the prevalence of Chiari%u2019s Network (CN in a pediatric outpatient department population by using transthoracic echocardiography (TTE and to determine its association with other cardiac anomalies. Material and Method: 2232 children who underwent cardiac examination and TTE at the pediatric cardiology outpatient department of our institution between April 2013 and April 2014 were included in the study. Routine M-mode, 2-D, and Doppler studies were applied. All co-existent lesions were recorded. Results: Of 2232 children, CN was detected in 76 patients (3.41% and found most frequently during the first month. Atrial septal defect and patent foramen ovale (ASD/PFO was the most common congenital defect seen with CN (55.3%. Ten children (13.2% had peripheral pulmonary stenosis (PPS and seven (9.21% showed atrial septal aneurism (ASA associated with CN. Of patients with CN, a total of 11 patients (14.5%, 10 of them 1-8 days old and 1 of them 17 days old, demonstrated right ventricular dysfunction. Three (3.9% patients 1-12 days old demonstrated biventricular diastolic dysfunction. Twenty-nine of the studied patients (11% demonstrated right ventricular diastolic dysfunction (90% 1-30 days old. Of the total 2232 patients, 267 individuals (8.4% showed ASA whereas there were only7 cases (9.6% of CN patients. Discussion: CN is an uncommon and incidental finding that should be recognized appropriately. This may not be always a normal variant. Proper documentation of CN is critical regarding possible future complications.

  3. Ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairy, Paul

    2016-11-01

    Remarkable gains in survival have led to an unprecedented number of adults with congenital heart disease. Arrhythmias collectively comprise the most common complication encountered. Recognising the unique issues and challenges involved in managing arrhythmias in adults with congenital heart disease and the consequential decisions surrounding sudden death prevention, expert societies have proposed evidence-based recommendations. On the whole, acute ventricular arrhythmias are managed according to general cardiology guidelines, while taking into consideration congenital heart disease-specific issues, such as positioning of patches or paddles according to location of the heart. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) are indicated for secondary prevention in patients with sustained ventricular tachycardia or resuscitated cardiac arrest in the absence of a reversible cause. Pharmacological therapy and catheter ablation can be effective in reducing recurrent ICD shocks. Risk-benefit assessment for primary prevention ICDs is a major challenge. Although a clearer picture has emerged of the high-risk patient with tetralogy of Fallot, ICD indications for those with systemic right ventricles or univentricular hearts remain contentious. Challenges to ICD implantation include obstructed veins, conduits and baffles, atrioventricular valve disease and intracardiac shunts. In selected patients, customised systems with epicardial and/or subcutaneous coils may represent a viable solution. Alternatively, the subcutaneous ICD is an attractive option for patients in whom transvenous access is not feasible or desirable and in whom bradycardia and antitachycardia pacing features are not essential. Continued advances in risk stratification and device technologies carry the potential to further improve efficacy and safety outcomes in this growing population of patients. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence

  4. [Optimization of postoperative medical therapy of infective endocarditis in patients with congenital valvular heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistyakov, I S; Medvedev, A P; Pichugin, V V

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of combined surgical and medical treatment of infective endocarditis in patients with congenital valvular heart disease when included in a regimen of the drug Reamberin. In this regard, the analysis of the effectiveness of a combination regimen of 74 patients with valvular congenital heart diseases complicated with infective endocarditis. Given the indications for surgical correction operative technique features and possible technical difficulties in carrying out such operations, due to the inflammatory changes and tissue destruction, and ways to overcome them. For the correction of metabolic disorders in the postoperative period, 47 patients (main group) was appointed Reamberin: once, intravenous drip 400 ml/day during the first 5 days after surgery. 27 patients (control group) was conducted infusion therapy depending on the severity of the condition according to the classical scheme. In addition to standard clinical and laboratory examination, to assess the effectiveness of Reamberin was investigated catalase activity of CPK in blood serum in the dynamics of observation (1, 3 and 5 days after surgery). It is revealed that surgical approach, used in complex treatment of patients with valvular congenital heart diseases, including reorganization of the cavities of the heart, increasing the frequency of joints and the use of reinforcing strips of synthetic material that prevents the cutting of sutures through the inflamed tissue has achieved good short-and long-term results. Infective endocarditis and destruction of the valvular annulus fibrosus the use of a frame of strips of polytetrafluoroethylene allows you to restore its integrity and to implant a mechanical prosthesis. The inclusion in the regimen of patients with infective endocarditis complicated by cardiac insufficiency in the early postoperative period the drug Reamberin improves the efficiency of treatment by a more rapid restoration of the normal

  5. PROFILE OF CONGENITAL HEART DISEASE AS DIAGNOSED BY FETAL ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY, A TERTIARY CARE EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Arunavalli

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : The incidence of congenital heart disease is 0.8 in 1000 live births. Fetal echo cardiography offers a chance to detect most hemodynamically significant congenital heart disease in early pregnancy, so that their management prenatally, at birth and postnatally can be planned better. OBJECTIVES : To analyze the profile of congenital heart disease as diagnosed by fetal echocardiography, in pregnant women referred to a tertiary care centre. MATERIAL AND METHODS : The study design is retrospective, observational study. A total number of 583 fetal echo studies were performed at our C entre from January 1 st 2014 to June 30 th 2015. All studies were performed by a single operator. The main i ndications for the referral were: inability to visualize a clear four chamber view on obstetric scan, echogenic focus in LV cavity, maternal diabetes, family history of congenital heart disease, and maternal request. Statistical analysis was performed usin g statistical package for social sciences SPSS: CHICAGO, 3L VSA program. All the women with abnormal FE studies, except ones with complex CHDS were instructed to bring the new borns for 2D echo within 1 – 2 days after birth. RESULTS : Overall, significant C HD was found in 5.4% of FE studies (32 out of 583 cases . The most common indications for referral were: inability to visualize a clear four chamber view on obstetric scan, echogenic focus in LV cavity, maternal diabetes, family history of congenital heart disease, and maternal request. The risk factors with highest yield of CHD were poly hydroamnios and maternal diabetes. The commonest lesion found was ostium secundum ASD. There was a significant correlation between the presence of echogenic focus prenatal ly and small to moderate sized ostium secundum ASD after birth. CONCLUSION : Our data suggests that the risk factors with highest yield of CHD are polyhydromnios and meternal diabetes. Presence of echogenic focus in the LV in FE is associated

  6. A heart team's perspective on interventional mitral valve repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treede, Hendrik; Schirmer, Johannes; Rudolph, Volker

    2012-01-01

    Surgical mitral valve repair carries an elevated perioperative risk in the presence of severely reduced ventricular function and relevant comorbidities. We sought to assess the feasibility of catheter-based mitral valve repair using a clip-based percutaneous edge-to-edge repair system in selected...

  7. 3D-shaded surface rendering of gadolinium-enhanced MR angiography in congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuda, S.; Kikinis, R.; Dumanli, H. [Surgical Planning Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Geva, T.; Powell, A.J. [Department of Cardiology, Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Chung, T. [Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2000-08-01

    Background. Gadolinium-enhanced three-dimensional (3D) MR angiography is a useful imaging technique for patients with congenital heart disease. Objective. This study sought to determine the added value of creating 3D shaded surface displays compared to standard maximal intensity projection (MIP) and multiplanar reformatting (MPR) techniques when analyzing 3D MR angiography data. Materials and methods. Seventeen patients (range, 3 months to 51 years old) with a variety of congenital cardiovascular defects underwent gadolinium-enhanced 3D MR angiography of the thorax. Color-coded 3D shaded surface models were rendered from the image data using manual segmentation and computer-based algorithms. Models could be rotated, translocated, or zoomed interactively by the viewer. Information available from the 3D models was compared to analysis based on viewing standard MIP/MPR displays. Results. Median postprocessing time for the 3D models was 6 h (range, 3-25 h) compared to approximately 20 min for MIP/MPR viewing. No additional diagnostic information was gained from 3D model analysis. All major findings with MIP/MPR postprocessing were also apparent on the 3D models. Qualitatively, the 3D models were more easily interpreted and enabled adjacent vessels to be distinguished more readily. Conclusion. Routine use of 3D shaded surface reconstructions for visualization of contrast enhanced MR angiography in congenital heart disease cannot be recommended. 3D surface rendering may be more useful for presenting complex anatomy to an audience unfamiliar with congenital heart disease and as an educational tool. (orig.)

  8. VIRTUAL 3-D MODELLING OF AIRWAYS IN CONGENITAL HEART DEFECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Speggiorin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The involvement of the airway is not uncommon in the presence of complex cardiovascular malformations. In these cases, a careful inspection of the relationship between the airway and the vasculature is paramount to plan the surgical procedure. Three-dimentional printing enhanced the visualization of the cardio-vascualr structure. Unfortunately IT does not allow to remove selected anatomy to improve the visualization of the surrounding ones. Computerized modelling (CM of has the potential to fill this gap by allowing a dynamic handling of different anatomies, increasing the exposure of vessels or bronchi to show their relationship.. We started to use this technique to plan the surgical repair in these complex cases where the airway is affected. This technique is routinely used in our Institution as an additional tool in the pre-surgical assessment. We report 4 cases in which the airways were compressed by vascular structures : ascending aorta in 1, left pulmonary artery sling in 1, Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA in 1 and major aorto-pulmonary collateral artery in 1. We believe this technique can enhance the understanding of the causes of airway involvement and facilitate the creation of an appropriate surgical plan.

  9. The alteration of interelemental ratios in myocardium under the congenital heart disease (SRXRF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trunova, V.A. [A.V. Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk, Lavrentyeva 3 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: Trunova@inp.nsk.su; Zvereva, V.V. [A.V. Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk, Lavrentyeva 3 (Russian Federation); Okuneva, G.N. [E.N. Meshalkin Institute of Pathology of Circulation of the Blood, 630055 Novosibirsk, Rechkunovskaja 15 (Russian Federation); Levicheva, E.N. [E.N. Meshalkin Institute of Pathology of Circulation of the Blood, 630055 Novosibirsk, Rechkunovskaja 15 (Russian Federation)

    2007-05-21

    It is the myocardium that bears the basic functional loading during heart working, including muscle contractility and enzyme activity. The elemental concentrations in myocardium tissue of heart were determined by SRXRF technique. Our investigation is systematical: the elemental content in each compartment (left and right ventricles, left and right auricles) of hearts of healthy and diseased children (congenital heart diseases, transposition of main vessels (TMV)) was analyzed. The elemental distribution in myocardium of four heart chambers of human fetuses was also analyzed. Following elements were determined: S, Cl, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb, Sr. It was revealed that the elemental concentrations in myocardium of both ventricles are almost constant in heart of fetuses and healthy children. The transition from pre-natal study (fetus) to post-natal study is accompanied by the redistribution of chemical elements in myocardium. The higher concentrations of S, Fe, Ca, Sr and Cu in myocardium of children are observed, the content of K, Br, Rb and especially Se is lower than in heart of fetuses. The elemental distribution in myocardium of children TMV is considerably different in comparison with the healthy children: the higher levels of Cu are observed. The content of Se is lower.

  10. The alteration of interelemental ratios in myocardium under the congenital heart disease (SRXRF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trunova, V. A.; Zvereva, V. V.; Okuneva, G. N.; Levicheva, E. N.

    2007-05-01

    It is the myocardium that bears the basic functional loading during heart working, including muscle contractility and enzyme activity. The elemental concentrations in myocardium tissue of heart were determined by SRXRF technique. Our investigation is systematical: the elemental content in each compartment (left and right ventricles, left and right auricles) of hearts of healthy and diseased children (congenital heart diseases, transposition of main vessels (TMV)) was analyzed. The elemental distribution in myocardium of four heart chambers of human fetuses was also analyzed. Following elements were determined: S, Cl, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb, Sr. It was revealed that the elemental concentrations in myocardium of both ventricles are almost constant in heart of fetuses and healthy children. The transition from pre-natal study (fetus) to post-natal study is accompanied by the redistribution of chemical elements in myocardium. The higher concentrations of S, Fe, Ca, Sr and Cu in myocardium of children are observed, the content of K, Br, Rb and especially Se is lower than in heart of fetuses. The elemental distribution in myocardium of children TMV is considerably different in comparison with the healthy children: the higher levels of Cu are observed. The content of Se is lower.

  11. Temporal Trends in Survival Among Infants With Critical Congenital Heart Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oster, Matthew E.; Lee, Kyung A.; Honein, Margaret A.; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Shin, Mikyong; Correa, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the trends in survival for infants with critical congenital heart defects (CCHDs) and to examine the potential impact of timing of diagnosis and other prognostic factors on survival. METHODS We performed a retrospective population-based cohort study in infants born with structural congenital heart defects (CHDs) between 1979 and 2005 and ascertained by the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program. We estimated Kaplan-Meier survival probabilities for 12 CCHD phenotypes by birth era and timing of diagnosis among infants without noncardiac defects or chromosomal disorders and used stratified Cox proportional hazards models to assess potential prognostic factors. RESULTS Of 1 056 541 births, there were 6965 infants with CHDs (1830 with CCHDs). One-year survival was 75.2% for those with CCHDs (n = 1336) vs 97.1% for those with noncritical CHDs (n = 3530; P 1 day of age (n = 405; P < .001). There was a significantly higher risk of 1-year mortality for infants with an earlier birth era, earlier diagnosis, and low birth weight and whose mothers were <30 years old. CONCLUSIONS One-year survival for infants with CCHDs has been improving over time, yet mortality remains high. Later diagnosis is associated with improved 1-year survival. These benchmark data and identified prognostic factors may aid future evaluations of the impact of pulse oximetry screening on survival from CCHDs. PMID:23610203

  12. Pediatric and congenital heart transplant: twenty-year experience in a tertiary Brazilian Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Augusto Miana

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cardiac transplantation remains the gold standard for end-stage cardiomyopathies and congenital heart defects in pediatric patients. Objective: This study aims to report on 20 years of experience since the first case and evaluate our results. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of the database and outpatient follow-up. Between October 1992 and April 2012, 109 patients underwent 114 transplants. 51.8% of them being female. The age of patients ranged from 12 days to 21 years with a mean of 8.8±5.7 years and a median of 5.2 years. The underlying diagnosis was dilated cardiomyopathy in 61.5%, congenital heart disease in 26.6% and restrictive cardiomyopathy in 11.9%. All patients above 17 years old had congenital heart disease. Results: Survival rate at 30 days, 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 years were 90.4%, 81.3%, 70.9%, 60.5%, 44.4% and 26.7%, respectively. Mean cold ischemic time was 187.9 minutes and it did not correlate with mortality (P>0.05. Infectious complications and rejection episodes were the most common complications (P<0.0001, occurring, respectively, in 66% and 57.4% of the survivors after 10 years. There was no incidence of graft vascular disease and lymphoproliferative disease at year one, but they affected, respectively, 7.4% and 11% of patients within 10 years. Conclusion: Twenty-year pediatric heart transplant results at our institution were quite satisfactory and complication rates were acceptable.

  13. Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices for Pediatric Patients With Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopski, Steven G; Moskowitz, William B; Stevens, Randy M; Throckmorton, Amy L

    2017-01-01

    The use of mechanical circulatory support (MCS) devices is a viable therapeutic treatment option for patients with congestive heart failure. Ventricular assist devices, cavopulmonary assist devices, and total artificial heart pumps continue to gain acceptance as viable treatment strategies for both adults and pediatric patients as bridge-to-transplant, bridge-to-recovery, and longer-term circulatory support alternatives. We present a review of the current and future MCS devices for patients having congenital heart disease (CHD) with biventricular or univentricular circulations. Several devices that are specifically designed for patients with complex CHD are in the development pipeline undergoing rigorous animal testing as readiness experiments in preparation for future clinical trials. These advances in the development of new blood pumps for patients with CHD will address a significant unmet clinical need, as well as generally improve innovation of the current state of the art in MCS technology.

  14. Long-term prognostic value of cardiac autonomic nervous activity in postoperative patients with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohuchi, Hideo; Negishi, Jun; Miyake, Akira; Sakaguchi, Heima; Miyazaki, Aya; Yamada, Osamu

    2011-09-15

    Abnormal cardiac autonomic nervous activity (CANA) is not uncommon in postoperative patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). We attempted to clarify the prognostic value of the CANA variables in postoperative CHD patients and prospectively evaluated the CANA variables in 292 consecutive biventricular and 91 Fontan repair patients. The CANA variables included the heart rate variability, arterial baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), washout ratio of the myocardial metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy, and plasma norepinephrine level. With a follow-up of 10 ± 2 years, 98 total events that required hospitalization, including 13 deaths and 48 unscheduled cardiac events (UCEs), occurred. In all the CHD patients, all the CANA indices predicted the total events and UCEs. Of those, the NE level (p=0.0004) and BRS (p=0.0373) predicted the mortality. In a multivariate analysis, the BRS was an independent CANA-predictor for the total events (p=0.007). In the biventricular patients, the plasma NE level, heart rate variability, and BRS predicted the total events and UCEs and the BRS was the only independent CANA-predictor for the total events (p=0.0329). In the Fontan patients, the plasma NE level was the only predictor for the UCEs (p=0.0242) and no other CANA variables were independent predictors of the total events or UCEs. All CANA variables, especially the BRS, were useful predictors for future clinical events in biventricular CHD patients, whereas no CANA variables, except for the plasma NE level, predicted future clinical events in the Fontan patients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The Comparison of Pulse Oximetry and Cardiac Catheterization in Managing the Treatment of Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Abbasi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Bachground & aim: Pulse oximetry and cardiac catheterization are concerned in the treatment of children with congenital heart disease. Diagnosis of arterial oxygen saturation in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD can be used to assess and manage their effecacy. The purpose of this study was to compare pulse oximetry and cardiac catheterizations in treatment manage of children with congenital heart disease. Methods: In the present cross sectional study, 110 patients with cyanic and non syani heart disease were studied undergoing right and left heart catheterization by pulse oximetry of index finger and simultaneously, oxygen saturation was measured by cardiac catheterization. Data were analyzed with SPSS software by using Pearson correlation and linear regression. Results: A significant correlation was seen between arterial oxygen saturation measured by pulse oximetry and arterial oxygen saturation (p<0.0001 as well as heart rate, electrocardiogram and pulse oximetry (p<0.0001 respectively. Furthermore, the presence of cyanosis (p=0.001, digital clubbing of the fingers ((p=0.001, low oxygen saturation in the superior vena cava and right atrium (p=0.002 can reduce the accuracy of pulse oximetry for detection of arterial oxygen saturation. The mean right atrial pressure can effect on accuracy of pulse oximetry to detect heartbeat (p=0.034. Maximum sensitivity and specificity for detection of pulse oximetry oxygen saturation was 88 % and 88 heart rate per minute. Conclusion: Pulse oximetric is a useful tool for estimating the arterial oxygen saturation and heart rate in children with congenital heart disease (CHD and is a non-invasive method in comparison with cardiac catheterization. Key words: Pulse oximeter, Congenital Heart Disease, Cardiac Catheterization

  16. Early enteral nutrition therapy in congenital cardiac repair postoperatively: A randomized, controlled pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Manoj Kumar; Singal, Anuradha; Menon, Ramesh; Singh, Sarvesh Pal; Mohan, Alka; Manral, Mala; Singh, Divya; Devagouru, V.; Talwar, Sachin; Choudhary, Shiv Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Adequate nutritional supplementation in infants with cardiac malformations after surgical repair is a challenge. Critically ill infants in the early postoperative period are in a catabolic stress. The mismatch between estimated energy requirement (EER) and the intake in the postoperative period is multifactorial, predisposing them to complications such as immune deficiency, more infection, and growth failure. This study aimed to assess the feasibility and efficacy of enriched breast milk feed on postoperative recovery and growth of infants after open heart surgery. Methodology: Fifty infants surgery is feasible and recommended. In addition, enriching the EBM is helpful in achieving the maximum possible calorie intake in the postoperative period. EN therapy might help in providing adequate nutrition, and it decreases ventilation duration, infection rate, LOIS, LOHS, and mortality. PMID:27716696

  17. The Congenital Heart Disease Genetic Network Study: rationale, design, and early results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelb, Bruce; Brueckner, Martina; Chung, Wendy; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Kaltman, Jonathan; Kaski, Juan Pablo; Kim, Richard; Kline, Jennie; Mercer-Rosa, Laura; Porter, George; Roberts, Amy; Rosenberg, Ellen; Seiden, Howard; Seidman, Christine; Sleeper, Lynn; Tennstedt, Sharon; Kaltman, Jonathan; Schramm, Charlene; Burns, Kristin; Pearson, Gail; Rosenberg, Ellen

    2013-02-15

    Congenital heart defects (CHD) are the leading cause of infant mortality among birth defects, and later morbidities and premature mortality remain problematic. Although genetic factors contribute significantly to cause CHD, specific genetic lesions are unknown for most patients. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-funded Pediatric Cardiac Genomics Consortium established the Congenital Heart Disease Genetic Network Study to investigate relationships between genetic factors, clinical features, and outcomes in CHD. The Pediatric Cardiac Genomics Consortium comprises 6 main and 4 satellite sites at which subjects are recruited, and medical data and biospecimens (blood, saliva, cardiovascular tissue) are collected. Core infrastructure includes an administrative/data-coordinating center, biorepository, data hub, and core laboratories (genotyping, whole-exome sequencing, candidate gene evaluation, and variant confirmation). Eligibility includes all forms of CHD. Annual follow-up is obtained for probands age is 5.5 years. The one third enrolled at age <1 year are contacted annually for follow-up information. The distribution of CHD favors more complex lesions. Approximately, 11% of probands have a genetic diagnosis. Adequate DNA is available from 97% and 91% of blood and saliva samples, respectively. Genomic analyses of probands with heterotaxy, atrial septal defects, conotruncal, and left ventricular outflow tract obstructive lesions are underway. The scientific community's use of Pediatric Cardiac Genomics Consortium resources is welcome.

  18. Cine magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of cardiac structure and flow dynamics in congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akagi, Teiji; Kiyomatsu, Yumi; Ohara, Nobutoshi; Takagi, Junichi; Sato, Noboru; Kato, Hirohisa (Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine); Eto, Takaharu

    1989-10-01

    Cine magnetic resonance imaging (Cine MRI) was performed in 20 patients aged 19 days to 13 years (mean 4.0 years), who had congenital heart disease confirmed at echocardiography or angiography. Prior to cine MRI, gated MRI was performed to evaluate for cardiac structure. Cine MRI was demonstrated by fast low fip angle shot imaging technique with a 30deg flip angle, 15 msec echo time, 30-40 msec pulse repetition time, and 128 x 128 acquisition matrix. Abnormalities of cardiac structure were extremely well defined in all patients by gated MRI. Intracardiac or intravascular blood flow were visualized in 17 (85%) of 20 patients by cine MRI. Left to right shunt flow through ventricular septal defect, atrial septal defect, and endocardial cushion defect were visualized with low signal intensity area. Low intensity jets flow through the site of re-coarctation of the aorta were also visualized. However, the good recording of cine MRI was not obtained because of artifacts in 3 of 20 patients (15%) who had severe congestive heart failure or respiratory arrhythmia. Gated MRI provides excellent visualization of fine structure, and cine MRI can provide high spatial resolution imaging of flow dynamic in a variety of congenital heart disease, noninvasively. (author).

  19. sup 67 Ga imaging in the patients with infective endocarditis after surgery for congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohata, Tohru; Ono, Yasuo; Kamiya, Tetsuro; Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Takamiya, Makoto; Yagihara, Toshikatsu (National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan))

    1991-11-01

    {sup 67}Ga imaging was performed in sixteen patients (age: 8 m.-18 y.) who had persistent fever and positive acute phase reactants after surgery for congenital heart disease. Abnormal uptake of {sup 67}Ga over the heart and the lungs was evaluated with a computer. Abnormal uptake of {sup 67}Ga was observed in seven patients. Of them, three showed it in the area of peripheral pulmonary artery and the other four showed it in the area of artificial vessels for pulmonary artery reconstruction. In six patients with positive blood cultures, five showed abnormal uptake of {sup 67}Ga and in ten patients with negative blood cultures, two showed it. Vegetation was detected with 2D-echocardiography in four patients and all of them showed abnormal uptake of {sup 67}Ga, while in 12 patients without vegetation three showed it. In conclusion, {sup 67}Ga imaging was useful to detect the foci of infective endocarditis or pulmonary embolism caused by the vegetation in infective endocarditis in the patients after surgery for congenital heart disease, especially in the peripheral pulmonary arteries and artificial vessels which could not be detected with 2D-echo. (author).

  20. Moving towards universal prenatal detection of critical congenital heart disease in southern Nevada: a community-wide program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, William; Castillo, William; Rollins, Robert; Luna, Carlos; Kip, Katrinka; Ludwick, Joseph; Madan, Nitin; Ciccolo, Michael; Galindo, Alvaro; Rothman, Abraham; Mayman, Gary; Cass, Kathleen; Thomas, Vincent; Restrepo, Humberto; Acherman, Ruben

    2015-02-01

    This study compares the current, prenatal detection rate for critical congenital heart disease in Southern Nevada with the previously reported rate, after developing and expanding a comprehensive, community-wide fetal cardiology program. For the current-period analysis, we inquired our database and electronic health records for patients born in Clark County, Nevada, with critical congenital heart disease between May 2012 and April 2014, and we compared the results with the previous period between May 2003 and April 2006. The major components of the community-wide program include fetal congenital heart disease screening via general obstetric ultrasound studies performed in obstetrician's offices, radiology imaging centers, or maternal-fetal medicine specialty practices; subsequent referral for comprehensive fetal echocardiography performed in maternal-fetal medicine offices under the on-site supervision by fetal cardiologists; and recurring community educational programs teaching the 5-axial plane, fetal echocardiographic screening protocol to general obstetric sonographers and instructing perinatal sonographers in advanced imaging topics. For the current period, the prenatal detection rate for critical congenital heart disease in Southern Nevada was 71 versus 36% for the previous period (p congenital heart disease may be related to our expanded decentralized, community-wide fetal cardiology program, and our experiences may be applicable to other metropolitan areas.

  1. Variability in noncardiac surgical procedures in children with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulkowski, Jason P; Cooper, Jennifer N; McConnell, Patrick I; Pasquali, Sara K; Shah, Samir S; Minneci, Peter C; Deans, Katherine J

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the volume and variability of noncardiac surgeries performed in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) requiring cardiac surgery in the first year of life. Patients who underwent cardiac surgery by 1 year of age and had a minimum 5-year follow-up at 22 of the hospitals contributing to the Pediatric Health Information System database between 2004 and 2012 were included. Frequencies of noncardiac surgical procedures by age 5 years were determined and categorized by subspecialty. Patients were stratified according to their maximum RACHS-1 (Risk Adjustment in Congenital Heart Surgery) category. The proportions of patients across hospitals who had a noncardiac surgical procedure for each subspecialty were compared using logistic mixed effects models. 8857 patients underwent congenital heart surgery during the first year of life, 3621 (41%) of whom had 13,894 noncardiac surgical procedures by 5 years. Over half of all procedures were in general surgery (4432; 31.9%) or otolaryngology (4002; 28.8%). There was significant variation among hospitals in the proportion of CHD patients having noncardiac surgical procedures. Compared to children in the low risk group (RACHS-1 categories 1-3), children in the high-risk group (categories 4-6) were more likely to have general, dental, orthopedic, and thoracic procedures. Children with CHD requiring cardiac surgery frequently also undergo noncardiac surgical procedures; however, considerable variability in the frequency of these procedures exists across hospitals. This suggests a lack of uniformity in indications used for surgical intervention. Further research should aim to better standardize care for this complex patient population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Risk Factors of Congenital Heart Diseases: A Case-Control Study in Northwest Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naghavi-Behzad Mohammad

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Congenital heart diseases are of immense importance and also a high prevalence. Contributing factors to developing these defects have not been abundantly studied. Therefore, the current study was conducted aiming at determining the effective factors on Congenital Heart Disease (CHD in newborn infants of Northwest Iran. Methods: A case-control study was carried out in North-West of Iran from 2002 to 2012 and a total of 473 infants entered the study. Required data were obtained through check lists completed by the information of hospital records and interview with mothers of 267 newborn infants with CHD together with medical records of mothers as the case group, and 206 medical records of healthy infants at the same period all together with those of their mothers as the control group. The obtained data were statistically analyzed using descriptive statistical methods, T-test, Spearman’s correlation coefficient, and Multi-variable Logistic Regression Model (OR with 95% CI, using SPSS.19. In the present study, P value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Based on the results of univariable analyses, the number of previous cesarean sections, past medical history of diseases, gestational age (GA, fetal weight at birth, diastolic blood pressure, fetal heart rate, pulse rate, fetal hemoglobin and hematocrit levels, and fetal head circumference at birth have significant relationship with incidence of congenital abnormalities (P<0.05. Family history, past cesarean sections history, past medical history and GA had significant relationship with CHD incidence. Conclusion: Based on the results of present study, in order to control and reduce the cases of CHD, it is crucial to make proper decisions and implement policies for reducing cesarean cases, lowering consanguineous marriages, providing proper pre-marriage counseling, prompt treatment of mothers’ illnesses, improving pregnancy health care and mothers

  3. EARLY DETECTION OF CRITICAL CONGENITAL HEART DISEASE IN NEW BORNS USING PULSE OXIMETRY SCREENING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ShahForum,Chatterjee Rajib, PatelPrashant C, Kunkulol Rahul R

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Congenital heart diseases which are dependent on the ductusarteriosus to maintain adequate oxygenation or systemic blood flow are termed as a critical congenital heart disease (CCHD. Delay in the diagnosis of CCHD is the major cause leading to morbidity and mortality in newborn infants. Clinical evaluation is likely to miss the diagnosis in first few hours of hospital stay after birth due to absence of signs and symptoms of CCHD. In the absence of clinical findings during early neonatal period, the best parameter that can be assessed is the detection of hypoxemia by pulse oximetry screening. Objectives: To record the value of Pulse Oximetry within 24 hours of birth and evaluate Pulse Oximetry as screening tool for early diagnosis of CCHD. &Methods: Longitudinal descriptive study was conducted on total 700 intramural neonates, satisfying the inclusion and exclusion criteria, who were evaluated within 24 hours of birth with currently available pulse oximeter, after the Institutional Ethical Committee approval. The study was conducted over a period of 4 months. Part-A: Neonatal Case Record, Part-B: Pulse Oximetry Screening Record, Part-C: Clinical Examination Record, Part-D: Echocardiography Record. Results and Conclusion: Total 700 neonates were screened by pulse oximeter with consecutive sampling method. 4 (0.57% subjects were detected to have positive screen and the diagnosis was confirmed by echocardiography. Study revealed that Pulse Oximetry Screening can be an important primary screening tool in routine neonatal care for early detection of Critical Congenital Heart Diseases particularly in rural setup

  4. Prevalence and Correlates of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder in Adults With Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lisa X; Khan, Abigail May; Drajpuch, David; Fuller, Stephanie; Ludmir, Jonathan; Mascio, Christopher E; Partington, Sara L; Qadeer, Ayesha; Tobin, Lynda; Kovacs, Adrienne H; Kim, Yuli Y

    2016-03-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with adverse outcomes and increased mortality in cardiac patients. No studies have examined PTSD in the adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) population. The objectives of this study were to assess the prevalence of self-reported symptoms of PTSD in patients with ACHD and explore potential associated factors. Patients were enrolled from an outpatient ACHD clinic and completed several validated measures including the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Clinical data were abstracted through medical data review. A total of 134 participants (mean age 34.6 ± 10.6; 46% men) were enrolled. Of the 127 participants who completed the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, 14 (11%) met criteria for elevated PTSD symptoms specifically related to their congenital heart disease or treatment. Of the 134 patients who completed PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version, 27 (21%) met criteria for global PTSD symptoms. In univariate analyses, patients with congenital heart disease-specific PTSD had their most recent cardiac surgery at an earlier year (p = 0.008), were less likely to have attended college (p = 0.04), had higher rates of stroke or transient ischemic attack (p = 0.03), and reported greater depressive symptoms on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (7 vs 2, p PTSD were depressive symptoms (p PTSD is present in 11% to 21% of subjects seen at a tertiary referral center for ACHD. The high prevalence of PTSD in this complex group of patients has important implications for the medical and psychosocial management of this growing population.

  5. The value of flat-detector computed tomography during catheterisation of congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gloeckler, Martin [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Erlangen (Germany); Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuernberg, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Erlangen (Germany); Koch, Andreas; Greim, Verena; Shabaiek, Amira; Dittrich, Sven [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Erlangen (Germany); Rueffer, Andre; Cesnjevar, Robert [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Congenital Heart Surgery, Erlangen (Germany); Achenbach, Stephan [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Cardiology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    To analyse the diagnostic utility of flat-detector computed tomography imaging (FD-CT) in patients with congenital heart disease, including the value of image fusion to overlay three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions on fluoroscopic images during catheter-based interventions. We retrospectively analysed 62 consecutive paediatric patients in whom FD-CT was used during catheterisation of congenital heart disease. Expert operators rated the clinical value of FD-CT over conventional fluoroscopic imaging. Added radiation exposure and contrast medium volume were evaluated. During a 12-month period, FD-CT was performed in 62 out of 303 cardiac catheterisations. Median patient age was 3.5 years. In 32/62 cases, FD-CT was used for diagnostic purposes, in 30/62 cases it was used in the context of interventions. Diagnostic utility was never rated as ''misleading''. It was classified as ''not useful'' in six cases (9.7%), ''useful'' in 18 cases (29.0%), ''very useful'' in 37 cases (59.7%) and ''essential'' in one case (1.6%). The median added dose-area product was 111.0 {mu}Gym{sup 2}, the required additional quantity of contrast medium was 1.6 ml/kg. FD-CT provides useful diagnostic information in most of the patients investigated for congenital heart disease. The added radiation exposure and contrast medium volume are reasonable. (orig.)

  6. Eisenmenger syndrome and long-term survival in patients with Down syndrome and congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körten, Marc-André; Helm, Paul C; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim; Baumgartner, Helmut; Kececioglu, Deniz; Schlensak, Christian; Bauer, Ulrike M M; Diller, Gerhard-Paul

    2016-10-01

    To characterise patients with trisomy 21 (Down syndrome, DS) based on the data of the German National Register for Congenital Heart Defects, to identify changes in the availability of surgical therapy over time and to analyse the impact of these changes on developing Eisenmenger syndrome (ES) as well as survival. Out of 1549 patients with DS with congenital heart disease in the National Register for Congenital Heart Defects, 894 patients (55% female, mean age 17.5 years) had a post-tricuspid shunt lesion (atrioventricular septal defect 69.5%, ventricular septal defect 27.7%, patent arterial duct 2.6%) and were included in the current study. The likelihood of being treated interventionally or surgically before the age of 1 year increased significantly over time. In parallel, the likelihood of developing ES decreased over time (53% birth cohort during 1950s/1960s vs 0.5% birth cohort during 2000-2009, p<0.0001). Overall survival after 1, 10, 20 and 40 years was 96.8%, 94.1%, 92.6% and 75.5%, respectively. Patients with ES had a significantly worse survival compared with those without ES (HR 18.1; 95% CI 7.2 to 45.4; p<0.0001). The availability of surgical correction was associated with a decrease in the likelihood of developing ES. Patients with DS still have reduced survival prospects compared with the general population, but this effect is largely driven by patients developing ES who still have a very poor prognosis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. Three-dimensional echocardiographic virtual endoscopy for the diagnosis of congenital heart disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Haihong; Sun, Kun; Yu, Jianguo; Chen, Binjin; Chen, Guozhen; Hong, Wenjing; Yao, Liping; Wu, Lanping

    2010-12-01

    Virtual endoscopy (VE) is a new post-processing method that uses volumetric data sets to simulate the tracks of a "conventional" flexible endoscope. However, almost all studies of this method have involved virtual visualizations of the cardiovascular structures applied to computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) datasets. This paper introduces a novel visualization method called the "three-dimensional echocardiographic intracardiac endoscopic simulation system (3DE IESS)", which uses 3D echocardiographic images in a virtual reality (VR) environment to diagnose congenital heart disease. The aim of this study was to analyze the feasibility of VE in the evaluation of congenital heart disease in children and its accuracy compared with 2DE. Three experienced pediatric cardiologists blinded to the patients' diagnoses separately reviewed 40 two-dimensional echocardiographic (2DE) datasets and 40 corresponding VE datasets and judged whether abnormal intracardiac anatomy was present in terms of a five-point scale (1 = definitely absent; 2 = probably absent; 3 = cannot be determined; 4 = probably present; and 5 = definitely present). Compared with clinical diagnosis, the diagnostic accuracy of VE was 98.7% for ASD, 92.4% for VSD, 92.6% for TOF, and 94% for DORV, respectively. Diagnostic accuracy of VE was significantly higher than that of 2DE for TOF and DORV except for ASD and VSD. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for VE was closer to the optimal performance point than was the ROC curve for 2DE. The area under the ROC curve was 0.96 for VE and 0.93 for 2DE. Kappa values (range, 0.73-0.79) for VE and 2DE indicated substantial agreement. 3D echocardiographic VE can enhance our understanding of intracardiac structures and facilitate the evaluation of congenital heart disease.

  8. Timing of Newborn Pulse Oximetry Screenings for Critical Congenital Heart Defects Before Discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouch, Lynn; Speroni, Karen Gabel; Jones, Ruth Ann; MacDougall, Eileen P; Daniel, Marlon G

    2016-01-01

    To determine if there would be positive results from a second pulse oximetry screening (POS) completed for newborns at discharge at 28 to 48 hours of age in addition to the newborn POS completed at 24 to 25 hours of age. Prospective descriptive research study. Rural, mid-Atlantic, 13-bed, level I hospital. Newborns (N = 1,002) at 35 weeks' gestation or older discharged from the newborn nursery. Registered nurses (RNs) performed POS at 24 to 25 hours of age (POS 1) and at discharge but less than 48 hours of age (POS 2). Data related to critical congenital heart defects were collected. There were no positive POS results (O2 saturation ≤ 90%) at POS 1 or POS 2, and no additional diagnostic tests were ordered as a result of POS. Although one full-term newborn had negative results at POS 1 and POS 2, the RN identified a murmur, and a subsequent echocardiogram was used to detect tetralogy of Fallot and pulmonary atresia. The RNs detected concerning conditions in 14 newborns that resulted in 28 additional tests, including echocardiograms (9), chest x-ray imaging (8), laboratory testing (7), electrocardiograms (3), and ultrasound imaging (1). The POS-positive result rate was 0 for newborns at POS 1 and POS 2. Therefore, our study findings supported Maryland's mandate of one POS completed within 24 to 48 hours of birth. Nurses must continue to be vigilant about assessing newborns, including screening for critical congenital heart defects and congenital heart defects. Copyright © 2016 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Morbidity After Cardiac Surgery in Patients With Adult Congenital Heart Disease in Comparison With Acquired Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karangelis, Dimos; Mazine, Amine; Narsupalli, Sreekanth; Mendis, Shamarli; Veldtman, Gruschen; Nikolaidis, Nicolas

    2017-06-28

    Due to the advancements in congenital cardiac surgery and interventional cardiology in the last five decades, more than 85% of congenital heart patients now survive to adulthood. This retrospective study included 135 Adult Congenital Heart Disease (ACHD) patients, who had cardiac surgery at Southampton General Hospital over three consecutive years. We also included 42 patients with a structurally normal heart who had cardiac surgery for acquired cardiac conditions as a control group. Preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative data were analysed in both groups to identify risk factors for morbidity and mortality. In the ACHD group, in hospital mortality was 0.7%. In the control group no deaths were observed. Fifty-eight per cent of the ACHD patients had significantly higher perioperative morbidity with arrhythmias (26%), bleeding (3%), prolonged ventilation (11.3%) and renal replacement therapy 1.5%. In the non ACHD control group 32% (p=0.003) developed perioperative complications with arrhythmias (9.8%), bleeding (2.5%), prolonged ventilation (4.3%) and renal replacement therapy (2.5%). In ACHD patients total in-hospital stay was longer in patients with longer cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) time (p=0.005), aortic cross clamp time (p=0.013) and higher preoperative alkaline phosphatase level (p=0.005). Early postoperative complications were higher in ACHD patients with longer cardiopulmonary bypass time (p=0.04) and presence of pulmonary artery hypertension (p=0.012). Even though the preoperative and operative characteristics are similar to both groups, the morbidity is more in ACHD group. Longer CBP time, aortic cross clamp time and presence of pulmonary hypertension are risk factors for higher morbidity in this group. Copyright © 2017 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Coronary artery problems and disease in adults with congenital heart disease: how to evaluate, how to prevent, how to treat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, S; Stuart, A G

    2014-10-01

    There are a wide variety of coronary artery anomalies and disease in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD). In fact, the increasing burden of acquired coronary artery disease (CAD) has to be considered in addition to congenital abnormalities of the coronary arteries, isolated or associated to other congenital diseases. This is largely a consequence of the increasing number of patients reaching older age. Due to complex underlying cardiac anatomy, previous surgery and comorbidities, treatment can be challenging. Individualized and multidisciplinary management involving congenital heart cardiologists, cardiac surgeons, coronary interventionists and imaging specialists is essential. This review gives an overview of coronary artery involvement in adults with CHD, summarizes the current literature and focuses on prevention, diagnosis and treatment. The potential role of cardiovascular risk factors for CAD is also discussed.

  11. Developing and Evaluating Virtual Cardiotomy for Preoperative Planning in Congenital Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thomas Sangild; Beerbaum, Philipp; Mosegaard, Jesper;

    2009-01-01

    Careful preoperative planning is of outmost importance -- in particular when considering complex corrective surgery on congenitally malformed hearts. As an aid to such decisionsmaking we describe a system for virtual reconstruction of patient-specific morphology from 3D-capable imaging modalities...... such as MRI and CT. We introduce and illustrate the concept of virtual cardiotomy as a new tool to preoperatively evaluate the feasibility of different surgical strategies by investigating the anatomical spatial relations through any number of virtual incisions. Ve review the technical and clinical...

  12. [Analgosedation with fentanyl/midazolam after correction of congenital heart defects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel-Behnke, I; Rothes, A; Hund, F; Huth, R; Wippermann, C F; Schmidt, F X; Oelert, H; Schranz, D

    1995-01-01

    There is no standard therapy in the management of postoperative pain control following corrective cardiac surgery of congenital heart disease. Assessment in the preverbal age is difficult. In a randomized study we compared a combined treatment of fentanyl and midazolam, given as continuous infusion versus single dose application. A pain assessment score was used to measure the effectiveness of analgosedation in addition to recording nurseries observations. Fentanyl and midazolam are an appropriate combination for postoperative pain treatment. Continuous application is considered to be more effective concerning basic anxiety, cumulative dosage and to avoid volume overload in infants and young children, following cardiac surgery; overdosage was not observed.

  13. Osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome with congenital heart disease: a new association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teebi, A S; Al-Awadi, S A; Marafie, M J; Bushnaq, R A; Satyanath, S

    1988-01-01

    We report a sibship of two brothers and one sister with the osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome and congenital heart disease. They presented in infancy with visual impairment and psychomotor retardation. Major features included bilateral cataracts, generalised osteopenia, severe platyspondyly, borderline mental retardation, muscular hypotonia, joint laxity, and ventricular septal defect. Parental consanguinity and affected sibs of both sexes strongly suggested autosomal recessive inheritance. Analysis of the present and previously reported cases showed a wide range of interfamilial variability which may point to the existence of multiple allelism or genetic heterogeneity in this syndrome.

  14. Meier-Gorlin syndrome: Report of an additional patient with congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a 7 year old female child with the classical triad of Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS, (microtia, absent patella and short stature. She had the characteristic facial features, with normal mentality and defective speech, skeletal abnormalities, conductive hearing loss, cystitis and normal growth hormone level. She suffered from recurrent chest infection during the first year of life which improved gradually with age. Although congenital heart is rarely observed in MGS, our patient had in addition fenestrated interatrial septal defect.

  15. [Successful treatment of atrial fibrillation by resection of a congenital aneurysm of the left heart atrium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heigl, F; Steinbeck, G; Rienmüller, R; Kemkes, B M; Klinner, W

    1992-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation occurred in a 27-year-old patient with a history of globular cardiac enlargement since childhood. Because of the probable causal relationship between the preexisting heart disease-which was supposed to be an enlargement of the left atrium-and the rhythm disturbance, we recommended a surgical intervention. Cardiac surgery revealed a congenital aneurysm of the left atrial appendage which could be resected without any complication. Postoperatively, atrial fibrillation had returned to regular sinus rhythm. The bad prognosis with a high risk of systemic embolism is the reason why early cardiac surgery should be performed after diagnosis of this rare anomaly (20 reported cases) of the left atrium.

  16. Role of connexins in human congenital heart disease: the chicken and egg problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida eSalameh

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Inborn cardiac diseases are among the most frequent congenital anomalies and are the main cause of death in infants within the first year of age in industrialized countries when not adequately treated. They can be divided into simple and complex cardiac malformations. The former ones, for instance atrial and ventricular septal defects, valvular or subvalvular stenosis or insufficiency account for up to 80% of cardiac abnormalities. The latter ones, for example transposition of the great vessels, Tetralogy of Fallot or Shone's anomaly often do not involve only the heart but also the great vessels and although occurring less frequently these severe cardiac malformations will become symptomatically within the first months of age and have a high risk of mortality if the patients remain untreated. In the last decade there is increasing evidence that cardiac gap junction proteins, the connexins (Cx, might have an impact on cardiac anomalies. In the heart mainly three of them (Cx40, Cx43 and Cx45 are differentially expressed with regard to temporal organogenesis and to their spatial distribution in the heart. These proteins, forming gap junction channels, are most important for a normal electrical conduction and coordinated synchronous heart muscle contraction and also for the normal embryonic development of the heart. Animal and also some human studies revealed that at least in some cardiac malformations alterations in certain gap junction proteins are present but until today no particular gap junction mutation could be assigned to a specific cardiac anomaly. As gap junctions transmit growth and differentiation signals from cell to cell it is reasonable to assume that they are somehow involved in misdirected growth present in many inborn heart diseases playing a primary or contributory role. This review addresses potential role of gap junctions in the development of inborn heart anomalies like the conotruncal heart defects.

  17. Role of connexins in human congenital heart disease: the chicken and egg problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salameh, Aida; Blanke, Katja; Daehnert, Ingo

    2013-01-01

    Inborn cardiac diseases are among the most frequent congenital anomalies and are the main cause of death in infants within the first year of age in industrialized countries when not adequately treated. They can be divided into simple and complex cardiac malformations. The former ones, for instance atrial and ventricular septal defects, valvular or subvalvular stenosis or insufficiency account for up to 80% of cardiac abnormalities. The latter ones, for example transposition of the great vessels, Tetralogy of Fallot or Shone's anomaly often do not involve only the heart, but also the great vessels and although occurring less frequently, these severe cardiac malformations will become symptomatic within the first months of age and have a high risk of mortality if the patients remain untreated. In the last decade, there is increasing evidence that cardiac gap junction proteins, the connexins (Cx), might have an impact on cardiac anomalies. In the heart, mainly three of them (Cx40, Cx43, and Cx45) are differentially expressed with regard to temporal organogenesis and to their spatial distribution in the heart. These proteins, forming gap junction channels, are most important for a normal electrical conduction and coordinated synchronous heart muscle contraction and also for the normal embryonic development of the heart. Animal and also some human studies revealed that at least in some cardiac malformations alterations in certain gap junction proteins are present but until today no particular gap junction mutation could be assigned to a specific cardiac anomaly. As gap junctions have often been supposed to transmit growth and differentiation signals from cell to cell it is reasonable to assume that they are somehow involved in misdirected growth present in many inborn heart diseases playing a primary or contributory role. This review addresses the potentional role of gap junctions in the development of inborn heart anomalies like the conotruncal heart defects.

  18. Profile and risk factors for congenital heart defects: A study in a tertiary care hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abqari, Shaad; Gupta, Akash; Shahab, Tabassum; Rabbani, MU; Ali, S Manazir; Firdaus, Uzma

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are an important cause of mortality and morbidity in children representing a major global health burden. It is thus important to determine their prevalence and spectrum and identify risk factors associated with the development of heart defects. Materials and Methods: A case-control study was carried out in the Department of Pediatrics and Center of Cardiology, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh, India, from February 2014 to August 2015. All patients referred with complaints or clinical examination suggestive of CHDs were further evaluated with echocardiography. On Echocardiography, patients having CHDs were included as cases and those having a normal echocardiographic study were included as controls. Healthy controls were also included. 400 cases and 400 controls were thus identified; preterms having patent ductus arteriosus and patent foramen ovale and those with acquired heart defects were excluded. Risk factors among cases and controls were further studied. Results: Acyanotic heart defects were 290 (72.50%) of the total heart defects, whereas the contribution of cyanotic heart defects was 110 (27.50%). Out of all CHDs, ventricular septal defect was the most common lesion with contribution of 152 (38%) cases, whereas among the cyanotic heart defects, Tetralogy of Fallot was the most common lesion (18% of total cases). Out of the total 400 cases, 261 were males (65.25%). On univariate analysis, paternal age (odds ratio, OR, 2.01), bad obstetric history (OR, 2.65), antenatal febrile illness (OR, 4.12), and advanced maternal age (OR, 3.28) were found to increase the risk of CHD whereas intake of multivitamin (OR, 3.02) was found to be protective. The risk factors were further analyzed with multivariate logistic regression analysis and all the above factors were found to be significantly associated. Conclusion: We noted that the profile of CHD in our population was similar

  19. Cardiac resynchronization therapy in patients with challenging anatomy due to venous anomalies or adult congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi, Imran; Dhala, Anwer; Choudhuri, Indrajit; Sra, Jasbir; Akhtar, Masood; Tajik, Abdul Jamil

    2014-09-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has proven salutary effects in patients with congestive heart failure, systolic dysfunction, and electromechanical dyssynchrony in the setting of ischemic, nonischemic, and congenital cardiomyopathy. While CRT device implants have become routine in the adult ischemic or nonischemic cardiomyopathy populations, patients with congenital heart disease offer special challenges due to unusual anatomic variations. A comprehensive assessment of anatomic abnormalities is essential prior to implant. In addition, implant techniques and equipment must be tailored to the expected anatomy. A flexible approach is necessary-implant may require equipment and techniques adapted from vascular intervention. This article describes our approach to CRT implant in patients with congenital heart disease, and is illustrated by reports of several cases. ©2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Emerging Research Directions in Adult Congenital Heart Disease: A Report From an NHLBI/ACHA Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurvitz, Michelle; Burns, Kristin M; Brindis, Ralph; Broberg, Craig S; Daniels, Curt J; Fuller, Stephanie M P N; Honein, Margaret A; Khairy, Paul; Kuehl, Karen S; Landzberg, Michael J; Mahle, William T; Mann, Douglas L; Marelli, Ariane; Newburger, Jane W; Pearson, Gail D; Starling, Randall C; Tringali, Glenn R; Valente, Anne Marie; Wu, Joseph C; Califf, Robert M

    2016-04-26

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common birth defect, affecting about 0.8% of live births. Advances in recent decades have allowed >85% of children with CHD to survive to adulthood, creating a growing population of adults with CHD. Little information exists regarding survival, demographics, late outcomes, and comorbidities in this emerging group, and multiple barriers impede research in adult CHD. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and the Adult Congenital Heart Association convened a multidisciplinary working group to identify high-impact research questions in adult CHD. This report summarizes the meeting discussions in the broad areas of CHD-related heart failure, vascular disease, and multisystem complications. High-priority subtopics identified included heart failure in tetralogy of Fallot, mechanical circulatory support/transplantation, sudden cardiac death, vascular outcomes in coarctation of the aorta, late outcomes in single-ventricle disease, cognitive and psychiatric issues, and pregnancy.

  1. Nutrition Support for Children Undergoing Congenital Heart Surgeries: A Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Judith J M; Cheifetz, Ira M; Ong, Chengsi; Nakao, Masakazu; Lee, Jan Hau

    2015-07-01

    Energy imbalance in infants and children with congenital heart disease (CHD) is common and influenced by age, underlying cardiac diagnoses, and presence or absence of congestive heart failure. During the surgical hospitalization period, these children are prone to nutritional deterioration due to stress of surgery, anesthetic/perfusion techniques, and postoperative care. Poor nutrition is associated with increased perioperative morbidity and mortality. This review aims to examine various aspects of nutrition in critically ill children with CHD, including (1) energy expenditure, (2) perioperative factors that contribute to energy metabolism, (3) bedside practices that are potentially able to optimize nutrient delivery, and (4) medium- to long-term impact of energy balance on clinical outcomes. We propose a nutrition algorithm to optimize nutrition of these children in the perioperative period where improvements in nutrition status will likely impact surgical outcomes.

  2. [Biologically active substances in patients with hypervolemic congenital heart defects undergoing general multicomponent anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimov, N M; Guliamov, D S; Karimova, T Z; Belova, O A; Ivanova, L S; Nam, L N

    1994-01-01

    In 95 patients with hypervolemic congenital heart diseases (42 with interventricular and interatrial septal defects, and 53 with patent ductus arteriosus) mixed venous blood levels of serotonin, histamine, adrenalin, noradrenaline, total 11-hydroxycorticosteroids were studied using spectrofluorimetry, cyclic adenosine- and guanosine-monophosphate (cAMP and cGMP), prostaglandins E+A and F2 alpha and their interaction were assessed using radioimmunoassay and correlation analysis, respectively. Before surgical treatment the patients showed higher (than in the control) concentrations of histamine, adrenalin, noradrenaline, cAMP, and cGMP, prostaglandins E+A. During anesthesia including fentanyl, morphine, diazepam, N2O:O2 in patients with heart valve defects cGMP level was increased and in patients with patent ductus arteriosus cAMP level was increased during analogous anesthesia with morphine replaced by halothane.

  3. Congenital heart disease and cardiac procedural outcomes in patients with trisomy 21 and Turner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Demori, Raysa

    2017-07-24

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is present in approximately 50% of patients with trisomy 21 (T21) and Turner syndrome (TS). According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, every patient with these genetic disorders should have a postnatal echocardiogram. T21 is usually associated with atrioventricular (30%-60%), atrial (16%-21%), or ventricular septal defects (14%-27%). TS is usually associated with left-sided heart disease. However, the spectrum of CHD in these genetic disorders is wider than those mentioned lesions. More cardiac surgical procedures are offered to these patients and that has influenced positively their life expectancy for some CHD conditions. Single ventricular anatomy is associated with high mortality in these genetic disorders (49% in T21 and 83%-91% in TS). The goal of this article is to describe the spectrum of CHD, screening guidelines, and cardiac surgical outcomes in patients with T21 or TS with CHD. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Advances in the Genetics of Congenital Heart Disease: A Clinician's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Gillian M; Kirk, Edwin P; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Sholler, Gary F; Dunwoodie, Sally L; Harvey, Richard P; Winlaw, David S

    2017-02-21

    Our understanding of the genetics of congenital heart disease (CHD) is rapidly expanding; however, many questions, particularly those relating to sporadic forms of disease, remain unanswered. Massively parallel sequencing technology has made significant contributions to the field, both from a diagnostic perspective for patients and, importantly, also from the perspective of disease mechanism. The importance of de novo variation in sporadic disease is a recent highlight, and the genetic link between heart and brain development has been established. Furthermore, evidence of an underlying burden of genetic variation contributing to sporadic and familial forms of CHD has been identified. Although we are still unable to identify the cause of CHD for most patients, recent findings have provided us with a much clearer understanding of the types of variants and their individual contributions and collectively mark an important milestone in our understanding of both familial and sporadic forms of disease.

  5. The accuracy of chest radiographs in the detection of congenital heart disease and in the diagnosis of specific congenital cardiac lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laya, Bernard F. [St. Luke' s Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Quezon (Philippines); Goske, Marilyn J. [The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Section of Pediatric Radiology, The Children' s Hospital, Cleveland, OH (United States); Children' s Hospital Medical Center of Akron, Department of Radiology, Akron, OH (United States); Morrison, Stuart; Reid, Janet R. [The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Section of Pediatric Radiology, The Children' s Hospital, Cleveland, OH (United States); Swischuck, Leonard [The University of Texas Medical Branch, Department of Radiology, Galveston, TX (United States); Ey, Elizabeth H. [The Children' s Medical Center, Department of Medical Imaging, Dayton, OH (United States); Murphy, Daniel J. [Stanford University Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Lieber, Michael; Obuchowski, Nancy [The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2006-07-15

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in pediatric patients. Traditional teaching holds that specific types of CHD can be diagnosed on the chest radiograph (CXR) through pattern recognition. To determine the accuracy of radiologists in detecting CHD on the CXR. This study was a blinded retrospective review of chest radiographs from 281 patients (<12 years) by five pediatric radiologists from three institutions. Thirteen groups were evaluated that included 12 categories of CHD and a control group of patients without heart disease. Radiographs were assessed for heart size, heart and mediastinal shape and vascularity. Clinical information, angiography, echocardiograms and surgery were used as the gold standard for definitive diagnosis. The average accuracy of the five readers in distinguishing normal from CHD patients was 78% (range of 72% to 82%). The overall measure of accuracy in distinguishing specific congenital cardiac lesions among 13 groups of patients was 71% (range of 63% to 79%). CXR alone is not diagnostic of specific cardiac lesions, with a low accuracy of only 71%. We believe that less emphasis should be placed on the use of radiographs alone in diagnosing specific congenital cardiac lesions. (orig.)

  6. Chromosome 8p23.1 deletions as a cause of complex congenital heart defects and diaphragmatic hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wat, Margaret J; Shchelochkov, Oleg A; Holder, Ashley M; Breman, Amy M; Dagli, Aditi; Bacino, Carlos; Scaglia, Fernando; Zori, Roberto T; Cheung, Sau Wai; Scott, Daryl A; Kang, Sung-Hae Lee

    2009-08-01

    Recurrent interstitial deletion of a region of 8p23.1 flanked by the low copy repeats 8p-OR-REPD and 8p-OR-REPP is associated with a spectrum of anomalies that can include congenital heart malformations and congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Haploinsufficiency of GATA4 is thought to play a critical role in the development of these birth defects. We describe two individuals and a monozygotic twin pair discordant for anterior CDH all of whom have complex congenital heart defects caused by this recurrent interstitial deletion as demonstrated by array comparative genomic hybridization. To better define the genotype/phenotype relationships associated with alterations of genes on 8p23.1, we review the spectrum of congenital heart and diaphragmatic defects that have been reported in individuals with isolated GATA4 mutations and interstitial, terminal, and complex chromosomal rearrangements involving the 8p23.1 region. Our findings allow us to clearly define the CDH minimal deleted region on chromosome 8p23.1 and suggest that haploinsufficiency of other genes, in addition to GATA4, may play a role in the severe cardiac and diaphragmatic defects associated with 8p23.1 deletions. These findings also underscore the importance of conducting a careful cytogenetic/molecular analysis of the 8p23.1 region in all prenatal and postnatal cases involving congenital defects of the heart and/or diaphragm.

  7. Chromosome 8p23.1 Deletions as a Cause of Complex Congenital Heart Defects and Diaphragmatic Hernia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wat, Margaret J.; Shchelochkov, Oleg A.; Holder, Ashley M.; Breman, Amy M.; Dagli, Aditi; Bacino, Carlos; Scaglia, Fernando; Zori, Roberto T.; Cheung, Sau Wai; Scott, Daryl A.; Kang, Sung-Hae Lee

    2009-01-01

    Recurrent interstitial deletion of a region of 8p23.1 flanked by the low copy repeats 8p-OR-REPD and 8p-OR-REPP is associated with a spectrum of anomalies that can include congenital heart malformations and congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Haploinsufficiency of GATA4 is thought to play a critical role in the development of these birth defects. We describe two individuals and a monozygotic twin pair discordant for anterior CDH all of whom have complex congenital heart defects caused by this recurrent interstitial deletion as demonstrated by array comparative genome hybridization. To better define the genotype/phenotype relationships associated with alterations of genes on 8p23.1, we review the spectrum of congenital heart and diaphragmatic defects that have been reported in individuals with isolated GATA4 mutations and interstitial, terminal, and complex chromosomal rearrangements involving the 8p23.1 region. Our findings allow us to clearly define the CDH minimal deleted region on chromosome 8p23.1 and suggest that haploinsufficiency of other genes, in addition to GATA4, may play a role in the severe cardiac and diaphragmatic defects associated with 8p23.1 deletions. These findings also underscore the importance of conducting a careful cytogenetic/molecular analysis of the 8p23.1 region in all prenatal and postnatal cases involving congenital defects of the heart and/or diaphragm. PMID:19606479

  8. Genetic Modifiers Predisposing to Congenital Heart Disease in the Sensitized Down Syndrome Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiqing; Cherry, Sheila; Klinedinst, Donna; DeLeon, Valerie; Redig, Jennifer; Reshey, Benjamin; Chin, Michael T.; Sherman, Stephanie L.; Maslen, Cheryl L.; Reeves, Roger H.

    2012-01-01

    Background About half of people with Down syndrome (DS) exhibit some form of congenital heart disease (CHD). However, trisomy for human chromosome 21 (Hsa21) alone is insufficient to cause CHD as half of all people with DS have a normal heart, suggesting that genetic modifiers interact with dosage sensitive gene(s) on Hsa21 to result in CHD. We hypothesize that a threshold exists in both Down syndrome and euploid populations for the number of genetic perturbations that can be tolerated before CHD results. Methods and Results We ascertained a group of individuals with DS and complete atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD) and sequenced two candidate genes for CHD, CRELD1, which is associated with AVSD in people with or without DS, and HEY2, whose mouse ortholog produces septal defects when mutated. Several deleterious variants were identified but the frequency of these potential modifiers was low. We crossed mice with mutant forms of these potential modifiers to the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome. Crossing loss-of-function alleles of either Creld1 or Hey2 onto the trisomic background caused a significant increase in the frequency of CHD, demonstrating an interaction between the modifiers and trisomic genes. We showed further that although either of these mutant modifiers is benign by itself, they interact to affect heart development when inherited together. Conclusions Using mouse models of Down syndrome and of genes associated with congenital heart disease we demonstrate a biological basis for an interaction that supports a threshold hypothesis for additive effects of genetic modifiers in the sensitized trisomic population. PMID:22523272

  9. [Management of heart diseases in pregnancy: rheumatic and congenital heart disease, myocardial infarction and post partum cardiomyopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westhoff-Bleck, M; Hilfiker-Kleiner, D; Günter, H H; Schieffer, E; Drexler, H

    2008-07-01

    Heart disease is present in 0.5-1% of all pregnancies. It is the leading non-obstetric cause of maternal mortality accounting for about 10-15% of all maternal death. Over the last decades the underlying cardiac disease has changed. Also new therapeutic options have been developed. In western industrial countries the incidence of acquired rheumatic heart disease has declined. In contrast, as a result of neonatal corrective or palliative surgery, congenital heart disease has become an increasing and challenging problem. Maternal older age and the increase in women's smoking habits amplify the likelihood of coronary artery disease. Multiple therapeutic options including percutaneous interventions are available and novel therapeutic concepts are emerging i.e. for peripartum cardiomyopathy. Management of pregnancy, labor and delivery requires accurate diagnosis of the underlying cardiac disorder. Hemodynamic changes physiologically occurring during pregnancy have a different impact depending on the type and severity of cardiac anomalies. Management of these patients requires teamwork of obstetricians, neonatologists, cardiologists, anesthetists and sometimes cardiac surgeons.

  10. Coronary anatomy in children with bicuspid aortic valves and associated congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenraadt, Wilke M C; Bartelings, Margot M; Bökenkamp, Regina; Gittenberger-de Groot, Adriana C; DeRuiter, Marco C; Schalij, Martin J; Jongbloed, Monique Rm

    2017-07-27

    In patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV), coronary anatomy is variable. High take-off coronary arteries have been described, but data are scarce, especially when associated with complex congenital heart disease (CHD). The purpose of this study was to describe coronary patterns in these patients. In 84 postmortem heart specimens with BAV and associated CHD, position and height of the coronary ostia were studied and related to BAV morphology. High take-off right (RCA) and left coronary arteries (LCA) were observed in 23% and 37% of hearts, respectively, most frequently in hearts with hypoplastic left ventricle (HLV) and outflow tract anomalies. In HLV, high take-off was observed in 18/40 (45%) more frequently of LCA (n=14) than RCA (n=6). In hearts with aortic hypoplasia, 8/13 (62%) had high take-off LCA and 6/13 (46%) high take-off RCA. High take-off was seen 19 times in 22 specimens with perimembranous ventricular septal defect (RCA 8, LCA 11). High take-off was associated with type 1A BAV (raphe between right and left coronary leaflets), more outspoken for the RCA. Separate ostia of left anterior descending coronary artery and left circumflex coronary artery were seen in four hearts (5%), not related to specific BAV morphology. High take-off coronary arteries, especially the LCA, occur more frequently in BAV with associated CHD than reported in normal hearts and isolated BAV. Outflow tract defects and HLV are associated with type 1A BAV and high take-off coronary arteries. Although it is unclear whether these findings in infants with detrimental outcome can be related to surviving adults, clinical awareness of variations in coronary anatomy is warranted. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Vitamin D Status After Cardiopulmonary Bypass in Children With Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Zahr, Riad; Faustino, Edward Vincent S; Carpenter, Thomas; Kirshbom, Paul; Hall, E Kevin; Fahey, John T; Kandil, Sarah B

    2016-06-01

    Deficiency in 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in the critically ill. Children who underwent surgery for congenital heart disease under cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) are typically deficient in 25OHD. It is unclear whether this deficiency is due to CPB. We hypothesized that CPB reduces the levels of 25OHD in children with congenital heart disease. We conducted a prospective observational study on children aged 2 months to 17 years who underwent CPB. Serum was collected at 3 time points: immediately before, immediately after surgery, and 24 hours after surgery. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, 1,25(OH)2D, vitamin D binding protein, and albumin levels were measured. Levels were compared using repeated measures analysis of variance. We enrolled 20 patients, 40% were deficient in 25OHD with levels Vitamin D binding protein and albumin levels did not significantly change. Cardiopulmonary bypass decreases 25OHD by reducing the free fraction. Current investigations are geared to establish whether vitamin D deficiency is associated with outcomes and if treatment is appropriate.

  12. Three-dimensional cine MRI in free-breathing infants and children with congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, Achim; Fenchel, Michael C.; Kramer, Ulrich; Bretschneider, Christiane; Doering, Joerg; Claussen, Claus D.; Miller, Stephan [University of Tuebingen (Germany). Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Greil, Gerald F. [St. Thomas Hospital, Division of Imaging Sciences, King' s College London (United Kingdom); Martirosian, Petros [University of Tuebingen, Section of Experimental Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Sieverding, Ludger [University of Tuebingen, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    Patients with congenital heart disease frequently have complex cardiac and vascular malformations requiring detailed non-invasive diagnostic evaluation including functional parameters. To evaluate the morphological and functional information provided by a novel 3-D cine steady-state free-precession (SSFP) sequence. Twenty consecutive children (mean age 2.2 years, nine boys) were examined using a 1.5-T MR system including 2-D cine gradient-recalled-echo sequences, static 3-D SSFP and 3-D cine SSFP sequences. Measurement of ventricular structures and volumes showed close agreement between the 3-D cine SSFP sequence and the 2-D cine gradient-recalled-echo and static 3-D SSFP sequences (left ventricular volumes mean difference 1.0-1.9 ml and 8.8-11.4%, respectively; right ventricular volumes 1.7-2.1 ml and 9.9-16.9%, respectively). No systematic bias was observed. 3-D cine MRI provides anatomic as well as functional information with sufficient spatial and temporal resolution in free-breathing infants with congenital heart disease. (orig.)

  13. Association of temporary complete AV block and junctional ectopic tachycardia after surgery for congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paech, Christian; Dähnert, Ingo; Kostelka, Martin; Mende, Meinhardt; Gebauer, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Junctional ectopic tachycardia (JET) is a postoperative complication with a mortality rate of up to 14% after surgery for congenital heart disease. This study evaluated the risk factors of JET and explored the association of postoperative temporary third degree atrioventricular (AV) block and the occurrence of JET. Data were collected retrospectively from 1158 patients who underwent surgery for congenital heart disease. The overall incidence of JET was 2.8%. Temporary third degree AV block occurred in 1.6% of cases. Permanent third degree AV block requiring pacemaker implantation occurred in 1% of cases. In all, 56% of patients with JET had temporary AV block (P AV block (P = 0.56). temporary third degree AV block did not suffer from JET. A correlation between temporary third degree AV block and postoperative JET could be observed. The risk factors identified for JET include younger age groups at the time of surgery, longer aortic cross clamping time and surgical procedures in proximity to the AV node.

  14. Growth Status of Iranian Children with Hemodynamically Important Congenital Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Dalili

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between congenital heart disease (CHD and growth retardation is well documented. We investigated the growth condition of Iranian children with several types of congenital heart disease (CHD and compared it with worldwide researches. Growth condition was investigated in 469 patients with important CHD aged from 1 month to 18 years. The patients were divided into two groups; infants (aged 12 months or less, and children (1-18 yrs of age. Children with hemodynamically unimportant small VSDs or small ASDs were not studied. Other exclusion criteria were prematurity, known genetic disorders and neurologic disease affecting growthd. All patients' cardiac diagnoses were made on the basis of clinical and laboratory examinations; including electrocardiography, echocardiography, cardiac catheterization, and angiography. Body weight and height of all patients were measured using conventional methods and compared with standard growth charts. In all patients body weights and heights were significantly lower than normal population. This difference was greater in the weight of female children. Other risk factors for growth failure were large left-to-right intracardiac shunts, pulmonary hypertension and cyanosis. Iranian children with CHD have growth failure somewhat different from other countries. Lower body weights of cyanotic patients and female children indicated that these patients need more nutritional and psychosocial attention.

  15. Role of Computational Modelling in Planning and Executing Interventional Procedures for Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slesnick, Timothy C

    2017-09-01

    Increasingly, computational modelling and numerical simulations are used to help plan complex surgical and interventional cardiovascular procedures in children and young adults with congenital heart disease. From its origins more than 30 years ago, surgical planning with analysis of flow hemodynamics and energy loss/efficiency has helped design and implement many modifications to existing techniques. On the basis of patient-specific medical imaging, surgical planning allows accurate model production that can then be manipulated in a virtual surgical environment, with the proposed solutions finally tested with advanced computational fluid dynamics to evaluate the results. Applications include a broad range of congenital heart disease, including patients with single-ventricle anatomy undergoing staged palliation, those with arch obstruction, with double outlet right ventricle, or with tetralogy of Fallot. In the present work, we focus on clinical applications of this exciting field. We describe the framework for these techniques, including brief descriptions of the engineering principles applied and the interaction between "benchtop" data with medical decision-making. We highlight some early insights learned from pioneers over the past few decades, including refinements in Fontan baffle geometries and configurations. Finally, we offer a glimpse into exciting advances that are presently being explored, including use of modelling for transcatheter interventions. In this era of personalized medicine, computational modelling and surgical planning allows patient-specific tailoring of interventions to optimize clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Repeatability of cardiac-MRI-measured right ventricular size and function in congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Rowan; Salem, Yishay [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, New York, NY (United States); Shah, Amee; Lai, Wyman W. [Morgan Stanley Children' s Hospital of New York Presbyterian, New York, NY (United States); Nielsen, James C. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai Children' s Heart Center, Box 1201, New York, NY (United States)

    2011-08-15

    The measurement error for right ventricular (RV) size and function assessed by cardiac MRI (CMRI) in congenital heart disease has not been fully characterized. As CMRI parameters are being increasingly utilized to make clinical decisions, defining error in the clinical setting is critical. This investigation examines the repeatability of CMRI for RV size and function. Forty consecutive people with congenital heart disease involving the RV were retrospectively identified. Contouring of RV volumes was performed by two expert CMRI clinicians. The coefficient of variability and repeatability coefficients were calculated. Repeatability coefficients were multiplied by the mean value for each group studied to define a threshold beyond which measurement error was unlikely to be responsible. The variability for indexed RV end-diastolic volume = 3.2% and 3.3% for intra- and interobserver comparisons, respectively. The repeatability coefficients were 13.2% and 14.9% for intra- and interobserver comparisons, which yielded threshold values of 15.1 ml/m{sup 2} and 20.2 ml/m{sup 2}, respectively. For RV ejection fraction (EF), the repeatability coefficients for intra- and interobserver comparisons were 5.0% and 6.0%, which resulted in threshold values of 2.6 EF% and 3.0 EF%. The threshold values generated can be used during serial assessment of RV size and function. (orig.)

  17. Challenges in the management of congenital heart disease in Vietnam: A single center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vu Minh Phuc

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vietnam, in Asia, is a low middle-income country with a relatively large population to cater to. Not many know about Vietnam, or its healthcare sector especially the field of pediatric cardiology and congenital heart disease. In contrast to the developed world, congenital heart disease (CHD is not diagnosed early. Since most of the patients visit the hospital only in later stages of the disease there are many complications during the operation and post-operatively. But during the past 5 years (from 2009, there has been major improvement in the treatment of CHD, both by intervention and surgery. At present, all kinds of CHD, both simple and complex are being successfully treated in our country. Today in Vietnam, all children under 6 years of age have health insurance coverage, under which almost all operations and catheter interventions are done free in government hospitals. It is helping many patients, especially those from the poor socioeconomic background. However, the present infrastructure is inadequate and a long waiting list has accumulated for treatment of CHD.

  18. Left-to-Right Shunt with Congenital Heart Disease: Single Center Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevik, Ayhan; Olgunturk, Rana; Kula, Serdar; Saylan, Berna; Pektas, Ayhan; Oguz, Deniz; Tunaoglu, Sedef

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in congenital heart disease (CHD) with an isolated, large left-to-right shunt and to indicate the factors in the development of PAH. Methods. The pressure measurements in the cardiac chambers and the calculations based on the Fick's principle were compared among 3 separate groups of patients, respectively, with PAH, with hyperkinetic pulmonary hypertension (HPH), and with neither PAH nor HPH. Results. PAH was diagnosed in 30 (12.3%) patients, HPH in 35 (14.4%), while 177 (73.1%) were free of either. The highest risk for the development of PAH was found in the presence of perimembranous ventricular septal defect. A statistically significant difference was seen among these groups as to their left atrial pressure (p = 0.005) and the mean pulmonary arterial pressure (PAPmean; p < 0.001). While a correlation was present between RpI on one hand and age on the other (p = 0.014), a multiple linear regression could not evidence any correlation among age (p = 0.321), gender (p = 0.929). Conclusion. Our findings do not allow establishing a correlation between the duration of the high pulmonary flow and pulmonary vascular resistance increase or PAH development in isolated left-to-right shunts with congenital heart diseases. PMID:23862073

  19. Thrombocytosis in asplenia syndrome with congenital heart disease: a previously unrecognized risk factor for thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamura, Kenichiro; Joo, Kunitaka; Ohga, Shouichi; Nagata, Hazumu; Ikeda, Kazuyuki; Muneuchi, Jun; Watanabe, Mamie; Hara, Toshiro

    2013-09-01

    Thrombocytosis and thromboembolic complications occur after splenectomy. However, there is no previous report investigating the presence of thrombocytosis and its association with thromboembolic events in patients having asplenia syndrome with congenital heart disease. Enrolled were 161 consecutive patients with functionally single ventricle who underwent cardiac catheterization between 1997 and 2010. They were divided into two groups: patients having asplenia (Group A, n=46) and patients having no asplenia (Group B, n=115). Aspirin therapy was employed in all patients after surgical interventions except for pulmonary artery banding. We retrospectively reviewed the platelet counts at each seven stage of cardiac catheterization (for pre- and postoperative evaluation of the first palliation, Glenn operation, and Fontan operation, and for late evaluation after Fontan operation), incidence of thromboembolic events, and other possible risk factors for thromboembolism. The median platelet counts in Group A were consistently higher than those in Group B at any of the seven stages of cardiac catheterizations (pthrombocytosis is present in patients with asplenia syndrome. It may greatly contribute to the development of thromboembolism during the management of congenital heart disease than expected. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Educational achievement among long-term survivors of congenital heart defects: a Danish population-based follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Morten; Hjortdal, Vibeke E; Mortensen, Laust Hvas;

    2011-01-01

    Background: Congenital heart defect patients may experience neurodevelopmental impairment. We investigated their educational attainments from basic schooling to higher education. Patients and methods: Using administrative databases, we identified all Danish patients with a cardiac defect diagnosis...... of educational attainment was reduced among long-term congenital heart defect survivors....... and controls born at term and without extracardiac defects or chromosomal anomalies. Results: We identified 2986 patients. Their probability of completing compulsory basic schooling was approximately 10% lower than that of control individuals (adjusted hazard ratio=0.79, ranged from 0.75 to 0.82 0.79; 95...