WorldWideScience

Sample records for reorientational correlation times

  1. Spinning in the Scanner: Neural Correlates of Virtual Reorientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Jennifer E.; Joanisse, Marc F.; Newcombe, Nora S.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have used spatial reorientation task paradigms to identify underlying cognitive mechanisms of navigation in children, adults, and a range of animal species. Despite broad interest in this task across disciplines, little is known about the brain bases of reorientation. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine neural…

  2. Spinning in the Scanner: Neural Correlates of Virtual Reorientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Jennifer E.; Joanisse, Marc F.; Newcombe, Nora S.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have used spatial reorientation task paradigms to identify underlying cognitive mechanisms of navigation in children, adults, and a range of animal species. Despite broad interest in this task across disciplines, little is known about the brain bases of reorientation. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine neural…

  3. Time-dependent solution for reorientation of rotating tidally deformed visco-elastic bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haiyang; van der Wal, Wouter; Vermeersen, Bert

    2017-04-01

    Many icy satellites or planets contain features which suggest a (past) reorientation of the body, such as the tiger stripes on Enceladus and the heart-shaped Sputnik Planum on Pluto. Most of these icy bodies are tidally locked and this creates a large tidal bulge which is about three times of its centrifugal (equatorial) bulge. To study the reorientation of such rotating tidally deformed body is complicated and most previous studies apply the so-called fluid limit method. The fluid limit approach ignores the viscous response of the body and assumes that it immediately reaches its fluid limit when simulating the reorientation due to a changing load. As a result, this method can only simulate cases when the change in the load is much slower than the dominant viscous modes of the body. For other kinds of load, for instance, a Heaviside load due to an impact which creates an instant relocation of mass, it does not give us a prediction of how the reorientation is accomplished (e.g. How fast? Along which path?). We establish a new method which can give an accurate time-dependent solution for reorientation of rotating tidally deformed bodies. Our method can be applied both semi-analytically or numerically (with finite element method) to include features such as lateral heterogeneity or non-linear material. We also present an extension of our method to simulate the e ffect of a fossil bulge. With our method, we show that reorientation of a tidally deformed body driven by a positive mass anomaly near the poles has a preference for rotating around the tidal axis instead of towards it, contrary to predictions in previous studies. References Hu, H., W. van der Wal and L.L.A. Vermeersen (2017). A numerical method for reorientation of rotating tidally deformed visco-elastic bodies. Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, doi:10.1002/2016JE005114, 2016JE005114. Matsuyama, I. and Nimmo, F. (2007). Rotational stability of tidally deformed planetary bodies. Journal of Geophysical

  4. Measuring molecular reorientation at liquid surfaces with time-resolved sum-frequency spectroscopy: a theoretical framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nienhuys, Han-Kwang; Bonn, Mischa

    2009-05-28

    A theoretical framework is presented for the design and analysis of ultrafast time- and polarization-resolved surface vibrational spectroscopy, aimed at elucidating surface molecular reorientational motion in real time. Vibrational excitation with linearly polarized light lifts the azimuthal symmetry of the surface transition-dipole distribution, causing marked, time-dependent changes in the surface sum-frequency generation (SFG) intensity. The subsequent recovery of the SFG signal generally reflects both vibrational relaxation and reorientational motion of surface molecules. We present experimental schemes that allow direct quantification of the time scale of surface molecular reorientational diffusive motion.

  5. Time course and auxin sensitivity of cortical microtubule reorientation in maize roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blancaflor, E. B.; Hasenstein, K. H.

    1995-01-01

    The kinetics of MT [microtubule] reorientation in primary roots of Zea mays cv. Merit, were examined 15, 30, 45, and 60 min after horizontal positioning. Confocal microscopy of longitudinal tissue sections showed no change in MT orientation 15 and 30 min after horizontal placement. However, after 45 and 60 min, MTs of the outer 4-5 cortical cell layers along the lower side were reoriented. In order to test whether MT reorientation during graviresponse is caused by an auxin gradient, we examined the organization of MTs in roots that were incubated for 1 h in solutions containing 10(-9) to 10(-6) M IAA. IAA treatment at 10(-8) M or less showed no major or consistent changes but 10(-7) M IAA resulted in MT reorientation in the cortex. The auxin effect does not appear to be acid-induced since benzoic acid (10(-5) M) did not cause MT reorientation. The region closest to the maturation zone was most sensitive to IAA. The data indicate that early stages of gravity induced curvature occur in the absence of MT reorientation but sustained curvature leads to reoriented MTs in the outer cortex. Growth inhibition along the lower side of graviresponding roots appears to result from asymmetric distribution of auxin following gravistimulation.

  6. Estrogen-induced collagen reorientation correlates with sympathetic denervation of the rat myometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, G F; Bianchimano, P; Brauer, M M

    2016-12-01

    Estrogen inhibits the growth and causes the degeneration (pruning) of sympathetic nerves supplying the rat myometrium. Previous cryoculture studies evidenced that substrate-bound signals contribute to diminish the ability of the estrogenized myometrium to support sympathetic nerve growth. Using electron microscopy, here we examined neurite-substrate interactions in myometrial cryocultures, observing that neurites grew associated to collagen fibrils present in the surface of the underlying cryosection. In addition, we assessed quantitatively the effects of estrogen on myometrial collagen organization in situ, using ovariectomized rats treated with estrogen and immature females undergoing puberty. Under low estrogen levels, most collagen fibrils were oriented in parallel to the muscle long axis (83% and 85%, respectively). Following estrogen treatment, 89% of fibrils was oriented perpendicularly to the muscle main axis; while after puberty, 57% of fibrils acquired this orientation. Immunohistochemistry combined with histology revealed that the vast majority of fine sympathetic nerve fibers supplying the myometrium courses within the areas where collagen realignment was observed. Finally, to assess whether depending on their orientation collagen fibrils can promote or inhibit neurite outgrowth, we employed cryocultures, now using as substrate tissue sections of rat-tail tendon. We observed that neurites grew extensively in the direction of the parallel-aligned collagen fibrils in the tendon main axis but were inhibited to grow perpendicularly to this axis. Collectively, these findings support the hypothesis that collagen reorientation may be one of the factors contributing to diminish the neuritogenic capacity of the estrogen-primed myometrial substrate.

  7. Real-Time Observation of Organic Cation Reorientation in Methylammonium Lead Iodide Perovskites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakulin, Artem A.; Selig, Oleg; Bakker, Huib J.; Rezus, Yves L. A.; Mueller, Christian; Glaser, Tobias; Lovrincic, Robert; Sun, Zhenhua; Chen, Zhuoying; Walsh, Aron; Frost, Jarvist M.; Jansen, Thomas L. C.

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of a mobile and polarized organic moiety as a cation in 3D lead-iodide perovskites brings fascinating optoelectronic properties to these materials. The extent and the time scales of the orientational mobility of the organic cation and the molecular mechanism behind its motion remain

  8. Junction Plasmon-Induced Molecular Reorientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hu, Dehong; Hess, Wayne P.

    2013-10-17

    Time and frequency dependent intensity variations in sequences of Raman spectra recorded at plasmonic junctions can be assigned to molecular reorientation. This is revealed through Raman trajectories recorded at a nanojunction formed between a silver AFM tip and a corrugated silver surface coated with biphenyl-4,4’-dithiol. Molecular motion is not observed when the tip is retracted and only surface enhancement is operative. In effect, junction plasmon induced molecular reorientation is tracked.

  9. Electron spin relaxation due to reorientation of a permanent zero field splitting tensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefle, Nathaniel; Sharp, Robert

    2004-09-15

    Electron spin relaxation of transition metal ions with spin S> or =1 results primarily from thermal modulation of the zero field splitting (zfs) tensor. This occurs both by distortion of the zfs tensor due to intermolecular collisions and, for complexes with less than cubic symmetry, by reorientational modulation of the permanent zfs tensor. The reorientational mechanism is much less well characterized in previous work than the distortional mechanism although it is an important determinant of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) paramagnetic relaxation enhancement phenomena (i.e., the enhancement of NMR relaxation rates produced by paramagnetic ions in solution or NMR-PRE). The classical density matrix theory of spin relaxation does not provide an appropriate description of the reorientational mechanism at low Zeeman field strengths because the zero-order spin wave functions are stochastic functions of time. Using spin dynamics simulation techniques, the time correlation functions of the spin operators have been computed and used to determine decay times for the reorientational relaxation mechanism for S=1. In the zfs limit of laboratory field strengths (H(Zeem)spin decay is exponential, the spin relaxation time, tau(S) (composite function) approximately 0.53tau(R)((1)), where tau(R)((1)) is the reorientational correlation time of a molecule-fixed vector. The value of tau(S) (composite function) is independent of the magnitude of the cylindrical zfs parameter (D), but it depends strongly on low symmetry zfs terms (the E/D ratio). Other spin dynamics (SD) simulations examined spin decay in the intermediate regime of field strengths where H(Zeem) approximately H(zfs) (composite function), and in the vicinity of the Zeeman limit. The results demonstrate that the reorientational electron spin relaxation mechanism is often significant when H(zfs) (composite function)> or =H(Zeem), and that its neglect can lead to serious errors in the interpretation of NMR-PRE data.

  10. The reorientation of spatial planning in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galland, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    has been reoriented at national, regional and urban/local levels over time. The fundamental objective of the project is hence to explore and examine the history and evolution of Danish spatial planning through three embedded case studies from inception until most recent transformations. Respectively......, these studies embrace the reorientations of Danish national spatial planning; regional spatial planning in North Jutland; and urban planning and waterfront redevelopment in the city of Aalborg. In attaining its aim, the dissertation is guided by the general premise that the reorientations of spatial planning...... planning practices at different administrative levels. As a whole, the outcome of this dissertation confirms that there is an increasing policy and institutional mismatch between national, regional and urban/local planning practices. It further suggests that the lack of spatial reflexion embedded...

  11. Reorienting Hypnosis Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alter, David S; Sugarman, Laurence Irwin

    2017-01-01

    The legacy model of professional clinical hypnosis training presents a restrictive frame increasingly incompatible with our evolving understanding of psychobiology, health, and care. Emerging science recognizes human experience not as disease and diagnosis, but as manifestations of individual, uniquely-endowed, adaptively self-regulating systems. Hypnosis is a particularly well-suited discipline for effecting beneficial change in this paradigm. Training in clinical hypnosis must progress from the current linearly-structured, diagnosis-based, reductionist model toward a more responsive, naturalistic, and client-centered curriculum in order to remain relevant and accessible to clinicians beginning to integrate it into their practices. To that end, this article extends Hope and Sugarman's (2015) thesis of hypnosis as a skill set for systemic perturbation and reorientation to consider what those skills may be, the principles on which they are based, and how they may be taught. Parsing a clinical vignette reveals how incorporation of novelty and uncertainty results in less restrictive and more naturalistic hypnotic encounters that, in response to client-generated cues, elicit psychophysiological plasticity. This disruptive hypnosis education and training framework extends the utility and benefit of applied clinical hypnosis.

  12. Cell reorientation under cyclic stretching

    CERN Document Server

    Livne, Ariel; Geiger, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical cues from the extracellular microenvironment play a central role in regulating the structure, function and fate of living cells. Nevertheless, the precise nature of the mechanisms and processes underlying this crucial cellular mechanosensitivity remains a fundamental open problem. Here we provide a novel framework for addressing cellular sensitivity and response to external forces by experimentally and theoretically studying one of its most striking manifestations -- cell reorientation to a uniform angle in response to cyclic stretching of the underlying substrate. We first show that existing approaches are incompatible with our extensive measurements of cell reorientation. We then propose a fundamentally new theory that shows that dissipative relaxation of the cell's passively-stored, two-dimensional, elastic energy to its minimum actively drives the reorientation process. Our theory is in excellent quantitative agreement with the complete temporal reorientation dynamics of individual cells, measu...

  13. Polarization-FTIR-spectroscopicstudy of the 2D-gas—solid transition, in CO 2 on NaCl(100): reorientation, correlation field breakdown, heats of adsorption and 2D-condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidberg, J.; Kampshoff, E.; Kühnemuth, R.; Schönekäs, O.

    Molecular reorientation and correlation field breakdown in the two-dimesional evaporation of CO 2 on NaCl(100) were measured by polarization Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. In the ordered 2D-condensed phase with p(2 × 1) structure a the correlation field exists, the CO 2 molecules being tilted 34° ± 5° from the surface. In the 2D-vapor the CO 2 molecules lie flat on surface, and no correlation field is detected. Both coexisting phases, clearly distinguished in the spectra, have constant density at constant temperature independent of coverage. From the variation of the 2D-vapor density with temperature the enthalpy of the 2D-evaporation was found to be Δ H v2D = 3.0 ± 0.1kJ/mol. The isosteric heats of adsorption of the 2D-gas and the 2D-solid were determined to 32.4 ± 1.1kJ/mol and35.6 ± 1.3kJ/mol, respectively.

  14. Optimal Reorientation Of Spacecraft Orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelnokov Yuriy Nikolaevich

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of optimal reorientation of the spacecraft orbit is considered. For solving the problem we used quaternion equations of motion written in rotating coordinate system. The use of quaternion variables makes this consideration more efficient. The problem of optimal control is solved on the basis of the maximum principle. An example of numerical solution of the problem is given.

  15. Reorientational eigenmode dynamics: a combined MD/NMR relaxation analysis method for flexible parts in globular proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prompers, J J; Brüschweiler, R

    2001-08-01

    An approach is presented for the interpretation of heteronuclear NMR spin relaxation data in mobile protein parts in terms of reorientational eigenmode dynamics. The method is based on the covariance matrix of the spatial functions of the nuclear spin interactions that cause relaxation expressed as spherical harmonics of rank 2. The approach was applied to characterize the dynamics of a loop region of ubiquitin. The covariance matrix was determined from a conformational ensemble generated by a 5 ns molecular dynamics simulation. It was found that the time correlation functions of the dominant eigenmodes decay in good approximation with a single correlation time. From the reorientational eigenmodes, their eigenvalues, and correlation times, NMR relaxation data were calculated in accordance with Bloch-Wangsness-Redfield relaxation theory and directly compared with experimental (15)N relaxation parameters. Using a fitting procedure, agreement between calculated and experimental data was improved significantly by adjusting eigenvalues and correlation times of the dominant modes. The presented procedure provides detailed information on correlated reorientational dynamics of flexible parts in globular proteins. The covariance matrix was linked to the covariance matrix of backbone dihedral angle fluctuations, allowing one to study the motional behavior of these degrees of freedom on nano- and subnanosecond time scales.

  16. Reorientation from Altered States: Please, More Carefully.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Charles A.

    1989-01-01

    Claims counselors too often appear to forget to reorient clients from altered states of consciousness used in counseling and that failure to reorient can result in unnecessary discomfort for clients. Provides suggestions for when and how to reorient to avoid unwanted, lingering aftereffects. (Author/ABL)

  17. Semiclassical approximations to quantum time correlation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, S. A.; Skinner, J. L.

    1998-09-01

    Over the last 40 years several ad hoc semiclassical approaches have been developed in order to obtain approximate quantum time correlation functions, using as input only the corresponding classical time correlation functions. The accuracy of these approaches has been tested for several exactly solvable gas-phase models. In this paper we test the accuracy of these approaches by comparing to an exactly solvable many-body condensed-phase model. We show that in the frequency domain the Egelstaff approach is the most accurate, especially at high frequencies, while in the time domain one of the other approaches is more accurate.

  18. The reorientation of spatial planning in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galland, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    have been increasingly overridden by growth-oriented and competitiveness logics. More recently, the effects of a structural reform that changed the geographies of inter-governmental arrangements within the country have significantly transformed the orientation, scope, structure and performance...... has been reoriented at national, regional and urban/local levels over time. The fundamental objective of the project is hence to explore and examine the history and evolution of Danish spatial planning through three embedded case studies from inception until most recent transformations. Respectively...

  19. Domain structures and correlated out-of-plane and in-plane polarization reorientations in Pb(Zr0.96Ti0.04O3 single crystal via piezoresponse force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Andreeva

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Pb(Zr1-xTixO3 single crystal with a low titanium content (x = 4% was studied by the piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The XRD studies showed that the crystal faces are orthogonal to the principal cubic axes and confirmed the existence of an intermediate phase between the high-temperature paraelectric (PE phase and the low-temperature antiferroelectric (AFE one. A significant temperature hysteresis of phase transitions was observed by the XRD: On heating, the AFE state transforms into the intermediate one at about 373 K and the PE phase appears at 508 K, whereas on cooling the intermediate phase forms at 503 K and persists down to at least 313 K. The PFM investigation was focused on the intermediate phase and involved measurements of both out-of-plane and in-plane electromechanical responses of the (001-oriented crystal face. The PFM images revealed the presence of polarization patterns switchable by an applied electric field, which confirms the ferroelectric character of the intermediate phase. Importantly, two types of regular domain structures were found, which differ by the spatial orientation of domain walls. The reconstruction of polarization configurations in the observed domain structures showed that one of them is a purely ferroelectric 180° structure with domain walls orthogonal to the crystal surface and parallel to one of the ⟨111⟩ pseudocubic directions. Another one is a ferroelectric-ferroelastic domain structure with the 71° walls parallel to the {101} or {011} crystallographic planes. Remarkably, this domain structure shows correlated out-of-plane and in-plane polarization reorientations after the poling with the aid of the microscope tip.

  20. Fundamental experiments on hydride reorientation in zircaloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colas, Kimberly B.

    In the current study, an in-situ X-ray diffraction technique using synchrotron radiation was used to follow directly the kinetics of hydride dissolution and precipitation during thermomechanical cycles. This technique was combined with conventional microscopy (optical, SEM and TEM) to gain an overall understanding of the process of hydride reorientation. Thus this part of the study emphasized the time-dependent nature of the process, studying large volume of hydrides in the material. In addition, a micro-diffraction technique was also used to study the spatial distribution of hydrides near stress concentrations. This part of the study emphasized the spatial variation of hydride characteristics such as strain and morphology. Hydrided samples in the shape of tensile dog-bones were used in the time-dependent part of the study. Compact tension specimens were used during the spatial dependence part of the study. The hydride elastic strains from peak shift and size and strain broadening were studied as a function of time for precipitating hydrides. The hydrides precipitate in a very compressed state of stress, as measured by the shift in lattice spacing. As precipitation proceeds the average shift decreases, indicating average stress is reduced, likely due to plastic deformation and morphology changes. When nucleation ends the hydrides follow the zirconium matrix thermal contraction. When stress is applied below the threshold stress for reorientation, hydrides first nucleate in a very compressed state similar to that of unstressed hydrides. After reducing the average strain similarly to unstressed hydrides, the average hydride strain reaches a constant value during cool-down to room temperature. This could be due to a greater ease of deforming the matrix due to the applied far-field strain which would compensate for the strains due to thermal contraction. Finally when hydrides reorient, the average hydride strains become tensile during the first precipitation regime and

  1. Time-dependent correlations in electricity markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez-Ramirez, Jose; Escarela-Perez, Rafael [Departamento de Energia, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Mexico DF, 09340 (Mexico)

    2010-03-15

    In the last years, many electricity markets were subjected to deregulated operation where prices are set by the action of market participants. In this form, producers and consumers rely on demand and price forecasts to decide their bidding strategies, allocate assets, negotiate bilateral contracts, hedge risks, and plan facility investments. A basic feature of efficient market hypothesis is the absence of correlations between price increments over any time scale leading to random walk-type behavior of prices, so arbitrage is not possible. However, recent studies have suggested that this is not the case and correlations are present in the behavior of diverse electricity markets. In this paper, a temporal quantification of electricity market correlations is made by means of detrended fluctuation and Allan analyses. The approach is applied to two Canadian electricity markets, Ontario and Alberta. The results show the existence of correlations in both demand and prices, exhibiting complex time-dependent behavior with lower correlations in winter while higher in summer. Relatively steady annual cycles in demand but unstable cycles in prices are detected. On the other hand, the more significant nonlinear effects (measured in terms of a multifractality index) are found for winter months, while the converse behavior is displayed during the summer period. In terms of forecasting models, our results suggest that nonlinear recursive models (e.g., feedback NNs) should be used for accurate day-ahead price estimation. In contrast, linear models can suffice for demand forecasting purposes. (author)

  2. Stress-induced martensite variant reorientation in magnetic shape memory Ni Mn Ga single crystal studied by neutron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, P.; Sittner, P.; Lukas, P.; Hannula, S.-P.; Heczko, O.

    2008-06-01

    Stress-induced martensite variant reorientation in magnetic shape memory Ni-Mn-Ga single crystal was studied in situ by the neutron diffraction technique. Principles of determination of individual tetragonal martensitic variants in shape memory alloys are explained. Using neutron diffraction we show that the macroscopic strain originates solely from the martensite structure reorientation or variant redistribution. Neutron diffraction also reveals that the reorientation of martensite is not fully completed even at a stress value of 25 MPa, which is about 20 times larger than the mean stress needed for reorientation. Only one twinning system is active during the reorientation process.

  3. Unequal-time correlators for cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitching, T. D.; Heavens, A. F.

    2017-03-01

    Measurements of the power spectrum from large-scale structure surveys have, to date, assumed an equal-time approximation, where the full cross-correlation power spectrum of the matter density field evaluated at different times (or distances) has been approximated either by the power spectrum at a fixed time or in an improved fashion, by a geometric mean P (k ;r1,r2)=[P (k ;r1)P (k ;r2)]1 /2 . In this paper we investigate the expected impact of the geometric mean ansatz and present an application in assessing the impact on weak-gravitational-lensing cosmological parameter inference, using a perturbative unequal time correlator. As one might expect, we find that the impact of this assumption is greatest at large separations in redshift Δ z ≳0.3 where the change in the amplitude of the matter power spectrum can be as much as 10 percent for k ≳5 h ⁢ Mpc-1 . However, of more concern is that the corrections for small separations, where the clustering is not close to zero, may not be negligibly small. In particular, we find that for a Euclid- or LSST-like weak lensing experiment, the assumption of equal-time correlators may result in biased predictions of the cosmic shear power spectrum, and that the impact is strongly dependent on the amplitude of the intrinsic alignment signal. To compute unequal-time correlations to sufficient accuracy will require advances in either perturbation theory to high k modes or extensive use of simulations.

  4. Wavelet Correlation Coefficient of 'strongly correlated' financial time series

    OpenAIRE

    Ashok Razdan

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we use wavelet concepts to show that correlation coefficient between two financial data's is not constant but varies with scale from high correlation value to strongly anti-correlation value This studies is important because correlation coefficient is used to quantify degree of independence between two variables. In econophysics correlation coefficient forms important input to evolve hierarchial tree and minimum spanning tree of financial data.

  5. Equilibrium time correlation functions in open systems

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Jinglong; Agarwal, Animesh; Site, Luigi Delle

    2014-01-01

    We study equilibrium time correlation functions for liquid water at room temperature employing the Molecular Dynamics (MD) adaptive resolution method AdResS in its Grand Canonical formulation (GC-AdResS). This study introduces two technical innovations: the employment of a local thermostat that acts only in the reservoir and the consequent construction of an "ideal" Grand Canonical reservoir of particles and energy. As a consequence the artificial action of a thermostat in the calculation of equilibrium time correlation functions of standard NVT simulations is efficiently removed. The success of the technical innovation provides the basis for formulating a profound conceptual problem, that is the extension of Liouville theorem to open systems (Grand Canonical ensemble), a question, so far, treated neither in MD nor (in general) in statistical physics.

  6. Reorientation of Defect Dipoles in Ferroelectric Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bao-Shan; LI Guo-Rong; ZHAO Su-Chuan; ZHU Zhi-Gang; DING Ai-Li

    2005-01-01

    @@ We investigate the frequency, temperature, tetragonality and quenched temperature dependences of the hysteresis loops in Pb[(Zr0.52 Ti0.48)0.95 (Mn1/3Nb2/3)0.05]O3 (PMnN-PZT) ceramics. It has been demonstrated that the polarization-field hysteresis curves show "pinched" shapes when tested at room temperature, higher frequency or using the large-tetragonality specimen. While normal square-like loops are observed at 200 ℃ and 0.01 Hz or using the small-tetragonality one. Meanwhile, close relations between the P-E loops and the applied frequency,temperature or tetragonality reveal that there exists a typical relaxation time corresponding to the reorientation of the defect dipoles. It can be seen further from the quenched temperature dependences of the loops that the reorientation of the defect dipoles may influence the pinching. Compared to the intrinsic depinning procedure induced by changes of the distribution of defect dipoles, we provide new evidence for extrinsic depinning mechanism of the defect dipoles in the ferroelectric ceramics.

  7. Genomic Signals of Reoriented ORFs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Dan Cristea

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex representation of nucleotides is used to convert DNA sequences into complex digital genomic signals. The analysis of the cumulated phase and unwrapped phase of DNA genomic signals reveals large-scale features of eukaryote and prokaryote chromosomes that result from statistical regularities of base and base-pair distributions along DNA strands. By reorienting the chromosome coding regions, a “hidden” linear variation of the cumulated phase has been revealed, along with the conspicuous almost linear variation of the unwrapped phase. A model of chromosome longitudinal structure is inferred on these bases.

  8. Nuclear disassembly time scales using space time correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durand, D.; Colin, J.; Lecolley, J.F.; Meslin, C.; Aboufirassi, M.; Bougault, R.; Brou, R. [Caen Univ., 14 (France). Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire; Bilwes, B.; Cosmo, F. [Strasbourg-1 Univ., 67 (France); Galin, J. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France); and others

    1996-09-01

    The lifetime, {tau}, with respect to multifragmentation of highly excited nuclei is deduced from the analysis of strongly damped Pb+Au collisions at 29 MeV/u. The method is based on the study of space-time correlations induced by `proximity` effects between fragments emitted by the two primary products of the reaction and gives the time between the re-separation of the two primary products and the subsequent multifragment decay of one partner. (author). 2 refs.

  9. A Molecular Jump Mechanism of Water Reorientation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Damien Laage; James T. Hynes

    2006-01-01

    .... This water reorientation mechanism involves large-amplitude angular jumps, rather than the commonly accepted sequence of small diffusive steps, and therefore calls for reinterpretation of many...

  10. INIST: databases reorientation; INIST: reorientation des bases de donnees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidet, J.C.

    1995-08-01

    INIST is a CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique) laboratory devoted to the treatment of scientific and technical informations and to the management of these informations compiled in a database. Reorientation of the database content has been proposed in 1994 to increase the transfer of research towards enterprises and services, to develop more automatized accesses to the informations, and to create a quality assurance plan. The catalog of publications comprises 5800 periodical titles (1300 for fundamental research and 4500 for applied research). A science and technology multi-thematic database will be created in 1995 for the retrieval of applied and technical informations. ``Grey literature`` (reports, thesis, proceedings..) and human and social sciences data will be added to the base by the use of informations selected in the existing GRISELI and Francis databases. Strong modifications are also planned in the thematic cover of Earth sciences and will considerably reduce the geological information content. (J.S.). 1 tab.

  11. Space-time correlations in urban sprawl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernando, A; Hernando, R; Plastino, A

    2014-02-06

    Understanding demographic and migrational patterns constitutes a great challenge. Millions of individual decisions, motivated by economic, political, demographic, rational and/or emotional reasons underlie the high complexity of demographic dynamics. Significant advances in quantitatively understanding such complexity have been registered in recent years, as those involving the growth of cities but many fundamental issues still defy comprehension. We present here compelling empirical evidence of a high level of regularity regarding time and spatial correlations in urban sprawl, unravelling patterns about the inertia in the growth of cities and their interaction with each other. By using one of the world's most exhaustive extant demographic data basis--that of the Spanish Government's Institute INE, with records covering 111 years and (in 2011) 45 million people, distributed among more than 8000 population nuclei--we show that the inertia of city growth has a characteristic time of 15 years, and its interaction with the growth of other cities has a characteristic distance of 80 km. Distance is shown to be the main factor that entangles two cities (60% of total correlations). The power of our current social theories is thereby enhanced.

  12. Space-time correlations in urban sprawl

    CERN Document Server

    Hernando, A; Plastino, A

    2014-01-01

    Understanding demographic and migrational patterns constitutes a great challenge. Millions of individual decisions, motivated by economic, political, demographic, rational, and/or emotional reasons underlie the high complexity of demographic dynamics. Significant advances in quantitatively understanding such complexity have been registered in recent years, as those involving the growth of cities [Bettencourt LMA, Lobo J, Helbing D, Kuehnert C, West GB (2007) Growth,. Innovation, Scaling, and the Pace of Life in Cities, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 104 (17) 7301-7306] but many fundamental issues still defy comprehension. We present here compelling empirical evidence of a high level of regularity regarding time and spatial correlations in urban sprawl, unraveling patterns about the inertia in the growth of cities and their interaction with each other. By using one of the world's most exhaustive extant demographic data basis ---that of the Spanish Government's Institute INE, with records covering 111 years and (in 201...

  13. Why water reorientation slows without iceberg formation around hydrophobic solutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laage, Damien; Stirnemann, Guillaume; Hynes, James T

    2009-02-26

    The dynamics of water molecules next to hydrophobic solutes is investigated, specifically addressing the recent controversy raised by the first time-resolved observations, which concluded that some water molecules are immobilized by hydrophobic groups, in strong contrast to previous NMR conclusions. Through molecular dynamics simulations and an analytic jump reorientation model, we identify the water reorientation mechanism next to a hydrophobic solute and provide evidence that no water molecules are immobilized by hydrophobic solutes. Their moderate rotational slowdown compared to bulk water (e.g., by a factor of less than 2 at low solute concentration) is mainly due to slower hydrogen-bond exchange. The slowdown is quantitatively described by a solute excluded volume effect at the transition state for the key hydrogen-bond exchange in the reorientation mechanism. We show that this picture is consistent with both ultrafast anisotropy and NMR experimental results and that the transition state excluded volume theory yields quantitative predictions of the rotational slowdown for diverse hydrophobic solutes of varying size over a wide concentration range. We also explain why hydrophobic groups slow water reorientation less than do some hydrophilic groups.

  14. Fast local trust region technique for diffusion tensor registration using exact reorientation and regularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junning; Shi, Yonggang; Tran, Giang; Dinov, Ivo; Wang, Danny J J; Toga, Arthur

    2014-05-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging is widely used in brain connectivity research. As more and more studies recruit large numbers of subjects, it is important to design registration methods which are not only theoretically rigorous, but also computationally efficient. However, the requirement of reorienting diffusion tensors complicates and considerably slows down registration procedures, due to the correlated impacts of registration forces at adjacent voxel locations. Based on the diffeomorphic Demons algorithm (Vercauteren , 2009), we propose a fast local trust region algorithm for handling inseparable registration forces for quadratic energy functions. The method guarantees that, at any time and at any voxel location, the velocity is always within its local trust region. This local regularization allows efficient calculation of the transformation update with numeric integration instead of completely solving a large linear system at every iteration. It is able to incorporate exact reorientation and regularization into the velocity optimization, and preserve the linear complexity of the diffeomorphic Demons algorithm. In an experiment with 84 diffusion tensor images involving both pair-wise and group-wise registrations, the proposed algorithm achieves better registration in comparison with other methods solving large linear systems (Yeo , 2009). At the same time, this algorithm reduces the computation time and memory demand tenfold.

  15. ORNL Interim Progress Report on Hydride Reorientation CIRFT Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yan, Yong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wang, Hong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-10-28

    A systematic study of H. B. Robinson (HBR) high burnup spent nuclear fuel (SNF) vibration integrity was performed in Phase I project under simulated transportation environments, using the Cyclic Integrated Reversible-Bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT) hot cell testing technology developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 2013–14. The data analysis on the as-irradiated HBR SNF rods demonstrated that the load amplitude is the dominant factor that controls the fatigue life of bending rods. However, previous studies have shown that the hydrogen content and hydride morphology has an important effect on zirconium alloy mechanical properties. To address the effect of radial hydrides in SNF rods, in Phase II a test procedure was developed to simulate the effects of elevated temperatures, pressures, and stresses during transfer-drying operations. Pressurized and sealed fuel segments were heated to the target temperature for a preset hold time and slow-cooled at a controlled rate. The procedure was applied to both non-irradiated/prehydrided and high-burnup Zircaloy-4 fueled cladding segments using the Nuclear Regulatory Commission-recommended 400°C maximum temperature limit at various cooling rates. Before testing high-burnup cladding, four out-of-cell tests were conducted to optimize the hydride reorientation (R) test condition with pre-hydride Zircaloy-4 cladding, which has the same geometry as the high burnup fuel samples. Test HR-HBR#1 was conducted at the maximum hoop stress of 145 MPa, at a 400°C maximum temperature and a 5°C/h cooling rate. On the other hand, thermal cycling was performed for tests HR-HBR#2, HR-HBR#3, and HR-HBR#4 to generate more radial hydrides. It is clear that thermal cycling increases the ratio of the radial hydride to circumferential hydrides. The internal pressure also has a significant effect on the radial hydride morphology. This report describes a procedure and experimental results of the four out-of-cell hydride reorientation tests of

  16. Reorienting with terrain slope and landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Daniele; Newcombe, Nora S; Shipley, Thomas F

    2013-02-01

    Orientation (or reorientation) is the first step in navigation, because establishing a spatial frame of reference is essential for a sense of location and heading direction. Recent research on nonhuman animals has revealed that the vertical component of an environment provides an important source of spatial information, in both terrestrial and aquatic settings. Nonetheless, humans show large individual and sex differences in the ability to use terrain slope for reorientation. To understand why some participants--mainly women--exhibit a difficulty with slope, we tested reorientation in a richer environment than had been used previously, including both a tilted floor and a set of distinct objects that could be used as landmarks. This environment allowed for the use of two different strategies for solving the task, one based on directional cues (slope gradient) and one based on positional cues (landmarks). Overall, rather than using both cues, participants tended to focus on just one. Although men and women did not differ significantly in their encoding of or reliance on the two strategies, men showed greater confidence in solving the reorientation task. These facts suggest that one possible cause of the female difficulty with slope might be a generally lower spatial confidence during reorientation.

  17. Reorientation of the early lunar pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Futoshi; Tsunakawa, Hideo; Shimizu, Hisayoshi; Shibuya, Hidetoshi; Matsushima, Masaki

    2014-06-01

    Palaeomagnetic measurements suggest that an active core dynamo operated on the Moon from 4.2 to 3.56 billion years ago. Since the Apollo era, many magnetic anomalies have been observed on the Moon. The magnetization of the lunar crust in some of these regions could preserve the signature of an early dipolar magnetic field generated by a core dynamo. Thus, the magnetic anomalies may yield information about the position of the palaeomagnetic pole during the time that the dynamo operated. Here we present a comprehensive survey of magnetic anomalies on the lunar surface using magnetometer data obtained by the Lunar Prospector and Kaguya lunar orbiters. We extract magnetization vectors from 24 magnetic anomalies using an iterative inversion method and derive the palaeomagnetic poles. We find that the north poles, as well as the antipodal south poles, cluster in two distinct locations: one near the present rotation axis and the other at mid-latitude. The clustering is consistent with a dipole-dominated magnetic field generated in the lunar core by a dynamo that was reversing, much like that of Earth. Furthermore, the two pole clusters imply that the Moon experienced a polar wander event during its ancient history due to the reorientation of the Moon with respect to its spin axis by 45°-60°.

  18. Water reorientation in the hydration shells of hydrophilic and hydrophobic solutes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAAGE; Damien; STIRNEMANN; Guillaume; HYNES; James; T.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss some key aspects of our recent theoretical work on water reorientation dynamics,which is important in a wide range of phenomena,including aqueous phase chemical reactions,protein folding,and drug binding to proteins and DNA. It is shown that,contrary to the standard conception that these dynamics are diffusional,the reorientation of a water molecule occurs by sudden,large amplitude angular jumps. The mechanism involves the exchange of one hydrogen bond for another by the reorienting water,and the process can be fruitfully viewed as a chemical reaction. The results for reorientation times,which can be well described analytically,are discussed in the context of the molecular level interpretation of recent ultrafast infrared spectroscopic results,focusing on the concepts of structure making/breaking and solvent ’icebergs’.

  19. Spin reorientation transition process in single crystal NdFeO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Gaibei; Jiang, Junjie; Kang, Baojuan; Zhang, Jincang; Cheng, Zhenxiang; Ma, Guohong; Cao, Shixun

    2015-06-01

    The spin reorientation transition in single crystal NdFeO3 is studied using AC magnetic susceptibility, hysteresis loops, and polarized terahertz (THz) time domain spectroscopy measurements. Different frequency dependence behaviors of AC susceptibility reflect that the dynamic response of magnetization inside the spin reorientation region differs from the phase outside the transition region. The magnetization hysteresis loops at different temperatures reveal that domains formed during the spin reorientation process, which coincides with the abrupt increase of AC magnetic susceptibility during the transition. In addition, temperature dependent THz wave excitation of quasi-antiferromagnetic mode indicates the process of spin reorientation as a continuous rotation of Fe3+ spins rather than a mixed phase of Γ4 and Γ2.

  20. Time-varying correlation and common structures in volatility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    This thesis studies time series properties of the covariance structure of multivariate asset returns. First, the time-varying feature of correlation is investigated at the intraday level with a new correlation model incorporating the intraday correlation dynamics. Second, the thesis develops a

  1. Using Perceptrons to Explore the Reorientation Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Michael R. W.; Kelly, Debbie M.; Spetch, Marcia L.; Dupuis, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The reorientation task is a paradigm that has been used extensively to study the types of information used by humans and animals to navigate in their environment. In this task, subjects are reinforced for going to a particular location in an arena that is typically rectangular in shape. The subject then has to find that location again after being…

  2. Reorientation of magnetic anisotropy in epitaxial cobalt ferrite thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisfi, A.; Williams, C.M.; Nguyen, L.T.; Lodder, J.C.; Coleman, A.; Corcoran, H.; Johnson, A.; Chang, P.; Kumar, A.; Morgan, W.

    2007-01-01

    Spin reorientation has been observed in CoFe2O4 thin single crystalline films epitaxially grown on (100) MgO substrate upon varying the film thickness. The critical thickness for such a spin-reorientation transition was estimated to be 300 nm. The reorientation is driven by a structural transition

  3. Reorientation of magnetic anisotropy in epitaxial cobalt ferrite thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisfi, A.; Williams, C.M.; Nguyen, L.T.; Lodder, J.C.; Coleman, A.; Corcoran, H.; Johnson, A.; Chang, P.; Abhishek Kumar, A.K.; Kumar, A.; Morgan, W.

    2007-01-01

    Spin reorientation has been observed in CoFe2O4 thin single crystalline films epitaxially grown on (100) MgO substrate upon varying the film thickness. The critical thickness for such a spin-reorientation transition was estimated to be 300 nm. The reorientation is driven by a structural transition

  4. The VLBA Correlator---Real-Time in the Distributed ERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Donald C.

    1993-01-01

    The Correlator is the signal processing engine of the Very Long Baseline Array [VLBA]. Radio signals are recorded on special wideband digital recorders at the 10 VLBA antennas and are shipped to the Array Operations Center in Socorro, New Mexico, where they are played back simultaneously into the Correlator. Real-time software and firmware controls the playback drives to achieve synchronization, compute models of the wavefront delay, control the numerous modules of the Correlator, and record FITS files of the fringe visibilities at the back-end of the Correlator. The Correlator system contains a total of more than 100 programmable computers, which communicate by means of various protocols. The VLBA Correlator's dependence on network protocols is an example of the radical transformation of the real-time world over the past five years: real-time is becoming more like conventional computing.

  5. Space-time combined correlation integral and earthquake interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Pietronero

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Scale invariant properties of seismicity argue for the presence of complex triggering mechanisms. We propose a new method, based on the space-time combined generalization of the correlation integral, that leads to a self-consistent visualization and analysis of both spatial and temporal correlations. The analysis has been applied on global medium-high seismicity. Results show that earthquakes do interact even on long distances and are correlated in time within defined spatial ranges varying over elapsed time. On that base we redefine the aftershock concept.

  6. Efficient quantum algorithm for computing n-time correlation functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedernales, J S; Di Candia, R; Egusquiza, I L; Casanova, J; Solano, E

    2014-07-11

    We propose a method for computing n-time correlation functions of arbitrary spinorial, fermionic, and bosonic operators, consisting of an efficient quantum algorithm that encodes these correlations in an initially added ancillary qubit for probe and control tasks. For spinorial and fermionic systems, the reconstruction of arbitrary n-time correlation functions requires the measurement of two ancilla observables, while for bosonic variables time derivatives of the same observables are needed. Finally, we provide examples applicable to different quantum platforms in the frame of the linear response theory.

  7. Anomalous diffusion in correlated continuous time random walks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejedor, Vincent; Metzler, Ralf, E-mail: metz@ph.tum.d [Physics Department T30 g, Technical University of Munich, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2010-02-26

    We demonstrate that continuous time random walks in which successive waiting times are correlated by Gaussian statistics lead to anomalous diffusion with the mean squared displacement (r{sup 2}(t)) {approx_equal} t{sup 2/3}. Long-ranged correlations of the waiting times with a power-law exponent alpha (0 < alpha <= 2) give rise to subdiffusion of the form (r{sup 2}(t)) {approx_equal} t{sup {alpha}/(1+{alpha})}. In contrast, correlations in the jump lengths are shown to produce superdiffusion. We show that in both cases weak ergodicity breaking occurs. Our results are in excellent agreement with simulations. (fast track communication)

  8. Reducing the Correlation Processing Time by Using a Novel Intrusion Alert Correlation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huwaida Tagelsir Ibrahim Elshoush

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Alert correlation analyzes the alerts from one or more Collaborative Intrusion Detection Systems (CIDSs to produce a concise overview of security-related activity on the network. The correlation process consists of multiple components, each responsible for a different aspect of the overall correlation goal. The sequential order of the correlation components affects the correlation process performance. Furthermore, the total time needed for the whole process depends on the number of processed alerts in each component. This paper presents an innovative alert correlation framework that minimizes the number of processed alerts on each component and thus reducing the correlation processing time. By reordering the components, the introduced correlation model reduces the number of processed alerts as early as possible by discarding the irrelevant, unreal and false alerts in the early phases of the correlation process. A new component, shushing the alerts, is added to deal with the unrelated and false positive alerts. A modified algorithm for fusing the alerts is outlined. The intruders’ intention is grouped into attack scenarios and thus used to detect future attacks. DARPA 2000 intrusion detection scenario specific datasets and a testbed network were used to evaluate the innovative alert correlation model. Comparisons with a previous correlation system were performed. The results of processing these datasets and recognizing the attack patterns demonstrated the potential of the improved correlation model and gave favorable results.

  9. On Reduced Time Evolution for Initially Correlated Pure States

    CERN Document Server

    Aniello, P; Marmo, G; Ventriglia, F; Vitale, P

    2009-01-01

    A new method to deal with reduced dynamics of open systems by means of the Schr\\"odinger equation is presented. It allows one to consider the reduced time evolution for correlated and uncorrelated initial conditions.

  10. Fluctuation, time-correlation function and geometric Phase

    CERN Document Server

    Pati, A K

    1999-01-01

    We establish a fluctuation-correlation theorem by relating the quantum fluctuations in the generator of the parameter change to the time integral of the quantum correlation function between the projection operator and force operator of the ``fast'' system. By taking a cue from linear response theory we relate the quantum fluctuation in the generator to the generalised susceptibility. Relation between the open-path geometric phase, diagonal elements of the quantum metric tensor and the force-force correlation function is provided and the classical limit of the fluctuation-correlation theorem is also discussed.

  11. Influence length and space-time correlation between earthquakes

    CERN Document Server

    Tosi, P; Loreto, V; Pietronero, L; Tosi, Patrizia; Rubeis, Valerio De; Loreto, Vittorio; Pietronero, Luciano

    2004-01-01

    Short and long range interactions between earthquakes are attracting increasing interest. Scale invariant properties of seismicity in time, space and energy argue for the presence of complex triggering mechanisms where, like a cascade process, each event produces aftershocks. A definitive method to assess any connection between two earthquakes separated in time and distance does not exist. Here we propose a novel method of data analysis that, based on the space-time combined generalization of the correlation integral leads to a self-consistent visualization and analysis of both spatial and temporal correlations. When analyzing global seismicity we discovered a universal relation linking the spatial Influence Length of a given earthquake to the time elapsed from the event itself. Following an event, time correlations (i.e. causality effects) exist in a region that shrinks over time, suggesting a long-range dissipating stress transfer. A different process is acting in the short-range where events are randomly s...

  12. On correlations and fractal characteristics of time series

    CERN Document Server

    Vitanov, N K; Yankulova, E D; Vitanov, Nikolay K.; Sakai, kenschi; Yankulova, Elka D.

    2005-01-01

    Correlation analysis is convenient and frequently used tool for investigation of time series from complex systems. Recently new methods such as the multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MFDFA) and the wavelet transform modulus maximum method (WTMM) have been developed. By means of these methods (i) we can investigate long-range correlations in time series and (ii) we can calculate fractal spectra of these time series. But opposite to the classical tool for correlation analysis - the autocorrelation function, the newly developed tools are not applicable to all kinds of time series. The unappropriate application of MFDFA or WTMM leads to wrong results and conclusions. In this article we discuss the opportunities and risks connected to the application of the MFDFA method to time series from a random number generator and to experimentally measured time series (i) for accelerations of an agricultural tractor and (ii) for the heartbeat activity of {\\sl Drosophila melanogaster}. Our main goal is to emphasize ...

  13. Strategy correlations and timing of adaptation in Minority Games

    OpenAIRE

    Galla, Tobias; Sherrington, David

    2005-01-01

    We study the role of strategy correlations and timing of adaptation for the dynamics of Minority Games, both simulationally and analytically. Using the exact generating functional approach a la De Dominicis we compute the phase diagram and the behaviour of batch and on-line games with correlated strategies, complementing exisiting replica studies of their statics. It is shown that the timing of adaptation can be relevant; while conventional games with uncorrelated strategies are nearly insens...

  14. Estimating correlation for a real-time measure of connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunkumar, Akhil; Panday, Ashish; Joshi, Bharat; Ravindran, Arun; Zaveri, Hitten P

    2012-01-01

    There has recently been considerable interest in connectivity analysis of fMRI and scalp and intracranial EEG time-series. The computational requirements of the pair-wise correlation (PWC), the core time-series measure used to estimate connectivity, presents a challenge to the real-time estimation of the PWC between all pairs of multiple time-series. We describe a parallel algorithm for computing PWC in real-time for streaming data from multiple channels. The algorithm was implemented on the Intel Xeon™ and IBM Cell Broadband Engine™ platforms. We evaluated time to estimate correlation for signals recorded with different acquisition parameters as a comparison to real-time constraints. We demonstrate that the execution time of these efficient implementations meet real-time constraints in most instances.

  15. Quantum Dynamics in Classical Time Evolution of Correlation Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Wetterich, C

    1997-01-01

    The time-dependence of correlation functions under the influence of cla= ssical equations of motion is described by an exact evolution equation. For conservative systems thermodynamic equilibrium is a fixed point of these equations. We show that this fixed point is not universally stable, since infinitely many conserved correlation functions obstruct the approach to equilibrium. Equilibrium can therefore be reached at most for suitably av= eraged quantities or for subsystems, similar to quantum statistics. The classica= l time evolution of correlation functions shows many dynamical features of quant= um mechanics.

  16. Femtosecond study of the effects of ions on the reorientation dynamics of water

    CERN Document Server

    van der Post, Sietse T; Bakker, Huib J

    2013-01-01

    We study the effects of ions on the reorientation dynamics of liquid water with polarization-resolved femtosecond mid-infared spectroscopy. We probe the anisotropy of the excitation of the O-D stretch vibration of HDO molecules in solutions of NaCl, NaI and tetra-alkylammonium bromide salts in 8 percent HDO:H2O. We find that the reorientation O-D groups of HDO molecules hydrating the Cl- and I- anions occurs on two different time scales with time constants of 2pm0.3 ps and 9pm2 ps. The fast component is due to a wobbling motion of the O-D group that keeps the hydrogen bond with the halogenic anion intact. For solutions of tetra-alkylammonium bromide salts we observe a very strong slowing down of the reorientation of water that is associated with the hydration of the hydrophobic alkyl groups of the tetra-alkylammonium ions.

  17. Efficient use of correlation entropy for analysing time series data

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K P Harikrishnan; R Misra; G Ambika

    2009-02-01

    The correlation dimension 2 and correlation entropy 2 are both important quantifiers in nonlinear time series analysis. However, use of 2 has been more common compared to 2 as a discriminating measure. One reason for this is that 2 is a static measure and can be easily evaluated from a time series. However, in many cases, especially those involving coloured noise, 2 is regarded as a more useful measure. Here we present an efficient algorithmic scheme to compute 2 directly from a time series data and show that 2 can be used as a more effective measure compared to 2 for analysing practical time series involving coloured noise.

  18. On the use of two-time correlation functions for X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikondoa, Oier

    2017-04-01

    Multi-time correlation functions are especially well suited to study non-equilibrium processes. In particular, two-time correlation functions are widely used in X-ray photon correlation experiments on systems out of equilibrium. One-time correlations are often extracted from two-time correlation functions at different sample ages. However, this way of analysing two-time correlation functions is not unique. Here, two methods to analyse two-time correlation functions are scrutinized, and three illustrative examples are used to discuss the implications for the evaluation of the correlation times and functional shape of the correlations.

  19. Intensity Correlation Function and Associated Relaxation Time of a Saturation Laser Model with Correlated Noises

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Ping; CHEN Shi-Bo; MEI Dong-Cheng

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the intensity correlation function C(s) and its associated relaxation time Tc for a saturation model of single-mode laser with correlated noises.The expressions of C(s) and Tc are derived by means of the projection operator method,and effects of correlations between an additive noise and a multiplicative noise are discussed by numerical calculation.Based on the calculated results,it is found that the correlation strength λ between the additive noise and the multiplicative noise can enhance the fluctuation decay of the laser intensity.

  20. Time series analysis : Smoothed correlation integrals, autocovariances, and power spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takens, F; Dumortier, F; Broer, H; Mawhin, J; Vanderbauwhede, A; Lunel, SV

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we relate notions from linear time series analyses, like autocovariances and power spectra, with notions from nonlinear times series analysis, like (smoothed) correlation integrals and the corresponding dimensions and entropies. The complete proofs of the results announced in this pape

  1. Correlation Time-of-flight Spectrometry of Ultracold Neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Novopoltsev, M I

    2010-01-01

    The fearures of the correlation method used in time-of-flight spectrometry of ultracold neutrons are analyzed. The time-of-flight spectrometer for the energy range of ultracold neutrons is described, and results of its testing by measuring spectra of neutrons passing through interference filters are presented.

  2. Time correlations of high energy muons in an underground detector

    CERN Document Server

    Becherini, Y; Chiarusi, T; Cozzi, M; Dekhissi, H; Derkaoui, J; Esposito, L S; Giacomelli, G; Giglietto, N; Giorgini, M; Maaroufi, F; Mandrioli, G; Manzoor, S; Margiotta, A; Moussa, A

    2005-01-01

    We present the result of a search for correlations in the arrival times of high energy muons collected from 1995 till 2000 with the streamer tube system of the complete MACRO detector at the underground Gran Sasso Lab. Large samples of single muons (8.6 million), double muons (0.46 million) and multiple muons with multiplicities from 3 to 6 (0.08 million) were selected. These samples were used to search for time correlations of cosmic ray particles coming from the whole upper hemisphere or from selected space cones. The results of our analyses confirm with high statistics a random arrival time distribution of high energy cosmic rays.

  3. Finite correlation time effects in kinematic dynamo problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schekochihin, A.A.; Kulsrud, R.M.

    2000-02-11

    One-point statistics of the magnetic fluctuations in kinematic regime with large Prandtl number and non delta-correlated in time advecting velocity field are studied. A perturbation expansion in the ratio of the velocity correlation time to the dynamo growth time is constructed in the spirit of the Kliatskin-Tatarskii functional method and carried out to first order. The convergence properties are improved compared to the commonly used van Kampen-Terwiel method. The zeroth-order growth rate of the magnetic energy is estimated to be reduced (in three dimensions) by approximately 40%. This reduction is quite close to existing numerical results.

  4. Involuntary Capture and Voluntary Reorienting of Attention Decline in Middle-Aged and Old Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa-Jaraba, Kenia S.; Cid-Fernández, Susana; Lindín, Mónica; Díaz, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to examine the effects of aging on event-related brain potentials (ERPs) associated with the automatic detection of unattended infrequent deviant and novel auditory stimuli (Mismatch Negativity, MMN) and with the orienting to these stimuli (P3a component), as well as the effects on ERPs associated with reorienting to relevant visual stimuli (Reorienting Negativity, RON). Participants were divided into three age groups: (1) Young: 21–29 years old; (2) Middle-aged: 51–64 years old; and (3) Old: 65–84 years old. They performed an auditory-visual distraction-attention task in which they were asked to attend to visual stimuli (Go, NoGo) and to ignore auditory stimuli (S: standard, D: deviant, N: novel). Reaction times (RTs) to Go visual stimuli were longer in old and middle-aged than in young participants. In addition, in all three age groups, longer RTs were found when Go visual stimuli were preceded by novel relative to deviant and standard auditory stimuli, indicating a distraction effect provoked by novel stimuli. ERP components were identified in the Novel minus Standard (N-S) and Deviant minus Standard (D-S) difference waveforms. In the N-S condition, MMN latency was significantly longer in middle-aged and old participants than in young participants, indicating a slowing of automatic detection of changes. The following results were observed in both difference waveforms: (1) the P3a component comprised two consecutive phases in all three age groups—an early-P3a (e-P3a) that may reflect the orienting response toward the irrelevant stimulation and a late-P3a (l-P3a) that may be a correlate of subsequent evaluation of the infrequent unexpected novel or deviant stimuli; (2) the e-P3a, l-P3a, and RON latencies were significantly longer in the Middle-aged and Old groups than in the Young group, indicating delay in the orienting response to and the subsequent evaluation of unattended auditory stimuli, and in the reorienting of

  5. A new twist on old ideas: how sitting reorients crawlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soska, Kasey C; Robinson, Scott R; Adolph, Karen E

    2015-03-01

    Traditionally, crawling and sitting are considered distinct motor behaviors with different postures and functions. Ten- to 12-month-old infants were observed in the laboratory or in their homes while being coaxed to crawl continuously over long, straight walkways (Study 1; N = 20) and during spontaneous crawling during free play (Study 2; N = 20). In every context, infants stopped crawling to sit 3-6 times per minute. Transitions from crawling to sitting frequently turned infants' bodies away from the direction of heading; subsequent transitions back to crawling were offset by as much as 180° from the original direction of heading. Apparently, body reorientations result from the biomechanics of transitioning between crawling and sitting. Findings indicate that sustained, linear crawling is likely an epiphenomenon of how gait is studied in standard paradigms. Postural transitions between crawling and sitting are ubiquitous and can represent a functional unit of action. These transitions and the accompanying body reorientations likely have cascading effects for infants' exploration, visual perception, and spatial cognition.

  6. Time series, correlation matrices and random matrix models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinayak [Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, C.P. 62210 Cuernavaca (Mexico); Seligman, Thomas H. [Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, C.P. 62210 Cuernavaca, México and Centro Internacional de Ciencias, C.P. 62210 Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    2014-01-08

    In this set of five lectures the authors have presented techniques to analyze open classical and quantum systems using correlation matrices. For diverse reasons we shall see that random matrices play an important role to describe a null hypothesis or a minimum information hypothesis for the description of a quantum system or subsystem. In the former case various forms of correlation matrices of time series associated with the classical observables of some system. The fact that such series are necessarily finite, inevitably introduces noise and this finite time influence lead to a random or stochastic component in these time series. By consequence random correlation matrices have a random component, and corresponding ensembles are used. In the latter we use random matrices to describe high temperature environment or uncontrolled perturbations, ensembles of differing chaotic systems etc. The common theme of the lectures is thus the importance of random matrix theory in a wide range of fields in and around physics.

  7. Space-Time Correlations and Dynamic Coupling in Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guowei; Jin, Guodong; Yang, Yue

    2017-01-01

    Space-time correlation is a staple method for investigating the dynamic coupling of spatial and temporal scales of motion in turbulent flows. In this article, we review the space-time correlation models in both the Eulerian and Lagrangian frames of reference, which include the random sweeping and local straining models for isotropic and homogeneous turbulence, Taylor's frozen-flow model and the elliptic approximation model for turbulent shear flows, and the linear-wave propagation model and swept-wave model for compressible turbulence. We then focus on how space-time correlations are used to develop time-accurate turbulence models for the large-eddy simulation of turbulence-generated noise and particle-laden turbulence. We briefly discuss their applications to two-point closures for Kolmogorov's universal scaling of energy spectra and to the reconstruction of space-time energy spectra from a subset of spatial and temporal signals in experimental measurements. Finally, we summarize the current understanding of space-time correlations and conclude with future issues for the field.

  8. Correlation measure to detect time series distances, whence economy globalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miśkiewicz, Janusz; Ausloos, Marcel

    2008-11-01

    An instantaneous time series distance is defined through the equal time correlation coefficient. The idea is applied to the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) yearly increments of 21 rich countries between 1950 and 2005 in order to test the process of economic globalisation. Some data discussion is first presented to decide what (EKS, GK, or derived) GDP series should be studied. Distances are then calculated from the correlation coefficient values between pairs of series. The role of time averaging of the distances over finite size windows is discussed. Three network structures are next constructed based on the hierarchy of distances. It is shown that the mean distance between the most developed countries on several networks actually decreases in time, -which we consider as a proof of globalization. An empirical law is found for the evolution after 1990, similar to that found in flux creep. The optimal observation time window size is found ≃15 years.

  9. Effect of thermo-mechanical cycling on zirconium hydride reorientation studied in situ with synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colas, Kimberly B.; Motta, Arthur T.; Daymond, Mark R.; Almer, Jonathan D.

    2013-09-01

    The circumferential hydrides normally present in nuclear reactor fuel cladding after reactor exposure may dissolve during drying for dry storage and re-precipitate when cooled under load into a more radial orientation, which could embrittle the fuel cladding. It is necessary to study the rates and conditions under which hydride reorientation may happen in order to assess fuel integrity in dry storage. The objective of this work is to study the effect of applied stress and thermal cycling on the hydride morphology in cold-worked stress-relieved Zircaloy-4 by combining conventional metallography and in situ X-ray diffraction techniques. Metallography is used to study the evolution of hydride morphology after several thermo-mechanical cycles. In situ X-ray diffraction performed at the Advanced Photon Source synchrotron provides real-time information on the process of hydride dissolution and precipitation under stress during several thermal cycles. The detailed study of diffracted intensity, peak position and full-width at half-maximum provides information on precipitation kinetics, elastic strains and other characteristics of the hydride precipitation process. The results show that thermo-mechanical cycling significantly increases the radial hydride fraction as well as the hydride length and connectivity. The radial hydrides are observed to precipitate at a lower temperature than circumferential hydrides. Variations in the magnitude and range of hydride strains due to reorientation and cycling have also been observed. These results are discussed in light of existing models and experiments on hydride reorientation. The study of hydride elastic strains during precipitation shows marked differences between circumferential and radial hydrides, which can be used to investigate the reorientation process. Cycling under stress above the threshold stress for reorientation drastically increases both the reoriented hydride fraction and the hydride size. The reoriented hydride

  10. The VLBA correlator: Real-time in the distributed era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, D. C.

    1992-01-01

    The correlator is the signal processing engine of the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). Radio signals are recorded on special wideband (128 Mb/s) digital recorders at the 10 telescopes, with sampling times controlled by hydrogen maser clocks. The magnetic tapes are shipped to the Array Operations Center in Socorro, New Mexico, where they are played back simultaneously into the correlator. Real-time software and firmware controls the playback drives to achieve synchronization, compute models of the wavefront delay, control the numerous modules of the correlator, and record FITS files of the fringe visibilities at the back-end of the correlator. In addition to the more than 3000 custom VLSI chips which handle the massive data flow of the signal processing, the correlator contains a total of more than 100 programmable computers, 8-, 16- and 32-bit CPUs. Code is downloaded into front-end CPU's dependent on operating mode. Low-level code is assembly language, high-level code is C running under a RT OS. We use VxWorks on Motorola MVME147 CPU's. Code development is on a complex of SPARC workstations connected to the RT CPU's by Ethernet. The overall management of the correlation process is dependent on a database management system. We use Ingres running on a Sparcstation-2. We transfer logging information from the database of the VLBA Monitor and Control System to our database using Ingres/NET. Job scripts are computed and are transferred to the real-time computers using NFS, and correlation job execution logs and status flow back by the route. Operator status and control displays use windows on workstations, interfaced to the real-time processes by network protocols. The extensive network protocol support provided by VxWorks is invaluable. The VLBA Correlator's dependence on network protocols is an example of the radical transformation of the real-time world over the past five years. Real-time is becoming more like conventional computing. Paradoxically, 'conventional

  11. Time-Correlated Structure in Spin Fluctuations in Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Price, Steve; Shore, Steve; Nice, David

    2012-01-01

    We study statistical properties of stochastic variations in pulse arrival times, timing noise, in radio pulsars using a new analysis method applied in the time domain. The method proceeds in two steps. First, we subtract low-frequency wander using a high-pass filter. Second, we calculate the discrete correlation function of the filtered data. As a complementary method for measuring correlations, we introduce a statistic that measures the dispersion of the data with respect to the data translated in time. The analysis methods presented here are robust and of general usefulness for studying arrival time variations over timescales approaching the average sampling interval. We apply these methods to timing data for 32 pulsars. In two radio pulsars, PSRs B1133+16 and B1933+16, we find that fluctuations in arrival times are correlated over timescales of 10 - 20 d with the distinct signature of a relaxation process. Though this relaxation response could be magnetospheric in origin, we argue that damping between the ...

  12. Correlation of transverse relaxation time with structure of biological tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, Gregory B.; Meerovich, Victor M.; Sokolovsky, Vladimir L.

    2016-09-01

    Transverse spin-spin relaxation of liquids entrapped in nanocavities with different orientational order is theoretically investigated. Based on the bivariate normal distribution of nanocavities directions, we have calculated the anisotropy of the transverse relaxation time for biological systems, such as collagenous tissues, articular cartilage, and tendon. In the framework of the considered model, the dipole-dipole interaction is determined by a single coupling constant. The calculation results for the transverse relaxation time explain the angular dependence observed in MRI experiments with biological objects. The good agreement with the experimental data is obtained by adjustment of only one parameter which characterizes the disorder in fiber orientations. The relaxation time is correlated with the degree of ordering in biological tissues. Thus, microstructure of the tissues can be revealed from the measurement of relaxation time anisotropy. The clinical significance of the correlation, especially in the detection of damage must be evaluated in a large prospective clinical trials.

  13. Advanced time-correlated single photon counting techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    Time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) is a remarkable technique for recording low-level light signals with extremely high precision and picosecond-time resolution. TCSPC has developed from an intrinsically time-consuming and one-dimensional technique into a fast, multi-dimensional technique to record light signals. So this reference and text describes how advanced TCSPC techniques work and demonstrates their application to time-resolved laser scanning microscopy, single molecule spectroscopy, photon correlation experiments, and diffuse optical tomography of biological tissue. It gives practical hints about constructing suitable optical systems, choosing and using detectors, detector safety, preamplifiers, and using the control features and optimising the operating conditions of TCSPC devices. Advanced TCSPC Techniques is an indispensable tool for everyone in research and development who is confronted with the task of recording low-intensity light signals in the picosecond and nanosecond range.

  14. Use of Geometry for Spatial Reorientation in Children Applies Only to Symmetric Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, Adina R.; Gibbons, Bryony; Murphy, Caroline; Bremner, J. Gavin

    2010-01-01

    Proponents of the geometric module hypothesis argue that following disorientation, many species reorient by use of macro-environment geometry. It is suggested that attention to the surface layout geometry of natural terrain features may have been selected for over evolutionary time due to the enduring and unambiguous location information it…

  15. Equilibrium time correlation functions in the low density limit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijeren, H. van; Lanford, O.E.; Lebowitz, J.L.; Spohn, H.

    1980-01-01

    We consider a system of hard spheres in thermal equilibrium. Using Lanford's result about the convergence of the solutions of the BBGKY hierarchy to the solutions of the Boltzmann hierarchy, we show that in the low-density limit (Boltzmann-Grad limit): (i) the total time correlation function is

  16. Benefits of Time Correlation Measurements for Passive Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murer, David; Blackie, Douglas; Peerani, Paolo

    2014-02-01

    The “FLASH Portals Project” is a collaboration between Arktis Radiation Detectors Ltd (CH), the Atomic Weapons Establishment (UK), and the Joint Research Centre (European Commission), supported by the Technical Support Working Group (TSWG). The program's goal was to develop and demonstrate a technology to detect shielded special nuclear materials (SNM) more efficiently and less ambiguously by exploiting time correlation. This study presents experimental results of a two-sided portal monitor equipped with in total 16 4He fast neutron detectors as well as four polyvinyltoluene (PVT) plastic scintillators. All detectors have been synchronized to nanosecond precision, thereby allowing the resolution of time correlations from timescales of tens of microseconds (such as (n, γ) reactions) down to prompt fission correlations directly. Our results demonstrate that such correlations can be detected in a typical radiation portal monitor (RPM) geometry and within operationally acceptable time scales, and that exploiting these signatures significantly improves the performance of the RPM compared to neutron counting. Furthermore, the results show that some time structure remains even in the presence of heavy shielding, thus significantly improving the sensitivity of the detection system to shielded SNM.

  17. Influence of Noise on Time Evolution of Intensity Correlation Function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Using the linear approximation method, we have studied how the correlation function C(t) of the laser intensity changes with time in the loss-noise model of the single-mode laser driven by the colored pump noise with signal modulation and the quantum noise with cross-correlation between the real and imaginary parts. We have found that when the pump noise self-correlation time τ changes, (I) in the case ofτ 1, the curve only exhibits periodically surging with descending envelope. When τ < 1 and τ does not change, with the increase of the pump noise intensity P, the curve experiences a repeated changing process, that is, from the monotonous descending to the appearance of a maximum, then to monotonous rise, and finally to the appearance of a maximum again. With the increase of the quantum noise intensity Q, the curve experiences a changing process from the monotonous rise to the appearance of a maximum, and finally to the monotonous descending. The increase of the quantum noise with cross-correlation between the real and imaginary parts will lead to the fall of the whole curve, but not affect the form of the time evolution of C(t).

  18. Kernel canonical-correlation Granger causality for multiple time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guorong; Duan, Xujun; Liao, Wei; Gao, Qing; Chen, Huafu

    2011-04-01

    Canonical-correlation analysis as a multivariate statistical technique has been applied to multivariate Granger causality analysis to infer information flow in complex systems. It shows unique appeal and great superiority over the traditional vector autoregressive method, due to the simplified procedure that detects causal interaction between multiple time series, and the avoidance of potential model estimation problems. However, it is limited to the linear case. Here, we extend the framework of canonical correlation to include the estimation of multivariate nonlinear Granger causality for drawing inference about directed interaction. Its feasibility and effectiveness are verified on simulated data.

  19. Pulsar timing analysis in the presence of correlated noise

    CERN Document Server

    Coles, W; Champion, D J; Manchester, R N; Verbiest, J P W

    2011-01-01

    Pulsar timing observations are usually analysed with least-square-fitting procedures under the assumption that the timing residuals are uncorrelated (statistically "white"). Pulsar observers are well aware that this assumption often breaks down and causes severe errors in estimating the parameters of the timing model and their uncertainties. Ad hoc methods for minimizing these errors have been developed, but we show that they are far from optimal. Compensation for temporal correlation can be done optimally if the covariance matrix of the residuals is known using a linear transformation that whitens both the residuals and the timing model. We adopt a transformation based on the Cholesky decomposition of the covariance matrix, but the transformation is not unique. We show how to estimate the covariance matrix with sufficient accuracy to optimize the pulsar timing analysis. We also show how to apply this procedure to estimate the spectrum of any time series with a steep red power-law spectrum, including those wi...

  20. Multivariate Option Pricing with Time Varying Volatility and Correlations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rombouts, Jeroen V.K.; Stentoft, Lars Peter

    In recent years multivariate models for asset returns have received much attention, in particular this is the case for models with time varying volatility. In this paper we consider models of this class and examine their potential when it comes to option pricing. Specifically, we derive the risk...... neutral dynamics for a general class of multivariate heteroskedastic models, and we provide a feasible way to price options in this framework. Our framework can be used irrespective of the assumed underlying distribution and dynamics, and it nests several important special cases. We provide an application...... to options on the minimum of two indices. Our results show that not only is correlation important for these options but so is allowing this correlation to be dynamic. Moreover, we show that for the general model exposure to correlation risk carries an important premium, and when this is neglected option...

  1. Understanding the reorientations and roles of spatial planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galland, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Spatial planning commonly adopts a diversity of functions and logics in contributing to handle growth and development. Being influenced by an array of contextual driving forces that result in specific institutional practices and policy agendas, spatial planning seems to be constantly reoriented...... by analytical concepts drawn from planning theory, state spatial theory and discourse analysis. Based on an in-depth study, the article then attempts to qualify, illustrate and synthesise the diverse roles that spatial planning has taken in Denmark throughout that time frame. The article concludes that spatial...... in terms of its purposes and reasoning. This article sets out to explore the diverse orientations and roles that spatial planning has assumed in Denmark over a 50-year period. In doing so, the article examines the evolution of national planning policy by means of a multi-disciplinary framework comprised...

  2. Comparison of correlation analysis techniques for irregularly sampled time series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Rehfeld

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Geoscientific measurements often provide time series with irregular time sampling, requiring either data reconstruction (interpolation or sophisticated methods to handle irregular sampling. We compare the linear interpolation technique and different approaches for analyzing the correlation functions and persistence of irregularly sampled time series, as Lomb-Scargle Fourier transformation and kernel-based methods. In a thorough benchmark test we investigate the performance of these techniques.

    All methods have comparable root mean square errors (RMSEs for low skewness of the inter-observation time distribution. For high skewness, very irregular data, interpolation bias and RMSE increase strongly. We find a 40 % lower RMSE for the lag-1 autocorrelation function (ACF for the Gaussian kernel method vs. the linear interpolation scheme,in the analysis of highly irregular time series. For the cross correlation function (CCF the RMSE is then lower by 60 %. The application of the Lomb-Scargle technique gave results comparable to the kernel methods for the univariate, but poorer results in the bivariate case. Especially the high-frequency components of the signal, where classical methods show a strong bias in ACF and CCF magnitude, are preserved when using the kernel methods.

    We illustrate the performances of interpolation vs. Gaussian kernel method by applying both to paleo-data from four locations, reflecting late Holocene Asian monsoon variability as derived from speleothem δ18O measurements. Cross correlation results are similar for both methods, which we attribute to the long time scales of the common variability. The persistence time (memory is strongly overestimated when using the standard, interpolation-based, approach. Hence, the Gaussian kernel is a reliable and more robust estimator with significant advantages compared to other techniques and suitable for large scale application to paleo-data.

  3. BENEFITS OF TIME CORRELATION MEASUREMENTS FOR PASSIVE SCREENING

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The “FLASH Portals Project” is a collaboration between Arktis Radiation Detectors Ltd (CH), the Atomic Weapons Establishment (UK), and the Joint Research Centre (European Commission), supported by the Technical Support Working Group (TSWG). The program’s goal was to develop and demonstrate a technology to detect shielded special nuclear materials (SNM) more efficiently and less ambiguously by exploiting time correlation. This study presents experimental results of a two-sided portal monitor e...

  4. On Clustering Time Series Using Euclidean Distance and Pearson Correlation

    OpenAIRE

    Berthold, Michael R.; Höppner, Frank

    2016-01-01

    For time series comparisons, it has often been observed that z-score normalized Euclidean distances far outperform the unnormalized variant. In this paper we show that a z-score normalized, squared Euclidean Distance is, in fact, equal to a distance based on Pearson Correlation. This has profound impact on many distance-based classification or clustering methods. In addition to this theoretically sound result we also show that the often used k-Means algorithm formally needs a mod ification to...

  5. Effective rotational correlation times of proteins from NMR relaxation interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Donghan; Hilty, Christian; Wider, Gerhard; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of the effective rotational correlation times, τc, for the modulation of anisotropic spin-spin interactions in macromolecules subject to Brownian motion in solution is of key interest for the practice of NMR spectroscopy in structural biology. The value of τc enables an estimate of the NMR spin relaxation rates, and indicates possible aggregation of the macromolecular species. This paper reports a novel NMR pulse scheme, [ 15N, 1H]-TRACT, which is based on transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy and permits to determine τc for 15N- 1H bonds without interference from dipole-dipole coupling of the amide proton with remote protons. [ 15N, 1H]-TRACT is highly efficient since only a series of one-dimensional NMR spectra need to be recorded. Its use is suggested for a quick estimate of the rotational correlation time, to monitor sample quality and to determine optimal parameters for complex multidimensional NMR experiments. Practical applications are illustrated with the 110 kDa 7,8-dihydroneopterin aldolase from Staphylococcus aureus, the uniformly 15N-labeled Escherichia coli outer membrane protein X (OmpX) in 60 kDa mixed OmpX/DHPC micelles with approximately 90 molecules of unlabeled 1,2-dihexanoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC), and the 16 kDa pheromone-binding protein from Bombyx mori, which cover a wide range of correlation times.

  6. Correlates of objectively measured sedentary time and self-reported screen time in Canadian children

    OpenAIRE

    LeBlanc, Allana G; Stephanie T Broyles; Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Leduc, Geneviève; Boyer, Charles; Borghese, Michael M.; Tremblay, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    Background Demographic, family, and home characteristics play an important role in determining childhood sedentary behaviour. The objective of this paper was to identify correlates of total sedentary time (SED) and correlates of self-reported screen time (ST) in Canadian children. Methods Child- and parent-reported household, socio-demographic, behavioural, and diet related data were collected; directly measured anthropometric and accelerometer data were also collected for each child. Partici...

  7. Turbulent eddy-time-correlation in the solar convective zone

    CERN Document Server

    Belkacem, K; Goupil, M J; Baudin, F; Salabert, D; Appourchaux, T

    2010-01-01

    Theoretical modeling of the driving processes of solar-like oscillations is a powerful way of understanding the properties of the convective zones of solar-type stars. In this framework, the description of the temporal correlation between turbulent eddies is an essential ingredient to model mode amplitudes. However, there is a debate between a Gaussian or Lorentzian description of the eddy-time correlation function (Samadi et al. 2003, Chaplin et al. 2005). Indeed, a Gaussian description reproduces the low-frequency shape of the mode amplitude for the Sun, but is unsatisfactory from a theoretical point of view (Houdek, 2009) and leads to other disagreements with observations (Samadi et al., 2007). These are solved by using a Lorentzian description, but there the low-frequency shape of the solar observations is not correctly reproduced. We reconcile the two descriptions by adopting the sweeping approximation, which consists in assuming that the eddy-time-correlation function is dominated by the advection of ed...

  8. Fluctuation dynamo at finite correlation times using renewing flows

    CERN Document Server

    Bhat, Pallavi

    2014-01-01

    Fluctuation dynamos are generic to turbulent astrophysical systems. The only analytical model of the fluctuation dynamo, due to Kazantsev, assumes the velocity to be delta-correlated in time. This assumption breaks down for any realistic turbulent flow. We generalize the analytic model of fluctuation dynamo to include the effects of a finite correlation time, $\\tau$, using renewing flows. The generalized evolution equation for the longitudinal correlation function $M_L$ leads to the standard Kazantsev equation in the $\\tau \\to 0$ limit, and extends it to the next order in $\\tau$. We find that this evolution equation involves also third and fourth spatial derivatives of $M_L$, indicating that the evolution for finite $\\tau$ will be non-local in general. In the perturbative case of small-$\\tau$ (or small Strouhl number), it can be recast using the Landau-Lifschitz approach, to one with at most second derivatives of $M_L$. Using both a scaling solution and the WKBJ approximation, we show that the dynamo growth r...

  9. Advanced time-correlated single photon counting applications

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    This book is an attempt to bridge the gap between the instrumental principles of multi-dimensional time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) and typical applications of the technique. Written by an originator of the technique and by sucessful users, it covers the basic principles of the technique, its interaction with optical imaging methods and its application to a wide range of experimental tasks in life sciences and clinical research. The book is recommended for all users of time-resolved detection techniques in biology, bio-chemistry, spectroscopy of live systems, live cell microscopy, clinical imaging, spectroscopy of single molecules, and other applications that require the detection of low-level light signals at single-photon sensitivity and picosecond time resolution.

  10. Fluctuation theorem for out-of-time-ordered correlator

    CERN Document Server

    Halpern, Nicole Yunger

    2016-01-01

    The out-of-time-ordered correlator (OTOC) diagnoses quantum chaos and the scrambling of quantum information via the spread of entanglement. The OTOC encodes forward and reverse evolutions and has deep connections with the flow of time. So do fluctuation theorems such as Jarzynski's Equality, derived in nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. I unite these two powerful, seemingly disparate tools by deriving a fluctuation theorem for the OTOC. The fluctuation theorem is analogous to Jarzynski's Equality. The theorem's left-hand side equals the OTOC. The right-hand side implies a platform-nonspecific protocol for experimentally measuring the OTOC in an indirect manner fundamentally different from existing proposals. Time evolution need not be reversed in any trial. The theorem opens holography, condensed matter, and quantum information to new insights from fluctuation theorems and vice versa.

  11. PIE techniques for hydride reorientation test at NDC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuda, Tomohiro; Shinohara, Yasunari; Yamaguchi, Yoichiro [Nuclear Development Corporation, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2008-11-15

    Dry storage of spent fuels in the interim storage facility is being planned in Japan. However, the gradual deterioration of the mechanical property of fuel cladding due to internal pressure and temperature during the storage term is known. Therefore, the integrity of stored fuel rods should be confirmed before the start of dry storage. For the last several years, NDC had a lot of experiences on the hydride reorientation test. The specimen preparation techniques on the hydride reorientation test and the mechanical testing techniques after the hydride reorientation are shown in this paper.

  12. Breast reconstruction: Correlation between different procedures, reconstruction timing and complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđelkov Katarina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Improved psychophysical condition after breast reconstruction in women has been well documented Objective. To determine the most optimal technique with minimal morbidity, the authors examined their results and complications based on reconstruction timing (immediate and delayed reconstruction and three reconstruction methods: TRAM flap, latissimus dorsi flap and reconstruction with tissue expanders and implants. Methods. Reconstruction was performed in 60 women of mean age 51.1 years. We analyzed risk factors: age, body mass index (BMI, smoking history and radiation therapy in correlation with timing and method of reconstruction. Complications of all three methods of reconstruction were under 1.5-2-year follow-up after the reconstruction. All data were statistically analyzed. Results. Only radiation had significant influence on the occurrence of complications both before and after the reconstruction, while age, smoking and BMI had no considerable influence of the development of complications. There were no statistically significant correlation between the incidence of complications, time and method of reconstruction. Conclusion. Any of the aforementioned breast reconstruction techniques can yield good results and a low rate of re-operations. To choose the best method, the patient needs to be as well informed as possible about the options including the risks and benefits of each method.

  13. Precise timing correlation in telemetry recording and processing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, R. B.; Matthews, F. L.

    1973-01-01

    Independent PCM telemetry data signals received from missiles must be correlated to within + or - 100 microseconds for comparison with radar data. Tests have been conducted to determine RF antenna receiving system delays; delays associated with wideband analog tape recorders used in the recording, dubbing and repdocuing processes; and uncertainties associated with computer processed time tag data. Several methods used in the recording of timing are evaluated. Through the application of a special time tagging technique, the cumulative timing bias from all sources is determined and the bias removed from final data. Conclusions show that relative time differences in receiving, recording, playback and processing of two telemetry links can be accomplished with a + or - 4 microseconds accuracy. In addition, the absolute time tag error (with respect to UTC) can be reduced to less than 15 microseconds. This investigation is believed to be the first attempt to identify the individual error contributions within the telemetry system and to describe the methods of error reduction within the telemetry system and to describe the methods of error reduction and correction.

  14. Almost Periodically Correlated Time Series in Business Fluctuations Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Lenart, Lukasz

    2012-01-01

    We propose a non-standard subsampling procedure to make formal statistical inference about the business cycle, one of the most important unobserved feature characterising fluctuations of economic growth. We show that some characteristics of business cycle can be modelled in a non-parametric way by discrete spectrum of the Almost Periodically Correlated (APC) time series. On the basis of estimated characteristics of this spectrum business cycle is extracted by filtering. As an illustration we characterise the man properties of business cycles in industrial production index for Polish economy.

  15. Characterizing time decay of bibenzyl scintillator using time correlated single photon counting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatarik, R.; Bernstein, L. A.; Caggiano, J. A.; Carman, M. L.; Schneider, D. H. G.; Zaitseva, N. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Wiedeking, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, 7129 Somerset West (South Africa)

    2012-10-15

    The time decay of several scintillation materials has been measured using the time correlated single photon counting method and a new organic crystal with a highly suppressed delayed light has been identified. Results comparing the light decay of the bibenzyl crystal with a xylene based detector, which is currently installed at National Ignition Facility will be presented.

  16. Correlated continuous time random walk and option pricing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Longjin; Xiao, Jianbin; Fan, Liangzhong; Ren, Fuyao

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we study a correlated continuous time random walk (CCTRW) with averaged waiting time, whose probability density function (PDF) is proved to follow stretched Gaussian distribution. Then, we apply this process into option pricing problem. Supposing the price of the underlying is driven by this CCTRW, we find this model captures the subdiffusive characteristic of financial markets. By using the mean self-financing hedging strategy, we obtain the closed-form pricing formulas for a European option with and without transaction costs, respectively. At last, comparing the obtained model with the classical Black-Scholes model, we find the price obtained in this paper is higher than that obtained from the Black-Scholes model. A empirical analysis is also introduced to confirm the obtained results can fit the real data well.

  17. Stimulus-driven reorienting in the ventral frontoparietal attention network: the role of emotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Witt Frank

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Activity in the human temporoparietal junction and inferior frontal gyrus is hypothesized to underlie stimulus-driven, or bottom-up attention reorienting. Demanding tasks require focused attention, and as task difficulty increases, activity suppression in the ventral network correlates positively with task performance, an effect thought to reflect the gating of irrelevant cues. However, activation in these structures is elicited by a range of stimulus features and task demands that vary across multiple characteristics, complicating the interpretation of the functional role of this pathway. Consideration of several current studies suggests that, in addition to task difficulty, the motivational relevance or emotional intensity of distractor stimuli may supersede ongoing task priority, and evoke ventral network activation. Support for this possibility is offered from a review of recent reports, and the import of this perspective for models of attention reorienting are discussed.

  18. Spatial- and Time-Correlated Detection of Fission Fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Platkevic M.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available With the goal to measure angular correlations of fission fragments in rare fission decay (e.g. ternary and quaternary fission, a multi-detector coincidence system based on two and up to four position sensitive pixel detectors Timepix has been built. In addition to the high granularity, wide dynamic range and per pixel signal threshold, these devices are equipped with per pixel energy and time sensitivity providing more information (position, energy, time, enhances particle-type identification and selectivity of event-by-event detection. Operation of the device with the integrated USB 2.0 based readout interface FITPix and the control and data acquisition software tool Pixelman enables online visualization and flexible/adjustable operation for a different type of experiments. Spatially correlated fission fragments can be thus registered in coincidence. Similarly triggered measurements are performed using an integrated spectrometric module with analogue signal chain electronics. The current status of development together with demonstration of the technique with a 252Cf source is presented.

  19. Geometric and featural systems, separable and combined: Evidence from reorientation in people with Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Katrina; Landau, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Spatial reorientation by humans and other animals engages geometric representations of surface layouts as well as featural landmarks; however, the two types of information are thought to be behaviorally and neurally separable. In this paper, we examine the use of these two types of information during reorientation among children and adults with Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic disorder accompanied by abnormalities in brain regions that support use of both geometry and landmarks. Previous studies of reorientation in adolescents and adults with WS have shown deficits in the ability to use geometry for reorientation, but intact ability to use features, suggesting that the two systems can be differentially impaired by genetic disorder. Using a slightly modified layout, we found that many WS participants could use geometry, and most could use features along with geometry. However, the developmental trajectories for the two systems were quite different from one other, and different from those found in typical development. Purely geometric responding was not correlated with age in WS, and search processes appeared similar to those in typically developing (TD) children. In contrast, use of features in combination with geometry was correlated with age in WS, and search processes were distinctly different from TD children. The results support the view that use of geometry and features stem from different underlying mechanisms, that the developmental trajectories and operation of each are altered in WS, and that combination of information from the two systems is atypical. Given brain abnormalities in regions supporting the two kinds of information, our findings suggest that the co-operation of the two systems is functionally altered in this genetic syndrome. PMID:26275835

  20. Comparison of time series using entropy and mutual correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madonna, Fabio; Rosoldi, Marco

    2015-04-01

    The potential for redundant time series to reduce uncertainty in atmospheric variables has not been investigated comprehensively for climate observations. Moreover, comparison among time series of in situ and ground based remote sensing measurements have been performed using several methods, but quite often relying on linear models. In this work, the concepts of entropy (H) and mutual correlation (MC), defined in the frame of the information theory, are applied to the study of essential climate variables with the aim of characterizing the uncertainty of a time series and the redundancy of collocated measurements provided by different surface-based techniques. In particular, integrated water vapor (IWV) and water vapour mixing ratio times series obtained at five highly instrumented GRUAN (GCOS, Global Climate Observing System, Reference Upper-Air Network) stations with several sensors (e.g radiosondes, GPS, microwave and infrared radiometers, Raman lidar), in the period from 2010-2012, are analyzed in terms of H and MC. The comparison between the probability density functions of the time series shows that caution in using linear assumptions is needed and the use of statistics, like entropy, that are robust to outliers, is recommended to investigate measurements time series. Results reveals that the random uncertainties on the IWV measured with radiosondes, global positioning system, microwave and infrared radiometers, and Raman lidar measurements differed by less than 8 % over the considered time period. Comparisons of the time series of IWV content from ground-based remote sensing instruments with in situ soundings showed that microwave radiometers have the highest redundancy with the IWV time series measured by radiosondes and therefore the highest potential to reduce the random uncertainty of the radiosondes time series. Moreover, the random uncertainty of a time series from one instrument can be reduced by 60% by constraining the measurements with those from

  1. Out-of-Time-Ordered Density Correlators in Luttinger Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dóra, Balázs; Moessner, Roderich

    2017-07-01

    Information scrambling and the butterfly effect in chaotic quantum systems can be diagnosed by out-of-time-ordered (OTO) commutators through an exponential growth and large late time value. We show that the latter feature shows up in a strongly correlated many-body system, a Luttinger liquid, whose density fluctuations we study at long and short wavelengths, both in equilibrium and after a quantum quench. We find rich behavior combining robustly universal and nonuniversal features. The OTO commutators display temperature- and initial-state-independent behavior and grow as t2 for short times. For the short-wavelength density operator, they reach a sizable value after the light cone only in an interacting Luttinger liquid, where the bare excitations break up into collective modes. This challenges the common interpretation of the OTO commutator in chaotic systems. We benchmark our findings numerically on an interacting spinless fermion model in 1D and find persistence of central features even in the nonintegrable case. As a nonuniversal feature, the short-time growth exhibits a distance-dependent power.

  2. Myopic decisions under negative emotions correlate with altered time perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Shuchen; Cheng, Lu; Fan, Ying; Li, Xianchun

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have obtained inconsistent findings about emotional influence on inter-temporal choice (IC). In the present study, we first examined the effect of temporary emotional priming induced by affective pictures in a trial-to-trial paradigm on IC. The results showed that negative priming resulted in much higher percentages of trials during which smaller-but-sooner reward (SS%) were chosen compared with positive and neutral priming. Next, we attempted to explore the possible mechanisms underlying such emotional effects. When participants performed a time reproduction task, mean reaction times in negative priming condition were significantly shorter than those in the other two emotional contexts, which indicated that negative emotional priming led to overestimation of time. Moreover, such overestimation was negatively correlated with performance in the IC task. In contrast, temporary changes of emotional contexts did not alter performances in a Go/NoGo task (including commission errors and omission errors). In sum, our present findings suggested that myopic decisions under negative emotions were associated with altered time perception but not response inhibition.

  3. Myopic decisions under negative emotions correlate with altered time perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuchen eGuan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have obtained inconsistent findings about emotional influence on inter-temporal choice. In the present study, we first examined the effect of temporary emotional priming induced by affective pictures in a trial-to-trial paradigm on inter-temporal choice. The results showed that negative priming resulted in much higher percentages of trials during which smaller-but-sooner rewards (SS% were chosen compared with positive and neutral priming. Next, we attempted to explore the possible mechanisms underlying such emotional effects. When participants performed a time reproduction task, mean reaction times in negative priming conditions were significantly shorter than those in the other two emotional contexts, which indicated that negative emotional priming led to overestimation of time. Moreover, such overestimation was negatively correlated with performance in the inter-temporal choice task. In contrast, temporary changes of emotional contexts did not alter performances in a Go/NoGo task (including commission errors and omission errors. In sum, our present findings suggested that myopic decisions under negative emotions were associated with altered time perception but not response inhibition.

  4. The effect of stress state on zirconium hydride reorientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinbiz, Mahmut Nedim

    correlating the finite element stress-state results with the spatial distribution of hydride microstructures observed within the optical micrographs for each sample. Experiments showed that the hydride reorientation was enhanced as the stress biaxiality increased. The threshold stress decreased from 150 MPa to 80 MPa when stress biaxiality ratio increased from uniaxial tension to near-equibiaxial tension. This behavior was also predicted by classical nucleation theory based on the Gibbs free energy of transformation being assisted by the far-field stress. An analysis of in situ X-ray diffraction data obtained during a thermo-mechanical cycle typical of vacuum drying showed a complex lattice-spacing behavior of the hydride phase during the dissolution and precipitation. The in-plane hydrides showed bilinear lattice expansion during heating with the intrinsic thermal expansion rate of the hydrides being observed only at elevated temperatures as they dissolve. For radial hydrides that precipitate during cooling under stress, the spacing of the close-packed {111} planes oriented normal to the maximum applied stress was permanently higher than the corresponding {111} plane spacing in the other directions. This behavior is believed to be a result of a complex stress state within the precipitating plate-like hydrides that induces a strain component within the hydrides normal to its "plate" face (i.e., the applied stress direction) that exceeds the lattice spacing strains in the other directions. During heat-up, the lattice spacing of these same "plate" planes actually contract due to the reversion of the stress state within the plate-like hydrides as they dissolve. The presence of radial hydrides and their connectivity with in-plane hydrides was shown to increase the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature during tensile testing. This behavior can be understood in terms of the role of radial hydrides in promoting the initiation of a long crack that subsequently propagates under

  5. Stochastic dynamics of time correlation in complex systems with discrete time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulmetyev; Hanggi; Gafarov

    2000-11-01

    In this paper we present the concept of description of random processes in complex systems with discrete time. It involves the description of kinetics of discrete processes by means of the chain of finite-difference non-Markov equations for time correlation functions (TCFs). We have introduced the dynamic (time dependent) information Shannon entropy S(i)(t) where i=0,1,2,3,ellipsis, as an information measure of stochastic dynamics of time correlation (i=0) and time memory (i=1,2,3,ellipsis). The set of functions S(i)(t) constitute the quantitative measure of time correlation disorder (i=0) and time memory disorder (i=1,2,3,ellipsis) in complex system. The theory developed started from the careful analysis of time correlation involving dynamics of vectors set of various chaotic states. We examine two stochastic processes involving the creation and annihilation of time correlation (or time memory) in details. We carry out the analysis of vectors' dynamics employing finite-difference equations for random variables and the evolution operator describing their natural motion. The existence of TCF results in the construction of the set of projection operators by the usage of scalar product operation. Harnessing the infinite set of orthogonal dynamic random variables on a basis of Gram-Shmidt orthogonalization procedure tends to creation of infinite chain of finite-difference non-Markov kinetic equations for discrete TCFs and memory functions (MFs). The solution of the equations above thereof brings to the recurrence relations between the TCF and MF of senior and junior orders. This offers new opportunities for detecting the frequency spectra of power of entropy function S(i)(t) for time correlation (i=0) and time memory (i=1,2,3,ellipsis). The results obtained offer considerable scope for attack on stochastic dynamics of discrete random processes in a complex systems. Application of this technique on the analysis of stochastic dynamics of RR intervals from human ECG

  6. Time-Correlated Vortex Tunneling in Layered Superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H. Miller

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The nucleation and dynamics of Josephson and Abrikosov vortices determine the critical currents of layered high-Tc superconducting (HTS thin films, grain boundaries, and coated conductors, so understanding their mechanisms is of crucial importance. Here, we treat pair creation of Josephson and Abrikosov vortices in layered superconductors as a secondary Josephson effect. Each full vortex is viewed as a composite fluid of micro-vortices, such as pancake vortices, which tunnel coherently via a tunneling matrix element. We introduce a two-terminal magnetic (Weber blockade effect that blocks tunneling when the applied current is below a threshold value. We simulate vortex tunneling as a dynamic, time-correlated process when the current is above threshold. The model shows nearly precise agreement with voltage-current (V-I characteristics of HTS cuprate grain boundary junctions, which become more concave rounded as temperature decreases, and also explains the piecewise linear V-I behavior observed in iron-pnictide bicrystal junctions and other HTS devices. When applied to either Abrikosov or Josephson pair creation, the model explains a plateau seen in plots of critical current vs. thickness of HTS-coated conductors. The observed correlation between theory and experiment strongly supports the proposed quantum picture of vortex nucleation and dynamics in layered superconductors.

  7. Correlation-induced Time Delay in Atomic Photoionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, David A.; Manson, Steven T.; Deshmukh, Pranawa C.; Kheifets, Anatoli S.

    2016-05-01

    Interchannel coupling has been seen to result in structures in the photoionization cross sections of outer shell electrons in the vicinity of inner-shell thresholds, a result which leads us to ask if the same would be true for the time delay of outer shell electrons near inner-shell thresholds. Using the relativistic-random-phase approximation (RRPA) methodology, a theoretical study of neon, argon, krypton, and xenon were performed to search for these correlation-induced effects. Calculations were performed both with coupling and without coupling to verify that the structures found in the time delay were in fact due to interchannel coupling. Using this method to study the effects of interchannel coupling reveals how much of an impact the coupling has on the time delay, in some cases over a broad energy range. In cases where the spin-orbit doublets' respective thresholds are far enough apart, effects can be found in the j = l + 1/2channels due to interchannel coupling with the j = l-1/2 channels. These structures are purely a relativistic effect and are related to spin-obit activated interchannel coupling effects. Work supported by DOE, Office of Chemical Sciences, DST (India), and the Australian Research Council.

  8. New Insights into Time Series Analysis II - No Correlated Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Lopes, C E Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Statistical parameters are used in finance, weather, industrial, science, among other vast number of different fields to draw conclusions. They are also used to identify variability patterns on photometric data in order to select non-stochastic variations, indicative of astrophysical effects. New more efficient selection methods are mandatory to analyses the huge amount of astronomical data. Our aims are to improve the current methods used to select non-stochastic variations on non-correlated data. A new approach including a modified Strateva function are used to select non-stochastic variations. Monte-Carlo simulation and public time-domain data are used to estimate its accuracy and performance. We introduce 15 modified statistical parameters covering different features of statistical distribution, like; average, dispersion, and shape parameters. Many of dispersion and shape parameters are unbound parameters, i.e. equations which do not require the calculation of the average. Unbound parameters are computed ...

  9. Vibrations and reorientations of NH3 molecules in [Mn(NH3)6](ClO4)2 studied by infrared spectroscopy and theoretical (DFT) calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetmańczyk, Joanna; Hetmańczyk, Łukasz; Migdał-Mikuli, Anna; Mikuli, Edward

    2015-02-05

    The vibrational and reorientational motions of NH3 ligands and ClO4(-) anions were investigated by Fourier transform middle-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) in the high- and low-temperature phases of [Mn(NH3)6](ClO4)2. The temperature dependencies of full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the infrared bands at: 591 and 3385cm(-1), associated with: ρr(NH3) and νas(N-H) modes, respectively, indicate that there exist fast (correlation times τR≈10(-12)-10(-13)s) reorientational motions of NH3 ligands, with a mean values of activation energies: 7.8 and 4.5kJmol(-1), in the phase I and II, respectively. These reorientational motions of NH3 ligands are only slightly disturbed in the phase transition region and do not significantly contribute to the phase transition mechanism. Fourier transform far-infrared and middle-infrared spectra with decreasing of temperature indicated characteristic changes at the vicinity of PT at TC(c)=137.6K (on cooling), which suggested lowering of the crystal structure symmetry. Infrared spectra of [Mn(NH3)6](ClO4)2 were recorded and interpreted by comparison with respective theoretical spectra calculated using DFT method (B3LYP functional, LANL2DZ ECP basis set (on Mn atom) and 6-311+G(d,p) basis set (on H, N, Cl, O atoms) for the isolated equilibrium two models (Model 1 - separate isolated [Mn(NH3)6](2+) cation and ClO4(-) anion and Model 2 - [Mn(NH3)6(ClO4)2] complex system). Calculated optical spectra show a good agreement with the experimental infrared spectra (FT-FIR and FT-MIR) for the both models. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Peculiarities in the director reorientation and evolution of NMR spectra under the influence of crossed electric and magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    Theoretical description is proposed for new modes of reorientation of the director field widehat n and the evolution of the NMR spectrum I(ν) of a nematic liquid crystal (LC) formed by molecules of deuterated 4-n-pentyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl encapsulated in a rectangular LC cell under the action of crossed electric, E, and magnetic, B, fields directed at an angle of α to one another. Numerical calculations in the framework of the nonlinear generalization of the classical Ericksen-Leslie theory show that, under certain relations between the forces and moments acting upon a unit volume of the LC phase upon the reorientation of widehat n, transient periodic structures can arise if the corresponding distortion mode is characterized by the fastest response and thus suppresses all other modes, including uniform ones. It is shown that the rise of these periodic structures leads to a reduction in the time for the reorientation of the director field.

  11. Understanding and analysing time-correlated stochastic signals in pulsar timing

    CERN Document Server

    van Haasteren, Rutger

    2012-01-01

    Although it is widely understood that pulsar timing observations generally contain time-correlated stochastic signals (TCSSs; red timing noise is of this type), most data analysis techniques that have been developed make an assumption that the stochastic uncertainties in the data are uncorrelated, i.e. "white". Recent work has pointed out that this can introduce severe bias in determination of timing-model parameters, and that better analysis methods should be used. This paper presents a detailed investigation of timing-model fitting in the presence of TCSSs, and gives closed expressions for the post-fit signals in the data. This results in a Bayesian technique to obtain timing-model parameter estimates in the presence of TCSSs, as well as computationally more efficient expressions of their marginalised posterior distribution. A new method to analyse hundreds of mock dataset realisations simultaneously without significant computational overhead is presented, as well as a statistically rigorous method to check...

  12. Optimal reorientation of underactuated spacecraft using genetic algorithm with wavelet approximation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinsheng Ge; Liqun Chen

    2009-01-01

    The optimal attitude control of an underactuated spacecraft is investigated in this paper. The flywheels of the spacecraft can somehow only provide control inputs in two independent directions. The dynamic equations are formulated for the spacecraft under a nonholonomic constraint resulting from the constant time-rate of the total angular momentum of the system. The reorientation of such underactuated spacecraft is transformed into an optimal control problem. A ggnetic algorithm is proposed to derive the control laws of the two flywheels angle velocity inputs. The control laws are approximated by the discrete orthogonal wavelets.The numerical simulations indicate that the genetic algorithm with the wavelet approximation is an effective approach to deal with the optimal reorientation of underactuated spacecraft.

  13. Time dependent intrinsic correlation analysis of temperature and dissolved oxygen time series using empirical mode decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Y X

    2014-01-01

    In the marine environment, many fields have fluctuations over a large range of different spatial and temporal scales. These quantities can be nonlinear \\red{and} non-stationary, and often interact with each other. A good method to study the multiple scale dynamics of such time series, and their correlations, is needed. In this paper an application of an empirical mode decomposition based time dependent intrinsic correlation, \\red{of} two coastal oceanic time series, temperature and dissolved oxygen (saturation percentage) is presented. The two time series are recorded every 20 minutes \\red{for} 7 years, from 2004 to 2011. The application of the Empirical Mode Decomposition on such time series is illustrated, and the power spectra of the time series are estimated using the Hilbert transform (Hilbert spectral analysis). Power-law regimes are found with slopes of 1.33 for dissolved oxygen and 1.68 for temperature at high frequencies (between 1.2 and 12 hours) \\red{with} both close to 1.9 for lower frequencies (t...

  14. Correlation, regression, and cointegration of nonstationary economic time series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Søren

    Yule (1926) introduced the concept of spurious or nonsense correlation, and showed by simulation that for some nonstationary processes, that the empirical correlations seem not to converge in probability even if the processes were independent. This was later discussed by Granger and Newbold (1974...

  15. Correlation, Regression, and Cointegration of Nonstationary Economic Time Series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Søren

    Yule (1926) introduced the concept of spurious or nonsense correlation, and showed by simulation that for some nonstationary processes, that the empirical correlations seem not to converge in probability even if the processes were independent. This was later discussed by Granger and Newbold (1974...

  16. Cross-correlation least-squares reverse time migration in the pseudo-time domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingyang; Huang, Jianping; Li, Zhenchun

    2017-08-01

    The least-squares reverse time migration (LSRTM) method with higher image resolution and amplitude is becoming increasingly popular. However, the LSRTM is not widely used in field land data processing because of its sensitivity to the initial migration velocity model, large computational cost and mismatch of amplitudes between the synthetic and observed data. To overcome the shortcomings of the conventional LSRTM, we propose a cross-correlation least-squares reverse time migration algorithm in pseudo-time domain (PTCLSRTM). Our algorithm not only reduces the depth/velocity ambiguities, but also reduces the effect of velocity error on the imaging results. It relieves the accuracy requirements on the migration velocity model of least-squares migration (LSM). The pseudo-time domain algorithm eliminates the irregular wavelength sampling in the vertical direction, thus it can reduce the vertical grid points and memory requirements used during computation, which makes our method more computationally efficient than the standard implementation. Besides, for field data applications, matching the recorded amplitudes is a very difficult task because of the viscoelastic nature of the Earth and inaccuracies in the estimation of the source wavelet. To relax the requirement for strong amplitude matching of LSM, we extend the normalized cross-correlation objective function to the pseudo-time domain. Our method is only sensitive to the similarity between the predicted and the observed data. Numerical tests on synthetic and land field data confirm the effectiveness of our method and its adaptability for complex models.

  17. Planar reorientation maneuvers of space multibody systems using internal controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyhanoglu, Mahmut; Mcclamroch, N. H.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper a reorientation maneuvering strategy for an interconnection of planar rigid bodies in space is developed. It is assumed that there are no exogeneous torques, and torques generated by joint motors are used as means of control so that the total angular momentum of the multibody system is a constant, assumed to be zero in this paper. The maneuver strategy uses the nonintegrability of the expression for the angular momentum. We demonstrate that large-angle maneuvers can be designed to achieve an arbitrary reorientation of the multibody system with respect to an inertial frame. The theoretical background for carrying out the required maneuvers is briefly summarized. Specifications and computer simulations of a specific reorientation maneuver, and the corresponding control strategies, are described.

  18. Neural mechanisms underlying pain's ability to reorient attention: evidence for sensitization of somatic threat detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowman, Robert

    2014-06-01

    Pain typically signals damage to the body, and as such can be perceived as threatening and can elicit a strong emotional response. This ecological significance undoubtedly underlies pain's well-known ability to demand attention. However, the neural mechanisms underlying this ability are poorly understood. Previous work from the author's laboratory has reported behavioral evidence suggesting that participants disengage their attention from an incorrectly cued visual target stimulus and reorient it toward a somatic target more rapidly when the somatic target is painful than when it is nonpainful. Furthermore, electrophysiological data suggest that this effect is mediated by a stimulus-driven process, in which somatic threat detectors located in the dorsal posterior insula activate the medial and lateral prefrontal cortex areas involved in reorienting attention toward the painful target. In these previous studies, the painful and nonpainful somatic targets were given in separate experiments involving different participants. Here, the nonpainful and painful somatic targets were presented in random order within the same block of trials. Unlike in the previous studies, both the nonpainful and painful somatic targets activated the somatic threat detectors, and the times taken to disengage and reorient attention were the same for both. These electrophysiological and behavioral data suggest that somatic threat detectors can become sensitized to nonpainful somatic stimuli that are presented in a context that includes painful stimuli.

  19. Correlation, Regression, and Cointegration of Nonstationary Economic Time Series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Søren

    ), and Phillips (1986) found the limit distributions. We propose to distinguish between empirical and population correlation coefficients and show in a bivariate autoregressive model for nonstationary variables that the empirical correlation and regression coefficients do not converge to the relevant population...... values, due to the trending nature of the data. We conclude by giving a simple cointegration analysis of two interests. The analysis illustrates that much more insight can be gained about the dynamic behavior of the nonstationary variables then simply by calculating a correlation coefficient...

  20. A Novel Approach for Nonstationary Time Series Analysis with Time-Invariant Correlation Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengrui Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We will concentrate on the modeling and analysis of a class of nonstationary time series, called correlation coefficient stationary series, which commonly exists in practical engineering. First, the concept and scope of correlation coefficient stationary series are discussed to get a better understanding. Second, a theorem is proposed to determine standard deviation function for correlation coefficient stationary series. Third, we propose a moving multiple-point average method to determine the function forms for mean and standard deviation, which can help to improve the analysis precision, especially in the context of limited sample size. Fourth, the conditional likelihood approach is utilized to estimate the model parameters. In addition, we discuss the correlation coefficient stationarity test method, which can contribute to the verification of modeling validity. Monte Carlo simulation study illustrates the authentication of the theorem and the validity of the established method. Empirical study shows that the approach can satisfactorily explain the nonstationary behavior of many practical data sets, including stock returns, maximum power load, China money supply, and foreign currency exchange rate. The effectiveness of these processes is addressed by forecasting performance.

  1. Scale and time dependence of serial correlations in word-length time series of written texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, E.; Aguilar-Cornejo, M.; Femat, R.; Alvarez-Ramirez, J.

    2014-11-01

    This work considered the quantitative analysis of large written texts. To this end, the text was converted into a time series by taking the sequence of word lengths. The detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) was used for characterizing long-range serial correlations of the time series. To this end, the DFA was implemented within a rolling window framework for estimating the variations of correlations, quantified in terms of the scaling exponent, strength along the text. Also, a filtering derivative was used to compute the dependence of the scaling exponent relative to the scale. The analysis was applied to three famous English-written literary narrations; namely, Alice in Wonderland (by Lewis Carrol), Dracula (by Bram Stoker) and Sense and Sensibility (by Jane Austen). The results showed that high correlations appear for scales of about 50-200 words, suggesting that at these scales the text contains the stronger coherence. The scaling exponent was not constant along the text, showing important variations with apparent cyclical behavior. An interesting coincidence between the scaling exponent variations and changes in narrative units (e.g., chapters) was found. This suggests that the scaling exponent obtained from the DFA is able to detect changes in narration structure as expressed by the usage of words of different lengths.

  2. Correlated errors in geodetic time series: Implications for time-dependent deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langbein, J.; Johnson, H.

    1997-01-01

    Analysis of frequent trilateration observations from the two-color electronic distance measuring networks in California demonstrate that the noise power spectra are dominated by white noise at higher frequencies and power law behavior at lower frequencies. In contrast, Earth scientists typically have assumed that only white noise is present in a geodetic time series, since a combination of infrequent measurements and low precision usually preclude identifying the time-correlated signature in such data. After removing a linear trend from the two-color data, it becomes evident that there are primarily two recognizable types of time-correlated noise present in the residuals. The first type is a seasonal variation in displacement which is probably a result of measuring to shallow surface monuments installed in clayey soil which responds to seasonally occurring rainfall; this noise is significant only for a small fraction of the sites analyzed. The second type of correlated noise becomes evident only after spectral analysis of line length changes and shows a functional relation at long periods between power and frequency of and where f is frequency and ?? ??? 2. With ?? = 2, this type of correlated noise is termed random-walk noise, and its source is mainly thought to be small random motions of geodetic monuments with respect to the Earth's crust, though other sources are possible. Because the line length changes in the two-color networks are measured at irregular intervals, power spectral techniques cannot reliably estimate the level of I//" noise. Rather, we also use here a maximum likelihood estimation technique which assumes that there are only two sources of noise in the residual time series (white noise and randomwalk noise) and estimates the amount of each. From this analysis we find that the random-walk noise level averages about 1.3 mm/Vyr and that our estimates of the white noise component confirm theoretical limitations of the measurement technique. In

  3. Lensing and time-delay contributions to galaxy correlations

    OpenAIRE

    Raccanelli, Alvise; Bertacca, Daniele; Maartens, Roy; Clarkson, Chris; Doré, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Galaxy clustering on very large scales can be probed via the 2-point correlation function in the general case of wide and deep separations, including all the lightcone and relativistic effects. Using our recently developed formalism, we analyze the behavior of the local and integrated contributions and how these depend on redshift range, linear and angular separations and luminosity function. Relativistic corrections to the local part of the correlation can be non-negligible but they remain g...

  4. Lensing and time-delay contributions to galaxy correlations

    OpenAIRE

    Raccanelli, Alvise; Bertacca, Daniele; Maartens, Roy; Clarkson, Chris; Doré, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Galaxy clustering on very large scales can be probed via the 2-point correlation function in the general case of wide and deep separations, including all the lightcone and relativistic effects. Using our recently developed formalism, we analyze the behavior of the local and integrated contributions and how these depend on redshift range, linear and angular separations and luminosity function. Relativistic corrections to the local part of the correlation can be non-negligible but they remain g...

  5. Detecting PM2.5's Correlations between Neighboring Cities Using a Time-Lagged Cross-Correlation Coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Wang, Lin; Chen, Yuming

    2017-08-31

    In order to investigate the time-dependent cross-correlations of fine particulate (PM2.5) series among neighboring cities in Northern China, in this paper, we propose a new cross-correlation coefficient, the time-lagged q-L dependent height crosscorrelation coefficient (denoted by p q (τ, L)), which incorporates the time-lag factor and the fluctuation amplitude information into the analogous height cross-correlation analysis coefficient. Numerical tests are performed to illustrate that the newly proposed coefficient ρ q (τ, L) can be used to detect cross-correlations between two series with time lags and to identify different range of fluctuations at which two series possess cross-correlations. Applying the new coefficient to analyze the time-dependent cross-correlations of PM2.5 series between Beijing and the three neighboring cities of Tianjin, Zhangjiakou, and Baoding, we find that time lags between the PM2.5 series with larger fluctuations are longer than those between PM2.5 series withsmaller fluctuations. Our analysis also shows that cross-correlations between the PM2.5 series of two neighboring cities are significant and the time lags between two PM2.5 series of neighboring cities are significantly non-zero. These findings providenew scientific support on the view that air pollution in neighboring cities can affect one another not simultaneously but with a time lag.

  6. Dynamic Isovector Reorientation of Deuteron as a Probe to Nuclear Symmetry Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Li; Xiao, Zhigang; Yi, Han; Wang, Ning; Liu, Min; Tian, Junlong

    2015-11-20

    We present the calculations on a novel reorientation effect of deuteron attributed to isovector interaction in the nuclear field of heavy target nuclei. The correlation angle determined by the relative momentum vector of the proton and the neutron originating from the breakup deuteron, which is experimentally detectable, exhibits significant dependence on the isovector nuclear potential but is robust against the variation of the isoscaler sector. In terms of sensitivity and cleanness, the breakup reactions induced by the polarized deuteron beam at about 100 MeV/u provide a more stringent constraint to the symmetry energy at subsaturation densities.

  7. Brain microstructural correlates of visuospatial choice reaction time in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kathrine Skak; Baaré, William F C; Skimminge, Arnold

    2011-01-01

    The corticospinal tracts and the basal ganglia continue to develop during childhood and adolescence, and indices of their maturation can be obtained using diffusion-weighted imaging. Here we show that a simple measure of visuomotor function is correlated with diffusion parameters in the corticosp...

  8. The World Is Not Flat: Can People Reorient Using Slope?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Daniele; Newcombe, Nora S.; Shipley, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    Studies of spatial representation generally focus on flat environments and visual input. However, the world is not flat, and slopes are part of most natural environments. In a series of 4 experiments, we examined whether humans can use a slope as a source of allocentric, directional information for reorientation. A target was hidden in a corner of…

  9. Reorientation of magnetic anisotropy in obliquely sputtered metallic thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisfi, A.; Lodder, J.C.; Wormeester, H.; Poelsema, B.

    2002-01-01

    Reorientation in the magnetic anisotropy as a function of film thickness has been observed in Co-Ni and Co thin films, obliquely sputtered on a polyethylene terephthalate substrate at a large incidence angle (70°). This effect is a consequence of the low magnetocrystalline anisotropy of the films (f

  10. Stategic reorientation of industrial R&D towards commercial objectives.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brook, Jacques W.; de Bruijn, E.J.; McDonough III, Edward F.; Kaynak, E.; Harcar, T.D.

    2007-01-01

    In an effort to leverage R&D knowledge asset and to create more value from industrial R&D in today’s increasing liberalized and globalising business environments, some corporations adopt a strategic reorientation of their industrial R&D organisation towards commercial objectives. This study suggests

  11. Symmetry breaking, slow relaxation dynamics, and topological defects at the field-induced helix reorientation in MnSi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, A.; Chacon, A.; Wagner, M.; Halder, M.; Georgii, R.; Rosch, A.; Pfleiderer, C.; Garst, M.

    2017-01-01

    We report a study of the reorientation of the helimagnetic order in the archetypal cubic chiral magnet MnSi as a function of magnetic field direction. The reorientation process as inferred from small-angle neutron scattering, the magnetization, and the ac susceptibility is in excellent agreement with an effective mean-field theory taking into account the precise symmetries of the crystallographic space group. Depending on the field and temperature history and the direction of the field with respect to the crystalline axes, the helix reorientation may exhibit a crossover, a first-order, or a second-order transition. The magnetization and ac susceptibility provide evidence that the reorientation of helimagnetic domains is associated with large relaxation times exceeding seconds. At the second-order transitions residual Ising symmetries are spontaneously broken at continuous elastic instabilities of the helimagnetic order. In addition, on the time scales explored in our experiments these transitions are hysteretic as a function of field suggesting, within the same theoretical framework, the formation of an abundance of plastic deformations of the helical spin order. These deformations comprise topologically nontrivial disclinations, reminiscent of the skyrmions discovered recently in the same class of materials.

  12. Long-time correlated quantum dynamics of phonon cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Carlig, Sergiu; Macovei, Mihai A.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the steady-state cooling dynamics of vibrational degrees of freedom related to a nanomechanical oscillator coupled with a laser-pumped quantum dot in an optical resonator. Correlations between phonon-cooling and quantum-dot photon emission processes occur respectively when a photon laser absorption together with a vibrational phonon absorption is followed by photon emission in the optical resonator. Therefore, the detection of photons generated in the cavity mode concomitantly ...

  13. Environmental Geometry Aligns the Hippocampal Map during Spatial Reorientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keinath, Alex T; Julian, Joshua B; Epstein, Russell A; Muzzio, Isabel A

    2017-02-06

    When a navigator's internal sense of direction is disrupted, she must rely on external cues to regain her bearings, a process termed spatial reorientation. Extensive research has demonstrated that the geometric shape of the environment exerts powerful control over reorientation behavior, but the neural and cognitive mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are not well understood. Whereas some theories claim that geometry controls behavior through an allocentric mechanism potentially tied to the hippocampus, others postulate that disoriented navigators reach their goals by using an egocentric view-matching strategy. To resolve this debate, we characterized hippocampal representations during reorientation. We first recorded from CA1 cells as disoriented mice foraged in chambers of various shapes. We found that the alignment of the recovered hippocampal map was determined by the geometry of the chamber, but not by nongeometric cues, even when these cues could be used to disambiguate geometric ambiguities. We then recorded hippocampal activity as disoriented mice performed a classical goal-directed spatial memory task in a rectangular chamber. Again, we found that the recovered hippocampal map aligned solely to the chamber geometry. Critically, we also found a strong correspondence between the hippocampal map alignment and the animal's behavior, making it possible to predict the search location of the animal from neural responses on a trial-by-trial basis. Together, these results demonstrate that spatial reorientation involves the alignment of the hippocampal map to local geometry. We hypothesize that geometry may be an especially salient cue for reorientation because it is an inherently stable aspect of the environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Space-time correlations of a Gaussian interface

    CERN Document Server

    Dunlop, Francois M

    2010-01-01

    The serial harness introduced by Hammersley is equivalent, in the Gaussian case, to the Gaussian Solid-On-Solid interface model with parallel heat bath dynamics. Here we consider sub-lattice parallel dynamics, and give exact results about relaxation dynamics, based on the equivalence to the infinite time limit of a time periodic random field. We also give a numerical comparison to the harness process in continuous time studied by Hsiao and by Ferrari, Niederhauser and Pechersky.

  15. Correlations of decay times of entangled composite unstable systems

    CERN Document Server

    Durt, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The role played by Time in the quantum theory is still mysterious by many aspects. In particular it is not clear today whether the distribution of decay times of unstable particles could be described by a Time Operator. As we shall discuss, different approaches to this problem (one could say interpretations) can be found in the literature on the subject. As we shall show, it is possible to conceive crucial experiments aimed at distinguishing the different approaches, by measuring with accuracy the statistical distribution of decay times of entangled particles. Such experiments can be realized in principle with entangled kaon pairs.

  16. Correlations of Decay Times of Entangled Composite Unstable Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The role played by time in the quantum theory is still mysterious by many aspects. In particular it is not clear today whether the distribution of decay times of unstable particles could be described by a time operator (TO). As we shall discuss, different approaches to this problem (one could say interpretations) can be found in the literature on the subject. As we shall show, it is possible to conceive crucial experiments aimed at distinguishing the different approaches, by measuring with accuracy the statistical distribution of decay times of entangled particles. Such experiments can be realized in principle with entangled kaon pairs.

  17. A 32-channel photon counting module with embedded auto/cross-correlators for real-time parallel fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, S.; Labanca, I.; Rech, I.; Ghioni, M. [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a well-established technique to study binding interactions or the diffusion of fluorescently labeled biomolecules in vitro and in vivo. Fast FCS experiments require parallel data acquisition and analysis which can be achieved by exploiting a multi-channel Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) array and a corresponding multi-input correlator. This paper reports a 32-channel FPGA based correlator able to perform 32 auto/cross-correlations simultaneously over a lag-time ranging from 10 ns up to 150 ms. The correlator is included in a 32 × 1 SPAD array module, providing a compact and flexible instrument for high throughput FCS experiments. However, some inherent features of SPAD arrays, namely afterpulsing and optical crosstalk effects, may introduce distortions in the measurement of auto- and cross-correlation functions. We investigated these limitations to assess their impact on the module and evaluate possible workarounds.

  18. A nonlinear correlation function for selecting the delay time in dynamical reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Luis Antonio

    1995-02-01

    Numerical results discussed in this paper suggest that a function which detects nonlinear correlations in time series usually indicates shorter correlation times than the linear autocorrelation function which is often used for this purpose. The nonlinear correlation function can also detect changes in the data which cannot be distinguished by the linear counterpart. This affects a number of approaches for the selection of the delay time used in the reconstruction of nonlinear dynamics from a single time series based on time delay coordinates.

  19. Time-dependent correlation buildup in spherical Yukawa balls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaehlert, Hanno; Bonitz, Michael

    2009-11-01

    In recent years it has become possible to create 3D dust crystals in experiments [1], where the particles arrange on concentric spherical shells. Compared to confined ions the interaction between the dust particles is screened, which has been shown to affect the shell occupation of the ground state [2], and the probability of metastable states [3,4]. Here we study dynamical processes in a trapped Yukawa plasma by means of Langevin dynamics simulations, which fully include the Coulomb correlations, the confinement and friction with the neutral gas. By cooling a weakly correlated initial state towards the strong coupling regime, the formation of concentric shells is observed. While in systems with Coulomb interaction the shells clearly emerge at the cluster boundary, they appear almost simultaneously for sufficiently large screening. Monte Carlo simulations are used to show that the sequence, in which radial order is established, is determined by the confinement potential.[4pt] [1] O. Arp, D. Block, A. Piel, and A. Melzer, PRL 93, 165004 (2004)[0pt] [2] H. Baumgartner et al., New J. Phys. 10, 093019 (2008)[0pt] [3] D. Block et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 040701 (2008)[0pt] [4] H. K"ahlert et al., Phys. Rev. E 78, 036408 (2008)

  20. Neural correlates of time versus money in product evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian eLehmann

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The common saying time is money reflects the widespread belief in many people’s everyday life that time is valuable like money. Psychologically and neurophysiologically, however, these concepts seem to be quite different. This research replicates prior behavioral investigations by showing that merely mentioning time (compared to merely mentioning money leads participants to evaluate a product more positively. Beyond this finding, the present functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI experiment provides novel insight into the neurophysiological underpinnings of this behavioral effect by showing that more positive product evaluations in the time primes (compared to money primes are preceded by increased activation in the insula. Our data, therefore, support the idea of a time mindset that is different from a money mindset. Studies on the functional neuroanatomy of the insula have implicated this brain area in distinct but related psychological phenomena such as urging, addiction, loss aversion, and love. These functions imply greater personal connection between the consumer and a target subject or object and, thus, help explain why time-primed consumers rate products more positively.

  1. Spatial reorientation experiments for NMR of solids and partially oriented liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Rachel W; Kelly, John E; Collier, Kelsey A

    2015-11-01

    Motional reorientation experiments are extensions of Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) where the rotor axis is changed in order to average out, reintroduce, or scale anisotropic interactions (e.g. dipolar couplings, quadrupolar interactions or chemical shift anisotropies). This review focuses on Variable Angle Spinning (VAS), Switched Angle Spinning (SAS), and Dynamic Angle Spinning (DAS), all of which involve spinning at two or more different angles sequentially, either in successive experiments or during a multidimensional experiment. In all of these experiments, anisotropic terms in the Hamiltonian are scaled by changing the orientation of the spinning sample relative to the static magnetic field. These experiments vary in experimental complexity and instrumentation requirements. In VAS, many one-dimensional spectra are collected as a function of spinning angle. In SAS, dipolar couplings and/or chemical shift anisotropies are reintroduced by switching the sample between two different angles, often 0° or 90° and the magic angle, yielding a two-dimensional isotropic-anisotropic correlation spectrum. Dynamic Angle Spinning (DAS) is a related experiment that is used to simultaneously average out the first- and second-order quadrupolar interactions, which cannot be accomplished by spinning at any unique rotor angle in physical space. Although motional reorientation experiments generally require specialized instrumentation and data analysis schemes, some are accessible with only minor modification of standard MAS probes. In this review, the mechanics of each type of experiment are described, with representative examples. Current and historical probe and coil designs are discussed from the standpoint of how each one accomplishes the particular objectives of the experiment(s) it was designed to perform. Finally, applications to inorganic materials and liquid crystals, which present very different experimental challenges, are discussed. The review concludes with perspectives

  2. Facial landmark detection in real-time with correlation filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Viridiana; Díaz-Ramírez, Víctor H.

    2016-09-01

    An algorithm for facial landmark detection based on template matched filtering is presented. The algorithm is able to detect and estimate the position of a set of prespecified landmarks by employing a bank of linear filters. Each filter in the bank is trained to detect a single landmark that is located in a small region of the input face image. The filter bank is implemented in parallel on a graphics processing unit to perform facial landmark detection in real-time. Computer simulation results obtained with the proposed algorithm are presented and discussed in terms of detection rate, accuracy of landmark location estimation, and real-time efficiency.

  3. Correlates of Graduating with a Full-Time Job versus a Full-Time Job Consistent with Major

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, Gary; Hill, Theodore L.; Halbert, Terry A.; Snell, Corinne; Atwater, Graig A.; Kershner, Ronald; Zuckerman, M. Michael

    2016-01-01

    This is an exploratory study that compares the correlates of securing a full-time job at graduation to securing a full-time job at graduation consistent with one's major. Results are drawn from a sample of 310 graduating business school seniors who filled out a Fall 2014 survey. Results showed three positive correlates to graduating with a…

  4. Long-time tails in angular momentum correlations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lowe, C.P.; Frenkel, D.; Masters, A.J.

    1995-01-01

    We compare computer simulation results for the angular velocity autocorrelation function (AVACF) of a colloidal particle with theoretical predictions. We consider both spherical and nonspherical particles in two and three dimensions. The theoretical prediction for the long-time decay of the AVACF in

  5. Time-Resolved PIV for Space-Time Correlations in Hot Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    2007-01-01

    Temporally Resolved Particle Image Velocimetry (TR-PIV) is being used to characterize the decay of turbulence in jet flows a critical element for understanding the acoustic properties of the flow. A TR-PIV system, developed in-house at the NASA Glenn Research Center, is capable of acquiring planar PIV image frame pairs at up to 10 kHz. The data reported here were collected at Mach numbers of 0.5 and 0.9 and at temperature ratios of 0.89 and 1.76. The field of view of the TR-PIV system covered 6 nozzle diameters along the lip line of the 50.8 mm diameter jet. The cold flow data at Mach 0.5 were compared with hotwire anemometry measurements in order to validate the new TR-PIV technique. The axial turbulence profiles measured across the shear layer using TR-PIV were thinner than those measured using hotwire anemometry and remained centered along the nozzle lip line. The collected TR-PIV data illustrate the differences in the single point statistical flow properties of cold and hot jet flows. The planar, time-resolved velocity records were then used to compute two-point space-time correlations of the flow at the Mach 0.9 flow condition. The TR-PIV results show that there are differences in the convective velocity and growth rate of the turbulent structures between cold and hot flows at the same Mach number.

  6. Correlation structure of time-changed Pearson diffusions

    OpenAIRE

    Mijena, Jebessa B.; Nane, Erkan

    2014-01-01

    The stochastic solution to diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients is called a Pearson diffusion. If the time derivative is replaced by a distributed fractional derivative, the stochastic solution is called a fractional Pearson diffusion. This paper develops a formula for the covariance function of a fractional Pearson diffusion in steady state, in terms of generalized Mittag-Leffler functions. That formula shows that fractional Pearson diffusions are long-range dependent, with a cor...

  7. The reorientation of spatial planning systems and policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galland, Daniel; Enemark, Stig

    2012-01-01

    spatial planning has become reoriented. This is performed through an empirical analysis regarding the transformation of spatial planning in relation with the evolving conception of planning policies at different scales, the changing role of planning in conceiving and handling growth and development......Danish spatial planning has been increasingly subjected to profound reorientations over the past two decades. The comprehensive frame wherein planning policies and practices operated across different levels of administration has become significantly altered. This has been particularly evident after...... radical shifts in terms of the scope of planning policies, the implementation of land-use tasks as well as the performance of the institutional arrangements operating within and beyond the planning system. Based on an in-depth analysis concerned with these changes, the paper endeavours into discussing how...

  8. Time-correlated neutron analysis of a multiplying HEU source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, E.C., E-mail: Eric.Miller@jhuapl.edu [Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD (United States); Kalter, J.M.; Lavelle, C.M. [Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD (United States); Watson, S.M.; Kinlaw, M.T.; Chichester, D.L. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Noonan, W.A. [Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The ability to quickly identify and characterize special nuclear material remains a national security challenge. In counter-proliferation applications, identifying the neutron multiplication of a sample can be a good indication of the level of threat. Currently neutron multiplicity measurements are performed with moderated {sup 3}He proportional counters. These systems rely on the detection of thermalized neutrons, a process which obscures both energy and time information from the source. Fast neutron detectors, such as liquid scintillators, have the ability to detect events on nanosecond time scales, providing more information on the temporal structure of the arriving signal, and provide an alternative method for extracting information from the source. To explore this possibility, a series of measurements were performed on the Idaho National Laboratory's MARVEL assembly, a configurable HEU source. The source assembly was measured in a variety of different HEU configurations and with different reflectors, covering a range of neutron multiplications from 2 to 8. The data was collected with liquid scintillator detectors and digitized for offline analysis. A gap based approach for identifying the bursts of detected neutrons associated with the same fission chain was used. Using this approach, we are able to study various statistical properties of individual fission chains. One of these properties is the distribution of neutron arrival times within a given burst. We have observed two interesting empirical trends. First, this distribution exhibits a weak, but definite, dependence on source multiplication. Second, there are distinctive differences in the distribution depending on the presence and type of reflector. Both of these phenomena might prove to be useful when assessing an unknown source. The physical origins of these phenomena can be illuminated with help of MCNPX-PoliMi simulations.

  9. Reorienting programme budgeting and marginal analysis (PBMA towards disinvestment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortimer Duncan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Remarkable progress has been made over the past 40 years in developing rational, evidence-based mechanisms for the allocation of health resources. Much of this progress has centred on mechanisms for commissioning new medical devices and pharmaceuticals. The attention of fund-managers and policy-makers is only now turning towards development of mechanisms for decommissioning, disinvesting or redeploying resources from currently funded interventions. While Programme Budgeting and Marginal Analysis would seem well-suited to this purpose, past applications include both successes and failures in achieving disinvestment and resource release. Discussion Drawing on recent successes/failures in achieving disinvestment and resource release via PBMA, this paper identifies four barriers/enablers to disinvestment via PBMA: (i specification of the budget constraint, (ii scope of the programme budget, (iii composition and role of the advisory group, and (iv incentives for/against contributing to a 'shift list' of options for disinvestment and resource release. A number of modifications to the PBMA process are then proposed with the aim of reorienting PBMA towards disinvestment. Summary The reoriented model is differentiated by four features: (i hard budget constraint with budgetary pressure; (ii programme budgets with broad scope but specific investment proposals linked to disinvestment proposals with similar input requirements; (iii advisory/working groups that include equal representation of sectional interests plus additional members with responsibility for advocating in favour of disinvestment, (iv 'shift lists' populated and developed prior to 'wish lists' and investment proposals linked to disinvestment proposals within a relatively narrow budget area. While the argument and evidence presented here suggest that the reoriented model will facilitate disinvestment and resource release, this remains an empirical question. Likewise

  10. Rocket propellant reorientation and fluid management used in space commercialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, R. J.; Lee, C. C.; Shyu, K. L.

    1990-01-01

    In a spacecraft design, the requirements of settled propellant are different for tank pressurization, engine restart, venting, or propellant transfer. The requirement to settle or to position liquid fuel over the outlet end of the spacecraft propellant tank prior main engine restart possess a microgravity fluid behavior problem. In this paper, the dynamical behavior of liquid propellant, fluid reorientation, and propellant resettling have been carried out.

  11. Multiple-time correlation functions for non-Markovian interaction: Beyond the Quantum Regression Theorem

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso, D; Alonso, Daniel; Vega, In\\'es de

    2004-01-01

    Multiple time correlation functions are found in the dynamical description of different phenomena. They encode and describe the fluctuations of the dynamical variables of a system. In this paper we formulate a theory of non-Markovian multiple-time correlation functions (MTCF) for a wide class of systems. We derive the dynamical equation of the {\\it reduced propagator}, an object that evolve state vectors of the system conditioned to the dynamics of its environment, which is not necessarily at the vacuum state at the initial time. Such reduced propagator is the essential piece to obtain multiple-time correlation functions. An average over the different environmental histories of the reduced propagator permits us to obtain the evolution equations of the multiple-time correlation functions. We also study the evolution of MTCF within the weak coupling limit and it is shown that the multiple-time correlation function of some observables satisfy the Quantum Regression Theorem (QRT), whereas other correlations do no...

  12. A model of cytoskeletal reorientation in response to substrate stretching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazopoulos K.A.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Living adherent cells change their orientation in response to substrate stretching such that their cytoskeletal components reorganize in a new direction. To study this phenomenon, we model the cytoskeleton as a planar system of elastic cables and struts both pinned at their endpoints to a flat flexible substrate. Tensed (pre-strained cables represent acting stress fibers, whereas compression-bearing struts represent microtubules. We assume that in response to uniaxial substrate stretching the model reorients and deforms into a new configuration that minimizes its total potential energy. Using the Maxwell's global stability criterion, we find global minima configurations during static extension and compression of the substrate. Based on these results, we predict reorientation during cyclic stretching of the substrate. We find that in response to cyclic stretching cells either reorient transversely to the direction of stretching, or exhibit multiple configurations symmetrically distributed relative to the direction of stretching. These predictions are consistent with experimental data on living cells from the literature.

  13. Time Resolved PIV for Space-Time Correlations in Hot Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    2007-01-01

    Temporally Resolved Particle Image Velocimetry (TR-PIV) is the newest and most exciting tool recently developed to support our continuing efforts to characterize and improve our understanding of the decay of turbulence in jet flows -- a critical element for understanding the acoustic properties of the flow. A new TR-PIV system has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center which is capable of acquiring planar PIV image frame pairs at up to 25 kHz. The data reported here were collected at Mach numbers of 0.5 and 0.9 and at temperature ratios of 0.89 and 1.76. The field of view of the TR-PIV system covered 6 nozzle diameters along the lip line of the 50.8 mm diameter jet. The cold flow data at Mach 0.5 were compared with hotwire anemometry measurements in order to validate the new TR-PIV technique. The axial turbulence profiles measured across the shear layer using TR-PIV were thinner than those measured using hotwire anemometry and remained centered along the nozzle lip line. The collected TR-PIV data illustrate the differences in the single point statistical flow properties of cold and hot jet flows. The planar, time-resolved velocity records were then used to compute two-point space-time correlations of the flow at the Mach 0.9 flow condition. The TR-PIV results show that there are differences in the convective velocity and growth rate of the turbulent structures between cold and hot flows at the same Mach number

  14. Strain induced magnetic transitions and spin reorientations in quantum paraelectric EuTiO3 material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengdi; Zhao, Jinglong; Dong, Zhengchao; Zhong, Chonggui; Huang, Yanyan; Min, Yi; Wang, Meng; Zhou, Pengxia

    2015-05-01

    Strain induced magnetic transitions and spin reorientations in quantum paraelectric EuTiO3 material have been investigated using the first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. Four kinds of magnetic configurations and three possible directions of magnetic moments in every configuration are taken into consideration, respectively, in paraelectric and ferroelectric phases induced by the biaxial compressive and tensile strains. The calculated results indicate that the strain, regardless of the compressive or tensile strain, can induce not only the magnetic transitions from G-type antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic phase, but also the reorientation of spin polarization in EuTiO3. The compressive strain can induce a ferromagnetic phase with spin polarization along a axis while the tensile one make magnetic moments along c axis. The further analysis for the electronic density of states (DOS) discover that the magnetic moment direction of EuTiO3 have intrinsic correlation with these orbitals, where the density of states are the most localized. In addition, Anderson super-exchange model is proposed to explain the changes of exchange coupling properties induced by the biaxial strains.

  15. Reorientational dynamics in molecular liquids as revealed by dynamic light scattering: From boiling point to glass transition temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtke, B.; Petzold, N.; Kahlau, R.; Rössler, E. A.

    2013-08-01

    We determine the reorientational correlation time τ of a series of molecular liquids by performing depolarized light scattering experiments (double monochromator, Fabry-Perot interferometry, and photon correlation spectroscopy). Correlation times in the range 10-12 s-100 s are compiled, i.e., the full temperature interval between the boiling point and the glass transition temperature Tg is covered. We focus on low-Tg liquids for which the high-temperature limit τ ≅ 10-12 s is easily accessed by standard spectroscopic equipment (up to 440 K). Regarding the temperature dependence three interpolation formulae of τ(T) with three parameters each are tested: (i) Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann equation, (ii) the approach recently discussed by Mauro et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 106, 19780 (2009)], and (iii) our approach decomposing the activation energy E(T) in a constant high temperature value E∞ and a "cooperative part" Ecoop(T) depending exponentially on temperature [Schmidtke et al., Phys. Rev. E 86, 041507 (2012)], 10.1103/PhysRevE.86.041507. On the basis of the present data, approaches (i) and (ii) are insufficient as they do not provide the correct crossover to the high-temperature Arrhenius law clearly identified in the experimental data while approach (iii) reproduces the salient features of τ(T). It allows to discuss the temperature dependence of the liquid's dynamics in terms of a Ecoop(T)/E∞ vs. T/E∞ plot and suggests that E∞ controls the energy scale of the glass transition phenomenon.

  16. Correlation times in stochastic equations with delayed feedback and multiplicative noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudreault, Mathieu; Berbert, Juliana Militão; Viñals, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    We obtain the characteristic correlation time associated with a model stochastic differential equation that includes the normal form of a pitchfork bifurcation and delayed feedback. In particular, the validity of the common assumption of statistical independence between the state at time t and that at t-τ, where τ is the delay time, is examined. We find that the correlation time diverges at the model's bifurcation line, thus signaling a sharp bifurcation threshold, and the failure of statistical independence near threshold. We determine the correlation time both by numerical integration of the governing equation, and analytically in the limit of small τ. The correlation time T diverges as T~a(-1), where a is the control parameter so that a=0 is the bifurcation threshold. The small-τ expansion correctly predicts the location of the bifurcation threshold, but there are systematic deviations in the magnitude of the correlation time.

  17. [Reorientation osteotomy of the trapezial saddle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapandji, Adalbert I; Heim, Urs F A

    2002-03-01

    At its early stage, the thumb TM osteo-arthritis is occasionally painful during some activities and there are mainly radiological signs, only visible on specific views and with maximum amplitudes. They are the first metacarpal base imperfect reintegration in the trapezium saddle in ante-position and an increased slope angle of 140 degrees. So, the "slippery saddle" of the trapezium induces a metacarpal base subluxation. The goal of the proposed technique is to correct the orientation of the trapezial saddle. The slope angle must return to its normal value of about 125 degrees, thanks to an opening wedge osteotomy into the trapezium, completed with a bony wedge insertion. Proposed for the first time in 1983, and used only once by Dr. Heim, this technique was "rediscovered" recently and used on five patients in ten years. It is easy to do, the only complication being two post-operative radial nerve sensitive branch neuromas. In six cases on seven, the pain disappeared, even if the osteo-arthritis was evolving for the two former cases. The functional recovery was total and the patients were satisfied in most of the cases. In spite of this short series, this technique is worth being used for the early stage of thumb osteo-arthritis, eventually combined with others techniques like tenotomy of the Abductor pollicis longus accessories or different types of ligamentoplasties. It is, in any case, more logical than the first metacarpal osteotomy.

  18. Time-integrating acousto-optic correlator for wideband random noise radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangtaek; Narayanan, Ram; Zhou, Wei; Wagner, Kelvin

    2004-10-01

    A time-integrating acousto-optic correlator (TIAOC) is a good candidate for imaging and target detection using a wideband random noise radar system. We have developed such a correlator for a random noise radar with a signal frequency range of 1-2 GHz. This system has demonstrated good wideband signal correlation performance with good dynamic range and fine tuning of delays.

  19. Unilateral reorientation of microtubules at the outer epidermal wall during photo- and gravitropic curvature of maize coleoptiles and sunflower hypocotyls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nick, P; Bergfeld, R; Schafer, E; Schopfer, P

    1990-05-01

    Auxin (indole-3-acetic acid) controls the orientation of cortical microtubes (MT) at the outer wall of the outer epidermis of growing maize coleoptiles (Bergfeld, R., Speth, V., Schopfer, P., 1988, Bot. Acta 101, 57-67). A detailed time course of MT reorientation, determined by labeling MT with fluorescent antibodies, revealed that the auxin-mediated movement of MT from the longitudinal to the transverse direction starts after less than 15 min and is completed after 60 min. This response was used for a critical test of the functional involvement of auxin in tropic curvature. It was found that phototropic (first phototropic curvature) as well as gravitropic bending are correlated with a change of MT orientation from transverse to longitudinal at the slower-growing organ flank whereas the transverse MT orientation is maintained (or even augmented) at the faster-growing organ flank. These directional changes are confined to the MT subjacent to the outer epidermal wall. The same basic results were obtained with sunflower hypocotyls subjected to phototropic or gravitropic stimulation. It is concluded that auxin is, in fact, involved in asymmetric growth leading to tropic curvature. However, our results do not allow us to discriminate between an uneven distribution of endogenous auxin or an even distribution of auxin, the activity of which is modulated by an unevenly distributed inhibitor of auxin action.

  20. Study of cross-correlation in a self-affine time series of taxi accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebende, G. F.; da Silva, P. A.; Machado Filho, A.

    2011-05-01

    We study in this paper the cross-correlation between self-affine time series of real variables recorded simultaneously in cases of taxi accidents. For this purpose, we apply the DCCA method and show that the cross-correlation can be divided into three distinct groups, if we look for the detrended covariance function, i.e., long-range cross-correlations, short-range cross-correlations and no cross-correlations. Finally, it will be seen that the detrended covariance function is robust, if compared with other methods, in identifying these types of cross-correlations.

  1. LES prediction of space-time correlations in turbulent shear flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Guo; Dong Li; Xing Zhang; Guo-Wei He

    2012-01-01

    We compare the space-time correlations calculated from direct numerical simulation (DNS) and large-eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent channel flows.It is found from the comparisons that the LES with an eddy-viscosity subgrid scale (SGS) model over-predicts the space-time correlations than the DNS.The overpredictions are further quantified by the integral scales of directional correlations and convection velocities.A physical argument for the overprediction is provided that the eddy-viscosity SGS model alone does not includes the backscatter effects although it correctly represents the energy dissipations of SGS motions.This argument is confirmed by the recently developed elliptic model for space-time correlations in turbulent shear flows.It suggests that enstrophy is crucial to the LES prediction of spacetime correlations.The random forcing models and stochastic SGS models are proposed to overcome the overpredictions on space-time correlations.

  2. Time-dependent cross-correlations between different stock returns: a directed network of influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullmann, L; Kertész, J; Kaski, K

    2002-08-01

    We study the time-dependent cross-correlations of stock returns, i.e., we measure the correlation as the function of the time shift between pairs of stock return time series using tick-by-tick data. We find a weak but significant effect showing that in many cases the maximum correlation appears at nonzero time shift, indicating directions of influence between the companies. Due to the weakness of this effect and the shortness of the characteristic time (of the order of a few minutes), our findings are compatible with market efficiency. The interaction of companies defines a directed network of influence.

  3. Shell model for time-correlated random advection of passive scalars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ken Haste; Muratore-Ginanneschi, P.

    1999-01-01

    We study a minimal shell model for the advection of a passive scalar by a Gaussian time-correlated velocity field. The anomalous scaling properties of the white noise limit are studied analytically. The effect of the time correlations are investigated using perturbation theory around the white...

  4. Equal-time temperature correlators of the one-dimensional Heisenberg $XY$ chain

    CERN Document Server

    Izergin, A G; Kitanine, N A

    1997-01-01

    Representations as determinants of $M\\times M$ dimensional matrices are obtained for equal-time temperature correlators of the anisotropic Heisenberg XY chain. These representations are simple deformations of the answers for the isotropic XX0 chain. In the thermodynamic limit, the correlators are expressed in terms of the Fredholm determinants of linear integral operators.

  5. Space-time correlations of fluctuating velocities in turbulent shear flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; He, Guo-Wei

    2009-04-01

    Space-time correlations or Eulerian two-point two-time correlations of fluctuating velocities are analytically and numerically investigated in turbulent shear flows. An elliptic model for the space-time correlations in the inertial range is developed from the similarity assumptions on the isocorrelation contours: they share a uniform preference direction and a constant aspect ratio. The similarity assumptions are justified using the Kolmogorov similarity hypotheses and verified using the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulent channel flows. The model relates the space-time correlations to the space correlations via the convection and sweeping characteristic velocities. The analytical expressions for the convection and sweeping velocities are derived from the Navier-Stokes equations for homogeneous turbulent shear flows, where the convection velocity is represented by the mean velocity and the sweeping velocity is the sum of the random sweeping velocity and the shear-induced velocity. This suggests that unlike Taylor's model where the convection velocity is dominating and Kraichnan and Tennekes' model where the random sweeping velocity is dominating, the decorrelation time scales of the space-time correlations in turbulent shear flows are determined by the convection velocity, the random sweeping velocity, and the shear-induced velocity. This model predicts a universal form of the space-time correlations with the two characteristic velocities. The DNS of turbulent channel flows supports the prediction: the correlation functions exhibit a fair good collapse, when plotted against the normalized space and time separations defined by the elliptic model.

  6. Power law classification scheme of time series correlations. On the example of G20 group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miśkiewicz, Janusz

    2013-05-01

    A power law classification scheme (PLCS) of time series correlations is proposed. It is shown that PLCS provides the ability to classify nonlinear correlations and measure their stability. PLCS has been applied to gross domestic product (GDP) per capita of G20 members and their correlations analysed. It has been shown that the method does not only recognise linear correlations properly, but also allows to point out converging time series as well as to distinguish nonlinear correlations. PLCS is capable of crash recognition as it is shown in the Argentina example. Finally the strength of correlations and the stability of correlation matrices have been used to construct a minimum spanning tree (MST). The results were compared with those based on the ultrametric distance (UD). Comparing the structures of MST, UD and PLCS indicates that the latter one is more complicated, but better fits the expected economic relations within the G20.

  7. A Robust Pre-Filter and Power Loading Design for Time Reversal UWB Systems over Time-Correlated MIMO Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajjad Alizadeh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Conventional Time Reversal (TR technique suffers from performance degradation in time varying Multiple-Input Multiple-Output Ultra-Wideband (MIMO-UWB systems due to outdating Channel State Information (CSI over time progressions. That is, the outdated CSI degrades the TR performance significantly in time varying channels. The correlation property of time correlated channels can improve the TR performance against other traditional TR designs. Based on this property, at first, we propose a robust TR-MIMO-UWB system design for a time-varying channel in which the CSI is updated only at the beginning of each block of data where the CSI is assumed to be known. As the channel varies over time, pre-processor blindly pre-equalizes the channel during the next symbol time by using the correlation property. Then, a novel recursive power allocation strategy is derived over time-correlated time-varying TR-MIMO-UWB channels. We show that the proposed power loading technique, considerably improves the BER performance of TR-MIMO-UWB system in imperfect CSI with robust pre-filter. The proposed algorithms lead to a cost-efficient CSI updating procedure for the TR optimization. Simulation results are provided to confirm the new design performance against traditional method.

  8. Spatial re-orienting of visual attention along the horizontal or the vertical axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaluso, E; Patria, F

    2007-06-01

    Neuroimaging data indicate functional segregation between voluntary and stimulus-driven control of spatial attention in dorsal and ventral fronto-parietal regions, respectively. While recent evidences demonstrated location-specific attentional effects in dorsal regions, little is known about any location or direction selectivity within the ventral network. Here, we used a spatial cueing paradigm to investigate stimulus-driven spatial re-orienting along different axes (horizontal or vertical). We found that re-orienting of attention activated the ventral attentional network, irrespective of axis-orientation. Statistical comparisons between homologous regions in the two hemispheres revealed significant main effects of attention re-orienting (common activation for the two hemispheres), irrespective of leftward or rightward re-orienting along the horizontal axis, or re-orienting along the vertical axis. We conclude that in healthy volunteers, a bilateral ventral network controls spatial covert re-orienting, and that this system is multidirectional.

  9. Young children reorient by computing layout geometry, not by matching images of the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Ah; Spelke, Elizabeth S

    2011-02-01

    Disoriented animals from ants to humans reorient in accord with the shape of the surrounding surface layout: a behavioral pattern long taken as evidence for sensitivity to layout geometry. Recent computational models suggest, however, that the reorientation process may not depend on geometrical analyses but instead on the matching of brightness contours in 2D images of the environment. Here we test this suggestion by investigating young children's reorientation in enclosed environments. Children reoriented by extremely subtle geometric properties of the 3D layout: bumps and ridges that protruded only slightly off the floor, producing edges with low contrast. Moreover, children failed to reorient by prominent brightness contours in continuous layouts with no distinctive 3D structure. The findings provide evidence that geometric layout representations support children's reorientation.

  10. Human sperm pattern of movement during chemotactic re-orientation towards a progesterone source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cecilia Soledad Blengini; Maria Eugenia Teves; Diego Rafael Unates; Hector Alejandro Guidobaldi; Laura Virginia Gatica; Laura Cecilia Giojalas

    2011-01-01

    @@ Human spermatozoa may chemotactically find out the egg by following an increasing gradient of attractant molecules.Although human spermatozoa have been observed to show several of the physiological characteristics of chemotaxis,the chemotactic pattern of movement has not been easy to describe.However,it is apparent that chemotactic cells may be identified while returning to the attractant source.This study characterizes the pattern of movement of human spermatozoa during chemotactic re-orientation towards a progesterone source,which is a physiological attractant candidate.By means of videomicroscopy and image analysis,a chemotactic pattern of movement was identified as the spermatozoon returned towards the source of a chemotactic concentration of progesterone (10 pmol l-1).First,as a continuation of its original path,the spermatozoon swims away from the progesterone source with linear movement and then turns back with a transitional movement that can be characterized by an increased velocity and decreased linearity.This sperm behaviour may help the spermatozoon to re-orient itself towards a progesterone source and may be used to identify the few cells that are undergoing chemotaxis at a given time.

  11. A novel computational modelling to describe the anisotropic, remodelling and reorientation behaviour of collagen fibrres in articular cartilage

    CERN Document Server

    Cortez, S; Alves, J L

    2016-01-01

    In articular cartilage the orientation of collagen fibres is not uniform, varying mostly with the depth on the tissue. Besides, the biomechanical response of each layer of the articular cartilage differs from the neighbouring ones, evolving through thickness as a function of the distribution, density and orientation of the collagen fibres. Based on a finite element implementation, a new continuum formulation is proposed to describe the remodelling and reorientation of the collagen fibres under arbitrary mechanical loads: the cartilaginous tissue is modelled based on a hyperelastic formulation, being the ground isotropic matrix described by a neo-Hookean law and the fibrillar anisotropic part modelled by a new anisotropic formulation introduced for the first time in the present work, in which both reorientation and remodelling are taken into account. To characterize the orientation of fibres, a structure tensor is defined to represent the expected distribution and orientation of fibres around a reference direc...

  12. A 3D finite-strain-based constitutive model for shape memory alloys accounting for thermomechanical coupling and martensite reorientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Moumni, Ziad; Zhang, Weihong; Xu, Yingjie; Zaki, Wael

    2017-06-01

    The paper presents a finite-strain constitutive model for shape memory alloys (SMAs) that accounts for thermomechanical coupling and martensite reorientation. The finite-strain formulation is based on a two-tier, multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient into thermal, elastic, and inelastic parts, where the inelastic deformation is further split into phase transformation and martensite reorientation components. A time-discrete formulation of the constitutive equations is proposed and a numerical integration algorithm is presented featuring proper symmetrization of the tensor variables and explicit formulation of the material and spatial tangent operators involved. The algorithm is used for finite element analysis of SMA components subjected to various loading conditions, including uniaxial, non-proportional, isothermal and adiabatic loading cases. The analysis is carried out using the FEA software Abaqus by means of a user-defined material subroutine, which is then utilized to simulate a SMA archwire undergoing large strains and rotations.

  13. Correlations in Many-Body systems from two-time Greens functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morawetz, K. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France); Kohler, H.S. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2000-07-01

    The Kadanoff-Baym (KB) equations are solved numerically for infinite nuclear matter. In particular we calculate correlation energies and correlation times. Approximating the Green's functions in the KB collision kernel by the free Green's functions the Levinson equation is obtained. This approximation is valid for weak interactions and/or low densities. It relates to the extended quasi-particle approximation for the spectral function. The Levinson correlation energy reduces for large times to a second order Born approximation for the energy. Comparing the Levinson, Born and KB calculations allows for an estimate of higher order spectral corrections to the correlations. (authors)

  14. Elliptic model for space-time correlations in turbulent shear flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guo-Wei; Zhang, Jin-Bai

    2006-05-01

    An elliptic model for space-time correlations in turbulent shear flows is proposed based on a second order approximation to the iso-correlation contours, while Taylor's hypothesis implies a first-order approximation. It is shown that the space-time correlations are mainly determined by their space correlations and the convection and sweeping velocities. This model accommodates two extreme cases: Taylor's hypothesis at vanishing sweeping velocity and the sweeping hypothesis at vanishing convection velocity. The result is supported by the data from the direct numerical simulation of turbulent channel flows.

  15. Field-measured drag area is a key correlate of level cycling time trial performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James E. Peterman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Drag area (Ad is a primary factor determining aerodynamic resistance during level cycling and is therefore a key determinant of level time trial performance. However, Ad has traditionally been difficult to measure. Our purpose was to determine the value of adding field-measured Ad as a correlate of level cycling time trial performance. In the field, 19 male cyclists performed a level (22.1 km time trial. Separately, field-determined Ad and rolling resistance were calculated for subjects along with projected frontal area assessed directly (AP and indirectly (Est AP. Also, a graded exercise test was performed to determine $\\dot {V}{O}_{2}$V̇O2 peak, lactate threshold (LT, and economy. $\\dot {V}{O}_{2}$V̇O2 peak ($\\mathrm{l}~\\min ^{-1}$lmin−1 and power at LT were significantly correlated to power measured during the time trial (r = 0.83 and 0.69, respectively but were not significantly correlated to performance time (r = − 0.42 and −0.45. The correlation with performance time improved significantly (p < 0.05 when these variables were normalized to Ad. Of note, Ad alone was better correlated to performance time (r = 0.85, p < 0.001 than any combination of non-normalized physiological measure. The best correlate with performance time was field-measured power output during the time trial normalized to Ad (r = − 0.92. AP only accounted for 54% of the variability in Ad. Accordingly, the correlation to performance time was significantly lower using power normalized to AP (r = − 0.75 or Est AP (r = − 0.71. In conclusion, unless normalized to Ad, level time trial performance in the field was not highly correlated to common laboratory measures. Furthermore, our field-measured Ad is easy to determine and was the single best predictor of level time trial performance.

  16. Short-time evolution of Lagrangian velocity gradient correlations in isotropic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Le; Jin, G D

    2015-01-01

    We show by direct numerical simulation (DNS) that the Lagrangian cross correlation of velocity gradients in homogeneous isotropic turbulence increases at short times, whereas its auto-correlation decreases. Kinematic considerations allow to show that two invariants of the turbulent velocity field determine the short-time velocity gradient correlations. In order to get a more intuitive understanding of the dynamics for longer times, heuristic models are proposed involving the combined action of local shear and rotation. These models quantitatively reproduce the effects and disentangle the different physical mechanisms leading to the observations in the DNS.

  17. Reorientation of Sputnik Planitia implies a subsurface ocean on Pluto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, F; Hamilton, D P; McKinnon, W B; Schenk, P M; Binzel, R P; Bierson, C J; Beyer, R A; Moore, J M; Stern, S A; Weaver, H A; Olkin, C B; Young, L A; Smith, K E

    2016-12-01

    The deep nitrogen-covered basin on Pluto, informally named Sputnik Planitia, is located very close to the longitude of Pluto's tidal axis and may be an impact feature, by analogy with other large basins in the Solar System. Reorientation of Sputnik Planitia arising from tidal and rotational torques can explain the basin's present-day location, but requires the feature to be a positive gravity anomaly, despite its negative topography. Here we argue that if Sputnik Planitia did indeed form as a result of an impact and if Pluto possesses a subsurface ocean, the required positive gravity anomaly would naturally result because of shell thinning and ocean uplift, followed by later modest nitrogen deposition. Without a subsurface ocean, a positive gravity anomaly requires an implausibly thick nitrogen layer (exceeding 40 kilometres). To prolong the lifetime of such a subsurface ocean to the present day and to maintain ocean uplift, a rigid, conductive water-ice shell is required. Because nitrogen deposition is latitude-dependent, nitrogen loading and reorientation may have exhibited complex feedbacks.

  18. Reorientation of Sputnik Planitia implies a subsurface ocean on Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, F.; Hamilton, D. P.; McKinnon, W. B.; Schenk, P. M.; Binzel, R. P.; Bierson, C. J.; Beyer, R. A.; Moore, J. M.; Stern, S. A.; Weaver, H. A.; Olkin, C. B.; Young, L. A.; Smith, K. E.; Moore, J. M.; McKinnon, W. B.; Spencer, J. R.; Beyer, R.; Binzel, R. P.; Buie, M.; Buratti, B.; Cheng, A.; Cruikshank, D.; Ore, C. Dalle; Earle, A.; Gladstone, R.; Grundy, W.; Howard, A. D.; Lauer, T.; Linscott, I.; Nimmo, F.; Parker, J.; Porter, S.; Reitsema, H.; Reuter, D.; Roberts, J. H.; Robbins, S.; Schenk, P. M.; Showalter, M.; Singer, K.; Strobel, D.; Summers, M.; Tyler, L.; White, O. L.; Umurhan, O. M.; Banks, M.; Barnouin, O.; Bray, V.; Carcich, B.; Chaikin, A.; Chavez, C.; Conrad, C.; Hamilton, D. P.; Howett, C.; Hofgartner, J.; Kammer, J.; Lisse, C.; Marcotte, A.; Parker, A.; Retherford, K.; Saina, M.; Runyon, K.; Schindhelm, E.; Stansberry, J.; Steffl, A.; Stryk, T.; Throop, H.; Tsang, C.; Verbiscer, A.; Winters, H.; Zangari, A.; Stern, S. A.; Weaver, H. A.; Olkin, C. B.; Young, L. A.; Smith, K. E.

    2016-12-01

    The deep nitrogen-covered basin on Pluto, informally named Sputnik Planitia, is located very close to the longitude of Pluto’s tidal axis and may be an impact feature, by analogy with other large basins in the Solar System. Reorientation of Sputnik Planitia arising from tidal and rotational torques can explain the basin’s present-day location, but requires the feature to be a positive gravity anomaly, despite its negative topography. Here we argue that if Sputnik Planitia did indeed form as a result of an impact and if Pluto possesses a subsurface ocean, the required positive gravity anomaly would naturally result because of shell thinning and ocean uplift, followed by later modest nitrogen deposition. Without a subsurface ocean, a positive gravity anomaly requires an implausibly thick nitrogen layer (exceeding 40 kilometres). To prolong the lifetime of such a subsurface ocean to the present day and to maintain ocean uplift, a rigid, conductive water-ice shell is required. Because nitrogen deposition is latitude-dependent, nitrogen loading and reorientation may have exhibited complex feedbacks.

  19. Surface instabilities and reorientation induced by vibration in microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Jeff; Laverón-Simavilla, Ana; Tinao Perez-Miravete, Ignacio; Fernandez Fraile, Jose Javier; Ezquerro Navarro, Jose Miguel

    2012-07-01

    The behavior of vibrated fluids and, in particular, the surface or interfacial instabilities that commonly arise in these systems have been the subject of continued experimental and theoretical attention since Faraday's seminal experiments in 1831. Both orientation and frequency are critical in determining the response of the fluid to excitation. Low frequencies are associated with sloshing while higher frequencies may generate Faraday waves or cross-waves, depending on whether the axis of vibration is perpendicular or parallel to the interface. In addition, high frequency vibrations are known to produce large scale reorientation of the fluid (vibroequilibria), an effect that becomes especially pronounced in the absence of gravity. We describe the results of investigations conducted at the ESA affiliated Spanish User Support and Operations Centre (E-USOC) on the effect of vibrations on fluid interfaces, particularly the interaction between Faraday waves, which arise in vertically vibrated systems, cross-waves, which are found in horizontally forced systems, and large scale reorientation (vibroequilibria). Ongoing ground experiments utilizing a dual-axis shaker configuration are described, including the effect on pattern formation of varying the two independent forcing frequencies, amplitudes, and phases. Theoretical results, based on the analysis of reduced models, and on numerical simulations, are then described and compared to experiment. Finally, the interest of a corresponding microgravity experiment is discussed and implications for fluid management strategies considered.

  20. Nonlinear Behaviors of Tail Dependence and Cross-Correlation of Financial Time Series Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Deng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear behaviors of tail dependence and cross-correlation of financial time series are reproduced and investigated by stochastic voter dynamic system. The voter process is a continuous-time Markov process and is one of the interacting dynamic systems. The tail dependence of return time series for pairs of Chinese stock markets and the proposed financial models is studied by copula analysis, in an attempt to detect and illustrate the existence of relevant correlation relationships. Further, the multifractality of cross-correlations for return series is studied by multifractal detrended cross-correlation analysis, which indicates the analogous cross-correlations and some fractal characters for both actual data and simulative data and provides an intuitive evidence for market inefficiency.

  1. Theory of frequency-filtered and time-resolved N-photon correlations

    CERN Document Server

    del Valle, Elena; Laussy, Fabrice P; Tejedor, Carlos; Hartmann, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    A theory of correlations between N photons of given frequencies and detected at given time delays is presented. These correlation functions are usually too cumbersome to be computed explicitly. We show that they are obtained exactly through intensity correlations between two-level sensors in the limit of their vanishing coupling to the system. This allows the computation of correlation functions hitherto unreachable. The uncertainties in time and frequency of the detection, which are necessary variables to describe the system, are intrinsic to the theory. We illustrate the formalism with the Jaynes--Cummings model, showing how correlations of various peaks at zero or finite time delays bring new insights into the dynamics of open quantum systems.

  2. Spatially heterogeneous dynamics investigated via a time-dependent four-point density correlation function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lacevic, N.; Starr, F. W.; Schrøder, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    two-point time-dependent density correlation functions, while providing information about the transient "caging" of particles on cooling, are unable to provide sufficiently detailed information about correlated motion and dynamical heterogeneity. Here, we study a four-point, time-dependent density...... simulations of a binary Lennard-Jones mixture approaching the mode coupling temperature from above. We find that the correlations between particles measured by g4(r,t) and S4(q,t) become increasingly pronounced on cooling. The corresponding dynamical correlation length xi4(t) extracted from the small......-q behavior of S4(q,t) provides an estimate of the range of correlated particle motion. We find that xi4(t) has a maximum as a function of time t, and that the value of the maximum of xi4(t) increases steadily from less than one particle diameter to a value exceeding nine particle diameters in the temperature...

  3. Effects of cross-correlated noises on the relaxation time of the bistable system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢崇伟; 梅冬成

    2003-01-01

    The stationary correlation function and the associated relaxation time for a general system driven by crosscorrelated white noises are derived, by virtue of a Stratonovich-like ansatz. The effects of correlated noises on the relaxation time of a bistable kinetic model coupled to an additive and a multiplicative white noises are studied. It is proved that for small fluctuations the relaxation time Tc as a function of λ (the correlated intensity between noises)exhibits very different behaviours for α< D and for α> D (α and D, respectively, stand for the intensities of additive and multiplicative noises). When α> D, Tc increases with increasing λ. But when α< D, Tc increases with λ for the case of weak correlated noises and sharply decreases with λ for the case of strong correlated noises, and thus Tc-λ curve behaves with one extremum.

  4. Because the Light is Better Here: Correlation-Time Analysis by NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Albert A; Ernst, Matthias; Meier, Beat H

    2017-08-30

    Relaxation data in NMR spectra are often used for dynamics analysis, by modeling motion in the sample with a correlation function consisting of one or more decaying exponential terms, each described by an order parameter, and a correlation time. This method has its origins in the Lipari-Szabo model-free approach, which originally considered overall tumbling plus one internal motion and was later expanded to several internal motions. Considering several of these cases in the solid state it is found that if the real motion is more complex than the assumed model, model fitting is biased towards correlation times where the relaxation data are most sensitive. This leads to unexpected distortions in the resulting dynamics description. Therefore dynamics detectors should be used, which characterize different ranges of correlation times and can help in the analysis of protein motion without assuming a specific model of the correlation function. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Two-time correlation and occupation time for the Brownian bridge and tied-down renewal processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godrèche, Claude

    2017-07-01

    Tied-down renewal processes are generalisations of the Brownian bridge, where an event (or a zero crossing) occurs both at the origin of time and at the final observation time t. We give an analytical derivation of the two-time correlation function for such processes in the Laplace space of all temporal variables. This yields the exact asymptotic expression of the correlation in the Porod regime of short separations between the two times and in the persistence regime of large separations. We also investigate other quantities, such as the backward and forward recurrence times, as well as the occupation time of the process. The latter has a broad distribution which is determined exactly. Physical implications of these results for the Poland Scheraga and related models are given. These results also give exact answers to questions posed in the past in the context of stochastically evolving surfaces.

  6. Generalized Correlation Coefficient for Non-Parametric Analysis of Microarray Time-Course Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Qihua; Thomassen, Mads; Burton, Mark; Mose, Kristian Fredløv; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Hjelmborg, Jacob; Kruse, Torben

    2017-06-06

    Modeling complex time-course patterns is a challenging issue in microarray study due to complex gene expression patterns in response to the time-course experiment. We introduce the generalized correlation coefficient and propose a combinatory approach for detecting, testing and clustering the heterogeneous time-course gene expression patterns. Application of the method identified nonlinear time-course patterns in high agreement with parametric analysis. We conclude that the non-parametric nature in the generalized correlation analysis could be an useful and efficient tool for analyzing microarray time-course data and for exploring the complex relationships in the omics data for studying their association with disease and health.

  7. Generalized Correlation Coefficient for Non-Parametric Analysis of Microarray Time-Course Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Qihua; Thomassen, Mads; Burton, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Modeling complex time-course patterns is a challenging issue in microarray study due to complex gene expression patterns in response to the time-course experiment. We introduce the generalized correlation coefficient and propose a combinatory approach for detecting, testing and clustering...... the heterogeneous time-course gene expression patterns. Application of the method identified nonlinear time-course patterns in high agreement with parametric analysis. We conclude that the non-parametric nature in the generalized correlation analysis could be an useful and efficient tool for analyzing microarray...... time-course data and for exploring the complex relationships in the omics data for studying their association with disease and health....

  8. Calculation of optical absorption and resonance Raman correlators using time-dependent recursion relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Christian; Mortensen, O. Sonnich; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1996-01-01

    Time-dependent recursion relationships are derived for optical absorption and resonance Raman correlators in the multidimensional harmonic case using a second-quantization formalism. Furthermore, a procedure is given for the calculation of correlators involving a general analytic coordinate depen...... dependence of the transition dipole moment....

  9. Space-time correlation analysis of traffic flow on road network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Fei; Dong, Honghui; Jia, Limin; Tian, Zhao; Sun, Xuan

    2017-02-01

    Space-time correlation analysis has become a basic and critical work in the research on road traffic congestion. It plays an important role in improving traffic management quality. The aim of this research is to examine the space-time correlation of road networks to determine likely requirements for building a suitable space-time traffic model. In this paper, it is carried out using traffic flow data collected on Beijing’s road network. In the framework, the space-time autocorrelation function (ST-ACF) is introduced as global measure, and cross-correlation function (CCF) as local measure to reveal the change mechanism of space-time correlation. Through the use of both measures, the correlation is found to be dynamic and heterogeneous in space and time. The finding of seasonal pattern present in space-time correlation provides a theoretical assumption for traffic forecasting. Besides, combined with Simpson’s rule, the CCF is also applied to finding the critical sections in the road network, and the experiments prove that it is feasible in computability, rationality and practicality.

  10. Dual reorientation relaxation routes of water molecules in oxyanion’s hydration shell: A molecular geometry perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Wen Jun; Yang, Yi Isaac; Gao, Yi Qin, E-mail: gaoyq@pku.edu.cn [Institute of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering and Biodynamic Optical Imaging Center, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-12-14

    In this study, we examine how complex ions such as oxyanions influence the dynamic properties of water and whether differences exist between simple halide anions and oxyanions. Nitrate anion is taken as an example to investigate the hydration properties of oxyanions. Reorientation relaxation of its hydration water can occur through two different routes: water can either break its hydrogen bond with the nitrate to form one with another water or switch between two oxygen atoms of the same nitrate. The latter molecular mechanism increases the residence time of oxyanion’s hydration water and thus nitrate anion slows down the translational motion of neighbouring water. But it is also a “structure breaker” in that it accelerates the reorientation relaxation of hydration water. Such a result illustrates that differences do exist between the hydration of oxyanions and simple halide anions as a result of different molecular geometries. Furthermore, the rotation of the nitrate solute is coupled with the hydrogen bond rearrangement of its hydration water. The nitrate anion can either tilt along the axis perpendicularly to the plane or rotate in the plane. We find that the two reorientation relaxation routes of the hydration water lead to different relaxation dynamics in each of the two above movements of the nitrate solute. The current study suggests that molecular geometry could play an important role in solute hydration and dynamics.

  11. Neural Correlates of the Time Marker for the Perception of Event Timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Liang; Terada, Yoshikazu; Nishida, Shin’ya

    2016-01-01

    While sensory processing latency, inferred from the manual reaction time (RT), is substantially affected by diverse stimulus parameters, subjective temporal judgments are relatively accurate. The neural mechanisms underlying this timing perception remain obscure. Here, we measured human neural activity by magnetoencephalography while participants performed a simultaneity judgment task between the onset of random-dot coherent motion and a beep. In a separate session, participants performed an RT task for the same stimuli. We analyzed the relationship between neural activity evoked by motion onset and point of subjective simultaneity (PSS) or RT. The effect of motion coherence was smaller for PSS than RT, but changes in RT and PSS could both be predicted by the time at which an integrated sensory response crossed a threshold. The task differences could be ascribed to the lower threshold for PSS than for RT. In agreement with the psychophysical threshold difference, the participants reported longer delays in their motor response from the subjective motion onset for weaker stimuli. However, they could not judge the timing of stimuli weaker than the detection threshold. A possible interpretation of the present findings is that the brain assigns the time marker for timing perception prior to stimulus detection, but the time marker is available only after stimulus detection. PMID:27679810

  12. On the long-term correlations and multifractal properties of electric arc furnace time series

    CERN Document Server

    Livi, Lorenzo; Rizzi, Antonello; Sadeghian, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study long-term correlations and multifractal properties elaborated from time series of three-phase current signals coming from an industrial electric arc furnace plant. Implicit sinusoidal trends are suitably detected in the scaling of the fluctuation function of such time series. Time series are then initially filtered via a Fourier based analysis, removing hence such strong periodicities. In the filtered time series we detected long-term, positive correlations. The presence of persistent correlations is in agreement with the typical V--I characteristic (hysteresis) of the electric arc furnace, justifying thus the memory effects found in the current time series. The multifractal signature is strong enough in the filtered time series to be effectively classified as multifractal.

  13. Travel cost inference from sparse, spatio-temporally correlated time series using markov models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, B.; Guo, C.; Jensen, C.S.

    2013-01-01

    of such time series offers insight into the underlying system and enables prediction of system behavior. While the techniques presented in the paper apply more generally, we consider the case of transportation systems and aim to predict travel cost from GPS tracking data from probe vehicles. Specifically, each......The monitoring of a system can yield a set of measurements that can be modeled as a collection of time series. These time series are often sparse, due to missing measurements, and spatiotemporally correlated, meaning that spatially close time series exhibit temporal correlation. The analysis...... road segment has an associated travel-cost time series, which is derived from GPS data. We use spatio-temporal hidden Markov models (STHMM) to model correlations among different traffic time series. We provide algorithms that are able to learn the parameters of an STHMM while contending...

  14. Sample correlations of infinite variance time series models: an empirical and theoretical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Cohen

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available When the elements of a stationary ergodic time series have finite variance the sample correlation function converges (with probability 1 to the theoretical correlation function. What happens in the case where the variance is infinite? In certain cases, the sample correlation function converges in probability to a constant, but not always. If within a class of heavy tailed time series the sample correlation functions do not converge to a constant, then more care must be taken in making inferences and in model selection on the basis of sample autocorrelations. We experimented with simulating various heavy tailed stationary sequences in an attempt to understand what causes the sample correlation function to converge or not to converge to a constant. In two new cases, namely the sum of two independent moving averages and a random permutation scheme, we are able to provide theoretical explanations for a random limit of the sample autocorrelation function as the sample grows.

  15. Real-Time Corrected Traffic Correlation Model for Traffic Flow Forecasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-pu Lu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the problems of short-term traffic flow forecasting. The main goal is to put forward traffic correlation model and real-time correction algorithm for traffic flow forecasting. Traffic correlation model is established based on the temporal-spatial-historical correlation characteristic of traffic big data. In order to simplify the traffic correlation model, this paper presents correction coefficients optimization algorithm. Considering multistate characteristic of traffic big data, a dynamic part is added to traffic correlation model. Real-time correction algorithm based on Fuzzy Neural Network is presented to overcome the nonlinear mapping problems. A case study based on a real-world road network in Beijing, China, is implemented to test the efficiency and applicability of the proposed modeling methods.

  16. Generalized Correlation Coefficient for Non-Parametric Analysis of Microarray Time-Course Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Qihua; Thomassen, Mads; Burton, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Modeling complex time-course patterns is a challenging issue in microarray study due to complex gene expression patterns in response to the time-course experiment. We introduce the generalized correlation coefficient and propose a combinatory approach for detecting, testing and clustering...... the heterogeneous time-course gene expression patterns. Application of the method identified nonlinear time-course patterns in high agreement with parametric analysis. We conclude that the non-parametric nature in the generalized correlation analysis could be an useful and efficient tool for analyzing microarray...

  17. The role of exchange and correlation in time-dependent density-functional theory for photoionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stener, M.; Decleva, P.; Görling, A.

    2001-05-01

    Atomic photoionization cross sections are calculated by time-dependent density-functional (TDDF) methods using different exchange-correlation potentials including the exact one. The exchange-correlation kernel is treated in the adiabatic local density approximation (ALDA). Results for the exact full and the exact exchange-only Kohn-Sham (KS) potential are very similar, the calculated photo cross section agree very well with experimental data. Thus the exact correlation potential seems to have no influence on photoionization and the ALDA for the exchange-correlation kernel seems to be sufficient for most features of the cross sections. The TDDF method employing the exact exchange-only KS potential in combination with the ALDA exchange-correlation kernel therefore is a promising approach to describe photoionization. Deviations from experiment are observed for the widths and shape of the autoionization resonances and have to be attributed to deficiencies of the ALDA exchange-correlation kernel. The calculation of widths and shapes of autoionization resonances therefore may serve as a severe test for new approximate exchange-correlation density-functionals. The asymptotically exact exchange-correlation potential of van Leeuwen and Baerends also leads to quite good photo cross section, which, however, shows deficiencies close to the ionization threshold and in the energetic position of the autoionization resonances. Supplementation of the exact exchange potential with the LDA correlation potential leads to a worsening of the photo cross section because the LDA correlation potential is too attractive.

  18. Approximate number and approximate time discrimination each correlate with school math abilities in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odic, Darko; Lisboa, Juan Valle; Eisinger, Robert; Olivera, Magdalena Gonzalez; Maiche, Alejandro; Halberda, Justin

    2016-01-01

    What is the relationship between our intuitive sense of number (e.g., when estimating how many marbles are in a jar), and our intuitive sense of other quantities, including time (e.g., when estimating how long it has been since we last ate breakfast)? Recent work in cognitive, developmental, comparative psychology, and computational neuroscience has suggested that our representations of approximate number, time, and spatial extent are fundamentally linked and constitute a "generalized magnitude system". But, the shared behavioral and neural signatures between number, time, and space may alternatively be due to similar encoding and decision-making processes, rather than due to shared domain-general representations. In this study, we investigate the relationship between approximate number and time in a large sample of 6-8 year-old children in Uruguay by examining how individual differences in the precision of number and time estimation correlate with school mathematics performance. Over four testing days, each child completed an approximate number discrimination task, an approximate time discrimination task, a digit span task, and a large battery of symbolic math tests. We replicate previous reports showing that symbolic math abilities correlate with approximate number precision and extend those findings by showing that math abilities also correlate with approximate time precision. But, contrary to approximate number and time sharing common representations, we find that each of these dimensions uniquely correlates with formal math: approximate number correlates more strongly with formal math compared to time and continues to correlate with math even when precision in time and individual differences in working memory are controlled for. These results suggest that there are important differences in the mental representations of approximate number and approximate time and further clarify the relationship between quantity representations and mathematics.

  19. Reorientation Timescales and Pattern Dynamics for Titan's Dunes: Does the Tail Wag the Dog or the Dragon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, R. C.; Hayes, A. G.; McCormick, C.; Ballard, C.; Troy, S. A.

    2012-04-01

    Fields of bedform patterns persist across many orders of magnitude, from cm-scale sub-aqueous current ripples to km-scale aeolian dunes, and form with surprisingly little difference in expression despite a range of formative environments. Because of the remarkable similarity among bedform patterns, extracting information about climate and environment from these patterns is a challenge. For example, crestline orientation is not diagnostic of a particular flow regime; similar patterns form under many different flow configurations. On Titan, these challenges have played out with many attempts to reconcile dune crestline orientation with modeled and expected wind regimes. We propose that thinking about the time-scale of the change in dune orientation, rather than the orientation itself, can provide new insights on the long-term stability of the dune-field patterns and the formative wind regime. In this work, we apply the crestline re-orientation model developed by Werner and Kocurek [Geology, 1997] to the equatorial dune fields of Titan. We use Cassini Synthetic Aperture Radar images processed through a de-noising algorithm recently developed by Lucas et al. [LPSC, 2012] to measure variations in pattern parameters (crest spacing, crest length and defect density, which is the number of defect pairs per total crest length) both within and between Titan's dune fields to describe pattern maturity and identify areas where changes in dune orientation are likely to occur (or may already be occurring). Measured defect densities are similar to Earth's largest linear dune fields, such as the Namib Sand Sea and the Simpson Desert. We use measured defect densities in the Werner and Kocurek model to estimate crestline reorientation rates. We find reorientation timescales varying from ten to a hundred thousand times the average migration timescale (time to migrate a bedform one meter, ~1 Titan year according to Tokano (Aeolian Research, 2010)). Well-organized patterns have the

  20. Africa Stock Markets Cross-Market Linkages: A Time-Varying Dynamic Conditional Correlations (DCC-GARCH) Approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Godfrey Marozva

    2017-01-01

    ...)’s Dynamic Conditional Correlation multivariate generalized autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity model was adapted to explore the time-varying conditional correlations to capture the contagion...

  1. Out-of-time-ordered correlators and purity in rational conformal field theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputa, Paweł; Numasawa, Tokiro; Veliz-Osorio, Alvaro

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we investigate measures of chaos and entanglement in rational conformal field theories in 1 + 1 dimensions. First, we derive a formula for the late time value of the out-of-time-ordered correlators for this class of theories. Our universal result can be expressed as a particular combination of the modular S-matrix elements known as anyon monodromy scalar. Next, in the explicit setup of an SUN Wess-Zumino-Witten model, we compare the late time behavior of the out-of-time-ordered correlators and the purity. Interestingly, in the large-c limit, the purity grows logarithmically as in holographic theories; in contrast, the out-of-time-ordered correlators remain, in general, nonvanishing.

  2. Quantum statistics and classical mechanics: real time correlation functions from ring polymer molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Ian R; Manolopoulos, David E

    2004-08-22

    We propose an approximate method for calculating Kubo-transformed real-time correlation functions involving position-dependent operators, based on path integral (Parrinello-Rahman) molecular dynamics. The method gives the exact quantum mechanical correlation function at time zero, exactly satisfies the quantum mechanical detailed balance condition, and for correlation functions of the form C(Ax)(t) and C(xB)(t) it gives the exact result for a harmonic potential. It also works reasonably well at short times for more general potentials and correlation functions, as we illustrate with some example calculations. The method provides a consistent improvement over purely classical molecular dynamics that is most apparent in the low-temperature regime.

  3. Time domain averaging and correlation-based improved spectrum sensing method for cognitive radio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shenghong; Bi, Guoan

    2014-12-01

    Based on the combination of time domain averaging and correlation, we propose an effective time domain averaging and correlation-based spectrum sensing (TDA-C-SS) method used in very low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) environments. With the assumption that the received signals from the primary users are deterministic, the proposed TDA-C-SS method processes the received samples by a time averaging operation to improve the SNR. Correlation operation is then performed with a correlation matrix to determine the existence of the primary signal in the received samples. The TDA-C-SS method does not need any prior information on the received samples and the associated noise power to achieve improved sensing performance. Simulation results are presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed TDA-C-SS method.

  4. On the reorientation of non-spherical prey particles in a feeding current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, Andre; Jonsson, P.R.

    2000-01-01

    Potentially, non-spherical prey can be re-oriented in a flow field and impact on the predator's feeding structures in a non- random manner. Herein, we quantify a process whereby this passive reorientation occurs, and present a model that predicts the orientation of a spheroidal prey as a function...

  5. A GPU-based Real-time Software Correlation System for the Murchison Widefield Array Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayth, Randall B.; Greenhill, Lincoln J.; Briggs, Frank H.

    2009-08-01

    Modern graphics processing units (GPUs) are inexpensive commodity hardware that offer Tflop/s theoretical computing capacity. GPUs are well suited to many compute-intensive tasks including digital signal processing. We describe the implementation and performance of a GPU-based digital correlator for radio astronomy. The correlator is implemented using the NVIDIA CUDA development environment. We evaluate three design options on two generations of NVIDIA hardware. The different designs utilize the internal registers, shared memory, and multiprocessors in different ways. We find that optimal performance is achieved with the design that minimizes global memory reads on recent generations of hardware. The GPU-based correlator outperforms a single-threaded CPU equivalent by a factor of 60 for a 32-antenna array, and runs on commodity PC hardware. The extra compute capability provided by the GPU maximizes the correlation capability of a PC while retaining the fast development time associated with using standard hardware, networking, and programming languages. In this way, a GPU-based correlation system represents a middle ground in design space between high performance, custom-built hardware, and pure CPU-based software correlation. The correlator was deployed at the Murchison Widefield Array 32-antenna prototype system where it ran in real time for extended periods. We briefly describe the data capture, streaming, and correlation system for the prototype array.

  6. The reorientation of spatial planning systems and policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galland, Daniel; Enemark, Stig

    2012-01-01

    Danish spatial planning has been increasingly subjected to profound reorientations over the past two decades. The comprehensive frame wherein planning policies and practices operated across different levels of administration has become significantly altered. This has been particularly evident after...... the implementation of a structural reform that changed the political and administrative structure in the country. Most importantly, the reform abolished the county level, which caused that planning policies, functions and responsibilities were re-scaled to municipal and national levels. This situation brought about...... radical shifts in terms of the scope of planning policies, the implementation of land-use tasks as well as the performance of the institutional arrangements operating within and beyond the planning system. Based on an in-depth analysis concerned with these changes, the paper endeavours into discussing how...

  7. Thin film magnetoelectric composites near spin reorientation transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiercelin, N. [Joint European Laboratory LEMAC: IEMN CNRS 8520-Ecole Centrale de Lille, Villeneuve d' Ascq 59652 (France)], E-mail: Nicolas.Tiercelin@iemn.univ-lille1.fr; Preobrazhensky, V. [Joint European Laboratory LEMAC: IEMN CNRS 8520-Ecole Centrale de Lille, Villeneuve d' Ascq 59652 (France); Joint European Laboratory LEMAC: WRC-GPI-RAS 117454, Vernadsky prosp. 78, Moscow (Russian Federation); Mortet, V. [Institute for Materials Research (IMO), Hasselt University, IMEC vzw, Division IMOMEC, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Talbi, A. [Joint European Laboratory LEMAC: IEMN CNRS 8520-Ecole Centrale de Lille, Villeneuve d' Ascq 59652 (France); Soltani, A. [IEMN CNRS 8520, Bd Poincare, Villeneuve d' Ascq 59651 (France); Haenen, K. [Institute for Materials Research (IMO), Hasselt University, IMEC vzw, Division IMOMEC, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Pernod, P. [Joint European Laboratory LEMAC: IEMN CNRS 8520-Ecole Centrale de Lille, Villeneuve d' Ascq 59652 (France)

    2009-06-15

    We report the use of a magnetic instability of the spin reorientation transition type to enhance the magnetoelectric sensitivity in magnetostrictive-piezoelectric structures. We present the theoretical study of a clamped beam resonant actuator composed of a piezoelectric element on a passive substrate actuated by a magnetostrictive nanostructured layer. The experiments were made on a polished 150 {mu}m thick 18x3 mm{sup 2} lead zirconate titanate (PZT) plate glued to a 50 {mu}m thick silicon plate and coated with a giant magnetostrictive nanostructured Nx(TbCo{sub 25nm}/FeCo{sub 5nm}) layer. A second set of experiments was done with magnetostrictive layer deposited on PZT plate. Finally, a film/film structure using magnetostrictive and aluminium nitride films on silicon substrate was realized, and showed ME amplitudes reaching 30 V Oe{sup -1} cm{sup -1}. Results agree with analytical theory.

  8. Tidal reorientation and the fracturing of Jupiter's moon Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcewen, A. S.

    1986-01-01

    The lineaments on Europa are discussed in terms of the orientation of the lineaments relative to the tensile stress trajectories due to tidal distortions and to nonsynchronous rotation. The cracks are noticeable by their darker albedo compared to the presumed water ice surrounding them. The stress trajectories for tidal distortion of a thin elastic shell are superimposed on Mercator projection maps of the lineaments. It is shown that the lineaments are mainly oriented at high angles to the tensile stress trajectories that would be expected for regularly occurring nonsynchronous rotation, i.e., extensional fractures would appear. The reorientation motions which would cause the fractures are estimated. It is suggested that the fractures occur episodically to release stresses built up on the tensile surface of the crust during the continuous nonsynchronous rotation of Europa.

  9. Reorienting MHD colliding flows: a shock physics mechanism for generating filaments normal to magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogerty, Erica; Carroll-Nellenback, Jonathan; Frank, Adam; Heitsch, Fabian; Pon, Andy

    2017-09-01

    We present numerical simulations of reorienting oblique shocks that form in the collision layer between magnetized colliding flows. Reorientation aligns post-shock filaments normal to the background magnetic field. We find that reorientation begins with pressure gradients between the collision region and the ambient medium. This drives a lateral expansion of post-shock gas, which reorients the growing filament from the outside-in (i.e. from the flow/ambient boundary, towards the colliding flows axis). The final structures of our simulations resemble polarization observations of filaments in Taurus and Serpens South, as well as the integral-shaped filament in Orion A. Given the ubiquity of colliding flows in the interstellar medium, shock reorientation may be relevant to the formation of filaments normal to magnetic fields.

  10. Reorienting MHD Colliding Flows: A Shock Physics Mechanism for Generating Filaments Normal to Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Fogerty, Erica L; Frank, Adam; Heitsch, Fabian; Pon, Andy

    2016-01-01

    We present numerical simulations of reorienting oblique shocks that form in the collision layer between magnetized colliding flows. Reorientation aligns parsec-scale post-shock filaments normal to the background magnetic field. We find that reorientation begins with pressure gradients between the collision region and the ambient medium. This drives a lateral expansion of post-shock gas, which reorients the growing filament from the outside-in (i.e. from the flow-ambient boundary, toward the colliding flows axis). The final structures of our simulations resemble polarization observations of filaments in Taurus and Serpens South, as well as the integral-shaped filament in Orion A. Given the ubiquity of colliding flows in the interstellar medium, shock reorientation may be relevant to the formation of filaments normal to magnetic fields.

  11. Spatial and space-time correlations in systems of subpopulations with stochastic migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epperson, B K

    1994-10-01

    The great majority of models of the population genetics of subdivided populations have made the simplifying assumption that the gene frequencies in migrant groups are deterministic. The present paper examines models which more closely mimic natural conditions, in which the gene frequencies in migrant groups are subject to stochastic effects. It is shown that some types of stochastic migration can cause dramatic changes in spatial correlations and variance. These changes depend on how the stochastic migration effects in the gene frequency recursion equations are shared among nearby subpopulations during the same generation. Only for cases where the effects are completely unshared are the equilibrium spatial and space-time correlations among adult subpopulations unaffected, but the variance is always inflated. The analyses here use novel methods, by recasting population genetic migration-drift models as space-time autoregressive moving average (STARMA) processes. Recent theorems for STARMA processes are employed for finding the spatial correlations, and for the first time in population genetics theory the complete set of space-time correlations, for systems with general patterns of migration rates and numbers of spatial dimensions. The space-time correlations provide a uniquely detailed description of a system, and thus form a link between observed spatial autocorrelation statistics and the underlying space-time population genetic process. STARMA theoretical processes have direct statistical analogues that can be applied for process identification, parameter estimation, model fitting, and forecasting in real systems.

  12. An NMR study of molecular reorientations and diffusion in solid LiBF4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynhardt, E. C.; Lourens, J. A. J.

    1984-06-01

    The 19F second moment and the 19F, 11B, and 7Li spin-lattice relaxation times in a powdered sample of LiBF4 have been measured as a function of temperature. The results show that the BF-4 ion reorients isotropically while the Li+ ion remains stationary. The activation energy associated with the BF-4 motion is 8.5 kcal/mol. Above ˜385 K the BF-4 and Li+ diffuse through the lattice resulting in a 19F second moment which is almost zero. The activation energy of this process is 19.2 kcal/mol. A librational motion presumably influences the 19F T1ρ results just before diffusion sets in. The migration of Li+ around the BF-4 ion, which seems to be a strong possibility in the case of an isolated LiBF4 molecule, does not take place in the solid.

  13. Fractal approach towards power-law coherency to measure cross-correlations between time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristoufek, Ladislav

    2017-09-01

    We focus on power-law coherency as an alternative approach towards studying power-law cross-correlations between simultaneously recorded time series. To be able to study empirical data, we introduce three estimators of the power-law coherency parameter Hρ based on popular techniques usually utilized for studying power-law cross-correlations - detrended cross-correlation analysis (DCCA), detrending moving-average cross-correlation analysis (DMCA) and height cross-correlation analysis (HXA). In the finite sample properties study, we focus on the bias, variance and mean squared error of the estimators. We find that the DMCA-based method is the safest choice among the three. The HXA method is reasonable for long time series with at least 104 observations, which can be easily attainable in some disciplines but problematic in others. The DCCA-based method does not provide favorable properties which even deteriorate with an increasing time series length. The paper opens a new venue towards studying cross-correlations between time series.

  14. Fluorescence lifetime imaging by time-correlated single-photon counting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, W.; Bergmann, A.; Hink, M.A.; Konig, K.; Benndorf, K.; Biskup, C.

    2004-01-01

    We present a time-correlated single photon counting (TCPSC) technique that allows time-resolved multi-wavelength imaging in conjunction with a laser scanning microscope and a pulsed excitation source. The technique is based on a four-dimensional histogramming process that records the photon density

  15. Influence of hot-carrier luminescence from avalanche photodiodes on time-correlated photon detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulu, G; Sergienko, A V; Unlü, M S

    2000-05-15

    We present the results of our time-resolved measurements of hot-carrier luminescence from passively quenched Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes. In time-correlated photon-counting (TCPC) experiments, hot-carrier luminescence interferes overwhelmingly with the coincidence spectrum, which results in artifacts. This potential problem should be taken into account in setting up TCPC experiments.

  16. (1)H and (19)F spin-lattice relaxation and CH3 or CF3 reorientation in molecular solids containing both H and F atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Peter A; Rheingold, Arnold L

    2016-04-21

    The dynamics of methyl (CH3) and fluoromethyl (CF3) groups in organic molecular (van der Waals) solids can be exploited to survey their local environments. We report solid state (1)H and (19)F spin-lattice relaxationexperiments in polycrystalline 3-trifluoromethoxycinnamic acid, along with an X-ray diffraction determination of the molecular and crystal structure, to investigate the intramolecular and intermolecular interactions that determine the properties that characterize the CF3 reorientation. The molecule is of no particular interest; it simply provides a motionless backbone (on the nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR) time scale) to investigate CF3 reorientation occurring on the NMR time scale. The effects of (19)F-(19)F and (19)F-(1)H spin-spin dipolar interactions on the complicated nonexponential NMRrelaxation provide independent inputs into determining a model for CF3 reorientation. As such, these experiments provide much more information than when only one spin species (usually (1)H) is present. In Sec. IV, which can be read immediately after the Introduction without reading the rest of the paper, we compare the barrier to CH3 and CF3 reorientation in seven organic solids and separate this barrier into intramolecular and intermolecular components.

  17. Ensemble Space-Time Correlation of Plasma Turbulence in the Solar Wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthaeus, W H; Weygand, J M; Dasso, S

    2016-06-17

    Single point measurement turbulence cannot distinguish variations in space and time. We employ an ensemble of one- and two-point measurements in the solar wind to estimate the space-time correlation function in the comoving plasma frame. The method is illustrated using near Earth spacecraft observations, employing ACE, Geotail, IMP-8, and Wind data sets. New results include an evaluation of both correlation time and correlation length from a single method, and a new assessment of the accuracy of the familiar frozen-in flow approximation. This novel view of the space-time structure of turbulence may prove essential in exploratory space missions such as Solar Probe Plus and Solar Orbiter for which the frozen-in flow hypothesis may not be a useful approximation.

  18. Implementation of ultrasound time-domain cross-correlation blood velocity estimators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1993-01-01

    are used in the algorithm, imposing a heavy burden on the signal processing hardware. The algorithm is analyzed with regard to the high sampling frequency, and a method for performing real-time high-speed-movement and cross-correlation is suggested. Implementation schemes based on using the sign......The implementation of real-time blood velocity estimators using time-domain cross-correlation is investigated. The basic algorithm for stationary echo canceling, cross-correlation estimation and subsequent velocity estimation is presented. Sampled data acquired at rates of approximately 20 MHz...... of the data as well as the full precision are proposed. From an analysis of the process it is concluded that the sign data implementation can attain real-time processing. This can also be obtained for the full precision data, but at the expense of using a number of dedicated signal processing chips. Both...

  19. On physical interpretation of two dimensional time-correlations regarding time delay velocities and eddy shaping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorczak, N. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Manz, P. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Max-Planck-Institut feur Plasmaphysik, Association Euratom-IPP, 85748Garching (Germany); Thakur, S. C.; Xu, M.; Tynan, G. R. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Xu, G. S.; Liu, S. C. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2012-12-15

    Time delay estimation (TDE) techniques are frequently used to estimate the flow velocity from fluctuating measurements. Tilted structures carried by the flow lead to misinterpretation of the time delays in terms of velocity direction and amplitude. It affects TDE measurements from probes, and is also intrinsically important for beam emission spectroscopy and gas puff imaging measurements. Local eddy shapes estimated from 2D fluctuating field are necessary to gain a more accurate flow estimate from TDE, as illustrated by Langmuir probe array measurements. A least square regression approach is proposed to estimate both flow field and shaping parameters. The technique is applied to a test case built from numerical simulation of interchange fluctuations. The local eddy shape does not only provide corrections for the velocity field but also quantitative information about the statistical interaction mechanisms between local eddies and E Multiplication-Sign B flow shear. The technique is then tested on gaz puff imaging data collected at the edge of EAST tokamak plasmas. It is shown that poloidal asymmetries of the fluctuation fields-velocity and eddy shape-are consistent at least qualitatively with a ballooning type of turbulence immersed in a radially sheared equilibrium flow.

  20. Time-dependent statistical and correlation properties of neural signals during handwriting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valery I Rupasov

    Full Text Available To elucidate the cortical control of handwriting, we examined time-dependent statistical and correlational properties of simultaneously recorded 64-channel electroencephalograms (EEGs and electromyograms (EMGs of intrinsic hand muscles. We introduced a statistical method, which offered advantages compared to conventional coherence methods. In contrast to coherence methods, which operate in the frequency domain, our method enabled us to study the functional association between different neural regions in the time domain. In our experiments, subjects performed about 400 stereotypical trials during which they wrote a single character. These trials provided time-dependent EMG and EEG data capturing different handwriting epochs. The set of trials was treated as a statistical ensemble, and time-dependent correlation functions between neural signals were computed by averaging over that ensemble. We found that trial-to-trial variability of both the EMGs and EEGs was well described by a log-normal distribution with time-dependent parameters, which was clearly distinguished from the normal (Gaussian distribution. We found strong and long-lasting EMG/EMG correlations, whereas EEG/EEG correlations, which were also quite strong, were short-lived with a characteristic correlation durations on the order of 100 ms or less. Our computations of correlation functions were restricted to the [Formula: see text] spectral range (13-30 Hz of EEG signals where we found the strongest effects related to handwriting. Although, all subjects involved in our experiments were right-hand writers, we observed a clear symmetry between left and right motor areas: inter-channel correlations were strong if both channels were located over the left or right hemispheres, and 2-3 times weaker if the EEG channels were located over different hemispheres. Although we observed synchronized changes in the mean energies of EEG and EMG signals, we found that EEG/EMG correlations were much

  1. Quantum correlations in continuos-time quantum walks of two indistinguishable particles

    CERN Document Server

    Benedetti, Claudia; Bordone, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    We evaluate the degree of quantum correlation between two fermions (bosons) subject to continuous time quantum walks in a one-dimensional ring lattice with periodic boundary conditions. In our approach, no particle-particle interaction is considered. We show that the interference effects due to exchange symmetry can result into the appearance of non-classical correlations. The role played onto the appearance of quantum correlations by the quantum statistics of the particles, the boundary conditions, and the partition of the system is widely investigated. Quantum correlations also been investigated in a model mimicking the ballistic evolution of two indistinguishable particles in a 1D continuous space structure. Our results are consistent with recent quantum optics and electron quantum optics experiments where the showing up of two-particle non-classical correlations has been observed even in the absence of mutual interaction between the particles.

  2. Effect of extreme value loss on long-term correlated time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Naiming; Fu, Zuntao; Li, Huiqun; Mao, Jiangyu

    2012-07-01

    Effects of extreme value loss on long-term correlated time series are analyzed by means of detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) and power spectral density analysis. Weaker memory can be detected after removing of extreme values for the artificial long-term correlated data, indicating the emergence of extreme events may be closely related to long-term memory. For observational temperature records, similar results are obtained, but not in all stations. For example, in some stations, only extending of scaling range to smaller time scales occurs, which may be due to the asymmetric distribution of values in the record. By comparing our findings with previous works, clustered positions of the extreme events are recognized as an important property in long-term correlated records. Through a simple numerical test, close relations between extreme events and long-term memory are discovered, which is helpful for our understanding of the effects of extreme value loss on long-term correlated records.

  3. Time Series Correlated Error's Simulation Scheme with the Application to Simulate the Ephemerides Error of CHAMP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Computer simulation experiment is very important in the phase of project design, the availability of simulated result highly depends on the scheme of error simulation. Time series observations are normally correlated. This paper first discusses the formula of correlated error propagation, then derives the formula of simulating time series correlated errors. This formula is then used to simulate correlated ephemerides errors of CHAMP, then the ephemerides are used to recover the gravity vector at satellite altitude with finite differential formula. The formulae derived in this paper are verified with the difference between the recovered gravity vectors and the true values' which are directly computed with the same gravity model as that generating the ephemerides.

  4. Bose-Einstein Correlations in a Space-Time Approach to $e^{+} e^{-}$ Annihilation into Hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Kinder-Geiger, Klaus; Heinz, Ulrich W; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2000-01-01

    A new treatment of Bose-Einstein correlations is incorporated in a space-time parton-shower model for e+ e- annihilation into hadrons. Two alternative afterburners are discussed, and we use a simple calculable model to demonstrate that they reproduce successfully the size of the hadron emission region. One of the afterburners is used to calculate two-pion correlations in e+ e- -> Z^0 -> hadrons and e+ e- -> W+ W- -> hadrons. Results are shown with and without resonance decays, for correlations along and transverse to the thrust jet axis in these two classes of events.

  5. Tomography of correlation functions for ultracold atoms via time-of-flight images

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG, WEI; Duan, L.-M.

    2009-01-01

    We propose to utilize density distributions from a series of time-of-flight images of an expanding cloud to reconstruct single-particle correlation functions of trapped ultra-cold atoms. In particular, we show how this technique can be used to detect off-diagonal correlations of atoms in a quasi-one-dimensional trap, where both real- and momentum- space correlations are extracted at a quantitative level. The feasibility of this method is analyzed with specific examples, taking into account fi...

  6. Wide-field time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) microscopy with time resolution below the frame exposure time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M. [Department of Physics, King' s College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom); Petrášek, Zdeněk [Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Department of Cellular and Molecular Biophysics, Am Klopferspitz 18, D-82152 Martinsried (Germany); Suhling, Klaus, E-mail: klaus.suhling@kcl.ac.uk [Department of Physics, King' s College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    Fast frame rate CMOS cameras in combination with photon counting intensifiers can be used for fluorescence imaging with single photon sensitivity at kHz frame rates. We show here how the phosphor decay of the image intensifier can be exploited for accurate timing of photon arrival well below the camera exposure time. This is achieved by taking ratios of the intensity of the photon events in two subsequent frames, and effectively allows wide-field TCSPC. This technique was used for measuring decays of ruthenium compound Ru(dpp) with lifetimes as low as 1 μs with 18.5 μs frame exposure time, including in living HeLa cells, using around 0.1 μW excitation power. We speculate that by using an image intensifier with a faster phosphor decay to match a higher camera frame rate, photon arrival time measurements on the nanosecond time scale could well be possible.

  7. Social correlates of leisure-time sedentary behaviours in Canadian adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Huffman

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Research on the correlates of sedentary behaviour among adults is needed to design health interventions to modify this behaviour. This study explored the associations of social correlates with leisure-time sedentary behaviour of Canadian adults, and whether these associations differ between different types of sedentary behaviour. A sample of 12,021 Canadian adults was drawn from the 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey, and analyzed using binary logistic regression to model the relationships that marital status, the presence of children in the household, and social support have with overall time spent sitting, using a computer, playing video games, watching television, and reading during leisure time. Covariates included gender, age, education, income, employment status, perceived health, physical activity level, body mass index (BMI, and province or territory of residence. Extensive computer time was primarily negatively related to being in a common law relationship, and primarily positively related to being single/never married. Being single/never married was positively associated with extensive sitting time in men only. Having children under 12 in the household was protective against extensive video game and reading times. Increasing social support was negatively associated with extensive computer time in men and women, while among men increasing social support was positively associated with extensive sitting time. Computer, video game, television, and reading time have unique correlates among Canadian adults. Marital status, the presence of children in the household, and social support should be considered in future analyses of sedentary activities in adults.

  8. Porting the ALMA Correlator Data Processor from hard real-time to plain Linux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amestica, Rodrigo; Perez, Jesus; Saez, Alejandro

    2016-07-01

    The ALMA correlator back-end consists of a cluster of 16 computing nodes and a master collector/packager node. The mission of the cluster is to process time domain lags into auto-correlations and complex visibilities, integrate them for some configurable amount of time and package them into a workable data product. Computers in the cluster are organized such that individual workloads per node are kept within achievable levels for different observing modes and antennas in the array. Over the course of an observation the master node transmits enough state information to each involved computing node to specify exactly how to process each set of lags received from the correlator. For that distributed mechanism to work, it is necessary to unequivocally identify each individual lag set arriving at each computing node. The original approach was based on a custom hardware interface to each node in the cluster plus a realtime version of the Linux Operating System. A modification recently introduced in the ALMA correlator consists of tagging each lag set with a time stamp before delivering them to the cluster. The time stamp identifies a precise 16- millisecond window during which that specific data set was streamed to the computing cluster. From the time stamp value a node is able to identify a centroid (in absolute time units), base-lines, and correlator mode during that hardware integration. That is, enough information to let the digital signal processing pipeline in each node to process time domain lags into frequency domain auto-correlations per antenna and visibilities per base-line. The scheme also means that a good degree of concurrency can be achieved in each node by having individual CPU cores process individual lag sets at the same time, thus rendering enough processing power to cope with a maximum 1 GiB/sec output from the correlator. The present paper describes how we time stamp lag sets within the correlator hardware, the implications to their on

  9. Characterizing many-body localization by out-of-time-ordered correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Rong-Qiang; Lu, Zhong-Yi

    2017-02-01

    The out-of-time-ordered (OTO) correlation is a key quantity for quantifying quantum chaoticity and has been recently used in the investigation of quantum holography. Here we use it to study and characterize many-body localization (MBL). We find that a long-time logarithmic variation of the OTO correlation occurs in the MBL phase but is absent in the Anderson localized and ergodic phases. We extract a localization length in the MBL phase, which depends logarithmically on interaction and diverges at a critical interaction. Furthermore, the infinite-time "thermal" fluctuation of the OTO correlation is zero (finite) in the ergodic (MBL) phase and thus can be considered as an order parameter for the ergodic-MBL transition, through which the transition can be identified and characterized. Specifically, the critical point and the related critical exponents can be calculated.

  10. Spectra of large time-lagged correlation matrices from random matrix theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Maciej A.; Tarnowski, Wojciech

    2017-06-01

    We analyze the spectral properties of large, time-lagged correlation matrices using the tools of random matrix theory. We compare predictions of the one-dimensional spectra, based on approaches already proposed in the literature. Employing the methods of free random variables and diagrammatic techniques, we solve a general random matrix problem, namely the spectrum of a matrix \\frac{1}{T}XA{{X}\\dagger} , where X is an N× T Gaussian random matrix and A is any T× T , not necessarily symmetric (Hermitian) matrix. Using this result, we study the spectral features of the large lagged correlation matrices as a function of the depth of the time-lag. We also analyze the properties of left and right eigenvector correlations for the time-lagged matrices. We positively verify our results by the numerical simulations.

  11. Correlation between detrended fluctuation analysis and the Lempel-Ziv complexity in nonlinear time series analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, You-Fu; Liu, Shu-Lin; Jiang, Rui-Hong; Liu, Ying-Hui

    2013-03-01

    We study the correlation between detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) and the Lempel-Ziv complexity (LZC) in nonlinear time series analysis in this paper. Typical dynamic systems including a logistic map and a Duffing model are investigated. Moreover, the influence of Gaussian random noise on both the DFA and LZC are analyzed. The results show a high correlation between the DFA and LZC, which can quantify the non-stationarity and the nonlinearity of the time series, respectively. With the enhancement of the random component, the exponent a and the normalized complexity index C show increasing trends. In addition, C is found to be more sensitive to the fluctuation in the nonlinear time series than α. Finally, the correlation between the DFA and LZC is applied to the extraction of vibration signals for a reciprocating compressor gas valve, and an effective fault diagnosis result is obtained.

  12. Connectivities of Potts Fortuin-Kasteleyn clusters and time-like Liouville correlator

    CERN Document Server

    Picco, Marco; Viti, Jacopo; Delfino, Gesualdo

    2013-01-01

    Recently, two of us argued that the probability that an FK cluster in the Q-state Potts model connects three given points is related to the time-like Liouville three-point correlation function. Moreover, they predicted that the FK three-point connectivity has a prefactor which unveils the effects of a discrete symmetry, reminiscent of the S_Q permutation symmetry of the Q=2,3,4 Potts model. Their theoretical prediction has been checked numerically for the case of percolation, corresponding to Q=1. We introduce the time-like Liouville correlator as the only consistent analytic continuation of the minimal model structure constants and present strong numerical tests of the relation between the time-like Liouville correlator and percolative properties of the FK clusters for real values of Q.

  13. Spectral analysis of finite-time correlation matrices near equilibrium phase transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinayak; Prosen, T.; Buča, B.; Seligman, T. H.

    2014-10-01

    We study spectral densities for systems on lattices, which, at a phase transition display, power-law spatial correlations. Constructing the spatial correlation matrix we prove that its eigenvalue density shows a power law that can be derived from the spatial correlations. In practice time series are short in the sense that they are either not stationary over long time intervals or not available over long time intervals. Also we usually do not have time series for all variables available. We shall make numerical simulations on a two-dimensional Ising model with the usual Metropolis algorithm as time evolution. Using all spins on a grid with periodic boundary conditions we find a power law, that is, for large grids, compatible with the analytic result. We still find a power law even if we choose a fairly small subset of grid points at random. The exponents of the power laws will be smaller under such circumstances. For very short time series leading to singular correlation matrices we use a recently developed technique to lift the degeneracy at zero in the spectrum and find a significant signature of critical behavior even in this case as compared to high temperature results which tend to those of random matrix models.

  14. Refinement of arrival-time picks using a cross-correlation based workflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Jubran; Eaton, David W.

    2016-12-01

    We propose a new iterative workflow based on cross-correlation for improved arrival-time picking on microseismic data. In this workflow, signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) and polarity weighted stacking are used to minimize the effect of S/N and polarity fluctuations on the pilot waveform computation. We use an exhaustive search technique for polarity estimation through stack power maximization. We use pseudo-synthetic and real microseismic data from western Canada in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of proposed workflow relative to Akaike information criterion (AIC) and a previously published cross-correlation based method. The pseudo-synthetic microseismic waveforms are obtained by introducing Gaussian noise and polarity fluctuations into waveforms from a high S/N microseismic event. We find that the cross-correlation based approaches yield more accurate arrival-time picks as compared to AIC for low S/N waveforms. AIC is not affected by waveform polarities as it works on individual receiver levels whereas the accuracy of existing cross-correlation method decreases in spite of using envelope correlation. We show that our proposed workflow yields better and consistent arrival-time picks regardless of waveform amplitude and polarity variations within the receiver array. After refinement, the initial arrival-time picks are located closer to the best estimated manual picks.

  15. Travel cost inference from sparse, spatio-temporally correlated time series using markov models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, B.; Guo, C.; Jensen, C.S.

    2013-01-01

    of such time series offers insight into the underlying system and enables prediction of system behavior. While the techniques presented in the paper apply more generally, we consider the case of transportation systems and aim to predict travel cost from GPS tracking data from probe vehicles. Specifically, each...... road segment has an associated travel-cost time series, which is derived from GPS data. We use spatio-temporal hidden Markov models (STHMM) to model correlations among different traffic time series. We provide algorithms that are able to learn the parameters of an STHMM while contending...... with the sparsity, spatio-temporal correlation, and heterogeneity of the time series. Using the resulting STHMM, near future travel costs in the transportation network, e.g., travel time or greenhouse gas emissions, can be inferred, enabling a variety of routing services, e.g., eco-routing. Empirical studies...

  16. Aircraft Target Classification Based on Correlation Features from Time-domain Echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Lan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the classification of helicopters, propeller-driven aircraft, and turbojet based on differences in their time-domain modulation periods using a conventional radar system. First, we determine the modulation periods of their time-domain echoes. Then, based on the differences in the time-domain modulation periods, we propose a method for the extraction of time-domain correlation features. Finally, based on the simulated and measured data, via a support vector machine classifier, it is proved that the time-domain correlation features can yield the good classification performance, even with the relatively low pulse repetition frequency, which may induce the ambiguity in Doppler-frequency domain.

  17. Employing an interaction picture to remove artificial correlations in multilayer multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haobin; Thoss, Michael

    2016-10-01

    The multilayer multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree (ML-MCTDH) method is implemented in the interaction picture to allow a more effective description of correlation effects. It is shown that the artificial correlation present in the original Schrödinger picture can be removed with an appropriate choice of the zeroth-order Hamiltonian. Thereby, operators in the interaction picture are obtained through time-dependent unitary transformations, which have negligible computational cost compared with other parts of the ML-MCTDH algorithm. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated by application to a model of vibrationally coupled charge transport in molecular junctions.

  18. Assessment of the accuracy of real-time continuous glucose monitoring system and its correlated factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洛佩

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the factors that influence the accuracy of real-time continuous glucose monitoring system(RT-CGM).Methods A total of 79 diabetic patients wore RT-CGM for three days continuously while calibrating by interphalangeal glucose values 4-8 times a day.We counted matching rate of interphalangeal glucose values and RT-CGM probe value,and analyzed correlation of the matching rate with MAGE,SDBG,MBG,AUC10,AUC3.9,and NGE by Pearson correlation analysis and multiple linear

  19. Search for Space-Time Correlations from the Planck Scale with the Fermilab Holometer

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Aaron S; Hogan, Craig; Kamai, Brittany; Kwon, Ohkyung; Lanza, Robert; McCuller, Lee; Meyer, Stephan S; Richardson, Jonathan; Stoughton, Chris; Tomlin, Raymond; Waldman, Samuel; Weiss, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Measurements are reported of high frequency cross-spectra of signals from the Fermilab Holometer, a pair of co-located 39 m, high power Michelson interferometers. The instrument obtains differential position sensitivity to cross-correlated signals far exceeding any previous measurement in a broad frequency band extending to the 3.8 MHz inverse light crossing time of the apparatus. A model of universal exotic spatial shear correlations that matches the Planck scale holographic information bound of space-time position states is excluded to 4.6{\\sigma} significance.

  20. Television Time among Brazilian Adolescents: Correlated Factors are Different between Boys and Girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Augusto Santos Silva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of excess television time and verify correlated factors in adolescent males and females. Methods. This cross-sectional study included 2,105 adolescents aged from 13 to 18 years from the city of Aracaju, Northeastern Brazil. Television time was self-reported, corresponding to the time spent watching television in a typical week. Several correlates were examined including age, skin color, socioeconomic status, parent education, physical activity level, consumption of fruits and vegetables, smoking status, alcohol use, and sports team participation. Results. The prevalence excess television time (≥2 hours/day in girls and boys was 70.9% and 66.2%, respectively. Girls with low socioeconomic status or inadequate consumption of fruits and vegetables were more likely to have excess television time. Among boys, those >16 years of age or with black skin color were more likely to have excess television time. Conclusions. Excess television time was observed in more than two-thirds of adolescents, being more evident in girls. Correlated factors differed according to sex. Efforts to reduce television time among Brazilian adolescents, and replace with more active pursuits, may yield desirable public health benefits.

  1. Expectations Among Academic Clinicians of Inpatient Imaging Turnaround Time: Does it Correlate with Satisfaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Keith T; Carroll, Tamara; Linnau, Ken F; Lehnert, Bruce

    2015-11-01

    Imaging report turnaround time (RTAT) is an important measure of radiology performance and has become the leading priority in customer satisfaction surveys conducted among nonradiologists, who may not be familiar with the imaging workflow. Our aim was to assess physicians' expected RTAT for commonly ordered studies and determine if satisfaction correlates with met expectations. Retrospective review of inpatient imaging was conducted at a single academic institution, and RTAT for 18,414 studies was calculated. Examinations were grouped by study type, priority, and time of day. A cross-sectional survey instrument was completed by 48 internal medicine and surgery resident physicians with questions regarding RTAT and their level of satisfaction with various examinations. Actual RTAT ranged from 1.6 to 26.0 hours, with chest radiographs and computed tomographies generally faster than magnetic resonance images and ultrasounds. Urgent (STAT) examinations and those ordered during business hours have shorter RTAT. The time for image interpretation largely contributed to the RTAT because of the lack of night-time radiology coverage. Referring physician expectations were consistently shorter than actual RTAT, ranging from 30 minutes to 24 hours. Overall satisfaction scores were inversely correlated with RTAT, with a strong correlation to the time from study order to imaging (r(2) = 0.63) and a weak correlation to the image interpretation time (r(2) = 0.17). Satisfaction scores did not correlate with whether the actual RTAT met expectations (r(2) = 0.06). Referring physician satisfaction is likely multifactorial. Although RTAT has been reported as a priority, shortening turnaround time alone may not directly improve clinician satisfaction. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A GPU based real-time software correlation system for the Murchison Widefield Array prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Wayth, Randall B; Briggs, Frank H

    2009-01-01

    Modern graphics processing units (GPUs) are inexpensive commodity hardware that offer Tflop/s theoretical computing capacity. GPUs are well suited to many compute-intensive tasks including digital signal processing. We describe the implementation and performance of a GPU-based digital correlator for radio astronomy. The correlator is implemented using the NVIDIA CUDA development environment. We evaluate three design options on two generations of NVIDIA hardware. The different designs utilize the internal registers, shared memory and multiprocessors in different ways. We find that optimal performance is achieved with the design that minimizes global memory reads on recent generations of hardware. The GPU-based correlator outperforms a single-threaded CPU equivalent by a factor of 60 for a 32 antenna array, and runs on commodity PC hardware. The extra compute capability provided by the GPU maximises the correlation capability of a PC while retaining the fast development time associated with using standard hardw...

  3. Broadband polarization interferometric time-integrating acousto-optic correlator for random noise radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangtaek; Wagner, Kelvin H.; Narayanan, Ram M.; Zhou, Wei

    2005-10-01

    We describe a time-integrating acousto-optic correlator (TIAOC) developed for imaging and target detection using a wideband random-noise radar system. This novel polarization interferometric in-line TIAOC uses an intensity-modulated laser diode for the random noise reference and a polarization-switching, self-collimating acoustic shear-mode gallium phosphide (GaP) acousto-optic device for traveling-wave modulation of the radar returns. The time-integrated correlation output is detected on a 1-D charge-coupled device (CCD) detector array and calibrated and demodulated in real time to produce the complex radar range profile. The complex radar reflectivity is measured in more than 150 radar range bins in parallel on the 3000 pixels of the CCD, improving target acquisition speeds and sensitivities by 150 over previous serial analog correlator approaches. The polarization interferometric detection of the correlation using the undiffracted light as the reference allows us to use the full acousto-optic device (AOD) bandwidth as the system bandwidth. Also, the experimental result shows the fully complex random-noise signal correlation and coherent demodulation without an explicit carrier, demonstrating that optically processed random-noise radars do not need a stable local oscillator.

  4. Spin reorientation transition in Co/Au multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quispe-Marcatoma, J., E-mail: jquispem@unmsm.edu.pe [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rio de Janeiro 22290-180 (Brazil); Facultad de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, P.O. Box 14-0149, Lima 14, Perú (Peru); Tarazona, H. [Facultad de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, P.O. Box 14-0149, Lima 14, Perú (Peru); Pandey, B. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rio de Janeiro 22290-180 (Brazil); Department of Applied Science, Symbiosis Institute of Technology, SIU, Lavale, Pune 412 115, India. (India); Sousa, M.A. de [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia 74001-970 (Brazil); Carvalho, M. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rio de Janeiro 22290-180 (Brazil); Landauro, C.V. [Facultad de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, P.O. Box 14-0149, Lima 14, Perú (Peru); Pelegrini, F. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia 74001-970 (Brazil); Baggio Saitovitch, E. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rio de Janeiro 22290-180 (Brazil)

    2014-10-01

    We report a study about the spin reorientation transition (SRT) from perpendicular easy axis to in-plane easy axis of magnetization in Co/Au multilayers. A series of multilayers of Si/Au(100 Å)/{[Co(t_C_o)/Au(20 Å)]_2_0}/Au(50 Å) family were studied, with Co layer thickness varying between 6 Å to 30 Å. The thickness of the Au layer was chosen large enough in order to minimize the interlayer exchange coupling between Co layers. In such thick Au-layer samples the magnetic properties are mainly the result of competition between interlayer magnetostatic coupling due to stray field, perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and shape anisotropy. The effective anisotropy constant K{sub eff} and the second order anisotropy K{sub 2} were deduced from the fit of the resonant magnetic field obtained from out of plane dependence Ferromagnetic Resonance (FMR) experiments. To study the SRT, we have plotted the phase diagram between K{sub eff} and K{sub 2}. The results show that SRT occurs through the metastable region with K{sub 2} ≤ −½ K{sub eff}, (K{sub eff} > 0). It is interesting to note that FMR shows the coexistence of two modes with different anisotropy for small Co thickness, while for thick Co layers the modes have the same anisotropy. Moreover, in thick Co layer samples, volume and surface spin wave resonance (SWR) modes were also excited by the microwave field, around the perpendicular FMR geometry, giving a clear evidence of a magnetic coupling between the Co layers. - Highlights: • Co/Au multilayers with varying Co layer thickness are prepared by DC-magnetron sputtering. • The spin reorientation transition (SRT) and flipping of magnetic moment are studied. • Effective anisotropy constant (K) and 2nd order anisotropy constant (K{sub 2}) are calculated. • K Vs K{sub 2} plot showed that SRT occurs through the metastable region with K{sub 2} ≤ −½ K, (K > 0). • Ferromagnetic Resonance spectra showed the coexistence of two resonance modes.

  5. Correlates of children’s time-specific physical activity: A review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley Rebecca M

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Assessment of correlates of physical activity occurring at different times of the day, locations and contexts, is imperative to understanding children’s physical activity behaviour. The purpose of this review was to identify the correlates of children’s physical activity (aged 8–14 years occurring during the school break time and after-school periods. A review was conducted of the peer-reviewed literature, published between 1990 and January 2011. A total of 22 studies (12 school break time studies, 10 after-school studies were included in the review. Across the 22 studies, 17 studies were cross-sectional and five studies were interventions. In the school break time studies, 39 potential correlates were identified, of which gender and age were consistently associated with school break time physical activity in two or more studies, and family affluence, access to a gym, access to four or more physical activity programs and the condition of a playing field were all associated with school break time physical activity in only one study. Access to loose and fixed equipment, playground markings, size of and access to play space and the length of school break time were all positively associated with changes in school break time physical activity in intervention studies. Thirty-six potential correlates of after-school physical activity were identified. Gender (with boys more active, younger age, lower body mass index (for females, lower TV viewing/playing video games, and greater access to facilities were associated with higher levels of after-school physical activity in two or more studies. Parent supervision was negatively associated with females’ after-school physical activity in one study. This review has revealed a relatively small number of studies investigating the school break time and after-school periods in the specified age range and only a few correlates have demonstrated a consistent association with physical activity

  6. Peri-event cross-correlation over time for analysis of interactions in neuronal firing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, António R C; Park, Il; Sanchez, Justin C; Príncipe, José C

    2008-01-01

    Several methods have been described in the literature to verify the presence of couplings between neurons in the brain. In this paper we introduce the peri-event cross-correlation over time (PECCOT) to describe the interaction among the two neurons as a function of the event onset. Instead of averaging over time, the PECCOT averages the cross-correlation over instances of the event. As a consequence, the PECCOT is able to characterize with high temporal resolution the interactions over time among neurons. To illustrate the method, the PECCOT is applied to a simulated dataset and for analysis of synchrony in recordings of a rat performing a go/no go behavioral lever press task. We verify the presence of synchrony before the lever press time and its suppression afterwards.

  7. Schizotypal perceptual aberrations of time: correlation between score, behavior and brain activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahar Arzy

    Full Text Available A fundamental trait of the human self is its continuum experience of space and time. Perceptual aberrations of this spatial and temporal continuity is a major characteristic of schizophrenia spectrum disturbances--including schizophrenia, schizotypal personality disorder and schizotypy. We have previously found the classical Perceptual Aberration Scale (PAS scores, related to body and space, to be positively correlated with both behavior and temporo-parietal activation in healthy participants performing a task involving self-projection in space. However, not much is known about the relationship between temporal perceptual aberration, behavior and brain activity. To this aim, we composed a temporal Perceptual Aberration Scale (tPAS similar to the traditional PAS. Testing on 170 participants suggested similar performance for PAS and tPAS. We then correlated tPAS and PAS scores to participants' performance and neural activity in a task of self-projection in time. tPAS scores correlated positively with reaction times across task conditions, as did PAS scores. Evoked potential mapping and electrical neuroimaging showed self-projection in time to recruit a network of brain regions at the left anterior temporal cortex, right temporo-parietal junction, and occipito-temporal cortex, and duration of activation in this network positively correlated with tPAS and PAS scores. These data demonstrate that schizotypal perceptual aberrations of both time and space, as reflected by tPAS and PAS scores, are positively correlated with performance and brain activation during self-projection in time in healthy individuals along the schizophrenia spectrum.

  8. Temperature-driven spin reorientation transition of magnetron sputtered nickel thin film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Xiao-Hui; Zhang Dian-Lin

    2008-01-01

    The temperature-driven spin reorientation transition of magnetron sputtered Ni/Si(111)systems has been studied.The relationship between ac initial susceptibility and temperature of nickel films with different thicknesses shows that the magnetization orientation changes from in-plane to out-of-plane with the increase of temperature.The temperature dependence of magnetoelastic,magneto-crystalline,and magnetostatic anisotropies determines the direction of the reorientation transition.The temperature-driven spin reorientation transition is supported by Hall coefficient measurements which show that its temperature dependence is similar to that of susceptibility.

  9. Trait Associations across Evolutionary Time within a Drosophila Phylogeny: Correlated Selection or Genetic Constraint?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellermann, Vanessa; Overgaard, Johannes; Loeschcke, Volker; Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard; Hoffmann, Ary A.

    2013-01-01

    Traits do not evolve independently. To understand how trait changes under selection might constrain adaptive changes, phenotypic and genetic correlations are typically considered within species, but these capture constraints across a few generations rather than evolutionary time. For longer-term constraints, comparisons are needed across species but associations may arise because of correlated selection pressures rather than genetic interactions. Implementing a unique approach, we use known patterns of selection to separate likely trait correlations arising due to correlated selection from those reflecting genetic constraints. We examined the evolution of stress resistance in >90 Drosophila species adapted to a range of environments, while controlling for phylogeny. Initially we examined the role of climate and phylogeny in shaping the evolution of starvation and body size, two traits previously not examined in this context. Following correction for phylogeny only a weak relationship between climate and starvation resistance was detected, while all of the variation in the relationship between body size and climate could be attributed to phylogeny. Species were divided into three environmental groups (hot and dry, hot and wet, cold) with the expectation that, if genetic correlations underpin trait correlations, these would persist irrespective of the environment, whereas selection-driven evolution should produce correlations dependent on the environment. We found positive associations between most traits in hot and dry environments coupled with high trait means. In contrast few trait correlations were observed in hot/wet and cold environments. These results suggest trait associations are primarily driven by correlated selection rather than genetic interactions, highlighting that such interactions are unlikely to limit evolution of stress resistance. PMID:24015206

  10. Fission Multiplicity Detection with Temporal Gamma-Neutron Discrimination from Higher-Order Time Correlation Statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberer, R.B.

    2002-11-12

    The current practice of nondestructive assay (NDA) of fissile materials using neutrons is dominated by the {sup 3}He detector. This has been the case since the mid 1980s when Fission Multiplicity Detection (FMD) was replaced with thermal well counters and neutron multiplicity counting (NMC). The thermal well counters detect neutrons by neutron capture in the {sup 3}He detector subsequent to moderation. The process of detection requires from 30 to 60 {micro}s. As will be explained in Section 3.3 the rate of detecting correlated neutrons (signal) from the same fission are independent of this time but the rate of accidental correlations (noise) are proportional to this time. The well counters are at a distinct disadvantage when there is a large source of uncorrelated neutrons present from ({alpha}, n) reactions for example. Plastic scintillating detectors, as were used in FMD, require only about 20 ns to detect neutrons from fission. One thousandth as many accidental coincidences are therefore accumulated. The major problem with the use of fast-plastic scintillation detectors, however, is that both neutrons and gamma rays are detected. The pulses from the two are indistinguishable in these detectors. For this thesis, a new technique was developed to use higher-order time correlation statistics to distinguish combinations of neutron and gamma ray detections in fast-plastic scintillation detectors. A system of analysis to describe these correlations was developed based on simple physical principles. Other sources of correlations from non-fission events are identified and integrated into the analysis developed for fission events. A number of ratios and metric are identified to determine physical properties of the source from the correlations. It is possible to determine both the quantity being measured and detection efficiency from these ratios from a single measurement without a separate calibration. To account for detector dead-time, an alternative analytical technique

  11. Noise-correlation-time-mediated localization in random nonlinear dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Cabrera, J L; De la Rubia, F J; Cabrera, Juan L.

    1999-01-01

    We investigate the behavior of the residence times density function for different nonlinear dynamical systems with limit cycle behavior and perturbed parametrically with a colored noise. We present evidence that underlying the stochastic resonancelike behavior with the noise correlation time, there is an effect of optimal localization of the system trajectories in the phase space. This phenomenon is observed in systems with different nonlinearities, suggesting a degree of universality.

  12. Electron correlation effects on photoionization time delay in atomic Ar and Xe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, A.; Saha, S.; Decshmukh, P. C.; Manson, S. T.; Kheifets, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    Time delay studies in photoionization processes have stimulated much interest as they provide valuable dynamical information about electron correlation and relativistic effects. In a recent work on Wigner time delay in the photoionization of noble gas atoms, it was found that correlations resulting from interchannel coupling involving shells with different principal quantum numbers have significant effects on 2s and 2p photoionization of Ne, 3s photoionization of Ar, and 3d photoionization of Kr. In the present work, photoionization time delay in inner and outer subshells of the noble gases Ar and Xe are examined by including electron correlations using different many body techniques: (i) the relativistic-random-phase approximation (RRPA), (ii) RRPA with relaxation, to include relaxation effects of the residual ion and (iii) the relativistic multiconfiguration Tamm-Dancoff (RMCTD) approximation. The (sometimes substantial) effects of the inclusion of non-RPA correlations on the photoionization Wigner time delay are reported. Work supported by DOE, Office of Chemical Sciences and DST (India).

  13. Quantum-kinetic equations for time correlation functions in higher-order perturbation theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leermakers, M.C.J.; Suttorp, L.G.

    1981-01-01

    The memory kernel of the kinetic equation for the time correlation function of a quantum fluid is determined both in third order of the interaction strength and in the low-density approximation. The results are obtained with the help of a diagram representation for the kernel. The connection with

  14. Correlates of sedentary time in different age groups: results from a large cross sectional Dutch survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernaards, C.; Hildebrandt, V.H.; Hendriksen, I.J.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Evidence shows that prolonged sitting is associated with an increased risk of mortality, independent of physical activity (PA). The aim of the study was to identify correlates of sedentary time (ST) in different age groups and day types (i.e. school-/work day versus non-school-/non-work

  15. A Concurrent Implementation of the Cascade-Correlation Algorithm, Using the Time Warp Operating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the method in which the Cascade-Correlation algorithm was parallelized in such a way that it could be run using the Time Warp Operating System (TWOS). TWOS is a special purpose operating system designed to run parellel discrete event simulations with maximum efficiency on parallel or distributed computers.

  16. Initial conditions, time evolution and BE correlations in e+e- annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Novák, T; Kittel, W; Metzger, W J

    2009-01-01

    Bose-Einstein correlations of identical charged-pion pairs produced in hadronic Z decays are analyzed in terms of various parametrizations. The tau-model with a one-sided L\\'evy proper-time distribution provides a good description, enabling the source function to be reconstructed.

  17. Initial Conditions, Time Evolution and BE Correlations in e+e- Annihilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novák, T.; Csörgő, T.; Kittel, W.; Metzger, W. J.

    2009-04-01

    Bose-Einstein correlations of identical charged-pion pairs produced in hadronic Z decays are analyzed in terms of various parametrizations. The tau -model with a one-sided Lévy proper-time distribution provides a good description, enabling the source function to be reconstructed.

  18. A Concurrent Implementation of the Cascade-Correlation Algorithm, Using the Time Warp Operating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the method in which the Cascade-Correlation algorithm was parallelized in such a way that it could be run using the Time Warp Operating System (TWOS). TWOS is a special purpose operating system designed to run parellel discrete event simulations with maximum efficiency on parallel or distributed computers.

  19. Variability of interconnected wind plants: correlation length and its dependence on variability time scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Martin, Clara M.; Lundquist, Julie K.; Handschy, Mark A.

    2015-04-01

    The variability in wind-generated electricity complicates the integration of this electricity into the electrical grid. This challenge steepens as the percentage of renewably-generated electricity on the grid grows, but variability can be reduced by exploiting geographic diversity: correlations between wind farms decrease as the separation between wind farms increases. But how far is far enough to reduce variability? Grid management requires balancing production on various timescales, and so consideration of correlations reflective of those timescales can guide the appropriate spatial scales of geographic diversity grid integration. To answer ‘how far is far enough,’ we investigate the universal behavior of geographic diversity by exploring wind-speed correlations using three extensive datasets spanning continents, durations and time resolution. First, one year of five-minute wind power generation data from 29 wind farms span 1270 km across Southeastern Australia (Australian Energy Market Operator). Second, 45 years of hourly 10 m wind-speeds from 117 stations span 5000 km across Canada (National Climate Data Archive of Environment Canada). Finally, four years of five-minute wind-speeds from 14 meteorological towers span 350 km of the Northwestern US (Bonneville Power Administration). After removing diurnal cycles and seasonal trends from all datasets, we investigate dependence of correlation length on time scale by digitally high-pass filtering the data on 0.25-2000 h timescales and calculating correlations between sites for each high-pass filter cut-off. Correlations fall to zero with increasing station separation distance, but the characteristic correlation length varies with the high-pass filter applied: the higher the cut-off frequency, the smaller the station separation required to achieve de-correlation. Remarkable similarities between these three datasets reveal behavior that, if universal, could be particularly useful for grid management. For high

  20. On the estimation of intracluster correlation for time-to-event outcomes in cluster randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalia, Sumeet; Klar, Neil; Donner, Allan

    2016-12-30

    Cluster randomized trials (CRTs) involve the random assignment of intact social units rather than independent subjects to intervention groups. Time-to-event outcomes often are endpoints in CRTs. Analyses of such data need to account for the correlation among cluster members. The intracluster correlation coefficient (ICC) is used to assess the similarity among binary and continuous outcomes that belong to the same cluster. However, estimating the ICC in CRTs with time-to-event outcomes is a challenge because of the presence of censored observations. The literature suggests that the ICC may be estimated using either censoring indicators or observed event times. A simulation study explores the effect of administrative censoring on estimating the ICC. Results show that ICC estimators derived from censoring indicators or observed event times are negatively biased. Analytic work further supports these results. Observed event times are preferred to estimate the ICC under minimum frequency of administrative censoring. To our knowledge, the existing literature provides no practical guidance on the estimation of ICC when substantial amount of administrative censoring is present. The results from this study corroborate the need for further methodological research on estimating the ICC for correlated time-to-event outcomes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Office workers' objectively assessed total and prolonged sitting time: Individual-level correlates and worksite variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyssa T. Hadgraft

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sedentary behavior is highly prevalent in office-based workplaces; however, few studies have assessed the attributes associated with this health risk factor in the workplace setting. This study aimed to identify the correlates of office workers' objectively-assessed total and prolonged (≥30 min bouts workplace sitting time. Participants were 231 Australian office workers recruited from 14 sites of a single government employer in 2012–13. Potential socio-demographic, work-related, health-related and cognitive-social correlates were measured through a self-administered survey and anthropometric measurements. Associations with total and prolonged workplace sitting time (measured with the activPAL3 were tested using linear mixed models. Worksites varied significantly in total workplace sitting time (overall mean [SD]: 79% [10%] of work hours and prolonged workplace sitting time (42% [19%], after adjusting for socio-demographic and work-related characteristics. Organisational tenure of 3–5 years (compared to tenure >5 years was associated with more time spent in total and prolonged workplace sitting time, while having a BMI categorised as obese (compared to a healthy BMI was associated with less time spent in total and prolonged workplace sitting time. Significant variations in sitting time were observed across different worksites of the same employer and the variation remained after adjusting for individual-level factors. Only BMI and organisational tenure were identified as correlates of total and prolonged workplace sitting time. Additional studies are needed to confirm the present findings across diverse organisations and occupations.

  2. Structure-induced spin reorientation in magnetic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Alexander; Frauen, Axel; Vollmers, Julian; Meyer, Andreas; Oepen, Hans Peter

    2016-09-01

    We report on structuring-induced changes of the magnetic anisotropy of cylindrical nanostructures which are carved out of thin Pt/Co/Pt films. The magnetic properties of films and structures with a diameter of about 34 nm were investigated via magneto-optic Kerr effect. The magnetic anisotropy is determined for both films and nanostructures for varying Co thicknesses (0.5-7 nm). In general, the nanostructures exhibit larger perpendicular anisotropy than the films. On thickness increase of the Co layer two spin reorientation transitions at about 2.2 and 5 nm are found. At 2.2 nm the nanostructures exhibit the transition from perpendicular to in-plane orientation of magnetization while at 5 nm the reversed transition is found. The variation of the magnetic anisotropy of the Co nanostructures is not solely caused by the change of shape anisotropy. The net change, corrected for the shape, reveals a reduction of strain in the thinnest Co layers while the increase of the anisotropy of the nanostructures at higher Co thicknesses is caused by a transformation of the Co lattice from fcc to hcp.

  3. Resolving coiled shapes reveals new reorientation behaviors in C. elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekmans, Onno D; Rodgers, Jarlath B; Ryu, William S; Stephens, Greg J

    2016-01-01

    We exploit the reduced space of C. elegans postures to develop a novel tracking algorithm which captures both simple shapes and also self-occluding coils, an important, yet unexplored, component of 2D worm behavior. We apply our algorithm to show that visually complex, coiled sequences are a superposition of two simpler patterns: the body wave dynamics and a head-curvature pulse. We demonstrate the precise Ω-turn dynamics of an escape response and uncover a surprising new dichotomy in spontaneous, large-amplitude coils; deep reorientations occur not only through classical Ω-shaped postures but also through larger postural excitations which we label here as δ-turns. We find that omega and delta turns occur independently, suggesting a distinct triggering mechanism, and are the serpentine analog of a random left-right step. Finally, we show that omega and delta turns occur with approximately equal rates and adapt to food-free conditions on a similar timescale, a simple strategy to avoid navigational bias. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17227.001 PMID:27644113

  4. On the equivalence of the RTI and SVM approaches to time correlated analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, S.; Favalli, A.; Henzlova, D.; Santi, P. A.

    2015-02-01

    Recently two papers on how to perform passive neutron auto-correlation analysis on time gated histograms formed from pulse train data, generically called time correlation analysis (TCA), have appeared in this journal Dubi et al. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment (673) (2012) 111; Croft et al. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment (691) (2012) 152. For those of us working in international nuclear safeguards these treatments are of particular interest because passive neutron multiplicity counting is a widely deployed technique for the quantification of plutonium. The purpose of this letter is to show that the skewness-variance-mean (SVM) approach developed in Dubi et al. (Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment (673) (2012) 111) is equivalent in terms of assay capability to the random trigger interval (RTI) analysis laid out in Croft et al. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment (691) (2012) 152. Mathematically we could also use other numerical ways to extract the time correlated information from the histogram data including, for example, what we might call the mean, mean square, and mean cube approach. The important feature however, from the perspective of real world applications, is that the correlated information extracted is the same, and subsequently gets interpreted in the same way based on the same underlying physics model.

  5. Real time tracker based upon local hit correlation circuit for silicon strip sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, Niklaus, E-mail: niklaus.lehmann@cern.ch [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Pirrami, Lorenzo [University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland, Boulevard de Pérolles 80 – CP 32, CH-1705 Fribourg (Switzerland); Blue, Andrew [SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Diez, Sergio [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestraße 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Dressnandt, Nandor [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Duner, Silvan [University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland, Boulevard de Pérolles 80 – CP 32, CH-1705 Fribourg (Switzerland); Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Haber, Carl [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Halgeri, Amogh; Keener, Paul [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Keller, John [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestraße 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Newcomer, Mitchell [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Pasner, Jacob [University of California Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Peschke, Richard [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestraße 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Risbud, Amar [University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ropraz, Eric; Stalder, Jonas [University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland, Boulevard de Pérolles 80 – CP 32, CH-1705 Fribourg (Switzerland); Wang, Haichen [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-01-11

    For the planned high luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a significant performance improvement of the detectors is required, including new tracker and trigger systems that makes use of charged track information early on. In this note we explore the principle of real time track reconstruction integrated in the readout electronics. A prototype was built using the silicon strip sensor for the ATLAS phase-II upgrade. The real time tracker is not the baseline for ATLAS but is nevertheless of interest, as the upgraded trigger design has not yet been finalized. For this, a new readout scheme in parallel with conventional readout, called the Fast Cluster Finder (FCF), was included in the latest prototype of the ATLAS strip detector readout chip (ABC130). The FCF is capable of finding hits within 6 ns and transmitting the found hit information synchronously every 25 ns. Using the FCF together with external correlation logic makes it possible to look for pairs of hits consistent with tracks from the interaction point above a transverse momentum threshold. A correlator logic finds correlations between two closely spaced parallel sensors, a “doublet”, and can generate information used as input to a lowest level trigger decision. Such a correlator logic was developed as part of a demonstrator and was successfully tested in an electron beam. The results of this test beam experiment proved the concept of the real time track vector processor with FCF.

  6. On the equivalence of the RTI and SVM approaches to time correlated analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croft, S., E-mail: crofts@ornl.gov [Safeguards and Security Technology (SST), Global Nuclear Security Technology Division, PO Box 2008, Bldg 5700, MS-6166, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6166 (United States); Favalli, A.; Henzlova, D.; Santi, P.A. [Safeguards Science and Technology Group (NEN-1), Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation Division, MS-E540, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2015-02-11

    Recently two papers on how to perform passive neutron auto-correlation analysis on time gated histograms formed from pulse train data, generically called time correlation analysis (TCA), have appeared in this journal Dubi et al. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment (673) (2012) 111; Croft et al. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment (691) (2012) 152. For those of us working in international nuclear safeguards these treatments are of particular interest because passive neutron multiplicity counting is a widely deployed technique for the quantification of plutonium. The purpose of this letter is to show that the skewness-variance-mean (SVM) approach developed in Dubi et al. (Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment (673) (2012) 111) is equivalent in terms of assay capability to the random trigger interval (RTI) analysis laid out in Croft et al. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment (691) (2012) 152. Mathematically we could also use other numerical ways to extract the time correlated information from the histogram data including, for example, what we might call the mean, mean square, and mean cube approach. The important feature however, from the perspective of real world applications, is that the correlated information extracted is the same, and subsequently gets interpreted in the same way based on the same underlying physics model.

  7. Equal-time two-point correlation functions in Coulomb gauge Yang-Mills theory

    CERN Document Server

    Campagnari, D; Reinhardt, H; Astorga, F; Schleifenbaum, W

    2009-01-01

    We apply a new functional perturbative approach to the calculation of the equal-time two-point correlation functions and the potential between static color charges to one-loop order in Coulomb gauge Yang-Mills theory. The functional approach proceeds through a solution of the Schroedinger equation for the vacuum wave functional to order g^2 and derives the equal-time correlation functions from a functional integral representation via new diagrammatic rules. We show that the results coincide with those obtained from the usual Lagrangian functional integral approach, extract the beta function and determine the anomalous dimensions of the equal-time gluon and ghost two-point functions and the static potential under the assumption of multiplicative renormalizability to all orders.

  8. Analysis of DNA sequences by an optical time-integrating correlator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brousseau, N; Brousseau, R; Salt, J W; Gutz, L; Tucker, M D

    1992-08-10

    The analysis of the molecular structure called DNA is of particular interest for the understanding of the basic processes governing life. Correlation techniques implemented on digital computers are currently used to do this analysis, but the process is so slow that the mapping and sequencing of the entire human genome requires a computational breakthrough. This paper presents a new method of performing the analysis of DNA sequences with an optical time-integrating correlator. The method is characterized by short processing times that make the analysis of the entire human genome a tractable enterprise. A processing strategy and the resultant processing times are presented. Experimental proofs of concept for the two types of analysis specified by the strategy are also included.

  9. Statistical model of exotic rotational correlations in emergent space-time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Craig; Kwon, Ohkyung; Richardson, Jonathan

    2017-07-01

    A Lorentz invariant statistical model is presented for rotational fluctuations in the local inertial frame that arise from new quantum degrees of freedom of space-time. The model assumes invariant classical causal structure, and a Planck information density in invariant proper time determined by the world line of an observer. It describes macroscopic spacelike correlations that appear as observable timelike correlations in phase differences of light propagating on paths that begin and end on the same world line. The model allows an exact prediction for the autocorrelation of any interferometer time signal from the shape of the light paths. Specific examples computed for configurations that approximate realistic experiments show that the model can be rigorously tested, allowing a direct experimental probe of Planck scale degrees of freedom.

  10. Detection of rheumatoid arthritis by evaluation of normalized variances of fluorescence time correlation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziekan, Thomas; Weissbach, Carmen; Voigt, Jan; Ebert, Bernd; MacDonald, Rainer; Bahner, Malte L.; Mahler, Marianne; Schirner, Michael; Berliner, Michael; Berliner, Birgitt; Osel, Jens; Osel, Ilka

    2011-07-01

    Fluorescence imaging using the dye indocyanine green as a contrast agent was investigated in a prospective clinical study for the detection of rheumatoid arthritis. Normalized variances of correlated time series of fluorescence intensities describing the bolus kinetics of the contrast agent in certain regions of interest were analyzed to differentiate healthy from inflamed finger joints. These values are determined using a robust, parameter-free algorithm. We found that the normalized variance of correlation functions improves the differentiation between healthy joints of volunteers and joints with rheumatoid arthritis of patients by about 10% compared to, e.g., ratios of areas under the curves of raw data.

  11. Spectral density analysis of time correlation functions in lattice QCD using the maximum entropy method

    CERN Document Server

    Fiebig, H R

    2002-01-01

    We study various aspects of extracting spectral information from time correlation functions of lattice QCD by means of Bayesian inference with an entropic prior, the maximum entropy method (MEM). Correlator functions of a heavy-light meson-meson system serve as a repository for lattice data with diverse statistical quality. Attention is given to spectral mass density functions, inferred from the data, and their dependence on the parameters of the MEM. We propose to employ simulated annealing, or cooling, to solve the Bayesian inference problem, and discuss practical issues of the approach.

  12. Capacity enhancement of wavelength/time/space asynchronous optical CDMA with relaxed cross-correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jaswinder

    2013-12-01

    The analysis of a three-dimensional (3-D) wavelength/time/space (W-T-S) asynchronous optical CDMA code family is presented considering MAI only under relaxed cross-correlation (λc ⩾ 1). Based on the code performance, it is shown that for code-limited systems (when W and/or T are non-prime), the number of generated codes and hence the supported users can be significantly increased by relaxing the cross-correlation constraint if a slight degradation in code performance can be tolerated.

  13. Quantum state reduction and conditional time evolution of wave-particle correlations in cavity QED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, G T; Orozco, L A; Castro-Beltran, H M; Carmichael, H J

    2000-10-09

    We report measurements in cavity QED of a wave-particle correlation function which records the conditional time evolution of the field of a fraction of a photon. Detection of a photon prepares a state of well-defined phase that evolves back to equilibrium via a damped vacuum Rabi oscillation. We record the regression of the field amplitude. The recorded correlation function is nonclassical and provides an efficiency independent path to the spectrum of squeezing. Nonclassicality is observed even when the intensity fluctuations are classical.

  14. Duodenoscope hang time does not correlate with risk of bacterial contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heroux, Riley; Sheppard, Michelle; Wright, Sharon B; Sawhney, Mandeep; Hirsch, Elizabeth B; Kalaidjian, Robin; Snyder, Graham M

    2017-04-01

    Current professional guidelines recommend a maximum hang time for reprocessed duodenoscopes of 5-14 days. We sought to study the association between hang time and risk of duodenoscope contamination. We analyzed cultures of the elevator mechanism and working channel collected in a highly standardized fashion just before duodenoscope use. Hang time was calculated as the time from reprocessing to duodenoscope sampling. The relationship between hang time and duodenoscope contamination was estimated using a calculated correlation coefficient between hang time in days and degree of contamination on the elevator mechanism and working channel. The 18 study duodenoscopes were cultured 531 times, including 465 (87.6%) in the analysis dataset. Hang time ranged from 0.07-39.93 days, including 34 (7.3%) with hang time ≥7.00 days. Twelve cultures (2.6%) demonstrated elevator mechanism and/or working channel contamination. The correlation coefficients for hang time and degree of duodenoscope contamination were very small and not statistically significant (-0.0090 [P = .85] for elevator mechanism and -0.0002 [P = 1.00] for working channel). Odds ratios for hang time (dichotomized at ≥7.00 days) and elevator mechanism and/or working channel contamination were not significant. We did not find a significant association between hang time and risk of duodenoscope contamination. Future guidelines should consider a recommendation of no limit for hang time. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Statistics of time delay and scattering correlation functions in chaotic systems. I. Random matrix theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novaes, Marcel [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Ave. João Naves de Ávila, 2121, Uberlândia, MG 38408-100 (Brazil)

    2015-06-15

    We consider the statistics of time delay in a chaotic cavity having M open channels, in the absence of time-reversal invariance. In the random matrix theory approach, we compute the average value of polynomial functions of the time delay matrix Q = − iħS{sup †}dS/dE, where S is the scattering matrix. Our results do not assume M to be large. In a companion paper, we develop a semiclassical approximation to S-matrix correlation functions, from which the statistics of Q can also be derived. Together, these papers contribute to establishing the conjectured equivalence between the random matrix and the semiclassical approaches.

  16. Statistics of time delay and scattering correlation functions in chaotic systems. I. Random matrix theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novaes, Marcel

    2015-06-01

    We consider the statistics of time delay in a chaotic cavity having M open channels, in the absence of time-reversal invariance. In the random matrix theory approach, we compute the average value of polynomial functions of the time delay matrix Q = - iħS†dS/dE, where S is the scattering matrix. Our results do not assume M to be large. In a companion paper, we develop a semiclassical approximation to S-matrix correlation functions, from which the statistics of Q can also be derived. Together, these papers contribute to establishing the conjectured equivalence between the random matrix and the semiclassical approaches.

  17. Variable angle correlation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y K [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-05-01

    In this dissertation, a novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, variable angle correlation spectroscopy (VACSY) is described and demonstrated with {sup 13}C nuclei in rapidly rotating samples. These experiments focus on one of the basic problems in solid state NMR: how to extract the wealth of information contained in the anisotropic component of the NMR signal while still maintaining spectral resolution. Analysis of the anisotropic spectral patterns from poly-crystalline systems reveal information concerning molecular structure and dynamics, yet in all but the simplest of systems, the overlap of spectral patterns from chemically distinct sites renders the spectral analysis difficult if not impossible. One solution to this problem is to perform multi-dimensional experiments where the high-resolution, isotropic spectrum in one dimension is correlated with the anisotropic spectral patterns in the other dimensions. The VACSY technique incorporates the angle between the spinner axis and the static magnetic field as an experimental parameter that may be incremented during the course of the experiment to help correlate the isotropic and anisotropic components of the spectrum. The two-dimensional version of the VACSY experiments is used to extract the chemical shift anisotropy tensor values from multi-site organic molecules, study molecular dynamics in the intermediate time regime, and to examine the ordering properties of partially oriented samples. The VACSY technique is then extended to three-dimensional experiments to study slow molecular reorientations in a multi-site polymer system.

  18. Switching of bacterial adhesion to a glycosylated surface by reversible reorientation of the carbohydrate ligand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Theresa; Chrasekaran, Vijayan; Stamer, Insa

    2014-01-01

    The surface recognition in many biological systems is guided by the interaction of carbohydrate-specific proteins (lectins) with carbohydrate epitopes (ligands) located within the unordered glycoconjugate layer (glycocalyx) of cells. Thus, for recognition, the respective ligand has to reorient...

  19. Improving the counting efficiency in time-correlated single photon counting experiments by dead-time optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peronio, P.; Acconcia, G.; Rech, I.; Ghioni, M. [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-11-15

    Time-Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) has been long recognized as the most sensitive method for fluorescence lifetime measurements, but often requiring “long” data acquisition times. This drawback is related to the limited counting capability of the TCSPC technique, due to pile-up and counting loss effects. In recent years, multi-module TCSPC systems have been introduced to overcome this issue. Splitting the light into several detectors connected to independent TCSPC modules proportionally increases the counting capability. Of course, multi-module operation also increases the system cost and can cause space and power supply problems. In this paper, we propose an alternative approach based on a new detector and processing electronics designed to reduce the overall system dead time, thus enabling efficient photon collection at high excitation rate. We present a fast active quenching circuit for single-photon avalanche diodes which features a minimum dead time of 12.4 ns. We also introduce a new Time-to-Amplitude Converter (TAC) able to attain extra-short dead time thanks to the combination of a scalable array of monolithically integrated TACs and a sequential router. The fast TAC (F-TAC) makes it possible to operate the system towards the upper limit of detector count rate capability (∼80 Mcps) with reduced pile-up losses, addressing one of the historic criticisms of TCSPC. Preliminary measurements on the F-TAC are presented and discussed.

  20. Improving the counting efficiency in time-correlated single photon counting experiments by dead-time optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peronio, P.; Acconcia, G.; Rech, I.; Ghioni, M.

    2015-11-01

    Time-Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) has been long recognized as the most sensitive method for fluorescence lifetime measurements, but often requiring "long" data acquisition times. This drawback is related to the limited counting capability of the TCSPC technique, due to pile-up and counting loss effects. In recent years, multi-module TCSPC systems have been introduced to overcome this issue. Splitting the light into several detectors connected to independent TCSPC modules proportionally increases the counting capability. Of course, multi-module operation also increases the system cost and can cause space and power supply problems. In this paper, we propose an alternative approach based on a new detector and processing electronics designed to reduce the overall system dead time, thus enabling efficient photon collection at high excitation rate. We present a fast active quenching circuit for single-photon avalanche diodes which features a minimum dead time of 12.4 ns. We also introduce a new Time-to-Amplitude Converter (TAC) able to attain extra-short dead time thanks to the combination of a scalable array of monolithically integrated TACs and a sequential router. The fast TAC (F-TAC) makes it possible to operate the system towards the upper limit of detector count rate capability (˜80 Mcps) with reduced pile-up losses, addressing one of the historic criticisms of TCSPC. Preliminary measurements on the F-TAC are presented and discussed.

  1. Neural correlates of belief-bias reasoning under time pressure: a near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujii, Takeo; Watanabe, Shigeru

    2010-04-15

    The dual-process theory of reasoning explained the belief-bias effect, the tendency for human reasoning to be erroneously biased when logical conclusions are incongruent with belief about the world, by proposing a belief-based fast heuristic system and a logic-based slow analytic system. Although the claims were supported by behavioral findings that the belief-bias effect was enhanced when subjects were not given sufficient time for reasoning, the neural correlates were still unknown. The present study therefore examined the relationship between the time-pressure effect and activity in the inferior frontal cortex (IFC) during belief-bias reasoning using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Forty-eight subjects performed congruent and incongruent reasoning tasks, involving long-span (20 s) and short-span trials (10 s). Behavioral analysis found that only incongruent reasoning performance was impaired by the time-pressure of short-span trials. NIRS analysis found that the time-pressure decreased right IFC activity during incongruent trials. Correlation analysis showed that subjects with enhanced right IFC activity could perform better in incongruent trials, while subjects for whom the right IFC activity was impaired by the time-pressure could not maintain better reasoning performance. These findings suggest that the right IFC may be responsible for the time-pressure effect in conflicting reasoning processes. When the right IFC activity was impaired in the short-span trials in which subjects were not given sufficient time for reasoning, the subjects may rely on the fast heuristic system, which result in belief-bias responses. We therefore offer the first demonstration of neural correlates of time-pressure effect on the IFC activity in belief-bias reasoning.

  2. Time-varying correlations in global real estate markets: A multivariate GARCH with spatial effects approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Huaying; Liu, Zhixue; Weng, Yingliang

    2017-04-01

    The present study applies the multivariate generalized autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity (MGARCH) with spatial effects approach for the analysis of the time-varying conditional correlations and contagion effects among global real estate markets. A distinguishing feature of the proposed model is that it can simultaneously capture the spatial interactions and the dynamic conditional correlations compared with the traditional MGARCH models. Results reveal that the estimated dynamic conditional correlations have exhibited significant increases during the global financial crisis from 2007 to 2009, thereby suggesting contagion effects among global real estate markets. The analysis further indicates that the returns of the regional real estate markets that are in close geographic and economic proximities exhibit strong co-movement. In addition, evidence of significantly positive leverage effects in global real estate markets is also determined. The findings have significant implications on global portfolio diversification opportunities and risk management practices.

  3. Results of the Baikal experiment on observations of macroscopic nonlocal correlations in reverse time

    CERN Document Server

    Korotaev, S M; Kiktenko, E O; Budnev, N M; Gorohov, J V

    2015-01-01

    Although the general theory macroscopic quantum entanglement of is still in its infancy, consideration of the matter in the framework of action-at-a distance electrodynamics predicts for the random dissipative processes observability of the advanced nonlocal correlations. These correlations were really revealed in our previous experiments with some large-scale heliogeophysical processes as the source ones and the lab detectors as the probe ones. Recently a new experiment has been performing on the base of Baikal Deep Water Neutrino Observatory. The thick water layer is an excellent shield against any local impacts on the detectors. The first annual series 2012/2013 has demonstrated that detector signals respond to the heliogeophysical processes and causal connection of the signals directed downwards: from the Earth surface to the Baikal floor. But this nonlocal connection proved to be in reverse time. In addition advanced nonlocal correlation of the detector signal with the regional source-process: the random...

  4. Nonlinear Analysis on Cross-Correlation of Financial Time Series by Continuum Percolation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Hongli; Wang, Jun

    We establish a financial price process by continuum percolation system, in which we attribute price fluctuations to the investors’ attitudes towards the financial market, and consider the clusters in continuum percolation as the investors share the same investment opinion. We investigate the cross-correlations in two return time series, and analyze the multifractal behaviors in this relationship. Further, we study the corresponding behaviors for the real stock indexes of SSE and HSI as well as the liquid stocks pair of SPD and PAB by comparison. To quantify the multifractality in cross-correlation relationship, we employ multifractal detrended cross-correlation analysis method to perform an empirical research for the simulation data and the real markets data.

  5. Quantum Transfer Energy and Nonlocal Correlation in a Dimer with Time-Dependent Coupling Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shishtawy, Reda M.; Berrada, K.; Haddon, Robert C.; Al-Hadeethi, Yas F.; Al-Heniti, Saleh H.; Raffah, Bahaaudin M.

    2017-02-01

    The presence of coherence phenomenon due to the interference of probability amplitude terms, is one of the most important features of quantum mechanics theory. Recent experiments show the presence of quantum processes whose coherence provided over suddenly large interval-time. In particular, photosynthetic mechanisms in light-harvesting complexes provide oscillatory behaviors in quantum mechanics due to quantum coherence. In this work, we investigate the coherent quantum transfer energy for a single-excitation and nonlocal correlation in a dimer system modelled by a two-level atom system with and without time-dependent coupling effect. We analyze and explore the required conditions that are feasible with real experimental realization for optimal transfer of quantum energy and generation of nonlocal quantum correlation. We show that the enhancement of the probability for a single-excitation transfer energy is greatly benefits from the combination of the energy detuning and time-dependent coupling effect. We investigate the presence of quantum correlations in the dimer using the entanglement of formation. We also find that the entanglement between the donor and acceptor is very sensitive to the physical parameters and it can be generated during the coherent energy transfer. On the other hand, we study the dynamical behavior of the quantum variance when performing a measurement on an observable of the density matrix operator. Finally, an interesting relationship between the transfer probability, entanglement and quantum variance is explored during the time evolution in terms of the physical parameters.

  6. Ignition delay time correlation of fuel blends based on Livengood-Wu description

    KAUST Repository

    Khaled, Fathi

    2017-08-17

    In this work, a universal methodology for ignition delay time (IDT) correlation of multicomponent fuel mixtures is reported. The method is applicable over wide ranges of temperatures, pressures, and equivalence ratios. n-Heptane, iso-octane, toluene, ethanol and their blends are investigated in this study because of their relevance to gasoline surrogate formulation. The proposed methodology combines benefits from the Livengood-Wu integral, the cool flame characteristics and the Arrhenius behavior of the high-temperature ignition delay time to suggest a simple and comprehensive formulation for correlating the ignition delay times of pure components and blends. The IDTs of fuel blends usually have complex dependences on temperature, pressure, equivalence ratio and composition of the blend. The Livengood-Wu integral is applied here to relate the NTC region and the cool flame phenomenon. The integral is further extended to obtain a relation between the IDTs of fuel blends and pure components. Ignition delay times calculated using the proposed methodology are in excellent agreement with those simulated using a detailed chemical kinetic model for n-heptane, iso-octane, toluene, ethanol and blends of these components. Finally, very good agreement is also observed for combustion phasing in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) predictions between simulations performed with detailed chemistry and calculations using the developed ignition delay correlation.

  7. Depth imaging in highly scattering underwater environments using time-correlated single-photon counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccarone, Aurora; McCarthy, Aongus; Halimi, Abderrahim; Tobin, Rachael; Wallace, Andy M.; Petillot, Yvan; McLaughlin, Steve; Buller, Gerald S.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents an optical depth imaging system optimized for highly scattering environments such as underwater. The system is based on the time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) technique and the time-of-flight approach. Laboratory-based measurements demonstrate the potential of underwater depth imaging, with specific attention given to environments with a high level of scattering. The optical system comprised a monostatic transceiver unit, a fiber-coupled supercontinuum laser source with a wavelength tunable acousto-optic filter (AOTF), and a fiber-coupled single-element silicon single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) detector. In the optical system, the transmit and receive channels in the transceiver unit were overlapped in a coaxial optical configuration. The targets were placed in a 1.75 meter long tank, and raster scanned using two galvo-mirrors. Laboratory-based experiments demonstrate depth profiling performed with up to nine attenuation lengths between the transceiver and target. All of the measurements were taken with an average laser power of less than 1mW. Initially, the data was processed using a straightforward pixel-wise cross-correlation of the return timing signal with the system instrumental timing response. More advanced algorithms were then used to process these cross-correlation results. These results illustrate the potential for the reconstruction of images in highly scattering environments, and to permit the investigation of much shorter acquisition time scans. These algorithms take advantage of the data sparseness under the Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) and the correlation between adjacent pixels, to restore the depth and reflectivity images.

  8. Lyapunov Exponent and Out-of-Time-Ordered Correlator's Growth Rate in a Chaotic System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenbaum, Efim B; Ganeshan, Sriram; Galitski, Victor

    2017-02-24

    It was proposed recently that the out-of-time-ordered four-point correlator (OTOC) may serve as a useful characteristic of quantum-chaotic behavior, because, in the semiclassical limit ℏ→0, its rate of exponential growth resembles the classical Lyapunov exponent. Here, we calculate the four-point correlator C(t) for the classical and quantum kicked rotor-a textbook driven chaotic system-and compare its growth rate at initial times with the standard definition of the classical Lyapunov exponent. Using both quantum and classical arguments, we show that the OTOC's growth rate and the Lyapunov exponent are, in general, distinct quantities, corresponding to the logarithm of the phase-space averaged divergence rate of classical trajectories and to the phase-space average of the logarithm, respectively. The difference appears to be more pronounced in the regime of low kicking strength K, where no classical chaos exists globally. In this case, the Lyapunov exponent quickly decreases as K→0, while the OTOC's growth rate may decrease much slower, showing a higher sensitivity to small chaotic islands in the phase space. We also show that the quantum correlator as a function of time exhibits a clear singularity at the Ehrenfest time t_{E}: transitioning from a time-independent value of t^{-1}lnC(t) at tt_{E}. We note that the underlying physics here is the same as in the theory of weak (dynamical) localization [Aleiner and Larkin, Phys. Rev. B 54, 14423 (1996)PRBMDO0163-182910.1103/PhysRevB.54.14423; Tian, Kamenev, and Larkin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 124101 (2004)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.93.124101] and is due to a delay in the onset of quantum interference effects, which occur sharply at a time of the order of the Ehrenfest time.

  9. Lyapunov Exponent and Out-of-Time-Ordered Correlator's Growth Rate in a Chaotic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenbaum, Efim B.; Ganeshan, Sriram; Galitski, Victor

    2017-02-01

    It was proposed recently that the out-of-time-ordered four-point correlator (OTOC) may serve as a useful characteristic of quantum-chaotic behavior, because, in the semiclassical limit ℏ→0 , its rate of exponential growth resembles the classical Lyapunov exponent. Here, we calculate the four-point correlator C (t ) for the classical and quantum kicked rotor—a textbook driven chaotic system—and compare its growth rate at initial times with the standard definition of the classical Lyapunov exponent. Using both quantum and classical arguments, we show that the OTOC's growth rate and the Lyapunov exponent are, in general, distinct quantities, corresponding to the logarithm of the phase-space averaged divergence rate of classical trajectories and to the phase-space average of the logarithm, respectively. The difference appears to be more pronounced in the regime of low kicking strength K , where no classical chaos exists globally. In this case, the Lyapunov exponent quickly decreases as K →0 , while the OTOC's growth rate may decrease much slower, showing a higher sensitivity to small chaotic islands in the phase space. We also show that the quantum correlator as a function of time exhibits a clear singularity at the Ehrenfest time tE: transitioning from a time-independent value of t-1ln C (t ) at t tE. We note that the underlying physics here is the same as in the theory of weak (dynamical) localization [Aleiner and Larkin, Phys. Rev. B 54, 14423 (1996), 10.1103/PhysRevB.54.14423; Tian, Kamenev, and Larkin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 124101 (2004), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.93.124101] and is due to a delay in the onset of quantum interference effects, which occur sharply at a time of the order of the Ehrenfest time.

  10. Dynamics in molecular and molecular-ionic crystals: a combined experimental and molecular simulation study of reorientational motions in benzene, pyridinium iodide, and pyridinium nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajzderska, A; Gonzalez, M A; Wąsicki, J

    2013-01-14

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for crystalline benzene (C(6)H(6)), pyridinium iodide [C(5)NH(6)](+)I(-), and pyridinium nitrate [C(5)NH(6)](+)NO(3)(-) have been performed as a function of temperature and pressure. Despite the similar shape of the benzene molecule and the pyridinium cation, the experimental and simulated data have showed clear differences in their dynamics. Therefore, the rotational dynamics have been explored in detail by comparing thoroughly the existing experimental results together with new quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) data obtained for (PyH)NO(3) and molecular dynamics simulations. The correlation times, activation energy, geometry of motion of benzene molecule and pyridinium cation, isothermal compressibility, and activation volume obtained from the simulations are compared with the experimental results obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance and QENS methods. MD simulations have also revealed that reorientation of the pyridinium cation in pyridinium nitrate between two inequivalent positions is strongly affected by the hydrogen bond N-H···O between the cation and the anion and the influence of temperature on strength of the hydrogen bond is much more important than that of the pressure.

  11. Magnetic dynamo action in random flows with zero and finite correlation times

    CERN Document Server

    Mason, Joanne; Boldyrev, Stanislav; Cattaneo, Fausto

    2011-01-01

    Hydromagnetic dynamo theory provides the prevailing theoretical description for the origin of magnetic fields in the universe. Here we consider the problem of kinematic, small-scale dynamo action driven by a random, incompressible, non-helical, homogeneous and isotropic flow. In the Kazantsev dynamo model the statistics of the driving flow are assumed to be instantaneously correlated in time. Here we compare the results of the model with the dynamo properties of a simulated flow that has equivalent spatial characteristics as the Kazantsev flow but different temporal statistics. In particular, the simulated flow is a solution of the forced Navier-Stokes equations and hence has a finite correlation time. We find that the Kazantsev model typically predicts a larger magnetic growth rate and a magnetic spectrum that peaks at smaller scales. However, we show that by filtering the diffusivity spectrum at small scales it is possible to bring the growth rates into agreement and simultaneously align the magnetic spectr...

  12. Microscopic model of quantum butterfly effect: out-of-time-order correlators and traveling combustion waves

    CERN Document Server

    Aleiner, Igor L; Ioffe, Lev B

    2016-01-01

    We extend the Keldysh technique to enable the computation of out-of-time order correlators. We show that the behavior of these correlators is described by equations that display initially an exponential instability which is followed by a linear propagation of the decoherence between two initially identically copies of the quantum many body systems with interactions. At large times the decoherence propagation (quantum butterfly effect) is described by a diffusion equation with non-linear dissipation known in the theory of combustion waves. The solution of this equation is a propagating non-linear wave moving with constant velocity despite the diffusive character of the underlying dynamics. Our general conclusions are illustrated by the detailed computations for the specific models describing the electrons interacting with bosonic degrees of freedom (phonons, two-level-systems etc.) or with each other.

  13. Determination of protein rotational correlation time from NMR relaxation data at various solvent viscosities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korchuganov, Denis S.; Gagnidze, Ivan E.; Tkach, Elena N.; Schulga, Alexey A.; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P.; Arseniev, Alexander S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shemyakin-Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (Russian Federation)], E-mail: aars@nmr.ru

    2004-12-15

    An accurate determination of the overall rotation of a protein plays a crucial role in the investigation of its internal motions by NMR. In the present work, an innovative approach to the determination of the protein rotational correlation time {tau}{sub R} from the heteronuclear relaxation data is proposed. The approach is based on a joint fit of relaxation data acquired at several viscosities of a protein solution. The method has been tested on computer simulated relaxation data as compared to the traditional {tau}{sub R} determination method from T{sub 1}/T{sub 2} ratio. The approach has been applied to ribonuclease barnase from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens dissolved in an aqueous solution and deuterated glycerol as a viscous component. The resulting rotational correlation time of 5.56 {+-} 0.01 ns and other rotational diffusion tensor parameters are in good agreement with those determined from T{sub 1}/T{sub 2} ratio.

  14. Estimating time-correlation functions by sampling and unbiasing dynamically activated events

    CERN Document Server

    Athènes, Manuel; Jourdan, Thomas; 10.1063/1.4766458

    2012-01-01

    Transition path sampling is a rare-event method that estimates state-to-state timecorrelation functions in many-body systems from samples of short trajectories. In this framework, it is proposed to bias the importance function using the lowest Jacobian eigenvalue moduli along the dynamical trajectory. A lowest eigenvalue modulus is related to the lowest eigenvalue of the Hessian matrix and is evaluated here using the Lanczos algorithm as in activation-relaxation techniques. This results in favoring the sampling of activated trajectories and enhancing the occurrence of the rare reactive trajectories of interest, those corresponding to transitions between locally stable states. Estimating the time-correlation functions involves unbiasing the sample of simulated trajectories which is done using the multi-state Bennett acceptance ratio (MBAR) method. To assess the performance of our procedure, we compute the time-correlation function associated with the migration of a vacancy in {\\alpha}-iron. The derivative of t...

  15. Statistical Analysis for Long Term Correlations in the Stress Time Series of Jerky Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Kugiumtzis, D; Kugiumtzis, Dimitris; Aifantis, Elias C.

    2004-01-01

    Stress time series from the PLC effect typically exhibit stick-slips of upload and download type. These data contain strong short-term correlations of a nonlinear type. We investigate whether there are also long term correlations, i.e. the successive up-down patterns are generated by a deterministic mechanism. A statistical test is conducted for the null hypothesis that the sequence of the up-down patterns is totally random. The test is constructed by means of surrogate data, suitably generated to represent the null hypothesis. Linear and nonlinear estimates are used as test statistics, namely autocorrelation, mutual information and Lyapunov exponents, which are found to have proper performance for the test. The test is then applied to three stress time series under different experimental conditions. Rejections are obtained for one of them and not with all statistics. From the overall results we cannot conclude that the underlying mechanism to the PLC effect has long memory.

  16. Coincidence detection of spatially correlated photon pairs with a monolithic time-resolving detector array

    CERN Document Server

    Unternährer, Manuel; Gasparini, Leonardo; Stoppa, David; Stefanov, André

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate coincidence measurements of spatially entangled photons by means of a novel type of multi-pixel based detection array. The adopted sensor is a fully digital 8$\\times$16 silicon photomultiplier array allowing not only photon counting but also per-pixel time stamping of the arrived photons with a resolution of 65 ps. Together with a frame rate of 500 kfps, this property exceeds the capabilities of conventional charge-coupled device cameras which have become of growing interest for the detection of transversely correlated photon pairs. The sensor is used to measure a second-order correlation function for various non-collinear configurations of entangled photons generated by spontaneous parametric down-conversion. The experimental results are compared to theory.

  17. Structural changes induced spin-reorientation of ultrathin Mn films grown on Ag(001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouarab, N., E-mail: ouarab_nourdine@yahoo.fr [Quantum Physics and Dynamical Systems Laboratory, Ferhat Abbas University of Sétif (Algeria); Semiconductor Technology Research Center for Energetic-(CRTSE), 02, Bd Frantz Fanon Algiers, BP N° 140 (Algeria); Haroun, A. [Quantum Physics and Dynamical Systems Laboratory, Ferhat Abbas University of Sétif (Algeria); Baadji, N. [School of Physics and CRANN, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2016-12-01

    The strained body centered tetragonal (bct) Mn ultrathin film from lattice parameter a=2.89 Å to lattice value of 2.73 Å induces anti-ferromagnetic behavior between Mn layers. The magnetic easy axis of Mn film was demonstrated theoretically to switch from the in-plane to out-of-plane by magneto-optical Kerr effect investigation. By including spin–orbit coupling in full potential linearized augmented plane waves and linearized muffin-tin orbitals methods, manganese ultrathin film displays different magnetic behaviors and the spin-reorientation transition is shown to be correlated to these structural changes. The calculated magnetic moment of manganese planes are enhanced and reach a value of ~4.02 μ{sub B}. The polar magneto-optical Kerr effect is calculated for a photon energy range extended to 15 eV. It shows a pronounced peak in visible light. - Highlights: • The applied strain in Mn-bct structure induces anti-ferromagnetic behavior. • The easy magnetization axis is demonstrated to be out-of-plane. • The magnetic moment of Mn-layers are enhanced and reach a value of ~4.02 μ{sub B}. • Kerr spectra show significant polar responses for Mn films in the visible range. • The prominent structures in the Kerr spectra have been identified.

  18. Low temperature spin reorientation in dysprosium iron garnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahoubi, M; Younsi, W; Soltani, M L [Department of Physics, Badji-Mokhtar University, BP-12 Annaba, 23000 (Algeria); Voiron, J; Schmitt, D, E-mail: mlahoubi@gmail.co [Louis Neel Laboratory, CNRS-UJF, BP-166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2009-03-01

    The spin reorientation (SR) phase transition in dysprosium iron garnet (Dy{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} or DyIG) have been studied by specific heat C{sub p}(T) and high field magnetisation measurements M{sub T}(H) and M{sub H}(T) on single crystals at low temperature. A first order SR is observed with a sharp jump at T{sub SR} = 14.5+-0.5 K in the C{sub p}(T) curve which corresponds to a spontaneous change from the high temperature (HT) easy direction (111) to an (uuw) angular low temperature (LT) phases. Above T{sub SR}, the magnetic structure is described by the irreducible representation (IR) A{sub 2g} of the rhombohedral space group R 3 c. Below T{sub SR}, the magnetic structure changes in the monoclinic the space group C2/c with the IR A{sub g}. When the field H is kept aligned along the hard symmetry directions (100) and (110), we obtain respectively the variation of the angular positions theta(T) and theta'(T) from the total spontaneous magnetisation down to 1.5 K (theta = 39.23 deg. and theta' = 30.14 deg.) and the results are in good agreement with the previous observations in low fields. When the sample is allowed to rotate freely on itself, the critical field H{sub c}(T) between the HT(111) and the LT(uuw) angular phases permits us to precise the transition line up to 15 T and 40 K between the so called canted field induced (FI) and the associated collinear magnetic phases. The experimental magnetic phase diagram (MPD) is precisely determined in the (H{sub c}-T) plane and the domains of the existence and the stability of the two magnetic phases are specified.

  19. Time Series Analysis on Stock Market for Text Mining Correlation of Economy News

    OpenAIRE

    Seker, Sadi Evren; MERT, Cihan; Al-Naami, Khaled; Ozalp, Nuri; Ayan, Ugur

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes an information retrieval method for the economy news. The effect of economy news, are researched in the word level and stock market values are considered as the ground proof. The correlation between stock market prices and economy news is an already addressed problem for most of the countries. The most well-known approach is applying the text mining approaches to the news and some time series analysis techniques over stock market closing values in order to apply classifica...

  20. Asymptotic distributions and subsampling in spectral analysis for almost periodically correlated time series

    CERN Document Server

    Lenart, Łukasz

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is to establish asymptotic distributions and consistency of subsampling for spectral density and for magnitude of coherence for non-stationary, almost periodically correlated time series. We show the asymptotic normality of the spectral density estimator and the limiting distribution of a magnitude of coherence statistic for all points from the bifrequency square. The theoretical results hold under $\\alpha$-mixing and moment conditions.

  1. Time correlation measurements from extensive air showers detected by the EEE telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Abbrescia, M; Fabbri, F L; Gnesi, I; Bressan, E; Tosello, F; Librizzi, F; Coccia, E; Paoletti, R; Yanez, G; Li, S; Votano, L; Scribano, A; Avanzini, C; Piragino, G; Perasso, L; Regano, A; Ferroli, R Baldini; De Gruttola, D; Sartorelli, G; Siddi, E; Cifarelli, L; Di Giovanni, A; Frolov, V; Serci, S; Selvi, M; Zouyevski, R; Dreucci, M; Squarcia, S; Righini, G C; Agocs, A; Zichichi, A; La Rocca, P; Pilo, F; Miozzi, S; Massai, M; Cicalo, C; D'Incecco, M; Panareo, M; Gemme, G; Garbini, M; Aiola, S; Riggi, F; Hatzifotiadou, D; Scapparone, E; Chiavassa, A; Maggiora, A; Bencivenni, G; Gustavino, C; Spandre, G; Taiuti, M; Williams, M C S; Bossini, E; De Pasquale, S

    2013-01-01

    Time correlated events due to cosmic muons from extensive air showers have been detected by means of telescope pairs of the EEE (Extreme Energy Events) Project array. The coincidence rate, properly normalized for detector acceptance, efficiency and altitude location, has been extracted as a function of the relative distance between the telescopes. The results have been also compared with additional measurements carried out by small scintillator detectors at various distances.

  2. Time correlation measurements from extensive air showers detected by the EEE telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbrescia, M.; Agocs, A.; Aiola, S.; Antolini, R.; Avanzini, C.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Bencivenni, G.; Bossini, E.; Bressan, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cicalò, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Coccia, E.; De Gruttola, D.; De Pasquale, S.; Di Giovanni, A.; D'Incecco, M.; Dreucci, M.; Fabbri, F. L.; Frolov, V.; Garbini, M.; Gemme, G.; Gnesi, I.; Gustavino, C.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; La Rocca, P.; Li, S.; Librizzi, F.; Maggiora, A.; Massai, M.; Miozzi, S.; Panareo, M.; Paoletti, R.; Perasso, L.; Pilo, F.; Piragino, G.; Regano, A.; Riggi, F.; Righini, G. C.; Sartorelli, G.; Scapparone, E.; Scribano, A.; Selvi, M.; Serci, S.; Siddi, E.; Spandre, G.; Squarcia, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tosello, F.; Votano, L.; Williams, M. C. S.; Yanez, G.; Zichichi, A.; Zouyevski, R.

    2013-12-01

    Time correlated events due to cosmic muons from extensive air showers have been detected by means of telescope pairs of the EEE (Extreme Energy Events) Project array. The coincidence rate, properly normalized for detector acceptance, efficiency and altitude location, has been extracted as a function of the relative distance between the telescopes. The results have been also compared with additional measurements carried out by small scintillator detectors at various distances.

  3. Detecting correlation functions of ultracold atoms through fourier sampling of time-of-flight images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, L-M

    2006-03-17

    We propose a detection method for ultracold atoms which allows reconstruction of the full one-particle and two-particle correlation functions from the measurements. The method is based on Fourier sampling of the time-of-flight images through two consecutive impulsive Raman pulses. For applications of this method, we discuss a few examples, including detection of phase separation between superfluid and Mott insulators, various types of spin or superfluid orders, entanglement, exotic or fluctuating orders.

  4. Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) Used for Space-Time Correlations in Nozzle Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Bridges, James E.

    2003-01-01

    An optical measurement technique known as Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) was used previously to characterize the first- and second-order statistical properties of both cold and hot jet flows from externally mixed nozzles in NASA Glenn Research Center's Nozzle Acoustic Test Rig. In this technique, an electronic camera records particles entrained in a flow as a laser light sheet is pulsed at two instances in time. Correlation processing of the recorded particle image pairs yields the two-component velocity field across the imaged plane of the flow. The information acquired using DPIV is being used to improve our understanding of the decay of turbulence in jet flows-a critical element for understanding the acoustic properties of the flow. Recently, two independent DPIV systems were installed in Glenn's Small Hot Jet Acoustic Rig, enabling multiplane correlations in time and space. The data were collected over a range of different Mach numbers and temperature ratios. DPIV system 1 was fixed to a large traverse rig, and DPIV system 2 was mounted on a small traverse system mounted on the large traverse frame. The light sheets from the two DPIV systems were aligned to lie in the same axial plane, with DPIV system 2 being independently traversed downstream along the flow direction. For each measurement condition, the DPIV systems were started at a fully overlapping orientation. A polarization separation technique was used to avoid cross-talk between the two systems. Then, the DPIV systems fields were shifted axially apart, in successively increasing steps. The downstream DPIV system 2 was triggered at a short time delay after the upstream DPIV system 1, where the time delay was proportional to the convective flow velocity in the shear layer of the jet flow and the axial separation of the two DPIV systems. The acquired data were processed to obtain the instantaneous velocity vector maps over a range of time delays and spatial separations. The velocity fields from

  5. Linearized semiclassical initial value time correlation functions with maximum entropy analytic continuation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jian; Miller, William H.

    2008-08-01

    The maximum entropy analytic continuation (MEAC) method is used to extend the range of accuracy of the linearized semiclassical initial value representation (LSC-IVR)/classical Wigner approximation for real time correlation functions. The LSC-IVR provides a very effective 'prior' for the MEAC procedure since it is very good for short times, exact for all time and temperature for harmonic potentials (even for correlation functions of nonlinear operators), and becomes exact in the classical high temperature limit. This combined MEAC+LSC/IVR approach is applied here to two highly nonlinear dynamical systems, a pure quartic potential in one dimensional and liquid para-hydrogen at two thermal state points (25K and 14K under nearly zero external pressure). The former example shows the MEAC procedure to be a very significant enhancement of the LSC-IVR, for correlation functions of both linear and nonlinear operators, and especially at low temperature where semiclassical approximations are least accurate. For liquid para-hydrogen, the LSC-IVR is seen already to be excellent at T = 25K, but the MEAC procedure produces a significant correction at the lower temperature (T = 14K). Comparisons are also made to how the MEAC procedure is able to provide corrections for other trajectory-based dynamical approximations when used as priors.

  6. Nonlinear stochastic exclusion financial dynamics modeling and time-dependent intrinsic detrended cross-correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Wang, Jun

    2017-09-01

    In attempt to reproduce price dynamics of financial markets, a stochastic agent-based financial price model is proposed and investigated by stochastic exclusion process. The exclusion process, one of interacting particle systems, is usually thought of as modeling particle motion (with the conserved number of particles) in a continuous time Markov process. In this work, the process is utilized to imitate the trading interactions among the investing agents, in order to explain some stylized facts found in financial time series dynamics. To better understand the correlation behaviors of the proposed model, a new time-dependent intrinsic detrended cross-correlation (TDI-DCC) is introduced and performed, also, the autocorrelation analyses are applied in the empirical research. Furthermore, to verify the rationality of the financial price model, the actual return series are also considered to be comparatively studied with the simulation ones. The comparison results of return behaviors reveal that this financial price dynamics model can reproduce some correlation features of actual stock markets.

  7. A time correlation function theory describing static field enhanced third order optical effects at interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neipert, Christine; Space, Brian

    2006-12-14

    Sum vibrational frequency spectroscopy, a second order optical process, is interface specific in the dipole approximation. At charged interfaces, there exists a static field, and as a direct consequence, the experimentally detected signal is a combination of enhanced second and static field induced third order contributions. There is significant evidence in the literature of the importance/relative magnitude of this third order contribution, but no previous molecularly detailed approach existed to separately calculate the second and third order contributions. Thus, for the first time, a molecularly detailed time correlation function theory is derived here that allows for the second and third order contributions to sum frequency vibrational spectra to be individually determined. Further, a practical, molecular dynamics based, implementation procedure for the derived correlation functions that describe the third order phenomenon is also presented. This approach includes a novel generalization of point atomic polarizability models to calculate the hyperpolarizability of a molecular system. The full system hyperpolarizability appears in the time correlation functions responsible for third order contributions in the presence of a static field.

  8. Minimum spanning tree filtering of correlations for varying time scales and size of fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwapień, Jarosław; Oświecimka, Paweł; Forczek, Marcin; DroŻdŻ, Stanisław

    2017-05-01

    Based on a recently proposed q -dependent detrended cross-correlation coefficient, ρq [J. Kwapień, P. Oświęcimka, and S. Drożdż, Phys. Rev. E 92, 052815 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevE.92.052815], we generalize the concept of the minimum spanning tree (MST) by introducing a family of q -dependent minimum spanning trees (q MST s ) that are selective to cross-correlations between different fluctuation amplitudes and different time scales of multivariate data. They inherit this ability directly from the coefficients ρq, which are processed here to construct a distance matrix being the input to the MST-constructing Kruskal's algorithm. The conventional MST with detrending corresponds in this context to q =2 . In order to illustrate their performance, we apply the q MSTs to sample empirical data from the American stock market and discuss the results. We show that the q MST graphs can complement ρq in disentangling "hidden" correlations that cannot be observed in the MST graphs based on ρDCCA, and therefore, they can be useful in many areas where the multivariate cross-correlations are of interest. As an example, we apply this method to empirical data from the stock market and show that by constructing the q MSTs for a spectrum of q values we obtain more information about the correlation structure of the data than by using q =2 only. More specifically, we show that two sets of signals that differ from each other statistically can give comparable trees for q =2 , while only by using the trees for q ≠2 do we become able to distinguish between these sets. We also show that a family of q MSTs for a range of q expresses the diversity of correlations in a manner resembling the multifractal analysis, where one computes a spectrum of the generalized fractal dimensions, the generalized Hurst exponents, or the multifractal singularity spectra: the more diverse the correlations are, the more variable the tree topology is for different q 's. As regards the correlation structure

  9. Prediction of altimetric sea level anomalies using time series models based on spatial correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miziński, Bartłomiej; Niedzielski, Tomasz

    2014-05-01

    Sea level anomaly (SLA) times series, which are time-varying gridded data, can be modelled and predicted using time series methods. This approach has been shown to provide accurate forecasts within the Prognocean system, the novel infrastructure for anticipating sea level change designed and built at the University of Wrocław (Poland) which utilizes the real-time SLA data from Archiving, Validation and Interpretation of Satellite Oceanographic data (AVISO). The system runs a few models concurrently, and our ocean prediction experiment includes both uni- and multivariate time series methods. The univariate ones are: extrapolation of polynomial-harmonic model (PH), extrapolation of polynomial-harmonic model and autoregressive prediction (PH+AR), extrapolation of polynomial-harmonic model and self-exciting threshold autoregressive prediction (PH+SETAR). The following multivariate methods are used: extrapolation of polynomial-harmonic model and vector autoregressive prediction (PH+VAR), extrapolation of polynomial-harmonic model and generalized space-time autoregressive prediction (PH+GSTAR). As the aforementioned models and the corresponding forecasts are computed in real time, hence independently and in the same computational setting, we are allowed to compare the accuracies offered by the models. The objective of this work is to verify the hypothesis that the multivariate prediction techniques, which make use of cross-correlation and spatial correlation, perform better than the univariate ones. The analysis is based on the daily-fitted and updated time series models predicting the SLA data (lead time of two weeks) over several months when El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) was in its neutral state.

  10. Correlations of the Time Dependent Signal and the State of a Continuously Monitored Quantum System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroozani, N.; Naghiloo, M.; Tan, D.; Mølmer, K.; Murch, K. W.

    2016-03-01

    In quantum physics, measurements give random results and yield a corresponding random backaction on the state of the system subject to measurement. If a quantum system is probed continuously over time, its state evolves along a stochastic quantum trajectory. To investigate the characteristic properties of such dynamics, we perform weak continuous measurements on a superconducting qubit that is driven to undergo Rabi oscillations. From the data we observe a number of striking temporal correlations within the time dependent signals and the quantum trajectories of the qubit, and we discuss their explanation in terms of quantum measurement and photodetection theory.

  11. Time Reversal Mirrors and Cross Correlation Functions in Acoustic Wave Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Louis; Jonsson, B. Lars G.; de Hoop, Maarten V.

    2009-03-01

    In time reversal acoustics (TRA), a signal is recorded by an array of transducers, time reversed, and then retransmitted into the configuration. The retransmitted signal propagates back through the same medium and retrofocuses on the source that generated the signal. If the transducer array is a single, planar (flat) surface, then this configuration is referred to as a planar, one-sided, time reversal mirror (TRM). In signal processing, for example, in active-source seismic interferometry, the measurement of the wave field at two distinct receivers, generated by a common source, is considered. Cross correlating these two observations and integrating the result over the sources yield the cross correlation function (CCF). Adopting the TRM experiments as the basic starting point and identifying the kinematically correct correspondences, it is established that the associated CCF signal processing constructions follow in a specific, infinite recording time limit. This perspective also provides for a natural rationale for selecting the Green's function components in the TRM and CCF expressions. For a planar, one-sided, TRM experiment and the corresponding CCF signal processing construction, in a three-dimensional homogeneous medium, the exact expressions are explicitly calculated, and the connecting limiting relationship verified. Finally, the TRM and CCF results are understood in terms of the underlying, governing, two-way wave equation, its corresponding time reversal invariance (TRI) symmetry, and the absence of TRI symmetry in the associated one-way wave equations, highlighting the role played by the evanescent modal contributions.

  12. Pipeline Implementation of Real Time Event Cross Correlation for Nuclear Treaty Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junek, W. N.; Wehlen, J. A., III

    2014-12-01

    The United States National Data Center (US NDC) is responsible for monitoring international compliance to nuclear test ban treaties. This mission is performed through real time acquisition, processing, and evaluation of data acquired by a global network of seismic, hydroacoustic, and infrasonic sensors. Automatic and human reviewed event solutions are stored in a data warehouse which contains over 15 years of alphanumeric information and waveform data. A significant effort is underway to employ the data warehouse in real time processing to improve the quality of automatic event solutions, reduce analyst burden, and supply decision makers with information regarding relevant historic events. To this end, the US NDC processing pipeline has been modified to automatically recognize events built in the past. Event similarity information and the most relevant historic solution are passed to the human analyst to assist their evaluation of automatically formed events. This is achieved through real time cross correlation of selected seismograms from automatically formed events against those stored in the data warehouse. Historic events used in correlation analysis are selected based on a set of user defined parameters, which are tuned to maintain pipeline timeliness requirements. Software architecture and database infrastructure were modified using a multithreaded design for increased processing speed, database connection pools for parallel queries, and Oracle spatial indexing to enhance query efficiency. This functionality allows the human analyst to spend more time studying anomalous events and less time rebuilding routine events.

  13. Clustering and correlates of screen-time and eating behaviours among young adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Natalie; Griffiths, Paula; Biddle, Stuart Jh; Johnston, Julie P; McGeorge, Sonia; Haycraft, Emma

    2017-05-31

    Screen-time and eating behaviours are associated in adolescents, but few studies have examined the clustering of these health behaviours in this age group. The identification of clustered health behaviours, and influences on adolescents' clustered health behaviours, at the time when they are most likely to become habitual, is important for intervention design. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence and clustering of health behaviours in adolescents, and examine the sociodemographic, individual, behavioural, and home social and physical environmental correlates of clustered health behaviours. Adolescents aged 11-12 years (n = 527, 48% boys) completed a questionnaire during class-time which assessed screen-time (ST), fruit and vegetable (FV), and energy-dense (ED) snack consumption using a Food Frequency Questionnaire. Health behaviours were categorised into high and low frequencies based on recommendations for FV and ST and median splits for ED snacks. Adolescents reported on their habits, self-efficacy, eating at the television (TV), eating and watching TV together with parents, restrictive parenting practices, and the availability and accessibility of foods within the home. Behavioural clustering was assessed using an observed over expected ratio (O/E). Correlates of clustered behaviours were examined using multivariate multinomial logistic regression. Approximately 70% reported having two or three health risk behaviours. Overall, O/E ratios were close to 1, which indicates clustering. The three risk behaviour combination of low FV, high ED, and high ST occurred more frequently than expected (O/E ratio = 1.06 95% CI 1.01, 1.15. Individual, behavioural, and social and physical home environmental correlates were differentially associated with behavioural clusters. Correlates consistently associated with clusters included eating ED snacks while watching TV, eating at the TV with parents, and the availability and accessibility of ED snack foods

  14. Precursory signatures of protein folding/unfolding: From time series correlation analysis to atomistic mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, P. J.; Lai, S. K., E-mail: sklai@coll.phy.ncu.edu.tw [Complex Liquids Laboratory, Department of Physics, National Central University, Chungli 320 Taiwan (China); Molecular Science and Technology Program, Taiwan International Graduate Program, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Cheong, S. A. [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 21 Nanyang Link, Singapore 637371 (Singapore)

    2014-05-28

    Folded conformations of proteins in thermodynamically stable states have long lifetimes. Before it folds into a stable conformation, or after unfolding from a stable conformation, the protein will generally stray from one random conformation to another leading thus to rapid fluctuations. Brief structural changes therefore occur before folding and unfolding events. These short-lived movements are easily overlooked in studies of folding/unfolding for they represent momentary excursions of the protein to explore conformations in the neighborhood of the stable conformation. The present study looks for precursory signatures of protein folding/unfolding within these rapid fluctuations through a combination of three techniques: (1) ultrafast shape recognition, (2) time series segmentation, and (3) time series correlation analysis. The first procedure measures the differences between statistical distance distributions of atoms in different conformations by calculating shape similarity indices from molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. The second procedure is used to discover the times at which the protein makes transitions from one conformation to another. Finally, we employ the third technique to exploit spatial fingerprints of the stable conformations; this procedure is to map out the sequences of changes preceding the actual folding and unfolding events, since strongly correlated atoms in different conformations are different due to bond and steric constraints. The aforementioned high-frequency fluctuations are therefore characterized by distinct correlational and structural changes that are associated with rate-limiting precursors that translate into brief segments. Guided by these technical procedures, we choose a model system, a fragment of the protein transthyretin, for identifying in this system not only the precursory signatures of transitions associated with α helix and β hairpin, but also the important role played by weaker correlations in such protein

  15. Timing of first sex before marriage and its correlates: evidence from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhya, K G; Acharya, Rajib; Jejeebhoy, Shireen J; Ram, Usha

    2011-03-01

    While several studies have documented the extent of pre-marital sexual experience among young people in India, little work has been done to explore the factors that are correlated with the timing of pre-marital sexual initiation. This paper examines age at initiation of pre-marital sex, circumstances in which first sex was experienced, nature of first sexual experience and correlates of age at initiation of pre-marital sex. Life table estimates suggest that pre-marital sexual initiation occurred in adolescence for 1 in 20 young women and 1 in 10 young men. For the majority of these young people, their first sex was with an opposite-sex romantic partner. First sex, moreover, was unprotected for the majority and forced for sizeable proportion of young women. A number of individual, family-, peer- and community-level factors were correlated with age at first pre-marital sex. Moreover, considerable gender differences were apparent in the correlates of age at first pre-marital sex, with peer- and parent-level factors found more often to be significant for young women than men.

  16. Minimum spanning tree filtering of correlations for varying time scales and size of fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Kwapien, Jaroslaw; Forczek, Marcin; Drozdz, Stanislaw

    2016-01-01

    Based on a recently proposed $q$-dependent detrended cross-correlation coefficient $\\rho_q$ (J.~Kwapie\\'n, P.~O\\'swi\\k{e}cimka, S.~Dro\\.zd\\.z, Phys. Rev.~E 92, 052815 (2015)), we introduce a family of $q$-dependent minimum spanning trees ($q$MST) that are selective to cross-correlations between different fluctuation amplitudes and different time scales of multivariate data. They inherit this ability directly from the coefficients $\\rho_q$ that are processed here to construct a distance matrix being the input to the MST-constructing Kruskal's algorithm. In order to illustrate their performance, we apply the $q$MSTs to sample empirical data from the American stock market and discuss the results. We show that the $q$MST graphs can complement $\\rho_q$ in detection of "hidden" correlations that cannot be observed by the MST graphs based on $\\rho_{\\rm DCCA}$ and, therefore, they can be useful in many areas where the multivariate cross-correlations are of interest (e.g., in portfolio analysis).

  17. A generative spike train model with time-structured higher order correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James eTrousdale

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Emerging technologies are revealing the spiking activity in ever larger neural ensembles. Frequently, this spiking is far from independent, with correlations in the spike times of different cells. Understanding how such correlations impact the dynamics and function of neural ensembles remains an important open problem.Here we describe a new, generative model for correlated spike trains that can exhibit many of the features observed in data. Extending prior work in mathematical finance, this generalized thinning and shift (GTaS model creates marginally Poisson spike trains with diverse temporal correlation structures.We give several examples which highlight the model's flexibility and utility. For instance, we use it to examine how a neural network responds to highly structured patterns of inputs.We then show that the GTaS model is analytically tractable, and derive cumulant densities of all orders in terms of model parameters. The GTaS framework can therefore be an important tool in the experimental and theoretical exploration of neural dynamics.

  18. A non linear analysis of human gait time series based on multifractal analysis and cross correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz-Diosdado, A [Department of Mathematics, Unidad Profesional Interdisciplinaria de Biotecnologia, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Av. Acueducto s/n, 07340, Mexico City (Mexico)

    2005-01-01

    We analyzed databases with gait time series of adults and persons with Parkinson, Huntington and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) diseases. We obtained the staircase graphs of accumulated events that can be bounded by a straight line whose slope can be used to distinguish between gait time series from healthy and ill persons. The global Hurst exponent of these series do not show tendencies, we intend that this is because some gait time series have monofractal behavior and others have multifractal behavior so they cannot be characterized with a single Hurst exponent. We calculated the multifractal spectra, obtained the spectra width and found that the spectra of the healthy young persons are almost monofractal. The spectra of ill persons are wider than the spectra of healthy persons. In opposition to the interbeat time series where the pathology implies loss of multifractality, in the gait time series the multifractal behavior emerges with the pathology. Data were collected from healthy and ill subjects as they walked in a roughly circular path and they have sensors in both feet, so we have one time series for the left foot and other for the right foot. First, we analyzed these time series separately, and then we compared both results, with direct comparison and with a cross correlation analysis. We tried to find differences in both time series that can be used as indicators of equilibrium problems.

  19. Effects of Time Delay on the Bistable System Subjected to Correlated Noises

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIE Lin-Ru; Mei Dong-Cheng

    2007-01-01

    The time-delayed bistable system subjected to the multiplicative and additive noises is investigated. In the condition of small delay time, the stationary probability distribution function (SPDF) is derived, and under the condition of large delay time, the SPDF is stochastically simulated. The analytical and simulative results indicate that: (i) For the case of λ= 0λ denotes the strength of correlations between the multiplicative and additive noises), the time delay affects weakly the SPDF peak structure, and the symmetrical property of the SPDF two-peak structure does not change with the increasing delay time, (ii) For the case of λ≠0, the two-peak structure changes with the increasing delay time, i.e. one peak goes up and the other go down simultaneously as the delay time increases and along with further increase of the delay time, the lower peak disappears gradually while the higher one goes up, i.e. the structure of the SPDF changes from a bimodal to a unimodal and the system becomes monostable.

  20. Delay-correlation landscape reveals characteristic time delays of brain rhythms and heart interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Aijing; Liu, Kang K L; Bartsch, Ronny P; Ivanov, Plamen Ch

    2016-05-13

    Within the framework of 'Network Physiology', we ask a fundamental question of how modulations in cardiac dynamics emerge from networked brain-heart interactions. We propose a generalized time-delay approach to identify and quantify dynamical interactions between physiologically relevant brain rhythms and the heart rate. We perform empirical analysis of synchronized continuous EEG and ECG recordings from 34 healthy subjects during night-time sleep. For each pair of brain rhythm and heart interaction, we construct a delay-correlation landscape (DCL) that characterizes how individual brain rhythms are coupled to the heart rate, and how modulations in brain and cardiac dynamics are coordinated in time. We uncover characteristic time delays and an ensemble of specific profiles for the probability distribution of time delays that underly brain-heart interactions. These profiles are consistently observed in all subjects, indicating a universal pattern. Tracking the evolution of DCL across different sleep stages, we find that the ensemble of time-delay profiles changes from one physiologic state to another, indicating a strong association with physiologic state and function. The reported observations provide new insights on neurophysiological regulation of cardiac dynamics, with potential for broad clinical applications. The presented approach allows one to simultaneously capture key elements of dynamic interactions, including characteristic time delays and their time evolution, and can be applied to a range of coupled dynamical systems.

  1. Delay-correlation landscape reveals characteristic time delays of brain rhythms and heart interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Aijing; Liu, Kang K. L.; Bartsch, Ronny P.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2016-05-01

    Within the framework of `Network Physiology', we ask a fundamental question of how modulations in cardiac dynamics emerge from networked brain-heart interactions. We propose a generalized time-delay approach to identify and quantify dynamical interactions between physiologically relevant brain rhythms and the heart rate. We perform empirical analysis of synchronized continuous EEG and ECG recordings from 34 healthy subjects during night-time sleep. For each pair of brain rhythm and heart interaction, we construct a delay-correlation landscape (DCL) that characterizes how individual brain rhythms are coupled to the heart rate, and how modulations in brain and cardiac dynamics are coordinated in time. We uncover characteristic time delays and an ensemble of specific profiles for the probability distribution of time delays that underly brain-heart interactions. These profiles are consistently observed in all subjects, indicating a universal pattern. Tracking the evolution of DCL across different sleep stages, we find that the ensemble of time-delay profiles changes from one physiologic state to another, indicating a strong association with physiologic state and function. The reported observations provide new insights on neurophysiological regulation of cardiac dynamics, with potential for broad clinical applications. The presented approach allows one to simultaneously capture key elements of dynamic interactions, including characteristic time delays and their time evolution, and can be applied to a range of coupled dynamical systems.

  2. Kinetic theory of time correlation functions for a dense one-component plasma in a magnetic field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoolderman, A.J.; Suttorp, L.G.

    1988-01-01

    The time-dependent correlations of a one-component plasma in a uniform magnetic field are studied with the help of kinetic theory. The time correlation functions of the particle density, the momentum density, and the kinetic energy density are evaluated for large time intervals. In the collision-dom

  3. [Correlation between weekly working time and burnout syndrome among anesthesiologists of Maceió-AL].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Fabiano Timbó; Eloi, Raissa Jardelino; Dos Santos, Luciano Menezes; Leão, Bruna Acioly; Lima, Fernando José Camelo de; de Sousa-Rodrigues, Célio Fernando

    The current reports are insufficient to determine the causative agent, as well as to identify high risk profiles for BS, leaving a clear need for more studies to this end. This study aimed to evaluate the correlation between weekly workload and BS dimensions. An observational, descriptive, cross-sectional study performed with 43 anesthesiologists from Maceió-AL, with the application of Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) forms. Pearson's correlation coefficient r was used for the three dimensions and a 95% confidence interval for the prevalence of burnout syndrome and high scores in all three dimensions. Among the studied physicians, 51.16% were male and the average age was 49.82±12.05 years. For physicians who have been diagnosed with BS through the MBI, the average weekly working time 69.27±22.39hours. The high level of frequency in at least one of the three dimensions was found in 67.44% of physicians, with this percentage being considered diagnostic for burnout syndrome in this population. This study showed no correlation between the weekly working time and the BS dimensions in this population. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Correlation between weekly working time and burnout syndrome among anesthesiologists of Maceió-AL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Fabiano Timbó; Eloi, Raissa Jardelino; Santos, Luciano Menezes Dos; Leão, Bruna Acioly; Lima, Fernando José Camelo de; Sousa-Rodrigues, Célio Fernando de

    The current jobs are insufficient to determine the causative agent, as well as to identify characteristic high risk profiles for BS, leaving a clear need for more studies to this end. This study objective was to evaluate the correlation between weekly workload and BS dimensions. An observational, descriptive, cross-sectional study performed with 43 anesthesiologists from Maceió-AL, with the application of Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) forms. Pearson's correlation coefficient r was used for the three dimensions and a 95% confidence interval for the prevalence of burnout syndrome and high scores in all three dimensions. Among the studied physicians, 51.16% were male and the average age was 49.82±12.05 years. For physicians who have been diagnosed with BS through the MBI, the average weekly working time 69.27±22.39h. The high level of frequency in at least one of the three dimensions was found in 67.44% of physicians, with this percentage being considered diagnostic for burnout syndrome in this population. This study showed no correlation between the weekly working time and the BS dimensions in this population. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Approximate but accurate quantum dynamics from the Mori formalism. II. Equilibrium time correlation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya-Castillo, Andrés; Reichman, David R.

    2017-02-01

    The ability to efficiently and accurately calculate equilibrium time correlation functions of many-body condensed phase quantum systems is one of the outstanding problems in theoretical chemistry. The Nakajima-Zwanzig-Mori formalism coupled to the self-consistent solution of the memory kernel has recently proven to be highly successful for the computation of nonequilibrium dynamical averages. Here, we extend this formalism to treat symmetrized equilibrium time correlation functions for the spin-boson model. Following the first paper in this series [A. Montoya-Castillo and D. R. Reichman, J. Chem. Phys. 144, 184104 (2016)], we use a Dyson-type expansion of the projected propagator to obtain a self-consistent solution for the memory kernel that requires only the calculation of normally evolved auxiliary kernels. We employ the approximate mean-field Ehrenfest method to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach. Via comparison with numerically exact results for the correlation function Cz z(t ) =Re ⟨σz(0 ) σz(t ) ⟩ , we show that the current scheme affords remarkable boosts in accuracy and efficiency over bare Ehrenfest dynamics. We further explore the sensitivity of the resulting dynamics to the choice of kernel closures and the accuracy of the initial canonical density operator.

  6. Passive scalar mixing at finite correlation times and the Batchelor spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Aiyer, Aditya K; Bhat, Pallavi

    2015-01-01

    An elegant model for passive scalar mixing was given by Kraichnan (1968) assuming the velocity to be delta-correlated in time. For realistic random flows this assumption becomes invalid. We generalize the Kraichnan model to include the effects of a finite correlation time, $\\tau$, using renewing flows. The generalized evolution equation for the 3-D passive scalar spectrum $\\hat{M}(k,t)$ or its correlation function $M(r,t)$, gives the Kraichnan equation when $\\tau \\to 0$, and extends it to the next order in $\\tau$. It involves third and fourth order derivatives of $M$ or $\\hat{M}$ (in the high $k$ limit). For small-$\\tau$ (or small Strouhl number), it can be recast using the Landau-Lifshitz approach, to one with at most second derivatives of $\\hat{M}$. We present both a scaling solution to this equation neglecting diffusion and a more exact solution including diffusive effects. Interestingly, to leading order in $\\tau$, we show that the steady state 1-D passive scalar spectrum, preserves the Batchelor (1959) f...

  7. Approximate but accurate quantum dynamics from the Mori formalism. II. Equilibrium time correlation functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya-Castillo, Andrés; Reichman, David R

    2017-02-28

    The ability to efficiently and accurately calculate equilibrium time correlation functions of many-body condensed phase quantum systems is one of the outstanding problems in theoretical chemistry. The Nakajima-Zwanzig-Mori formalism coupled to the self-consistent solution of the memory kernel has recently proven to be highly successful for the computation of nonequilibrium dynamical averages. Here, we extend this formalism to treat symmetrized equilibrium time correlation functions for the spin-boson model. Following the first paper in this series [A. Montoya-Castillo and D. R. Reichman, J. Chem. Phys. 144, 184104 (2016)], we use a Dyson-type expansion of the projected propagator to obtain a self-consistent solution for the memory kernel that requires only the calculation of normally evolved auxiliary kernels. We employ the approximate mean-field Ehrenfest method to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach. Via comparison with numerically exact results for the correlation function Czz(t)=Re⟨σz(0)σz(t)⟩, we show that the current scheme affords remarkable boosts in accuracy and efficiency over bare Ehrenfest dynamics. We further explore the sensitivity of the resulting dynamics to the choice of kernel closures and the accuracy of the initial canonical density operator.

  8. Real-time finite-temperature correlators from AdS/CFT

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, Edwin; Wu, Chaolun; Arnold, Peter

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we use AdS/CFT ideas in conjunction with insights from finite temperature real-time field theory formalism to compute 3-point correlators of ${\\cal N}{=}4$ super Yang-Mills operators, in real time and at finite temperature. To this end, we propose that the gravity field action is integrated only over the right and left quadrants of the Penrose diagram of the Anti de Sitter-Schwarzschild background, with a relative sign between the two terms. For concreteness we consider the case of a scalar field in the black hole background. Using the scalar field Schwinger-Keldysh bulk-to-boundary propagators, we give the general expression of a 3-point real-time Green's correlator. We then note that this particular prescription amounts to adapting the finite-temperature analog of Veltman's circling rules to tree-level Witten diagrams, and comment on the retarded and Feynman scalar bulk-to-boundary propagators. We subject our prescription to several checks: KMS identities, the largest time equation and the zer...

  9. Cycling in São Paulo, Brazil (1997–2012: Correlates, time trends and health consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Hérick Sá

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to describe cyclists and cycling trips, and to explore correlates, time trends and health consequences of cycling in São Paulo, Brazil from 1997 to 2012. Cross-sectional analysis using repeated São Paulo Household Travel Surveys (HTS. At all time periods cycling was a minority travel mode in São Paulo (1174 people with cycling trips out of 214,719 people. Poisson regressions for individual correlates were estimated using the entire 2012 HTS sample. Men were six times more likely to cycle than women. We found rates of bicycle use rising over time among the richest quartile but total cycling rates dropped from 1997 to 2012 due to decreasing rates among the poor. Harms from air pollution would negate benefits from physical activity through cycling only at 1997 air pollution levels and at very high cycling levels (≥9 h of cycling per day. Exposure-based road injury risk decreased between 2007 and 2012, from 0.76 to 0.56 cyclist deaths per 1000 person-hours travelled. Policies to reduce spatial segregation, measures to tackle air pollution, improvements in dedicated cycling infrastructure, and integrating the bicycle with the public transport system in neighborhoods of all income levels could make cycling safer and prevent more individuals from abandoning the cycling mode in São Paulo.

  10. Cycling in São Paulo, Brazil (1997-2012): Correlates, time trends and health consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Thiago Hérick; Duran, Ana Clara; Tainio, Marko; Monteiro, Carlos Augusto; Woodcock, James

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe cyclists and cycling trips, and to explore correlates, time trends and health consequences of cycling in São Paulo, Brazil from 1997 to 2012. Cross-sectional analysis using repeated São Paulo Household Travel Surveys (HTS). At all time periods cycling was a minority travel mode in São Paulo (1174 people with cycling trips out of 214,719 people). Poisson regressions for individual correlates were estimated using the entire 2012 HTS sample. Men were six times more likely to cycle than women. We found rates of bicycle use rising over time among the richest quartile but total cycling rates dropped from 1997 to 2012 due to decreasing rates among the poor. Harms from air pollution would negate benefits from physical activity through cycling only at 1997 air pollution levels and at very high cycling levels (≥ 9 h of cycling per day). Exposure-based road injury risk decreased between 2007 and 2012, from 0.76 to 0.56 cyclist deaths per 1000 person-hours travelled. Policies to reduce spatial segregation, measures to tackle air pollution, improvements in dedicated cycling infrastructure, and integrating the bicycle with the public transport system in neighborhoods of all income levels could make cycling safer and prevent more individuals from abandoning the cycling mode in São Paulo.

  11. Long-time coherence in fourth-order spin correlation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhling, Nina; Anders, Frithjof B.

    2017-07-01

    We study the long-time decay of fourth-order electron spin correlation functions for an isolated singly charged semiconductor quantum dot. The electron spin dynamics is governed by the applied external magnetic field as well as the hyperfine interaction. While the long-time coherent oscillations in the correlation functions can be understood within a semiclassical approach treating the Overhauser field as frozen, the field dependent decay of its amplitude reported in different experiments cannot be explained by the central-spin model indicating the insufficiency of such a description. By incorporating the nuclear Zeeman splitting and the strain induced nuclear-electric quadrupolar interaction, we find the correct crossover from a fast decay in small magnetic fields to a slow exponential asymptotic in large magnetic fields. It originates from a competition between the quadrupolar interaction inducing an enhanced spin decay and the nuclear Zeeman term that suppressed the spin-flip processes. We are able to explain the magnetic field dependency of the characteristic long-time decay time T2 depending on the experimental setups. The calculated asymptotic values of T2=3 -4 μ s agree qualitatively well with the experimental data.

  12. A high resolution laser ranging system based on time-correlated single-photon counting technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yixin; Wang, Huanqin; Huang, Zhe; Cao, Yangyang; Gui, Huaqiao

    2014-12-01

    Laser ranging has become an important method for both distance measurements and acquisition of threedimensional (3D) images. In this paper, a laser ranging system based on Time-Correlated Single-Photon Counting technology (TCSPC) is developed. A Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (G-APD), which has the ability of detecting single-photon events, is used to capture the weak light scattered from the long-range target. In order to improve the ranging resolution of TCSPC based measurement system, a high repetition frequency of subnanosecond narrow pulse generator circuit based on the avalanche effect of RF-BJT is designed and applied as the light source. Moreover, some optimized optical light designs have been done to improve the system signal to noise rate (SNR), including using a special aspherical lens as projecting lens, adopting a telephoto camera lens with small view angle and short depth of field before detector. Experimental tests for evaluation of the laser raging system performance are described. As a means of echo signal analysis, three different algorithms have been introduced, in which the cross-correlation algorithm was demonstrated to be the most effective algorithm to determining the round trip time to a target, even based on histograms with a significant amount of background noise photons. It was found that centimeter ranging resolution can be achieved thanks to the use of Time-to-Digital Converter (TDC) with picosecond resolution and the Cross-Correlation algorithm. The proposed laser ranging system has advantages of high range resolution, short response time and simple structure, which was potential applications for 3D object recognition, computer vision, reverse engineering and virtual reality.

  13. Step detection in single-molecule real time trajectories embedded in correlated noise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srikesh G Arunajadai

    Full Text Available Single-molecule real time trajectories are embedded in high noise. To extract kinetic or dynamic information of the molecules from these trajectories often requires idealization of the data in steps and dwells. One major premise behind the existing single-molecule data analysis algorithms is the gaussian 'white' noise, which displays no correlation in time and whose amplitude is independent on data sampling frequency. This so-called 'white' noise is widely assumed but its validity has not been critically evaluated. We show that correlated noise exists in single-molecule real time trajectories collected from optical tweezers. The assumption of white noise during analysis of these data can lead to serious over- or underestimation of the number of steps depending on the algorithms employed. We present a statistical method that quantitatively evaluates the structure of the underlying noise, takes the noise structure into account, and identifies steps and dwells in a single-molecule trajectory. Unlike existing data analysis algorithms, this method uses Generalized Least Squares (GLS to detect steps and dwells. Under the GLS framework, the optimal number of steps is chosen using model selection criteria such as Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC. Comparison with existing step detection algorithms showed that this GLS method can detect step locations with highest accuracy in the presence of correlated noise. Because this method is automated, and directly works with high bandwidth data without pre-filtering or assumption of gaussian noise, it may be broadly useful for analysis of single-molecule real time trajectories.

  14. Analysing correlations after the financial crisis of 2008 and multifractality in global financial time series

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sunil Kumar; Nivedita Deo

    2015-02-01

    We apply random matrix theory (RMT) to investigate the structure of cross-correlation in 20 global financial time series after the global financial crisis of 2008. We find that the largest eigenvalue deviates from the RMT prediction and is sensitive to the financial crisis. We find that the components of eigenvectors corresponding to the second largest eigenvalue changes sign in response to the crisis. We show that 20 global financial indices exhibit multifractality. We find that the origin of multifractality is due to the long-range correlations as well as broad probability function in the financial indices, with the exception of the index of Taiwan, as in all other indices the multifractal degree for shuffled and surrogate series is weaker than the original series. We fit the binomial multifractal model to the global financial indices.

  15. Exact out-of-time-ordered correlation functions for an interacting lattice fermion model

    CERN Document Server

    Tsuji, Naoto; Ueda, Masahito

    2016-01-01

    An exact solution for local equilibrium and nonequilibrium out-of-time-ordered correlation (OTOC) functions is obtained for a lattice fermion model with on-site interactions, namely the Falicov-Kimball (FK) model, in the large dimensional and thermodynamic limit. Our approach is based on the nonequilibrium dynamical mean-field theory generalized to an extended Kadanoff-Baym contour. We find that the OTOC is enhanced at intermediate coupling around the metal-insulator phase transition, implying that the system is most scrambled in that regime. In the high-temperature limit, the OTOC remains nontrivially finite, even though dynamical charge correlations probed by an ordinary response function are suppressed. We propose an experiment to measure OTOCs of fermionic lattice systems including the FK and Hubbard models in ultracold atomic systems.

  16. Exact out-of-time-ordered correlation functions for an interacting lattice fermion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Naoto; Werner, Philipp; Ueda, Masahito

    2017-01-01

    Exact solutions for local equilibrium and nonequilibrium out-of-time-ordered correlation (OTOC) functions are obtained for a lattice fermion model with on-site interactions, namely, the Falicov-Kimball (FK) model, in the large dimensional and thermodynamic limit. Our approach is based on the nonequilibrium dynamical mean-field theory generalized to an extended Kadanoff-Baym contour. We find that the density-density OTOC is most enhanced at intermediate coupling around the metal-insulator phase transition. In the high-temperature limit, the OTOC remains nontrivially finite and interaction dependent, even though dynamical charge correlations probed by an ordinary response function are completely suppressed. We propose an experiment to measure OTOCs of fermionic lattice systems including the FK and Hubbard models in ultracold atomic systems.

  17. Correlations between pulsed X-ray flux and radio arrival time in the Vela pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Lommen, A N; Gwinn, C; Arzoumanian, Z; Harding, A; Strickman, M S; Dodson, R; McCulloch, P; Moffett, D

    2007-01-01

    We report the results of simultaneous observations of the Vela pulsar in X-rays and radio from the RXTE satellite and the Mount Pleasant Radio Observatory in Tasmania. We sought correlations between the Vela's X-ray and radio flux densities and radio arrival times on a pulse by pulse basis. We found significantly higher flux density in Vela's main X-ray peak during radio pulses that arrived early. This excess flux shifts to the 'trough' following the 2nd X-ray peak during radio pulses that arrive later. We suggest that the mechanism producing the radio pulses is intimately connected to the mechanism producing X-rays. Current models using resonant absorption in the outer magnetosphere as a cause of the radio emission, and less directly of the X-ray emission, are explored as a possible explanation for the correlation.

  18. Correlation between X-ray Lightcurve Shape and Radio Arrival Time in the Vela Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Lommen, A; Gwinn, C; Arzoumanian, Z; Harding, A; Strickman, M S; Dodson, R; McCulloch, P; Moffett, D

    2006-01-01

    We report the results of simultaneous observations of the Vela pulsar in X-rays and radio from the RXTE satellite and the Mount Pleasant Radio Observatory in Tasmania. We sought correlations between the Vela's X-ray emission and radio arrival times on a pulse by pulse basis. At a confidence level of 99.8% we have found significantly higher flux density in Vela's main X-ray peak during radio pulses that arrived early. This excess flux shifts to the 'trough' following the 2nd X-ray peak during radio pulses that arrive later. Our results suggest that the mechanism producing the radio pulses is intimately connected to the mechanism producing X-rays. Current models using resonant absorption of radio emission in the outer magnetosphere as a cause of the X-ray emission are explored as a possible explanation for the correlation.

  19. Nuclear dynamical correlation effects in X-ray spectroscopy from a time-domain perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Karsten, Sven; Aziz, Saadullah G; Bokarev, Sergey I; Kühn, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    To date X-ray spectroscopy has become a routine tool that can reveal highly local and element-specific information on the electronic structure of atoms in complex environments. Here, we focus on nuclear dynamical effects in X-ray spectra and develop a rigorous time-correlation method employing ground state molecular dynamics simulations. The importance of nuclear correlation phenomena is demonstrated by comparison against the results from the conventional sampling approach for gas phase water. In contrast to the first-order absorption, second-order resonant inelastic scattering spectra exhibit pronounced fingerprints of nuclear motions. The developed methodology does not depend on the accompanying electronic structure method in principle as well as on the spectral range and, thus, can be applied to, e.g., UV and X-ray photo-electron and Auger spectroscopies.

  20. Time-domain channel estimator based on cyclic correlation for OFDM systems with guard interval

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Min; GU Xue-mai; IM Se-bin; CHOI Hyung-jin

    2008-01-01

    Channel impulse response (CIR) can be estimated on the basis of cyclic correlation in time-domain for orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) systems. This article proposes a generalized channel estimation method to reduce the estimation error by taking the average of different CIRs. Channel impulse responses are derived according to the different starting points of cyclic correlation. In addition, an effective CIR length estimation algorithm is also presented. The whole proposed methods are more effective to OFDM systems, especially to those with longer cyclic prefix. The analysis and the simulation results verify that the mean square error performance is 4-5 dB better than the conventional schemes under the same conditions.

  1. Correlations and Non-predictability in the Time Evolution of Earthquake Ruptures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkhoury, J. E.; Knopoff, L.

    2007-12-01

    The characterization of the time evolution of ruptures is one of the important aspects of the earthquake process. What makes a rupture, that starts small, to become a big one or end very quickly resulting in a small earthquake is central to understanding the physics of the time evolution of ruptures. Establishing whether there are any correlations in time, between the initiation of the rupture and its ultimate size, is a step in the right direction. Here, we analyze three source-time function data sets. The first is produced by the generation of repeated rupture events on a 2D heterogeneous, in-plane, dynamical model, while the second is produced by an-age dependent critical branching model. The third is the source-time function data base of Ruff [1]. We formulate the problem in terms of two questions. 1) Are there any correlations between the moment release at the beginning of the rupture and the total moment release during the entire rupture? 2) Can we predict the final size of an earthquake, once it has started and without any a posteriori information, by just knowing the moment release up to a certain time τ? Using the three data bases, the answer to the first question is yes and no to the second. The longer τ is, the stronger the correlations are between what goes on at the initiation and the final size. But, for τ fixed, and not a major fraction of the rupture time, there is no predictability of the rupture size. In particular, if a rupture starts with a very large moment release during time τ, it becomes a large earthquake. On the other hand, large earthquakes might start with very small moment release during τ; the non-predictability is due to the heterogeneities. The randomness in the critical branching model mimics the effect of the heterogeneities in the crust and in the 2D model. \\begin{thebibliography}{99} \\bibitem{ruff} Ruff, L. J., http://www.geo.lsa.umich.edu/SeismoObs/STF.html

  2. Scalable time-correlated photon counting system with multiple independent input channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Michael; Rahn, Hans-Jürgen; Röhlicke, Tino; Kell, Gerald; Nettels, Daniel; Hillger, Frank; Schuler, Ben; Erdmann, Rainer

    2008-12-01

    Time-correlated single photon counting continues to gain importance in a wide range of applications. Most prominently, it is used for time-resolved fluorescence measurements with sensitivity down to the single molecule level. While the primary goal of the method used to be the determination of fluorescence lifetimes upon optical excitation by short light pulses, recent modifications and refinements of instrumentation and methodology allow for the recovery of much more information from the detected photons, and enable entirely new applications. This is achieved most successfully by continuously recording individually detected photons with their arrival time and detection channel information (time tagging), thus avoiding premature data reduction and concomitant loss of information. An important property of the instrumentation used is the number of detection channels and the way they interrelate. Here we present a new instrument architecture that allows scalability in terms of the number of input channels while all channels are synchronized to picoseconds of relative timing and yet operate independent of each other. This is achieved by means of a modular design with independent crystal-locked time digitizers and a central processing unit for sorting and processing of the timing data. The modules communicate through high speed serial links supporting the full throughput rate of the time digitizers. Event processing is implemented in programmable logic, permitting classical histogramming, as well as time tagging of individual photons and their temporally ordered streaming to the host computer. Based on the time-ordered event data, any algorithms and methods for the analysis of fluorescence dynamics can be implemented not only in postprocessing but also in real time. Results from recently emerging single molecule applications are presented to demonstrate the capabilities of the instrument.

  3. A study of pile-up in integrated time-correlated single photon counting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlt, Jochen; Tyndall, David; Rae, Bruce R; Li, David D-U; Richardson, Justin A; Henderson, Robert K

    2013-10-01

    Recent demonstration of highly integrated, solid-state, time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) systems in CMOS technology is set to provide significant increases in performance over existing bulky, expensive hardware. Arrays of single photon single photon avalanche diode (SPAD) detectors, timing channels, and signal processing can be integrated on a single silicon chip with a degree of parallelism and computational speed that is unattainable by discrete photomultiplier tube and photon counting card solutions. New multi-channel, multi-detector TCSPC sensor architectures with greatly enhanced throughput due to minimal detector transit (dead) time or timing channel dead time are now feasible. In this paper, we study the potential for future integrated, solid-state TCSPC sensors to exceed the photon pile-up limit through analytic formula and simulation. The results are validated using a 10% fill factor SPAD array and an 8-channel, 52 ps resolution time-to-digital conversion architecture with embedded lifetime estimation. It is demonstrated that pile-up insensitive acquisition is attainable at greater than 10 times the pulse repetition rate providing over 60 dB of extended dynamic range to the TCSPC technique. Our results predict future CMOS TCSPC sensors capable of live-cell transient observations in confocal scanning microscopy, improved resolution of near-infrared optical tomography systems, and fluorescence lifetime activated cell sorting.

  4. Real-time data acquisition incorporating high-speed software correlator for single-molecule spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L-L; Lee, H-Y; Wang, M-K; Lin, X-Y; Hsu, K-H; Chang, Y-R; Fann, W; White, J D

    2009-06-01

    Single-molecule spectroscopy and detection are powerful techniques for the study of single fluorescent particles and their interaction with their environment. We present a low-cost system for simultaneous real-time acquisition, storage of inter-photon arrival times and the calculation and display of the fluorescence time trace, autocorrelation function and distribution of delays histogram for single-molecule experiments. From a hardware perspective, in addition to a multi-core computer, only a standard low-cost counting board is required as processing is software-based. Software is written in a parallel programming environment with time crucial operations coded in ANSI-C. Crucial to system performance is a simple and efficient real-time autocorrelation algorithm (acf) optimized for the count rates (approximately 10(4) cps) encountered in single-molecule experiments. The algorithm's time complexity is independent of temporal resolution, which is maintained at all time delays. The system and algorithm's performance was validated by duplicating the signal from the photon detector and sending it to both the ordinary counter board and a commercial correlator simultaneously. The data acquisition system's robustness under typical single-molecule experimental conditions was tested by observing the diffusion of Rhodamine 6G molecules in deionized water.

  5. Developmental patterns and parental correlates of youth leisure-time physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Chun Bun; McHale, Susan M

    2015-02-01

    This study examined the developmental patterns and parental correlates of youth leisure-time physical activity from middle childhood through adolescence. On 5 occasions across 7 years, fathers, mothers, and children who were first- and second born from 201 European American, working- and middle-class families participated in home and multiple nightly phone interviews. Multilevel modeling revealed that, controlling for family socioeconomic status, neighborhood characteristics, and youth overweight status and physical health, leisure-time physical activity increased during middle childhood and declined across adolescence, and the decline was more pronounced for girls than for boys. Moreover, controlling for time-varying, parental work hours and youth interest in sports and outdoor activities, on occasions when fathers and mothers spent proportionally more time on these activities with youth than usual, youth also spent more total time on these activities than usual. The within-person association between mother-youth joint involvement and youth's total involvement in leisure-time physical activity reached statistical significance at the transition to adolescence, and became stronger over time. Findings highlight the importance of maintaining adolescents', especially girls', physical activity levels and targeting both fathers' and mothers' involvement to promote youth's physical activity.

  6. Constant time tensor correlation experiments by non-gamma-encoded recoupling pulse sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Yun; Tsai, Tim W T; Chan, Jerry C C

    2012-10-28

    Constant-time tensor correlation under magic-angle spinning conditions is an important technique in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for the measurements of backbone or side-chain torsion angles of polypeptides and proteins. We introduce a general method for the design of constant-time tensor correlation experiments under magic-angle spinning. Our method requires that the amplitude of the average Hamiltonian must depend on all the three Euler angles bringing the principal axis system to the rotor-fixed frame, which is commonly referred to as non-gamma encoding. We abbreviate this novel approach as COrrelation of Non-Gamma-Encoded Experiment (CONGEE), which exploits the orientation-dependence of non-gamma-encoded sequences with respect to the magic-angle rotation axis. By manipulating the relative orientation of the average Hamiltonians created by two non-gamma-encoded sequences, one can obtain a modulation of the detected signal, from which the structural information can be extracted when the tensor orientations relative to the molecular frame are known. CONGEE has a prominent feature that the number of rf pulses and the total pulse sequence duration can be maintained to be constant so that for torsion angle determination the effects of systematic errors owing to the experimental imperfections and/or T(2) effects could be minimized. As a proof of concept, we illustrate the utility of CONGEE in the correlation between the C' chemical shift tensor and the C(α)-H(α) dipolar tensor for the backbone psi angle determination. In addition to a detailed theoretical analysis, numerical simulations and experiments measured for [U-(13)C, (15)N]-L-alanine and N-acetyl-[U-(13)C, (15)N]-D,L-valine are used to validate our approach at a spinning frequency of 20 kHz.

  7. Time and spectrum-resolving multiphoton correlator for 300-900 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Kelsey D.; Kolenderski, Piotr; Scarcella, Carmelo; Thibault, Marilyne; Tosi, Alberto; Jennewein, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate a single-photon sensitive spectrometer in the visible range, which allows us to perform time-resolved and multi-photon spectral correlation measurements at room temperature. It is based on a monochromator composed of two gratings, collimation optics, and an array of single photon avalanche diodes. The time resolution can reach 110 ps and the spectral resolution is 2 nm/pixel, limited by the design of the monochromator. This technique can easily be combined with commercial monochromators and can be useful for joint spectrum measurements of two photons emitted in the process of parametric down conversion, as well as time-resolved spectrum measurements in optical coherence tomography or medical physics applications.

  8. Time and spectrum-resolving multiphoton correlator for 300–900 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnsen, Kelsey D.; Thibault, Marilyne; Jennewein, Thomas [Institute for Quantum Computing and Department for Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave. West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Kolenderski, Piotr, E-mail: kolenderski@fizyka.umk.pl [Institute for Quantum Computing and Department for Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave. West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Institute of Physics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Scarcella, Carmelo; Tosi, Alberto [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2014-10-14

    We demonstrate a single-photon sensitive spectrometer in the visible range, which allows us to perform time-resolved and multi-photon spectral correlation measurements at room temperature. It is based on a monochromator composed of two gratings, collimation optics, and an array of single photon avalanche diodes. The time resolution can reach 110 ps and the spectral resolution is 2 nm/pixel, limited by the design of the monochromator. This technique can easily be combined with commercial monochromators and can be useful for joint spectrum measurements of two photons emitted in the process of parametric down conversion, as well as time-resolved spectrum measurements in optical coherence tomography or medical physics applications.

  9. Quantum Chemistry on the time axis: electron correlations and rearrangements on femtosecond and attosecond scales

    CERN Document Server

    Nicolaides, Cleanthes A

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments toward the production and laboratory use of pulses of high intensity, and/or of very high frequency, and/or of ultrashort duration, make possible experiments which can produce time-resolved data on ultrafast transformations involving motions of electrons. The formulation, quantitative understanding and prediction of related new phenomena entail the possibility of computing and applying solutions of the many-electron time-dependent Schroedinger equation, for arbitrary electronic structures, including the dominant effects of Rydberg series, of multiply excited states and of the multi-channel continuous spectrum. To this purpose, we have proposed and applied to many prototypical cases the state-specific expansion approach (SSEA). (Mercouris, Komninos and Nicolaides, Adv. Quantum Chem. 60, 333 (2010)). The paper explains briefly the SSEA, and outlines four of its applications to recently formulated problems concerning time-resolved electronic processes, where electron correlations are crucial....

  10. Statistical propeties of a single-mode laser driven by additive and multiplicative coloured noises with a coloured cross-correlation for different correlation times

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁贵云; 曹力; 张莉; 吴大进

    2003-01-01

    We study a system for a single-mode laser driven by additive and multiplicative coloured noises with a coloured cross-correlation. The analytical expression of the stationary intensity distribution (SID) for the laser is derived in the case of three different correlation times. The influences of each stochastic parameter on the SID are discussed, the the skewness, λ3(O) of the single-mode laser are investigated. We find that there are colourful phase transitions for the SID above a threshold, and re-entrant transitions induced by the "colour" of the additive noises. Further research of the not only increases with the additive noise correlation time τ2 and the cross-correlation time τs, but also the quality of the output of laser beams is optimized.

  11. Maximizing negative correlations in resting-state functional connectivity MRI by time-lag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goelman, Gadi; Gordon, Noam; Bonne, Omer

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to better understand the physiological meaning of negative correlations in resting state functional connectivity MRI (r-fcMRI). The correlations between anatomy-based brain regions of 18 healthy humans were calculated and analyzed with and without a correction for global signal and with and without spatial smoothing. In addition, correlations between anatomy-based brain regions of 18 naïve anesthetized rats were calculated and compared to the human data. T-statistics were used to differentiate between positive and negative connections. The application of spatial smoothing and global signal correction increased the number of significant positive connections but their effect on negative connections was complex. Positive connections were mainly observed between cortical structures while most negative connections were observed between cortical and non-cortical structures with almost no negative connections between non-cortical structures. In both human and rats, negative connections were never observed between bilateral homologous regions. The main difference between positive and negative connections in both the human and rat data was that positive connections became less significant with time-lags, while negative connections became more significant with time-lag. This effect was evident in all four types of analyses (with and without global signal correction and spatial smoothing) but was most significant in the analysis with no correction for the global signal. We hypothesize that the valence of r-fcMRI connectivity reflects the relative contributions of cerebral blood volume (CBV) and flow (CBF) to the BOLD signal and that these relative contributions are location-specific. If cerebral circulation is primarily regulated by CBF in one region and by CBV in another, a functional connection between these regions can manifest as an r-fcMRI negative and time-delayed correlation. Similarly, negative correlations could result from spatially inhomogeneous

  12. Development of skin conductance orienting, habituation, and reorienting from ages 3 to 8 years: a longitudinal latent growth curve analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yu; Raine, Adrian; Dawson, Michael E; Venables, Peter H; Mednick, Sarnoff A

    2007-11-01

    Little is known about the development of the skin conductance orienting response (SCOR) in childhood. This longitudinal study examines the effects of age on initial SCOR, habituation, and reorienting. Skin conductance responses to nonsignal auditory stimuli were recorded from 200 male and female children at five different time points (ages 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8 years). Longitudinal latent growth curve analyses were used to determine the trajectory of each SCOR measure during this period. Results indicated that (a) initial SCOR is present at age 3, increases thereafter to peak at age 6, and then levels off, (b) habituation is absent at age 3, but becomes apparent at age 4 years and increases thereafter with increasing age, (c) SC reorienting is absent from ages 3 to 8, and (d) boys and girls do not exhibit different developmental trajectories. Results suggest that from age 3 to 8 years, the transition from the functionally immature to mature neural network underlying orienting and habituation is a continuous process and may be related to children's cognitive development during this period.

  13. New insights into time series analysis. II - Non-correlated observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira Lopes, C. E.; Cross, N. J. G.

    2017-08-01

    Context. Statistical parameters are used to draw conclusions in a vast number of fields such as finance, weather, industrial, and science. These parameters are also used to identify variability patterns on photometric data to select non-stochastic variations that are indicative of astrophysical effects. New, more efficient, selection methods are mandatory to analyze the huge amount of astronomical data. Aims: We seek to improve the current methods used to select non-stochastic variations on non-correlated data. Methods: We used standard and new data-mining parameters to analyze non-correlated data to find the best way to discriminate between stochastic and non-stochastic variations. A new approach that includes a modified Strateva function was performed to select non-stochastic variations. Monte Carlo simulations and public time-domain data were used to estimate its accuracy and performance. Results: We introduce 16 modified statistical parameters covering different features of statistical distribution such as average, dispersion, and shape parameters. Many dispersion and shape parameters are unbound parameters, i.e. equations that do not require the calculation of average. Unbound parameters are computed with single loop and hence decreasing running time. Moreover, the majority of these parameters have lower errors than previous parameters, which is mainly observed for distributions with few measurements. A set of non-correlated variability indices, sample size corrections, and a new noise model along with tests of different apertures and cut-offs on the data (BAS approach) are introduced. The number of mis-selections are reduced by about 520% using a single waveband and 1200% combining all wavebands. On the other hand, the even-mean also improves the correlated indices introduced in Paper I. The mis-selection rate is reduced by about 18% if the even-mean is used instead of the mean to compute the correlated indices in the WFCAM database. Even-statistics allows us

  14. Anti-correlated hard X-ray time lags in Galactic black hole sources

    CERN Document Server

    Sriram, K; Pendharkar, J K; Rao, A R; Pendharkar, Jayant K.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the accretion disk geometry in Galactic black hole sources by measuring the time delay between soft and hard X-ray emissions. Similar to the recent discoveries of anti-correlated hard X-ray time lags in Cyg X-3 and GRS 1915+105, we find that the hard X-rays are anti-correlated with soft X-rays with a significant lag in another source: XTE J1550-564. We also find the existence of pivoting in the model independent X-ray spectrum during these observations. We investigate time-resolved X-ray spectral parameters and find that the variation in these parameters is consistent with the idea of a truncated accretion disk. The QPO frequency, which is a measure of the size of truncated accretion disk, too changes indicating that the geometric size of the hard X-ray emitting region changes along with the spectral pivoting and soft X-ray flux. Similar kind of delay is also noticed in 4U 1630-47.

  15. On a Correlation between the Ionospheric Electric Field and the Time Derivative of the Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. Ilma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A correlation of the ionospheric electric field and the time derivative of the magnetic field was noticed over thirty years ago and has yet to be explained. Here we report on another set of examples during the superstorm of November 2004. The electric field in the equatorial ionosphere, measured with the Jicamarca incoherent scatter radar, exhibited a 3 mV/m electric field pulse that was not seen in the interplanetary medium. It was, however, accompanied by a correlation with the time derivative of the magnetic field measured at two points in Peru. Our inclination was to assume that the field was inductive. However, the time scale of the pulse was too short for the magnetic field to penetrate the crust of the Earth. This means that the area threaded by ∂B/∂t was too small to create the observed electric field by induction. We suggest that the effect was caused by a modulation of the ring current location relative to the Earth due to the electric field. This electric field is required, as the magnetic field lines are considered frozen into the plasma in the magnetosphere. The closer location of the ring current to the Earth in turn increased the magnetic field at the surface.

  16. Record statistics of a strongly correlated time series: random walks and Lévy flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godrèche, Claude; Majumdar, Satya N.; Schehr, Grégory

    2017-08-01

    We review recent advances on the record statistics of strongly correlated time series, whose entries denote the positions of a random walk or a Lévy flight on a line. After a brief survey of the theory of records for independent and identically distributed random variables, we focus on random walks. During the last few years, it was indeed realized that random walks are a very useful ‘laboratory’ to test the effects of correlations on the record statistics. We start with the simple one-dimensional random walk with symmetric jumps (both continuous and discrete) and discuss in detail the statistics of the number of records, as well as of the ages of the records, i.e. the lapses of time between two successive record breaking events. Then we review the results that were obtained for a wide variety of random walk models, including random walks with a linear drift, continuous time random walks, constrained random walks (like the random walk bridge) and the case of multiple independent random walkers. Finally, we discuss further observables related to records, like the record increments, as well as some questions raised by physical applications of record statistics, like the effects of measurement error and noise.

  17. Time-Shift Correlation Algorithm for P300 Event Related Potential Brain-Computer Interface Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Chi Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A high efficient time-shift correlation algorithm was proposed to deal with the peak time uncertainty of P300 evoked potential for a P300-based brain-computer interface (BCI. The time-shift correlation series data were collected as the input nodes of an artificial neural network (ANN, and the classification of four LED visual stimuli was selected as the output node. Two operating modes, including fast-recognition mode (FM and accuracy-recognition mode (AM, were realized. The proposed BCI system was implemented on an embedded system for commanding an adult-size humanoid robot to evaluate the performance from investigating the ground truth trajectories of the humanoid robot. When the humanoid robot walked in a spacious area, the FM was used to control the robot with a higher information transfer rate (ITR. When the robot walked in a crowded area, the AM was used for high accuracy of recognition to reduce the risk of collision. The experimental results showed that, in 100 trials, the accuracy rate of FM was 87.8% and the average ITR was 52.73 bits/min. In addition, the accuracy rate was improved to 92% for the AM, and the average ITR decreased to 31.27 bits/min. due to strict recognition constraints.

  18. A Black Hole Mass-Variability Time Scale Correlation at Submillimeter Wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Bower, Geoffrey C; Markoff, Sera; Gurwell, Mark A; Rao, Ramprasad; McHardy, Ian

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the light curves of 413 radio sources at submillimeter wavelengths using data from the Submillimeter Array calibrator database. The database includes more than 20,000 observations at 1.3 and 0.8 mm that span 13 years. We model the light curves as a damped random walk and determine a characteristic time scale $\\tau$ at which the variability amplitude saturates. For the vast majority of sources, primarily blazars and BL Lac objects, we find only lower limits on $\\tau$. For two nearby low luminosity active galactic nuclei, M81 and M87, however, we measure $\\tau=1.6^{+3.0}_{-0.9}$ days and $\\tau=45^{+61}_{-24}$ days, respectively ($2\\sigma$ errors). Including the previously measured $\\tau=0.33\\pm 0.16$ days for Sgr A*, we show an approximately linear correlation between $\\tau$ and black hole mass for these nearby LLAGN. Other LLAGN with spectra that peak in the submm are expected to follow this correlation. These characteristic time scales are comparable to the minimum time scale for emission processes...

  19. Time-Shift Correlation Algorithm for P300 Event Related Potential Brain-Computer Interface Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ju-Chi; Chou, Hung-Chyun; Chen, Chien-Hsiu; Lin, Yi-Tseng; Kuo, Chung-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    A high efficient time-shift correlation algorithm was proposed to deal with the peak time uncertainty of P300 evoked potential for a P300-based brain-computer interface (BCI). The time-shift correlation series data were collected as the input nodes of an artificial neural network (ANN), and the classification of four LED visual stimuli was selected as the output node. Two operating modes, including fast-recognition mode (FM) and accuracy-recognition mode (AM), were realized. The proposed BCI system was implemented on an embedded system for commanding an adult-size humanoid robot to evaluate the performance from investigating the ground truth trajectories of the humanoid robot. When the humanoid robot walked in a spacious area, the FM was used to control the robot with a higher information transfer rate (ITR). When the robot walked in a crowded area, the AM was used for high accuracy of recognition to reduce the risk of collision. The experimental results showed that, in 100 trials, the accuracy rate of FM was 87.8% and the average ITR was 52.73 bits/min. In addition, the accuracy rate was improved to 92% for the AM, and the average ITR decreased to 31.27 bits/min. due to strict recognition constraints.

  20. Kinetic and potential components of the exact time-dependent correlation potential

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Kai; Sandoval, Ernesto D; Elliott, Peter; Maitra, Neepa T

    2013-01-01

    The exact exchange-correlation (xc) potential of time-dependent density functional theory has been shown to have striking features. For example, step and peak features are generically found when the system is far from its ground-state, and these depend nonlocally on the density in space and time. We analyze the xc potential by decomposing it into kinetic and interaction potential components, and comparing each with their exact-adiabatic counterparts, for a range of dynamical situations in model one-dimensional (1D) two-electron systems. We find that often, but not always, the kinetic contri- bution is mostly responsible for these features, that are missed by the adiabatic approximation. The adiabatic approximation often makes a smaller error for the potential contribution, which we write in two parts, one being the Coulomb potential due to the time-dependent xc hole. These observations also held in non-equilibrium cases we studied where there are large features in the correlation po- tential although no step ...

  1. The correlates of leisure time physical activity among an adults population from southern Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Ju; Huang, Ying-Hsiang; Lu, Feng-Hwa; Wu, Jin-Shang; Lin, Linda L; Chang, Chih-Jen; Yang, Yi-Ching

    2011-06-03

    Assessing the correlates of practicing physical activity during leisure time is important with regard to planning and designing public health strategies to increase beneficial behaviors among adult populations. Although the importance of leisure time physical activity (LTPA) is highlighted in many Western countries, there are not many publications on physical activity patterns, and even less on their correlates, in non-Western societies. The goal of this study was thus to explore the determinants influencing adults' leisure time physical activity (LTPA) in a city in southern Taiwan. A cross-sectional population-based study was conducted in 2007, using a standardized questionnaire. Energy expenditure was dichotomized into two groups based on the recommended levels of moderate physical activity from LTPA: ≥10 or convenience of exercise facilities (OR = 2.04; 95%CI = 1.28-3.24) and past exercise experience in school (OR = 1.86; 95%CI= 1.19-2.91) participated in more LTPA. Subjects with more general social support (OR = 1.66;95%CI = 1.13-2.44), greater knowledge about the health benefits of exercise (OR = 1.85;95%CI = 1.25-2.74), more sports media consumption (OR = 1.94;95%CI = 1.26-2.98), and higher self-efficacy (OR = 3.99;95%CI = 2.67-5.97) were more likely to engage in LTPA. Further analysis comparing different sources of social support showed only social support from friends had a significant positive association (OR = 1.73;95%CI = 1.14-2.63) with increased LTPA. LTPA in southern city of Taiwan showed some unique associations with age, socioeconomic status and media consumption that are not commonly reported in the Western World and similar associations with regards to psychosocial correlates of LTPA participation. Further studies from developing countries are warranted to highlight culture-specific differences in physical activity participation.

  2. Correlated electron dynamics and memory in time-dependent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiele, Mark

    2009-07-28

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is an exact reformulation of the time-dependent many-electron Schroedinger equation, where the problem of many interacting electrons is mapped onto the Kohn-Sham system of noninteracting particles which reproduces the exact electronic density. In the Kohn-Sham system all non-classical many-body effects are incorporated in the exchange-correlation potential which is in general unknown and needs to be approximated. It is the goal of this thesis to investigate the connection between memory effects and correlated electron dynamics in strong and weak fields. To this end one-dimensional two-electron singlet systems are studied. At the same time these systems include the onedimensional helium atom model, which is an established system to investigate the crucial effects of correlated electron dynamics in external fields. The studies presented in this thesis show that memory effects are negligible for typical strong field processes. Here the approximation of the spatial nonlocality is of primary importance. For the photoabsorption spectra on the other hand the neglect of memory effects leads to qualitative and quantitative errors, which are shown to be connected to transitions of double excitation character. To develop a better understanding of the conditions under which memory effects become important quantum fluid dynamics has been found to be especially suitable. It represents a further exact reformulation of the quantum mechanic many-body problem which is based on hydrodynamic quantities such as density and velocity. Memory effects are shown to be important whenever the velocity field develops strong gradients and dissipative effects contribute. (orig.)

  3. Can Time-Dependent Zeta Correlators be Swept under the Rug?

    CERN Document Server

    Boran, Sibel

    2016-01-01

    We discuss quantum gravitational loop effects to observable quantities such as curvature power spectrum and primordial non-gaussianity of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation. We first review the previously shown case where one gets a time dependence for zeta-zeta correlator due to loop corrections. Then we investigate the effect of these loop corrections to primordial non-gaussianity of CMB. We conclude that with a single scalar inflaton one gets a huge value for non-gaussianity which exceeds the observed value by at least 30 orders of magnitude. Finally we discuss the consequences of this result for scalar driven inflationary models.

  4. Correlators for the Wigner-Smith time-delay matrix of chaotic cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deelan Cunden, Fabio; Mezzadri, Francesco; Simm, Nick; Vivo, Pierpaolo

    2016-05-01

    We study the Wigner-Smith time-delay matrix Q of a ballistic quantum dot supporting N scattering channels. We compute the v-point correlators of the power traces {Tr}{Q}κ for arbitrary v≥slant 1 at leading order for large N using techniques from the random matrix theory approach to quantum chromodynamics. We conjecture that the cumulants of the {Tr}{Q}κ 's are integer-valued at leading order in N and include a MATHEMATICA code that computes their generating functions recursively.

  5. A study of methyl reorientation in solid nitromethane by neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino, S. F.; Rymes, W. H.

    1980-09-01

    The geometrical and dynamical properties of the reorientation of the methyl group of nitromethane in the solid state have been studied by inelastic neutron scattering. Quasielastic scattering spectra have been obtained for several values of momentum transfer at five temperatures between 50° and 150 °K. The spectra are shown to be consistent with jumps of 120 ° about an axis coincident with the C-N bond. The temperature dependence of the residence time yields a barrier of 234 cal/mole. An inelastic neutron spectrum obtained at 4.2 °K suggests a tunnel splitting of the torsional ground state of 0.045±0.005 meV, which is consistent with the derived activation energy. Inelastic neutron scattering has also been used to determine the energy of the tunnel split first excited state which in CH3NO2 has a mean energy of 7.4 meV above the ground state and is split by 1.8 meV. In the deuterated compound, the first excited stated is at 5.3 meV above the ground state and its splitting is less than the instrumental resolution.

  6. Quantifying Signaling-Induced Reorientation of TCR's During Immunological Synapse Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, W C; Irvine, D J; Davis, M M; Krummel, M F

    2002-10-17

    Productive T cell recognition of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) is normally accompanied by the formation of a cell-cell contact called the 'immunological synapse.' Our understanding of the steps leading up to this formation has been limited by the absence of tools for analyzing 3D surfaces and surface distributions as they change over time. Here we use a 3D fluorescence quantitation method to show that T cell receptors are recruited in bulk within the first minute after the onset of activation and with velocities ranging from 0.04 to 0.1 {micro}m/s; a speed significantly greater than unrestricted diffusion. Our method reveals a second feature of this reorientation: a conformational change as the T cell pushes more total membrane into the interface creating a larger contact area for additional receptors. Analysis of individual T cell receptor velocities using a single-particle tracking method confirms our velocity measurement. This method should permit the quantitation of other dynamic membrane events and the associated movement of cell-surface molecules.

  7. Time-correlated single-photon counting study of multiple photoluminescence lifetime components of silicon nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamare, D., E-mail: d.diamare@ee.ucl.ac.uk [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London, WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Wojdak, M. [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London, WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Lettieri, S. [Institute for Superconductors and Innovative Materials, National Council of Research (CNR-SPIN), Via Cintia 80126, Naples (Italy); Department of Physical Sciences, University of Naples “Federico II”, Via Cintia 80126, Naples (Italy); Kenyon, A.J. [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London, WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

    2013-04-15

    We report time-resolved photoluminescence measurements of thin films of silica containing silicon nanoclusters (Si NCs), produced by PECVD and annealed at temperatures between 700 °C and 1150 °C. While the near infrared emission of Si NCs has long been studied, visible light emission has only recently attracted interest due to its very short decay times and its recently-reported redshift with decreasing NCs size. We analyse the PL decay dynamics in the range 450–700 nm with picosecond time resolution using Time Correlated Single Photon Counting. In the resultant multi-exponential decays two dominant components can clearly be distinguished: a very short component, in the range of hundreds of picoseconds, and a nanosecond component. In this wavelength range we do not detect the microsecond component generally associated with excitonic recombination. We associate the nanosecond component to defect relaxation: it decreases in intensity in the sample annealed at higher temperature, suggesting that the contribution from defects decreases with increasing temperature. The origin of the very fast PL component (ps time region) is also discussed. We show that it is consistent with the Auger recombination times of multiple excitons. Further work needs to be done in order to assess the contribution of the Auger-controlled recombinations to the defect-assisted mechanism of photoluminescence. -- Highlights: ► We report time-resolved PL measurements of Si-Ncs embedded in SiO{sub 2} matrix. ► Net decrease of PL with increasing the annealing temperature has been observed. ► Lifetime distribution analysis revealed a multiexponential decay with ns and ps components. ► Ps components are consistent with the lifetime range of the Auger recombination times. ► No evidence for a fast direct transition at the Brillouin zone centre.

  8. Non-invasive real-time imaging through scattering layers and around corners via speckle correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Ori; Fink, Mathias; Gigan, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Imaging with optical resolution through and inside complex samples is a difficult challenge with important applications in many fields. The fundamental problem is that inhomogeneous samples, such as biological tissues, randomly scatter and diffuse light, impeding conventional image formation. Despite many advancements, no current method enables to noninvasively image in real-time using diffused light. Here, we show that owing to the memory-effect for speckle correlations, a single image of the scattered light, captured with a standard high-resolution camera, encodes all the information that is required to image through the medium or around a corner. We experimentally demonstrate single-shot imaging through scattering media and around corners using incoherent light and various samples, from white paint to dynamic biological samples. Our lensless technique is simple, does not require laser sources, wavefront-shaping, nor time-gated detection, and is realized here using a camera-phone. It has the potential to en...

  9. Statistics of time delay and scattering correlation functions in chaotic systems. II. Semiclassical approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novaes, Marcel [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Av. João Naves de Ávila, 2121, Uberlândia, MG 38408-100 (Brazil)

    2015-06-15

    We consider S-matrix correlation functions for a chaotic cavity having M open channels, in the absence of time-reversal invariance. Relying on a semiclassical approximation, we compute the average over E of the quantities Tr[S{sup †}(E − ϵ) S(E + ϵ)]{sup n}, for general positive integer n. Our result is an infinite series in ϵ, whose coefficients are rational functions of M. From this, we extract moments of the time delay matrix Q = − iħS{sup †}dS/dE and check that the first 8 of them agree with the random matrix theory prediction from our previous paper [M. Novaes, J. Math. Phys. 56, 062110 (2015)].

  10. Estimating time-varying conditional correlations between stock and foreign exchange markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tastan, Hüseyin

    2006-02-01

    This study explores the dynamic interaction between stock market returns and changes in nominal exchange rates. Many financial variables are known to exhibit fat tails and autoregressive variance structure. It is well-known that unconditional covariance and correlation coefficients also vary significantly over time and multivariate generalized autoregressive model (MGARCH) is able to capture the time-varying variance-covariance matrix for stock market returns and changes in exchange rates. The model is applied to daily Euro-Dollar exchange rates and two stock market indexes from the US economy: Dow-Jones Industrial Average Index and S&P500 Index. The news impact surfaces are also drawn based on the model estimates to see the effects of idiosyncratic shocks in respective markets.

  11. Correlation between real-time qPCR and development of strongyle eggs from cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drag, Markus; Nejsum, Peter; Höglund, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Differentiation of veterinary important parasitic strongyle eggs is time-consuming, because morphologically distinct third-stage larvae (L3) must be cultured for species/genus identification. A recently published qPCR technique provides a non-labour intensive method for detection and quantification...... of the two most important nematode eggs in cattle faeces. However, as quantification correlates with DNA content, quantification of copy numbers of the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) region is problematic as DNA content increases during egg development. The aim of this study was to assess....... To test the effect of oxygen deprivation, fresh faecal samples (n=18) were vacuum packed. A total of 36 aliquots were stored at temperatures of 4°C or 25°C for up to 336 hours. Morphological changes were observed, and DNA content was measured at nine time points throughout the study period. Preliminary...

  12. Correlation between real-time qPCR and development of strongyle eggs from cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drag, Markus; Nejsum, Peter; Höglund, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Differentiation of veterinary important parasitic strongyle eggs is time-consuming, because morphologically distinct third-stage larvae (L3) must be cultured for species/genus identification. A recently published qPCR technique provides a non-labour intensive method for detection and quantification...... of the two most important nematode eggs in cattle faeces. However, as quantification correlates with DNA content, quantification of copy numbers of the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) region is problematic as DNA content increases during egg development. The aim of this study was to assess....... To test the effect of oxygen deprivation, fresh faecal samples (n=18) were vacuum packed. A total of 36 aliquotswere stored at temperatures of 4°C or 25°C for up to 336 hours. Morphological changes were observed, and DNA content was measured at nine time points throughout the study period. Preliminary...

  13. Brillouin optical correlation analysis system using a simplified frequency-modulated time division method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bo-Hun; Kwon, Il-Bum

    2014-01-01

    A time-division Brillouin optical correlation domain analysis system was successfully achieved using simplified laser diode (LD) modulation and pump lightwave optimization. A complicated transfer function for a precise output waveform of a LD was required for the conventional system. However, a very simple modulation function gave a power output very close to a required ideal rectangle waveform without sacrificing optical output spectrum. An electrical input waveform applied into a gate in the pump lightwave path was also optimized for eliminating a probe lightwave included in a pump lightwave and for passing consecutive pump pulses alternatively. So the stimulated Brillouin scattering gain was attained without seriously distorting FM modulation, and the targeted spatial resolution was clearly accomplished. Additionally, using high speed response of a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA), unlike an erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA), the possibility was investigated that an SOA was going to replace an EDFA and a modulator used as a gate in the same time.

  14. Continuously scanning time-correlated single-photon-counting single-pixel 3-D lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksson, Markus; Larsson, Håkan; Grönwall, Christina; Tolt, Gustav

    2017-03-01

    Time-correlated single-photon-counting (TCSPC) lidar provides very high resolution range measurements. This makes the technology interesting for three-dimensional imaging of complex scenes with targets behind foliage or other obscurations. TCSPC is a statistical method that demands integration of multiple measurements toward the same area to resolve objects at different distances within the instantaneous field-of-view. Point-by-point scanning will demand significant overhead for the movement, increasing the measurement time. Here, the effect of continuously scanning the scene row-by-row is investigated and signal processing methods to transform this into low-noise point clouds are described. The methods are illustrated using measurements of a characterization target and an oak and hazel copse. Steps between different surfaces of less than 5 cm in range are resolved as two surfaces.

  15. Left ventricular ejection time, not heart rate, is an independent correlate of aortic pulse wave velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, Paolo; Palombo, Carlo; Salvi, Giovanni Matteo; Labat, Carlos; Parati, Gianfranco; Benetos, Athanase

    2013-12-01

    Several studies showed a positive association between heart rate and pulse wave velocity, a sensitive marker of arterial stiffness. However, no study involving a large population has specifically addressed the dependence of pulse wave velocity on different components of the cardiac cycle. The aim of this study was to explore in subjects of different age the link between pulse wave velocity with heart period (the reciprocal of heart rate) and the temporal components of the cardiac cycle such as left ventricular ejection time and diastolic time. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity was assessed in 3,020 untreated subjects (1,107 men). Heart period, left ventricular ejection time, diastolic time, and early-systolic dP/dt were determined by carotid pulse wave analysis with high-fidelity applanation tonometry. An inverse association was found between pulse wave velocity and left ventricular ejection time at all ages (pulse wave velocity and heart period was also found, with the exception of the youngest subjects (P = 0.20). A significant positive correlation was also found between pulse wave velocity and dP/dt (P pulse wave velocity at all ages, whereas the contribution of heart period no longer became significant. Our data demonstrate that pulse wave velocity is more closely related to left ventricular systolic function than to heart period. This may have methodological and pathophysiological implications.

  16. MPACT FY2011 Advanced Time-Correlated Measurement Research at INL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. L. Chichester; S. A. Pozzi; J. L. Dolan; M. Flaska; S. M. Watson

    2011-09-01

    Simulations and experiments have been carried out to investigate advanced time-correlated measurement methods for characterizing and assaying nuclear material for safeguarding the nuclear fuel cycle. These activities are part of a project studying advanced instrumentation techniques in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cycle Research and Development program and its Materials Protection, Accounting, and Control Technologies (MPACT) program. For fiscal year 2011 work focused on examining the practical experimental aspects of using a time-tagged, associated-particle electronic neutron generator for interrogating low-enrichment uranium in combination with steady-state interrogation using a moderated 241Am-Li neutron source. Simulation work for the project involved the use of the MCNP-PoliMi Monte Carlo simulation tool to determine the relative strength and the time-of-flight energy spectra of different sample materials under irradiation. Work also took place to develop a post-processor parser code to extract comparable data from the MCNP5&6 codes. Experiments took place using a commercial deuterium-tritium associated-particle electronic neutron generator to irradiate a number of uranium-bearing material samples. Time-correlated measurements of neutron and photon signatures of these measurements were made using five liquid scintillator detectors in a novel array, using high-speed waveform digitizers for data collection. This report summarizes the experiments that took place in FY2011, presents preliminary analyses that have been carried out to date for a subpart of these experiments, and describes future activities planned in this area. The report also describes support Idaho National Laboratory gave to Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 2011 to facilitate 2-dimensional imagery of mixed-oxide fuel pins for safeguards applications as a part of the MPACT program.

  17. Structural measurements on several alamethicin peptides by the time-of-flight correlation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe-Schriemer, N.; Ens, W.; O'Neil, J. D.; Spicer, V.; Standing, K. G.; Westmore, J. B.; Yee, A. A.

    1995-05-01

    Time-of-flight correlation methods have been used to determine the primary structure of the major component in a nonstandard preparation of alamethicins, and to give some sequence information about minor components. The peptide (MW [approximate] 2000 u) is blocked at the N terminus with an acetyl group and has a primary alcohol rather than a carboxyl group at the C terminus, so the usual wet chemical sequencing methods cannot be applied. Upon bombardment with 25 keVI- ions, the peptide, deposited on the surface of a solid target, produces both molecular ions and prompt fragment ions (i.e. ions formed at or very near the surface of the target). After acceleration, these ions may undergo metastable decay as they pass along the flight tube of a reflecting time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Measurement of the correlations between the neutral and charged daughters from these decompositions determines the decay pattern of each ion, which in turn yields definitive information about the sequence of the original peptide. All events are recorded on magnetic tape and analyzed off-line, so a single run on the spectrometer provides information on the decay of every ion produced at the target, i.e. information similar to that obtainable from a complete set of daughter ion scans on a multiple sector or triple quadrupole instrument.

  18. Correlations of Eisenia fetida metabolic responses to extractable phenanthrene concentrations through time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKelvie, Jennifer R.; Wolfe, David M.; Celejewski, Magda; Simpson, Andre J. [Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, Ontario, M1C 1A4 (Canada); Simpson, Myrna J., E-mail: myrna.simpson@utoronto.c [Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, Ontario, M1C 1A4 (Canada)

    2010-06-15

    Eisenia fetida earthworms were exposed to phenanthrene for thirty days to compare hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPCD) extraction of soil and {sup 1}H NMR earthworm metabolomics as indicators of bioavailability. The phenanthrene 28-d LC{sub 50} value was 750 mg/kg (632-891, 95% confidence intervals) for the peat soil tested. The initial phenanthrene concentration was 319 mg/kg, which biodegraded to 16 mg/kg within 15 days, at which time HPCD extraction suggested that phenanthrene was no longer bioavailable. Multivariate statistical analysis of {sup 1}H NMR spectra for E. fetida tissue extracts indicated that phenanthrene exposed and control earthworms differed throughout the 30 day experiment despite the low phenanthrene concentrations present after 15 days. This metabolic response was better correlated to total phenanthrene concentrations (Q{sup 2} = 0.59) than HPCD-extractable phenanthrene concentrations (Q{sup 2} = 0.46) suggesting that {sup 1}H NMR metabolomics offers considerable promise as a novel, molecular-level method to directly monitor the bioavailability of contaminants to earthworms in the environment. - Metabolic responses of Eisenia fetida earthworms to phenanthrene exposure are better correlated to total phenanthrene concentrations than to cyclodextrin-extractable concentrations through time.

  19. Hanbury-Brown Twiss noise correlation with time controlled quasi-particles in ballistic quantum conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glattli, D. C.; Roulleau, P.

    2016-02-01

    We study the Hanbury Brown and Twiss correlation of electronic quasi-particles injected in a quantum conductor using current noise correlations and we experimentally address the effect of finite temperature. By controlling the relative time of injection of two streams of electrons it is possible to probe the fermionic antibunching, performing the electron analog of the optical Hong Ou Mandel (HOM) experiment. The electrons are injected using voltage pulses with either sine-wave or Lorentzian shape. In the latter case, we propose a set of orthogonal wavefunctions, describing periodic trains of multiply charged electron pulses, which give a simple interpretation to the HOM shot noise. The effect of temperature is then discussed and experimentally investigated. We observe a perfect electron anti-bunching for a large range of temperature, showing that, as recently predicted, thermal mixing of the states does not affect anti-bunching properties, a feature qualitatively different from dephasing. For single charge Lorentzian pulses, we provide experimental evidence of the prediction that the HOM shot noise variation versus the emission time delay is remarkably independent of the temperature.

  20. Real-Time Robust Tracking for Motion Blur and Fast Motion via Correlation Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lingyun; Luo, Haibo; Hui, Bin; Chang, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Visual tracking has extensive applications in intelligent monitoring and guidance systems. Among state-of-the-art tracking algorithms, Correlation Filter methods perform favorably in robustness, accuracy and speed. However, it also has shortcomings when dealing with pervasive target scale variation, motion blur and fast motion. In this paper we proposed a new real-time robust scheme based on Kernelized Correlation Filter (KCF) to significantly improve performance on motion blur and fast motion. By fusing KCF and STC trackers, our algorithm also solve the estimation of scale variation in many scenarios. We theoretically analyze the problem for CFs towards motions and utilize the point sharpness function of the target patch to evaluate the motion state of target. Then we set up an efficient scheme to handle the motion and scale variation without much time consuming. Our algorithm preserves the properties of KCF besides the ability to handle special scenarios. In the end extensive experimental results on benchmark of VOT datasets show our algorithm performs advantageously competed with the top-rank trackers. PMID:27618046

  1. A three-phase time-correlation image sensor using pinned photodiode active pixels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sangman; Iwahori, Tomohiro; Sawada, Tomonari; Kawahito, Shoji; Ando, Shigeru

    2010-01-01

    A time correlation (TC) image sensor is a device that produces 3-phase time-correlated signals between the incident light intensity and three reference signals. A conventional implementation of the TC image sensor using a standard CMOS technology works at low frequency and with low sensitivity. In order to achieve higher modulation frequency and high sensitivity, the TC image sensor with a dual potential structure using a pinned diode is proposed. The dual potential structure is created by changing the impurity doping concentration in the two different potential regions. In this structure, high-frequency modulation can be achieved, while maintaining a sufficient light receiving area. A prototype TC image sensor with 366×390pixels is implemented with 0.18-μm 1P4M CMOS image sensor technology. Each pixel with the size of 12μm×12μm has one pinned photodiode with the dual potential structure, 12 transistors and 3capacitors to implement three-parallel-output active pixel circuits. A fundamental operation of the implemented TC sensor is demonstrated.

  2. Gender Differences in Sociodemographic Correlates with Exces-sive Television Viewing Time in Taiwanese Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Hsi CHANG

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Television viewing (TV is associated with an in-creased risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular dis-eases, and all-cause mortality (1. In particular, ex-cessive TV viewing was found to be more preva-lent among older adults aged over 55 years than among younger age groups (2. Moreover, it has been emphasized the importance of identifying at-risk populations with excessive TV viewing time and its potential moderator in older adults (3, 4. For examining these associations, a telephone-based survey conducted from June to July 2013 in Taiwanese population aged 55 years or older. A total of 1031 participants had valid data for analy-sis. The dependent variable was TV viewing time using 2 hours/day as the cut-off point. The inde-pendent variables were sociodemographic attrib-utes including gender, age, residential area, marital status, job status, education level, living status and physical activity. This study examined the socio-demographic correlates of excessive TV viewing time in older women and men.The nearly half of the respondents (47.4% viewed TV for more than 2 hours/day. Consistent with a previous Japanese study (4, Likelihood ratio test indicated there were significant interactions be-tween gender and sociodemographic for TV view-ing. Binary logistic regression models showed that older Taiwanese women who were overweight, obese, living in the northern area were more likely to view TV for more than 2 hours/day. No signif-icant correlates of excessive TV viewing were ob-served in older Taiwanese men.Our results indicated that gender is a potential moderator between sociodemographic factors and excessive TV viewing time. Older women who were being overweight, obese and living in the metropolitan areas tend to spend excessive time watching TV. Future studies should enhance the understanding of TV viewing time in older adults, thereby facilitating the development of more ef-fective gender-specific strategies or interventions for reducing TV

  3. Reorientation phenomena in imidazolium methyl sulfonate as probed by advanced solid-state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goward, Gillian R; Saalwächter, Kay; Fischbach, Ingrid; Spiess, Hans Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    Evidence for reorientation of imidazolium rings in imidazolium methylsulfonate is demonstrated using solid-state NMR. This material is a model system for exciting new proton-conducting materials based on imidazole. Two advanced NMR methods, including 1H-13C and 1H-15N recoupled polarization transfer with dipolar sideband pattern analysis and analysis of the coalescence of 13C lineshapes are used to characterize the ring reorientation. The process is found to occur at temperatures well below the melting point of the salt, between 240 and 380 K, and is described by a single activation energy, of 38+/-5 kJ/mol. This material is considered as a model system for quantifying the ring reorientation process, which is often proposed to be the rate-limiting step in proton transport in imidazole-based proton conducting materials.

  4. Influence of Rayleigh-Taylor Instability on Liquid Propellant Reorientation in a Low-Gravity Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhang-Guo; LIU Qiu-Sheng; LIU Rong; HU Wei; DENG Xin-Yu

    2009-01-01

    A computational simulation is conducted to investigate the influence of Rayleigh-Taylor instability on liquid propellant reorientation flow dynamics for the tank of CZ-3A launch vehicle series fuel tanks in a low-gravity environment. The volume-of-fluid (VOF) method is used to simulate the free surface flow of gas-liquid. The process of the liquid propellant reorientation started from initially fiat and curved interfaces are numerically studied. These two different initial conditions of the gas-liquid interface result in two modes of liquid flow. It is found that the Rayleigh-Taylor instability can be reduced evidently at the initial gas-liquid interface with a high curve during the process of liquid reorientation in a low-gravity environment.

  5. Reorientation of single-wall carbon nanotubes in negative anisotropy liquid crystals by an electric field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda García-García

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT are anisotropic nanoparticles that can cause modifications in the electrical and electro-optical properties of liquid crystals. The control of the SWCNT concentration, distribution and reorientation in such self-organized fluids allows for the possibility of tuning the liquid crystal properties. The alignment and reorientation of CNTs are studied in a system where the liquid crystal orientation effect has been isolated. Complementary studies including Raman spectroscopy, microscopic inspection and impedance studies were carried out. The results reveal an ordered reorientation of the CNTs induced by an electric field, which does not alter the orientation of the liquid crystal molecules. Moreover, impedance spectroscopy suggests a nonnegligible anchoring force between the CNTs and the liquid crystal molecules.

  6. Reorientation response of magnetic microspheres attached to gold electrodes under an applied magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Los Santos Valladares, L.; Reeve, R.M.; Mitrelias, T.; Langford, R.M.; Barnes, C.H.W., E-mail: luis_d_v@hotmail.com [Cavendish Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Cambridge Materials and Structures Laboratory (United Kingdom); Bustamante Dominguez, A. [Laboratorio de Ceramicos y Nanomateriales, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima (Peru); Aguiar, J. Albino [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Fisica; Azuma, Y. [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Midori-ku, Yokohama (Japan); Majima, Y. [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Midori-ku, Yokohama (Japan)

    2013-08-15

    In this work, we report the mechanical reorientation of thiolated ferromagnetic microspheres bridging a pair of gold electrodes under an external magnetic field. When an external magnetic field (7 kG) is applied during the measurement of the current-voltage characteristics of a carboxyl ferromagnetic microsphere (4 μm diameter) attached to two gold electrodes by self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of octane dithiol (C{sub 8}H{sub 18}S{sub 2}), the current signal is distorted. Rather than due to magnetoresistance, this effect is caused by a mechanical reorientation of the ferromagnetic sphere, which alters the number of SAMs between the sphere and the electrodes and therefore affects conduction. To study the physical reorientation of the ferromagnetic particles, we measure their hysteresis loops while suspended in a liquid solution. (author)

  7. Fluidization, resolidification, and reorientation of the endothelial cell in response to slow tidal stretches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Canovic, Elizabeth Peruski; Iordan, Andreea L; Rajendran, Kavitha; Manomohan, Greeshma; Pirentis, Athanassios P; Smith, Michael L; Butler, James P; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Stamenovic, Dimitrije

    2012-08-15

    Mechanical stretch plays an important role in regulating shape and orientation of the vascular endothelial cell. This morphological response to stretch is basic to angiogenesis, neovascularization, and vascular homeostasis, but mechanism remains unclear. To elucidate mechanisms, we used cell mapping rheometry to measure traction forces in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells subjected to periodic uniaxial stretches. Onset of periodic stretch of 10% strain amplitude caused a fluidization response typified by attenuation of traction forces almost to zero. As periodic stretch continued, the prompt fluidization response was followed by a slow resolidification response typified by recovery of the traction forces, but now aligned along the axis perpendicular to the imposed stretch. Reorientation of the cell body lagged reorientation of the traction forces, however. Together, these observations demonstrate that cellular reorientation in response to periodic stretch is preceded by traction attenuation by means of cytoskeletal fluidization and subsequent traction recovery transverse to the stretch direction by means of cytoskeletal resolidification.

  8. Effect of spin reorientation on magnetocaloric and transport properties of NdAl2

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, M. V.; da Silva, J. A.; Silva, L. S.

    2017-01-01

    We report the magneto-thermal and resistive properties of rare-earth dialuminide NdAl2, including spin reorientation transition. To this purpose, we used a theoretical model that considers the interactions of exchange and Zeeman, besides the anisotropy due to the electrical crystal field. The theoretical results obtained were compared to experimental data of the NdAl2 in single crystal and bulk forms. Explicitly, we have calculated the anisotropic variation of magnetic entropy with the magnetic field oriented along the three principal crystallographic directions: [100], [110], and [111] of NdAl2 single crystal, where a signature of the spin reorientation is observed in the [110] and [111] directions. Moreover, of magnetoresistivity we consider the applied magnetic field along the crystallographic directions [100] and [110]. In turn, for the polycrystalline form, the good agreement between theory and experiment confirms the presence of spin reorientation, which was predicted theoretically in magnetization curves.

  9. Chaotic attitude and reorientation maneuver for completely liquid-filled spacecraft with flexible appendage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baozeng Yue

    2009-01-01

    The present paper investigates the chaotic attitude dynamics and reorientation maneuver for completely viscous liquid-filled spacecraft with flexible appendage. All of the equations of motion are derived by using Lagrangian mechanics and then transformed into a form consisting of an unperturbed part plus perturbed terms so that the system's nonlinear characteristics can be exploited in phase space.Emphases are laid on the chaotic attitude dynamics produced from certain sets of physical parameter values of the spacecraft when energy dissipation acts to derive the body from minor to major axis spin. Numerical solutions of these equations show that the attitude dynamics of liquid-filled flexible spacecraft possesses characteristics common to random, nonperiodic solutions and chaos, and it is demonstrated that the desired reorientation maneuver is guaranteed by using a pair of thruster impulses. The control strategy for reorientation maneuver is designed and the numerical simulation results are presented for both the uncontrolled and controlled spins transition.

  10. Reorientation of single-wall carbon nanotubes in negative anisotropy liquid crystals by an electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, Amanda; Vergaz, Ricardo; Algorri, José F; Zito, Gianluigi; Cacace, Teresa; Marino, Antigone; Otón, José M

    2016-01-01

    Summary Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) are anisotropic nanoparticles that can cause modifications in the electrical and electro-optical properties of liquid crystals. The control of the SWCNT concentration, distribution and reorientation in such self-organized fluids allows for the possibility of tuning the liquid crystal properties. The alignment and reorientation of CNTs are studied in a system where the liquid crystal orientation effect has been isolated. Complementary studies including Raman spectroscopy, microscopic inspection and impedance studies were carried out. The results reveal an ordered reorientation of the CNTs induced by an electric field, which does not alter the orientation of the liquid crystal molecules. Moreover, impedance spectroscopy suggests a nonnegligible anchoring force between the CNTs and the liquid crystal molecules. PMID:27547599

  11. Delirium prevention in critically ill adults through an automated reorientation intervention - A pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Cindy L; Cairns, Paula; Ji, Ming; Calero, Karel; Anderson, W McDowell; Liang, Zhan

    Explore the effect of an automated reorientation intervention on ICU delirium in a prospective randomized controlled trial. Delirium is common in ICU patients, and negatively affects outcomes. Few prevention strategies have been tested. Thirty ICU patients were randomized to 3 groups. Ten received hourly recorded messages in a family member's voice during waking hours over 3 ICU days, 10 received the same messages in a non-family voice, and 10 (control) did not receive any automated reorientation messages. The primary outcome was delirium free days during the intervention period (evaluated by CAM-ICU). Groups were compared by Fisher's Exact Test. The family voice group had more delirium free days than the non-family voice group, and significantly more delirium free days (p = 0.0437) than the control group. Reorientation through automated, scripted messages reduced incidence of delirium. Using identical scripted messages, family voice was more effective than non-family voice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Black Box Real-Time Transient Absorption Spectroscopy and Electron Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhill, John

    2017-06-01

    We introduce an atomistic, all-electron, black-box electronic structure code to simulate transient absorption (TA) spectra and apply it to simulate pyrazole and a GFP- chromophore derivative1. The method is an application of OSCF2, our dissipative exten- sion of time-dependent density-functional theory. We compare our simulated spectra directly with recent ultra-fast spectroscopic experiments. We identify features in the TA spectra to Pauli-blocking which may be missed without a first-principles model. An important ingredient in this method is the stationary-TDDFT correction scheme recently put forwards by Fischer, Govind, and Cramer which allows us to overcome a limitation of adiabatic TDDFT. We demonstrate that OSCF2 is able to reproduce the energies of bleaches and induced absorptions, as well as the decay of the transient spectrum, with only the molecular structure as input. We show that the treatment of electron correlation is the biggest hurdle for TA simulations, which motivates the second half of the talk a new method for realtime electron correlation. We continue to derive and propagate self-consistent electronic dynamics. Extending our derivation of OSCF2 to include electron correlation we obtain a non-linear correlated one-body equation of motion which corrects TDHF. Similar equations are known in quantum kinetic theory, but rare in electronic structure. We introduce approximations that stabilize the theory and reduce its computational cost. We compare the resulting dynamics with well-known exact and approximate theories showing improvements over TDHF. When propagated EE2 changes occupation numbers like exact theory, an important feature missing from TDHF or TDDFT. We introduce a rotating wave approximation to reduce the scaling of the model to O(N^4), and enable propagation on realistically large systems. The equation-of-motion does not rely on a pure-state model for the electronic state, and could be used to study the relationship between electron

  13. Attributions, future time perspective and career maturity in nursing undergraduates: correlational study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Cheng; Yang, Liu; Chen, Yuxia; Zou, Huijing; Su, Yonggang; Fan, Xiuzhen

    2016-01-25

    Career maturity is an important parameter as nursing undergraduates prepare for their future careers. However, little is known regarding the relationships between attributions, future time perspective and career maturity among nursing undergraduates. The purpose of this study was to investigate the degree of career maturity and its relationship with attributions and future time perspective. A cross-sectional survey was designed. This survey was administered to 431 Chinese nursing undergraduates. Independent-sample t-tests and one-way ANOVA were performed to examine the mean differences between categories of binary and categorical demographic characteristics, respectively. Pearson correlations and multiple linear regressions were used to test the relationships between attributions, future time perspective and career maturity. The degree of career maturity was moderate among nursing undergraduates and that internal attributions of academic achievement, future efficacy and future purpose consciousness were positively associated with career maturity (all p imperative roles of internal attributions and future time perspective and to facilitate their transition from school to clinical practice.

  14. Iterative Monte Carlo with bead-adapted sampling for complex-time correlation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhao, Vikram; Makri, Nancy

    2010-03-01

    In a recent communication [V. Jadhao and N. Makri, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 161102 (2008)], we introduced an iterative Monte Carlo (IMC) path integral methodology for calculating complex-time correlation functions. This method constitutes a stepwise evaluation of the path integral on a grid selected by a Monte Carlo procedure, circumventing the exponential growth of statistical error with increasing propagation time, while realizing the advantageous scaling of importance sampling in the grid selection and integral evaluation. In the present paper, we present an improved formulation of IMC, which is based on a bead-adapted sampling procedure; thus leading to grid point distributions that closely resemble the absolute value of the integrand at each iteration. We show that the statistical error of IMC does not grow upon repeated iteration, in sharp contrast to the performance of the conventional path integral approach which leads to exponential increase in statistical uncertainty. Numerical results on systems with up to 13 degrees of freedom and propagation up to 30 times the "thermal" time ℏβ /2 illustrate these features.

  15. Improved efficiency of maximum likelihood analysis of time series with temporally correlated errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langbein, John O.

    2017-01-01

    Most time series of geophysical phenomena have temporally correlated errors. From these measurements, various parameters are estimated. For instance, from geodetic measurements of positions, the rates and changes in rates are often estimated and are used to model tectonic processes. Along with the estimates of the size of the parameters, the error in these parameters needs to be assessed. If temporal correlations are not taken into account, or each observation is assumed to be independent, it is likely that any estimate of the error of these parameters will be too low and the estimated value of the parameter will be biased. Inclusion of better estimates of uncertainties is limited by several factors, including selection of the correct model for the background noise and the computational requirements to estimate the parameters of the selected noise model for cases where there are numerous observations. Here, I address the second problem of computational efficiency using maximum likelihood estimates (MLE). Most geophysical time series have background noise processes that can be represented as a combination of white and power-law noise, 1/fα">1/fα1/fα with frequency, f. With missing data, standard spectral techniques involving FFTs are not appropriate. Instead, time domain techniques involving construction and inversion of large data covariance matrices are employed. Bos et al. (J Geod, 2013. doi:10.1007/s00190-012-0605-0) demonstrate one technique that substantially increases the efficiency of the MLE methods, yet is only an approximate solution for power-law indices >1.0 since they require the data covariance matrix to be Toeplitz. That restriction can be removed by simply forming a data filter that adds noise processes rather than combining them in quadrature. Consequently, the inversion of the data covariance matrix is simplified yet provides robust results for a wider range of power-law indices.

  16. Improved efficiency of maximum likelihood analysis of time series with temporally correlated errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langbein, John

    2017-02-01

    Most time series of geophysical phenomena have temporally correlated errors. From these measurements, various parameters are estimated. For instance, from geodetic measurements of positions, the rates and changes in rates are often estimated and are used to model tectonic processes. Along with the estimates of the size of the parameters, the error in these parameters needs to be assessed. If temporal correlations are not taken into account, or each observation is assumed to be independent, it is likely that any estimate of the error of these parameters will be too low and the estimated value of the parameter will be biased. Inclusion of better estimates of uncertainties is limited by several factors, including selection of the correct model for the background noise and the computational requirements to estimate the parameters of the selected noise model for cases where there are numerous observations. Here, I address the second problem of computational efficiency using maximum likelihood estimates (MLE). Most geophysical time series have background noise processes that can be represented as a combination of white and power-law noise, 1/f^{α } with frequency, f. With missing data, standard spectral techniques involving FFTs are not appropriate. Instead, time domain techniques involving construction and inversion of large data covariance matrices are employed. Bos et al. (J Geod, 2013. doi: 10.1007/s00190-012-0605-0) demonstrate one technique that substantially increases the efficiency of the MLE methods, yet is only an approximate solution for power-law indices >1.0 since they require the data covariance matrix to be Toeplitz. That restriction can be removed by simply forming a data filter that adds noise processes rather than combining them in quadrature. Consequently, the inversion of the data covariance matrix is simplified yet provides robust results for a wider range of power-law indices.

  17. Improved efficiency of maximum likelihood analysis of time series with temporally correlated errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langbein, John

    2017-08-01

    Most time series of geophysical phenomena have temporally correlated errors. From these measurements, various parameters are estimated. For instance, from geodetic measurements of positions, the rates and changes in rates are often estimated and are used to model tectonic processes. Along with the estimates of the size of the parameters, the error in these parameters needs to be assessed. If temporal correlations are not taken into account, or each observation is assumed to be independent, it is likely that any estimate of the error of these parameters will be too low and the estimated value of the parameter will be biased. Inclusion of better estimates of uncertainties is limited by several factors, including selection of the correct model for the background noise and the computational requirements to estimate the parameters of the selected noise model for cases where there are numerous observations. Here, I address the second problem of computational efficiency using maximum likelihood estimates (MLE). Most geophysical time series have background noise processes that can be represented as a combination of white and power-law noise, 1/f^{α } with frequency, f. With missing data, standard spectral techniques involving FFTs are not appropriate. Instead, time domain techniques involving construction and inversion of large data covariance matrices are employed. Bos et al. (J Geod, 2013. doi: 10.1007/s00190-012-0605-0) demonstrate one technique that substantially increases the efficiency of the MLE methods, yet is only an approximate solution for power-law indices >1.0 since they require the data covariance matrix to be Toeplitz. That restriction can be removed by simply forming a data filter that adds noise processes rather than combining them in quadrature. Consequently, the inversion of the data covariance matrix is simplified yet provides robust results for a wider range of power-law indices.

  18. Computational time-resolved and resonant x-ray scattering of strongly correlated materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bansil, Arun [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-11-09

    Basic-Energy Sciences of the Department of Energy (BES/DOE) has made large investments in x-ray sources in the U.S. (NSLS-II, LCLS, NGLS, ALS, APS) as powerful enabling tools for opening up unprecedented new opportunities for exploring properties of matter at various length and time scales. The coming online of the pulsed photon source, literally allows us to see and follow the dynamics of processes in materials at their natural timescales. There is an urgent need therefore to develop theoretical methodologies and computational models for understanding how x-rays interact with matter and the related spectroscopies of materials. The present project addressed aspects of this grand challenge of x-ray science. In particular, our Collaborative Research Team (CRT) focused on developing viable computational schemes for modeling x-ray scattering and photoemission spectra of strongly correlated materials in the time-domain. The vast arsenal of formal/numerical techniques and approaches encompassed by the members of our CRT were brought to bear through appropriate generalizations and extensions to model the pumped state and the dynamics of this non-equilibrium state, and how it can be probed via x-ray absorption (XAS), emission (XES), resonant and non-resonant x-ray scattering, and photoemission processes. We explored the conceptual connections between the time-domain problems and other second-order spectroscopies, such as resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) because RIXS may be effectively thought of as a pump-probe experiment in which the incoming photon acts as the pump, and the fluorescent decay is the probe. Alternatively, when the core-valence interactions are strong, one can view K-edge RIXS for example, as the dynamic response of the material to the transient presence of a strong core-hole potential. Unlike an actual pump-probe experiment, here there is no mechanism for adjusting the time-delay between the pump and the probe. However, the core hole

  19. Frequency-time correlation of inhomogeneous broadening in a three-level system and the stimulated photon echo locking effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nefed'ev, L. A.; Nizamova, E. I.; Garnaeva, G. I.

    2016-07-01

    The frequency-time correlation of inhomogeneous broadening on different transitions in a threelevel resonant medium in the presence of external spatially nonuniform electric fields is considered. It is shown that, under a certain relationship between the magnitudes of gradients of external nonuniform electric fields acting at different moments of time, it is possible to control the magnitude of the frequency-time correlation on different frequency transitions. An increase in the frequency-time correlation coefficient with certain strengths of external spatially nonuniform electric fields leads to the recovery of the phase memory of the system and an increase in the stimulated photon echo intensity.

  20. Long-range correlations in heart rate variability during computer-mouse work under time pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dineng; He, Mulu; Qiu, Yihong; Zhu, Yisheng; Tong, Shanbao

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influences of time pressure on long-range correlations in heart rate variability (HRV), the effects of relaxation on the cardiovascular regulation system and the advantages of detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) over the conventional power spectral analysis in discriminating states of the cardiovascular systems under different levels of time pressure. Volunteer subjects ( n=10, male/female=5/5) participated in a computer-mouse task consisting of five sessions, i.e. baseline session (BSS) which was free of time pressure, followed by sessions with 80% (SS80), 100% (SS100), 90% (SS90) and 150% (SS150) of the baseline time. Electrocardiogram (ECG) and task performance were recorded throughout the experiments. Two rest sessions before and after the computer-mouse work, i.e. RS1 and RS2, were also recorded as comparison. HRV series were subsequently analyzed by both conventional power spectral analysis and detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). The long-term scaling exponent α2 by DFA was significantly lower in SS80 than that in other sessions. It was also found that short-term release of time pressure had positive influences on the cardiovascular system, i.e. the α2 in RS2 was significantly higher than that in SS80, SS100 and SS90. No significant differences were found between any two sessions by conventional power spectral analysis. Our results showed that DFA performed better in discriminating the states of cardiovascular autonomic modulation under time pressure than the conventional power spectral analysis.

  1. Cross-correlation based time delay estimation for turbulent flow velocity measurements: Statistical considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tal, Balazs; Bencze, Attila; Zoletnik, Sandor; Veres, Gabor [KFKI-Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Association EURATOM, PO Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Por, Gabor [Department of Nuclear Techniques, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Association EURATOM, Muegyetem rkp. 9., H-1111 Budapest (Hungary)

    2011-12-15

    Time delay estimation methods (TDE) are well-known techniques to investigate poloidal flows in hot magnetized plasmas through the propagation properties of turbulent structures in the medium. One of these methods is based on the estimation of the time lag at which the cross-correlation function (CCF) estimation reaches its maximum value. The uncertainty of the peak location refers to the smallest determinable flow velocity modulation, and therefore the standard deviation of the time delay imposes important limitation to the measurements. In this article, the relative standard deviation of the CCF estimation and the standard deviation of its peak location are calculated analytically using a simple model of turbulent signals. This model assumes independent (non interacting) overlapping events (coherent structures) with randomly distributed spatio-temporal origins moving with background flow. The result of our calculations is the derivation of a general formula for the CCF variance, which is valid not exclusively in the high event density limit, but also for arbitrary event densities. Our formula reproduces the well known expression for high event densities previously published in the literature. In this paper we also present a derivation of the variance of time delay estimation that turns out to be inversely proportional to the applied time window. The derived formulas were tested in real plasma measurements. The calculations are an extension of the earlier work of Bencze and Zoletnik [Phys. Plasmas 12, 052323 (2005)] where the autocorrelation-width technique was developed. Additionally, we show that velocities calculated by a TDE method possess a broadband noise which originates from this variance, its power spectral density cannot be decreased by worsening the time resolution and can be coherent with noises of other velocity measurements where the same turbulent structures are used. This noise should not be confused with the impact of zero mean frequency zonal flow

  2. Pressure-induced spin fluctuations and spin reorientation in hexagonal manganites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlenko, D. P.; Kichanov, S. E.; Lee, S.; Park, J.-G.; Savenko, B. N.

    2007-04-01

    The magnetic structures of hexagonal manganites YMnO3 and LuMnO3 have been studied by powder neutron diffraction up to 6 GPa in the temperature range 10-295 K. At ambient pressure, a triangular antiferromagnetic (AFM) state of a Γ1 irreducible representation is stable below TN = 70 K in YMnO3. Upon the application of high pressure, a spin reorientation is induced and the triangular AFM structure evolves from Γ1 to Γ1+Γ2 representations. On the other hand, in LuMnO3 the triangular AFM state of a Γ2 irreducible representation with TNap90 K remains stable over the entire pressure range investigated. The ordered magnetic moment values decrease under pressure with dM/dP = -0.35 μB GPa-1 in YMnO3 and -0.08 μB GPa-1 in LuMnO3. Simultaneously, a considerable increase in diffuse scattering intensity was found in YMnO3, while it was much less pronounced for LuMnO3. Both features indicate the enhancement of spin fluctuations due to geometrical frustration effects and an increase in the volume fraction of the spin-liquid state coexisting with the ordered AFM phase. The characteristic spin correlation length is weakly affected by pressure. The relationship between the pressure-induced behaviour of magnetic structure and the structural characteristics of the quasi-two-dimensional (2D) triangular network formed by Mn and O ions in hexagonal RMnO3 is analysed.

  3. The Correlates of Leisure Time Physical Activity among an Adults Population from Southern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Jin-Shang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Assessing the correlates of practicing physical activity during leisure time is important with regard to planning and designing public health strategies to increase beneficial behaviors among adult populations. Although the importance of leisure time physical activity (LTPA is highlighted in many Western countries, there are not many publications on physical activity patterns, and even less on their correlates, in non-Western societies. The goal of this study was thus to explore the determinants influencing adults' leisure time physical activity (LTPA in a city in southern Taiwan. Methods A cross-sectional population-based study was conducted in 2007, using a standardized questionnaire. Energy expenditure was dichotomized into two groups based on the recommended levels of moderate physical activity from LTPA: ≥10 or -1. Logistic regression analyses were applied to the results. Results A total of 762 subjects with valid data took part in the study (mean age 53.8 ± 13.8 years. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, we found the following results: Age was positively associated with LTPA. Adults with stronger perceived convenience of exercise facilities (OR = 2.04; 95%CI = 1.28-3.24 and past exercise experience in school (OR = 1.86; 95%CI= 1.19-2.91 participated in more LTPA. Subjects with more general social support (OR = 1.66;95%CI = 1.13-2.44, greater knowledge about the health benefits of exercise (OR = 1.85;95%CI = 1.25-2.74, more sports media consumption (OR = 1.94;95%CI = 1.26-2.98, and higher self-efficacy (OR = 3.99;95%CI = 2.67-5.97 were more likely to engage in LTPA. Further analysis comparing different sources of social support showed only social support from friends had a significant positive association (OR = 1.73;95%CI = 1.14-2.63 with increased LTPA. Conclusions LTPA in southern city of Taiwan showed some unique associations with age, socioeconomic status and media consumption that are not commonly

  4. Orbital magnetic moment instability at the spin reorientation transition of Nd2Fe14B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia; Chaboy; Bartolome; Goedkoop

    2000-07-10

    Highly accurate soft-XMCD data recorded on a Nd2Fe14B single crystal, through the spin reorientation transition show that the average Fe orbital moment (a) is proportional to the macroscopic Fe anisotropy constant, and (b) diverges 15 K below the reorientation transition temperature. This divergence is indicative of a critical behavior and it is related to a tetragonal distortion. These results give experimental evidence of the mutual dependence between orbital moment, macroscopic magnetic anisotropy, and tetragonal distortion. Furthermore, it is argued that the critical behavior of the orbital moment is at the origin of similar divergences previously observed in Mossbauer and Hall-effect data.

  5. New fractal math tool providing simultaneous reorientation and acceleration of spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yefremov, Alexander P.

    2017-10-01

    Quaternion based math system of spacecraft reorientation is extended by admitting imaginary rotation parameters, thus involving hyperbolic functions. For simplicity only one simple hyperbolic rotation is added as the last one in the series of orthogonal matrices. The scheme is reduced to a single rotation about instant axis, and to transformation of primitive basis on a 2D fractal space of dimension ½. This new tool is proved to simultaneously reorient the spacecraft and to accelerate it the kinematics automatically described as relativistic. With a small speed the problem becomes a classical one.

  6. A study of time management: the correlation between video game usage and academic performance markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Vivek

    2007-08-01

    This study analyzes the correlation between video game usage and academic performance. Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) and grade-point average (GPA) scores were used to gauge academic performance. The amount of time a student spends playing video games has a negative correlation with students' GPA and SAT scores. As video game usage increases, GPA and SAT scores decrease. A chi-squared analysis found a p value for video game usage and GPA was greater than a 95% confidence level (0.005 video game usage also returned a p value that was significant (0.01 video games may have a detrimental effect on an individual's GPA and possibly on SAT scores. Although these results show statistical dependence, proving cause and effect remains difficult, since SAT scores represent a single test on a given day. The effects of video games maybe be cumulative; however, drawing a conclusion is difficult because SAT scores represent a measure of general knowledge. GPA versus video games is more reliable because both involve a continuous measurement of engaged activity and performance. The connection remains difficult because of the complex nature of student life and academic performance. Also, video game usage may simply be a function of specific personality types and characteristics.

  7. Leisure-time physical exercise : Prevalence, attitudinal correlates, and behavioral correlates among young Europeans from 21 countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steptoe, A; Wardle, J; Fuller, R; Holte, A; Justo, J; Sanderman, R; Wichstrom, L; Wichstroem, L.

    1997-01-01

    Background. Increasing leisure time physical exercise is a major target of public health programs throughout the developed world, but few international comparisons of exercise habits among people from diverse cultures have been published, The objectives of this study were to assess the prevalence of

  8. Leisure-time physical exercise : Prevalence, attitudinal correlates, and behavioral correlates among young Europeans from 21 countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steptoe, A; Wardle, J; Fuller, R; Holte, A; Justo, J; Sanderman, R; Wichstrom, L; Wichstroem, L.

    1997-01-01

    Background. Increasing leisure time physical exercise is a major target of public health programs throughout the developed world, but few international comparisons of exercise habits among people from diverse cultures have been published, The objectives of this study were to assess the prevalence of

  9. Photon efficiency optimization in time-correlated single photon counting technique for fluorescence lifetime imaging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgeman, Lior; Fixler, Dror

    2013-06-01

    In time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) systems, the maximum signal throughput is limited by the occurrence of pile-up and other effects. In many biological applications that exhibit high levels of fluorescence intensity (FI), pile-up-related distortions yield serious distortions in the fluorescence lifetime (FLT) calculation as well as significant decrease in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Recent developments that allow the use of high-repetition-rate light sources (in the range of 50-100 MHz) in fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) experiments enable minimization of pile-up-related distortions. However, modern TCSPC configurations that use high-repetition-rate excitation sources for FLIM suffer from dead-time-related distortions that cause unpredictable distortions of the FI signal. In this study, the loss of SNR is described by F- value as it is typically done in FLIM systems. This F-value describes the relation of the relative standard deviation in the estimated FLT to the relative standard deviation in FI measurements. Optimization of the F-value allows minimization of signal distortion, as well as shortening of the acquisition time for certain samples. We applied this method for Fluorescein, Rhodamine B, and Erythrosine fluorescent solutions that have different FLT values (4 ns, 1.67 ns, and 140 ps, respectively).

  10. Real-time three-dimensional digital image correlation for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Rong; Wu, Hua; Arola, Dwayne; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2016-10-01

    Digital image correlation (DIC) has been successfully applied for evaluating the mechanical behavior of biological tissues. A three-dimensional (3-D) DIC system has been developed and applied to examining the motion of bones in the human foot. To achieve accurate, real-time displacement measurements, an algorithm including matching between sequential images and image pairs has been developed. The system was used to monitor the movement of markers which were attached to a precisely motorized stage. The accuracy of the proposed technique for in-plane and out-of-plane measurements was found to be -0.25% and 1.17%, respectively. Two biomedical applications were presented. In the experiment involving the foot arch, a human cadaver lower leg and foot specimen were subjected to vertical compressive loads up to 700 N at a rate of 10 N/s and the 3-D motions of bones in the foot were monitored in real time. In the experiment involving distal tibio fibular syndesmosis, a human cadaver lower leg and foot specimen were subjected to a monotonic rotational torque up to 5 Nm at a speed of 5 deg per min and the relative displacements of the tibia and fibula were monitored in real time. Results showed that the system could reach a frequency of up to 16 Hz with 6 points measured simultaneously. This technique sheds new lights on measuring 3-D motion of bones in biomechanical studies.

  11. 32-channel time-correlated-single-photon-counting system for high-throughput lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peronio, P.; Labanca, I.; Acconcia, G.; Ruggeri, A.; Lavdas, A. A.; Hicks, A. A.; Pramstaller, P. P.; Ghioni, M.; Rech, I.

    2017-08-01

    Time-Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) is a very efficient technique for measuring weak and fast optical signals, but it is mainly limited by the relatively "long" measurement time. Multichannel systems have been developed in recent years aiming to overcome this limitation by managing several detectors or TCSPC devices in parallel. Nevertheless, if we look at state-of-the-art systems, there is still a strong trade-off between the parallelism level and performance: the higher the number of channels, the poorer the performance. In 2013, we presented a complete and compact 32 × 1 TCSPC system, composed of an array of 32 single-photon avalanche diodes connected to 32 time-to-amplitude converters, which showed that it was possible to overcome the existing trade-off. In this paper, we present an evolution of the previous work that is conceived for high-throughput fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. This application can be addressed by the new system thanks to a centralized logic, fast data management and an interface to a microscope. The new conceived hardware structure is presented, as well as the firmware developed to manage the operation of the module. Finally, preliminary results, obtained from the practical application of the technology, are shown to validate the developed system.

  12. Timing and intensity of light correlate with body weight in adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn J Reid

    Full Text Available Light exposure can influence sleep and circadian timing, both of which have been shown to influence weight regulation. The goal of this study was to evaluate the relationship between ambient light, sleep and body mass index. Participants included 54 individuals (26 males, mean age 30.6, SD = 11.7 years. Light levels, sleep midpoint and duration were measured with wrist actigraphy (Actiwatch-L for 7 days. BMI was derived from self-reported height and weight. Caloric intake was determined from 7 days of food logs. For each participant, light and activity data were output in 2 minute epochs, smoothed using a 5 point (10 minute moving average and then aggregated over 24 hours. The mean light timing above 500 lux (MLiT500 was defined as the average clock time of all aggregated data points above 500 lux. MLiT500 was positively correlated with BMI (r = 0.51, p<0.001, and midpoint of sleep (r = 0.47, p<0.01. In a multivariable linear regression model including MLiT500 and midpoint of sleep, MLiT500 was a significant predictor of BMI (B = 1.26 SE = 0.34, β = 0.53 p = 0.001, r2Δ = 0.22. Adjusting for covariates, MLiT500 remained an independent predictor of BMI (B = 1.28 SE = 0.36, β = 0.54, p = 0.002, r2Δ = 0.20. The full model accounted for 34.7% of the variance in BMI (p = 0.01. Exposure to moderate levels of light at biologically appropriate times can influence weight, independent of sleep timing and duration.

  13. Estimation of T2 relaxation time of breast cancer: Correlation with clinical, imaging and pathological features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Mirinae; Sohn, Yu Mee [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Jung Kyu; Jahng, Geon Ho; Rhee, Sun Jung; Oh, Jang Hoon; Won, Kyu Yeoun [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the T2* relaxation time in breast cancer, and to evaluate the association between the T2* value with clinical-imaging-pathological features of breast cancer. Between January 2011 and July 2013, 107 consecutive women with 107 breast cancers underwent multi-echo T2*-weighted imaging on a 3T clinical magnetic resonance imaging system. The Student's t test and one-way analysis of variance were used to compare the T2* values of cancer for different groups, based on the clinical-imaging-pathological features. In addition, multiple linear regression analysis was performed to find independent predictive factors associated with the T2* values. Of the 107 breast cancers, 92 were invasive and 15 were ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). The mean T2* value of invasive cancers was significantly longer than that of DCIS (p = 0.029). Signal intensity on T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) and histologic grade of invasive breast cancers showed significant correlation with T2* relaxation time in univariate and multivariate analysis. Breast cancer groups with higher signal intensity on T2WI showed longer T2* relaxation time (p = 0.005). Cancer groups with higher histologic grade showed longer T2* relaxation time (p = 0.017). The T2* value is significantly longer in invasive cancer than in DCIS. In invasive cancers, T2* relaxation time is significantly longer in higher histologic grades and high signal intensity on T2WI. Based on these preliminary data, quantitative T2* mapping has the potential to be useful in the characterization of breast cancer.

  14. Ultra-compact 32-channel system for time-correlated single-photon counting measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonioli, S.; Cuccato, A.; Miari, L.; Labanca, I.; Rech, I.; Ghioni, M.

    2013-05-01

    Modern Time-Correlated Single-Photon Counting applications require to detect spectral and temporal fluorescence data simultaneously and from different areas of the analyzed sample. These rising quests have led the development of multichannel systems able to perform high count rate and high performance analysis. In this work we describe a new 32-channel TCSPC system designed to be used in modern setups. The presented module consists of four independent 8-channel TCSPC boards, each of them including two 4-channel Time-Amplitude Converter arrays. These TAC arrays are built-in 0.35 μm Si-Ge BiCMOS technology and are characterized by low crosstalk, high resolution, high conversion rate and variable full-scale range. The 8-channel TCSPC board implements an 8-channel ADC to sample the TAC outputs, an FPGA to record and organize the measurement results and a USB 2.0 interface to enable real-time data transmission to and from an external PC. Experimental results demonstrate that the acquisition system ensures high performance TCSPC measurements, in particular: high conversion rate (5 MHz), good time resolution (down to 30 psFWHM with the full scale range set to 11 ns) and low differential non-linearity (rms value lower than 0.15% of the time bin width). We design the module to be very compact and, thanks to the reduced dimensions of the 8-channel TCSPC board (95×40 mm), the whole system can be enclosed in a small aluminum case (160×125×30 mm).

  15. Real-time flight altitude estimation using phase correlation with Gram polynomial decimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhry, Aadil Jaleel; Badshah, Amir; Amin, Saadullah

    2017-03-01

    The paper presents a passive technique for real-time altitude above ground level estimation for aerial vehicles using a monocular camera, a GPS receiver and an inertial measurement unit. The paper discusses a robust method for featureless registration of successive images through phase correlation using Gram polynomial decimation. Altitude is estimated by formulating the shift in pixels between the images in terms of distance travelled, calculated using corresponding GPS latitudes and longitudes. Resultant value is compensated for changes in pitch before being passed through Savitzky-Golay filter. The system can generate results every 300ms on a lowcost commercial digital signal processor with mean error of 2m and standard deviation of 13m. The proposed system is suitable for speeds up to 300m/s and altitudes up to 3000m.

  16. Correlations for the estimation of monthly mean hourly diffuse solar radiation: a time dependent approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Katiyar, Akhilesh Kumar, C. K. Pandey, V. K. Katiyar, S. H. Abdi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The time dependent monthly mean hourly diffuse solar radiation on a horizontal surface has been estimated for Lucknow (latitude26.75 degree, longitude 80.50 degree using least squares regression analysis. The monthly and annually regression constants are obtained. The present results are compared with the estimation of Orgill-Holands (Sol. Energy, 19 (4, 357 (1977, Erbs et. al (Sol. Energy 28 (4, 293-304(1982 and Spencer (Sol. Energy 29 (1, 19-32(1982 as well as with experimental value. The proposed constant provides better estimation for the entire year over others. Spencer, who correlate hourly diffuse fraction with clearness index, estimates lowest value except in summers when insolation in this region is very high. The accuracy of the regression constants are also checked with statistical tests of root mean square error (RMSE, mean bias error (MBE and t –statistic tests.

  17. Time Reversibility, Correlation Decay and the Steady State Fluctuation Relation for Dissipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis J. Evans

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Steady state fluctuation relations for nonequilibrium systems are under intense investigation because of their important practical implications in nanotechnology and biology. However the precise conditions under which they hold need clarification. Using the dissipation function, which is related to the entropy production of linear irreversible thermodynamics, we show time reversibility, ergodic consistency and a recently introduced form of correlation decay, called T-mixing, are sufficient conditions for steady state fluctuation relations to hold. Our results are not restricted to a particular model and show that the steady state fluctuation relation for the dissipation function holds near or far from equilibrium subject to these conditions. The dissipation function thus plays a comparable role in nonequilibrium systems to thermodynamic potentials in equilibrium systems.

  18. Turbulent Prandtl number and space-time temperature correlation measurements in an incompressible turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Nader; Strataridakis, Constantine J.; White, Bruce R.

    1990-01-01

    Hot-wire anemometry measurements in an incompressible turbulent boundary laeyr flow over a heated flat plate at zero pressure gradient were made using an x-probe and temperature fluctuation probe. The experiments resulted in direct measurement of the turbulent Prandtl number as a function of height through the boundary layer for three temperature difference cases. Also, space-time correlations of temperature fluctuations T-prime were obtained with a pair of temperature fluctuation probes. The mean convection velocities of the T-prime large-scale structure are presented for the three temperature difference cases. The mean convection velocity of the T-prime structure is a function of position y(+) and is found to be independent of the temperature difference for the cases considered.

  19. Exploring self-perceptions and social influences as correlates of adolescent leisure-time physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabiston, Catherine M; Crocker, Peter R E

    2008-02-01

    This study examined adolescent leisure-time physical activity correlates using the expectancy-value (EV) model. Adolescents (N = 857) completed questionnaires to assess competence and value self-perceptions, social influences, and physical activity. Direct and indirect effects of self-perceptions and parent and best friend influences on physical activity were explored using structural equation modeling. Measurement models were a good fit to the data and gender invariance was supported. The structural mediation model was a reasonable fit to the data, whereby the indirect effects of parents and peers and the direct effects of competence beliefs and values together accounted for 49% of the variance in physical activity. In this model, the pattern of relationships was similar for adolescent males and females. Findings supporting the EV model provide theoretical and practical implications for understanding adolescent physical activity.

  20. On-line Time Differential Perturbed Angular Correlation With Light Probe Nucleus 19F

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T.Minamisono; K.Matsuta; M.Fukuda; M.Mihara; WANGZhi-qiang; K.Sato; H.Akai

    2001-01-01

    1 IntroductionThe time differential perturbed angular correlation(TDPAC) has been known for about 50 years. So far, no on-line TDPAC(TDPACOL) has been performed because of mother nuclei all having a rather long lifetime. In addition, almost all TDPAC experiments have been conducted using probe nuclei with a mass heavier than 40.The present work is motivated to develop a TDPACOL technique with light probe nuclei. The key point for it is to have short-lived mother nuclei with a lifetime of, say, several ten seconds. We have found a suitable mother nucleus 19O having a half-life of 26.9 s and decaying to the daughter nucleus

  1. Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocity measurements in fluids using time-domain cross-correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunker, J.; Beard, P.

    2013-03-01

    Blood flow measurements have been demonstrated using the acoustic resolution mode of photoacoustic sensing. This is unlike previous flowmetry methods using the optical resolution mode, which limits the maximum penetration depth to approximately 1mm. Here we describe a pulsed time correlation photoacoustic Doppler technique that is inherently flexible, lending itself to both resolution modes. Doppler time shifts are quantified via cross-correlation of pairs of photoacoustic waveforms generated in moving absorbers using pairs of laser light pulses, and the photoacoustic waves detected using an ultrasound transducer. The acoustic resolution mode is employed by using the transducer focal width, rather than the large illuminated volume, to define the lateral spatial resolution. The use of short laser pulses allows depth-resolved measurements to be obtained with high spatial resolution, offering the prospect of mapping flow within microcirculation. Whilst our previous work has been limited to a non-fluid phantom, we now demonstrate measurements in more realistic blood-mimicking phantoms incorporating fluid suspensions of microspheres flowing along an optically transparent tube. Velocities up to 110 mm/s were measured with accuracies approaching 1% of the known velocities, and resolutions of a few mm/s. The velocity range and resolution are scalable with excitation pulse separation, but the maximum measurable velocity was considerably smaller than the value expected from the detector focal beam width. Measurements were also made for blood flowing at velocities up to 13.5 mm/s. This was for a sample reduced to 5% of the normal haematocrit; increasing the red blood cell concentration limited the maximum measurable velocity so that no results were obtained for concentrations greater than 20% of a physiologically realistic haematocrit. There are several possible causes for this limitation; these include the detector bandwidth and irregularities in the flow pattern. Better

  2. Extra-regional residence time as a correlate of plant invasiveness: European archaeophytes in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Sorte, Frank A; Pysek, Petr

    2009-09-01

    Human activities have degraded biogeographical barriers to dispersal resulting in the spread and naturalization of increasing numbers of nonnative invasive species. One correlate of invasiveness within a region is residence time or time since introduction. Plant species that were introduced into Europe prior to AD 1500 (European archaeophytes) that were subsequently introduced into North America provide a unique opportunity to examine the effect of extra-regional residence time (i.e., residence time that occurred in a nonnative region before a species was introduced into a new region). Here, we examine how nonnative species with extensive extra-regional residence times have affected beta diversity among states in the contiguous United States of America based on an analysis of occupancy and distance decay of similarity. State floras contained an average of 3106 +/- 922 species (mean +/- SD) with 2318 +/- 757 species classified as native, 180 +/- 43 species as European archaeophyte, and 608 -236 species as other exotic with no European archaeophyte association. For European archaeophytes, 42% were identified as noxious weeds in the United States with 8% identified as agricultural and 14% as natural-area weeds (20%, 2%, and 13% for other exotics, respectively). In strong contrast to natives and other exotics, European archaeophytes were more widespread and presented weaker distance-decay patterns. Thus, European archaeophytes were more likely to become noxious weeds, particularly within agricultural areas, and were associated with significant losses in beta diversity. We suggest that this outcome is a consequence of extra-regional residence time, which allowed for the selection of species or the evolution of traits that favored the colonization of arable habitats associated with early agricultural activities in Europe, habitats that are widespread, resource rich, and uniformly distributed in the United States. Our findings suggest that a long-term trajectory can be

  3. Temperature-pressure-induced solid-solid to reorientation in FCC metallic nanowire: a molecular dynamic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutrakar, Vijay Kumar; Roy Mahapatra, D; Pillai, A C R

    2012-01-11

    Atomistic simulation of initial oriented FCC Cu nanowires shows a novel coupled temperature-pressure dependent reorientation from to phase. A temperature-pressure-induced solid-solid to reorientation diagram is generated for Cu nanowire with varying cross-sectional sizes. A critical pressure is reported for Cu nanowires with varying cross-sectional sizes, above which an initial oriented nanowire shows temperature independent reorientation into the phase. The effect of surface stresses on the to reorientation is also studied. The results indicate that above a critical cross-sectional size for a given temperature-pressure, to reorientation is not possible. It is also reported here that for a given applied pressure, an increase in temperature is required for the to reorientation with increasing cross-sectional size of the nanowire. The temperature-pressure-induced solid-solid to reorientation diagram reported in the present paper could further be used as guidelines for controlling the reorientations/shape memory in nano-scale applications of FCC metallic nanowires.

  4. Time dependence of entropy flux and entropy production for a dynamical system driven by noises with coloured cross-correlation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Wen-Xian; Xu Wei; Cai Li

    2007-01-01

    This paper shows the Fokker-Planck equation of a dynamical system driven by coloured cross-correlated white noises in the absence and presence of a small external force. Based on the Fokker-Planck equation and the definition of Shannon's information entropy, the time dependence of entropy flux and entropy production can be calculated. The present results can be used to explain the extremal behaviour of time dependence of entropy flux and entropy production in view of the dissipative parameter γ of the system, coloured cross-correlation time τ and coloured cross-correlation strength λ.

  5. Calculation of correlated initial state in the hierarchical equations of motion method using an imaginary time path integral approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Linze; Shi, Qiang

    2015-11-21

    Based on recent findings in the hierarchical equations of motion (HEOM) for correlated initial state [Y. Tanimura, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 044114 (2014)], we propose a new stochastic method to obtain the initial conditions for the real time HEOM propagation, which can be used further to calculate the equilibrium correlation functions and symmetrized correlation functions. The new method is derived through stochastic unraveling of the imaginary time influence functional, where a set of stochastic imaginary time HEOM are obtained. The validity of the new method is demonstrated using numerical examples including the spin-Boson model, and the Holstein model with undamped harmonic oscillator modes.

  6. Photothermal damage is correlated to the delivery rate of time-integrated temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Michael L.; Noojin, Gary D.; Gamboa, B. Giovanna; Ahmed, Elharith M.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    2016-03-01

    Photothermal damage rate processes in biological tissues are usually characterized by a kinetics approach. This stems from experimental data that show how the transformation of a specified biological property of cells or biomolecule (plating efficiency for viability, change in birefringence, tensile strength, etc.) is dependent upon both time and temperature. However, kinetic methods require determination of kinetic rate constants and knowledge of substrate or product concentrations during the reaction. To better understand photothermal damage processes we have identified temperature histories of cultured retinal cells receiving minimum lethal thermal doses for a variety of laser and culture parameters. These "threshold" temperature histories are of interest because they inherently contain information regarding the fundamental thermal dose requirements for damage in individual cells. We introduce the notion of time-integrated temperature (Tint) as an accumulated thermal dose (ATD) with units of °C s. Damaging photothermal exposure raises the rate of ATD accumulation from that of the ambient (e.g. 37 °C) to one that correlates with cell death (e.g. 52 °C). The degree of rapid increase in ATD (ΔATD) during photothermal exposure depends strongly on the laser exposure duration and the ambient temperature.

  7. Digital image correlation for full-field time-resolved assessment of arterial stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Adriaan; Soons, Joris; Heuten, Hilde; Ennekens, Guy; Goovaerts, Inge; Vrints, Christiaan; Lava, Pascal; Dirckx, Joris

    2014-01-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) of the arterial system is a very important parameter to evaluate cardiovascular health. Currently, however, there is no golden standard for PWV measurement. Digital image correlation (DIC) was used for full-field time-resolved assessment of displacement, velocity, acceleration, and strains of the skin in the neck directly above the common carotid artery. By assessing these parameters, propagation of the pulse wave could be tracked, leading to a new method for PWV detection based on DIC. The method was tested on five healthy subjects. As a means of validation, PWV was measured with ultrasound (US) as well. Measured PWV values were between 3.68 and 5.19 m/s as measured with DIC and between 5.14 and 6.58 m/s as measured with US, with a maximum absolute difference of 2.78 m/s between the two methods. DIC measurements of the neck region can serve as a test base for determining a robust strategy for PWV detection, they can serve as reference for three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction models, or they may even evolve into a screening method of their own. Moreover, full-field, time-resolved DIC can be adapted for other applications in biomechanics.

  8. Development of a high-performance multichannel system for time-correlated single photon counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peronio, P.; Cominelli, A.; Acconcia, G.; Rech, I.; Ghioni, M.

    2017-05-01

    Time-Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) is one of the most effective techniques for measuring weak and fast optical signals. It outperforms traditional "analog" techniques due to its high sensitivity along with high temporal resolution. Despite those significant advantages, a main drawback still exists, which is related to the long acquisition time needed to perform a measurement. In past years many TCSPC systems have been developed with higher and higher number of channels, aimed to dealing with that limitation. Nevertheless, modern systems suffer from a strong trade-off between parallelism level and performance: the higher the number of channels the poorer the performance. In this work we present the design of a 32x32 TCSPC system meant for overtaking the existing trade-off. To this aim different technologies has been employed, to get the best performance both from detectors and sensing circuits. The exploitation of different technologies will be enabled by Through Silicon Vias (TSVs) which will be investigated as a possible solution for connecting the detectors to the sensing circuits. When dealing with a high number of channels, the count rate is inevitably set by the affordable throughput to the external PC. We targeted a throughput of 10Gb/s, which is beyond the state of the art, and designed the number of TCSPC channels accordingly. A dynamic-routing logic will connect the detectors to the lower number of acquisition chains.

  9. Boltzmann-conserving classical dynamics in quantum time-correlation functions: Matsubara dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Hele, Timothy J H; Muolo, Andrea; Althorpe, Stuart C

    2015-01-01

    We show that a single change in the derivation of the linearized semiclassical-initial value representation (LSC-IVR or classical Wigner approximation) results in a classical dynamics which conserves the quantum Boltzmann distribution. We rederive the (standard) LSC-IVR approach by writing the (exact) quantum time-correlation function in terms of the normal modes of a free ring-polymer (i.e. a discrete imaginary-time Feynman path), taking the limit that the number of polymer beads $N \\to \\infty$, such that the lowest normal-mode frequencies take their Matsubara values. The change we propose is to truncate the quantum Liouvillian, not explicitly in powers of $\\hbar^2$ at $\\hbar^0$ (which gives back the standard LSC-IVR approximation), but in the normal-mode derivatives corresponding to the lowest Matsubara frequencies. The resulting Matsubara dynamics is inherently classical (since all terms $\\mathcal{O}\\left(\\hbar^{2}\\right)$ disappear from the Matsubara Liouvillian in the limit $N \\to \\infty$), and conserves...

  10. G7 country Gross Domestic Product (GDP) time correlations. A graph network analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Mi'skiewicz, J

    2005-01-01

    The correlation between G7 countries has been analysed on the basis of Gross Domestic Product using different distance functions i.e. discrete, linear correlation and distribution distance. The distance matrics is analysed by various graph methods and the percolation threshold is calculated. The globalization process understood as increas of correlation has been observed. The applications of different distance function discussed.

  11. RHO binding to FAM65A regulates Golgi reorientation during cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Directional cell migration involves reorientation of the secretory machinery. However, the molecular mechanisms that control this reorientation are not well characterised. Here, we identify a new Rho effector protein, named FAM65A, which binds to active RHOA, RHOB and RHOC. FAM65A links RHO proteins to Golgi-localising cerebral cavernous malformation-3 protein (CCM3; also known as PDCD10) and its interacting proteins mammalian STE20-like protein kinases 3 and 4 (MST3 and MST4; also known as STK24 and STK26, respectively). Binding of active RHO proteins to FAM65A does not affect the kinase activity of MSTs but results in their relocation from the Golgi in a CCM3-dependent manner. This relocation is crucial for reorientation of the Golgi towards the leading edge and subsequent directional cell migration. Our results reveal a previously unidentified pathway downstream of RHO that regulates the polarity of migrating cells through Golgi reorientation in a FAM65A-, CCM3- and MST3- and MST4-dependent manner. PMID:27807006

  12. Social reorientation in adolescence : neurobiological changes and individual differences in empathic concern

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overgaauw, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    One of the most prominent changes in adolescence is social reorientation. In other words, adolescents develop more intimate relationships with peers, they discover what it is like to be involved in a romantic relationship, and they take (social) risks by for example showing risky driving in the pres

  13. Why Size Counts: Children's Spatial Reorientation in Large and Small Enclosures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learmonth, Amy E.; Newcombe, Nora S.; Sheridan, Natalie; Jones, Meredith

    2008-01-01

    When mobile organisms are spatially disoriented, for instance by rapid repetitive movement, they must re-establish orientation. Past research has shown that the geometry of enclosing spaces is consistently used for reorientation by a wide variety of species, but that non-geometric features are not always used. Based on these findings, some…

  14. Real time correlation function in a single phase spaceintegral--beyond the linearized semiclassical initial valuerepresentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jian; Miller, William H.

    2007-07-10

    It is shown how quantum mechanical time correlation functions [defined, e.g., in Eq. (1.1)] can be expressed, without approximation, in the same form as the linearized approximation of the semiclassical initial value representation (LSC-IVR), or classical Wigner model, for the correlation function [cf. Eq. (2.1)], i.e., as a phase space average (over initial conditions for trajectories) of the Wigner functions corresponding to the two operators. The difference is that the trajectories involved in the LSC-IVR evolve classically, i.e., according to the classical equations of motion, while in the exact theory they evolve according to generalized equations of motion that are derived here. Approximations to the exact equations of motion are then introduced to achieve practical methods that are applicable to complex (i.e., large) molecular systems. Four such methods are proposed in the paper--the full Wigner dynamics (full WD) and the 2nd order WD based on 'Winger trajectories', and the full Donoso-Martens dynamics (full DMD) and the 2nd order DMD based on 'Donoso-Martens trajectories'--all of which can be viewed as generalizations of the original LSC-IVR method. Numerical tests of these four versions of this new approach are made for two anharmonic model problems, and for each the momentum autocorrelation function (i.e., operators linear in coordinate or momentum operators) and the force autocorrelation function (non-linear operators) have been calculated. These four new approximate treatments are indeed seen to be significant improvements to the original LSC-IVR approximation.

  15. Tuberculosis incidence correlates with sunshine: an ecological 28-year time series study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin C K W Koh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Birmingham is the largest UK city after London, and central Birmingham has an annual tuberculosis incidence of 80 per 100,000. We examined seasonality and sunlight as drivers of tuberculosis incidence. Hours of sunshine are seasonal, sunshine exposure is necessary for the production of vitamin D by the body and vitamin D plays a role in the host response to tuberculosis. METHODS: We performed an ecological study that examined tuberculosis incidence in Birmingham from Dec 1981 to Nov 2009, using publicly-available data from statutory tuberculosis notifications, and related this to the seasons and hours of sunshine (UK Meteorological Office data using unmeasured component models. RESULTS: There were 9,739 tuberculosis cases over the study period. There was strong evidence for seasonality, with notifications being 24.1% higher in summer than winter (p<0.001. Winter dips in sunshine correlated with peaks in tuberculosis incidence six months later (4.7% increase in incidence for each 100 hours decrease in sunshine, p<0.001. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: A potential mechanism for these associations includes decreased vitamin D levels with consequent impaired host defence arising from reduced sunshine exposure in winter. This is the longest time series of any published study and our use of statutory notifications means this data is essentially complete. We cannot, however, exclude the possibility that another factor closely correlated with the seasons, other than sunshine, is responsible. Furthermore, exposure to sunlight depends not only on total hours of sunshine but also on multiple individual factors. Our results should therefore be considered hypothesis-generating. Confirmation of a potential causal relationship between winter vitamin D deficiency and summer peaks in tuberculosis incidence would require a randomized-controlled trial of the effect of vitamin D supplementation on future tuberculosis incidence.

  16. Polyglutamine variation in a flowering time protein correlates with island age in a Hawaiian plant radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laakkonen Liisa

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A controversial topic in evolutionary developmental biology is whether morphological diversification in natural populations can be driven by expansions and contractions of amino acid repeats in proteins. To promote adaptation, selection on protein length variation must overcome deleterious effects of multiple correlated traits (pleiotropy. Thus far, systems that demonstrate this capacity include only ancient or artificial morphological diversifications. The Hawaiian Islands, with their linear geological sequence, present a unique environment to study recent, natural radiations. We have focused our research on the Hawaiian endemic mints (Lamiaceae, a large and diverse lineage with paradoxically low genetic variation, in order to test whether a direct relationship between coding-sequence repeat diversity and morphological change can be observed in an actively evolving system. Results Here we show that in the Hawaiian mints, extensive polyglutamine (CAG codon repeat polymorphism within a homolog of the pleiotropic flowering time protein and abscisic acid receptor FCA tracks the natural environmental cline of the island chain, consequent with island age, across a period of 5 million years. CAG expansions, perhaps following their natural tendency to elongate, are more frequent in colonists of recently-formed, nutrient-rich islands than in their forebears on older, nutrient-poor islands. Values for several quantitative morphological variables related to reproductive investment, known from Arabidopsis fca mutant studies, weakly though positively correlate with increasing glutamine tract length. Together with protein modeling of FCA, which indicates that longer polyglutamine tracts could induce suboptimally mobile functional domains, we suggest that CAG expansions may form slightly deleterious alleles (with respect to protein function that become fixed in founder populations. Conclusion In the Hawaiian mint FCA system, we infer that

  17. Correlation Coefficients Between Different Methods of Expressing Bacterial Quantification Using Real Time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahman Navidshad

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The applications of conventional culture-dependent assays to quantify bacteria populations are limited by their dependence on the inconsistent success of the different culture-steps involved. In addition, some bacteria can be pathogenic or a source of endotoxins and pose a health risk to the researchers. Bacterial quantification based on the real-time PCR method can overcome the above-mentioned problems. However, the quantification of bacteria using this approach is commonly expressed as absolute quantities even though the composition of samples (like those of digesta can vary widely; thus, the final results may be affected if the samples are not properly homogenized, especially when multiple samples are to be pooled together before DNA extraction. The objective of this study was to determine the correlation coefficients between four different methods of expressing the output data of real-time PCR-based bacterial quantification. The four methods were: (i the common absolute method expressed as the cell number of specific bacteria per gram of digesta; (ii the Livak and Schmittgen, ΔΔCt method; (iii the Pfaffl equation; and (iv a simple relative method based on the ratio of cell number of specific bacteria to the total bacterial cells. Because of the effect on total bacteria population in the results obtained using ΔCt-based methods (ΔΔCt and Pfaffl, these methods lack the acceptable consistency to be used as valid and reliable methods in real-time PCR-based bacterial quantification studies. On the other hand, because of the variable compositions of digesta samples, a simple ratio of cell number of specific bacteria to the corresponding total bacterial cells of the same sample can be a more accurate method to quantify the population.

  18. Space-time ambiguity of two- and three-fragment reduced velocity correlation functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glasmacher, T.; Phair, L.; Bowman, D.R.; Gelbke, C.K.; Gong, W.G.; Kim, Y.D.; Lisa, M.A.; Lynch, W.G.; Peaslee, G.F.; de Souza, R.T.; Tsang, M.B.; Zhu, F. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Reduced-velocity correlation functions between two and three intermediate mass fragments are compared for central {sup 36}Ar+{sup 197}Ar collisions at {ital E}/{ital A}=50 MeV. Previously published {ital N}-body Coulomb-trajectory calculations, capable of reproducing the measured two-fragment reduced velocity-correlation function, describe the measured three-fragment correlation function equally well. Moreover, ambiguities between source size and lifetime observed in the analysis of two-fragment correlations remain unresolved in the three-fragment correlation function.

  19. Time correlated measurements using plastic scintillators with neutron-photon pulse shape discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Norman E., IV

    nuclear and radiological material. Moreover, the production of 3He isotope as a byproduct of security programs was drastically decreased. This isotope shortage coupled with the disadvantages of relying on a detector that requires neutron moderation before the detection of fission neutrons, poses a significant challenge in supporting the existing detection systems and the development of future technologies. To address this problem, a reliable and accurate alternative technology to detect neutrons emitted in fissions must be developed. One such alternative technology that shows promise in this application is the use of scintillators based on solid state materials (plastics) which are sensitive to fast neutrons. However, plastic scintillators are also sensitive to photons. Hence, it is necessary to separate the neutron signals from the photon signals, using the pulse shape discrimination (PSD) analysis. The PSD is based on the comparison of the pulse shapes of digitized signal waveforms. This approach allows for the measurement of fast neutrons without the necessity of their moderation. Because the fission spectrum neutrons are mainly fast, methods employing fast neutron detection are applicable for the assay of fissile materials. In addition, the average time of scintillation of the plastic medium is much shorter than those of the gaseous counters, thus allowing scintillation detectors to be used in high count rate environments. Furthermore, the temporal information of the fast neutron detection using multiple sensors enables the time correlation analysis of the fission neutron multiplicity. The study of time correlation measurements of fast neutrons using the array of plastic scintillators is the basis of this work. The array of four plastic scintillator detectors equipped with the digital data acquisition and analysis system was developed. The digital PSD analysis of detector signals "on-the-fly" was implemented for the array. The time coincidence measurement technique

  20. Electron spin echo studies of the internal motion of radicals in crystals: Phase memory vs correlation time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kispert, Lowell D.; Bowman, Michael K.; Norris, James R.; Brown, Meta S.

    1982-01-01

    An electron spin echo (ESE) study of the internal motion of the CH2 protons in irradiated zinc acetate dihydrate crystals shows that quantitative measurements of the motional correlation time can be obtained quite directly from pulsed measurements. In the slow motional limit, the motional correlation time is equal to the phase memory time determined by ESE. In the fast motional limit, the motional correlation time is proportional to the no motion spectral second moment divided by the ESE phase memory time. ESE offers a convenient method of studying motion, electron transfer, conductivity, etc. in a variety of systems too complicated for study by ordinary EPR. New systems for study by ESE include biological samples, organic polymers, liquid solutions of radicals with unresolved hyperfine, etc. When motion modulates large anisotropic hyperfine couplings, ESE measurements of the phase memory time are sensitive to modulation of pseudosecular hyperfine interactions.

  1. Subliminal Reorientation and Repositioning in Immersive Virtual Environments using Saccadic Suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolte, Benjamin; Lappe, Markus

    2015-04-01

    Virtual reality strives to provide a user with an experience of a simulated world that feels as natural as the real world. Yet, to induce this feeling, sometimes it becomes necessary for technical reasons to deviate from a one-to-one correspondence between the real and the virtual world, and to reorient or reposition the user's viewpoint. Ideally, users should not notice the change of the viewpoint to avoid breaks in perceptual continuity. Saccades, the fast eye movements that we make in order to switch gaze from one object to another, produce a visual discontinuity on the retina, but this is not perceived because the visual system suppresses perception during saccades. As a consequence, our perception fails to detect rotations of the visual scene during saccades. We investigated whether saccadic suppression of image displacement (SSID) can be used in an immersive virtual environment (VE) to unconsciously rotate and translate the observer's viewpoint. To do this, the scene changes have to be precisely time-locked to the saccade onset. We used electrooculography (EOG) for eye movement tracking and assessed the performance of two modified eye movement classification algorithms for the challenging task of online saccade detection that is fast enough for SSID. We investigated the sensitivity of participants to translations (forward/backward) and rotations (in the transverse plane) during trans-saccadic scene changes. We found that participants were unable to detect approximately ±0.5m translations along the line of gaze and ±5° rotations in the transverse plane during saccades with an amplitude of 15°. If the user stands still, our approach exploiting SSID thus provides the means to unconsciously change the user's virtual position and/or orientation. For future research and applications, exploiting SSID has the potential to improve existing redirected walking and change blindness techniques for unlimited navigation through arbitrarily-sized VEs by real walking.

  2. Noise-Driven Phenotypic Heterogeneity with Finite Correlation Time in Clonal Populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    UnJin Lee

    Full Text Available There has been increasing awareness in the wider biological community of the role of clonal phenotypic heterogeneity in playing key roles in phenomena such as cellular bet-hedging and decision making, as in the case of the phage-λ lysis/lysogeny and B. Subtilis competence/vegetative pathways. Here, we report on the effect of stochasticity in growth rate, cellular memory/intermittency, and its relation to phenotypic heterogeneity. We first present a linear stochastic differential model with finite auto-correlation time, where a randomly fluctuating growth rate with a negative average is shown to result in exponential growth for sufficiently large fluctuations in growth rate. We then present a non-linear stochastic self-regulation model where the loss of coherent self-regulation and an increase in noise can induce a shift from bounded to unbounded growth. An important consequence of these models is that while the average change in phenotype may not differ for various parameter sets, the variance of the resulting distributions may considerably change. This demonstrates the necessity of understanding the influence of variance and heterogeneity within seemingly identical clonal populations, while providing a mechanism for varying functional consequences of such heterogeneity. Our results highlight the importance of a paradigm shift from a deterministic to a probabilistic view of clonality in understanding selection as an optimization problem on noise-driven processes, resulting in a wide range of biological implications, from robustness to environmental stress to the development of drug resistance.

  3. Correlation Between Time Change in Modulus of Short-Period Geomagnetic Variation and Seismicity in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuang-Jung Chen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, geomagnetic data of the Lunping observatory from 1993 to 2000 are utilized for computing the amplitude variation of short-period geomagnetic total intensity data, using the complex demodulation method (CD method. In order to compare these time changes with seismicity, earthquakes that occurred within 150 km of Lunping, with magnitude ML greater than 3.0, are located. The total sum of those earthquakes, summed month by month, is correlated with the modulus. After removing seasonal effect, our results show that the modulus of periods 24, 12, and 8 hr reveals a notable change that seems to be related to the total sum of events within the whole study period. One possible precursor is found 6 months prior to the 1999 high seismicity. The modulus for the periods 24, 12, and 8 hr increased gradually from the beginning of 1999 to August 1999. After earthquake occurrence the modulus decreased again to a normal level. We propose that this notable increase might be related to a preparation process for this strong earthquake.

  4. Correlation Between Ecospace and Metabolic Rate of Marine Organisms Through Geologic Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, C.; Tenorio, A.; Heim, N. A.; Payne, J.

    2015-12-01

    Marine organisms are the most abundant fossils scientists have discovered in the fossil record. Various factors affect the survival rate of individual organisms and entire genera including metabolic rate, genetic diversity, environmental availability, and ecology. We however chose to focus our attention on studying mean metabolic rates in correlation to life modes. A marine organism's life mode is determined by three criteria: tiering, motility, and feeding mechanism. We believe an organism's life mode has an effect on its survivorship, especially since ecospace is the "primary determinant of routine metabolic rate for marine organisms" (Seibel & Drazen 2007). Using the metabolic equation, we were able to plot metabolic rate changes for various life modes over time. Seibel and Drazen (2007) explain that "metabolic variation in the ocean results from interspecific differences in ecological energy demand," thus allowing us to hypothesize that with different combinations of life modes, different marine organisms will have varying metabolic rates. To further compare our data, we created a heatmap to show the change in metabolic rates over the last 540 million years. Based on the collection of data, metabolic rates of marine organisms have shown an increasing trend. When analyzing ecospaces, pelagic (living in the water column), free moving organisms have relatively high metabolic rates in comparison to other modes of tiering. In other life modes, there's a general trend of genera maintaining a stabilized and moderate metabolic rate that is neither extremely high nor low.

  5. A time and space correlated turbulence synthesis method for Large Eddy Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Hugo G.; Paz, Rodrigo R.

    2013-02-01

    In the present work the problem of generating synthesized turbulence at inflow boundaries of the simulation domain is addressed in the context of the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) method. To represent adequately certain statistical properties of a turbulent process, we propose a synthesized turbulence method which is based on previous works (Huang et al., 2010; Smirnov et al., 2001) [15,28]. For this purpose, time and space correlations are introduced strictly in the mathematical formulation of the synthetic turbulence inflow data. It is demonstrated that the proposed approach inherits the properties of the methods on which it is based while presents some particular advantages as well. The strategy of imposing conditions on the inlet velocity field through turbulence synthesis is implemented in the parallel multiphysics code called PETSc-FEM (http://www.cimec.org.ar/petscfem) primarily targeted to calculations throughout finite elements on general unstructured 2D and 3D grids. We present several numerical tests in order to validate and evaluate the method describing the dynamic phenomena that take place in “real-life” problems, such as a swirling turbulent flow inside a diffuser and the airflow around a vehicle model inside a wind tunnel at high Reynolds number.

  6. Moffatt drift driven large scale dynamo due to $\\alpha$ fluctuations with nonzero correlation times

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Nishant K

    2015-01-01

    We present a theory of large-scale dynamo action in a turbulent flow that has stochastic, zero-mean fluctuations of the $\\alpha$ parameter. We extend the Kraichnan-Moffatt model to explore effects of finite memory of $\\alpha$ fluctuations, in a spirit similar to that of Sridhar & Singh (2014), hereafter SS14. Using the first-order smoothing approximation, we derive a linear integro-differential equation governing the dynamics of the large-scale magnetic field, which is non-perturbative in the $\\alpha$-correlation time $\\tau_{\\alpha}$. We recover earlier results in the exactly solvable white-noise (WN) limit where the Moffatt drift does not contribute to the dynamo growth/decay. To study finite memory effects, we reduce the integro-differential equation to a partial differential equation by assuming that the $\\tau_{\\alpha}$ be small but nonzero and the large-scale magnetic field is slowly varying. We derive the dispersion relation and provide explicit expression for the growth rate as a function of four in...

  7. Study of a theoretical model for the measured gate moments resulting from correlated detection events and an extending dead time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauck, Danielle K., E-mail: hauck@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Croft, Stephen; Evans, Louise G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Favalli, Andrea; Santi, Peter A.; Dowell, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2013-08-11

    Neutron emissions from fissioning nuclear material are temporally correlated. The detection of these correlated neutrons is frequently used to quantify plutonium (Pu) and other fissile materials for international nuclear safeguards and related activities. However, detector dead time affects the observed rates of correlated neutrons in a non-trivial manner, and must be accounted for to obtain accurate results. A major simplification made in the most widely used dead time corrections is that the neutron detections are occurring randomly in time. A few previous attempts at providing a dead time model for correlated neutrons have been limited in scope, have made simplifying assumptions early in the derivation, and have, in general, not been implemented in the broader safeguards community. This paper provides an exact dead time model for correlated neutron detections in a single channel system assuming an updating dead time, and therefore a paralyzable system. This dead time model includes the assumption that a single exponential, with one characteristic decay constant, can describe the system neutron die-away profile. An exact model for the effects of dead time on measured gate moments is derived which is extendable to an arbitrary order of neutron correlation. This dead time model predicts the measured gate moments based on the dead time and underlying detection rates, including the effects from detection rates with an arbitrarily high order of correlation. The effects of dead time on the apparent singles, doubles, triples and quadruples rates using either event triggered, random or mixed gate structure is also derived. Either the equations for the measured gate moments or the apparent multiplicity rates can be numerically inverted to find the dead time corrected multiplicity rates. Although the model has been explicitly solved for rates up to and including quadruples, it is directly extendable to any order of correlation. This model is presented from the perspective

  8. CANONICAL CORRELATION ANALYSIS BETWEEN TIME SERIES AND STATIC OUTCOMES, WITH APPLICATION TO THE SPECTRAL ANALYSIS OF HEART RATE VARIABILITY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krafty, Robert T; Hall, Martica

    2013-03-01

    Although many studies collect biomedical time series signals from multiple subjects, there is a dearth of models and methods for assessing the association between frequency domain properties of time series and other study outcomes. This article introduces the random Cramér representation as a joint model for collections of time series and static outcomes where power spectra are random functions that are correlated with the outcomes. A canonical correlation analysis between cepstral coefficients and static outcomes is developed to provide a flexible yet interpretable measure of association. Estimates of the canonical correlations and weight functions are obtained from a canonical correlation analysis between the static outcomes and maximum Whittle likelihood estimates of truncated cepstral coefficients. The proposed methodology is used to analyze the association between the spectrum of heart rate variability and measures of sleep duration and fragmentation in a study of older adults who serve as the primary caregiver for their ill spouse.

  9. Exploring lag times between monthly atmospheric deposition and stream chemistry in Appalachian forests using cross-correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWalle, David R.; Boyer, Elizabeth W.; Buda, Anthony R.

    2016-12-01

    Forecasts of ecosystem changes due to variations in atmospheric emissions policies require a fundamental understanding of lag times between changes in chemical inputs and watershed response. Impacts of changes in atmospheric deposition in the United States have been documented using national and regional long-term environmental monitoring programs beginning several decades ago. Consequently, time series of weekly NADP atmospheric wet deposition and monthly EPA-Long Term Monitoring stream chemistry now exist for much of the Northeast which may provide insights into lag times. In this study of Appalachian forest basins, we estimated lag times for S, N and Cl by cross-correlating monthly data from four pairs of stream and deposition monitoring sites during the period from 1978 to 2012. A systems or impulse response function approach to cross-correlation was used to estimate lag times where the input deposition time series was pre-whitened using regression modeling and the stream response time series was filtered using the deposition regression model prior to cross-correlation. Cross-correlations for S were greatest at annual intervals over a relatively well-defined range of lags with the maximum correlations occurring at mean lags of 48 months. Chloride results were similar but more erratic with a mean lag of 57 months. Few high-correlation lags for N were indicated. Given the growing availability of atmospheric deposition and surface water chemistry monitoring data and our results for four Appalachian basins, further testing of cross-correlation as a method of estimating lag times on other basins appears justified.

  10. Usefulness of measurement of circulation time using MgSO{sub 4} : correlation with time-density curve using electron beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byung Ki; Lee, Hui Joong; Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Yong Joo; Kang, Duck Sik [Kyungpook National Univ., Kyungpook National Univ. Hospital, College of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-01

    To determine the usefulness of MgSO{sub 4} for measuring the systemic circulation time. Systemic circulation time, defined as elapsed time from the injection of MgSO{sub 4} solution to the point of pharyngeal burning sensation, was measured in 63 volunteers. MgSO{sub 4} was injected into a superficial vein of an upper extremity. Using dynamic electron beam computed tomography at the level of the abdominal aorta and celiac axis, a time-intensity curve was plotted, and for these two locations, maximal enhancement time was compared. For 60 of the 63 subjects, both systemic circulation time and maximal enhancement time were determined. Average systemic circulation time was 17.4 (SD:3.6) secs. and average maximal enhancement times at the level of the abdominal aorta and celiac axis were 17.5 (SD:3.0) secs. and 18.5 (SD:3.2) secs., respectively. Correlation coefficients between systemic circulation time and maximal enhancement time for the abdominal aorta and celiac axis were 0.73 (p<0.01) and 0.73 (p<0.05) respectively. The systemic circulation time demonstrated by MgSO{sub 4} injection and maximal enhancement time for the abdominal aorta showed significant correlation. Thus, to determine the appropriate scanning time in contrast-enhanced radiological studies, MgSO{sub 4} can be used instead of a test bolus study.

  11. EVOLUTION OF THE CROSS-CORRELATION AND TIME LAG OF 4U 1735-44 ALONG THE BRANCHES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei Yajuan; Zhang Haotong; Zhang Chengmin; Yuan Hailong; Dong Yiqiao; Zhao Yongheng; Zhang Yanxia [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Qu Jinlu; Song Liming [Particle Astrophysics Center, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang Dehua [Astronomy Department, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Yin Hongxing, E-mail: leiyjcwmy@163.com [School of Space Science and Physics, Shandong University, Weihai 264209 (China)

    2013-09-15

    We analyze the cross-correlation function between the soft and hard X-rays of atoll source 4U 1735-44 with RXTE data, and find anti-correlated soft and hard time lags of about a hecto-second. In the island state, the observations do not show any obvious correlations, and most observations of the banana branch show a positive correlation. However, anti-correlations are detected in the upper banana branch. These results are different from those of Z-sources (Cyg X-2, GX 5-1), where anti-correlations are detected in the horizontal branch and upper normal branch. In this case, the lag timescales of both this atoll and Z-sources are found to be similar, at a magnitude of several tens to hundreds of seconds. As a comparison, it is noted that anti-correlated lags lasting thousands of seconds have been reported from several black hole candidates in their intermediate states. In addition, for an observation containing four segments that show positive or anti-correlation, we analyze the spectral evolution with the hybrid model. In the observation, the anti-correlation is detected at the highest flux. The fitting results show that the Comptonized component is not the lowest at the highest flux, which suggests that the anti-correlation corresponds to the transition between the soft and hard states. Finally, we compare the corresponding results of atoll source 4U 1735-44 with those observed in Z-sources and black hole candidates, and the possible origins of the anti-correlated time lags are discussed.

  12. Asymmetric multiscale detrended cross-correlation analysis of financial time series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yi; Shang, Pengjian

    2014-09-01

    We propose the asymmetric multiscale detrended cross-correlation analysis (MS-ADCCA) method and apply MS-ADCCA method to explore the existence of asymmetric cross-correlation for daily price returns in US and Chinese stock markets and to assess the properties of these asymmetric cross-correlations. The results all show the existences of asymmetric cross-correlations, while small asymmetries at small scales and larger asymmetries at larger scales are also displayed. There is a strong similarity between S&P500 and DJI, and we reveal that the asymmetries depend more on the cross-correlations of S&P500 vs. DJI, S&P500 vs. NQCI, DJI vs. NQCI, and ShangZheng vs. ShenCheng when the market is falling than rising, respectively. By comparing the spectra of S&P500 vs. NQCI and DJI vs. NQCI with uptrends and downtrends, we detect some new characteristics which lead to some new conclusions. Likewise, some new conclusions also can be drawn by the new characteristics displayed through the comparison between the spectra of ShangZheng vs. HSI and ShenCheng vs. HSI. Obviously, we conclude that although the overall spectra are similar and one market has the same effect when it is rising and falling in the study of asymmetric cross-correlations between it and different markets, the cross-correlations and asymmetries on the trends of the different markets are all different. MS-ADCCA method can detect the differences on the asymmetric cross-correlations by different trends of markets. Moreover, the uniqueness of cross-correlation between NQCI and HSI can be detected in the study of the asymmetric cross-correlations, which confirms that HSI is unique in the Chinese stock markets and NQCI is unique in the US stock markets further.

  13. Correlation varies with different time lags between the motions of the hyoid bone, epiglottis, and larynx during swallowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Han Gil; Oh, Byung-Mo; Leigh, Ja-Ho; Han, Tai Ryoon

    2014-10-01

    Although coordination and timing of swallowing have often been investigated by using discrete timing events such as the onset, peak, and duration of specific motions, the sequence and duration of swallowing events cannot represent the coordination of the swallowing mechanism quantitatively. This study aimed to apply a cross-correlation analysis of the motions of the hyolaryngeal structures during swallowing as an objective method for measuring the coordination and timing of the motions. Forty healthy subjects swallowed 2 and 5 ml of diluted barium solution (35 %) and 5 ml of curd yogurt under videofluoroscopy. Hyolaryngeal motions in videofluoroscopic images were digitized using the motion analysis system. The time series of the horizontal and vertical hyoid motion, the laryngeal elevation, and the angle of the epiglottic tilt were analyzed using cross-correlation at each 1/60-s time lag. The results showed high and consistent cross-correlations between hyolaryngeal motions during swallowing in most of the subjects regardless of age and bolus type. The horizontal hyoid motion and laryngeal elevation were more strongly correlated with the epiglottic tilt than the vertical hyoid motion, which might suggest the mechanism of the epiglottic tilt during swallowing. The bolus volume and viscosity affected the correlation coefficients and time lags between the hyolaryngeal motions, particularly those related to the epiglottic tilt. The results suggest that cross-correlation analysis may be used for measuring the coordination and timing of swallowing. Further studies using cross-correlation analysis of additional physiological factors related to swallowing or pathological conditions are warranted.

  14. Modeling Mental Speed: Decomposing Response Time Distributions in Elementary Cognitive Tasks and Correlations with Working Memory Capacity and Fluid Intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Schmitz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown an inverse relation between response times in elementary cognitive tasks and intelligence, but findings are inconsistent as to which is the most informative score. We conducted a study (N = 200 using a battery of elementary cognitive tasks, working memory capacity (WMC paradigms, and a test of fluid intelligence (gf. Frequently used candidate scores and model parameters derived from the response time (RT distribution were tested. Results confirmed a clear correlation of mean RT with WMC and to a lesser degree with gf. Highly comparable correlations were obtained for alternative location measures with or without extreme value treatment. Moderate correlations were found as well for scores of RT variability, but they were not as strong as for mean RT. Additionally, there was a trend towards higher correlations for slow RT bands, as compared to faster RT bands. Clearer evidence was obtained in an ex-Gaussian decomposition of the response times: the exponential component was selectively related to WMC and gf in easy tasks, while mean response time was additionally predictive in the most complex tasks. The diffusion model parsimoniously accounted for these effects in terms of individual differences in drift rate. Finally, correlations of model parameters as trait-like dispositions were investigated across different tasks, by correlating parameters of the diffusion and the ex-Gaussian model with conventional RT and accuracy scores.

  15. Leisure-time physical activity patterns and correlates among pregnant women in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaston, Anca; Vamos, Cheryl A

    2013-04-01

    Physical activity significantly impacts public health as it reduces the risk of chronic diseases and provides numerous protective factors during pregnancy. Although Canadian guidelines recommend regular physical activity for healthy pregnant women, little is known about their leisure-time physical activity patterns. This study compared the physical activity levels of pregnant and non-pregnant women and examined socio-demographic and health correlates of physical activity during pregnancy. Canadian Community Health Survey data (2005-2008) from 623 pregnant women and 20,392 non-pregnant women aged 15-49 years in Ontario, Canada were examined. The prevalence of regular physical activity (15 or more minutes on at least 3 days of the week) was 58.3 % [95 % CI 52.9, 63.4], among pregnant women and 66.9 % [95 % CI 65.8, 68.0] among non-pregnant women. However, the prevalence of meeting Canadian guidelines for physical activity during pregnancy (30 or more minutes on at least 4 days of the week) was only 23.3 %, [95 % CI 19.4, 27.7] among pregnant women and 33.6 % [95 % CI 32.7, 34.6] among non-pregnant women. Pregnant women were less likely to be meeting guidelines if they were single, divorced, separated or widowed, a visible minority, had a household income between $20,000 and $79,999, and reported being in good or fair/poor health; when it came to education, women who had completed high school were more likely to be meeting guidelines. Few pregnant women in Ontario are meeting guidelines for physical activity during pregnancy. Results indicate that promoting physical activity during pregnancy should remain a public health priority.

  16. Serial Spike Time Correlations Affect Probability Distribution of Joint Spike Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, Mina; van Vreeswijk, Carl; Pipa, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Detecting the existence of temporally coordinated spiking activity, and its role in information processing in the cortex, has remained a major challenge for neuroscience research. Different methods and approaches have been suggested to test whether the observed synchronized events are significantly different from those expected by chance. To analyze the simultaneous spike trains for precise spike correlation, these methods typically model the spike trains as a Poisson process implying that the generation of each spike is independent of all the other spikes. However, studies have shown that neural spike trains exhibit dependence among spike sequences, such as the absolute and relative refractory periods which govern the spike probability of the oncoming action potential based on the time of the last spike, or the bursting behavior, which is characterized by short epochs of rapid action potentials, followed by longer episodes of silence. Here we investigate non-renewal processes with the inter-spike interval distribution model that incorporates spike-history dependence of individual neurons. For that, we use the Monte Carlo method to estimate the full shape of the coincidence count distribution and to generate false positives for coincidence detection. The results show that compared to the distributions based on homogeneous Poisson processes, and also non-Poisson processes, the width of the distribution of joint spike events changes. Non-renewal processes can lead to both heavy tailed or narrow coincidence distribution. We conclude that small differences in the exact autostructure of the point process can cause large differences in the width of a coincidence distribution. Therefore, manipulations of the autostructure for the estimation of significance of joint spike events seem to be inadequate.

  17. Anti-correlated time lags in the Z source GX 5-1: Possible evidence for a truncated accretion disk

    OpenAIRE

    Sriram, K; Choi, C. S.; Rao, A. R.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the nature of the inner accretion disk in the neutron star source GX 5-1 by making a detailed study of time lags between X-rays of different energies. Using the cross-correlation analysis, we found anti-correlated hard and soft time lags of the order of a few tens to a few hundred seconds and the corresponding intensity states were mostly the horizontal branch (HB) and upper normal branch (NB). The model independent and dependent spectral analysis showed that during these time ...

  18. Analysis and Modeling of Time-Correlated Characteristics of Rainfall-Runoff Similarity in the Upstream Red River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuli Sang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We constructed a similarity model (based on Euclidean distance between rainfall and runoff to study time-correlated characteristics of rainfall-runoff similar patterns in the upstream Red River Basin and presented a detailed evaluation of the time correlation of rainfall-runoff similarity. The rainfall-runoff similarity was used to determine the optimum similarity. The results showed that a time-correlated model was found to be capable of predicting the rainfall-runoff similarity in the upstream Red River Basin in a satisfactory way. Both noised and denoised time series by thresholding the wavelet coefficients were applied to verify the accuracy of model. And the corresponding optimum similar sets obtained as the equation solution conditions showed an interesting and stable trend. On the whole, the annual mean similarity presented a gradually rising trend, for quantitatively estimating comprehensive influence of climate change and of human activities on rainfall-runoff similarity.

  19. Impact of network structure and cellular response on spike time correlations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Trousdale

    Full Text Available Novel experimental techniques reveal the simultaneous activity of larger and larger numbers of neurons. As a result there is increasing interest in the structure of cooperative--or correlated--activity in neural populations, and in the possible impact of such correlations on the neural code. A fundamental theoretical challenge is to understand how the architecture of network connectivity along with the dynamical properties of single cells shape the magnitude and timescale of correlations. We provide a general approach to this problem by extending prior techniques based on linear response theory. We consider networks of general integrate-and-fire cells with arbitrary architecture, and provide explicit expressions for the approximate cross-correlation between constituent cells. These correlations depend strongly on the operating point (input mean and variance of the neurons, even when connectivity is fixed. Moreover, the approximations admit an expansion in powers of the matrices that describe the network architecture. This expansion can be readily interpreted in terms of paths between different cells. We apply our results to large excitatory-inhibitory networks, and demonstrate first how precise balance--or lack thereof--between the strengths and timescales of excitatory and inhibitory synapses is reflected in the overall correlation structure of the network. We then derive explicit expressions for the average correlation structure in randomly connected networks. These expressions help to identify the important factors that shape coordinated neural activity in such networks.

  20. Variance in population firing rate as a measure of slow time-scale correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam C. Snyder

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Correlated variability in the spiking responses of pairs of neurons, also known as spike count correlation, is a key indicator of functional connectivity and a critical factor in population coding. Underscoring the importance of correlation as a measure for cognitive neuroscience research is the observation that spike count correlations are not fixed, but are rather modulated by perceptual and cognitive context. Yet while this context fluctuates from moment to moment, correlation must be calculated over multiple trials. This property undermines its utility as a dependent measure for investigations of cognitive processes which fluctuate on a trial-to-trial basis, such as selective attention. A measure of functional connectivity that can be assayed on a moment-to-moment basis is needed to investigate the single-trial dynamics of populations of spiking neurons. Here, we introduce the measure of population variance in normalized firing rate for this goal. We show using mathematical analysis, computer simulations and in vivo data how population variance in normalized firing rate is inversely related to the latent correlation in the population, and how this measure can be used to reliably classify trials from different typical correlation conditions, even when firing rate is held constant. We discuss the potential advantages for using population variance in normalized firing rate as a dependent measure for both basic and applied neuroscience research.

  1. Reorienting the GWOT to Win the Moral Level of War

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-25

    Indeed, the asymmetry itself is considered by many to be immoral. Some philosophers of jus in bello, to include Juergen Habermas , argue that there...50 Giovanna Borradori, Philosophy In A Time of Terror: Dialogues with Juergen Habermas and Jacques Derrida (Chicago: The University of...60 BIBLIOGRAPHY Borradori, Giovanna. Philosophy In A Time of Terror: Dialogues with Juergen Habermas and Jacques Derrida. Chicago: The University of

  2. Real-time medical video processing, enabled by hardware accelerated correlations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savarimuthu, T. R.; Kjaer-Nielsen, A.; Sorensen, A. S.

    2011-01-01

    Image processing involving correlation based filter algorithms have proved extremely useful for image enhancement, feature extraction and recognition, in a wide range of medical applications, but is almost exclusively used with still images due to the amount of computations required by the correl......Image processing involving correlation based filter algorithms have proved extremely useful for image enhancement, feature extraction and recognition, in a wide range of medical applications, but is almost exclusively used with still images due to the amount of computations required...

  3. Quantifying and modeling long-range cross correlations in multiple time series with applications to world stock indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Duan; Podobnik, Boris; Horvatić, Davor; Stanley, H Eugene

    2011-04-01

    We propose a modified time lag random matrix theory in order to study time-lag cross correlations in multiple time series. We apply the method to 48 world indices, one for each of 48 different countries. We find long-range power-law cross correlations in the absolute values of returns that quantify risk, and find that they decay much more slowly than cross correlations between the returns. The magnitude of the cross correlations constitutes "bad news" for international investment managers who may believe that risk is reduced by diversifying across countries. We find that when a market shock is transmitted around the world, the risk decays very slowly. We explain these time-lag cross correlations by introducing a global factor model (GFM) in which all index returns fluctuate in response to a single global factor. For each pair of individual time series of returns, the cross correlations between returns (or magnitudes) can be modeled with the autocorrelations of the global factor returns (or magnitudes). We estimate the global factor using principal component analysis, which minimizes the variance of the residuals after removing the global trend. Using random matrix theory, a significant fraction of the world index cross correlations can be explained by the global factor, which supports the utility of the GFM. We demonstrate applications of the GFM in forecasting risks at the world level, and in finding uncorrelated individual indices. We find ten indices that are practically uncorrelated with the global factor and with the remainder of the world indices, which is relevant information for world managers in reducing their portfolio risk. Finally, we argue that this general method can be applied to a wide range of phenomena in which time series are measured, ranging from seismology and physiology to atmospheric geophysics.

  4. Relating anomaly correlation to lead time: Clustering analysis of CFSv2 forecasts of summer precipitation in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tongtiegang; Liu, Pan; Zhang, Yongyong; Ruan, Chengqing

    2017-09-01

    Global climate model (GCM) forecasts are an integral part of long-range hydroclimatic forecasting. We propose to use clustering to explore anomaly correlation, which indicates the performance of raw GCM forecasts, in the three-dimensional space of latitude, longitude, and initialization time. Focusing on a certain period of the year, correlations for forecasts initialized at different preceding periods form a vector. The vectors of anomaly correlation across different GCM grid cells are clustered to reveal how GCM forecasts perform as time progresses. Through the case study of Climate Forecast System Version 2 (CFSv2) forecasts of summer precipitation in China, we observe that the correlation at a certain cell oscillates with lead time and can become negative. The use of clustering reveals two meaningful patterns that characterize the relationship between anomaly correlation and lead time. For some grid cells in Central and Southwest China, CFSv2 forecasts exhibit positive correlations with observations and they tend to improve as time progresses. This result suggests that CFSv2 forecasts tend to capture the summer precipitation induced by the East Asian monsoon and the South Asian monsoon. It also indicates that CFSv2 forecasts can potentially be applied to improving hydrological forecasts in these regions. For some other cells, the correlations are generally close to zero at different lead times. This outcome implies that CFSv2 forecasts still have plenty of room for further improvement. The robustness of the patterns has been tested using both hierarchical clustering and k-means clustering and examined with the Silhouette score.

  5. Quantifying and modeling long-range cross correlations in multiple time series with applications to world stock indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Duan; Podobnik, Boris; Horvatić, Davor; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2011-04-01

    We propose a modified time lag random matrix theory in order to study time-lag cross correlations in multiple time series. We apply the method to 48 world indices, one for each of 48 different countries. We find long-range power-law cross correlations in the absolute values of returns that quantify risk, and find that they decay much more slowly than cross correlations between the returns. The magnitude of the cross correlations constitutes “bad news” for international investment managers who may believe that risk is reduced by diversifying across countries. We find that when a market shock is transmitted around the world, the risk decays very slowly. We explain these time-lag cross correlations by introducing a global factor model (GFM) in which all index returns fluctuate in response to a single global factor. For each pair of individual time series of returns, the cross correlations between returns (or magnitudes) can be modeled with the autocorrelations of the global factor returns (or magnitudes). We estimate the global factor using principal component analysis, which minimizes the variance of the residuals after removing the global trend. Using random matrix theory, a significant fraction of the world index cross correlations can be explained by the global factor, which supports the utility of the GFM. We demonstrate applications of the GFM in forecasting risks at the world level, and in finding uncorrelated individual indices. We find ten indices that are practically uncorrelated with the global factor and with the remainder of the world indices, which is relevant information for world managers in reducing their portfolio risk. Finally, we argue that this general method can be applied to a wide range of phenomena in which time series are measured, ranging from seismology and physiology to atmospheric geophysics.

  6. 企业经营投资调整分析%The Analysis of Business Investment Reorientation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王欢; 陈收; 毛超

    2011-01-01

    企业在寻求内外部因素匹配的过程中,存在内部演化机制,在不断适应、试错中形成投资调整模式.为探索企业经营投资调整的影响因素及其对竞争优势的影响,引入空间向量模型度量企业经营投资调整程度,对我国酒业20家上市公司进行实证分析.结果显示,企业经营投资调整受到了主营产品利润增长率的市场激励信号、财务杠杆的正向作用,内部专用性资产规模的负向作用影响.影响因素的共同作用下形成了一定的调整轨迹,在酒业这样的成熟且竞争激烈的行业中,企业调整程度越低,越利于生存发展和竞争优势的巩固.本文力求为企业制定经营投资调整决策提供有益思路.%In the proeess of matching internal and external factors, the internal evolutionary mechanism will cause the formation of a certain investment adjustment mode in its adapting and trial process. In order to explore the influencing factors of business investment reorientation and its effect on competitive advantage, this paper introduces the vector space model to measure the level of business investment adjustment, and then analyzes 20 Chinese listed wine corporations. The results show that: (l) corporate business investment adjustment has a significantly positive correlation with the growth rate of main products and the level of long-term debt ratio while it negatively correlates with the size of corporate specific assets;(2) All of these factors form a certain adjustment path and in such a mature and highly competitive wine industry, the lower level the adjustment is at, the more beneficial it is for industry survival and its competirive advantage. This paper seeks to provide useful suggestions for Chinese enterprises to plan business investment reorientation.

  7. Multiscale Detrended Cross-Correlation Analysis of Traffic Time Series Based on Empirical Mode Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yi; Shang, Pengjian

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we propose multiscale detrended cross-correlation analysis (MSDCCA) to detect the long-range power-law cross-correlation of considered signals in the presence of nonstationarity. For improving the performance and getting better robustness, we further introduce the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) to eliminate the noise effects and propose MSDCCA method combined with EMD, which is called MS-EDXA method, then systematically investigate the multiscale cross-correlation structure of the real traffic signals. We apply the MSDCCA and MS-EDXA methods to study the cross-correlations in three situations: velocity and volume on one lane, velocities on the present and the next moment and velocities on the adjacent lanes, and further compare their spectrums respectively. When the difference between the spectrums of MSDCCA and MS-EDXA becomes unobvious, there is a crossover which denotes the turning point of difference. The crossover results from the competition between the noise effects in the original signals and the intrinsic fluctuation of traffic signals and divides the plot of spectrums into two regions. In all the three case, MS-EDXA method makes the average of local scaling exponents increased and the standard deviation decreased and provides a relative stable persistent scaling cross-correlated behavior which gets the analysis more precise and more robust and improves the performance after noises being removed. Applying MS-EDXA method avoids the inaccurate characteristics of multiscale cross-correlation structure at the short scale including the spectrum minimum, the range for the spectrum fluctuation and general trend, which are caused by the noise in the original signals. We get the conclusions that the traffic velocity and volume are long-range cross-correlated, which is accordant to their actual evolution, while velocities on the present and the next moment and velocities on adjacent lanes reflect the strong cross-correlations both in temporal and

  8. Evaluation of Phase Locking and Cross Correlation Methods for Estimating the Time Lag between Brain Sites: A Simulation Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltanzadeh, Mohammad Javad; Daliri, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Direction and latency of electrical connectivity between different sites of brain explains brain neural functionality. We compared efficiency of cross correlation and phase locking methods in time lag estimation which are based on local field potential (LFP) and LFP-spike signals, respectively. Signals recorded from MT area of a macaque's brain was used in a simulation approach. The first signal was real brain activity and the second was identical to the first one, but with two kinds of delayed and not delayed forms. Time lag between two signals was estimated by cross correlation and phase locking methods. Both methods estimated the time lags with no errors. Phase locking was not as time efficient as correlation. In addition, phase locking suffered from temporal self bias. Correlation was a more efficient method. Phase locking was not considered as a proper method to estimate the time lags between brain sites due to time inefficiency and self bias, the problems which are reported for the first time about this method.

  9. PROFIT ANALYSIS OF A COMPLEX SYSTEM WITH CORRELATION IN TIME TO PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE AND TIME TAKEN IN PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alka Chaudhury

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the cost benefit analysis of a complex system with correlationin time to preventive maintenance and time taken in preventive maintenance. The systemconsists of two subsystems, say A & B, connected in series. Subsystem A consists of twoidentical units while subsystem B consist only one unit. The operation of only one unit ofsubsystem A with subsystem B is sufficient to do the job. The joint distribution of time topreventive maintenance and time taken in preventive maintenance are taken bivariateexponential. Each repaired unit works as good as new. Various measures of system effectivenessof interest to system designers and operation managers are obtained by using regenerative pointtechnique. The graphical behaviors of MTSF and profit function have also been studied.

  10. On the problem of earthquake correlation in space and time over large distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgoulas, G.; Konstantaras, A.; Maravelakis, E.; Katsifarakis, E.; Stylios, C. D.

    2012-04-01

    A quick examination of geographical maps with the epicenters of earthquakes marked on them reveals a strong tendency of these points to form compact clusters of irregular shapes and various sizes often traversing with other clusters. According to [Saleur et al. 1996] "earthquakes are correlated in space and time over large distances". This implies that seismic sequences are not formatted randomly but they follow a spatial pattern with consequent triggering of events. Seismic cluster formation is believed to be due to underlying geological natural hazards, which: a) act as the energy storage elements of the phenomenon, and b) tend to form a complex network of numerous interacting faults [Vallianatos and Tzanis, 1998]. Therefore it is imperative to "isolate" meaningful structures (clusters) in order to mine information regarding the underlying mechanism and at a second stage to test the causality effect implied by what is known as the Domino theory [Burgman, 2009]. Ongoing work by Konstantaras et al. 2011 and Katsifarakis et al. 2011 on clustering seismic sequences in the area of the Southern Hellenic Arc and progressively throughout the Greek vicinity and the entire Mediterranean region based on an explicit segmentation of the data based both on their temporal and spatial stamp, following modelling assumptions proposed by Dobrovolsky et al. 1989 and Drakatos et al. 2001, managed to identify geologically validated seismic clusters. These results suggest that that the time component should be included as a dimension during the clustering process as seismic cluster formation is dynamic and the emerging clusters propagate in time. Another issue that has not been investigated yet explicitly is the role of the magnitude of each seismic event. In other words the major seismic event should be treated differently compared to pre or post seismic sequences. Moreover the sometimes irregular and elongated shapes that appear on geophysical maps means that clustering algorithms

  11. Joint cross-correlation analysis reveals complex, time-dependent functional relationship between cortical neurons and arm electromyograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Katie Z.; Lebedev, Mikhail A.

    2014-01-01

    Correlation between cortical activity and electromyographic (EMG) activity of limb muscles has long been a subject of neurophysiological studies, especially in terms of corticospinal connectivity. Interest in this issue has recently increased due to the development of brain-machine interfaces with output signals that mimic muscle force. For this study, three monkeys were implanted with multielectrode arrays in multiple cortical areas. One monkey performed self-timed touch pad presses, whereas the other two executed arm reaching movements. We analyzed the dynamic relationship between cortical neuronal activity and arm EMGs using a joint cross-correlation (JCC) analysis that evaluated trial-by-trial correlation as a function of time intervals within a trial. JCCs revealed transient correlations between the EMGs of multiple muscles and neural activity in motor, premotor and somatosensory cortical areas. Matching results were obtained using spike-triggered averages corrected by subtracting trial-shuffled data. Compared with spike-triggered averages, JCCs more readily revealed dynamic changes in cortico-EMG correlations. JCCs showed that correlation peaks often sharpened around movement times and broadened during delay intervals. Furthermore, JCC patterns were directionally selective for the arm-reaching task. We propose that such highly dynamic, task-dependent and distributed relationships between cortical activity and EMGs should be taken into consideration for future brain-machine interfaces that generate EMG-like signals. PMID:25210153

  12. Probe for high resolution NMR with sample reorientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Alexander; Samoson, Ago

    1990-01-01

    An improved NMR probe and method are described which substantially improve the resolution of NMR measurements made on powdered or amorphous or otherwise orientationally disordered samples. The apparatus mechanically varies the orientation of the sample such that the time average of two or more sets of spherical harmonic functions are zero.

  13. Understanding the reorientations and roles of spatial planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galland, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    by analytical concepts drawn from planning theory, state spatial theory and discourse analysis. Based on an in-depth study, the article then attempts to qualify, illustrate and synthesise the diverse roles that spatial planning has taken in Denmark throughout that time frame. The article concludes that spatial...

  14. Prevalence and socio-demographic correlates of time spent cooking by adults in the 2005 UK Time Use Survey. Cross-sectional analysis☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jean; White, Martin

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to document the prevalence and socio-demographic correlates of time spent cooking by adults in the 2005 UK Time-Use Survey. Respondents reported their main activities, in 10 minute slots, throughout one 24 hour period. Activities were coded into 30 pre-defined codes, including ‘cooking, washing up’. Four measures of time spent cooking were calculated: any time spent cooking, 30 continuous minutes spent cooking, total time spent cooking, and longest continuous time spent cooking. Socio-demographic correlates were: age, employment, social class, education, and number of adults and children in the household. Analyses were stratified by gender. Data from 4214 participants were included. 85% of women and 60% of men spent any time cooking; 60% of women and 33% of men spent 30 continuous minutes cooking. Amongst women, older age, not being in employment, lower social class, greater education, and living with other adults or children were positively associated with time cooking. Few differences in time spent cooking were seen in men. Socio-economic differences in time spent cooking may have been overstated as a determinant of socio-economic differences in diet, overweight and obesity. Gender was a stronger determinant of time spent cooking than other socio-demographic variables. PMID:26004671

  15. Effect of dopant nanoparticles on reorientation process in polymer-dispersed liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobov, K. V.; Zharkova, G. M.; Syzrantsev, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of the experimental data of the nanoscale powders application for doping polymer-dispersed liquid crystals (PDLC) was represented in this work. A model based on the separation of the liquid crystals reorientation process on the surface mode and the volume mode was proposed and tested. In the research the wide-spread model mixture PDLC were used. But alumina nanoparticles were the distinctive ones obtained by electron beam evaporation. The proposed model allowed to conclude that the nanoparticles localization at the surface of the droplets (as in the Pickering emulsion) lead to the variation of the connection force between the liquid crystals and the polymer. The effect of nanoparticles resulted in an acceleration of the reorientation process near the surface when the control field is turned on and in a deceleration when it is turned off. The effect for the different size particles was confirmed.

  16. A mechanism for reorientation of cortical microtubule arrays driven by microtubule severing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindeboom, Jelmer J; Nakamura, Masayoshi; Hibbel, Anneke; Shundyak, Kostya; Gutierrez, Ryan; Ketelaar, Tijs; Emons, Anne Mie C; Mulder, Bela M; Kirik, Viktor; Ehrhardt, David W

    2013-12-06

    Environmental and hormonal signals cause reorganization of microtubule arrays in higher plants, but the mechanisms driving these transitions have remained elusive. The organization of these arrays is required to direct morphogenesis. We discovered that microtubule severing by the protein katanin plays a crucial and unexpected role in the reorientation of cortical arrays, as triggered by blue light. Imaging and genetic experiments revealed that phototropin photoreceptors stimulate katanin-mediated severing specifically at microtubule intersections, leading to the generation of new microtubules at these locations. We show how this activity serves as the basis for a mechanism that amplifies microtubules orthogonal to the initial array, thereby driving array reorientation. Our observations show how severing is used constructively to build a new microtubule array.

  17. Transient Reorientation of a Doped Liquid Crystal System under a Short Laser Pulse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Tao; XIANG Ying; LIU Yi-Kun; WANG Jian; YANG Shun-Lin

    2009-01-01

    The transient optical nonlinearity of a nematic liquid crystal doped with azo-dye DRW is examined.The optical reorientation threshold of a 25-μm-thick planar-aligned sample of 5CB using a 50 ns pulse duration 532 nm YAG laser pulse is observed to decrease from 800 mJ/mm2 to 0.6 mJ/mm2 after the addition of 1 vol% azo dopant,a reduction of three orders of magnitude.When using a laser pulse duration of 10 ns,no such effect is observed.Experimental results indicate that the azo dopant molecules undergo photoisomerization from trans-isomer to cis-isomer under exposure to light,and this conformation change reorients the 5CB molecules via intermolecular coupling between guest and host.This guest-host couphng also affects the azo photoisomerization process.

  18. Paleomagnetic reorientation of San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pares, J.M.; Schleicher, A.M.; van der Pluijm, B.A.; Hickman, S.

    2008-01-01

    We present a protocol for using paleomagnetic analysis to determine the absolute orientation of core recovered from the SAFOD borehole. Our approach is based on determining the direction of the primary remanent magnetization of a spot core recovered from the Great Valley Sequence during SAFOD Phase 2 and comparing its direction to the expected reference field direction for the Late Cretaceous in North America. Both thermal and alternating field demagnetization provide equally resolved magnetization, possibly residing in magnetite, that allow reorientation. Because compositionally similar siltstones and fine-grained sandstones were encountered in the San Andreas Fault Zone during Stage 2 rotary drilling, we expect that paleomagnetic reorientation will yield reliable core orientations for continuous core acquired from directly within and adjacent to the San Andreas Fault during SAFOD Phase 3, which will be key to interpretation of spatial properties of these rocks. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Influence of an electric field on the spin-reorientation transition in Ni/Cu(100)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerhard, Lukas [Institut für Nanotechnologie, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Bonell, Frédéric; Suzuki, Yoshishige [CREST, Japan Science Technology, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Wulfhekel, Wulf [Institut für Nanotechnologie, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2014-10-13

    Magnetoelectric coupling offers the possibility to change the magnetic state of a material by an applied electric field. Over the last few years, metallic systems have come up as simple prototypes for this interaction. While the previous studies focused on Fe and Co thin films or their alloys, here we demonstrate magnetoelectric coupling in a Ni thin film which is close to a spin-reorientation transition. Our magneto-optic Kerr effect measurements on 10 ML of Ni/Cu(100) show a considerable influence of the applied electric field on the magnetism. This rounds off the range of magnetic metals that exhibit magnetoelectric coupling, and it reveals the possibility of an electric field control of a spin-reorientation transition.

  20. A structured continuum modelling framework for martensitic transformation and reorientation in shape memory materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardini, Davide; Pence, Thomas J

    2016-04-28

    Models for shape memory material behaviour can be posed in the framework of a structured continuum theory. We study such a framework in which a scalar phase fraction field and a tensor field of martensite reorientation describe the material microstructure, in the context of finite strains. Gradients of the microstructural descriptors naturally enter the formulation and offer the possibility to describe and resolve phase transformation localizations. The constitutive theory is thoroughly described by a single free energy function in conjunction with a path-dependent dissipation function. Balance laws in the form of differential equations are obtained and contain both bulk and surface terms, the latter in terms of microstreses. A natural constraint on the tensor field for martensite reorientation gives rise to reactive fields in these balance laws. Conditions ensuring objectivity as well as the relation of this framework to that provided by currently used models for shape memory alloy behaviour are discussed.

  1. Trading Time with Space - Development of subduction zone parameter database for a maximum magnitude correlation assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Andreas; Wenzel, Friedemann

    2017-04-01

    Subduction zones are generally the sources of the earthquakes with the highest magnitudes. Not only in Japan or Chile, but also in Pakistan, the Solomon Islands or for the Lesser Antilles, subduction zones pose a significant hazard for the people. To understand the behavior of subduction zones, especially to identify their capabilities to produce maximum magnitude earthquakes, various physical models have been developed leading to a large number of various datasets, e.g. from geodesy, geomagnetics, structural geology, etc. There have been various studies to utilize this data for the compilation of a subduction zone parameters database, but mostly concentrating on only the major zones. Here, we compile the largest dataset of subduction zone parameters both in parameter diversity but also in the number of considered subduction zones. In total, more than 70 individual sources have been assessed and the aforementioned parametric data have been combined with seismological data and many more sources have been compiled leading to more than 60 individual parameters. Not all parameters have been resolved for each zone, since the data completeness depends on the data availability and quality for each source. In addition, the 3D down-dip geometry of a majority of the subduction zones has been resolved using historical earthquake hypocenter data and centroid moment tensors where available and additionally compared and verified with results from previous studies. With such a database, a statistical study has been undertaken to identify not only correlations between those parameters to estimate a parametric driven way to identify potentials for maximum possible magnitudes, but also to identify similarities between the sources themselves. This identification of similarities leads to a classification system for subduction zones. Here, it could be expected if two sources share enough common characteristics, other characteristics of interest may be similar as well. This concept

  2. Multi-Measurement Correlations in the Near-Field of a Complex Supersonic Jet Using Time-Resolved Schlieren Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenney, Andrew; Coleman, Thomas; Lewalle, Jacques; Glauser, Mark; Gogineni, Sivaram

    2016-11-01

    Supersonic flow from a three-stream non-axisymmetric jet is visualized using time resolved schlieren photography (up to 400,000 frames per second) while pressure on the aft deck plate of the nozzle is simultaneously sampled using kulites. Time series are constructed using the schlieren photographs and conditioned to reduce the effects of signal drift and clipping where necessary. The effect of this detrending and clipping reconstruction on signal statistics is examined. In addition, signals constructed from near field schlieren will be correlated with one another to visualize the propagation of information in the near field. The goal of utilizing space-time correlations is to assist in identifying and tracking the evolution of individual structures in the near field. The schlieren signals will also be correlated with the deck pressure traces to assist in unraveling the interaction of flow structures.

  3. The correlation between the imaging characteristics of hamstring injury and time required before returning to sports: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Kjell; Alricsson, Marie; Eckerman, Mattias; Magounakis, Theofilos; Werner, Suzanne

    2016-06-01

    Injuries to the hamstring muscles are common in athletes. Track and field, Australian football, American football and soccer are examples of sports where hamstring injuries are the most common. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether there is a correlation between a hamstring injury prognosis and its characteristics of imaging parameters. The literature search was performed in the databases PubMed and CINAHL, and eleven articles were included. Seven out of the 11 articles showed a correlation between the size of the hamstring injury and length of time required before returning to sports. Different authors have reported contrasting results about length of time required before returning to sports due to location of injury within specific muscle. Majority of the articles found hamstring strain correlated to an extended amount of time required before returning to sports.

  4. Comparative study of dynamic structure of pig and chicken aspartate aminotransferases by measuring the rotational correlation time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, V P; Dudich, I V; Volkenstein, M V

    1980-01-01

    The rotational correlation time of two homologous cytoplasmic aspartate aminotransferase molecules isolated from pig and chicken hearts was obtained by spin-labeling technique. The maleimide and iodoacetamide spin-labels modifying external SH-groups of a protein were used. In the interpretation of ESR spectra a rotational motion of nitroxide group relative to the protein molecule was taken into account. To determine the macromolecule rotational correlation time two methods of the immobilization of a protein molecule were used: 1) by means of increasing protein solution viscosity and 2) by fixation of the protein molecule on adsorbent. From comparison of experimental and theoretical values of rotational correlation time it was conclude that the both enzymes exhibits an intramolecular flexibility.

  5. A new twist on old ideas: How sitting reorients crawlers

    OpenAIRE

    Soska, Kasey C.; Scott R. Robinson; Adolph, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, crawling and sitting are considered distinct motor behaviors with different postures and functions. Ten- to 12-month-old infants were observed in the laboratory or in their homes while being coaxed to crawl continuously over long, straight walkways (Study 1; N = 20) and during spontaneous crawling during free play (Study 2; N = 20). In every context, infants stopped crawling to sit 3-6 times per minute. Transitions from crawling to sitting frequently turned infants’ bodies away...

  6. Pluto followed its heart: reorientation and faulting of Pluto due to volatile loading in Sputnik Planum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle Keane, James; Matsuyama, Isamu; Kamata, Shunichi; Steckloff, Jordan

    2016-10-01

    The New Horizons flyby of Pluto revealed the dwarf planet to be a strikingly diverse, geologically active world. Perhaps the most intriguing feature on the New Horizons encounter hemisphere is Sputnik Planum—a 1000 km diameter, probable impact basin, filled with several kilometers of actively convecting volatile ices (N2, CH4, CO). One salient characteristic of Sputnik Planum is its curious alignment with the Pluto-Charon tidal axis. The alignment of large geologic features with principal axis of inertia (such as the tidal axis) is the hallmark of global reorientation, i.e. true polar wander. Here we show that the present location of Sputnik Planum is a natural consequence of loading of 1-2 km of volatile ices within the Sputnik Planum basin. Larger volatile ice thicknesses (like those inferred from studies of ice convection within Sputnik Planum) betray an underlying negative gravity anomaly associated with the basin. As Pluto reoriented in response to the loading of volatile ices within Sputnik Planum, stresses accumulated within the lithosphere (as each geographic location experiences a change in tidal/rotational potential). These reorientation stresses, coupled with loading stresses, and stresses from the freezing of a subsurface ocean resulted in the fracturing of Pluto's lithosphere in a characteristic, global pattern of extensional faults. Our predicted pattern of extensional faults due to this reorientation closely replicates the observed distribution of faults on Pluto (more so than global expansion, orbit migration, de-spinning, or loading alone). Sputnik Planum likely formed ~60° northwest of its present location, and was loaded with volatile ices over millions of years due to seasonal volatile transport cycles. This result places Pluto in a truly unique category of planetary bodies where volatiles are not only controlling surface geology and atmospheric processes, but they are also directly controlling the orientation of the entire dwarf planet

  7. Giant magnetostrictive superlattices: from spin reorientation transition to MEMS. Static and dynamical properties

    CERN Document Server

    Tiercelin, N; Preobrazhensky, V; Pernod, P; Gall, H L

    2002-01-01

    The results of development of 'giant magnetostrictive' multilayers with spin reorientation transition (SRT) for microactuators are presented. Manifestations of magneto-mechanical instability and nonlinearity near SRT are studied experimentally and simulated numerically. Improvement of magneto-mechanical sensitivity near SRT is demonstrated for various modes of linear and nonlinear actuation of magnetostrictive unimorph. Limitations of sensitivity caused by magnetic field distortions are described by a numerical model, the results are compared with the experimental data.

  8. GOLPH3 drives cell migration by promoting Golgi reorientation and directional trafficking to the leading edge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Mengke; Peterman, Marshall C; Davis, Robert L; Oegema, Karen; Shiau, Andrew K; Field, Seth J

    2016-12-01

    The mechanism of directional cell migration remains an important problem, with relevance to cancer invasion and metastasis. GOLPH3 is a common oncogenic driver of human cancers, and is the first oncogene that functions at the Golgi in trafficking to the plasma membrane. Overexpression of GOLPH3 is reported to drive enhanced cell migration. Here we show that the phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate/GOLPH3/myosin 18A/F-actin pathway that is critical for Golgi-to-plasma membrane trafficking is necessary and limiting for directional cell migration. By linking the Golgi to the actin cytoskeleton, GOLPH3 promotes reorientation of the Golgi toward the leading edge. GOLPH3 also promotes reorientation of lysosomes (but not other organelles) toward the leading edge. However, lysosome function is dispensable for migration and the GOLPH3 dependence of lysosome movement is indirect, via GOLPH3's effect on the Golgi. By driving reorientation of the Golgi to the leading edge and driving forward trafficking, particularly to the leading edge, overexpression of GOLPH3 drives trafficking to the leading edge of the cell, which is functionally important for directional cell migration. Our identification of a novel pathway for Golgi reorientation controlled by GOLPH3 provides new insight into the mechanism of directional cell migration with important implications for understanding GOLPH3's role in cancer. © 2016 Xing, Peterman, et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  9. Reorientation of Asymmetric Rigid Body Using Two Controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghoon Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Most spacecrafts are designed to be maneuvered to achieve pointing goals. This is accomplished usually by designing a three-axis control system, which can achieve arbitrary maneuvers, where the goal is to repoint the spacecraft and match a desired angular velocity at the end of the maneuver. New control laws are required, however, if one of the three-axis control actuators fails. This paper explores suboptimal maneuver strategies when only two control torque inputs are available. To handle this underactuated system control problem, the three-axis maneuver strategy is transformed to two successive independent submaneuver strategies. The first maneuver is conducted on one of the available torque axes. Next, the second maneuver is conducted on the torque available plane using two available control torques. However, the resulting control law is more complicated than the general three-axis control law. This is because an optimal switch time needs to be found for determining the end time for the single-axis maneuver or the start time for the second maneuver. Numerical simulation results are presented that compare optimal maneuver strategies for both nominal and failed actuator cases.

  10. Reorientation and faulting of Pluto due to volatile loading within Sputnik Planitia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, James T; Matsuyama, Isamu; Kamata, Shunichi; Steckloff, Jordan K

    2016-12-01

    Pluto is an astoundingly diverse, geologically dynamic world. The dominant feature is Sputnik Planitia-a tear-drop-shaped topographic depression approximately 1,000 kilometres in diameter possibly representing an ancient impact basin. The interior of Sputnik Planitia is characterized by a smooth, craterless plain three to four kilometres beneath the surrounding rugged uplands, and represents the surface of a massive unit of actively convecting volatile ices (N2, CH4 and CO) several kilometres thick. This large feature is very near the Pluto-Charon tidal axis. Here we report that the location of Sputnik Planitia is the natural consequence of the sequestration of volatile ices within the basin and the resulting reorientation (true polar wander) of Pluto. Loading of volatile ices within a basin the size of Sputnik Planitia can substantially alter Pluto's inertia tensor, resulting in a reorientation of the dwarf planet of around 60 degrees with respect to the rotational and tidal axes. The combination of this reorientation, loading and global expansion due to the freezing of a possible subsurface ocean generates stresses within the planet's lithosphere, resulting in a global network of extensional faults that closely replicate the observed fault networks on Pluto. Sputnik Planitia probably formed northwest of its present location, and was loaded with volatiles over million-year timescales as a result of volatile transport cycles on Pluto. Pluto's past, present and future orientation is controlled by feedbacks between volatile sublimation and condensation, changing insolation conditions and Pluto's interior structure.

  11. Optimal reorientation of asymmetric underactuated spacecraft using differential flatness and receding horizon control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wei-wei; Yang, Le-ping; Zhu, Yan-wei

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method integrating nominal trajectory optimization and tracking for the reorientation control of an underactuated spacecraft with only two available control torque inputs. By employing a pseudo input along the uncontrolled axis, the flatness property of a general underactuated spacecraft is extended explicitly, by which the reorientation trajectory optimization problem is formulated into the flat output space with all the differential constraints eliminated. Ultimately, the flat output optimization problem is transformed into a nonlinear programming problem via the Chebyshev pseudospectral method, which is improved by the conformal map and barycentric rational interpolation techniques to overcome the side effects of the differential matrix's ill-conditions on numerical accuracy. Treating the trajectory tracking control as a state regulation problem, we develop a robust closed-loop tracking control law using the receding-horizon control method, and compute the feedback control at each control cycle rapidly via the differential transformation method. Numerical simulation results show that the proposed control scheme is feasible and effective for the reorientation maneuver.

  12. Free energy barrier for melittin reorientation from a membrane-bound state to a transmembrane state

    CERN Document Server

    Irudayam, Sheeba J; Berkowitz, Max L

    2013-01-01

    An important step in a phospholipid membrane pore formation by melittin antimicrobial peptide is a reorientation of the peptide from a surface into a transmembrane conformation. In this work we perform umbrella sampling simulations to calculate the potential of mean force (PMF) for the reorientation of melittin from a surface-bound state to a transmembrane state and provide a molecular level insight into understanding peptide and lipid properties that influence the existence of the free energy barrier. The PMFs were calculated for a peptide to lipid (P/L) ratio of 1/128 and 4/128. We observe that the free energy barrier is reduced when the P/L ratio increased. In addition, we study the cooperative effect; specifically we investigate if the barrier is smaller for a second melittin reorientation, given that another neighboring melittin was already in the transmembrane state. We observe that indeed the barrier of the PMF curve is reduced in this case, thus confirming the presence of a cooperative effect.

  13. Is height a core geometric cue for navigation? Young children's use of height in reorientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qingfen; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Di; Shao, Yi

    2015-02-01

    With respect to reorientation, children older than 1.5 to 2 years can use geometric cues (distance and left/right sense). However, because previous studies have focused mainly on the plane geometric properties, little is known about the role of information with respect to vertical dimension in children's reorientation. The current study aimed to examine whether and how 3- and 4-year-old children use height information to search for a hidden toy when disoriented in a small enclosure. In a slant-ceiling rectangular room and a slant-ceiling square room, 4-year-olds were able to use height information to reorient and search for the toy in the correct corner, whereas 3-year-olds were not able to do so. Our results suggest that children can, at least by the age of 4 years, use height information and that height is not used as early as other geometric properties that are in the core geometry system for navigation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Spatial reorientation decline in aging: the combination of geometry and landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffò, Alessandro O; Lopez, Antonella; Spano, Giuseppina; Serino, Silvia; Cipresso, Pietro; Stasolla, Fabrizio; Savino, Michelina; Lancioni, Giulio E; Riva, Giuseppe; Bosco, Andrea

    2017-07-20

    The study is focused on the assessment of reorientation skills in a sample of community-dwelling elderly people, manipulating landmarks and geometric (layout) information. A neuropsychological assessment was administered to 286 elderly participants, divided into six groups (healthy controls, HC; four subgroups of participants with mild cognitive impairment, MCI; participants with probable dementia, Prob_D) and tested with the Virtual Reorientation Test (VReoT). VReoT manipulated different spatial cues: geometry and landmarks (proximal and distal). Compared with HC, participants with MCI and Prob_D showed to be impaired in tasks involving geometry, landmarks and a combination of them. Both single and multiple domain impairment in MCI had an impact on reorientation performance. Moreover, VReoT was marginally able to discriminate between amnesic and non-amnesic MCI. The occurrence of getting lost events seemed to be associated to learning of geometric information. The associative strength between landmark and target plays an important role in affecting spatial orientation performance of cognitively impaired participants. Geometry significantly supports landmark information and becomes helpful with the increase of cognitive impairment which is linked to a decrement in landmark encoding. VReoT seems to represent a reliable evaluation supplement for spatial orientation deficits in prodromal stages of dementia.

  15. Hypergravity induces reorientation of cortical microtubules and modifies growth anisotropy in azuki bean epicotyls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soga, Kouichi; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Kamisaka, Seiichiro; Hoson, Takayuki

    2006-11-01

    We examined the changes in the orientation of cortical microtubules during the hypergravity-induced modification of growth anisotropy (inhibition of elongation growth and promotion of lateral growth) in azuki bean (Vigna angularis Ohwi et Ohashi) epicotyls. The percentage of cells with transverse microtubules was decreased, while that with longitudinal microtubules was increased, in proportion to the logarithm of the magnitude of gravity. The percentage of cells with longitudinal microtubules showed an increase within 0.5 h of transfer of the 1g-grown seedlings to a 300g-hypergravity condition. Lanthanum and gadolinium, blockers of calcium channels, nullified the modification of growth anisotropy and reorientation of microtubules by hypergravity. Horizontal and acropetal hypergravity modified growth anisotropy and reorientation of microtubules, as did basipetal hypergravity, and these changes were not seen in the presence of lanthanum or gadolinium. These results suggest that hypergravity changes activities of lanthanum- and gadolinium-sensitive calcium channels independently of its direction, which may lead to reorientation of cortical microtubules and modification of growth anisotropy in azuki bean epicotyls.

  16. Stable panoramic views facilitate snap-shot like memories for spatial reorientation in homing pigeons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Pecchia

    Full Text Available Following spatial disorientation, animals can reorient themselves by relying on geometric cues (metric and sense specified both by the macroscopic surface layout of an enclosed space and prominent visual landmarks in arrays. Whether spatial reorientation in arrays of landmarks is based on explicit representation of the geometric cues is a matter of debate. Here we trained homing pigeons (Columba livia to locate a food-reward in a rectangular array of four identical or differently coloured pipes provided with four openings, only one of which allowed the birds to have access to the reward. Pigeons were trained either with a stable or a variable position of the opening on pipes, so that they could view the array either from the same or a variable perspective. Explicit mapping of configural geometry would predict successful reorientation irrespective of access condition. In contrast, we found that a stable view of the array facilitated spatial learning in homing pigeons, likely through the formation of snapshot-like memories.

  17. Age-related differences during a gaze reorientation task while standing or walking on a treadmill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinelli, Michael; Patla, Aftab; Stuart, Bethany

    2008-02-01

    Falls among adults over the age of 65 years have become a growing concern. Two factors related to high incidence of falls in this group of adults are decreased head stability and impaired balance. Older adults' level of control of head stability or balance is unknown when they must reorient their gaze. In the current study, ten older adults (69 +/- 3.27 years) performed a gaze reorienting task while standing or walking on a treadmill. The task was the same as that used on young adults by Cinelli et al. (2007). The results show that older adults use a different strategy than young adults when reorienting gaze. Shoulder and hip rotations occurred synchronously when standing and were more variable when walking on a treadmill. As well, there was a larger difference between the onset of eye movements and body segment movement in the older adults. These differences can be accounted for by decreases in physiological subsystems. The visual presence of a visual target helped the older adults stabilize their heads-in-space by incorporating information from more than one sensory system.

  18. Involvement of the head and trunk during gaze reorientation during standing and treadmill walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinelli, Michael; Patla, Aftab; Stuart, Bethany

    2007-07-01

    As individuals stand or walk in an environment their gaze may be reoriented from one location to another in response to auditory or visual stimuli. In order to reorient gaze, the eyes and/or the head and trunk must rotate. However, what determines the exact degree of rotation of each segment while standing or walking is not fully understood. In the current study we show that when participants were asked to reorient their gaze towards light cues positioned at eccentric locations of up to 90 degrees while standing or walking on a treadmill their eyes and head mainly facilitated the action. Rotations of the head-in-space were similar for both tasks, but the rotation of the shoulders- and hips-in-space were lower for the treadmill walking condition. It is argued that this difference in the level of head-on-trunk rotation during the two tasks is controlled by the vestibular feedback loop. The regulation of this feedback loop is performed by the cerebellum in response to the level of threat to postural stability.

  19. Reorientation dynamics of nematics encapsulated in microscopic volumes in a strong electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, A. V.; Vakulenko, A. A.; Pasechnik, S. V.

    2016-09-01

    We theoretically describe a new regime of reorientation of the director field widehat n and velocity v of a nematic liquid crystal (LC) encapsulated in a rectangular cell under the action of strong electric field E directed at angle α ( π/2) to the horizontal surfaces bounding the LC cell. The numerical calculations in the framework of nonlinear generalization of the classical Eriksen-Leslie theory showed that at certain relations between the torques and momenta affecting the unit LC volume and E ≫ E th, transition periodic structures can arise during reorientation of widehat n, if the corresponding distortion mode has the fastest response and, thus, suppresses all the rest of the modes, including uniform ones. The position of sites of these periodic structures is affected by the value of field E, angle α, and the character of anchoring of LC molecules to the bounding surfaces. The calculations performed for the nematic formed by 4-n-penthyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl showed that several vortexes can form in an LC cell under the action of reorientation of the nematic field; the boundaries of these vortexes are determined by the positions of periodic structure sites.

  20. Statistical Model of Exotic Rotational Correlations in Emergent Space-Time

    CERN Document Server

    Hogan, Craig; Richardson, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    A statistical model is formulated to compute exotic rotational correlations that arise as inertial frames and causal structure emerge on large scales from entangled Planck scale quantum systems. Noncommutative quantum dynamics are represented by random transverse displacements that respect causal symmetry. Entanglement is represented by covariance of these displacements in Planck scale intervals defined by future null cones of events on an observer's world line. Light that propagates in a nonradial direction inherits a projected component of the exotic rotational correlation that accumulates as a random walk in phase. A calculation of the projection and accumulation leads to exact predictions for statistical properties of exotic Planck scale correlations in an interferometer of any configuration. The cross-covariance for two nearly co-located interferometers is shown to depart only slightly from the autocovariance. Specific examples are computed for configurations that approximate realistic experiments, and s...