WorldWideScience

Sample records for reorient experimental satellites

  1. Synchronized Position and Hold Reorient Experimental Satellites - International Space Station (SPHERES-ISS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Payload Systems Inc. (PSI) and the MIT Space Systems Laboratory (MIT-SSL) propose an innovative research program entitled SPHERES-ISS that uses their satellite...

  2. Experimental Satellite 2 Successfully Launched

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiuJie

    2004-01-01

    Small satellite Experimental Satellite 2 (SY-2) was launched by LM-2C launch vehicle from Xichang Satellite Launch Center on Nov. 18, 2004. Later the satellite entered the preset sun-synchronous orbit, which is 700 kilometers above the earth. The launch was the eighthmission this year by China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation(CASC), which aims to test the technology of the satellite, conduct survey and monitoring of the land and resources and geographical environment on a trial basis.

  3. Communications satellites - The experimental years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelson, B. I.

    1983-10-01

    Only eight years after the launc of Sputnik-1 by the Soviet Union, the first commercial satellite, 'Early Bird', entered service. In just twelve years commercial satellite service extended around the earth and became profitable. The reasons for the successful development of the communications satellite services in a comparatively short time are considered. These reasons are related to the presence of three ingredients, taking into account technology to create the system, communications requirements to form a market, and a management structure to implement the system. The formation of the concept of using earth orbiting satellites for telecommunications is discussed. It is pointed out that the years from 1958 to 1964 were the true 'experimental years' for satellite communications. The rapid development of technology during this crucial period is described, giving attention to passive satellites, active systems, and development satellites.

  4. Experimental Satellite Quantum Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallone, Giuseppe; Bacco, Davide; Dequal, Daniele; Gaiarin, Simone; Luceri, Vincenza; Bianco, Giuseppe; Villoresi, Paolo

    2015-07-24

    Quantum communication (QC), namely, the faithful transmission of generic quantum states, is a key ingredient of quantum information science. Here we demonstrate QC with polarization encoding from space to ground by exploiting satellite corner cube retroreflectors as quantum transmitters in orbit and the Matera Laser Ranging Observatory of the Italian Space Agency in Matera, Italy, as a quantum receiver. The quantum bit error ratio (QBER) has been kept steadily low to a level suitable for several quantum information protocols, as the violation of Bell inequalities or quantum key distribution (QKD). Indeed, by taking data from different satellites, we demonstrate an average value of QBER=4.6% for a total link duration of 85 s. The mean photon number per pulse μ_{sat} leaving the satellites was estimated to be of the order of one. In addition, we propose a fully operational satellite QKD system by exploiting our communication scheme with orbiting retroreflectors equipped with a modulator, a very compact payload. Our scheme paves the way toward the implementation of a QC worldwide network leveraging existing receivers.

  5. Experimental millimeter-wave satellite communications system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Shimada, Masaaki; Arimoto, Yoshinori; Shiomi, Tadashi; Kitazume, Susumu

    This paper describes an experimental system of millimeter-wave satellite communications via Japan's Engineering Test Satellite-VI (ETS-VI) and a plan of experiments. Two experimental missions are planned using ETS-VI millimeter-wave (43/38 GHz bands) transponder, considering the millimeter-wave characteristics such as large transmission capacity and possibility to construct a small earth station with a high gain antenna. They are a personal communication system and an inter-satellite communication system. Experimental system including the configuration and the fundamental functions of the onboard transponder and the outline of the experiments are presented.

  6. Cell reorientation under cyclic stretching

    CERN Document Server

    Livne, Ariel; Geiger, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical cues from the extracellular microenvironment play a central role in regulating the structure, function and fate of living cells. Nevertheless, the precise nature of the mechanisms and processes underlying this crucial cellular mechanosensitivity remains a fundamental open problem. Here we provide a novel framework for addressing cellular sensitivity and response to external forces by experimentally and theoretically studying one of its most striking manifestations -- cell reorientation to a uniform angle in response to cyclic stretching of the underlying substrate. We first show that existing approaches are incompatible with our extensive measurements of cell reorientation. We then propose a fundamentally new theory that shows that dissipative relaxation of the cell's passively-stored, two-dimensional, elastic energy to its minimum actively drives the reorientation process. Our theory is in excellent quantitative agreement with the complete temporal reorientation dynamics of individual cells, measu...

  7. Communication Satellites: Experimental & Operational, Commercial & Public Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Development Communication Report, 1979

    1979-01-01

    The title reflects the first and major article in an issue of this newsletter devoted entirely to communication satellites. This series of articles on the potential and applications of communication satellites in development projects is concerned with their development for commercial and public service, development in the Pacific region, SPACECOM…

  8. Dynamics in molecular and molecular-ionic crystals: a combined experimental and molecular simulation study of reorientational motions in benzene, pyridinium iodide, and pyridinium nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajzderska, A; Gonzalez, M A; Wąsicki, J

    2013-01-14

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for crystalline benzene (C(6)H(6)), pyridinium iodide [C(5)NH(6)](+)I(-), and pyridinium nitrate [C(5)NH(6)](+)NO(3)(-) have been performed as a function of temperature and pressure. Despite the similar shape of the benzene molecule and the pyridinium cation, the experimental and simulated data have showed clear differences in their dynamics. Therefore, the rotational dynamics have been explored in detail by comparing thoroughly the existing experimental results together with new quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) data obtained for (PyH)NO(3) and molecular dynamics simulations. The correlation times, activation energy, geometry of motion of benzene molecule and pyridinium cation, isothermal compressibility, and activation volume obtained from the simulations are compared with the experimental results obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance and QENS methods. MD simulations have also revealed that reorientation of the pyridinium cation in pyridinium nitrate between two inequivalent positions is strongly affected by the hydrogen bond N-H···O between the cation and the anion and the influence of temperature on strength of the hydrogen bond is much more important than that of the pressure.

  9. Dependent surveillance through an experimental satellite data link system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobley, G. A.

    The development and testing of an experimental dependent aircraft-surveillance system using a satellite data link is reported. In this system, the aircraft position is determined onboard using GPS or inertial navigation, enclosed in a message block using a data-link system, and transmitted to an Inmarsat GEO communication satellites; the ground station receives and analyzes the data to keep constant track of the aircraft position. The hardware implementation and the results of demonstrations performed on flights from Iowa to Wisconsin and the North Atlantic are discussed, and diagrams and maps are provided.

  10. Reorienting Hypnosis Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alter, David S; Sugarman, Laurence Irwin

    2017-01-01

    The legacy model of professional clinical hypnosis training presents a restrictive frame increasingly incompatible with our evolving understanding of psychobiology, health, and care. Emerging science recognizes human experience not as disease and diagnosis, but as manifestations of individual, uniquely-endowed, adaptively self-regulating systems. Hypnosis is a particularly well-suited discipline for effecting beneficial change in this paradigm. Training in clinical hypnosis must progress from the current linearly-structured, diagnosis-based, reductionist model toward a more responsive, naturalistic, and client-centered curriculum in order to remain relevant and accessible to clinicians beginning to integrate it into their practices. To that end, this article extends Hope and Sugarman's (2015) thesis of hypnosis as a skill set for systemic perturbation and reorientation to consider what those skills may be, the principles on which they are based, and how they may be taught. Parsing a clinical vignette reveals how incorporation of novelty and uncertainty results in less restrictive and more naturalistic hypnotic encounters that, in response to client-generated cues, elicit psychophysiological plasticity. This disruptive hypnosis education and training framework extends the utility and benefit of applied clinical hypnosis.

  11. PLANCK, the Satellite: a New Experimental Test of General Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borissova L.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available If the origin of a microwave background (EMB is the Earth, what would be its density and associated dipole anisotropy measured at different altitudes from the surface of the Earth? The mathematical methods of the General Theory of Relativity are applied herein to answer these questions. The density of the EMB is answered by means of Einstein’s equations for the electromagnetic field of the Earth. The dipole anisotropy, which is due to the rapid motion of the source (the Earth in the weak intergalactic field, is analysed by using the geodesic equations for light-like particles (photons, which are mediators for electromagnetic radiation. It is shown that the EMB decreases with altitude so that the density of its energy at the altitude of the COBE orbit (900km is 0.68 times less than that at the altitude of a U2 aeroplane (25 km. Furthermore, the density at the 2nd Lagrange point (1.5 million km, the position of the WMAP and PLANCK satellites should be only 1E-7 of the value detected by a U2 aeroplane or at the COBE orbit. The dipole anisotropy of the EMB doesn’t depend on altitude from the surface of the Earth, it should be the same irrespective of the altitude at which measurements are taken. This result is in support to the experimental and observational analysis conducted by P.-M. Robitaille, according to which the 2.7 K microwave background, first observed by Penzias and Wilson, is not of cosmic origin, but of the Earth, and is generated by the oceans. WMAP indicated the same anisotropy of the microwave background at the 2nd Lagrange point that near the Earth. Therefore when PLANCK, which is planned on July, 2008, will manifest the 2.7 K monopole microwave signal deceased at the 2nd Langrange point, it will be a new experimental verification of Einstein’s theory.

  12. Optimal Reorientation Of Spacecraft Orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelnokov Yuriy Nikolaevich

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of optimal reorientation of the spacecraft orbit is considered. For solving the problem we used quaternion equations of motion written in rotating coordinate system. The use of quaternion variables makes this consideration more efficient. The problem of optimal control is solved on the basis of the maximum principle. An example of numerical solution of the problem is given.

  13. Reorientation from Altered States: Please, More Carefully.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Charles A.

    1989-01-01

    Claims counselors too often appear to forget to reorient clients from altered states of consciousness used in counseling and that failure to reorient can result in unnecessary discomfort for clients. Provides suggestions for when and how to reorient to avoid unwanted, lingering aftereffects. (Author/ABL)

  14. Genomic Signals of Reoriented ORFs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Dan Cristea

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex representation of nucleotides is used to convert DNA sequences into complex digital genomic signals. The analysis of the cumulated phase and unwrapped phase of DNA genomic signals reveals large-scale features of eukaryote and prokaryote chromosomes that result from statistical regularities of base and base-pair distributions along DNA strands. By reorienting the chromosome coding regions, a “hidden” linear variation of the cumulated phase has been revealed, along with the conspicuous almost linear variation of the unwrapped phase. A model of chromosome longitudinal structure is inferred on these bases.

  15. A Molecular Jump Mechanism of Water Reorientation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Damien Laage; James T. Hynes

    2006-01-01

    .... This water reorientation mechanism involves large-amplitude angular jumps, rather than the commonly accepted sequence of small diffusive steps, and therefore calls for reinterpretation of many...

  16. INIST: databases reorientation; INIST: reorientation des bases de donnees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidet, J.C.

    1995-08-01

    INIST is a CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique) laboratory devoted to the treatment of scientific and technical informations and to the management of these informations compiled in a database. Reorientation of the database content has been proposed in 1994 to increase the transfer of research towards enterprises and services, to develop more automatized accesses to the informations, and to create a quality assurance plan. The catalog of publications comprises 5800 periodical titles (1300 for fundamental research and 4500 for applied research). A science and technology multi-thematic database will be created in 1995 for the retrieval of applied and technical informations. ``Grey literature`` (reports, thesis, proceedings..) and human and social sciences data will be added to the base by the use of informations selected in the existing GRISELI and Francis databases. Strong modifications are also planned in the thematic cover of Earth sciences and will considerably reduce the geological information content. (J.S.). 1 tab.

  17. Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). Phase 1: Industrial/academic experimenters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisel, James E.; Nowlin, Robert W.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents the work done at Arizona State University under the ACTS Experimenters Program. The main thrust of the Program was to develop experiments to test, evaluate, and prove the commercial worthiness of the ACTS satellite which is scheduled for launch in 1993. To accomplish this goal, meetings were held with various governmental, industrial, and academic units to discuss the ACTS satellite and its technology and possible experiments that would generate industrial interest and support for ASU's efforts. Several local industries generated several experiments of their own. The investigators submitted several experiments of educational, medical, commercial, and technical value and interest. The disposition of these experimental proposals is discussed in this report.

  18. Why water reorientation slows without iceberg formation around hydrophobic solutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laage, Damien; Stirnemann, Guillaume; Hynes, James T

    2009-02-26

    The dynamics of water molecules next to hydrophobic solutes is investigated, specifically addressing the recent controversy raised by the first time-resolved observations, which concluded that some water molecules are immobilized by hydrophobic groups, in strong contrast to previous NMR conclusions. Through molecular dynamics simulations and an analytic jump reorientation model, we identify the water reorientation mechanism next to a hydrophobic solute and provide evidence that no water molecules are immobilized by hydrophobic solutes. Their moderate rotational slowdown compared to bulk water (e.g., by a factor of less than 2 at low solute concentration) is mainly due to slower hydrogen-bond exchange. The slowdown is quantitatively described by a solute excluded volume effect at the transition state for the key hydrogen-bond exchange in the reorientation mechanism. We show that this picture is consistent with both ultrafast anisotropy and NMR experimental results and that the transition state excluded volume theory yields quantitative predictions of the rotational slowdown for diverse hydrophobic solutes of varying size over a wide concentration range. We also explain why hydrophobic groups slow water reorientation less than do some hydrophilic groups.

  19. Experimental Study on the Precise Orbit Determination of the BeiDou Navigation Satellite System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Wickert

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The regional service of the Chinese BeiDou satellite navigation system is now in operation with a constellation including five Geostationary Earth Orbit satellites (GEO, five Inclined Geosynchronous Orbit (IGSO satellites and four Medium Earth Orbit (MEO satellites. Besides the standard positioning service with positioning accuracy of about 10 m, both precise relative positioning and precise point positioning are already demonstrated. As is well known, precise orbit and clock determination is essential in enhancing precise positioning services. To improve the satellite orbits of the BeiDou regional system, we concentrate on the impact of the tracking geometry and the involvement of MEOs, and on the effect of integer ambiguity resolution as well. About seven weeks of data collected at the BeiDou Experimental Test Service (BETS network is employed in this experimental study. Several tracking scenarios are defined, various processing schemata are designed and carried out; and then, the estimates are compared and analyzed in detail. The results show that GEO orbits, especially the along-track component, can be significantly improved by extending the tracking network in China along longitude direction, whereas IGSOs gain more improvement if the tracking network extends in latitude. The involvement of MEOs and ambiguity-fixing also make the orbits better.

  20. Easy-to-Build Satellite Beacon Receiver for Propagation Experimentation at Millimeter Bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Machado

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the design and development of a digital satellite beacon receiver for propagation experimentation. Satellite beacons are frequently available for pointing large antennas, but such signals can be used for measuring rain attenuation and other phenomena as, for example, tropospheric scintillation. A fairly inexpensive beacon receiver has been built using off-the-shelf parts. This instrument is not at all bulky making it suitable for easy transportation. This article analyzes the receiver specifications, describes in detail its structure and presents some operational test results.

  1. Tilted wheel satellite attitude control with air-bearing table experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inumoh, Lawrence O.; Forshaw, Jason L.; Horri, Nadjim M.

    2015-12-01

    Gyroscopic actuators for satellite control have attracted significant research interest over the years, but their viability for the control of small satellites has only recently started to become clear. Research on variable speed gyroscopic actuators has long been focused on single gimbal actuators; double gimbal actuators typically operate at constant wheel spin rate and allow tilt angle ranges far larger than the ranges needed to operate most satellite missions. This research examines a tilted wheel, a newly proposed type of inertial actuator that can generate torques in all three principal axes of a rigid satellite using a spinning wheel and a double tilt mechanism. The tilt mechanism tilts the angular momentum vector about two axes providing two degree of freedom control, while variation of the wheel speed provides the third. The equations of motion of the system lead to a singularity-free system during nominal operation avoiding the need for complex steering logic. This paper describes the hardware design of the tilted wheel and the experimental setup behind both standalone and spherical air-bearing tables used to test it. Experimental results from the air bearing table are provided with the results depicting the high performance capabilities of the proposed actuator in torque generation.

  2. Junction Plasmon-Induced Molecular Reorientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hu, Dehong; Hess, Wayne P.

    2013-10-17

    Time and frequency dependent intensity variations in sequences of Raman spectra recorded at plasmonic junctions can be assigned to molecular reorientation. This is revealed through Raman trajectories recorded at a nanojunction formed between a silver AFM tip and a corrugated silver surface coated with biphenyl-4,4’-dithiol. Molecular motion is not observed when the tip is retracted and only surface enhancement is operative. In effect, junction plasmon induced molecular reorientation is tracked.

  3. ORNL Interim Progress Report on Hydride Reorientation CIRFT Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yan, Yong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wang, Hong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-10-28

    A systematic study of H. B. Robinson (HBR) high burnup spent nuclear fuel (SNF) vibration integrity was performed in Phase I project under simulated transportation environments, using the Cyclic Integrated Reversible-Bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT) hot cell testing technology developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 2013–14. The data analysis on the as-irradiated HBR SNF rods demonstrated that the load amplitude is the dominant factor that controls the fatigue life of bending rods. However, previous studies have shown that the hydrogen content and hydride morphology has an important effect on zirconium alloy mechanical properties. To address the effect of radial hydrides in SNF rods, in Phase II a test procedure was developed to simulate the effects of elevated temperatures, pressures, and stresses during transfer-drying operations. Pressurized and sealed fuel segments were heated to the target temperature for a preset hold time and slow-cooled at a controlled rate. The procedure was applied to both non-irradiated/prehydrided and high-burnup Zircaloy-4 fueled cladding segments using the Nuclear Regulatory Commission-recommended 400°C maximum temperature limit at various cooling rates. Before testing high-burnup cladding, four out-of-cell tests were conducted to optimize the hydride reorientation (R) test condition with pre-hydride Zircaloy-4 cladding, which has the same geometry as the high burnup fuel samples. Test HR-HBR#1 was conducted at the maximum hoop stress of 145 MPa, at a 400°C maximum temperature and a 5°C/h cooling rate. On the other hand, thermal cycling was performed for tests HR-HBR#2, HR-HBR#3, and HR-HBR#4 to generate more radial hydrides. It is clear that thermal cycling increases the ratio of the radial hydride to circumferential hydrides. The internal pressure also has a significant effect on the radial hydride morphology. This report describes a procedure and experimental results of the four out-of-cell hydride reorientation tests of

  4. Mechatronic Design, Dynamic Modeling and Results of a Satellite Flight Simulator for Experimental Validation of Satellite Attitude Determination and Control Schemes in 3-Axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Mendoza-Bárcenas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the integration and implementation of a satellite flight simulator based on an air bearing system, which was designed and instrumented in our laboratory to evaluate and to perform research in the field of Attitude Determination and Control Systems for satellites, using the hardware-in-the-loop technique. The satellite flight simulator considers two main blocks: an instrumented mobile platform and an external computer executing costume-made Matlab® software. The first block is an air bearing system containing an FPGA based on-board computer with capabilities to integrate digital architectures for data acquisition from inertial navigation sensors, control of actuators and communications data handling. The second block is an external personal computer, which runs in parallel Matlab® based algorithms for attitude determination and control. Both blocks are linked by means of radio modems. The paper also presents the analysis of the satellite flight simulator dynamics in order to obtain its movement equation which allows a better understanding of the satellite flight simulator behavior. In addition, the paper shows experimental results about the automated tracking of the satellite flight simulator based a virtual reality model developed in Matlab®. It also depicts two different versions of FPGA based on-board computers developed in-house to integrate embedded and polymorphic digital architectures for spacecrafts applications. Finally, the paper shows successful experimental results for an attitude control test using the satellite flight simulator based on a linear control law.

  5. A model of cytoskeletal reorientation in response to substrate stretching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazopoulos K.A.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Living adherent cells change their orientation in response to substrate stretching such that their cytoskeletal components reorganize in a new direction. To study this phenomenon, we model the cytoskeleton as a planar system of elastic cables and struts both pinned at their endpoints to a flat flexible substrate. Tensed (pre-strained cables represent acting stress fibers, whereas compression-bearing struts represent microtubules. We assume that in response to uniaxial substrate stretching the model reorients and deforms into a new configuration that minimizes its total potential energy. Using the Maxwell's global stability criterion, we find global minima configurations during static extension and compression of the substrate. Based on these results, we predict reorientation during cyclic stretching of the substrate. We find that in response to cyclic stretching cells either reorient transversely to the direction of stretching, or exhibit multiple configurations symmetrically distributed relative to the direction of stretching. These predictions are consistent with experimental data on living cells from the literature.

  6. Reorienting with terrain slope and landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Daniele; Newcombe, Nora S; Shipley, Thomas F

    2013-02-01

    Orientation (or reorientation) is the first step in navigation, because establishing a spatial frame of reference is essential for a sense of location and heading direction. Recent research on nonhuman animals has revealed that the vertical component of an environment provides an important source of spatial information, in both terrestrial and aquatic settings. Nonetheless, humans show large individual and sex differences in the ability to use terrain slope for reorientation. To understand why some participants--mainly women--exhibit a difficulty with slope, we tested reorientation in a richer environment than had been used previously, including both a tilted floor and a set of distinct objects that could be used as landmarks. This environment allowed for the use of two different strategies for solving the task, one based on directional cues (slope gradient) and one based on positional cues (landmarks). Overall, rather than using both cues, participants tended to focus on just one. Although men and women did not differ significantly in their encoding of or reliance on the two strategies, men showed greater confidence in solving the reorientation task. These facts suggest that one possible cause of the female difficulty with slope might be a generally lower spatial confidence during reorientation.

  7. The reorientation of spatial planning in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galland, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    has been reoriented at national, regional and urban/local levels over time. The fundamental objective of the project is hence to explore and examine the history and evolution of Danish spatial planning through three embedded case studies from inception until most recent transformations. Respectively......, these studies embrace the reorientations of Danish national spatial planning; regional spatial planning in North Jutland; and urban planning and waterfront redevelopment in the city of Aalborg. In attaining its aim, the dissertation is guided by the general premise that the reorientations of spatial planning...... planning practices at different administrative levels. As a whole, the outcome of this dissertation confirms that there is an increasing policy and institutional mismatch between national, regional and urban/local planning practices. It further suggests that the lack of spatial reflexion embedded...

  8. Trans-Pacific HDR Satellite Communications Experiment Phase-2 Project Plan and Experimental Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Eddie; Kadowaki, Naoto; Yoshimura, Naoko; Takahashi, Takashi; Yoshikawa, Makoto; Bergman, Larry; Bhasin, Kul

    2000-01-01

    The trans-Pacific high data rate (TP-HDR) satellite communications experiment was proposed at the Japan-U.S. Cooperation in Space (JUCS) Program Workshop held in Hawaii in 1993 and remote high definition video post-production was demonstrated as the first phase trial. ATM-based 45 Mbps trans-Pacific link was established in the first phase, and the following experiments with 155 Mbps was planned as the phase 2. This paper describes the experimental network configuration and project plan of TP-HDR experiment phase 2. Additional information is provided in the original.

  9. Experimental quantum key distribution with simulated ground-to-satellite photon losses and processing limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgoin, Jean-Philippe; Gigov, Nikolay; Higgins, Brendon L.; Yan, Zhizhong; Meyer-Scott, Evan; Khandani, Amir K.; Lütkenhaus, Norbert; Jennewein, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) has the potential to improve communications security by offering cryptographic keys whose security relies on the fundamental properties of quantum physics. The use of a trusted quantum receiver on an orbiting satellite is the most practical near-term solution to the challenge of achieving long-distance (global-scale) QKD, currently limited to a few hundred kilometers on the ground. This scenario presents unique challenges, such as high photon losses and restricted classical data transmission and processing power due to the limitations of a typical satellite platform. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of such a system by implementing a QKD protocol, with optical transmission and full post-processing, in the high-loss regime using minimized computing hardware at the receiver. Employing weak coherent pulses with decoy states, we demonstrate the production of secure key bits at up to 56.5 dB of photon loss. We further illustrate the feasibility of a satellite uplink by generating a secure key while experimentally emulating the varying losses predicted for realistic low-Earth-orbit satellite passes at 600 km altitude. With a 76 MHz source and including finite-size analysis, we extract 3374 bits of a secure key from the best pass. We also illustrate the potential benefit of combining multiple passes together: while one suboptimal "upper-quartile" pass produces no finite-sized key with our source, the combination of three such passes allows us to extract 165 bits of a secure key. Alternatively, we find that by increasing the signal rate to 300 MHz it would be possible to extract 21 570 bits of a secure finite-sized key in just a single upper-quartile pass.

  10. Using Perceptrons to Explore the Reorientation Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Michael R. W.; Kelly, Debbie M.; Spetch, Marcia L.; Dupuis, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The reorientation task is a paradigm that has been used extensively to study the types of information used by humans and animals to navigate in their environment. In this task, subjects are reinforced for going to a particular location in an arena that is typically rectangular in shape. The subject then has to find that location again after being…

  11. An Experimental Global Monitoring System for Rainfall-triggered Landslides using Satellite Remote Sensing Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yang; Adler, Robert F.; Huffman, George J.

    2006-01-01

    Landslides triggered by rainfall can possibly be foreseen in real time by jointly using rainfall intensity-duration thresholds and information related to land surface susceptibility. However, no system exists at either a national or a global scale to monitor or detect rainfall conditions that may trigger landslides due to the lack of extensive ground-based observing network in many parts of the world. Recent advances in satellite remote sensing technology and increasing availability of high-resolution geospatial products around the globe have provided an unprecedented opportunity for such a study. In this paper, a framework for developing an experimental real-time monitoring system to detect rainfall-triggered landslides is proposed by combining two necessary components: surface landslide susceptibility and a real-time space-based rainfall analysis system (http://trmm.gsfc.nasa.aov). First, a global landslide susceptibility map is derived from a combination of semi-static global surface characteristics (digital elevation topography, slope, soil types, soil texture, and land cover classification etc.) using a GIs weighted linear combination approach. Second, an adjusted empirical relationship between rainfall intensity-duration and landslide occurrence is used to assess landslide risks at areas with high susceptibility. A major outcome of this work is the availability of a first-time global assessment of landslide risk, which is only possible because of the utilization of global satellite remote sensing products. This experimental system can be updated continuously due to the availability of new satellite remote sensing products. This proposed system, if pursued through wide interdisciplinary efforts as recommended herein, bears the promise to grow many local landslide hazard analyses into a global decision-making support system for landslide disaster preparedness and risk mitigation activities across the world.

  12. Measuring molecular reorientation at liquid surfaces with time-resolved sum-frequency spectroscopy: a theoretical framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nienhuys, Han-Kwang; Bonn, Mischa

    2009-05-28

    A theoretical framework is presented for the design and analysis of ultrafast time- and polarization-resolved surface vibrational spectroscopy, aimed at elucidating surface molecular reorientational motion in real time. Vibrational excitation with linearly polarized light lifts the azimuthal symmetry of the surface transition-dipole distribution, causing marked, time-dependent changes in the surface sum-frequency generation (SFG) intensity. The subsequent recovery of the SFG signal generally reflects both vibrational relaxation and reorientational motion of surface molecules. We present experimental schemes that allow direct quantification of the time scale of surface molecular reorientational diffusive motion.

  13. Reorientation of magnetic anisotropy in epitaxial cobalt ferrite thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisfi, A.; Williams, C.M.; Nguyen, L.T.; Lodder, J.C.; Coleman, A.; Corcoran, H.; Johnson, A.; Chang, P.; Kumar, A.; Morgan, W.

    2007-01-01

    Spin reorientation has been observed in CoFe2O4 thin single crystalline films epitaxially grown on (100) MgO substrate upon varying the film thickness. The critical thickness for such a spin-reorientation transition was estimated to be 300 nm. The reorientation is driven by a structural transition

  14. Reorientation of magnetic anisotropy in epitaxial cobalt ferrite thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisfi, A.; Williams, C.M.; Nguyen, L.T.; Lodder, J.C.; Coleman, A.; Corcoran, H.; Johnson, A.; Chang, P.; Abhishek Kumar, A.K.; Kumar, A.; Morgan, W.

    2007-01-01

    Spin reorientation has been observed in CoFe2O4 thin single crystalline films epitaxially grown on (100) MgO substrate upon varying the film thickness. The critical thickness for such a spin-reorientation transition was estimated to be 300 nm. The reorientation is driven by a structural transition

  15. An experimental 20/30 GHz communications satellite conceptual design employing multiple-beam paraboloid reflector antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, A. M., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    An experimental 20/30 GHz communications satellite conceptual design is described which employs multiple-beam paraboloid reflector antennas coupled to a TDMA transponder. It is shown that the satellite employs solid state GaAs FET power amplifiers and low noise amplifiers while signal processing and switching takes place on-board the spacecraft. The proposed areas to be served by this satellite would be the continental U.S. plus Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands, as well as southern Canada and Mexico City. Finally, attention is given to the earth stations which are designed to be low cost.

  16. Orbital magnetic moment instability at the spin reorientation transition of Nd2Fe14B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia; Chaboy; Bartolome; Goedkoop

    2000-07-10

    Highly accurate soft-XMCD data recorded on a Nd2Fe14B single crystal, through the spin reorientation transition show that the average Fe orbital moment (a) is proportional to the macroscopic Fe anisotropy constant, and (b) diverges 15 K below the reorientation transition temperature. This divergence is indicative of a critical behavior and it is related to a tetragonal distortion. These results give experimental evidence of the mutual dependence between orbital moment, macroscopic magnetic anisotropy, and tetragonal distortion. Furthermore, it is argued that the critical behavior of the orbital moment is at the origin of similar divergences previously observed in Mossbauer and Hall-effect data.

  17. Effect of spin reorientation on magnetocaloric and transport properties of NdAl2

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, M. V.; da Silva, J. A.; Silva, L. S.

    2017-01-01

    We report the magneto-thermal and resistive properties of rare-earth dialuminide NdAl2, including spin reorientation transition. To this purpose, we used a theoretical model that considers the interactions of exchange and Zeeman, besides the anisotropy due to the electrical crystal field. The theoretical results obtained were compared to experimental data of the NdAl2 in single crystal and bulk forms. Explicitly, we have calculated the anisotropic variation of magnetic entropy with the magnetic field oriented along the three principal crystallographic directions: [100], [110], and [111] of NdAl2 single crystal, where a signature of the spin reorientation is observed in the [110] and [111] directions. Moreover, of magnetoresistivity we consider the applied magnetic field along the crystallographic directions [100] and [110]. In turn, for the polycrystalline form, the good agreement between theory and experiment confirms the presence of spin reorientation, which was predicted theoretically in magnetization curves.

  18. Surface instabilities and reorientation induced by vibration in microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Jeff; Laverón-Simavilla, Ana; Tinao Perez-Miravete, Ignacio; Fernandez Fraile, Jose Javier; Ezquerro Navarro, Jose Miguel

    2012-07-01

    The behavior of vibrated fluids and, in particular, the surface or interfacial instabilities that commonly arise in these systems have been the subject of continued experimental and theoretical attention since Faraday's seminal experiments in 1831. Both orientation and frequency are critical in determining the response of the fluid to excitation. Low frequencies are associated with sloshing while higher frequencies may generate Faraday waves or cross-waves, depending on whether the axis of vibration is perpendicular or parallel to the interface. In addition, high frequency vibrations are known to produce large scale reorientation of the fluid (vibroequilibria), an effect that becomes especially pronounced in the absence of gravity. We describe the results of investigations conducted at the ESA affiliated Spanish User Support and Operations Centre (E-USOC) on the effect of vibrations on fluid interfaces, particularly the interaction between Faraday waves, which arise in vertically vibrated systems, cross-waves, which are found in horizontally forced systems, and large scale reorientation (vibroequilibria). Ongoing ground experiments utilizing a dual-axis shaker configuration are described, including the effect on pattern formation of varying the two independent forcing frequencies, amplitudes, and phases. Theoretical results, based on the analysis of reduced models, and on numerical simulations, are then described and compared to experiment. Finally, the interest of a corresponding microgravity experiment is discussed and implications for fluid management strategies considered.

  19. Time-dependent solution for reorientation of rotating tidally deformed visco-elastic bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haiyang; van der Wal, Wouter; Vermeersen, Bert

    2017-04-01

    Many icy satellites or planets contain features which suggest a (past) reorientation of the body, such as the tiger stripes on Enceladus and the heart-shaped Sputnik Planum on Pluto. Most of these icy bodies are tidally locked and this creates a large tidal bulge which is about three times of its centrifugal (equatorial) bulge. To study the reorientation of such rotating tidally deformed body is complicated and most previous studies apply the so-called fluid limit method. The fluid limit approach ignores the viscous response of the body and assumes that it immediately reaches its fluid limit when simulating the reorientation due to a changing load. As a result, this method can only simulate cases when the change in the load is much slower than the dominant viscous modes of the body. For other kinds of load, for instance, a Heaviside load due to an impact which creates an instant relocation of mass, it does not give us a prediction of how the reorientation is accomplished (e.g. How fast? Along which path?). We establish a new method which can give an accurate time-dependent solution for reorientation of rotating tidally deformed bodies. Our method can be applied both semi-analytically or numerically (with finite element method) to include features such as lateral heterogeneity or non-linear material. We also present an extension of our method to simulate the e ffect of a fossil bulge. With our method, we show that reorientation of a tidally deformed body driven by a positive mass anomaly near the poles has a preference for rotating around the tidal axis instead of towards it, contrary to predictions in previous studies. References Hu, H., W. van der Wal and L.L.A. Vermeersen (2017). A numerical method for reorientation of rotating tidally deformed visco-elastic bodies. Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, doi:10.1002/2016JE005114, 2016JE005114. Matsuyama, I. and Nimmo, F. (2007). Rotational stability of tidally deformed planetary bodies. Journal of Geophysical

  20. Fundamental experiments on hydride reorientation in zircaloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colas, Kimberly B.

    In the current study, an in-situ X-ray diffraction technique using synchrotron radiation was used to follow directly the kinetics of hydride dissolution and precipitation during thermomechanical cycles. This technique was combined with conventional microscopy (optical, SEM and TEM) to gain an overall understanding of the process of hydride reorientation. Thus this part of the study emphasized the time-dependent nature of the process, studying large volume of hydrides in the material. In addition, a micro-diffraction technique was also used to study the spatial distribution of hydrides near stress concentrations. This part of the study emphasized the spatial variation of hydride characteristics such as strain and morphology. Hydrided samples in the shape of tensile dog-bones were used in the time-dependent part of the study. Compact tension specimens were used during the spatial dependence part of the study. The hydride elastic strains from peak shift and size and strain broadening were studied as a function of time for precipitating hydrides. The hydrides precipitate in a very compressed state of stress, as measured by the shift in lattice spacing. As precipitation proceeds the average shift decreases, indicating average stress is reduced, likely due to plastic deformation and morphology changes. When nucleation ends the hydrides follow the zirconium matrix thermal contraction. When stress is applied below the threshold stress for reorientation, hydrides first nucleate in a very compressed state similar to that of unstressed hydrides. After reducing the average strain similarly to unstressed hydrides, the average hydride strain reaches a constant value during cool-down to room temperature. This could be due to a greater ease of deforming the matrix due to the applied far-field strain which would compensate for the strains due to thermal contraction. Finally when hydrides reorient, the average hydride strains become tensile during the first precipitation regime and

  1. The reorientation of spatial planning in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galland, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    have been increasingly overridden by growth-oriented and competitiveness logics. More recently, the effects of a structural reform that changed the geographies of inter-governmental arrangements within the country have significantly transformed the orientation, scope, structure and performance...... has been reoriented at national, regional and urban/local levels over time. The fundamental objective of the project is hence to explore and examine the history and evolution of Danish spatial planning through three embedded case studies from inception until most recent transformations. Respectively...

  2. Giant magnetostrictive superlattices: from spin reorientation transition to MEMS. Static and dynamical properties

    CERN Document Server

    Tiercelin, N; Preobrazhensky, V; Pernod, P; Gall, H L

    2002-01-01

    The results of development of 'giant magnetostrictive' multilayers with spin reorientation transition (SRT) for microactuators are presented. Manifestations of magneto-mechanical instability and nonlinearity near SRT are studied experimentally and simulated numerically. Improvement of magneto-mechanical sensitivity near SRT is demonstrated for various modes of linear and nonlinear actuation of magnetostrictive unimorph. Limitations of sensitivity caused by magnetic field distortions are described by a numerical model, the results are compared with the experimental data.

  3. Experimental and numerical investigation of coupled microvibration dynamics for satellite reaction wheels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addari, D.; Aglietti, G. S.; Remedia, M.

    2017-01-01

    Microvibrations of a satellite reaction wheel assembly are commonly analysed in either hard-mounted or coupled boundary conditions, though coupled wheel-to-structure disturbance models are more representative of the real environment in which the wheel operates. This article investigates the coupled microvibration dynamics of a cantilever configured reaction wheel assembly mounted on either a stiff or flexible platform. Here a method is presented to cope with modern project necessities: (i) need of a model which gives accurate estimates covering a wide frequency range; (ii) reduce the personnel and time costs derived from the test campaign, (iii) reduce the computational effort without affecting the quality of the results. The method involves measurements of the disturbances induced by the reaction wheel assembly in a hard-mounted configuration and of the frequency and speed dependent dynamic mass of the reaction wheel. In addition, it corrects the approximation due to missing speed dependent dynamic mass in conventional reaction wheel assembly microvibration analysis. The former was evaluated experimentally using a previously designed and validated platform. The latter, on the other hand, was estimated analytically using a finite element model of the wheel assembly. Finally, the validation of the coupled wheel-structure disturbance model is presented, giving indication of the level of accuracy that can be achieved with this type of analyses.

  4. A geometrical approach to determine reorientation start and continuation conditions in ferromagnetic shape memory alloys considering the effects of loading history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirani, M.; Kadkhodaei, M.

    2014-12-01

    Ferromagnetic shape memory alloys (FSMAs) and magnetic shape memory alloys (MSMAs) are metallic alloys that can undergo inelastic responses when exposed to magnetic fields. Several constitutive models have been proposed so far to model the behaviors of FSMAs. In this work, the effects of loading history on reorientation start conditions are considered, and it is shown that reorientation start conditions are not fixed values; rather, they change with respect to the amount of loading history. To consider the effects of loading history on reorientation start conditions, an available phase diagram in stress-field space is generalized to reorientation surfaces in stress-field-loading history space. Correspondingly, kinetic laws are derived in a continuum framework to be used with the reorientation surfaces to determine the amount of the martensitic variant 2 volume fraction. Based on the geometry of the reorientation surfaces, conditions that must be satisfied to ensure the continuation of reorientations are obtained. Available experimental findings validate the proposed model and the reorientation surfaces.

  5. Reorientation of Defect Dipoles in Ferroelectric Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bao-Shan; LI Guo-Rong; ZHAO Su-Chuan; ZHU Zhi-Gang; DING Ai-Li

    2005-01-01

    @@ We investigate the frequency, temperature, tetragonality and quenched temperature dependences of the hysteresis loops in Pb[(Zr0.52 Ti0.48)0.95 (Mn1/3Nb2/3)0.05]O3 (PMnN-PZT) ceramics. It has been demonstrated that the polarization-field hysteresis curves show "pinched" shapes when tested at room temperature, higher frequency or using the large-tetragonality specimen. While normal square-like loops are observed at 200 ℃ and 0.01 Hz or using the small-tetragonality one. Meanwhile, close relations between the P-E loops and the applied frequency,temperature or tetragonality reveal that there exists a typical relaxation time corresponding to the reorientation of the defect dipoles. It can be seen further from the quenched temperature dependences of the loops that the reorientation of the defect dipoles may influence the pinching. Compared to the intrinsic depinning procedure induced by changes of the distribution of defect dipoles, we provide new evidence for extrinsic depinning mechanism of the defect dipoles in the ferroelectric ceramics.

  6. Spinning in the Scanner: Neural Correlates of Virtual Reorientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Jennifer E.; Joanisse, Marc F.; Newcombe, Nora S.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have used spatial reorientation task paradigms to identify underlying cognitive mechanisms of navigation in children, adults, and a range of animal species. Despite broad interest in this task across disciplines, little is known about the brain bases of reorientation. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine neural…

  7. Spinning in the Scanner: Neural Correlates of Virtual Reorientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Jennifer E.; Joanisse, Marc F.; Newcombe, Nora S.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have used spatial reorientation task paradigms to identify underlying cognitive mechanisms of navigation in children, adults, and a range of animal species. Despite broad interest in this task across disciplines, little is known about the brain bases of reorientation. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine neural…

  8. Experimental study of mountain lee—waves by means of satellite photographs and aircraft measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Cruette, Denise

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a summary of a Ph.D. Thesis1 which was a systematic study of the influence of various meteorological factors on the occurrence and characteristics of mountain waves, more specifically of lee-waves of great horizontal extent. The data used are, beside classical meteorological informations, that given by satellite pictures completed by quasi-simultaneous measurements from planes or gliders. The analysis of many satellite pictures received at the french station of Lannion (Brittany...

  9. Theory of experimental location of ionospheric inhomogeneities at medium latitudes by satellite radioholography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubovoi, A.P.; Sinelnikov, V.M.

    1980-08-01

    A theory is developed for a quasiholographic experiment which uses a differential-phase signal derived from radio signals transmitted at two coherent frequencies to obtain information on ionospheric inhomogeneities in a plane connecting the ground station and a part of the satellite orbit. The method makes it possible to determine the size and location of small-scale inhomogeneities with a radius of 100-500 m from ground-based measurements of spaced satellite signals transmitted at sufficiently high coherent frequencies.

  10. Magnetometer Compensation Scheme and Experimental Results on ZDPS-1A Pico-satellite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Ke; WANG Hao; XIANG Tian; JIN Zhonghe

    2012-01-01

    In a pico-satellite with small volume,measurements from on-board three-axis magnetometer (TAM) are not accurate,as it can be easily disturbed by other electronic systems.To improve its accuracy,a scheme of compensation mcthods is introduced in this article.The scheme is based on an improved measurement model of pico-satellite TAM,and it mainly consists of three steps.First,in satellite design stage,several techniques are recommended to simplify the afterwards compensations.Then after satellite assembly,TAM ground tests and pre-launch calibration with least-square batch filter are introduced to improve magnetometer performance.At the end,a post-launch calibration with unscented Kalman filter (UKF) is implemented with in-orbit data.The compensation scheme is used in the development of Chinese pico-satellite ZDPS-1A made by Zhejiang University.Results show that with the introduced compensation scheme,the maximum error of ZDPS-1A TAM can be reduced from 80 mG to 6 mG (1G=10-4 T).

  11. PIE techniques for hydride reorientation test at NDC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuda, Tomohiro; Shinohara, Yasunari; Yamaguchi, Yoichiro [Nuclear Development Corporation, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2008-11-15

    Dry storage of spent fuels in the interim storage facility is being planned in Japan. However, the gradual deterioration of the mechanical property of fuel cladding due to internal pressure and temperature during the storage term is known. Therefore, the integrity of stored fuel rods should be confirmed before the start of dry storage. For the last several years, NDC had a lot of experiences on the hydride reorientation test. The specimen preparation techniques on the hydride reorientation test and the mechanical testing techniques after the hydride reorientation are shown in this paper.

  12. Experimental Demonstration of an Algorithm to Detect the Presence of a Parasitic Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-03-01

    1-9 ACTEX · · · Advanced Controls Technology Experiment . . . . . . . . 2-2 ETS-VI · · · Engineering Test Satellite-VI...Technology Experiment ( ACTEX ), Stetson’s on-orbit ID work on NOAA-2 [33], and Wertz and Lee’s operational MOI estimation of the Cassini spacecraft. 2.1.2

  13. Reorientation of the early lunar pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Futoshi; Tsunakawa, Hideo; Shimizu, Hisayoshi; Shibuya, Hidetoshi; Matsushima, Masaki

    2014-06-01

    Palaeomagnetic measurements suggest that an active core dynamo operated on the Moon from 4.2 to 3.56 billion years ago. Since the Apollo era, many magnetic anomalies have been observed on the Moon. The magnetization of the lunar crust in some of these regions could preserve the signature of an early dipolar magnetic field generated by a core dynamo. Thus, the magnetic anomalies may yield information about the position of the palaeomagnetic pole during the time that the dynamo operated. Here we present a comprehensive survey of magnetic anomalies on the lunar surface using magnetometer data obtained by the Lunar Prospector and Kaguya lunar orbiters. We extract magnetization vectors from 24 magnetic anomalies using an iterative inversion method and derive the palaeomagnetic poles. We find that the north poles, as well as the antipodal south poles, cluster in two distinct locations: one near the present rotation axis and the other at mid-latitude. The clustering is consistent with a dipole-dominated magnetic field generated in the lunar core by a dynamo that was reversing, much like that of Earth. Furthermore, the two pole clusters imply that the Moon experienced a polar wander event during its ancient history due to the reorientation of the Moon with respect to its spin axis by 45°-60°.

  14. Effect of dopant nanoparticles on reorientation process in polymer-dispersed liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobov, K. V.; Zharkova, G. M.; Syzrantsev, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of the experimental data of the nanoscale powders application for doping polymer-dispersed liquid crystals (PDLC) was represented in this work. A model based on the separation of the liquid crystals reorientation process on the surface mode and the volume mode was proposed and tested. In the research the wide-spread model mixture PDLC were used. But alumina nanoparticles were the distinctive ones obtained by electron beam evaporation. The proposed model allowed to conclude that the nanoparticles localization at the surface of the droplets (as in the Pickering emulsion) lead to the variation of the connection force between the liquid crystals and the polymer. The effect of nanoparticles resulted in an acceleration of the reorientation process near the surface when the control field is turned on and in a deceleration when it is turned off. The effect for the different size particles was confirmed.

  15. Transient Reorientation of a Doped Liquid Crystal System under a Short Laser Pulse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Tao; XIANG Ying; LIU Yi-Kun; WANG Jian; YANG Shun-Lin

    2009-01-01

    The transient optical nonlinearity of a nematic liquid crystal doped with azo-dye DRW is examined.The optical reorientation threshold of a 25-μm-thick planar-aligned sample of 5CB using a 50 ns pulse duration 532 nm YAG laser pulse is observed to decrease from 800 mJ/mm2 to 0.6 mJ/mm2 after the addition of 1 vol% azo dopant,a reduction of three orders of magnitude.When using a laser pulse duration of 10 ns,no such effect is observed.Experimental results indicate that the azo dopant molecules undergo photoisomerization from trans-isomer to cis-isomer under exposure to light,and this conformation change reorients the 5CB molecules via intermolecular coupling between guest and host.This guest-host couphng also affects the azo photoisomerization process.

  16. Findings from the UK and Canadian Space Situational Awareness (SSA) Experimentation during the Relocation of SKYNET 5A Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, A.; Scott, L.; Feline, W.

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the planning, execution, analysis and lessons identified from a collaborative Space Situational Awareness (SSA) experiment to observe the SKYNET 5A satellite during a series of orbital maneuvers that occurred in the summer of 2015. In March 2015 Airbus Defence and Space (Airbus DS) announced its intention to relocate the SKYNET 5A satellite from the Atlantic to the Asia Pacific region to increase its global coverage; this provided an opportunity to observe this high value asset to explore the challenges and technical solutions related to deep space SSA. Within the UK the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl, part of the UK Ministry of Defence) were established as the lead agency to plan the observation campaign utilising operational and emerging experimental SSA capabilities. The campaign was then expanded to involve Canada, the United States and Australia under the auspices of the Combined Space Operations (CSpO) Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to further explore the coordination of observations between operational systems and potential fusion of data collected using experimental SSA assets. The focus for this paper is the collaborative work between Dstl and Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC) that featured a period of experimentation to explore methods that enable cross cueing between ground-based and space-based SSA sensors, namely the UK Starbrook facility (located on the island of Cyprus), and NEOSSat/ Sapphire space surveillance satellites located in low-Earth orbit. A number of conclusions and lessons are identified in this paper that seek to inform the wider SSA community on the challenges, potential solutions and benefits of operating a distributed SSA architecture such as the one utilized during this experiment.

  17. Defining and representing events in a satellite scheduling system - The IEPS (Interactive Experimenter Planning System) approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, David R.; Littlefield, Ronald G.; Macoughtry, William O.

    A methodology is described for defining and representing satellite events from the IEPS perspective. The task of doing this is divided into four categories and includes defining and representing resource windows, event parameters, event scheduling strategies, and event constraints. The description of each of these categories includes examples from the IEPS ERBS-TDRSS Contact Planning System. This is a system which is being used by the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) schedulers to request TDRSS contact times from the NCC. The system is written in the C programming language and uses a custom built inference engine (TIE1) to do constraint checking and a custom built strategies interpreter to derive the plan. The planning system runs on the IBM-PC/AT or on any similar hardware which has a C development environment and 640K of memory.

  18. Experimental verification of chaotic control of an underactuated tethered satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Zhaojun; Jin, Dongping

    2016-03-01

    This paper studies chaotic control of a tethered satellite system (TSS) driven only by a momentum-exchange device during its attitude adjustment. In dealing with such the underactuated system, an extended time-delay autosynchronization (ETDAS) is employed to stabilize the chaotic motion to a periodic motion. To obtain the control domains of the ETDAS method, a stability analysis of the controlled tethered satellite system in elliptical orbit is implemented. According to the principle of dynamic similarity, then, ground-based experiment setups are proposed and designed to emulate the in-plane motions of the TSS. Representative experiments are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the ETDAS scheme in controlling the chaotic motion of the underactuated TSS.

  19. An Experimental Biotelemetric Study Based on Satellite Tracking During Post-nesting Migrations of Green Turtles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A biotelemetry experiment is conducted to study the migrant behavior of green turtles (Chelonia mydas) in South China Sea and acquire the physical environment data. The method in use is to track the post-nesting migrant routes of green turtles through the satellite linked transmitters attached on the back of turtles and the global satellite signal transmitting system of Argos. We obtained the posinestions of the post-nesting migrant routes of three green turtles and environment data, which are important in conservation of green turtles and the research of physical oceanography. Based on the test, the concept, principle and method of biotelemetry are also introduced in this paper with a discussion of the further development of this technique and its applying prospection in future.

  20. Proceedings of the Seventeenth NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX 17) and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davarian, Faramaz (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX) is convened annually to discuss studies made on radio wave propagation by investors from domestic and international organizations. NAPEX 17 was held on 15 June 1993. The meeting was organized into two technical sessions. The first session was dedicated to slant path propagation studies and experiments. The second session focused on propagation studies for mobile and personal communications. Preceding NAPEX 17, the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop was held on 14 June 1993 to review ACTS propagation activities with emphasis on ACTS experiments status and data collection, processing, and exchange.

  1. Analysis of Software Development Methodologies to Build Safety Software Applications for the SATEX-II: A Mexican Experimental Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar Cisneros, Jorge; Vargas Martinez, Hector; Pedroza Melendez, Alejandro; Alonso Arevalo, Miguel

    2013-09-01

    Mexico is a country where the experience to build software for satellite applications is beginning. This is a delicate situation because in the near future we will need to develop software for the SATEX-II (Mexican Experimental Satellite). SATEX- II is a SOMECyTA's project (the Mexican Society of Aerospace Science and Technology). We have experienced applying software development methodologies, like TSP (Team Software Process) and SCRUM in other areas. Then, we analyzed these methodologies and we concluded: these can be applied to develop software for the SATEX-II, also, we supported these methodologies with SSP-05-0 Standard in particular with ESA PSS-05-11. Our analysis was focusing on main characteristics of each methodology and how these methodologies could be used with the ESA PSS 05-0 Standards. Our outcomes, in general, may be used by teams who need to build small satellites, but, in particular, these are going to be used when we will build the on board software applications for the SATEX-II.

  2. Numerical and Experimental Study for a Beam System with Local Unilateral Contact Modeling Satellite Solar Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Hazim, Hamad; Ferguson, Neil

    2009-01-01

    The mass reduction of satellite solar arrays results in significant panel flexibility, so possibly striking one another dynamically leading ultimately to structural damage. To prevent this, rubber snubbers are mounted at well chosen points of the structure and they act as one sided linear spring; as a negative consequence, the dynamic of these panels becomes nonlinear. The finite element approximation is used to solve partial differential equations governing the structural dynamic. The models are validated and adjusted with experiments done in the ISVR laboratory, Southampton university.

  3. Planar reorientation maneuvers of space multibody systems using internal controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyhanoglu, Mahmut; Mcclamroch, N. H.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper a reorientation maneuvering strategy for an interconnection of planar rigid bodies in space is developed. It is assumed that there are no exogeneous torques, and torques generated by joint motors are used as means of control so that the total angular momentum of the multibody system is a constant, assumed to be zero in this paper. The maneuver strategy uses the nonintegrability of the expression for the angular momentum. We demonstrate that large-angle maneuvers can be designed to achieve an arbitrary reorientation of the multibody system with respect to an inertial frame. The theoretical background for carrying out the required maneuvers is briefly summarized. Specifications and computer simulations of a specific reorientation maneuver, and the corresponding control strategies, are described.

  4. Satellite guidance systems in agriculture: experimental comparison between EZ-Steer/RTK and AUTOPILOT/EGNOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. D’Antonio

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The research has been conducted using two different satellite-guidance devices and two different correction systems of the GPS signal: the EZ-Steer/RTK and Autopilot/EGNOS. The machines used in the tests were the tractor New Holland T7060, the rotary harrow Alpego DG-400 and the burier Forigo DG-45, in order to determine which of the two systems ensured the best quality of work. On the basis of the results obtained it is clear that the EZ-Steer/RTK system, guarantees a lower stability of the theoretical trajectory compared to the Autopilot/EGNOS system, above 1,77%. From the elaboration of data of the two guidance systems behavior to manage the only width of transposition, it is observed that the EZ-Steer/RTK system is able to guarantee a better hold of the line compared to the Autopilot/EGNOS system, which provides a mistake of 164 cm on the total width of transposition and 2 cm on the mean value. In the matter of the normalized transposition surfaces, the Autopilot/EGNOS system ensures a better work quality.

  5. Low Earth orbit satellite-to-ground optical scintillation: comparison of experimental observations and theoretical predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yura, Harold T; Kozlowski, David A

    2011-07-01

    Scintillation measurements of a 1064 nm laser at a 5 kHz sampling rate were made by an optical ground station at the European Space Agency observatory in Tenerife, Spain while tracking a low Earth orbit satellite during the spring and summer of 2010. The scintillation index (SI), the variance of irradiance normalized to the square of the mean, and power spectra measurements were compared to theoretical predictions based on the Kolmogorov spectrum, the Maui3 nighttime turbulence profile, weak scintillation finite-beam wave theory, included receiver, and source aperture averaging with no free-fitting parameters. Good agreement was obtained, not only for the magnitude of the observed fluctuations, but also for the corresponding elevation angle dependence and shape of the power spectra. Little variation was seen for the SI between daytime and nighttime links. For all elevation angles, ascending and descending, the observed scintillation over extensive regions of the atmosphere is consistent with log-normal statistics. Additionally, it appears from the results presented here that the nighttime turbulence profile for the atmosphere above the observatory in Tenerife is similar to that above Haleakala in Maui, Hawaii.

  6. Low temperature spin reorientation in dysprosium iron garnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahoubi, M; Younsi, W; Soltani, M L [Department of Physics, Badji-Mokhtar University, BP-12 Annaba, 23000 (Algeria); Voiron, J; Schmitt, D, E-mail: mlahoubi@gmail.co [Louis Neel Laboratory, CNRS-UJF, BP-166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2009-03-01

    The spin reorientation (SR) phase transition in dysprosium iron garnet (Dy{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} or DyIG) have been studied by specific heat C{sub p}(T) and high field magnetisation measurements M{sub T}(H) and M{sub H}(T) on single crystals at low temperature. A first order SR is observed with a sharp jump at T{sub SR} = 14.5+-0.5 K in the C{sub p}(T) curve which corresponds to a spontaneous change from the high temperature (HT) easy direction (111) to an (uuw) angular low temperature (LT) phases. Above T{sub SR}, the magnetic structure is described by the irreducible representation (IR) A{sub 2g} of the rhombohedral space group R 3 c. Below T{sub SR}, the magnetic structure changes in the monoclinic the space group C2/c with the IR A{sub g}. When the field H is kept aligned along the hard symmetry directions (100) and (110), we obtain respectively the variation of the angular positions theta(T) and theta'(T) from the total spontaneous magnetisation down to 1.5 K (theta = 39.23 deg. and theta' = 30.14 deg.) and the results are in good agreement with the previous observations in low fields. When the sample is allowed to rotate freely on itself, the critical field H{sub c}(T) between the HT(111) and the LT(uuw) angular phases permits us to precise the transition line up to 15 T and 40 K between the so called canted field induced (FI) and the associated collinear magnetic phases. The experimental magnetic phase diagram (MPD) is precisely determined in the (H{sub c}-T) plane and the domains of the existence and the stability of the two magnetic phases are specified.

  7. Application of a simple dynamic vegetation model to an experimental plot and validation through satellite data and field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Pérez, Guiomar; Pasquato, Marta; Medici, Chiara; González-Sanchis, María; Molina, Antonio; Fernandes, Tarcísio José Gualberto; del Campo, Antonio; Francés, Félix

    2014-05-01

    It is well known that the vegetation plays a key role in the catchment's water balance particularly for semi-arid areas that generally are water-controlled ecosystems. For this reason, the number of hydrological models which include vegetation as a state variable has increased substantially in the last decade. However, many of the available dynamic vegetation models are quite complex.To cope with the difficulty of estimating a large number of parameters and inputs, the authors focused on the use of a parsimonious model called LUE-model. This model is based on the amount of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by green vegetation (APAR) and the Light Use Efficiency index (the efficiency by which that radiation is converted to plant biomass increment) in order to compute the gross primary production (GPP). The advantages of this simple conceptualization are: (1) the low number of parameters, (2) it could be easily coupled with a hydrological model and, (3) as it is based on APAR, it is directly connected with satellite data. This model has been calibrated and validated using remote sensing data and afterwards further tested against field observations. Plant transpiration and soil moisture were obtained in an experimental plot of a semi-arid catchment (La Hunde, East of Spain), during the period from 27/03/2009 to 31/05/2011, covered by Aleppo pine.The satellite data used in this study were: the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), both included in the products MOD13Q1 and MYD13Q1. Concerning NDVI, its own definition links this index to the "greenness" of the target, so that it appears highly linked to chlorophyll content and vegetation condition. Recent studies about Aleppo pine have shown that NDVI is sensitive to water stress, because the photosynthetic pigment is it. For this reason, the model simulated LAI was corrected by a plant water-stress factor. After such correction, the correlation coefficient with

  8. Dynamic Isovector Reorientation of Deuteron as a Probe to Nuclear Symmetry Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Li; Xiao, Zhigang; Yi, Han; Wang, Ning; Liu, Min; Tian, Junlong

    2015-11-20

    We present the calculations on a novel reorientation effect of deuteron attributed to isovector interaction in the nuclear field of heavy target nuclei. The correlation angle determined by the relative momentum vector of the proton and the neutron originating from the breakup deuteron, which is experimentally detectable, exhibits significant dependence on the isovector nuclear potential but is robust against the variation of the isoscaler sector. In terms of sensitivity and cleanness, the breakup reactions induced by the polarized deuteron beam at about 100 MeV/u provide a more stringent constraint to the symmetry energy at subsaturation densities.

  9. Spatial reorientation experiments for NMR of solids and partially oriented liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Rachel W; Kelly, John E; Collier, Kelsey A

    2015-11-01

    Motional reorientation experiments are extensions of Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) where the rotor axis is changed in order to average out, reintroduce, or scale anisotropic interactions (e.g. dipolar couplings, quadrupolar interactions or chemical shift anisotropies). This review focuses on Variable Angle Spinning (VAS), Switched Angle Spinning (SAS), and Dynamic Angle Spinning (DAS), all of which involve spinning at two or more different angles sequentially, either in successive experiments or during a multidimensional experiment. In all of these experiments, anisotropic terms in the Hamiltonian are scaled by changing the orientation of the spinning sample relative to the static magnetic field. These experiments vary in experimental complexity and instrumentation requirements. In VAS, many one-dimensional spectra are collected as a function of spinning angle. In SAS, dipolar couplings and/or chemical shift anisotropies are reintroduced by switching the sample between two different angles, often 0° or 90° and the magic angle, yielding a two-dimensional isotropic-anisotropic correlation spectrum. Dynamic Angle Spinning (DAS) is a related experiment that is used to simultaneously average out the first- and second-order quadrupolar interactions, which cannot be accomplished by spinning at any unique rotor angle in physical space. Although motional reorientation experiments generally require specialized instrumentation and data analysis schemes, some are accessible with only minor modification of standard MAS probes. In this review, the mechanics of each type of experiment are described, with representative examples. Current and historical probe and coil designs are discussed from the standpoint of how each one accomplishes the particular objectives of the experiment(s) it was designed to perform. Finally, applications to inorganic materials and liquid crystals, which present very different experimental challenges, are discussed. The review concludes with perspectives

  10. The World Is Not Flat: Can People Reorient Using Slope?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Daniele; Newcombe, Nora S.; Shipley, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    Studies of spatial representation generally focus on flat environments and visual input. However, the world is not flat, and slopes are part of most natural environments. In a series of 4 experiments, we examined whether humans can use a slope as a source of allocentric, directional information for reorientation. A target was hidden in a corner of…

  11. Reorientation of magnetic anisotropy in obliquely sputtered metallic thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisfi, A.; Lodder, J.C.; Wormeester, H.; Poelsema, B.

    2002-01-01

    Reorientation in the magnetic anisotropy as a function of film thickness has been observed in Co-Ni and Co thin films, obliquely sputtered on a polyethylene terephthalate substrate at a large incidence angle (70°). This effect is a consequence of the low magnetocrystalline anisotropy of the films (f

  12. Stategic reorientation of industrial R&D towards commercial objectives.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brook, Jacques W.; de Bruijn, E.J.; McDonough III, Edward F.; Kaynak, E.; Harcar, T.D.

    2007-01-01

    In an effort to leverage R&D knowledge asset and to create more value from industrial R&D in today’s increasing liberalized and globalising business environments, some corporations adopt a strategic reorientation of their industrial R&D organisation towards commercial objectives. This study suggests

  13. Why SIT works: normal function despite typical myofiber pattern in Situs Inversus Totalis (SIT) hearts derived by shear-induced myofiber reorientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluijmert, Marieke; Kroon, Wilco; Rossi, Alessandro C; Bovendeerd, Peter H M; Delhaas, Tammo

    2012-01-01

    The left ventricle (LV) of mammals with Situs Solitus (SS, normal organ arrangement) displays hardly any interindividual variation in myofiber pattern and experimentally determined torsion. SS LV myofiber pattern has been suggested to result from adaptive myofiber reorientation, in turn leading to efficient pump and myofiber function. Limited data from the Situs Inversus Totalis (SIT, a complete mirror image of organ anatomy and position) LV demonstrated an essential different myofiber pattern, being normal at the apex but mirrored at the base. Considerable differences in torsion patterns in between human SIT LVs even suggest variation in myofiber pattern among SIT LVs themselves. We addressed whether different myofiber patterns in the SIT LV can be predicted by adaptive myofiber reorientation and whether they yield similar pump and myofiber function as in the SS LV. With a mathematical model of LV mechanics including shear induced myofiber reorientation, we predicted myofiber patterns of one SS and three different SIT LVs. Initial conditions for SIT were based on scarce information on the helix angle. The transverse angle was set to zero. During reorientation, a non-zero transverse angle developed, pump function increased, and myofiber function increased and became more homogeneous. Three continuous SIT structures emerged with a different location of transition between normal and mirrored myofiber orientation pattern. Predicted SIT torsion patterns matched experimentally determined ones. Pump and myofiber function in SIT and SS LVs are similar, despite essential differences in myocardial structure. SS and SIT LV structure and function may originate from same processes of adaptive myofiber reorientation.

  14. Environmental Geometry Aligns the Hippocampal Map during Spatial Reorientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keinath, Alex T; Julian, Joshua B; Epstein, Russell A; Muzzio, Isabel A

    2017-02-06

    When a navigator's internal sense of direction is disrupted, she must rely on external cues to regain her bearings, a process termed spatial reorientation. Extensive research has demonstrated that the geometric shape of the environment exerts powerful control over reorientation behavior, but the neural and cognitive mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are not well understood. Whereas some theories claim that geometry controls behavior through an allocentric mechanism potentially tied to the hippocampus, others postulate that disoriented navigators reach their goals by using an egocentric view-matching strategy. To resolve this debate, we characterized hippocampal representations during reorientation. We first recorded from CA1 cells as disoriented mice foraged in chambers of various shapes. We found that the alignment of the recovered hippocampal map was determined by the geometry of the chamber, but not by nongeometric cues, even when these cues could be used to disambiguate geometric ambiguities. We then recorded hippocampal activity as disoriented mice performed a classical goal-directed spatial memory task in a rectangular chamber. Again, we found that the recovered hippocampal map aligned solely to the chamber geometry. Critically, we also found a strong correspondence between the hippocampal map alignment and the animal's behavior, making it possible to predict the search location of the animal from neural responses on a trial-by-trial basis. Together, these results demonstrate that spatial reorientation involves the alignment of the hippocampal map to local geometry. We hypothesize that geometry may be an especially salient cue for reorientation because it is an inherently stable aspect of the environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Trends in communications satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Curtin, Denis J

    1979-01-01

    Trends in Communications Satellites offers a comprehensive look at trends and advances in satellite communications, including experimental ones such as NASA satellites and those jointly developed by France and Germany. The economic aspects of communications satellites are also examined. This book consists of 16 chapters and begins with a discussion on the fundamentals of electrical communications and their application to space communications, including spacecraft, earth stations, and orbit and wavelength utilization. The next section demonstrates how successful commercial satellite communicati

  16. Reaction and reorientation of electronically excited H{sub 2}(B)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pibel, C.D.

    1992-09-01

    The room temperature rate (TR) constants for fluorescence quenching fluorescence of H{sub 2}, HD, and D{sub 2} B {sup 1}{Sigma}{sub u}{sup +} by {sup 4}He were measured as a function of the initially excited rotational and vibrational level of the hydrogen molecule, and the RT rate constants for molecular angular momentum reorientation of H{sub 2}, HD and D{sub 2} (B {sup 1}{Sigma}{sub u}{sup +}. v{prime}=0, J{prime}=1, M{sub J}=0) in collisions with He, Ne, Ar and H{sub 2}(X {sup 1}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +}) were also measured. Vibrational state dependence of the quenching cross sections fits a vibrationally adiabatic model of the quenching process. From the vibrational state dependence of the quenching cross section, the barrier height for the quenching reaction is found to be 250{plus_minus}40 cm{sup {minus}1}, and the difference in the H-H stretching frequencies between H{sub 2}(B) and the H{sub 2}-He complex at the barrier to reaction is 140{plus_minus}80 cm{sup {minus}1}. The effective cross sections for angular momentum reorientation in collisions of H{sub 2}, HD, D{sub 2} with He and Ne were found to be about 30 {Angstrom}{sup 2} and were nearly the same for each isotope and with He and Ne as collision partners. Cross sections forreorientation of HD and D{sub 2} in collisions with Ar were 10.6{plus_minus}2.0 and 13.9{plus_minus}3.0 {Angstrom}{sup 2}, respectively. Reorientation of D{sub 2}(B) in collisions with room temperature H{sub 2}(X) occurs with a 7.6{plus_minus}3.4 {Angstrom}{sup 2} cross section. Calculated cross sections using semiclassical and quantum close coupled methods give cross sections for reorientation of H{sub 2}(B) and D{sub 2}(B) in collisions with He that agree quantitatively with experiment. Discrepancy between the calculated and experimental cross sections for HD(B)-HE are likely due to rotational relaxation in HD a Turbo PASCAL version of the data-taking program is included.

  17. Reaction and reorientation of electronically excited H[sub 2](B)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pibel, C.D.

    1992-09-01

    The room temperature rate (TR) constants for fluorescence quenching fluorescence of H[sub 2], HD, and D[sub 2] B [sup 1][Sigma][sub u][sup +] by [sup 4]He were measured as a function of the initially excited rotational and vibrational level of the hydrogen molecule, and the RT rate constants for molecular angular momentum reorientation of H[sub 2], HD and D[sub 2] (B [sup 1][Sigma][sub u][sup +]. v[prime]=0, J[prime]=1, M[sub J]=0) in collisions with He, Ne, Ar and H[sub 2](X [sup 1][Sigma][sub g][sup +]) were also measured. Vibrational state dependence of the quenching cross sections fits a vibrationally adiabatic model of the quenching process. From the vibrational state dependence of the quenching cross section, the barrier height for the quenching reaction is found to be 250[plus minus]40 cm[sup [minus]1], and the difference in the H-H stretching frequencies between H[sub 2](B) and the H[sub 2]-He complex at the barrier to reaction is 140[plus minus]80 cm[sup [minus]1]. The effective cross sections for angular momentum reorientation in collisions of H[sub 2], HD, D[sub 2] with He and Ne were found to be about 30 [Angstrom][sup 2] and were nearly the same for each isotope and with He and Ne as collision partners. Cross sections forreorientation of HD and D[sub 2] in collisions with Ar were 10.6[plus minus]2.0 and 13.9[plus minus]3.0 [Angstrom][sup 2], respectively. Reorientation of D[sub 2](B) in collisions with room temperature H[sub 2](X) occurs with a 7.6[plus minus]3.4 [Angstrom][sup 2] cross section. Calculated cross sections using semiclassical and quantum close coupled methods give cross sections for reorientation of H[sub 2](B) and D[sub 2](B) in collisions with He that agree quantitatively with experiment. Discrepancy between the calculated and experimental cross sections for HD(B)-HE are likely due to rotational relaxation in HD a Turbo PASCAL version of the data-taking program is included.

  18. The reorientation of spatial planning systems and policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galland, Daniel; Enemark, Stig

    2012-01-01

    spatial planning has become reoriented. This is performed through an empirical analysis regarding the transformation of spatial planning in relation with the evolving conception of planning policies at different scales, the changing role of planning in conceiving and handling growth and development......Danish spatial planning has been increasingly subjected to profound reorientations over the past two decades. The comprehensive frame wherein planning policies and practices operated across different levels of administration has become significantly altered. This has been particularly evident after...... radical shifts in terms of the scope of planning policies, the implementation of land-use tasks as well as the performance of the institutional arrangements operating within and beyond the planning system. Based on an in-depth analysis concerned with these changes, the paper endeavours into discussing how...

  19. Magnetic anisotropy and spin reorientation effects in Gd/Fe and Gd/(FeCo) multilayers for high density magneto-optical recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrou, E.; Sbiaa, R.; Suzuki, T.; Knappmann, S.; Röll, K.

    2000-05-01

    We have investigated the anisotropy behavior and temperature dependent changes of the magnetic anisotropy in Gd/Fe and Gd/(FeCo) multilayers. The spin reorientation effects are very important for the super resolution readout in new methods for high-density magneto-optical recording. Gd/(Fe, Co) multilayered films are a good alternative to the common Gd(Fe, Co) alloy films, because the magnetic anisotropy and also spin reorientation effects can be comfortably adjusted by varying the interface and volume anisotropy components and the composition using experimental parameters such as the periodicity λ=tGd+tTM [tGd,tTM: the sublayer thicknesses of the Gd and transition metal Fe, FeCo (TM)] and the ratio of the sublayer thicknesses tGd/tTM. We have found the mechanisms for spin reorientation, which are explained qualitatively with a new model.

  20. Spatial reorientation in rats (Rattus norvegicus): Use of geometric and featural information as a function of arena size and feature location

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maes, J.H.R.; Fontanari, L.; Regolin, L.

    2009-01-01

    Rats were used in a spatial reorientation task to assess their ability to use geometric and non-geometric, featural, information. Experimental conditions differed in the size of the arena (small, medium, or large) and whether the food-baited corner was near or far from a visual feature. The main mea

  1. Reorienting programme budgeting and marginal analysis (PBMA towards disinvestment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortimer Duncan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Remarkable progress has been made over the past 40 years in developing rational, evidence-based mechanisms for the allocation of health resources. Much of this progress has centred on mechanisms for commissioning new medical devices and pharmaceuticals. The attention of fund-managers and policy-makers is only now turning towards development of mechanisms for decommissioning, disinvesting or redeploying resources from currently funded interventions. While Programme Budgeting and Marginal Analysis would seem well-suited to this purpose, past applications include both successes and failures in achieving disinvestment and resource release. Discussion Drawing on recent successes/failures in achieving disinvestment and resource release via PBMA, this paper identifies four barriers/enablers to disinvestment via PBMA: (i specification of the budget constraint, (ii scope of the programme budget, (iii composition and role of the advisory group, and (iv incentives for/against contributing to a 'shift list' of options for disinvestment and resource release. A number of modifications to the PBMA process are then proposed with the aim of reorienting PBMA towards disinvestment. Summary The reoriented model is differentiated by four features: (i hard budget constraint with budgetary pressure; (ii programme budgets with broad scope but specific investment proposals linked to disinvestment proposals with similar input requirements; (iii advisory/working groups that include equal representation of sectional interests plus additional members with responsibility for advocating in favour of disinvestment, (iv 'shift lists' populated and developed prior to 'wish lists' and investment proposals linked to disinvestment proposals within a relatively narrow budget area. While the argument and evidence presented here suggest that the reoriented model will facilitate disinvestment and resource release, this remains an empirical question. Likewise

  2. Rocket propellant reorientation and fluid management used in space commercialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, R. J.; Lee, C. C.; Shyu, K. L.

    1990-01-01

    In a spacecraft design, the requirements of settled propellant are different for tank pressurization, engine restart, venting, or propellant transfer. The requirement to settle or to position liquid fuel over the outlet end of the spacecraft propellant tank prior main engine restart possess a microgravity fluid behavior problem. In this paper, the dynamical behavior of liquid propellant, fluid reorientation, and propellant resettling have been carried out.

  3. Reorientational eigenmode dynamics: a combined MD/NMR relaxation analysis method for flexible parts in globular proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prompers, J J; Brüschweiler, R

    2001-08-01

    An approach is presented for the interpretation of heteronuclear NMR spin relaxation data in mobile protein parts in terms of reorientational eigenmode dynamics. The method is based on the covariance matrix of the spatial functions of the nuclear spin interactions that cause relaxation expressed as spherical harmonics of rank 2. The approach was applied to characterize the dynamics of a loop region of ubiquitin. The covariance matrix was determined from a conformational ensemble generated by a 5 ns molecular dynamics simulation. It was found that the time correlation functions of the dominant eigenmodes decay in good approximation with a single correlation time. From the reorientational eigenmodes, their eigenvalues, and correlation times, NMR relaxation data were calculated in accordance with Bloch-Wangsness-Redfield relaxation theory and directly compared with experimental (15)N relaxation parameters. Using a fitting procedure, agreement between calculated and experimental data was improved significantly by adjusting eigenvalues and correlation times of the dominant modes. The presented procedure provides detailed information on correlated reorientational dynamics of flexible parts in globular proteins. The covariance matrix was linked to the covariance matrix of backbone dihedral angle fluctuations, allowing one to study the motional behavior of these degrees of freedom on nano- and subnanosecond time scales.

  4. An experimental analysis for the impact of 3D variation assi- milation of satellite data on typhoon track simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Hongqin; WU Zengmao; GAO Shanhong

    2004-01-01

    A series of test simulations are performed to evaluate the impact of satellite-derived meteorological data on numerical typhoon track prediction. Geostationary meteorological satellite (GMS-5) and NOAA's TIROS operational vertical sounder (TOVS) observations are used in the experiments. A three-dimensional variational (3D-Var) assimilation scheme is developed to assimilate the satellite data directly into the Penn State-NCAR nonhydrostatic meteorological model (MM5). Three-dimensional objective analysis fields based on the T213 results and conventional observations are employed as the background fields of the initialization. The comparisons of the simulated typhoon tracks are carried out, which correspond respectively to assimilate different kinds of satellite data. It is found that, compared with the experiment without satellite data assimilation, the 3D-Var assimilation schemes lead to significant improvements on typhoon track prediction. Track errors reduce from approximately 25% at 24 h to approximately 30% at 48 h for 3D-Var assimilation experiments.

  5. Converse magnetoelectric effect via strain-driven magnetization reorientations in ultrathin ferromagnetic films on ferroelectric substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertsev, N. A.

    2015-07-01

    A phenomenological theory is developed for the strain-driven magnetization reorientations occurring in ultrathin ferromagnetic films coupled to ferroelectric substrates experiencing electric-field-induced piezoelectric deformations. The theory takes into account the surface/interface magnetic anisotropy playing an important role in the energetics of such films and first describes the thickness-driven spin reorientation transitions emerging in the presence of substrate-induced lattice strains. Then the threshold and critical intensities of the electric field created in a ferroelectric substrate are calculated, at which different magnetic states acquire the same energy or become unstable in a strained ferromagnetic overlayer. To demonstrate stability ranges of various possible magnetization orientations, we introduce magnetoelectric orientational diagrams, where the electric-field intensity and film thickness are employed as two variables. Such diagrams are constructed for ultrathin Ni, Fe, and F e60C o40 films coupled to single crystals of classical and relaxor ferroelectrics. The inspection of these diagrams shows that the use of multiferroic hybrids comprising ultrathin ferromagnetic films significantly enlarges the range of ferroic materials suitable for experimental observations of the strain-mediated converse magnetoelectric effect.

  6. Analysis of Fade Detection and Compensation Experimental Results in a Ka-Band Satellite System. Degree awarded by Akron Univ., May 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sandra

    2001-01-01

    The frequency bands being used for new satellite communication systems are constantly increasing to accommodate the requirements for additional capacity. At these higher frequencies, propagation impairments that did not significantly affect the signal at lower frequencies begin to have considerable impact. In Ka-band, the next logical commercial frequency band to be used for satellite communication, attenuation of the signal due to rain is a primary concern. An experimental satellite built by NASA, the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS), launched in September 1993, is the first US communication satellite operating in the Ka-band. In addition to higher carrier frequencies, a number of other new technologies, including onboard baseband processing, multiple beam antennas, and rain fade detection and compensation techniques, were designed into the ACTS. Verification experiments have been conducted since the launch to characterize the new technologies. The focus of this thesis is to describe and validate the method used by the ACTS Very Small Aperture Terminal (VSAT) ground stations in detecting the presence of fade in the communication signal and to adaptively compensate for it by the addition of burst rate reduction and forward error correction. Measured data obtained from the ACTS program is used to validate the compensation technique. In this thesis, models in MATLAB are developed to statistically characterize the increased availability achieved by the compensation techniques in terms of the bit error rate time enhancement factor. Several improvements to the ACTS technique are discussed and possible implementations for future Ka-band systems are also presented.

  7. Assessment of needs for satellite tracking of birds and suggestions for expediting a program. [experimental design using Nimbus 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craighead, F. C., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Equipment development and testing, animal-instrument interphase or attachment methods, and the evaluation of various feasibility-tracking experiments with raptors are described as well as suggestions for expediting a future program. Results of animal-instrument interphases work indicate that large free-flying birds can be successfully instrumented with radio packages comparable in weight to satellite-transmitter packages. The 401 MHz frequency proved satisfactory for a combination of satellite and ground tracking of migrating birds. Tests run for nearly a year with the Nimbus 6 satellite and a miniaturized, one-watt prototype RAMS transmitter produced encouraging results in regard to location accuracy, frequency of contact with satellite and use of whip antennas. A future program is recommended with priority given to development of six operational transmitters for feasibility experiments.

  8. Spatial re-orienting of visual attention along the horizontal or the vertical axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaluso, E; Patria, F

    2007-06-01

    Neuroimaging data indicate functional segregation between voluntary and stimulus-driven control of spatial attention in dorsal and ventral fronto-parietal regions, respectively. While recent evidences demonstrated location-specific attentional effects in dorsal regions, little is known about any location or direction selectivity within the ventral network. Here, we used a spatial cueing paradigm to investigate stimulus-driven spatial re-orienting along different axes (horizontal or vertical). We found that re-orienting of attention activated the ventral attentional network, irrespective of axis-orientation. Statistical comparisons between homologous regions in the two hemispheres revealed significant main effects of attention re-orienting (common activation for the two hemispheres), irrespective of leftward or rightward re-orienting along the horizontal axis, or re-orienting along the vertical axis. We conclude that in healthy volunteers, a bilateral ventral network controls spatial covert re-orienting, and that this system is multidirectional.

  9. Young children reorient by computing layout geometry, not by matching images of the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Ah; Spelke, Elizabeth S

    2011-02-01

    Disoriented animals from ants to humans reorient in accord with the shape of the surrounding surface layout: a behavioral pattern long taken as evidence for sensitivity to layout geometry. Recent computational models suggest, however, that the reorientation process may not depend on geometrical analyses but instead on the matching of brightness contours in 2D images of the environment. Here we test this suggestion by investigating young children's reorientation in enclosed environments. Children reoriented by extremely subtle geometric properties of the 3D layout: bumps and ridges that protruded only slightly off the floor, producing edges with low contrast. Moreover, children failed to reorient by prominent brightness contours in continuous layouts with no distinctive 3D structure. The findings provide evidence that geometric layout representations support children's reorientation.

  10. Temperature-dependent magnetostriction as the key factor for martensite reorientation in magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'vov, Victor A.; Kosogor, Anna

    2016-09-01

    The magnetic field application leads to spatially inhomogeneous magnetostriction of twinned ferromagnetic martensite. When the increasing field and magnetostrictive strain reach certain threshold values, the motion of twin boundaries and magnetically induced reorientation (MIR) of twinned martensite start. The MIR leads to giant magnetically induced deformation of twinned martensite. In the present article, the threshold field (TF) and temperature range of observability of MIR were calculated for the Ni-Mn-Ga martensite assuming that the threshold strain (TS) is temperature-independent. The calculations show that if the TS is of the order of 10-4, the TF strongly depends on temperature and MIR can be observed only above the limiting temperature (~220 K). If the TS is of the order of 10-6, the TF weakly depends on temperature and MIR can be observed at extremely low temperatures. The obtained theoretical results are in agreement with available experimental data.

  11. Nonlinear continuous-wave optical propagation in nematic liquid crystals: Interplay between reorientational and thermal effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberucci, Alessandro; Laudyn, Urszula A.; Piccardi, Armando; Kwasny, Michał; Klus, Bartlomiej; Karpierz, Mirosław A.; Assanto, Gaetano

    2017-07-01

    We investigate nonlinear optical propagation of continuous-wave (CW) beams in bulk nematic liquid crystals. We thoroughly analyze the competing roles of reorientational and thermal nonlinearity with reference to self-focusing/defocusing and, eventually, the formation of nonlinear diffraction-free wavepackets, the so-called spatial optical solitons. To this extent we refer to dye-doped nematic liquid crystals in planar cells excited by a single CW beam in the highly nonlocal limit. To adjust the relative weight between the two nonlinear responses, we employ two distinct wavelengths, inside and outside the absorption band of the dye, respectively. Different concentrations of the dye are considered in order to enhance the thermal effect. The theoretical analysis is complemented by numerical simulations in the highly nonlocal approximation based on a semi-analytic approach. Theoretical results are finally compared to experimental results in the Nematic Liquid Crystals (NLC) 4-trans-4'-n-hexylcyclohexylisothiocyanatobenzene (6CHBT) doped with Sudan Blue dye.

  12. Early mammalian development under conditions of reorientation relative to the gravity vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolgemuth, D. J.; Grills, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    A clinostat was used to assess the effects of reorientation relative to the gravity vector on mammalian germ cells cultured in vitro. Previous studies using this system revealed an inhibition of meiotic maturation of mouse oocytes. In the present study, the effects of clinostat rotation on in vitro fertilization were examined. The frequency of fertilization of experimental cultures did not vary from that of the clinostat vertical control cultures at either of the rotation rates examined. Importantly, no abnormalities of fertilization, such as parthenogenetic activation, fragmentation, or polyspermy were seen. It is concluded that the initial events of fertilization were unaffected by this treatment, although the developmental potential of these embryos remains to be assessed.

  13. Reorientation of Sputnik Planitia implies a subsurface ocean on Pluto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, F; Hamilton, D P; McKinnon, W B; Schenk, P M; Binzel, R P; Bierson, C J; Beyer, R A; Moore, J M; Stern, S A; Weaver, H A; Olkin, C B; Young, L A; Smith, K E

    2016-12-01

    The deep nitrogen-covered basin on Pluto, informally named Sputnik Planitia, is located very close to the longitude of Pluto's tidal axis and may be an impact feature, by analogy with other large basins in the Solar System. Reorientation of Sputnik Planitia arising from tidal and rotational torques can explain the basin's present-day location, but requires the feature to be a positive gravity anomaly, despite its negative topography. Here we argue that if Sputnik Planitia did indeed form as a result of an impact and if Pluto possesses a subsurface ocean, the required positive gravity anomaly would naturally result because of shell thinning and ocean uplift, followed by later modest nitrogen deposition. Without a subsurface ocean, a positive gravity anomaly requires an implausibly thick nitrogen layer (exceeding 40 kilometres). To prolong the lifetime of such a subsurface ocean to the present day and to maintain ocean uplift, a rigid, conductive water-ice shell is required. Because nitrogen deposition is latitude-dependent, nitrogen loading and reorientation may have exhibited complex feedbacks.

  14. A new twist on old ideas: how sitting reorients crawlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soska, Kasey C; Robinson, Scott R; Adolph, Karen E

    2015-03-01

    Traditionally, crawling and sitting are considered distinct motor behaviors with different postures and functions. Ten- to 12-month-old infants were observed in the laboratory or in their homes while being coaxed to crawl continuously over long, straight walkways (Study 1; N = 20) and during spontaneous crawling during free play (Study 2; N = 20). In every context, infants stopped crawling to sit 3-6 times per minute. Transitions from crawling to sitting frequently turned infants' bodies away from the direction of heading; subsequent transitions back to crawling were offset by as much as 180° from the original direction of heading. Apparently, body reorientations result from the biomechanics of transitioning between crawling and sitting. Findings indicate that sustained, linear crawling is likely an epiphenomenon of how gait is studied in standard paradigms. Postural transitions between crawling and sitting are ubiquitous and can represent a functional unit of action. These transitions and the accompanying body reorientations likely have cascading effects for infants' exploration, visual perception, and spatial cognition.

  15. Reorientation of Sputnik Planitia implies a subsurface ocean on Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, F.; Hamilton, D. P.; McKinnon, W. B.; Schenk, P. M.; Binzel, R. P.; Bierson, C. J.; Beyer, R. A.; Moore, J. M.; Stern, S. A.; Weaver, H. A.; Olkin, C. B.; Young, L. A.; Smith, K. E.; Moore, J. M.; McKinnon, W. B.; Spencer, J. R.; Beyer, R.; Binzel, R. P.; Buie, M.; Buratti, B.; Cheng, A.; Cruikshank, D.; Ore, C. Dalle; Earle, A.; Gladstone, R.; Grundy, W.; Howard, A. D.; Lauer, T.; Linscott, I.; Nimmo, F.; Parker, J.; Porter, S.; Reitsema, H.; Reuter, D.; Roberts, J. H.; Robbins, S.; Schenk, P. M.; Showalter, M.; Singer, K.; Strobel, D.; Summers, M.; Tyler, L.; White, O. L.; Umurhan, O. M.; Banks, M.; Barnouin, O.; Bray, V.; Carcich, B.; Chaikin, A.; Chavez, C.; Conrad, C.; Hamilton, D. P.; Howett, C.; Hofgartner, J.; Kammer, J.; Lisse, C.; Marcotte, A.; Parker, A.; Retherford, K.; Saina, M.; Runyon, K.; Schindhelm, E.; Stansberry, J.; Steffl, A.; Stryk, T.; Throop, H.; Tsang, C.; Verbiscer, A.; Winters, H.; Zangari, A.; Stern, S. A.; Weaver, H. A.; Olkin, C. B.; Young, L. A.; Smith, K. E.

    2016-12-01

    The deep nitrogen-covered basin on Pluto, informally named Sputnik Planitia, is located very close to the longitude of Pluto’s tidal axis and may be an impact feature, by analogy with other large basins in the Solar System. Reorientation of Sputnik Planitia arising from tidal and rotational torques can explain the basin’s present-day location, but requires the feature to be a positive gravity anomaly, despite its negative topography. Here we argue that if Sputnik Planitia did indeed form as a result of an impact and if Pluto possesses a subsurface ocean, the required positive gravity anomaly would naturally result because of shell thinning and ocean uplift, followed by later modest nitrogen deposition. Without a subsurface ocean, a positive gravity anomaly requires an implausibly thick nitrogen layer (exceeding 40 kilometres). To prolong the lifetime of such a subsurface ocean to the present day and to maintain ocean uplift, a rigid, conductive water-ice shell is required. Because nitrogen deposition is latitude-dependent, nitrogen loading and reorientation may have exhibited complex feedbacks.

  16. Experimental evaluation of self-calibrating cavity radiometers for use in earth flux radiation balance measurements from satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, J. R.; Karoli, A. R.; Alton, B. M.

    1982-01-01

    A method for evaluating out-of-field response of wide-field, earth-viewing satellite radiometers is described. The equipment which simulates the earth and space consists of a central blackbody surrounded by a cooled ring. The radiometric and orbital considerations are discussed. Some test results for prototype ERBE cavity sensors are included. This presentation is restricted to longwave radiative transfer

  17. Temperature-Induced Magnetization Reorientation in GdFeCo/TbFeCo Exchange-Coupled Double Layer Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王现英; 张约品; 李佐宜; 沈德芳; 干福熹

    2003-01-01

    GdFeCo/TbFeCo exchange-coupled double-layer (ECDL) films used for centre aperture type magnetically in duced super resolution were investigated through experiments and theoretical calculation. The ECDL films were prepared by the magnetron sputtering method. Polar Kerr effect measurements showed that magnetization reorientation occurred in the GdFeCo layer with the temperature rising, which was subsequently analysed by the micromagnetic calculation based on the mean-field theory and a continuum model. Theoretical analysis is in agreement well with the experimental results.

  18. On the reorientation of non-spherical prey particles in a feeding current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, Andre; Jonsson, P.R.

    2000-01-01

    Potentially, non-spherical prey can be re-oriented in a flow field and impact on the predator's feeding structures in a non- random manner. Herein, we quantify a process whereby this passive reorientation occurs, and present a model that predicts the orientation of a spheroidal prey as a function...

  19. Experimental design for the evaluation of high-T(sub c) superconductive thermal bridges in a sensor satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Elaine P.; Lee, Kasey M.

    1994-01-01

    Infrared sensor satellites, which consist of cryogenic infrared sensor detectors, electrical instrumentation, and data acquisition systems, are used to monitor the conditions of the earth's upper atmosphere in order to evaluate its present and future changes. Currently, the electrical connections (instrumentation), which act as thermal bridges between the cryogenic infrared sensor and the significantly warmer data acquisition unit of the sensor satellite system, constitute a significant portion of the heat load on the cryogen. As a part of extending the mission life of the sensor satellite system, the researchers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Langley Research Center (NASA-LaRC) are evaluating the effectiveness of replacing the currently used manganin wires with high-temperature superconductive (HTS) materials as the electrical connections (thermal bridges). In conjunction with the study being conducted at NASA-LaRC, the proposed research is to design a space experiment to determine the thermal savings on a cryogenic subsystem when manganin leads are replaced by HTS leads printed onto a substrate with a low thermal conductivity, and to determine the thermal conductivities of HTS materials. The experiment is designed to compare manganin wires with two different types of superconductors on substrates by determining the heat loss by the thermal bridges and providing temperature measurements for the estimation of thermal conductivity. A conductive mathematical model has been developed and used as a key tool in the design process and subsequent analysis.

  20. The reorientation of spatial planning systems and policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galland, Daniel; Enemark, Stig

    2012-01-01

    Danish spatial planning has been increasingly subjected to profound reorientations over the past two decades. The comprehensive frame wherein planning policies and practices operated across different levels of administration has become significantly altered. This has been particularly evident after...... the implementation of a structural reform that changed the political and administrative structure in the country. Most importantly, the reform abolished the county level, which caused that planning policies, functions and responsibilities were re-scaled to municipal and national levels. This situation brought about...... radical shifts in terms of the scope of planning policies, the implementation of land-use tasks as well as the performance of the institutional arrangements operating within and beyond the planning system. Based on an in-depth analysis concerned with these changes, the paper endeavours into discussing how...

  1. Thin film magnetoelectric composites near spin reorientation transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiercelin, N. [Joint European Laboratory LEMAC: IEMN CNRS 8520-Ecole Centrale de Lille, Villeneuve d' Ascq 59652 (France)], E-mail: Nicolas.Tiercelin@iemn.univ-lille1.fr; Preobrazhensky, V. [Joint European Laboratory LEMAC: IEMN CNRS 8520-Ecole Centrale de Lille, Villeneuve d' Ascq 59652 (France); Joint European Laboratory LEMAC: WRC-GPI-RAS 117454, Vernadsky prosp. 78, Moscow (Russian Federation); Mortet, V. [Institute for Materials Research (IMO), Hasselt University, IMEC vzw, Division IMOMEC, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Talbi, A. [Joint European Laboratory LEMAC: IEMN CNRS 8520-Ecole Centrale de Lille, Villeneuve d' Ascq 59652 (France); Soltani, A. [IEMN CNRS 8520, Bd Poincare, Villeneuve d' Ascq 59651 (France); Haenen, K. [Institute for Materials Research (IMO), Hasselt University, IMEC vzw, Division IMOMEC, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Pernod, P. [Joint European Laboratory LEMAC: IEMN CNRS 8520-Ecole Centrale de Lille, Villeneuve d' Ascq 59652 (France)

    2009-06-15

    We report the use of a magnetic instability of the spin reorientation transition type to enhance the magnetoelectric sensitivity in magnetostrictive-piezoelectric structures. We present the theoretical study of a clamped beam resonant actuator composed of a piezoelectric element on a passive substrate actuated by a magnetostrictive nanostructured layer. The experiments were made on a polished 150 {mu}m thick 18x3 mm{sup 2} lead zirconate titanate (PZT) plate glued to a 50 {mu}m thick silicon plate and coated with a giant magnetostrictive nanostructured Nx(TbCo{sub 25nm}/FeCo{sub 5nm}) layer. A second set of experiments was done with magnetostrictive layer deposited on PZT plate. Finally, a film/film structure using magnetostrictive and aluminium nitride films on silicon substrate was realized, and showed ME amplitudes reaching 30 V Oe{sup -1} cm{sup -1}. Results agree with analytical theory.

  2. Understanding the reorientations and roles of spatial planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galland, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Spatial planning commonly adopts a diversity of functions and logics in contributing to handle growth and development. Being influenced by an array of contextual driving forces that result in specific institutional practices and policy agendas, spatial planning seems to be constantly reoriented...... by analytical concepts drawn from planning theory, state spatial theory and discourse analysis. Based on an in-depth study, the article then attempts to qualify, illustrate and synthesise the diverse roles that spatial planning has taken in Denmark throughout that time frame. The article concludes that spatial...... in terms of its purposes and reasoning. This article sets out to explore the diverse orientations and roles that spatial planning has assumed in Denmark over a 50-year period. In doing so, the article examines the evolution of national planning policy by means of a multi-disciplinary framework comprised...

  3. Tidal reorientation and the fracturing of Jupiter's moon Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcewen, A. S.

    1986-01-01

    The lineaments on Europa are discussed in terms of the orientation of the lineaments relative to the tensile stress trajectories due to tidal distortions and to nonsynchronous rotation. The cracks are noticeable by their darker albedo compared to the presumed water ice surrounding them. The stress trajectories for tidal distortion of a thin elastic shell are superimposed on Mercator projection maps of the lineaments. It is shown that the lineaments are mainly oriented at high angles to the tensile stress trajectories that would be expected for regularly occurring nonsynchronous rotation, i.e., extensional fractures would appear. The reorientation motions which would cause the fractures are estimated. It is suggested that the fractures occur episodically to release stresses built up on the tensile surface of the crust during the continuous nonsynchronous rotation of Europa.

  4. Reorienting MHD colliding flows: a shock physics mechanism for generating filaments normal to magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogerty, Erica; Carroll-Nellenback, Jonathan; Frank, Adam; Heitsch, Fabian; Pon, Andy

    2017-09-01

    We present numerical simulations of reorienting oblique shocks that form in the collision layer between magnetized colliding flows. Reorientation aligns post-shock filaments normal to the background magnetic field. We find that reorientation begins with pressure gradients between the collision region and the ambient medium. This drives a lateral expansion of post-shock gas, which reorients the growing filament from the outside-in (i.e. from the flow/ambient boundary, towards the colliding flows axis). The final structures of our simulations resemble polarization observations of filaments in Taurus and Serpens South, as well as the integral-shaped filament in Orion A. Given the ubiquity of colliding flows in the interstellar medium, shock reorientation may be relevant to the formation of filaments normal to magnetic fields.

  5. Reorienting MHD Colliding Flows: A Shock Physics Mechanism for Generating Filaments Normal to Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Fogerty, Erica L; Frank, Adam; Heitsch, Fabian; Pon, Andy

    2016-01-01

    We present numerical simulations of reorienting oblique shocks that form in the collision layer between magnetized colliding flows. Reorientation aligns parsec-scale post-shock filaments normal to the background magnetic field. We find that reorientation begins with pressure gradients between the collision region and the ambient medium. This drives a lateral expansion of post-shock gas, which reorients the growing filament from the outside-in (i.e. from the flow-ambient boundary, toward the colliding flows axis). The final structures of our simulations resemble polarization observations of filaments in Taurus and Serpens South, as well as the integral-shaped filament in Orion A. Given the ubiquity of colliding flows in the interstellar medium, shock reorientation may be relevant to the formation of filaments normal to magnetic fields.

  6. The effect of stress state on zirconium hydride reorientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinbiz, Mahmut Nedim

    Prior to storage in a dry-cask facility, spent nuclear fuel must undergo a vacuum drying cycle during which the spent fuel rods are heated up to elevated temperatures of ≤ 400°C to remove moisture the canisters within the cask. As temperature increases during heating, some of the hydride particles within the cladding dissolve while the internal gas pressure in fuel rods increases generating multi-axial hoop and axial stresses in the closed-end thin-walled cladding tubes. As cool-down starts, the hydrogen in solid solution precipitates as hydride platelets, and if the multiaxial stresses are sufficiently large, the precipitating hydrides reorient from their initial circumferential orientation to radial orientation. Radial hydrides can severely embrittle the spent nuclear fuel cladding at low temperature in response to hoop stress loading. Because the cladding can experience a range of stress states during the thermo-mechanical treatment induced during vacuum drying, this study has investigated the effect of stress state on the process of hydride reorientation during controlled thermo-mechanical treatments utilizing the combination of in situ X-ray diffraction and novel mechanical testing analyzed by the combination of metallography and finite element analysis. The study used cold worked and stress relieved Zircaloy-4 sheet containing approx. 180 wt. ppm hydrogen as its material basis. The failure behavior of this material containing radial hydrides was also studied over a range of temperatures. Finally, samples from reactor-irradiated cladding tubes were examined by X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. To reveal the stress state effect on hydride reorientation, the critical threshold stress to reorient hydrides was determined by designing novel mechanical test samples which produce a range of stress states from uniaxial to "near-equibiaxial" tension when a load is applied. The threshold stress was determined after thermo-mechanical treatments by

  7. Time course and auxin sensitivity of cortical microtubule reorientation in maize roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blancaflor, E. B.; Hasenstein, K. H.

    1995-01-01

    The kinetics of MT [microtubule] reorientation in primary roots of Zea mays cv. Merit, were examined 15, 30, 45, and 60 min after horizontal positioning. Confocal microscopy of longitudinal tissue sections showed no change in MT orientation 15 and 30 min after horizontal placement. However, after 45 and 60 min, MTs of the outer 4-5 cortical cell layers along the lower side were reoriented. In order to test whether MT reorientation during graviresponse is caused by an auxin gradient, we examined the organization of MTs in roots that were incubated for 1 h in solutions containing 10(-9) to 10(-6) M IAA. IAA treatment at 10(-8) M or less showed no major or consistent changes but 10(-7) M IAA resulted in MT reorientation in the cortex. The auxin effect does not appear to be acid-induced since benzoic acid (10(-5) M) did not cause MT reorientation. The region closest to the maturation zone was most sensitive to IAA. The data indicate that early stages of gravity induced curvature occur in the absence of MT reorientation but sustained curvature leads to reoriented MTs in the outer cortex. Growth inhibition along the lower side of graviresponding roots appears to result from asymmetric distribution of auxin following gravistimulation.

  8. Spin reorientation transition in Co/Au multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quispe-Marcatoma, J., E-mail: jquispem@unmsm.edu.pe [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rio de Janeiro 22290-180 (Brazil); Facultad de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, P.O. Box 14-0149, Lima 14, Perú (Peru); Tarazona, H. [Facultad de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, P.O. Box 14-0149, Lima 14, Perú (Peru); Pandey, B. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rio de Janeiro 22290-180 (Brazil); Department of Applied Science, Symbiosis Institute of Technology, SIU, Lavale, Pune 412 115, India. (India); Sousa, M.A. de [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia 74001-970 (Brazil); Carvalho, M. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rio de Janeiro 22290-180 (Brazil); Landauro, C.V. [Facultad de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, P.O. Box 14-0149, Lima 14, Perú (Peru); Pelegrini, F. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia 74001-970 (Brazil); Baggio Saitovitch, E. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rio de Janeiro 22290-180 (Brazil)

    2014-10-01

    We report a study about the spin reorientation transition (SRT) from perpendicular easy axis to in-plane easy axis of magnetization in Co/Au multilayers. A series of multilayers of Si/Au(100 Å)/{[Co(t_C_o)/Au(20 Å)]_2_0}/Au(50 Å) family were studied, with Co layer thickness varying between 6 Å to 30 Å. The thickness of the Au layer was chosen large enough in order to minimize the interlayer exchange coupling between Co layers. In such thick Au-layer samples the magnetic properties are mainly the result of competition between interlayer magnetostatic coupling due to stray field, perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and shape anisotropy. The effective anisotropy constant K{sub eff} and the second order anisotropy K{sub 2} were deduced from the fit of the resonant magnetic field obtained from out of plane dependence Ferromagnetic Resonance (FMR) experiments. To study the SRT, we have plotted the phase diagram between K{sub eff} and K{sub 2}. The results show that SRT occurs through the metastable region with K{sub 2} ≤ −½ K{sub eff}, (K{sub eff} > 0). It is interesting to note that FMR shows the coexistence of two modes with different anisotropy for small Co thickness, while for thick Co layers the modes have the same anisotropy. Moreover, in thick Co layer samples, volume and surface spin wave resonance (SWR) modes were also excited by the microwave field, around the perpendicular FMR geometry, giving a clear evidence of a magnetic coupling between the Co layers. - Highlights: • Co/Au multilayers with varying Co layer thickness are prepared by DC-magnetron sputtering. • The spin reorientation transition (SRT) and flipping of magnetic moment are studied. • Effective anisotropy constant (K) and 2nd order anisotropy constant (K{sub 2}) are calculated. • K Vs K{sub 2} plot showed that SRT occurs through the metastable region with K{sub 2} ≤ −½ K, (K > 0). • Ferromagnetic Resonance spectra showed the coexistence of two resonance modes.

  9. Experimental free-space distribution of entangled photon pairs over 13 km: towards satellite-based global quantum communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Yang, Tao; Bao, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Jun; Jin, Xian-Min; Feng, Fa-Yong; Yang, Bin; Yang, Jian; Yin, Juan; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Nan; Tian, Bao-Li; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2005-04-22

    We report free-space distribution of entangled photon pairs over a noisy ground atmosphere of 13 km. It is shown that the desired entanglement can still survive after both entangled photons have passed through the noisy ground atmosphere with a distance beyond the effective thickness of the aerosphere. This is confirmed by observing a spacelike separated violation of Bell inequality of 2.45+/-0.09. On this basis, we exploit the distributed entangled photon source to demonstrate the Bennett-Brassard 1984 quantum cryptography scheme. The distribution distance of entangled photon pairs achieved in the experiment is for the first time well beyond the effective thickness of the aerosphere, hence presenting a significant step towards satellite-based global quantum communication.

  10. Temperature-driven spin reorientation transition of magnetron sputtered nickel thin film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Xiao-Hui; Zhang Dian-Lin

    2008-01-01

    The temperature-driven spin reorientation transition of magnetron sputtered Ni/Si(111)systems has been studied.The relationship between ac initial susceptibility and temperature of nickel films with different thicknesses shows that the magnetization orientation changes from in-plane to out-of-plane with the increase of temperature.The temperature dependence of magnetoelastic,magneto-crystalline,and magnetostatic anisotropies determines the direction of the reorientation transition.The temperature-driven spin reorientation transition is supported by Hall coefficient measurements which show that its temperature dependence is similar to that of susceptibility.

  11. Experimental investigation and planetary implications of the stability of clathrate hydrates in aqueous solution at icy satellite conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, M.; Choukroun, M.; Barmatz, M.; Hodyss, R. P.; Smythe, W. D.

    2012-12-01

    Clathrate hydrates consist of hydrogen-bonded water molecules forming cages in which gas molecules are trapped individually. They are among the favored volatile reservoirs in solar system bodies, and are expected to play an important role in many processes: accretion of volatiles in planetesimals, outgassing on Titan, Enceladus, and comets. Their insulating thermal properties and high mechanical strength also bear important implications for understanding the evolution of icy satellites like Europa. However, the conditions allowing for their formation and/or their dissociation and the release of volatiles to the atmosphere (Titan) or the plumes (Enceladus) are still poorly understood. This is mainly because of a lack of knowledge on the stability of mixed clathrate hydrates in presence of anti-freeze agents such as ammonia. We have developed a high-pressure cryogenic calorimeter to address this deficiency in the literature. This liquid nitrogen - cooled Setaram BT2.15 calorimeter is located at the JPL Ice Physics Laboratory. The temperature range achievable with this instrument is 77-473 K. This calorimeter uses Calvet elements (3D arrays of thermocouples) to measure the heat flow required to follow a predefined heating rate within a sample and a reference cell with a resolution of 0.1 μW. A gas handling system has been designed and fabricated in house to reach pressures up to 100 bars, corresponding to several km depth in icy satellites. The thermodynamic properties of CO2 and CH4 clathrates with ammonia are under investigation, and the results will be used to constrain a statistical thermodynamic model of clathrates for applications to planetary environments. Preliminary results will be shown at the meeting. This work has been conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA. Support from the Minnesota Space Grant Consortium, the NASA Outer Planets Research program, and government sponsorship are gratefully

  12. Stress-induced martensite variant reorientation in magnetic shape memory Ni Mn Ga single crystal studied by neutron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, P.; Sittner, P.; Lukas, P.; Hannula, S.-P.; Heczko, O.

    2008-06-01

    Stress-induced martensite variant reorientation in magnetic shape memory Ni-Mn-Ga single crystal was studied in situ by the neutron diffraction technique. Principles of determination of individual tetragonal martensitic variants in shape memory alloys are explained. Using neutron diffraction we show that the macroscopic strain originates solely from the martensite structure reorientation or variant redistribution. Neutron diffraction also reveals that the reorientation of martensite is not fully completed even at a stress value of 25 MPa, which is about 20 times larger than the mean stress needed for reorientation. Only one twinning system is active during the reorientation process.

  13. Processus de réorientation des variantes de martensite dans un monocristal de Cu Al NiReorientation process of martensite variants in a Cu Al Ni monocrystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, Pascal; Lexcellent, Christian

    2003-04-01

    On the one hand, Chu (Thesis, Minnesota, 1993), Abeyaratne et al. (Philos. Mag. A 73 (2) (1996) 457-497) performed biaxial tensile tests on a single crystal Cu-Al-Ni plate, in order to analyze the reorientation process of martensite variants. On the other hand, use is made of a constitutive model with n+1 internal variables (the volume fractions of austenite and of the n martensite variants) specific to the thermomechanical behavior of SMA single crystals in order to simulate the martensite variant reorientation. The comparison between experimental results and model prediction is fairly good. To cite this article: P. Blanc, C. Lexcellent, C. R. Mecanique 331 (2003).

  14. Structure-induced spin reorientation in magnetic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Alexander; Frauen, Axel; Vollmers, Julian; Meyer, Andreas; Oepen, Hans Peter

    2016-09-01

    We report on structuring-induced changes of the magnetic anisotropy of cylindrical nanostructures which are carved out of thin Pt/Co/Pt films. The magnetic properties of films and structures with a diameter of about 34 nm were investigated via magneto-optic Kerr effect. The magnetic anisotropy is determined for both films and nanostructures for varying Co thicknesses (0.5-7 nm). In general, the nanostructures exhibit larger perpendicular anisotropy than the films. On thickness increase of the Co layer two spin reorientation transitions at about 2.2 and 5 nm are found. At 2.2 nm the nanostructures exhibit the transition from perpendicular to in-plane orientation of magnetization while at 5 nm the reversed transition is found. The variation of the magnetic anisotropy of the Co nanostructures is not solely caused by the change of shape anisotropy. The net change, corrected for the shape, reveals a reduction of strain in the thinnest Co layers while the increase of the anisotropy of the nanostructures at higher Co thicknesses is caused by a transformation of the Co lattice from fcc to hcp.

  15. Resolving coiled shapes reveals new reorientation behaviors in C. elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekmans, Onno D; Rodgers, Jarlath B; Ryu, William S; Stephens, Greg J

    2016-01-01

    We exploit the reduced space of C. elegans postures to develop a novel tracking algorithm which captures both simple shapes and also self-occluding coils, an important, yet unexplored, component of 2D worm behavior. We apply our algorithm to show that visually complex, coiled sequences are a superposition of two simpler patterns: the body wave dynamics and a head-curvature pulse. We demonstrate the precise Ω-turn dynamics of an escape response and uncover a surprising new dichotomy in spontaneous, large-amplitude coils; deep reorientations occur not only through classical Ω-shaped postures but also through larger postural excitations which we label here as δ-turns. We find that omega and delta turns occur independently, suggesting a distinct triggering mechanism, and are the serpentine analog of a random left-right step. Finally, we show that omega and delta turns occur with approximately equal rates and adapt to food-free conditions on a similar timescale, a simple strategy to avoid navigational bias. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17227.001 PMID:27644113

  16. Satellite Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technology Teacher, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Presents a discussion of communication satellites: explains the principles of satellite communication, describes examples of how governments and industries are currently applying communication satellites, analyzes issues confronting satellite communication, links mathematics and science to the study of satellite communication, and applies…

  17. Influence of temperature on threshold stress for reorientation of hydrides and residual stress variation across thickness of Zr-2.5Nb alloy pressure tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, R.N. [Materials Science, Technology and Society, Malmo University, SE20506 (Sweden) and Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)]. E-mail: ram.singh@ts.mah.se; Lala Mikin, R. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee 247 667, Uttaranchal (India); Dey, G.K. [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Sah, D.N. [Post Irradiation Examination Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Batra, I.S. [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Stahle, P. [Materials Science, Technology and Society, Malmo University, SE20506 (Sweden)

    2006-12-15

    Threshold stress, {sigma} {sub th}, for reorientation of hydrides in cold worked and stress-relieved (CWSR) Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material was determined in the temperature range of 523-673 K. Using tapered gage tensile specimen, mean value of {sigma} {sub th} was experimentally determined by two methods, half thickness method and area compensation method. The difference between local values of {sigma} {sub th} measured across the thickness of the tube and the mean {sigma} {sub th} values yielded the residual stress variation across the tube thickness. It was observed that both the mean threshold stress and residual stress decrease with increase in reorientation temperature. Also, the maximum value of residual stresses was observed near the midsection of the tube.

  18. Water reorientation in the hydration shells of hydrophilic and hydrophobic solutes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAAGE; Damien; STIRNEMANN; Guillaume; HYNES; James; T.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss some key aspects of our recent theoretical work on water reorientation dynamics,which is important in a wide range of phenomena,including aqueous phase chemical reactions,protein folding,and drug binding to proteins and DNA. It is shown that,contrary to the standard conception that these dynamics are diffusional,the reorientation of a water molecule occurs by sudden,large amplitude angular jumps. The mechanism involves the exchange of one hydrogen bond for another by the reorienting water,and the process can be fruitfully viewed as a chemical reaction. The results for reorientation times,which can be well described analytically,are discussed in the context of the molecular level interpretation of recent ultrafast infrared spectroscopic results,focusing on the concepts of structure making/breaking and solvent ’icebergs’.

  19. Spin reorientation transition process in single crystal NdFeO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Gaibei; Jiang, Junjie; Kang, Baojuan; Zhang, Jincang; Cheng, Zhenxiang; Ma, Guohong; Cao, Shixun

    2015-06-01

    The spin reorientation transition in single crystal NdFeO3 is studied using AC magnetic susceptibility, hysteresis loops, and polarized terahertz (THz) time domain spectroscopy measurements. Different frequency dependence behaviors of AC susceptibility reflect that the dynamic response of magnetization inside the spin reorientation region differs from the phase outside the transition region. The magnetization hysteresis loops at different temperatures reveal that domains formed during the spin reorientation process, which coincides with the abrupt increase of AC magnetic susceptibility during the transition. In addition, temperature dependent THz wave excitation of quasi-antiferromagnetic mode indicates the process of spin reorientation as a continuous rotation of Fe3+ spins rather than a mixed phase of Γ4 and Γ2.

  20. Switching of bacterial adhesion to a glycosylated surface by reversible reorientation of the carbohydrate ligand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Theresa; Chrasekaran, Vijayan; Stamer, Insa

    2014-01-01

    The surface recognition in many biological systems is guided by the interaction of carbohydrate-specific proteins (lectins) with carbohydrate epitopes (ligands) located within the unordered glycoconjugate layer (glycocalyx) of cells. Thus, for recognition, the respective ligand has to reorient...

  1. Experimental Validation of a High Accuracy Test of the Equivalence Principle with the Small Satellite "GALILEO GALILEI"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobili, Anna M.; Comandi, Gian Luca; Doravari, Suresh; Maccarrone, Francesco; Bramanti, Donato; Polacco, Erseo

    The small satellite "Galileo Galilei" (GG) has been designed to test the equivalence principle (EP) to 10-17 with a total mass at launch of 250 kg. The key instrument is a differential accelerometer made up of weakly coupled coaxial, concentric test cylinders rapidly spinning around the symmetry axis and sensitive in the plane perpendicular to it, lying at a small inclination from the orbit plane. The whole spacecraft spins around the same symmetry axis so as to be passively stabilized. The test masses are large (10 kg each, to reduce thermal noise), their coupling is very weak (for high sensitivity to differential effects), and rotation is fast (for high frequency modulation of the signal). A 1 g version of the accelerometer ("Galileo Galilei on the Ground" — GGG) has been built to the full scale — except for coupling, which cannot be as weak as in the absence of weight, and a motor to maintain rotation (not needed in space due to angular momentum conservation). GGG has proved: (i) high Q; (ii) auto-centering and long term stability; (iii) a sensitivity to EP testing which is close to the target sensitivity of the GG experiment provided that the physical properties of the experiment in space are going to be fully exploited.

  2. Microscopic structure and reorientation kinetics of B-H complexes in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noya, José C.; Herrero, Carlos P.; Ramírez, Rafael

    1997-12-01

    Structural and dynamical properties of hydrogen and deuterium in boron-doped silicon have been studied by the path-integral Monte Carlo method as a function of temperature in the range between 30 and 400 K. The Si-Si and Si-B interactions were modeled by Stillinger-Weber-type potentials, and the Si-H and B-H interactions were parametrized by following the results of earlier pseudopotential-density-functional calculations for this system. Impurity energy, nuclei delocalization, and lattice relaxation are analyzed, the latter resulting to be mass dependent. The reorientation rate of the complex is obtained from quantum transition-state theory. A break in the slope of the Arrhenius plot for the jump rate of hydrogen is obtained at T~60 K, indicating a crossover from thermally activated quasiclassical motion over a barrier to thermally assisted quantum tunneling, in good agreement with previous experimental results. For deuterium, this deviation from an Arrhenius law is found at T~35 K. Both the impurity and the host nuclei are treated quantum mechanically, and it is shown that the defect complex undergoing quantum tunneling consists of hydrogen, boron, and the nearest silicon atoms.

  3. Extrinsic Curie temperature and spin reorientation changes in Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B/{alpha}-Fe nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, L.H. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Panchanathan, V. [Magnequench International, Inc., Anderson, IN (United States)

    1998-05-01

    The Curie temperatures and spin reorientation temperatures of a series of four melt-spun nanocomposite materials comprised of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 1}4B and varying amounts of {alpha}-Fe were measured using independent techniques. The phase constitution and grain size was assessed with synchrotron x-ray diffraction; the Curie temperatures were measured by differential thermal analysis (DTA) and dc SQUID magnetometry in the temperature range 375 K {le} T {le} 800 K, whereas the spin reorientation transition temperature was determined from ac susceptibility measurements taken in the range 10 K {le} T {le} 300 K. The Curie temperature increases with increasing excess iron content, resulting in a 18 {degree} enhancement over the Curie temperature of pure Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B for 27 wt% excess {alpha}-Fe. The spin reorientation temperatures are depressed from the single-crystal value by an average of 10 degrees. Both anomalous effects are attributed to intergranular exchange coupling present in the alloys, although the effects of uncompensated stress between the constituent phases cannot be ruled out The experimental results suggest that while the Curie temperature of the Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase may be extrinsically enhanced significantly beyond the bulk value, possibly extending the range of applications of this compound, the anisotropy may be simultaneously lowered, impeding the attainment of high coercivities in these alloys.

  4. Reorientation phenomena in imidazolium methyl sulfonate as probed by advanced solid-state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goward, Gillian R; Saalwächter, Kay; Fischbach, Ingrid; Spiess, Hans Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    Evidence for reorientation of imidazolium rings in imidazolium methylsulfonate is demonstrated using solid-state NMR. This material is a model system for exciting new proton-conducting materials based on imidazole. Two advanced NMR methods, including 1H-13C and 1H-15N recoupled polarization transfer with dipolar sideband pattern analysis and analysis of the coalescence of 13C lineshapes are used to characterize the ring reorientation. The process is found to occur at temperatures well below the melting point of the salt, between 240 and 380 K, and is described by a single activation energy, of 38+/-5 kJ/mol. This material is considered as a model system for quantifying the ring reorientation process, which is often proposed to be the rate-limiting step in proton transport in imidazole-based proton conducting materials.

  5. Influence of Rayleigh-Taylor Instability on Liquid Propellant Reorientation in a Low-Gravity Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhang-Guo; LIU Qiu-Sheng; LIU Rong; HU Wei; DENG Xin-Yu

    2009-01-01

    A computational simulation is conducted to investigate the influence of Rayleigh-Taylor instability on liquid propellant reorientation flow dynamics for the tank of CZ-3A launch vehicle series fuel tanks in a low-gravity environment. The volume-of-fluid (VOF) method is used to simulate the free surface flow of gas-liquid. The process of the liquid propellant reorientation started from initially fiat and curved interfaces are numerically studied. These two different initial conditions of the gas-liquid interface result in two modes of liquid flow. It is found that the Rayleigh-Taylor instability can be reduced evidently at the initial gas-liquid interface with a high curve during the process of liquid reorientation in a low-gravity environment.

  6. Femtosecond study of the effects of ions on the reorientation dynamics of water

    CERN Document Server

    van der Post, Sietse T; Bakker, Huib J

    2013-01-01

    We study the effects of ions on the reorientation dynamics of liquid water with polarization-resolved femtosecond mid-infared spectroscopy. We probe the anisotropy of the excitation of the O-D stretch vibration of HDO molecules in solutions of NaCl, NaI and tetra-alkylammonium bromide salts in 8 percent HDO:H2O. We find that the reorientation O-D groups of HDO molecules hydrating the Cl- and I- anions occurs on two different time scales with time constants of 2pm0.3 ps and 9pm2 ps. The fast component is due to a wobbling motion of the O-D group that keeps the hydrogen bond with the halogenic anion intact. For solutions of tetra-alkylammonium bromide salts we observe a very strong slowing down of the reorientation of water that is associated with the hydration of the hydrophobic alkyl groups of the tetra-alkylammonium ions.

  7. Reorientation of single-wall carbon nanotubes in negative anisotropy liquid crystals by an electric field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda García-García

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT are anisotropic nanoparticles that can cause modifications in the electrical and electro-optical properties of liquid crystals. The control of the SWCNT concentration, distribution and reorientation in such self-organized fluids allows for the possibility of tuning the liquid crystal properties. The alignment and reorientation of CNTs are studied in a system where the liquid crystal orientation effect has been isolated. Complementary studies including Raman spectroscopy, microscopic inspection and impedance studies were carried out. The results reveal an ordered reorientation of the CNTs induced by an electric field, which does not alter the orientation of the liquid crystal molecules. Moreover, impedance spectroscopy suggests a nonnegligible anchoring force between the CNTs and the liquid crystal molecules.

  8. Reorientation response of magnetic microspheres attached to gold electrodes under an applied magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Los Santos Valladares, L.; Reeve, R.M.; Mitrelias, T.; Langford, R.M.; Barnes, C.H.W., E-mail: luis_d_v@hotmail.com [Cavendish Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Cambridge Materials and Structures Laboratory (United Kingdom); Bustamante Dominguez, A. [Laboratorio de Ceramicos y Nanomateriales, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima (Peru); Aguiar, J. Albino [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Fisica; Azuma, Y. [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Midori-ku, Yokohama (Japan); Majima, Y. [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Midori-ku, Yokohama (Japan)

    2013-08-15

    In this work, we report the mechanical reorientation of thiolated ferromagnetic microspheres bridging a pair of gold electrodes under an external magnetic field. When an external magnetic field (7 kG) is applied during the measurement of the current-voltage characteristics of a carboxyl ferromagnetic microsphere (4 μm diameter) attached to two gold electrodes by self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of octane dithiol (C{sub 8}H{sub 18}S{sub 2}), the current signal is distorted. Rather than due to magnetoresistance, this effect is caused by a mechanical reorientation of the ferromagnetic sphere, which alters the number of SAMs between the sphere and the electrodes and therefore affects conduction. To study the physical reorientation of the ferromagnetic particles, we measure their hysteresis loops while suspended in a liquid solution. (author)

  9. Fluidization, resolidification, and reorientation of the endothelial cell in response to slow tidal stretches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Canovic, Elizabeth Peruski; Iordan, Andreea L; Rajendran, Kavitha; Manomohan, Greeshma; Pirentis, Athanassios P; Smith, Michael L; Butler, James P; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Stamenovic, Dimitrije

    2012-08-15

    Mechanical stretch plays an important role in regulating shape and orientation of the vascular endothelial cell. This morphological response to stretch is basic to angiogenesis, neovascularization, and vascular homeostasis, but mechanism remains unclear. To elucidate mechanisms, we used cell mapping rheometry to measure traction forces in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells subjected to periodic uniaxial stretches. Onset of periodic stretch of 10% strain amplitude caused a fluidization response typified by attenuation of traction forces almost to zero. As periodic stretch continued, the prompt fluidization response was followed by a slow resolidification response typified by recovery of the traction forces, but now aligned along the axis perpendicular to the imposed stretch. Reorientation of the cell body lagged reorientation of the traction forces, however. Together, these observations demonstrate that cellular reorientation in response to periodic stretch is preceded by traction attenuation by means of cytoskeletal fluidization and subsequent traction recovery transverse to the stretch direction by means of cytoskeletal resolidification.

  10. Chaotic attitude and reorientation maneuver for completely liquid-filled spacecraft with flexible appendage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baozeng Yue

    2009-01-01

    The present paper investigates the chaotic attitude dynamics and reorientation maneuver for completely viscous liquid-filled spacecraft with flexible appendage. All of the equations of motion are derived by using Lagrangian mechanics and then transformed into a form consisting of an unperturbed part plus perturbed terms so that the system's nonlinear characteristics can be exploited in phase space.Emphases are laid on the chaotic attitude dynamics produced from certain sets of physical parameter values of the spacecraft when energy dissipation acts to derive the body from minor to major axis spin. Numerical solutions of these equations show that the attitude dynamics of liquid-filled flexible spacecraft possesses characteristics common to random, nonperiodic solutions and chaos, and it is demonstrated that the desired reorientation maneuver is guaranteed by using a pair of thruster impulses. The control strategy for reorientation maneuver is designed and the numerical simulation results are presented for both the uncontrolled and controlled spins transition.

  11. Reorientation of single-wall carbon nanotubes in negative anisotropy liquid crystals by an electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, Amanda; Vergaz, Ricardo; Algorri, José F; Zito, Gianluigi; Cacace, Teresa; Marino, Antigone; Otón, José M

    2016-01-01

    Summary Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) are anisotropic nanoparticles that can cause modifications in the electrical and electro-optical properties of liquid crystals. The control of the SWCNT concentration, distribution and reorientation in such self-organized fluids allows for the possibility of tuning the liquid crystal properties. The alignment and reorientation of CNTs are studied in a system where the liquid crystal orientation effect has been isolated. Complementary studies including Raman spectroscopy, microscopic inspection and impedance studies were carried out. The results reveal an ordered reorientation of the CNTs induced by an electric field, which does not alter the orientation of the liquid crystal molecules. Moreover, impedance spectroscopy suggests a nonnegligible anchoring force between the CNTs and the liquid crystal molecules. PMID:27547599

  12. Delirium prevention in critically ill adults through an automated reorientation intervention - A pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Cindy L; Cairns, Paula; Ji, Ming; Calero, Karel; Anderson, W McDowell; Liang, Zhan

    Explore the effect of an automated reorientation intervention on ICU delirium in a prospective randomized controlled trial. Delirium is common in ICU patients, and negatively affects outcomes. Few prevention strategies have been tested. Thirty ICU patients were randomized to 3 groups. Ten received hourly recorded messages in a family member's voice during waking hours over 3 ICU days, 10 received the same messages in a non-family voice, and 10 (control) did not receive any automated reorientation messages. The primary outcome was delirium free days during the intervention period (evaluated by CAM-ICU). Groups were compared by Fisher's Exact Test. The family voice group had more delirium free days than the non-family voice group, and significantly more delirium free days (p = 0.0437) than the control group. Reorientation through automated, scripted messages reduced incidence of delirium. Using identical scripted messages, family voice was more effective than non-family voice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Electron spin relaxation due to reorientation of a permanent zero field splitting tensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefle, Nathaniel; Sharp, Robert

    2004-09-15

    Electron spin relaxation of transition metal ions with spin S> or =1 results primarily from thermal modulation of the zero field splitting (zfs) tensor. This occurs both by distortion of the zfs tensor due to intermolecular collisions and, for complexes with less than cubic symmetry, by reorientational modulation of the permanent zfs tensor. The reorientational mechanism is much less well characterized in previous work than the distortional mechanism although it is an important determinant of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) paramagnetic relaxation enhancement phenomena (i.e., the enhancement of NMR relaxation rates produced by paramagnetic ions in solution or NMR-PRE). The classical density matrix theory of spin relaxation does not provide an appropriate description of the reorientational mechanism at low Zeeman field strengths because the zero-order spin wave functions are stochastic functions of time. Using spin dynamics simulation techniques, the time correlation functions of the spin operators have been computed and used to determine decay times for the reorientational relaxation mechanism for S=1. In the zfs limit of laboratory field strengths (H(Zeem)spin decay is exponential, the spin relaxation time, tau(S) (composite function) approximately 0.53tau(R)((1)), where tau(R)((1)) is the reorientational correlation time of a molecule-fixed vector. The value of tau(S) (composite function) is independent of the magnitude of the cylindrical zfs parameter (D), but it depends strongly on low symmetry zfs terms (the E/D ratio). Other spin dynamics (SD) simulations examined spin decay in the intermediate regime of field strengths where H(Zeem) approximately H(zfs) (composite function), and in the vicinity of the Zeeman limit. The results demonstrate that the reorientational electron spin relaxation mechanism is often significant when H(zfs) (composite function)> or =H(Zeem), and that its neglect can lead to serious errors in the interpretation of NMR-PRE data.

  14. New fractal math tool providing simultaneous reorientation and acceleration of spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yefremov, Alexander P.

    2017-10-01

    Quaternion based math system of spacecraft reorientation is extended by admitting imaginary rotation parameters, thus involving hyperbolic functions. For simplicity only one simple hyperbolic rotation is added as the last one in the series of orthogonal matrices. The scheme is reduced to a single rotation about instant axis, and to transformation of primitive basis on a 2D fractal space of dimension ½. This new tool is proved to simultaneously reorient the spacecraft and to accelerate it the kinematics automatically described as relativistic. With a small speed the problem becomes a classical one.

  15. Temperature-pressure-induced solid-solid to reorientation in FCC metallic nanowire: a molecular dynamic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutrakar, Vijay Kumar; Roy Mahapatra, D; Pillai, A C R

    2012-01-11

    Atomistic simulation of initial oriented FCC Cu nanowires shows a novel coupled temperature-pressure dependent reorientation from to phase. A temperature-pressure-induced solid-solid to reorientation diagram is generated for Cu nanowire with varying cross-sectional sizes. A critical pressure is reported for Cu nanowires with varying cross-sectional sizes, above which an initial oriented nanowire shows temperature independent reorientation into the phase. The effect of surface stresses on the to reorientation is also studied. The results indicate that above a critical cross-sectional size for a given temperature-pressure, to reorientation is not possible. It is also reported here that for a given applied pressure, an increase in temperature is required for the to reorientation with increasing cross-sectional size of the nanowire. The temperature-pressure-induced solid-solid to reorientation diagram reported in the present paper could further be used as guidelines for controlling the reorientations/shape memory in nano-scale applications of FCC metallic nanowires.

  16. CHINA RETRIEVES 19th RECOVERABLE SATELLITE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    China on Sept.25 recovered its 19th recoverable sci-tech experimental satellite 27 days after the satellite orbited in space. The satellite, which was launched on Aug.29 from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in Gansu Province, northwest China, touched the ground at 7:55 a.m.on Sept.25. The satellite, atop a Long March 2C carrier rocket, is mainly for

  17. RHO binding to FAM65A regulates Golgi reorientation during cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Directional cell migration involves reorientation of the secretory machinery. However, the molecular mechanisms that control this reorientation are not well characterised. Here, we identify a new Rho effector protein, named FAM65A, which binds to active RHOA, RHOB and RHOC. FAM65A links RHO proteins to Golgi-localising cerebral cavernous malformation-3 protein (CCM3; also known as PDCD10) and its interacting proteins mammalian STE20-like protein kinases 3 and 4 (MST3 and MST4; also known as STK24 and STK26, respectively). Binding of active RHO proteins to FAM65A does not affect the kinase activity of MSTs but results in their relocation from the Golgi in a CCM3-dependent manner. This relocation is crucial for reorientation of the Golgi towards the leading edge and subsequent directional cell migration. Our results reveal a previously unidentified pathway downstream of RHO that regulates the polarity of migrating cells through Golgi reorientation in a FAM65A-, CCM3- and MST3- and MST4-dependent manner. PMID:27807006

  18. Social reorientation in adolescence : neurobiological changes and individual differences in empathic concern

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overgaauw, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    One of the most prominent changes in adolescence is social reorientation. In other words, adolescents develop more intimate relationships with peers, they discover what it is like to be involved in a romantic relationship, and they take (social) risks by for example showing risky driving in the pres

  19. Use of Geometry for Spatial Reorientation in Children Applies Only to Symmetric Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, Adina R.; Gibbons, Bryony; Murphy, Caroline; Bremner, J. Gavin

    2010-01-01

    Proponents of the geometric module hypothesis argue that following disorientation, many species reorient by use of macro-environment geometry. It is suggested that attention to the surface layout geometry of natural terrain features may have been selected for over evolutionary time due to the enduring and unambiguous location information it…

  20. Why Size Counts: Children's Spatial Reorientation in Large and Small Enclosures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learmonth, Amy E.; Newcombe, Nora S.; Sheridan, Natalie; Jones, Meredith

    2008-01-01

    When mobile organisms are spatially disoriented, for instance by rapid repetitive movement, they must re-establish orientation. Past research has shown that the geometry of enclosing spaces is consistently used for reorientation by a wide variety of species, but that non-geometric features are not always used. Based on these findings, some…

  1. Constrained spacecraft reorientation using mixed integer convex programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Margaret; Glenn Lightsey, E.

    2016-10-01

    A constrained attitude guidance (CAG) system is developed using convex optimization to autonomously achieve spacecraft pointing objectives while meeting the constraints imposed by on-board hardware. These constraints include bounds on the control input and slew rate, as well as pointing constraints imposed by the sensors. The pointing constraints consist of inclusion and exclusion cones that dictate permissible orientations of the spacecraft in order to keep objects in or out of the field of view of the sensors. The optimization scheme drives a body vector towards a target inertial vector along a trajectory that consists solely of permissible orientations in order to achieve the desired attitude for a given mission mode. The non-convex rotational kinematics are handled by discretization, which also ensures that the quaternion stays unity norm. In order to guarantee an admissible path, the pointing constraints are relaxed. Depending on how strict the pointing constraints are, the degree of relaxation is tuneable. The use of binary variables permits the inclusion of logical expressions in the pointing constraints in the case that a set of sensors has redundancies. The resulting mixed integer convex programming (MICP) formulation generates a steering law that can be easily integrated into an attitude determination and control (ADC) system. A sample simulation of the system is performed for the Bevo-2 satellite, including disturbance torques and actuator dynamics which are not modeled by the controller. Simulation results demonstrate the robustness of the system to disturbances while meeting the mission requirements with desirable performance characteristics.

  2. Variability of the infrared complex refractive index of African mineral dust: experimental estimation and implications for radiative transfer and satellite remote sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Di Biagio

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Experimental estimations of the infrared refractive index of African mineral dust have been retrieved from laboratory measurements of particle transmission spectra in the wavelength range 2.5–25 μm. Five dust samples collected at Banizoumbou (Niger and Tamanrasset (Algeria during dust events originated from different Western Saharan and Sahelian areas have been investigated. The obtained real (n and imaginary (k parts of the refractive index for the different dust cases vary in the range 1.1–2.7 and 0.05–1.0, respectively, and appear to be strongly sensitive to the mineralogical composition of the particles, especially in the 8–12 μm and 17–25 μm spectral intervals. Dust absorption is controlled mainly by clays, and, in minor fraction, by quartz and Ca-rich minerals. Size distribution, and the coarse fraction in particular, plays also a role in determining the refractive index. Significant differences are obtained when comparing our results with existing experimental estimations available in the literature, and with the values of the OPAC (Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds database. The different datasets appear comparable in magnitude, with our values of n and k falling in the range of variability of past studies. However, literature data fail in accurately reproducing the spectral signatures of main minerals, in particular clays, and they significantly overestimate the contribution of quartz. We also found that the real and the imaginary parts of the refractive index from part of literature studies do not verify Kramers–Kronig relations, thus resulting theoretically incorrect. The comparison between our results, from Western Africa, and literature data, from different locations in Europe, Africa, and the Caribbean, nonetheless, confirms the expected large variability of the infrared refractive index of dust, thus highlighting the necessity for an extended systematic investigation. Aerosol intensive optical properties

  3. An Overview Of Operational Satellites Built By China: Communications Satellites (Part1)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang Bo

    2008-01-01

    @@ Communications satellite technology has seen great advances since Decemher 1958 when the Americans launched the first experimental communications satellite.Currently, satellite communications account for over 80 percent of the intercontinental communications traffic and 100 percent of international live TV broadcast, while taking part in domestic and regional services. Moreover, the satellite communication service is showing a favorable continuous growth tendency.

  4. Satellite RNAs and Satellite Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palukaitis, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Satellite RNAs and satellite viruses are extraviral components that can affect either the pathogenicity, the accumulation, or both of their associated viruses while themselves being dependent on the associated viruses as helper viruses for their infection. Most of these satellite RNAs are noncoding RNAs, and in many cases, have been shown to alter the interaction of their helper viruses with their hosts. In only a few cases have the functions of these satellite RNAs in such interactions been studied in detail. In particular, work on the satellite RNAs of Cucumber mosaic virus and Turnip crinkle virus have provided novel insights into RNAs functioning as noncoding RNAs. These effects are described and potential roles for satellite RNAs in the processes involved in symptom intensification or attenuation are discussed. In most cases, models describing these roles involve some aspect of RNA silencing or its suppression, either directly or indirectly involving the particular satellite RNA.

  5. Centriolar satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tollenaere, Maxim A X; Mailand, Niels; Bekker-Jensen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Centriolar satellites are small, microscopically visible granules that cluster around centrosomes. These structures, which contain numerous proteins directly involved in centrosome maintenance, ciliogenesis, and neurogenesis, have traditionally been viewed as vehicles for protein trafficking...... highlight newly discovered regulatory mechanisms targeting centriolar satellites and their functional status, and we discuss how defects in centriolar satellite components are intimately linked to a wide spectrum of human diseases....

  6. Satellite theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozai, Y.

    1981-04-01

    The dynamical characteristics of the natural satellite of Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune are analyzed on the basis of the solar tidal perturbation factor and the oblateness factor of the primary planet for each satellite. For the inner satellites, for which the value of the solar tidal factor is much smaller than the planetary oblateness factor, it is shown that the eccentricity and inclination of satellite orbits are generally very small and almost constant; several pairs of inner satellites are also found to exhibit commensurable mean motions, or secular accelerations in mean longitude. In the case of the outer satellites, for which solar perturbations are dominant, secular perturbations and long-period perturbations may be derived by the solution of equations of motion reduced to one degree of freedom. The existence of a few satellites, termed intermediary satellites, for which the solar tidal perturbation is on the order of the planetary oblateness factor, is also observed, and the pole of the orbital plane of the satellite is noted to execute a complex motion around the pole of the planet or the orbital plane of the planet.

  7. Positional, reorientational, and bond orientational order in DNA mesophases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorman, V; Podgornik, R; Zeks, B

    2001-11-19

    We investigate the orientational order of transverse polarization vectors of long, stiff polymer molecules and their coupling to bond orientational and positional order in high density mesophases. Homogeneous ordering of transverse polarization vector promotes distortions in the hexatic phase, whereas inhomogeneous ordering precipitates crystallization of the 2D sections with different orientations of the transverse polarization vector on each molecule in the unit cell. We propose possible scenarios for going from the hexatic phase, through the distorted hexatic phase, to the crystalline phase with an orthorhombic unit cell observed experimentally for the case of DNA.

  8. Vibrations and reorientations of NH3 molecules in [Mn(NH3)6](ClO4)2 studied by infrared spectroscopy and theoretical (DFT) calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetmańczyk, Joanna; Hetmańczyk, Łukasz; Migdał-Mikuli, Anna; Mikuli, Edward

    2015-02-05

    The vibrational and reorientational motions of NH3 ligands and ClO4(-) anions were investigated by Fourier transform middle-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) in the high- and low-temperature phases of [Mn(NH3)6](ClO4)2. The temperature dependencies of full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the infrared bands at: 591 and 3385cm(-1), associated with: ρr(NH3) and νas(N-H) modes, respectively, indicate that there exist fast (correlation times τR≈10(-12)-10(-13)s) reorientational motions of NH3 ligands, with a mean values of activation energies: 7.8 and 4.5kJmol(-1), in the phase I and II, respectively. These reorientational motions of NH3 ligands are only slightly disturbed in the phase transition region and do not significantly contribute to the phase transition mechanism. Fourier transform far-infrared and middle-infrared spectra with decreasing of temperature indicated characteristic changes at the vicinity of PT at TC(c)=137.6K (on cooling), which suggested lowering of the crystal structure symmetry. Infrared spectra of [Mn(NH3)6](ClO4)2 were recorded and interpreted by comparison with respective theoretical spectra calculated using DFT method (B3LYP functional, LANL2DZ ECP basis set (on Mn atom) and 6-311+G(d,p) basis set (on H, N, Cl, O atoms) for the isolated equilibrium two models (Model 1 - separate isolated [Mn(NH3)6](2+) cation and ClO4(-) anion and Model 2 - [Mn(NH3)6(ClO4)2] complex system). Calculated optical spectra show a good agreement with the experimental infrared spectra (FT-FIR and FT-MIR) for the both models. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Observations of artificial satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. MAMMANO

    1964-06-01

    Full Text Available The following publication gives the results of photographic
    observations of artificial satellites made at Asiago during the second
    and third year of this programme. The fixed camera technique and that
    with moving film (the latter still in its experimental stage have been used.

  10. Effect of thermo-mechanical cycling on zirconium hydride reorientation studied in situ with synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colas, Kimberly B.; Motta, Arthur T.; Daymond, Mark R.; Almer, Jonathan D.

    2013-09-01

    The circumferential hydrides normally present in nuclear reactor fuel cladding after reactor exposure may dissolve during drying for dry storage and re-precipitate when cooled under load into a more radial orientation, which could embrittle the fuel cladding. It is necessary to study the rates and conditions under which hydride reorientation may happen in order to assess fuel integrity in dry storage. The objective of this work is to study the effect of applied stress and thermal cycling on the hydride morphology in cold-worked stress-relieved Zircaloy-4 by combining conventional metallography and in situ X-ray diffraction techniques. Metallography is used to study the evolution of hydride morphology after several thermo-mechanical cycles. In situ X-ray diffraction performed at the Advanced Photon Source synchrotron provides real-time information on the process of hydride dissolution and precipitation under stress during several thermal cycles. The detailed study of diffracted intensity, peak position and full-width at half-maximum provides information on precipitation kinetics, elastic strains and other characteristics of the hydride precipitation process. The results show that thermo-mechanical cycling significantly increases the radial hydride fraction as well as the hydride length and connectivity. The radial hydrides are observed to precipitate at a lower temperature than circumferential hydrides. Variations in the magnitude and range of hydride strains due to reorientation and cycling have also been observed. These results are discussed in light of existing models and experiments on hydride reorientation. The study of hydride elastic strains during precipitation shows marked differences between circumferential and radial hydrides, which can be used to investigate the reorientation process. Cycling under stress above the threshold stress for reorientation drastically increases both the reoriented hydride fraction and the hydride size. The reoriented hydride

  11. A research feasibility study proposal for conducting experimental research in curriculum sharing via Communications Technology Satellite among institutions having large minority enrollments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, L., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The applicability of the tele-conference method of curriculum sharing as well as the sharing of scientific research results between universities and industrial organizations was evaluated in relation to other techniques and methods. Ten universities cooperated with NC A&T State University in an effort to increase the number of minority scientists and engineers in the USA via the utilization of the communication features of satellites. Research activities, experiments and studies in curriculum sharing are described as well as the techniques, interconnections and equipment utilized. Suggested methods and recommendations for a continuation of innovative applications of satellite technology in higher education at NC A&T State University are included.

  12. A mechanism for reorientation of cortical microtubule arrays driven by microtubule severing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindeboom, Jelmer J; Nakamura, Masayoshi; Hibbel, Anneke; Shundyak, Kostya; Gutierrez, Ryan; Ketelaar, Tijs; Emons, Anne Mie C; Mulder, Bela M; Kirik, Viktor; Ehrhardt, David W

    2013-12-06

    Environmental and hormonal signals cause reorganization of microtubule arrays in higher plants, but the mechanisms driving these transitions have remained elusive. The organization of these arrays is required to direct morphogenesis. We discovered that microtubule severing by the protein katanin plays a crucial and unexpected role in the reorientation of cortical arrays, as triggered by blue light. Imaging and genetic experiments revealed that phototropin photoreceptors stimulate katanin-mediated severing specifically at microtubule intersections, leading to the generation of new microtubules at these locations. We show how this activity serves as the basis for a mechanism that amplifies microtubules orthogonal to the initial array, thereby driving array reorientation. Our observations show how severing is used constructively to build a new microtubule array.

  13. Optimal reorientation of underactuated spacecraft using genetic algorithm with wavelet approximation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinsheng Ge; Liqun Chen

    2009-01-01

    The optimal attitude control of an underactuated spacecraft is investigated in this paper. The flywheels of the spacecraft can somehow only provide control inputs in two independent directions. The dynamic equations are formulated for the spacecraft under a nonholonomic constraint resulting from the constant time-rate of the total angular momentum of the system. The reorientation of such underactuated spacecraft is transformed into an optimal control problem. A ggnetic algorithm is proposed to derive the control laws of the two flywheels angle velocity inputs. The control laws are approximated by the discrete orthogonal wavelets.The numerical simulations indicate that the genetic algorithm with the wavelet approximation is an effective approach to deal with the optimal reorientation of underactuated spacecraft.

  14. Paleomagnetic reorientation of San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pares, J.M.; Schleicher, A.M.; van der Pluijm, B.A.; Hickman, S.

    2008-01-01

    We present a protocol for using paleomagnetic analysis to determine the absolute orientation of core recovered from the SAFOD borehole. Our approach is based on determining the direction of the primary remanent magnetization of a spot core recovered from the Great Valley Sequence during SAFOD Phase 2 and comparing its direction to the expected reference field direction for the Late Cretaceous in North America. Both thermal and alternating field demagnetization provide equally resolved magnetization, possibly residing in magnetite, that allow reorientation. Because compositionally similar siltstones and fine-grained sandstones were encountered in the San Andreas Fault Zone during Stage 2 rotary drilling, we expect that paleomagnetic reorientation will yield reliable core orientations for continuous core acquired from directly within and adjacent to the San Andreas Fault during SAFOD Phase 3, which will be key to interpretation of spatial properties of these rocks. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Stimulus-driven reorienting in the ventral frontoparietal attention network: the role of emotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Witt Frank

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Activity in the human temporoparietal junction and inferior frontal gyrus is hypothesized to underlie stimulus-driven, or bottom-up attention reorienting. Demanding tasks require focused attention, and as task difficulty increases, activity suppression in the ventral network correlates positively with task performance, an effect thought to reflect the gating of irrelevant cues. However, activation in these structures is elicited by a range of stimulus features and task demands that vary across multiple characteristics, complicating the interpretation of the functional role of this pathway. Consideration of several current studies suggests that, in addition to task difficulty, the motivational relevance or emotional intensity of distractor stimuli may supersede ongoing task priority, and evoke ventral network activation. Support for this possibility is offered from a review of recent reports, and the import of this perspective for models of attention reorienting are discussed.

  16. Influence of an electric field on the spin-reorientation transition in Ni/Cu(100)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerhard, Lukas [Institut für Nanotechnologie, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Bonell, Frédéric; Suzuki, Yoshishige [CREST, Japan Science Technology, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Wulfhekel, Wulf [Institut für Nanotechnologie, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2014-10-13

    Magnetoelectric coupling offers the possibility to change the magnetic state of a material by an applied electric field. Over the last few years, metallic systems have come up as simple prototypes for this interaction. While the previous studies focused on Fe and Co thin films or their alloys, here we demonstrate magnetoelectric coupling in a Ni thin film which is close to a spin-reorientation transition. Our magneto-optic Kerr effect measurements on 10 ML of Ni/Cu(100) show a considerable influence of the applied electric field on the magnetism. This rounds off the range of magnetic metals that exhibit magnetoelectric coupling, and it reveals the possibility of an electric field control of a spin-reorientation transition.

  17. A structured continuum modelling framework for martensitic transformation and reorientation in shape memory materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardini, Davide; Pence, Thomas J

    2016-04-28

    Models for shape memory material behaviour can be posed in the framework of a structured continuum theory. We study such a framework in which a scalar phase fraction field and a tensor field of martensite reorientation describe the material microstructure, in the context of finite strains. Gradients of the microstructural descriptors naturally enter the formulation and offer the possibility to describe and resolve phase transformation localizations. The constitutive theory is thoroughly described by a single free energy function in conjunction with a path-dependent dissipation function. Balance laws in the form of differential equations are obtained and contain both bulk and surface terms, the latter in terms of microstreses. A natural constraint on the tensor field for martensite reorientation gives rise to reactive fields in these balance laws. Conditions ensuring objectivity as well as the relation of this framework to that provided by currently used models for shape memory alloy behaviour are discussed.

  18. Pluto followed its heart: reorientation and faulting of Pluto due to volatile loading in Sputnik Planum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle Keane, James; Matsuyama, Isamu; Kamata, Shunichi; Steckloff, Jordan

    2016-10-01

    The New Horizons flyby of Pluto revealed the dwarf planet to be a strikingly diverse, geologically active world. Perhaps the most intriguing feature on the New Horizons encounter hemisphere is Sputnik Planum—a 1000 km diameter, probable impact basin, filled with several kilometers of actively convecting volatile ices (N2, CH4, CO). One salient characteristic of Sputnik Planum is its curious alignment with the Pluto-Charon tidal axis. The alignment of large geologic features with principal axis of inertia (such as the tidal axis) is the hallmark of global reorientation, i.e. true polar wander. Here we show that the present location of Sputnik Planum is a natural consequence of loading of 1-2 km of volatile ices within the Sputnik Planum basin. Larger volatile ice thicknesses (like those inferred from studies of ice convection within Sputnik Planum) betray an underlying negative gravity anomaly associated with the basin. As Pluto reoriented in response to the loading of volatile ices within Sputnik Planum, stresses accumulated within the lithosphere (as each geographic location experiences a change in tidal/rotational potential). These reorientation stresses, coupled with loading stresses, and stresses from the freezing of a subsurface ocean resulted in the fracturing of Pluto's lithosphere in a characteristic, global pattern of extensional faults. Our predicted pattern of extensional faults due to this reorientation closely replicates the observed distribution of faults on Pluto (more so than global expansion, orbit migration, de-spinning, or loading alone). Sputnik Planum likely formed ~60° northwest of its present location, and was loaded with volatile ices over millions of years due to seasonal volatile transport cycles. This result places Pluto in a truly unique category of planetary bodies where volatiles are not only controlling surface geology and atmospheric processes, but they are also directly controlling the orientation of the entire dwarf planet

  19. Geometric and featural systems, separable and combined: Evidence from reorientation in people with Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Katrina; Landau, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Spatial reorientation by humans and other animals engages geometric representations of surface layouts as well as featural landmarks; however, the two types of information are thought to be behaviorally and neurally separable. In this paper, we examine the use of these two types of information during reorientation among children and adults with Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic disorder accompanied by abnormalities in brain regions that support use of both geometry and landmarks. Previous studies of reorientation in adolescents and adults with WS have shown deficits in the ability to use geometry for reorientation, but intact ability to use features, suggesting that the two systems can be differentially impaired by genetic disorder. Using a slightly modified layout, we found that many WS participants could use geometry, and most could use features along with geometry. However, the developmental trajectories for the two systems were quite different from one other, and different from those found in typical development. Purely geometric responding was not correlated with age in WS, and search processes appeared similar to those in typically developing (TD) children. In contrast, use of features in combination with geometry was correlated with age in WS, and search processes were distinctly different from TD children. The results support the view that use of geometry and features stem from different underlying mechanisms, that the developmental trajectories and operation of each are altered in WS, and that combination of information from the two systems is atypical. Given brain abnormalities in regions supporting the two kinds of information, our findings suggest that the co-operation of the two systems is functionally altered in this genetic syndrome. PMID:26275835

  20. GOLPH3 drives cell migration by promoting Golgi reorientation and directional trafficking to the leading edge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Mengke; Peterman, Marshall C; Davis, Robert L; Oegema, Karen; Shiau, Andrew K; Field, Seth J

    2016-12-01

    The mechanism of directional cell migration remains an important problem, with relevance to cancer invasion and metastasis. GOLPH3 is a common oncogenic driver of human cancers, and is the first oncogene that functions at the Golgi in trafficking to the plasma membrane. Overexpression of GOLPH3 is reported to drive enhanced cell migration. Here we show that the phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate/GOLPH3/myosin 18A/F-actin pathway that is critical for Golgi-to-plasma membrane trafficking is necessary and limiting for directional cell migration. By linking the Golgi to the actin cytoskeleton, GOLPH3 promotes reorientation of the Golgi toward the leading edge. GOLPH3 also promotes reorientation of lysosomes (but not other organelles) toward the leading edge. However, lysosome function is dispensable for migration and the GOLPH3 dependence of lysosome movement is indirect, via GOLPH3's effect on the Golgi. By driving reorientation of the Golgi to the leading edge and driving forward trafficking, particularly to the leading edge, overexpression of GOLPH3 drives trafficking to the leading edge of the cell, which is functionally important for directional cell migration. Our identification of a novel pathway for Golgi reorientation controlled by GOLPH3 provides new insight into the mechanism of directional cell migration with important implications for understanding GOLPH3's role in cancer. © 2016 Xing, Peterman, et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  1. Tm2(FeGa)17化合物自旋再取向的分析%THE ANALYSIS FOR SPIN-REORIENTATION PHENOMENA OF Tm2(FeGa)17 COMPOUNDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨庆之; 李怀山; 乔一枝

    2001-01-01

    本文用单离子晶场模型分析了Tm2(FeGa)17-xGax化合物自旋再取向现象,计算了这些化合物的自旋再取向温度,并与实验数据进行了比较.还计算了4f-3d交换能,讨论了Ga取代对晶场的影响.%By using crystalline electric field model, the spin-reorientation phenomena of Tm2Fe17-xGax Compounds is analysed in this paper. We calculate spin-reorientation temperature values of these compounds and compare them with experimental data. The 4f-3d exchange energies are also obtained by calculation. The effect of Ga concentration on Bmn is discussed.

  2. Satellite Communications

    CERN Document Server

    Pelton, Joseph N

    2012-01-01

    The field of satellite communications represents the world's largest space industry. Those who are interested in space need to understand the fundamentals of satellite communications, its technology, operation, business, economic, and regulatory aspects. This book explains all this along with key insights into the field's future growth trends and current strategic challenges. Fundamentals of Satellite Communications is a concise book that gives all of the key facts and figures as well as a strategic view of where this dynamic industry is going. Author Joseph N. Pelton, PhD, former Dean of the International Space University and former Director of Strategic Policy at Intelstat, presents a r

  3. Reorientation and faulting of Pluto due to volatile loading within Sputnik Planitia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, James T; Matsuyama, Isamu; Kamata, Shunichi; Steckloff, Jordan K

    2016-12-01

    Pluto is an astoundingly diverse, geologically dynamic world. The dominant feature is Sputnik Planitia-a tear-drop-shaped topographic depression approximately 1,000 kilometres in diameter possibly representing an ancient impact basin. The interior of Sputnik Planitia is characterized by a smooth, craterless plain three to four kilometres beneath the surrounding rugged uplands, and represents the surface of a massive unit of actively convecting volatile ices (N2, CH4 and CO) several kilometres thick. This large feature is very near the Pluto-Charon tidal axis. Here we report that the location of Sputnik Planitia is the natural consequence of the sequestration of volatile ices within the basin and the resulting reorientation (true polar wander) of Pluto. Loading of volatile ices within a basin the size of Sputnik Planitia can substantially alter Pluto's inertia tensor, resulting in a reorientation of the dwarf planet of around 60 degrees with respect to the rotational and tidal axes. The combination of this reorientation, loading and global expansion due to the freezing of a possible subsurface ocean generates stresses within the planet's lithosphere, resulting in a global network of extensional faults that closely replicate the observed fault networks on Pluto. Sputnik Planitia probably formed northwest of its present location, and was loaded with volatiles over million-year timescales as a result of volatile transport cycles on Pluto. Pluto's past, present and future orientation is controlled by feedbacks between volatile sublimation and condensation, changing insolation conditions and Pluto's interior structure.

  4. Optimal reorientation of asymmetric underactuated spacecraft using differential flatness and receding horizon control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wei-wei; Yang, Le-ping; Zhu, Yan-wei

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method integrating nominal trajectory optimization and tracking for the reorientation control of an underactuated spacecraft with only two available control torque inputs. By employing a pseudo input along the uncontrolled axis, the flatness property of a general underactuated spacecraft is extended explicitly, by which the reorientation trajectory optimization problem is formulated into the flat output space with all the differential constraints eliminated. Ultimately, the flat output optimization problem is transformed into a nonlinear programming problem via the Chebyshev pseudospectral method, which is improved by the conformal map and barycentric rational interpolation techniques to overcome the side effects of the differential matrix's ill-conditions on numerical accuracy. Treating the trajectory tracking control as a state regulation problem, we develop a robust closed-loop tracking control law using the receding-horizon control method, and compute the feedback control at each control cycle rapidly via the differential transformation method. Numerical simulation results show that the proposed control scheme is feasible and effective for the reorientation maneuver.

  5. Free energy barrier for melittin reorientation from a membrane-bound state to a transmembrane state

    CERN Document Server

    Irudayam, Sheeba J; Berkowitz, Max L

    2013-01-01

    An important step in a phospholipid membrane pore formation by melittin antimicrobial peptide is a reorientation of the peptide from a surface into a transmembrane conformation. In this work we perform umbrella sampling simulations to calculate the potential of mean force (PMF) for the reorientation of melittin from a surface-bound state to a transmembrane state and provide a molecular level insight into understanding peptide and lipid properties that influence the existence of the free energy barrier. The PMFs were calculated for a peptide to lipid (P/L) ratio of 1/128 and 4/128. We observe that the free energy barrier is reduced when the P/L ratio increased. In addition, we study the cooperative effect; specifically we investigate if the barrier is smaller for a second melittin reorientation, given that another neighboring melittin was already in the transmembrane state. We observe that indeed the barrier of the PMF curve is reduced in this case, thus confirming the presence of a cooperative effect.

  6. Is height a core geometric cue for navigation? Young children's use of height in reorientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qingfen; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Di; Shao, Yi

    2015-02-01

    With respect to reorientation, children older than 1.5 to 2 years can use geometric cues (distance and left/right sense). However, because previous studies have focused mainly on the plane geometric properties, little is known about the role of information with respect to vertical dimension in children's reorientation. The current study aimed to examine whether and how 3- and 4-year-old children use height information to search for a hidden toy when disoriented in a small enclosure. In a slant-ceiling rectangular room and a slant-ceiling square room, 4-year-olds were able to use height information to reorient and search for the toy in the correct corner, whereas 3-year-olds were not able to do so. Our results suggest that children can, at least by the age of 4 years, use height information and that height is not used as early as other geometric properties that are in the core geometry system for navigation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Spatial reorientation decline in aging: the combination of geometry and landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffò, Alessandro O; Lopez, Antonella; Spano, Giuseppina; Serino, Silvia; Cipresso, Pietro; Stasolla, Fabrizio; Savino, Michelina; Lancioni, Giulio E; Riva, Giuseppe; Bosco, Andrea

    2017-07-20

    The study is focused on the assessment of reorientation skills in a sample of community-dwelling elderly people, manipulating landmarks and geometric (layout) information. A neuropsychological assessment was administered to 286 elderly participants, divided into six groups (healthy controls, HC; four subgroups of participants with mild cognitive impairment, MCI; participants with probable dementia, Prob_D) and tested with the Virtual Reorientation Test (VReoT). VReoT manipulated different spatial cues: geometry and landmarks (proximal and distal). Compared with HC, participants with MCI and Prob_D showed to be impaired in tasks involving geometry, landmarks and a combination of them. Both single and multiple domain impairment in MCI had an impact on reorientation performance. Moreover, VReoT was marginally able to discriminate between amnesic and non-amnesic MCI. The occurrence of getting lost events seemed to be associated to learning of geometric information. The associative strength between landmark and target plays an important role in affecting spatial orientation performance of cognitively impaired participants. Geometry significantly supports landmark information and becomes helpful with the increase of cognitive impairment which is linked to a decrement in landmark encoding. VReoT seems to represent a reliable evaluation supplement for spatial orientation deficits in prodromal stages of dementia.

  8. Hypergravity induces reorientation of cortical microtubules and modifies growth anisotropy in azuki bean epicotyls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soga, Kouichi; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Kamisaka, Seiichiro; Hoson, Takayuki

    2006-11-01

    We examined the changes in the orientation of cortical microtubules during the hypergravity-induced modification of growth anisotropy (inhibition of elongation growth and promotion of lateral growth) in azuki bean (Vigna angularis Ohwi et Ohashi) epicotyls. The percentage of cells with transverse microtubules was decreased, while that with longitudinal microtubules was increased, in proportion to the logarithm of the magnitude of gravity. The percentage of cells with longitudinal microtubules showed an increase within 0.5 h of transfer of the 1g-grown seedlings to a 300g-hypergravity condition. Lanthanum and gadolinium, blockers of calcium channels, nullified the modification of growth anisotropy and reorientation of microtubules by hypergravity. Horizontal and acropetal hypergravity modified growth anisotropy and reorientation of microtubules, as did basipetal hypergravity, and these changes were not seen in the presence of lanthanum or gadolinium. These results suggest that hypergravity changes activities of lanthanum- and gadolinium-sensitive calcium channels independently of its direction, which may lead to reorientation of cortical microtubules and modification of growth anisotropy in azuki bean epicotyls.

  9. Stable panoramic views facilitate snap-shot like memories for spatial reorientation in homing pigeons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Pecchia

    Full Text Available Following spatial disorientation, animals can reorient themselves by relying on geometric cues (metric and sense specified both by the macroscopic surface layout of an enclosed space and prominent visual landmarks in arrays. Whether spatial reorientation in arrays of landmarks is based on explicit representation of the geometric cues is a matter of debate. Here we trained homing pigeons (Columba livia to locate a food-reward in a rectangular array of four identical or differently coloured pipes provided with four openings, only one of which allowed the birds to have access to the reward. Pigeons were trained either with a stable or a variable position of the opening on pipes, so that they could view the array either from the same or a variable perspective. Explicit mapping of configural geometry would predict successful reorientation irrespective of access condition. In contrast, we found that a stable view of the array facilitated spatial learning in homing pigeons, likely through the formation of snapshot-like memories.

  10. Age-related differences during a gaze reorientation task while standing or walking on a treadmill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinelli, Michael; Patla, Aftab; Stuart, Bethany

    2008-02-01

    Falls among adults over the age of 65 years have become a growing concern. Two factors related to high incidence of falls in this group of adults are decreased head stability and impaired balance. Older adults' level of control of head stability or balance is unknown when they must reorient their gaze. In the current study, ten older adults (69 +/- 3.27 years) performed a gaze reorienting task while standing or walking on a treadmill. The task was the same as that used on young adults by Cinelli et al. (2007). The results show that older adults use a different strategy than young adults when reorienting gaze. Shoulder and hip rotations occurred synchronously when standing and were more variable when walking on a treadmill. As well, there was a larger difference between the onset of eye movements and body segment movement in the older adults. These differences can be accounted for by decreases in physiological subsystems. The visual presence of a visual target helped the older adults stabilize their heads-in-space by incorporating information from more than one sensory system.

  11. Involvement of the head and trunk during gaze reorientation during standing and treadmill walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinelli, Michael; Patla, Aftab; Stuart, Bethany

    2007-07-01

    As individuals stand or walk in an environment their gaze may be reoriented from one location to another in response to auditory or visual stimuli. In order to reorient gaze, the eyes and/or the head and trunk must rotate. However, what determines the exact degree of rotation of each segment while standing or walking is not fully understood. In the current study we show that when participants were asked to reorient their gaze towards light cues positioned at eccentric locations of up to 90 degrees while standing or walking on a treadmill their eyes and head mainly facilitated the action. Rotations of the head-in-space were similar for both tasks, but the rotation of the shoulders- and hips-in-space were lower for the treadmill walking condition. It is argued that this difference in the level of head-on-trunk rotation during the two tasks is controlled by the vestibular feedback loop. The regulation of this feedback loop is performed by the cerebellum in response to the level of threat to postural stability.

  12. Neural mechanisms underlying pain's ability to reorient attention: evidence for sensitization of somatic threat detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowman, Robert

    2014-06-01

    Pain typically signals damage to the body, and as such can be perceived as threatening and can elicit a strong emotional response. This ecological significance undoubtedly underlies pain's well-known ability to demand attention. However, the neural mechanisms underlying this ability are poorly understood. Previous work from the author's laboratory has reported behavioral evidence suggesting that participants disengage their attention from an incorrectly cued visual target stimulus and reorient it toward a somatic target more rapidly when the somatic target is painful than when it is nonpainful. Furthermore, electrophysiological data suggest that this effect is mediated by a stimulus-driven process, in which somatic threat detectors located in the dorsal posterior insula activate the medial and lateral prefrontal cortex areas involved in reorienting attention toward the painful target. In these previous studies, the painful and nonpainful somatic targets were given in separate experiments involving different participants. Here, the nonpainful and painful somatic targets were presented in random order within the same block of trials. Unlike in the previous studies, both the nonpainful and painful somatic targets activated the somatic threat detectors, and the times taken to disengage and reorient attention were the same for both. These electrophysiological and behavioral data suggest that somatic threat detectors can become sensitized to nonpainful somatic stimuli that are presented in a context that includes painful stimuli.

  13. Reorientation dynamics of nematics encapsulated in microscopic volumes in a strong electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, A. V.; Vakulenko, A. A.; Pasechnik, S. V.

    2016-09-01

    We theoretically describe a new regime of reorientation of the director field widehat n and velocity v of a nematic liquid crystal (LC) encapsulated in a rectangular cell under the action of strong electric field E directed at angle α ( π/2) to the horizontal surfaces bounding the LC cell. The numerical calculations in the framework of nonlinear generalization of the classical Eriksen-Leslie theory showed that at certain relations between the torques and momenta affecting the unit LC volume and E ≫ E th, transition periodic structures can arise during reorientation of widehat n, if the corresponding distortion mode has the fastest response and, thus, suppresses all the rest of the modes, including uniform ones. The position of sites of these periodic structures is affected by the value of field E, angle α, and the character of anchoring of LC molecules to the bounding surfaces. The calculations performed for the nematic formed by 4-n-penthyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl showed that several vortexes can form in an LC cell under the action of reorientation of the nematic field; the boundaries of these vortexes are determined by the positions of periodic structure sites.

  14. A new biomarker to examine the role of hippocampal function in the development of spatial reorientation in children: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Vanessa eVieites; Alina eNazareth; Reeb-Sutherland, Bethany C.; Shannon M Pruden

    2015-01-01

    Spatial navigation is an adaptive skill that involves determining the route to a particular goal or location, and then travelling that path. A major component of spatial navigation is spatial reorientation, or the ability to reestablish a sense of direction after being disoriented. The hippocampus is known to be critical for navigating, and has more recently been implicated in reorienting in adults, but relatively little is known about the development of the hippocampus in relation to these l...

  15. Arousal and attention re-orienting in autism spectrum disorders: evidence from auditory event-related potentials

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The extended phenotype of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) includes a combination of arousal regulation problems, sensory modulation difficulties, and attention re-orienting deficit. A slow and inefficient re-orienting to stimuli that appear outside of the attended sensory stream is thought to be especially detrimental for social functioning. Event-related potentials (ERPs) and magnetic fields (ERFs) may help to reveal which processing stages underlying brain response to unattended but salient...

  16. Arousal and attention re-orienting in autism spectrum disorders: evidence from auditory event-related potentials

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The extended phenotype of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) includes a combination of arousal regulation problems, sensory modulation difficulties, and attention re-orienting deficit. A slow and inefficient re-orienting to stimuli that appear outside of the attended sensory stream is thought to be especially detrimental for social functioning. Event-related potentials (ERPs) and magnetic fields (ERFs) may help to reveal which processing stages underlying brain response to unattended but salien...

  17. Satellite Geomagnetism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Stolle, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Observations of Earth’s magnetic field from space began more than 50 years ago. A continuous monitoring of the field using low Earth orbit (LEO) satellites, however, started only in 1999, and three satellites have taken highprecision measurements of the geomagnetic field during the past decade...... ability to characterize and understand the many sources that contribute to Earth’s magnetic field. In this review, we summarize investigations of Earth’s interior and environment that have been possible through the analysis of high-precision magnetic field observations taken by LEO satellites........ The unprecedented time-space coverage of their data opened revolutionary new possibilities for monitoring, understanding, and exploring Earth’s magnetic field. In the near future, the three-satellite constellation Swarm will ensure continuity of such measurement and provide enhanced possibilities to improve our...

  18. Satellite (Natural)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    In its most general sense, any celestial object in orbit around a similar larger object. Thus, for example, the Magellanic Clouds are satellite galaxies of our own Milky Way galaxy. Without qualification, the term is used to mean a body in orbit around a planet; an alternative term is moon. The term natural satellite distinguishes these bodies from artificial satellites—spacecraft placed in orbi...

  19. Inter-satellite links for satellite autonomous integrity monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Irma; García-Serrano, Cristina; Catalán Catalán, Carlos; García, Alvaro Mozo; Tavella, Patrizia; Galleani, Lorenzo; Amarillo, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    A new integrity monitoring mechanisms to be implemented on-board on a GNSS taking advantage of inter-satellite links has been introduced. This is based on accurate range and Doppler measurements not affected neither by atmospheric delays nor ground local degradation (multipath and interference). By a linear combination of the Inter-Satellite Links Observables, appropriate observables for both satellite orbits and clock monitoring are obtained and by the proposed algorithms it is possible to reduce the time-to-alarm and the probability of undetected satellite anomalies.Several test cases have been run to assess the performances of the new orbit and clock monitoring algorithms in front of a complete scenario (satellite-to-satellite and satellite-to-ground links) and in a satellite-only scenario. The results of this experimentation campaign demonstrate that the Orbit Monitoring Algorithm is able to detect orbital feared events when the position error at the worst user location is still under acceptable limits. For instance, an unplanned manoeuvre in the along-track direction is detected (with a probability of false alarm equals to 5 × 10-9) when the position error at the worst user location is 18 cm. The experimentation also reveals that the clock monitoring algorithm is able to detect phase jumps, frequency jumps and instability degradation on the clocks but the latency of detection as well as the detection performances strongly depends on the noise added by the clock measurement system.

  20. A magnetically actuated cellular strain assessment tool for quantitative analysis of strain induced cellular reorientation and actin alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademolhosseini, F.; Liu, C.-C.; Lim, C. J.; Chiao, M.

    2016-08-01

    Commercially available cell strain tools, such as pneumatically actuated elastomer substrates, require special culture plates, pumps, and incubator setups. In this work, we present a magnetically actuated cellular strain assessment tool (MACSAT) that can be implemented using off-the-shelf components and conventional incubators. We determine the strain field on the MACSAT elastomer substrate using numerical models and experimental measurements and show that a specific region of the elastomer substrate undergoes a quasi-uniaxial 2D stretch, and that cells confined to this region of the MACSAT elastomer substrate undergo tensile, compressive, or zero axial strain depending on their angle of orientation. Using the MACSAT to apply cyclic strain on endothelial cells, we demonstrate that actin filaments within the cells reorient away from the stretching direction, towards the directions of minimum axial strain. We show that the final actin orientation angles in strained cells are spread over a region of compressive axial strain, confirming previous findings on the existence of a varied pre-tension in the actin filaments of the cytoskeleton. We also demonstrate that strained cells exhibit distinctly different values of actin alignment coherency compared to unstrained cells and therefore propose that this parameter, i.e., the coherency of actin alignment, can be used as a new readout to determine the occurrence/extent of actin alignment in cell strain experiments. The tools and methods demonstrated in this study are simple and accessible and can be easily replicated by other researchers to study the strain response of other adherent cells.

  1. Scientific Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1967-01-01

    followed Hale’s into orbit. In 1879, Jules Verne wrote about launching small satellites with a gun possessing a muzzle velocity of 10 000 m/sec (ref. 3...was activated in 1950.11 It was located only a few tens of miles from the spot where Jules Verne had his Baltimore Gun Club fire a manned projectile to...principle, satellites can be launched by a single impulse applied at the Earth’s surface-say, with a large cannon, & la Jules Verne (sec. 8-3). In

  2. Direct Broadcast Satellite: Radio Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollansworth, James E.

    1992-01-01

    NASA is committed to providing technology development that leads to the introduction of new commercial applications for communications satellites. The Direct Broadcast Satellite-Radio (DBS-R) Program is a joint effort between The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and The United States Information Agency/Voice of America (USIA/VOA) directed at this objective. The purpose of this program is to define the service and develop the technology for a direct-to-listener satellite sound broadcasting system. The DBS-R Program, as structured by NASA and VOA, is now a three-phase program designed to help the U.S. commercial communications satellite and receiver industry bring about this new communications service. Major efforts are being directed towards frequency planning hardware and service development, service demonstration, and experimentation with new satellite and receiver technology.

  3. A numerical method for reorientation of rotating tidally deformed viscoelastic bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, H.; Wal, W.; Vermeersen, L. L. A.

    2017-01-01

    Existing approaches for simulating the true polar wander (TPW) of a viscoelastic body can be divided into three categories: (i) a linear dynamic approach which uses the linearized Liouville equation (e.g., Wu and Peltier (1984) and Mitrovica et al. (2005)); (ii) a nonlinear dynamic approach which is based on the quasi-fluid approximation (e.g., Sabadini and Peltier (1981), Ricard et al. (1993), and Cambiotti et al. (2011)); and (iii) a long-term limit approach which only considers the fluid limit of a reorientation (e.g., Matsuyama and Nimmo (2007)). Several limitations of these approaches have not been studied: the range for which the linear approach is accurate, the validity of the quasi-fluid approximation, and the dynamic solution for TPW of a tidally deformed rotating body. We establish a numerical procedure which is able to determine the large-angle reorientation of a viscoelastic celestial body that can be both centrifugally and tidally deformed. We show that the linear approach leads to significant errors for loadings near the poles or the equator. Second, we show that slow relaxation modes can have a significant effect on large-angle TPW of Earth or other planets. Finally, we show that reorientation of a tidally deformed body driven by a positive mass anomaly near the poles has a preference for rotating around the tidal axis instead of toward it. At a tidally deformed body which does not have a remnant bulge, positive mass anomalies are more likely to be found near the equator and the plane perpendicular to the tidal axis, while negative mass anomalies tend to be near the great circle that contains the tidal and rotational axes.

  4. Reorientation of Magnetic Graphene Oxide Nanosheets in Crosslinked Quaternized Polyvinyl Alcohol as Effective Solid Electrolyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Shuin Lin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to clarify the effect of magnetic graphene oxide (GO reorientation in a polymer matrix on the ionic conduction and methanol barrier properties of nanocomposite membrane electrolytes. Magnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4 nanoparticles were prepared and dispersed on GO nanosheets (GO-Fe3O4. The magnetic GO-Fe3O4 was imbedded into a quaternized polyvinyl alcohol (QPVA matrix and crosslinked (CL- with glutaraldehyde (GA to obtain a polymeric nanocomposite. A magnetic field was applied in the through-plane direction during the drying and film formation steps. The CL-QPVA/GO-Fe3O4 nanocomposite membranes were doped with an alkali to obtain hydroxide-conducting electrolytes for direct methanol alkaline fuel cell (DMAFC applications. The magnetic field-reoriented CL-QPVA/GO-Fe3O4 electrolyte demonstrated higher conductivity and lower methanol permeability than the unoriented CL-QPVA/GO-Fe3O4 membrane or the CL-QPVA film. The reoriented CL-QPVA/GO-Fe3O4 nanocomposite was used as the electrolyte in a DMAFC and resulted in a maximum power density of 55.4 mW·cm−2 at 60 °C, which is 73.7% higher than that of the composite without the magnetic field treatment (31.9 mW·cm−2. In contrast, the DMAFC using the CL-QPVA electrolyte generated only 22.4 mW·cm−2. This research proved the surprising benefits of magnetic-field-assisted orientation of GO-Fe3O4 in facilitating the ion conduction of a polymeric electrolyte.

  5. Environment size and the use of feature and geometric cues for reorientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturz, Bradley R; Kelly, Debbie M

    2013-02-01

    We tested associative-based accounts of orientation by investigating the influence of environment size on the use of feature and geometric cues for reorientation. Two groups of participants were trained in dynamic three-dimensional virtual rectangular environments that differed in size to find a distinctly colored bin located at one of the four corners. Subsequently, we probed the reliance on feature and geometric cues for reorientation during test trials by presenting six trial types: Small Geometry Only, Large Geometry Only, Small Cue Conflict, Large Cue Conflict, Small Distal, and Large Distal. During Geometry Only test trials, all bins were black; thus, all distinctive featural information was removed leaving only geometric cues. For Cue Conflict test trials, all colored bins were shifted counter-clockwise one corner; thus, the geometric cues from the trained corner and the trained color were in direct conflict. During Distal test trials, the bin in the geometrically incorrect corner farthest from the trained corner was colored the same as during training; the remaining three bins were black. Thus, only this distant feature cue could be used to determine the location of the goal bin. Results suggested that geometric cues were used across changes in environment size, featural cues exerted greater influence when in conflict with geometric cues, and the far featural cue was used to disambiguate the correct from the rotationally equivalent location. In short, both feature and geometric cues were used for reorientation, and environment size influenced the relative use of feature and geometric cues. Collectively, our results provide evidence against associative-based accounts of orientation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Resting-state functional connectivity of ventral parietal regions associated with attention reorienting and episodic recollection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander M Daselaar

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In functional neuroimaging studies, ventral parietal cortex (VPC is recruited by very different cognitive tasks. Explaining the contributions VPC to these tasks has become a topic of intense study and lively debate. Perception studies frequently find VPC activations during tasks involving attention-reorienting, and memory studies frequently find them during tasks involving episodic recollection. According to the Attention to Memory (AtoM model, both phenomena can be explained by the same VPC function: bottom-up attention. Yet, a recent functional MRI (fMRI meta-analysis suggested that attention-reorienting activations are more frequent in anterior VPC, whereas recollection activations are more frequent in posterior VPC. Also, there is evidence that anterior and posterior VPC regions have different functional connectivity patterns. To investigate these issues, we conducted a resting-state functional connectivity analysis using as seeds the center-of-mass of attention-reorienting and recollection activations in the meta-analysis, which were located in the supramarginal gyrus (SMG, around the temporo-parietal junction—TPJ and in the angular gyrus (AG, respectively. The SMG seed showed stronger connectivity with ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC and occipito-temporal cortex, whereas the AG seed showed stronger connectivity with the hippocampus and default network regions. To investigate whether these connectivity differences were graded or sharp, VLPFC and hippocampal connectivity was measured in VPC regions traversing through the SMG and AG seeds. The results showed a graded pattern: VLPFC connectivity gradually decreases from SMG to AG, whereas hippocampal connectivity gradually increases from SMG to AG. Importantly, both gradients showed an abrupt break when extended beyond VPC borders. This finding suggests that functional differences between SMG and AG are more subtle than previously thought. These connectivity differences can be

  7. Reorientation and faulting of Pluto due to volatile loading within Sputnik Planitia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, James T.; Matsuyama, Isamu; Kamata, Shunichi; Steckloff, Jordan K.

    2016-12-01

    Pluto is an astoundingly diverse, geologically dynamic world. The dominant feature is Sputnik Planitia—a tear-drop-shaped topographic depression approximately 1,000 kilometres in diameter possibly representing an ancient impact basin. The interior of Sputnik Planitia is characterized by a smooth, craterless plain three to four kilometres beneath the surrounding rugged uplands, and represents the surface of a massive unit of actively convecting volatile ices (N2, CH4 and CO) several kilometres thick. This large feature is very near the Pluto-Charon tidal axis. Here we report that the location of Sputnik Planitia is the natural consequence of the sequestration of volatile ices within the basin and the resulting reorientation (true polar wander) of Pluto. Loading of volatile ices within a basin the size of Sputnik Planitia can substantially alter Pluto’s inertia tensor, resulting in a reorientation of the dwarf planet of around 60 degrees with respect to the rotational and tidal axes. The combination of this reorientation, loading and global expansion due to the freezing of a possible subsurface ocean generates stresses within the planet’s lithosphere, resulting in a global network of extensional faults that closely replicate the observed fault networks on Pluto. Sputnik Planitia probably formed northwest of its present location, and was loaded with volatiles over million-year timescales as a result of volatile transport cycles on Pluto. Pluto’s past, present and future orientation is controlled by feedbacks between volatile sublimation and condensation, changing insolation conditions and Pluto’s interior structure.

  8. Slosh wave excitation due to cryogenic liquid reorientation in space-based propulsion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, R. J.; Shyu, K. L.; Lee, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the cryogenic fluid management of the spacecraft propulsion system is to develop the technology necessary for acquistion or positioning of liquid and vapor within a tank in reduced gravity to enable liquid outflow or vapor venting. In this study slosh wave excitation induced by the resettling flow field activated by 1.0 Hz medium frequency impulsive reverse gravity acceleration during the course of liquid fluid reorientation with the initiation of geyser for liquid filled levels of 30, 50, and 80 percent have been studied. Characteristics of slosh waves with various frequencies excited are discussed.

  9. Influence of family, religion, and social conformity on client participation in sexual reorientation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccio, Elaine M

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the likelihood of participating in sexual reorientation therapy (SRT) based on actual or expected family reactions to the disclosure of one's same-sex sexuality, religious fundamentalism, social conformity, and several demographic variables. A sample of 52 SRT participants and 211 SRT nonparticipants who had ever identified as gay, lesbian, or bisexual completed a survey either online or in hardcopy format. Actual or expected negative family reactions, high religious fundamentalism, and identifying as spiritual significantly increased one's odds of participating in SRT. The findings are essential for preparing practitioners in any clinical practice setting to work with clients struggling with their sexuality.

  10. Nd-induced Mn spin-reorientation transition in NdMnAsO

    OpenAIRE

    Marcinkova, A.; Hansen, T.C.; Curfs, C.; Margadonna, S.; Bos, J. -W. G.

    2010-01-01

    A combination of synchrotron x-ray, neutron powder-diffraction, magnetization, heat-capacity, and electrical-resistivity measurements reveals that NdMnAsO is an antiferromagnetic semiconductor with large Neel temperature [T-N=359(2) K]. At room temperature the magnetic propagation vector k=0 and the Mn moments are directed along the crystallographic c axis [m(Mn)=2.41(6) mu(B)]. Upon cooling a spin-reorientation (SR) transition of the Mn moments into the ab plane occurs (T-SR=23 K). This coin...

  11. Periodic structures induced by director reorientation in the lyotropic nematic phase of disodium cromoglycate-water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Y. W.; Kuzma, M. R.; San Miguel, M.; Labes, M. M.

    1985-07-01

    A nonequilibrium periodic structure is induced by a magnetic field H applied to an aligned lyotropic uniaxial nematic phase of disodium cromoglycate-water. A series of parallel lines perpendicular to H represents boundaries between 180° out-of-phase regions of director reorientation. The distance between the lines decreases with increasing H. The line spacing is also directly proportional to thickness of the sample (in a limited range of thickness), and a secondary periodicity, consisting of nodes in these lines, is observed in thicker samples. An extension of a theoretical model by Guyon et al. is used to qualitatively interpret the abovementioned dependencies.

  12. Investigation of spin-reorientation phase transitions at surface and in volume of alpha-Fe sub 2 O sub 3 monocrystals

    CERN Document Server

    Kamzin, A S

    2002-01-01

    The magnetic structure of the surface layer and volume and the processes, observed by the spin-reorientation phase transition (SRPT), are studied in the direct comparison of the properties of the thin surface layer and the volume of the hematite (alpha-Fe sub 2 O sub 3) macroscopic crystals. The method of simultaneous gamma, X-ray and electron Moessbauer spectroscopy was used in the studies. The direct data on the existence of the transition layer on the hematite crystals surface are obtained. It is established, that the Morin-type SRPT in the sample volume occurs by a jump (the first-order phase transition). The SRPT in the surface layer as well as in the crystal volume is accompanied by formation of the intermediate state, wherein the low- and high-temperature phases coexist. The obtained experimental data on the SRPT mechanism in the surface layer agree well with the conclusions of the phenomenological theory

  13. A three-dimensional model of magneto-mechanical behaviors of martensite reorientation in ferromagnetic shape memory alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xue; Moumni, Ziad; He, Yongjun; Zhang, Weihong

    2014-03-01

    The large strain in Ferromagnetic Shape Memory Alloys (FSMA) is due to the martensite reorientation driven by mechanical stresses and/or magnetic fields. Although most experiments studying the martensite reorientation in FSMA are under 1D condition (uniaxial stress plus a perpendicular magnetic field), it has been shown that the 2D/3D configurations can improve the working stress and give much flexibility of the material's applications [He, Y.J., Chen, X., Moumni, Z., 2011. Two-dimensional analysis to improve the output stress in ferromagnetic shape memory alloys. Journal of Applied Physics 110, 063905]. To predict the material's behaviors in 3D loading conditions, a constitutive model is developed in this paper, based on the thermodynamics of irreversible processes with internal variables. All the martensite variants are considered in the model and the temperature effect is also taken into account. The model is able to describe all the behaviors of martensite reorientation in FSMA observed in the existing experiments: rotating/non-rotating magnetic-field-induced martensite reorientation, magnetic-field-assisted super-elasticity, super-elasticity under biaxial compressions and temperature-dependence of martensite reorientation. The model is further used to study the nonlinear bending behaviors of FSMA beams and provides some basic guidelines for designing the FSMA-based bending actuators.

  14. Low speed maneuvering flight of the rose-breasted cockatoo (Eolophus roseicapillus). II. Inertial and aerodynamic reorientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrick, T L; Usherwood, J R; Biewener, A A

    2007-06-01

    The reconfigurable, flapping wings of birds allow for both inertial and aerodynamic modes of reorientation. We found evidence that both these modes play important roles in the low speed turning flight of the rose-breasted cockatoo Eolophus roseicapillus. Using three-dimensional kinematics recorded from six cockatoos making a 90 degrees turn in a flight corridor, we developed predictions of inertial and aerodynamic reorientation from estimates of wing moments of inertia and flapping arcs, and a blade-element aerodynamic model. The blade-element model successfully predicted weight support (predicted was 88+/-17% of observed, N=6) and centripetal force (predicted was 79+/-29% of observed, N=6) for the maneuvering cockatoos and provided a reasonable estimate of mechanical power. The estimated torque from the model was a significant predictor of roll acceleration (r(2)=0.55, Pflight dynamics (approximately -0.45), were required to bring our estimates of reorientation due to aerodynamic torque back into conjunction with the measured changes in orientation. Our estimates of inertial reorientation were statistically significant predictors of the measured reorientation within wingbeats (r(2) from 0.2 to 0.37, Pflight muscles: the pectoralis, supracoracoideus, biceps brachii and extensor metacarpi radialis (r(2) from 0.27 to 0.45, Pflight maneuvers rely on production of asymmetries throughout the flight apparatus rather than in a specific set of control or turning muscles.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of atomic motion in borohydride-based materials: Fast anion reorientations and cation diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skripov, A.V., E-mail: skripov@imp.uran.ru; Soloninin, A.V.; Babanova, O.A.; Skoryunov, R.V.

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Solid solutions LiBH{sub 4}–LiI: extremely fast BH{sub 4} reorientations down to low T. • LiLa(BH{sub 4}){sub 3}Cl: Li-ion diffusive jumps and BH{sub 4} reorientations at the same frequency scale. • Dramatic acceleration of B{sub 12}H{sub 12} reorientations in the disordered phase of Na{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12}. • Fast Na-ion diffusion in the disordered phase of Na{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12}. - Abstract: Two basic types of thermally activated atomic jump motion are known to exist in solid borohydrides and the related systems: the reorientations of complex anions ([BH{sub 4}]{sup −}, [B{sub 12}H{sub 12}]{sup 2−}) and the translational diffusion of metal cations or complex anions. This paper reviews recent progress in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of these jump processes in complex hydrides, such as solid solutions of halide anions in borohydrides, bimetallic borohydrides and borohydride–chlorides, borohydride–amides, and B{sub 12}H{sub 12}-based compounds. The emphasis is put on the systems showing fast-ion conductivity. For these systems, we discuss a possible relation between the reorientational motion of complex anions and the translational motion of metal cations.

  16. Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedney, Richard T.; Schertler, Ronald J.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) was conceived to help maintain U.S. leadership in the world's communications-satellite market. This experimental satellite is expected to be launched by NASA in 1992 and to furnish the technology necessary for establishing very small aperture terminal digital networks which provide on-demand full-mesh connectivity, and 1.544-MBPS services with only a single hop. Utilizing on-board switching and processing, each individual voice or data circuit can be separately routed to any location in the network. This paper provides an overview of the ACTS and discusses the value of the technology for future communications systems.

  17. Magnetic structure and spin reorientation of quaternary Dy2Fe2Si2C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susilo, R. A.; Cadogan, J. M.; Hutchison, W. D.; Stewart, G. A.; Avdeev, M.; Campbell, S. J.

    2017-03-01

    We have investigated the low temperature magnetic properties of Dy2Fe2Si2C by using magnetisation, specific heat, x-ray diffraction, neutron powder diffraction and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy measurements over the temperature range 1.5 K–300 K. Dy2Fe2Si2C exhibits two magnetic transitions at low temperatures: an antiferromagnetic transition at {{T}\\text{N}}∼ 26 K and a spin-reorientation transition at {{T}t}∼ 6 K. The magnetic structure above T t can be described with a propagation vector \\mathbf{k}~=~≤ft(0~0~\\frac{1}{2}\\right) with the ordering of the Dy magnetic moments along the monoclinic b-axis whereas on cooling below T t the Dy moment tips away from the b-axis towards the ac-plane. We find that the spin-reorientation in Dy2Fe2Si2C is mainly driven by the competition between the second-order crystal field term B 20 and the higher-order terms, in particular B 40 and B 64.

  18. Strain induced magnetic transitions and spin reorientations in quantum paraelectric EuTiO3 material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengdi; Zhao, Jinglong; Dong, Zhengchao; Zhong, Chonggui; Huang, Yanyan; Min, Yi; Wang, Meng; Zhou, Pengxia

    2015-05-01

    Strain induced magnetic transitions and spin reorientations in quantum paraelectric EuTiO3 material have been investigated using the first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. Four kinds of magnetic configurations and three possible directions of magnetic moments in every configuration are taken into consideration, respectively, in paraelectric and ferroelectric phases induced by the biaxial compressive and tensile strains. The calculated results indicate that the strain, regardless of the compressive or tensile strain, can induce not only the magnetic transitions from G-type antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic phase, but also the reorientation of spin polarization in EuTiO3. The compressive strain can induce a ferromagnetic phase with spin polarization along a axis while the tensile one make magnetic moments along c axis. The further analysis for the electronic density of states (DOS) discover that the magnetic moment direction of EuTiO3 have intrinsic correlation with these orbitals, where the density of states are the most localized. In addition, Anderson super-exchange model is proposed to explain the changes of exchange coupling properties induced by the biaxial strains.

  19. Fast local trust region technique for diffusion tensor registration using exact reorientation and regularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junning; Shi, Yonggang; Tran, Giang; Dinov, Ivo; Wang, Danny J J; Toga, Arthur

    2014-05-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging is widely used in brain connectivity research. As more and more studies recruit large numbers of subjects, it is important to design registration methods which are not only theoretically rigorous, but also computationally efficient. However, the requirement of reorienting diffusion tensors complicates and considerably slows down registration procedures, due to the correlated impacts of registration forces at adjacent voxel locations. Based on the diffeomorphic Demons algorithm (Vercauteren , 2009), we propose a fast local trust region algorithm for handling inseparable registration forces for quadratic energy functions. The method guarantees that, at any time and at any voxel location, the velocity is always within its local trust region. This local regularization allows efficient calculation of the transformation update with numeric integration instead of completely solving a large linear system at every iteration. It is able to incorporate exact reorientation and regularization into the velocity optimization, and preserve the linear complexity of the diffeomorphic Demons algorithm. In an experiment with 84 diffusion tensor images involving both pair-wise and group-wise registrations, the proposed algorithm achieves better registration in comparison with other methods solving large linear systems (Yeo , 2009). At the same time, this algorithm reduces the computation time and memory demand tenfold.

  20. Human sperm pattern of movement during chemotactic re-orientation towards a progesterone source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cecilia Soledad Blengini; Maria Eugenia Teves; Diego Rafael Unates; Hector Alejandro Guidobaldi; Laura Virginia Gatica; Laura Cecilia Giojalas

    2011-01-01

    @@ Human spermatozoa may chemotactically find out the egg by following an increasing gradient of attractant molecules.Although human spermatozoa have been observed to show several of the physiological characteristics of chemotaxis,the chemotactic pattern of movement has not been easy to describe.However,it is apparent that chemotactic cells may be identified while returning to the attractant source.This study characterizes the pattern of movement of human spermatozoa during chemotactic re-orientation towards a progesterone source,which is a physiological attractant candidate.By means of videomicroscopy and image analysis,a chemotactic pattern of movement was identified as the spermatozoon returned towards the source of a chemotactic concentration of progesterone (10 pmol l-1).First,as a continuation of its original path,the spermatozoon swims away from the progesterone source with linear movement and then turns back with a transitional movement that can be characterized by an increased velocity and decreased linearity.This sperm behaviour may help the spermatozoon to re-orient itself towards a progesterone source and may be used to identify the few cells that are undergoing chemotaxis at a given time.

  1. Ion induced magnetization reorientation in Co/Pt multilayers for patterned media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, D.; Baglin, J.E.E.; Kellock, A.J.; Hannibal, K.A.; Toney, M.F.; Kusinski, G.; Lang, S.; Best, M.E.; Terris, B.D.

    2000-01-01

    Co/Pt multilayer films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and large out-of-plane coercivities of 3.9 - 8.5 kOe have been found to undergo a spin reorientation transition from out-of-plane to in-plane upon irradiation with 700 keV nitrogen ions. X-ray reflectivity experiments show that the multilayer structure gets progressively disrupted with increasing ion dose, providing direct evidence for local atomic displacements at the Co/Pt interfaces. This effectively destroys the magnetic interface anisotropy, which was varied by about a factor of two, between KS@ 0.4 erg/cm2 and KS@ 0.85 erg/cm2 for two particular films. The dose required to initiate spin-reorientation, 6x1014 N+/cm2 and 1.5x1015 N+/cm2, respectively, scales with KS. It is roughly equal to the number of Co interface atoms per unit interface area contributing to KS.

  2. Peculiarities in the director reorientation and evolution of NMR spectra under the influence of crossed electric and magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    Theoretical description is proposed for new modes of reorientation of the director field widehat n and the evolution of the NMR spectrum I(ν) of a nematic liquid crystal (LC) formed by molecules of deuterated 4-n-pentyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl encapsulated in a rectangular LC cell under the action of crossed electric, E, and magnetic, B, fields directed at an angle of α to one another. Numerical calculations in the framework of the nonlinear generalization of the classical Ericksen-Leslie theory show that, under certain relations between the forces and moments acting upon a unit volume of the LC phase upon the reorientation of widehat n, transient periodic structures can arise if the corresponding distortion mode is characterized by the fastest response and thus suppresses all other modes, including uniform ones. It is shown that the rise of these periodic structures leads to a reduction in the time for the reorientation of the director field.

  3. Reorientational dynamics in molecular liquids as revealed by dynamic light scattering: From boiling point to glass transition temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtke, B.; Petzold, N.; Kahlau, R.; Rössler, E. A.

    2013-08-01

    We determine the reorientational correlation time τ of a series of molecular liquids by performing depolarized light scattering experiments (double monochromator, Fabry-Perot interferometry, and photon correlation spectroscopy). Correlation times in the range 10-12 s-100 s are compiled, i.e., the full temperature interval between the boiling point and the glass transition temperature Tg is covered. We focus on low-Tg liquids for which the high-temperature limit τ ≅ 10-12 s is easily accessed by standard spectroscopic equipment (up to 440 K). Regarding the temperature dependence three interpolation formulae of τ(T) with three parameters each are tested: (i) Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann equation, (ii) the approach recently discussed by Mauro et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 106, 19780 (2009)], and (iii) our approach decomposing the activation energy E(T) in a constant high temperature value E∞ and a "cooperative part" Ecoop(T) depending exponentially on temperature [Schmidtke et al., Phys. Rev. E 86, 041507 (2012)], 10.1103/PhysRevE.86.041507. On the basis of the present data, approaches (i) and (ii) are insufficient as they do not provide the correct crossover to the high-temperature Arrhenius law clearly identified in the experimental data while approach (iii) reproduces the salient features of τ(T). It allows to discuss the temperature dependence of the liquid's dynamics in terms of a Ecoop(T)/E∞ vs. T/E∞ plot and suggests that E∞ controls the energy scale of the glass transition phenomenon.

  4. Giant rotating magnetocaloric effect in the region of spin-reorientation transition in the NdCo₅ single crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, S A; Skokov, K P; Koshkid'ko, Yu S; Pastushenkov, Yu G; Ivanova, T I

    2010-09-24

    We have investigated the anisotropy of the magnetocaloric effect in a NdCo₅ single crystal in a wide range of temperatures, including the spin-reorientation temperature region. In the field μ(0)H =1.3 T in the spin-reorientation region 250-310 K, we discovered a giant rotating magnetocaloric effect of ~ 1.6 K, caused by rotation of the magnetization vector. The calculations of the anisotropy magnetocaloric effect for the field μ(0)H =1.3 T have been carried out.

  5. Resting-state functional connectivity of ventral parietal regions associated with attention reorienting and episodic recollection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daselaar, S. M.; Huijbers, W.; Eklund, K.; Moscovitch, M.; Cabeza, R.

    2013-01-01

    In functional neuroimaging studies, ventral parietal cortex (VPC) is recruited by very different cognitive tasks. Explaining the contributions of VPC to these tasks has become a topic of intense study and lively debate. Perception studies frequently find VPC activations during tasks involving attention-reorienting, and memory studies frequently find them during tasks involving episodic recollection. According to the Attention to Memory (AtoM) model, both phenomena can be explained by the same VPC function: bottom-up attention. Yet, a recent functional MRI (fMRI) meta-analysis suggested that attention-reorienting activations are more frequent in anterior VPC, whereas recollection activations are more frequent in posterior VPC. Also, there is evidence that anterior and posterior VPC regions have different functional connectivity patterns. To investigate these issues, we conducted a resting-state functional connectivity analysis using as seeds the center-of-mass of attention-reorienting and recollection activations in the meta-analysis, which were located in the supramarginal gyrus (SMG, around the temporo-parietal junction—TPJ) and in the angular gyrus (AG), respectively. The SMG seed showed stronger connectivity with ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) and occipito-temporal cortex, whereas the AG seed showed stronger connectivity with the hippocampus and default network regions. To investigate whether these connectivity differences were graded or sharp, VLPFC and hippocampal connectivity was measured in VPC regions traversing through the SMG and AG seeds. The results showed a graded pattern: VLPFC connectivity gradually decreases from SMG to AG, whereas hippocampal connectivity gradually increases from SMG to AG. Importantly, both gradients showed an abrupt break when extended beyond VPC borders. This finding suggests that functional differences between SMG and AG are more subtle than previously thought. These connectivity differences can be explained by

  6. Involuntary Capture and Voluntary Reorienting of Attention Decline in Middle-Aged and Old Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa-Jaraba, Kenia S.; Cid-Fernández, Susana; Lindín, Mónica; Díaz, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to examine the effects of aging on event-related brain potentials (ERPs) associated with the automatic detection of unattended infrequent deviant and novel auditory stimuli (Mismatch Negativity, MMN) and with the orienting to these stimuli (P3a component), as well as the effects on ERPs associated with reorienting to relevant visual stimuli (Reorienting Negativity, RON). Participants were divided into three age groups: (1) Young: 21–29 years old; (2) Middle-aged: 51–64 years old; and (3) Old: 65–84 years old. They performed an auditory-visual distraction-attention task in which they were asked to attend to visual stimuli (Go, NoGo) and to ignore auditory stimuli (S: standard, D: deviant, N: novel). Reaction times (RTs) to Go visual stimuli were longer in old and middle-aged than in young participants. In addition, in all three age groups, longer RTs were found when Go visual stimuli were preceded by novel relative to deviant and standard auditory stimuli, indicating a distraction effect provoked by novel stimuli. ERP components were identified in the Novel minus Standard (N-S) and Deviant minus Standard (D-S) difference waveforms. In the N-S condition, MMN latency was significantly longer in middle-aged and old participants than in young participants, indicating a slowing of automatic detection of changes. The following results were observed in both difference waveforms: (1) the P3a component comprised two consecutive phases in all three age groups—an early-P3a (e-P3a) that may reflect the orienting response toward the irrelevant stimulation and a late-P3a (l-P3a) that may be a correlate of subsequent evaluation of the infrequent unexpected novel or deviant stimuli; (2) the e-P3a, l-P3a, and RON latencies were significantly longer in the Middle-aged and Old groups than in the Young group, indicating delay in the orienting response to and the subsequent evaluation of unattended auditory stimuli, and in the reorienting of

  7. Young Children's Use of Features to Reorient Is More than Just Associative: Further Evidence against a Modular View of Spatial Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcombe, Nora S.; Ratliff, Kristin R.; Shallcross, Wendy L.; Twyman, Alexandra D.

    2010-01-01

    Proponents of a geometric module have argued that instances of young children's use of features as well as geometry to reorient can be explained by a two-stage process. In this model, only the first stage is a true reorientation, accomplished by using geometric information alone; features are considered in a second stage using association (Lee,…

  8. In-situ particles reorientation during magnetic hyperthermia application: Shape matters twice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonidis, Konstantinos; Morales, M. Puerto; Marciello, Marzia; Angelakeris, Makis; de La Presa, Patricia; Lazaro-Carrillo, Ana; Tabero, Andrea; Villanueva, Angeles; Chubykalo-Fesenko, Oksana; Serantes, David

    2016-12-01

    Promising advances in nanomedicine such as magnetic hyperthermia rely on a precise control of the nanoparticle performance in the cellular environment. This constitutes a huge research challenge due to difficulties for achieving a remote control within the human body. Here we report on the significant double role of the shape of ellipsoidal magnetic nanoparticles (nanorods) subjected to an external AC magnetic field: first, the heat release is increased due to the additional shape anisotropy; second, the rods dynamically reorientate in the orthogonal direction to the AC field direction. Importantly, the heating performance and the directional orientation occur in synergy and can be easily controlled by changing the AC field treatment duration, thus opening the pathway to combined hyperthermic/mechanical nanoactuators for biomedicine. Preliminary studies demonstrate the high accumulation of nanorods into HeLa cells whereas viability analysis supports their low toxicity and the absence of apoptotic or necrotic cell death after 24 or 48 h of incubation.

  9. Power-controlled transition from standard to negative refraction in reorientational soft matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccardi, Armando; Alberucci, Alessandro; Kravets, Nina; Buchnev, Oleksandr; Assanto, Gaetano

    2014-11-25

    Refraction at a dielectric interface can take an anomalous character in anisotropic crystals, when light is negatively refracted with incident and refracted beams emerging on the same side of the interface normal. In soft matter subject to reorientation, such as nematic liquid crystals, the nonlinear interaction with light allows tuning of the optical properties. We demonstrate that in such material a beam of light can experience either positive or negative refraction depending on input power, as it can alter the spatial distribution of the optic axis and, in turn, the direction of the energy flow when traveling across an interface. Moreover, the nonlinear optical response yields beam self-focusing and spatial localization into a self-confined solitary wave through the formation of a graded-index waveguide, linking the refractive transition to power-driven readdressing of copolarized guided-wave signals, with a number of output ports not limited by diffraction.

  10. Mechanism of dynamic reorientation of cortical microtubules due to mechanical stress

    CERN Document Server

    Muratov, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Directional growth caused by gravitropism and corresponding bending of plant cells has been explored since 19th century, however, many aspects of mechanisms underlying the perception of gravity at the molecular level are still not well known. Perception of gravity in root and shoot gravitropisms is usually attributed to gravisensitive cells, called statocytes, which exploit sedimentation of macroscopic and heavy organelles, amyloplasts, to sense the direction of gravity. Gravity stimulus is then transduced into distal elongation zone, which is several mm far from statocytes, where it causes stretching. It is suggested that gravity stimulus is conveyed by gradients in auxin flux. We propose a theoretical model that may explain how concentration gradients and/or stretching may indirectly affect the global orientation of cortical microtubules, attached to the cell membrane and induce their dynamic reorientation perpendicular to the gradients. In turn, oriented microtubules arrays direct the growth and orientatio...

  11. Observation of second spin reorientation transition within ultrathin region in Fe films on Ag(001) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khim, T.-Y. [c-CCMR and Department of Physics, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, M.; Lee, H., E-mail: easyscan@sookmyung.ac.kr, E-mail: jhp@postech.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Park, B.-G. [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL), Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Park, J.-H., E-mail: easyscan@sookmyung.ac.kr, E-mail: jhp@postech.ac.kr [c-CCMR and Department of Physics, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Division of Advanced Materials Science, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Max Plank POSTECH Center for Complex Phase Materials, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-21

    We acquired direct measurements for in-plane and perpendicular-to-plane magnetic moments of Fe films using an x-ray magnetic circular dichroism technique with increase of the Fe thickness (up to 40 Å) on the Ag(001) surface. Epitaxial Fe/Ag(001) films were grown in situ with the thickness varying from 2 Å to 40 Å, and the magnetic anisotropy was carefully investigated as a function of the film thickness. We found re-entrance of the in-plane magnetic anisotropy of the Fe film in ultrathin region. The results manifest that the epitaxial Fe/Ag(001) film undergoes two distinct spin reorientation transitions from in-plane to out-of-plane at the film thickness t ≈ 9 Å and back to in-plane at t ≈ 18 Å as t increases.

  12. Rotational reorientation dynamics of C60 in various solvents. Picosecond transient grating experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubtsov, I. V.; Khudiakov, D. V.; Nadtochenko, V. A.; Lobach, A. S.; Moravskii, A. P.

    1994-11-01

    The picosecond transient grating technique has been used to study the rotational reorientation of C60 in various solvents: in toluene 7 +/- 1.5 ps, o-dichlorobenzene 10.3 +/- 1.5 ps, o-xylene 13 +/- 2 ps and in decalin 3.5 +/- 1.5 ps. The data obtained cannot be described by hydrodynamic Debye theory. Rough-sphere fluid theory predicts the correct values for C60 rotation in toluene, o-dichlorobenzene and in decalin. The deviations for o-xylene are probably connected with the specifics of the local solvent structure or with the stronger interaction of C60 with solvent molecules. The rotation of C60 in decalin is rapid and approaches the rotation in the gas phase determined by inertia.

  13. An image analysis approach for automatically re-orienteering CT images for dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucchiara, Rita; Lamma, Evelina; Sansoni, Tommaso

    2004-06-01

    In the last decade, computerized tomography (CT) has become the most frequently used imaging modality to obtain a correct pre-operative implant planning. In this work, we present an image analysis and computer vision approach able to identify, from the reconstructed 3D data set, the optimal cutting plane specific to each implant to be planned, in order to obtain the best view of the implant site and to have correct measures. If the patient requires more implants, different cutting planes are automatically identified, and the axial and cross-sectional images can be re-oriented accordingly to each of them. In the paper, we describe the defined algorithms in order to recognize 3D markers (each one aligned with a missed tooth for which an implant has to be planned) in the 3D reconstructed space, and the results in processing real exams, in terms of effectiveness and precision and reproducibility of the measure.

  14. An NMR study of molecular reorientations and diffusion in solid LiBF4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynhardt, E. C.; Lourens, J. A. J.

    1984-06-01

    The 19F second moment and the 19F, 11B, and 7Li spin-lattice relaxation times in a powdered sample of LiBF4 have been measured as a function of temperature. The results show that the BF-4 ion reorients isotropically while the Li+ ion remains stationary. The activation energy associated with the BF-4 motion is 8.5 kcal/mol. Above ˜385 K the BF-4 and Li+ diffuse through the lattice resulting in a 19F second moment which is almost zero. The activation energy of this process is 19.2 kcal/mol. A librational motion presumably influences the 19F T1ρ results just before diffusion sets in. The migration of Li+ around the BF-4 ion, which seems to be a strong possibility in the case of an isolated LiBF4 molecule, does not take place in the solid.

  15. Communication: On the origin of the non-Arrhenius behavior in water reorientation dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirnemann, Guillaume; Laage, Damien

    2012-07-21

    We combine molecular dynamics simulations and analytic modeling to determine the origin of the non-Arrhenius temperature dependence of liquid water's reorientation and hydrogen-bond dynamics between 235 K and 350 K. We present a quantitative model connecting hydrogen-bond exchange dynamics to local structural fluctuations, measured by the asphericity of Voronoi cells associated with each water molecule. For a fixed local structure the regular Arrhenius behavior is recovered, and the global anomalous temperature dependence is demonstrated to essentially result from a continuous shift in the unimodal structure distribution upon cooling. The non-Arrhenius behavior can thus be explained without invoking an equilibrium between distinct structures. In addition, the large width of the homogeneous structural distribution is shown to cause a growing dynamical heterogeneity and a non-exponential relaxation at low temperature.

  16. Dynamic selective switching in antiferromagnetically-coupled bilayers close to the spin reorientation transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernández-Pacheco, A., E-mail: af457@cam.ac.uk; Mansell, R.; Petit, D.; Lee, J. H.; Cowburn, R. P. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Ummelen, F. C.; Swagten, H. J. M. [Department of Applied Physics, Center for NanoMaterials, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2014-09-01

    We have designed a bilayer synthetic antiferromagnet where the order of layer reversal can be selected by varying the sweep rate of the applied magnetic field. The system is formed by two ultra-thin ferromagnetic layers with different proximities to the spin reorientation transition, coupled antiferromagnetically using Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interactions. The different dynamic magnetic reversal behavior of both layers produces a crossover in their switching fields for field rates in the kOe/s range. This effect is due to the different effective anisotropy of both layers, added to an appropriate asymmetric antiferromagnetic coupling between them. Field-rate controlled selective switching of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy layers as shown here can be exploited in sensing and memory applications.

  17. Altruism and Re-Orientation as Core for the Development of Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simeon Omale

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Jan Knippers Black in his book, Development in Theory and Practice: Paradigm and Paradoxes had identified theories ranging from Liberal international School; modernization school; cultural weakness; Interdependence School as reasons for the unparalleled development of the world. While often these are used along the like of cultural imperialism and the un-even trade opportunities as reasons for Africa’s developmental quagmire, it is the opinion of this paper that Africa’s underdevelopment are largely products of our actions and non-actions. It is in this light that we seek to argue for the development of the spirit of Altruism and a reorientation of the national consciousness via investment in the Early Child Education adopting participatory learning and communication approach as necessary panacea for Africa’s development. By instilling in the young minds the expediency of a more altruistic modus vivendi, the culture of egoistic corruption could be overturned.

  18. Re-orienting a remote acute care model towards a primary health care approach: key enablers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Vicki; Reeve, Carole A; Humphreys, John S; Wakerman, John; Carter, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the key enablers of change in re-orienting a remote acute care model to comprehensive primary healthcare delivery. The setting of the study was a 12-bed hospital in Fitzroy Crossing, Western Australia. Individual key informant, in-depth interviews were completed with five of six identified senior leaders involved in the development of the Fitzroy Valley Health Partnership. Interviews were recorded and transcripts were thematically analysed by two investigators for shared views about the enabling factors strengthening primary healthcare delivery in a remote region of Australia. Participants described theestablishment of a culturally relevant primary healthcare service, using a community-driven, 'bottom up' approach characterised by extensive community participation. The formal partnership across the government and community controlled health services was essential, both to enable change to occur and to provide sustainability in the longer term. A hierarchy of major themes emerged. These included community participation, community readiness and desire for self-determination; linkages in the form of a government community controlled health service partnership; leadership; adequate infrastructure; enhanced workforce supply; supportive policy; and primary healthcare funding. The strong united leadership shown by the community and the health service enabled barriers to be overcome and it maximised the opportunities provided by government policy changes. The concurrent alignment around a common vision enabled implementation of change. The key principle learnt from this study is the importance of community and health service relationships and local leadership around a shared vision for the re-orientation of community health services.

  19. The impact of reorienting cone-beam computed tomographic images in varied head positions on the coordinates of anatomical landmarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Hun; Jeong, Ho Gul; Hwang, Jae Joon; Lee, Jung Hee; Han, Sang Sun [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Yonsei University, College of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the coordinates of anatomical landmarks on cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) images in varied head positions before and after reorientation using image analysis software. CBCT images were taken in a normal position and four varied head positions using a dry skull marked with 3 points where gutta percha was fixed. In each of the five radiographic images, reference points were set, 20 anatomical landmarks were identified, and each set of coordinates was calculated. Coordinates in the images from the normally positioned head were compared with those in the images obtained from varied head positions using statistical methods. Post-reorientation coordinates calculated using a three-dimensional image analysis program were also compared to the reference coordinates. In the original images, statistically significant differences were found between coordinates in the normal-position and varied-position images. However, post-reorientation, no statistically significant differences were found between coordinates in the normal-position and varied-position images. The changes in head position impacted the coordinates of the anatomical landmarks in three-dimensional images. However, reorientation using image analysis software allowed accurate superimposition onto the reference positions.

  20. Flux line lattice reorientation in the borocarbide superconductors with ¤H¤ parallel to ¤a¤

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, M.R.; Abrahamsen, A.B.; Lopez, D.

    2001-01-01

    Small angle neutron scattering studies of the flux line lattice in LuNi2B2C and ErNi2B2C induced by a held parallel to the a axis reveal a first order flux Line lattice reorientation transition. Below the transition the Bur line lattice nearest neighbor direction is parallel to the b axis, and ab...

  1. Symmetry breaking, slow relaxation dynamics, and topological defects at the field-induced helix reorientation in MnSi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, A.; Chacon, A.; Wagner, M.; Halder, M.; Georgii, R.; Rosch, A.; Pfleiderer, C.; Garst, M.

    2017-01-01

    We report a study of the reorientation of the helimagnetic order in the archetypal cubic chiral magnet MnSi as a function of magnetic field direction. The reorientation process as inferred from small-angle neutron scattering, the magnetization, and the ac susceptibility is in excellent agreement with an effective mean-field theory taking into account the precise symmetries of the crystallographic space group. Depending on the field and temperature history and the direction of the field with respect to the crystalline axes, the helix reorientation may exhibit a crossover, a first-order, or a second-order transition. The magnetization and ac susceptibility provide evidence that the reorientation of helimagnetic domains is associated with large relaxation times exceeding seconds. At the second-order transitions residual Ising symmetries are spontaneously broken at continuous elastic instabilities of the helimagnetic order. In addition, on the time scales explored in our experiments these transitions are hysteretic as a function of field suggesting, within the same theoretical framework, the formation of an abundance of plastic deformations of the helical spin order. These deformations comprise topologically nontrivial disclinations, reminiscent of the skyrmions discovered recently in the same class of materials.

  2. The impact of reorienting cone-beam computed tomographic images in varied head positions on the coordinates of anatomical landmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Hun; Hwang, Jae Joon; Lee, Jung-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to compare the coordinates of anatomical landmarks on cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) images in varied head positions before and after reorientation using image analysis software. Materials and Methods CBCT images were taken in a normal position and four varied head positions using a dry skull marked with 3 points where gutta percha was fixed. In each of the five radiographic images, reference points were set, 20 anatomical landmarks were identified, and each set of coordinates was calculated. Coordinates in the images from the normally positioned head were compared with those in the images obtained from varied head positions using statistical methods. Post-reorientation coordinates calculated using a three-dimensional image analysis program were also compared to the reference coordinates. Results In the original images, statistically significant differences were found between coordinates in the normal-position and varied-position images. However, post-reorientation, no statistically significant differences were found between coordinates in the normal-position and varied-position images. Conclusion The changes in head position impacted the coordinates of the anatomical landmarks in three-dimensional images. However, reorientation using image analysis software allowed accurate superimposition onto the reference positions. PMID:27358821

  3. Dedicated Slosh Dynamics Experiment on ISS using SPHERES (Advanced Space Operations in CR) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Synchronized Position, Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites – VERTIGO (SPHERES-VERTIGO) developed by the Massachusetts Institute of...

  4. A new biomarker to examine the role of hippocampal function in the development of spatial reorientation in children: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieites, Vanessa; Nazareth, Alina; Reeb-Sutherland, Bethany C; Pruden, Shannon M

    2015-01-01

    Spatial navigation is an adaptive skill that involves determining the route to a particular goal or location, and then traveling that path. A major component of spatial navigation is spatial reorientation, or the ability to reestablish a sense of direction after being disoriented. The hippocampus is known to be critical for navigating, and has more recently been implicated in reorienting in adults, but relatively little is known about the development of the hippocampus in relation to these large-scale spatial abilities in children. It has been established that, compared to school-aged children, preschool children tend to perform poorly on certain spatial reorientation tasks, suggesting that their hippocampi may not be mature enough to process the demands of such a task. Currently, common techniques used to examine underlying brain activity, such as electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), are not suitable for examining hippocampal development in young children. In the present paper, we argue instead for the use of eyeblink conditioning (EBC), a relatively under-utilized, inexpensive, and safe method that is easy to implement in developing populations. In addition, EBC has a well defined neural circuitry, which includes the hippocampus, making it an ideal tool to indirectly measure hippocampal functioning in young children. In this review, we will evaluate the literature on EBC and its relation to hippocampal development, and discuss the possibility of using EBC as an objective measure of associative learning in relation to large-scale spatial skills. We support the use of EBC as a way to indirectly access hippocampal function in typical and atypical populations in order to characterize the neural substrates associated with the development of spatial reorientation abilities in early childhood. As such, EBC is a potential, simple biomarker for success in tasks that require the hippocampus, including spatial reorientation.

  5. A New Biomarker to Examine the Role of Hippocampal Function in the Development of Spatial Reorientation in Children: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa eVieites

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Spatial navigation is an adaptive skill that involves determining the route to a particular goal or location, and then travelling that path. A major component of spatial navigation is spatial reorientation, or the ability to reestablish a sense of direction after being disoriented. The hippocampus is known to be critical for navigating, and has more recently been implicated in reorienting in adults, but relatively little is known about the development of the hippocampus in relation to these large-scale spatial abilities in children. It has been established that, compared to school-aged children, preschool children tend to perform poorly on certain spatial reorientation tasks, suggesting that their hippocampi may not be mature enough to process the demands of such a task. Currently, common techniques used to examine underlying brain activity, such as electroencephalography (EEG and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, are not suitable for examining hippocampal development in young children. In the present paper, we argue for the use of eyeblink conditioning (EBC, a relatively under-utilized, inexpensive, and safe method that is easy to implement in developing populations. In addition, EBC has a well defined neural circuitry, which includes the hippocampus, making it an ideal tool to indirectly measure hippocampal functioning in young children. In this review, we will evaluate the literature on EBC and its relation to hippocampal development, and discuss the possibility of using EBC as an objective measure of associative learning in relation to large-scale spatial skills. We support the use of EBC as a way to indirectly access hippocampal function in typical and atypical populations in order to characterize the neural substrates associated with the development of spatial reorientation abilities in early childhood. Thus, we advocate for EBC as a simple biomarker for success in various tasks that require the hippocampus, including spatial

  6. TUBSAT-1, satellite technology for educational purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginati, A.

    1988-01-01

    TUBSAT-1 (Technical University of Berlin Satellite) is an experimental low-cost satellite within the NASA Get Away Special (GAS) program. This project is being financed by the German BMFT (Federal Ministry for Research and Technology), mainly for student education. The dimensions and weight are determined by GAS requirements and the satellite will be ejected from the space shuttle into an approximately 300-km circular orbit. It is a sun/star oriented satellite with an additional spin stabilization mode. The first planned payload is to be used for observing flight paths of migratory birds from northern Europe to southern Africa and back.

  7. Geostationary Satellite (GOES) Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Visible and Infrared satellite imagery taken from radiometer instruments on SMS (ATS) and GOES satellites in geostationary orbit. These satellites produced...

  8. Neptune's small satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, P.

    1992-04-01

    The small satellites of Neptune and other planets discovered during the Voyager 2 mission are discussed in terms of their composition and relationship to the planetary systems. The satellite Proteus is described in terms of its orbit, five other satellites are described, and they are compared to ther small satellites and systems. Neptune's satellites are hypothesized to be related to the ring system, and the satellite Galatea is related to the confinement of the rings.

  9. Beyond ATS-6: Social Uses of Communications Satellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cater, Douglass

    A panel discussion was held to examine the efficacy of the Applications Technology Satellites, powerful communication satellites designed to send quality signals to low-cost ground terminals. The satellites have been used on an experimental basis in rural America, Canada, and India. While the panel generally agreed on the great potential of the…

  10. Communication Satellites 1958 to 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-10-01

    effort that is still advancing the state of the art . 2-1 3. EXPERIMENTAL SATELLITES Although the performance of communication satellites could be...bandwidths was much beyond the state of the art . The choice of the Delta launch vehicle provided basic design constraints such as size, weight, and... Griego M6/215 A. S. Gilcrest M4/958 T. J. Carr M5/699 C. H. Bredall M5/690 J. B. Bryson M5/669 R. L. Porter M5/692 T. M. Bedbury M5/669 R. D. Smith

  11. Reorienting land degradation towards sustainable land management: linking sustainable livelihoods with ecosystem services in rangeland systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, M S; Stringer, L C; Dougill, A J; Perkins, J S; Atlhopheng, J R; Mulale, K; Favretto, N

    2015-03-15

    This paper identifies new ways of moving from land degradation towards sustainable land management through the development of economic mechanisms. It identifies new mechanisms to tackle land degradation based on retaining critical levels of natural capital whilst basing livelihoods on a wider range of ecosystem services. This is achieved through a case study analysis of the Kalahari rangelands in southwest Botswana. The paper first describes the socio-economic and ecological characteristics of the Kalahari rangelands and the types of land degradation taking place. It then focuses on bush encroachment as a way of exploring new economic instruments (e.g. Payments for Ecosystem Services) designed to enhance the flow of ecosystem services that support livelihoods in rangeland systems. It does this by evaluating the likely impacts of bush encroachment, one of the key forms of rangeland degradation, on a range of ecosystem services in three land tenure types (private fenced ranches, communal grazing areas and Wildlife Management Areas), before considering options for more sustainable land management in these systems. We argue that with adequate policy support, economic mechanisms could help reorient degraded rangelands towards more sustainable land management.

  12. A study of methyl reorientation in solid nitromethane by neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino, S. F.; Rymes, W. H.

    1980-09-01

    The geometrical and dynamical properties of the reorientation of the methyl group of nitromethane in the solid state have been studied by inelastic neutron scattering. Quasielastic scattering spectra have been obtained for several values of momentum transfer at five temperatures between 50° and 150 °K. The spectra are shown to be consistent with jumps of 120 ° about an axis coincident with the C-N bond. The temperature dependence of the residence time yields a barrier of 234 cal/mole. An inelastic neutron spectrum obtained at 4.2 °K suggests a tunnel splitting of the torsional ground state of 0.045±0.005 meV, which is consistent with the derived activation energy. Inelastic neutron scattering has also been used to determine the energy of the tunnel split first excited state which in CH3NO2 has a mean energy of 7.4 meV above the ground state and is split by 1.8 meV. In the deuterated compound, the first excited stated is at 5.3 meV above the ground state and its splitting is less than the instrumental resolution.

  13. Quantifying Signaling-Induced Reorientation of TCR's During Immunological Synapse Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, W C; Irvine, D J; Davis, M M; Krummel, M F

    2002-10-17

    Productive T cell recognition of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) is normally accompanied by the formation of a cell-cell contact called the 'immunological synapse.' Our understanding of the steps leading up to this formation has been limited by the absence of tools for analyzing 3D surfaces and surface distributions as they change over time. Here we use a 3D fluorescence quantitation method to show that T cell receptors are recruited in bulk within the first minute after the onset of activation and with velocities ranging from 0.04 to 0.1 {micro}m/s; a speed significantly greater than unrestricted diffusion. Our method reveals a second feature of this reorientation: a conformational change as the T cell pushes more total membrane into the interface creating a larger contact area for additional receptors. Analysis of individual T cell receptor velocities using a single-particle tracking method confirms our velocity measurement. This method should permit the quantitation of other dynamic membrane events and the associated movement of cell-surface molecules.

  14. Teaching-Service integration within the National Professional Health Education Reorientation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendruscolo, Carine; Prado, Marta Lenise do; Kleba, Maria Elisabeth

    2016-09-01

    This integrative literature review aimed at identifying the characteristics and describing how teaching-service integration is expressed in studies on Pró-Saúde (Charitable institution for social and hospital assistance) published in Brazil in the period 2007-2012. For the search, the term National Professional Health Education Reorientation Program was entered in the following databases: Virtual Health Library (BVS), Google Scholar and the Bank of Theses of the Coordination for the Improvement of Higher Education Personnel (CAPES). Forty-one publications were selected with the following inclusion criteria: scientific papers; theses and dissertations; studies in English, Portuguese or Spanish. The critical review of studies was performed through a comprehensive reading of the texts. Outcomes are presented in two categories: Dialogue and partnership as tools for teaching-service integration and Movements of change in teaching-service through Pró-Saúde. Studies have shown that changes in professional education and practice are possible and necessary, especially when supported by strategies that encourage active participation of subjects and confirm teaching-service integration as opportunity for dialogue, promoted by this inducing policy.

  15. Noble metal capping effects on the spin-reorientation transitions of Co/Ru(0001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Gabaly, Farid; Figuera, Juan de la [Centro de Microanalisis de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid 28049 (Spain); McCarty, Kevin F [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Schmid, Andreas K [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley 94720 (United States); Munoz, M Carmen; Gallego, Silvia [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Szunyogh, Laszlo [Department of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Physics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, H-111 Budapest (Hungary); Weinberger, Peter [Center for Computational Nanoscience, A-1010 Wien (Austria)], E-mail: juan.delafiguera@iqfr.csic.es

    2008-07-15

    Thin films of Co/Ru(0001) are known to exhibit an unusual spin reorientation transition (SRT) coupled to the completion of Co atomic layers for Co thicknesses under four layers. By means of spin-polarized low-energy electron microscopy, we follow in real space the magnetization orientation during the growth of atomically thick capping layers on Co/Ru(0001). Capping with noble metal (Cu, Ag and Au) elements modifies the SRT depending on the Co and overlayer thickness and on the overlayer material, resulting in an expanded range of structures with high perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The origin of the SRT can be explained in terms of ab initio calculations of the layer-resolved contributions to the magnetic anisotropy energy. Besides the changes in the SRT introduced by the capping, a quantitative enhancement of the magnetic anisotropy is identified. A detailed analysis of the interplay between strain and purely electronic effects allows us to identify the conditions that lead to a high perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in thin hcp Co films.

  16. Structural changes induced spin-reorientation of ultrathin Mn films grown on Ag(001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouarab, N., E-mail: ouarab_nourdine@yahoo.fr [Quantum Physics and Dynamical Systems Laboratory, Ferhat Abbas University of Sétif (Algeria); Semiconductor Technology Research Center for Energetic-(CRTSE), 02, Bd Frantz Fanon Algiers, BP N° 140 (Algeria); Haroun, A. [Quantum Physics and Dynamical Systems Laboratory, Ferhat Abbas University of Sétif (Algeria); Baadji, N. [School of Physics and CRANN, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2016-12-01

    The strained body centered tetragonal (bct) Mn ultrathin film from lattice parameter a=2.89 Å to lattice value of 2.73 Å induces anti-ferromagnetic behavior between Mn layers. The magnetic easy axis of Mn film was demonstrated theoretically to switch from the in-plane to out-of-plane by magneto-optical Kerr effect investigation. By including spin–orbit coupling in full potential linearized augmented plane waves and linearized muffin-tin orbitals methods, manganese ultrathin film displays different magnetic behaviors and the spin-reorientation transition is shown to be correlated to these structural changes. The calculated magnetic moment of manganese planes are enhanced and reach a value of ~4.02 μ{sub B}. The polar magneto-optical Kerr effect is calculated for a photon energy range extended to 15 eV. It shows a pronounced peak in visible light. - Highlights: • The applied strain in Mn-bct structure induces anti-ferromagnetic behavior. • The easy magnetization axis is demonstrated to be out-of-plane. • The magnetic moment of Mn-layers are enhanced and reach a value of ~4.02 μ{sub B}. • Kerr spectra show significant polar responses for Mn films in the visible range. • The prominent structures in the Kerr spectra have been identified.

  17. Estrogen-induced collagen reorientation correlates with sympathetic denervation of the rat myometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, G F; Bianchimano, P; Brauer, M M

    2016-12-01

    Estrogen inhibits the growth and causes the degeneration (pruning) of sympathetic nerves supplying the rat myometrium. Previous cryoculture studies evidenced that substrate-bound signals contribute to diminish the ability of the estrogenized myometrium to support sympathetic nerve growth. Using electron microscopy, here we examined neurite-substrate interactions in myometrial cryocultures, observing that neurites grew associated to collagen fibrils present in the surface of the underlying cryosection. In addition, we assessed quantitatively the effects of estrogen on myometrial collagen organization in situ, using ovariectomized rats treated with estrogen and immature females undergoing puberty. Under low estrogen levels, most collagen fibrils were oriented in parallel to the muscle long axis (83% and 85%, respectively). Following estrogen treatment, 89% of fibrils was oriented perpendicularly to the muscle main axis; while after puberty, 57% of fibrils acquired this orientation. Immunohistochemistry combined with histology revealed that the vast majority of fine sympathetic nerve fibers supplying the myometrium courses within the areas where collagen realignment was observed. Finally, to assess whether depending on their orientation collagen fibrils can promote or inhibit neurite outgrowth, we employed cryocultures, now using as substrate tissue sections of rat-tail tendon. We observed that neurites grew extensively in the direction of the parallel-aligned collagen fibrils in the tendon main axis but were inhibited to grow perpendicularly to this axis. Collectively, these findings support the hypothesis that collagen reorientation may be one of the factors contributing to diminish the neuritogenic capacity of the estrogen-primed myometrial substrate.

  18. A novel computational modelling to describe the anisotropic, remodelling and reorientation behaviour of collagen fibrres in articular cartilage

    CERN Document Server

    Cortez, S; Alves, J L

    2016-01-01

    In articular cartilage the orientation of collagen fibres is not uniform, varying mostly with the depth on the tissue. Besides, the biomechanical response of each layer of the articular cartilage differs from the neighbouring ones, evolving through thickness as a function of the distribution, density and orientation of the collagen fibres. Based on a finite element implementation, a new continuum formulation is proposed to describe the remodelling and reorientation of the collagen fibres under arbitrary mechanical loads: the cartilaginous tissue is modelled based on a hyperelastic formulation, being the ground isotropic matrix described by a neo-Hookean law and the fibrillar anisotropic part modelled by a new anisotropic formulation introduced for the first time in the present work, in which both reorientation and remodelling are taken into account. To characterize the orientation of fibres, a structure tensor is defined to represent the expected distribution and orientation of fibres around a reference direc...

  19. A 3D finite-strain-based constitutive model for shape memory alloys accounting for thermomechanical coupling and martensite reorientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Moumni, Ziad; Zhang, Weihong; Xu, Yingjie; Zaki, Wael

    2017-06-01

    The paper presents a finite-strain constitutive model for shape memory alloys (SMAs) that accounts for thermomechanical coupling and martensite reorientation. The finite-strain formulation is based on a two-tier, multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient into thermal, elastic, and inelastic parts, where the inelastic deformation is further split into phase transformation and martensite reorientation components. A time-discrete formulation of the constitutive equations is proposed and a numerical integration algorithm is presented featuring proper symmetrization of the tensor variables and explicit formulation of the material and spatial tangent operators involved. The algorithm is used for finite element analysis of SMA components subjected to various loading conditions, including uniaxial, non-proportional, isothermal and adiabatic loading cases. The analysis is carried out using the FEA software Abaqus by means of a user-defined material subroutine, which is then utilized to simulate a SMA archwire undergoing large strains and rotations.

  20. Reorientable dipolar CuCa antisite and anomalous screening in CaCu3Ti4O12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delugas, Pietro; Alippi, Paola; Fiorentini, Vincenzo; Raineri, Vito

    2010-02-01

    Based on first-principles calculations, we show that the abundant CuCa antisite defect contributes sizably to dielectric screening in single-crystal CaCu3Ti4O12 . CuCa has a multi-minimum off-center equilibrium configuration, whereby it possesses a large and easily reorientable dipole moment. The low-temperature and frequency cut-off behavior of CuCa -induced response is consistent with experiment.

  1. Observation of re-entrant spin reorientation in TbFe1-xMnxO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yifei; Yang, Ya; Liu, Xinzhi; Kang, Jian; Hao, Lijie; Chen, Xiping; Xie, Lei; Sun, Guangai; Chandragiri, Venkatesh; Wang, Chin-Wei; Cao, Yiming; Chen, Fei; Liu, Yuntao; Chen, Dongfeng; Cao, Shixun; Lin, Chengtian; Ren, Wei; Zhang, Jincang

    2016-09-01

    We report a spin reorientation from Γ4(Gx, Ay, Fz) to Γ1(Ax, Gy, Cz) magnetic configuration near room temperature and a re-entrant transition from Γ1(Ax, Gy, Cz) to Γ4(Gx, Ay, Fz) at low temperature in TbFe1-xMnxO3 single crystals by performing both magnetization and neutron diffraction measurements. The Γ4 - Γ1 spin reorientation temperature can be enhanced to room temperature when x is around 0.5 ~ 0.6. These new transitions are distinct from the well-known Γ4 - Γ2 transition observed in TbFeO3, and the sinusoidal antiferromagnetism to complex spiral magnetism transition observed in multiferroic TbMnO3. We further study the evolution of magnetic entropy change (-ΔSM) versus Mn concentration to reveal the mechanism of the re-entrant spin reorientation behavior and the complex magnetic phase at low temperature. The variation of -ΔSM between a and c axes indicates the significant change of magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy in the TbFe1-xMnxO3 system. Furthermore, as Jahn-Teller inactive Fe3+ ions coexist with Jahn-Teller active Mn3+ ions, various anisotropy interactions, compete with each other, giving rise to a rich magnetic phase diagram. The large magnetocaloric effect reveals that the studied material could be a potential magnetic refrigerant. These findings expand our knowledge of spin reorientation phenomena and offer the alternative realization of spin-switching devices at room temperature in the rare-earth orthoferrites.

  2. Arousal and attention re-orienting in autism spectrum disorders: evidence from auditory event-related potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orekhova, Elena V; Stroganova, Tatiana A

    2014-01-01

    The extended phenotype of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) includes a combination of arousal regulation problems, sensory modulation difficulties, and attention re-orienting deficit. A slow and inefficient re-orienting to stimuli that appear outside of the attended sensory stream is thought to be especially detrimental for social functioning. Event-related potentials (ERPs) and magnetic fields (ERFs) may help to reveal which processing stages underlying brain response to unattended but salient sensory event are affected in individuals with ASD. Previous research focusing on two sequential stages of the brain response-automatic detection of physical changes in auditory stream, indexed by mismatch negativity (MMN), and evaluation of stimulus novelty, indexed by P3a component,-found in individuals with ASD either increased, decreased, or normal processing of deviance and novelty. The review examines these apparently conflicting results, notes gaps in previous findings, and suggests a potentially unifying hypothesis relating the dampened responses to unattended sensory events to the deficit in rapid arousal process. Specifically, "sensory gating" studies focused on pre-attentive arousal consistently demonstrated that brain response to unattended and temporally novel sound in ASD is already affected at around 100 ms after stimulus onset. We hypothesize that abnormalities in nicotinic cholinergic arousal pathways, previously reported in individuals with ASD, may contribute to these ERP/ERF aberrations and result in attention re-orienting deficit. Such cholinergic dysfunction may be present in individuals with ASD early in life and can influence both sensory processing and attention re-orienting behavior. Identification of early neurophysiological biomarkers for cholinergic deficit would help to detect infants "at risk" who can potentially benefit from particular types of therapies or interventions.

  3. Arousal and attention re-orienting in autism spectrum disorders: evidence from auditory event-related potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena V Orekhova

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The extended phenotype of autism spectrum disorders (ASD includes a combination of arousal regulation problems, sensory modulation difficulties, and attention re-orienting deficit. A slow and inefficient re-orienting to stimuli that appear outside of the attended sensory stream is thought to be especially detrimental for social functioning. Event-related potentials (ERPs and magnetic fields (ERFs may help to reveal which processing stages underlying brain response to unattended but salient sensory event are affected in individuals with ASD. Previous research focusing on two sequential stages of the brain response - automatic detection of physical changes in auditory stream, indexed by mismatch negativity (MMN, and evaluation of stimulus novelty, indexed by P3a component, - found in individuals with ASD either increased, decreased or normal processing of deviance and novelty. The review examines these apparently conflicting results, notes gaps in previous findings, and suggests a potentially unifying hypothesis relating the dampened responses to unattended sensory events to the deficit in rapid arousal process. Specifically, ‘sensory gating’ studies focused on pre-attentive arousal consistently demonstrated that brain response to unattended and temporally novel sound in ASD is already affected at around 100 ms after stimulus onset. We hypothesize that abnormalities in nicotinic cholinergic arousal pathways, previously reported in individuals with ASD, may contribute to these ERP/ERF aberrations and result in attention re-orienting deficit. Such cholinergic dysfunction may be present in individuals with ASD early in life and can influence both sensory processing and attention re-orienting behavior. Identification of early neurophysiological biomarkers for cholinergic deficit would help to detect infants at risk who can potentially benefit from particular types of therapies or interventions.

  4. rTMS of medial parieto-occipital cortex interferes with attentional reorienting during attention and reaching tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciavarro, Marco; Ambrosini, Ettore; Tosoni, Annalisa; Committeri, Giorgia; Fattori, Patrizia; Galletti, Claudio

    2013-09-01

    Unexpected changes in the location of a target for an upcoming action require both attentional reorienting and motor planning update. In both macaque and human brain, the medial posterior parietal cortex is involved in both phenomena but its causal role is still unclear. Here we used on-line rTMS over the putative human V6A (pV6A), a reach-related region in the dorsal part of the anterior bank of the parieto-occipital sulcus, during an attention and a reaching task requiring covert shifts of attention and planning of reaching movements toward cued targets in space. We found that rTMS increased RTs to invalidly cued but not to validly cued targets during both the attention and reaching task. Furthermore, we found that rTMS induced a deviation of reaching endpoints toward visual fixation and that this deviation was larger for invalidly cued targets. The results suggest that reorienting signals are used by human pV6A area to rapidly update the current motor plan or the ongoing action when a behaviorally relevant object unexpectedly occurs in an unattended location. The current findings suggest a direct involvement of the action-related dorso-medial visual stream in attentional reorienting and a more specific role of pV6A area in the dynamic, on-line control of reaching actions.

  5. Dual reorientation relaxation routes of water molecules in oxyanion’s hydration shell: A molecular geometry perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Wen Jun; Yang, Yi Isaac; Gao, Yi Qin, E-mail: gaoyq@pku.edu.cn [Institute of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering and Biodynamic Optical Imaging Center, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-12-14

    In this study, we examine how complex ions such as oxyanions influence the dynamic properties of water and whether differences exist between simple halide anions and oxyanions. Nitrate anion is taken as an example to investigate the hydration properties of oxyanions. Reorientation relaxation of its hydration water can occur through two different routes: water can either break its hydrogen bond with the nitrate to form one with another water or switch between two oxygen atoms of the same nitrate. The latter molecular mechanism increases the residence time of oxyanion’s hydration water and thus nitrate anion slows down the translational motion of neighbouring water. But it is also a “structure breaker” in that it accelerates the reorientation relaxation of hydration water. Such a result illustrates that differences do exist between the hydration of oxyanions and simple halide anions as a result of different molecular geometries. Furthermore, the rotation of the nitrate solute is coupled with the hydrogen bond rearrangement of its hydration water. The nitrate anion can either tilt along the axis perpendicularly to the plane or rotate in the plane. We find that the two reorientation relaxation routes of the hydration water lead to different relaxation dynamics in each of the two above movements of the nitrate solute. The current study suggests that molecular geometry could play an important role in solute hydration and dynamics.

  6. Role of rare earth on the Mn3+ spin reorientation in multiferroic Ho1-xLuxMnO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magesh, J.; Murugavel, P.; Mangalam, R. V. K.; Singh, K.; Simon, Ch.; Prellier, W.

    2013-09-01

    The role of rare earth ion R3+ in spin reorientation and magneto dielectric response is investigated by substitution of non-magnetic smaller ionic radii Lu3+ in multiferroic hexagonal HoMnO3. The XRD analysis suggests that the dopant may preferably goes to C3V site up to 1/3rd of the composition in order to reduce the lattice distortion. We suggest that the R3+ ion at C3 site could play a strong role in spin reorientation than the C3V site. The observation of TSR even in LuMnO3 precludes the role of rare earth magnetic moment in driving the spin reorientation. Surprisingly, the magneto dielectric response of HoMnO3 is dominated by the rare earth RO8 dipoles. The oppositely oriented RO8 dipole at the C3V and C3 determines the magneto dielectric response in various magnetic phases reaffirming the site specific substitution. Thus, site specific doping could be a way to enhance the magnetoelectric coupling strength.

  7. Tooth reorientation affects tooth function during prey processing and tooth ontogeny in the lesser electric ray, Narcine brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Mason N; Ramsay, Jason B; Schaefer, Justin T

    2008-01-01

    The dental anatomy of elasmobranch fishes (sharks, rays and relatives) creates a functional system that is more dynamic than that of mammalian dentition. Continuous dental replacement (where new teeth are moved rostrally to replace older ones) and indirect fibrous attachment of the dentition to the jaw allow teeth to reorient relative to the jaw over both long- and short-term scales, respectively. In this study, we examine the processing behavior and dental anatomy of the lesser electric ray Narcine brasiliensis (Olfers, 1831) to illustrate that the freedom of movement of elasmobranch dentition allows a functional flexibility that can be important for complex prey processing behaviors. From static manipulations of dissected jaws and observations of feeding events in live animals, we show that the teeth rotate during jaw protrusion, resulting in a secondary grasping mechanism that likely serves to hold prey while the buccal cavity is flushed free of sediment. The function of teeth is not always readily apparent from morphology; in addition to short-term reorientation, the long-term dental reorientation during replacement allows a given tooth to serve multiple functions during tooth ontogeny. Unlike teeth inside the mouth, the cusps of external teeth (on the portion of the tooth pad that extends past the occlusal plane) lay flat, such that the labial faces act as a functional battering surface, protecting the jaws during prey excavation.

  8. Spin reorientation driven by the interplay between spin-orbit coupling and Hund's rule coupling in iron pnictides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Morten H.; Kang, Jian; Andersen, Brian M.; Eremin, Ilya; Fernandes, Rafael M.

    2015-12-01

    In most magnetically-ordered iron pnictides, the magnetic moments lie in the FeAs planes, parallel to the modulation direction of the spin stripes. However, recent experiments in hole-doped iron pnictides have observed a reorientation of the magnetic moments from in-plane to out-of-plane. Interestingly, this reorientation is accompanied by a change in the magnetic ground state from a stripe antiferromagnet to a tetragonal nonuniform magnetic configuration. Motivated by these recent observations, here we investigate the origin of the spin anisotropy in iron pnictides using an itinerant microscopic electronic model that respects all the symmetry properties of a single FeAs plane. We find that the interplay between the spin-orbit coupling and the Hund's rule coupling can account for the observed spin anisotropies, including the spin reorientation in hole-doped pnictides, without the need to invoke orbital or nematic order. Our calculations also reveal an asymmetry between the magnetic ground states of electron- and hole-doped compounds, with only the latter displaying tetragonal magnetic states.

  9. On the nonlinear problem of the three-axis reorientation of a three-rotor gyrostat in the game noise model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorotnikov, V. I.; Martyshenko, Yu. G.

    2013-09-01

    The nonlinear game problem of the three-axis reorientation of an asymmetric solid body with three flywheels (rotors) has been solved. Acceptable levels of uncontrollable noise depending on given constraints of control moments have been estimated.

  10. Satellite data compression

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Bormin

    2011-01-01

    Satellite Data Compression covers recent progress in compression techniques for multispectral, hyperspectral and ultra spectral data. A survey of recent advances in the fields of satellite communications, remote sensing and geographical information systems is included. Satellite Data Compression, contributed by leaders in this field, is the first book available on satellite data compression. It covers onboard compression methodology and hardware developments in several space agencies. Case studies are presented on recent advances in satellite data compression techniques via various prediction-

  11. Reorientation Timescales and Pattern Dynamics for Titan's Dunes: Does the Tail Wag the Dog or the Dragon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, R. C.; Hayes, A. G.; McCormick, C.; Ballard, C.; Troy, S. A.

    2012-04-01

    Fields of bedform patterns persist across many orders of magnitude, from cm-scale sub-aqueous current ripples to km-scale aeolian dunes, and form with surprisingly little difference in expression despite a range of formative environments. Because of the remarkable similarity among bedform patterns, extracting information about climate and environment from these patterns is a challenge. For example, crestline orientation is not diagnostic of a particular flow regime; similar patterns form under many different flow configurations. On Titan, these challenges have played out with many attempts to reconcile dune crestline orientation with modeled and expected wind regimes. We propose that thinking about the time-scale of the change in dune orientation, rather than the orientation itself, can provide new insights on the long-term stability of the dune-field patterns and the formative wind regime. In this work, we apply the crestline re-orientation model developed by Werner and Kocurek [Geology, 1997] to the equatorial dune fields of Titan. We use Cassini Synthetic Aperture Radar images processed through a de-noising algorithm recently developed by Lucas et al. [LPSC, 2012] to measure variations in pattern parameters (crest spacing, crest length and defect density, which is the number of defect pairs per total crest length) both within and between Titan's dune fields to describe pattern maturity and identify areas where changes in dune orientation are likely to occur (or may already be occurring). Measured defect densities are similar to Earth's largest linear dune fields, such as the Namib Sand Sea and the Simpson Desert. We use measured defect densities in the Werner and Kocurek model to estimate crestline reorientation rates. We find reorientation timescales varying from ten to a hundred thousand times the average migration timescale (time to migrate a bedform one meter, ~1 Titan year according to Tokano (Aeolian Research, 2010)). Well-organized patterns have the

  12. Influence of spin-phonon interactions and spin-reorientation transitions on the phonon properties of RCrO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolov, A. T.; Apostolova, I. N.; Wesselinowa, J. M.

    2017-01-01

    Using a microscopic model and a Green’s function technique we calculate the renormalized phonon energy in multiferroic RCrO3 (R = Sm, Dy, Er, Pr, Gd and Y) compounds as a function of temperature, magnetic field and R-ionic radius. We explain the observed anomalies in the temperature dependence of the phonon spectra based on a detailed analysis of the influence of the magnetic sublattices, the interaction between them and the spin-reorientation (SR) transition on lattice vibrations via spin-phonon interactions. When the rare earth ions are magnetic we investigate their essential role for the anomalies around the SR temperature. For the case when R is nonmagnetic, for example YCrO3, we propose a new microscopic model. We define an induced Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (IDM) vector as a consequence from the spontaneous polarization. This IDM interaction is responsible for the appearance of a temperature-driven SR transition, which itself is responsible for the phonon anomalies at low temperatures. The numerical calculations are in good qualitative agreement with the experimental data.

  13. Reorientation mechanisms of phyllosilicates in the mudstone-to-slate transition at Lehigh Gap, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Nei-Che; Peacor, Donald R.; van der Pluijm, Ben A.

    1995-03-01

    The mudstone-to-slate transition of the Martinsburg Formation at Lehigh Gap, Pennsylvania, was re-examined using a new transmission-mode X-ray texture goniometer, supplemented by SEM, XRD, and optical studies. Three mesoscopic zones are recognized in the outcrop: (I) mudstone, (II) transition, and (III) slate zone. In the mudstone zone, the mica basal planes are parallel to bedding whereas the preferred orientation of the chlorite basal planes is up to 30° shallower than bedding. The angular difference between chlorite and mica decreases towards the transition zone, becoming subparallel at ca. 50 m from the contact with the overlying Shawangunk Formation. In the transition zone, the preferred orientations of both mica and chlorite are intermediate to bedding and cleavage orientations, which is consistent with mechanical reorientation of phyllosilicates. This is supported by a decrease in March strain with a minimum at ca. 95 m from the contact for both mica and chlorite. SEM observations similarly show the importance of grain rotation in large detrital grains. In the slate zone, both chlorite and mica orientations are parallel to cleavage. Chlorite and mica in the cleavage orientation of the slate zone have high Fe contents, whereas low-Fe mica and Mg > Fe chlorite dominate in the mudstone and transition zone, which indicates that dissolution-neocrystallization is the dominant mechanism in the slate zone. Thus, mechanical rotation of large detrital grains is important in the early stages of cleavage development, with dissolution—neocrystallization occurring at all stages and becoming dominant in the more evolved stages.

  14. Re-orienting crop improvement for the changing climatic conditions of the 21st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mba Chikelu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A 70% increase in food production is required over the next four decades to feed an ever-increasing population. The inherent difficulties in achieving this unprecedented increase are exacerbated by the yield-depressing consequences of climate change and variations and by the pressures on food supply by other competing demographic and socioeconomic demands. With the dwindling or stagnant agricultural land and water resources, the sought-after increases will therefore be attained mainly through the enhancement of crop productivity under eco-efficient crop production systems. ‘Smart’ crop varieties that yield more with fewer inputs will be pivotal to success. Plant breeding must be re-oriented in order to generate these ‘smart’ crop varieties. This paper highlights some of the scientific and technological tools that ought to be the staple of all breeding programs. We also make the case that plant breeding must be enabled by adequate policies, including those that spur innovation and investments. To arrest and reverse the worrisome trend of declining capacities for crop improvement, a new generation of plant breeders must also be trained. Equally important, winning partnerships, including public-private sector synergies, are needed for 21st century plant breeding to bear fruits. We also urge the adoption of the continuum approach to the management of plant genetic resources for food and agriculture as means to improved cohesion of the components of its value chain. Compellingly also, the National Agricultural Research and Extension System of developing countries require comprehensive overhauling and strengthening as crop improvement and other interventions require a sustained platform to be effective. The development of a suite of actionable policy interventions to be packaged for assisting countries in developing result-oriented breeding programs is also called for.

  15. Magnetic reorientation induced by pressure solution: A potential mechanism for orogenic-scale remagnetizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Urcia, Belén; Pueyo, Emilio L.; Larrasoaña, Juan C.

    2008-01-01

    New paleomagnetic analyses of Triassic, Cretaceous and Eocene strata in the south-central Pyrenees show evidence for a widespread remagnetization, located along the southern border of the Axial Zone, the Internal Sierras, and the northern part of the Jaca-Pamplona basin. This remagnetization, always reversed in polarity, was acquired after an extensive period of Late Eocene-Early Oligocene folding and tilting in the area, and affects limestones, sandstones, marls and red beds. In addition, a characteristic prefolding component was identified in 30% of Upper Cretaceous and Triassic red beds. These results, together with a revaluation of previously published paleomagnetic data from the central Pyrenees, indicate that the spatial distribution of the postfolding remagnetization coincides with that of a domain of pressure solution cleavage. A relationship between the intensity of the remagnetization and the characteristic (prefolding component) with respect to the density of cleavage surfaces, leads us to propose a mechanism for the remagnetization related to the development of pressure solution cleavage that is framed within the tectonic evolution of the central Pyrenees. Partial dissolution of rock under tectonic compression leads to the liberation and subsequent accumulation of insoluble minerals in cleavage planes. Magnetic grains are part of the relatively insoluble residue, and they reorient in the presence of the ambient field after they are freed during dissolution of the rock matrix. Chemical reequilibrium (dissolution and/or neoformation of magnetic carriers) during this process cannot be excluded. The remagnetization mechanism we propose can help to explain widespread remagnetizations in low to moderately deformed rocks without the need of large-scale migration of orogenic fluids.

  16. Subliminal Reorientation and Repositioning in Immersive Virtual Environments using Saccadic Suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolte, Benjamin; Lappe, Markus

    2015-04-01

    Virtual reality strives to provide a user with an experience of a simulated world that feels as natural as the real world. Yet, to induce this feeling, sometimes it becomes necessary for technical reasons to deviate from a one-to-one correspondence between the real and the virtual world, and to reorient or reposition the user's viewpoint. Ideally, users should not notice the change of the viewpoint to avoid breaks in perceptual continuity. Saccades, the fast eye movements that we make in order to switch gaze from one object to another, produce a visual discontinuity on the retina, but this is not perceived because the visual system suppresses perception during saccades. As a consequence, our perception fails to detect rotations of the visual scene during saccades. We investigated whether saccadic suppression of image displacement (SSID) can be used in an immersive virtual environment (VE) to unconsciously rotate and translate the observer's viewpoint. To do this, the scene changes have to be precisely time-locked to the saccade onset. We used electrooculography (EOG) for eye movement tracking and assessed the performance of two modified eye movement classification algorithms for the challenging task of online saccade detection that is fast enough for SSID. We investigated the sensitivity of participants to translations (forward/backward) and rotations (in the transverse plane) during trans-saccadic scene changes. We found that participants were unable to detect approximately ±0.5m translations along the line of gaze and ±5° rotations in the transverse plane during saccades with an amplitude of 15°. If the user stands still, our approach exploiting SSID thus provides the means to unconsciously change the user's virtual position and/or orientation. For future research and applications, exploiting SSID has the potential to improve existing redirected walking and change blindness techniques for unlimited navigation through arbitrarily-sized VEs by real walking.

  17. Pressure-induced spin fluctuations and spin reorientation in hexagonal manganites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlenko, D. P.; Kichanov, S. E.; Lee, S.; Park, J.-G.; Savenko, B. N.

    2007-04-01

    The magnetic structures of hexagonal manganites YMnO3 and LuMnO3 have been studied by powder neutron diffraction up to 6 GPa in the temperature range 10-295 K. At ambient pressure, a triangular antiferromagnetic (AFM) state of a Γ1 irreducible representation is stable below TN = 70 K in YMnO3. Upon the application of high pressure, a spin reorientation is induced and the triangular AFM structure evolves from Γ1 to Γ1+Γ2 representations. On the other hand, in LuMnO3 the triangular AFM state of a Γ2 irreducible representation with TNap90 K remains stable over the entire pressure range investigated. The ordered magnetic moment values decrease under pressure with dM/dP = -0.35 μB GPa-1 in YMnO3 and -0.08 μB GPa-1 in LuMnO3. Simultaneously, a considerable increase in diffuse scattering intensity was found in YMnO3, while it was much less pronounced for LuMnO3. Both features indicate the enhancement of spin fluctuations due to geometrical frustration effects and an increase in the volume fraction of the spin-liquid state coexisting with the ordered AFM phase. The characteristic spin correlation length is weakly affected by pressure. The relationship between the pressure-induced behaviour of magnetic structure and the structural characteristics of the quasi-two-dimensional (2D) triangular network formed by Mn and O ions in hexagonal RMnO3 is analysed.

  18. Re-orientation transition in molecular thin films: Potts model with dipolar interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Danh-Tai; Kasperski, Maciej; Puszkarski, Henryk; Diep, H T

    2013-02-06

    We study the low-temperature behavior and the phase transition of a thin film by Monte Carlo simulation. The thin film has a simple cubic lattice structure where each site is occupied by a Potts parameter which indicates the molecular orientation of the site. We take only three molecular orientations in this paper, which correspond to the three-state Potts model. The Hamiltonian of the system includes (i) the exchange interaction J(ij) between nearest-neighbor sites i and j, (ii) the long-range dipolar interaction of amplitude D truncated at a cutoff distance r(c), and (iii) a single-ion perpendicular anisotropy of amplitude A. We allow J(ij) = J(s) between surface spins, and J(ij) = J otherwise. We show that the ground state depends on the ratio D/A and r(c). For a single layer, for a given A, there is a critical value D(c) below (above) which the ground-state (GS) configuration of molecular axes is perpendicular (parallel) to the film surface. When the temperature T is increased, a re-orientation transition occurs near D(c): the low-T in-plane ordering undergoes a transition to the perpendicular ordering at a finite T, below the transition to the paramagnetic phase. The same phenomenon is observed in the case of a film with a thickness. Comparison with the Fe/Gd experiment is given. We show that the surface phase transition can occur below or above the bulk transition depending on the ratio J(s)/J. Surface and bulk order parameters as well as other physical quantities are shown and discussed.

  19. Xichang Satellite Launch Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiuJie

    2004-01-01

    Xichang Satellite Launch Center(XSLC) is mainly for geosynchronous orbit launches. The main purpose of XSLC is to launch spacecraft, such as broadcasting,communications and meteorological satellites, into geo-stationary orbit.Most of the commercial satellite launches of Long March vehicles have been from Xichang Satellite Launch Center. With 20 years' development,XSLC can launch 5 kinds of launch vehicles and send satellites into geostationary orbit and polar orbit. In the future, moon exploration satellites will also be launched from XSLC.

  20. Handbook of satellite applications

    CERN Document Server

    Madry, Scott; Camacho-Lara, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    The first edition of this ground breaking reference work was the most comprehensive reference source available about the key aspects of the satellite applications field. This updated second edition covers the technology, the markets, applications and regulations related to satellite telecommunications, broadcasting and networking—including civilian and military systems; precise satellite navigation and timing networks (i.e. GPS and others); remote sensing and meteorological satellite systems. Created under the auspices of the International Space University based in France, this brand new edition is now expanded to cover new innovative small satellite constellations, new commercial launching systems, innovation in military application satellites and their acquisition, updated appendices, a useful glossary and more.

  1. Galileo satellite antenna modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steigenberger, Peter; Dach, Rolf; Prange, Lars; Montenbruck, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    The space segment of the European satellite navigation system Galileo currently consists of six satellites. Four of them belong to the first generation of In-Orbit Validation (IOV) satellites whereas the other two are Full Operational Capability (FOC) satellites. High-precision geodetic applications require detailed knowledge about the actual phase center of the satellite and receiver antenna. The deviation of this actual phase center from a well-defined reference point is described by phase center offsets (PCOs) and phase center variations (PCVs). Unfortunately, no public information is available about the Galileo satellite antenna PCOs and PCVs, neither for the IOV, nor the FOC satellites. Therefore, conventional values for the IOV satellite antenna PCOs have been adopted for the Multi-GNSS experiment (MGEX) of the International GNSS Service (IGS). The effect of the PCVs is currently neglected and no PCOs for the FOC satellites are available yet. To overcome this deficiency in GNSS observation modeling, satellite antenna PCOs and PCVs are estimated for the Galileo IOV satellites based on global GNSS tracking data of the MGEX network and additional stations of the legacy IGS network. Two completely independent solutions are computed with the Bernese and Napeos software packages. The PCO and PCV values of the individual satellites are analyzed and the availability of two different solutions allows for an accuracy assessment. The FOC satellites are built by a different manufacturer and are also equipped with another type of antenna panel compared to the IOV satellites. Signal transmission of the first FOC satellite has started in December 2014 and activation of the second satellite is expected for early 2015. Based on the available observations PCO estimates and, optionally PCVs of the FOC satellites will be presented as well. Finally, the impact of the new antenna model on the precision and accuracy of the Galileo orbit determination is analyzed.

  2. Satellite Attitude Control System Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.T. Conti

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Future space missions will involve satellites with great autonomy and stringent pointing precision, requiring of the Attitude Control Systems (ACS with better performance than before, which is function of the control algorithms implemented on board computers. The difficulties for developing experimental ACS test is to obtain zero gravity and torque free conditions similar to the SCA operate in space. However, prototypes for control algorithms experimental verification are fundamental for space mission success. This paper presents the parameters estimation such as inertia matrix and position of mass centre of a Satellite Attitude Control System Simulator (SACSS, using algorithms based on least square regression and least square recursive methods. Simulations have shown that both methods have estimated the system parameters with small error. However, the least square recursive methods have performance more adequate for the SACSS objectives. The SACSS platform model will be used to do experimental verification of fundamental aspects of the satellite attitude dynamics and design of different attitude control algorithm.

  3. Multi-life cycles utilization of retired satellites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Retired geosynchronous (GEO) communication satellites affect the GEO orbit environment in outer space. According to the new concept of modern design, the authors propose creatively a method of reusing retired GEO communication satellites, through adjusting retired GEO satellites to slightly inclined orbit geosynchronous (SIGSO) satellites. After these retired satellites are applied to the navigation and communication system, integrity of navigation system and positioning accuracy of the system is improved. Meanwhile, some transponders on these retired satellites can be used to establish a new satellite communication service, and initiate the study and utilization of the multi-life cycle for retired satellites. Experimental results show that this project has significant social value and can make remarkable economic benefit.

  4. Multi-life cycles utilization of retired satellites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI HuLi; AI GuoXiang; HAN YanBen; MA LiHua; CHEN JiBin; GENG JianPing

    2009-01-01

    Retired geosynchronous (GEO) communication satellites affect the GEO orbit environment in outer apace.According to the new concept of modern design,the authors propose creatively a method of reusing retired GEO communication satellites,through adjusting retired GEO satellites to slightly inclined orbit geosynchronous (SIGSO) satellites.After these retired satellites are applied to the navigation and communication system,integrity of navigation system and positioning accuracy of the system is improved.Meanwhile,some transponders on these retired satellites can be used to establish a new satellite communication service,and initiate the study and utilization of the multi-life cycle for retired satellites.Experimental results show that this project has significant social value and can make remarkable economic benefit.

  5. Satellite-Delivered Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnall, Gail C.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the application of satellite information delivery to training. Describes a new trend, horizontal programming. Also discusses vertical programming and in-house production of training materials. Lists vendors of satellite-based training. (CH)

  6. GPS Satellite Simulation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The GPS satellite simulation facility consists of a GPS satellite simulator controlled by either a Silicon Graphics Origin 2000 or PC depending upon unit under test...

  7. China's Recoverable Satellites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tang Boehang

    2008-01-01

    @@ By the end of 2006, China had launched 24 recoverable satellites (FSW) in total. Among them, 23 were launched successfully, of which all but one were successfully recovered. Recoverable satellites launched by China are listed in Table 1.

  8. Satellite Tags- Hawaii EEZ

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Satellite tagging was implemented in 2013. Satellite tagging is conducted using a Dan Inject air rifle and deployment arrows designed by Wildlife Computers. Two...

  9. Upgraded Radiometer Improves Observation of Meteorological Satellite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ A new meteorological satellite, Fengyun-2C,was successfully launched at 9:20 am on Oct. 19 in Xichang Satellite Launch Center in China's southwest province of Sichuan. The Fengyun-2 (or FY-2,meaning "winds and clouds" in Chinese) is a geostationary meteorological satellite series of China.China started its FY-2 development program in 1980 and has sent two experimental models of FY-2 series in 1997 and 2000 respectively. The FY2-C is China's first professional one in the series.

  10. Satellite communication engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Kolawole, Michael Olorunfunmi

    2013-01-01

    An undeniably rich and thorough guide to satellite communication engineering, Satellite Communication Engineering, Second Edition presents the fundamentals of information communications systems in a simple and succinct way. This book considers both the engineering aspects of satellite systems as well as the practical issues in the broad field of information transmission. Implementing concepts developed on an intuitive, physical basis and utilizing a combination of applications and performance curves, this book starts off with a progressive foundation in satellite technology, and then moves on

  11. FY 2016 Status Report: CIRFT Testing on Spent Nuclear Fuels and Hydride Reorientation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Wang, Hong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Yan, Yong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Bevard, Bruce B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Scaglione, John M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division

    2016-08-04

    This report provides a detailed description of the Cyclic Integrated Reversible-Bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT) testing conducted on spent nuclear fuel (SNF) rods in FY 2016, including hydride reorientation test results. Contact-based measurement, or three-LVDT-based curvature measurement, of SNF rods has proven to be quite reliable in CIRFT testing. However, how the linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) head contacts the SNF rod may have a significant effect on the curvature measurement, depending on the magnitude and direction of rod curvature. To correct such contact/curvature issues, sensor spacing, defined as the amount of separation between the three LVDT probes, is a critical measurement that can be used to calculate rod curvature once the deflections are obtained. Recently developed CIRFT data analyses procedures were integrated into FY 2016 CIRFT testing results for the curvature measurements. The variations in fatigue life are provided in terms of moment, equivalent stress, curvature, and equivalent strain for the tested SNFs. The equivalent stress plot collapsed the data points from all of the SNFs into a single zone. A detailed examination revealed that, at same stress level, fatigue lives display a descending order as follows: H. B. Robinson Nuclear Power Station (HBR), Limerick Nuclear Power Station (LMK), mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX). If looking at the strain, then LMK fuel has a slightly longer fatigue life than HBR fuel, but the difference is subtle. The knee point of endurance limit in the curve of moment and curvature or equivalent quantities is more clearly defined for LMK and HBR fuels. The treatment affects the fatigue life of specimens. Both a drop of 12 in. and radial hydride treatment (RHT) have a negative impact on fatigue life. The effect of thermal annealing on MOX fuel rods was relatively small at higher amplitude but became significant at low amplitude of moment. Thermal annealing tended to extend the fatigue life of

  12. FY 2016 Status Report: Documentation of All CIRFT Data including Hydride Reorientation Tests (Draft M2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Wang, Hong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Jiang, Hao [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Yan, Yong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Bevard, Bruce B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Scaglione, John M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division

    2016-09-04

    The first portion of this report provides a detailed description of fiscal year (FY) 2015 test result corrections and analysis updates based on FY 2016 updates to the Cyclic Integrated Reversible-Bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT) program methodology, which is used to evaluate the vibration integrity of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) under normal conditions of transport (NCT). The CIRFT consists of a U-frame test setup and a real-time curvature measurement method. The three-component U-frame setup of the CIRFT has two rigid arms and linkages connecting to a universal testing machine. The curvature SNF rod bending is obtained through a three-point deflection measurement method. Three linear variable differential transformers (LVDTs) are clamped to the side connecting plates of the U-frame and used to capture deformation of the rod. The second portion of this report provides the latest CIRFT data, including data for the hydride reorientation test. The variations in fatigue life are provided in terms of moment, equivalent stress, curvature, and equivalent strain for the tested SNFs. The equivalent stress plot collapsed the data points from all of the SNF samples into a single zone. A detailed examination revealed that, at the same stress level, fatigue lives display a descending order as follows: H. B. Robinson Nuclear Power Station (HBR), LMK, and mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX). Just looking at the strain, LMK fuel has a slightly longer fatigue life than HBR fuel, but the difference is subtle. The third portion of this report provides finite element analysis (FEA) dynamic deformation simulation of SNF assemblies . In a horizontal layout under NCT, the fuel assembly’s skeleton, which is formed by guide tubes and spacer grids, is the primary load bearing apparatus carrying and transferring vibration loads within an SNF assembly. These vibration loads include interaction forces between the SNF assembly and the canister basket walls. Therefore, the integrity of the guide

  13. FY 2016 Status Report: Documentation of All CIRFT Data including Hydride Reorientation Tests (Draft M2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Wang, Hong [ORNL

    2016-09-01

    The first portion of this report provides a detailed description of fiscal year (FY) 2015 test result corrections and analysis updates based on FY 2016 updates to the Cyclic Integrated Reversible-Bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT) program methodology, which is used to evaluate the vibration integrity of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) under normal conditions of transport (NCT). The CIRFT consists of a U-frame test setup and a real-time curvature measurement method. The three-component U-frame setup of the CIRFT has two rigid arms and linkages connecting to a universal testing machine. The curvature SNF rod bending is obtained through a three-point deflection measurement method. Three linear variable differential transformers (LVDTs) are clamped to the side connecting plates of the U-frame and used to capture deformation of the rod. The second portion of this report provides the latest CIRFT data, including data for the hydride reorientation test. The variations in fatigue life are provided in terms of moment, equivalent stress, curvature, and equivalent strain for the tested SNFs. The equivalent stress plot collapsed the data points from all of the SNF samples into a single zone. A detailed examination revealed that, at the same stress level, fatigue lives display a descending order as follows: H. B. Robinson Nuclear Power Station (HBR), LMK, and mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX). Just looking at the strain, LMK fuel has a slightly longer fatigue life than HBR fuel, but the difference is subtle. The third portion of this report provides finite element analysis (FEA) dynamic deformation simulation of SNF assemblies . In a horizontal layout under NCT, the fuel assembly’s skeleton, which is formed by guide tubes and spacer grids, is the primary load bearing apparatus carrying and transferring vibration loads within an SNF assembly. These vibration loads include interaction forces between the SNF assembly and the canister basket walls. Therefore, the integrity of the guide

  14. Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiuJie

    2004-01-01

    There are three major space launch bases in China, the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center,the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center and the Xichang Satellite Launch Center. All the three launch centers are located in sparsely populated areas where the terrain is even and the field of vision is broad. Security, transport conditions and the influence of the axial rotation

  15. Geodetic Secor Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-06-01

    simple, and had low-power lem. 17 14. Satellite Orientation . The satellite was designed to maintain a constant relationship between the antenna...the same satellite orientation . Further considerations were Th oscillations, however, when higher orbital ranges (500-2500 nautical miles) -, 3 a

  16. TC-2 Satellite Delivered

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    On April 18, 2005, TC-2, the second satellite of Double Star Program (DSP), which was jointly developed by CNSA and ESA, was approved to be delivered to the user after the on-board test and trial operation. The satellite is working well and the performance can meet the user's need. The satellite has collected large amount of valuable scientific data

  17. Virus Satellites Drive Viral Evolution and Ecology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén Frígols

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Virus satellites are widespread subcellular entities, present both in eukaryotic and in prokaryotic cells. Their modus vivendi involves parasitism of the life cycle of their inducing helper viruses, which assures their transmission to a new host. However, the evolutionary and ecological implications of satellites on helper viruses remain unclear. Here, using staphylococcal pathogenicity islands (SaPIs as a model of virus satellites, we experimentally show that helper viruses rapidly evolve resistance to their virus satellites, preventing SaPI proliferation, and SaPIs in turn can readily evolve to overcome phage resistance. Genomic analyses of both these experimentally evolved strains as well as naturally occurring bacteriophages suggest that the SaPIs drive the coexistence of multiple alleles of the phage-coded SaPI inducing genes, as well as sometimes selecting for the absence of the SaPI depressing genes. We report similar (accidental evolution of resistance to SaPIs in laboratory phages used for Staphylococcus aureus typing and also obtain the same qualitative results in both experimental evolution and phylogenetic studies of Enterococcus faecalis phages and their satellites viruses. In summary, our results suggest that helper and satellite viruses undergo rapid coevolution, which is likely to play a key role in the evolution and ecology of the viruses as well as their prokaryotic hosts.

  18. Virus Satellites Drive Viral Evolution and Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frígols, Belén; Quiles-Puchalt, Nuria; Mir-Sanchis, Ignacio; Donderis, Jorge; Elena, Santiago F; Buckling, Angus; Novick, Richard P; Marina, Alberto; Penadés, José R

    2015-10-01

    Virus satellites are widespread subcellular entities, present both in eukaryotic and in prokaryotic cells. Their modus vivendi involves parasitism of the life cycle of their inducing helper viruses, which assures their transmission to a new host. However, the evolutionary and ecological implications of satellites on helper viruses remain unclear. Here, using staphylococcal pathogenicity islands (SaPIs) as a model of virus satellites, we experimentally show that helper viruses rapidly evolve resistance to their virus satellites, preventing SaPI proliferation, and SaPIs in turn can readily evolve to overcome phage resistance. Genomic analyses of both these experimentally evolved strains as well as naturally occurring bacteriophages suggest that the SaPIs drive the coexistence of multiple alleles of the phage-coded SaPI inducing genes, as well as sometimes selecting for the absence of the SaPI depressing genes. We report similar (accidental) evolution of resistance to SaPIs in laboratory phages used for Staphylococcus aureus typing and also obtain the same qualitative results in both experimental evolution and phylogenetic studies of Enterococcus faecalis phages and their satellites viruses. In summary, our results suggest that helper and satellite viruses undergo rapid coevolution, which is likely to play a key role in the evolution and ecology of the viruses as well as their prokaryotic hosts.

  19. Virus Satellites Drive Viral Evolution and Ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frígols, Belén; Quiles-Puchalt, Nuria; Mir-Sanchis, Ignacio; Donderis, Jorge; Elena, Santiago F.; Buckling, Angus; Novick, Richard P.; Marina, Alberto; Penadés, José R.

    2015-01-01

    Virus satellites are widespread subcellular entities, present both in eukaryotic and in prokaryotic cells. Their modus vivendi involves parasitism of the life cycle of their inducing helper viruses, which assures their transmission to a new host. However, the evolutionary and ecological implications of satellites on helper viruses remain unclear. Here, using staphylococcal pathogenicity islands (SaPIs) as a model of virus satellites, we experimentally show that helper viruses rapidly evolve resistance to their virus satellites, preventing SaPI proliferation, and SaPIs in turn can readily evolve to overcome phage resistance. Genomic analyses of both these experimentally evolved strains as well as naturally occurring bacteriophages suggest that the SaPIs drive the coexistence of multiple alleles of the phage-coded SaPI inducing genes, as well as sometimes selecting for the absence of the SaPI depressing genes. We report similar (accidental) evolution of resistance to SaPIs in laboratory phages used for Staphylococcus aureus typing and also obtain the same qualitative results in both experimental evolution and phylogenetic studies of Enterococcus faecalis phages and their satellites viruses. In summary, our results suggest that helper and satellite viruses undergo rapid coevolution, which is likely to play a key role in the evolution and ecology of the viruses as well as their prokaryotic hosts. PMID:26495848

  20. Class analysis and the reorientation of class theory: the case of persisting differentials in educational attainment. 1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldthorpe, John H

    2010-01-01

    In class analysis the main regularities that have been established by empirical research are not ones of long-term class formation or decomposition, as envisaged in Marxist or liberal theory, but rather ones that exhibit the powerful resistance to change of class relations and associated life-chances and patterns of social action. If these regularities are to be explained, theory needs to be correspondingly reoriented, and must abandon functionalist and teleological assumptions in favour of providing more secure micro-foundations. This argument is developed and illustrated in the course of an attempt to apply rational action theory to the explanation of persisting class differentials in educational attainment.

  1. Reorientation of the high mobility plane in pentacene-based carbon nanotube enabled vertical field effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Mitchell A; Liu, Bo; Jayaraman, Ramesh; Gilbert, Stephen M; Kim, Do Young; So, Franky; Rinzler, Andrew G

    2011-01-25

    The large current densities attained by carbon nanotube enabled vertical field effect transistors using crystalline organic channel materials are somewhat unexpected given the known large anisotropy in the mobility of crystalline organics and their conventional ordering on dielectric surfaces which tends to orient their high mobility axes parallel to the surface. This seeming contradiction is resolved by the finding that the nanotubes induce a molecular ordering that reorients the high mobility axes to favor current flow in a direction perpendicular to the substrate surface.

  2. Advanced satellite communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staples, Edward J.; Lie, Sen

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this research program was to develop an innovative advanced satellite receiver/demodulator utilizing surface acoustic wave (SAW) chirp transform processor and coherent BPSK demodulation. The algorithm of this SAW chirp Fourier transformer is of the Convolve - Multiply - Convolve (CMC) type, utilizing off-the-shelf reflective array compressor (RAC) chirp filters. This satellite receiver, if fully developed, was intended to be used as an on-board multichannel communications repeater. The Advanced Communications Receiver consists of four units: (1) CMC processor, (2) single sideband modulator, (3) demodulator, and (4) chirp waveform generator and individual channel processors. The input signal is composed of multiple user transmission frequencies operating independently from remotely located ground terminals. This signal is Fourier transformed by the CMC Processor into a unique time slot for each user frequency. The CMC processor is driven by a waveform generator through a single sideband (SSB) modulator. The output of the coherent demodulator is composed of positive and negative pulses, which are the envelopes of the chirp transform processor output. These pulses correspond to the data symbols. Following the demodulator, a logic circuit reconstructs the pulses into data, which are subsequently differentially decoded to form the transmitted data. The coherent demodulation and detection of BPSK signals derived from a CMC chirp transform processor were experimentally demonstrated and bit error rate (BER) testing was performed. To assess the feasibility of such advanced receiver, the results were compared with the theoretical analysis and plotted for an average BER as a function of signal-to-noise ratio. Another goal of this SBIR program was the development of a commercial product. The commercial product developed was an arbitrary waveform generator. The successful sales have begun with the delivery of the first arbitrary waveform generator.

  3. Meteorological satellite systems

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Su-Yin

    2014-01-01

    “Meteorological Satellite Systems” is a primer on weather satellites and their Earth applications. This book reviews historic developments and recent technological advancements in GEO and polar orbiting meteorological satellites. It explores the evolution of these remote sensing technologies and their capabilities to monitor short- and long-term changes in weather patterns in response to climate change. Satellites developed by various countries, such as U.S. meteorological satellites, EUMETSAT, and Russian, Chinese, Japanese and Indian satellite platforms are reviewed. This book also discusses international efforts to coordinate meteorological remote sensing data collection and sharing. This title provides a ready and quick reference for information about meteorological satellites. It serves as a useful tool for a broad audience that includes students, academics, private consultants, engineers, scientists, and teachers.

  4. Theory of geostationary satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Zee, Chong-Hung

    1989-01-01

    Geostationary or equatorial synchronous satellites are a daily reminder of our space efforts during the past two decades. The nightly television satellite weather picture, the intercontinental telecommunications of television transmissions and telephone conversations, and the establishrnent of educational programs in remote regions on Earth are constant reminders of the presence of these satellites. As used here, the term 'geo­ stationary' must be taken loosely because, in the long run, the satellites will not remain 'stationary' with respect to an Earth-fixed reference frame. This results from the fact that these satellites, as is true for all satellites, are incessantly subject to perturbations other than the central-body attraction of the Earth. Among the more predominant pertur­ bations are: the ellipticity of the Earth's equator, the Sun and Moon, and solar radiation pressure. Higher harmonics of the Earth's potential and tidal effects also influence satellite motion, but they are of second­ order whe...

  5. Reorientation of M{sub A}{sup +}-centres in CaF{sub 2}:Me{sup +} crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chornyi, Z.P.; Shchur, G.O.; Salapak, V.M. [Ukrainian State Univ. of Forestry and Wood Technology, Lviv (Ukraine); Kravchuk, I.M.; Kachan, S.I. [State Univ. ' ' Lvivska Polytekhnika' ' , Lviv (Ukraine)

    2001-02-01

    Studies of photoinductive dichroism allow to define the orientation of colour centres. The photo-inductive dichroism of absorption testifies the fact that oscillators, responsible for the long-wave absorption band of M{sub A}{sup +}-centres, are located along left angle 100 right angle crystallographic directions, and high-energetic oscillators, along left angle 110 right angle crystallographic directions. Various impurities cause unequal perturbations in the crystal lattice. The determination of the kinetic parameters of the reorientation processes in simple and complex colour centres allows establishing the structure of the aggregative centre. The size of the impurity ion influences the energy of reorientation of M{sub A}{sup +}-centres, and this, in turn, is connected with the displacement of vacancies towards the anion sites of the crystal. It is found that the anion vacancy in M{sub A}{sup +}-centres jumps in left angle 110 right angle directions, but in F{sub A}{sup +}-centres it jumps in left angle 100 right angle directions. (orig.)

  6. [The trajectory of the national policy for the reorientation of professional training in health in the Unified Health System (SUS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Henrique Sant'anna; Lima, Luciana Dias de; Teixeira, Márcia

    2013-06-01

    This paper examines the national policy and its antecedents for reorientation of professional health training implemented after 2003. It highlights landmarks and transformations in the course of policies between 1980 and 2010, elements of continuity and change and the connections between past and current policy initiatives. The study involved a review of the literature on the subject and document analysis supported by theoretical analysis of public policies, particularly historical institutionalism. The results point to four different moments during the trajectory of the policy, marked by changes in the initiatives of reorientation of higher education in health: antecedents; initial experiences; university protagonism; broadening and enhancement. As an element of continuity, there is the permanence of objects in the guiding principles advocated in the policies. The evidence of implementation expresses prospects of enhancement, with diversification of mobilized actors and organizations, and more projects implemented. The accumulated experience suggests structural maturity of the structural bases of action and the main changes relate to the enhancement of decision-making bodies of the SUS and the approximation to the process of decentralization and regionalization of national health policy.

  7. Beacons and surface features differentially influence human reliance on global and local geometric cues when reorienting in a virtual environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodily, Kent D; Kilday, Zachary A; Eastman, Caroline K; Gaskin, Katherine A; Graves, April A; Roberts, Jonathan E; Sturz, Bradley R

    2013-02-01

    In the reorientation literature, non-geometric cues include discrete objects (e.g., beacons) and surface-based features (e.g., colors, textures, and odors). To date, these types of non-geometric cues have been considered functionally similar, and it remains unknown whether beacons and surface features differentially influence the extent to which organisms reorient via global and local geometric cues. In the present experiment, we trained human participants to approach a location in a trapezoid-shaped enclosure uniquely specified by global and local geometric cues. We explored the role of beacons on the use of geometric cues by training participants in the presence or absence of uniquely-colored beacons. We explored the role of surface features on the use of geometric cues by recoloring two adjacent walls at the correct location and/or adding a line on the floor which corresponded to the major principal axis of the enclosure. All groups were then tested in novel-shaped enclosures in the absence of unique beacons and surface features to assess the relative use of global and local geometric cues. Results suggested that beacons facilitated the use of global geometric cues, whereas surface features either facilitated or hindered the use of geometric cues, depending on the feature. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Reorientation of lineation in the Central Crystalline Zone, Munsiari–Milam area of the Kumaun Greater Himalaya

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Verma; A R Bhattacharya

    2015-03-01

    During large scale ductile shear deformation, linear features of the rocks tend to be reoriented towards the direction of bulk shear. This is demonstrated in a crustal scale shear zone of the Himalaya, the Main Central Thrust (MCT), typically exposed in the Munsiari–Milam area of eastern Kumaun Greater Himalaya. Along the MCT, the crystalline rocks of the Greater Himalaya are thrust over the younger sedimentary belt of the Lesser Himalaya. In the study area, the scatter of lineation orientation in the vicinity of the MCT has been observed to drastically reduce within 27° in a zone of about 18 km (about 13 km in the crystalline rocks and about 5 km in the sedimentary rocks). Beyond this zone, the scatter is very high, up to 70° or more. The low scatter of lineation orientation around the MCT could be related to the strong ductile shear deformation associated with the movement along this thrust due to which the linear features got reoriented towards the direction of bulk shear. Away from this zone, ductile shearing had negligible or no effect on the rocks and, therefore, the scatter of lineation remains very high.

  9. Does constraining field of view prevent extraction of geometric cues for humans during virtual-environment reorientation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturz, Bradley R; Kilday, Zachary A; Bodily, Kent D

    2013-10-01

    Environment size has been shown to influence the reliance on local and global geometric cues during reorientation. Unless changes in environment size are produced by manipulating length and width proportionally, changes in environment size are confounded by the amount of the environment that is visible from a single vantage point. Yet, the influence of the amount of the environment that is visible from any single vantage point on the use of local and global geometric cues remains unknown. We manipulated the amount of an environment that was visually available to participants by manipulating field of view (FOV) in a virtual environment orientation task. Two groups of participants were trained in a trapezoid-shaped enclosure to find a location that was uniquely specified by both local and global geometric cues. One group (FOV 50°) had visually less of the environment available to them from any one perspective compared to another group (FOV 100°). Following training, we presented both groups with a control test along with three novel-shaped environments. Testing assessed the use of global geometry in isolation, in alignment with local geometry, or in conflict with local geometry. Results (confirmed by a follow-up experiment) indicated that constraining FOV prevented extraction of geometric properties and relationships of space and resulted in an inability to use either global or local geometric cues for reorientation.

  10. Reorienting in virtual 3D environments: do adult humans use principal axes, medial axes or local geometry?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Althea H Ambosta

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that animals, including humans, use the geometric properties of environments to orient. It has been proposed that orientation is accomplished primarily by encoding the principal axes (i.e., global geometry of an environment. However, recent research has shown that animals use local information such as wall length and corner angles as well as local shape parameters (i.e., medial axes to orient. The goal of the current study was to determine whether adult humans reorient according to global geometry based on principal axes or whether reliance is on local geometry such as wall length and sense information or medial axes. Using a virtual environment task, participants were trained to select a response box located at one of two geometrically identical corners within a featureless rectangular-shaped environment. Participants were subsequently tested in a transformed L-shaped environment that allowed for a dissociation of strategies based on principal axes, medial axes and local geometry. Results showed that participants relied primarily on a medial axes strategy to reorient in the L-shaped test environment. Importantly, the search behaviour of participants could not be explained by a principal axes-based strategy.

  11. Development of skin conductance orienting, habituation, and reorienting from ages 3 to 8 years: a longitudinal latent growth curve analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yu; Raine, Adrian; Dawson, Michael E; Venables, Peter H; Mednick, Sarnoff A

    2007-11-01

    Little is known about the development of the skin conductance orienting response (SCOR) in childhood. This longitudinal study examines the effects of age on initial SCOR, habituation, and reorienting. Skin conductance responses to nonsignal auditory stimuli were recorded from 200 male and female children at five different time points (ages 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8 years). Longitudinal latent growth curve analyses were used to determine the trajectory of each SCOR measure during this period. Results indicated that (a) initial SCOR is present at age 3, increases thereafter to peak at age 6, and then levels off, (b) habituation is absent at age 3, but becomes apparent at age 4 years and increases thereafter with increasing age, (c) SC reorienting is absent from ages 3 to 8, and (d) boys and girls do not exhibit different developmental trajectories. Results suggest that from age 3 to 8 years, the transition from the functionally immature to mature neural network underlying orienting and habituation is a continuous process and may be related to children's cognitive development during this period.

  12. Ab initio prediction of giant magnetostriction and spin-reorientation in strained Au/FeCo/MgO heterostructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ong, P.V., E-mail: phuongvu.ong@csun.edu; Kioussis, Nicholas, E-mail: nick.kioussis@csun.edu

    2016-02-15

    Employing ab initio electronic structure calculations we have investigated the magnetostrictive properties and the effect of epitaxial strain on the magnetic anisotropy (MA) of Au/FeCo/MgO heterostructure. Under small expansive strain on the FeCo layer the system exhibits an in-plane MA. The calculations reveal that the strain dependence of the MA is nonlinear and that the FeCo film undergoes a spin reorientation at a critical strain between 2 and 4%. The underlying mechanism is the strain-induced shift of the spin–orbit coupled d-states of the Fe atoms. We predict a giant magnetostriction coefficient of about 420×10{sup −6} in the heterostructure. - Highlights: • Nonlinear strain dependence of magnetic anisotropy. • The FeCo film undergoes a spin reorientation at a critical strain between 2 and 4%. • The underlying mechanism is the strain-induced shift of the spin–orbit coupled d-states of the Fe atoms. • Giant magnetostriction coefficient of about 420×10{sup -6} in the heterostructure.

  13. Magnetization reorientation induced by interfacial structures in ultrathin disordered FePt film sandwiched by SiO{sub 2} layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Guang; Zhang, Jing-Yan [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); State Key Laboratory of Magnetism, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wang, Shou-Guo, E-mail: sgwang@iphy.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Jiang, Shao-Long; Zhao, Yun-Chi [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Ma, Qi-Di; Wang, Chao; Dong, Bo-Wen; Liu, Jia-Long; Zhang, Ying; Sun, Young [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wu, Zheng-Long [Analytical and Testing Center, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Yu, Guang-Hua, E-mail: ghyu@mater.ustb.edu.cn [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2015-10-30

    In general, ultrathin disordered FePt film exhibits in-plane magnetic anisotropy due to large demagnetization fields and negligible volume anisotropy. Here, we demonstrated that magnetization reorientation from in-plane to out-of-plane takes place when ultrathin disordered FePt film is sandwiched by amorphous SiO{sub 2} layers and annealed at 350 °C. Based on the interfacial and structural analysis from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy, the reorientation originates from the electronic structural changes because of strong bonding between Fe and O atoms at the top FePt/SiO{sub 2} interface. This interface anisotropy plays a crucial role in the magnetic behaviour, resulting in magnetization reorientation of ultrathin disordered FePt film.

  14. Electric field triggering the spin reorientation and controlling the absorption and release of heat in the induced multiferroic compound EuTiO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Ranke, P. J.; Gama, S.; Ribeiro, P. O.; Carvalho, A. Magnus G.; Alho, B. P.; Alvarenga, T. S. T.; Nobrega, E. P.; Caldas, A.; de Sousa, V. S. R.; Lopes, P. H. O.; de Oliveira, N. A.

    2015-12-01

    We report remarkable results due to the coupling between the magnetization and the electric field induced polarization in EuTiO3. Using a microscopic model Hamiltonian to describe the three coupled sublattices, Eu-(spin-up), Eu-(spin-down), and Ti-(moment), the spin flop and spin reorientation phase transitions were described with and without the electric-magnetic coupling interaction. The external electric field can be used to tune the temperature of the spin reorientation phase transition TSR = TSR(E). When the TSR is tuned around the EuTiO3—Néel temperature (TN = 5.5 K), an outstanding effect emerges in which EuTiO3 releases heat under magnetic field change. The electric field controlling the spin reorientation transition and the endo-exothermic processes are discussed through the microscopic interactions model parameters.

  15. Plan of advanced satellite communications experiment using ETS-VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiomi, Tadashi

    1988-01-01

    Communications Research Laboratory (CRL, Ministry of Posts and Telecommunications, Japan) has been engaged in development of three advanced satellite communication payloads aiming at experiments by Japan's 2-ton class Engineering Test Satellite VI (ETS-VI) which is to be launched in H-II rocket by NASDA in August 1992. CRL's three experimental systems are: (1) S-band inter-satellite communications; (2) millimeter-wave inter-satellite and personal-satellite communications; and (3) optical inter-satellite communications. CRL develops experimental optical communication system with telescope of 75 mm diameter which has gimbal mirror beam pointing/tracking mechanism. The onboard system has fundamental optical communication functions with laser diode transmitter of wavelength 0.83 micron, laser beam point-ahead mechanism, receiver of wavelength 0.51 micron, modulation/demodulation subsystem, and so on.

  16. Mobile satellite communications handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Cochetti, Roger

    2014-01-01

    With a Preface by noted satellite scientist Dr. Ahmad Ghais, the Second Edition reflects the expanded user base for this technology by updating information on historic, current, and planned commercial and military satellite systems and by expanding sections that explain the technology for non-technical professionals.   The book begins with an introduction to satellite communications and goes on to provide an overview of the technologies involved in mobile satellite communications, providing basic introductions to RF Issues, power Issues, link issues and system issues. It describes

  17. Satellite communication antenna technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittra, R. (Editor); Imbriale, W. A. (Editor); Maanders, E. J. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    A general overview of current technology in the field of communication satellite antennas is presented. Among the topics discussed are: the design of multiple beam systems; frequency reuse; and polarization control of antenna measurements. Consideration is also given to: contour beam synthesis; dual shaped reflector synthesis; beam shaping; and offset reflector design. The applications of the above technologies to present and future generations of communications satellites is considered, with emphasis given to such systems as: the Intelsats; the Defense Satellite Communications System, (DSCS-III); Satellite Business System (SBS), and Comstar.

  18. Methods of satellite oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The theoretical basis for remote sensing measurements of climate and ocean dynamics is examined. Consideration is given to: the absorption of electromagnetic radiation in the atmosphere; scattering in the atmosphere; and satellite observations using visible light. Consideration is also given to: the theory of radio scatter from the sea; scatter of centimeter waves from the sea; and the theory of operation of synthetic aperture radars. Additional topics include: the coordinate systems of satellite orbits for oceanographic remote sensing applications; the operating features of the major U.S. satellite systems for viewing the ocean; and satellite altimetry.

  19. Description of spin reorientation transition in Au/Co/Au sandwich with Co film thickness within a simple phenomenological model of ferromagnetic film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popov, A.P., E-mail: APPopov@mephi.ru [Moscow Engineering Physics institute (State University), Kashirskoe shosse 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-15

    Simple phenomenological model of ferromagnetic film characterized by equal energies of surface anisotropies at two sides of a film (symmetric film) is considered. The model is used to describe a two-step spin reorientation transition (SRT) in Au/Co/Au sandwich with Co film thickness: the SRT from perpendicular to canted noncollinear (CNC) state at N{sub Up-Tack }=6.3 atomic layers and the subsequent SRT from CNC to in-plane state at N{sub Parallel-To }=10.05 atomic layers. Analytic expressions for the stability criterion of collinear perpendicular and in-plane states of a film are derived with account of discrete location of atomic layers. The dependence of borders that separate regions corresponding to various magnetic states of a film in the (k{sub B},k{sub S})-diagram on film thickness N is established. k{sub S}(k{sub B}) is surface (bulk) reduced anisotropy constant. The comparison of theory with experiment related to Au/Co/Au sandwich shows that there is a whole region in the (k{sub B},k{sub S})-diagram corresponding to experimentally determined values of threshold film thicknesses N{sub Up-Tack }=6.3 and N{sub Parallel-To }=10.05. The comparison of this region with similar region determined earlier for a bare Co/Au film within the same model of asymmetric film and characterized by N{sub Up-Tack }=3.5, N{sub Parallel-To }=5.5 shows that the intersection of these regions is not empty. Hence, both the SRT in Au/Co/Au sandwich and in bare Co/Au film with Co film thickness can be described within the same model using the same magnitudes of model parameters k{sub S}, k{sub B}. Based on this result we conclude that the energy of Neel surface anisotropy at free Co surface is negligible compared to the energy of Co-Au interface anisotropy. It is demonstrated that the destabilization of collinear states in symmetric film leads to occurrence of the ground CNC state and two novel metastable CNC states. These three CNC states exhibit different kinds of symmetry. In case

  20. Satellite-Based Quantum Communications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Richard J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nordholt, Jane E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; McCabe, Kevin P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Newell, Raymond T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Peterson, Charles G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-09-20

    Single-photon quantum communications (QC) offers the attractive feature of 'future proof', forward security rooted in the laws of quantum physics. Ground based quantum key distribution (QKD) experiments in optical fiber have attained transmission ranges in excess of 200km, but for larger distances we proposed a methodology for satellite-based QC. Over the past decade we have devised solutions to the technical challenges to satellite-to-ground QC, and we now have a clear concept for how space-based QC could be performed and potentially utilized within a trusted QKD network architecture. Functioning as a trusted QKD node, a QC satellite ('QC-sat') could deliver secret keys to the key stores of ground-based trusted QKD network nodes, to each of which multiple users are connected by optical fiber or free-space QC. A QC-sat could thereby extend quantum-secured connectivity to geographically disjoint domains, separated by continental or inter-continental distances. In this paper we describe our system concept that makes QC feasible with low-earth orbit (LEO) QC-sats (200-km-2,000-km altitude orbits), and the results of link modeling of expected performance. Using the architecture that we have developed, LEO satellite-to-ground QKD will be feasible with secret bit yields of several hundred 256-bit AES keys per contact. With multiple ground sites separated by {approx} 100km, mitigation of cloudiness over any single ground site would be possible, potentially allowing multiple contact opportunities each day. The essential next step is an experimental QC-sat. A number of LEO-platforms would be suitable, ranging from a dedicated, three-axis stabilized small satellite, to a secondary experiment on an imaging satellite. to the ISS. With one or more QC-sats, low-latency quantum-secured communications could then be provided to ground-based users on a global scale. Air-to-ground QC would also be possible.

  1. Ferroelectricity and magnetoelectric coupling in h-YbMnO{sub 3}: Spin reorientation and defect effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiang, Gang; Fang, Yifei; Lu, Xiaowen; Cao, Shixun; Zhang, Jincang, E-mail: jczhang@shu.edu.cn [Materials Genome Institute and Department of Physics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China)

    2016-01-11

    Low-temperature magnetic and electric properties in hexagonal multiferroic compound YbMnO{sub 3} were studied. The Mn{sup 3+} spin moments order at T{sub N} = 85 K and reoriented around 43.5 K, leading to the magnetic phase transition from B{sub 2}(P6{sub 3}cm) → A{sub 2}(P6{sub 3}cm). The concomitant ferroelectric polarization is observed and explained microscopically by the destruction of initial symmetric relationship of the polarization between the upper and lower half of the magnetic unit cell. The asymmetry of the polarization vs temperature curves under opposite poling voltage revealed the pinning effect of the defects on the electrical polarization.

  2. Element-resolved magnetism across the temperature- and pressure-induced spin reorientation in MnBi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yongseong; Jiang, Xiujuan; Bi, Wenli; Lapa, Pavel; Chouhan, Rajiv K.; Paudyal, D.; Varga, Tamas; Popov, Dmitry; Cui, Jun; Haskel, Daniel; Jiang, J. S.

    2016-11-01

    Rare-earth free permanent magnet MnBi (NiAs-type crystal structure) displays strong magnetic anisotropy above its 90 K spin reorientation transition (SRT). X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) shows induced magnetism in Bi 5d band, which is strongly coupled to the magnetism of Mn. A clear increase in Bi orbital-to-spin moment ratio is observed above the SRT. Hydrostatic pressure mimics the e*ect of temperature on the SRT, and the pressure effect also leads to anisotropic lattice contraction, which is known to be induced by cooling. These results reveal that temperature and pressure can similarly induce the coupled structural and magnetic responses, suggesting the importance of the anisotropic lattice change and Mn-Bi hybridization to the magnetic anisotropy change across the SRT.

  3. Stripe-to-bubble transition of magnetic domains at the spin reorientation of (Fe/Ni)/Cu/Ni/Cu(001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, J.; Choi, J.; Won, C.; Wu, Y. Z.; Scholl, A.; Doran, A.; Hwang, Chanyong; Qiu, Z.

    2010-06-09

    Magnetic domain evolution at the spin reorientation transition (SRT) of (Fe/Ni)/Cu/Ni/Cu(001) is investigated using photoemission electron microscopy. While the (Fe/Ni) layer exhibits the SRT, the interlayer coupling of the perpendicularly magnetized Ni layer to the (Fe/Ni) layer serves as a virtual perpendicular magnetic field exerted on the (Fe/Ni) layer. We find that the perpendicular virtual magnetic field breaks the up-down symmetry of the (Fe/Ni) stripe domains to induce a net magnetization in the normal direction of the film. Moreover, as the virtual magnetic field increases to exceed a critical field, the stripe domain phase evolves into a bubble domain phase. Although the critical field depends on the Fe film thickness, we show that the area fraction of the minority domain exhibits a universal value that determines the stripe-to-bubble phase transition.

  4. [Hallux valgus and hypermobility of the first ray--causal treatment using tarso-metatarsal reorientation arthrodesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaue, K

    1991-12-01

    Today, bunion surgery is still very controversial. Considering that a bunion deformity is actually a result of multiple possible causes, the rationale of the currently applied techniques has not been conclusively demonstrated. Multiple techniques are still applied with uncertain outcome, as shown by the not insignificant recurrence rate. The tarsometatarsal reorientation arthrodesis addresses the deficient anteromedial buttress which is due to the most often concomittent hypermobile first ray. This is an important aspect of treating hallux valgus deformity and includes the sagittal alignment besides the horizontal reposition of the metatarsal over the sesamoid complex. Since in hallux valgus, the first metatarsal looses its position also by the insufficiency of the intrinsic musculature and the ligamento-capsular structures, the arthrodesis regulates the elasticity of the multiarticular first ray within the sagittal plane. Recurrences are less likely after this operation, even when performed on the adolescent hallux which is known as very difficult to be treated successfully.

  5. Probing temperature-driven spin reorientation transition of GdFeCo film by Kerr loops and ferromagnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Wei, E-mail: hewei@aphy.iphy.ac.cn; Liu, Hao-Liang; Cai, Jian-Wang; Cheng, Zhao-Hua, E-mail: zhcheng@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism and Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wu, Hong-Ye [Department of Physics, Baotou Teachers College, Baotou 014030 (China)

    2015-01-26

    The magnetic anisotropy is of both scientific and technological interest for magneto-optical material GdFeCo film. We characterize the magnetic anisotropy of a 20 nm GdFeCo film from 265 K to 320 K via Kerr loops and ferromagnetic resonance. With increasing temperature, both of the first-order uniaxial magnetic anisotropy and shape anisotropy increase. However, the competition between them causes a temperature-driven spin reorientation transition (SRT) and the effective perpendicular magnetic anisotropy decrease from 2.22 × 10{sup 4 }ergs/cm{sup 3} (288 K) to −1.56 × 10{sup 4 }ergs/cm{sup 3} (317 K). The positive second-order uniaxial magnetic anisotropy determines an easy-cone state as the mediated state during SRT.

  6. Microscopic analysis of the composition driven spin-reorientation transition in Ni(x)Pd(1-x)/Cu(001).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlob, Daniel M; Doğanay, Hatice; Nickel, Florian; Cramm, Stefan; Krug, Ingo P; Nemšák, Slavomír; Schneider, Claus M

    2015-12-01

    The spin-reorientation transition (SRT) in epitaxial NixPd1-x/Cu(001) is studied by photoemission microscopy utilizing the X-ray magnetic circular dichroism effect at the Ni L2,3 edge. In a composition/thickness wedged geometry, a composition driven SRT could be observed between 37 ML and 60 ML, and 0 and 38% of Pd. Microspectroscopy in combination with azimuthal sample rotation confirms a magnetization preference changing from the [001] to an in-plane easy axis. At this increased thickness, the domain patterns arrange comparable to SRTs in ultrathin films. The images document domains equivalent to a canted state SRT, at which an additional effect of in-plane anisotropies could be identified.

  7. Satellites of spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaritsky, Dennis; Smith, Rodney; Frenk, Carlos; White, Simon D. M.

    1993-01-01

    We present a survey of satellites around a homogeneous set of late-type spirals with luminosity similar to that of the Milky Way. On average, we find fewer than 1.5 satellites per primary, but we argue that we can treat the survey as an ensemble and so derive the properties of the halo of a 'typical' isolated spiral. The projected density profile of the ensemble falls off approximately as 1/r. Within 50 kpc the azimuthal distribution of satellites shows some evidence for the 'Holmberg effect', an excess near the minor axis of the primary; however, at larger projected distances, the distribution appears isotropic. There is a weak but significant correlation between the size of a satellite and its distance from its primary, as expected if satellites are tidally truncated. Neither Hubble type nor spectral characteristics correlate with apparent separation. The ensemble of satellites appears to be rotating at about 30 km/s in the same direction as the galactic disk. Satellites on prograde orbits tend to be brighter than those on retrograde orbits. The typical velocity difference between a satellite and its primary shows no clear dependence either on apparent separation, or on the rotation speed of the primary. Thus our survey demonstrates that isolated spiral galaxies have massive halos that extend to many optical radii.

  8. Communication satellite technology trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuccia, Louis

    1986-01-01

    A chronology of space-Earth interconnectivity is presented. The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) system, Land Mobile Satellite, space-Earth antennas, impact of antenna size on coverage, intersatellite links are outlined. This presentation is represented by graphs and charts only.

  9. An Educator's Guide to Communication Satellite Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polcyn, Kenneth A.

    Recent developments in the area of sophisticated communications technology present challenges to the imagination of every educator. This guide provides educational planners with an awareness and understanding of communication satellite technology, its current uses, and some of the tentative plans for educational experimentation. The first part…

  10. Spin reorientation in α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles induced by interparticle exchange interactions in alpha-Fe2O3/NiO nanocomposites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Cathrine; Lefmann, Kim; Lebech, Bente

    2011-01-01

    We report that the spin structure of alpha-Fe2O3 nanoparticles rotates coherently out of the basal (001) plane at low temperatures when interacting with thin plate-shaped NiO nanoparticles. The observed spin reorientation (up to similar to 70 degrees) in alpha-Fe2O3 nanoparticles has, in appearan...

  11. Spin reorientation in α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles induced by interparticle exchange interactions in alpha-Fe2O3/NiO nanocomposites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Cathrine; Lefmann, Kim; Lebech, Bente;

    2011-01-01

    We report that the spin structure of alpha-Fe2O3 nanoparticles rotates coherently out of the basal (001) plane at low temperatures when interacting with thin plate-shaped NiO nanoparticles. The observed spin reorientation (up to similar to 70 degrees) in alpha-Fe2O3 nanoparticles has, in appearan...

  12. Cellular basis for the automorphic curvature of rice coleoptiles on a three-dimensional clinostat: possible involvement of reorientation of cortical microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Mizue; Fujita, Hiroshi; Soga, Kouichi; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Kamisaka, Seiichiro; Yamashita, Masamichi; Hoson, Takayuki

    2005-06-01

    Coleoptiles of rice (Oryza sativa L.) show a spontaneous (automorphic) curvature toward the caryopsis under microgravity conditions. The possible involvement of the reorientation of cortical microtubules in automorphic curvature was studied in rice coleoptiles grown on a three-dimensional clinostat. When rice seedlings that had been grown in the normal gravitational field were transferred to the clinostat in the dark, cortical microtubules of epidermal cells in the dorsal side of the coleoptiles oriented more transversely than the ventral side within 0.5 h. The rotation on the clinostat also increased the cell wall extensibility in the dorsal side and decreased the extensibility in the ventral side, and induced automorphic curvature. The reorientation of cortical microtubules preceded the changes in the cell wall extensibility and the curvature. The irradiation of rice seedlings with white light from above inhibited microtubule reorientation and changes in the cell wall extensibility, as well as curvature of coleoptiles. Also, colchicine, applied to the bending region of coleoptiles, partially inhibited the automorphic curvature. These results suggest that reorientation of cortical microtubules is involved in causing automorphic curvature in rice coleoptiles on the clinostat.

  13. Transient increase in the levels of γ-tubulin complex and katanin are responsible for reorientation by ethylene and hypergravity of cortical microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soga, Kouichi; Yamaguchi, Aya; Kotake, Toshihisa; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Hoson, Takayuki

    2010-11-01

    The body shape of a plant is primarily regulated by orientation of cortical microtubules. γ-Tubulin complex and katanin are required for the nucleation and the severing of microtubules, respectively. Here we discuss the role of γ-tubulin complex and katanin during reorientation of cortical microtubules. 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), the immediate precursor of ethylene, modifies growth anisotropy of azuki bean epicotyls; it inhibits elongation growth and promotes lateral growth. The ACC-induced reorientation of cortical microtubules from transverse to longitudinal directions preceded the modification of growth anisotropy. The transcript level of γ-tubulin complex (VaTUG and VaGCP3) and katanin (VaKTN1) was increased transiently by ACC treatment. During reorientation of cortical microtubules by hypergravity, which also modifies growth anisotropy of shoots, the expression levels of both γ-tubulin complex and katanin genes were increased transiently. The increase in the number of the nucleated microtubule branch as well as the microtubule-severing activity via upregulation of γ-tubulin complex genes and katanin genes may be involved in the reorientation of cortical microtubules, and contribute to the regulation of the shape of plant body.

  14. (1)H and (19)F spin-lattice relaxation and CH3 or CF3 reorientation in molecular solids containing both H and F atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Peter A; Rheingold, Arnold L

    2016-04-21

    The dynamics of methyl (CH3) and fluoromethyl (CF3) groups in organic molecular (van der Waals) solids can be exploited to survey their local environments. We report solid state (1)H and (19)F spin-lattice relaxationexperiments in polycrystalline 3-trifluoromethoxycinnamic acid, along with an X-ray diffraction determination of the molecular and crystal structure, to investigate the intramolecular and intermolecular interactions that determine the properties that characterize the CF3 reorientation. The molecule is of no particular interest; it simply provides a motionless backbone (on the nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR) time scale) to investigate CF3 reorientation occurring on the NMR time scale. The effects of (19)F-(19)F and (19)F-(1)H spin-spin dipolar interactions on the complicated nonexponential NMRrelaxation provide independent inputs into determining a model for CF3 reorientation. As such, these experiments provide much more information than when only one spin species (usually (1)H) is present. In Sec. IV, which can be read immediately after the Introduction without reading the rest of the paper, we compare the barrier to CH3 and CF3 reorientation in seven organic solids and separate this barrier into intramolecular and intermolecular components.

  15. NOAA/NESDIS Satellite Derived Surface Oil Analysis Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NESDIS Experimental Marine Pollution Surveillance Report (EMPSR) and the Daily Composite product are new products of the NOAA Satellite Analysis Branch and...

  16. Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) Gyro Temperature Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, J. N.; Noonan, C. H.; Garrick, J.

    1996-01-01

    The geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) 1/M series of spacecraft are geostationary weather satellites that use the latest in weather imaging technology. The inertial reference unit package onboard consists of three gyroscopes measuring angular velocity along each of the spacecraft's body axes. This digital integrating rate assembly (DIRA) is calibrated and used to maintain spacecraft attitude during orbital delta-V maneuvers. During the early orbit support of GOES-8 (April 1994), the gyro drift rate biases exhibited a large dependency on gyro temperature. This complicated the calibration and introduced errors into the attitude during delta-V maneuvers. Following GOES-8, a model of the DIRA temperature and drift rate bias variation was developed for GOES-9 (May 1995). This model was used to project a value of the DIRA bias to use during the orbital delta-V maneuvers based on the bias change observed as the DIRA warmed up during the calibration. The model also optimizes the yaw reorientation necessary to achieve the correct delta-V pointing attitude. As a result, a higher accuracy was achieved on GOES-9 leading to more efficient delta-V maneuvers and a propellant savings. This paper summarizes the: Data observed on GOES-8 and the complications it caused in calibration; DIRA temperature/drift rate model; Application and results of the model on GOES-9 support.

  17. Beginnings of Satellite Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miljenko Solarić

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The first satellite navigation system called the Navy Navigation Satellite System (NNSS or TRANSIT was planned in the USA in 1958. It consisted of 5-6 artificial Earth satellites, was set in motion for the USA military in 1964, and in 1967 for civilian purposes. The frequency shift of received radio waves emitted from the satellite and caused by the Doppler effect was measured. The TRANSIT satellite speed of approaching or moving away was derived from that; the TRANSIT satellites emmited also their own coordinates. Then the ship's position was determined by an intersection of three hyperboloids, which were determined from differences of distances in three time intervals. Maintenance of this navigation system was stopped in 1996, but it is still being used in the USA Navy for exploring the ionosphere. Furthermore, results of Doppler measurements in international projects at the Hvar Observatory from 1982 and 1983. This was the first time in Croatia and the former country that the coordinates of the Hvar Observatory were determined in the unique world coordinate system WGS'72. The paper ends with a brief representation of the Tsiklon Doppler navigation system produced in the former Soviet Union, and there is a list of some of numerous produced and designed satellite navigation systems.Ključne riječi

  18. System refinement for content based satellite image retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NourElDin Laban

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We are witnessing a large increase in satellite generated data especially in the form of images. Hence intelligent processing of the huge amount of data received by dozens of earth observing satellites, with specific satellite image oriented approaches, presents itself as a pressing need. Content based satellite image retrieval (CBSIR approaches have mainly been driven so far by approaches dealing with traditional images. In this paper we introduce a novel approach that refines image retrieval process using the unique properties to satellite images. Our approach uses a Query by polygon (QBP paradigm for the content of interest instead of using the more conventional rectangular query by image approach. First, we extract features from the satellite images using multiple tiling sizes. Accordingly the system uses these multilevel features within a multilevel retrieval system that refines the retrieval process. Our multilevel refinement approach has been experimentally validated against the conventional one yielding enhanced precision and recall rates.

  19. Affine kinematics in planar fibrous connective tissues: an experimental investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayyosi, C; Affagard, J-S; Ducourthial, G; Bonod-Bidaud, C; Lynch, B; Bancelin, S; Ruggiero, F; Schanne-Klein, M-C; Allain, J-M; Bruyère-Garnier, K; Coret, M

    2017-03-29

    The affine transformation hypothesis is usually adopted in order to link the tissue scale with the fibers scale in structural constitutive models of fibrous tissues. Thanks to the recent advances in imaging techniques, such as multiphoton microscopy, the microstructural behavior and kinematics of fibrous tissues can now be monitored at different stretching within the same sample. Therefore, the validity of the affine hypothesis can be investigated. In this paper, the fiber reorientation predicted by the affine assumption is compared to experimental data obtained during mechanical tests on skin and liver capsule coupled with microstructural imaging using multiphoton microscopy. The values of local strains and the collagen fibers orientation measured at increasing loading levels are used to compute a theoretical estimation of the affine reorientation of collagen fibers. The experimentally measured reorientation of collagen fibers during loading could not be successfully reproduced with this simple affine model. It suggests that other phenomena occur in the stretching process of planar fibrous connective tissues, which should be included in structural constitutive modeling approaches.

  20. Trends In Satellite Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poley, William A.; Stevens, Grady H.; Stevenson, Steven M.; Lekan, Jack; Arth, Clifford H.; Hollansworth, James E.; Miller, Edward F.

    1988-01-01

    Report assesses trends in satellite communication from present to year 2010. Examines restrictions imposed by limited spectrum resource and technology needs created by trends. Personal communications, orbiting switchboards, and videophones foreseen.

  1. Domestic Communication Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Andrew

    1974-01-01

    A discussion of the Federal Communications Commission's new policy on domestic satellites in light of our 1) military and economic history; 2) corporate interests; 3) citizen surveillance; and 4) media control. (HB)

  2. Handbook of satellite applications

    CERN Document Server

    Madry, Scott; Camacho-Lara, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Top space experts from around the world have collaborated to produce this comprehensive, authoritative, and clearly illustrated reference guide to the fast growing, multi-billion dollar field of satellite applications and space communications. This handbook, done under the auspices of the International Space University based in France, addresses not only system technologies but also examines market dynamics, technical standards and regulatory constraints. The handbook is a completely multi-disciplinary reference book that covers, in an in-depth fashion, the fields of satellite telecommunications, Earth observation, remote sensing, satellite navigation, geographical information systems, and geosynchronous meteorological systems. It covers current practices and designs as well as advanced concepts and future systems. It provides a comparative analysis of the common technologies and design elements for satellite application bus structures, thermal controls, power systems, stabilization techniques, telemetry, com...

  3. Biological satellite Kosmos-936

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedeshin, L. A.

    1978-01-01

    A description is given of physiological experiments performed on the biological satellite Kosmos-936. Other experiments to determine the electrostatic and dielectric responses to the effects of cosmic radiation are discussed.

  4. Small Satellite Transporter Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The primary objective is to determine whether this small satellite transporter is capable of transporting at least four 6U CubeSats is possible for a given set of...

  5. DFH-3 Satellite Platform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RenShufang

    2005-01-01

    The DFH-3 satellite platform is designed and developed by China Academy of Space Technology (CAST). It is a medium capability communications satellite platform. The platform adopts threeaxis attitude stabilization control system, having solar array output power of 1.7kW by the end of its design lifetime of 8 years. Its mass is 2100kg with payload capacity of 220kg.

  6. The Archimedes satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Stuart C.; Shurvinton, William D.

    1992-03-01

    Archimedes is a satellite system conceived by the European Space Agency (ESA) to effectively serve the European market for Mobile Radio Services (MRS). This paper describes the requirements and technical design of the Archimedes satellite system. The underlying assumptions and trade-offs behind the design are detailed and the design is compared and contrasted against alternative design solutions, both technically and economically. A path forward for the development of the system is indicated.

  7. ASTRID II satellit projekt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif; Primdahl, Fritz

    1997-01-01

    The report describes the instruments developed for the Swedish micro satellite "ASTRID II". Specifications of the two instruments realized under this contract, a Stellar Compass and a CSC magnetometer are given follwed by a description of the project status and plan.......The report describes the instruments developed for the Swedish micro satellite "ASTRID II". Specifications of the two instruments realized under this contract, a Stellar Compass and a CSC magnetometer are given follwed by a description of the project status and plan....

  8. Satellite formation. II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, A. W.

    1978-01-01

    A satellite formation model is extended to include evolution of planetary ring material and elliptic orbital motion. In this model the formation of the moon begins at a later time in the growth of the earth, and a significant fraction of the lunar material is processed through a circumterrestrial debris cloud where volatiles might have been lost. Thus, the chemical differences between the earth and moon are more plausibly accounted for. Satellites of the outer planets probably formed in large numbers throughout the growth of those planets. Because of rapid inward evolution of the orbits of small satellites, the present satellite systems represent only satellites formed in the last few percent of the growths of their primaries. The rings of Saturn and Uranus are most plausibly explained as the debris of satellites disrupted within the Roche limit. Because such a ring would collapse onto the planet in the course of any significant further accretion by the planet, the rings must have formed very near or even after the conclusion of accretion.

  9. CHINA LAUNCHES NEW SCIENTIFIC SATELLITE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    China on Sept. 27, 2004 launched a scientific satellite atop a Long March 2D carrier rocket from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in Gansu province. 10 minutes after the launch, the satellite entered a preset orbit and is running sound at the orbit. It is the 20th recoverable satellite for scientific and technological

  10. 企业经营投资调整分析%The Analysis of Business Investment Reorientation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王欢; 陈收; 毛超

    2011-01-01

    企业在寻求内外部因素匹配的过程中,存在内部演化机制,在不断适应、试错中形成投资调整模式.为探索企业经营投资调整的影响因素及其对竞争优势的影响,引入空间向量模型度量企业经营投资调整程度,对我国酒业20家上市公司进行实证分析.结果显示,企业经营投资调整受到了主营产品利润增长率的市场激励信号、财务杠杆的正向作用,内部专用性资产规模的负向作用影响.影响因素的共同作用下形成了一定的调整轨迹,在酒业这样的成熟且竞争激烈的行业中,企业调整程度越低,越利于生存发展和竞争优势的巩固.本文力求为企业制定经营投资调整决策提供有益思路.%In the proeess of matching internal and external factors, the internal evolutionary mechanism will cause the formation of a certain investment adjustment mode in its adapting and trial process. In order to explore the influencing factors of business investment reorientation and its effect on competitive advantage, this paper introduces the vector space model to measure the level of business investment adjustment, and then analyzes 20 Chinese listed wine corporations. The results show that: (l) corporate business investment adjustment has a significantly positive correlation with the growth rate of main products and the level of long-term debt ratio while it negatively correlates with the size of corporate specific assets;(2) All of these factors form a certain adjustment path and in such a mature and highly competitive wine industry, the lower level the adjustment is at, the more beneficial it is for industry survival and its competirive advantage. This paper seeks to provide useful suggestions for Chinese enterprises to plan business investment reorientation.

  11. Satellite Communications for ATM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamma, Mohammed A.

    2003-01-01

    This presentation is an overview on Satellite Communication for the Aeronautical Telecommunication Management (ATM) research. Satellite Communications are being considered by the FAA and NASA as a possible alternative to the present and future ground systems supporting Air Traffic Communications. The international Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) have in place Standards and Recommended Practices (SARPS) for the Aeronautical Mobile Satellite Services (AMSS) which is mainly derived from the pre-existing Inmarsat service that has been in service since the 1980s. The Working Group A of the Aeronautical Mobile Communication Panel of ICAO has also been investigating SARPS for what is called the Next Generation Satellite Service (NGSS) which conforms less to the Inmarsat based architecture and explores wider options in terms of satellite architectures. Several designs are being proposed by Firms such as Boeing, ESA, NASA that are geared toward full or secondary usage of satellite communications for ATM. Satellite communications for ATM can serve several purposes ranging from primary usage where ground services would play a minimal backup role, to an integrated solution where it will be used to cover services, or areas that are less likely to be supported by the proposed and existing ground infrastructure. Such Integrated roles can include usage of satellite communications for oceanic and remote land areas for example. It also can include relieving the capacity of the ground network by providing broadcast based services of Traffic Information Services messages (TIS-B), or Flight Information Services (FIS-B) which can take a significant portion of the ground system capacity. Additionally, satellite communication can play a backup role to support any needs for ground replacement, or additional needed capacity even after the new digital systems are in place. The additional bandwidth that can be provided via satellite communications can also open the door for many new

  12. Effects of constraints on lattice re-orientation and strain in polycrystal plasticity simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldrup, Martin Kristoffer; McGinty, R.D.; McDowell, D.L.

    2009-01-01

    Employing a rate-dependent crystal plasticity model implemented in a novel and fast algorithm, two instantiations of an OFHC copper microstructure have been simulated by FE modelling to 11% tensile engineering strain with two different sets of boundary conditions. Analysis of lattice rotations......, strain distributions and global stress–strain response show the effect of changing from free to periodic boundary conditions to be a perturbation of a response dictated by the microstructure. Average lattice rotation for each crystallographic grain has been found to be in fair agreement with Taylor......-constraint simulations while fine scale element-resolved analysis shows large deviations from this prediction. Locally resolved analysis shows the existence of large domains dominated by slip on only a few slip systems. The modelling results are discussed in the light of recent experimental advances with respect to 2...

  13. China's Meteorological Satellite Application System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jiashen

    2008-01-01

    @@ China's meteorological satellite program consists of five systems,namely the satellite system,the launch vehicle system,the launch center system,TT&C and the ground application system.The satellite system consists of FengYun (FY) polar orbiting series and FY geostationary series,which are launched by LM launch vehicles from Taiyan Satellite Launch Center (TSLC) and Xichang Satellite Launch Center (XSLC) respectively.

  14. Oxidation-induced spin reorientation in Co adatoms and CoPd dimers on Ni/Cu(100)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K.; Beeck, T.; Fiedler, S.; Baev, I.; Wurth, W.; Martins, M.

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasmall magnetic clusters and adatoms are of strong current interest because of their possible use in future technological applications. Here, we demonstrate that the magnetic coupling between the adsorbates and the substrate can be significantly changed through oxidation. The magnetic properties of Co adatoms and CoPd dimers deposited on a remanently magnetized Ni/Cu(100) substrate have been investigated by x-ray absorption and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy at the Co L2 ,3 edges. Using spectral differences, pure and oxidized components are distinguished, and their respective magnetic moments are determined. The Co adatoms and the CoPd dimers are coupled ferromagnetically to the substrate, while their oxides, Co-O and CoPd-O, are coupled antiferromagnetically to the substrate. Along with the spin reorientation from the pure to the oxidized state, the magnetic moment of the adatom is highly reduced from Co to Co-O. In contrast, the magnetic moment of the dimer is of similar order for CoPd and CoPd-O.

  15. Crystal growth and spin reorientation transition in Sm0.4Er0.6FeO3 orthoferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiangyang; Zhang, Kailin; Xu, Kai; Man, Peiwen; Xie, Tao; Wu, Anhua; Ma, Guohong; Cao, Shixun; Su, Liangbi

    2016-04-01

    High quality Sm0.4Er0.6FeO3 single crystal has been successfully grown by the floating zone method. Temperature dependence of the magnetizations of Sm0.4Er0.6FeO3 under ZFC process is studied in the temperature range of 4-300 K. Spin reorientation transition between Γ2 (Gz, Fx) and Γ4 (Gx, Fz) is observed in the temperature range of 170-210 K, which is significantly lower than that of SmFeO3, while much higher than that of ErFeO3. A compensation point (35.8 K) corresponding to zero magnetization and a spontaneous magnetization reversal transition at 49.5 K are observed in Sm0.4Er0.6FeO3. Temperature-induced SRT of Sm0.4Er0.6FeO3 is systematically studied by THz-TDS range from 40 K to 300 K. The temperature dependence of amplitude of AFM mode coincides well with the magnetization measurement which demonstrate that SRT in Sm0.4Er0.6FeO3 can be studied through the amplitude of AFM mode FID emission. The AF mode frequency is almost invariant, while the F mode frequency significantly decreases with increasing temperature, which could be explained by the temperature dependence of anisotropy energy.

  16. HEAT-UP AND COOL-DOWN TEMPERATURE-DEPENDENT HYDRIDE REORIENTATION BEHAVIORS IN ZIRCONIUM ALLOY CLADDING TUBES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JU-JIN WON

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydride reorientation behaviors of PWR cladding tubes under typical interim dry storage conditions were investigated with the use of as-received 250 and 485ppm hydrogen-charged Zr-Nb alloy cladding tubes. In order to evaluate the effect of typical cool-down processes on the radial hydride precipitation, two terminal heat-up temperatures of 300 and 400°C, as well as two terminal cool-down temperatures of 200 and 300°C, were considered. In addition, two cooling rates of 2.5 and 8.0°C/min during the cool-down processes were taken into account along with zero stress or a tensile hoop stress of 150MPa. It was found that the 250ppm hydrogen-charged specimen experiencing the higher terminal heat-up temperature and the lower terminal cool-down temperature generated the highest number of radial hydrides during the cool-down process under 150MPa hoop tensile stress, which may be explained by terminal solid hydrogen solubilities for precipitation, and dissolution and remaining circumferential hydrides at the terminal heat-up temperatures. In addition, the slower cool-down rate generates the larger number of radial hydrides due to a cooling rate-dependent, longer residence time at a relatively high temperature that can accelerate the radial hydride nucleation and growth.

  17. Application of the spin reorientation in RFe1-xMnxO3 (R = Tb/Ho)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yifei; Cui, Xiaopeng; Kang, Jian; Sun, Wei; Cheng, Pengyu; Chen, Fei; Zhang, Jincang

    2017-08-01

    Temperature dependence of the magnetizations were revisited in Mn-doped perovskite rare-earth ferrites RFe1-xMnxO3 (R=Ho and Tb). The spin reorientation of these materials shows a magnetic phase transition from Γ4 (Gx , Ay , Fz) to Γ1 (Ax , Gy , Cz) , contrast to that of parent HoFeO3 and TbFeO3. This transition can not only be distinct for single crystals but also obvious for polycrystals. The Γ4 → Γ1 transition temperature can be modified from quite low temperature (50 K for HoFeO3 and 8.5 K for TbFeO3) to near room temperature by adjusting different Mn concentration. Above the transition temperature, the Mn doped materials show weak ferromagnetic state while below it appears an antiferromagnetic state. By repeating warming and cooling process, the magnetization route presents recurrent coincidence. These revealed advantages of controllable transition temperature and the repeatability of remarkable switch between ferromagnetic state and antiferromagnetic state, may provide a feasible way to develop the temperature sensitive spintronics device.

  18. Unilateral reorientation of microtubules at the outer epidermal wall during photo- and gravitropic curvature of maize coleoptiles and sunflower hypocotyls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nick, P; Bergfeld, R; Schafer, E; Schopfer, P

    1990-05-01

    Auxin (indole-3-acetic acid) controls the orientation of cortical microtubes (MT) at the outer wall of the outer epidermis of growing maize coleoptiles (Bergfeld, R., Speth, V., Schopfer, P., 1988, Bot. Acta 101, 57-67). A detailed time course of MT reorientation, determined by labeling MT with fluorescent antibodies, revealed that the auxin-mediated movement of MT from the longitudinal to the transverse direction starts after less than 15 min and is completed after 60 min. This response was used for a critical test of the functional involvement of auxin in tropic curvature. It was found that phototropic (first phototropic curvature) as well as gravitropic bending are correlated with a change of MT orientation from transverse to longitudinal at the slower-growing organ flank whereas the transverse MT orientation is maintained (or even augmented) at the faster-growing organ flank. These directional changes are confined to the MT subjacent to the outer epidermal wall. The same basic results were obtained with sunflower hypocotyls subjected to phototropic or gravitropic stimulation. It is concluded that auxin is, in fact, involved in asymmetric growth leading to tropic curvature. However, our results do not allow us to discriminate between an uneven distribution of endogenous auxin or an even distribution of auxin, the activity of which is modulated by an unevenly distributed inhibitor of auxin action.

  19. DNA hybridization-induced reorientation of liquid crystal anchoring at the nematic liquid crystal/aqueous interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Andrew D; Schwartz, Daniel K

    2008-07-01

    Interactions between DNA and an adsorbed cationic surfactant at the nematic liquid crystal (LC)/aqueous interface were investigated using polarized and fluorescence microscopy. The adsorption of octadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (OTAB) surfactant to the LC/aqueous interface resulted in homeotropic (untilted) LC alignment. Subsequent adsorption of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) to the surfactant-laden interface modified the interfacial structure, resulting in a reorientation of the LC from homeotropic alignment to an intermediate tilt angle. Exposure of the ssDNA/OTAB interfacial complex to its ssDNA complement induced a second change in the interfacial structure characterized by the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of lateral regions that induced homeotropic LC alignment. Fluorescence microscopy showed explicitly that the complement was colocalized in the same regions as the homeotropic domains. Exposure to noncomplementary ssDNA caused no such response, suggesting that the homeotropic regions were due to DNA hybridization. This hybridization occurred in the vicinity of the interface despite the fact that the conditions in bulk solution were such that hybridization did not occur (high stringency), suggesting that the presence of the cationic surfactant neutralized electrostatic repulsion and allowed for hydrogen bonding between DNA complements. This system has potential for label-less and portable DNA detection. Indeed, LC response to ssDNA target was detected with a lower limit of approximately 50 fmol of complement and was sufficiently selective to differentiate a one-base-pair mismatch in a 16-mer target.

  20. Space Solar Power Satellite Systems, Modern Small Satellites, and Space Rectenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergsrud, Corey Alexis Marvin

    Space solar power satellite (SSPS) systems is the concept of placing large satellite into geostationary Earth orbit (GEO) to harvest and convert massive amounts of solar energy into microwave energy, and to transmit the microwaves to a rectifying antenna (rectenna) array on Earth. The rectenna array captures and converts the microwave power into usable power that is injected into the terrestrial electric grid for use. This work approached the microwave power beam as an additional source of power (with solar) for lower orbiting satellites. Assuming the concept of retrodirectivity, a GEO-SSPS antenna array system tracks and delivers microwave power to lower orbiting satellites. The lower orbiting satellites are equipped with a stacked photovoltaic (PV)/rectenna array hybrid power generation unit (HPGU) in order to harvest solar and/or microwave energy for on-board use during orbit. The area, and mass of the PV array part of the HPGU was reduced at about 32% beginning-of-life power in order to achieve the spacecraft power requirements. The HPGU proved to offer a mass decrease in the PGU, and an increase in mission life due to longer living component life of the rectenna array. Moreover, greater mission flexibility is achieved through a track and power delivery concept. To validate the potential advantages offered by a HPGU, a mission concept was presented that utilizes modern small satellites as technology demonstrators. During launch, a smaller power receiving "daughter" satellite sits inside a larger power transmitting "mother" satellite. Once separated from the launch vehicle the daughter satellite is ejected away from the mother satellite, and each satellite deploys its respective power transmitting or power receiving hardware's for experimentation. The concept of close proximity mission operations between the satellites is considered. To validate the technology of the space rectenna array part of the HPGU, six milestones were completed in the design. The first

  1. Transient increase in the levels of gamma-tubulin complex in reorientation of cortical microtubules by gravity in azuki bean epicotyls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soga, Kouichi; Kotake, Toshihisa; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Kamisaka, Seiichiro; Hoson, Takayuki

    Azuki bean (Vigna angularis Ohwi et Ohashi) seedlings were exposed to centrifugal hypergravity, and the changes in the orientation of cortical microtubules and the expression of genes cording γ-tubulin complex (VaTUBG and VaSpc98p) were examined. By 300 g treatment, the percentage of cells with transverse microtubules was decreased, while that with longitudinal microtubules was increased in epicotyls. Hypergravity increased the expression of VaTUBG and VaSpc98p transiently. Also, the expression of both genes was increased transiently by removal of hypergravity stimulus. Lanthanum and gadolinium ions, potential blockers of mechanosensitive calcium ion-permeable channels (mechanoreceptors), nullified reorientation of microtubules as well as up-regulation of expression of VaTUBG and VaSpc98p by hypergravity. These results suggest that mechanoreceptors on the plasma membrane may perceive the gravity signal, which leads to reorientation of cortical microtubules by transiently stimulating the formation of γ-tubulin complex.

  2. Transient increase in the transcript levels of gamma-tubulin complex genes during reorientation of cortical microtubules by gravity in azuki bean (Vigna angularis) epicotyls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soga, Kouichi; Kotake, Toshihisa; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Kamisaka, Seiichiro; Hoson, Takayuki

    2008-09-01

    By hypergravity treatment, the percentage of cells with transverse microtubules was decreased, while that with longitudinal microtubules was increased in azuki bean (Vigna angularis) epicotyls. The expression of genes encoding gamma-tubulin complex (VaTUG and VaGCP3) was increased transiently in response to changes in the gravitational conditions. Lanthanum and gadolinium ions, potential blockers of mechanosensitive calcium ion-permeable channels (mechanoreceptors), nullified reorientation of microtubules as well as up-regulation of expression of VaTUG and VaGCP3 by hypergravity. These results suggest that mechanoreceptors may perceive the gravity signal, which leads to a transient increase in the transcript levels of gamma-tubulin complex genes and reorientation of cortical microtubules.

  3. Solar Power Satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Flournoy, Don M

    2012-01-01

    Communication satellites are a $144 billion industry. Is there any space-based industry that could possibly beat that market? 'Solar Power Satellites' shows why and how the space satellite industry will soon begin expanding its market from relaying signals to Earth to generating energy in space and delivering it to the ground as electricity. In all industrialized nations, energy demand is growing exponentially. In the developing world, the need for energy is as basic as food and water. The Sun's energy is available everywhere, and it is non-polluting. As business plans demonstrate its technical feasibility, commercial potential, and environmental acceptability, every country on Earth will look to space for the power it needs.

  4. Geostationary satellites collocation

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hengnian

    2014-01-01

    Geostationary Satellites Collocation aims to find solutions for deploying a safe and reliable collocation control. Focusing on the orbital perturbation analysis, the mathematical foundations for orbit and control of the geostationary satellite are summarized. The mathematical and physical principle of orbital maneuver and collocation strategies for multi geostationary satellites sharing with the same dead band is also stressed. Moreover, the book presents some applications using the above algorithms and mathematical models to help readers master the corrective method for planning station keeping maneuvers. Engineers and scientists in the fields of aerospace technology and space science can benefit from this book. Hengnian Li is the Deputy Director of State Key Laboratory of Astronautic Dynamics, China.

  5. ESA's satellite communications programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholome, P.

    1985-02-01

    The developmental history, current status, and future plans of the ESA satellite-communications programs are discussed in a general survey and illustrated with network diagrams and maps. Consideration is given to the parallel development of national and European direct-broadcast systems and telecommunications networks, the position of the European space and electronics industries in the growing world market, the impact of technological improvements (both in satellite systems and in ground-based networks), and the technological and commercial advantages of integrated space-terrestrial networks. The needs for a European definition of the precise national and international roles of satellite communications, for maximum speed in implementing such decisions (before the technology becomes obsolete), and for increased cooperation and standardization to assure European equipment manufacturers a reasonable share of the market are stressed.

  6. AVS on satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Haiwu; Wang, Guozhong; Hou, Gang

    2005-07-01

    AVS is a new digital audio-video coding standard established by China. AVS will be used in digital TV broadcasting and next general optical disk. AVS adopted many digital audio-video coding techniques developed by Chinese company and universities in recent years, it has very low complexity compared to H.264, and AVS will charge very low royalty fee through one-step license including all AVS tools. So AVS is a good and competitive candidate for Chinese DTV and next generation optical disk. In addition, Chinese government has published a plan for satellite TV signal directly to home(DTH) and a telecommunication satellite named as SINO 2 will be launched in 2006. AVS will be also one of the best hopeful candidates of audio-video coding standard on satellite signal transmission.

  7. Satellite Control Laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Bak, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    The Satellite Laboratory at the Department of Control Engineering of Aalborg University (SatLab) is a dynamic motion facility designed for analysis and test of micro spacecraft. A unique feature of the laboratory is that it provides a completely gravity-free environment. A test spacecraft...... is suspended on an air bearing, and rotates freely in 3 degrees of freedom. In order to avoid any influence of the gravitational force the centre of mass of the satellite is placed in the geometric centre of the air bearing by an automatic balancing system. The test spacecraft is equipped with a three......-axis magnetometer, three piezoelectric gyros, and four reaction wheels in a tetrahedron configuration. The operation of the spacecraft is fully autonomous. The data flow between the transducers and the onboard computer placed physically outside the satellite is provided by a radio link. The purpose...

  8. FIELD DEPENDENCE OF THE SPIN REORIENTATION TEMPERATURE IN MICRO AND NANOCRYSTALLINE FORMS OF Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LEWIS,L.H.; HARLAND,C.L.

    2002-08-18

    Insight into the anisotropy behavior of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B may be obtained by measurements of the spin reorientation temperature T{sub S} where the overall magnetocrystalline anisotropy changes to allow the magnetic moment to relax from an easy axis to an easy cone configuration. DC magnetization measurements made at various applied fields on sintered and nanocrystalline forms of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B indicate a T{sub S} that remains constant for the sintered sample but is strongly field-dependent for the nanocrystalline forms of the material. Specifically, T{sub S} decreases with decreasing applied fields of strengths 5 T, 1 T and 0.01 T. A simple model that minimizes the total energy of the system leads to the conclusion that the spin reorientation temperature is insensitive to applied field. Therefore it is concluded that the apparent decrease in the system's spin reorientation temperatures with decrease in measuring field can be attributed to the nanoscale structure of the system and a difference in the anisotropy constants compared to their bulk values.

  9. Effect of Jahn-Teller Mn/sup 3 +/ ion on magnetic properties and spin-reorientation transitions in rare-earth orthoferrites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadomtseva, A.M.; Bostrem, I.G.; Krynetskij, I.B.; Moskvin, A.S.; Ovchinnikova, T.L.; Terziev, V.G. (Ural' skij Gosudarstvennyj Univ., Sverdlovsk (USSR))

    1982-08-01

    A magnetic behavior of manganese-substituted orthoferrites of dysprosium and erbium, for which various types of spin-reorientation transitions (Gsub(x)Fsub(z) ..-->.. Gsub(z)Fsub(x), Gsub(z) Fsub(x) ..-->.. Gsub(y), Gsub(x)Fsub(z) ..-->.. Gsub(y)) were observed, has been studied in the temperature range from 2 up to 600 K. The microscopic theoretical analysis of manganese-substituted orthoferrites has been carried out taking into account peculiarities of the Jahn-Teller effect for the impurity Mn/sup 3 +/ ion. It has been shown that the appearance of reorientation transitions from a weak-ferromagnetic state and antiferromagnetic one (the Morine type transition), observed during the replacement of a part of Fe/sup 3 +/ ions on Mn/sup 3 +/ ions, is connected with the fact, that one-ion anisotropy of Mn/sup 3 +/ stabilizes antiferromagnetic spin structure of Gy. In the (ac)-plane the one-ion Mn/sup 3 +/ anisotropy changes in the orthoferrite series stabilizing Gsub(x)Fsub(z) at the beginning of the series and Gsub(z)Fsub(x) at the end of it. The phase diagram of temperature reorientation as a function of Mn/sup 3 +/ ion concentration has been built up.

  10. Navigation as a source of geometric knowledge: Young children’s use of length, angle, distance, and direction in a reorientation task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Ah; Sovrano, Valeria A.; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2012-01-01

    Geometry is one of the highest achievements of our species, but its foundations are obscure. Consistent with longstanding suggestions that geometrical knowledge is rooted in processes guiding navigation, the present study examines potential sources of geometrical knowledge in the navigation processes by which young children establish their sense of orientation. Past research reveals that children reorient both by the shape of the surface layout and the shapes of distinctive landmarks, but it fails to clarify what shape properties children use. The present study explores two-year-old children's sensitivity to angle, length, distance and direction by testing disoriented children’s search in a variety of fragmented rhombic and rectangular environments. Children reoriented themselves in accord with surface distances and directions, but they failed to use surface lengths or corner angles either for directional reorientation or as local landmarks. Thus, navigating children navigate by some but not all of the abstract properties captured by formal Euclidean geometry. While navigation systems may contribute to children's developing geometric understanding, they likely are not the sole source of abstract geometric intuitions. PMID:22257573

  11. Electric field triggering the spin reorientation and controlling the absorption and release of heat in the induced multiferroic compound EuTiO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranke, P. J. von, E-mail: von.ranke@uol.com.br; Ribeiro, P. O.; Alho, B. P.; Alvarenga, T. S. T.; Nobrega, E. P.; Caldas, A.; Sousa, V. S. R. de; Lopes, P. H. O.; Oliveira, N. A. de [Instituto de Física, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro–UERJ, Rua São, Francisco Xavier, 524, 20550-013 Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janerio (Brazil); Gama, S. [Departamento de Ciências Exatas e da Terra-UNIFESP, Diadema, 09971-270 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Carvalho, A. Magnus G. [Laboratório Nacional de Luz Síncrotron, CNPEM, 13083-970 Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-12-28

    We report remarkable results due to the coupling between the magnetization and the electric field induced polarization in EuTiO{sub 3}. Using a microscopic model Hamiltonian to describe the three coupled sublattices, Eu-(spin-up), Eu-(spin-down), and Ti-(moment), the spin flop and spin reorientation phase transitions were described with and without the electric-magnetic coupling interaction. The external electric field can be used to tune the temperature of the spin reorientation phase transition T{sub SR} = T{sub SR}(E). When the T{sub SR} is tuned around the EuTiO{sub 3}—Néel temperature (T{sub N} = 5.5 K), an outstanding effect emerges in which EuTiO{sub 3} releases heat under magnetic field change. The electric field controlling the spin reorientation transition and the endo-exothermic processes are discussed through the microscopic interactions model parameters.

  12. Incoherent correlator system for satellite orientation control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouris, Aristodemos; Young, Rupert C. D.; Chatwin, Christopher R.; Birch, Philip M.

    2002-03-01

    An incoherent correlator configuration is proposed and experimentally demonstrated that is capable of recognizing star patterns. The device may thus be employed for the orientation and navigation of a satellite or spacecraft. The correlator employs starlight directly and requires no laser or input spatial light modulator for operation. The filter is constructed form an array of mirrors that may be individually appropriately tilted so as recognize a particular star arrangement. The only other components of the system are a converging lens and CCD array detector. The device is capable of determining the pointing direction and rotation of a satellite or space vehicle. Experimental results employing the mirror array device illuminated with a point source early to simulate starlight are presented.

  13. An experimental case study to estimate Pre-harvest Wheat Acreage/Production in Hilly and Plain region of Uttarakhand state: Challenges and solutions of problems by using satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uniyal, D.; Kimothi, M. M.; Bhagya, N.; Ram, R. D.; Patel, N. K.; Dhaundiya, V. K.

    2014-11-01

    Wheat is an economically important Rabi crop for the state, which is grown on around 26 % of total available agriculture area in the state. There is a variation in productivity of wheat crop in hilly and tarai region. The agricultural productivity is less in hilly region in comparison of tarai region due to terrace cultivation, traditional system of agriculture, small land holdings, variation in physiography, top soil erosion, lack of proper irrigation system etc. Pre-harvest acreage/yield/production estimation of major crops is being done with the help of conventional crop cutting method, which is biased, inaccurate and time consuming. Remote Sensing data with multi-temporal and multi-spectral capabilities has shown new dimension in crop discrimination analysis and acreage/yield/production estimation in recent years. In view of this, Uttarakhand Space Applications Centre (USAC), Dehradun with the collaboration of Space Applications Centre (SAC), ISRO, Ahmedabad and Uttarakhand State Agriculture Department, have developed different techniques for the discrimination of crops and estimation of pre-harvest wheat acreage/yield/production. In the 1st phase, five districts (Dehradun, Almora, Udham Singh Nagar, Pauri Garhwal and Haridwar) with distinct physiography i.e. hilly and plain regions, have been selected for testing and verification of techniques using IRS (Indian Remote Sensing Satellites), LISS-III, LISS-IV satellite data of Rabi season for the year 2008-09 and whole 13 districts of the Uttarakhand state from 2009-14 along with ground data were used for detailed analysis. Five methods have been developed i.e. NDVI (Normalized Differential Vegetation Index), Supervised classification, Spatial modeling, Masking out method and Programming on visual basics methods using multitemporal satellite data of Rabi season along with the collateral and ground data. These methods were used for wheat discriminations and preharvest acreage estimations and subsequently results

  14. GPS satellite surveying

    CERN Document Server

    Leick, Alfred; Tatarnikov, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    THE MOST COMPREHENSIVE, UP-TO-DATE GUIDE ON GPS TECHNOLOGY FOR SURVEYING Three previous editions have established GPS Satellite Surveying as the definitive industry reference. Now fully updated and expanded to reflect the newest developments in the field, this Fourth Edition features cutting-edge information on GNSS antennas, precise point positioning, real-time relative positioning, lattice reduction, and much more. Expert authors examine additional tools and applications, offering complete coverage of geodetic surveying using satellite technologies. The past decade has seen a major evolut

  15. Declassified intelligence satellite photographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1998-01-01

    Recently declassified photographs from spy satellites are an important addition to the record of the Earth?s land surface held by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). More than 800,000 high-resolution photos taken between 1959 through 1972 were made available by Executive Order of the President. The collection is held at the USGS EROS Data Center, near Sioux Falls, S. Dak., and are offered for public sale. For some purposes in earth science studies, these photos extend the record of changes in the land surface another decade back in time from the advent of the Landsat earth-observing satellite program.

  16. Oceanography from satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, W. S.

    1981-01-01

    It is pointed out that oceanographers have benefited from the space program mainly through the increased efficiency it has brought to ship operations. For example, the Transit navigation system has enabled oceanographers to compile detailed maps of sea-floor properties and to more accurately locate moored subsurface instrumentation. General descriptions are given of instruments used in satellite observations (altimeter, color scanner, infrared radiometer, microwave radiometer, scatterometer, synthetic aperture radar). It is pointed out that because of the large volume of data that satellite instruments generate, the development of algorithms for converting the data into a form expressed in geophysical units has become especially important.

  17. Satellite oceanography - The instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    It is pointed out that no instrument is sensitive to only one oceanographic variable; rather, each responds to a combination of atmospheric and oceanic phenomena. This complicates data interpretation and usually requires that a number of observations, each sensitive to somewhat different phenomena, be combined to provide unambiguous information. The distinction between active and passive instruments is described. A block diagram illustrating the steps necessary to convert data from satellite instruments into oceanographic information is included, as is a diagram illustrating the operation of a radio-frequency radiometer. Attention is also given to the satellites that carry the various oceanographic instruments.

  18. Geometric Calibration and Accuracy Verification of the GF-3 Satellite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ruishan; Zhang, Guo; Deng, Mingjun; Xu, Kai; Guo, Fengcheng

    2017-08-29

    The GF-3 satellite is the first multi-polarization synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging satellite in China, which operates in the C band with a resolution of 1 m. Although the SAR satellite system was geometrically calibrated during the in-orbit commissioning phase, there are still some system errors that affect its geometric positioning accuracy. In this study, these errors are classified into three categories: fixed system error, time-varying system error, and random error. Using a multimode hybrid geometric calibration of spaceborne SAR, and considering the atmospheric propagation delay, all system errors can be effectively corrected through high-precision ground control points and global atmospheric reference data. The geometric calibration experiments and accuracy evaluation for the GF-3 satellite are performed using ground control data from several regions. The experimental results show that the residual system errors of the GF-3 SAR satellite have been effectively eliminated, and the geometric positioning accuracy can be better than 3 m.

  19. Integrated Satellite-HAP Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cianca, Ernestina; De Sanctis, Mauro; De Luise, Aldo

    2005-01-01

    for an efficient hybrid terrestrial-satellite communication system. Two integrated HAP-satellite scenarios are presented, in which the HAP is used to overcome some of the shortcomings of satellite- based communications. Moreover, it is shown that the integration of HAPs with satellite systems can be used......Thus far, high-altitude platform (HAP)-based systems have been mainly conceived as an alternative to satellites for complementing the terrestrial network. This article aims to show that HAP should no longer be seen as a competitor technology by investors of satellites, but as a key element...

  20. Laser Communication Experiments with Artemis Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzkov, Sergii; Sodnik, Zoran; Kuzkov, Volodymyr

    2013-10-01

    In November 2001, the European Space Agency (ESA) established the world-first inter-satellite laser communication link between the geostationary ARTEMIS satellite and the low Earth orbiting (LEO) SPOT-4 Earth observation satellite, demonstrating data rates of 50 Mbps. In 2006, the Japanese Space Agency launched the KIRARI (OICETS) LEO satellite with a compatible laser communication terminal and bidirectional laser communication links (50 Mbps and 2 Mbps) were successfully realized between KIRARI and ARTEMIS. ESA is now developing the European Data Relay Satellite (EDRS) system, which will use laser communication technology to transmit data between the Sentinel 1 and 2 satellites in LEO to two geostationary satellites (EDRS-A and EDRS-C) at data rates of 1.8 Gbps. As the data handling capabilities of state-of-the-art telecommunication satellites in GEO increase so is the demand for the feeder-link bandwidth to be transmitted from ground. This is why there is an increasing interest in developing high bandwidth ground-to-space laser communication systems working through atmosphere. In 2002, the Main Astronomical Observatory (MAO) started the development of its own laser communication system for its 0.7m AZT-2 telescope, located in Kyiv, Ukraine. The work was supported by the National Space Agency of Ukraine and by ESA. MAO developed a highly accurate computerized tracking system for AZT-2 telescope and a compact laser communication package called LACES (Laser Atmosphere and Communication Experiments with Satellites). The LACES instrument includes a camera of the pointing and tracking subsystems, a receiver module, a laser transmitter module, a tip/tilt atmospheric turbulence compensation subsystem, a bit error rate tester module and other optical and electronic components. The principal subsystems are mounted on a platform, which is located at the Cassegrain focus of the AZT-2 telescope. All systems were tested with the laser communication payload on-board ARTEMIS and

  1. Satellite orbit determination and gravity field recovery from satellite-to-satellite tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakker, K. F.; Ambrosius, B. A. C.; Leenman, H.

    1989-07-01

    Studies on satellite-to-satellite tracking (SST) with POPSAT (a geodetic satellite concept) and a ERS-class (Earth observation) satellite, a Satellite-to-Satellite Tracking (SST) gravity mission, and precise gravity field determination methods and mission requirements are reported. The first two studies primarily address the application of SST between the high altitude POPSAT and an ERS-class or GRM (Geopotential Research Mission) satellite to the orbit determination of the latter two satellites. Activities focussed on the determination of the tracking coverage of the lower altitude satellite by ground based tracking systems and by POPSAT, orbit determination error analysis and the determination of the surface forces acting on GRM. The third study surveys principles of SST, uncertainties of existing drag models, effects of direct luni-solar attraction and tides on orbit and the gravity gradient observable. Detailed ARISTOTELES (which replaced POPSAT) orbit determination error analyses were performed for various ground based tracking networks.

  2. Man-made Satellites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝昌明

    2005-01-01

    If you watch the sky about an hour after the sun goes down, you may see some “moving stars”. But they're not real stars. They're manmade satellites (卫星). And the biggest of all is the International Space Station (ISS国际空间站).

  3. Perception via satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinove, Charles J.

    1970-01-01

    The earth resources observation satellite (EROS) program in the Department of the Interior is intended to gather and use data from satellites and aircraft on natural and man-made features of the earth's surface. Earth resources technology satellite will provide the EROS program with data for use in dealing with natural resource problems and understanding the interaction between man and the environment. Applications will include studies of tectonic features, hydrologic problems, location of fish schools, determination of the conditions of range land, mapping land use for urban planning, studies of erosion and change along coastlines and major streams, and inventories of land use and land forms. In addition, the ERTS data may be used for detecting forest and crop diseases and inventorying crops. The ERTS satellite will be in a polar, sun-synchronous orbit so that each point on the earth's surface will be sensed every 17 to 20 days, at the same time of day. Multispectral photography is being investigated for its usefulness in hydrology. Side-looking airborne radar has not yet been widely used in hydrologic studies, although it is an excellent tool for all-weather, day or night, coverage of large areas. Other techniques being investigated include passive microwave radiometry, ultraviolet and visible stimulated luminescence, and absorption spectroscopy.

  4. Satellite Photometric Error Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-18

    of nearly specular reflections from most solar panels. Our primary purpose in presenting these two plots is to demonstrate the usefulness of...than a transformation for stars because the spectral energy distribution of satellites can change with phase angle and is subject to specular

  5. Creating Better Satellite Conferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Tommy

    1998-01-01

    Presents four ways to improve broadcasts of company satellite conferences, including creative site selection (using facilities at educational institutions rather than hotel rooms); creative programming (using graphics and other interruptions to break up lectures or speeches); creative crew selection; and creative downlink site activities (to…

  6. Ocean surveillance satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, D.

    Soviet and U.S. programs involving satellites for surveillance of ships and submarines are discussed, considering differences in approaches. The Soviet program began with the Cosmos 198 in 1967 and the latest, the Cosmos 1400 series, 15 m long and weighing 5 tons, carry radar for monitoring ships and a nuclear reactor for a power supply. Other Soviet spacecraft carrying passive microwave sensors and ion drives powered by solar panels have recently been detonated in orbit for unknown reasons. It has also been observed that the Soviet satellites are controlled in pairs, with sequential orbital changes for one following the other, and both satellites then overflying the same points. In contrast, U.S. surveillance satellites have been placed in higher orbits, thus placing greater demands on the capabilities of the on-board radar and camera systems. Project White Cloud and the Clipper Bow program are described, noting the continued operation of the White Cloud spacecraft, which are equipped to intercept radio signals from surface ships. Currently, the integrated tactical surveillance system program has completed its study and a decision is expected soon.

  7. OMV With Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    This 1986 artist's concept shows the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) towing a satellite. As envisioned by Marshall Space Flight Center plarners, the OMV would be a remotely-controlled free-flying space tug which would place, rendezvous, dock, and retrieve orbital payloads.

  8. Advances in satellite oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, O. B.; Cheney, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    Technical advances and recent applications of active and passive satellite remote sensing techniques to the study of oceanic processes are summarized. The general themes include infrared and visible radiometry, active and passive microwave sensors, and buoy location systems. The surface parameters of sea surface temperature, windstream, sea state, altimetry, color, and ice are treated as applicable under each of the general methods.

  9. Evaluation of Cast Re-Orientation on a Dental Surveyor Using Three Tripod Techniques: A Survey and In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed, Mohammed E; Busaily, Idris A; Nahari, Rana J; Hakami, Ruaa O; Maashi, Sami M; Ramireddy, Naveen R

    2017-01-18

    To survey different educational levels (i.e., students, interns, technicians, and prosthodontic faculty) with regard to their opinions, attitudes, and adoption of three selected tripod techniques. The study will also investigate the accuracy of these techniques to reposition casts on the dental surveyor in anterio-posterior (AP) and lateral directions at both technique and educational levels. Tripod points, scored lines, and cemented post tripod techniques were used in this study. Three Kennedy class II modification I stone casts, duplicated from a standard cast, were assigned to each of the tripod techniques. The tilt angles of all casts were set on the dental surveyor to 10° (control angle) in AP and lateral directions using a digital angle gauge with an accuracy of 0.2°. The casts were tripoded accordingly. A total of 243 participants were involved in this study. Participants were first asked to remount the three casts on three different dental surveyors using the tripod technique noted on each cast. Questionnaires were then given to each participant in an individual interview setting; this assured a 100% response rate. The angle differences were calculated. All data were coded and entered into an Excel Spreadsheet file. Statistical analyses were performed using a paired Chi-square, Wilcoxon Matched-pairs, ANOVA, and Tukey post hoc tests at 5% level of significance. No significant difference was found between the educational levels relative to the responses to technique demands, sensitivity, and time required for reorientation (p = 0.08202, 0.8108, 0.6874, respectively); however, the majority of respondents reported low technique demands, low sensitivity, and time saving for technique C in comparison to techniques A and B. Significant differences were noted among the educational levels in response to preference and adoption questions (p = 0.0035 and 0.0015, respectively). The highest percentage of faculty chose technique A for inclusion into the academic

  10. Cibola flight experiment satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, P.; Liddle, Doug; Paffett, John; Sweeting, Martin; Curiel, A.; Sun, Wei; Eves, Stuart

    2004-11-01

    In order to achieve an "economy of scale" with respect to payload capacity the major trend in telecommunications satellites is for larger and larger platforms. With these large platforms the level of integration between platform and payload is increasing leading to longer delivery schedules. The typical lifecycle for procurement of these large telecommunications satellites is now 3-6 years depending on the level of non-recurring engineering needed. Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL) has designed a low-cost platform aimed at telecommunications and navigation applications. SSTL's Geostationary Minisatellite Platform (GMP) is a new entrant addressing the lower end of the market with payloads up to 250kg requiring less than 1.5 kW power. The British National Space Centre through the MOSAIC Small Satellite Initiative supported the development of GMP. The main design goals for GMP are low-cost for the complete mission including launch and operations and a platform allowing flexible payload accommodation. GMP is specifically designed to allow rapid development and deployment with schedules typically between 1 and 2 years from contract signature to flight readiness. GMP achieves these aims by a modular design where the level of integration between the platform and payload is low. The modular design decomposes the satellite into three major components - the propulsion bay, the avionics bay and the payload module. Both the propulsion and avionics bays are reusable, largely unchanged, and independent of the payload configuration. Such a design means that SSTL or a 3rd party manufacturer can manufacture the payload in parallel to the platform with integration taking place quite late in the schedule. In July 2003 SSTL signed a contract for ESA's first Galileo navigation satellite known as GSTBV2/A. The satellite is based on GMP and ESA plan to launch it into a MEO orbit late in 2005. The second flight of GMP is likely to be in 2006 carrying a geostationary payload

  11. Reorienting health services in the Northern Territory of Australia: a conceptual model for building health promotion capacity in the workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, Jenni; Keleher, Helen

    2013-06-01

    Reorienting work practices to include health promotion and prevention is complex and requires specific strategies and interventions. This paper presents original research that used 'real-world' practice to demonstrate that knowledge gathered from practice is relevant for the development of practice-based evidence. The paper shows how practitioners can inform and influence improvements in health promotion practice. Practitioner-informed evidence necessarily incorporates qualitative research to capture the richness of their reflective experiences. Using a participatory action research (PAR) approach, the research question asked 'what are the core dimensions of building health promotion capacity in a primary health care workforce in a real-world setting?' PAR is a method in which the researcher operates in full collaboration with members of the organisation being studied for the purposes of achieving some kind of change, in this case to increase the amount of health promotion and prevention practice within this community health setting. The PAR process involved six reflection and action cycles over two years. Data collection processes included: survey; in-depth interviews; a training intervention; observations of practice; workplace diaries; and two nominal groups. The listen/reflect/act process enabled lessons from practice to inform future capacity-building processes. This research strengthened and supported the development of health promotion to inform 'better health' practices through respectful change processes based on research, practitioner-informed evidence, and capacity-building strategies. A conceptual model for building health promotion capacity in the primary health care workforce was informed by the PAR processes and recognised the importance of the determinants approach. Practitioner-informed evidence is the missing link in the evidence debate and provides the links between evidence and its translation to practice. New models of health promotion service

  12. Mismatch negativity and P3a/reorienting complex in subjects with schizophrenia or at-risk mental state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko eHiguchi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Shorter duration of untreated psychosis has been associated with better prognosis in patients with schizophrenia. In Introduction: In this study, we measured duration mismatch negativity (dMMN, P3a and reorienting negativity (RON in subjects with at-risk mental state (ARMS, patients with first-episode or chronic schizophrenia, and healthy volunteers. The main interest was to determine if these event-related potentials provide a biomarker associated with progression to overt schizophrenia in ARMS subjects.Methods: Seventeen ARMS subjects meeting the criteria of the Comprehensive Assessment of At-Risk Mental State, 38 patients with schizophrenia (19 first-episode and 19 chronic, and 19 healthy controls participated in the study. dMMN, P3a and RON were measured with an auditory odd-ball paradigm at baseline. Results: During the follow-up period (2.2 years, 4 out of the 19 ARMS subjects transitioned to schizophrenia (Converters while 15 did not (non-Converters. dMMN amplitudes of Converters were significantly smaller than those of non-Converters at frontal and central electrodes before onset of illness. dMMN amplitudes of non-Converters did not differ from those of healthy controls, while Converters showed significantly smaller dMMN amplitudes compared to control subjects. RON amplitudes were also reduced at frontal and central electrodes in subjects with schizophrenia, but not ARMS. Converter subjects tended to show smaller RON amplitudes compared to non-Converters. Conclusions: Our data confirm that diminished dMMN amplitudes provide a biomarker which is present before and after the development of psychosis. In this respect, RON amplitudes may also be useful, as suggested for the first time in this study.

  13. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites collect visible and infrared cloud imagery as well as monitoring the atmospheric, oceanographic,...

  14. An enhanced algorithm to estimate BDS satellite's differential code biases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chuang; Fan, Lei; Li, Min; Liu, Zhizhao; Gu, Shengfeng; Zhong, Shiming; Song, Weiwei

    2016-02-01

    This paper proposes an enhanced algorithm to estimate the differential code biases (DCB) on three frequencies of the BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) satellites. By forming ionospheric observables derived from uncombined precise point positioning and geometry-free linear combination of phase-smoothed range, satellite DCBs are determined together with ionospheric delay that is modeled at each individual station. Specifically, the DCB and ionospheric delay are estimated in a weighted least-squares estimator by considering the precision of ionospheric observables, and a misclosure constraint for different types of satellite DCBs is introduced. This algorithm was tested by GNSS data collected in November and December 2013 from 29 stations of Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) and BeiDou Experimental Tracking Stations. Results show that the proposed algorithm is able to precisely estimate BDS satellite DCBs, where the mean value of day-to-day scattering is about 0.19 ns and the RMS of the difference with respect to MGEX DCB products is about 0.24 ns. In order to make comparison, an existing algorithm based on IGG: Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics, China (IGGDCB), is also used to process the same dataset. Results show that, the DCB difference between results from the enhanced algorithm and the DCB products from Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE) and MGEX is reduced in average by 46 % for GPS satellites and 14 % for BDS satellites, when compared with DCB difference between the results of IGGDCB algorithm and the DCB products from CODE and MGEX. In addition, we find the day-to-day scattering of BDS IGSO satellites is obviously lower than that of GEO and MEO satellites, and a significant bias exists in daily DCB values of GEO satellites comparing with MGEX DCB product. This proposed algorithm also provides a new approach to estimate the satellite DCBs of multiple GNSS systems.

  15. DFH Satellite Co.,Ltd.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SunQing

    2004-01-01

    DFH Satellite Co.,Ltd. is a hi-tech enterprise founded and sponsored by China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation(CASC) and one of CASC subsidiaries,China Academy of Space Technology (CAST). The company is mainly engaged in the research and development of small satellites and micro-satellites, Osystem designs and product development for satellite application projects as well as the international exchanges and cooperation.

  16. CTS United States experiments - A progress report. [Communications Technology Satellite for high power broadcasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, W. H.; Donoughe, P. L.

    1976-01-01

    The Communications Technology Satellite (CTS) is a high-power broadcast satellite launched by NASA on January 17, 1976. CTS is the first satellite to operate at a frequency of 12 gigahertz and incorporates technology making possible new satellite telecommunications services. CTS is a cooperative program of the United States and Canada. This paper presents the results of the United States experimental activity to date. Wide segments of the population are involved in the Experiments Program, including the scientific community, other government agencies, industry, and the education and health entities. The experiments are associated with both technological objectives and the demonstration of new community and social services via satellite.

  17. Telelibrary: Library Services via Satellite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rosa

    1979-01-01

    Investigates the provision of library services via satellite, explains briefly the operation and advantages of communication satellites, and discusses the various telecommunications equipment and services which, when coupled with satellite transmission, will enhance library activities. Demand trend projections for telecommunications services…

  18. Mobile satellite service for Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sward, David

    1988-05-01

    The Mobile Satellite (MSAT) system and a special program designed to provide interim mobile satellite services (IMSS) during the construction phase of MSAT are described. A mobile satellite system is a key element in extending voice and and data telecommunications to all Canadians.

  19. Satellite Aerodynamics and Density Determination from Satellite Dynamic Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    The aerodynamic drag and lift properties of a satellite are first expressed as a function of two parameters associated with gas-surface interaction at the satellite surface. The dynamic response of the satellite as it passes through the atmosphere is then expressed as a function of the two gas-surface interaction parameters, the atmospheric density, the satellite velocity, and the satellite orientation to the high speed flow. By proper correlation of the observed dynamic response with the changing angle of attack of the satellite, it is found that the two unknown gas-surface interaction parameters can be determined. Once the gas-surface interaction parameters are known, the aerodynamic properties of the satellite at all angles of attack are also determined.

  20. Design and implementation of an experiment scheduling system for the ACTS satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringer, Mark J.

    1994-01-01

    The Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) was launched on the 12th of September 1993 aboard STS-51. All events since that time have proceeded as planned with user operations commencing on December 6th, 1993. ACTS is a geosynchronous satellite designed to extend the state of the art in communication satellite design and is available to experimenters on a 'time/bandwidth available' basis. The ACTS satellite requires the advance scheduling of experimental activities based upon a complex set of resource, state, and activity constraints in order to ensure smooth operations. This paper describes the software system developed to schedule experiments for ACTS.

  1. Thematic mapping from satellite imagery

    CERN Document Server

    Denègre, J

    2013-01-01

    Thematic Mapping from Satellite Imagery: A Guidebook discusses methods in producing maps using satellite images. The book is comprised of five chapters; each chapter covers one stage of the process. Chapter 1 tackles the satellite remote sensing imaging and its cartographic significance. Chapter 2 discusses the production processes for extracting information from satellite data. The next chapter covers the methods for combining satellite-derived information with that obtained from conventional sources. Chapter 4 deals with design and semiology for cartographic representation, and Chapter 5 pre

  2. Cooperative and cognitive satellite systems

    CERN Document Server

    Chatzinotas, Symeon; De Gaudenzi, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Cooperative and Cognitive Satellite Systems provides a solid overview of the current research in the field of cooperative and cognitive satellite systems, helping users understand how to incorporate state-of-the-art communication techniques in innovative satellite network architectures to enable the next generation of satellite systems. The book is edited and written by top researchers and practitioners in the field, providing a comprehensive explanation of current research that allows users to discover future technologies and their applications, integrate satellite and terrestrial systems

  3. Satellite Control Laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Bak, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    The Satellite Laboratory at the Department of Control Engineering of Aalborg University (SatLab) is a dynamic motion facility designed for analysis and test of micro spacecraft. A unique feature of the laboratory is that it provides a completely gravity-free environment. A test spacecraft...... is suspended on an air bearing, and rotates freely in 3 degrees of freedom. In order to avoid any influence of the gravitational force the centre of mass of the satellite is placed in the geometric centre of the air bearing by an automatic balancing system. The test spacecraft is equipped with a three...... of the laboratory is to conduct dynamic tests of the control and attitude determination algorithms during nominal operation and in abnormal conditions. Further it is intended to use SatLab for validation of various algorithms for fault detection, accommodation and supervisory control. Different mission objectives...

  4. Declassified Intelligence Satellite Photographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2008-01-01

    Declassified photographs from U.S. intelligence satellites provide an important worldwide addition to the public record of the Earth's land surface. This imagery was released to the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in accordance with Executive Order 12951 on February 23, 1995. The NARA has the original declassified film and a viewing copy. The USGS has another copy of the film to complement the Landsat archive. The declassified collection involves more than 990,000 photographs taken from 1959 through 1980 and was released on two separate occasions: February 1995 (Declass 1) and September 2002 (Declass 2). The USGS copy is maintained by the Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center, near Sioux Falls, South Dakota. Both the NARA and EROS provide public access to this unique collection that extends the record of land-surface change back another decade from the advent of the Landsat program that began satellite operations in 1972.

  5. Satellites in Canadian broadcasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siocos, C. A.

    The involvement of Canadian broadcasting and related enterprises in satellite telecommunications is surveyed. This includes point-to-point transmissions and direct ones to the general public. The mode of such utilizations is indicated in both these cases. For the forthcoming DBS systems the many types of service offerings and utilization concepts under discussion elasewhere are presented as well as the business prospects and regulatory climate offering them.

  6. Neptune: Minor Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2003-04-01

    All but one of Neptune's minor satellites orbit within or just outside its ringsystem; the exception is the distant object Nereid. Some of them are betterdescribed as `mid-sized' rather than `minor', but are included under thisheading as little is known of them. The inner four, with approximatediameters, are Naiad (60 km), Thalassa (80 km), Despina (150 km) and Galatea(160 km). The first three lie...

  7. Satellite Surveillance: Domestic Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    earthquake and tsunami in the Indian Ocean and Hurricane Katrina in 2005, when the NGA provided graphics for “relief efforts that depicted the locations of...that show the damage resulting from an earthquake , fire, flood, hurricane, oil spill, or volcanic eruption.8 Bush Administration Policies...Satellite information has continued to have important civil applications in such disparate areas as the movement of glaciers in Yakutat Bay in Alaska

  8. Tethered satellite design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manarini, G.

    1986-01-01

    The capability of the satellite to perform a variety of space operations to be accomplished from the shuttle is reviewed considering use of the satellite with man-in-loop and closed loop modes and deployment (toward or away from Earth, up to 100 km), stationkeeping, retrieval and control of the satellite. Scientific payloads are to be used to perform experiments and scientific investigation for applications such as magnetometry, electrodynamics, atmospheric science, chemical release, communications, plasmaphysics, dynamic environment, and power and thrust generation. The TSS-S will be reused for at least 3 missions after reconfiguration and refurbishment by changing the peculiar mission items such as thermal control, fixed boom for experiments, aerodynamic tail for yaw attitude control, external skin, experiments, and any other feature. The TSS-S is to be composed of three modules in order to allow independent integration of a single module and to facilitate the refurbishment and reconfiguration between flights. The three modules are service, auxiliary propulsion, and payload modules.

  9. Heart Monitoring By Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    The ambulance antenna shown is a specially designed system that allows satellite-relayed two-way communications between a moving emergency vehicle and a hospital emergency room. It is a key component of a demonstration program aimed at showing how emergency medical service can be provided to people in remote rural areas. Satellite communication permits immediate, hospital- guided treatment of heart attacks or other emergencies by ambulance personnel, saving vital time when the scene of the emergency is remote from the hospital. If widely adopted, the system could save tens of thousands of lives annually in the U.S. alone, medical experts say. The problem in conventional communication with rural areas is the fact that radio signals travel in line of sight. They may be blocked by tall buildings, hills and mountains, or even by the curvature of the Earth, so signal range is sharply limited. Microwave relay towers could solve the problem, but a complete network of repeater towers would be extremely expensive. The satellite provides an obstruction-free relay station in space.

  10. Tactical Satellite 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, T. M.; Straight, S. D.; Lockwook, R. B.

    2008-08-01

    Tactical Satellite 3 is an Air Force Research Laboratory Science and Technology (S&T) initiative that explores the capability and technological maturity of small, low-cost satellites. It features a low cost "plug and play" modular bus and low cost militarily significant payloads - a Raytheon developed Hyperspectral imager and secondary payload data exfiltration provided by the Office of Naval Research. In addition to providing for ongoing innovation and demonstration in this important technology area, these S&T efforts also help mitigate technology risk and establish a potential concept of operations for future acquisitions. The key objectives are rapid launch and on-orbit checkout, theater commanding, and near-real time theater data integration. It will also feature a rapid development of the space vehicle and integrated payload and spacecraft bus by using components and processes developed by the satellite modular bus initiative. Planned for a late summer 2008 launch, the TacSat-3 spacecraft will collect and process images and then downlink processed data using a Common Data Link. An in-theater tactical ground station will have the capability to uplink tasking to spacecraft and will receive full data image. An international program, the United Kingdom Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL) and Australian Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO) plan to participate in TacSat-3 experiments.

  11. A satellite anemometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, W. B.; Heelis, R. A.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the design, development, and testing of components of a satellite anemometer, an instrument for measuring neutral winds in the upper atmosphere from a satellite platform. The device, which uses four nearly identical pressure sensors, measures the angle of arrival of the bulk neutral flow in the satellite frame of reference. It could also be used in a feedback loop to control spacecraft attitude with respect to the ram velocity direction. We have now developed miniaturized ionization pressure gauges that will work well from the slip flow region near 115 km up to the base of the exosphere, which covers the entire altitude range currently being considered for Tether. Laboratory tests have demonstrated a very linear response to changes in ram angle out to +/- 20 deg. (transverse wind component of 2.7 km s(exp -1)) from the ram, and a monotonic response to out beyond 45 deg. Pitch (vertical wind) and yaw (horizontal wind) can be sampled simultaneously and meaningfully up to 10 Hz. Angular sensitivity of 30 arc seconds (approximately 1 ms(exp -1) is readily attainable, but absolute accuracy for winds will be approximately 1 deg (130 m/s) unless independent attitude knowledge is available. The critical elements of the design have all been tested in the laboratory.

  12. Binary Satellite Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Evslin, Jarah

    2013-01-01

    Suggestions have appeared in the literature that the following five pairs of Milky Way and Andromeda satellite galaxies are gravitationally bound: Draco and Ursa Minor, Leo IV and V, Andromeda I and III, NGC 147 and 185, and the Magellanic clouds. Under the assumption that a given pair is gravitationally bound, the Virial theorem provides an estimate of its total mass and so its instantaneous tidal radius. For all of these pairs except for the Magellanic clouds the resulting total mass is 2 to 4 orders of magnitude higher than that within the half light radius. Furthermore in the case of each pair except for Leo IV and Leo V, the estimated tidal radius is inferior to the separation between the two satellites. Therefore all or almost all of these systems are not gravitationally bound. We note several possible explanations for the proximities and similar radial velocities of the satellites in each pair, for example they may have condensed from the same infalling structure or they may be bound by a nongravitatio...

  13. Negotiated reorienting: a grounded theory of nurses' end-of-life decision-making in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Ann; Bousso, Regina Szylit; McCarthy, Joan; Kohlen, Helen; Andrews, Tom; Paganini, Maria Cristina; Abu-El-Noor, Nasser Ibrahim; Cox, Anna; Haas, Margit; Arber, Anne; Abu-El-Noor, Mysoon Khalil; Baliza, Michelle Freire; Padilha, Katia Grillo

    2015-04-01

    Intensive care units (ICUs) focus on treatment for those who are critically ill and interventions to prolong life. Ethical issues arise when decisions have to be made regarding the withdrawal and withholding of life-sustaining treatment and the shift to comfort and palliative care. These issues are particularly challenging for nurses when there are varying degrees of uncertainty regarding prognosis. Little is known about nurses' end-of-life (EoL) decision-making practice across cultures. To understand nurses' EoL decision-making practices in ICUs in different cultural contexts. We collected and analysed qualitative data using Grounded Theory. Interviews were conducted with experienced ICU nurses in university or hospital premises in five countries: Brazil, England, Germany, Ireland and Palestine. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 51 nurses (10 in Brazil, 9 in England, 10 in Germany, 10 in Ireland and 12 nurses in Palestine). They were purposefully and theoretically selected to include nurses having a variety of characteristics and experiences concerning end-of-life (EoL) decision-making. The study used grounded theory to inform data collection and analysis. Interviews were facilitated by using key questions. The comparative analysis of the data within and across data generated by the different research teams enabled researchers to develop a deeper understanding of EoL decision-making practices in the ICU. Ethical approval was granted in each of the participating countries and voluntary informed consent obtained from each participant. The core category that emerged was 'negotiated reorienting'. Whilst nurses do not make the 'ultimate' EoL decisions, they engage in two core practices: consensus seeking (involving coaxing, information cuing and voice enabling); and emotional holding (creating time-space and comfort giving). There was consensus regarding the core concept and core practices employed by nurses in the ICUs in the five countries. However

  14. Effect of additive elements on exchange coupling and spin reorientation transition of nanocrystalline single-phase Nd-Fe-B alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Nd12.3Fe81.7-xZrxB6.0 (x=0,1.5) and (NdDyTb)12.3(FeZrNbCu)81.7-yCoyB6.0 (y=0,12) ribbons were prepared by melt spinning at 22 m/s and subsequent annealing.The influences of Zr,Dy/Tb and Co substitutions on magnetic properties and spin reorientation transitions of nanophase Nd2Fe14B have been systematically investigated.Compared with Zr-free sample,the remanence,intrinsic coercivity and maximum energy product for Nd12.3Fe80.2Zr1.5B6.0 ribbon increase by 10.8 %,17.8 % and 60.2 %,respectively.The significant improvement of magnetic properties originates from the finer grains of the sample by introducing Zr,which leads to the stronger exchange coupling between neighboring grains.The intrinsic coercivity for (DyTb)-substituted ribbon is significantly increased although the remanence is reduced,which could be compensated by the substitution of Co for Fe.The spin reorientation temperature Tsr of nanocrystalline Nd2Fe14B alloys was determined by measuring the ac magnetic susceptibility.It was found to be lower than that of bulk Nd2Fe14B.The substitutions of Zr,Dy/Tb and Co result in reduction of Tsr.The smaller the grain size,the lower the Tsr will be.Influence of spin reorientation on magnetization characteristics of nanophase Nd2Fe14B was discussed.

  15. A novel algorithm for satellite data transmission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    For remote sensing satellite data transmission,a novel algorithm is proposed in this paper.It integrates different type feature descriptors into multistage recognizers.In the first level,the dynamic clustering algorithm is used.In the second level,the improved support vector machines algorithm demonstrates its validity.In the third level,the shape matrices similarity comparison algorithm shows its excellent performance.The single child recognizers are connected in series,but they are independent of each other.Objects which are not recognized correctly by the lower level recognizers are then put into the higher level recognizers.Experimental results show that the multistage recognition algorithm improves the accuracy greatly with higher level feature descriptors and higher level recognizers.The algorithm may offer a new methodology for high speed satellite data transmission.

  16. A direct broadcast satellite-audio experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaisnys, Arvydas; Abbe, Brian; Motamedi, Masoud

    1992-03-01

    System studies have been carried out over the past three years at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) on digital audio broadcasting (DAB) via satellite. The thrust of the work to date has been on designing power and bandwidth efficient systems capable of providing reliable service to fixed, mobile, and portable radios. It is very difficult to predict performance in an environment which produces random periods of signal blockage, such as encountered in mobile reception where a vehicle can quickly move from one type of terrain to another. For this reason, some signal blockage mitigation techniques were built into an experimental DAB system and a satellite experiment was conducted to obtain both qualitative and quantitative measures of performance in a range of reception environments. This paper presents results from the experiment and some conclusions on the effectiveness of these blockage mitigation techniques.

  17. A Deep Chandra Observation of the X-shaped Radio Galaxy 4C +00.58: A Candidate for Merger-induced Reorientation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    Radio Galaxy 4C +00.58: A Candidate for Merger-induced Reorientation? 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S... cosmology (H0 = 71 km s −1 Mpc−1, ΩΛ = 0.73, and Ωm = 0.27; Spergel et al. 2007). At a redshift of z = 0.059, 1 ′′ = 1.13 kpc. 2. Observations We...GHz map resolves the jet into a string of knots (§3.3). We detect no counterjet. The X-ray emission (Fig. 1) is made up of two components: bright

  18. Satellite Upper Air Network (SUAN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reale, Tony L.; Thorne, Peter

    2004-10-01

    During the past 20 years of NOAA operational polar satellites, it has become evident that a growing problem concerning their utilization in Climate and also Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) applications are the systematic errors and uncertainties inherent in the satellite measurements. Similar arguments can be made for global radiosonde observations. These uncertainties are often larger than the sensitive signals and processes, that satellite and radiosonde measurements are designed to reveal, particularly in the realm of climate. Possible strategies to quantify and compensate for these problems include the analysis of satellite overlap data and/or available collocations of satellite and ground truth (radiosonde) observations. However, overlap observations are typically not available except in extreme polar regions and current sampling strategies for compiling collocated radiosonde and satellite observations are insufficient, further compounding the inherent uncertainties in the ground-truth radiosonde data. A Satellite Upper Air Network is proposed to provide reference radiosonde launches coincident with operational polar satellite(s) overpass. The SUAN consist of 36 global radiosonde stations sub-sampled from the Global Upper Air Network (GUAN), and is designed to provide a robust, global sample of collocated radiosonde and satellite observations conducive to the monitoring and validation of satellite and radiosonde observations. The routine operation of such a network in conjunction with operational polar satellites would provide a long-term of performance for critical observations of particular importance for climate. The following report presents a candidate network of 36 upper-air sites that could comprise a SUAN. Their selection along with the mutual benefit across the satellite, radiosonde, climate, numerical weather prediction (NWP) and radiative transfer (RT) model areas are discussed.

  19. A satellite formation flying approach providing both positioning and tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurge, Mark A.; Youngquist, Robert C.; Starr, Stanley O.

    2016-05-01

    A magnetic field approach is presented whereby a large number of closely located satellites can be positioned and oriented relative to each other, but can also be tracked in six degrees of freedom. This is accomplished by using frequency-multiplexed magnetic fields where coils are placed on each satellite to allow them to generate magnetic fields, to interact with the magnetic fields from other satellites, and to sample the surrounding magnetic fields. By doing this, a satellite can choose which alternating field to push or pull against, to provide torque about, or to sample in order to determine its location and orientation relative to the other satellites. Theory is provided demonstrating the capability of this approach along with its advantages and limitations. An experimental system allowing 3 degrees-of-freedom was constructed and used to demonstrate a feedback and control system where a satellite is told to move to a location and it does this by interacting with the surrounding satellites to both generate forces and torques and to track its position and orientation.

  20. Mapping cultivable land from satellite imagery with clustering algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arango, R. B.; Campos, A. M.; Combarro, E. F.; Canas, E. R.; Díaz, I.

    2016-07-01

    Open data satellite imagery provides valuable data for the planning and decision-making processes related with environmental domains. Specifically, agriculture uses remote sensing in a wide range of services, ranging from monitoring the health of the crops to forecasting the spread of crop diseases. In particular, this paper focuses on a methodology for the automatic delimitation of cultivable land by means of machine learning algorithms and satellite data. The method uses a partition clustering algorithm called Partitioning Around Medoids and considers the quality of the clusters obtained for each satellite band in order to evaluate which one better identifies cultivable land. The proposed method was tested with vineyards using as input the spectral and thermal bands of the Landsat 8 satellite. The experimental results show the great potential of this method for cultivable land monitoring from remote-sensed multispectral imagery.

  1. 622 Mbps High-speed satellite communication system for WINDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Yasuo; Hashimoto, Yukio; Yoshimura, Naoko; Suzuki, Ryutaro; Gedney, Richard T.; Dollard, Mike

    2006-07-01

    WINDS is the experimental communications satellite currently under joint development by Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT). The high-speed satellite communication system is very effective for quick deployment of high-speed networks economically. The WINDS will realize ultra high-speed networking and demonstrate operability of satellite communication systems in high-speed internet. NICT is now developing high-speed satellite communication system for WINDS. High-speed TDMA burst modem with high performance TPC error correction is underdevelopment. Up to the DAC on the transmitter and from the ADC on the receiver, all modem functions are performed in the digital processing technology. Burst modem has been designed for a user data rate up to 1244 Mbps. NICT is developing the digital terminal as a user interface and a network controller for this earth station. High compatibility with the Internet will be provided.

  2. Radio broadcasting via satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, Neil R.; Pritchard, Wilbur L.

    1990-10-01

    Market areas offering potential for future narrowband broadcast satellites are examined, including international public diplomacy, government- and advertising-supported, and business-application usages. Technical issues such as frequency allocation, spacecraft types, transmission parameters, and radio receiver characteristics are outlined. Service and system requirements, advertising revenue, and business communications services are among the economic issues discussed. The institutional framework required to provide an operational radio broadcast service is studied, and new initiatives in direct broadcast audio radio systems, encompassing studies, tests, in-orbit demonstrations of, and proposals for national and international commercial broadcast services are considered.

  3. Understanding satellite navigation

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, Rajat

    2014-01-01

    This book explains the basic principles of satellite navigation technology with the bare minimum of mathematics and without complex equations. It helps you to conceptualize the underlying theory from first principles, building up your knowledge gradually using practical demonstrations and worked examples. A full range of MATLAB simulations is used to visualize concepts and solve problems, allowing you to see what happens to signals and systems with different configurations. Implementation and applications are discussed, along with some special topics such as Kalman Filter and Ionosphere. W

  4. China Satellite Navigation Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jingnan; Fan, Shiwei; Wang, Feixue

    2016-01-01

    These Proceedings present selected research papers from CSNC2016, held during 18th-20th May in Changsha, China. The theme of CSNC2016 is Smart Sensing, Smart Perception. These papers discuss the technologies and applications of the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), and the latest progress made in the China BeiDou System (BDS) especially. They are divided into 12 topics to match the corresponding sessions in CSNC2016, which broadly covered key topics in GNSS. Readers can learn about the BDS and keep abreast of the latest advances in GNSS techniques and applications.

  5. China Satellite Navigation Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jingnan; Yang, Yuanxi; Fan, Shiwei; Yu, Wenxian

    2017-01-01

    These proceedings present selected research papers from CSNC2017, held during 23th-25th May in Shanghai, China. The theme of CSNC2017 is Positioning, Connecting All. These papers discuss the technologies and applications of the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), and the latest progress made in the China BeiDou System (BDS) especially. They are divided into 12 topics to match the corresponding sessions in CSNC2017, which broadly covered key topics in GNSS. Readers can learn about the BDS and keep abreast of the latest advances in GNSS techniques and applications.

  6. The Galilean Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This composite includes the four largest moons of Jupiter which are known as the Galilean satellites. The Galilean satellites were first seen by the Italian astronomer Galileo Galilei in 1610. Shown from left to right in order of increasing distance from Jupiter, Io is closest, followed by Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto.The order of these satellites from the planet Jupiter helps to explain some of the visible differences among the moons. Io is subject to the strongest tidal stresses from the massive planet. These stresses generate internal heating which is released at the surface and makes Io the most volcanically active body in our solar system. Europa appears to be strongly differentiated with a rock/iron core, an ice layer at its surface, and the potential for local or global zones of water between these layers. Tectonic resurfacing brightens terrain on the less active and partially differentiated moon Ganymede. Callisto, furthest from Jupiter, appears heavily cratered at low resolutions and shows no evidence of internal activity.North is to the top of this composite picture in which these satellites have all been scaled to a common factor of 10 kilometers (6 miles) per picture element.The Solid State Imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft acquired the Io and Ganymede images in June 1996, the Europa images in September 1996, and the Callisto images in November 1997.Launched in October 1989, the spacecraft's mission is to conduct detailed studies of the giant planet, its largest moons and the Jovian magnetic environment. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission

  7. Future communications satellite applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagwell, James W.

    1992-01-01

    The point of view of the research is made through the use of viewgraphs. It is suggested that future communications satellite applications will be made through switched point to point narrowband communications. Some characteristics of which are as follows: small/low cost terminals; single hop communications; voice compatible; full mesh networking; ISDN compatible; and possible limited use of full motion video. Some target applications are as follows: voice/data networks between plants and offices in a corporation; data base networking for commercial and science users; and cellular radio internodal voice/data networking.

  8. HETE Satellite Power Subsystem

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    The HETE (High-Energy Transient Experiment) satellite a joint project between MIT's Center for Space Research and AeroAstro. is a high-energy gamma-ray burst/X-Ray/UV observatory platform. HETE will be launched into a 550 km circular orbit with an inclination of 37.7°, and has a design lifetime of 18 months. This paper presents a description of the spacecraft's power subsystem, which collects, regulates, and distributes power to the experiment payload modules and to the various spacecraft sub...

  9. The TAOS/STEP Satellite

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, David; Hosken, Robert

    1995-01-01

    The Technology for Autonomous Operational Survivability / Space Test Experiments Platform (TAOS/STEP) satellite was launched on a Taurus booster from Vandenberg Air Force Base into a nearly circular, 105 degree inclined orbit on March 13, 1994. The purpose of this satellite is twofold: 1) to test a new concept in multiple procurements of fast-track modular satellites and 2) to test a suite of Air Force Phillips Laboratory payloads in space. The TAOS payloads include the Microcosm Autonomous N...

  10. Living antennas on communication satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lumholt, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Crises change the global pattern of communication. The communications problems occur because the satellites are optimized to cover specific geographic areas, and these areas cannot be altered once the satellites are in Earth orbit. An effective solution to the problem is to equip communication...... satellites with "living" antennas that can adjust their radiation coverage areas according to the new demands. The development of living antennas is, therefore, among the focus areas identified and supported by the European Space Agency, ESA....

  11. Trends in mobile satellite communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannsen, Klaus G.; Bowles, Mike W.; Milliken, Samuel; Cherrette, Alan R.; Busche, Gregory C.

    1993-01-01

    Ever since the U.S. Federal Communication Commission opened the discussion on spectrum usage for personal handheld communication, the community of satellite manufacturers has been searching for an economically viable and technically feasible satellite mobile communication system. Hughes Aircraft Company and others have joined in providing proposals for such systems, ranging from low to medium to geosynchronous orbits. These proposals make it clear that the trend in mobile satellite communication is toward more sophisticated satellites with a large number of spot beams and onboard processing, providing worldwide interconnectivity. Recent Hughes studies indicate that from a cost standpoint the geosynchronous satellite (GEOS) is most economical, followed by the medium earth orbit satellite (MEOS) and then by the low earth orbit satellite (LEOS). From a system performance standpoint, this evaluation may be in reverse order, depending on how the public will react to speech delay and collision. This paper discusses the trends and various mobile satellite constellations in satellite communication under investigation. It considers the effect of orbital altitude and modulation/multiple access on the link and spacecraft design.

  12. Magnetic Satellite Missions and Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Kotsiaros, Stavros

    2011-01-01

    Although the first satellite observations of the Earth’s magnetic field were already taken more than 50 years ago, continuous geomagnetic measurements from space are only available since 1999. The unprecedented time-space coverage of this recent data set opened revolutionary new possibilities...... for exploring the Earth’s magnetic field from space. In this chapter we discuss characteristics of satellites measuring the geomagnetic field and report on past, present and upcoming magnetic satellite missions. We conclude with some basics about space magnetic gradiometry as a possible path for future...... exploration of Earth’s magnetic field with satellites....

  13. Satellite Communications: The Indian Scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Ranjit Singh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available India has launched as many as 73 Indian satellites as of today since its first attempt in 1975. Besides serving traditional markets of telephony and broadcasting, satellites are on the frontiers of advanced applications as telemedicine, distance learning, environment monitoring, remote sensing, and so on. Satellite systems are optimized for services such as Internet access, virtual private networks and personal access. Costs have been coming down in recent years to the point where satellite broadband is becoming competitive. This article is an attempt to view this important topic from Indian perspective. India’s Project GAGAN, GPS Aided Geo Augmented Navigation is discussed.

  14. Business Use of Satellite Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelson, Burton I.; Cooper, Robert S.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews business communications development and discusses business applications of satellite communications, system technology, and prospects for future developments in digital transmission systems. (JN)

  15. Towards ultra-high resolution fibre tract mapping of the human brain - registration of polarised light images and reorientation of fibre vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Palm

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Polarised Light Imaging (PLI utilises the birefringence of the myelin sheaths in order to visualise the orientation of nerve fibres in microtome sections of adult human post-mortem brains at ultra-high spatial resolution. The preparation of post-mortem brains for PLI involves fixation, freezing and cutting into 100-micrometer thick sections. Hence, geometrical distortions of histological sections are inevitable and have to be removed for 3D reconstruction and subsequent fibre tracking. We here present a processing pipeline for 3D reconstruction of these sections using PLI derived multimodal images of post-mortem brains. Blockface images of the brains were obtained during cutting; they serve as reference data for alignment and elimination of distortion artefacts. In addition to the spatial image transformation, fibre orientation vectors were reoriented using the transformation fields, which consider both affine and subsequent non-linear registration. The application of this registration and reorientation approach results in a smooth fibre vector field, which reflects brain morphology. PLI combined with 3D reconstruction and fibre tracking is a powerful tool for human brain mapping. It can also serve as an independent method for evaluating in vivo fibre tractography.

  16. Almost the Same, but Not Quite: Re-Orienting the Story of the Subject in Christina Fernández Cubas's El año de Gracia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A. Folkart

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Cristina Fernández Cubas's novel El año de Gracia (1985, about a young Spaniard who is shipwrecked on a deserted island with only a mangy shepherd for company, evokes the political dialectics of self/other found in the European's discovery and conquest of an unknown island in Robinson Crusoe . In Fernández Cubas's literary depiction of the European subject, however, she situates him on the margins of power in order to view the dynamic from a different perspective. The postcolonial theorizations of Edward Said and Homi Bhabha inform this analysis of how Fernández Cubas's castaway is at first overpowered by the other and then, in his struggle for control, comes to appreciate and learn from those different qualities instead of subsuming them beneath his personal dominance. While the Spanish novel clearly foregrounds Robinson Crusoe as its model text, it also reorients the once supreme subject in the site of exclusion. Hence this protagonist tells his story from a newly formed, hybrid perspective of the oppressor and the oppressed melded into one. El año de Gracia engages conflicting visions of power in dialogue with one another, interrogating the borders that define them according to the differences they exclude. In the process, it disorients the subject in order to reorient the story that he tells as one that is almost the same as its literary forebear but, importantly, not quite.

  17. Declassified Intelligence Satellite Photographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2008-01-01

    Declassified photographs from U.S. intelligence satellites provide an important worldwide addition to the public record of the Earth’s land surface. This imagery was released to the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in accordance with Executive Order 12951 on February 23, 1995. The NARA has the original declassified film and a viewing copy. The USGS has another copy of the film to complement the Landsat archive.The declassified collection involves more than 990,000 photographs taken from 1959 through 1980 and was released on two separate occasions: February 1995 (Declass 1) and September 2002 (Declass 2). The USGS copy is maintained by the Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center, near Sioux Falls, South Dakota. Both the NARA and EROS provide public access to this unique collection that extends the record of land-surface change back another decade from the advent of the Landsat program that began satellite operations in 1972.

  18. The power relay satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Peter E.

    The availability and use of renewable energy sources compatible with reducing risks to the global environment are key to sustainable development. Large-scale, renewable energy resources at undeveloped or underutilized sites are potentially available on several continents. The Power Relay Satellite (PRS) concept has the potential to access these remote energy resources by coupling primary electricity generation from terrestrial transmission lines. A global PRS network can be envisioned to provide a high degree of flexibility for supplying energy demands worldwide with wireless power transmitted from sites on Earth to geosynchronous orbit and then reflected to receivers interfacing with terrestrial power transmision networks. Past developments in wireless power transmission (WPT) are reviewed and recent successful results are noted. The origins of the PRS concept, and a possible configuration are discussed, principles of WPT at microwave frequencies, functional requirements, and system design contraints are outlined, and space transportation concepts presented. PRS assessments including applicable technologies, economic projections, and societal issues are highlighted. It is concluded that the PRS provides a promising option to access renewable resources at great distances from major markets, and represents an important stage in the future development in the future of solar power satellites.

  19. Recent Korean R&D in Satellite Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ho-Jin; Kim, Jae Moung; Lee, Byung-Seub; Lee, Han; Ryoo, Jang-Soo

    The R&D in satellite communications in Korea has been driven mainly by KCC (Korea Communications Commission) but in a small scale compared to Korea space development program organized by MEST (Ministry of Education, Science and Technology). Public and civilian satcom sector R&D has been led mainly by ETRI with small/medium companies contrary to rare investment in private sector while military sector R&D has been orchestrated by ADD with defense industry. By the COMS (Communication, Ocean and Meteorological Satellite) experimental Ka-band payload, Korea pursues a space qualification of own technology for national infrastructure evolution as well as industrialization of space R&D results. Once COMS launched and space qualified in 2009, subsequent application experiments and new technology R&D like UHDTV will entail service and industry promotion. The payload technology is expected for the next Korean commercial satellites or for new OBP satellites. The COMS ground control system and GNSS ground station technologies are under development for COMS operation and enhanced GNSS services along with advent of Galileo respectively. Satellite broadband mobile VSAT based on DVB-S2/RCS (+M) and low profile tracking antennas have been developed for trains, ships, and planes. While APSI is developing GMR-1 based Thuraya handset functions, ETRI is designing IMT-Advanced satellite radio interface for satellite and terrestrial dual-mode handheld communication system like Japanese STICS, with universities' satellite OFDM researches. A 21GHz Ka-band higher-availability scalable HD broadcasting technology and SkyLife's hybrid satellite IPTV technology are being developed. In near term Korea will extend R&D programs to upgrade the space communication infrastructure for universal access to digital opportunity and safer daily life from disaster, and to promote space green IT industrialization, national security, and space resources sovereign. Japanese stakeholders are invited to establish

  20. Gigabit Satellite Network for NASA's Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoder, Douglas; Bergamo, Marcos

    1996-01-01

    The advanced communication technology satellite (ACTS) gigabit satellite network provides long-haul point-to-point and point-to-multipoint full-duplex SONET services over NASA's ACTS. at rates up to 622 Mbit/s (SONET OC-12), with signal quality comparable to that obtained with terrestrial fiber networks. Data multiplexing over the satellite is accomplished using time-division multiple access (TDMA) techniques coordinated with the switching and beam hopping facilities provided by ACTS. Transmissions through the satellite are protected with Reed-Solomon encoding. providing virtually error-free transmission under most weather conditions. Unique to the system are a TDMA frame structure and satellite synchronization mechanism that allow: (a) very efficient utilization of the satellite capacity: (b) over-the-satellite dosed-loop synchronization of the network in configurations with up to 64 ground stations: and (c) ground station initial acquisition without collisions with existing signalling or data traffic. The user interfaces are compatible with SONET standards, performing the function of conventional SONET multiplexers and. as such. can be: readily integrated with standard SONET fiber-based terrestrial networks. Management of the network is based upon the simple network management protocol (SNMP). and includes an over-the-satellite signalling network and backup terrestrial internet (IP-based) connectivity. A description of the ground stations is also included.

  1. Transport and magnetic study of the spin reorientation transition in the Tb{sub 5}(Si{sub 0.5}Ge{sub 0.5}){sub 4} magnetocaloric compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, J P [IFIMUP and Physics Department of FCUP, University of Porto, R. Campo Alegre 687, Porto 4169-007 (Portugal); Pereira, A M [IFIMUP and Physics Department of FCUP, University of Porto, R. Campo Alegre 687, Porto 4169-007 (Portugal); Braga, M E [IFIMUP and Physics Department of FCUP, University of Porto, R. Campo Alegre 687, Porto 4169-007 (Portugal); Pinto, R P [IFIMUP and Physics Department of FCUP, University of Porto, R. Campo Alegre 687, Porto 4169-007 (Portugal); Teixeira, J M [IFIMUP and Physics Department of FCUP, University of Porto, R. Campo Alegre 687, Porto 4169-007 (Portugal); Correia, F C [IFIMUP and Physics Department of FCUP, University of Porto, R. Campo Alegre 687, Porto 4169-007 (Portugal); Sousa, J B [IFIMUP and Physics Department of FCUP, University of Porto, R. Campo Alegre 687, Porto 4169-007 (Portugal); Morellon, L [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon, Universidad de Zaragoza and Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas and Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Algarabel, P A [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon, Universidad de Zaragoza and Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Magen, C [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon, Universidad de Zaragoza and Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Ibarra, M R [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon, Universidad de Zaragoza and Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas and Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2005-08-17

    Detailed measurements of the electrical resistivity {rho}(T), thermopower S(T) and magnetization of Tb{sub 5}(Si{sub 0.5}Ge{sub 0.5}){sub 4} in the vicinity of the spin reorientation transitions observed in this compound are reported. Our results indicate a complex spin reorientation process associated with three different lattice sites occupied by the Tb ions. We identify two critical transition temperatures: one at T{sub SR{sub 1}} = 57 K, as previously reported, and a new one at T{sub SR{sub 2}} = 40 K. A simple model based on an approximate magnetic anisotropy energy is presented; it gives a satisfactory qualitative description of the main features of the reorientation processes.

  2. Multicast Routing in Satellite Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭惠玲; 宋姝; 李磊; 刘志涛; 郭鹏程

    2004-01-01

    There are some problems in the dual-layer satellite MPLs metworks to be composed of LEO and MEO. In order to solve the problems, this paper presents a plan by means of unicast LSP to implement multicast in the dual-layer satellite MPLs networks. It has advantages of saving space and reducing extra charge.

  3. Magnetic Satellite Missions and Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Kotsiaros, Stavros

    2011-01-01

    for exploring the Earth’s magnetic field from space. In this chapter we discuss characteristics of satellites measuring the geomagnetic field and report on past, present and upcoming magnetic satellite missions. We conclude with some basics about space magnetic gradiometry as a possible path for future...

  4. Introducing you to satellite operated data collection platforms (DCP).

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Stavropoulos, CC

    1977-09-01

    Full Text Available using this form of repeater. However, satellites able to handle reports from data collection platform (DCP's) have hitherto only been experimental. Within the next two years the operational phase for this type of activity will have been reached...

  5. Videoconferencing Via Satellite: Opening Congress to the People. Technical Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Fred B.; And Others

    The value of satellite videoconferencing in providing a new mechanism for informed dialogue between congressmen and constituents is evaluated through actual demonstrations. The experimental demonstrations described include large and small group congressional-constituent meetings in urban and rural areas, and a congressional subcommittee hearing…

  6. Applications of the Petite Amateur Navy Satellite (PANSAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-01

    want to do a rescue!" 82 LIST OF REFERENCES [I] Hutchinson, Charles L. and Kleinman, Joel P., editors, The ARRL Handbook for the Radio Amateur, The...the US Naval Postgraduate School’s PANSAT," Oct. 1988. [24] Davidoff, Martin, The Satellite Experimenter’s Handbook , The American Radio Relay League

  7. The SPOT satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouquet, J.-P.

    1981-03-01

    The background, objectives and data products of the French SPOT remote sensing satellite system are presented. The system, which was developed starting in 1978 with the subsequent participation of Sweden and Belgium, is based on a standard multimission platform with associated ground control station and a mission-specific payload, which includes two High-Resolution Visible range instruments allowing the acquisition of stereoscopic views from different orbits. Mission objectives include the definition of future remote sensing systems, the compilation of a cartographic and resources data base, the study of species discrimination and production forecasting based on frequent access and off-nadir viewing, the compilation of a stereoscopic data base, and platform and instrument qualification, for possible applications in cartography, geology and agriculture. Standard data products will be available at three levels of preprocessing: radiometric correction only, precision processing for vertical viewing, and cartographic quality processing.

  8. Satellite Control Laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Bak, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    The Satellite Laboratory at the Department of Control Engineering of Aalborg University (SatLab) is a dynamic motion facility designed for analysis and test of micro spacecraft. A unique feature of the laboratory is that it provides a completely gravity-free environment. A test spacecraft...... of the laboratory is to conduct dynamic tests of the control and attitude determination algorithms during nominal operation and in abnormal conditions. Further it is intended to use SatLab for validation of various algorithms for fault detection, accommodation and supervisory control. Different mission objectives...... can be implemented in the laboratory, e.g. three-axis attitude control, slew manoeuvres, spins stabilization using magnetic actuation and/or reaction wheels. The spacecraft attitude can be determined applying magnetometer measurements...

  9. Astronomy from satellite clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachnik, R.; Labeyrie, A.

    1984-03-01

    Attention is called to the accumulating evidence that giant space telescopes, comprising a number of separate mirrors on independent satellites, are a realistic prospect for providing research tools of extraordinary power. The ESA-sponsored group and its counterpart in the US have reached remarkably similar conclusions regarding the basic configuration of extremely large synthetic-aperture devices. Both share the basic view that a cluster of spacecraft is preferable to a single monolithic structure. The emphasis of the US group has been on a mission that sweeps across as many sources as possible in the minimum time; it is referred to as SAMSI (Spacecraft Array for Michelson Spatial Interferometry). The European group has placed more emphasis on obtaining two-dimensional images. Their system is referred to as TRIO because, at least initially, it involves three independent systems. Detailed descriptions are given of the two systems.

  10. Sky alert! when satellites fail

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Les

    2013-01-01

    How much do we depend on space satellites? Defense, travel, agriculture, weather forecasting, mobile phones and broadband, commerce...the list seems endless. But what would our live be like if the unimaginable happened and, by accident or design, those space assets disappeared? Sky Alert! explores what our world would be like, looking in turn at areas where the loss could have catastrophic effects. The book - demonstrates our dependence on space technology and satellites; - outlines the effect on our economy, defense, and daily lives if satellites and orbiting spacecraft were destroyed; - illustrates the danger of dead satellites, spent rocket stages, and space debris colliding with a functioning satellites; - demonstrates the threat of dramatically increased radiation levels associated with geomagnetic storms; - introduces space as a potential area of conflict between nations.

  11. Induction studies with satellite data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils

    1999-01-01

    analysis of the geomagnetic field is performed, and the Q-response, which is the transfer function between the internal (induced) and the external (inducing) expansion coefficients is determined for a specific frequency. In the second approach, known as the geomagnetic depth sounding method, the C....... This paper reviews and discusses the possibilities for induction studies using high-precision magnetic measurements from low-altitude satellites. The different methods and various transfer functions are presented, with special emphasis on the differences in analysing data from ground stations and from...... satellites. The results of several induction studies with scalar satellite data (from the POGO satellites) and with vector data (from the Magsat mission) demonstrate the ability to probe the Earth's conductivity from space. However, compared to the results obtained with ground data the satellite results...

  12. The dielectronic satellites to the 2s-3p Ne-like krypton resonance lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khakhalin, S.Ya. (MISDC, NPO ' ' VNIIFTRI' ' , Mendeleevo (Russian Federation)); Dyakin, V.M. (MISDC, NPO ' ' VNIIFTRI' ' , Mendeleevo (Russian Federation)); Faenov, A.Ya. (MISDC, NPO ' ' VNIIFTRI' ' , Mendeleevo (Russian Federation)); Fiedorowicz, H. (Inst. of Optoelectronics, Warsaw (Poland)); Bartnik, A. (Inst. of Optoelectronics, Warsaw (Poland)); Parys, P. (Inst. of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland)); Nilsen, J. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)); Osterheld, A. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States))

    1994-08-01

    We present an analysis of dielectronic satellite spectra of 2p[sup 6]-2s2p[sup 6]3p Ne-like krypton resonance lines. The satellite structure was registered with high (better than [lambda]/[Delta][lambda] > 3500) spectral resolution in the emission of a laser irradiated gas puff target. We perform an unambiguous identification of satellite lines caused by radiative transitions from autoionizing states of sodium-like krypton ions. A total of about 20 spectral features are identified, most of them for the first time. Very good agreement between the satellite structure calculations and experimental emission spectra is obtained. (orig.).

  13. The Communications Satellite as Educational Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Peter

    1982-01-01

    Drawing on the experiences of several countries, the author describes satellite technology, discusses the feasibility of satellite use in traditional educational institutions, and analyzes the role of satellites in social development. (SK)

  14. Polar-Orbiting Satellite (POES) Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Visible and Infrared satellite imagery taken from camera systems or radiometer instruments on satellites in orbit around the poles. Satellite campaigns include...

  15. SAA drift: Experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryan, O. R.; Romashova, V. V.; Petrov, A. N.

    According to the paleomagnetic analysis there are variations of Earth’s magnetic field connected with magnetic moment changing. These variations affect on the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) location. Indeed different observations approved the existence of the SAA westward drift rate (0.1 1.0 deg/year) and northward drift rate (approximately 0.1 deg/year). In this work, we present the analysis of experimental results obtained in Scobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University (SINP MSU) onboard different Earth’s artificial satellites (1972 2003). The fluxes of protons with energy >50 MeV, gamma quanta with energy >500 keV and neutrons with energy 0.1 1.0 MeV in the SAA region have been analyzed. The mentioned above experimental data were obtained onboard the orbital stations Salut-6 (1979), MIR (1991, 1998) and ISS (2003) by the similar experimental equipment. The comparison of the data obtained during these two decades of investigations confirms the fact that the SAA drifts westward. Moreover the analysis of fluxes of electrons with energy about hundreds keV (Cosmos-484 (1972) and Active (Interkosmos-24, 1991) satellites) verified not only the SAA westward drift but northward drift also.

  16. Spatial Cloud Detection and Retrieval System for Satellite Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman Nasr

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In last the decade we witnessed a large increase in data generated by earth observing satellites. Hence, intelligent processing of the huge amount of data received by hundreds of earth receiving stations, with specific satellite image oriented approaches, presents itself as a pressing need. One of the most important steps in earlier stages of satellite image processing is cloud detection. Satellite images having a large percentage of cloud cannot be used in further analysis. While there are many approaches that deal with different semantic meaning, there are rarely approaches that deal specifically with cloud detection and retrieval. In this paper we introduce a novel approach that spatially detect and retrieve clouds in satellite images using their unique properties .Our approach is developed as spatial cloud detection and retrieval system (SCDRS that introduce a complete framework for specific semantic retrieval system. It uses a Query by polygon (QBP paradigm for the content of interest instead of using the more conventional rectangular query by image approach. First, we extract features from the satellite images using multiple tile sizes using spatial and textural properties of cloud regions. Second, we retrieve our tiles using a parametric statistical approach within a multilevel refinement process. Our approach has been experimentally validated against the conventional ones yielding enhanced precision and recall rates in the same time it gives more precise detection of cloud coverage regions.

  17. Magnetostructural coupling, magnetic ordering, and cobalt spin reorientation in metallic P r0.5S r0.5Co O3 cobaltite

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Muñoz, José Luis; Padilla-Pantoja, Jessica; Torrelles, Xavier; Blasco, Javier; Herrero-Martín, Javier; Bozzo, Bernat; Rodríguez-Velamazán, José A.

    2016-07-01

    In half-doped P r0.50A0.50Co O3 metallic perovskites, the spin-lattice coupling brings about distinct magnetostructural transitions for A =Ca and A =Sr at temperatures close to ˜100 K. However, the ground magnetic properties of P r0.50S r0.50Co O3 (PSCO) strongly differ from P r0.50C a0.50Co O3 ones, where a partial P r3 + to P r4 + valence shift and Co spin transition makes the system insulating below the transition. This paper investigates and describes the relationship between the I m m a →I 4 /m c m symmetry change [Padilla-Pantoja, García-Muñoz, Bozzo, Jirák, and Herrero-Martín, Inorg. Chem. 53, 12297 (2014)] and the original magnetic behavior of PSCO versus temperature and external magnetic fields. The FM1 and FM2 ferromagnetic phases, above and below the magnetostructural transition (TS 1˜120 K ) have been investigated. The FM2 phase of PSCO is composed of [100] FM domains, with magnetic symmetry I m'm'a (mx≠0 , mz=0 ). The magnetic space group of the FM1 phase is F m'm'm (with mx=my ). Neutron data analyses in combination with magnetometry and earlier reports results agrees with a reorientation of the magnetization axis by 45∘ within the a b plane across the transition, in which the system retains its metallic character. The presence below TS 1 of conjugated magnetic domains, both of F m'm'm symmetry but having perpendicular spin orientations along the diagonals in the x y plane of the tetragonal unit cell, is at the origin of the anomalies observed in the macroscopic magnetization. A relatively small field μ0H [⊥ z ] ≳30 mT is able to reorient the magnetization within the a b plane, whereas a higher field (μ0H [∥z ] ≳1.2 T at 2 K) is necessary to align the Co moments perpendicular to the a b plane. Such a spin reorientation, in which the orbital and spin components of the Co moment rotate joined by 45∘, was not observed previously in analogous cobaltites without praseodymium.

  18. [Medial flexor digitorum longus tendon augmentation and lateral foot column lengthening or reorienting triple arthrodesis as surgical therapy of posterior tibial tendon dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speck, M; Klaue, K

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the alignment and functional outcome after surgical augmentation of the tibialis posterior by tendon transfer and lateral column lengthening by osteotomy of the os calcis, calcaneo-cuboidal arthrodesis or reorientating triple arthrodesis. From 1991 to 1999 41 patients with the clinical and radiological diagnosis of dysfunction of the tibialis posterior tendon underwent surgical exploration and repair. These 41 patients (22 women, 19 men) had an average age of 44.3 years (range, 19-69 years) and had been symptomatic for an average of 2.3 years (range, 6 months to 6 years). All patients had the symptoms of a painful flatfoot deformity without dynamic support along the medioplantar aspect. Flexor digitorum longus (FDL) tendon transfer as reconstruction of the tibialis posterior tendon was performed in the cases without major deformity (n = 77). Patients underwent FDL transfer and lengthening osteotomy (n = 15) of the os calcis or calcaneocuboidal (c-c) arthrodesis (n = 12) if passive correction of the foot deformity was still possible and reorientating triple arthrodesis (n = 7) when a fixed flatfoot deformity had developed. AOFAS score and radiological examination were used preoperatively and in the follow-up. The AOFAS score improved for stage 1 patients after a mean follow-up of 43 months with FDL transfer from a preoperative mean of 54 to 84 points, for stage II patients with FDL transfer and lengthening osteotomy (mean follow-up 36 m) from 47 to 92 points, with c-c arthrodesis (follow-up 66 m) from 48 to 86 points, and for stage III patients with triple arthrodesis from 42 to 72 points. In two patients, the deformity failed to improve (stage I) necessitating a revision surgery with a calceneo-cuboidal lengthening arthrodesis for relapsing deformity. In order to correct deformity and provide substantial relief of foot pain and dysfunction, we recommend the transfer of the FDL tendon in flexible flat foot deformity together

  19. Stereoscopic observations from meteorological satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasler, A. F.; Mack, R.; Negri, A.

    The capability of making stereoscopic observations of clouds from meteorological satellites is a new basic analysis tool with a broad spectrum of applications. Stereoscopic observations from satellites were first made using the early vidicon tube weather satellites (e.g., Ondrejka and Conover [1]). However, the only high quality meteorological stereoscopy from low orbit has been done from Apollo and Skylab, (e.g., Shenk et al. [2] and Black [3], [4]). Stereoscopy from geosynchronous satellites was proposed by Shenk [5] and Bristor and Pichel [6] in 1974 which allowed Minzner et al. [7] to demonstrate the first quantitative cloud height analysis. In 1978 Bryson [8] and desJardins [9] independently developed digital processing techniques to remap stereo images which made possible precision height measurement and spectacular display of stereograms (Hasler et al. [10], and Hasler [11]). In 1980 the Japanese Geosynchronous Satellite (GMS) and the U.S. GOES-West satellite were synchronized to obtain stereo over the central Pacific as described by Fujita and Dodge [12] and in this paper. Recently the authors have remapped images from a Low Earth Orbiter (LEO) to the coordinate system of a Geosynchronous Earth Orbiter (GEO) and obtained stereoscopic cloud height measurements which promise to have quality comparable to previous all GEO stereo. It has also been determined that the north-south imaging scan rate of some GEOs can be slowed or reversed. Therefore the feasibility of obtaining stereoscopic observations world wide from combinations of operational GEO and LEO satellites has been demonstrated. Stereoscopy from satellites has many advantages over infrared techniques for the observation of cloud structure because it depends only on basic geometric relationships. Digital remapping of GEO and LEO satellite images is imperative for precision stereo height measurement and high quality displays because of the curvature of the earth and the large angular separation of the

  20. Theory of satellite geodesy applications of satellites to geodesy

    CERN Document Server

    Kaula, William M

    2000-01-01

    The main purpose of this classic text is to demonstrate how Newtonian gravitational theory and Euclidean geometry can be used and developed in the earth's environment. The second is to collect and explain some of the mathematical techniques developed for measuring the earth by satellite.Book chapters include discussions of the earth's gravitational field, with special emphasis on spherical harmonies and the potential of the ellipsoid; matrices and orbital geometry; elliptic motion, linear perturbations, resonance, and other aspects of satellite orbit dynamics; the geometry of satellite obser

  1. Hybrid Atom Electrostatic System for Satellite Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahzam, Nassim; Bidel, Yannick; Bresson, Alexandre; Huynh, Phuong-Anh; Liorzou, Françoise; Lebat, Vincent; Foulon, Bernard; Christophe, Bruno

    2017-04-01

    The subject of this poster comes within the framework of new concepts identification and development for future satellite gravity missions, in continuation of previously launched space missions CHAMP, GRACE, GOCE and ongoing and prospective studies like NGGM, GRACE 2 or E-GRASP. We were here more focused on the inertial sensors that complete the payload of such satellites. The clearly identified instruments for space accelerometry are based on the electrostatic technology developed for many years by ONERA and that offer a high level of performance and a high degree of maturity for space applications. On the other hand, a new generation of sensors based on cold atom interferometry (AI) is emerging and seems very promising in this context. These atomic instruments have already demonstrated on ground impressive results, especially with the development of state-of-the-art gravimeters, and should reach their full potential only in space, where the microgravity environment allows long interaction times. Each of these two types of instruments presents their own advantages which are, for the electrostatic sensors (ES), their demonstrated short term sensitivity and their high TRL, and for AI, amongst others, the absolute nature of the measurement and therefore no need for calibration processes. These two technologies seem in some aspects very complementary and a hybrid sensor bringing together all their assets could be the opportunity to take a big step in this context of gravity space missions. We present here the first experimental association on ground of an electrostatic accelerometer and an atomic accelerometer and underline the interest of calibrating the ES instrument with the AI. Some technical methods using the ES proof-mass as the Raman Mirror seem very promising to remove rotation effects of the satellite on the AI signal. We propose a roadmap to explore further in details and more rigorously this attractive hybridization scheme in order to assess its potential

  2. Satellite DNA in Plants: More than Just Rubbish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Ramos, Manuel A

    2015-01-01

    For decades, satellite DNAs have been the hidden part of genomes. Initially considered as junk DNA, there is currently an increasing appreciation of the functional significance of satellite DNA repeats and of their sequences. Satellite DNA families accumulate in the heterochromatin in different parts of the eukaryotic chromosomes, mainly in pericentromeric and subtelomeric regions, but they also span the functional centromere. Tandem repeat sequences may spread from subtelomeric to interstitial loci, leading to the formation of chromosome-specific loci or to the accumulation in equilocal sites in different chromosomes. They also appear as the main components of the heterochromatin in the sex-specific region of sex chromosomes. Satellite DNA, required for chromosome organization, also plays a role in pairing and segregation. Some satellite repeats are transcribed and can participate in the formation and maintenance of heterochromatin structure and in the modulation of gene expression. In addition to the identification of the different satellite DNA families, their characteristics and location, we are interested in determining their impact on the genomes, by identifying the mechanisms leading to their appearance and amplification as well as in understanding how they change over time, the factors affecting these changes, and the influence exerted by the evolutionary history of the organisms. On the other hand, satellite DNA sequences are rapidly evolving sequences that may cause reproductive barriers between organisms and promote speciation. The accumulation of experimental data collected in recent years and the emergence of new approaches based on next-generation sequencing and high-throughput genome analysis are opening new perspectives that are changing our understanding of satellite DNA. This review examines recent data to provide a timely update on the overall information gathered about this part of the genome, focusing on the advances in the knowledge of its

  3. Remote Synchronization Experiments for Quasi-Senith Satellite System Using Current Geostationary Satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Iwata

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The remote synchronization system for the onboard crystal oscillator (RESSOX realizes accurate synchronization between an atomic clock at a ground station and the QZSS onboard crystal oscillator, reduces overall cost and satellite power consumption, as well as onboard weight and volume, and is expected to have a longer lifetime than a system with onboard atomic clocks. Since a QZSS does not yet exist, we have been conducting synchronization experiments using geostationary earth orbit satellites (JCSAT-1B or Intelsat-4 to confirm that RESSOX is an excellent system for timing synchronization. JCSAT-1B, the elevation angle of which is 46.5 degrees at our institute, is little affected by tropospheric delay, whereas Intelsat-4, the elevation angle of which is 7.9 degrees, is significantly affected. The experimental setup and the results of uplink experiments and feedback experiments using mainly Intelsat-4 are presented. The results show that synchronization within 10 ns is realized.

  4. How Good Are Satellite Rainfall Products For Hydrologic Simulations Of A Small Watershed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeweldi, D. A.; Gebremichael, M.; Downer, C. W.

    2009-12-01

    Despite recent advances in satellite rainfall technology, the use of satellite rainfall products for hydrological applications is very limited. Assessing the potential and utility of satellite rainfall products is crucially important to advance their utility. In this work, first we quantify the errors in satellite rainfall products. We considered different satellite rainfall algorithms; namely, CMORPH (~8km, 30-minute), PERSIANN-CCS (4km, hourly) and HydroEstimator (10 km, hourly). Second, we assess how these errors propagate to hydrologic model streamflow simulations. We used the fully-distributed hydrologic model known as GSSHA. Our study region is the Goodwin Creek experimental watershed (21 sq. km) in Mississippi, USA. Our results provide information on how good different satellite rainfall products are for hydrologic simulations of a small watershed.

  5. Multi-mission Satellite Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamilkowski, M. L.; Teter, M. A.; Grant, K. D.; Dougherty, B.; Cochran, S.

    2015-12-01

    NOAA's next-generation environmental satellite, the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) replaces the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES). JPSS satellites carry sensors which collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological, and solar-geophysical observations of the earth, atmosphere, and space. The first JPSS satellite was launched in 2011 and is currently NOAA's primary operational polar satellite. The JPSS ground system is the Common Ground System (CGS), and provides command, control, and communications (C3) and data processing (DP). A multi-mission system, CGS provides combinations of C3/DP for numerous NASA, NOAA, DoD, and international missions. In preparation for the next JPSS satellite, CGS improved its multi-mission capabilities to enhance mission operations for larger constellations of earth observing satellites with the added benefit of streamlining mission operations for other NOAA missions. CGS's multi-mission capabilities allows management all of assets as a single enterprise, more efficiently using ground resources and personnel and consolidating multiple ground systems into one. Sophisticated scheduling algorithms compare mission priorities and constraints across all ground stations, creating an enterprise schedule optimized to mission needs, which CGS executes to acquire the satellite link, uplink commands, downlink and route data to the operations and data processing facilities, and generate the final products for delivery to downstream users. This paper will illustrate the CGS's ability to manage multiple, enterprise-wide polar orbiting missions by demonstrating resource modeling and tasking, production of enterprise contact schedules for NOAA's Fairbanks ground station (using both standing and ad hoc requests), deconflicting resources due to ground outages, and updating resource allocations through dynamic priority definitions.

  6. Renal SPECT with {sup 99m} Tc-Dmsa. Reorientation and processing; SPECT renal con {sup 99m} Tc-Dmsa. Reorientacion y procesamiento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, J.L.; Perera, A.; Fraxedas, R. [Centro de InvestigacionesClinicas 34 no.4501 e/45 y 47 Kohly, Playa C. Habana (Cuba)

    1998-12-31

    For the study of different renal affections with repercussion in the parenchyma is widely used the plane gammagraphy wit {sup 99m} Tc-Dmsa though not in the same way the SPECT technique. In general, the different inclination and orientation of the longitudinal axes of both kidneys in the patients entail aid to high variability in the detection of the different types of defects which leads to a possible mistaken diagnostic. With a view to this,it was developed in our centre a methodology for the automated reorientation of the different renal volumes obtained by SPECT and its posterior processing, obtaining as result a software with a high grade of independence from the operator. In this way, it is obtained a procedure standardization and so it let us with major rigor to realize evolutive studies of the patients. (Author)

  7. Electric field control of magnetization reorientation in Co/Pb (Mg1/3Nb2/3)-PbTiO3 heterostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fenglong; Zhou, Cai; Gesang, Dunzhu; Jiang, Changjun

    2017-12-01

    Herein, we demonstrated an apparent electric field control of magnetization reorientation at room temperature, through a strain-mediated magnetoelectric coupling in ferromagnetic/ferroelectric (FM/FE) multiferroic heterostructure. As the applied electric field increased, the magnetization tended to deviate from the original direction, which was induced by nonlinear strain vs electric-field behavior from the ferroelectric substrates. Ferromagnetic resonance showed that the in-plane magnetic easy axis of the Co film was shifted sharply with electric field E = 10 kV/cm, which indicates that the in-plane uniaxial magnetic anisotropy of the Co film can be inverted via the application of an electric field. These results demonstrated that converse magnetoelectric effect in the FM/FE heterostructure was indeed a feasible method to control magnetization orientation in technologically relevant ferromagnetic thin films at room temperature.

  8. Electric field control of spin re-orientation in perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions—CoFeB and MgO thickness dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Hao; Naik, Vinayak Bharat; Liu, Ruisheng; Han, Guchang

    2014-07-01

    We report an investigation of electric-field (EF) control of spin re-orientation as functions of the thicknesses of CoFeB free layer (FL) and MgO layer in synthetic-antiferromagnetic pinned magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. It is found that the EF modulates the coercivity (Hc) of the FL almost linearly for all FL thicknesses, while the EF efficiency, i.e., the slope of the linearity, increases as the FL thickness increases. This linear variation in Hc is also observed for larger MgO thicknesses (≥1.5 nm), while the EF efficiency increases only slightly from 370 to 410 Oe nm/V when MgO thickness increases from 1.5 to 1.76 nm. We have further observed the absence of quasi-DC unipolar switching. We discuss its origin and highlight the underlying challenges to implement the EF controlled switching in a practical magnetic memory.

  9. Satellite communications principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Calcutt, David

    1994-01-01

    Satellites are increasingly used for global communications, as well as for radio and television transmissions. With the growth of mobile communications, and of digital technology, the use of satellite systems is set to expand substantially and already all students of electronics or communications engineering must study the subject.This book steers a middle path between offering a basic understanding of the process of communication by satellite and the methodology used; and the extensive mathematical analysis normally adopted in similar texts. It presents the basic concepts, using as mu

  10. The french educational satellite arsene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danvel, M.; Escudier, B.

    ARSENE (Ariane, Radio-amateur, Satellite pour l'ENseignement de l'Espace) is a telecommunications satellite for Amateur Space Service. Its main feature is that more than 100 students from French engineering schools and universities have been working since 1979 for definition phase and satellite development. The highest IAF awards has been obtained by "ARSENE students" in Tokyo (1980) and Rome (1981). The French space agency, CNES and French aerospace industries are supporting the program. The European Space Agency offered to place ARSENE in orbit on the first Ariane mark IV launch late 1985.

  11. ISDN - The case for satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelton, Joseph N.; McDougal, Patrick J.

    1987-05-01

    The Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) holds much promise for both suppliers and users of telecommunications in the near future. This article examines the role of satellites in this new ISDN environment and emphasizes several advantages of satellites in the ongoing evolution to an all-digital world. In specific, the role of Intelsat, the global satellite system, is discussed with emphasis on Intelsat's digital services which today can offer all the characteristics and standards of ISDN in a flexible, cost-efficient manner.

  12. Leucocytes, cytokines and satellite cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Gøran; Mikkelsen, Ulla Ramer; Raastad, Truls

    2012-01-01

    -damaging exercise', primarily eccentric exercise. We review the evidence for the notion that the degree of muscle damage is related to the magnitude of the cytokine response. In the third and final section, we look at the satellite cell response to a single bout of eccentric exercise, as well as the role...... damage. With the exception of IL-6, the sources of systemic cytokines following exercise remain unclear The satellite cell response to severe muscle damage is related to regeneration, whereas the biological significance of satellite cell proliferation after mild damage or non-damaging exercise remains...

  13. Spin-reorientation and weak ferromagnetism in antiferromagnetic TbMn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nhalil, Hariharan, E-mail: hariharan@physics.iisc.ernet.in, E-mail: hariharan.nhalil@gmail.com; Sanathkumar, R.; Elizabeth, Suja [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Nair, Harikrishnan S. [Highly Correlated Matter Research Group, Physics Department, University of Johannesburg, P.O. Box 524, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa); Strydom, André M. [Highly Correlated Matter Research Group, Physics Department, University of Johannesburg, P.O. Box 524, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa); Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids (MPICPfS), Nöthnitzerstraße 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-05-07

    Orthorhombic single crystals of TbMn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} are found to exhibit spin-reorientation, magnetization reversal, and weak ferromagnetism. Strong anisotropy effects are evident in the temperature dependent magnetization measurements along the three crystallographic axes a, b, and c. A broad magnetic transition is visible at T{sub N}{sup Fe/Mn}=286 K due to paramagnetic to A{sub x}G{sub y}C{sub z} ordering. A sharp transition is observed at T{sub SR}{sup Fe/Mn}=28 K, which is pronounced along c axis in the form of a sharp jump in magnetization where the spins reorient to G{sub x}A{sub y}F{sub z} configuration. The negative magnetization observed below T{sub SR}{sup Fe/Mn} along c axis is explained in terms of domain wall pinning. A component of weak ferromagnetism is observed in field-scans along c-axis but below 28 K. Field-induced steps-like transitions are observed in hysteresis measurement along b axis below 28 K. It is noted that no sign of Tb-order is discernible down to 2 K. TbMn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} could be highlighted as a potential candidate to evaluate its magneto-dielectric effects across the magnetic transitions.

  14. Mobile satellite communications technology - A summary of NASA activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutzi, E. J.; Knouse, G. H.

    1986-01-01

    Studies in recent years indicate that future high-capacity mobile satellite systems are viable only if certain high-risk enabling technologies are developed. Accordingly, NASA has structured an advanced technology development program aimed at efficient utilization of orbit, spectrum, and power. Over the last two years, studies have concentrated on developing concepts and identifying cost drivers and other issues associated with the major technical areas of emphasis: vehicle antennas, speech compression, bandwidth-efficient digital modems, network architecture, mobile satellite channel characterization, and selected space segment technology. The program is now entering the next phase - breadboarding, development, and field experimentation.

  15. Planetary satellites - an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, J. K.

    1983-11-01

    General features of all known planetary satellites in the system are provided, and attention is focused on prominent features of several of the bodies. Titan has an atmosphere 1.5 times earth's at sea level, a well a a large body of liquid which may be ethane, CH4, and disolved N2. Uranus has at least five moons, whose masses have recently been recalculated and determined to be consistent with predictions of outer solar system composition. Io's violent volcanic activity is a demonstration of the conversion of total energy (from Jupiter) to heat, i.e., interior melting and consequent volcanoes. Plumes of SO2 have been seen and feature temperatures of up to 650 K. Enceladus has a craterless, cracked surface, indicating the presence of interior ice and occasional breakthroughs from tidal heating. Hyperion has a chaotic rotation, and Iapetus has one light and one dark side, possibly from periodic collisions with debris clouds blasted off the surface of the outer moon Phoebe.

  16. Hubble Space Telescope satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope, named for the American astronomer Edwin Powell Hubble, will be the largest and most powerful astronomical instrument ever orbited. Placed above the obscuring effects of the earth's atmosphere in a 600-km orbit, this remotely-controlled, free-flying satellite observatory will expand the terrestrial-equivalent resolution of the universe by a factor of seven, or a volumetric factor of 350. This telescope has a 2.4-m primary mirror and can accommodate five scientific instruments (cameras, spectrographs and photometers). The optics are suitable for a spectral range from 1100 angstrom to 1 mm wavelength. With a projected service life of fifteen years, the spacecraft can be serviced on-orbit for replacement of degraded systems, to insert advanced scientific instruments, and to reboost the telescope from decayed altitudes. The anticipated image quality will be a result of extremely precise lambda/20 optics, stringent cleanliness, and very stable pointing: jitter will be held to less than 0.01 arcsecond for indefinite observation periods, consistent with instrument apertures as small as 0.1 arcsecond.

  17. EFFECTS OF RAIN ATTENUATION ON SATELLITE COMMUNICATION LINK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Ezeh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Rain attenuation is a major challenge to microwave satellite communication especially at frequencies above 10 GHz, causing unavailability of signals most of the time. Rain attenuation predictions have become one of the vital considerations while setting up a satellite communication link. In this study, rain attenuation models, cumulative distribution curves and other analytical tools for successful prediction of rain attenuation are presented. A three year Rain rate data was obtained from the Nigeria Meteorological Agency (NIMET database in addition to experimental data. Of the three prediction models used in the study, Ajayi model gave the range of values closest to the experimental data. A correctional factor was determined as 1.0988 and used to modify the Ajayi model. This modification to Ajayi’s model enabled its rain attenuation values conform more closely to the experimental result.

  18. Visual attitude propagation for small satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawashdeh, Samir A.

    As electronics become smaller and more capable, it has become possible to conduct meaningful and sophisticated satellite missions in a small form factor. However, the capability of small satellites and the range of possible applications are limited by the capabilities of several technologies, including attitude determination and control systems. This dissertation evaluates the use of image-based visual attitude propagation as a compliment or alternative to other attitude determination technologies that are suitable for miniature satellites. The concept lies in using miniature cameras to track image features across frames and extracting the underlying rotation. The problem of visual attitude propagation as a small satellite attitude determination system is addressed from several aspects: related work, algorithm design, hardware and performance evaluation, possible applications, and on-orbit experimentation. These areas of consideration reflect the organization of this dissertation. A "stellar gyroscope" is developed, which is a visual star-based attitude propagator that uses relative motion of stars in an imager's field of view to infer the attitude changes. The device generates spacecraft relative attitude estimates in three degrees of freedom. Algorithms to perform the star detection, correspondence, and attitude propagation are presented. The Random Sample Consensus (RANSAC) approach is applied to the correspondence problem to successfully pair stars across frames while mitigating falsepositive and false-negative star detections. This approach provides tolerance to the noise levels expected in using miniature optics and no baffling, and the noise caused by radiation dose on orbit. The hardware design and algorithms are validated using test images of the night sky. The application of the stellar gyroscope as part of a CubeSat attitude determination and control system is described. The stellar gyroscope is used to augment a MEMS gyroscope attitude propagation

  19. Commercial satellite broadcasting for Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, J. R.

    1988-12-01

    A review is presented of the current television broadcasting situation in European countries, which involves a varied mix of terrestrial VHF or UHF systems and cable networks. A small market has emerged in Europe for receivers using the low-power telecommunications satellite transmission between the program providers and cable network companies. This is expected to change with the launch of medium-power pan-European telecommunication satellites (e.g. ASTRA, EUTELSAT II), which are now directly addressing the market of home reception. DBS (direct broadcast satellite) in the UK, using the D-MAC transmission standard, will offer three additional television channels, data broadcasting services, and a planned evolution to compatible forms of wide-screen, high-definition television. Comments are given on receiver and conditional access system standardization. Some views are expressed on satellite broadcasting as part of an overall broadcasting framework for the future.

  20. Biogeography based Satellite Image Classification

    CERN Document Server

    Panchal, V K; Kaur, Navdeep; Kundra, Harish

    2009-01-01

    Biogeography is the study of the geographical distribution of biological organisms. The mindset of the engineer is that we can learn from nature. Biogeography Based Optimization is a burgeoning nature inspired technique to find the optimal solution of the problem. Satellite image classification is an important task because it is the only way we can know about the land cover map of inaccessible areas. Though satellite images have been classified in past by using various techniques, the researchers are always finding alternative strategies for satellite image classification so that they may be prepared to select the most appropriate technique for the feature extraction task in hand. This paper is focused on classification of the satellite image of a particular land cover using the theory of Biogeography based Optimization. The original BBO algorithm does not have the inbuilt property of clustering which is required during image classification. Hence modifications have been proposed to the original algorithm and...

  1. Virtual Satellite Integration Environment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An integrated environment for rapid design studies of small satellite missions will be developed. This environment will be designed to streamline processes at the...

  2. Virtual Satellite Integration Environment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advatech Pacific proposes to develop a Virtual Satellite Integration Environment (VSIE) for the NASA Ames Mission Design Center. The VSIE introduces into NASA...

  3. Satellite Teleconferencing in the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Hollis C.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the need for, and the development, use, and future trends of, the University of the West Indies Distance Teaching Experiment, which utilizes telephone and communications satellite technology teleconferencing to extend educational opportunities to the peoples of the Caribbean. (MBR)

  4. Geography with the environmental satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.P. Gastellu Etchegorry

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Coarse spatial resolution, high temporal frequency data from the earth polar orbiting (NOAA. HACMM, Nimbus, etc. satellites and from the geostationary (GOES. Meteosat, and GMS satellites are presented to demonstrate their utility for monitoring terrestrial and atmospheric processes. The main characteristics of these ,satellites and of the instruments on board are reviewed. In order to be useful for environmental assessments. the remotely sensed data must be processed (atmospheric and geometric corrections, etc.. The NOAA Center provides a wide range of already processed data. such as meteorological. oceanic, hydrologic and vegetation products; o rough description of these preprocessed data is given in this article. Finally, some examples of applicotions in Southeast Asia and especially in Indonesia, are described, i.e.: agroecosystem, drought and oceanic monitoring. The paper concludes that coarse resolution, high temporal frequency ,satellite data are very valuable for environmental studies. the emphasis being laid on the improve. ment of the crop and drought assessment programmes.

  5. women Contrlbute to Satellite Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    IN the early morning of August 14, 1992, at the Xichang satellite launching center, China Central Television Station was about to do a live, worldwide broadcast on the launching of an Australian communications satellite made by the United States. With the order of the commander, "Ignition," people could watch the white rocket rise, pierce the blue sky and race toward the space with a long flaming tail trailing behind it.

  6. Existence of undiscovered Uranian satellites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boice, D.C.

    1986-04-01

    Structure in the Uranian ring system as observed in recent occultations may contain indirect evidence for the existence of undiscovered satellites. Using the Alfven and Arrhenius (1975, 1976) scenario for the formation of planetary systems, the orbital radii of up to nine hypothetical satellites interior to Miranda are computed. These calculations should provide interesting comparisons when the results from the Voyager 2 encounter with Uranus are made public. 15 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  7. Radio interferometry and satellite tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Kawase, Seiichiro

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide growth of space communications has caused a rapid increase in the number of satellites operating in geostationary orbits, causing overcrowded orbits. This practical resource is designed to help professionals overcome this problem. This timely book provides a solid understanding of the use of radio interferometers for tracking and monitoring satellites in overcrowded environments. Practitioners learn the fundamentals of radio interferometer hardware, including antennas, receiving equipment, signal processing and phase detection, and measurement accuracies. This in-depth volume describ

  8. A neuromorphic approach to satellite image understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partsinevelos, Panagiotis; Perakakis, Manolis

    2014-05-01

    Remote sensing satellite imagery provides high altitude, top viewing aspects of large geographic regions and as such the depicted features are not always easily recognizable. Nevertheless, geoscientists familiar to remote sensing data, gradually gain experience and enhance their satellite image interpretation skills. The aim of this study is to devise a novel computational neuro-centered classification approach for feature extraction and image understanding. Object recognition through image processing practices is related to a series of known image/feature based attributes including size, shape, association, texture, etc. The objective of the study is to weight these attribute values towards the enhancement of feature recognition. The key cognitive experimentation concern is to define the point when a user recognizes a feature as it varies in terms of the above mentioned attributes and relate it with their corresponding values. Towards this end, we have set up an experimentation methodology that utilizes cognitive data from brain signals (EEG) and eye gaze data (eye tracking) of subjects watching satellite images of varying attributes; this allows the collection of rich real-time data that will be used for designing the image classifier. Since the data are already labeled by users (using an input device) a first step is to compare the performance of various machine-learning algorithms on the collected data. On the long-run, the aim of this work would be to investigate the automatic classification of unlabeled images (unsupervised learning) based purely on image attributes. The outcome of this innovative process is twofold: First, in an abundance of remote sensing image datasets we may define the essential image specifications in order to collect the appropriate data for each application and improve processing and resource efficiency. E.g. for a fault extraction application in a given scale a medium resolution 4-band image, may be more effective than costly

  9. Spanish Earth Observation Satellite System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, A.; Cerezo, F.; Fernandez, M.; Lomba, J.; Lopez, M.; Moreno, J.; Neira, A.; Quintana, C.; Torres, J.; Trigo, R.; Urena, J.; Vega, E.; Vez, E.

    2010-12-01

    The Spanish Ministry of Industry, Tourism and Trade (MITyC) and the Ministry of Defense (MoD) signed an agreement in 2007 for the development of a "Spanish Earth Observation Satellite System" based, in first instance, on two satellites: a high resolution optical satellite, called SEOSAT/Ingenio, and a radar satellite based on SAR technology, called SEOSAR/Paz. SEOSAT/Ingenio is managed by MITyC through the Centre for the Development of Industrial Technology (CDTI), with technical and contractual support from the European Space Agency (ESA). HISDESA T together with the Spanish Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial (INTA, National Institute for Aerospace Technology) will be responsible for the in-orbit operation and the commercial operation of both satellites, and for the technical management of SEOSAR/Paz on behalf of the MoD. In both cases EADS CASA Espacio (ECE) is the prime contractor leading the industrial consortia. The ground segment development will be assigned to a Spanish consortium. This system is the most important contribution of Spain to the European Programme Global Monitoring for Environment and Security, GMES. This paper presents the Spanish Earth Observation Satellite System focusing on SEOSA T/Ingenio Programme and with special emphasis in the potential contribution to the ESA Third Party Missions Programme and to the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security initiative (GMES) Data Access.

  10. Satellite medical centers project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Arvind

    2002-08-01

    World class health care for common man at low affordable cost: anywhere, anytime The project envisages to set up a national network of satellite Medical centers. Each SMC would be manned by doctors, nurses and technicians, six doctors, six nurses, six technicians would be required to provide 24 hour cover, each SMC would operate 24 hours x 7 days. It would be equipped with the Digital telemedicine devices for capturing clinical patient information and investigations in the form of voice, images and data and create an audiovisual text file - a virtual Digital patient. Through the broad band connectivity the virtual patient can be sent to the central hub, manned by specialists, specialists from several specialists sitting together can view the virtual patient and provide a specialized opinion, they can see the virtual patient, see the examination on line through video conference or even PCs, talk to the patient and the doctor at the SMC and controlle capturing of information during examination and investigations of the patient at the SMC - thus creating a virtual Digital consultant at the SMC. Central hub shall be connected to the doctors and consultants in remote locations or tertiary care hospitals any where in the world, thus creating a virtual hub the hierarchical system shall provide upgradation of knowledge to thedoctors in central hub and smc and thus continued medical education and benefit the patient thru the world class treatment in the smc located at his door step. SMC shall be set up by franchisee who shall get safe business opportunity with high returns, patients shall get Low cost user friendly worldclass health care anywhere anytime, Doctors can get better meaningful selfemplyment with better earnings, flexibility of working time and place. SMC shall provide a wide variety of services from primary care to world class Global consultation for difficult patients.

  11. Satellite Attitude from a Raven Class Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Cache MATLAB was used as an interface to the jSim libraries, including orbit propagation, Earth Track determination, and satellite orientation methods...collection opportunities of the satellite. The combined software tool calculates the satellite orientation required to image the asset location... satellite orientation estimations, with only the photometric signatures with strong features being correctly estimated. The strong features that

  12. CHINA LAUNCHES 2 SCIENTIFIC EXPERIMENT SATELLITES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    China placed 2 scientific experiment satellites into preset orbits atop a LM-4B launch vehicle on Sept. 9, 2004. A LM-4B blasted off at 7:14 am from Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center in Shanxi Province. Sources from the Xi'an Satellite Monitor and Control Center said that one satellite,

  13. China Launches First Ever Nano-satellite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiuJie

    2004-01-01

    China successfully launched two scientific satellites, including a nano-satellite for the first time, heralding a breakthrough in space technology. A LM-2C rocket carrying Nano-Satellite I (NS-1), which weighs just 25kg and an Experiment Satellite I, weighing 204kg blasted off at 11:59 p.m. on April 18,

  14. Fade durations in satellite-path mobile radio propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmier, Robert G.; Bostian, Charles W.

    1986-01-01

    Fades on satellite to land mobile radio links are caused by several factors, the most important of which are multipath propagation and vegetative shadowing. Designers of vehicular satellite communications systems require information about the statistics of fade durations in order to overcome or compensate for the fades. Except for a few limiting cases, only the mean fade duration can be determined analytically, and all other statistics must be obtained experimentally or via simulation. This report describes and presents results from a computer program developed at Virginia Tech to simulate satellite path propagation of a mobile station in a rural area. It generates rapidly-fading and slowly-fading signals by separate processes that yield correct cumulative signal distributions and then combines these to simulate the overall signal. This is then analyzed to yield the statistics of fade duration.

  15. First satellite mobile communication trials using BLQS-CDMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzdemateo, Maria; Johns, Simon; Dothey, Michel; Vanhimbeeck, Carl; Deman, Ivan; Wery, Bruno

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, technical results obtained in the first MSBN Land mobile technical trial are reported. MSBN (Mobile Satellite Business Network) is a new program undertaken by the European Space Agency (ESA) to promote mobile satellite communication in Europe, in particular voice capability. The first phase of the MSBN system implementation plan is an experimental phase. Its purpose is to evaluate through field experiments the performance of the MSBN system prior to finalization of its specifications. Particularly, the objective is to verify in the field and possibly improve the performance of the novel satellite access technique BLQS-CDMA (Band Limited Quasi-Synchronous-Code Division Multiple Access), which is proposed as baseline for the MSBN.

  16. The best printing methods to print satellite images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.A. Yousif

    2011-12-01

    In this paper different printing systems were used to print an image of SPOT-4 satellite, caver part of Sharm Elshekh area, Sinai, Egypt, on the same type of paper as much as possible, especially in the photography. This step is followed by measuring the experimental data, and analyzed colors to determine the best printing systems for satellite image printing data. The laser system is the more printing system where produce a wider range of color and highest densities of ink and access much color detail. Followed by the offset system which it recorded the best dot gain. Moreover, the study shows that it can use the advantages of each method according to the satellite image color and quantity to be produced.

  17. Fast Development Of China's Small Satellite Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Hongjin

    2009-01-01

    @@ China Spacesat Co., Ltd of China Academy of Space Technology (CAST) recently said, along with the successful launch of HJ-1A/B for the environment and disaster monitoring and forecasting small satellite constellation and after years of efforts, small satellite development technology has achieved fruitful results, and the development status has been greatly improved.China's small satellite technology has realized a great-leap-forward in development from a single satellite model to series model, from the satellite program to space industry. China has explored a development road for China's small satellite industrialization, and a modern small satellite development base has resulted.

  18. Shadow imaging of geosynchronous satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Dennis Michael

    Geosynchronous (GEO) satellites are essential for modern communication networks. If communication to a GEO satellite is lost and a malfunction occurs upon orbit insertion such as a solar panel not deploying there is no direct way to observe it from Earth. Due to the GEO orbit distance of ~36,000 km from Earth's surface, the Rayleigh criteria dictates that a 14 m telescope is required to conventionally image a satellite with spatial resolution down to 1 m using visible light. Furthermore, a telescope larger than 30 m is required under ideal conditions to obtain spatial resolution down to 0.4 m. This dissertation evaluates a method for obtaining high spatial resolution images of GEO satellites from an Earth based system by measuring the irradiance distribution on the ground resulting from the occultation of the satellite passing in front of a star. The representative size of a GEO satellite combined with the orbital distance results in the ground shadow being consistent with a Fresnel diffraction pattern when observed at visible wavelengths. A measurement of the ground shadow irradiance is used as an amplitude constraint in a Gerchberg-Saxton phase retrieval algorithm that produces a reconstruction of the satellite's 2D transmission function which is analogous to a reverse contrast image of the satellite. The advantage of shadow imaging is that a terrestrial based redundant set of linearly distributed inexpensive small telescopes, each coupled to high speed detectors, is a more effective resolved imaging system for GEO satellites than a very large telescope under ideal conditions. Modeling and simulation efforts indicate sub-meter spatial resolution can be readily achieved using collection apertures of less than 1 meter in diameter. A mathematical basis is established for the treatment of the physical phenomena involved in the shadow imaging process. This includes the source star brightness and angular extent, and the diffraction of starlight from the satellite

  19. Infrared Spectral Radiance Intercomparisons With Satellite and Aircraft Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larar, Allen M.; Zhou, Daniel K.; Liu, Xu; Smith, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Measurement system validation is critical for advanced satellite sounders to reach their full potential of improving observations of the Earth's atmosphere, clouds, and surface for enabling enhancements in weather prediction, climate monitoring capability, and environmental change detection. Experimental field campaigns, focusing on satellite under-flights with well-calibrated FTS sensors aboard high-altitude aircraft, are an essential part of the validation task. Airborne FTS systems can enable an independent, SI-traceable measurement system validation by directly measuring the same level-1 parameters spatially and temporally coincident with the satellite sensor of interest. Continuation of aircraft under-flights for multiple satellites during multiple field campaigns enables long-term monitoring of system performance and inter-satellite cross-validation. The NASA / NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed - Interferometer (NAST-I) has been a significant contributor in this area by providing coincident high spectral/spatial resolution observations of infrared spectral radiances along with independently-retrieved geophysical products for comparison with like products from satellite sensors being validated. This presentation gives an overview of benefits achieved using airborne sensors such as NAST-I utilizing examples from recent field campaigns. The methodology implemented is not only beneficial to new sensors such as the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) flying aboard the Suomi NPP and future JPSS satellites but also of significant benefit to sensors of longer flight heritage such as the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on the AQUA and METOP-A platforms, respectively, to ensure data quality continuity important for climate and other applications. Infrared spectral radiance inter-comparisons are discussed with a particular focus on usage of NAST-I data for enabling inter-platform cross-validation.

  20. Lopsided Collections of Satellite Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-12-01

    You might think that small satellite galaxies would be distributed evenly around their larger galactic hosts but local evidence suggests otherwise. Are satellite distributions lopsided throughout the universe?Satellites in the Local GroupThe distribution of the satellite galaxies orbiting Andromeda, our neighboring galaxy, is puzzling: 21 out of 27 ( 80%) of its satellites are on the side of Andromeda closest to us. In a similar fashion, 4 of the 11 brightest Milky Way satellites are stacked on the side closest to Andromeda.It seems to be the case, then, that satellites around our pair of galaxies preferentially occupy the space between the two galaxies. But is this behavior specific to the Local Group? Or is it commonplace throughout the universe? In a recent study, a team of scientists led by Noam Libeskind (Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam, Germany) set out to answer this question.Properties of the galaxies included in the authors sample. Left: redshifts for galaxy pairs. Right: Number of satellite galaxies around hosts. [Adapted from Libeskind et al. 2016]Asymmetry at LargeLibeskind and collaborators tested whether this behavior is common by searching through Sloan Digital Sky Survey observations for galaxy pairs that are similar to the Milky Way/Andromeda pair. The resulting sample consists of 12,210 pairs of galaxies, which have 46,043 potential satellites among them. The team then performed statistical tests on these observations to quantify the anisotropic distribution of the satellites around the host galaxies.Libeskind and collaborators find that roughly 8% more galaxies are seen within a 15 angle facing the other galaxy of a pair than would be expected in a uniform distribution. The odds that this asymmetric behavior is randomly produced, they show, are lower than 1 in 10 million indicating that the lopsidedness of satellites around galaxies in pairs is a real effect and occurs beyond just the Local Group.Caution for ModelingProbability that

  1. Jupiter small satellite montage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    A montage of images of the small inner moons of Jupiter from the camera onboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft shows the best views obtained of these moons during Galileo's 11th orbit around the giant planet in November 1997. At that point, Galileo was completing its first two years in Jupiter orbit--known as the Galileo 'prime mission'--and was about to embark on a successful two-year extension, called the Galileo Europa Mission. The top two images show the moon Thebe. Thebe rotates by approximately 50 degrees between the time these two images were taken, so that the same prominent impact crater is seen in both views; this crater, which has been given the provisional name Zethus, is near the point on Thebe that faces permanently away from Jupiter. The next two images show the moon Amalthea; they were taken with the Sun directly behind the observer, an alignment that emphasizes patterns of intrinsically bright or dark surface material. The third image from the top is a view of Amalthea's leading side, the side of the moon that 'leads' as Amalthea moves in its orbit around Jupiter. This image looks 'noisy' because it was obtained serendipitously during an observation of the Jovian satellite Io (Amalthea and Io shared the same camera frame but the image was exposed for bright Io rather than for the much darker Amalthea). The fourth image from the top emphasizes prominent 'spots' of relatively bright material that are located near the point on Amalthea that faces permanently away from Jupiter. The bottom image is a view of the tiny moon Metis. In all the images, north is approximately up, and the moons are shown in their correct relative sizes. The images are, from top to bottom: Thebe taken on November 7, 1997 at a range of 504,000 kilometers (about 313,000 miles); Thebe on November 7, 1997 at a range of 548,000 kilometers (about 340,000 miles); Amalthea on November 6, 1997 at a range of about 650,000 kilometers (about 404,000 miles); Amalthea on November 7, 1997 at a

  2. Satellite broadcasting experiments and in-orbit performance of BSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoseko, S.; Yamamoto, M.; Kajikawa, M.; Arai, K.

    1981-09-01

    The Japanese medium-scale Broadcasting Satellite for Experimental Purposes (BSE) was launched in April 1978 and placed in a geostationary orbit at 110 deg E longitude. Two transmitters with bandwidths of 50 MHz and 80 MHz were mounted on the BSE transponder to conduct experiments on various television signals; no significant variation in transmission characteristics was observed during the two-year period. Rain attenuation characteristics in the 12 GHz band were studied and a value of 6.6 dB was registered in Owase, one of the most rainy areas in Japan. The strength of the rain scatter wave of the BSE uplink signal was measured to investigate the characteristics between broadcasting satellite uplink and a terrestrial link in the 14 GHz band. Uplink power control, important for the efficient operation of satellite communications systems, was shown to compensate the variations in receiving power due to fluctuations in the beam pointing of the satellite antenna. Routine operations were performed to check the three-axis attitude control, stationkeeping, housekeeping, and the bus equipment. The electrical power, secondary propulsion, thermal control, and communication subsystems were also evaluated. The first operations 1 broadcasting satellite is scheduled to be launched early in 1984.

  3. Satellite ocean remote sensing at NOAA/NESDIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayler, Eric J.

    2004-10-01

    Satellite oceanography within the Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR) in National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration"s (NOAA) National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) focuses on observation retrievals and applications to address the NOAA missions of environmental assessment, prediction, and stewardship. Satellite oceanography within NOAA/NESDIS is an end-to-end process, addressing user requirements, sensor design support, observation retrieval research and development, calibration, applications and product research and development, the transition of research to operations, continuing product validation, and operational user support. The breadth of scientific investigation encompasses three functional areas: satellite ocean sensors, ocean dynamics/data assimilation, and marine ecosystems/climate. A cross-cutting science team from these functional areas has been established for each core subject: sea-surface temperature, sea-surface height, sea-surface roughness, ocean color, ocean surface winds, and sea ice. These science teams pursue the science and issues end to end within the core subject, with the primary objective being the transition of research to operations. Data fusion opportunities between science teams are also pursued. Each science team area addresses the common themes of calibration/validation, data assimilation, climate, and operational oceanography. Experimental and operational products, as well as user support, are provided to the user community via the NOAA OceanWatch/CoastWatch program.

  4. Aeronautical satellite antenna steering using magnetic field sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydor, John; Dufour, Martial

    1993-01-01

    Designers of aeronautical satellite terminals are often faced with the problem of steering a directive antenna from an airplane or helicopter. This problem is usually solved by using aircraft orientation information derived from inertial sensors on-board the aircraft in combination with satellite ephemeris information calculated from geographic coordinates. This procedure works well but relies heavily on avionics that are external to the terminal. For the majority of small aircraft and helicopters which will form the bulk of future aeronautical satcom users, such avionics either do not exist or are difficult for the satellite terminal to interface with. At the Communications Research Center (CRC), work has been undertaken to develop techniques that use the geomagnetic field and satellite antenna pointing vectors (both of which are stationary in a local geographical area) to track the position of a satellite relative to a moving platform such as an aircraft. The performance of this technique is examined and a mathematical steering transformation is developed within this paper. Details are given regarding the experimental program that will be undertaken to test the concepts proposed herein.

  5. Weather Satellite Enterprise Information Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamilkowski, M. L.; Grant, K. D.; Miller, S. W.; Cochran, S.

    2015-12-01

    NOAA & NASA are acquiring the next-generation civilian operational weather satellite: Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). Contributing the afternoon orbit & ground system (GS) to replace current NOAA POES Satellites, its sensors will collect meteorological, oceanographic & climatological data. The JPSS Common Ground System (CGS), consisting of C3 and IDP segments, is developed by Raytheon. It now flies the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite, transferring data between ground facilities, processing them into environmental products for NOAA weather centers, and expanding to support JPSS-1 in 2017. As a multi-mission system, CGS provides combinations of C3, data processing, and product delivery for numerous NASA, NOAA, DoD and international missions.The CGS provides a wide range of support to a number of missions: Command and control and mission management for the S-NPP mission today, expanding this support to the JPSS-1 satellite mission in 2017 Data acquisition for S-NPP, the JAXA's Global Change Observation Mission - Water (GCOM-W1), POES, and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) and Coriolis/WindSat for the DoD Data routing over a global fiber network for S-NPP, JPSS-1, GCOM-W1, POES, DMSP, Coriolis/WindSat, NASA EOS missions, MetOp for EUMETSAT and the National Science Foundation Environmental data processing and distribution for S-NPP, GCOM-W1 and JPSS-1 The CGS plays a key role in facilitating the movement and value-added enhancement of data all the way from satellite-based sensor data to delivery to the consumers who generate forecasts and produce watches and warnings. This presentation will discuss the information flow from sensors, through data routing and processing, and finally to product delivery. It will highlight how advances in architecture developed through lessons learned from S-NPP and implemented for JPSS-1 will increase data availability and reduce latency for end user applications.

  6. Assimilation of GMS-5 satellite winds using nudging method with MM5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Shanhong; WU Zengmao; YANG Bo

    2006-01-01

    With the aid of Meteorological Information Composite and Processing System (MICAPS), satellite wind vectors derived from the Geostationary Meteorological Statellite-5 (GMS-5) and retrieved by National Satellite Meteorology Center of China (NSMC) can be obtained. Based on the nudging method built in the fifth-generation Mesoscale Model (MM5) of Pennsylvania State University and National Center for Atmospheric Research, a data preprocessor is developed to convert these satellite wind vectors to those with specified format required in MM5. To examine the data preprocessor and evaluate the impact of satellite winds from GMS-5 on MM5 simulations, a series of numerical experimental forecasts consisting of four typhoon cases in 2002 are designed and implemented. The results show that the preprocessor can process satellite winds smoothly and MM5 model runs successfully with a little extra computational load during ingesting these winds, and that assimilation of satellite winds by MM5 nudging method can obviously improve typhoon track forecast but contributes a little to typhoon intensity forecast. The impact of the satellite winds depends heavily upon whether the typhoon bogussing scheme in MM5 was turned on or not. The data preprocessor developed in this paper not only can treat GMS-5 satellite winds but also has capability with little modification to process derived winds from other geostationary satellites.

  7. Satellite Image Security Improvement by Combining DWT-DCT Watermarking and AES Encryption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naida.H.Nazmudeen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available With the large-scale research in space sciences and technologies, there is a great demand of satellite image security system for providing secure storage and transmission of satellite images. As the demand to protect the sensitive and valuable data from satellites has increased and hence proposed a new method for satellite image security by combining DWT-DCT watermarking and AES encryption. Watermarking techniques developed for multimedia data cannot be directly applied to the satellite images because here the analytic integrity of the data, rather than perceptual quality, is of primary importance. To improve performance, combine discrete wavelet transform (DWT with another equally powerful transform; the discrete cosine transform (DCT. The combined DWT-DCT watermarking algorithm’s imperceptibility was better than the performance of the DWT approach. Modified decision based unsymmetrical trimmed median filter (MDBUTMF algorithm is proposed for the restoration of satellite images that are highly corrupted by salt and pepper noise. Satellite images desire not only the watermarking for copyright protection but also encryption during storage and transmission for preventing information leakage. Hence this paper investigates the security and performance level of joint DWT-DCT watermarking and Advanced Encryption Standard (AES for satellite imagery. Theoretical analysis can be done by calculating PSNR and MSE. The experimental results demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed scheme, which fulfils the strict requirements concerning alterations of satellite images.

  8. An autonomous orbit determination method for MEO and LEO satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Wang, Jin; Yu, Guobin; Zhong, Jie; Lin, Ling

    2014-09-01

    A reliable and secure navigation system and assured autonomous capability of satellite are in high demand in case of emergencies in space. This paper introduces a novel autonomous orbit determination method for Middle-Earth-Orbit and Low-Earth-Orbit (MEO and LEO) satellite by observing space objects whose orbits are known. Generally, the geodetic satellites, such as LAGEOS and ETALONS, can be selected as the space objects here. The precision CCD camera on tracking gimbal can make a series of photos of the objects and surrounding stars when MEO and LEO satellite encounters the space objects. Then the information processor processes images and attains sightings and angular observations of space objects. Several clusters of such angular observations are incorporated into a batch least squares filter to obtain an orbit determination solution. This paper describes basic principle and builds integrated mathematical model. The accuracy of this method is analyzed by means of computer simulation. Then a simulant experiment system is built, and the experimental results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of this method. The experimental results show that this method can attain the accuracy of 150 meters with angular observations of 1 arcsecond system error.

  9. Stream Gauges and Satellite Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsdorf, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    Satellite measurements should not be viewed as a replacement for stream gauges. However, occasionally it is suggested that because satellite-based measurements can provide river discharge, a motivation for satellite approaches is an increasing lack of stream gauges. This is an argument for more stream gauges, but not necessarily for satellite measurements. Rather, in-situ and spaceborne methods of estimating discharge are complementary. Stream gauges provide frequent measurements at one point in the river reach whereas satellites have the potential to measure throughout all reaches but at orbital repeat intervals of days to weeks. The Surface Water and Ocean Topography satellite mission (SWOT) is an opportunity to further develop these complements. The motivation for SWOT, and indeed for any satellite based method of estimating discharge, should not be as a replacement for stream gauges. Scientific and application uses should motivate the measurements. For example, understanding floods with their dynamic water surfaces are best sampled from remote platforms that provide water surface elevations throughout the floodwave. As another example, today’s water and energy balance models are giving outputs at increasing spatial resolution and are making use of water surface elevations throughout the modeled basin. These models require a similar resolution in the calibrating and validating observations. We should also be aware of practical limitations. In addition to providing spatially distributed hydrodynamic measurements on rivers, SWOT will be able to measure storage changes in the estimated 30 million lakes in the world that are larger than a hectare. Knowing the storage changes in these lakes is especially important in certain regions such as the Arctic but gauging even a small fraction of these is impractical. Another motivator for satellite methods is that even in the presence of stream gauges, discharge data is not always well shared throughout all countries

  10. Experimental Tests of Local Cosmological Expansion Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Widom, A; Srivastava, Y

    2015-01-01

    Cosmological expansion on a local scale is usually neglected in part due to its smallness, and in part due to components of bound systems (especially those bound by non-gravitational forces such as atoms and nuclei) not following the geodesics of the cosmological metric. However, it is interesting to ask whether or not experimental tests of cosmological expansion on a local scale (well within our own galaxy) might be experimentally accessible in some manner. We point out, using the Pioneer satellites as an example, that current satellite technology allows for this possibility within time scales of less than one human lifetime.

  11. Use of Earth Observing Satellites for Operational Hazard Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, H. M.; Lauritson, L.

    continental U.S., Carribean, and adjacent oceans, it also tracks volcanic eruptions throughout the world. Text messages are produced along with graphic interpretations. This information, along with volcanic ash forecasts produced by NOAA's National Weather Service, is made available to U.S. Government and international agencies concerned with aviation, seismology, and climate analysis. Earth observing satellites help NESDIS to ensure safe navigation of ships through sea ice by measuring the extent, thickness, and age of ice as well as sea surface winds over the polar regions of the globe, coastal areas, and inland waterways. These satellites also help NESDIS to monitor U.S. coastal areas for dangerous algal blooms or other toxic effects to fish and sea mammals as well as monitoring floods and fires. Experimental fire products can help in the monitoring of fires and fire weather, as well as determining fire risk. Experimental soil moisture products support flood and drought monitoring. Flood extent and damage assessment for a variety of hazards can be determined from several satellites at varying spatial resolutions. The Search and Rescue Satellite Aided Tracking (SARSAT) system detects and locates persons in distress on land or water. NOAA satellites relay distress signals from emergency beacons through a network of ground stations to the U.S. Mission Control Center (USMCC). The USMCC processes the data and alerts the appropriate search and rescue authorities. SARSAT is part of the international Cospas-Sarsat Program. NOAA's GOES Data Collection (DCS) and Argos (jointly with the French space agency) POES Data Collection and Locations Systems transmit data collected from remote land and water based platforms and distributes the data to researchers, governmental and environmental organizations worldwide. The GOES DCS system allows near real time and frequent transmissions, e.g. hourly, over the Americas and much of the Atlantic and Eastern Pacific Oceans. ARGOS transmissions

  12. Chartering Launchers for Small Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Daniel

    The question of how to launch small satellites has been solved over the years by the larger launchers offering small satellites the possibility of piggy-backing. Specific fixtures have been developed and commercialized: Arianespace developed the ASAP interface, the USAF studied ESPA, NASA has promoted Shuttle launch possibilities, Russian authorities and companies have been able to find solutions with many different launchers... It is fair to say that most launcher suppliers have worked hard and finally often been able to find solutions to launch most small satellites into orbit. It is also true, however, that most of these small satellites were technology demonstration missions capable of accepting a wide range of orbit and launch characteristics: orbit altitude and inclination, launch date, etc. In some cases the small satellite missions required a well-defined type of orbit and have therefore been obliged to hire a small launcher on which they were the prime passenger. In our paper we would like to propose an additional solution to all these possibilities: launchers could plan well in advance (for example about 3 years), trips to precisely defined orbits to allow potential passengers to organize themselves and be ready on the D-Day. On the scheduled date the chartered launcher goes to the stated orbit while on another date, another chartered launcher goes to another orbit. The idea is to organize departures for space like trains or airplanes leaving on known schedules for known destinations.

  13. Low Earth orbit communications satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroney, D.; Lashbrook, D.; Mckibben, B.; Gardener, N.; Rivers, T.; Nottingham, G.; Golden, B.; Barfield, B.; Bruening, J.; Wood, D.

    1992-01-01

    A current thrust in satellite communication systems considers a low-Earth orbiting constellations of satellites for continuous global coverage. Conceptual design studies have been done at the time of this design project by LORAL Aerospace Corporation under the program name GLOBALSTAR and by Motorola under their IRIDIUM program. This design project concentrates on the spacecraft design of the GLOBALSTAR low-Earth orbiting communication system. Overview information on the program was gained through the Federal Communications Commission licensing request. The GLOBALSTAR system consists of 48 operational satellites positioned in a Walker Delta pattern providing global coverage and redundancy. The operational orbit is 1389 km (750 nmi) altitude with eight planes of six satellites each. The orbital planes are spaced 45 deg., and the spacecraft are separated by 60 deg. within the plane. A Delta 2 launch vehicle is used to carry six spacecraft for orbit establishment. Once in orbit, the spacecraft will utilize code-division multiple access (spread spectrum modulation) for digital relay, voice, and radio determination satellite services (RDSS) yielding position determination with accuracy up to 200 meters.

  14. Satellite Tracking Astrometric Network (STAN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchiato, Alberto; Gai, Mario

    2015-08-01

    The possibility of precise orbit tracking and determination of different types of satellites has been explored for at least some 25 years (Arimoto et al., 1990). Proposals in this sense made use mainly of astrometric observations, but multiple tracking techniques combining transfer and laser ranging was also suggested (Guo et al., 2009; Montojo et al., 2011), with different requirements and performances ranging from $\\sim100$~m to tenths of meters.In this work we explore the possible improvements and a novel implementation of a technique relying on large angle, high precision astrometry from ground for the determination of satellite orbits. The concept is based on combined observation of geostationary satellites and other near-Earth space objects from two or more telescopes, applying the triangulation principle over widely separated regions of the sky. An accuracy of a few $10^{-2}$~m can be attained with 1-meter-class telescopes and a field of vied of some arcminutes.We discuss the feasibility of the technique, some of the implementation aspects, and the limitations imposed by atmospheric turbulence. The potential benefits for satellite orbit control and navigation systems are presented, depending on the number and position of the contributing telescopes.We also discuss the possibility that, by reversing the roles of stars and satellites, the same kind of observations can be used for verification and maintenance of astrometric catalogs.

  15. Research Supporting Satellite Communications Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horan Stephen; Lyman, Raphael

    2005-01-01

    This report describes the second year of research effort under the grant Research Supporting Satellite Communications Technology. The research program consists of two major projects: Fault Tolerant Link Establishment and the design of an Auto-Configurable Receiver. The Fault Tolerant Link Establishment protocol is being developed to assist the designers of satellite clusters to manage the inter-satellite communications. During this second year, the basic protocol design was validated with an extensive testing program. After this testing was completed, a channel error model was added to the protocol to permit the effects of channel errors to be measured. This error generation was used to test the effects of channel errors on Heartbeat and Token message passing. The C-language source code for the protocol modules was delivered to Goddard Space Flight Center for integration with the GSFC testbed. The need for a receiver autoconfiguration capability arises when a satellite-to-ground transmission is interrupted due to an unexpected event, the satellite transponder may reset to an unknown state and begin transmitting in a new mode. During Year 2, we completed testing of these algorithms when noise-induced bit errors were introduced. We also developed and tested an algorithm for estimating the data rate, assuming an NRZ-formatted signal corrupted with additive white Gaussian noise, and we took initial steps in integrating both algorithms into the SDR test bed at GSFC.

  16. Orbit Determination Using Satellite-to-Satellite Tracking Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Satellite-to-Satellite Tracking (SST) data can be used to determine the orbits of spacecraft in two ways. One is combined orbit determination, which combines SST data with ground-based tracking data and exploits the enhanced tracking geometry. The other is the autonomous orbit determination, which uses only SST. The latter only fits some particular circumstances since it suffers the rank defect problem in other circumstances. The proof of this statement is presented. The na ture of the problem is also investigated in order to find an effective solution. Several methods of solution are discussed. The feasibility of the methods is demonstrated by their apphcation to a simulation.

  17. New Regional Satellite Positioning Constellation Scheme Discussion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHU Hai-bin; ZHANG Nai-tong; GU Xue-mai

    2005-01-01

    The characteristics of present "Beidou" satellite positioning system are analyzed. In order to perfect our country regional satellite positioning system, the idea of "Beidou" geosychronous earth orbit (GEO) satellites combined with some middle earth orbit (MEO) satellites constellation is put forward. The details of general satellite constellation optimized method are described, using this method the multiple positioning constellation design results are gained. And those results belong to two type of schems, one is 2 GEO plus some MEO satellites and the other is 3 GEO plus some MEO satellites. Through simulation and comparison, among those multiple design results, final optimized regional positioning constellation is given. In order to check the chosen constellation cover performance, the position dilution of precision(PDOP) is calculated, and with satellite constellation simulation software Satlab many coverage performances of the chosen constellation substellar point track, elevation, azimuth and visible satellites number changing situation are also simulated.

  18. ERTS-A satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvocoresses, Alden P.

    1970-01-01

    The first satellite designed to survey the Earth's resources is scheduled to be launched in 1972. This satellite, known as ERTS-A, will telemeter frames of imagery each covering 100-nautical-mile squares of the Earth. Except for the internal anomalies in the sensor system, the imagery, after being properly scaled, rectified, and controlled, may be considered an orthographic view of the Earth and used as a planimetric photomap. The accuracy of this photomap will be limited, principally by the geometric fidelity of the sensor system rather than by external effects, such as relief displacement, which restrict the direct cartographic use of the conventional aerial photograph. ERST-A is not designed as a topographic mapping satellite but does have real potential' for thematic mapping particularly in areas now covered by topographic maps.

  19. Gaussian Entanglement Distribution via Satellite

    CERN Document Server

    Hosseinidehaj, Nedasadat

    2014-01-01

    In this work we analyse three quantum communication schemes for the generation of Gaussian entanglement between two ground stations. Communication occurs via a satellite over two independent atmospheric fading channels dominated by turbulence-induced beam wander. In our first scheme the engineering complexity remains largely on the ground transceivers, with the satellite acting simply as a reflector. Although the channel state information of the two atmospheric channels remains unknown in this scheme, the Gaussian entanglement generation between the ground stations can still be determined. On the ground, distillation and Gaussification procedures can be applied, leading to a refined Gaussian entanglement generation rate between the ground stations. We compare the rates produced by this first scheme with two competing schemes in which quantum complexity is added to the satellite, thereby illustrating the trade-off between space-based engineering complexity and the rate of ground-station entanglement generation...

  20. Satellite Communications Using Commercial Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, William D.; Griner, James H.; Dimond, Robert; Frantz, Brian D.; Kachmar, Brian; Shell, Dan

    2000-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center has been working with industry, academia, and other government agencies in assessing commercial communications protocols for satellite and space-based applications. In addition, NASA Glenn has been developing and advocating new satellite-friendly modifications to existing communications protocol standards. This paper summarizes recent research into the applicability of various commercial standard protocols for use over satellite and space- based communications networks as well as expectations for future protocol development. It serves as a reference point from which the detailed work can be readily accessed. Areas that will be addressed include asynchronous-transfer-mode quality of service; completed and ongoing work of the Internet Engineering Task Force; data-link-layer protocol development for unidirectional link routing; and protocols for aeronautical applications, including mobile Internet protocol routing for wireless/mobile hosts and the aeronautical telecommunications network protocol.