WorldWideScience

Sample records for reorganize existing spatial

  1. Spatial language processing in the blind: evidence for a supramodal representation and cortical reorganization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijn E Struiksma

    Full Text Available Neuropsychological and imaging studies have shown that the left supramarginal gyrus (SMG is specifically involved in processing spatial terms (e.g. above, left of, which locate places and objects in the world. The current fMRI study focused on the nature and specificity of representing spatial language in the left SMG by combining behavioral and neuronal activation data in blind and sighted individuals. Data from the blind provide an elegant way to test the supramodal representation hypothesis, i.e. abstract codes representing spatial relations yielding no activation differences between blind and sighted. Indeed, the left SMG was activated during spatial language processing in both blind and sighted individuals implying a supramodal representation of spatial and other dimensional relations which does not require visual experience to develop. However, in the absence of vision functional reorganization of the visual cortex is known to take place. An important consideration with respect to our finding is the amount of functional reorganization during language processing in our blind participants. Therefore, the participants also performed a verb generation task. We observed that only in the blind occipital areas were activated during covert language generation. Additionally, in the first task there was functional reorganization observed for processing language with a high linguistic load. As the visual cortex was not specifically active for spatial contents in the first task, and no reorganization was observed in the SMG, the latter finding further supports the notion that the left SMG is the main node for a supramodal representation of verbal spatial relations.

  2. Spatial Language Processing in the Blind: Evidence for a Supramodal Representation and Cortical Reorganization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struiksma, Marijn E.; Noordzij, Matthijs L.; Neggers, Sebastiaan F. W.; Bosker, Wendy M.; Postma, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Neuropsychological and imaging studies have shown that the left supramarginal gyrus (SMG) is specifically involved in processing spatial terms (e.g. above, left of), which locate places and objects in the world. The current fMRI study focused on the nature and specificity of representing spatial language in the left SMG by combining behavioral and neuronal activation data in blind and sighted individuals. Data from the blind provide an elegant way to test the supramodal representation hypothesis, i.e. abstract codes representing spatial relations yielding no activation differences between blind and sighted. Indeed, the left SMG was activated during spatial language processing in both blind and sighted individuals implying a supramodal representation of spatial and other dimensional relations which does not require visual experience to develop. However, in the absence of vision functional reorganization of the visual cortex is known to take place. An important consideration with respect to our finding is the amount of functional reorganization during language processing in our blind participants. Therefore, the participants also performed a verb generation task. We observed that only in the blind occipital areas were activated during covert language generation. Additionally, in the first task there was functional reorganization observed for processing language with a high linguistic load. As the visual cortex was not specifically active for spatial contents in the first task, and no reorganization was observed in the SMG, the latter finding further supports the notion that the left SMG is the main node for a supramodal representation of verbal spatial relations. PMID:21935391

  3. Beta-globin LCR and intron elements cooperate and direct spatial reorganization for gene therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla Buzina

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The Locus Control Region (LCR requires intronic elements within beta-globin transgenes to direct high level expression at all ectopic integration sites. However, these essential intronic elements cannot be transmitted through retrovirus vectors and their deletion may compromise the therapeutic potential for gene therapy. Here, we systematically regenerate functional beta-globin intron 2 elements that rescue LCR activity directed by 5'HS3. Evaluation in transgenic mice demonstrates that an Oct-1 binding site and an enhancer in the intron cooperate to increase expression levels from LCR globin transgenes. Replacement of the intronic AT-rich region with the Igmu 3'MAR rescues LCR activity in single copy transgenic mice. Importantly, a combination of the Oct-1 site, Igmu 3'MAR and intronic enhancer in the BGT158 cassette directs more consistent levels of expression in transgenic mice. By introducing intron-modified transgenes into the same genomic integration site in erythroid cells, we show that BGT158 has the greatest transcriptional induction. 3D DNA FISH establishes that induction stimulates this small 5'HS3 containing transgene and the endogenous locus to spatially reorganize towards more central locations in erythroid nuclei. Electron Spectroscopic Imaging (ESI of chromatin fibers demonstrates that ultrastructural heterochromatin is primarily perinuclear and does not reorganize. Finally, we transmit intron-modified globin transgenes through insulated self-inactivating (SIN lentivirus vectors into erythroid cells. We show efficient transfer and robust mRNA and protein expression by the BGT158 vector, and virus titer improvements mediated by the modified intron 2 in the presence of an LCR cassette composed of 5'HS2-4. Our results have important implications for the mechanism of LCR activity at ectopic integration sites. The modified transgenes are the first to transfer intronic elements that potentiate LCR activity and are designed to facilitate

  4. Efficient energy transfer in light-harvesting systems, I: optimal temperature, reorganization energy, and spatial-temporal correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jianlan; Shen, Young; Cao, Jianshu; Silbey, Robert J

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of efficient and robust energy transfer in light-harvesting systems provides new insights for the optimal design of artificial systems. In this paper, we use the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) protein complex and phycocyanin 645 (PC 645) to explore the general dependence on physical parameters that help maximize the efficiency and maintain its stability. With the Haken-Strobl model, the maximal energy transfer efficiency (ETE) is achieved under an intermediate optimal value of dephasing rate. Guided by the insight, we use the generalized Bloch-Redfield (GBR) equation approach to correctly describe dissipative exciton dynamics and find that maximal ETE can be achieved under various physical conditions, including temperature, reorganization energy, and spatial-temporal correlations in noise. We also identify regimes of reorganization energy where the ETE changes monotonically with temperature or spatial correlation and therefore cannot be optimized with respect to these two variables.

  5. Spatial and temporal plasticity of chromatin during programmed DNA-reorganization in Stylonychia macronuclear development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Postberg Jan

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: In this study we exploit the unique genome organization of ciliates to characterize the biological function of histone modification patterns and chromatin plasticity for the processing of specific DNA sequences during a nuclear differentiation process. Ciliates are single-cell eukaryotes containing two morphologically and functionally specialized types of nuclei, the somatic macronucleus and the germline micronucleus. In the course of sexual reproduction a new macronucleus develops from a micronuclear derivative. During this process specific DNA sequences are eliminated from the genome, while sequences that will be transcribed in the mature macronucleus are retained. Results: We show by immunofluorescence microscopy, Western analyses and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP experiments that each nuclear type establishes its specific histone modification signature. Our analyses reveal that the early macronuclear anlage adopts a permissive chromatin state immediately after the fusion of two heterochromatic germline micronuclei. As macronuclear development progresses, repressive histone modifications that specify sequences to be eliminated are introduced de novo. ChIP analyses demonstrate that permissive histone modifications are associated with sequences that will be retained in the new macronucleus. Furthermore, our data support the hypothesis that a PIWI-family protein is involved in a transnuclear cross-talk and in the RNAi-dependent control of developmental chromatin reorganization. Conclusion: Based on these data we present a comprehensive analysis of the spatial and temporal pattern of histone modifications during this nuclear differentiation process. Results obtained in this study may also be relevant for our understanding of chromatin plasticity during metazoan embryogenesis.

  6. Spatial reorganization of the endoplasmic reticulum during mitosis relies on mitotic kinase cyclin A in the early Drosophila embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Zane J; Mclaurin, Justin D; Eritano, Anthony S; Johnson, Brittany M; Sims, Amanda Q; Riggs, Blake

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase with their cyclin partners (cyclin:Cdks) are the master regulators of cell cycle progression responsible for regulating a host of activities during mitosis. Nuclear mitotic events, including chromosome condensation and segregation have been directly linked to Cdk activity. However, the regulation and timing of cytoplasmic mitotic events by cyclin:Cdks is poorly understood. In order to examine these mitotic cytoplasmic events, we looked at the dramatic changes in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during mitosis in the early Drosophila embryo. The dynamic changes of the ER can be arrested in an interphase state by inhibition of either DNA or protein synthesis. Here we show that this block can be alleviated by micro-injection of Cyclin A (CycA) in which defined mitotic ER clusters gathered at the spindle poles. Conversely, micro-injection of Cyclin B (CycB) did not affect spatial reorganization of the ER, suggesting CycA possesses the ability to initiate mitotic ER events in the cytoplasm. Additionally, RNAi-mediated simultaneous inhibition of all 3 mitotic cyclins (A, B and B3) blocked spatial reorganization of the ER. Our results suggest that mitotic ER reorganization events rely on CycA and that control and timing of nuclear and cytoplasmic events during mitosis may be defined by release of CycA from the nucleus as a consequence of breakdown of the nuclear envelope.

  7. Spatial Reorganization of the Endoplasmic Reticulum during Mitosis Relies on Mitotic Kinase Cyclin A in the Early Drosophila Embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Zane J.; Mclaurin, Justin D.; Eritano, Anthony S.; Johnson, Brittany M.; Sims, Amanda Q.; Riggs, Blake

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase with their cyclin partners (cyclin:Cdks) are the master regulators of cell cycle progression responsible for regulating a host of activities during mitosis. Nuclear mitotic events, including chromosome condensation and segregation have been directly linked to Cdk activity. However, the regulation and timing of cytoplasmic mitotic events by cyclin:Cdks is poorly understood. In order to examine these mitotic cytoplasmic events, we looked at the dramatic changes in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during mitosis in the early Drosophila embryo. The dynamic changes of the ER can be arrested in an interphase state by inhibition of either DNA or protein synthesis. Here we show that this block can be alleviated by micro-injection of Cyclin A (CycA) in which defined mitotic ER clusters gathered at the spindle poles. Conversely, micro-injection of Cyclin B (CycB) did not affect spatial reorganization of the ER, suggesting CycA possesses the ability to initiate mitotic ER events in the cytoplasm. Additionally, RNAi-mediated simultaneous inhibition of all 3 mitotic cyclins (A, B and B3) blocked spatial reorganization of the ER. Our results suggest that mitotic ER reorganization events rely on CycA and that control and timing of nuclear and cytoplasmic events during mitosis may be defined by release of CycA from the nucleus as a consequence of breakdown of the nuclear envelope. PMID:25689737

  8. Spatial language processing in the blind: evidence for a supramodel representation and cortical reorganization.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struiksma, Marijn E.; Noordzij, Matthijs Leendert; Neggers, Sebastiaan F.W.; Bosker, Wendy M.; Postma, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Neuropsychological and imaging studies have shown that the left supramarginal gyrus (SMG) is specifically involved in processing spatial terms (e.g. above, left of), which locate places and objects in the world. The current fMRI study focused on the nature and specificity of representing spatial lan

  9. Impacts of Kelvin wave forcing in the Peru Humboldt Current system: Scenarios of spatial reorganizations from physics to fishers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Sophie; Dewitte, Boris; Tam, Jorge; Díaz, Erich; Bertrand, Arnaud

    2008-10-01

    Because climate change challenges the sustainability of important fish populations and the fisheries they support, we need to understand how large scale climatic forcing affects the functioning of marine ecosystems. In the Humboldt Current system (HCS), a main driver of climatic variability is coastally-trapped Kelvin waves (KWs), themselves originating as oceanic equatorial KWs. Here we (i) describe the spatial reorganizations of living organisms in the Humboldt coastal system as affected by oceanic KWs forcing, (ii) quantify the strength of the interactions between the physical and biological component dynamics of the system, (iii) formulate hypotheses on the processes which drive the redistributions of the organisms, and (iv) build scenarios of space occupation in the HCS under varying KW forcing. To address these questions we explore, through bivariate lagged correlations and multivariate statistics, the relationships between time series of oceanic KW amplitude (TAO mooring data and model-resolved baroclinic modes) and coastal Peruvian oceanographic data (SST, coastal upwelled waters extent), anchoveta spatial distribution (mean distance to the coast, spatial concentration of the biomass, mean depth of the schools), and fishing fleet statistics (trip duration, searching duration, number of fishing sets and catch per trip, features of the foraging trajectory as observed by satellite vessel monitoring system). Data sets span all or part of January 1983 to September 2006. The results show that the effects of oceanic KW forcing are significant in all the components of the coastal ecosystem, from oceanography to the behaviour of the top predators - fishers. This result provides evidence for a bottom-up transfer of the behaviours and spatial stucturing through the ecosystem. We propose that contrasting scenarios develop during the passage of upwelling versus downwelling KWs. From a predictive point of view, we show that KW amplitudes observed in the mid-Pacific can

  10. Spatial reorganization of putaminal dopamine D2-like receptors in cranial and hand dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Kevin J; Snyder, Abraham Z; Mink, Jonathan W; Tolia, Veeral N; Revilla, Fredy J; Moerlein, Stephen M; Perlmutter, Joel S

    2014-01-01

    The putamen has a somatotopic organization of neurons identified by correspondence of firing rates with selected body part movements, as well as by complex, but organized, differential cortical projections onto putamen. In isolated focal dystonia, whole putaminal binding of dopamine D2-like receptor radioligands is quantitatively decreased, but it has not been known whether selected parts of the putamen are differentially affected depending upon the body part affected by dystonia. The radioligand [(18)F]spiperone binds predominantly to D2-like receptors in striatum. We hypothesized that the spatial location of [(18)F]spiperone binding within the putamen would differ in patients with dystonia limited to the hand versus the face, and we tested that hypothesis using positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. To address statistical and methodological concerns, we chose a straightforward but robust image analysis method. An automated algorithm located the peak location of [(18)F]spiperone binding within the striatum, relative to a brain atlas, in each of 14 patients with cranial dystonia and 8 patients with hand dystonia. The mean (left and right) |x|, y, and z coordinates of peak striatal binding for each patient were compared between groups by t test. The location of peak [(18)F]spiperone binding within the putamen differed significantly between groups (cranial dystonia zputamen depending on the body part manifesting dystonia.

  11. Instability and Existence of Spatial Nonhomogenuos Steady State of the Classical Contiunuum Heisenberg Spain Chin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    The Landau-Lifshitz equation of the ferromagnetic spin chain with Gilbert damping term is considered.which is described by δS/δt=S×ΔS-λS×(S×ΔS),All spatial nonhomogenuos steady-state solutions.which are the form S=R1 cos(lr)+ R2 sin(lr)Al∈R,wherer |R1|=|R2|=1 and R1⊥R2,are proposed,Moreover the instability of the spatial nonhomogenuos steady-state solutions Sl(r)(l≠0) is investigated.Every perturbation of the spatial nonhomogenuos steady-state tends to a spatial homogeneous steady-state as t→∞.Thus the hetercolinic orbits,which connect the spatial nonhomogenuos steady-state and the spatial homogeneous steady-state,are exist.Filially numerical experiments are provided.

  12. Drilling reorganizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    As the first in a proposed series of steps that would move scientific ocean drilling from its own niche within the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Directorate for Astronomical, Atmospheric, Earth, and Ocean Sciences (AAEO) into the agency's Division of Ocean Sciences, Grant Gross, division director, has been appointed acting director of the Office of Scientific Ocean Drilling (OSOD). Gross will retain the directorship of the division, which also is part of AAEO. Allen M. Shinn, Jr., OSOD director for nearly 2 years, has been reassigned effective July 10 to a position in NSF's Office of Planning and Resource Management.The move aims to tie drilling operations more closely to the science with which it is associated, Gross said. This first step is an organizational response to the current leaning toward using a commercial drilling vessel as the drilling platform, he said. Before the market for such commercial drill ships opened (Eos, February 22, 1983, p . 73), other ship options for scientific ocean drilling included refurbishing the aging Glomar Challenger or renovating, at great expense, the Glomar Explorer. A possible next step in the reorganization is to make OSOD the third section within the Ocean Sciences Division. Currently, the division is divided into the Oceanographic Facilities and Support Section and the Ocean Sciences Research Section.

  13. Analyzing existing conventional soil information sources to be incorporated in thematic Spatial Data Infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Aguilar, J. A.; Rubio, J. L.; Domínguez, J.; Andreu, V.

    2012-04-01

    New information technologies give the possibility of widespread dissemination of spatial information to different geographical scales from continental to local by means of Spatial Data Infrastructures. Also administrative awareness on the need for open access information services has allowed the citizens access to this spatial information through development of legal documents, such as the INSPIRE Directive of the European Union, adapted by national laws as in the case of Spain. The translation of the general criteria of generic Spatial Data Infrastructures (SDI) to thematic ones is a crucial point for the progress of these instruments as large tool for the dissemination of information. In such case, it must be added to the intrinsic criteria of digital information, such as the harmonization information and the disclosure of metadata, the own environmental information characteristics and the techniques employed in obtaining it. In the case of inventories and mapping of soils, existing information obtained by traditional means, prior to the digital technologies, is considered to be a source of valid information, as well as unique, for the development of thematic SDI. In this work, an evaluation of existing and accessible information that constitutes the basis for building a thematic SDI of soils in Spain is undertaken. This information framework has common features to other European Union states. From a set of more than 1,500 publications corresponding to the national territory of Spain, the study was carried out in those documents (94) found for five autonomous regions of northern Iberian Peninsula (Asturias, Cantabria, Basque Country, Navarra and La Rioja). The analysis was performed taking into account the criteria of soil mapping and inventories. The results obtained show a wide variation in almost all the criteria: geographic representation (projections, scales) and geo-referencing the location of the profiles, map location of profiles integrated with edaphic

  14. Implementation of ecological network in existing conditions of municipal spatial management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawłat-Zawrzykraj Agata

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary socio-economic development requires a rational and sustainable land management. The pressure for urbanization and building development, existing infrastructural barriers and creation of the new ones, contribute to fragmentation of landscape and thus increase isolation of biologically active areas. Idea of ecological network as a tool for maintaining ecological connectivity is not new and has broad theoretical bases, but implementation of this concept in real-life scenarios is very challenging. The article presents existing formal and legal possibilities of implementing ecological networks, enacted as a part of municipal spatial policy. Differentiated approach to implementation of the idea of ecological connectivity is presented on the example of two suburban municipalities Piaseczno and Góra Kalwaria. Ecological network and especially ecological corridors in these areas have varied status of nature conservation and development of investments is implemented either in accordance with local spatial development plans or, in case of lack of the plans, in accordance with development conditions decision. Analysis of changes in spatial development of the municipalities was used to identify risk areas of losing the ecological connectivity.

  15. Patchiness and co-existence of indigenous and invasive mussels at small spatial scales: the interaction of facilitation and competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlandsson, Johan; McQuaid, Christopher D; Sköld, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Ecological theory predicts that two species with similar requirements will fail to show long-term co-existence in situations where shared resources are limiting, especially at spatial scales that are small relative to the size of the organisms. Two species of intertidal mussels, the indigenous Perna perna and the invasive Mytilus galloprovincialis, form mixed beds on the south coast of South Africa in a situation that has been stable for several generations of these species, even though these populations are often limited by the availability of space. We examined the spatial structure of these species where they co-exist at small spatial scales in the absence of apparent environmental heterogeneity at two sites, testing: whether conspecific aggregation of mussels can occur (using spatial Monte-Carlo tests); the degree of patchiness (using Korcak B patchiness exponent), and whether there was a relationship between percent cover and patchiness. We found that under certain circumstances there is non-random conspecific aggregation, but that in other circumstances there may be random distribution (i.e. the two species are mixed), so that spatial patterns are context-dependent. The relative cover of the species differed between sites, and within each site, the species with higher cover showed low Korcak B values (indicating low patchiness, i.e. the existence of fewer, larger patches), while the less abundant species showed the reverse, i.e. high patchiness. This relationship did not hold for either species within sites. We conclude that co-existence between these mussels is possible, even at small spatial scales because each species is an ecological engineer and, while they have been shown to compete for space, this is preceded by initial facilitation. We suggest that a patchy pattern of co-existence is possible because of a balance between direct (competitive) and indirect (facilitative) interactions.

  16. Patchiness and co-existence of indigenous and invasive mussels at small spatial scales: the interaction of facilitation and competition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Erlandsson

    Full Text Available Ecological theory predicts that two species with similar requirements will fail to show long-term co-existence in situations where shared resources are limiting, especially at spatial scales that are small relative to the size of the organisms. Two species of intertidal mussels, the indigenous Perna perna and the invasive Mytilus galloprovincialis, form mixed beds on the south coast of South Africa in a situation that has been stable for several generations of these species, even though these populations are often limited by the availability of space. We examined the spatial structure of these species where they co-exist at small spatial scales in the absence of apparent environmental heterogeneity at two sites, testing: whether conspecific aggregation of mussels can occur (using spatial Monte-Carlo tests; the degree of patchiness (using Korcak B patchiness exponent, and whether there was a relationship between percent cover and patchiness. We found that under certain circumstances there is non-random conspecific aggregation, but that in other circumstances there may be random distribution (i.e. the two species are mixed, so that spatial patterns are context-dependent. The relative cover of the species differed between sites, and within each site, the species with higher cover showed low Korcak B values (indicating low patchiness, i.e. the existence of fewer, larger patches, while the less abundant species showed the reverse, i.e. high patchiness. This relationship did not hold for either species within sites. We conclude that co-existence between these mussels is possible, even at small spatial scales because each species is an ecological engineer and, while they have been shown to compete for space, this is preceded by initial facilitation. We suggest that a patchy pattern of co-existence is possible because of a balance between direct (competitive and indirect (facilitative interactions.

  17. How supportive are existing national legal regimes for multi-use marine spatial planning?—The South African case

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Taljaard, Susan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the past six years international interest in multi-use marine spatial planning (MSP), as a practical process to launch integrated coastal management (ICM), exploded. This paper explores the extent to which existing national legal frameworks can...

  18. Do existing classification systems capture mountain snowpack heterogeneity? Accounting for spatial variability in a changing environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, C.; Godsey, S.; Harpold, A. A.; Link, T. E.; Rajagopal, S.; Larsen, L.

    2016-12-01

    Spatial patterns of snow accumulation and melt control water and nutrient fluxes from mountain landscapes and determine the dynamics of resource availability for nearby human and ecological communities. Because seasonal snowpack is sensitive to changes in regional climate, there is a growing need for a snowpack classification system that (1) recognizes salient processes, (2) captures the variance of the system, (3) recognizes temporal and/or spatial change, and (4) has application to predicting snowmelt runoff regimes. Previous classification systems have focused on textural and stratigraphic snow characteristics or climatological observations to map broad geographic classes (e.g. maritime, continental, ephemeral, etc.). While these approaches have revealed general patterns, they may not capture the spatial heterogeneity of snowpack characteristics that are common across high relief terrain. Here, we use 1 km resolution gridded outputs from a physically based, spatially-distributed energy- and mass-balance snow model (SNODAS) to produce a snow classification system for the western U.S. and Great Plains. To meet the outlined criterion, we initially explored the ability of a large number of metrics (13) to characterize the amount, timing, and melt-rate of snowpack. Principal components analysis and pairwise correlations were used to identify a subset of metrics (6) that captured the variance of the system but also contributed unique information. K-means was used to delineate 12 process-based groups that reveal both climatic and orographic influences on snowpack accumulation, timing, and melt rate. The important effects of elevation-mediated processes in our classification system suggest a greater spatial diversity in snowpack patterns than suggested by previous characterizations (e.g. maritime-to-continental). Application of the system from the early 2000's to present reveals that interannual temporal and spatial variability have been greatest in the Columbia Plateau

  19. Spatially localized attacks on interdependent networks: the existence of a finite critical attack size

    CERN Document Server

    Berezin, Yehiel; Danziger, Michael M; Li, Daqing; Havlin, Shlomo

    2013-01-01

    Many real world complex systems such as infrastructure, communication and transportation networks are embedded in space, where entities of one system may depend on entities of other systems. These systems are subject to geographically localized failures due to malicious attacks or natural disasters. Here we study the resilience of a system composed of two interdependent spatially embedded networks to localized geographical attacks. We find that if an attack is larger than a finite (zero fraction of the system) critical size, it will spread through the entire system and lead to its complete collapse. If the attack is below the critical size, it will remain localized. In contrast, under random attack a finite fraction of the system needs to be removed to initiate system collapse. We present both numerical simulations and a theoretical approach to analyze and predict the effect of local attacks and the critical attack size. Our results demonstrate the high risk of local attacks on interdependent spatially embedd...

  20. The Reorganization Law in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał ADAMUS

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present general remarks of the legal structure of the Polish reorganization law. This is a completely new institution in Poland. The Act of 28 February 2003 the Bankruptcy and Reorganization Law (J.L. No 60, item 535 as amended, the articles 492 - 521 b.r.l. is the main source of law in the commented matter. The idea of the Polish regulation derives from the Chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code of the United States. The statistics of the usage of the reorganization proceedings in Poland are not very impressive. In this respect some critics maintain that the legislative experiment called “reorganization proceedings” is unsuccessful. Nevertheless the Reorganization Law is a very important figure in the Polish commercial law. Reorganization proceedings seriously differ from bankruptcy proceedings

  1. Egypt/FOF reorganize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    In Egypt, both the national family planning program and the privately operated social marketing program, Family of the Future (FOF), are currently being reorganized. The Population and Family Planning Board, orginally charged with the responsibility of overseeing the national family planning program, was replaced by the newly created National Council. The reasons for the change and the type of program changes which will ensue from this organizational change are unclear. The FOF recently adopted a new management organizational structure, implemented a computerized management and information system, and initiated a staff training program. The management of the program's product line is now divided into 3 sections. There are separate sections for IUDs, barrier methods, and hormonal methods. Each section is responsible for developing a marketing plan for its products and overseeing the distribution of its products. The management staff is now provided with management skills training. To date, 9 managers have received training in management techniques in the US at George Washington University. Personal computers are being installed at the FOF office in Cairo. The system will be used to keep tract of inventory, volunteer activities, and product distribution and to handle accounting procedures. These innovations are expected to facilitate the handling of planned changes in FOF's product line. FOF will begin selling surgical gloves, as a supplemental item for its currently marketed IUD kit, and pregnancy testing kits for use by physicians and hospitals. Other anticipated introductions include Depo Provera, an injectable contraceptive, the new Ortho vaginal tablet which will replace the currently marketed Annan vaginal tablet, and possibly, the implant contraceptive, Norplant. Triton is currently under contract with the US Agency for International Development to provide technical assistance for the FOF program. This contract is due to expire in December, 1984, and a

  2. Reorganization of Lithuanian Airspace

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    Vaidotas Kondroška

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The basic purpose of the article is considering problems related to ensuring the required capacity of Lithuanian airspace and organising the provision of air traffic services in the most efficient way. The paper presents the results of analysis and experimental research on several scenarios of Lithuanian airspace models that are the most appropriate from the point of view of air traffic control. To allow for a realistic comparison between the scenarios and traffic samples, the current route network, a real traffic sample and the existing traffic dynamics have been used. Furthermore, all other related aspects such as flight level occupancy, flight time, aircraft type and traffic flows have been taken into consideration. The results of analysis will form a basis for ensuring the required capacity of Lithuanian airspace. Article in Lithuanian

  3. Expediting Scientific Data Analysis with Reorganization of Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byna, Surendra; Wu, Kesheng

    2013-08-19

    Data producers typically optimize the layout of data files to minimize the write time. In most cases, data analysis tasks read these files in access patterns different from the write patterns causing poor read performance. In this paper, we introduce Scientific Data Services (SDS), a framework for bridging the performance gap between writing and reading scientific data. SDS reorganizes data to match the read patterns of analysis tasks and enables transparent data reads from the reorganized data. We implemented a HDF5 Virtual Object Layer (VOL) plugin to redirect the HDF5 dataset read calls to the reorganized data. To demonstrate the effectiveness of SDS, we applied two parallel data organization techniques: a sort-based organization on a plasma physics data and a transpose-based organization on mass spectrometry imaging data. We also extended the HDF5 data access API to allow selection of data based on their values through a query interface, called SDS Query. We evaluated the execution time in accessing various subsets of data through existing HDF5 Read API and SDS Query. We showed that reading the reorganized data using SDS is up to 55X faster than reading the original data.

  4. Investigating the Small-Scale Spatial Variabilty of Precipitable Water Vapor by Adding Single-Frequency Receivers into an Existing Dual-Frequency Receiver Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krietemeyer, Andreas; ten Veldhuis, Marie-claire; van de Giesen, Nick

    2017-04-01

    Exploiting GNSS signal delays is one possibility to obtain Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) estimates in the atmosphere. The technique is well known since the early 1990s and by now an established method in the meteorological community. The data is crucial for weather forecasting and its assimilation into numerical weather forecasting models is a topic of ongoing research. However, the spatial resolution of ground based GNSS receivers is usually low, in the order of tens of kilometres. Since severe weather events such as convective storms can be concentrated in spatial extent, existing GNSS networks are often not sufficient to retrieve small scale PWV fluctuations and need to be densified. For economic reasons, the use of low-cost single-frequency receivers is a promising solution. In this study, we will deploy a network of single-frequency receivers to densify an existing dual-frequency network in order to investigate the spatial and temporal PWV variations. We demonstrate a test network consisting of four single-frequency receivers in the Rotterdam area (Netherlands). In order to eliminate the delay caused by the ionosphere, the Satellite-specific Epoch-differenced Ionospheric Delay model (SEID) is applied, using a surrounding dual-frequency network distributed over a radius of approximately 25 km. With the synthesized L2 frequency, the tropospheric delays are estimated using the Precise Point Positioning (PPP) strategy and International GNSS Service (IGS) final orbits. The PWV time series are validated by a comparison of a collocated single-frequency and a dual-frequency receiver. The time series themselves form the basis for potential further studies like data assimilation into numerical weather models and GNSS tomography to study the impact of the increased spatial resolution on local heavy rain forecast.

  5. Firm Reorganization : Social Control or Social Contract?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalbers, Hendrik Leendert; Dolfsma, Wilfred; Blinde-Leerentveld, Rowan

    2014-01-01

    Firm reorganizations deeply affect employees. Management can reorganize in different ways, focusing on costs or acknowledging the involvement of employees. The latter implies following a social contract that complements incomplete (formal) labor contracts. Little is known about how the way in which

  6. Firm Reorganization: Social Control or Social Contract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalbers, H.L.; Dolfsma, W.A.; Blinde-Leerentveld, R.

    2014-01-01

    Firm reorganizations deeply affect employees. Management can reorganize in different ways, focusing on costs or acknowledging the involvement of employees. The latter implies following a social contract that complements incomplete (formal) labor contracts. Little is known about how the way in which

  7. Massive cortical reorganization in sighted Braille readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siuda-Krzywicka, Katarzyna; Bola, Łukasz; Paplińska, Małgorzata; Sumera, Ewa; Jednoróg, Katarzyna; Marchewka, Artur; Śliwińska, Magdalena W; Amedi, Amir; Szwed, Marcin

    2016-03-15

    The brain is capable of large-scale reorganization in blindness or after massive injury. Such reorganization crosses the division into separate sensory cortices (visual, somatosensory...). As its result, the visual cortex of the blind becomes active during tactile Braille reading. Although the possibility of such reorganization in the normal, adult brain has been raised, definitive evidence has been lacking. Here, we demonstrate such extensive reorganization in normal, sighted adults who learned Braille while their brain activity was investigated with fMRI and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Subjects showed enhanced activity for tactile reading in the visual cortex, including the visual word form area (VWFA) that was modulated by their Braille reading speed and strengthened resting-state connectivity between visual and somatosensory cortices. Moreover, TMS disruption of VWFA activity decreased their tactile reading accuracy. Our results indicate that large-scale reorganization is a viable mechanism recruited when learning complex skills.

  8. Dispersal governs the reorganization of ecological networks under environmental change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Patrick L; Gonzalez, Andrew

    2017-05-08

    Ecological networks, such as food webs, mutualist webs and host-parasite webs, are reorganizing as species abundances and spatial distributions shift in response to environmental change. Current theoretical expectations for how this reorganization will occur are available for competition or for parts of interaction networks, but these may not extend to more complex networks. Here we use metacommunity theory to develop new expectations for how complex networks will reorganize under environmental change, and show that dispersal is crucial for determining the degree to which networks will retain their composition and structure. When dispersal between habitat patches is low, all types of species interactions act as a strong determinant for whether species can colonize suitable habitats. This colonization resistance drives species turnover, which breaks apart current networks and leads to the formation of new networks. However, when dispersal rates are increased, colonists arrive in high abundance in habitats where they are well adapted, so interactions with resident species contribute less to colonization success. Dispersal ensures that species associations are maintained as they shift in space, so networks retain similar composition and structure. The crucial role of dispersal reinforces the need to manage habitat connectivity to sustain species and interaction diversity into the future.

  9. Farthest First Clustering in Links Reorganization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepshree A. Vadeyar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Website can be easily design but to efficient user navigation is not a easy task since user behavior is keep changing and developer view is quite different from what user wants, so to improve navigation one way is reorganization of website structure. For reorganization here proposed strategy is farthest first traversal clustering algorithm perform clustering on two numeric parameters and for finding frequent traversal path of user Apriori algorithm is used. Our aim is to perform reorganization with fewer changes in website structure.

  10. Spatial distribution of digestive proteinases in the midgut of the Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) indicates the existence of endo-ectoperitrophic circulation in Crustacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre, Daniel; Ozório, Renata A; Derner, Roberto B; Fracalossi, Débora M; Oliveira, Gabriel B; Samuels, Richard I; Terra, Walter R; Silva, Carlos P

    2014-01-01

    The effect of dietary protein concentration on the spatial distribution of digestive proteinases in the shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei indicates the existence of endo-ectoperitrophic enzyme circulation in this species. Samples recovered from the midgut gland tissues, stomach contents, three different portions of the midgut and feces were used for quantitative and qualitative analyses of the composition and distribution of the digestive proteinases. Animals were divided into three different groups: (1) animals (controls) fed with a commercial 35% protein diet, (2) animals fed with a commercial diet supplemented with ovalbumin to a final protein concentration of 60%; (3) animals fed with an 80% protein diet. Quantitative determinations using different substrates and zymograms showed that increasing protein concentration in the diet alters the distribution of proteinases along the digestive tract. Composition of proteinases in the midgut gland, stomach contents, midgut sections and feces were similar, but not identical. Chymotrypsin and trypsin paralogues were identified in all enzyme sources in a concentration gradient along the midgut in the control shrimp, the expected distribution supporting the existence of a recycling mechanism. The occurrence of a peritrophic membrane in other Decapoda suggests that endo-ectoperitrophic circulation of digestive enzymes and nutrients may also occur in other crustaceans and also extends beyond the Insecta.

  11. PDGF induces reorganization of vimentin filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valgeirsdóttir, S; Claesson-Welsh, L; Bongcam-Rudloff, E; Hellman, U; Westermark, B; Heldin, C H

    1998-07-30

    In this study we demonstrate that stimulation with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) leads to a marked reorganization of the vimentin filaments in porcine aortic endothelial (PAE) cells ectopically expressing the PDGF beta-receptor. Within 20 minutes after stimulation, the well-spread fine fibrillar vimentin was reorganized as the filaments aggregated into a dense coil around the nucleus. The solubility of vimentin upon Nonidet-P40-extraction of cells decreased considerably after PDGF stimulation, indicating that PDGF caused a redistribution of vimentin to a less soluble compartment. In addition, an increased tyrosine phosphorylation of vimentin was observed. The redistribution of vimentin was not a direct consequence of its tyrosine phosphorylation, since treatment of cells with an inhibitor for the cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase Src, attenuated phosphorylation but not redistribution of vimentin. These changes in the distribution of vimentin occurred in conjunction with reorganization of actin filaments. In PAE cells expressing a Y740/751F mutant receptor that is unable to bind and activate phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI3-kinase), the distribution of vimentin was virtually unaffected by PDGF stimulation. Thus, PI3-kinase is important for vimentin reorganization, in addition to its previously demonstrated role in actin reorganization. The small GTPase Rac has previously been shown to be involved downstream of PI3-kinase in the reorganization of actin filaments. In PAE cells overexpressing dominant negative Rac1 (N17Rac1), no change in the fine fibrillar vimentin network was seen after PDGF-BB stimulation, whereas in PAE cells overexpressing constitutively active Rac1 (V12Rac1), there was a dramatic change in vimentin filament organization independent of PDGF stimulation. These data indicate that PDGF causes a reorganization of microfilaments as well as intermediate filaments in its target cells and suggest an important role for Rac downstream of PI3-kinase in

  12. It does exist! A left-to-right spatial-numerical association of response codes (SNARC) effect among native Hebrew speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar-Shai, Bar; Tzelgov, Joseph; Karni, Avi; Rubinsten, Orly

    2017-04-01

    Several studies, starting with Dehaene, Bossini, and Giraux (1993), have reported that, in parity-judgment tasks, the difference in response latencies generated by the right and left hand are negatively correlated with number magnitudes. This SNARC (spatial-numerical association of response codes) effect is in line with the notion that the "mental number line" extends from left to right. The SNARC effect has been found mainly in native speakers of Germanic/Romanic languages; it has been suggested that the SNARC effect may derive from the experience of reading from left to right. To date, there is no evidence that the SNARC (or reverse SNARC) effect exists in parity judgments in native speakers of Hebrew readers. Here we provide the first demonstration of a horizontal, left-to-right SNARC effect in native speakers of Hebrew performing the parity task. Although we found no SNARC effect using the standard parity task, a reliable SNARC effect was found when we succeeded in reducing the MARC (markedness association of response codes) effect. We succeeded in reducing the MARC effect by implementing the parity task in 2 sessions, on 2 different days, each time using a different mapping of the parity-to-response side. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Massive cortical reorganization in sighted Braille readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siuda-Krzywicka, Katarzyna; Bola, Łukasz; Paplińska, Małgorzata; Sumera, Ewa; Jednoróg, Katarzyna; Marchewka, Artur; Śliwińska, Magdalena W; Amedi, Amir; Szwed, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    The brain is capable of large-scale reorganization in blindness or after massive injury. Such reorganization crosses the division into separate sensory cortices (visual, somatosensory...). As its result, the visual cortex of the blind becomes active during tactile Braille reading. Although the possibility of such reorganization in the normal, adult brain has been raised, definitive evidence has been lacking. Here, we demonstrate such extensive reorganization in normal, sighted adults who learned Braille while their brain activity was investigated with fMRI and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Subjects showed enhanced activity for tactile reading in the visual cortex, including the visual word form area (VWFA) that was modulated by their Braille reading speed and strengthened resting-state connectivity between visual and somatosensory cortices. Moreover, TMS disruption of VWFA activity decreased their tactile reading accuracy. Our results indicate that large-scale reorganization is a viable mechanism recruited when learning complex skills. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10762.001 PMID:26976813

  14. "Grid" versus "Ground": Optimized Design of Low-Distortion Projections Using Existing Projection Types Rigorously Georeferenced to the National Spatial Reference System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, M. L.; Armstrong, M. L.

    2016-12-01

    With the adoption of a new geometric datum in 2022, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey (NGS) will update the State Plane Coordinate System (SPCS). This update may consist simply of offsetting northings and/or eastings of existing SPCS projection zones. However, there is significant interest among NGS customers for another type of projected coordinate system: Low-Distortion Projections (LDPs). Although LDPs are presently not endorsed or supported by NGS, an assessment of LDP feasibility and performance is warranted within the context of updating the National Spatial Reference System (NSRS). LDPs are conformal map projections that minimize linear distortion at the topographic surface, manifested as a difference in distance between a pair of projected "grid" coordinates and the true horizontal "ground" distance. For SPCS, the differences can exceed a few hundred parts per million (ppm), and it can be problematic for engineering and surveying applications. Although such distortion cannot be eliminated, an LDP design method is presented that yields optimal results even for large areas of variable elevation. This approach can provide much lower distortion than the traditional method of scaling SPCS to ground, often called "modified" SPCS (MSPCS). MSPCS was included in training provided by NGS beginning in the 1960s, but it does not optimally minimize linear distortion. LDP systems have been adopted throughout the United States. One such system is the Oregon Coordinate Reference System (OCRS). Figure 1 compares distortion of an MSPCS for Bend, Oregon, to the OCRS zone for that area, where the green shading indicates distortion within ±20 ppm (2 cm/km or 0.1 ft/mile). The difference in performance is striking, even though both use the same projection type. Because LDPs cover larger areas, one can be used for many projects, whereas in most cases one MSPCS (and sometimes more) must be defined for every project. Importantly, the presented method for designing LDPs is based on

  15. Shareholders, creditors approve utility reorganization plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-04-12

    Shareholders and all classes of secured creditors of Public Service Company of New Hampshire voted overwhelmingly last month to approve Northeast Utilities' Chapter 11 reorganization plan for PSNH, the utility announced. PSNH filed for bankruptcy protection in January 1988. Under the reorganization plan, Connecticut-based NU would acquire the utility for $2.3 billion. While PSNH's preferred and common stockholders voted to accept the proposal, holders of warrants to purchase PSNH common stock rejected the plan. Except for the votes of a group of independent power producers, PSNH's unsecured creditors also voted to accept the plan.

  16. From network structure to network reorganization: implications for adult neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider-Mizell, Casey M.; Parent, Jack M.; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Zochowski, Michal R.; Sander, Leonard M.

    2010-12-01

    Networks can be dynamical systems that undergo functional and structural reorganization. One example of such a process is adult hippocampal neurogenesis, in which new cells are continuously born and incorporate into the existing network of the dentate gyrus region of the hippocampus. Many of these introduced cells mature and become indistinguishable from established neurons, joining the existing network. Activity in the network environment is known to promote birth, survival and incorporation of new cells. However, after epileptogenic injury, changes to the connectivity structure around the neurogenic niche are known to correlate with aberrant neurogenesis. The possible role of network-level changes in the development of epilepsy is not well understood. In this paper, we use a computational model to investigate how the structural and functional outcomes of network reorganization, driven by addition of new cells during neurogenesis, depend on the original network structure. We find that there is a stable network topology that allows the network to incorporate new neurons in a manner that enhances activity of the persistently active region, but maintains global network properties. In networks having other connectivity structures, new cells can greatly alter the distribution of firing activity and destroy the initial activity patterns. We thus find that new cells are able to provide focused enhancement of network only for small-world networks with sufficient inhibition. Network-level deviations from this topology, such as those caused by epileptogenic injury, can set the network down a path that develops toward pathological dynamics and aberrant structural integration of new cells.

  17. JUDICIAL REORGANIZATION – SOLUTION FOR CRISIS PERIODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARINA UHER

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Currently in the Romanian economic landscape the insolvency phenomenon began to be increasingly better known to the business community first through the impact on business partners from different areas of the industry, and then through the personal experience. For creditors supporting a reorganization plan with real prospects of recovery and covering claims proves to be advantageous especially in current market conditions.

  18. 17 CFR 250.63 - Approval of reorganization fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, PUBLIC UTILITY HOLDING COMPANY ACT OF 1935 Solicitations and Reorganizations § 250.63 Approval of reorganization fees. All fees, expenses and remuneration, whether interim or...

  19. Temporal evolution of brain reorganization under cross-modal training: insights into the functional architecture of encoding and retrieval networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likova, Lora T.

    2015-03-01

    This study is based on the recent discovery of massive and well-structured cross-modal memory activation generated in the primary visual cortex (V1) of totally blind people as a result of novel training in drawing without any vision (Likova, 2012). This unexpected functional reorganization of primary visual cortex was obtained after undergoing only a week of training by the novel Cognitive-Kinesthetic Method, and was consistent across pilot groups of different categories of visual deprivation: congenitally blind, late-onset blind and blindfolded (Likova, 2014). These findings led us to implicate V1 as the implementation of the theoretical visuo-spatial 'sketchpad' for working memory in the human brain. Since neither the source nor the subsequent 'recipient' of this non-visual memory information in V1 is known, these results raise a number of important questions about the underlying functional organization of the respective encoding and retrieval networks in the brain. To address these questions, an individual totally blind from birth was given a week of Cognitive-Kinesthetic training, accompanied by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) both before and just after training, and again after a two-month consolidation period. The results revealed a remarkable temporal sequence of training-based response reorganization in both the hippocampal complex and the temporal-lobe object processing hierarchy over the prolonged consolidation period. In particular, a pattern of profound learning-based transformations in the hippocampus was strongly reflected in V1, with the retrieval function showing massive growth as result of the Cognitive-Kinesthetic memory training and consolidation, while the initially strong hippocampal response during tactile exploration and encoding became non-existent. Furthermore, after training, an alternating patch structure in the form of a cascade of discrete ventral regions underwent radical transformations to reach complete functional

  20. Physiological reorganization in the hypotrich ciliate Apoamphisiella vernalis (Protista, Ciliophora, Hypotricha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa A. M. de Castro

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Physiological reorganization is described for the first time for the hypotrich ciliate genus Apoamphisiella Foissner, 1997, based on a population of A. vernalis (Stokes, 1887 Berger, 2006 collected from an eutrophic pond in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Stomatogenesis is epiapokinetal, and the cirral pattern reorganizes from six typical fronto-ventral-transverse primordia, plus at least one short primordium located between IV and V. Primordia I and II originate from disaggregating undulating membranes and buccal cirrus, respectively; primordium III originates from left frontoventral cirrus plus a streak of basal bodies extending from the anterior end of oral primordium; primordium IV and the short extra primordia are formed from basal bodies perhaps associated to the posterior end of III plus the disaggregation of anteriormost cirri of the left ventral row. Primordia V and VI arise within the right ventral row as a single streak, splitting to form the two primordia. Marginal primordia develop initially within the pre-existent marginal rows, continuing to reorganize outside, pushing the old marginal cirri leftwards. Two dorsomarginal kineties develop associated to the right marginal row primordium. Dorsal ciliature also reorganizes from within the pre-existent dorsal kineties. The two macronuclear nodules approach each in middle reorganizers, briefly touching each other. At least one micronucleus undergo division. The process of physiological reorganization in A. vernalis resembles that of the North American Paraurostyla weissei complex representative, and along with features of the interphase morphology, indicate that Apoamphisiella belongs or is related to the Cyrtohymena-Paraurostyla group, within the Dorsomarginalia.

  1. Active biopolymers confer fast reorganization kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Douglas; Wingreen, Ned S

    2011-11-18

    Many cytoskeletal biopolymers are "active," consuming energy in large quantities. In this Letter, we identify a fundamental difference between active polymers and passive, equilibrium polymers: for equal mean lengths, active polymers can reorganize faster than equilibrium polymers. We show that equilibrium polymers are intrinsically limited to linear scaling between mean lifetime (or mean first-passage time, or MFPT) and mean length, MFPT∼, by analogy to 1D Potts models. By contrast, we present a simple active-polymer model that improves upon this scaling, such that MFPT∼(1/2). Since, to be biologically useful, structural biopolymers must typically be many monomers long yet respond dynamically to the needs of the cell, the difference in reorganization kinetics may help to justify the active polymers' greater energy cost.

  2. Active Polymers Confer Fast Reorganization Kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Swanson, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Many cytoskeletal biopolymers are "active," consuming energy in large quantities. In this Letter, we identify a fundamental difference between active polymers and passive, equilibrium polymers: for equal mean lengths, active polymers can reorganize faster than equilibrium polymers. We show that equilibrium polymers are intrinsically limited to linear scaling between mean lifetime and mean length, MFPT ~ , by analogy to 1-d Potts models. By contrast, we present a simple active-polymer model that improves upon this scaling, such that MFPT ~ ^{1/2}. Since to be biologically useful, structural biopolymers must typically be many monomers long, yet respond dynamically to the needs of the cell, the difference in reorganization kinetics may help to justify active polymers' greater energy cost. PACS numbers: 87.10.Ed, 87.16.ad, 87.16.Ln

  3. Reorganizing and restructuring the human resources function

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandrina Mirela, Stan

    2010-01-01

    To determine what kind of skills (internal or external) of human resources are adequate organization can use human resources audit. Audit is an action guide that provides step by step consistency of human resources activities within the organization with legal regulations and informal practices. This paper aims to highlight the importance of human resources audit which is an essential activity and is basis for the reorganization and restructuring of human resources function.

  4. Landscape reorganization under changing climatic forcing: Results from an experimental landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Arvind; Reinhardt, Liam; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

    2015-06-01

    Understanding how landscapes respond to climate dynamics in terms of macroscale (average topographic features) and microscale (landform reorganization) is of interest both for deciphering past climates from today's landscapes and for predicting future landscapes in view of recent climatic trends. Although several studies have addressed macro-scale response, only a few have focused on quantifying smaller-scale basin reorganization. To that goal, a series of controlled laboratory experiments were conducted where a self-organized complete drainage network emerged under constant precipitation and uplift dynamics. Once steady state was achieved, the landscape was subjected to a fivefold increase in precipitation (transient state). Throughout the evolution, high-resolution spatiotemporal topographic data in the form of digital elevation models were collected. The steady state landscape was shown to possess three distinct geomorphic regimes (unchannelized hillslopes, debris-dominated channels, and fluvially dominated channels). During transient state, landscape reorganization was observed to be driven by hillslopes via accelerated erosion, ridge lowering, channel widening, and reduction of basin relief as opposed to channel base-level reduction. Quantitative metrics on which these conclusions were based included slope-area curve, correlation analysis of spatial and temporal elevation increments, and wavelet spectral analysis of the evolving landscapes. Our results highlight that landscape reorganization in response to increased precipitation seems to follow "an arrow of scale": major elevation change initiates at the hillslope scale driving erosional regime change at intermediate scales and further cascading to geomorphic changes at the channel scale as time evolves.

  5. Experimental evidence of dynamic re-organization of evolving landscapes under changing climatic forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Arvind; Tejedor, Alejandro; Zaliapin, Ilya; Reinhardt, Liam; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study is to better understand the dynamic re-organization of an evolving landscape under a scenario of changing climatic forcing for improving our knowledge of geomorphic transport laws under transient conditions and developing predictive models of landscape response to external perturbations. Real landscape observations for long-term analysis are limited and to this end a high resolution controlled laboratory experiment was conducted at the St. Anthony Falls laboratory at the University of Minnesota. Elevation data were collected at temporal resolution of 5 mins and spatial resolution of 0.5 mm as the landscape approached steady state (constant uplift and precipitation rate) and in the transient state (under the same uplift and 5x precipitation). The results reveal rapid topographic re-organization under a five-fold precipitation increase with the fluvial regime expanding into the previously debris dominated regime, accelerated erosion happening at hillslope scales, and rivers shifting from an erosion-limited to a transport-limited regime. From a connectivity and clustering analysis of the erosional and depositional events, we demonstrate the strikingly different spatial patterns of landscape evolution under steady-state (SS) and transient-state (TS), even when the time under SS is "stretched" compared to that under TS such as to match the total volume and PDF of erosional and depositional amounts. We quantify the spatial coupling of hillslopes and channels and demonstrate that hillslopes lead and channels follow in re-organizing the whole landscape under such an amplified precipitation regime.

  6. Large-Scale Functional Brain Network Reorganization During Taoist Meditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jao, Tun; Li, Chia-Wei; Vértes, Petra E; Wu, Changwei Wesley; Achard, Sophie; Hsieh, Chao-Hsien; Liou, Chien-Hui; Chen, Jyh-Horng; Bullmore, Edward T

    2016-02-01

    Meditation induces a distinct and reversible mental state that provides insights into brain correlates of consciousness. We explored brain network changes related to meditation by graph theoretical analysis of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data. Eighteen Taoist meditators with varying levels of expertise were scanned using a within-subjects counterbalanced design during resting and meditation states. State-related differences in network topology were measured globally and at the level of individual nodes and edges. Although measures of global network topology, such as small-worldness, were unchanged, meditation was characterized by an extensive and expertise-dependent reorganization of the hubs (highly connected nodes) and edges (functional connections). Areas of sensory cortex, especially the bilateral primary visual and auditory cortices, and the bilateral temporopolar areas, which had the highest degree (or connectivity) during the resting state, showed the biggest decrease during meditation. Conversely, bilateral thalamus and components of the default mode network, mainly the bilateral precuneus and posterior cingulate cortex, had low degree in the resting state but increased degree during meditation. Additionally, these changes in nodal degree were accompanied by reorganization of anatomical orientation of the edges. During meditation, long-distance longitudinal (antero-posterior) edges increased proportionally, whereas orthogonal long-distance transverse (right-left) edges connecting bilaterally homologous cortices decreased. Our findings suggest that transient changes in consciousness associated with meditation introduce convergent changes in the topological and spatial properties of brain functional networks, and the anatomical pattern of integration might be as important as the global level of integration when considering the network basis for human consciousness.

  7. 76 FR 71919 - Corporate Reorganizations; Allocation of Basis in “All Cash D” Reorganizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BJ21 Corporate Reorganizations; Allocation of Basis in.... Fuller, Office of Associate Chief Counsel (Corporate). However, other personnel from the IRS and the..., Reporting and recordkeeping requirements. Proposed Amendments to the Regulations Accordingly, 26 CFR part...

  8. Structural damage to the corticospinal tract correlates with bilateral sensorimotor cortex reorganization in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaechter, Judith D; Perdue, Katherine L; Wang, Ruopeng

    2008-02-01

    Damage to the corticospinal tract (CST) in stroke patients has been associated with functional reorganization in the ipsilesional and contralesional sensorimotor cortices. However, it is unknown whether a quantitative relationship exists between the extent of structural damage to the CST and functional reorganization in stroke patients. The purpose of the current study was to examine the relationship between structural CST damage and motor task-related cortical activity in chronic hemiparetic stroke patients. In 10 chronic hemiparetic stroke patients with heterogeneous lesions, CST damage was quantified using conventional structural magnetic resonance imaging and tractography based on diffusion tensor imaging. Cortical activity was measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging during repetitive flexion/extension movements of the digits. We found that the two measures of CST damage were strongly correlated. Moreover, greater CST damage was significantly and linearly correlated with increased activation during affected hand movement in the hand area of the contralesional primary sensorimotor cortex (M1/S1) and in the ipsilesional M1/S1 ventral to the hand area. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a quantitative relationship between the extent of structural damage to the CST and functional reorganization in stroke patients. This relationship was observed in stroke patients with heterogeneous lesions, suggesting that CST damage is a factor relevant to the variation in functional reorganization in the clinical population.

  9. 16 CFR 802.10 - Stock dividends and splits; reorganizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Stock dividends and splits; reorganizations... INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE HART-SCOTT-RODINO ANTITRUST IMPROVEMENTS ACT OF 1976 EXEMPTION RULES § 802.10 Stock dividends and splits; reorganizations. (a) The acquisition of voting securities pursuant to a stock split...

  10. Rotational reorganization of doped cholesteric liquid crystalline films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eelkema, R.; M. Pollard, M.; Katsonis, N.; Vicario, J.; J. Broer, D.; Feringa, B.L.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper an unprecedented rotational reorganization of cholesteric liquid crystalline films is described. This rotational reorganization results from the conversion of a chiral molecular motor dopant to an isomer with a different helical twisting power, leading to a change in the cholesteric pi

  11. Perilesional reorganization of motor function in stroke patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sung Ho Jang

    2010-01-01

    Perilesional reorganization is an important recovery mechanism for stroke patients because it yields good motor outcomes. However, perilesional reorganization remains poorly understood. The scientific basis for stroke rehabilitation can be established when detailed mechanisms of recovery are clarified. In addition, studies at the subcortical level remain in the early stages. Therefore, the present study suggested that additional investigations should focus on perilesional reorganization at the subcortical level, identifying the critical period for this mechanism and determining treatment strategies and modalities to facilitate development. The present study reviews literature focused on perilesional reorganization in stroke patients with regard to demonstration, clinical characteristics,and rehabilitative aspects, as well as previous studies of perilesional reorganization at cortical and subcortical levels.

  12. Global Reorganization of the Nuclear Landscape in Senescent Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamir Chandra

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence has been implicated in tumor suppression, development, and aging and is accompanied by large-scale chromatin rearrangements, forming senescence-associated heterochromatic foci (SAHF. However, how the chromatin is reorganized during SAHF formation is poorly understood. Furthermore, heterochromatin formation in senescence appears to contrast with loss of heterochromatin in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria. We mapped architectural changes in genome organization in cellular senescence using Hi-C. Unexpectedly, we find a dramatic sequence- and lamin-dependent loss of local interactions in heterochromatin. This change in local connectivity resolves the paradox of opposing chromatin changes in senescence and progeria. In addition, we observe a senescence-specific spatial clustering of heterochromatic regions, suggesting a unique second step required for SAHF formation. Comparison of embryonic stem cells (ESCs, somatic cells, and senescent cells shows a unidirectional loss in local chromatin connectivity, suggesting that senescence is an endpoint of the continuous nuclear remodelling process during differentiation.

  13. Reorganization of human motor cortex after hand replantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röricht, S; Machetanz, J; Irlbacher, K; Niehaus, L; Biemer, E; Meyer, B U

    2001-08-01

    In 10 patients, reorganizational changes of the motor cortex contralateral to a replanted hand (MCreplant) were studied one to 14 years after complete traumatic amputation and consecutive successful replantation of the hand. The organizational state of MCreplant was assessed for the deafferentated and peripherally deefferentated hand-associated motor cortex and the adjacent motor representation of the proximal arm. For this, response maps were established for the first dorsal interosseus and biceps brachii muscle using focal transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) on a skull surface grid. Characteristics of the maps were center of gravity (COG), number of effective stimulation sites, amplitude sum, and amplitudes and response threshold at the optimal stimulation point. The COG is defined by the spatial distribution of response amplitudes on the map and lies over the cortex region with the most excitable corticospinal neurones supplying the recorded muscle. The COG of the biceps map in MCreplant was shifted laterally by 9.8 +/- 3.6 mm (range 5.0-15.7 mm). The extension of the biceps map in MCreplant was increased and the responses were enlarged and had lowered thresholds. For the muscles of the replanted hand, the pattern of reorganization was different: Response amplitudes were enlarged but thresholds, COG, and area of the cortical response map were normal. The different reorganizational phenomena observed for the motor cortical areas supplying the replanted hand and the biceps brachii of the same arm may be influenced by a different extent of deafferentation and by their different role in hand motor control.

  14. Global reorganization of the nuclear landscape in senescent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Tamir; Ewels, Philip Andrew; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Furlan-Magaril, Mayra; Wingett, Steven William; Kirschner, Kristina; Thuret, Jean-Yves; Andrews, Simon; Fraser, Peter; Reik, Wolf

    2015-02-03

    Cellular senescence has been implicated in tumor suppression, development, and aging and is accompanied by large-scale chromatin rearrangements, forming senescence-associated heterochromatic foci (SAHF). However, how the chromatin is reorganized during SAHF formation is poorly understood. Furthermore, heterochromatin formation in senescence appears to contrast with loss of heterochromatin in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria. We mapped architectural changes in genome organization in cellular senescence using Hi-C. Unexpectedly, we find a dramatic sequence- and lamin-dependent loss of local interactions in heterochromatin. This change in local connectivity resolves the paradox of opposing chromatin changes in senescence and progeria. In addition, we observe a senescence-specific spatial clustering of heterochromatic regions, suggesting a unique second step required for SAHF formation. Comparison of embryonic stem cells (ESCs), somatic cells, and senescent cells shows a unidirectional loss in local chromatin connectivity, suggesting that senescence is an endpoint of the continuous nuclear remodelling process during differentiation. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Reorganization of the rat cerebellar cortex during postnatal development following cisplatin treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avella, D; Pisu, M B; Roda, E; Gravati, M; Bernocchi, G

    2006-09-01

    We examined the effects of the antitumor agent cisplatin on the development and plasticity of cerebellar cytoarchitecture. Since knowledge of the parallel and climbing fiber-Purkinje cell system is important in order to determine the architectural basis of cerebellar function, we used immunofluorescence for vesicular glutamate transporters (VGluT1 and VGluT2) to evaluate the trend of synaptogenesis of parallel and climbing fibers on Purkinje cells in the cerebellum vermis after a single injection of cisplatin to 10-day-old rats, i.e., during a crucial period of cerebellar development. The temporal and spatial patterns of VGluT1 and VGluT2 immunoreactivity after the early cisplatin injury provided evidence that remodeling of excitatory afferents and Purkinje cell dendrites occurs. After an early slow down of Purkinje cell dendrite growth, 7 days following the treatment, the extension of the molecular layer was reduced, as was parallel fiber innervation, but VGluT1 immunoreactive fibers contacted Purkinje cell dendrite branches extending within the external granular layer. VGluT2 immunopositive climbing fiber varicosities were still largely present on the soma and stem dendrites of Purkinje cells. Twenty days after the cisplatin injection, the thickness of the VGluT1 immunopositive molecular layer was reduced. VGluT2 climbing fiber varicosities were found on the remodeled Purkinje cell dendrites, as in controls, although at a lower density. Alterations in the immunoreactivity for polysialic acid neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) during the recovery phase suggest that this molecule plays a fundamental role not only during development, but also in the reorganization of neuroarchitecture. The changes were restricted to the neocerebellar vermis and were likely dependent on the different timing of lobule formation. The results of these investigations reveal the existence of vulnerability windows of the cerebellum to exposure to experimental or environmental

  16. Dynamic reorganization of Amazon forest structure and canopy illumination from tree and branch fall events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, D. C.; Leitold, V.; Longo, M.; dos-Santos, M. N.; Keller, M. M.; Cook, B.

    2016-12-01

    Amazon forests are dynamic ecosystems that store and cycle globally-significant amounts of atmospheric CO2. Forest inventory plots and atmospheric CO2 measurements integrate long-term and large-scale changes in Amazon forests, respectively, but neither approach captures the dynamic reorganization of Amazon forests at fine spatial and temporal scales necessary to refine estimates of the Amazon forest carbon sink. Here, we used multi-temporal airborne lidar data to characterize changes in canopy structure and illumination in the Brazilian Amazon. Annualized rates of canopy turnover varied four-fold across study sites (1.18 to 4.63% yr-1). Branch fall events (4 - 25 m2) were widespread and accounted for one-third of total canopy turnover. Branch and tree fall events created intermediate or low illumination conditions in 80% of canopy turnover areas, regardless of size, as taller neighbors partially shaded areas with canopy height losses. Importantly, canopy losses also redistributed light to adjacent canopy trees, doubling the canopy area influenced by turnover dynamics. Linking multi-temporal lidar measurements with field data on tree mortality and coarse woody debris, our analysis provides a critical link between existing forest inventory data and next generation ecosystem models with full three-dimensional representation of tropical forest structure and canopy dynamics. Current ecosystem models do not capture the influence of forest structure on canopy illumination, dynamism in canopy light availability over short (1-4 yr) time scales, or contributions from branch falls to canopy turnover. These mechanisms alter Amazon forest productivity over time scales relevant for carbon cycle science and climate mitigation efforts.

  17. 75 FR 29451 - Agency Reorganization and Delegations of Authority

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-26

    ... January 31, 2010, and to delegate authority to certain FMC bureaus and offices in order to improve the FMC... No. 10-04] RIN 3072-AC37 Agency Reorganization and Delegations of Authority AGENCY: Federal Maritime...

  18. Prolonged reorganization of thiol-capped Au nanoparticles layered structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarathi Kundu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Prolonged reorganization behaviour of mono-, di-, tri- and multi-layer films of Au nanoparticles prepared by Langmuir-Blodgett method on hydrophobic Si(001 substrates have been studied by using X-ray scattering techniques. Out-of-plane study shows that although at the initial stage the reorganization occurs through the compaction of the films keeping the layered structure unchanged but finally all layered structures modify to monolayer structure. Due to this reorganization the Au density increases within the nanometer thick films. In-plane study shows that inside the reorganized films Au nanoparticles are distributed randomly and the particle size modifies as the metallic core of Au nanoparticles coalesces.

  19. Functional Reorganizations of Brain Network in Prelingually Deaf Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Wenjing Li; Jianhong Li; Jieqiong Wang; Peng Zhou; Zhenchang Wang; Junfang Xian; Huiguang He

    2016-01-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies suggested structural or functional brain reorganizations occurred in prelingually deaf subjects. However, little is known about the reorganizations of brain network architectures in prelingually deaf adolescents. The present study aims to investigate alterations of whole-brain functional network using resting-state fMRI and graph theory analysis. We recruited 16 prelingually deaf adolescents (10~18 years) and 16 normal controls matched in age and gender. Brain ne...

  20. Polymer models of chromosome (re)organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirny, Leonid

    Chromosome Conformation Capture technique (Hi-C) provides comprehensive information about frequencies of spatial interactions between genomic loci. Inferring 3D organization of chromosomes from these data is a challenging biophysical problem. We develop a top-down approach to biophysical modeling of chromosomes. Starting with a minimal set of biologically motivated interactions we build ensembles of polymer conformations that can reproduce major features observed in Hi-C experiments. I will present our work on modeling organization of human metaphase and interphase chromosomes. Our works suggests that active processes of loop extrusion can be a universal mechanism responsible for formation of domains in interphase and chromosome compaction in metaphase.

  1. Adaptive Reorganization of German Special Operations Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    of major uprisings in Rwanda in 1994, rebels took eleven German hostages. Despite the existence of GSG9 and specially-trained military units like... Congo in 2006, operations in Syria or Libya and a hostage rescue operation somewhere else. 38. Ibid...Special Operations Forces (the Army’s KSK) were founded in 1996 after the events in Rwanda 1994. In 2005, Navy’s Kampfschwimmer also achieved the

  2. Rural School District Reorganization on the Great Plains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Miles

    2002-01-01

    Rural school district reorganization and school consolidation are put into perspective by reviewing the large population increases that fueled small-school growth in the Great Plains, 1870-1930. Since the Dust Bowl and Great Depression, population losses, improvements in transportation, and arguments advocating economies of scale and increased…

  3. 12 CFR 5.32 - Expedited procedures for certain reorganizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... that the bank holding company will provide to the shareholders of the reorganizing bank for their shares of stock of the bank; (B) The date as of which the rights of each shareholder to participate in... national bank. (e) Rights of dissenting shareholders. Any shareholder of a bank who has voted against...

  4. Experimental evidence of landscape reorganization under changing external forcing: implications to climate-driven knickpoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Arvind; Tejedor, Alejandro; Grimaud, Jean-Louis; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

    2017-04-01

    Understanding and quantifying geomorphic and topologic re-organization of landscape in response to changing climatic or tectonic forcing is of scientific and practical interest. Although several studies have addressed the large-scale response (e.g., change in mean relief), studies on the smaller-scale drainage pattern re-organization and quantification of landscape vulnerability to the timing, magnitude, and frequency of changing forcing are lacking. To that goal, a series of controlled laboratory experiments were conducted to study the effect of changing precipitation patterns on landscape evolution at the short and long-time scales. High resolution digital elevation (DEM) both in space and time were measured for a range of rainfall patterns and uplift rates. Results from our study show a distinct signature of the precipitation increase on the probabilistic and geometrical structure of landscape features, evident in widening and deepening of channels and valleys, change in drainage patterns within sub-basins and change in the space-time structure of erosional and depositional events. A spatially explicit analysis of the locus of these erosional and depositional events show an acceleration of erosion in the hillslopes when the rainfall intensity is increased, while the incision in fluvial channels is slowed down exhibiting a sediment-flux dependent behavior. Finally, we document the changes in the longitudinal river profiles with increasing precipitation intensity, revealing the formation of knickpoints at certain confluences where large discontinuities in the ratio Qs/Qw are observed.

  5. Existence of Minkowski space

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Physics textbooks present Minkowski space as an almost pure mathematical construct, without any explicit restriction on a domain where it is applicable in physics. Meanwhile, its physical meaning cannot but follow the same premises as those which underlies the special relativity theory: motion of free point particles and propagation of electromagnetic waves. However, the common formalism of coordinate transformations between any two inertial frames appears too ponderous to infer the existence of Minkowski space. For this reason, the time dilation and retardation, the contraction of the length along and the spatial invariance across the direction of relative motion of two frames are presented in a coordinate-free manner. This results in the transformation between two frames in the form of relationships between the time moments and the components of the position vector of a given event, along and across the directions of the frames' motion. The obtained transformation rules for the components of the position ve...

  6. Why reorganization of firms fails: evidence from Estonia. Summary: Saneerimismenetluse ebaõnnestumise põhjused Eestis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Lukason

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Although most countries have firm reorganization option in legislation (either as a separate law or part of insolvency code, the practice of successful reorganizations has remained modest. Reorganization law was introduced in Estonia in late 2008, but only a few firms have been successfully reorganized since. Derived from previous the article studies, what are the reasons for firm reorganization failure. From legal viewpoint, main causes are found to be that firms under reorganization do not submit reorganization plans to court and the preconditions for reorganization lapse. The financial ratios for successful and unsuccessful reorganizations are not significantly different according to independent samples median test. Unsuccessfully reorganized firms perform worse than successful ones in the year before reorganization year, but the opposite phenomenon occurs two and three years before reorganization year.

  7. Clinical neurorehabilitation - implications of the Reorganization of Elementary Functions (REF) model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rytter, Hana Malá; Mogensen, Jesper

    The REF (Reorganization of Elementary Functions) model suggests mechanisms of posttraumatic reorganization, and resolves the contradiction between localization and functional recovery. In the process of developing this model, we have reconceptualised the term ‘function’ and introduced a concept...

  8. Reorganization of visual fields after periventricular haemorrhagic infarction: potentials and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzzetta, Andrea; Fiori, Simona; Scelfo, Danilo; Conti, Eugenia; Bancale, Ada

    2013-11-01

    Visual functions are often impaired in preterm infants with periventricular haemorrhagic infarction, because of the involvement of the region where the optic radiations are located. In some cases an unexpected sparing of the visual fields has been described, and related to the plasticity of thalamo-cortical afferents that are supposedly able to bypass the lesion when it occurs in the early third trimester of gestation. We systematically reviewed the literature in the field to determine the limits and potentials of this type of reorganization. We found four studies meeting our criteria, from which we extracted case reports on 19 individuals with intraventricular haemorrhagic infarction. Eleven of the 19 did not have visual field defects, five had a bilateral visual field defect, and the remaining three had a unilateral visual field defect. The involvement of the optic radiations was often associated with normal visual fields as only one of the four individuals with damaged optic radiations showed visual field defects. Conversely, the presence of basal ganglia/thalamus involvement apparently prevented such reorganization, as the only two individuals with unilateral field restriction and available magnetic resonance imaging data both showed abnormalities in those structures. Consistent with this, we report on a further individual in which visual field restriction was associated with abnormal tractography on brain magnetic resonance imaging. Overall, this review supports the existence of effective mechanisms of plastic reorganization that allow a rewiring of geniculo-calcarine connections with restoration of full field vision but which are hindered by the involvement of the basal ganglia and thalamus.

  9. 26 CFR 54.4980B-9 - Business reorganizations and employer withdrawals from multiemployer plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...-9 Business reorganizations and employer withdrawals from multiemployer plans. The following... multiemployer plans: Q-1: For purposes of this section, what are a business reorganization, a stock sale, and an... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Business reorganizations and...

  10. ATM Dependent Silencing Links Nucleolar Chromatin Reorganization to DNA Damage Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Shane M; Boiarsky, Jonathan A; Greenberg, Roger A

    2015-10-13

    Resolution of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is essential for the suppression of genome instability. DSB repair in transcriptionally active genomic regions represents a unique challenge that is associated with ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase-mediated transcriptional silencing. Despite emerging insights into the underlying mechanisms, how DSB silencing connects to DNA repair remains undefined. We observe that silencing within the rDNA depends on persistent DSBs. Non-homologous end-joining was the predominant mode of DSB repair allowing transcription to resume. ATM-dependent rDNA silencing in the presence of persistent DSBs led to the large-scale reorganization of nucleolar architecture, with movement of damaged chromatin to nucleolar cap regions. These findings identify ATM-dependent temporal and spatial control of DNA repair and provide insights into how communication between DSB signaling and ongoing transcription promotes genome integrity.

  11. ATM Dependent Silencing Links Nucleolar Chromatin Reorganization to DNA Damage Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane M. Harding

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Resolution of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs is essential for the suppression of genome instability. DSB repair in transcriptionally active genomic regions represents a unique challenge that is associated with ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM kinase-mediated transcriptional silencing. Despite emerging insights into the underlying mechanisms, how DSB silencing connects to DNA repair remains undefined. We observe that silencing within the rDNA depends on persistent DSBs. Non-homologous end-joining was the predominant mode of DSB repair allowing transcription to resume. ATM-dependent rDNA silencing in the presence of persistent DSBs led to the large-scale reorganization of nucleolar architecture, with movement of damaged chromatin to nucleolar cap regions. These findings identify ATM-dependent temporal and spatial control of DNA repair and provide insights into how communication between DSB signaling and ongoing transcription promotes genome integrity.

  12. Corporate reorganization: the last gasp or last clear chance for the tax-exempt, nonprofit hospital?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, M

    1988-01-01

    The current revolution in health care organization and financing, increased competition, and a retrenching of industry from its commitments to expansion of health care benefits challenge the nonprofit hospital's existence as a viable entity. Hospital governing boards and administrators have turned to corporate reorganization in order to maintain their financial position and to continue to serve their communities. This Article examines the not-for-profit concept and the problems facing nonprofit hospitals. It reviews the pros and cons of reorganization and the for-profit/nonprofit controversy. It questions whether the hybridization of the hospital results in a stronger or weaker species and discusses the possible effects of the newly structured entity on the quality and delivery of health care. Finally, the Article suggests that the nonprofit hospital may survive only by a continued commitment to societal and communal values, to service rather than to profit; that this commitment is adequate justificaton for the preservation of the nonprofit system, and its preservation will reinforce and strengthen the concept.

  13. Bankruptcy Reorganization in China and the United States:Cautions for the Comparativist

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William J.Woodward

    2010-01-01

    <正>In the late 1930’s Americans developed their first comprehensive law of bankruptcy reorganization.In larger cases,that law provided for the appointment of a trustee and seizure of control of the business from the business’s prior control group.In 1978,that was all changed;the prototype in the United States now leaves the "debtor in possession" charged with operating the business for the benefit of the business’s creditors.In this and many other ways,America’s law differs substantially from China’s relatively-new bankruptcy law.This article briefly looks at some of the stronger differences between the two systems and gives some background to how and why the American system evolved from the older model to the newer one.While we might easily identify many fundamental differences between the American and Chinese systems,drawing normative policy recommendations from those differences is a much more challenging task.One might,of course,be tempted to do so anyway.But the differing cultural,legal,and economic contexts within which bankruptcy reorganization exists suggests that one so tempted should proceed very cautiously and,perhaps,with an extra measure of modesty as well.

  14. THE HIGHLY DEVELOPED INFORMATION AND EDUCATION ENVIRONMENT AS A PRECONDITION OF EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM REORGANIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. K. Khenner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper regards the development of the information and education environment of Russian universities as an important condition for successful reorganization of higher education. Taking as an example one of theUSuniversities, the author demonstrates the capacity of information education environment and its impact on the multilevel educational process. The comparative analysis of the existing information education environments of Russian an American universities reveals that such effective improvements as increasing number of students working on the individual curricula,__ implementation of the learning outcome monitoring, inclusive education, etc require immediate and substantial development of the information education environment of Russian universities. Both the development level and informational content of the environment in question remain unsatisfactory due to the financial, economic and staff related reasons. Consequently, the higher school reorganization is lagging behind retarded by the lack of synchronization between the attempts to improve the education quality and competitiveness on the one hand, and insufficient level of the information education environment characteristic of Russian universities on the other hand.

  15. Zyxin regulates endothelial von Willebrand factor secretion by reorganizing actin filaments around exocytic granules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaofan; Li, Pin; Yang, Zhenghao; Huang, Xiaoshuai; Wei, Guoqin; Sun, Yujie; Kang, Xuya; Hu, Xueting; Deng, Qiuping; Chen, Liangyi; He, Aibin; Huo, Yingqing; Li, Dong; Betzig, Eric; Luo, Jincai

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial exocytosis of Weibel–Palade body (WPB) is one of the first lines of defence against vascular injury. However, the mechanisms that control WPB exocytosis in the final stages (including the docking, priming and fusion of granules) are poorly understood. Here we show that the focal adhesion protein zyxin is crucial in this process. Zyxin downregulation inhibits the secretion of von Willebrand factor (VWF), the most abundant cargo in WPBs, from human primary endothelial cells (ECs) induced by cAMP agonists. Zyxin-deficient mice exhibit impaired epinephrine-stimulated VWF release, prolonged bleeding time and thrombosis, largely due to defective endothelial secretion of VWF. Using live-cell super-resolution microscopy, we visualize previously unappreciated reorganization of pre-existing actin filaments around WPBs before fusion, dependent on zyxin and an interaction with the actin crosslinker α-actinin. Our findings identify zyxin as a physiological regulator of endothelial exocytosis through reorganizing local actin network in the final stage of exocytosis. PMID:28256511

  16. Dynamic Reorganization and Correlation among Lipid Raft Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Mónica M; Hovis, Jennifer S; Moss, Frank R; Boxer, Steven G

    2016-08-10

    Lipid rafts are widely believed to be an essential organizational motif in cell membranes. However, direct evidence for interactions among lipid and/or protein components believed to be associated with rafts is quite limited owing, in part, to the small size and intrinsically dynamic interactions that lead to raft formation. Here, we exploit the single negative charge on the monosialoganglioside GM1, commonly associated with rafts, to create a gradient of GM1 in response to an electric field applied parallel to a patterned supported lipid bilayer. The composition of this gradient is visualized by imaging mass spectrometry using a NanoSIMS. Using this analytical method, added cholesterol and sphingomyelin, both neutral and not themselves displaced by the electric field, are observed to reorganize with GM1. This dynamic reorganization provides direct evidence for an attractive interaction among these raft components into some sort of cluster. At steady state we obtain an estimate for the composition of this cluster.

  17. Workplace Re-organization and Changes in Physiological Stress Markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsson, Rikke Hinge; Hansen, Åse Marie; Kristiansen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate changes in physiological stress markers as a consequence of workplace reorganization. Moreover, we aimed to investigate changes in the psychosocial work environment (job strain, effortreward imbalance (ERI), in psychological distress (stress symptoms......, perceived stress) and the mediating effect of these factors on changes in physiological stress markers. We used data from a longitudinal study that studied the health consequences of a major reorganization of non-state public offices executed in Denmark on 1 January 2007. Collection of clinical...... and questionnaire data was in 2006 and 2008, and in this sub-study we included 359 participants. To reflect stress reactions of the autonomic nervous system, the endocrine system and the immune system, we included 13 physiological markers. We observed significant change in several physiological stress markers...

  18. A self-reorganizing digital flight control system for aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, R. C.; Caglayan, A. K.

    1974-01-01

    This paper presents a design method for digital self-reorganizing control systems which is optimally tolerant of failures in aircraft sensors. The functions of this system are accomplished with software instead of the popular and costly technique of hardware duplication. The theoretical development, based on M-ary hypothesis testing, results in a bank of M Kalman filters operating in parallel in the failure detection logic. A moving window of the innovations of each Kalman filter drives the detection logic to decide the failure state of the system. The detection logic also selects the optimal state estimate (for control logic) from the bank of Kalman filters. The design process is applied to the design of a self-reorganizing control system for a current configuration of the space shuttle orbiter at Mach 5 and 120,000 feet. The failure detection capabilities of the system are demonstrated using a real-time simulation of the system with noisy sensors.

  19. Reorganizing Geographic Combatant Command Headquarters for Joint Force 2020

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Commander’s Initiative Group, or CIG . Finally, Jeffrey R. Immelt (CEO from 2001-Present) first reorganized eleven business units into thirteen, and...Resources, Intelligence, Rule of Law, and Communication. COMISAF’s special staff includes the Commander’s Initiative Group ( CIG ), Legislative...the COS (18 reporting entities). The special staff group consists of the Commander’s Initiative Group ( CIG ), IG, Judge Advocate, Legislative Affairs

  20. Enhancing Physical Activity and Brain Reorganization after Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that, if reorganization of brain function is to be optimal after stroke, there needs to be a reorganisation of the methods used in physical rehabilitation and the time spent in specific task practice, strength and endurance training, and aerobic exercise. Frequency and intensity of rehabilitation need to be increased so that patients can gain the energy levels and vigour necessary for participation in physical activity both during rehabilitation and after dis...

  1. Interframe hierarchical vector quantization using hashing-based reorganized codebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Chang Y.; Cheng, Che H.; Nasrabadi, Nasser M.

    1995-12-01

    Real-time multimedia communication over PSTN (Public Switched Telephone Network) or wireless channel requires video signals to be encoded at the bit rate well below 64 kbits/second. Most of the current works on such very low bit rate video coding are based on H.261 or H.263 scheme. The H.263 encoding scheme, for example, consists mainly of motion estimation and compensation, discrete cosine transform, and run and variable/fixed length coding. Vector quantization (VQ) is an efficient and alternative scheme for coding at very low bit rate. One such VQ code applied to video coding is interframe hierarchical vector quantization (IHVQ). One problem of IHVQ, and VQ in general, is the computational complexity due to codebook search. A number of techniques have been proposed to reduce the search time which include tree-structured VQ, finite-state VQ, cache VQ, and hashing based codebook reorganization. In this paper, we present an IHVQ code with a hashing based scheme to reorganize the codebook so that codebook search time, and thus encoding time, can be significantly reduced. We applied the algorithm to the same test environment as in H.263 and evaluated coding performance. It turned out that the performance of the proposed scheme is significantly better than that of IHVQ without hashed codebook. Also, the performance of the proposed scheme was comparable to and often better than that of the H.263, due mainly to hashing based reorganized codebook.

  2. A molecularly based theory for electron transfer reorganization energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Bilin; Wang, Zhen-Gang, E-mail: zgw@cheme.caltech.edu [Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2015-12-14

    Using field-theoretic techniques, we develop a molecularly based dipolar self-consistent-field theory (DSCFT) for charge solvation in pure solvents under equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions and apply it to the reorganization energy of electron transfer reactions. The DSCFT uses a set of molecular parameters, such as the solvent molecule’s permanent dipole moment and polarizability, thus avoiding approximations that are inherent in treating the solvent as a linear dielectric medium. A simple, analytical expression for the free energy is obtained in terms of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium electrostatic potential profiles and electric susceptibilities, which are obtained by solving a set of self-consistent equations. With no adjustable parameters, the DSCFT predicts activation energies and reorganization energies in good agreement with previous experiments and calculations for the electron transfer between metallic ions. Because the DSCFT is able to describe the properties of the solvent in the immediate vicinity of the charges, it is unnecessary to distinguish between the inner-sphere and outer-sphere solvent molecules in the calculation of the reorganization energy as in previous work. Furthermore, examining the nonequilibrium free energy surfaces of electron transfer, we find that the nonequilibrium free energy is well approximated by a double parabola for self-exchange reactions, but the curvature of the nonequilibrium free energy surface depends on the charges of the electron-transferring species, contrary to the prediction by the linear dielectric theory.

  3. Spatially Assisted Schwinger Mechanism and Magnetic Catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Copinger, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Using the worldline formalism we compute an effective action for fermions under a temporally modulated electric field and a spatially modulated magnetic field. It is known that the former leads to an enhanced Schwinger Mechanism, while we find that the latter can also result in enhanced particle production and even cause a reorganization of the vacuum to acquire a larger dynamical mass in equilibrium which spatially assists the Magnetic Catalysis.

  4. Spatially Assisted Schwinger Mechanism and Magnetic Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copinger, Patrick; Fukushima, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    Using the worldline formalism we compute an effective action for fermions under a temporally modulated electric field and a spatially modulated magnetic field. It is known that the former leads to an enhanced Schwinger mechanism, while we find that the latter can also result in enhanced particle production and even cause a reorganization of the vacuum to acquire a larger dynamical mass in equilibrium which spatially assists the magnetic catalysis.

  5. Spatially Assisted Schwinger Mechanism and Magnetic Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copinger, Patrick; Fukushima, Kenji

    2016-08-19

    Using the worldline formalism we compute an effective action for fermions under a temporally modulated electric field and a spatially modulated magnetic field. It is known that the former leads to an enhanced Schwinger mechanism, while we find that the latter can also result in enhanced particle production and even cause a reorganization of the vacuum to acquire a larger dynamical mass in equilibrium which spatially assists the magnetic catalysis.

  6. Data Reorganization for Optimal Time Series Data Access, Analysis, and Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, H.; Teng, W. L.; Strub, R.; Vollmer, B.

    2012-12-01

    visualization that contribute to knowledge discovery from large science data sets, the GES DISC recently begun a NASA ACCESS-funded project to, in part, optimally reorganize selected large data sets for access and use by the hydrological user community. This presentation discusses the following aspects of the project: (1) explorations of approaches, such as database and file system; (2) findings for each approach, such as limitations and concerns, and pros and cons; (3) implementation of reorganizing data via the file system approach, including data processing (parameter and spatial subsetting), metadata and file structure of reorganized time series data (true "Data Rod," single variable, single grid point, and entire data range per file), and production and quality control. The reorganized time series data will be integrated into several broadly used data tools, such as NASA Giovanni and those provided by CUAHSI HIS (http://his.cuahsi.org/) and EPA BASINS (http://water.epa.gov/scitech/datait/models/basins/), as well as accessible via direct FTP, along with documentation and sample reading software. The data reorganization is initially, as part of the project, applied to selected popular hydrology-related parameters, with other parameters to be added, as resources permit.

  7. Optimizing resource allocation and patient flow: process analysis and reorganization in three chemotherapy outpatient clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Morgan; Bodie, Kelly; Porter, Geoffrey; Sullivan, Victoria; Tarasuk, Joy; Trembley, Jodie; Trudeau, Maureen

    2010-01-01

    Optimizing human and physical resources is a major concern for cancer care decision-makers and practitioners. This issue is particularly acute in the context of ambulatory out patient chemotherapy clinics, especially when - as is the case almost everywhere in the industrialized world - the number of people requiring systemic therapy is increasing while budgets, staffing and physical space remain static. Recent initiatives at three hospital-based chemotherapy units - in Halifax, Toronto and Kingston - shed light on the value of process analysis and reorganization for using existing human and physical resources to their full potential, improving patient flow and enhancing patient satisfaction. The steps taken in these settings are broadly applicable to other healthcare settings and would likely result in similar benefits in those environments.

  8. A major reorganization of Asian climate by the early Miocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. T. Guo

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The global climate system experienced a series of drastic changes during the Cenozoic. In Asia, these include the climate transformation from a zonal pattern to a monsoon-dominated pattern, the disappearance of typical subtropical aridity, and the onset of inland deserts. Despite major advances in the last two decades in characterizing and understanding these climate phenomena, disagreements persist relative to the timing, behaviors and underlying causes.

    This paper addresses these issues mainly based on two lines of evidence. First, we compiled newly collected data from geological indicators of the Cenozoic environment in China as paleoenvironmental maps of ten intervals. In confirming the earlier observation that a zonal climate pattern was transformed into a monsoonal one, the maps within the Miocene indicate that this change was achieved by the early Miocene, roughly consistent with the onset of loess deposition in China. Although a monsoon-like regime would have existed in the Eocene, it was restricted to tropical-subtropical regions. The latitudinal oscillations of the climate zones during the Paleogene are likely attributable to the imbalance in evolution of polar ice-sheets between the two hemispheres.

    Secondly, we examine the relevant depositional and soil forming processes of the Miocene loess-soil sequences to determine the circulation characteristics with emphasis on the early Miocene. Continuous eolian deposition in the middle reaches of the Yellow River since the early Miocene firmly indicates the formation of inland deserts, which have been constantly maintained during the past 22 Ma. Grain-size gradients between loess sections indicate northerly dust-carrying winds from northern sources, a clear indication of an Asian winter monsoon system. Meanwhile, well-developed Luvisols show evidence that moisture from the oceans reached northern China. This evidence shows the coexistence of two kinds of

  9. INTERACTION BETWEEN MODELS OF THE LIFE CYCLE OF INDUSTRIAL ENTERPRISE AND CYCLE OF ITS REORGANIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chulkov Vitaliy Olegovich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this scientific research is to develop a theoretical model of organizational and technology-related processes of reorganization of industrial enterprises, as well as their interaction. Multipoint logic notions of growth and interaction phases are used as research methods. The author describes the basic stages of reorganization, the life cycle of industrial enterprises and the cycle of their transformation. The processes are presented as an infographical image that represents a concentric model of interaction. This concentric model represents interaction between two or more phases. The process is entitled infografical modeling on the polyfunctional level. The concentric model moves both clockwise and anti-clockwise. Basic organizational and technological processes of reorganization of industrial enterprises that include decision making in terms of expediency of reorganization, design, construction, and performance of industrial enterprises at full capacity, and further operation of the industrial enterprise are described in the paper. Attainment of this objective, namely, reorganization of an industrial enterprise, involves a huge amount of resources, including labour resources that need interaction with all parties of reorganization; therefore, the concentric model of interaction describing the basic cycle of reorganization, the life cycle of an industrial enterprise and the cycle of its conversion is a trustworthy representation of this process. The proposed concentric model of interaction should be used in the design of organizational and technology-related processes for integrated consideration of reorganization of enterprises required to understand and improve the efficiency of reorganizations and to control the reorganization of industrial facilities.

  10. Tropical Forest Reorganization after Cyclone and Fire Disturbance in Samoa: Remnant Trees as Biological Legacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åsa Fritioff

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In disturbed rain forests, large, living remnant trees may be of significant importance for postdisturbance reorganization either directly, by producing large quantities of seeds, or indirectly, by attracting vertebrate seed dispersers. In addition, remnant trees may also be important in providing a favorable microhabitat for seedlings of late-successional species. This study focused on the role of large remnant trees (> 40 cm dbh in patterns of regeneration after cyclone and fire damage in the Tafua and Falealupo Rain Forest Preserves, Savaií, Samoa. At Tafua, 10 large trees at each of two sites (one site burned in 1990 were investigated with regard to numbers of species and densities of plants from three different size classes at different distances from remnant trees. At the burned site, both species richness and the densities of plants < 1cm dbh were significantly higher inside the canopies of remnant trees than outside of them. At the unburned site, no or only marginally significant differences were observed. At Falealupo, two burned sites (burned in 1993 and 1998 were investigated using seed traps. At both sites, the seed rain from vertebrate dispersers was disproportionally higher under the canopies of remnant trees than in outside areas. No differences in soil characteristics were found when comparing samples taken from inside and outside canopies. Our results are congruent with the prediction that large remnant trees surviving in severely disturbed rain-forest areas represent biological legacies and serve as nuclei for reorganization. Based on this study and our previous work, we suggest that three factors represent essential components of the spatial resilience of tropical forest ecosystems and should be targeted for active management in tropical forests exposed to large-scale disturbances, particularly fire: remnant trees, refugia, and vertebrate dispersers.

  11. Global Dynamic Numerical Simulations of Plate Tectonic Reorganizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morra, G.; Quevedo, L.; Butterworth, N.; Matthews, K. J.; Müller, D.

    2010-12-01

    We use a new numerical approach for global geodynamics to investigate the origin of present global plate motion and to identify the causes of the last two global tectonic reorganizations occurred about 50 and 100 million years ago (Ma) [1]. While the 50 Ma event is the most well-known global plate-mantle event, expressed by the bend in the Hawaiian-Emperor volcanic chain, a prominent plate reorganization at about 100 Ma, although presently little studied, is clearly indicated by a major bend in the fracture zones in the Indian Ocean and by a change in Pacific plate motion [2]. Our workflow involves turning plate reconstructions into surface meshes that are subsequently employed as initial conditions for global Boundary Element numerical models. The tectonic setting that anticipates the reorganizations is processed with the software GPlates, combining the 3D mesh of the paleo-plate morphology and the reconstruction of paleo-subducted slabs, elaborated from tectonic history [3]. All our models involve the entire planetary system, are fully dynamic, have free surface, are characterized by a spectacular computational speed due to the simultaneous use of the multi-pole algorithm and the Boundary Element formulation and are limited only by the use of sharp material property variations [4]. We employ this new tool to unravel the causes of plate tectonic reorganizations, producing and comparing global plate motion with the reconstructed ones. References: [1] Torsvik, T., Müller, R.D., Van der Voo, R., Steinberger, B., and Gaina, C., 2008, Global Plate Motion Frames: Toward a unified model: Reviews in Geophysics, VOL. 46, RG3004, 44 PP., 2008 [2] Wessel, P. and Kroenke, L.W. Pacific absolute plate motion since 145 Ma: An assessment of the fixed hot spot hypothesis. Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol 113, B06101, 2008 [3] L. Quevedo, G. Morra, R. D. Mueller. Parallel Fast Multipole Boundary Element Method for Crustal Dynamics, Proceeding 9th World Congress and 4th Asian

  12. Reorganizing Complex Network to Improve Large-Scale Multiagent Teamwork

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale multiagent teamwork has been popular in various domains. Similar to human society infrastructure, agents only coordinate with some of the others, with a peer-to-peer complex network structure. Their organization has been proven as a key factor to influence their performance. To expedite team performance, we have analyzed that there are three key factors. First, complex network effects may be able to promote team performance. Second, coordination interactions coming from their sources are always trying to be routed to capable agents. Although they could be transferred across the network via different paths, their sources and sinks depend on the intrinsic nature of the team which is irrelevant to the network connections. In addition, the agents involved in the same plan often form a subteam and communicate with each other more frequently. Therefore, if the interactions between agents can be statistically recorded, we are able to set up an integrated network adjustment algorithm by combining the three key factors. Based on our abstracted teamwork simulations and the coordination statistics, we implemented the adaptive reorganization algorithm. The experimental results briefly support our design that the reorganized network is more capable of coordinating heterogeneous agents.

  13. Dynamic reorganization of brain functional networks during cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bola, Michał; Sabel, Bernhard A

    2015-07-01

    How does cognition emerge from neural dynamics? The dominant hypothesis states that interactions among distributed brain regions through phase synchronization give basis for cognitive processing. Such phase-synchronized networks are transient and dynamic, established on the timescale of milliseconds in order to perform specific cognitive operations. But unlike resting-state networks, the complex organization of transient cognitive networks is typically not characterized within the graph theory framework. Thus, it is not known whether cognitive processing merely changes the strength of functional connections or, conversely, requires qualitatively new topological arrangements of functional networks. To address this question, we recorded high-density EEG while subjects performed a visual discrimination task. We conducted an event-related network analysis (ERNA) where source-space weighted functional networks were characterized with graph measures. ERNA revealed rapid, transient, and frequency-specific reorganization of the network's topology during cognition. Specifically, cognitive networks were characterized by strong clustering, low modularity, and strong interactions between hub-nodes. Our findings suggest that dense and clustered connectivity between the hub nodes belonging to different modules is the "network fingerprint" of cognition. Such reorganization patterns might facilitate global integration of information and provide a substrate for a "global workspace" necessary for cognition and consciousness to occur. Thus, characterizing topology of the event-related networks opens new vistas to interpret cognitive dynamics in the broader conceptual framework of graph theory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Reorganization of cytoskeletal proteins of mouse oocytes mediated by integrins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE Limin; ZHANG Lei; HE Yaping; ZHANG Jinhu; ZHENG Jie; HE Yanfang; ZHENG Yu; ZHANG Jie; ZHANG Li

    2004-01-01

    To study whether integrins on cell membrane ligate with intracellular cytoskeletal proteins and mediate their reorganization in egg activation, female mice were used for superovulation. The zona-free oocytes were incubated separately with specific ligand of integrins,an active RGD peptide, in vitro for certain period of time. RGE peptide and mouse capacitated sperm were used as controls. Freshly ovulated oocytes and those treated with different factors were immunostained with FITC-labeled anti-actin antibody, then detected with confocal microscope. The results demonstrated that freshly ovulated mouse oocytes, oocytes incubated for 2 h in vitro and those treated with control RGE peptide for 15 min showed hardly visible fluorescene or only thin fluorescence in plasma membrane region. Oocytes coincubated with sperms for 15 min and those treated with active RGD peptide for 10 min, 30 min and 2 hours respectively had strong and thick fluorescence in the plasma membrane and cortical region of oocytes, and some of them showed asymmetrically fluorescent distribution. It is proved that integrins on membrane are ligated directly with cytoskeletal protein. Integrins binding with their ligands regulate reorganization of cytoskelal protein, which may be involved in transmembrane signaling in egg activation.

  15. Reorganization of cytoskeletal proteins of mouse oocytes mediated by integrins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE; Limin; ZHANG; Lei; HE; Yaping; ZHANG; Jinhu; ZHENG; Ji

    2004-01-01

    To study whether integrins on cell membrane ligate with intracellular cytoskeletal proteins and mediate their reorganization in egg activation, female mice were used for superovulation. The zona-free oocytes were incubated separately with specific ligand of integrins,an active RGD peptide, in vitro for certain period of time. RGE peptide and mouse capacitated sperm were used as controls. Freshly ovulated oocytes and those treated with different factors were immunostained with FITC-labeled anti-actin antibody, then detected with confocal microscope. The results demonstrated that freshly ovulated mouse oocytes, oocytes incubated for 2 h in vitro and those treated with control RGE peptide for 15 min showed hardly visible fluorescene or only thin fluorescence in plasma membrane region. Oocytes coincubated with sperms for 15 min and those treated with active RGD peptide for 10 min, 30 min and 2 hours respectively had strong and thick fluorescence in the plasma membrane and cortical region of oocytes, and some of them showed asymmetrically fluorescent distribution. It is proved that integrins on membrane are ligated directly with cytoskeletal protein. Integrins binding with their ligands regulate reorganization of cytoskelal protein, which may be involved in transmembrane signaling in egg activation.

  16. Structural and functional reorganization of propriospinal connections promotes functional recovery after spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Linard Filli; Martin E Schwab

    2015-01-01

    Axonal regeneration and ifber regrowth is limited in the adult central nervous system, but re-search over the last decades has revealed a high intrinsic capacity of brain and spinal cord circuits to adapt and reorganize after smaller injuries or denervation. Short-distance ifber growth and synaptic rewiring was found in cortex, brain stem and spinal cord and could be associated with restoration of sensorimotor functions that were impaired by the injury. Such processes of struc-tural plasticity were initially observed in the corticospinal system following spinal cord injury or stroke, but recent studies showed an equally high potential for structural and functional reorganization in reticulospinal, rubrospinal or propriospinal projections. Here we review the lesion-induced plastic changes in the propriospinal pathways, and we argue that they represent a key mechanism triggering sensorimotor recovery upon incomplete spinal cord injury. The for-mation or strengthening of spinal detour pathways bypassing supraspinal commands around the lesion site to the denervated spinal cord were identiifed as prominent neural substrate inducing substantial motor recovery in different species from mice to primates. Indications for the exis-tence of propriospinal bypasses were also found in humans after cortical stroke. It is mandatory for current research to dissect the biological mechanisms underlying spinal circuit remodeling and to investigate how these processes can be stimulated in an optimal way by therapeutic inter-ventions (e.g., ifber-growth enhancing interventions, rehabilitation). This knowledge will clear the way for the development of novel strategies targeting the remarkable plastic potential of pro-priospinal circuits to maximize functional recovery after spinal cord injury.

  17. Structural and functional reorganization of propriospinal connections promotes functional recovery after spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linard Filli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Axonal regeneration and fiber regrowth is limited in the adult central nervous system, but research over the last decades has revealed a high intrinsic capacity of brain and spinal cord circuits to adapt and reorganize after smaller injuries or denervation. Short-distance fiber growth and synaptic rewiring was found in cortex, brain stem and spinal cord and could be associated with restoration of sensorimotor functions that were impaired by the injury. Such processes of structural plasticity were initially observed in the corticospinal system following spinal cord injury or stroke, but recent studies showed an equally high potential for structural and functional reorganization in reticulospinal, rubrospinal or propriospinal projections. Here we review the lesion-induced plastic changes in the propriospinal pathways, and we argue that they represent a key mechanism triggering sensorimotor recovery upon incomplete spinal cord injury. The formation or strengthening of spinal detour pathways bypassing supraspinal commands around the lesion site to the denervated spinal cord were identified as prominent neural substrate inducing substantial motor recovery in different species from mice to primates. Indications for the existence of propriospinal bypasses were also found in humans after cortical stroke. It is mandatory for current research to dissect the biological mechanisms underlying spinal circuit remodeling and to investigate how these processes can be stimulated in an optimal way by therapeutic interventions (e.g., fiber-growth enhancing interventions, rehabilitation. This knowledge will clear the way for the development of novel strategies targeting the remarkable plastic potential of propriospinal circuits to maximize functional recovery after spinal cord injury.

  18. Requirements for existing buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kirsten Engelund; Wittchen, Kim Bjarne

    2012-01-01

    This report collects energy performance requirements for existing buildings in European member states by June 2012.......This report collects energy performance requirements for existing buildings in European member states by June 2012....

  19. Requirements for existing buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kirsten Engelund; Wittchen, Kim Bjarne

    2012-01-01

    This report collects energy performance requirements for existing buildings in European member states by June 2012.......This report collects energy performance requirements for existing buildings in European member states by June 2012....

  20. Robotic tele-existence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachi, Susumu; Arai, Hirohiko; Maeda, Taro

    1989-01-01

    Tele-existence is an advanced type of teleoperation system that enables a human operator at the controls to perform remote manipulation tasks dexterously with the feeling that he or she exists in the remote anthropomorphic robot in the remote environment. The concept of a tele-existence is presented, the principle of the tele-existence display method is explained, some of the prototype systems are described, and its space application is discussed.

  1. Quantifying the scale- and process- dependent reorganization of landscape under climatic change: inferences from an experimental landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A.; Tejedor, A.; Grimaud, J. L.; Zaliapin, I. V.; Foufoula-Georgiou, E.

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge of the dynamics of evolving landscapes in terms of their geomorphic and topologic re-organization in response to changing climatic or tectonic forcing is of scientific and practical interest. Although several studies have addressed the large-scale response (e.g., change in mean relief), studies on the smaller-scale drainage pattern re-organization and quantification of landscape vulnerability to the timing, magnitude, and frequency of changing forcing are lacking. The reason is the absence of data for such an analysis. To that goal, a series of controlled laboratory experiments were conducted at the St. Anthony Falls laboratory of the University of Minnesota to study the effect of changing precipitation patterns on landscape evolution at the short and long-time scales. High resolution digital elevation (DEM) both in space and time were measured for a range of rainfall patterns and uplift rates. Results from our study show a distinct signature of the precipitation increase on the probabilistic and geometrical structure of landscape features, evident in widening and deepening of channels and valleys, change in drainage patterns within sub-basins and change in the space-time structure of erosional and depositional events. A spatially explicit analysis of the locus of these erosional and depositional events suggests a regime shift, during the onset of the transient state, from supply-limited to transport-limited fluvial channels. We document a characteristic scale-dependent signature of erosion at steady state (which we term the "E50-area curve") and show that during reorganization, its evolving shape reflects process and scales of geomorphic change. Finally, we document changes in the longitudinal river profiles, in response to increased precipitation rate, with the formation of abrupt gradient (knickpoints) that migrate upstream as time proceeds.

  2. Super-resolution microscopy reveals protein spatial reorganization in early innate immune responses.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carson, Bryan D.; Aaron, Jesse S.; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann

    2010-10-01

    Over the past decade optical approaches were introduced that effectively break the diffraction barrier. Of particular note were introductions of Stimulated Emission/Depletion (STED) microscopy, Photo-Activated Localization Microscopy (PALM), and the closely related Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (STORM). STORM represents an attractive method for researchers, as it does not require highly specialized optical setups, can be implemented using commercially available dyes, and is more easily amenable to multicolor imaging. We implemented a simultaneous dual-color, direct-STORM imaging system through the use of an objective-based TIRF microscope and filter-based image splitter. This system allows for excitation and detection of two fluorophors simultaneously, via projection of each fluorophor's signal onto separate regions of a detector. We imaged the sub-resolution organization of the TLR4 receptor, a key mediator of innate immune response, after challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a bacteria-specific antigen. While distinct forms of LPS have evolved among various bacteria, only some LPS variations (such as that derived from E. coli) typically result in significant cellular immune response. Others (such as from the plague bacteria Y. pestis) do not, despite affinity to TLR4. We will show that challenge with LPS antigens produces a statistically significant increase in TLR4 receptor clusters on the cell membrane, presumably due to recruitment of receptors to lipid rafts. These changes, however, are only detectable below the diffraction limit and are not evident using conventional imaging methods. Furthermore, we will compare the spatiotemporal behavior of TLR4 receptors in response to different LPS chemotypes in order to elucidate possible routes by which pathogens such as Y. pestis are able to circumvent the innate immune system. Finally, we will exploit the dual-color STORM capabilities to simultaneously image LPS and TLR4 receptors in the cellular membrane at resolutions at or below 40nm.

  3. International trade, and land use intensification and spatial reorganization explain Costa Rica’s forest transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadin, I.; Meyfroidt, P.; Lambin, E. F.

    2016-03-01

    While tropical deforestation remains widespread, some countries experienced a forest transition—a shift from net deforestation to net reforestation. Costa Rica had one of the highest deforestation rates in the 1980s and is now considered as a model of environmental sustainability, despite being a major producer of bananas and pineapples. We tested three land use processes that are thought to facilitate forest transitions. First, forest transitions may be accompanied by land use displacement through international trade of land-based products, which may undermine the global-scale environmental benefits of national forest protection. Second, reforestation is often associated with land use intensification in agriculture and forestry, allowing for land sparing. Third, this intensification may partly result from a geographical redistribution of land use at the sub-national scale to better match land use with land suitability. These hypotheses were verified for Costa Rica’s forest transition. We also tested whether forest increased mainly in regions with a low ecological value and agriculture expanded in regions with a high ecological value. Intensification and land use redistribution accounted for 76% of land spared during the forest transition, with 32% of this spared area corresponding to net reforestation. Decreasing meat exports led to a contraction of pastures, freeing an area equivalent to 80% of the reforested area. The forest transition in Costa Rica was environmentally beneficial at the global scale, with the reforested area over 1989-2013 corresponding to 130% of the land use displaced abroad through imports of agricultural products. However, expansion of export-oriented cropland caused deforestation in the most ecologically valuable regions of Costa Rica. Moreover, wood extraction from forest plantations increased to produce the pallets needed to export fruits. This highlights the importance of a multi-scale analysis when evaluating causes and impacts of national-scale forest transitions.

  4. A theoretical description of charge reorganization energies in molecular organic P-type semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brückner, Charlotte; Engels, Bernd

    2016-06-05

    Charge transport properties of materials composed of small organic molecules are important for numerous optoelectronic applications. A material's ability to transport charges is considerably influenced by the charge reorganization energies of the composing molecules. Hence, predictions about charge-transport properties of organic materials deserve reliable statements about these charge reorganization energies. However, using density functional theory which is mostly used for the predictions, the computed reorganization energies depend strongly on the chosen functional. To gain insight, a benchmark of various density functionals for the accurate calculation of charge reorganization energies is presented. A correlation between the charge reorganization energies and the ionization potentials is found which suggests applying IP-tuning to obtain reliable values for charge reorganization energies. According to benchmark investigations with IP-EOM-CCSD single-point calculations, the tuned functionals provide indeed more reliable charge reorganization energies. Among the standard functionals, ωB97X-D and SOGGA11X yield accurate charge reorganization energies in comparison with IP-EOM-CCSD values. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. 29 CFR Appendix A to Part 24 - Your Rights Under the Energy Reorganization Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Your Rights Under the Energy Reorganization Act A Appendix A to Part 24 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor PROCEDURES FOR THE HANDLING OF RETALIATION... the Energy Reorganization Act ER10AU07.000...

  6. 76 FR 86 - Expansion/Reorganization of Foreign-Trade Zone 202, Los Angeles, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Expansion/Reorganization of Foreign-Trade Zone 202, Los Angeles, CA Pursuant to... Commissioners of the City of Los Angeles, grantee of Foreign-Trade Zone 202, submitted an application to the Board for authority to reorganize and expand FTZ 202 in the Los Angeles, California area, within...

  7. Relationship between chronic pain and brain reorganization after deafferentation: A systematic review of functional MRI findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.R. Jutzeler

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Based solely on advanced functional neuroimaging results, there is only limited evidence for a relationship between chronic pain intensity and reorganization after deafferentation. The review demonstrates the need for additional neuroimaging studies to clarify the relationship between chronic pain and reorganization.

  8. Protein degradation during reconsolidation as a mechanism for memory reorganization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bong-Kiun Kaang

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Memory is a reference formed from a past experience that is used to respond to present situations. However, the world is dynamic and situations change, so it is important to update the memory with new information each time it is reactivated in order to adjust the response in the future. Recent researches indicate that memory may undergo a dynamic process that could work as an updating mechanism. This process which is called reconsolidation involves destabilization of the memory after it is reactivated, followed by restabilization. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the initial destabilization process of reconsolidation requires protein degradation. Using protein degradation inhibition as a method to block reconsolidation, recent researches suggest that reconsolidation, especially the protein degradation-dependent destabilization process is necessary for memory reorganization.

  9. Cultural differences in perceptual reorganization in US and Piraha adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M D Yoon

    Full Text Available Visual illusions and other perceptual phenomena can be used as tools to uncover the otherwise hidden constructive processes that give rise to perception. Although many perceptual processes are assumed to be universal, variable susceptibility to certain illusions and perceptual effects across populations suggests a role for factors that vary culturally. One striking phenomenon is seen with two-tone images-photos reduced to two tones: black and white. Deficient recognition is observed in young children under conditions that trigger automatic recognition in adults. Here we show a similar lack of cue-triggered perceptual reorganization in the Pirahã, a hunter-gatherer tribe with limited exposure to modern visual media, suggesting such recognition is experience- and culture-specific.

  10. Glassy protein dynamics and gigantic solvent reorganization energy of plastocyanin

    CERN Document Server

    LeBard, David N

    2007-01-01

    We report the results of Molecular Dynamics simulations of electron transfer activation parameters of plastocyanin metalloprotein involved as electron carrier in natural photosynthesis. We have discovered that slow, non-ergodic conformational fluctuations of the protein, coupled to hydrating water, result in a very broad distribution of donor-acceptor energy gaps far exceeding that observed for commonly studied inorganic and organic donor-acceptor complexes. The Stokes shift is not affected by these fluctuations and can be calculated from solvation models in terms of the response of the solvent dipolar polarization. The non-ergodic character of large-amplitude protein/water mobility breaks the strong link between the Stokes shift and reorganization energy characteristic of equilibrium (ergodic) theories of electron transfer. This mechanism might be responsible for low activation barriers in natural electron transfer proteins characterized by low reaction free energy.

  11. Analysis of Septin Reorganization at Cytokinesis Using Polarized Fluorescence Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly McQuilken

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Septins are conserved filament-forming proteins that act in diverse cellular processes. They closely associate with membranes and, in some systems, components of the cytoskeleton. It is not well understood how filaments assemble into higher-order structures in vivo or how they are remodeled throughout the cell cycle. In the budding yeast S. cerevisiae, septins are found through most of the cell cycle in an hourglass organization at the mother-bud neck until cytokinesis when the collar splits into two rings that disassemble prior to the next cell cycle. Experiments using polarized fluorescence microscopy have suggested that septins are arranged in ordered, paired filaments in the hourglass and undergo a coordinated 90° reorientation during splitting at cytokinesis. This apparent reorganization could be due to two orthogonal populations of filaments disassembling and reassembling or being preferentially retained at cytokinesis. In support of this idea, we report a decrease in septin concentration at the mother-bud neck during cytokinesis consistent with other reports and the timing of the decrease depends on known septin regulators including the Gin4 kinase. We took a candidate-based approach to examine what factors control reorientation during splitting and used polarized fluorescence microscopy to screen mutant yeast strains deficient in septin interacting proteins. Using this method, we have linked known septin regulators to different aspects of the assembly, stability, and reorganization of septin assemblies. The data support that ring splitting requires Gin4 activity and an anillin-like protein Bud4, and normal accumulation of septins at the ring requires phosphorylation of Shs1. We found distinct regulatory requirements for septin organization in the hourglass compared to split rings. We propose that septin subpopulations can vary in their localization and assembly/disassembly behavior in a cell-cycle dependent manner at cytokinesis.

  12. Metalloproteinase inhibition prevents inhibitory synapse reorganization and seizure genesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Emily; Everest, Michelle; Brown, Arthur; Poulter, Michael O

    2014-10-01

    The integrity and stability of interneurons in a cortical network are essential for proper network function. Loss of interneuron synaptic stability and precise organization can lead to disruptions in the excitation/inhibition balance, a characteristic of epilepsy. This study aimed to identify alterations to the GABAergic interneuron network in the piriform cortex (PC: a cortical area believed to be involved in the development of seizures) after kindling-induced seizures. Immunohistochemistry was used to mark perineuronal nets (PNNs: structures in the extracellular matrix that provide synaptic stability and restrict reorganization of inhibitory interneurons) and interneuron nerve terminals in control and kindled tissues. We found that PNNs were significantly decreased around parvalbumin-positive interneurons after the induction of experimental epilepsy. Additionally, we found layer-specific increases in GABA release sites originating from calbindin, calretinin, and parvalbumin interneurons, implying that there is a re-wiring of the interneuronal network. This increase in release sites was matched by an increase in GABAergic post-synaptic densities. We hypothesized that the breakdown of the PNN could be due to the activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and that the prevention of PNN breakdown may reduce the rewiring of interneuronal circuits and suppress seizures. To test this hypothesis we employed doxycycline, a broad spectrum MMP inhibitor, to stabilize PNNs in kindled rats. We found that doxycycline prevented PNN breakdown, re-organization of the inhibitory innervation, and seizure genesis. Our observations indicate that PNN degradation may be necessary for the development of seizures by facilitating interneuron plasticity and increased GABAergic activity.

  13. A gauge-invariant reorganization of thermal gauge theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Nan

    2010-07-01

    This dissertation is devoted to the study of thermodynamics for quantum gauge theories. The poor convergence of quantum field theory at finite temperature has been the main obstacle in the practical applications of thermal QCD for decades. In this dissertation I apply hard-thermal-loop perturbation theory, which is a gauge-invariant reorganization of the conventional perturbative expansion for quantum gauge theories to the thermodynamics of QED and Yang-Mills theory to three-loop order. For the Abelian case, I present a calculation of the free energy of a hot gas of electrons and photons by expanding in a power series in m{sub D}/T, m{sub f}/T and e{sup 2}, where m{sub D} and m{sub f} are the photon and electron thermal masses, respectively, and e is the coupling constant. I demonstrate that the hard-thermal-loop perturbation reorganization improves the convergence of the successive approximations to the QED free energy at large coupling, e {proportional_to} 2. For the non-Abelian case, I present a calculation of the free energy of a hot gas of gluons by expanding in a power series in m{sub D}/T and g{sup 2}, where m{sub D} is the gluon thermal mass and g is the coupling constant. I show that at three-loop order hard-thermal-loop perturbation theory is compatible with lattice results for the pressure, energy density, and entropy down to temperatures T {proportional_to} 2 - 3 T{sub c}. The results suggest that HTLpt provides a systematic framework that can be used to calculate static and dynamic quantities for temperatures relevant at LHC. (orig.)

  14. Unilateral hearing during development: hemispheric specificity in plastic reorganizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej eKral

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the hemispheric contributions of neuronal reorganization following early single-sided hearing (unilateral deafness. The experiments were performed on ten cats from our colony of deaf white cats. Two were identified in early hearing screening as unilaterally congenitally deaf. The remaining eight were bilaterally congenitally deaf, unilaterally implanted at different ages with a cochlear implant. Implanted animals were chronically stimulated using a single-channel portable signal processor for two to five months. Microelectrode recordings were performed at the primary auditory cortex under stimulation at the hearing and deaf ear with bilateral cochlear implants. Local field potentials (LFPs were compared at the cortex ipsilateral and contralateral to the hearing ear. The focus of the study was on the morphology and the onset latency of the LFPs. The data revealed that effects of hearing experience were more pronounced when stimulating the hearing ear. With respect to morphology of LFPs, pronounced hemisphere-specific effects were observed. Morphology of amplitude-normalized LFPs for stimulation of the deaf and the hearing ear was similar for responses recorded at the same hemisphere. However, when comparisons were performed between the hemispheres, the morphology was more dissimilar even though the same ear was stimulated. This demonstrates hemispheric specificity of some cortical adaptations irrespective of the ear stimulated. The results suggest a specific adaptation process at the hemisphere ipsilateral to the hearing ear, involving specific (down-regulated inhibitory mechanisms not found in the contralateral hemisphere. Finally, onset latencies revealed that the sensitive period for the cortex ipsilateral to the hearing ear is shorter than that for the contralateral cortex. Unilateral hearing experience leads to a functionally-asymmetric brain with different neuronal reorganizations and different sensitive

  15. Landscape response to climate change: quantifying a regime shift in transport processes at the onset of re-organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Arvind; Tejedor, Alejandro; Densmore, Alexander; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

    2016-04-01

    Quantifying the ways in which landscapes are reorganized under changing allogenic forcing, including changes in the patterns, rates, and processes of erosion and deposition, is still an open question. Data at the time scales and resolutions required to undertake such a question are typically not available for real landscapes, making physical experiments attractive and powerful means for studying the dynamics of landscape evolution. To this aim, we capitalize on a series of controlled laboratory experiments conducted at the St. Anthony Falls laboratory at the University of Minnesota. The eXperimental Landscape Evolution (XLE) facility consists of an erosion box (0.5 x 0.5 x 0.3 m3) wherein two main variables can be controlled: uplift rate and rainfall intensity. Topographic data were collected at a temporal resolution of 5 mins and spatial resolution of 0.5 mm as the landscape approached steady state (under constant uplift and precipitation rate), and during the transient state following an increase in the precipitation rate by a factor of 5. In order to quantify the changes observed during the onset of reorganization in the transient state, we perform a connectivity and clustering analysis of the erosional and depositional events, showing strikingly different spatial patterns on landscape evolution under steady-state (SS) and transient-state (TS) conditions, even when the time under SS is renormalized to match the total volume of eroded and deposited sediment in TS. Our results suggest a regime shift in the behavior of transport processes within the fluvial regime of the landscape, from supply-limited to transport-limited, during the onset of the TS. Results on the evolution of the spatial patterns of erosional and depositional events when the time advances within the TS are also discussed.

  16. Existence of magnetic charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akers, David

    1990-10-01

    A status report is presented on the existence of quarks carrying the Dirac unit of magnetic charge g = (137/2) e. The Paschen-Back effect in dyonium is discussed. From the dyonium model, Akers predicted the existence of a new η meson at 1814 MeV with I G(JPC) = 0+(0-+). Experimental evidence now confirms the existence of the meson resonance.

  17. Linking genomic reorganization to tumor initiation via the giant cell cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, N; Zhang, J; Zhang, N; Mercado-Uribe, I; Tao, F; Han, Z; Pathak, S; Multani, A S; Kuang, J; Yao, J; Bast, R C; Sood, A K; Hung, M-C; Liu, J

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the mechanisms underlying our recent paradoxical finding that mitotically incapacitated and genomically unstable polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCCs) are capable of tumor initiation, we labeled ovarian cancer cells with α-tubulin fused to green fluorescent protein, histone-2B fused to red fluorescent protein and FUCCI (fluorescent ubiquitination cell cycle indicator), and tracked the spatial and time-dependent change in spindle and chromosomal dynamics of PGCCs using live-cell fluorescence time-lapse recording. We found that single-dose (500 nm) treatment with paclitaxel paradoxically initiated endoreplication to form PGCCs after massive cell death. The resulting PGCCs continued self-renewal via endoreplication and further divided by nuclear budding or fragmentation; the small daughter nuclei then acquired cytoplasm, split off from the giant mother cells and acquired competency in mitosis. FUCCI showed that PGCCs divided via truncated endoreplication cell cycle (endocycle or endomitosis). Confocal microscopy showed that PGCCs had pronounced nuclear fragmentation and lacked expression of key mitotic proteins. PGCC-derived daughter cells were capable of long-term proliferation and acquired numerous new genome/chromosome alterations demonstrated by spectral karyotyping. These data prompt us to conceptualize a giant cell cycle composed of four distinct but overlapping phases, initiation, self-renewal, termination and stability. The giant cell cycle may represent a fundamental cellular mechanism to initiate genomic reorganization to generate new tumor-initiating cells in response to chemotherapy-induced stress and contributes to disease relapse. PMID:27991913

  18. Drawing in the blind and the sighted as a probe of cortical reorganization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likova, Lora T.

    2010-02-01

    In contrast to other arts, such as music, there is a very little neuroimaging research on visual art and in particular - on drawing. Drawing - from artistic to technical - involves diverse aspects of spatial cognition, precise sensorimotor planning and control as well as a rich set of higher cognitive functions. A new method for learning the drawing skill in the blind that we have developed, and the technological advances of a multisensory MR-compatible drawing system, allowed us to run for the first time a comparative fMRI study on drawing in the blind and the sighted. In each population, we identified widely distributed cortical networks, extending from the occipital and temporal cortices, through the parietal to the frontal lobe. This is the first neuroimaging study of drawing in blind novices, as well as the first study on the learning to draw in either population. We sought to determine the cortical reorganization taking place as a result of learning to draw, despite the lack of visual input to the brains of the blind. Remarkably, we found massive recruitment of the visual cortex on learning to draw, although our subjects had no previous experience, but only a short training with our new drawing method. This finding implies a rapid, learning-based plasticity mechanism. We further proposed that the functional level of the brain reorganization in the blind may still differ from that in the sighted even in areas that overlap between the two populations, such as in the visual cortex. We tested this idea in the framework of saccadic suppression. A methodological innovation allowed us to estimate the retinotopic regions locations in the blind brain. Although the visual cortex of both groups was greatly recruited, only the sighted experienced dramatic suppression in hMT+ and V1, while there was no sign of an analogous process in the blind. This finding has important implications and suggests that the recruitment of the visual cortex in the blind does not assure a

  19. Reorganization of Strain in Response to Erosional Forcing at Intermediate Scales: Puli Embayment, Western Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, P.; Mueller, K. J.; Koons, P. O.; Powell, L.

    2003-12-01

    The Taiwan orogeny accommodates 82 mm of oblique convergence per year between the Philippine Sea and Eurasian plates and is situated in a region of very high rainfall, resulting in high rates of rock uplift and erosion. Studies in western Taiwan suggest that there is considerable along strike variation in late Quaternary erosion rates and in the modern distribution of strain along the western margin of the orogen. In the Puli Embayment, a 50 km wide, 1500 m deep depression within the Foothills belt, Hsueshan Range and Backbone Ranges of western Taiwan, lower elevation and enhanced exhumation are associated with a broad 50 km wide belt of active shortening hindward of the leading edge of the orogen. Localized high erosion rates have been shown to significantly influence the mechanical behavior of collisional mountain belts on timescales of 1-5 Ma where the wavelength of the erosional signal is on the order of the thickness of the brittle crust. Examples include the Southern Alps of New Zealand and the indentor corners, Nanga Parbat and Namche Bawa, of the Himalaya, where the geometry of the erosional signal is reflected in the topographic and petrological signal of the resultant mountain belt. The coincidence of enhanced exhumation, lower elevation and active deformation suggests that the Puli embayment is accommodating shortening and rock uplift in response to the reduction in mass. If so, it is occurring on shorter temporal and spatial scales than previously documented and may represent the early stages of river-induced thermal thinning leading to the formation of a structure on the scale of an anticlinorium. Western Taiwan provides an ideal setting in which to explore, on a sub-orogen scale, the implications of enhanced exhumation for the beginnings of reorganization of strain within an orogen at higher spatial and temporal frequency.

  20. Existe-t-il un ancrage spatial des minorités chrétiennes en Asie centrale ?Le poids du passé russo-soviétique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Peyrouse

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Les cinq républiques musulmanes d’Asie centrale, nées de l’implosion de l’URSS en 1991, constituent des exemples intéressants pour la problématique étudiée ici : elles invitent à reposer la question des minorités religieuses en terre d’islam en ne répondant pas au schéma classique et attendu sur la question. Elles prouvent qu’il existe des pays musulmans sans législation particulière envers les minorités religieuses, où la division entre communautés se fait plus selon des critères nationaux que strictement religieux, et où le marquage de l’espace garde avant tout le souvenir des brutales transformations urbaines exigées par un pouvoir soviétique qui niait toute expression de la foi. On ne peut en effet saisir le cas centrasiatique sans revenir sur le poids du legs russo-soviétique, aussi bien en matière de religion que d’urbanisme : les populations des cinq républiques vivent aujourd’hui dans un environnement urbain essentiellement européanisé, très marqué par la présence des non musulmans et où l’espace n’est que très peu un facteur de différenciation communautaire.

  1. Reutilizing Existing Library Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Marlys Cresap

    1987-01-01

    This discussion of the reutilization of existing library space reviews the decision process and considerations for implementation. Two case studies of small public libraries which reassigned space to better use are provided, including floor plans. (1 reference) (MES)

  2. Porous silicon reorganization: Influence on the structure, surface roughness and strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milenkovic, N.; Drießen, M.; Weiss, C.; Janz, S.

    2015-12-01

    Porous silicon and epitaxial thickening is a lift-off approach for silicon foil fabrication to avoid kerf losses and produce foils with thicknesses less than 50 μm. The crystal quality of the epitaxial silicon film strongly depends on the porous silicon template, which can be adapted through a reorganization process prior to epitaxy. In this work, we investigated the influence of reorganization on the structure of etched porous silicon layers. The reorganization processes were carried out in a quasi-inline Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition reactor. Variations on the temperatures and process durations for the reorganization step were examined. The cross-sections showed that porous silicon requires temperatures of approximately 1150 °C to produce an excellent template for epitaxy. Atomic Force Microscopy measurements on the samples annealed at different temperatures showed the evolution of the pores from as-etched to a closed surface. These measurements confirm that the surface is not yet closed after 30 min of reorganization at 1000 °C. Different durations of the reorganization step at a fixed temperature of 1150 °C all lead to a closed surface with a comparable roughness of less than 0.5 nm. X-ray diffraction measurements show a change in the strain in the porous layer from tensile to compressive when the reorganization temperature is increased from 800 °C to 1150 °C. A longer reorganization at a fixed temperature of 1150 °C leads to a reduction in the strain without reducing the quality of the surface roughness. Defect density measurements on silicon layers deposited on those templates confirm an improvement of the template for longer reorganization times. This study shows that our porous silicon templates achieve lower surface roughness and strain values than those reported in other publications.

  3. Enhancing Physical Activity and Brain Reorganization after Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet H. Carr

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It is becoming increasingly clear that, if reorganization of brain function is to be optimal after stroke, there needs to be a reorganisation of the methods used in physical rehabilitation and the time spent in specific task practice, strength and endurance training, and aerobic exercise. Frequency and intensity of rehabilitation need to be increased so that patients can gain the energy levels and vigour necessary for participation in physical activity both during rehabilitation and after discharge. It is evident that many patients are discharged from inpatient rehabilitation severely deconditioned, meaning that their energy levels are too low for active participation in daily life. Physicians, therapists, and nursing staff responsible for rehabilitation practice should address this issue not only during inpatient rehabilitation but also after discharge by promoting and supporting community-based exercise opportunities. During inpatient rehabilitation, group sessions should be frequent and need to include specific aerobic training. Physiotherapy must take advantage of the training aids available, including exercise equipment such as treadmills, and of new developments in computerised feedback systems, robotics, and electromechanical trainers. For illustrative purposes, this paper focuses on the role of physiotherapists, but the necessary changes in practice and in attitude will require cooperation from many others.

  4. Hippocampal-neocortical functional reorganization underlies children's cognitive development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shaozheng; Cho, Soohyun; Chen, Tianwen; Rosenberg-Lee, Miriam; Geary, David C; Menon, Vinod

    2014-09-01

    The importance of the hippocampal system for rapid learning and memory is well recognized, but its contributions to a cardinal feature of children's cognitive development-the transition from procedure-based to memory-based problem-solving strategies-are unknown. Here we show that the hippocampal system is pivotal to this strategic transition. Longitudinal functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 7-9-year-old children revealed that the transition from use of counting to memory-based retrieval parallels increased hippocampal and decreased prefrontal-parietal engagement during arithmetic problem solving. Longitudinal improvements in retrieval-strategy use were predicted by increased hippocampal-neocortical functional connectivity. Beyond childhood, retrieval-strategy use continued to improve through adolescence into adulthood and was associated with decreased activation but more stable interproblem representations in the hippocampus. Our findings provide insights into the dynamic role of the hippocampus in the maturation of memory-based problem solving and establish a critical link between hippocampal-neocortical reorganization and children's cognitive development.

  5. Local awakening: regional reorganizations of brain oscillations after sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Pei-Jung; Chen, Sharon Chia-Ju; Hsu, Chun-Yao; Wu, Changwei W; Wu, Yu-Chin; Hung, Ching-Sui; Yang, Albert C; Liu, Po-Yu; Biswal, Bharat; Lin, Ching-Po

    2014-11-15

    Brain functions express rhythmic fluctuations accompanied by sleep and wakefulness each day, but how sleep regulates brain rhythms remains unclear. Following the dose-dependent local sleep concept, two succeeding questions emerge: (1) is the sleep regulation a network-specific process; and (2) is the awakening state dependent on the previous sleep stages? To answer the questions, we conducted simultaneous EEG and fMRI recordings over 22 healthy male participants, along pre-sleep, nocturnal sleep and awakening. Using paired comparisons between awakening and pre-sleep conditions, three scenarios of the regional specificity were demonstrated on awakening: (1) the default-mode and hippocampal networks maintained similar connectivity and spectral power; (2) the sensorimotor network presented reduced connectivity and spectral power; and (3) the thalamus demonstrated substantially enhanced connectivity to the neo-cortex with decreased spectral power. With regard to the stage effect, the deep sleep group had significant changes in both functional connectivity and spectral power on awakening, whereas the indices of light sleep group remained relatively quiescent after sleep. The phenomena implied that slow-wave sleep could be key to rebooting the BOLD fluctuations after sleep. In conclusion, the regional specificity and the stage effect were verified in support of the local awakening concept, indicating that sleep regulation leads to the reorganization of brain networks upon awakening.

  6. Membrane indentation triggers clathrin lattice reorganization and fluidization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordella, Nicholas; Lampo, Thomas J; Melosh, Nicholas; Spakowitz, Andrew J

    2015-01-21

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis involves the coordinated assembly of clathrin cages around membrane indentations, necessitating fluid-like reorganization followed by solid-like stabilization. This apparent duality in clathrin's in vivo behavior provides some indication that the physical interactions between clathrin triskelia and the membrane effect a local response that triggers fluid-solid transformations within the clathrin lattice. We develop a computational model to study the response of clathrin protein lattices to spherical deformations of the underlying flexible membrane. These deformations are similar to the shapes assumed during intracellular trafficking of nanoparticles. Through Monte Carlo simulations of clathrin-on-membrane systems, we observe that these membrane indentations give rise to a greater than normal defect density within the overlaid clathrin lattice. In many cases, the bulk surrounding lattice remains in a crystalline phase, and the extra defects are localized to the regions of large curvature. This can be explained by the fact that the in-plane elastic stress in the clathrin lattice are reduced by coupling defects to highly curved regions. The presence of defects brought about by indentation can result in the fluidization of a lattice that would otherwise be crystalline, resulting in an indentation-driven, defect-mediated phase transition. Altering subunit elasticity or membrane properties is shown to drive a similar transition, and we present phase diagrams that map out the combined effects of these parameters on clathrin lattice properties.

  7. Mechanism of filopodia initiation by reorganization of a dendritic network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svitkina, Tatyana M; Bulanova, Elena A; Chaga, Oleg Y; Vignjevic, Danijela M; Kojima, Shin-ichiro; Vasiliev, Jury M; Borisy, Gary G

    2003-02-03

    Afilopodium protrudes by elongation of bundled actin filaments in its core. However, the mechanism of filopodia initiation remains unknown. Using live-cell imaging with GFP-tagged proteins and correlative electron microscopy, we performed a kinetic-structural analysis of filopodial initiation in B16F1 melanoma cells. Filopodial bundles arose not by a specific nucleation event, but by reorganization of the lamellipodial dendritic network analogous to fusion of established filopodia but occurring at the level of individual filaments. Subsets of independently nucleated lamellipodial filaments elongated and gradually associated with each other at their barbed ends, leading to formation of cone-shaped structures that we term Lambda-precursors. An early marker of initiation was the gradual coalescence of GFP-vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (GFP-VASP) fluorescence at the leading edge into discrete foci. The GFP-VASP foci were associated with Lambda-precursors, whereas Arp2/3 was not. Subsequent recruitment of fascin to the clustered barbed ends of Lambda-precursors initiated filament bundling and completed formation of the nascent filopodium. We propose a convergent elongation model of filopodia initiation, stipulating that filaments within the lamellipodial dendritic network acquire privileged status by binding a set of molecules (including VASP) to their barbed ends, which protect them from capping and mediate association of barbed ends with each other.

  8. Cytoskeletal Reorganization Drives Mesenchymal Condensation and Regulates Downstream Molecular Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poulomi Ray

    Full Text Available Skeletal condensation occurs when specified mesenchyme cells self-organize over several days to form a distinctive cartilage template. Here, we determine how and when specified mesenchyme cells integrate mechanical and molecular information from their environment, forming cartilage condensations in the pharyngeal arches of chick embryos. By disrupting cytoskeletal reorganization, we demonstrate that dynamic cell shape changes drive condensation and modulate the response of the condensing cells to Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF, Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP and Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β signaling pathways. Rho Kinase (ROCK-driven actomyosin contractions and Myosin II-generated differential cell cortex tension regulate these cell shape changes. Disruption of the condensation process inhibits the differentiation of the mesenchyme cells into chondrocytes, demonstrating that condensation regulates the fate of the mesenchyme cells. We also find that dorsal and ventral condensations undergo distinct cell shape changes. BMP signaling is instructive for dorsal condensation-specific cell shape changes. Moreover, condensations exhibit ventral characteristics in the absence of BMP signaling, suggesting that in the pharyngeal arches ventral morphology is the ground pattern. Overall, this study characterizes the interplay between cytoskeletal dynamics and molecular signaling in a self-organizing system during tissue morphogenesis.

  9. Reorganization of the North Atlantic Oscillation during early Holocene deglaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassenburg, Jasper A.; Dietrich, Stephan; Fietzke, Jan; Fohlmeister, Jens; Jochum, Klaus Peter; Scholz, Denis; Richter, Detlev K.; Sabaoui, Abdellah; Spötl, Christoph; Lohmann, Gerrit; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Immenhauser, Adrian

    2016-08-01

    The North Atlantic Oscillation is the dominant atmospheric pressure mode in the North Atlantic region and affects winter temperature and precipitation in the Mediterranean, northwest Europe, Greenland, and Asia. The index that describes the sea-level pressure difference between Iceland and the Azores is correlated with a dipole precipitation pattern over northwest Europe and northwest Africa. How the North Atlantic Oscillation will develop as the Greenland ice sheet melts is unclear. A potential past analogue is the early Holocene, during which melting ice sheets around the North Atlantic freshened surface waters, affecting the strength of the meridional overturning circulation. Here we present a Holocene rainfall record from northwest Africa based on speleothem δ18O and compare it against a speleothem-based rainfall record from Europe. The two records are positively correlated during the early Holocene, followed by a shift to an anti-correlation, similar to the modern record, during the mid-Holocene. On the basis of our simulations with an Earth system model, we suggest the shift to the anti-correlation reflects a large-scale atmospheric and oceanic reorganization in response to the demise of the Laurentide ice sheet and a strong reduction of meltwater flux to the North Atlantic, pointing to a potential sensitivity of the North Atlantic Oscillation to the melting of ice sheets.

  10. Structural reorganization of cylindrical nanoparticles triggered by polylactide stereocomplexation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liang; Pitto-Barry, Anaïs; Kirby, Nigel; Schiller, Tara L.; Sanchez, Ana M.; Dyson, M. Adam; Sloan, Jeremy; Wilson, Neil R.; O'Reilly, Rachel K.; Dove, Andrew P.

    2014-12-01

    Co-crystallization of polymers with different configurations/tacticities provides access to materials with enhanced performance. The stereocomplexation of isotactic poly(L-lactide) and poly(D-lactide) has led to improved properties compared with each homochiral material. Herein, we report the preparation of stereocomplex micelles from a mixture of poly(L-lactide)-b-poly(acrylic acid) and poly(D-lactide)-b-poly(acrylic acid) diblock copolymers in water via crystallization-driven self-assembly. During the formation of these stereocomplex micelles, an unexpected morphological transition results in the formation of dense crystalline spherical micelles rather than cylinders. Furthermore, mixture of cylinders with opposite homochirality in either THF/H2O mixtures or in pure water at 65 °C leads to disassembly into stereocomplexed spherical micelles. Similarly, a transition is also observed in a related PEO-b-PLLA/PEO-b-PDLA system, demonstrating wider applicability. This new mechanism for morphological reorganization, through competitive crystallization and stereocomplexation and without the requirement for an external stimulus, allows for new opportunities in controlled release and delivery applications.

  11. Reorganization of the Brain and Heart Rhythm During Autogenic Meditation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae-Keun eKim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The underlying changes in heart coherence that are associated with reported EEG changes in response to meditation have been explored. We measured EEG and heart rate variability (HRV before and during autogenic meditation. Fourteen subjects participated in the study. Heart coherence scores were significantly increased during meditation compared to the baseline. We found near significant decrease in high beta absolute power, increase in alpha relative power and significant increases in lower(alpha and higher(above beta band coherence during 3 minute epochs of heart coherent meditation compared to 3 minute epochs of heart noncoherence at baseline. The coherence and relative power increase in alpha band and absolute power decrease in high beta band could reflect relaxation state during the heart coherent meditation. The coherence increase in the higher(above beta band could reflect cortico-cortical local integration and thereby affect cognitive reorganization, simultaneously with relaxation. Further research is still needed for a confirmation of heart coherence as a simple window for the meditative state.

  12. Spatial organization of multiple plant species in arid ecosystems:linking patterns and processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amit; CHAKRABORTY; B.Larry; LI

    2010-01-01

    Spatial organization of multiple plant species that appears as a non-random distribution of vegetative patches is one of the mostly observed spatial patterns in arid ecosystems. Yet understanding of ecological processes allowing this spatial pattern to emerge through interspecific interactions is still lacking. With a proposed conceptual model involving interspecific trade-offs between species competitive ability and colonization ability, we have argued that within patch abundance dynamics regulated by the mechanisms of competition are strongly influenced by the between patches colonization dynamics that are maintained via this trade-offs and it holds a positive, intraspecific occupancy-abundance relationship, in which increased patch occupancy increases species density within inhabiting patches. In a constant environment, while local abundance dynamics approach toward a stable equilibrium point, a fixed spatial arrangement of species can be retained through this coupled dynamics. However, in fluctuating environments where existence of such stable equilibriums is highly uncertain, it may involve continuous transitions from one community state to another as species re-organized themselves over space through the rapid changes in local species abundances. While some of the inhabiting patches are destroyed exogenously or endogenously, or species responses to increasing environmental fluctuations vary increasingly with time, discontinuous transitions into an abrupt, irreversible state of the community dynamics may occur, as with this effect the inherent positive relationship between occupancy and abundance of species is no longer maintained.

  13. The Relativity of Existence

    CERN Document Server

    Heinrich, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    Despite the success of physics in formulating mathematical theories that can predict the outcome of experiments, we have made remarkably little progress towards answering some of the most basic questions about our existence, such as: why does the universe exist? Why is the universe apparently fine-tuned to be able to support life? Why are the laws of physics so elegant? Why do we have three dimensions of space and one of time? How is it that the universe can be non-local and non-causal at the quantum scale, and why is there quantum randomness? In this paper, it is shown that all of these questions are answered if existence is relative, and moreover, it seems that we are logically bound to accept it.

  14. This elusive objective existence

    CERN Document Server

    Mohrhoff, U

    2004-01-01

    Zurek's existential interpretation of quantum mechanics suffers from three classical prejudices, including the belief that space and time are intrinsically and infinitely differentiated. They compel him to relativize the concept of objective existence in two ways. The elimination of these prejudices makes it possible to recognize the quantum formalism's ontological implications - the relative and contingent reality of spatiotemporal distinctions and the extrinsic and finite spatiotemporal differentiation of the physical world - which in turn makes it possible to arrive at an unqualified objective existence. Contrary to a widespread misconception, viewing the quantum formalism as being fundamentally a probability algorithm does not imply that quantum mechanics is concerned with states of knowledge rather than states of Nature. On the contrary, it makes possible a complete and strongly objective description of the physical world that requires no reference to observers. What objectively exists, in a sense that r...

  15. Management of change in the nuclear industry - Evidence from maintenance reorganizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiman, T.; Oedewald, P. [VTT Industrial Systems (Finland); Rollenhagen, C.; Kahlbom, U. [Maelardalen Univ. (Sweden)

    2006-03-15

    The nuclear industry and especially the maintenance activities have been under various restructuring initiatives in addition to continuous incremental change due to e.g. new technologies, ageing plants, deregulation and the change of generation. These changes have been experienced as causing stress and uncertainty among the workers. Also, changes have lead to e.g. lowered sense of control, goal unclarity and lowered sense of personal responsibility over one's work. Organizational changes clearly are issues that have potential effects on safety. Both positive and negative cases on safety effects of organizational changes exist, and various accidents have been pinpointed to organizational changes in the company. In this report the challenges of management of change at nuclear power plants are considered mainly from organizational culture -perspective. The cultural perspective taken in this paper strives to combine technical approaches to human resources approaches. The report focuses on evidence gathered from studies made at Nordic NPP maintenance units, but the results and models depicted in the report are of general relevance in the nuclear industry. The report is based on four case studies of reorganizing in NPP maintenance units and on a literature review of change management at various other safety critical organizations. The report presents a framework for considering organizational changes and their safety consequences. (au)

  16. Glacial reorganization of topography in a tectonically active mountain range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Byron; Ehlers, Todd

    2016-04-01

    Tests of the interactions between tectonic and climate forcing on Earth's topography often focus on the concept of steady-state whereby processes of rock deformation and erosion are opposing and equal. However, when conditions change such as the climate or tectonic rock uplift, then surface processes act to restore the balance between rock deformation and erosion by adjusting topography. Most examples of canonical steady-state mountain ranges lie within the northern hemisphere, which underwent a radical change in the Quaternary due to the onset of widespread glaciation. The activity of glaciers changed erosion rates and topography in many of these mountain ranges, which likely violates steady-state assumptions. With new topographic analysis, and existing patterns of climate and rock uplift, we explore a mountain range previously considered to be in steady-state, the Olympic Mountains, USA. The details of our analysis suggest the dominant topographic signal in the Olympic Mountains is a spatial, and likely temporal, variation in erosional efficiency dictated by orographic precipitation, and Pleistocene glacier ELA patterns, and not tectonic rock uplift rates. Alpine glaciers drastically altered the relief structure of the Olympic Mountains. The details of these relief changes are recorded in channel profiles as overdeepenings, reduced slopes, and associated knickpoints. We find the position of these relief changes within the orogen is dependent on the position of the Pleistocene ELA. While alpine glaciers overdeepened valleys in regions near the Pleistocene ELA (which has a tendency to increase relief), headward erosion of west and north flowing glacier systems captured significant area from opposing systems and caused drainage divide lowering. This divide lowering reduced relief throughout the range. We demonstrate similar topographic effects recorded in the basin hypsometries of other Cenozoic mountain ranges around the world. The significant glacial overprint on

  17. Relativity, Dimensionality, and Existence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkov, Vesselin

    A 100 years have passed since the advent of special relativity and 2008 will mark another important to all relativists anniversary - 100 years since Minkowski gave his talk "Space and Time" on September 21, 1908 in which he proposed the unifi- cation of space and time into an inseparable entity - space-time. Although special relativity has been an enormously successful physical theory no progress has been made in clarifying the question of existence of the objects represented by two of its basic concepts - space-time and world lines (or worldtubes in the case of extended bodies). The major reason for this failure appears to be the physicists' tradition to call such questions of existence philosophical. This tradition, however, is not quite consistent. In Newtonian mechanics physicists believe that they describe real objects whenever they talk about particles - one of the basic concepts of Newtonian physics. The situation is the same in quantum physics - no one questions the existence of electrons, protons, etc. Then why should the question of existence of worldtubes (representing particles in relativity) be regarded as a philosophical question?

  18. Bilateral experimental neck pain reorganize axioscapular muscle coordination and pain sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Steffan Wittrup; Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neck pain is a large clinical problem where reorganized trunk and axioscapular muscle activities have been hypothesised contributing to pain persistence and pain hypersensitivity. This study investigated the effects of bilateral experimental neck pain on trunk and axioscapular muscle ...

  19. A new cellular stress response that triggers centriolar satellite reorganization and ciliogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villumsen, Bine H; Danielsen, Jannie R; Povlsen, Lou;

    2013-01-01

    Centriolar satellites are small, granular structures that cluster around centrosomes, but whose biological function and regulation are poorly understood. We show that centriolar satellites undergo striking reorganization in response to cellular stresses such as UV radiation, heat shock...

  20. Spatial planning

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitrov, Nikola; Koteski, Cane

    2016-01-01

    The professional book ,, Space planning "processed chapters on: space, concept and definition of space, space as a system, spatial economics, economic essence of space, space planning, social determinants of spatial planning, spatial planning as a process, factors development and elements in spatial planning, methodology, components and content of spatial planning stages and types of preparation of spatial planning, spatial planning and industrialization, industrialization, urbanization and s...

  1. Spatial planning

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitrov, Nikola; Koteski, Cane

    2016-01-01

    The professional book ,, Space planning "processed chapters on: space, concept and definition of space, space as a system, spatial economics, economic essence of space, space planning, social determinants of spatial planning, spatial planning as a process, factors development and elements in spatial planning, methodology, components and content of spatial planning stages and types of preparation of spatial planning, spatial planning and industrialization, industrialization, urbanization and s...

  2. Reorganization energy of the CuA center in purple azurin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Hwang, Hee Jung; Pecht, Israel

    2007-01-01

    shown that lowering the pH from 8.0 to 4.0 results in a similar (~0.4 eV) decrease in reorganization energy for both blue (type 1) and purple (CuA) azurins, even though the reorganization energies of the two different copper centers are different at a given pH. These results suggest that the MV state...

  3. Single-sphere model for solvent reorganization energy and its application to electron transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In this work, the authors give detailed deductions and develop the single-sphere model of solvent reorganization energy in electron transfer with point dipole approximation. At the level of DFT/6- 31++G**, the electron transfer between 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane and its anion has been investigated. Using the novel single-sphere model, the authors evaluate the solvent reorganization energy of this system, and the computational result proves rational in comparison with the experimental estimations.

  4. Motor unit reorganization in progressive muscular dystrophies and congenital myopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmidt-Sałkowska, Elżbieta; Gaweł, Małgorzata; Lipowska, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze motor unit reorganization in different types of progressive muscular dystrophies and congenital myopathies. The study population consisted of patients with genetically verified progressive muscular dystrophies: Duchenne (DMD) (n=54), Becker (BMD) (n=30), facio-scapulo-humeral (FSHD) (n=37), and Emery-Dreifuss (E-DD) (n=26). Patients with probable limb-girdle dystrophy (L-GD) (n=58) and congenital myopathies (n=35) were also included in the study. Quantitative EMG recordings were obtained from 469 muscles. Muscle activity at rest and during slight voluntary and maximal muscle contraction was analyzed. The motor unit activity potential (MUAP) duration, amplitude, area, size index (SI), polyphasicity, and the presence of "outliers" were evaluated. Diminished values of MUAP parameters and decreased maximal amplitude of maximal muscle contraction were recorded most frequently in DMD and mainly in the biceps brachii muscles. SI was the most frequently changed EMG parameter. "Outliers" with amplitude below the normal range were recorded more frequently then a decreased mean MUAP amplitude (what could indicate a very high sensitivity of this EMG parameter). Pathological interference pattern was recorded in 34.7% of biceps brachii and in 21.2% of rectus femoris muscles. In FSHD, decreased MUAP duration and SI and pathological interference pattern with low amplitude were recorded most frequently in the tibial anterior and deltoid muscles. The presence of potentials with reduced parameters is a result of decreasing motor unit area (reduced number and size of muscle fibers), while high amplitude potentials recorded in BMD and E-DD could indicate a slow and mild course of disease and muscle regeneration.

  5. The Problem of Existence

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    envisionment ) produced by GIZMO . ? In the envisionment , I s indicates the set of quantity—conditioned individuals that exists during a situa- tion... envisionment step by step . In START, the initial state, GIZMO deduces that heat flow occurs, since there is assumed to be a temperature difference between the...stov e GIZMO implements the basic operations of qualitative process theory, including an envisioner for makin g predictions and a program for

  6. Hermeneutics as Embodied Existence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marja Schuster RN, PhD

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the possibilities and limits of a hermeneutic way of being in the world, more specifically being a researcher as a part of human, embodied existence. Understanding existence as embodied highlights the subjectivity of a researcher. For a hermeneutic researcher this subjectivity is both a precondition for interpretation and something that might endanger the scientific endeavour. In this article, I examine the possibilities of combining Hans-Georg Gadamer's empathetic hermeneutics with Paul Ricoeur's critical hermeneutics as a means of both recognizing and, to some extent, controlling my subjectivity in the research process. With Gabriel Marcel I also argue for hermeneutics as an embodied experience. This is exemplified by my study with a focus on the existential dimensions of the nursing profession. The first part of the article introduces Marcel and his philosophical anthropology concerning our bodily existence as essential for shared lives with others. In the second part, this understanding of self and others is further developed by means of the hermeneutics of Gadamer and Ricoeur. In the third part, I present a way of applying hermeneutics in procedures for interviews, transcription, and analysis of data.

  7. Effective Use of Existing Space in Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Nancy A.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the effective use of stack space through weeding, storage, microfilm, and selection; study space based on student population; and service space by reorganization of staff, collections, and study space. Three references are noted. (CHC)

  8. Moving Spatial Keyword Queries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Dingming; Yiu, Man Lung; Jensen, Christian S.

    2013-01-01

    Web users and content are increasingly being geo-positioned. This development gives prominence to spatial keyword queries, which involve both the locations and textual descriptions of content. We study the efficient processing of continuously moving top-k spatial keyword (MkSK) queries over spatial...... text data. State-of-the-art solutions for moving queries employ safe zones that guarantee the validity of reported results as long as the user remains within the safe zone associated with a result. However, existing safe-zone methods focus solely on spatial locations and ignore text relevancy. We...

  9. Existing chemicals: international activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purchase, J F

    1989-01-01

    The standards of care used in the protection of the health and safety of people exposed to chemicals has increased dramatically in the last decade. Standards imposed by regulation and those adopted by industry have required a greater level of knowledge about the hazards of chemicals. In the E.E.C., the 6th amendment of the dangerous substances directive imposed the requirement that al new chemicals should be tested according to prescribed programme before introduction on to the market. The development of a European inventory of existing chemicals was an integral part of the 6th amendment. It has now become clear that increased standards of care referred to above must be applied to the chemicals on the inventory list. There is, however, a considerable amount of activity already under way in various international agencies. The OECD Chemicals Programme has been involved in considering the problem of existing chemicals for some time, and is producing a priority list and action programme. The International Programme on Chemical Safety produces international chemical safety cards, health and safety guides and environmental health criteria documents. The international register of potentially toxic compounds (part of UNEP) has prepared chemical data profiles on 990 compounds. The International Agency for Research on Cancer prepared monographs on the carcinogenic risk of chemicals to man. So far 42 volumes have been prepared covering about 900 substances. IARC and IPCS also prepare periodic reports on ongoing research on carcinogenicity or toxicity (respectively) of chemicals. The chemical industry through ECETOC (the European Chemical Industry Ecology and Toxicology Centre) has mounted a major initiative on existing chemicals. Comprehensive reviews of the toxicity of selected chemicals are published (Joint Assessment of Commodity Chemicals). In its technical report no. 30 ECETOC lists reviews and evaluations by major national and international organisations, which provides

  10. Hinged Dissections Exist

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, Timothy G; Charlton, David; Demaine, Erik D; Demaine, Martin L; Kominers, Scott D

    2007-01-01

    We prove that any finite collection of polygons of equal area has a common hinged dissection. That is, for any such collection of polygons there exists a chain of polygons hinged at vertices that can be folded in the plane continuously without self-intersection to form any polygon in the collection. This result settles the open problem about the existence of hinged dissections between pairs of polygons that goes back implicitly to 1864 and has been studied extensively in the past ten years. Our result generalizes and indeed builds upon the result from 1814 that polygons have common dissections (without hinges). We also extend our common dissection result to edge-hinged dissections of solid 3D polyhedra that have a common (unhinged) dissection, as determined by Dehn's 1900 solution to Hilbert's Third Problem. Our proofs are constructive, giving explicit algorithms in all cases. For a constant number of planar polygons, both the number of pieces and running time required by our construction are pseudopolynomial...

  11. Quaternary Reorganization of North American Mid-continent Drainage Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, E. C.; Rawling, J. E., III; Attig, J. W.; Bates, B. R.

    2013-12-01

    changes to the total discharge of the St. Lawrence and Mississippi Rivers. While it is unclear if the Teays River ever flowed into the St. Lawrence drainage or developed as a westward-flowing tributary to the buried Mahomet valley in Illinois, both the ancestral Pittsburgh and Wyalusing Rivers originated as headwaters of the St. Lawrence basin before being rerouted as part of the Mississippi basin. The areas formerly drained by the Pittsburgh and Wyalusing Rivers comprise ~8% of the modern Mississippi River basin, and modern discharge from those areas represent ~14% of the mean annual discharge of the Mississippi River. The transfer of this drainage area and discharge to the Mississippi basin is mirrored by an equivalent loss from the St. Lawrence system during the Quaternary as a direct result of glacially-driven drainage system reorganization.

  12. Light signaling controls nuclear architecture reorganization during seedling establishment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bourbousse, C.; Mestiri, I.; Zabulon, G.; Bourge, M.; Formiggini, F.; Koini, M.A.; Brown, S.C.; Fransz, P.; Bowler, C.; Barneche, F.

    2015-01-01

    The spatial organization of chromatin can be subject to extensive remodeling in plant somatic cells in response to developmental and environmental signals. However, the mechanisms controlling these dynamic changes and their functional impact on nuclear activity are poorly understood. Here, we determ

  13. Lebesgue Sets Immeasurable Existence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Marginean Petrovai

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the notion of measure and integral were released early enough in close connection with practical problems of measuring of geometric figures. Notion of measure was outlined in the early 20th century through H. Lebesgue’s research, founder of the modern theory of measure and integral. It was developed concurrently a technique of integration of functions. Gradually it was formed a specific area todaycalled the measure and integral theory. Essential contributions to building this theory was made by a large number of mathematicians: C. Carathodory, J. Radon, O. Nikodym, S. Bochner, J. Pettis, P. Halmos and many others. In the following we present several abstract sets, classes of sets. There exists the sets which are not Lebesgue measurable and the sets which are Lebesgue measurable but are not Borel measurable. Hence B ⊂ L ⊂ P(X.

  14. Comparing Spatial Predictions

    KAUST Repository

    Hering, Amanda S.

    2011-11-01

    Under a general loss function, we develop a hypothesis test to determine whether a significant difference in the spatial predictions produced by two competing models exists on average across the entire spatial domain of interest. The null hypothesis is that of no difference, and a spatial loss differential is created based on the observed data, the two sets of predictions, and the loss function chosen by the researcher. The test assumes only isotropy and short-range spatial dependence of the loss differential but does allow it to be non-Gaussian, non-zero-mean, and spatially correlated. Constant and nonconstant spatial trends in the loss differential are treated in two separate cases. Monte Carlo simulations illustrate the size and power properties of this test, and an example based on daily average wind speeds in Oklahoma is used for illustration. Supplemental results are available online. © 2011 American Statistical Association and the American Society for Qualitys.

  15. A major reorganization of Asian climate regime by the early Miocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. T. Guo

    2008-05-01

    system. Meanwhile, the well-developed Luvisols evidence the existence of circulations from the ocean, which brought moisture to northern China. These imply the coexistence of two kinds of circulations, one from the ocean as moisture carrier and another from the inland deserts as dust transporter. The accretionary properties of the early Miocene paleosols, resulted from interactive soil-forming and dust deposition processes, evidence two seasonally alternative circulations, i.e. a monsoonal climate regime. The much stronger development of the early Miocene soils compared to those in the Quaternary loess indicates significantly stronger summer monsoons.

    These lines of evidence indicate a joint change in circulations and inland aridity by the early Miocene, and suggest a dynamic linkage of them. Our recent numerical experiments reconfirm the potential roles of Tibetan uplift and Paratethys shrinkage in triggering this major climate reorganization, as revealed in peer studies, but yielded more details about their combined scenarios. These two factors would have coacted with the help of South China Sea spreading. Although the realistic effects of each factor remain to be further discriminated, probably through more paleoaltimetrical and tectonic approaches, the Miocene loess record provides a vital insight that tectonics had evolved to a threshold by the early Miocene to cause this major climate reorganization in Asia.

  16. Cyberspace: Time to Reassess, Reorganize, and Resource for Evolving Threats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources , gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing this collection of...cyberspace as notional and non-existent. The 1982 Disney movie TRON contributes to this fantasy by portraying humans entering into cyberspace via an...make cyberspace a very high priority. High priority equates to additional funding within the national budget. As the DoD reduces the size of the

  17. Historical Evolution of Spatial Abilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ardila

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Historical evolution and cross-cultural differences in spatial abilities are analyzed. Spatial abilities have been found to be significantly associated with the complexity of geographical conditions and survival demands. Although impaired spatial cognition is found in cases of, exclusively or predominantly, right hemisphere pathology, it is proposed that this asymmetry may depend on the degree of training in spatial abilities. It is further proposed that spatial cognition might have evolved in a parallel way with cultural evolution and environmental demands. Contemporary city humans might be using spatial abilities in some new, conceptual tasks that did not exist in prehistoric times: mathematics, reading, writing, mechanics, music, etc. Cross-cultural analysis of spatial abilities in different human groups, normalization of neuropsychological testing instruments, and clinical observations of spatial ability disturbances in people with different cultural backgrounds and various spatial requirements, are required to construct a neuropsychological theory of brain organization of spatial cognition.

  18. Extrastriate visual cortex reorganizes despite sequential bilateral occipital stroke: implications for vision recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy eBrodtmann

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The extent of visual cortex reorganization following injury remains controversial. We report serial functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data from a patient with sequential posterior circulation strokes occurring three weeks apart, compared with data from an age-matched healthy control subject. At 8 days following a left occipital stroke, contralesional visual cortical activation was within expected striate and extrastriate sites, comparable to that seen in controls. Despite a further infarct in the right (previously unaffected hemisphere, there was evolution of visual cortical reorganization progressed. In this patient, there was evidence of utilization of peri-infarct sites (right-sided and recruitment of new activation sites in extrastriate cortices, including in the lateral middle and inferior temporal lobes. The changes over time corresponded topographically with the patient’s lesion site and its connections. Reorganization of the surviving visual cortex was demonstrated 8 days after the first stroke. Ongoing reorganization in extant cortex was demonstrated at the 6 month scan. We present a summary of mechanisms of recovery following stroke relevant to the visual system. We conclude that mature primary visual cortex displays considerable plasticity and capacity to reorganize, associated with evolution of visual field deficits. We discuss these findings and their implications for therapy within the context of current concepts in visual compensatory and restorative therapies.

  19. Reorganization of visual processing in macular degeneration is not specific to the "preferred retinal locus".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilks, Daniel D; Baker, Chris I; Peli, Eli; Kanwisher, Nancy

    2009-03-04

    Recent work has shown that foveal cortex, deprived of its normal bottom-up input as a result of macular degeneration (MD), begins responding to stimuli presented to a peripheral retinal location. However, these studies have only presented stimuli to the "preferred retinal location," or PRL, a spared part of the peripheral retina used by individuals with MD for fixating, face recognition, reading, and other visual tasks. Thus, previous research has not yet answered a question critical for understanding the mechanisms underlying this reorganization: Does formerly foveal cortex respond only to stimuli presented at the PRL, or does it also respond to other peripheral locations of similar eccentricity? If foveal cortex responds to stimuli at PRL because it is the long-term habitual use of this region as a functional fovea that drives the formerly foveal cortex to respond to stimuli presented at the PRL (the "use-dependent reorganization" hypothesis), then foveal cortex will not respond to stimuli presented at other locations. Alternatively, it may be that foveal cortex responds to any peripheral retinal input, independent of whether input at that retinal location has been chronically attended for months or years (the "use-independent reorganization" hypothesis). Using fMRI, we found clear activation of formerly foveal cortex to stimuli presented at either the PRL or an isoeccentric non-PRL location in two individuals with MD, supporting the use-independent reorganization hypothesis. This finding suggests that reorganization is driven by passive, not use-dependent mechanisms.

  20. Burnout in health-care professionals during reorganizations and downsizing. A cohort study in nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall-Lord Marie-Louise

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burnout is a psychological reaction triggered by interaction between personal characteristics and stress factors. Reorganizations and downsizing with increased workload imply stress for health-care professionals. This is a study of burnout in nurses during a period with two comprehensive reorganizations. Methods In this quasi-experimental retrospective cohort study, burnout was assessed in nurses with long work experience in three surveys during a 30 months' period with two comprehensive reorganizations and downsizing of a hospital unit with mostly seriously ill patients with cancer. Burnout was measured with Bergen Burnout Indicator (BBI at each survey, and "Sense of Coherence" (SOC with Antonovsky's questionnaire at the last survey. Results One man and 45 women aged 30 to 65 years were invited to the surveys. There was a significant increase in burnout during the study period, the mean increase in BBI-score was 12.5 pr year (p Conclusions There was a significant development of burnout in a group of nurses during a period with two reorganizations and downsizing. Burnout was associated with low SOC. Working with seriously ill patients with cancer has probably made the nurses exceptionally vulnerable to the stress and workload related to the reorganizations.

  1. Extrastriate visual cortex reorganizes despite sequential bilateral occipital stroke: implications for vision recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodtmann, Amy; Puce, Aina; Darby, David; Donnan, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    The extent of visual cortex reorganization following injury remains controversial. We report serial functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data from a patient with sequential posterior circulation strokes occurring 3 weeks apart, compared with data from an age-matched healthy control subject. At 8 days following a left occipital stroke, contralesional visual cortical activation was within expected striate and extrastriate sites, comparable to that seen in controls. Despite a further infarct in the right (previously unaffected hemisphere), there was evolution of visual cortical reorganization progressed. In this patient, there was evidence of utilization of peri-infarct sites (right-sided) and recruitment of new activation sites in extrastriate cortices, including in the lateral middle and inferior temporal lobes. The changes over time corresponded topographically with the patient's lesion site and its connections. Reorganization of the surviving visual cortex was demonstrated 8 days after the first stroke. Ongoing reorganization in extant cortex was demonstrated at the 6 month scan. We present a summary of mechanisms of recovery following stroke relevant to the visual system. We conclude that mature primary visual cortex displays considerable plasticity and capacity to reorganize, associated with evolution of visual field deficits. We discuss these findings and their implications for therapy within the context of current concepts in visual compensatory and restorative therapies.

  2. A modified two-sphere model for solvent reorganization energy in electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Han-Yu; Ren, Hai-Sheng; Zhu, Quan; Li, Xiang-Yuan

    2012-04-28

    In this work, the solvent reorganization energy is formulated within the framework of classical thermodynamics, by adding some external charges to construct a constrained equilibrium state. The derivation clearly shows that the reorganization energy is exactly the polarization cost for the inertial part of the polarization. We perform our derivation just within the framework of the first law of thermodynamics, and the final form of the reorganization energy is completely the same as that we gave in our recent work by defining a nonequilibrium solvation free energy. With the two-sphere model approximation, our solvent reorganization energy is derived as λ(0) = Δq(2)/2[1/r(D) + 1/r(A) - 2/d][(ε(-1)(op) - ε(-1)(s))/(1 - ε(-1)(s))]. This amends Marcus' model by a factor of (ε(-1)(op) - ε(-1)(s))/(1 - ε(-1)(s)), which is coupled with the solvent polarity. Making use of the modified expression of solvent reorganization energy, two recently reported electron transfer processes are investigated in representative solvents. The results show that our formula can well reproduce the experimental observations. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2012

  3. SPATIAL STABILITY

    OpenAIRE

    Pascal Mossay

    2004-01-01

    We consider a continuous spatial economy consisting of pure exchange local economies. Agents are allowed to change their location over time as a response to spatial utility differentials. These spatial adjustments toward higher utility neighborhoods lead the spatial economy to converge to a spatially uniform allocation of resources, provided that the matrix of price effects is quasi-negative definite. Furthermore our model provides a real time interpretation of the tâtonnement story. Also, sp...

  4. DESCRIPTION OF THE ORGANIZATIONAL AND TECHNOLOGICAL PROCESSES ON THE GROUND OF THE BASIC MODEL OF THE CYCLE OF REORGANIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gazaryan Robert Kamoevich

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this scientific research is application of the basic model of interaction between phases of a cycle of reorganization of organizational and technological processes underway at industrial enterprises. The authors describe interactions between all six phases of the process of reorganization within the framework of the basic model of a cycle that contemplates organizational and technological processes. Engineering studies are necessary to check for the feasibility of reorganization of industrial enterprises and application of results extracted from the design documentation with a view to reorganization of production activities and construction operations. Upon completion of the decision-making process concerning the need for reorganization in accordance with the basic model of interaction between phases, there occurs restructuring that incorporates processes of design and construction. The authors have demonstrated that reorganization of the basic model cycle should be used in the design of organizational and technological processes with a view to the integrated consideration of reorganization of enterprises in order to comprehend and improve the efficiency of reorganization at each stage, as well as the control over the reorganization of a construction facility.

  5. A molecular Debye-Hückel approach to the reorganization energy of electron transfer reactions in an electric cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Tiejun; Song, Xueyu

    2014-10-07

    Electron transfer near an electrode immersed in ionic fluids is studied using the linear response approximation, namely, mean value of the vertical energy gap can be used to evaluate the reorganization energy, and hence any linear response model that can treat Coulomb interactions successfully can be used for the reorganization energy calculation. Specifically, a molecular Debye-Hückel theory is used to calculate the reorganization energy of electron transfer reactions in an electric cell. Applications to electron transfer near an electrode in molten salts show that the reorganization energies from our molecular Debye-Hückel theory agree well with the results from MD simulations.

  6. Plumes Do Not Exist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, W. B.; Anderson, D. L.; Foulger, G. R.; Winterer, E. L.

    conjectures are made ever more complex and implausible to encompass contrary data, and have no predictive value. The inescapable conclusion is that deep-mantle thermal plumes not only are unneces- sary but that they do not exist.

  7. [Structural and functional reorganization of photosynthetic apparatus in cold adaptation of wheat plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venzhik, Ju V; Titov, D F; Talanova, V V; Miroslavov, E D; Koteeva, N K

    2012-01-01

    The structural and functional characteristics of the photosynthetic apparatus (PSA) and the cold resistance of wheat seedlings were studied during low-temperature adaptation. It has been established that large chloroplasts with thylakoid system of "sun type" forme in the mesophyll cells in the early hours of plants hardening. At the same time the functional reorganization of the PSA in the leaves of wheat occurs: content of pigments changes, stabilization of the pigment-protein complexes is observed, non-photochemical quenching of excess energy increases. The stabilization of photosynthesis during cold adaptation occurs due to structural and functional reorganization of the PSA. It is assumed that the reorganization of the PSA is a prerequisite for formation of increased cold resistance of leaf cells, and this, along with other physiological and biochemical changes occurring in cells and tissues of plants, allows the plants to survive in chilling.

  8. Heterochromatin Reorganization during Early Mouse Development Requires a Single-Stranded Noncoding Transcript

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Casanova

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The equalization of pericentric heterochromatin from distinct parental origins following fertilization is essential for genome function and development. The recent implication of noncoding transcripts in this process raises questions regarding the connection between RNA and the nuclear organization of distinct chromatin environments. Our study addresses the interrelationship between replication and transcription of the two parental pericentric heterochromatin (PHC domains and their reorganization during early embryonic development. We demonstrate that the replication of PHC is dispensable for its clustering at the late two-cell stage. In contrast, using parthenogenetic embryos, we show that pericentric transcripts are essential for this reorganization independent of the chromatin marks associated with the PHC domains. Finally, our discovery that only reverse pericentric transcripts are required for both the nuclear reorganization of PHC and development beyond the two-cell stage challenges current views on heterochromatin organization.

  9. Thermo-optically induced reorganizations in the main light harvesting antenna of plants. II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jens Kai; Varkonyi, Zsuzsanna; Kovacs, Laszlo

    2005-01-01

    from the same membranes. These reorganizations have earlier been assigned to originate from a thermo-optic effect. According to the thermo-optic mechanism, fast local thermal transients due to dissipation of the excess excitation energy induce elementary structural changes in the close vicinity......, together with other close similarities between the two systems, strongly suggests that the gross short-term, thermo-optically induced structural reorganizations in the membranes occur mainly, albeit probably not exclusively, in the LHCII-only domains [Boekema et al. (2000) J Mol Biol 301: 1123–1133]. Hence...

  10. Reorganization and plastic changes of the human brain associated with skill learning and expertise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongmin eChang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Novel experience and learning new skills are known as modulators of brain function. Advances in non-invasive brain imaging have provided new insight into structural and functional reorganization associated with skill learning and expertise. Especially, significant imaging evidences come from the domains of sports and music. Data from in vivo imaging studies in sports and music have provided vital information on plausible neural substrates contributing to brain reorganization underlying skill acquisition in humans. This mini review will attempt to take a narrow snapshot of imaging findings demonstrating functional and structural plasticity that mediate skill learning and expertise while identifying converging areas of interest and possible avenues for future research.

  11. М. SCHUMPETER’S INNOVATION PARADIGM AND PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEM REORGANIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kravchenko

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to the principles of the reorganization of the economic system of Ukraine. The principles of the economic system reorganization presented in the paper as a consequence Schumpeter’s theory of economic development. The main idea of the article is that institutions of modern society should systematically promote the establishment, operation and development of a new appropriation form that follows from both the role of innovation as a factor in Schumpeter’s theory of economic development and the role of social factors.

  12. Disconnection and hyper-connectivity underlie reorganization after TBI: A rodent functional connectomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, N G; Verley, D R; Gutman, B A; Thompson, P M; Yeh, H J; Brown, J A

    2016-03-01

    While past neuroimaging methods have contributed greatly to our understanding of brain function after traumatic brain injury (TBI), resting state functional MRI (rsfMRI) connectivity methods have more recently provided a far more unbiased approach with which to monitor brain circuitry compared to task-based approaches. However, current knowledge on the physiologic underpinnings of the correlated blood oxygen level dependent signal, and how changes in functional connectivity relate to reorganizational processes that occur following injury is limited. The degree and extent of this relationship remain to be determined in order that rsfMRI methods can be fully adapted for determining the optimal timing and type of rehabilitative interventions that can be used post-TBI to achieve the best outcome. Very few rsfMRI studies exist after experimental TBI and therefore we chose to acquire rsfMRI data before and at 7, 14 and 28 days after experimental TBI using a well-known, clinically-relevant, unilateral controlled cortical impact injury (CCI) adult rat model of TBI. This model was chosen since it has widespread axonal injury, a well-defined time-course of reorganization including spine, dendrite, axonal and cortical map changes, as well as spontaneous recovery of sensorimotor function by 28 d post-injury from which to interpret alterations in functional connectivity. Data were co-registered to a parcellated rat template to generate adjacency matrices for network analysis by graph theory. Making no assumptions about direction of change, we used two-tailed statistical analysis over multiple brain regions in a data-driven approach to access global and regional changes in network topology in order to assess brain connectivity in an unbiased way. Our main hypothesis was that deficits in functional connectivity would become apparent in regions known to be structurally altered or deficient in axonal connectivity in this model. The data show the loss of functional connectivity

  13. Facilities Improvement for Sustainability of Existing Public Office ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sultan

    2Faculty of Technology Management and Business, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn ... The features were classified into Spatial Plan, Structure and Facilities, ..... audio and emergency buttons that call into the ..... Existing School Buildings: A Case.

  14. Deglacial intermediate water reorganization: new evidence from the Indian Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Romahn

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The importance of intermediate water masses in climate change and ocean circulation has been emphasized recently. In particular, Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW is thought to have acted as an active interhemispheric transmitter of climate anomalies. Here we reconstruct changes in AAIW signature and spatial and temporal evolution based on a 40 kyr time series of oxygen and carbon isotopes as well as planktic Mg/Ca based thermometry from a site in the western Indian Ocean. Our data suggest that AAIW transmitted Antarctic temperature trends to the equatorial Indian Ocean via the "oceanic tunnel" mechanism. Moreover, our results reveal that deglacial AAIW carried a signature of aged Southern Ocean deep water. We find no evidence of increased formation of intermediate waters during the deglaciation.

  15. Spatial Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-19

    for a city . Spatial attributes are used to define the spatial location and extent of spatial objects [35]. The spatial attributes of a spatial object...regarding both geometry and thematic differentiation. It can be used to model 2.5D data (e.g., digital terrain model), as well as 3D data ( walkable ...within a city , if the coverage area of a wireless antenna is considered to be the visible area, then the union of coverage areas of all the antennas in

  16. Inter-hemispheric language functional reorganization in low-grade glioma patients after tumour surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kristo, Gert; Raemaekers, Mathijs; Rutten, Geert Jan; de Gelder, Beatrice; Ramsey, Nick F.

    2015-01-01

    Despite many claims of functional reorganization following tumour surgery, empirical studies that investigate changes in functional activation patterns are rare. This study investigates whether functional recovery following surgical treatment in patients with a low-grade glioma in the left hemispher

  17. Cortical Reorganization in Dyslexic Children after Phonological Training: Evidence from Early Evoked Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spironelli, Chiara; Penolazzi, Barbara; Vio, Claudio; Angrilli, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    Brain plasticity was investigated in 14 Italian children affected by developmental dyslexia after 6 months of phonological training. The means used to measure language reorganization was the recognition potential, an early wave, also called N150, elicited by automatic word recognition. This component peaks over the left temporo-occipital cortex…

  18. 75 FR 26198 - Foreign-Trade Zone 152 - Burns Harbor, Indiana, Application for Reorganization under Alternative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-11

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 152 - Burns Harbor, Indiana, Application for Reorganization...-purpose zone currently consists of six sites in the Burns Harbor/Gary, Indiana area: Site 1: (533,288 sq...); Site 2: (441 acres) within the Port of Indiana/Burns International Harbor, Burns Harbor (Porter...

  19. Cortical Development, Plasticity and Re-Organization in Children with Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anu; Nash, Amy A.; Dorman, Michael

    2009-01-01

    A basic tenet of developmental neurobiology is that certain areas of the cortex will re-organize, if appropriate stimulation is withheld for long periods. Stimulation must be delivered to a sensory system within a narrow window of time (a sensitive period) if that system is to develop normally. In this article, we will describe age cut-offs for a…

  20. Differential reorganization of fusiform gyrus in two types of alexia after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyun, Sung-Bom; Sohn, Hyo-Jeong; Jung, Jae-Bum; Nam, Kichun

    2007-10-01

    Lesions affecting the left fusiform gyrus (FG) commonly result in dyslexia and recovery largely depends on efficient reorganization of the reading network. We performed a follow-up fMRI study to elucidate the reorganization patterns of the FG according to the recovery of reading ability in two patients (MH with pure alexia and KM with alexia with agraphia) after stroke involving the left FG. Initially, MH was an effortful letter-by-letter (LBL) reader, and she improved to become a proficient LBL reader. The initial fMRI results showed scattered activation on occipital and ventral temporal cortex during reading, which was localized to right FG in the follow-up study. KM's severe alexia with agraphia did not improve, even after 6 months had passed since the onset of the alexia. The initial and follow-up fMRI results showed no significant activation in the bilateral FG or central higher language areas during word reading. Our results suggest that the reorganization of the FG is different according to the type of alexia and the amount of clinical recovery in each patient. Also, the successful reorganization of the visual component of reading in the right FG is responsible for the recovery of LBL reading in pure alexia.

  1. 78 FR 60695 - Regulatory Reorganization; Administrative Changes to Regulations Due to the Consolidation of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... Fiscal Service Bureau of the Fiscal Service 31 CFR Chapter II, Parts 202-391 RIN 1510-AB31 Regulatory Reorganization; Administrative Changes to Regulations Due to the Consolidation of the Financial Management Service and the Bureau of the Public Debt Into the Bureau of the Fiscal Service AGENCY: Bureau of...

  2. 75 FR 61051 - Reorganization of Title 30, Code of Federal Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-04

    ... reorganization, the Secretary renamed MMS's Minerals Revenue Management Program (MRM) the Office of Natural... of Natural Resources Revenue (ONRR); the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM); and the Bureau of.... Part 243--Suspensions Pending Appeal and Bonding--Minerals Revenue Management, which becomes part...

  3. 76 FR 38555 - Reorganization of Title 30, Code of Federal Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    ... that the Minerals Revenue Management Program (MRM) of the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 250 Office of Natural Resources Revenue 30 CFR Parts 1204, 1206, 1218, 1241, and 1290 RIN 1012-AA06 Reorganization of Title 30, Code...

  4. 78 FR 24154 - Notice of Availability of a National Animal Health Laboratory Network Reorganization Concept Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ... Network Reorganization Concept Paper AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION... Plant Health Inspection Service is making available a concept paper that describes a revised structure... paper we are making available for comment presents a structure we believe will give the NAHLN increased...

  5. Kinetics of structural reorganizations in multilamellarphotosynthetic membranes monitored by small-angle neutronscattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagy, Gergely; Kovacs, Laszlo; Unnep, Renata;

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the power of time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering experiments for the investigation of the structure and structural reorganizations of multilamellar photosynthetic membranes. In addition to briefly summarizing our results on thylakoid membranes isolated from higher plants a...

  6. NMDAR-regulated dynamics of layer 4 neuronal dendrites during thalamocortical reorganization in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Hidenobu; Luo, Wenshu; Tarusawa, Etsuko; Saito, Yoshikazu M; Sato, Takuya; Yoshimura, Yumiko; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Iwasato, Takuji

    2014-04-16

    Thalamocortical (TC) connectivity is reorganized by thalamic inputs during postnatal development; however, the dynamic characteristics of TC reorganization and the underlying mechanisms remain unexplored. We addressed this question using dendritic refinement of layer 4 (L4) stellate neurons in mouse barrel cortex (barrel cells) as a model; dendritic refinement of L4 neurons is a critical component of TC reorganization through which postsynaptic L4 neurons acquire their dendritic orientation toward presynaptic TC axon termini. Simultaneous labeling of TC axons and individual barrel cell dendrites allowed in vivo time-lapse imaging of dendritic refinement in the neonatal cortex. The barrel cells reinforced the dendritic orientation toward TC axons by dynamically moving their branches. In N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-deficient barrel cells, this dendritic motility was enhanced, and the orientation bias was not reinforced. Our data suggest that L4 neurons have "fluctuating" dendrites during TC reorganization and that NMDARs cell autonomously regulate these dynamics to establish fine-tuned circuits.

  7. Reassessing cortical reorganization in the primary sensorimotor cortex following arm amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makin, Tamar R; Scholz, Jan; Henderson Slater, David; Johansen-Berg, Heidi; Tracey, Irene

    2015-08-01

    The role of cortical activity in generating and abolishing chronic pain is increasingly emphasized in the clinical community. Perhaps the most striking example of this is the maladaptive plasticity theory, according to which phantom pain arises from remapping of cortically neighbouring representations (lower face) into the territory of the missing hand following amputation. This theory has been extended to a wide range of chronic pain conditions, such as complex regional pain syndrome. Yet, despite its growing popularity, the evidence to support the maladaptive plasticity theory is largely based on correlations between pain ratings and oftentimes crude measurements of cortical reorganization, with little consideration of potential contributions of other clinical factors, such as adaptive behaviour, in driving the identified brain plasticity. Here, we used a physiologically meaningful measurement of cortical reorganization to reassess its relationship to phantom pain in upper limb amputees. We identified small yet consistent shifts in lip representation contralateral to the missing hand towards, but not invading, the hand area. However, we were unable to identify any statistical relationship between cortical reorganization and phantom sensations or pain either with this measurement or with the traditional Euclidian distance measurement. Instead, we demonstrate that other factors may contribute to the observed remapping. Further research that reassesses more broadly the relationship between cortical reorganization and chronic pain is warranted.

  8. [The reorganization of the schema and body image of the amputee].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgi, Ines; Gobba, Omar; Manera, Marina

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with the psychological problems related to the amputee's experience. The stages of the reorganization of the body image and the problems that may arise, are described. In this process the phantom limb syndrome represents an important paradigm for study and reflection.

  9. Language localization in cases of left temporal lobe arachnoid cyst : Evidence against interhemispheric reorganization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stowe, LA; Go, KG; Pruim, J; den Dunnen, W; Meiners, LC; Paans, AMJ

    2000-01-01

    We investigated whether left-hemisphere arachnoid cysts lead to reorganization of the language function using PET. A group analysis demonstrated that patients showed no more right-hemisphere activation than a matched control group. Several patients had clear language localizations in the left hemisp

  10. 26 CFR 1.1502-30 - Stock basis after certain triangular reorganizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stock basis after certain triangular... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Basis, Stock Ownership, and Earnings and Profits Rules § 1.1502-30 Stock basis after certain triangular reorganizations. (a) Scope. This section provides...

  11. Large impact of reorganization energy on photovoltaic conversion due to interfacial charge-transfer transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Jun-ichi

    2015-05-14

    Interfacial charge-transfer (ICT) transitions are expected to be a novel charge-separation mechanism for efficient photovoltaic conversion featuring one-step charge separation without energy loss. Photovoltaic conversion due to ICT transitions has been investigated using several TiO2-organic hybrid materials that show organic-to-inorganic ICT transitions in the visible region. In applications of ICT transitions to photovoltaic conversion, there is a significant problem that rapid carrier recombination is caused by organic-inorganic electronic coupling that is necessary for the ICT transitions. In order to solve this problem, in this work, I have theoretically studied light-to-current conversions due to the ICT transitions on the basis of the Marcus theory with density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) calculations. An apparent correlation between the reported incident photon-to-current conversion efficiencies (IPCE) and calculated reorganization energies was clearly found, in which the IPCE increases with decreasing the reorganization energy consistent with the Marcus theory in the inverted region. This activation-energy dependence was systematically explained by the equation formulated by the Marcus theory based on a simple excited-state kinetic scheme. This result indicates that the reduction of the reorganization energy can suppress the carrier recombination and enhance the IPCE. The reorganization energy is predominantly governed by the structural change in the chemical-adsorption moiety between the ground and ICT excited states. This work provides crucial knowledge for efficient photovoltaic conversion due to ICT transitions.

  12. Sleep EEG Changes during Adolescence: An Index of a Fundamental Brain Reorganization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Irwin; Campbell, Ian G.

    2010-01-01

    Delta (1-4 Hz) EEG power in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep declines massively during adolescence. This observation stimulated the hypothesis that during adolescence the human brain undergoes an extensive reorganization driven by synaptic elimination. The parallel declines in synaptic density, delta wave amplitude and cortical metabolic rate…

  13. Stimulation through Simulation? Motor Imagery and Functional Reorganization in Hemiplegic Stroke Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-Frey, Scott H.

    2004-01-01

    A key factor influencing reorganization of function in damaged neural networks of the adult brain is stimulation. How to stimulate motor areas of patients with paralyses is a formidable challenge. One possibility is to use internal movement simulations, or motor imagery, as an alternative to conventional therapeutic interventions that require…

  14. 13 CFR 108.470 - SBA approval of merger, consolidation, or reorganization of NMVC Company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., consolidation, or reorganization of NMVC Company. 108.470 Section 108.470 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM Changes in Ownership, Structure, or Control Change in Structure of Nmvc Company § 108.470 SBA approval of merger, consolidation,...

  15. 7 CFR 4290.470 - Prior approval of merger, consolidation, or reorganization of RBIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANY (âRBICâ) PROGRAM Changes in Ownership, Structure, or Control Change in Structure of Rbic § 4290.470 Prior approval of merger, consolidation, or reorganization of RBIC. You may not merge, consolidate, change form of organization (corporation, limited liability company, or...

  16. Reorganization of Elementary Educational System and Commutation of Children to Collective Commune Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palonka, Krystyna Maria

    Between 1973-1979, the elementary educational system in rural areas of Poland has been reorganized into a system of collective commune schools; students commute or are bused to the schools. Since September 1973, 944 new collective commune schools have been set up. A study of the data indicates that the process of setting up collective commune…

  17. Thermodynamics for nonequilibrium solvation and numerical evaluation of solvent reorganization energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This work presents a thermodynamic method for treating nonequilibrium solvation. By imposing an extra electric field onto the nonequilibrium solvation system, a virtual constrained equilibrium state is prepared. In this way, the free energy difference between the real nonequilibrium state and the con-strained equilibrium one is simply the potential energy of the nonequilibrium polarization in the extra electronic field, according to thermodynamics. Further, new expressions of nonequilibrium solvation energy and solvent reorganization energy have been formulated. Analysis shows that the present formulations will give a value of reorganization energy about one half of the traditional Marcus theory in polar solvents, thus the explanation on why the traditional theory tends to overestimate this quantity has been found out. For the purpose of numerical determination of solvent reorganization energy, we have modified Gamess program on the basis of dielectric polarizable continuum model. Applying the procedure to the well-investigated intramolecular electron transfer in biphenyl-androstane-naphthyl and biphenyl-androstane-phenanthryl systems, the numerical results of solvent reorganization energy have been found to be in good agreement with the experimental fittings.

  18. Photoinduced Reorganization of Motor-Doped Chiral Liquid Crystals : Bridging Molecular Isomerization and Texture Rotation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosco, Alessandro; Jongejan, Mahthild G. M.; Eelkema, Rienk; Katsonis, Nathalie; Lacaze, Ernmanuelle; Ferrarini, Alberta; Feringa, Ben L.; Lacaze, Emmanuelle

    2008-01-01

    We recently reported that the photoisomerization of molecular motors used as chiral dopants in a cholesteric liquid crystal film induces a rotational reorganization which can be observed by optical microscopy and produces the motion of microscopic objects placed on top of the film (Feringa, B. L.;

  19. Reorganization of Functional Connectivity as a Correlate of Cognitive Recovery in Acquired Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Nazareth P.; Paul, Nuria; Ordonez, Victoria E.; Demuynck, Olivier; Bajo, Ricardo; Campo, Pablo; Bilbao, Alvaro; Ortiz, Tomas; del-Pozo, Francisco; Maestu, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive processes require a functional interaction between specialized multiple, local and remote brain regions. Although these interactions can be strongly altered by an acquired brain injury, brain plasticity allows network reorganization to be principally responsible for recovery. The present work evaluates the impact of brain injury on…

  20. A Voronoi-based spatial algebra for spatial relations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Spatial relation between spatial objects is a very important topic for spatial reasoning, query and analysis in geographical information systems (GIS). The most popular models in current use have fundamental deficiencies in theory. In this paper, a generic algebra for spatial relations is presented, in which (i) appropriate operators from set operators (i.e. union, intersection, difference, difference by, symmetric difference, etc.) are utilized to distinguish the spatial relations between neighboring spatial objects; (ii) three types of values are used for the computational results of set operations-content, dimension and number of connected components; and (iii) a spatial object is treated as a whole but the Voronoi region of an object is employed to enhance its interaction with its neighbours. This algebra overcomes the shortcomings of the existing models and it can effectively describe the relations of spatial objects.

  1. Cost Analysis of Spatial Data Production as Part of Business Intelligence Within the Mapping Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisa, A.; Erkek, B.; Çolak, S.

    2012-07-01

    Business intelligence is becoming an important strategic tool for business management. Companies have invested significant resources in applications for customer relationship management (CRM), supply chain management (SCM), enterprise resource planning (ERP), e-commerce, among others, which collect vast amounts of data. Today, these same companies are realizing that no matter how robust their application feature sets are, without an equally robust BI mechanism to make use of the collected data, these applications are ultimately coming up short. They do not provide actionable information to end users nor can they give a global understanding among all the organization's information from the various databases for accounting, CRM, and so on. General Directorate of Land Registry and Cadastre (GDLRC) is the leader organizations in Turkey on the field of mapping-land registry-cadastre. GDLRC has executed spatial based projects on the way National Spatial Data Infrastructure especially from the beginnings of 2000s. such as; Continuously Operating GPS Reference Stations (TUSAGA-Aktif), Geo-Metadata Portal (HBB), Orthophoto-Base Map Production and web services, Completion of Initial Cadastre, Cadastral Renovation Project (TKMP), Land Registry and Cadastre Information System (TAKBIS), Turkish National Spatial Data Infrastructure Project (TNSDI), Ottoman Land Registry Archive Information System (TARBIS). Most of this project has been completed. Some software has been developed within the mentioned project, especially reporting for management level to take decision. In the year of 2010 a new law launched and forced to reorganization of General Directorate of Land Registry and Cadastre. The new structural changes effected to whole organization, management understanding, carrier understanding so on. Even in mapping department which is spatial data producer, now there is no technician, there is no section; there are new carrier as experts. Because of that, all procedures and

  2. Unresolved Trauma in Mothers: Intergenerational Effects and the Role of Reorganization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udita eIyengar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A mother’s unresolved trauma may interfere with her ability to sensitively respond to her infant, thus affecting the development of attachment in her own child, and potentially contributing to the intergenerational transmission of trauma. One novel construct within the Dynamic Maturational Model of Attachment and Adaptation (DMM coding of the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI is reorganization, a process whereby speakers are actively changing their understanding of past and present experiences and moving toward attachment security. We conducted a study of mothers with unresolved trauma, exploring their own attachment classification, attachment outcomes of their children, and the potential effects of reorganization on child attachment. Forty-seven first-time mothers participated in the AAI during pregnancy, and returned with their child at 11 months to assess child attachment using the Strange Situation Procedure. Mothers with and without unresolved trauma were compared. We found that mothers with unresolved trauma had insecure attachment themselves and were more likely to have infants with insecure attachment. However, the one exception was that all of the mothers with unresolved trauma who were reorganizing towards secure attachment had infants with secure attachment. These preliminary findings suggest that mothers who are reorganizing may be able to more sensitively respond to their child’s cues, contributing to the development of secure attachment. While our results need to be replicated in a larger cohort, this study is the first to explore the construct of reorganization and its potential relationship with child attachment. If confirmed in future studies, it may provide clinical insight into the intergenerational transmission of insecure attachment within the context of unresolved trauma.

  3. Neural network remodeling underlying motor map reorganization induced by rehabilitative training after ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Naohiko; Shiromoto, Takashi; Himi, Naoyuki; Lu, Feng; Maruyama-Nakamura, Emi; Narita, Kazuhiko; Iwachidou, Nobuhisa; Yagita, Yoshiki; Miyamoto, Osamu

    2016-12-17

    Motor map reorganization is believed to be one mechanism underlying rehabilitation-induced functional recovery. Although the ipsilesional secondary motor area has been known to reorganize motor maps and contribute to rehabilitation-induced functional recovery, it is unknown how the secondary motor area is reorganized by rehabilitative training. In the present study, using skilled forelimb reaching tasks, we investigated neural network remodeling in the rat rostral forelimb area (RFA) of the secondary motor area during 4weeks of rehabilitative training. Following photothrombotic stroke in the caudal forelimb area (CFA), rehabilitative training led to task-specific recovery and motor map reorganization in the RFA. A second injury to the RFA resulted in reappearance of motor deficits. Further, when both the CFA and RFA were destroyed simultaneously, rehabilitative training no longer improved task-specific recovery. In neural tracer studies, although rehabilitative training did not alter neural projection to the RFA from other brain areas, rehabilitative training increased neural projection from the RFA to the lower spinal cord, which innervates the muscles in the forelimb. Double retrograde tracer studies revealed that rehabilitative training increased the neurons projecting from the RFA to both the upper cervical cord, which innervates the muscles in the neck, trunk, and part of the proximal forelimb, and the lower cervical cord. These results suggest that neurons projecting to the upper cervical cord provide new connections to the denervated forelimb area of the spinal cord, and these new connections may contribute to rehabilitation-induced task-specific recovery and motor map reorganization in the secondary motor area.

  4. [Impact of reorganization of the Hungarian system of intensive care units in 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresz, Miklós

    2016-10-01

    In 2012, the Hungarian system of intensive care units was reorganized. During this process, multidisciplinary units were separated from observation units. The author analysed certain indicators of the remaining intensive care units. The study was based on reports of National Health Insurance Fund between 2000 and 2015. After reorganization the number of the multidisciplinary intensive care units decreased by 20% and the number of beds decreased by 10%. Due to the reorganization, both the case-mix index and the days of mechanical ventilation increased significantly in the multidisciplinary intensive care units. In 2000, 12% of the patients were discharged directly from the intensive care units to home, but by 2014, this figure decreased to 3%. The bed-occupancy rate of the intensive care units did not change fundamentally and it was under 80% in each calendar day. In addition to the ICD leading groups I and J, the rate of "Sine morbo" (U9990) diagnosis decreased from 0.7% to 0.2%. Similarly, the ratio of R group which describes only symptoms decreased from 1.7% to 1.1%. In contrast, between the interventions the number of fluid and electrolyte imbalances and respiratory monitoring showed more than twofold increase. These results suggest that the reorganization was effective. The activity of the intensive care units has improved significantly, without disturbing patient care. The author suggests further analysis on the basis of the same criteria for other departments and the consistent continuation of the reorganization process. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(44), 1757-1761.

  5. Super-resolution microscopy reveals the insulin-resistance-regulated reorganization of GLUT4 on plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lan; Chen, Junling; Gao, Jing; Wang, Hongda; Xiong, Wenyong

    2017-01-15

    GLUT4 (also known as SLC2A4) is essential for glucose uptake in skeletal muscles and adipocytes, which play central roles in whole-body glucose metabolism. Here, using direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) to investigate the characteristics of plasma-membrane-fused GLUT4 at the single-molecule level, we have demonstrated that insulin and insulin resistance regulate the spatial organization of GLUT4 in adipocytes. Stimulation with insulin shifted the balance of GLUT4 on the plasma membrane toward a more dispersed configuration. In contrast, insulin resistance induced a more clustered distribution of GLUT4 and increased the mean number of molecules per cluster. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that the F(5)QQI motif and lipid rafts mediate the maintenance of GLUT4 clusters on the plasma membrane. Mutation of F(5)QQI (F(5)QQA-GLUT4) induced a more clustered distribution of GLUT4; moreover, destruction of lipid rafts in adipocytes expressing F(5)QQA-GLUT4 dramatically decreased the percentage of large clusters and the mean number of molecules per cluster. In conclusion, our data clarify the effects of insulin stimulation or insulin resistance on GLUT4 reorganization on the plasma membrane and reveal new pathogenic mechanisms of insulin resistance.

  6. Topological reorganization of odor representations in the olfactory bulb.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Yaksi

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Odors are initially represented in the olfactory bulb (OB by patterns of sensory input across the array of glomeruli. Although activated glomeruli are often widely distributed, glomeruli responding to stimuli sharing molecular features tend to be loosely clustered and thus establish a fractured chemotopic map. Neuronal circuits in the OB transform glomerular patterns of sensory input into spatiotemporal patterns of output activity and thereby extract information about a stimulus. It is, however, unknown whether the chemotopic spatial organization of glomerular inputs is maintained during these computations. To explore this issue, we measured spatiotemporal patterns of odor-evoked activity across thousands of individual neurons in the zebrafish OB by temporally deconvolved two-photon Ca(2+ imaging. Mitral cells and interneurons were distinguished by transgenic markers and exhibited different response selectivities. Shortly after response onset, activity patterns exhibited foci of activity associated with certain chemical features throughout all layers. During the subsequent few hundred milliseconds, however, MC activity was locally sparsened within the initial foci in an odor-specific manner. As a consequence, chemotopic maps disappeared and activity patterns became more informative about precise odor identity. Hence, chemotopic maps of glomerular input activity are initially transmitted to OB outputs, but not maintained during pattern processing. Nevertheless, transient chemotopic maps may support neuronal computations by establishing important synaptic interactions within the circuit. These results provide insights into the functional topology of neural activity patterns and its potential role in circuit function.

  7. Spatial cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Mary Kister; Remington, Roger

    1988-01-01

    Spatial cognition is the ability to reason about geometric relationships in the real (or a metaphorical) world based on one or more internal representations of those relationships. The study of spatial cognition is concerned with the representation of spatial knowledge, and our ability to manipulate these representations to solve spatial problems. Spatial cognition is utilized most critically when direct perceptual cues are absent or impoverished. Examples are provided of how human spatial cognitive abilities impact on three areas of space station operator performance: orientation, path planning, and data base management. A videotape provides demonstrations of relevant phenomena (e.g., the importance of orientation for recognition of complex, configural forms). The presentation is represented by abstract and overhead visuals only.

  8. The Ambivalence of Creative Activism as a Reorganization of Critique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrebye, Silas

    2015-01-01

    This article identifies an emerging type of critique and defines it as creative activism. It is argued why this is distinguishable from earlier similar forms of protests and shown why traditional theories of political art, social movements and citizenship are in themselves insufficient to accurat......This article identifies an emerging type of critique and defines it as creative activism. It is argued why this is distinguishable from earlier similar forms of protests and shown why traditional theories of political art, social movements and citizenship are in themselves insufficient...... to accurately describe and understand the normative ambivalence of what is also known as culture jamming. Irony and utopia are proposed as analytical concepts supplementing these existing theoretical frameworks. It is also demonstrated how these alternative perspectives can be fruitfully applied to understand...

  9. Visual Cross-Modal Re-Organization in Children with Cochlear Implants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Campbell

    Full Text Available Visual cross-modal re-organization is a neurophysiological process that occurs in deafness. The intact sensory modality of vision recruits cortical areas from the deprived sensory modality of audition. Such compensatory plasticity is documented in deaf adults and animals, and is related to deficits in speech perception performance in cochlear-implanted adults. However, it is unclear whether visual cross-modal re-organization takes place in cochlear-implanted children and whether it may be a source of variability contributing to speech and language outcomes. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine if visual cross-modal re-organization occurs in cochlear-implanted children, and whether it is related to deficits in speech perception performance.Visual evoked potentials (VEPs were recorded via high-density EEG in 41 normal hearing children and 14 cochlear-implanted children, aged 5-15 years, in response to apparent motion and form change. Comparisons of VEP amplitude and latency, as well as source localization results, were conducted between the groups in order to view evidence of visual cross-modal re-organization. Finally, speech perception in background noise performance was correlated to the visual response in the implanted children.Distinct VEP morphological patterns were observed in both the normal hearing and cochlear-implanted children. However, the cochlear-implanted children demonstrated larger VEP amplitudes and earlier latency, concurrent with activation of right temporal cortex including auditory regions, suggestive of visual cross-modal re-organization. The VEP N1 latency was negatively related to speech perception in background noise for children with cochlear implants.Our results are among the first to describe cross modal re-organization of auditory cortex by the visual modality in deaf children fitted with cochlear implants. Our findings suggest that, as a group, children with cochlear implants show evidence of visual cross

  10. Conformational Reorganization Coupled to the Ionization of Internal Lys Residues in Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Daniel E; Majumdar, Ananya; García-Moreno E, Bertrand

    2015-09-29

    Ionizable groups buried in the hydrophobic interior of proteins are essential for energy transduction and catalysis. Because the protein interior is usually neither as polar nor as polarizable as water, these groups tend to have anomalous pKa values, and their ionization tends to be coupled to conformational reorganization. To elucidate mechanisms of energy transduction in proteins, it is necessary to understand the structural determinants of the pKa values of these buried groups, including the range and character of the conformational reorganization that the ionization of these buried groups can elicit. The L25K and L125K variants of staphylococcal nuclease (SNase) were used to characterize the diverse types of structural reorganization that can be promoted by the ionization of buried groups. NMR relaxation dispersion and ZZ-exchange experiments were used to identify the locations and measure the time scales and extent of pH-dependent conformational exchange in these two proteins. The buried Lys-25 and Lys-125 residues titrate with pKa of 6.3 and 6.2, respectively. The L25K protein fluctuates between the native state and an ensemble of locally unfolded states on the 400 μs to 7 ms time scale. On the 100 to 500 ms time scale the native state exchanges with a subglobally unfolded state in which the β-barrel is partially reorganized. The equilibrium between the native state and this alternative state is highly pH dependent; at pH values below the pKa of Lys-25 the state with the partially reorganized β-barrel is the dominant state. In contrast, the L125K protein only exhibited pH-independent fluctuation in the microsecond to millisecond time scale in the region near Lys-125. The study illustrates how diverse and how localized the coupling between conformational reorganization and ionization of buried groups can be. The pH-sensitive exchange between the fully native and subglobally or locally unfolded states in time scales well into hundreds of milliseconds will

  11. Spatializing Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bodil Marie Stavning

    2011-01-01

    The article analyses some of artist Søren Lose's photographic installations in which time, history and narration is reflected in the creation of allegoric, spatial relations.......The article analyses some of artist Søren Lose's photographic installations in which time, history and narration is reflected in the creation of allegoric, spatial relations....

  12. Spatializing Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    The article analyses some of artist Søren Lose's photographic installations in which time, history and narration is reflected in the creation of allegoric, spatial relations.......The article analyses some of artist Søren Lose's photographic installations in which time, history and narration is reflected in the creation of allegoric, spatial relations....

  13. Axially Symmetric, Spatially Homothetic Spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Wagh, S M; Wagh, Sanjay M.; Govinder, Keshlan S.

    2002-01-01

    We show that the existence of appropriate spatial homothetic Killing vectors is directly related to the separability of the metric functions for axially symmetric spacetimes. The density profile for such spacetimes is (spatially) arbitrary and admits any equation of state for the matter in the spacetime. When used for studying axisymmetric gravitational collapse, such solutions do not result in a locally naked singularity.

  14. Applying and extending Oracle Spatial

    CERN Document Server

    Simon Gerard Greener, Siva Ravada

    2013-01-01

    This book is an advanced practical guide to applying and extending Oracle Spatial.This book is for existing users of Oracle and Oracle Spatial who have, at a minimum, basic operational experience of using Oracle or an equivalent database. Advanced skills are not required.

  15. SHOULD THE REORGANIZATION OF ADDICTION-RELATED RESEARCH ACROSS ALL THE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH BE STRUCTURAL?—THE DEVIL IS TRULY IN THE DETAILS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Bankole A.; Messing, Robert O.; Charness, Michael E.; Crabbe, John C.; Goldman, Mark S.; Harris, R. Adron; Kranzler, Henry R.; Mitchell, Mack C.; Nixon, Sara Jo; Riley, Edward P.; Schuckit, Marc A.; Sher, Kenneth J.; Thomas, Jennifer D.

    2011-01-01

    The recent proposal to dissolve the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism and National Institute on Drug Abuse and create a new institute for substance use, abuse, and addiction will require significant effort by the staff of both institutes, the Advisory Councils, and outside experts to overcome complex challenges that could threaten its success. Although integration of the grants portfolios can be achieved, harmonization of goals and policies related to legal use of alcohol versus illegal consumption of drugs will present serious challenges. Consolidating the infrastructure of the two existing institutes would entail avoiding encroachment on grant funding. A new institute for substance use, abuse, and addiction would require an enormous amount of cooperation from other institutes since the portfolios of research on alcohol, tobacco, and other drug abuse should logically be transferred to the new institute. In the near term, a structural reorganization would be less efficient and more costly than the individual institutes are currently. Increasing efficiency and reducing costs over time will necessitate careful strategic planning. Success in this difficult task would be made easier and less costly by first implementing carefully placed building blocks of increasing functional reorganization. The newly created institute should increase opportunities for specialization within disorders of addiction, attract new leadership, and build a novel strategic plan that will energize scientists and staff and incorporate ideas of stakeholders to advance the public good in preventing and treating alcohol, tobacco, and all addictions. Attention must be paid to the devil in the details. PMID:21443646

  16. The influence of psychological flexibility on work redesign: mediated moderation of a work reorganization intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Frank W; Flaxman, Paul E; Bunce, David

    2008-05-01

    This quasi-experiment tested the extent to which an individual characteristic, psychological flexibility, moderated the effects of a control-enhancing work reorganization intervention in a call center. Results indicated that, compared with a control group, this intervention produced improvements in mental health and absence rates, particularly for individuals with higher levels of psychological flexibility. Findings also showed that these moderated intervention effects were mediated by job control. Specifically, the intervention enhanced perceptions of job control, and hence its outcomes, for the people who received it, especially for those who had greater psychological flexibility. Discussion highlights the benefits of understanding the processes (e.g., mediators, moderators, and mediated moderators) involved in work reorganization interventions.

  17. Reorganization of early visual cortex functional connectivity following selective peripheral and central visual loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbah, Norman; Sanda, Nicolae; Authié, Colas N; Mohand-Saïd, Saddek; Sahel, José-Alain; Habas, Christophe; Amedi, Amir; Safran, Avinoam B

    2017-02-24

    Behavioral alterations emerging after central or peripheral vision loss suggest that cerebral reorganization occurs for both the afferented and deafferented early visual cortex (EVC). We explored the functional reorganization of the central and peripheral EVC following visual field defects specifically affecting central or peripheral vision. Compared to normally sighted, afferented central and peripheral EVC enhance their functional connectivity with areas involved in visual processing, whereas deafferented central and peripheral EVC increase their functional connectivity with more remote regions. The connectivity pattern of afferented EVC suggests adaptive changes that might enhance the visual processing capacity whereas the connectivity pattern of deafferented EVC may reflect the involvement of these regions in high-order mechanisms. Characterizing and understanding the plastic changes induced by these visual defects is essential for any attempt to develop efficient rehabilitation strategies.

  18. Effect of a reorganized after-hours family practice service on frequent attenders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedsted, Peter; Olesen, Frede

    1999-01-01

    of this reorganization on the use of services by frequent attenders (FAs). METHODS: From 1990 to 1994, methods of contact and annual costs per attender were analyzed in an ecological time-trend study based on aggregated administrative data collected from the database of the Public Health Insurance, Aarhus County......BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: A governmental reorganization of the after-hours general practice service in Denmark was launched in January 1992. The biggest change was the introduction of mandatory county-wide telephone triage systems staffed by general practitioners. This study assesses the effect......, Denmark (600,000 inhabitants). The study only included attenders ages 18 and over. FAs were defined as the group that, within each calendar year (12 months), had 4 or more contacts with the after-hours family practice service. RESULTS: FAs made up 9.5% of the attenders and accounted for more than 40...

  19. Tuning Reactivity and Electronic Properties through Ligand Reorganization within a Cerium Heterobimetallic Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Jerome R.; Gordon, Zachary; Booth, Corwin H.; Carroll, Patrick J.; Walsh, Patrick J.; Schelter, Eric J.

    2014-06-24

    Cerium compounds have played vital roles in organic, inorganic, and materials chemistry due to their reversible redox chemistry between trivalent and tetravalent oxidation states. However, attempts to rationally access molecular cerium complexes in both oxidation states have been frustrated by unpredictable reactivity in cerium(III) oxidation chemistry. Such oxidation reactions are limited by steric saturation at the metal ion, which can result in high energy activation barriers for electron transfer. An alternative approach has been realized using a rare earth/alkali metal/1,1'-BINOLate (REMB) heterobimetallic framework, which uses redox-inactive metals within the secondary coordination sphere to control ligand reorganization. The rational syntheses of functionalized cerium(IV) products and a mechanistic examination of the role of ligand reorganization in cerium(III) oxidation are presented.

  20. A Systems Survey of Progressive Host-Cell Reorganization during Rotavirus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Victoria A; Pelkmans, Lucas

    2016-07-13

    Pathogen invasion is often accompanied by widespread alterations in cellular physiology, which reflects the hijacking of host factors and processes for pathogen entry and replication. Although genetic perturbation screens have revealed the complexity of host factors involved for numerous pathogens, it has remained challenging to temporally define the progression of events in host cell reorganization during infection. We combine high-confidence genome-scale RNAi screening of host factors required for rotavirus infection in human intestinal cells with an innovative approach to infer the trajectory of virus infection from fixed cell populations. This approach reveals a comprehensive network of host cellular processes involved in rotavirus infection and implicates AMPK in initiating the development of a rotavirus-permissive environment. Our work provides a powerful approach that can be generalized to order complex host cellular requirements along a trajectory of cellular reorganization during pathogen invasion.

  1. Structural Reorganization of CNC in Injection-Molded CNC/PBAT Materials under Thermal Annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariano, Marcos; El Kissi, Nadia; Dufresne, Alain

    2016-10-04

    Composite materials were prepared by extrusion and injection molding from polybutyrate adipate terephthalate (PBAT) and high aspect ratio cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) extracted from capim dourado fibers. Three CNC contents were used, corresponding to 0.5, 1, and 2 times the theoretical percolation threshold. Small-amplitude oscillary shear (SAOS) experiments show that as the CNC content increases, a more elastic behavior is observed but no percolating network can form within the polymeric matrix as a result of the high shear rates involved during the injection-molding process. Annealing of the samples at 170 °C was performed, and the possible reorganization of the nanofiller was investigated. This reorganization was further elucidated using 2D-SAOS and creep experiments.

  2. Designed azurins show lower reorganization free energies for intraprotein electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Marshall, Nicholas M; Wherland, Scot

    2013-01-01

    and to enable potential applications in different energy conversion systems. Herein we report studies of the intramolecular ET from pulse radiolytically produced disulfide radicals to Cu(II) in rationally designed azurin mutants. In these mutants, the copper coordination sphere has been fine-tuned to span...... a wide range of reduction potentials while leaving the metal binding site effectively undisrupted. We find that the reorganization free energies of ET within the mutants are indeed lower than that of WT azurin, increasing the intramolecular ET rate constants almost 10-fold: changes that are correlated...... with increased flexibility of their copper sites. Moreover, the lower reorganization free energy results in the ET rate constants reaching a maximum value at higher driving forces, as predicted by the Marcus theory....

  3. Symmetrization in jellyfish: reorganization to regain function, and not lost parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Michael J; Goentoro, Lea

    2016-02-01

    We recently reported a previously unidentified strategy of self-repair in the moon jellyfish Aurelia aurita. Rather than regenerating lost parts, juvenile Aurelia reorganize remaining parts to regain essential body symmetry. This process that we called symmetrization is rapid and frequent, and is not driven by cell proliferation or cell death. Instead, the swimming machinery generates mechanical forces that drive symmetrization. We found evidence for symmetrization across three other species of jellyfish (Chrysaora pacifica, Mastigias sp., and Cotylorhiza tuberculata). We propose reorganization to regain function without recovery of initial morphology as a potentially broad class of self-repair strategy beyond radially symmetrical animals, and discuss the implications of this finding on the evolution of self-repair strategies in animals.

  4. Functional Cortical and Cerebellar Reorganization in a Case of Moyamoya Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrò, Rocco S.; Bramanti, Placido; Baglieri, Annalisa; Corallo, Francesco; De Luca, Rosaria; De Salvo, Simona

    2015-01-01

    Background: Functional studies have been previous reported in stroke patients, but no studies of functional magnetic resonance imaging have been performed in Moyamoya disease. Objective: To assess the cortical and cerebellar reorganization in a moyamoya patient. Methods: We reported a case of a patient suffering from moyamoya disease, undergoing a neuropsychological assessment, a neurocognitive rehabilitative treatment, an electroencephalogram evaluation, and a functional magnetic resonance imaging examination. Results: The subject showed a cognitive impairment, a slow electroencephalogram activity, and the ipsi- and controlateral motor cortex and cerebellar functional magnetic resonance imaging activation. Conclusions: This is the first functional magnetic resonance imaging case study reported in moyamoya disease. We showed a cortical reorganization, which could play an important role in clinical evaluation and motor recovery. The cerebellar activation, showed after cognitive and motor rehabilitation, could support the idea that the cerebellum contains several cognitive-related subregions involved in different functional networks in moyamoya disease. PMID:25852976

  5. [Functional role of dragonfly legs before and after hatching: reorganization of coordinating interactions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sviderskiĭ, V L; Plotnikova, S I; Gorelkin, V S; Severina, I Iu; Isavnina, I L

    2012-11-01

    The characteristics of a structure-functional organization of leg apparatus were examined in the dragonfly Aeshna grandis: larvae of the final stadium, which legs perform a locomotion function and adults (imago) rising on a wing, which legs lose a locomotion function and are used mainly for catching a prey in the air. It has been demonstrated that legs of the imago practically do not differ from those of the larva either in shape or in proportion of segments of the leg and all changes in the functional role of legs of the imago are implemented due to modifications of mechanisms of limb muscle control and an appropriate reorganization or coordinating interactions. As it is proved by the obtained data, this reorganization concerns mechanisms of the generation of motor commands as well as close coordination of the activity of wing and leg apparatus and some others. The abovementioned mechanisms are discussed.

  6. Structural and pathway complexity of beta-strand reorganization within aggregates of human transthyretin(105-115) peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Da-Wei; Han, Li; Huo, Shuanghong

    2007-05-17

    Interstrand conformational rearrangements of human transthyretin peptide (TTR(105-115)) within dimeric aggregates were simulated by means of molecular dynamics (MD) with implicit solvation model for a total length of 48 micros. The conformations sampled in the MD simulations were clustered to identify free energy minima without any projections of free energy surface. A connected graph was constructed with nodes (=clusters) and edges corresponding to free energy minima and transitions between nodes, respectively. This connected graph which reflects the complexity of the free energy surface was used to extract the transition disconnectivity graph, which reflects the overall free energy barriers between pairs of free energy minima but does not contain information on transition paths. The routes of transitions between important free energy minima were obtained by further processing the original graph and the MD data. We have found that both parallel and antiparallel aggregates are populated. The parallel aggregates with different alignment patterns are separated by nonnegligible free energy barriers. Multiroutes exist in the interstrand conformational reorganization. Most visited routes do not dominant the kinetics, while less visited routes contribute a little each but they are numerous and their total contributions are actually dominant. There are various kinds of reptation motions, including those through a beta-bulge, side-chain aided reptation, and flipping or rotation of a hairpin formed by one strand.

  7. Reorganization of Cajal bodies and nucleolar targeting of coilin in motor neurons of type I spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Olga; Bengoechea, Rocío; Palanca, Ana; Arteaga, Rosa; Val-Bernal, J Fernando; Tizzano, Eduardo F; Berciano, María T; Lafarga, Miguel

    2012-05-01

    Type I spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by loss or mutations of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. The reduction in SMN protein levels in SMA leads to degeneration and death of motor neurons. In this study, we have analyzed the nuclear reorganization of Cajal bodies, PML bodies and nucleoli in type I SMA motor neurons with homozygous deletion of exons 7 and 8 of the SMN1 gene. Western blot analysis is is revealed a marked reduction of SMN levels compared to the control sample. Using a neuronal dissociation procedure to perform a careful immunocytochemical and quantitative analysis of nuclear bodies, we demonstrated a severe decrease in the mean number of Cajal bodies per neuron and in the proportion of motor neurons containing these structures in type I SMA. Moreover, most Cajal bodies fail to recruit SMN and spliceosomal snRNPs, but contain the proteasome activator PA28, a molecular marker associated with the cellular stress response. Neuronal stress in SMA motor neurons also increases PML body number. The existence of chromatolysis and eccentric nuclei in SMA motor neurons correlates with Cajal body disruption and nucleolar relocalization of coil in, a Cajal body marker. Our results indicate that the Cajal body is a pathophysiological target in type I SMA motor neurons. They also suggest the Cajal body-dependent dysfunction of snRNP biogenesis and, therefore, pre-mRNA splicing in these neurons seems to be an essential component for SMA pathogenesis.

  8. Kierkegaardovo pojetí existence

    OpenAIRE

    Janatová, Kristýna

    2016-01-01

    The topic of the bachelor thesis is "Kierkegaard's conception of existence". There are both the life of the Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard and his philosophy discussed. The issue of human existence is analysed with its main three stages which are focused on aesthetics, ethics and religion. These stages of existence are at first described and afterwards compared with each other. The aesthetic represents the first stage of life and the religious stage is considered to be the highest aim o...

  9. Detection of Brain Reorganization in Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Using Functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    epilepsy patients as well as tumor and intravenous malformation patients who were placed under consideration to undergo pediatric brain surgery at...dissemination activities— journal articles, abstracts, and presentations—have friends or family who suffer from pediatric brain disorders; these...Page | 2 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0464 TITLE: Detection of Brain Reorganization in Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Using Functional MRI

  10. Task-specific reorganization of the auditory cortex in deaf humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bola, Łukasz; Zimmermann, Maria; Mostowski, Piotr; Jednoróg, Katarzyna; Marchewka, Artur; Rutkowski, Paweł; Szwed, Marcin

    2017-01-24

    The principles that guide large-scale cortical reorganization remain unclear. In the blind, several visual regions preserve their task specificity; ventral visual areas, for example, become engaged in auditory and tactile object-recognition tasks. It remains open whether task-specific reorganization is unique to the visual cortex or, alternatively, whether this kind of plasticity is a general principle applying to other cortical areas. Auditory areas can become recruited for visual and tactile input in the deaf. Although nonhuman data suggest that this reorganization might be task specific, human evidence has been lacking. Here we enrolled 15 deaf and 15 hearing adults into an functional MRI experiment during which they discriminated between temporally complex sequences of stimuli (rhythms). Both deaf and hearing subjects performed the task visually, in the central visual field. In addition, hearing subjects performed the same task in the auditory modality. We found that the visual task robustly activated the auditory cortex in deaf subjects, peaking in the posterior-lateral part of high-level auditory areas. This activation pattern was strikingly similar to the pattern found in hearing subjects performing the auditory version of the task. Although performing the visual task in deaf subjects induced an increase in functional connectivity between the auditory cortex and the dorsal visual cortex, no such effect was found in hearing subjects. We conclude that in deaf humans the high-level auditory cortex switches its input modality from sound to vision but preserves its task-specific activation pattern independent of input modality. Task-specific reorganization thus might be a general principle that guides cortical plasticity in the brain.

  11. Adolescence and the reorganization of infant development: a neuro-psychoanalytic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stortelder, Frans; Ploegmakers-Burg, Marian

    2010-01-01

    The psychoanalytic view of adolescence as a phase of turbulence and reorganization occupied a central position in child and adolescent psychiatry until about 1980. The view of adolescence as a silent-transition phase then prevailed and diverged from the psychoanalytic perspective. This article reviews infant and adolescent development using an interdisciplinary, neuro-psychoanalytic model in which psychoanalytic, neurobiological, and developmental perspectives converge and complement each other. Recent empirical research focuses attention on adolescence as a phase in which a far-reaching neurobiological and psychological reorganization takes place. According to the ontogenetic principle of psychoanalysis, the development and organization of the basic psychic functions occur in the first five years of life, while a reorganization takes place in adolescence. Neurobiological research confirms that the basic growth and maturation of the brain occurs in the first five years of life, and that a substantial reorganization in brain development transpires in adolescence. Research also verifies the clinical psychoanalytic concept that neurobiological and psychological maturation in adolescence remain unfinished till approximately age 23. The long-term and late biopsychosocial maturation in adolescence implies that adequate monitoring by parents and school remains necessary. The view that adolescents need to separate, and discover their individuality and independence alone, is unsupported by recent findings. The adolescent must acquire his independence, personal identity, and self-agency ("scaffolding") step by step. It is important that the adolescent knows that his parents are in the background monitoring and intervening as necessary; that he is not entirely alone, adrift and at risk for potential fragmentation. The long-term plasticity of the brain in adolescence implies greater vulnerability for the development of psychopathology, but offers opportunity for

  12. Rehabilitation of amelogenesis imperfecta using a reorganized approach: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kingsley H C; Ho, Edward H T; Botelho, Michael G; Pow, Edmond H N

    2011-05-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is a genetic disorder that causes defective enamel development in both the primary and permanent dentitions. Significant tooth structure damage often results in various pulpal symptoms, occlusal disharmony, impaired function, and esthetic disfigurement. These problems pose great challenges to the clinician when rehabilitating patients with amelogenesis imperfecta. This case report describes an uncomplicated and logical way to reorganize, temporize, and completely restore an extensively damaged dentition caused by amelogenesis imperfecta.

  13. Opportunity Missed: Congressional Reorganization of the Army Air Service 1917-1920

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-05-01

    consoli- dation on behalf of the Navy.71 Senator Gilbert M. Hitchcock (D) of Nebraska declared that nothing but confusion would re- sult from having...Aviation Mission is reprinted in full in the text of the hearings, beginning at page 20. Alfred F. Hurley, Billy Mitchell, 48-49. 16. House of...development of Mitchell’s crusade for airpower after 1920 is presented in Alfred F. Hurley, Billy Mitchell: Crusader for Airpower. 53. Senate, Reorganization

  14. Shaping Early Reorganization of Neural Networks Promotes Motor Function after Stroke.

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Neural plasticity is a major factor driving cortical reorganization after stroke. We here tested whether repetitively enhancing motor cortex plasticity by means of intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS) prior to physiotherapy might promote recovery of function early after stroke. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to elucidate underlying neural mechanisms. Twenty-six hospitalized, first-ever stroke patients (time since stroke: 1–16 days) with hand motor deficits were e...

  15. Reorganization of the connectivity of cortical field DZ in congenitally deaf cat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Barone

    Full Text Available Psychophysics and brain imaging studies in deaf patients have revealed a functional crossmodal reorganization that affects the remaining sensory modalities. Similarly, the congenital deaf cat (CDC shows supra-normal visual skills that are supported by specific auditory fields (DZ-dorsal zone and P-posterior auditory cortex but not the primary auditory cortex (A1. To assess the functional reorganization observed in deafness we analyzed the connectivity pattern of the auditory cortex by means of injections of anatomical tracers in DZ and A1 in both congenital deaf and normally hearing cats. A quantitative analysis of the distribution of the projecting neurons revealed the presence of non-auditory inputs to both A1 and DZ of the CDC which were not observed in the hearing cats. Firstly, some visual (areas 19/20 and somatosensory (SIV areas were projecting toward DZ of the CDC but not in the control. Secondly, A1 of the deaf cat received a weak projection from the visual lateral posterior nuclei (LP. Most of these abnormal projections to A1 and DZ represent only a small fraction of the normal inputs to these areas. In addition, most of the afferents to DZ and A1 appeared normal in terms of areal specificity and strength of projection, with preserved but smeared nucleotopic gradient of A1 in CDCs. In conclusion, while the abnormal projections revealed in the CDC can participate in the crossmodal compensatory mechanisms, the observation of a limited reorganization of the connectivity pattern of the CDC implies that functional reorganization in congenital deafness is further supported also by normal cortico-cortical connectivity.

  16. Microstructure of transcallosal motor fibers reflects type of cortical (re-)organization in congenital hemiparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juenger, Hendrik; Koerte, Inga K; Muehlmann, Marc; Mayinger, Michael; Mall, Volker; Krägeloh-Mann, Ingeborg; Shenton, Martha E; Berweck, Steffen; Staudt, Martin; Heinen, Florian

    2014-11-01

    Early unilateral brain lesions can lead to different types of corticospinal (re-)organization of motor networks. In one group of patients, the contralesional hemisphere exerts motor control not only over the contralateral non-paretic hand but also over the (ipsilateral) paretic hand, as the primary motor cortex is (re-)organized in the contralesional hemisphere. Another group of patients with early unilateral lesions shows "normal" contralateral motor projections starting in the lesioned hemisphere. We investigated how these different patterns of cortical (re-)organization affect interhemispheric transcallosal connectivity in patients with congenital hemiparesis. Eight patients with ipsilateral motor projections (group IPSI) versus 7 patients with contralateral motor projections (group CONTRA) underwent magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). The corpus callosum (CC) was subdivided in 5 areas (I-V) in the mid-sagittal slice and volumetric information. The following diffusion parameters were calculated: fractional anisotropy (FA), trace, radial diffusivity (RD), and axial diffusivity (AD). DTI revealed significantly lower FA, increased trace and RD for group IPSI compared to group CONTRA in area III of the corpus callosum, where transcallosal motor fibers cross the CC. In the directly neighboring area IV, where transcallosal somatosensory fibers cross the CC, no differences were found for these DTI parameters between IPSI and CONTRA. Volume of callosal subsections showed significant differences for area II (connecting premotor cortices) and III, where group IPSI had lower volume. The results of this study demonstrate that the callosal microstructure in patients with congenital hemiparesis reflects the type of cortical (re-)organization. Early lesions disrupting corticospinal motor projections to the paretic hand consecutively affect the development or maintenance of transcallosal motor fibers. Copyright © 2014 European Paediatric Neurology Society

  17. Evolution of crossmodal reorganization of the voice area in cochlear-implanted deaf patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouger, Julien; Lagleyre, Sébastien; Démonet, Jean-François; Fraysse, Bernard; Deguine, Olivier; Barone, Pascal

    2012-08-01

    Psychophysical and neuroimaging studies in both animal and human subjects have clearly demonstrated that cortical plasticity following sensory deprivation leads to a brain functional reorganization that favors the spared modalities. In postlingually deaf patients, the use of a cochlear implant (CI) allows a recovery of the auditory function, which will probably counteract the cortical crossmodal reorganization induced by hearing loss. To study the dynamics of such reversed crossmodal plasticity, we designed a longitudinal neuroimaging study involving the follow-up of 10 postlingually deaf adult CI users engaged in a visual speechreading task. While speechreading activates Broca's area in normally hearing subjects (NHS), the activity level elicited in this region in CI patients is abnormally low and increases progressively with post-implantation time. Furthermore, speechreading in CI patients induces abnormal crossmodal activations in right anterior regions of the superior temporal cortex normally devoted to processing human voice stimuli (temporal voice-sensitive areas-TVA). These abnormal activity levels diminish with post-implantation time and tend towards the levels observed in NHS. First, our study revealed that the neuroplasticity after cochlear implantation involves not only auditory but also visual and audiovisual speech processing networks. Second, our results suggest that during deafness, the functional links between cortical regions specialized in face and voice processing are reallocated to support speech-related visual processing through cross-modal reorganization. Such reorganization allows a more efficient audiovisual integration of speech after cochlear implantation. These compensatory sensory strategies are later completed by the progressive restoration of the visuo-audio-motor speech processing loop, including Broca's area. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Re-organization Impact on the Telekom Malaysias International Division Productivity

    OpenAIRE

    Ahasanul Haque; Ali Khatibi; Khaizura Karim

    2005-01-01

    International Divisions productivity was perceived to incline towards a downward trend which was contravened in 1996 re-organization objective of Telekom Malaysia. This study aims to analyze the root causes of this setback and recommend the solutions to improve the companys productivity. The method to diagnose the root cause was done through surveys and interviews. The data collection was carried out through questionnaire consisting of 85 questions. Total of 171 respondents from the internati...

  19. Reorganization of marriage, relationships and family in contemporary society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobić Mirjana

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes contemporary changes in marriage, relationships and family in European populations, and then their evolution from the last decade of the twentieth century till present day, as well as various forms and types, in which plurality of contemporary partnership unions is revealed. The other goal of this supplement was to provide a wider theoretical-hypothetical, explanatory framework for understanding what is happening in population (on appearance level but now in the context of contemporary societies. Three variables are introduced: macro (paradigm of modernization, namely social, i.e. structural and cultural changes, micro (paradigm: resources-limitations-behavior and mezzo (differences in social and demographic development of countries of North, Western, South and Central and Eastern Europe (former socialistic countries in transition. Cautious predictions on what could be expected in future concerning: empirical documented differences of living arrangements of European populations of the West, but also of the East, as well as relative demographic consequences. On the macro level (paradigm structure/culture the responses depend on the rate the two main social processes will develop: 1 development of "European society", and 2 the birth of "world" (global society. Most of the authors conclude on the convergence of social and demographic development on the territory of Western, but not Eastern Europe (and especially the Balkans. This conclusion concerns even the countries of the South European region, considering that it is uncertain in which direction and speed will their integration into the European Union develop. With regards to the trend of decreasing fertility, a continuance of existing secular tendencies may be expected in future as well, even on the whole European territory, and that it will be supported by social changes of (post modernization, individualization and rational behavior, so that it will become a general model

  20. Stability-dependent behavioural and electro-cortical reorganizations during intentional switching between bimanual tapping modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallet, Jessica; Barral, Jérôme; James, Clara; Hauert, Claude-Alain

    2010-10-11

    This study investigated behavioural and electro-cortical reorganizations accompanying intentional switching between two distinct bimanual coordination tapping modes (In-phase and Anti-phase) that differ in stability when produced at the same movement rate. We expected that switching to a less stable tapping mode (In-to-Anti switching) would lead to larger behavioural perturbations and require supplementary neural resources than switching to a more stable tapping mode (Anti-to-In switching). Behavioural results confirmed that the In-to-Anti switching lasted longer than the Anti-to-In switching. A general increase in attention-related neural activity was found at the moment of switching for both conditions. Additionally, two condition-dependent EEG reorganizations were observed. First, a specific increase in cortico-cortical coherence appeared exclusively during the In-to-Anti switching. This result may reflect a strengthening in inter-regional communication in order to engage in the subsequent, less stable, tapping mode. Second, a decrease in motor-related neural activity (increased beta spectral power) was found for the Anti-to-In switching only. The latter effect may reflect the interruption of the previous, less stable, tapping mode. Given that previous results on spontaneous Anti-to-In switching revealing an inverse pattern of EEG reorganization (decreased beta spectral power), present findings give new insight on the stability-dependent neural correlates of intentional motor switching.

  1. Reorganization of the Connectivity between Elementary Functions – A Model Relating Conscious States to Neural Connections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesper Mogensen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper it is argued that the “neural correlate of consciousness” (NCC does not appear to be a separate “module” – but an aspect of information processing within the neural substrate of various cognitive processes. Consequently, NCC can only be addressed adequately within frameworks that model the general relationship between neural processes and mental states – and take into account the dynamic connectivity of the brain. We presently offer the REFGEN (general reorganization of elementary functions model as such a framework. This model builds upon and expands the REF (reorganization of elementary functions and REFCON (of elementary functions and consciousness models. All three models integrate the relationship between the neural and mental layers of description via the construction of an intermediate level dealing with computational states. The importance of experience based organization of neural and cognitive processes is stressed. The models assume that the mechanisms of consciousness are in principle the same as the basic mechanisms of all aspects of cognition – when information is processed to a sufficiently “high level” it becomes available to conscious experience. The NCC is within the REFGEN model seen as aspects of the dynamic and experience driven reorganizations of the synaptic connectivity between the neurocognitive “building blocks” of the model – the elementary functions.

  2. Reorganization of Anatomical Connectome following Electroconvulsive Therapy in Major Depressive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinkun Zeng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is considered one of the most effective and fast-acting treatment options for depressive episodes. Little is known, however, about ECT’s enabling brain (neuroplasticity effects, particular for plasticity of white matter pathway. Materials and Methods. We collected longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging in the first-episode, drug-naïve major depressive disorder (MDD patients n=24 before and after a predefined time window ECT treatment. We constructed large-scale anatomical networks derived from white matter fiber tractography and evaluated the topological reorganization using graph theoretical analysis. We also assessed the relationship between topological reorganization with improvements in depressive symptoms. Results. Our investigation revealed three main findings: (1 the small-worldness was persistent after ECT series; (2 anatomical connections changes were found in limbic structure, temporal and frontal lobes, in which the connection changes between amygdala and parahippocampus correlate with depressive symptom reduction; (3 significant nodal strength changes were found in right paralimbic network. Conclusions. ECT elicits neuroplastic processes associated with improvements in depressive symptoms that act to specific local ventral frontolimbic circuits, but not small-world property. Overall, ECT induced topological reorganization in large-scale brain structural network, opening up new avenues to better understand the mode of ECT action in MDD.

  3. Age-related neural reorganization during spoken word recognition: the interaction of form and meaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafto, Meredith; Randall, Billi; Stamatakis, Emmanuel A; Wright, Paul; Tyler, L K

    2012-06-01

    Research on language and aging typically shows that language comprehension is preserved across the life span. Recent neuroimaging results suggest that this good performance is underpinned by age-related neural reorganization [e.g., Tyler, L. K., Shafto, M. A., Randall, B., Wright, P., Marslen-Wilson, W. D., & Stamatakis, E. A. Preserving syntactic processing across the adult life span: The modulation of the frontotemporal language system in the context of age-related atrophy. Cerebral Cortex, 20, 352-364, 2010]. The current study examines how age-related reorganization affects the balance between component linguistic processes by manipulating semantic and phonological factors during spoken word recognition in younger and older adults. Participants in an fMRI study performed an auditory lexical decision task where words varied in their phonological and semantic properties as measured by degree of phonological competition and imageability. Older adults had a preserved lexicality effect, but compared with younger people, their behavioral sensitivity to phonological competition was reduced, as was competition-related activity in left inferior frontal gyrus. This was accompanied by increases in behavioral sensitivity to imageability and imageability-related activity in left middle temporal gyrus. These results support previous findings that neural compensation underpins preserved comprehension in aging and demonstrate that neural reorganization can affect the balance between semantic and phonological processing.

  4. Mirror therapy in lower limb amputees--a look beyond primary motor cortex reorganization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, S; Kasprian, G; Furtner, J; Schöpf, V; Essmeister, M; Sycha, T; Auff, E; Prayer, D

    2011-11-01

    Phantom pain in upper limb amputees is associated with the extent of reorganization in the primary sensorimotor cortex. Mirror visual feedback therapy has been shown to improve phantom pain. We investigated the extent of cortical reorganization in lower limb amputees and changes in neural activity induced by mirror therapy. Eight lower limb amputees underwent 12 sessions of MVFT and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the brain before the first and after the last MVFT session. FMRI sessions consisted of two runs in which subjects were instructed to perform repetitive movement of the healthy and phantom ankle. Before MVFT, the mean phantom pain intensity was 4.6 ± 3.1 on a visual analog scale and decreased to 1.8 ± 1.7 (p = 0.04). We did not observe a consistent pattern of cortical activation in primary sensorimotor areas during phantom limb movements. Following MVFT, increased activity was obtained in the right orbitofrontal cortex during phantom ankle movements. Comparison of cortical activity during movements of the phantom ankle and the intact ankle showed significantly higher activity in the left inferior frontal cortex (pars triangularis). These results question the known association between phantom pain and primary sensorimotor reorganization and propose reorganizational changes involving multiple cortical areas in lower limb amputees. Finally, reduction of phantom pain after mirror visual feedback therapy was associated with increased prefrontal cortical activity during phantom ankle movements. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Reorganization of Anatomical Connectome following Electroconvulsive Therapy in Major Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jinkun; Luo, Qinghua; Du, Lian; Liao, Wei; Li, Yongmei; Liu, Haixia; Liu, Dan; Fu, Yixiao; Qiu, Haitang; Li, Xirong; Qiu, Tian; Meng, Huaqing

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is considered one of the most effective and fast-acting treatment options for depressive episodes. Little is known, however, about ECT's enabling brain (neuro)plasticity effects, particular for plasticity of white matter pathway. Materials and Methods. We collected longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging in the first-episode, drug-naïve major depressive disorder (MDD) patients (n = 24) before and after a predefined time window ECT treatment. We constructed large-scale anatomical networks derived from white matter fiber tractography and evaluated the topological reorganization using graph theoretical analysis. We also assessed the relationship between topological reorganization with improvements in depressive symptoms. Results. Our investigation revealed three main findings: (1) the small-worldness was persistent after ECT series; (2) anatomical connections changes were found in limbic structure, temporal and frontal lobes, in which the connection changes between amygdala and parahippocampus correlate with depressive symptom reduction; (3) significant nodal strength changes were found in right paralimbic network. Conclusions. ECT elicits neuroplastic processes associated with improvements in depressive symptoms that act to specific local ventral frontolimbic circuits, but not small-world property. Overall, ECT induced topological reorganization in large-scale brain structural network, opening up new avenues to better understand the mode of ECT action in MDD. PMID:26770836

  6. Reorganization of microtubular cytoskeleton and formation of cellular processes during post-telophase in haemanthus endosperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajer, A S; Smirnova, E A

    1999-10-01

    We followed time-dependent post-telophase reorganization of the microtubule cytoskeleton on immunostained preparations of endosperm of the higher plant Haemanthus. After completion of mitosis, the phragmoplast continued to reorganize for several hours. This prompted the formation of phragmoplast-like derivatives (secondary and accessory phragmoplasts and peripheral microtubular ring). Next, elongated cellular protrusions (processes) appeared at the cell periphery. These processes contained long microtubule bundles and disorderly arranged actin filaments. Microtubule converging centers or accessory phragmoplasts were often present at the tips of the processes. Observation in vivo demonstrated that processes were formed at the cell periphery as extensions of lammelipodia or filopodia-type protrusions that commonly terminated with cytoplasmic blobs. We suggest that processes are derivatives of a peripheral microtubular ring that reorganizes gradually into cellular protrusions. Endosperm processes have several features of neuronal cells, or animal somatic cells with overexpressed MAPs. Since microtubule-containing processes were never detected shortly after extrusion of the cells from the embryo sac, this course of events might be restricted specifically to extruded endosperm and triggered either by removal of cells, their placement in monolayer on agar substrate, or both. Thus, post telophase behavior of endosperm cells offers a novel experimental system for studies of cytoskeleton in higher plants.

  7. Mirror therapy in lower limb amputees. A look beyond primary motor cortex reorganization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, S.; Essmeister, M.; Sycha, T.; Auff, E. [Vienna Medical Univ. (Austria). Dept. of Neurology; Kasprian, G.; Furtner, J.; Schoepf, V.; Prayer, D. [Vienna Medical Univ. (Austria). Dept. of Neuroradiology

    2011-11-15

    Phantom pain in upper limb amputees is associated with the extent of reorganization in the primary sensorimotor cortex. Mirror visual feedback therapy has been shown to improve phantom pain. We investigated the extent of cortical reorganization in lower limb amputees and changes in neural activity induced by mirror therapy. Eight lower limb amputees underwent 12 sessions of MVFT and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the brain before the first and after the last MVFT session. FMRI sessions consisted of two runs in which subjects were instructed to perform repetitive movement of the healthy and phantom ankle. Before MVFT, the mean phantom pain intensity was 4.6 {+-} 3.1 on a visual analog scale and decreased to 1.8 {+-} 1.7 (p = 0.04). We did not observe a consistent pattern of cortical activation in primary sensorimotor areas during phantom limb movements. Following MVFT, increased activity was obtained in the right orbitofrontal cortex during phantom ankle movements. Comparison of cortical activity during movements of the phantom ankle and the intact ankle showed significantly higher activity in the left inferior frontal cortex (pars triangularis). These results question the known association between phantom pain and primary sensorimotor reorganization and propose reorganizational changes involving multiple cortical areas in lower limb amputees. Finally, reduction of phantom pain after mirror visual feedback therapy was associated with increased prefrontal cortical activity during phantom ankle movements. (orig.)

  8. Early Hearing-Impairment Results in Crossmodal Reorganization of Ferret Core Auditory Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alex Meredith

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous investigations of cortical crossmodal plasticity, most often in congenital or early-deaf subjects, have indicated that secondary auditory cortical areas reorganize to exhibit visual responsiveness while the core auditory regions are largely spared. However, a recent study of adult-deafened ferrets demonstrated that core auditory cortex was reorganized by the somatosensory modality. Because adult animals have matured beyond their critical period of sensory development and plasticity, it was not known if adult-deafening and early-deafening would generate the same crossmodal results. The present study used young, ototoxically-lesioned ferrets (n=3 that, after maturation (avg. = 173 days old, showed significant hearing deficits (avg. threshold = 72 dB SPL. Recordings from single-units (n=132 in core auditory cortex showed that 72% were activated by somatosensory stimulation (compared to 1% in hearing controls. In addition, tracer injection into early hearing-impaired core auditory cortex labeled essentially the same auditory cortical and thalamic projection sources as seen for injections in the hearing controls, indicating that the functional reorganization was not the result of new or latent projections to the cortex. These data, along with similar observations from adult-deafened and adult hearing-impaired animals, support the recently proposed brainstem theory for crossmodal plasticity induced by hearing loss.

  9. Dynamic neural network reorganization associated with second language vocabulary acquisition: a multimodal imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoda, Chihiro; Tanaka, Kanji; Nariai, Tadashi; Honda, Manabu; Hanakawa, Takashi

    2013-08-21

    It remains unsettled whether human language relies exclusively on innately privileged brain structure in the left hemisphere or is more flexibly shaped through experiences, which induce neuroplastic changes in potentially relevant neural circuits. Here we show that learning of second language (L2) vocabulary and its cessation can induce bidirectional changes in the mirror-reverse of the traditional language areas. A cross-sectional study identified that gray matter volume in the inferior frontal gyrus pars opercularis (IFGop) and connectivity of the IFGop with the caudate nucleus and the superior temporal gyrus/supramarginal (STG/SMG), predominantly in the right hemisphere, were positively correlated with L2 vocabulary competence. We then implemented a cohort study involving 16 weeks of L2 training in university students. Brain structure before training did not predict the later gain in L2 ability. However, training intervention did increase IFGop volume and reorganization of white matter including the IFGop-caudate and IFGop-STG/SMG pathways in the right hemisphere. These "positive" plastic changes were correlated with the gain in L2 ability in the trained group but were not observed in the control group. We propose that the right hemispheric network can be reorganized into language-related areas through use-dependent plasticity in young adults, reflecting a repertoire of flexible reorganization of the neural substrates responding to linguistic experiences.

  10. Factors Influencing Adaptive Capacity in the Reorganization of Forest Management in Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Beier

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Several studies of U.S. National Forests suggest that declines of their associated forest products industries were driven by synergistic changes in federal governance and market conditions during the late 20th century. In Alaska, dramatic shifts in the economic and political settings of the Tongass National Forest (Tongass drove changes in governance leading to collapse of an industrial forest management system in the early 1990s. However, 15 years since collapse, the reorganization of Tongass governance to reflect 'new' economic and political realities has not progressed. To understand both the factors that hinder institutional change (inertia and the factors that enable progress toward reorganization (adaptation, I analyzed how Tongass forest management, specifically timber sale planning, has responded to changes in market conditions, local industry structure, and larger-scale political governance. Inertia was evidenced by continued emphasis on even-aged management and large-scale harvesting, i.e., the retention of an industrial forestry philosophy that, in the current political situation, yields mostly litigation and appeals, and relatively few forest products. Adaptation was evidenced by flexibility in harvest methods, a willingness to meet local demand instead of political targets, and a growing degree of cooperation with environmental advocacy groups. New partnerships, markets, and political leaders at state and national levels can frame a new blueprint for reorganization of Tongass management toward a more sustainable future.

  11. 75 FR 69621 - Foreign-Trade Zone 50-Long Beach, CA; Application for Reorganization/Expansion Under Alternative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-15

    ...-Trade Zone 50--Long Beach, CA; Application for Reorganization/Expansion Under Alternative Site Framework...)--909 East Colon Street, Wilmington; Site 2 (1,844 acres)-- California Commerce Center, Ontario; Site...

  12. The Association Between Workers' Employability and Burnout in a Reorganization Context: Longitudinal Evidence Building Upon the Conservation of Resources Theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuyper, de Nele; Raeder, Sabine; Heijden, van der Beatrice I.J.M.; Wittekind, Anette

    2012-01-01

    This longitudinal study probes the relationship between employability and burnout among employees from a company undergoing reorganization. We advanced employability as a personal resource that relates negatively to burnout. We expected that this hypothesis would hold for different operationalizatio

  13. Tomography of Spatial Mode Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bobrov, Ivan; Markov, Anton; Straupe, Stanislav; Kulik, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    Transformation and detection of photons in higher-order spatial modes usually requires complicated holographic techniques. Detectors based on spatial holograms suffer from non-idealities and should be carefully calibrated. We report a novel method for analyzing the quality of projective measurements in spatial mode basis inspired by quantum detector tomography. It allows us to calibrate the detector response using only gaussian beams. We experimentally investigate the inherent inaccuracy of the existing methods of mode transformation and provide a full statistical reconstruction of the POVM (positive operator valued measure) elements for holographic spatial mode detectors.

  14. Cenozoic tectonic reorganizations of the Death Valley region, southeast California and southwest Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridrich, Christopher J.; Thompson, Ren A.

    2011-01-01

    The Death Valley region, of southeast California and southwest Nevada, is distinct relative to adjacent regions in its structural style and resulting topography, as well as in the timing of basin-range extension. Cenozoic basin-fill strata, ranging in age from greater than or equal to 40 to approximately 2 million years are common within mountain-range uplifts in this region. The tectonic fragmentation and local uplift of these abandoned basin-fills indicate a multistage history of basin-range tectonism. Additionally, the oldest of these strata record an earlier, pre-basin-range interval of weak extension that formed broad shallow basins that trapped sediments, without forming basin-range topography. The Cenozoic basin-fill strata record distinct stratigraphic breaks that regionally cluster into tight age ranges, constrained by well-dated interbedded volcanic units. Many of these stratigraphic breaks are long recognized formation boundaries. Most are angular unconformities that coincide with abrupt changes in depositional environment. Deposits that bound these unconformities indicate they are weakly diachronous; they span about 1 to 2 million years and generally decrease in age to the west within individual basins and regionally, across basin boundaries. Across these unconformities, major changes are found in the distribution and provenance of basin-fill strata, and in patterns of internal facies. These features indicate rapid, regionally coordinated changes in strain patterns defined by major active basin-bounding faults, coincident with step-wise migrations of the belt of active basin-range tectonism. The regionally correlative unconformities thus record short intervals of radical tectonic change, here termed "tectonic reorganizations." The intervening, longer (about 3- to 5-million-year) interval of gradual, monotonic evolution in the locus and style of tectonism are called "tectonic stages." The belt of active tectonism in the Death Valley region has abruptly

  15. Functional reorganization of the auditory pathways (or lack thereof) in callosal agenesis is predicted by monaural sound localization performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiement, Philippe; Champoux, François; Bacon, Benoit A; Lassonde, Maryse; Mensour, Boualem; Leroux, Jean-Maxime; Lepore, Franco

    2010-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies show that permanent peripheral lesions such as unilateral deafness cause functional reorganization in the auditory pathways. However, functional reorganization of the auditory pathways as a result of higher-level damage or abnormalities remains poorly investigated. A relatively recent behavioural study points to functional changes in the auditory pathways in some, but interestingly not in all, of the acallosal individuals that were tested. The present study uses fMRI to investigate auditory activities in both cerebral hemispheres in those same acallosal subjects in order to directly investigate the contributions of ipsilateral and contralateral functional pathways reorganization. Predictions were made that functional reorganization could be predicted from behavioural performance. As reported previously in a number of neuroimaging studies, results showed that in neurologically intact subjects, binaural stimulation induced balanced activities between both hemispheres, while monaural stimulation induced strong contralateral activities and weak ipsilateral activities. In accordance with behavioural predictions, some acallosal subjects showed patterns of auditory cortical activities that were similar to those observed in neurologically intact subjects while others showed functional reorganization of the auditory pathways. Essentially they showed a significant increase and a significant decrease of neural activities in the contralateral and/or ipsilateral pathways, respectively. These findings indicate that at least in some acallosal subjects, functional reorganization inside the auditory pathways does contribute to compensate for the absence of the corpus callosum.

  16. Reorganization of auditory cortex in early-deaf people: functional connectivity and relationship to hearing aid use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiell, Martha M; Champoux, François; Zatorre, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Cross-modal reorganization after sensory deprivation is a model for understanding brain plasticity. Although it is a well-documented phenomenon, we still know little of the mechanisms underlying it or the factors that constrain and promote it. Using fMRI, we identified visual motion-related activity in 17 early-deaf and 17 hearing adults. We found that, in the deaf, the posterior superior temporal gyrus (STG) was responsive to visual motion. We compared functional connectivity of this reorganized cortex between groups to identify differences in functional networks associated with reorganization. In the deaf more than the hearing, the STG displayed increased functional connectivity with a region in the calcarine fissure. We also explored the role of hearing aid use, a factor that may contribute to variability in cross-modal reorganization. We found that both the cross-modal activity in STG and the functional connectivity between STG and calcarine cortex correlated with duration of hearing aid use, supporting the hypothesis that residual hearing affects cross-modal reorganization. We conclude that early auditory deprivation alters not only the organization of auditory regions but also the interactions between auditory and primary visual cortex and that auditory input, as indexed by hearing aid use, may inhibit cross-modal reorganization in early-deaf people.

  17. Investigating the Empirical Existence of Static User Equilibrium

    CERN Document Server

    Raimbault, Juste

    2016-01-01

    The Static User Equilibrium is a powerful framework for the theoretical study of traffic. Despite the restricting assumption of stationary flows that intuitively limit its application to real traffic systems, many operational models implementing it are still used without an empirical validation of the existence of the equilibrium. We investigate its existence on a traffic dataset of three months for the region of Paris, FR. The implementation of an application for interactive spatio-temporal data exploration allows to hypothesize a high spatial and temporal heterogeneity, and to guide further quantitative work. The assumption of locally stationary flows is invalidated in a first approximation by empirical results, as shown by a strong spatial and temporal variability in shortest paths and in network topological measures such as betweenness centrality. Furthermore, the behavior of spatial autocorrelation index of congestion patterns at different spatial ranges suggest a chaotic evolution at the local scale, es...

  18. From oocyte to 16-cell stage: cytoplasmic and cortical reorganizations that pattern the ascidian embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardet, Christian; Paix, Alexandre; Prodon, François; Dru, Philippe; Chenevert, Janet

    2007-07-01

    The dorsoventral and anteroposterior axes of the ascidian embryo are defined before first cleavage by means of a series of reorganizations that reposition cytoplasmic and cortical domains established during oogenesis. These domains situated in the periphery of the oocyte contain developmental determinants and a population of maternal postplasmic/PEM RNAs. One of these RNAs (macho-1) is a determinant for the muscle cells of the tadpole embryo. Oocytes acquire a primary animal-vegetal (a-v) axis during meiotic maturation, when a subcortical mitochondria-rich domain (myoplasm) and a domain rich in cortical endoplasmic reticulum (cER) and maternal postplasmic/PEM RNAs (cER-mRNA domain) become polarized and asymmetrically enriched in the vegetal hemisphere. Fertilization at metaphase of meiosis I initiates a series of dramatic cytoplasmic and cortical reorganizations of the zygote, which occur in two major phases. The first major phase depends on sperm entry which triggers a calcium wave leading in turn to an actomyosin-driven contraction wave. The contraction concentrates the cER-mRNA domain and myoplasm in and around a vegetal/contraction pole. The precise localization of the vegetal/contraction pole depends on both the a-v axis and the location of sperm entry and prefigures the future site of gastrulation and dorsal side of the embryo. The second major phase of reorganization occurs between meiosis completion and first cleavage. Sperm aster microtubules and then cortical microfilaments cause the cER-mRNA domain and myoplasm to reposition toward the posterior of the zygote. The location of the posterior pole depends on the localization of the sperm centrosome/aster attained during the first major phase of reorganization. Both cER-mRNA and myoplasm domains localized in the posterior region are partitioned equally between the first two blastomeres and then asymmetrically over the next two cleavages. At the eight-cell stage the cER-mRNA domain compacts and gives rise to

  19. Differentially Private Spatial Decompositions

    CERN Document Server

    Cormode, Graham; Shen, Entong; Srivastava, Divesh; Yu, Ting

    2011-01-01

    Differential privacy has recently emerged as the de facto standard for private data release. This makes it possible to provide strong theoretical guarantees on the privacy and utility of released data. While it is well-known how to release data based on counts and simple functions under this guarantee, it remains to provide general purpose techniques to release different kinds of data. In this paper, we focus on spatial data such as locations and more generally any data that can be indexed by a tree structure. Directly applying existing differential privacy methods to this type of data simply generates noise. Instead, we introduce a new class of "private spatial decompositions": these adapt standard spatial indexing methods such as quadtrees and kd-trees to provide a private description of the data distribution. Equipping such structures with differential privacy requires several steps to ensure that they provide meaningful privacy guarantees. Various primitives, such as choosing splitting points and describi...

  20. Fault reactivation by stress pattern reorganization in the Hyblean foreland domain of SE Sicily (Italy) and seismotectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cultrera, Fabrizio; Barreca, Giovanni; Scarfì, Luciano; Monaco, Carmelo

    2015-10-01

    Between the October 2011 and the July 2012, several seismic swarms occurred in the Hyblean foreland domain of SE Sicily (Italy) along the Cavagrande Canyon, one of the most impressive fluvial incisions of Sicily. Despite the low magnitude of the events (main shock with M ~ 3.7), they represent the biggest strain release of the Hyblean area over the last 10 years. A careful waveform analysis of the earthquakes revealed that most of them form a family of "multiplets". These findings allow us to reconstruct the attitude of the accountable fault plane by interpolating their high-precision 3D location parameters into a GIS platform. A detailed morpho-structural analysis, performed at the ideal updip projection of the modeled plane, showed that during the Middle-Late Pleistocene the epicentral area has been deformed by a belt of extensional faults, a segment of which matches well with the computer-generated surface. Despite the field evidence, computed focal solutions support contrasting strike-slip kinematics on the same fault plane, clearly indicating a dextral shearing on this pre-existing normal fault. The seismic swarms nucleated on a small rupture area along a ~ 10 km long, NW-SE trending fault segment, that could be able to generate M ~ 6 earthquakes. Following our analysis and looking at seismicity distribution in the SE portion of Hyblean area, we assess that a stress pattern reorganization occurred all over the Hyblean foreland between the Late Pleistocene and present-day. Change in the trajectory of the max stress axes (from vertical to horizontal) seems to have involved a pre-existing large-scale fault configuration with considerable seismotectonic implications.

  1. THE EXISTENCE OF CONNECTING ORBITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,using the notion of an isolating block and Conley's attractor theory,an existence criterion of trajectories connecting a pair of invariant sets of ordinary differential equations is given.

  2. Homology of the enigmatic nuchal bone reveals novel reorganization of the shoulder girdle in the evolution of the turtle shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyson, Tyler R; Bhullar, Bhart-Anjan S; Bever, Gabe S; Joyce, Walter G; de Queiroz, Kevin; Abzhanov, Arhat; Gauthier, Jacques A

    2013-01-01

    The turtle shell represents a unique modification of the ancestral tetrapod body plan. The homologies of its approximately 50 bones have been the subject of debate for more than 200 years. Although most of those homologies are now firmly established, the evolutionary origin of the dorsal median nuchal bone of the carapace remains unresolved. We propose a novel hypothesis in which the nuchal is derived from the paired, laterally positioned cleithra-dorsal elements of the ancestral tetrapod pectoral girdle that are otherwise retained among extant tetrapods only in frogs. This hypothesis is supported by origin of the nuchal as paired, mesenchymal condensations likely derived from the neural crest followed by a unique two-stage pattern of ossification. Further support is drawn from the establishment of the nuchal as part of a highly conserved "muscle scaffold" wherein the cleithrum (and its evolutionary derivatives) serves as the origin of the Musculus trapezius. Identification of the nuchal as fused cleithra is congruent with its general spatial relationships to other elements of the shoulder girdle in the adult morphology of extant turtles, and it is further supported by patterns of connectivity and transformations documented by critical fossils from the turtle stem group. The cleithral derivation of the nuchal implies an anatomical reorganization of the pectoral girdle in which the dermal portion of the girdle was transformed from a continuous lateral-ventral arc into separate dorsal and ventral components. This transformation involved the reduction and eventual loss of the scapular rami of the clavicles along with the dorsal and superficial migration of the cleithra, which then fused with one another and became incorporated into the carapace. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. THE LOCAL AND GLOBAL EXISTENCE OF THE SOLUTIONS OF HYPERBOLIC-PARABOLIC SYSTEM MODELING BIOLOGICAL PHENOMENA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The authors prove the local existence and uniqueness of weak solution of a hyperbolic-parabolic system and establish the global existence of the weak solution for this system for the spatial dimension n = 1.

  4. Spatial Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    – 2006. The essays published here allow us to subdivide the field of spatial culture into five major domains, summarized in the titles of chapters in the book: ”Perception and Strategies: Architecture”, ”Politics and Poetics: Urban Spaces”, ”Movements and Cityscape: Textuality”, ”Crisis and Construction......Spatial Culture – A Humanities Perspective Abstract of introductory essay by Henrik Reeh Secured by alliances between socio-political development and cultural practices, a new field of humanistic studies in spatial culture has developed since the 1990s. To focus on links between urban culture...... and modern society is, however, an intellectual practice which has a much longer history. Already in the 1980s, the debate on the modern and the postmodern cited Paris and Los Angeles as spatio-cultural illustrations of these major philosophical concepts. Earlier, in the history of critical studies, the work...

  5. Learning causes reorganization of neuronal firing patterns to represent related experiences within a hippocampal schema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Sam; Robinson, Nick T M; Herrera, Lauren; Churchill, Jordana C; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2013-06-19

    According to schema theory as proposed by Piaget and Bartlett, learning involves the assimilation of new memories into networks of preexisting knowledge, as well as alteration of the original networks to accommodate the new information. Recent evidence has shown that rats form a schema of goal locations and that the hippocampus plays an essential role in adding new memories to the spatial schema. Here we examined the nature of hippocampal contributions to schema updating by monitoring firing patterns of multiple CA1 neurons as rats learned new goal locations in an environment in which there already were multiple goals. Before new learning, many neurons that fired on arrival at one goal location also fired at other goals, whereas ensemble activity patterns also distinguished different goal events, thus constituting a neural representation that linked distinct goals within a spatial schema. During new learning, some neurons began to fire as animals approached the new goals. These were primarily the same neurons that fired at original goals, the activity patterns at new goals were similar to those associated with the original goals, and new learning also produced changes in the preexisting goal-related firing patterns. After learning, activity patterns associated with the new and original goals gradually diverged, such that initial generalization was followed by a prolonged period in which new memories became distinguished within the ensemble representation. These findings support the view that consolidation involves assimilation of new memories into preexisting neural networks that accommodate relationships among new and existing memories.

  6. Poesia e existência

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wladimir Antônio da Costa Garcia

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Temas como aquilo que há; o ser na sua singularidade (independentemente dos seus atributos ou das contingências; a relação entre escolha, necessidade e acaso; a relação entre possibilidade e impossibilidade (ou mesmo possíveis impossibilidades; e, por fim, neste ensaio, a relação entre caos e sistemas de ordem, sempre estiveram presentes, tanto na criação lírica como na reflexão filosófica. Logo, a existência não é privilégio do existencialismo. A noção de existência forma-se a partir daqueles temas: ela é secundária em relação aos pensamentos que a determinam. Trata-se, portanto, de uma “longa história, esta do sentido da existência” (DELEUZE, 1985. Desde o pensamento que se forma de uma culpa, desde o ressentimento e da vingança em torno da injustiça permanente do devir (quando a existência torna-se modificada pelos predicados, ou seja, niilista, à negação do todo e à absolvição da existência pela sua inocência (isto é, a afirmação do devir, o eterno retorno do ser do devir, etc., a noção de existência se desdobra. Sendo assim, o título deste trabalho, ao suspender aqueles sentidos estabelecidos, busca capturar a existência desde a potencialidade de suas relações com as configurações do poético.

  7. Diffusion on spatial network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Zi; Tang, Xiaoyue; Li, Wei; Greneche, Jean-Marc; Wang, Qiuping A.

    2015-04-01

    In this work, we study the problem of diffusing a product (idea, opinion, disease etc.) among agents on spatial network. The network is constructed by random addition of nodes on the planar. The probability for a previous node to be connected to the new one is inversely proportional to their spatial distance to the power of α. The diffusion rate between two connected nodes is inversely proportional to their spatial distance to the power of β as well. Inspired from the Fick's first law, we introduce the diffusion coefficient to measure the diffusion ability of the spatial network. Using both theoretical analysis and Monte Carlo simulation, we get the fact that the diffusion coefficient always decreases with the increasing of parameter α and β, and the diffusion sub-coefficient follows the power-law of the spatial distance with exponent equals to -α-β+2. Since both short-range diffusion and long-range diffusion exist, we use anomalous diffusion method in diffusion process. We get the fact that the slope index δ in anomalous diffusion is always smaller that 1. The diffusion process in our model is sub-diffusion.

  8. Spatial Interpolation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stein, A.

    1991-01-01

    The theory and practical application of techniques of statistical interpolation are studied in this thesis, and new developments in multivariate spatial interpolation and the design of sampling plans are discussed. Several applications to studies in soil science are presented.Sampling s

  9. Existing Steel Railway Bridges Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vičan, Josef; Gocál, Jozef; Odrobiňák, Jaroslav; Koteš, Peter

    2016-12-01

    The article describes general principles and basis of evaluation of existing railway bridges based on the concept of load-carrying capacity determination. Compared to the design of a new bridge, the modified reliability level for existing bridges evaluation should be considered due to implementation of the additional data related to bridge condition and behaviour obtained from regular inspections. Based on those data respecting the bridge remaining lifetime, a modification of partial safety factors for actions and materials could be respected in the bridge evaluation process. A great attention is also paid to the specific problems of determination of load-caring capacity of steel railway bridges in service. Recommendation for global analysis and methodology for existing steel bridge superstructure load-carrying capacity determination are described too.

  10. Cortical reorganization in patients with subcortical hemiparesis: neural mechanisms of functional recovery and prognostic implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Yukihiko; Nakada, Tsutomu

    2003-01-01

    A systematic investigation on cortical reorganization in patients with hemiparesis of a subcortical origin, with special emphasis on functional correlates, was conducted using functional magnetic resonance (fMR) imaging performed on a 3-tesla system specifically optimized for fMR imaging investigation. The study group included 46 patients with hemiparesis (25 with right and 21 with left hemiparesis) and 30 age-matched healthy volunteers as controls. All study participants were originally right handed. The characteristics of the lesion were putaminal hemorrhage in 19 patients, thalamic hemorrhage in 10 patients, and striatocapsular bland infarction in 17 patients. Functional recovery in subcortical hemiparesis showed two distinct phases of the recovery process involving entirely different neural mechanisms. Phase I is characterized by the process of recovery and/or reorganization of the primary system. Successful recovery of this system is typically reached within 1 month after stroke onset. Its clinical correlate is a rapid recovery course and significant recovery of function within 1 month of stroke onset. Failure of recovery of the primary system shifts the recovery process to Phase II, during which reorganization involving the ipsilateral pathway takes place. The clinical correlate of Phase II is a slow recovery course with variable functional outcome. Effective functional organization of the ipsilateral pathway, as identified by linked activation of the ipsilateral primary sensorimotor cortex and contralateral anterior lobe of the cerebellum, is correlated with a good prognostic outcome for patients in the slow recovery group. A high degree of connectivity between supplementary motor areas, bilaterally, appears to influence functional recovery adversely.

  11. Identifying functional reorganization of spelling networks: An Individual Peak Probability Comparison Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Joseph Purcell

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that damage to the neural substrates of orthographic processing can lead to functional reorganization during reading (Tsapkini et al., 2011; in this research we ask if the same is true for spelling. To examine the functional reorganization of spelling networks we present a novel three-stage Individual Peak Probability Comparison (IPPC analysis approach for comparing the activation patterns obtained during fMRI of spelling in a single brain-damaged individual with dysgraphia to those obtained in a set of non-impaired control participants. The first analysis stage characterizes the convergence in activations across non-impaired control participants by applying a technique typically used for characterizing activations across studies: Activation Likelihood Estimate (ALE (Turkeltaub et al., 2002. This method was used to identify locations that have a high likelihood of yielding activation peaks in the non-impaired participants. The second stage provides a characterization of the degree to which the brain-damaged individual’s activations correspond to the group pattern identified in Stage 1. This involves performing a Mahalanobis distance statistics analysis (Tsapkini et al., 2011 that compares each of a control group’s peak activation locations to the nearest peak generated by the brain-damaged individual. The third stage evaluates the extent to which the brain-damaged individual’s peaks are atypical relative to the range of individual variation among the control participants. This IPPC analysis allows for a quantifiable, statistically sound method for comparing an individual’s activation pattern to the patterns observed in a control group and, thus, provides a valuable tool for identifying functional reorganization in a brain-damaged individual with impaired spelling. Furthermore, this approach can be applied more generally to compare any individual’s activation pattern with that of a set of other individuals.

  12. Reorganization of finger coordination patterns through motor exploration in individuals after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Rajiv

    2017-09-11

    Impairment of hand and finger function after stroke is common and affects the ability to perform activities of daily living. Even though many of these coordination deficits such as finger individuation have been well characterized, it is critical to understand how stroke survivors learn to explore and reorganize their finger coordination patterns for optimizing rehabilitation. In this study, I examine the use of a body-machine interface to assess how participants explore their movement repertoire, and how this changes with continued practice. Ten participants with chronic stroke wore a data glove and the finger joint angles were mapped on to the position of a cursor on a screen. The task of the participants was to move the cursor back and forth between two specified targets on a screen. Critically, the map between the finger movements and cursor motion was altered so that participants sometimes had to generate coordination patterns that required finger individuation. There were two phases to the experiment - an initial assessment phase on day 1, followed by a learning phase (days 2-5) where participants trained to reorganize their coordination patterns. Participants showed difficulty in performing tasks which had maps that required finger individuation, and the degree to which they explored their movement repertoire was directly related to clinical tests of hand function. However, over four sessions of practice, participants were able to learn to reorganize their finger movement coordination pattern and improve their performance. Moreover, training also resulted in improvements in movement repertoire outside of the context of the specific task during free exploration. Stroke survivors show deficits in movement repertoire in their paretic hand, but facilitating movement exploration during training can increase the movement repertoire. This suggests that exploration may be an important element of rehabilitation to regain optimal function.

  13. Phospholipase d activation correlates with microtubule reorganization in living plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhonukshe, Pankaj; Laxalt, Ana M; Goedhart, Joachim; Gadella, Theodorus W J; Munnik, Teun

    2003-11-01

    A phospholipase D (PLD) was shown recently to decorate microtubules in plant cells. Therefore, we used tobacco BY-2 cells expressing the microtubule reporter GFP-MAP4 to test whether PLD activation affects the organization of plant microtubules. Within 30 min of adding n-butanol, a potent activator of PLD, cortical microtubules were released from the plasma membrane and partially depolymerized, as visualized with four-dimensional confocal imaging. The isomers sec- and tert-butanol, which did not activate PLD, did not affect microtubule organization. The effect of treatment on PLD activation was monitored by the in vivo formation of phosphatidylbutanol, a specific reporter of PLD activity. Tobacco cells also were treated with mastoparan, xylanase, NaCl, and hypoosmotic stress as reported activators of PLD. We confirmed the reports and found that all treatments induced microtubule reorganization and PLD activation within the same time frame. PLD still was activated in microtubule-stabilized (taxol) and microtubule-depolymerized (oryzalin) situations, suggesting that PLD activation triggers microtubular reorganization and not vice versa. Exogenously applied water-soluble synthetic phosphatidic acid did not affect the microtubular cytoskeleton. Cell cycle studies revealed that n-butanol influenced not just interphase cortical microtubules but also those in the preprophase band and phragmoplast, but not those in the spindle structure. Cell growth and division were inhibited in the presence of n-butanol, whereas sec- and tert-butanol had no such effects. Using these novel insights, we propose a model for the mechanism by which PLD activation triggers microtubule reorganization in plant cells.

  14. Identifying functional reorganization of spelling networks: an individual peak probability comparison approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Jeremy J; Rapp, Brenda

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has shown that damage to the neural substrates of orthographic processing can lead to functional reorganization during reading (Tsapkini et al., 2011); in this research we ask if the same is true for spelling. To examine the functional reorganization of spelling networks we present a novel three-stage Individual Peak Probability Comparison (IPPC) analysis approach for comparing the activation patterns obtained during fMRI of spelling in a single brain-damaged individual with dysgraphia to those obtained in a set of non-impaired control participants. The first analysis stage characterizes the convergence in activations across non-impaired control participants by applying a technique typically used for characterizing activations across studies: Activation Likelihood Estimate (ALE) (Turkeltaub et al., 2002). This method was used to identify locations that have a high likelihood of yielding activation peaks in the non-impaired participants. The second stage provides a characterization of the degree to which the brain-damaged individual's activations correspond to the group pattern identified in Stage 1. This involves performing a Mahalanobis distance statistics analysis (Tsapkini et al., 2011) that compares each of a control group's peak activation locations to the nearest peak generated by the brain-damaged individual. The third stage evaluates the extent to which the brain-damaged individual's peaks are atypical relative to the range of individual variation among the control participants. This IPPC analysis allows for a quantifiable, statistically sound method for comparing an individual's activation pattern to the patterns observed in a control group and, thus, provides a valuable tool for identifying functional reorganization in a brain-damaged individual with impaired spelling. Furthermore, this approach can be applied more generally to compare any individual's activation pattern with that of a set of other individuals.

  15. T Lymphocyte Activation Threshold and Membrane Reorganization Perturbations in Unique Culture Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, C. L.; Sams, C. F.

    2000-01-01

    Quantitative activation thresholds and cellular membrane reorganization are mechanisms by which resting T cells modulate their response to activating stimuli. Here we demonstrate perturbations of these cellular processes in a unique culture system that non-invasively inhibits T lymphocyte activation. During clinorotation, the T cell activation threshold is increased 5-fold. This increased threshold involves a mechanism independent of TCR triggering. Recruitment of lipid rafts to the activation site is impaired during clinorotation but does occur with increased stimulation. This study describes a situation in which an individual cell senses a change in its physical environment and alters its cell biological behavior.

  16. Dynamic reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëlle Letort

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cellular processes, including morphogenesis, polarization, and motility, rely on a variety of actin-based structures. Although the biochemical composition and filament organization of these structures are different, they often emerge from a common origin. This is possible because the actin structures are highly dynamic. Indeed, they assemble, grow, and disassemble in a time scale of a second to a minute. Therefore, the reorganization of a given actin structure can promote the formation of another. Here, we discuss such transitions and illustrate them with computer simulations.

  17. [Does Stendhal's syndrome exist really?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valtueña Borque, Oscar

    2009-01-01

    The author, Medical Doctor and Master in Art History, dicusses the real existence of the so called by the Florentine MD Magherini Stendhal syndrome, first time published in 1980 to put out the sickness that some tourists in their Florentia visit suffered, because the big beauty they founded in the city, as the French writter Stendahl suffered two centuries ago.

  18. Spatial distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borregaard, Michael Krabbe; Hendrichsen, Ditte Katrine; Nachman, Gøsta Støger

    2008-01-01

    Living organisms are distributed over the entire surface of the planet. The distribution of the individuals of each species is not random; on the contrary, they are strongly dependent on the biology and ecology of the species, and vary over different spatial scale. The structure of whole...... populations reflects the location and fragmentation pattern of the habitat types preferred by the species, and the complex dynamics of migration, colonization, and population growth taking place over the landscape. Within these, individuals are distributed among each other in regular or clumped patterns......, depending on the nature of intraspecific interactions between them: while the individuals of some species repel each other and partition the available area, others form groups of varying size, determined by the fitness of each group member. The spatial distribution pattern of individuals again strongly...

  19. Materijalna motivacija kao nosilac uspešne reorganizacije kompanije NIS (Material Motivation as the Holder of a Successful Reorganization on the Example of Company Nis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radmila Stojanović

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available For successful organization people are the primary development resource. Motivation and satisfaction of employees become the basis of modern organizations. Motivated employees today represent a strategic resource which gain a competitive advantage for the organization. If someone wants to motivate others, must first be able to motivate yourself. That means that if in organization exists motivated staff, there must be a motivated manager who will be able to launch employees. The aim of this paper is to emphasizes the importance of material motivation for successful business of a large company that had in the past significant organizational change. Through unstructured interviews were collected data on which was investigated the hypothesis that the material motivation of the most important holder for successful reorganization on the example of leading Serbian company for exploration, production and refining of oil and gas NIS. From the above it can be concluded that high-quality human resources management involves proper motivation system, that has been based on material incentives. In this paper, attention will be focused on monetary motivation and how a well-established system of material incentives can lead to the great success of the company that had a significant reorganization in the past. It will be shown in detail the system of material incentives and the positive results which obtained by this system, when it comes to the business of the company, which today is the most desirable employer in Serbia and the region. The paper should emphasize the benefits of a fair system of motivation which brings to an organization, but also to encourage further thinking to improve this aspect of motivation, which is a prerequisite for successful business and the basis for all other activities in the HRM. The analysis results indeed show that a system of material incentives in NIS is the holder of a successful reorganization, and the proof is the business

  20. VAMP-7 links granule exocytosis to actin reorganization during platelet activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koseoglu, Secil; Peters, Christian G; Fitch-Tewfik, Jennifer L; Aisiku, Omozuanvbo; Danglot, Lydia; Galli, Thierry; Flaumenhaft, Robert

    2015-07-30

    Platelet activation results in profound morphologic changes accompanied by release of granule contents. Recent evidence indicates that fusion of granules with the plasma membrane during activation provides auxiliary membrane to cover growing actin structures. Yet little is known about how membrane fusion is coupled with actin reorganization. Vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)-7 is found on platelet vesicles and possesses an N-terminal longin domain capable of linking exocytosis to cytoskeletal remodeling. We have evaluated platelets from VAMP-7(-/-) mice to determine whether this VAMP isoform contributes to granule release and platelet spreading. VAMP-7(-/-) platelets demonstrated a partial defect in dense granule exocytosis and impaired aggregation. α Granule exocytosis from VAMP-7(-/-) platelets was diminished both in vitro and in vivo during thrombus formation. Consistent with a role of VAMP-7 in cytoskeletal remodeling, spreading on matrices was decreased in VAMP-7(-/-) platelets compared to wild-type controls. Immunoprecipitation of VAMP-7 revealed an association with VPS9-domain ankyrin repeat protein (VARP), an adaptor protein that interacts with both membrane-bound and cytoskeleton proteins and with Arp2/3. VAMP-7, VARP, and Arp2/3 localized to the platelet periphery during spreading. These studies demonstrate that VAMP-7 participates in both platelet granule secretion and spreading and suggest a mechanism whereby VAMP-7 links granule exocytosis with actin reorganization.

  1. Aging causes a reorganization of cortical and spinal control of posture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma ePapegaaij

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Classical studies in animal preparations suggest a strong role for spinal control of posture. In young adults it is now established that the cerebral cortex contributes to postural control of unperturbed and perturbed standing. The age-related degeneration and accompanying functional changes in the brain, reported so far mainly in conjunction with simple manual motor tasks, may also affect the mechanisms that control complex motor tasks involving posture. This review outlines the age-related structural and functional changes at spinal and cortical levels and provides a mechanistic analysis of how such changes may be linked to the behaviorally manifest postural deficits in old adults. The emerging picture is that the age-related reorganization in motor control during voluntary tasks, characterized by differential modulation of spinal reflexes, greater cortical activation and cortical disinhibition, is also present during postural tasks. We discuss the possibility that this reorganization underlies the increased coactivation and dual task interference reported in elderly. Finally, we propose a model for future studies to unravel the structure-function-behavior relations in postural control and aging.

  2. Cerebral Functional Reorganization in Ischemic Stroke after Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: An fMRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Xue-Wei; Zuo, Zhen-Tao; Lu, Jie; Meng, Chun-Ling; Fang, Hong-Ying; Xue, Rong; Fan, Yong; Guan, Yu-Zhou; Zhang, Wei-Hong

    2016-12-01

    Our study aimed to figure out brain functional reorganization evidence after repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) using the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI). Twelve patients with unilateral subcortex lesion in the middle cerebral artery territory were recruited. Seven of them received a 10-day rTMS treatment beginning at about 5 days after stroke onset. The remaining five received sham treatment. RsfMRI and motor functional scores were obtained before and after rTMS or sham rTMS. The rTMS group showed motor recovery according to the behavioral testing scores, while there was no significant difference of motor functional scores in the sham group before and after the sham rTMS. It proved that rTMS facilitates motor recovery of early ischemic stroke patients. Compared with the sham, the rTMS treatment group achieved increased functional connectivity (FC) between ipsilesional M1 and contralesional M1, supplementary motor area, bilateral thalamus, and contralesional postcentral gyrus. And decreased FC was found between ipsilesional M1 and ipsilesional M1, postcentral gyrus and inferior and middle frontal gyrus. Increased or decreased FC detected by rsfMRI is an important finding to understand the mechanism of brain functional reorganization. The rTMS treatment is a promising therapeutic approach to facilitate motor rehabilitation for early stroke patients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. White matter reorganization and functional response after focal cerebral ischemia in the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrystelle Po

    Full Text Available After stroke, the brain has shown to be able to achieve spontaneous functional recovery despite severe cerebral damage. This phenomenon is poorly understood. To address this issue, focal transient ischemia was induced by 60 min middle cerebral artery occlusion in Wistar rats. The evolution of stroke was followed using two magnetic resonance imaging modalities: diffusion spectrum imaging (acquired before, one and four weeks after stroke and functional magnetic resonance imaging (acquired before and five weeks after stroke. To confirm the imaging observations, immunohistochemical staining for myelin, astrocytes and macrophages/microglia was added. At four weeks after stroke, a focal alteration of the diffusion anisotropy was observed between the ipsilesional ventricle and the lesion area. Using tractography this perturbation was identified as reorganization of the ipsilesional internal capsule. Functional imaging at five weeks after ischemia demonstrated activation of the primary sensorimotor cortex in both hemispheres in all rats except one animal lacking a functional response in the ipsilesional cortex. Furthermore, fiber tracking showed a transhemispheric fiber connection through the corpus callosum, which-in the rat without functional recovery-was lost. Our study shows the influence of the internal capsule reorganization, combined with inter-hemispheric connections though the corpus callosum, on the functional activation of the brain from stroke. In conclusion, tractography opens a new door to non-invasively investigate the structural correlates of lack of functional recovery after stroke.

  4. Brain reorganization, not relative brain size, primarily characterizes anthropoid brain evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaers, J B; Soligo, C

    2013-05-22

    Comparative analyses of primate brain evolution have highlighted changes in size and internal organization as key factors underlying species diversity. It remains, however, unclear (i) how much variation in mosaic brain reorganization versus variation in relative brain size contributes to explaining the structural neural diversity observed across species, (ii) which mosaic changes contribute most to explaining diversity, and (iii) what the temporal origin, rates and processes are that underlie evolutionary shifts in mosaic reorganization for individual branches of the primate tree of life. We address these questions by combining novel comparative methods that allow assessing the temporal origin, rate and process of evolutionary changes on individual branches of the tree of life, with newly available data on volumes of key brain structures (prefrontal cortex, frontal motor areas and cerebrocerebellum) for a sample of 17 species (including humans). We identify patterns of mosaic change in brain evolution that mirror brain systems previously identified by electrophysiological and anatomical tract-tracing studies in non-human primates and functional connectivity MRI studies in humans. Across more than 40 Myr of anthropoid primate evolution, mosaic changes contribute more to explaining neural diversity than changes in relative brain size, and different mosaic patterns are differentially selected for when brains increase or decrease in size. We identify lineage-specific evolutionary specializations for all branches of the tree of life covered by our sample and demonstrate deep evolutionary roots for mosaic patterns associated with motor control and learning.

  5. Dynamic functional reorganizations and relationship with working memory performance in healthy aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roser eSala-Llonch

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, several theories have been proposed in attempts to identify the neural mechanisms underlying successful cognitive aging. Old subjects show increased neural activity during the performance of tasks, mainly in prefrontal areas, which is interpreted as a compensatory mechanism linked to functional brain efficiency. Moreover, resting-state studies have concluded that elders show disconnection or disruption of large-scale functional networks. We used functional MRI during resting-state and a verbal n-back task with different levels of memory load in a cohort of young and old healthy adults to identify patterns of networks associated with working memory and brain default mode. We found that the disruption of resting-state networks in the elderly coexists with task-related overactivations of certain brain areas and with reorganizations within these functional networks. Moreover, elders who were able to activate additional areas and to recruit a more bilateral frontal pattern within the task-related network achieved successful performance on the task. We concluded that the balanced and plastic reorganization of brain networks underlies successful cognitive aging. This observation allows the integration of several theories that have been proposed to date regarding the aging brain.

  6. Congenital blindness is associated with large-scale reorganization of anatomical networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasson, Uri; Andric, Michael; Atilgan, Hicret; Collignon, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    Blindness is a unique model for understanding the role of experience in the development of the brain's functional and anatomical architecture. Documenting changes in the structure of anatomical networks for this population would substantiate the notion that the brain's core network-level organization may undergo neuroplasticity as a result of life-long experience. To examine this issue, we compared whole-brain networks of regional cortical-thickness covariance in early blind and matched sighted individuals. This covariance is thought to reflect signatures of integration between systems involved in similar perceptual/cognitive functions. Using graph-theoretic metrics, we identified a unique mode of anatomical reorganization in the blind that differed from that found for sighted. This was seen in that network partition structures derived from subgroups of blind were more similar to each other than they were to partitions derived from sighted. Notably, after deriving network partitions, we found that language and visual regions tended to reside within separate modules in sighted but showed a pattern of merging into shared modules in the blind. Our study demonstrates that early visual deprivation triggers a systematic large-scale reorganization of whole-brain cortical-thickness networks, suggesting changes in how occipital regions interface with other functional networks in the congenitally blind.

  7. Cross-modal re-organization in adults with early stage hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Julia; Sharma, Anu

    2014-01-01

    Cortical cross-modal re-organization, or recruitment of auditory cortical areas for visual processing, has been well-documented in deafness. However, the degree of sensory deprivation necessary to induce such cortical plasticity remains unclear. We recorded visual evoked potentials (VEP) using high-density electroencephalography in nine persons with adult-onset mild-moderate hearing loss and eight normal hearing control subjects. Behavioral auditory performance was quantified using a clinical measure of speech perception-in-noise. Relative to normal hearing controls, adults with hearing loss showed significantly larger P1, N1, and P2 VEP amplitudes, decreased N1 latency, and a novel positive component (P2') following the P2 VEP. Current source density reconstruction of VEPs revealed a shift toward ventral stream processing including activation of auditory temporal cortex in hearing-impaired adults. The hearing loss group showed worse than normal speech perception performance in noise, which was strongly correlated with a decrease in the N1 VEP latency. Overall, our findings provide the first evidence that visual cross-modal re-organization not only begins in the early stages of hearing impairment, but may also be an important factor in determining behavioral outcomes for listeners with hearing loss, a finding which demands further investigation.

  8. Corticospinal Reorganization after Locomotor Training in a Person with Motor Incomplete Paraplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nupur Hajela

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Activity-dependent plasticity as a result of reorganization of neural circuits is a fundamental characteristic of the central nervous system that occurs simultaneously in multiple sites. In this study, we established the effects of subthreshold transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS over the primary motor cortex region on the tibialis anterior (TA long-latency flexion reflex. Neurophysiological tests were conducted before and after robotic gait training in one person with a motor incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI while at rest and during robotic-assisted stepping. The TA flexion reflex was evoked following nonnociceptive sural nerve stimulation and was conditioned by TMS at 0.9 TA motor evoked potential resting threshold at conditioning-test intervals that ranged from 70 to 130 ms. Subthreshold TMS induced a significant facilitation on the TA flexion reflex before training, which was reversed to depression after training with the subject seated at rest. During stepping, corticospinal facilitation of the flexion reflex at early and midstance phases before training was replaced with depression at early and midswing followed by facilitation at late swing after training. These results constitute the first neurophysiologic evidence that locomotor training reorganizes the cortical control of spinal interneuronal circuits that generate patterned motor activity, modifying spinal reflex function, in the chronic lesioned human spinal cord.

  9. Desiccation tolerance in the tardigrade Richtersius coronifer relies on muscle mediated structural reorganization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halberg, Kenneth Agerlin; Jørgensen, Aslak; Møbjerg, Nadja

    2013-01-01

    Life unfolds within a framework of constraining abiotic factors, yet some organisms are adapted to handle large fluctuations in physical and chemical parameters. Tardigrades are microscopic ecdysozoans well known for their ability to endure hostile conditions, such as complete desiccation--a phenomenon called anhydrobiosis. During dehydration, anhydrobiotic animals undergo a series of anatomical changes. Whether this reorganization is an essential regulated event mediated by active controlled processes, or merely a passive result of the dehydration process, has not been clearly determined. Here, we investigate parameters pivotal to the formation of the so-called "tun", a state that in tardigrades and rotifers marks the entrance into anhydrobiosis. Estimation of body volume in the eutardigrade Richtersius coronifer reveals an 87 % reduction in volume from the hydrated active state to the dehydrated tun state, underlining the structural stress associated with entering anhydrobiosis. Survival experiments with pharmacological inhibitors of mitochondrial energy production and muscle contractions show that i) mitochondrial energy production is a prerequisite for surviving desiccation, ii) uncoupling the mitochondria abolishes tun formation, and iii) inhibiting the musculature impairs the ability to form viable tuns. We moreover provide a comparative analysis of the structural changes involved in tun formation, using a combination of cytochemistry, confocal laser scanning microscopy and 3D reconstructions as well as scanning electron microscopy. Our data reveal that the musculature mediates a structural reorganization vital for anhydrobiotic survival, and furthermore that maintaining structural integrity is essential for resumption of life following rehydration.

  10. Desiccation tolerance in the tardigrade Richtersius coronifer relies on muscle mediated structural reorganization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Agerlin Halberg

    Full Text Available Life unfolds within a framework of constraining abiotic factors, yet some organisms are adapted to handle large fluctuations in physical and chemical parameters. Tardigrades are microscopic ecdysozoans well known for their ability to endure hostile conditions, such as complete desiccation--a phenomenon called anhydrobiosis. During dehydration, anhydrobiotic animals undergo a series of anatomical changes. Whether this reorganization is an essential regulated event mediated by active controlled processes, or merely a passive result of the dehydration process, has not been clearly determined. Here, we investigate parameters pivotal to the formation of the so-called "tun", a state that in tardigrades and rotifers marks the entrance into anhydrobiosis. Estimation of body volume in the eutardigrade Richtersius coronifer reveals an 87 % reduction in volume from the hydrated active state to the dehydrated tun state, underlining the structural stress associated with entering anhydrobiosis. Survival experiments with pharmacological inhibitors of mitochondrial energy production and muscle contractions show that i mitochondrial energy production is a prerequisite for surviving desiccation, ii uncoupling the mitochondria abolishes tun formation, and iii inhibiting the musculature impairs the ability to form viable tuns. We moreover provide a comparative analysis of the structural changes involved in tun formation, using a combination of cytochemistry, confocal laser scanning microscopy and 3D reconstructions as well as scanning electron microscopy. Our data reveal that the musculature mediates a structural reorganization vital for anhydrobiotic survival, and furthermore that maintaining structural integrity is essential for resumption of life following rehydration.

  11. End-group Influence on the Frontier Molecular Orbital Reorganization in Molecular Junctions -- Effect on Thermopower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Janakiraman; Reddy, Pramod; Dunietz, Barry; Gavini, Vikram

    2014-03-01

    The frontier molecular orbital (FMO) reorganization and in turn on the thermopower of the aromatic molecules trapped between metal electrodes (aka molecular junctions) depends on two effects namely (1) the stabilization effect - due to the physical presence of the metal electrode atoms and (2) change in e-e interactions - due to end-group mediated charge transfer. The stabilization effect always reduces the FMO energies. The charge transfer effect increases the FMO energies in charge-gaining molecules, which in turn opposes the stabilization effect resulting in a small overall shift. However, the charge transfer effect decreases the FMO energies in charge-losing molecules, which in turn complements the stabilization effect resulting in a large overall downward shift. This hypothesis is validated by delineating the shifts due to stabilization and charge-transfer effects independently. Further we also demonstrate the generality of the hypothesis by applying it on a wide range of aromatic molecules with different length and end-groups. Finally, we also present computationally efficient strategies, based on the proposed mechanism, to quantitatively compute the FMO reorganization which in turn has potential for high throughput analysis of molecular junctions.

  12. Myeloperoxidase modulates human platelet aggregation via actin cytoskeleton reorganization and store-operated calcium entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina V. Gorudko

    2013-07-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO is a heme-containing enzyme released from activated leukocytes into the extracellular space during inflammation. Its main function is the production of hypohalous acids that are potent oxidants. MPO can also modulate cell signaling and inflammatory responses independently of its enzymatic activity. Because MPO is regarded as an important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases associated with increased platelet activity, we studied the effects of MPO on human platelet functional properties. Laser scanning confocal microscopy was used to reveal carbohydrate-independent MPO binding to human platelet membrane. Adding MPO to platelets did not activate their aggregation under basal conditions (without agonist. In contrast, MPO augmented agonist-induced platelet aggregation, which was not prevented by MPO enzymatic activity inhibitors. It was found that exposure of platelets to MPO leads to actin cytoskeleton reorganization and an increase in their elasticity. Furthermore, MPO evoked a rise in cytosolic Ca2+ through enhancement of store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE. Together, these findings indicate that MPO is not a direct agonist but rather a mediator that binds to human platelets, induces actin cytoskeleton reorganization and affects the mechanical stiffness of human platelets, resulting in potentiating SOCE and agonist-induced human platelet aggregation. Therefore, an increased activity of platelets in vascular disease can, at least partly, be provided by MPO elevated concentrations.

  13. Progressive brain damage, synaptic reorganization and NMDA activation in a model of epileptogenic cortical dysplasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Colciaghi

    Full Text Available Whether severe epilepsy could be a progressive disorder remains as yet unresolved. We previously demonstrated in a rat model of acquired focal cortical dysplasia, the methylazoxymethanol/pilocarpine - MAM/pilocarpine - rats, that the occurrence of status epilepticus (SE and subsequent seizures fostered a pathologic process capable of modifying the morphology of cortical pyramidal neurons and NMDA receptor expression/localization. We have here extended our analysis by evaluating neocortical and hippocampal changes in MAM/pilocarpine rats at different epilepsy stages, from few days after onset up to six months of chronic epilepsy. Our findings indicate that the process triggered by SE and subsequent seizures in the malformed brain i is steadily progressive, deeply altering neocortical and hippocampal morphology, with atrophy of neocortex and CA regions and progressive increase of granule cell layer dispersion; ii changes dramatically the fine morphology of neurons in neocortex and hippocampus, by increasing cell size and decreasing both dendrite arborization and spine density; iii induces reorganization of glutamatergic and GABAergic networks in both neocortex and hippocampus, favoring excitatory vs inhibitory input; iv activates NMDA regulatory subunits. Taken together, our data indicate that, at least in experimental models of brain malformations, severe seizure activity, i.e., SE plus recurrent seizures, may lead to a widespread, steadily progressive architectural, neuronal and synaptic reorganization in the brain. They also suggest the mechanistic relevance of glutamate/NMDA hyper-activation in the seizure-related brain pathologic plasticity.

  14. Cortical reorganization during PASAT task in MS patients with preserved working memory functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forn, C; Barros-Loscertales, A; Escudero, J; Belloch, V; Campos, S; Parcet, M A; Avila, C

    2006-06-01

    Cortical reorganization in multiple sclerosis (MS) is defined as a compensatory mechanism which requires MS patients to overactivate specific brain areas in order to perform the task as controls. To investigate this process with the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT) task, we selected 15 MS patients who performed the PASAT task within-normal limits and 10 healthy controls. Once selected, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate brain areas involved in PASAT performance in both groups. Results showed that the task activated the left frontal (BA6 and 9) and parietal cortex (BA7 and 40) in both groups, but MS patients showed a stronger activation in the left prefrontal cortex (BA9, 44 and 45) when compared with controls. These results confirmed those obtained post hoc by Audoin et al. [Audoin, B., Ibarrola, D., Ranjeva, J.P., Confort-Gouny, S., Malikova, I., Ali-Chérif, A.M., Pelletier, J., Cozzone, P., et al., 2003. Compensatory cortical activation observed by fMRI during cognitive task at the earliest stage of MS. Hum. Brain Mapp. 20, 51-58], and we interpreted this as showing true cortical reorganization.

  15. Large extents of intensive land use limit community reorganization during climate warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Tom H; Gillings, Simon; Pearce-Higgins, James W; Brereton, Tom; Crick, Humphrey Q P; Duffield, Simon J; Morecroft, Michael D; Roy, David B

    2017-06-01

    Climate change is increasingly altering the composition of ecological communities, in combination with other environmental pressures such as high-intensity land use. Pressures are expected to interact in their effects, but the extent to which intensive human land use constrains community responses to climate change is currently unclear. A generic indicator of climate change impact, the community temperature index (CTI), has previously been used to suggest that both bird and butterflies are successfully 'tracking' climate change. Here, we assessed community changes at over 600 English bird or butterfly monitoring sites over three decades and tested how the surrounding land has influenced these changes. We partitioned community changes into warm- and cold-associated assemblages and found that English bird communities have not reorganized successfully in response to climate change. CTI increases for birds are primarily attributable to the loss of cold-associated species, whilst for butterflies, warm-associated species have tended to increase. Importantly, the area of intensively managed land use around monitoring sites appears to influence these community changes, with large extents of intensively managed land limiting 'adaptive' community reorganization in response to climate change. Specifically, high-intensity land use appears to exacerbate declines in cold-adapted bird and butterfly species, and prevent increases in warm-associated birds. This has broad implications for managing landscapes to promote climate change adaptation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Solvent Reorganization Energy of Intramolecular Electron Transfer in Peptides Involving Tryptophan and Tyrosine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ying-Yi; MA Jian-Yi; ZHAO Xiao-Jun; LI Xiang-Yuan

    2008-01-01

    Intramolecular electron transfer(ET)from tyrosine to tryptophan within peptide Trp-(Pro),-Tyr(n=1,2)has been investigated by ab initio calculation associated with a proper consideration of solvent effect by a continuum model.After geometry optimizations of the charge-localized reactant and product,double-well potentials have been constructed by adopting the linear reaction coordinate.The transition state has been determined by finding the crossing point of the potential energy curves.The realistic ET reaction was found complicated in polar solvent,hence the solvent reorganization energy of the electron transfer has received especial attention in this work.Apply-ing the nonequilibrium solvation procedure implemented based on the polarizable continuum model by the authors,the solvent reorganization energy was estimated to be 87.36 kJ/mol for the ET in Trp-Pro-Tyr system and 105.80 kJ/mol for Trp-(Pro)2-Tyr.

  17. Reading acquisition reorganizes the phonological awareness network only in alphabetic writing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Christine; Cao, Fan; Pedroarena-Leal, Nicole; McNorgan, Chris; Booth, James R

    2013-12-01

    It is unknown how experience with different types of orthographies influences the neural basis of oral language processing. In order to determine the effects of alphabetic and nonalphabetic writing systems, the current study examined the influence of learning to read on oral language in English and Chinese speakers. Children (8-12 years olds) and adults made rhyming judgments to pairs of spoken words during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Developmental increases were seen only for English speakers in the left hemisphere phonological network (superior temporal gyrus (STG), inferior parietal lobule, and inferior frontal gyrus). The increase in the STG was more pronounced for words with conflicting orthography (e.g. pint-mint; jazz-has) even though access to orthography was irrelevant to the task. Moreover, higher reading skill was correlated with greater activation in the STG only for English speaking children. The effects suggest that learning to read reorganizes the phonological awareness network only for alphabetic and not logographic writing systems because of differences in the principles for mapping between orthographic and phonological representations. The reorganization of the auditory cortex may result in better phonological awareness skills in alphabetic readers. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Cross-modal re-organization in adults with early stage hearing loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Campbell

    Full Text Available Cortical cross-modal re-organization, or recruitment of auditory cortical areas for visual processing, has been well-documented in deafness. However, the degree of sensory deprivation necessary to induce such cortical plasticity remains unclear. We recorded visual evoked potentials (VEP using high-density electroencephalography in nine persons with adult-onset mild-moderate hearing loss and eight normal hearing control subjects. Behavioral auditory performance was quantified using a clinical measure of speech perception-in-noise. Relative to normal hearing controls, adults with hearing loss showed significantly larger P1, N1, and P2 VEP amplitudes, decreased N1 latency, and a novel positive component (P2' following the P2 VEP. Current source density reconstruction of VEPs revealed a shift toward ventral stream processing including activation of auditory temporal cortex in hearing-impaired adults. The hearing loss group showed worse than normal speech perception performance in noise, which was strongly correlated with a decrease in the N1 VEP latency. Overall, our findings provide the first evidence that visual cross-modal re-organization not only begins in the early stages of hearing impairment, but may also be an important factor in determining behavioral outcomes for listeners with hearing loss, a finding which demands further investigation.

  19. Medial reorganization of motor function in corona radiata following middle cerebral artery infarction A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sung Ho Jang

    2009-01-01

    Peri-lesional reorganization is one of the motor recovery mechanisms following stroke. A 23-year-old female who presented with complete paralysis of the right extremities at the onset of infarct in the left middle cerebral artery territory was included. She slowly recovered some function, and could extend the affected knee with resistance after 9 months. Diffusion tensor tractography, functional MRI, and transcranial magnetic stimulation testing were performed at 7 years after onset. Results showed that diffusion tensor tractography of the affected (left) hemisphere passed through the medial corona radiata at, or around, the wall of the lateral ventricle. The contralateral primary sensorimotor cortex was activated during affected knee movements. The motor-evoked potential, which was obtained from the affected leg, exhibited corticospinal tract characteristics. Results indicated that motor function of the affected leg recovered via the corticospinal tract, which descended through the corona radiata medial to the infarct. The motor function of the affected leg was reorganized to the medial corona radiata following infarct to the middle cerebral artery territory.

  20. The EXIST Mission Concept Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Gerald J.; Grindlay, J.; Hong, J.

    2008-01-01

    EXIST is a mission designed to find and study black holes (BHs) over a wide range of environments and masses, including: 1) BHs accreting from binary companions or dense molecular clouds throughout our Galaxy and the Local Group, 2) supermassive black holes (SMBHs) lying dormant in galaxies that reveal their existence by disrupting passing stars, and 3) SMBHs that are hidden from our view at lower energies due to obscuration by the gas that they accrete. 4) the birth of stellar mass BHs which is accompanied by long cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) which are seen several times a day and may be associated with the earliest stars to form in the Universe. EXIST will provide an order of magnitude increase in sensitivity and angular resolution as well as greater spectral resolution and bandwidth compared with earlier hard X-ray survey telescopes. With an onboard optical-infra red (IR) telescope, EXIST will measure the spectra and redshifts of GRBs and their utility as cosmological probes of the highest z universe and epoch of reionization. The mission would retain its primary goal of being the Black Hole Finder Probe in the Beyond Einstein Program. However, the new design for EXIST proposed to be studied here represents a significant advance from its previous incarnation as presented to BEPAC. The mission is now less than half the total mass, would be launched on the smallest EELV available (Atlas V-401) for a Medium Class mission, and most importantly includes a two-telescope complement that is ideally suited for the study of both obscured and very distant BHs. EXIST retains its very wide field hard X-ray imaging High Energy Telescope (HET) as the primary instrument, now with improved angular and spectral resolution, and in a more compact payload that allows occasional rapid slews for immediate optical/IR imaging and spectra of GRBs and AGN as well as enhanced hard X-ray spectra and timing with pointed observations. The mission would conduct a 2 year full sky survey in

  1. Cluster pre-existence probability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajeswari, N.S.; Vijayaraghavan, K.R.; Balasubramaniam, M. [Bharathiar University, Department of Physics, Coimbatore (India)

    2011-10-15

    Pre-existence probability of the fragments for the complete binary spectrum of different systems such as {sup 56}Ni, {sup 116}Ba, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 256}Fm are calculated, from the overlapping part of the interaction potential using the WKB approximation. The role of reduced mass as well as the classical hydrodynamical mass in the WKB method is analysed. Within WKB, even for negative Q -value systems, the pre-existence probability is calculated. The calculations reveal rich structural information. The calculated results are compared with the values of preformed cluster model of Gupta and collaborators. The mass asymmetry motion is shown here for the first time as a part of relative separation motion. (orig.)

  2. Existence of undiscovered Uranian satellites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boice, D.C.

    1986-04-01

    Structure in the Uranian ring system as observed in recent occultations may contain indirect evidence for the existence of undiscovered satellites. Using the Alfven and Arrhenius (1975, 1976) scenario for the formation of planetary systems, the orbital radii of up to nine hypothetical satellites interior to Miranda are computed. These calculations should provide interesting comparisons when the results from the Voyager 2 encounter with Uranus are made public. 15 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  3. The Spatial Politics of Spatial Representation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Kristian; Richardson, Tim

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the interplay between the spatial politics of new governance landscapes and innovations in the use of spatial representations in planning. The central premise is that planning experiments with new relational approaches become enmeshed in spatial politics. The case of strategic...... spatial planning in Denmark reveals how fuzzy spatial representations and relational spatial concepts are being used to depoliticise strategic spatial planning processes and to camouflage spatial politics. The paper concludes that, while relational geography might play an important role in building...... consensus, it plays an equal important role in supporting current neoliberal transformations of strategic spatial planning....

  4. Saddle scars Existence and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mendes, R V

    1998-01-01

    A quantum scar is a wave function which displays an high intensity in the region of a classical unstable periodic orbit. Saddle scars are states related to the unstable harmonic motions along the stable manifold of a saddle point of the potential. Using a semiclassical method it is shown that, independently of the overall structure of the potential, the local dynamics of the saddle point is sufficient to insure the general existence of this type of scars and their factorized structure is obtained. Potentially useful situations are identified, where these states appear (directly or in disguise) and might be used for quantum control purposes.

  5. The Factors and Transversal Reorganizations Principles of Romanian Textile Industry Enterprises using Activity-Based Costing Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorinel Capusneanu

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the factors and the principles of transversal reorganization of the enterprises from the Romanian textile industry by adapting the Activity-Based Costing method (ABC to its specific. There are presented and analyzed the real possibilities of reorganization of the enterprises in Romania by elaboration of methodological phases that will be covered until the implementation of their transversal organization. Are we ready to adapt the Activity-Based Costing method to the specific of the Romanian textile industry and not only? Here is the question whose response we will find in this article.

  6. Turbulence: does energy cascade exist?

    CERN Document Server

    Josserand, Christophe; Lehner, Thierry; Pomeau, Yves

    2016-01-01

    To answer the question whether a cascade of energy exists or not in turbulence, we propose a set of correlation functions able to test if there is an irreversible transfert of energy, step by step, from large to small structures. These tests are applied to real Eulerian data of a turbulent velocity flow, taken in the wind grid tunnel of Modane, and also to a prototype model equation for wave turbulence. First we demonstrate the irreversible character of the flow by using multi-time correlation function at a given point of space. Moreover the unexpected behavior of the test function leads us to connect irreversibility and finite time singularities (intermittency). Secondly we show that turbulent cascade exists, and is a dynamical process, by using a test function depending on time and frequency. The cascade shows up only in the inertial domain where the kinetic energy is transferred more rapidly (on average) from the wavenumber $k_{1}$ to $k_{2}$ than from $k_{1}$ to $k'_{2}$ larger than $k_{2}$.

  7. Corporate debts ad credit performance under the new mechanism of reorganization of the Russian banks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey A. Andryushin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective to explore the dynamics and factors of formation of corporate debts the characteristics of low credit activity of the Russian banks and regulation of liquidity deficit of enterprises under the new reorganization mechanism in the Russian banking sector. Methods systematic approach to the cognition of economic phenomena which allows to study them in their dynamic development taking into account the influence of various environmental factors. The systematic approach determined selection of specific research methods empirical logical comparative and statistical. Results the article is devoted to the problems of declining credit activity of commercial banks under the conditions of economic activity revival as well as to assessing the impact of the new reorganization mechanism on this process. It is shown that in the recent years the nonfinancial sector faces the trend of optimizing the corporate debts and the liquidity deficit which reduced the demand for loans and as a consequence decreased the banksrsquo credit activity. To analyze the dynamics of deficitsurplus of liquidity in the corporate sector a new classification of liquidity deficitsurplus levels was introduced. Based on the proposed classification the risk factors were identified that influenced the dynamics of indebtedness in the corporate sector. The article also analyses the modern monetary mechanism of money supply in the economy and its transformation. It was determined that the main limitation of credit issuance by commercial banks is their capital not the reserve multiplier. The new mechanism of credit institutionsrsquo financial recovery and its impact on the banksrsquo credit activity was estimated. The conditions of liquidity deficiency reduction in the Russian companies were analyzed in the medium term. Scientific novelty for the first time on the basis of system analysis methods the growth factors of the corporate debt load were identified the peculiarities of low

  8. Straightening: existence, uniqueness and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destrade, M; Ogden, R W; Sgura, I; Vergori, L

    2014-04-08

    One of the least studied universal deformations of incompressible nonlinear elasticity, namely the straightening of a sector of a circular cylinder into a rectangular block, is revisited here and, in particular, issues of existence and stability are addressed. Particular attention is paid to the system of forces required to sustain the large static deformation, including by the application of end couples. The influence of geometric parameters and constitutive models on the appearance of wrinkles on the compressed face of the block is also studied. Different numerical methods for solving the incremental stability problem are compared and it is found that the impedance matrix method, based on the resolution of a matrix Riccati differential equation, is the more precise.

  9. Straightening: existence, uniqueness and stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destrade, M.; Ogden, R. W.; Sgura, I.; Vergori, L.

    2014-01-01

    One of the least studied universal deformations of incompressible nonlinear elasticity, namely the straightening of a sector of a circular cylinder into a rectangular block, is revisited here and, in particular, issues of existence and stability are addressed. Particular attention is paid to the system of forces required to sustain the large static deformation, including by the application of end couples. The influence of geometric parameters and constitutive models on the appearance of wrinkles on the compressed face of the block is also studied. Different numerical methods for solving the incremental stability problem are compared and it is found that the impedance matrix method, based on the resolution of a matrix Riccati differential equation, is the more precise. PMID:24711723

  10. Local Existence of Spinor Potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Andersson, F

    1999-01-01

    We present a new, simple proof of existence for the Lanczos spinor potential in 3+1 dimensions that introduces a potential $T_{ABCD}= T_{(ABC)D}$ of the Lanczos potential together with several generalizations to other index configurations and metric signatures. The potential $T_{ABCD}$ can also be used to express, in a concise way, the gauge freedom left in the Lanczos potential after the differential gauge has been specified. We consider Einstein spacetimes and prove that in those spacetimes any symmetric (3,1)-spinor possesses a symmetric potential $H_{ABA'B'}$. Potentials of this type have earlier occurred in some special cases investigated e.g., by Torres del Castillo, Bergqvist and ourselves.

  11. Version based spatial record management techniques for spatial database management system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KIM Ho-seok; KIM Hee-taek; KIM Myung-keun; BAE Hae-young

    2004-01-01

    The search operation of spatial data was a principal operation in existent spatial database management system, but the update operation of spatial data such as tracking are occurring frequently in the spatial database management system recently. So, necessity of concurrency improvement among transactions is increasing. In general database management system, many techniques have been studied to solve concurrency problem of transaction. Among them, multi-version algorithm does to minimize interference among transactions. However, to apply existent multi-version algorithm to improve concurrency of transaction to spatial database management system, the waste of storage happens because it must store entire version for spatial record even if only aspatial data of spatial record is changed. This paper has proposed the record management techniques to manage separating aspatial data version and spatial data version to decrease waste of storage for record version and improve concurrency among transactions.

  12. Does the polystomatic gland exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, M; Shibata, T; Moriguchi, K; Kinbara, M

    1989-03-01

    According to the P.N.A., the N.A.J. and some scholars, the sublingual gland has the ductus sublingualis major and ductus sublinguales minores. This means that the gland is a polystomatic gland. We intended to determine whether the so-called polystomatic gland exists or not. 1. According to the P.N.A., the N.A.J. and some scholars, the gl. sublingualis has the ductus sublingualis major and ductus sublinguales minores. This means the gland is a polystomatic gland. However, the formation of one gland with plural excretory ducts is embryologically impossible, in other words, the polystomatic gland does not exist. 2. Many scholars described that the gl. sublingualis was composed of the gl. sublingualis major and g11. sublinguales minores. However, they are completely different kinds of glands. Accordingly, we suggest the terms for these glands: the g1. sublingualis and its ductus sublingualis ("major" is useless), the g11. sublinguales minores and their ductus sublinguales minores. 3. The N.A.V.J. and some scholars use the term g1. sublingualis polystomatica or parvicanalaris. However, this is a group of a number of independent glands each of which has its own excretory duct. Such a gland should not be regarded as a single gland. We suggest that the term g11. sublinguales minores and their excretory ducts should be replaced with the term the ductus sublinguales minores. 4. The g1. lingualis anterior, g1. retromolaris and g1. lacrimalis are not single glands but a group of several independent glands each of which has its own excretory duct. Accordingly, they should be termed the g11. linguales anteriores, g11. retromolares and g11. lacrimales such as the g11. labiales, g11. buccales and g11. palatinae.

  13. Technological Similarity, Post-acquisition R&D Reorganization, and Innovation Performance in Horizontal Acquisition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colombo, Massimo G.; Rabbiosi, Larissa

    2014-01-01

    &D personnel. We rely on PLS techniques to test our theoretical model using detailed information on 31 horizontal acquisitions in high- and medium-tech industries. Our results indicate that in horizontal acquisitions, technological similarity negatively affects post-acquisition innovation performance......This paper aims to disentangle the mechanisms through which technological similarity between acquiring and acquired firms influences innovation in horizontal acquisitions. We develop a theoretical model that links technological similarity to: (i) two key aspects of post-acquisition reorganization...... of acquired R&D operations – the rationalization of the R&D operations and the replacement of the R&D top manager, and (ii) two intermediate effects that are closely associated with the post-acquisition innovation performance of the combined firm – improvements in R&D productivity and disruptions in R...

  14. Alteration and reorganization of functional networks: a new perspective in brain injury study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazareth P. Castellanos

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Plasticity is the mechanism underlying brain’s potential capability to compensate injury. Recently several studies have shown that functional connections among brain areas are severely altered by brain injury and plasticity leading to a reorganization of the networks. This new approach studies the impact of brain injury by means of alteration of functional interactions. The concept of functional connectivity refers to the statistical interdependencies between physiological time series simultaneously recorded in various brain areas and it could be an essential tool for brain function studies, being its deviation from healthy reference an indicator for damage. In this article, we review studies investigating functional connectivity changes after brain injury and subsequent recovery, providing an accessible introduction to common mathematical methods to infer functional connectivity, exploring their capabilities, future perspectives and clinical uses in brain injury studies.

  15. Reorganization of water utilities - regionalization, an opportunity to increase their efficiency A comparative literature - Albania Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Naqellari

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is the study and analysis of factors affecting the need for reorganization of entities engaged in water supply services. From this perspective, the research seeks to identify international practices made in this regard and how they can be adapted to water utilities in Albania. The objective of this paper is to show that regionalization of water utilities is a successful development direction not only of studied literature but also practice in Albania. The study is based on sources of information taken from primary and secondary sources. The selected method for collecting and processing information from primary sources is the empirical method through direct surveys and questionnaires, whereas from secondary sources is descriptive and analytical method. As secondary sources, we are consulted and referred to academic resources, such as articles, books, studies and reports carried out and published by national organizations, local and foreign companies in this field.

  16. Reorganization of a hospital catering system increases food intake in patients with inadequate intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freil, M.; Nielsen, M. A.; Biltz, C.

    2006-01-01

    the energy and protein intake of the patients. Design: Observational study comparing the food intake before and twice after the implementation of the new system, the first time by specially trained staff and the second time by ordinary staff members, following training. The amount of food served, eaten...... and wasted was measured, and energy and protein intake calculated. Results: The quartile of patients with the lowest energy intake consumed on average 128 kJ per patient [(95% confidence interval (CI) 79-178 kJ] with the old system; with the new system they consumed 560 kJ per patient (95% CI 489-631 k......: Reorganization of a hospital catering system can increase energy and protein intake and reduce waste substantially. Keywords: hospital food; nutritional risk; undernutrition...

  17. Reorganization of a hospital catering system increases food intake in patients with inadequate intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freil, M; Nielsen, MA; Blitz, B

    2006-01-01

    , increases the energy and protein intake of the patients. Design: Observational study comparing the food intake before and twice after the implementation of the new system, the first time by specially trained staff and the second time by ordinary staff members, following training. The amount of food served......, eaten and wasted was measured, and energy and protein intake calculated. Results: The quartile of patients with the lowest energy intake consumed on average 128 kJ per patient [(95% confidence interval (CI) 79-178 kJ] with the old system; with the new system they consumed 560 kJ per patient (95% CI 489....... Conclusions: Reorganization of a hospital catering system can increase energy and protein intake and reduce waste substantially....

  18. Photovoltaic industry, towards a reorganization; Photovoltaique, vers une concentration du marche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houot, G.

    2011-09-15

    During the first semester 2011 the sales of photovoltaic equipment have dropped unexpectedly, certainly due to the harsh winter in Europe and the reduction of the policy of financial incentives in some countries. This drop in demand has triggered such a drop in prices that some manufacturers face financial difficulties, for instance the American Evergreen Solar was declared bankrupt in mid august 2011. Today the production of solar panels exceeds the demand. The third term of 2011 shows an improvement but the sector will not escape a reorganization: there are too many manufacturers, some will disappear, other will merge, the biggest will stay. Some economists see the future market divided into 2 sectors: one sector dedicated to the mass production of classical solar panels at very low cost, this sector will be occupied mainly by Chinese companies and another sector demanding a more specialized know-how will be driven by American, Japanese and European companies. (A.C.)

  19. Microcirculation and structural reorganization of the bladder mucosa in chronic cystitis under conditions of ozone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neimark, A I; Nepomnyashchikh, L M; Lushnikova, E L; Bakarev, M A; Abdullaev, N A; Sizov, K A

    2014-01-01

    Structural reorganization of the bladder mucosa in chronic cystitis and its correction by ozone therapy were studied. A relationship between the epithelial layer restructuring of different kinds (dystrophy, metaplasia, and degeneration), level of cell proliferation, and ultrastructural organization of urotheliocytes was detected. This complex of structural reactions was combined with dysregulation of tissue bloodflow in the bladder mucosa, shown by laser Doppler flowmetry. Positive structural changes were most marked in intravesical and less so in parenteral ozone therapy added to the therapeutic complex and manifested in reduction of inflammation and alteration in parallel with more intense reparative reactions. A special feature of parenteral ozone therapy was a significant improvement of microcirculation in the bladder mucosa.

  20. Constraint-induced movement therapy promotes brain functional reorganization in stroke patients with hemiplegia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenqing Wang; Aihui Wang; Limin Yu; Xuesong Han; Guiyun Jiang; Changshui Weng; Hongwei Zhang; Zhiqiang Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Stroke patients with hemiplegia exhibit flexor spasms in the upper limb and extensor spasms in the lower limb, and their movement patterns vary greatly. Constraint-induced movement therapy is an upper limb rehabilitation technique used in stroke patients with hemiplegia; however, studies of lower extremity rehabilitation are scarce. In this study, stroke patients with lower limb hemiplegia underwent conventional Bobath therapy for 4 weeks as baseline treatment, followed by constraint-induced movement therapy for an additional 4 weeks. The 10-m maximum walking speed and Berg balance scale scores significantly improved following treatment, and lower extremity motor function also improved. The results of functional MRI showed that constraint-induced movement therapy alleviates the reduction in cerebral functional activation in patients, which indicates activation of functional brain regions and a significant increase in cerebral blood perfusion. These results demonstrate that constraint-induced movement therapy promotes brain functional reorganization in stroke patients with lower limb hemiplegia.

  1. Structural reorganization of the fungal endoplasmic reticulum upon induction of mycotoxin biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boenisch, Marike Johanne; Broz, Karen Lisa; Purvine, Samuel Owen; Chrisler, William Byron; Nicora, Carrie Diana; Connolly, Lanelle Reine; Freitag, Michael; Baker, Scott Edward; Kistler, Harold Corby

    2017-01-01

    Compartmentalization of metabolic pathways to particular organelles is a hallmark of eukaryotic cells. Knowledge of the development of organelles and attendant pathways under different metabolic states has been advanced by live cell imaging and organelle specific analysis. Nevertheless, relatively few studies have addressed the cellular localization of pathways for synthesis of fungal secondary metabolites, despite their importance as bioactive compounds with significance to medicine and agriculture. When triggered to produce sesquiterpene (trichothecene) mycotoxins, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of the phytopathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum is reorganized both in vitro and in planta. Trichothecene biosynthetic enzymes accumulate in organized smooth ER with pronounced expansion at perinuclear- and peripheral positions. Fluorescence tagged trichothecene biosynthetic proteins co-localize with the modified ER as confirmed by co-fluorescence and co-purification with known ER proteins. We hypothesize that changes to the fungal ER represent a conserved process in specialized eukaryotic cells such as in mammalian hepatocytes and B-cells. PMID:28287158

  2. Constraint-induced movement therapy promotes brain functional reorganization in stroke patients with hemiplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenqing; Wang, Aihui; Yu, Limin; Han, Xuesong; Jiang, Guiyun; Weng, Changshui; Zhang, Hongwei; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2012-11-15

    Stroke patients with hemiplegia exhibit flexor spasms in the upper limb and extensor spasms in the lower limb, and their movement patterns vary greatly. Constraint-induced movement therapy is an upper limb rehabilitation technique used in stroke patients with hemiplegia; however, studies of lower extremity rehabilitation are scarce. In this study, stroke patients with lower limb hemiplegia underwent conventional Bobath therapy for 4 weeks as baseline treatment, followed by constraint-induced movement therapy for an additional 4 weeks. The 10-m maximum walking speed and Berg balance scale scores significantly improved following treatment, and lower extremity motor function also improved. The results of functional MRI showed that constraint-induced movement therapy alleviates the reduction in cerebral functional activation in patients, which indicates activation of functional brain regions and a significant increase in cerebral blood perfusion. These results demonstrate that constraint-induced movement therapy promotes brain functional reorganization in stroke patients with lower limb hemiplegia.

  3. Necessity of Re-Organization of Turkish Agricultural Higher Education System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ulger

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Education in Agricultural Faculties has been changing from beginning to these days in Turkey. However, education in agriculture always contains all area of agriculture and students are awarded the same diploma which is “Agricultural Engineer” after four years. By means of science and technology has been developing, agricultural applications also have been changing recently. This resulted in increasing of requirements from agricultural engineer in respect of both wide and deep knowledge about agriculture. In this study it was aimed that clarification of history of agricultural higher education from the beginning till now in Turkey and agricultural higher education systems in some developed countries. Necessity of re-organization of Turkish agricultural higher education system was also discussed and some recommendations about this theme were given.

  4. Perilesional reorganization of somatosensory function following traumatic cortical contusion A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mi Young Lee; Sung Ho Jang

    2011-01-01

    The present study reports on a 23-year-old male patient with somatosensory dysfunction of the left hand following cortical contusion. His somatosensory dysfunction recovered to a nearly normal state at 6 months after injury. Functional MRI results demonstrated that the contralateral primary sensorimotor cortex centered on the primary somatosensroy cortex was activated during touch stimulation of the patient's right hand and either hand of control subjects. By contrast, the anterior area of the lesion centered on the precentral knob in the right hemisphere was activated during touch stimulation of the left hand. These findings show that the somatosensory function of the affected hand appears to have been recovered by the somatosensory cortex reorganizing into the anterior area of the contused primary somatosensory cortex.

  5. Cross-Modal Re-Organization in Clinical Populations with Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anu Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We review evidence for cross-modal cortical re-organization in clinical populations with hearing loss. Cross-modal plasticity refers to the ability for an intact sensory modality (e.g., vision or somatosensation to recruit cortical brain regions from a deprived sensory modality (e.g., audition to carry out sensory processing. We describe evidence for cross-modal changes in hearing loss across the age-spectrum and across different degrees of hearing impairment, including children with profound, bilateral deafness with cochlear implants, single-sided deafness before and after cochlear implantation, and adults with early-stage, mild-moderate, age-related hearing loss. Understanding cross-modal plasticity in the context of auditory deprivation, and the potential for reversal of these changes following intervention, may be vital in directing intervention and rehabilitation options for clinical populations with hearing loss.

  6. Rapid reorganization in ocean biogeochemistry off Peru towards the end of the Little Ice Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Gutiérrez

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Climate and ocean ecosystem variability has been well recognized during the twentieth century but it is unclear if modern ocean biogeochemistry is susceptible to the large, abrupt shifts that characterized the Late Quaternary. Time series from marine sediments off Peru show an abrupt centennial-scale biogeochemical regime shift in the early nineteenth century, of much greater magnitude and duration than present day multi-decadal variability. A rapid expansion of the subsurface nutrient-rich, oxygen-depleted waters resulted in higher biological productivity, including pelagic fish. The shift was likely driven by a northward migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone and the South Pacific Subtropical High to their present day locations, coupled with a strengthening of Walker circulation, towards the end of the Little Ice Age. These findings reveal the potential for large reorganizations in tropical Pacific climate with immediate effects on ocean biogeochemical cycling and ecosystem structure.

  7. Constraint-induced movement therapy promotes brain functional reorganization in stroke patients with hemiplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenqing; Wang, Aihui; Yu, Limin; Han, Xuesong; Jiang, Guiyun; Weng, Changshui; Zhang, Hongwei; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2012-01-01

    Stroke patients with hemiplegia exhibit flexor spasms in the upper limb and extensor spasms in the lower limb, and their movement patterns vary greatly. Constraint-induced movement therapy is an upper limb rehabilitation technique used in stroke patients with hemiplegia; however, studies of lower extremity rehabilitation are scarce. In this study, stroke patients with lower limb hemiplegia underwent conventional Bobath therapy for 4 weeks as baseline treatment, followed by constraint-induced movement therapy for an additional 4 weeks. The 10-m maximum walking speed and Berg balance scale scores significantly improved following treatment, and lower extremity motor function also improved. The results of functional MRI showed that constraint-induced movement therapy alleviates the reduction in cerebral functional activation in patients, which indicates activation of functional brain regions and a significant increase in cerebral blood perfusion. These results demonstrate that constraint-induced movement therapy promotes brain functional reorganization in stroke patients with lower limb hemiplegia. PMID:25337108

  8. Cocaine exposure reorganizes cell type- and input-specific connectivity in the nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacAskill, Andrew F; Cassel, John M; Carter, Adam G

    2014-09-01

    Repeated exposure to cocaine alters the structural and functional properties of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). These changes suggest a rewiring of the NAc circuit, with an enhancement of excitatory synaptic connections onto MSNs. However, it is unknown how drug exposure alters the balance of long-range afferents onto different cell types in the NAc. Here we used whole-cell recordings, two-photon microscopy, optogenetics and pharmacogenetics to show how repeated cocaine exposure alters connectivity in the mouse NAc medial shell. Cocaine selectively enhanced amygdala innervation of MSNs expressing D1 dopamine receptors (D1-MSNs) relative to D2-MSNs. We also found that amygdala activity was required for cocaine-induced changes to behavior and connectivity. Finally, we established how heightened amygdala innervation can explain the structural and functional changes evoked by cocaine. Our findings reveal how exposure to drugs of abuse fundamentally reorganizes cell type- and input-specific connectivity in the NAc.

  9. [A major game in the re-organization of the Professional Nursing School].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Amorin, Wellington Mendonça; Barreira, Ieda de Alencar

    2007-01-01

    This is a historical-social description study supported on the thought of Pierre Bourdieu based on documental analysis. It describes the sanitarists and psychiatrists' actions from the reformulation of Education and Public Health Ministry into Education and Health Ministry in the beginning of New State and analyse the fight's strategies of the main agents to take advantage on their proposals of Professional Nursing School's reorganization. The fight's strategies that psychiatrists, sanitarists and certificated nurses had used to stake their projects, characterized a difficult battle inserted in a hard major game. The analyse of the ten course's months of the main document shows the conflict between those agents to impose a new rule to the school.

  10. Cortical reorganization after long-term adaptation to retinal lesions in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Susana T L

    2013-11-13

    Single-unit recordings demonstrated that the adult mammalian visual cortex is capable of reorganizing after induced retinal lesions. In humans, whether the adult cortex is capable of reorganizing has only been studied using functional magnetic resonance imaging, with equivocal results. Here, we exploited the phenomenon of visual crowding, a major limitation on object recognition, to show that, in humans with long-standing retinal (macular) lesions that afflict the fovea and thus use their peripheral vision exclusively, the signature properties of crowding are distinctly different from those of the normal periphery. Crowding refers to the inability to recognize objects when the object spacing is smaller than the critical spacing. Critical spacing depends only on the retinal location of the object, scales linearly with its distance from the fovea, and is approximately two times larger in the radial than the tangential direction with respect to the fovea, thus demonstrating the signature radial-tangential anisotropy of the crowding zone. Using retinal imaging combined with behavioral measurements, we mapped out the crowding zone at the precise peripheral retinal locations adopted by individuals with macular lesions as the new visual reference loci. At these loci, the critical spacings are substantially smaller along the radial direction than expected based on the normal periphery, resulting in a lower scaling of critical spacing with the eccentricity of the peripheral locus and a loss in the signature radial-tangential anisotropy of the crowding zone. These results imply a fundamental difference in the substrate of cortical processing in object recognition following long-term adaptation to macular lesions.

  11. Evolutionary formation of gene clusters by reorganization: the meleagrin/roquefortine paradigm in different fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Juan F; Liras, Paloma

    2016-02-01

    The biosynthesis of secondary metabolites in fungi is catalyzed by enzymes encoded by genes linked in clusters that are frequently co-regulated at the transcriptional level. Formation of gene clusters may take place by de novo assembly of genes recruited from other cellular functions, but also novel gene clusters are formed by reorganization of progenitor clusters and are distributed by horizontal gene transfer. This article reviews (i) the published information on the roquefortine/meleagrin/neoxaline gene clusters of Penicillium chrysogenum (Penicillium rubens) and the short roquefortine cluster of Penicillium roqueforti, and (ii) the correlation of the genes present in those clusters with the enzymes and metabolites derived from these pathways. The P. chrysogenum roq/mel cluster consists of seven genes and includes a gene (roqT) encoding a 12-TMS transporter protein of the MFS family. Interestingly, the orthologous P. roquefortine gene cluster has only four genes and the roqT gene is present as a residual pseudogene that encodes only small peptides. Two of the genes present in the central region of the P. chrysogenum roq/mel cluster have been lost during the evolutionary formation of the short cluster and the order of the structural genes in the cluster has been rearranged. The two lost genes encode a N1 atom hydroxylase (nox) and a roquefortine scaffold-reorganizing oxygenase (sro). As a consequence P. roqueforti has lost the ability to convert the roquefortine-type carbon skeleton to the glandicoline/meleagrin-type scaffold and is unable to produce glandicoline B, meleagrin and neoxaline. The loss of this genetic information is not recent and occurred probably millions of years ago when a progenitor Penicillium strain got adapted to life in a few rich habitats such as cheese, fermented cereal grains or silage. P. roqueforti may be considered as a "domesticated" variant of a progenitor common to contemporary P. chrysogenum and related Penicillia.

  12. Reorganization of Sleep by Temperature in Drosophila Requires Light, the Homeostat, and the Circadian Clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisky, Katherine M; Agosto Rivera, José L; Donelson, Nathan C; Kotecha, Sejal; Griffith, Leslie C

    2016-04-04

    Increasing ambient temperature reorganizes the Drosophila sleep pattern in a way similar to the human response to heat, increasing daytime sleep while decreasing nighttime sleep. Mutation of core circadian genes blocks the immediate increase in daytime sleep, but not the heat-stimulated decrease in nighttime sleep, when animals are in a light:dark cycle. The ability of per(01) flies to increase daytime sleep in light:dark can be rescued by expression of PER in either LNv or DN1p clock cells and does not require rescue of locomotor rhythms. Prolonged heat exposure engages the homeostat to maintain daytime sleep in the face of nighttime sleep loss. In constant darkness, all genotypes show an immediate decrease in sleep in response to temperature shift during the subjective day, implying that the absence of light input uncovers a clock-independent pro-arousal effect of increased temperature. Interestingly, the effects of temperature on nighttime sleep are blunted in constant darkness and in cry(OUT) mutants in light:dark, suggesting that they are dependent on the presence of light the previous day. In contrast, flies of all genotypes kept in constant light sleep more at all times of day in response to high temperature, indicating that the presence of light can invert the normal nighttime response to increased temperature. The effect of temperature on sleep thus reflects coordinated regulation by light, the homeostat, and components of the clock, allowing animals to reorganize sleep patterns in response to high temperature with rough preservation of the total amount of sleep.

  13. Reorganization of neuronal circuits of the central olfactory system during postprandial sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Manabe, Hiroyuki; Murata, Koshi; Mori, Kensaku

    2013-01-01

    Plastic changes in neuronal circuits often occur in association with specific behavioral states. In this review, we focus on an emerging view that neuronal circuits in the olfactory system are reorganized along the wake-sleep cycle. Olfaction is crucial to sustaining the animals' life, and odor-guided behaviors have to be newly acquired or updated to successfully cope with a changing odor world. It is therefore likely that neuronal circuits in the olfactory system are highly plastic and undergo repeated reorganization in daily life. A remarkably plastic feature of the olfactory system is that newly generated neurons are continually integrated into neuronal circuits of the olfactory bulb (OB) throughout life. New neurons in the OB undergo an extensive selection process, during which many are eliminated by apoptosis for the fine tuning of neuronal circuits. The life and death decision of new neurons occurs extensively during a short time window of sleep after food consumption (postprandial sleep), a typical daily olfactory behavior. We review recent studies that explain how olfactory information is transferred between the OB and the olfactory cortex (OC) along the course of the wake-sleep cycle. Olfactory sensory input is effectively transferred from the OB to the OC during waking, while synchronized top-down inputs from the OC to the OB are promoted during the slow-wave sleep. We discuss possible neuronal circuit mechanisms for the selection of new neurons in the OB, which involves the encoding of olfactory sensory inputs and memory trace formation during waking and internally generated activities in the OC and OB during subsequent sleep. The plastic changes in the OB and OC are well coordinated along the course of olfactory behavior during wakefulness and postbehavioral rest and sleep. We therefore propose that the olfactory system provides an excellent model in which to understand behavioral state-dependent plastic mechanisms of the neuronal circuits in the brain.

  14. Molecular simulations of outersphere reorganization energies for intramolecular electron and hole transfer in polar solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leontyev, I. V.; Tovmash, A. V.; Vener, M. V.; Rostov, I. V.; Basilevsky, M. V.

    2005-12-01

    Outersphere reorganization energies ( λ) for intramolecular electron transfer (ET) and hole transfer are studied in anion- and cation-radical forms of complex organic substrates (biphenylyl-spacer-naphtyl) in polar solvents simulated by means of the nonpolarizable models of water and 1,2-dichloroethane. The earlier elaborated molecular/continuum approach (the MD/FRCM, J. Chem. Phys., 119 (2003) 8024) is used; this method provides a physically relevant background for separating inertial and inertialess polarization responses within a nonpolarizable MD simulation (the SPC water model). Quantum-chemical calculations of solute charge distributions were performed with semiempirical (AM1) and second ab initio (HF/6-31G(d,p)) approximations. Ab initio charges give lower λ-values and are preferable, probably, because of including the effect of the SCRF polarization of the diabatic ET states. Standard Lennard-Jones and charge parameters implemented in MD runs were not specially fitted for reproducing ET effects. The difference in values for a cation and an anion originating from the same parent structure was specially investigated. As shown earlier, this effect, nonlinear in its nature, proved to be extremely large when a model dipolar two-site system was studied. For the present ET structures representing real chemical substrates it has reduced to a plausible value of 6-8 kcal/mol. The study of the temperature dependence of λ comprises a first MD simulation of this problem and its slope was found to be in accord with an experimental observation for an anionic species. Calculations of absolute λ-values for the hole transfer in 1,2-dichloroethane are the first MD simulations of reorganization energies in experimentally studied reactions. Computed values of λ-s are higher than the experimental data. The effect of this magnitude could be eliminated by proper tuning the solvent parameters.

  15. Exploring non-stationarity patterns in schizophrenia: neural reorganization abnormalities in the alpha band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Pablo; Poza, Jesús; Bachiller, Alejandro; Gomez-Pilar, Javier; Lubeiro, Alba; Molina, Vicente; Hornero, Roberto

    2017-08-01

    Objective. The aim of this paper was to characterize brain non-stationarity during an auditory oddball task in schizophrenia (SCH). The level of non-stationarity was measured in the baseline and response windows of relevant tones in SCH patients and healthy controls. Approach. Event-related potentials were recorded from 28 SCH patients and 51 controls. Non-stationarity was estimated in the conventional electroencephalography frequency bands by means of Kullback-Leibler divergence (KLD). Relative power (RP) was also computed to assess a possible complementarity with KLD. Main results. Results showed a widespread statistically significant increase in the level of non-stationarity from baseline to response in all frequency bands for both groups. Statistically significant differences in non-stationarity were found between SCH patients and controls in beta-2 and in the alpha band. SCH patients showed more non-stationarity in the left parieto-occipital region during the baseline window in the beta-2 band. A leave-one-out cross validation classification study with feature selection based on binary stepwise logistic regression to discriminate between SCH patients and controls provided a positive predictive value of 72.73% and negative predictive value of 78.95%. Significance. KLD can characterize transient neural reorganization during an attentional task in response to novelty and relevance. Our findings suggest anomalous reorganization of neural dynamics in SCH during an oddball task. The abnormal frequency-dependent modulation found in SCH patients during relevant tones is in agreement with the hypothesis of aberrant salience detection in SCH. The increase in non-stationarity in the alpha band during the active task supports the notion that this band is involved in top-down processing. The baseline differences in the beta-2 band suggest that hyperactivation of the default mode network during attention tasks may be related to SCH symptoms. Furthermore, the classification

  16. Reorganization of neuronal circuits of the central olfactory system during postprandial sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro eYamaguchi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Plastic changes in neuronal circuits often occur in association with specific behavioral states. In this review, we focus on an emerging view that neuronal circuits in the olfactory system are reorganized along the wake-sleep cycle. Olfaction is crucial to sustaining the animals’ life, and odor-guided behaviors have to be newly acquired or updated to successfully cope with a changing odor world. It is therefore likely that neuronal circuits in the olfactory system are highly plastic and undergo repeated reorganization in daily life. A remarkably plastic feature of the olfactory system is that newly generated neurons are continually integrated into neuronal circuits of the olfactory bulb (OB throughout life. New neurons in the OB undergo an extensive selection process, during which many are eliminated by apoptosis for the fine tuning of neuronal circuits. The life and death decision of new neurons occurs extensively during a short time window of sleep after food consumption (postprandial sleep, a typical daily olfactory behavior. We review recent studies that explain how olfactory information is transferred between the OB and the olfactory cortex (OC along the course of the wake-sleep cycle. Olfactory sensory input is effectively transferred from the OB to the OC during waking, while synchronized top-down inputs from the OC to the OB are promoted during the slow-wave sleep. We discuss possible neuronal circuit mechanisms for the selection of new neurons in the OB, which involves the encoding of olfactory sensory inputs and memory trace formation during waking and internally generated activities in the OC and OB during subsequent sleep. The plastic changes in the OB and OC are well coordinated along the course of olfactory behavior during wakefulness and postbehavioral rest and sleep. We therefore propose that the olfactory system provides an excellent model in which to understand behavioral state-dependent plastic mechanisms of the neuronal

  17. 78 FR 44523 - Reorganization of Foreign-Trade Zone 122 Under Alternative Site Framework; Corpus Christi, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-24

    ...; Corpus Christi, Texas Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade Zones Act of June 18, 1934, as... establishment or reorganization of zones; Whereas, the Port of Corpus Christi Authority, grantee of Foreign..., Kleberg and Bee Counties, Texas, within and adjacent to the Corpus Christi Customs and Border...

  18. 75 FR 72801 - Reorganization of Foreign-Trade Zone 152 Under Alternative Site Framework Burns Harbor, IN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Reorganization of Foreign-Trade Zone 152 Under Alternative Site Framework Burns Harbor, IN Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade Zones Act of June 18, 1934, as amended (19...

  19. 76 FR 1133 - Foreign-Trade Zone 152-Burns Harbor, IN, Application for Reorganization (Expansion of Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 152--Burns Harbor, IN, Application for Reorganization (Expansion of Service Area) Under the Alternative Site Framework An application has been submitted to...

  20. Structural damage and functional reorganization in ipsilesional m1 in well-recovered patients with subcortical stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Meng, Liangliang; Qin, Wen; Liu, Ningning; Shi, Fu-Dong; Yu, Chunshui

    2014-03-01

    Both structural atrophy and functional reorganization of the primary motor cortex (M1) have been reported in patients with subcortical infarctions affecting the motor pathway. However, the relationship between structural impairment and functional reorganization in M1 remains unclear. Twenty-six patients exhibiting significant recovery after subcortical infarctions were investigated using multimodal MRI techniques. Structural impairment was assessed via cortical thickness, and functional reorganization was analyzed using task-evoked activation, amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation, and resting-state functional connectivity. Compared with healthy controls, patients with stroke exhibited reduced cortical thickness in the ipsilesional M1; however, this region exhibited increased task-evoked activation, amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation, and resting-state functional connectivity in these patients. Patients with stroke demonstrated increased task-evoked activation in another ipsilesional M1 region, in which increased amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation and resting-state functional connectivity were observed. The structural and functional changes in M1 were located selectively in the ipsilesional hemisphere. We provide convincing evidence that indicates extensive functional reorganization in the ipsilesional M1 of patients with chronic subcortical infarctions, including the structurally impaired M1 region.

  1. Cross-Modal Functional Reorganization of Visual and Auditory Cortex in Adult Cochlear Implant Users Identified with fNIRS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ling-Chia; Sandmann, Pascale; Thorne, Jeremy D; Bleichner, Martin G; Debener, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear implant (CI) users show higher auditory-evoked activations in visual cortex and higher visual-evoked activation in auditory cortex compared to normal hearing (NH) controls, reflecting functional reorganization of both visual and auditory modalities. Visual-evoked activation in auditory cortex is a maladaptive functional reorganization whereas auditory-evoked activation in visual cortex is beneficial for speech recognition in CI users. We investigated their joint influence on CI users' speech recognition, by testing 20 postlingually deafened CI users and 20 NH controls with functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Optodes were placed over occipital and temporal areas to measure visual and auditory responses when presenting visual checkerboard and auditory word stimuli. Higher cross-modal activations were confirmed in both auditory and visual cortex for CI users compared to NH controls, demonstrating that functional reorganization of both auditory and visual cortex can be identified with fNIRS. Additionally, the combined reorganization of auditory and visual cortex was found to be associated with speech recognition performance. Speech performance was good as long as the beneficial auditory-evoked activation in visual cortex was higher than the visual-evoked activation in the auditory cortex. These results indicate the importance of considering cross-modal activations in both visual and auditory cortex for potential clinical outcome estimation.

  2. 77 FR 59891 - Reorganization of Foreign-Trade Zone 107 Under Alternative Site Framework, Polk County, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... Board adopted the alternative site framework (ASF) (74 FR 1170, 01/12/09; correction 74 FR 3987, 01/22/09; 75 FR 71069-71070, 11/22/10) as an option for the establishment or reorganization of zones...; Whereas, notice inviting public comment was given in the Federal Register (77 FR 8805-8806, 2/15/2012)...

  3. 78 FR 36165 - Reorganization/Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 104; (Expansion of Service Area and Expansion of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ... Federal Register (77 FR 43047, 07/23/12) and the application has been processed pursuant to the FTZ Act... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Reorganization/Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 104; (Expansion of Service Area and Expansion of Zone); Under Alternative Site Framework, Savannah, Georgia Pursuant to its...

  4. Motor Recovery and Cortical Reorganization After Mirror Therapy in Chronic Stroke Patients : A Phase II Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michielsen, Marian E.; Selles, Ruud W.; van der Geest, Jos N.; Eckhardt, Martine; Yavuzer, Gunes; Stam, Henk J.; Smits, Marion; Ribbers, Gerard M.; Bussmann, Johannes B. J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate for any clinical effects of home-based mirror therapy and subsequent cortical reorganization in patients with chronic stroke with moderate upper extremity paresis. Methods. A total of 40 chronic stroke patients (mean time post. onset, 3.9 years) were randomly assigned to the

  5. 76 FR 65171 - Foreign-Trade Zone 272-Counties of Lehigh and Northampton, PA; Application for Reorganization...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-20

    ... Zones (FTZ) Board (the Board) by the Lehigh Valley Economic Development Corporation, grantee of FTZ 272... Customs and Border Protection port of entry. The applicant is requesting authority to reorganize its... sites. The ASF allows for the possible exemption of one magnet site from the ``sunset'' time limits...

  6. Reorganization of the Cerebro-Cerebellar Network of Language Production in Patients with Congenital Left-Hemispheric Brain Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidzba, K.; Wilke, M.; Staudt, M.; Krageloh-Mann, I.; Grodd, W.

    2008-01-01

    Patients with congenital lesions of the left cerebral hemisphere may reorganize language functions into the right hemisphere. In these patients, language production is represented homotopically to the left-hemispheric language areas. We studied cerebellar activation in five patients with congenital lesions of the left cerebral hemisphere to assess…

  7. 77 FR 41742 - Reorganization and Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 202 Under Alternative Site Framework Los...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-16

    ... Framework Los Angeles, CA Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade Zones Act of June 18, 1934, as... general-purpose zones; Whereas, the Board of Harbor Commissioners of the City of Los Angeles, grantee of... authority to reorganize and expand under the ASF with a service area of Orange County and portions of Los...

  8. 76 FR 50717 - Foreign-Trade Zone 74, Baltimore, MD; Application for Reorganization/Expansion Under Alternative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-16

    ... (Site 9); Henry Bath (Site 12); Under Armour (Site 13); Pacorini Metals (Sites 17 & 25); Ruxton Services... Under Alternative Site Framework An application has been submitted to the Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZ... of FTZ 74, requesting authority to reorganize and expand the zone under the alternative site...

  9. Reorganization of the Cerebro-Cerebellar Network of Language Production in Patients with Congenital Left-Hemispheric Brain Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidzba, K.; Wilke, M.; Staudt, M.; Krageloh-Mann, I.; Grodd, W.

    2008-01-01

    Patients with congenital lesions of the left cerebral hemisphere may reorganize language functions into the right hemisphere. In these patients, language production is represented homotopically to the left-hemispheric language areas. We studied cerebellar activation in five patients with congenital lesions of the left cerebral hemisphere to assess…

  10. Cross-Modal Functional Reorganization of Visual and Auditory Cortex in Adult Cochlear Implant Users Identified with fNIRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Chia Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cochlear implant (CI users show higher auditory-evoked activations in visual cortex and higher visual-evoked activation in auditory cortex compared to normal hearing (NH controls, reflecting functional reorganization of both visual and auditory modalities. Visual-evoked activation in auditory cortex is a maladaptive functional reorganization whereas auditory-evoked activation in visual cortex is beneficial for speech recognition in CI users. We investigated their joint influence on CI users’ speech recognition, by testing 20 postlingually deafened CI users and 20 NH controls with functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS. Optodes were placed over occipital and temporal areas to measure visual and auditory responses when presenting visual checkerboard and auditory word stimuli. Higher cross-modal activations were confirmed in both auditory and visual cortex for CI users compared to NH controls, demonstrating that functional reorganization of both auditory and visual cortex can be identified with fNIRS. Additionally, the combined reorganization of auditory and visual cortex was found to be associated with speech recognition performance. Speech performance was good as long as the beneficial auditory-evoked activation in visual cortex was higher than the visual-evoked activation in the auditory cortex. These results indicate the importance of considering cross-modal activations in both visual and auditory cortex for potential clinical outcome estimation.

  11. 77 FR 43048 - Foreign-Trade Zone 8-Toledo, OH; Application for Reorganization and Expansion Under Alternative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 8--Toledo, OH; Application for Reorganization and Expansion...) Board (the Board) by the Toledo-Lucas County Port Authority, grantee of FTZ 8, requesting authority to...: Site 1 (332 acres)--Port of Toledo Complex, Toledo; Site 2 (337 acres)--Toledo Express Airport, 11311...

  12. 78 FR 1197 - Reorganization/Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 8 Under Alternative Site Framework; Toledo, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-08

    ... Framework; Toledo, OH Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade Zones Act of June 18, 1934, as... establishment or reorganization of zones; Whereas, the Toledo-Lucas County Port Authority, grantee of Foreign..., Lucas and Defiance Counties, Ohio, in and adjacent to the Toledo- Sandusky Customs and Border...

  13. Existe sujeito em Michel Maffesoli?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marli Appel da Silva

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Este ensaio discute a concepção de sujeito na abordagem teórica de Michel Maffesoli. As ideias desse autor estão em voga em alguns meios acadêmicos no Brasil e são difundidas por algumas mídias de grande circulação nacional. Entretanto, ao longo de suas obras, os pressupostos que definem quem é o sujeito maffesoliano se encontram pouco clarificados. Portanto, para alcançar o objetivo a que se propõe, este ensaio desenvolve uma análise da epistemologia e da ontologia maffesoliana com a finalidade de compreender as origens dos pressupostos desse autor, ou seja, as teorias e os autores em que Maffesoli se baseou para desenvolver uma visão de sujeito. Com essa compreensão, pretende-se responder à questão: existe sujeito na abordagem teórica de Maffesoli.

  14. Does Metabolically Healthy Obesity Exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Garach, Araceli; Cornejo-Pareja, Isabel; Tinahones, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between obesity and other metabolic diseases have been deeply studied. However, there are clinical inconsistencies, exceptions to the paradigm of “more fat means more metabolic disease”, and the subjects in this condition are referred to as metabolically healthy obese (MHO).They have long-standing obesity and morbid obesity but can be considered healthy despite their high degree of obesity. We describe the variable definitions of MHO, the underlying mechanisms that can explain the existence of this phenotype caused by greater adipose tissue inflammation or the different capacity for adipose tissue expansion and functionality apart from other unknown mechanisms. We analyze whether these subjects improve after an intervention (traditional lifestyle recommendations or bariatric surgery) or if they stay healthy as the years pass. MHO is common among the obese population and constitutes a unique subset of characteristics that reduce metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors despite the presence of excessive fat mass. The protective factors that grant a healthier profile to individuals with MHO are being elucidated. PMID:27258304

  15. Dynamic spatial panels : models, methods, and inferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elhorst, J. Paul

    This paper provides a survey of the existing literature on the specification and estimation of dynamic spatial panel data models, a collection of models for spatial panels extended to include one or more of the following variables and/or error terms: a dependent variable lagged in time, a dependent

  16. Continuous-Time Modeling with Spatial Dependence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oud, J.H.L.; Folmer, H.; Patuelli, R.; Nijkamp, P.

    2012-01-01

    (Spatial) panel data are routinely modeled in discrete time (DT). However, compelling arguments exist for continuous-time (CT) modeling of (spatial) panel data. Particularly, most social processes evolve in CT, so that statistical analysis in DT is an oversimplification, gives an incomplete

  17. Continuous-Time Modeling with Spatial Dependence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oud, J.; Folmer, H.; Patuelli, R.; Nijkamp, P.

    (Spatial) panel data are routinely modeled in discrete time (DT). However, compelling arguments exist for continuous-time (CT) modeling of (spatial) panel data. Particularly, most social processes evolve in CT, so that statistical analysis in DT is an oversimplification, gives an incomplete

  18. Reorganization of Damaged Chromatin by the Exchange of Histone Variant H2A.Z-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishibuchi, Ikuno [Department of Cellular Biology, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima Prefectural Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan); Suzuki, Hidekazu; Kinomura, Aiko; Sun, Jiying; Liu, Ning-Ang [Department of Cellular Biology, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Horikoshi, Yasunori [Department of Cellular Biology, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Research Center for Mathematics of Chromatin Live Dynamics, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Shima, Hiroki [Department of Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Kusakabe, Masayuki; Harata, Masahiko [Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Fukagawa, Tatsuo [Department of Molecular Genetics, National Institute of Genetics and The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Mishima (Japan); Ikura, Tsuyoshi [Laboratory of Chromatin Regulatory Network, Department of Mutagenesis, Radiation Biology Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Ishida, Takafumi [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Nagata, Yasushi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Tashiro, Satoshi, E-mail: ktashiro@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Cellular Biology, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Research Center for Mathematics of Chromatin Live Dynamics, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The reorganization of damaged chromatin plays an important role in the regulation of the DNA damage response. A recent study revealed the presence of 2 vertebrate H2A.Z isoforms, H2A.Z-1 and H2A.Z-2. However, the roles of the vertebrate H2A.Z isoforms are still unclear. Thus, in this study we examined the roles of the vertebrate H2A.Z isoforms in chromatin reorganization after the induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Methods and Materials: To examine the dynamics of H2A.Z isoforms at damaged sites, we constructed GM0637 cells stably expressing each of the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled H2A.Z isoforms, and performed fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis and inverted FRAP analysis in combination with microirradiation. Immunofluorescence staining using an anti-RAD51 antibody was performed to study the kinetics of RAD51 foci formation after 2-Gy irradiation of wild-type (WT), H2A.Z-1- and H2A.Z-2-deficient DT40 cells. Colony-forming assays were also performed to compare the survival rates of WT, H2A.Z-1-, and H2A.Z-2-deficient DT40 cells with control, and H2A.Z-1- and H2A.Z-2-depleted U2OS cells after irradiation. Results: FRAP analysis revealed that H2A.Z-2 was incorporated into damaged chromatin just after the induction of DSBs, whereas H2A.Z-1 remained essentially unchanged. Inverted FRAP analysis showed that H2A.Z-2 was released from damaged chromatin. These findings indicated that H2A.Z-2 was exchanged at DSB sites immediately after the induction of DSBs. RAD51 focus formation after ionizing irradiation was disturbed in H2A.Z-2-deficient DT40 cells but not in H2A.Z-1-deficient cells. The survival rate of H2A.Z-2-deficient cells after irradiation was lower than those of WT and H2A.Z-1- DT40 cells. Similar to DT40 cells, H2A.Z-2-depleted U2OS cells were also radiation-sensitive compared to control and H2A.Z-1-depleted cells. Conclusions: We found that vertebrate H2A.Z-2 is involved in the regulation of the DNA

  19. Global existence and asymptotic behavior for a nonlinear degenerate SIS model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarik Ali Ziane

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigate the global existence and asymptotic behavior of a reaction diffusion system with degenerate diffusion arising in the modeling and the spatial spread of an epidemic disease.

  20. Handbook of Spatial Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Gelfand, Alan E

    2010-01-01

    Offers an introduction detailing the evolution of the field of spatial statistics. This title focuses on the three main branches of spatial statistics: continuous spatial variation (point referenced data); discrete spatial variation, including lattice and areal unit data; and, spatial point patterns.

  1. Basin Assessment Spatial Planning Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-07-26

    The tool is intended to facilitate hydropower development and water resource planning by improving synthesis and interpretation of disparate spatial datasets that are considered in development actions (e.g., hydrological characteristics, environmentally and culturally sensitive areas, existing or proposed water power resources, climate-informed forecasts). The tool enables this capability by providing a unique framework for assimilating, relating, summarizing, and visualizing disparate spatial data through the use of spatial aggregation techniques, relational geodatabase platforms, and an interactive web-based Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Data are aggregated and related based on shared intersections with a common spatial unit; in this case, industry-standard hydrologic drainage areas for the U.S. (National Hydrography Dataset) are used as the spatial unit to associate planning data. This process is performed using all available scalar delineations of drainage areas (i.e., region, sub-region, basin, sub-basin, watershed, sub-watershed, catchment) to create spatially hierarchical relationships among planning data and drainages. These entity-relationships are stored in a relational geodatabase that provides back-end structure to the web GIS and its widgets. The full technology stack was built using all open-source software in modern programming languages. Interactive widgets that function within the viewport are also compatible with all modern browsers.

  2. Reorganizing nursing work on surgical units: a time-and-motion study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, France; Cardinal, Linda; Belzile, Eric; McCusker, Jane

    2008-01-01

    A time-and-motion study was conducted in response to perceptions that the surgical nursing staff at a Montreal hospital was spending an excessive amount of time on non-nursing care. A sample of 30 nurse shifts was observed by trained observers who timed nurses' activities for their entire working shift using a hand-held Personal Digital Assistant. Activities were grouped into four main categories: direct patient care, indirect patient care, non-nursing and personal activities. Break and meal times were excluded from the denominator of total worked hours. A total of 201 working hours were observed, an average of 6 hours, 42 minutes per nurse shift. The mean proportions of each nurse shift spent on the main activity categories were: direct care 32.8%, indirect care 55.7%, non-nursing tasks 9.0% and personal 2.5%. Three activities (communication among health professionals, medication verification/preparation and documentation) comprised 78.9% of indirect care time. Greater time on indirect care was associated with work on night shifts and on the short-stay surgical unit. Subsequent work reorganization focused on reducing time spent on communication and medications. The authors conclude that time-and-motion studies are a useful method of monitoring appropriate use of nursing staff, and may provide results that assist in restructuring nursing tasks.

  3. Dopamine receptor activation reorganizes neuronal ensembles during hippocampal sharp waves in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeyuki Miyawaki

    Full Text Available Hippocampal sharp wave (SW/ripple complexes are thought to contribute to memory consolidation. Previous studies suggest that behavioral rewards facilitate SW occurrence in vivo. However, little is known about the precise mechanism underlying this enhancement. Here, we examined the effect of dopaminergic neuromodulation on spontaneously occurring SWs in acute hippocampal slices. Local field potentials were recorded from the CA1 region. A brief (1 min treatment with dopamine led to a persistent increase in the event frequency and the magnitude of SWs. This effect lasted at least for our recording period of 45 min and did not occur in the presence of a dopamine D1/D5 receptor antagonist. Functional multineuron calcium imaging revealed that dopamine-induced SW augmentation was associated with an enriched repertoire of the firing patterns in SW events, whereas the overall tendency of individual neurons to participate in SWs and the mean number of cells participating in a single SW were maintained. Therefore, dopaminergic activation is likely to reorganize cell assemblies during SWs.

  4. Neural activation patterns of successful episodic encoding: Reorganization during childhood, maintenance in old age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee Lee Shing

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The two-component framework of episodic memory (EM development posits that the contributions of medial temporal lobe (MTL and prefrontal cortex (PFC to successful encoding differ across the lifespan. To test the framework’s hypotheses, we compared subsequent memory effects (SME of 10–12 year-old children, younger adults, and older adults using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Memory was probed by cued recall, and SME were defined as regional activation differences during encoding between subsequently correctly recalled versus omitted items. In MTL areas, children’s SME did not differ in magnitude from those of younger and older adults. In contrast, children’s SME in PFC were weaker than the corresponding SME in younger and older adults, in line with the hypothesis that PFC contributes less to successful encoding in childhood. Differences in SME between younger and older adults were negligible. The present results suggest that, among individuals with high memory functioning, the neural circuitry contributing to successful episodic encoding is reorganized from middle childhood to adulthood. Successful episodic encoding in later adulthood, however, is characterized by the ability to maintain the activation patterns that emerged in young adulthood.

  5. Pathway-specific reorganization of projection neurons in somatosensory cortex during learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jerry L; Margolis, David J; Stankov, Atanas; Sumanovski, Lazar T; Schneider, Bernard L; Helmchen, Fritjof

    2015-08-01

    In the mammalian brain, sensory cortices exhibit plasticity during task learning, but how this alters information transferred between connected cortical areas remains unknown. We found that divergent subpopulations of cortico-cortical neurons in mouse whisker primary somatosensory cortex (S1) undergo functional changes reflecting learned behavior. We chronically imaged activity of S1 neurons projecting to secondary somatosensory (S2) or primary motor (M1) cortex in mice learning a texture discrimination task. Mice adopted an active whisking strategy that enhanced texture-related whisker kinematics, correlating with task performance. M1-projecting neurons reliably encoded basic kinematics features, and an additional subset of touch-related neurons was recruited that persisted past training. The number of S2-projecting touch neurons remained constant, but improved their discrimination of trial types through reorganization while developing activity patterns capable of discriminating the animal's decision. We propose that learning-related changes in S1 enhance sensory representations in a pathway-specific manner, providing downstream areas with task-relevant information for behavior.

  6. Distinct impact of targeted actin cytoskeleton reorganization on mechanical properties of normal and malignant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efremov, Yu M; Dokrunova, A A; Efremenko, A V; Kirpichnikov, M P; Shaitan, K V; Sokolova, O S

    2015-11-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is substantially modified in cancer cells because of changes in actin-binding protein abundance and functional activity. As a consequence, cancer cells have distinctive motility and mechanical properties, which are important for many processes, including invasion and metastasis. Here, we studied the effects of actin cytoskeleton alterations induced by specific nucleation inhibitors (SMIFH2, CK-666), cytochalasin D, Y-27632 and detachment from the surface by trypsinization on the mechanical properties of normal Vero and prostate cancer cell line DU145. The Young's modulus of Vero cells was 1300±900 Pa, while the prostate cancer cell line DU145 exhibited significantly lower Young's moduli (600±400 Pa). The Young's moduli exhibited a log-normal distribution for both cell lines. Unlike normal cells, cancer cells demonstrated diverse viscoelastic behavior and different responses to actin cytoskeleton reorganization. They were more resistant to specific formin-dependent nucleation inhibition, and reinforced their cortical actin after detachment from the substrate. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology.

  7. Shaping Early Reorganization of Neural Networks Promotes Motor Function after Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volz, L J; Rehme, A K; Michely, J; Nettekoven, C; Eickhoff, S B; Fink, G R; Grefkes, C

    2016-06-01

    Neural plasticity is a major factor driving cortical reorganization after stroke. We here tested whether repetitively enhancing motor cortex plasticity by means of intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS) prior to physiotherapy might promote recovery of function early after stroke. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to elucidate underlying neural mechanisms. Twenty-six hospitalized, first-ever stroke patients (time since stroke: 1-16 days) with hand motor deficits were enrolled in a sham-controlled design and pseudo-randomized into 2 groups. iTBS was administered prior to physiotherapy on 5 consecutive days either over ipsilesional primary motor cortex (M1-stimulation group) or parieto-occipital vertex (control-stimulation group). Hand motor function, cortical excitability, and resting-state fMRI were assessed 1 day prior to the first stimulation and 1 day after the last stimulation. Recovery of grip strength was significantly stronger in the M1-stimulation compared to the control-stimulation group. Higher levels of motor network connectivity were associated with better motor outcome. Consistently, control-stimulated patients featured a decrease in intra- and interhemispheric connectivity of the motor network, which was absent in the M1-stimulation group. Hence, adding iTBS to prime physiotherapy in recovering stroke patients seems to interfere with motor network degradation, possibly reflecting alleviation of post-stroke diaschisis.

  8. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor inhibits hippocampal synaptic reorganization in pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-ju ZHANG; Ruo-peng SUN; Ge-fei LEI; Lu YANG; Chun-xi LIU

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To examine modulations caused by cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors on altered microenvironments and overbalanced neurotransmitters in pilocarpine-induced epileptic status rats and to investigate possible mechanisms. Methods:Celecoxib (a COX-2 inhibitor) was administered 45 min prior to pilocarpine administration. The effects of COX-2 inhibitors on mIPSCs (miniature GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents) of CA3 pyramidal cells in the hippocampus were recorded. Expressions of COX-2, c-Fos, newly generated neurons, and activated microgliosis wore analyzed by immunohistochemistry, and expressions of α-subunit of γ-amino butyric acid (GABAA) receptors and mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular sig-nal-regulated protein kinase (MAPK/ERK) activity were detected by Western blotting. Results: Pretreatment with celecoxib showed protection against pilocarpine-induced seizures. Celecoxib prevented microglia activation in the hilus and inhibited the abnormal neurogenesis and astrogliosis in the hippocampus by inhibiting MAPK/ERK activity and c-Fos transcription. Celecoxib also up-regulated the expression of GABAA receptors. NS-398 (N-2-cyclohexyloxy-4-nitrophenyl-methanesuifonamide), another COX-2 inhibitor, enhanced the frequency and decay time of mIPSCs. Conclusion: The COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib decreased neuronal excitability and prevented epileptogenesis in pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus rats. Celecoxib regulates synaptic reorganization by inhibiting astrogliosis and ectopic neurogenesis by attenuating MAPK/ERK signal activity, mediated by a GABAergic mechanism.

  9. Reorganization of the injured brain: Implications for studies of the neural substrate of cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesper eMogensen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the search for a neural substrate of cognitive processes, a frequently utilized method is the scrutiny of posttraumatic symptoms exhibited by individuals suffering focal injury to the brain. For instance, the presence or absence of conscious awareness within a particular domain may, combined with knowledge of which regions of the brain have been injured, provide important data in the search for neural correlates of consciousness. Like all studies addressing the consequences of brain injury, however, such research has to face the fact that in most cases, posttraumatic impairments are accompanied by a functional recovery during which symptoms are reduced or eliminated. The apparent contradiction between localization and recovery, respectively, of functions constitutes a problem to almost all aspects of cognitive neuroscience. Several lines of investigation indicate that although the brain remains highly plastic throughout life, the posttraumatic plasticity does not recreate a copy of the neural mechanisms lost to injury. Instead, the uninjured parts of the brain are functionally reorganized in a manner which – in spite of not recreating the basic information processing lost to injury – is able to allow a more or less complete return of the surface phenomena (including manifestations of consciousness originally impaired by the trauma. A novel model (the REF-model of these processes is presented – and some of its implications discussed relative to studies of the neural substrates of cognition and consciousness.

  10. Ice stream reorganization and glacial retreat on the northwest Greenland shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, A. M. W.; Knutz, P. C.; Huuse, M.; Gannon, P.; Brocklehurst, S. H.; Clausen, O. R.; Gong, Y.

    2017-08-01

    Understanding conditions at the grounding-line of marine-based ice sheets is essential for understanding ice sheet evolution. Offshore northwest Greenland, knowledge of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) ice sheet extent in Melville Bugt was previously based on sparse geological evidence. This study uses multibeam bathymetry, combined with 2-D and 3-D seismic reflection data, to present a detailed landform record from Melville Bugt. Seabed landforms include mega-scale glacial lineations, grounding-zone wedges, iceberg scours, and a lateral shear margin moraine, formed during the last glacial cycle. The geomorphology indicates that the LGM ice sheet reached the shelf edge before undergoing flow reorganization. After retreat of 80 km across the outer shelf, the margin stabilized in a mid-shelf position, possibly during the Younger Dryas (12.9-11.7 ka). The ice sheet then decoupled from the seafloor and retreated to a coast-proximal position. This landform record provides an important constraint on deglaciation history offshore northwest Greenland.

  11. SCFSlimb ubiquitin ligase suppresses condensin II–mediated nuclear reorganization by degrading Cap-H2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buster, Daniel W.; Daniel, Scott G.; Nguyen, Huy Q.; Windler, Sarah L.; Skwarek, Lara C.; Peterson, Maureen; Roberts, Meredith; Meserve, Joy H.; Hartl, Tom; Klebba, Joseph E.; Bilder, David; Bosco, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Condensin complexes play vital roles in chromosome condensation during mitosis and meiosis. Condensin II uniquely localizes to chromatin throughout the cell cycle and, in addition to its mitotic duties, modulates chromosome organization and gene expression during interphase. Mitotic condensin activity is regulated by phosphorylation, but mechanisms that regulate condensin II during interphase are unclear. Here, we report that condensin II is inactivated when its subunit Cap-H2 is targeted for degradation by the SCFSlimb ubiquitin ligase complex and that disruption of this process dramatically changed interphase chromatin organization. Inhibition of SCFSlimb function reorganized interphase chromosomes into dense, compact domains and disrupted homologue pairing in both cultured Drosophila cells and in vivo, but these effects were rescued by condensin II inactivation. Furthermore, Cap-H2 stabilization distorted nuclear envelopes and dispersed Cid/CENP-A on interphase chromosomes. Therefore, SCFSlimb-mediated down-regulation of condensin II is required to maintain proper organization and morphology of the interphase nucleus. PMID:23530065

  12. Electrolyte-induced reorganization of SDS self-assembly on graphene: a molecular simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuyan; Wu, Bin; Yang, Xiaoning

    2014-04-23

    A molecular dynamics simulation was conducted to study the structure and morphology of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactants adsorbed on a nanoscale graphene nanostructure in the presence of an electrolyte. The self-assembly structure can be reorganized by the electrolyte-induced effect. An increase in the ionic strength of the added electrolyte can enhance the stretching of adsorbed surfactants toward the bulk aqueous phase and make headgroups assemble densely, leading to a more compact structure of the SDS/graphene composite. The change in the self-assembly structure is attributed to the accumulation/condensation of electrolyte cations near the surfactant aggregate, consequently screening the electrostatic repulsion between charged headgroups. The role of the electrolyte revealed here provides direct microscopic evidence or an explanation of the reported experiments in the electrolyte tuning of the interfacial structure of a surfactant aggregate on the surface of carbon nanoparticles. Additionally, the buoyant density of the SDS/graphene assembly has been computed. With an increase in the ionic strength of the electrolyte, the buoyant density of the SDS/graphene composite rises. The interfacial accumulation of electrolytes provides an important contribution to the density enhancement. The study will be valuable for the dispersion and application of graphene nanomaterials.

  13. Combined Cognitive-Psychological-Physical Intervention Induces Reorganization of Intrinsic Functional Brain Architecture in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwei Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mounting evidence suggests that enriched mental, physical, and socially stimulating activities are beneficial for counteracting age-related decreases in brain function and cognition in older adults. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to demonstrate the functional plasticity of brain activity in response to a combined cognitive-psychological-physical intervention and investigated the contribution of the intervention-related brain changes to individual performance in healthy older adults. The intervention was composed of a 6-week program of combined activities including cognitive training, Tai Chi exercise, and group counseling. The results showed improved cognitive performance and reorganized regional homogeneity of spontaneous fluctuations in the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD signals in the superior and middle temporal gyri, and the posterior lobe of the cerebellum, in the participants who attended the intervention. Intriguingly, the intervention-induced changes in the coherence of local spontaneous activity correlated with the improvements in individual cognitive performance. Taken together with our previous findings of enhanced resting-state functional connectivity between the medial prefrontal cortex and medial temporal lobe regions following a combined intervention program in older adults, we conclude that the functional plasticity of the aging brain is a rather complex process, and an effective cognitive-psychological-physical intervention is helpful for maintaining a healthy brain and comprehensive cognition during old age.

  14. Structural Reorganization and Fibrinogen Adsorption Behaviors on the Polyrotaxane Surfaces Investigated by Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Aimin; Seo, Ji-Hun; Qiao, Lin; Yui, Nobuhiko; Ye, Shen

    2015-10-14

    Polyrotaxanes, such as supramolecular assemblies with methylated α-cyclodextrins (α-CDs) as host molecules noncovalently threaded on the linear polymer backbone, are promising materials for biomedical applications because they allow adsorbed proteins possessing a high surface flexibility as well as control of the cellular morphology and adhesion. To provide a general design principle for biomedical materials, we examined the surface reorganization behaviors and adsorption conformations of fibrinogen on the polyrotaxane surfaces with comparison to several random copolymers by sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy. We showed that the polyrotaxane (OMe-PRX-PMB) with methylated α-CDs as the host molecule exhibited unique surface structures in an aqueous environment. The hydrophobic interaction between the methoxy groups of the methylated α-CD molecules and methyl groups of the n-butyl methacrylate (BMA) side chains may dominate the surface restructuring behavior of the OMe-PRX-PMB. The orientation analysis revealed that the orientation of the fibrinogen adsorbed on the OMe-PRX-PMB surface is close to a single distribution, which is different from the adsorption behaviors of fibrinogen on other polyrotaxane or random copolymer surfaces.

  15. CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF THE MECHANOSTAT THEORY PART I. REORGANIZATION MECHANISMS OF SKELETAL ARCHITECTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Avrunin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains a critical analysis of the mechanostat theory. It is shown that for continuous modeling and osteoklastic-and-osteoblastic remodeling is not providing the necessary safety margin of skeletal structures and reduce risk of fractures. It is established that at each level of the hierarchical organization of a skeleton there are also other mechanisms of its reorganization. The functioning of this system is controlled by mechanisms of osteocytes and purposefully provides two effects: the first -preservation of bone structures deformability according to demanded productivity of convective fluid movement mechanism of a lacunary-tubular system, second - the optimization of the cross-section of the cavities of a lacunary-tubular system, respectively, the required level of throughput for the flow of fluid. As a result, the parameters of mechanical-metabolic environment surrounding the osteocytes are stored in the homeostatic limits, which increases cell viability, and hence bone and skeleton as a whole. However, this is often at the expense of the strength properties of bone structures.

  16. Cerebral reorganization as a function of linguistic recovery in children: An fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkana, Odelia; Frost, Ram; Kramer, Uri; Ben-Bashat, Dafna; Hendler, Talma; Schmidt, David; Schweiger, Avraham

    2011-02-01

    Characterizing and mapping the relationship between neuronal reorganization and functional recovery are essential to the understanding of cerebral plasticity and the dynamic processes which occur following brain damage. The neuronal mechanisms underlying linguistic recovery following left hemisphere (LH) lesions are still unknown. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we investigated whether the extent of brain lateralization of linguistic functioning in specific regions of interest (ROIs) is correlated with the level of linguistic performance following recovery from acquired childhood aphasia. The study focused on a rare group of children in whom lesions occurred after normal language acquisition, but prior to complete maturation of the brain. During fMRI scanning, rhyming, comprehension and verb generation activation tasks were monitored. The imaging data were evaluated with reference to linguistic performance measured behaviorally during imaging, as well as outside the scanner. Compared with normal controls, we found greater right hemisphere (RH) lateralization in patients. However, correlations with linguistic performance showed that increased proficiency in linguistic tasks was associated with greater lateralization to the LH. These results were replicated in a longitudinal case study of a patient scanned twice, 3 years apart. Additional improvement in linguistic performance of the patient was accompanied by increasing lateralization to the LH in the anterior language region. This, however, was the result of a decreased involvement of the RH. These findings suggest that recovery is a dynamic, ongoing process, which may last for years after onset. The role of each hemisphere in the recovery process may continuously change within the chronic stage.

  17. Electrically induced reorganization phenomena of liquid metal film printed on biological skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Cangran; Yi, Liting; Yu, Yang; Liu, Jing

    2016-12-01

    Liquid metal has been demonstrated to be directly printable on biological skin as physiological measurement elements. However, many fundamental issues remained unclear so far. Here, we disclosed an intriguing phenomenon of electrically induced reorganization of liquid metal film. According to the experiments, when applying an external electric field to liquid metal films which were spray printed on biological skin, it would induce unexpected transformations of the liquid metals among different morphologies and configurations. These include shape shift from a large liquid metal film into a tiny sphere and contraction of liquid metal pool into spherical one. For comprehensively understanding the issues, the impacts of the size, voltage, orientations of the liquid metal electrodes, etc., were clarified. Further, effects of various substrates such as in vitro skin and in vivo skin affecting the liquid metal transformations were experimentally investigated. Compared to the intact tissues, the contraction magnitude of the liquid metal electrode appears weaker on in vivo skin of nude mice under the same electric field. The mechanisms lying behind such phenomena were interpreted through theoretical modeling. Lastly, typical applications of applying the current effect into practical elements such as electrical gating devices were also illustrated as an example. The present findings have both fundamental and practical values, which would help design future technical strategies in fabricating electronically controlled liquid metal electronics on skin.

  18. River piracy and drainage basin reorganization led by climate-driven glacier retreat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugar, Daniel H.; Clague, John J.; Best, James L.; Schoof, Christian; Willis, Michael J.; Copland, Luke; Roe, Gerard H.

    2017-04-01

    River piracy--the diversion of the headwaters of one stream into another one--can dramatically change the routing of water and sediment, with a profound effect on landscape evolution. Stream piracy has been investigated in glacial environments, but so far it has mainly been studied over Quaternary or longer timescales. Here we document how retreat of Kaskawulsh Glacier--one of Canada's largest glaciers--abruptly and radically altered the regional drainage pattern in spring 2016. We use a combination of hydrological measurements and drone-generated digital elevation models to show that in late May 2016, meltwater from the glacier was re-routed from discharge in a northward direction into the Bering Sea, to southward into the Pacific Ocean. Based on satellite image analysis and a signal-to-noise ratio as a metric of glacier retreat, we conclude that this instance of river piracy was due to post-industrial climate change. Rapid regional drainage reorganizations of this type can have profound downstream impacts on ecosystems, sediment and carbon budgets, and downstream communities that rely on a stable and sustained discharge. We suggest that the planforms of Slims and Kaskawulsh rivers will adjust in response to altered flows, and the future Kaskawulsh watershed will extend into the now-abandoned headwaters of Slims River and eventually capture the Kluane Lake drainage.

  19. Reorganizing therapy: changing the clinical approach to upper limb recovery post-stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Isobel J; Carey, Leeanne M; Budd, Timothy W; Parsons, Mark W

    2015-03-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of adult disability, and as a consequence, most therapists will provide health care to patients with stroke during their professional careers. An increasing number of studies are investigating the association between upper limb recovery and changes in brain activation patterns following stroke. In this review, we explore the translational implications of this research for health professionals working in stroke recovery. We argue that in light of the most recent evidence, therapists should consider how best to take full advantage of the brain's natural ability to reorganize, when prescribing and applying interventions to those with a stroke-affected upper limb. The authors propose that stroke is a brain-based problem that needs a brain-based solution. This review addresses two topics, anticipating recovery and maximizing recovery. It proposes five practice-ready recommendations that are based on the evidence reviewed. The over-riding aim of this review and discussion is to challenge therapists to reconsider the health care they prescribe and apply to people with a stroke-affected upper limb.

  20. Reorganizing Neural Network System for Two Spirals and Linear Low-Density Polyethylene Copolymer Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Behery

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an automatic system of neural networks (NNs that has the ability to simulate and predict many of applied problems. The system architectures are automatically reorganized and the experimental process starts again, if the required performance is not reached. This processing is continued until the performance obtained. This system is first applied and tested on the two spiral problem; it shows that excellent generalization performance obtained by classifying all points of the two-spirals correctly. After that, it is applied and tested on the shear stress and the pressure drop problem across the short orifice die as a function of shear rate at different mean pressures for linear low-density polyethylene copolymer (LLDPE at 190∘C. The system shows a better agreement with an experimental data of the two cases: shear stress and pressure drop. The proposed system has been also designed to simulate other distributions not presented in the training set (predicted and matched them effectively.

  1. Combined cognitive-psychological-physical intervention induces reorganization of intrinsic functional brain architecture in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhiwei; Zhu, Xinyi; Yin, Shufei; Wang, Baoxi; Niu, Yanan; Huang, Xin; Li, Rui; Li, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that enriched mental, physical, and socially stimulating activities are beneficial for counteracting age-related decreases in brain function and cognition in older adults. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to demonstrate the functional plasticity of brain activity in response to a combined cognitive-psychological-physical intervention and investigated the contribution of the intervention-related brain changes to individual performance in healthy older adults. The intervention was composed of a 6-week program of combined activities including cognitive training, Tai Chi exercise, and group counseling. The results showed improved cognitive performance and reorganized regional homogeneity of spontaneous fluctuations in the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signals in the superior and middle temporal gyri, and the posterior lobe of the cerebellum, in the participants who attended the intervention. Intriguingly, the intervention-induced changes in the coherence of local spontaneous activity correlated with the improvements in individual cognitive performance. Taken together with our previous findings of enhanced resting-state functional connectivity between the medial prefrontal cortex and medial temporal lobe regions following a combined intervention program in older adults, we conclude that the functional plasticity of the aging brain is a rather complex process, and an effective cognitive-psychological-physical intervention is helpful for maintaining a healthy brain and comprehensive cognition during old age.

  2. Alkyl ether lipids, ion channels and lipid raft reorganization in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffrès, Paul-Alain; Gajate, Consuelo; Bouchet, Ana Maria; Couthon-Gourvès, Hélène; Chantôme, Aurélie; Potier-Cartereau, Marie; Besson, Pierre; Bougnoux, Philippe; Mollinedo, Faustino; Vandier, Christophe

    2016-09-01

    Synthetic alkyl lipids, such as the ether lipids edelfosine (1-O-octadecyl-2-O-methyl-rac-glycero-3-phosphocholine) and ohmline (1-O-hexadecyl-2-O-methyl-rac-glycero-3-β-lactose), are forming a class of antitumor agents that target cell membranes to induce apoptosis and to decrease cell migration/invasion, leading to the inhibition of tumor and metastasis development. In this review, we present the structure-activity relationship of edelfosine and ohmline, and we point out differences and similarities between these two amphiphilic compounds. We also discuss the mechanisms of action of these synthetic alkyl ether lipids (involving, among other structures and molecules, membrane domains, Fas/CD95 death receptor signaling, and ion channels), and highlight a key role for lipid rafts in the underlying process. The reorganization of lipid raft membrane domains induced by these alkyl lipids affects the function of death receptors and ion channels, thus leading to apoptosis and/or inhibition of cancer cell migration. The possible therapeutic use of these alkyl lipids and the clinical perspectives for these lipids in prevention or/and treatment of tumor development and metastasis are also discussed.

  3. F-actin reorganization upon de- and rehydration in the aeroterrestrial green alga Klebsormidium crenulatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaas, Kathrin; Holzinger, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    Filamentous actin (F-actin) is a dynamic network involved in many cellular processes like cell division and cytoplasmic streaming. While many studies have addressed the involvement of F-actin in different cellular processes in cultured cells, little is known on the reactions to environmental stress scenarios, where this system might have essential regulatory functions. We investigated here the de- and rehydration kinetics of breakdown and reassembly of F-actin in the streptophyte green alga Klebsormidium crenulatum. Measurements of the chlorophyll fluorescence (effective quantum yield of photosystem II [ΔF/Fm']) via pulse amplitude modulation were performed as a measure for dehydration induced shut down of physiological activity, which ceased after 141±15min at ∼84% RH. We hypothesized that there is a link between this physiological parameter and the status of the F-actin system. Indeed, 20min of dehydration (ΔF/Fm'=0) leads to a breakdown of the fine cortical F-actin network as visualized by Atto 488 phalloidin staining, and dot-like structures remained. Already 10min after rehydration a beginning reassembly of F-actin is observed, after 25min the F-actin network appeared similar to untreated controls, indicating a full recovery. These results demonstrate the fast kinetics of F-actin dis- and reassembly likely contributing to cellular reorganization upon rehydration. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Abscisic acid induces ectopic outgrowth in epidermal cells through cortical microtubule reorganization in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatani, Shogo; Hirayama, Takashi; Hashimoto, Takashi; Takahashi, Taku; Motose, Hiroyasu

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) regulates seed maturation, germination and various stress responses in plants. The roles of ABA in cellular growth and morphogenesis, however, remain to be explored. Here, we report that ABA induces the ectopic outgrowth of epidermal cells in Arabidopsis thaliana. Seedlings of A. thaliana germinated and grown in the presence of ABA developed ectopic protrusions in the epidermal cells of hypocotyls, petioles and cotyledons. One protrusion was formed in the middle of each epidermal cell. In the hypocotyl epidermis, two types of cell files are arranged alternately into non-stoma cell files and stoma cell files, ectopic protrusions being restricted to the non-stoma cell files. This suggests the presence of a difference in the degree of sensitivity to ABA or in the capacity of cells to form protrusions between the two cell files. The ectopic outgrowth was suppressed in ABA insensitive mutants, whereas it was enhanced in ABA hypersensitive mutants. Interestingly, ABA-induced ectopic outgrowth was also suppressed in mutants in which microtubule organization was compromised. Furthermore, cortical microtubules were disorganized and depolymerized by the ABA treatment. These results suggest that ABA signaling induces ectopic outgrowth in epidermal cells through microtubule reorganization. PMID:26068445

  5. Neural activation patterns of successful episodic encoding: Reorganization during childhood, maintenance in old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shing, Yee Lee; Brehmer, Yvonne; Heekeren, Hauke R; Bäckman, Lars; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2016-08-01

    The two-component framework of episodic memory (EM) development posits that the contributions of medial temporal lobe (MTL) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) to successful encoding differ across the lifespan. To test the framework's hypotheses, we compared subsequent memory effects (SME) of 10-12 year-old children, younger adults, and older adults using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Memory was probed by cued recall, and SME were defined as regional activation differences during encoding between subsequently correctly recalled versus omitted items. In MTL areas, children's SME did not differ in magnitude from those of younger and older adults. In contrast, children's SME in PFC were weaker than the corresponding SME in younger and older adults, in line with the hypothesis that PFC contributes less to successful encoding in childhood. Differences in SME between younger and older adults were negligible. The present results suggest that, among individuals with high memory functioning, the neural circuitry contributing to successful episodic encoding is reorganized from middle childhood to adulthood. Successful episodic encoding in later adulthood, however, is characterized by the ability to maintain the activation patterns that emerged in young adulthood.

  6. Reorganization of brain function after a short-term behavioral intervention for stuttering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chunming; Zheng, Lifen; Long, Yuhang; Yan, Qian; Ding, Guosheng; Liu, Li; Peng, Danling; Howell, Peter

    2017-05-01

    This study investigated changes in brain function that occurred over a 7-day behavioral intervention for adults who stutter (AWS). Thirteen AWS received the intervention (AWS+), and 13 AWS did not receive the intervention (AWS-). There were 13 fluent controls (FC-). All participants were scanned before and after the intervention. Whole-brain analysis pre-intervention showed significant differences in task-related brain activation between AWS and FC- in the right inferior frontal cortex (IFC) and left middle temporal cortex, but there were no differences between the two AWS groups. Across the 7-day period of the intervention, AWS+ alone showed a significant increase of brain activation in the left ventral IFC/insula. There were no changes in brain function for the other two groups. Further analysis revealed that the change did not correlate with resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) that AWS showed in the cerebellum (Lu et al., 2012). However, both changes in task-related brain function and RSFC correlated with changes in speech fluency level. Together, these findings suggest that functional reorganization in a brain region close to the left IFC that shows anomalous function in AWS, occurs after a short-term behavioral intervention for stuttering. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Toddlers actively reorganize their whole body coordination to maintain walking stability while carrying an object.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wen-Hao; Miranda, Daniel L; Chistolini, Trevor L; Goldfield, Eugene C

    2016-10-01

    Balanced walking involves freely swinging the limbs like pendula. However, children immediately begin to carry objects as soon as they can walk. One possibility for this early skill development is that whole body coordination during walking may be re-organized into loosely coupled collections of body parts, allowing children to use their arms to perform one function, while the legs perform another. Therefore, this study examines: 1) how carrying an object affects the coordination of the arms and legs during walking, and 2) if carrying an object influences stride length and width. Ten healthy toddlers with 3-12 months of walking experience were recruited to walk barefoot while carrying or not carrying a small toy. Stride length, width, speed, and continuous relative phase (CRP) of the hips and of the shoulders were compared between carrying conditions. While both arms and legs demonstrated destabilization and stabilization throughout the gait cycle, the arms showed a reduction in intra-subject coordination variability in response to carrying an object. Carrying an object may modify the function of the arms from swinging for balance to maintaining hold of an object. The observed period-dependent changes of the inter-limb coordination of the hips and of the shoulders also support this interpretation. Overall, these findings support the view that whole-body coordination patterns may become partitioned in particular ways as a function of task requirements.

  8. Reorganization energy, activation energy, and mechanism of hole transfer process in DNA: a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arshad

    2008-02-21

    The density functional calculations with aug-cc-pVDZ basis sets on cationic guanine-cytosine (GC(+)) and adenine-thymine (AT(+)) base pairs suggest that the cationic charge is almost entirely localized on the G and A units with significant changes in the N-H and N...O distances around the H-bonded area. While the calculated intramolecular reorganization energy (lambda(v)) for a GC base pair (0.75 eV) is remarkably larger than that for an isolated G base (0.49 eV), for the AT base pairs these values (0.44 and 0.40 eV) are almost the same. The gas phase activation energies (E(a)) for GC(+)GC-->GCGC(+), AT(+)AT-->ATAT(+), and GC(+)AT-->GCAT(+) hole transfer processes are 0.19, 0.11, and 0.73 eV with rate constants of 1.69 x 10(11), 3.15 x 10(11), and 4.61(0.168) s(-1), respectively, at 298 K. An alternative mechanism of hole transfer has been proposed on the basis of energy barriers.

  9. Cerebral Reorganization in Subacute Stroke Survivors after Virtual Reality-Based Training: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Xiao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is a promising method for quantifying brain recovery and investigating the intervention-induced changes in corticomotor excitability after stroke. This study aimed to evaluate cortical reorganization subsequent to virtual reality-enhanced treadmill (VRET training in subacute stroke survivors. Methods. Eight participants with ischemic stroke underwent VRET for 5 sections per week and for 3 weeks. fMRI was conducted to quantify the activity of selected brain regions when the subject performed ankle dorsiflexion. Gait speed and clinical scales were also measured before and after intervention. Results. Increased activation in the primary sensorimotor cortex of the lesioned hemisphere and supplementary motor areas of both sides for the paretic foot (p<0.01 was observed postintervention. Statistically significant improvements were observed in gait velocity (p<0.05. The change in voxel counts in the primary sensorimotor cortex of the lesioned hemisphere is significantly correlated with improvement of 10 m walk time after VRET (r=−0.719. Conclusions. We observed improved walking and increased activation in cortical regions of stroke survivors after VRET training. Moreover, the cortical recruitment was associated with better walking function. Our study suggests that cortical networks could be a site of plasticity, and their recruitment may be one mechanism of training-induced recovery of gait function in stroke. This trial is registered with ChiCTR-IOC-15006064.

  10. 10 CFR 4.127 - Existing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Existing facilities. 4.127 Section 4.127 Energy NUCLEAR... 1973, as Amended Discriminatory Practices § 4.127 Existing facilities. (a) Accessibility. A recipient... make each of its existing facilities or every part of an existing facility accessible to and usable by...

  11. 28 CFR 41.57 - Existing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing facilities. 41.57 Section 41.57... Practices Program Accessibility § 41.57 Existing facilities. (a) A recipient shall operate each program or... existing facilities or every part of an existing facility accessible to and usable by handicapped...

  12. Directed assembly of gold nanowires on silicon via reorganization and simultaneous fusion of randomly distributed gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Hendrik M; Bücker, Kerstin; Hampp, Norbert A

    2015-05-04

    Laser-induced reorganization and simultaneous fusion of nanoparticles is introduced as a versatile concept for pattern formation on surfaces. The process takes advantage of a phenomenon called laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) which originates from periodically alternating photonic fringe patterns in the near-field of solids. Associated photonic fringe patterns are shown to reorganize randomly distributed gold nanoparticles on a silicon wafer into periodic gold nanostructures. Concomitant melting due to optical heating facilitates the formation of continuous structures such as periodic gold nanowire arrays. Generated patterns can be converted into secondary structures using directed assembly or self-organization. This includes for example the rotation of gold nanowire arrays by arbitrary angles or their fragmentation into arrays of aligned gold nanoparticles.

  13. Neuroplastic Sensorimotor Resting State Network Reorganization in Children With Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy Treated With Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Kathryn Y; Menon, Ravi S; Gorter, Jan Willem; Mesterman, Ronit; Campbell, Craig; Switzer, Lauren; Fehlings, Darcy

    2016-02-01

    Using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we aim to understand the neurologic basis of improved function in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy treated with constraint-induced movement therapy. Eleven children including 4 untreated comparison subjects diagnosed with hemiplegic cerebral palsy were recruited from 3 clinical centers. MRI and clinical data were gathered at baseline and 1 month for both groups, and 6 months later for the case group only. After constraint therapy, the sensorimotor resting state network became more bilateral, with balanced contributions from each hemisphere, which was sustained 6 months later. Sensorimotor resting state network reorganization after therapy was correlated with a change in the Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test score at 1 month (r = 0.79, P = .06), and Canadian Occupational Performance Measure scores at 6 months (r = 0.82, P = .05). This clinically correlated resting state network reorganization provides further evidence of the neuroplastic mechanisms underlying constraint-induced movement therapy.

  14. Cortical Reorganization in Patients Recovered from Bell's Palsy: An Orofacial and Finger Movements Task-State fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaeyoun; Yuan, Aihong; Wu, Hongli; Wang, Anqin; Xue, Qiuju; Wang, Tao; Wang, Linying; Gao, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To explore cortical reorganization of patients recovered from Bell's palsy (BP) by task-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during finger and orofacial movements and provide more evidence for acupuncture clinical treatment of BP. Methods. We collected 17 BP patients with complete clinical recovery (BP group) and 20 healthy volunteers (control group) accepted the task-state fMRI scans with lip pursing movements and finger movements, respectively. Results. It was found that there were significant differences of brain functional status between the two groups. Conclusions. The results showed that there was cortical reorganization in the brain of patients recovered from BP after acupuncture treatment, which also suggested the relationship between the hand motor areas and facial motor areas of BP patients. PMID:28116170

  15. Neonatal Neurobehavior and Diffusion MRI Changes in Brain Reorganization Due to Intrauterine Growth Restriction in a Rabbit Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eixarch, Elisenda; Batalle, Dafnis; Illa, Miriam; Muñoz-Moreno, Emma; Arbat-Plana, Ariadna; Amat-Roldan, Ivan; Figueras, Francesc; Gratacos, Eduard

    2012-01-01

    Background Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) affects 5–10% of all newborns and is associated with a high risk of abnormal neurodevelopment. The timing and patterns of brain reorganization underlying IUGR are poorly documented. We developed a rabbit model of IUGR allowing neonatal neurobehavioral assessment and high resolution brain diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The aim of the study was to describe the pattern and functional correlates of fetal brain reorganization induced by IUGR. Methodology/Principal Findings IUGR was induced in 10 New Zealand fetal rabbits by ligation of 40–50% of uteroplacental vessels in one horn at 25 days of gestation. Ten contralateral horn fetuses were used as controls. Cesarean section was performed at 30 days (term 31 days). At postnatal day +1, neonates were assessed by validated neurobehavioral tests including evaluation of tone, spontaneous locomotion, reflex motor activity, motor responses to olfactory stimuli, and coordination of suck and swallow. Subsequently, brains were collected and fixed and MRI was performed using a high resolution acquisition scheme. Global and regional (manual delineation and voxel based analysis) diffusion tensor imaging parameters were analyzed. IUGR was associated with significantly poorer neurobehavioral performance in most domains. Voxel based analysis revealed fractional anisotropy (FA) differences in multiple brain regions of gray and white matter, including frontal, insular, occipital and temporal cortex, hippocampus, putamen, thalamus, claustrum, medial septal nucleus, anterior commissure, internal capsule, fimbria of hippocampus, medial lemniscus and olfactory tract. Regional FA changes were correlated with poorer outcome in neurobehavioral tests. Conclusions IUGR is associated with a complex pattern of brain reorganization already at birth, which may open opportunities for early intervention. Diffusion MRI can offer suitable imaging biomarkers to characterize and monitor

  16. Electrochemical Electron Transfer and Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Effects of Double Layer and Ionic Environment on Solvent Reorganization Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Soumya; Soudackov, Alexander; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2016-06-14

    Electron transfer and proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions at electrochemical interfaces play an essential role in a broad range of energy conversion processes. The reorganization energy, which is a measure of the free energy change associated with solute and solvent rearrangements, is a key quantity for calculating rate constants for these reactions. We present a computational method for including the effects of the double layer and ionic environment of the diffuse layer in calculations of electrochemical solvent reorganization energies. This approach incorporates an accurate electronic charge distribution of the solute within a molecular-shaped cavity in conjunction with a dielectric continuum treatment of the solvent, ions, and electrode using the integral equations formalism polarizable continuum model. The molecule-solvent boundary is treated explicitly, but the effects of the electrode-double layer and double layer-diffuse layer boundaries, as well as the effects of the ionic strength of the solvent, are included through an external Green’s function. The calculated total reorganization energies agree well with experimentally measured values for a series of electrochemical systems, and the effects of including both the double layer and ionic environment are found to be very small. This general approach was also extended to electrochemical PCET and produced total reorganization energies in close agreement with experimental values for two experimentally studied PCET systems. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  17. Spatial Management Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spatial management files combine all related and relevant spatial management files into an integrated fisheries management file. Overlaps of the redundant spatial...

  18. Reorganization of Practicum in Initial Teacher Education: A Search for Challenges in Implementation by Ex-Ante Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Niklasson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The background of the study is a perceived need of increasing quality in practice during Initial Teacher Education (ITE in Sweden. In order to achieve higher quality, the government encourages reorganization towards a limited number of practice schools, competence development for supervisors and research focusing on the selected practice schools.  The aim of this study is to present and critically discuss prerequisites for implementation of the reform. The paper focuses on how a preliminary logic model and a SWOT analysis can show challenges encountered during the implementation of the reorganization. By using the logic model and the SWOT analysis an ex-ante evaluation was carried out in two steps. The results disclosed that the motivation behind reorganization, improving the quality of practicum, might meet some challenges. Indicators of higher quality being attained are not provided; the local organization is expected to construct such indicators during the process. In contrast to the challenges the results showed that the implementation was supported by earlier good relations and a common idea of developing practicum in ITE. The implication for implementation is a need to have a dialogue about indicators for quality among different stakeholders in ITE. Without such a dialogue it can be disputed whether the change in practicum was successful.

  19. Functional reorganization and prediction of motor recovery after a stroke: A graph theoretical analysis of functional networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jungsoo; Lee, Minji; Kim, Dae-Shik; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the changes in the network topological configuration of the ipsilesional and contralesional hemispheres after a stroke and the indicators for the prediction of motor recovery using a graph theoretical approach in networks obtained from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). A longitudinal observational experiments (2 weeks and 1, 3, and 6 months after onset) were conducted on 12 patients after a stroke. We investigated the network reorganization during recovery in the ipsilesional and contralesional hemispheres by examining changes of graph indices related to network randomization. We predicted the recovery of motor function by examining the relationship between specific network measures and improved motor function scores. The ipsilesional hemispheric network showed active reorganization during recovery after a stroke. The randomness of the network significantly increased for 3 months post-stroke. We described an indicator for the prediction of the recovery of motor function from graph indices: the characteristic path length. As the path length of the ipsilesional network was lower immediately after onset, the better recovery could be expected after 3 months. This approach were helpful for understanding dynamic reorganizations of both hemispheric networks after a stroke and finding the implication for recovery.

  20. Reorganization and Stability for Motor and Language Areas Using Cortical Stimulation: Case Example and Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Sandra; Komisarow, Jordan M.; Gallentine, William; Mikati, Mohamad A.; Bonner, Melanie J.; Kranz, Peter G.; Haglund, Michael M.; Grant, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    The cerebral organization of language in epilepsy patients has been studied with invasive procedures such as Wada testing and electrical cortical stimulation mapping and more recently with noninvasive neuroimaging techniques, such as functional MRI. In the setting of a chronic seizure disorder, clinical variables have been shown to contribute to cerebral language reorganization underscoring the need for language lateralization and localization procedures. We present a 14-year-old pediatric patient with a refractory epilepsy disorder who underwent two neurosurgical resections of a left frontal epileptic focus separated by a year. He was mapped extraoperatively through a subdural grid using cortical stimulation to preserve motor and language functions. The clinical history and extensive workup prior to surgery is discussed as well as the opportunity to compare the cortical maps for language, motor, and sensory function before each resection. Reorganization in cortical tongue sensory areas was seen concomitant with a new zone of ictal and interictal activity in the previous tongue sensory area. Detailed neuropsychological data is presented before and after any surgical intervention to hypothesize about the extent of reorganization between epochs. We conclude that intrahemispheric cortical plasticity does occur following frontal lobe resective surgery in a teenager with medically refractory seizures. PMID:24961623

  1. ERK is involved in the reorganization of somatosensory cortical maps in adult rats submitted to hindlimb unloading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwan Dupont

    Full Text Available Sensorimotor restriction by a 14-day period of hindlimb unloading (HU in the adult rat induces a reorganization of topographic maps and receptive fields. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Interest was turned towards a possible implication of intracellular MAPK signaling pathway since Extracellular-signal-Regulated Kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 is known to play a significant role in the control of synaptic plasticity. In order to better understand the mechanisms underlying cortical plasticity in adult rats submitted to a sensorimotor restriction, we analyzed the time-course of ERK1/2 activation by immunoblot and of cortical reorganization by electrophysiological recordings, on rats submitted to hindlimb unloading over four weeks. Immunohistochemistry analysis provided evidence that ERK1/2 phosphorylation was increased in layer III neurons of the somatosensory cortex. This increase was transient, and parallel to the changes in hindpaw cortical map area (layer IV. By contrast, receptive fields were progressively enlarged from 7 to 28 days of hindlimb unloading. To determine whether ERK1/2 was involved in cortical remapping, we administered a specific ERK1/2 inhibitor (PD-98059 through osmotic mini-pump in rats hindlimb unloaded for 14 days. Results demonstrate that focal inhibition of ERK1/2 pathway prevents cortical reorganization, but had no effect on receptive fields. These results suggest that ERK1/2 plays a role in the induction of cortical plasticity during hindlimb unloading.

  2. Ice-flow reorganization in West Antarctica 2.5 kyr ago dated using radar-derived englacial flow velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingslake, Jonathan; Martín, Carlos; Arthern, Robert J.; Corr, Hugh F. J.; King, Edward C.

    2016-09-01

    We date a recent ice-flow reorganization of an ice divide in the Weddell Sea Sector, West Antarctica, using a novel combination of inverse methods and ice-penetrating radars. We invert for two-dimensional ice flow within an ice divide from data collected with a phase-sensitive ice-penetrating radar while accounting for the effect of firn on radar propagation and ice flow. By comparing isochronal layers simulated using radar-derived flow velocities with internal layers observed with an impulse radar, we show that the divide's internal structure is not in a steady state but underwent a disturbance, potentially implying a regional ice-flow reorganization, 2.5 (1.8-2.9) kyr B.P. Our data are consistent with slow ice flow in this location before the reorganization and the ice divide subsequently remaining stationary. These findings increase our knowledge of the glacial history of a region that lacks dated constraints on late-Holocene ice-sheet retreat and provides a key target for models that reconstruct and predict ice-sheet behavior.

  3. Contralesional cortical structural reorganization contributes to motor recovery after sub-cortical stroke: A longitudinal voxel-based morphometry study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxin Cai

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Although changes in brain gray matter after stroke have been identified in some neuroimaging studies, lesion heterogeneity and individual variability make the detection of potential neuronal reorganization difficult. This study attempted to investigate the potential structural cortical reorganization after sub-cortical stroke using a longitudinal voxel-based gray matter volume (GMV analysis. Eleven right-handed patients with first -onset, subcortical, ischemic infarctions involving the basal ganglia regions underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging in addition to National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and Motricity Index assessments in the acute (< 5 days and chronic stages (1 year later. The GMVs were calculated and compared between the two stages using nonparametric permutation paired t tests. Moreover, the Spearman correlations between the GMV changes and clinical recoveries were analyzed. Compared with the acute stage, significant decreases in GMV were observed in the ipsilesional precentral gyrus (PreCG, paracentral gyrus, and contralesional cerebellar lobule VII in the chronic stage. Additionally, significant increases in GMV were found in the contralesional orbitofrontal cortex (OFC and middle (MFG and inferior (IFG frontal gyri. Furthermore, severe GMV atrophy in the ipsilesional PreCG predicted poorer clinical recovery, and greater GMV increases in the contralesional OFG and MFG predicted better clinical recovery. Our findings suggest that structural reorganization of the contralesional ‘cognitive’ cortices might contribute to motor recovery after sub-cortical stroke.

  4. Nuclear substructure reorganization during late stageerythropoiesis is selective and does not involve caspase cleavage ofmajor nuclear substructural proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, Sharon Wald; Lo, Annie J.; Short, Sarah A.; Koury, MarkJ.; Mohandas, Narla; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2005-04-06

    Enucleation, a rare feature of mammalian differentiation, occurs in three cell types: erythroblasts, lens epithelium and keratinocytes. Previous investigations suggest that caspase activation functions in lens epithelial and keratinocyte enucleation, as well as in early erythropoiesis encompassing BFU-E differentiation to proerythroblast. To determine whether caspase activation contributes to later erythropoiesis and whether nuclear substructures other than chromatin reorganize, we analyzed distributions of nuclear subcompartment proteins and assayed for caspase-induced cleavage of subcompartmental target proteins in mouse erythroblasts. We found that patterns of lamin B in the filamentous network interacting with both the nuclear envelope and DNA, nuclear matrix protein NuMA, and splicing factors Sm and SC35 persisted during nuclear condensation, consistent with effective transcription of genes expressed late in differentiation. Thus nuclear reorganization prior to enucleation is selective, allowing maintenance of critical transcriptional processes independent of extensive chromosomal reorganization. Consistent with these data, we found no evidence for caspase-induced cleavage of major nuclear subcompartment proteins during late erythropoiesis, in contrast to what has been observed in early erythropoiesis and in lens epithelial and keratinocyte differentiation. These findings imply that nuclear condensation and extrusion during terminal erythroid differentiation involve novel mechanisms that do not entail major activation of apoptotic machinery.

  5. Prediction of reorganization free energies for biological electron transfer: a comparative study of Ru-modified cytochromes and a 4-helix bundle protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipmanee, Varomyalin; Oberhofer, Harald; Park, Mina; Kim, Kwang S; Blumberger, Jochen

    2010-12-01

    The acceleration of electron transfer (ET) rates in redox proteins relative to aqueous solutes can be attributed to the protein's ability to reduce the nuclear response or reorganization upon ET, while maintaining sufficiently high electronic coupling. Quantitative predictions of reorganization free energy remain a challenge, both experimentally and computationally. Using density functional calculations and molecular dynamics simulation with an electronically polarizable force field, we report reorganization free energies for intraprotein ET in four heme-containing ET proteins that differ in their protein fold, hydrophilicity, and solvent accessibility of the electron-accepting group. The reorganization free energies for ET from the heme cofactors of cytochrome c and b(5) to solvent exposed Ru-complexes docked to histidine residues at the surface of these proteins fall within a narrow range of 1.2-1.3 eV. Reorganization free energy is significantly lowered in a designed 4-helix bundle protein where both redox active cofactors are protected from the solvent. For all ET reactions investigated, the major components of reorganization are the solvent and the protein, with the solvent contributing close to or more than 50% of the total. In three out of four proteins, the protein reorganization free energy can be viewed as a collective effect including many residues, each of which contributing a small fraction. These results have important implications for the design of artificial electron transport proteins. They suggest that reorganization free energy may in general not be effectively controlled by single point mutations, but to a large extent by the degree of solvent exposure of the ionizable cofactors.

  6. Mechanical insights into tectonic reorganization of the southern San Andreas fault system at ca. 1.1-1.5 Ma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattaruso, L.; Cooke, M. L.; Dorsey, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    Reorganization of active fault systems may result from changes in relative plate motion and evolving fault geometries. Between ~1.5 and 1.1 Ma the southern San Andreas fault system underwent a major reorganization that included initiation of the San Jacinto fault zone, termination of slip on the extensional West Salton detachment fault, and reorganization of structures in the Mecca Hills northeast of the San Andreas fault during a local change from transtension to transpression conditions with no known change in Pacific-North America relative plate motion. The active trace of the southern San Andreas fault itself also evolved during this time, with shifts in activity from the Mission Creek to Mill Creek to the present-day active fault geometry of the San Bernardino, Garnet Hill, and Banning strands of the San Andreas fault. Although there is a rich geologic record of these changes, the mechanisms that controlled abandonment of active faults, initiation of new strands, and shifting loci of uplift are poorly understood. We use three-dimensional mechanical Boundary Element Method models to investigate this major tectonic reorganization at ~1.1-1.5 Ma. Previous mechanical modeling studies have examined the evolution of the southern San Andreas fault geometry in the San Gorgonio Pass using a series of snapshot models of the succession of active fault geometries. We use the same approach to explore the role of fault interaction and tectonic loading in abandonment of the West Salton detachment fault and initiation of the San Jacinto fault. The snapshots include: (1) regional transtension with an active West Salton detachment fault and active Mission Creek strand of the San Andreas fault; (2) cessation of local extension in combination with initiation of the San Jacinto fault in which we explore both north-to-south propagation and simultaneous growth; (3) shift of activity to the Mill Creek strand of the San Andreas fault; and (4) shift of activity to the present

  7. The Determinants of VAT Introduction : A Spatial Duration Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cizek, P.; Lei, J.; Ligthart, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: The spatial survival models typically impose frailties, which characterize unobserved heterogeneity, to be spatially correlated. This specification relies highly on a pre-determinate covariance structure of the errors. However, the spatial effect may not only exist in the unobserved errors

  8. The idiosyncrasy of spatial structure in bacterial competition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, F.J.H.; Galajda, P.; Woolthuis, R.G.; Dekker, C.; Keymer, J.E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The spatial structure of a habitat can have a strong impact on community dynamics. Different experimental approaches exist to explore the effect of spatial structure on bacterial communities. To investigate the effect of ‘space’, a single implementation of spatial structure is often contr

  9. Whisker motor cortex reorganization after superior colliculus output suppression in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronesi, Carlo; Maggiolini, Emma; Franchi, Gianfranco

    2013-10-01

    The effect of unilateral superior colliculus (SC) output suppression on the ipsilateral whisker motor cortex (WMC) was studied at different time points after tetrodotoxin and quinolinic acid injections, in adult rats. The WMC output was assessed by mapping the movement evoked by intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) and by recording the ICMS-evoked electromyographic (EMG) responses from contralateral whisker muscles. At 1 h after SC injections, the WMC showed: (i) a strong decrease in contralateral whisker sites, (ii) a strong increase in ipsilateral whisker sites and in ineffective sites, and (iii) a strong increase in threshold current values. At 6 h after injections, the WMC size had shrunk to 60% of the control value and forelimb representation had expanded into the lateral part of the normal WMC. Thereafter, the size of the WMC recovered, returning to nearly normal 12 h later (94% of control) and persisted unchanged over time (1-3 weeks). The ICMS-evoked EMG response area decreased at 1 h after SC lesion and had recovered its baseline value 12 h later. Conversely, the latency of ICMS-evoked EMG responses had increased by 1 h and continued to increase for as long as 3 weeks following the lesion. These findings provide physiological evidence that SC output suppression persistently withdrew the direct excitatory drive from whisker motoneurons and induced changes in the WMC. We suggest that the changes in the WMC are a form of reversible short-term reorganization that is induced by SC lesion. The persistent latency increase in the ICMS-evoked EMG response suggested that the recovery of basic WMC excitability did not take place with the recovery of normal explorative behaviour. © 2013 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Fingerprints of changes in the terrestrial carbon cycle in response to large reorganizations in ocean circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bozbiyik

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available CO2 and carbon cycle changes in the land, ocean and atmosphere are investigated using the comprehensive carbon cycle-climate model NCAR CSM1.4-carbon. Ensemble simulations are forced with freshwater perturbations applied at the North Atlantic and Southern Ocean deep water formation sites under pre-industrial climate conditions. As a result, the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation reduces in each experiment to varying degrees. The physical climate fields show changes qualitatively in agreement with results documented in the literature, but there is a clear distinction between northern and southern perturbations. Changes in the physical variables, in turn, affect the land and ocean biogeochemical cycles and cause a reduction, or an increase, in the atmospheric CO2 concentration by up to 20 ppmv, depending on the location of the perturbation. In the case of a North Atlantic perturbation, the land biosphere reacts with a strong reduction in carbon stocks in some tropical locations and in high northern latitudes. In contrast, land carbon stocks tend to increase in response to a southern perturbation. The ocean is generally a sink of carbon although large reorganizations occur throughout various basins. The response of the land biosphere is strongest in the tropical regions due to a shift of the Intertropical Convergence Zone. The carbon fingerprints of this shift, either to the south or to the north depending on where the freshwater is applied, can be found most clearly in South America. For this reason, a compilation of various paleoclimate proxy records of Younger Dryas precipitation changes are compared with our model results. The proxy records, in general, show good agreement with the model's response to a North Atlantic freshwater perturbation.

  11. Class 3 semaphorins induce F-actin reorganization in human dendritic cells: Role in cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreli, Sabrina; Wong, Bin Sheng; Latinovic, Olga; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Stamatos, Nicholas M

    2016-12-01

    Class 3 semaphorins (Semas) are soluble proteins that are well recognized for their role in guiding axonal migration during neuronal development. In the immune system, Sema3A has been shown to influence murine dendritic cell (DC) migration by signaling through a neuropilin (NRP)-1/plexin-A1 coreceptor axis. Potential roles for class 3 Semas in human DCs have yet to be described. We tested the hypothesis that Sema3A, -3C, and -3F, each with a unique NRP-1 and/or NRP-2 binding specificity, influence human DC migration. In this report, we find that although NRP-1 and NRP-2 are expressed in human immature DCs (imDCs), NRP-2 expression increases as cells mature further, whereas expression of NRP-1 declines dramatically. Elevated levels of RNA encoding plexin-A1 and -A3 are present in both imDCs and mature DC (mDCs), supporting the relevance of Sema/NRP/plexin signaling pathways in these cells. Sema3A, -3C, and -3F bind to human DCs, with Sema3F binding predominantly through NRP-2. The binding of these Semas leads to reorganization of actin filaments at the plasma membrane and increased transwell migration in the absence or presence of chemokine CCL19. Microfluidic chamber assays failed to demonstrate consistent changes in speed of Sema3C-treated DCs, suggesting increased cell deformability as a possible explanation for enhanced transwell migration. Although monocytes express RNA encoding Sema3A, -3C, and -3F, only RNA encoding Sema3C increases robustly during DC differentiation. These data suggest that Sema3A, -3C, and -3F, likely with coreceptors NRP-1, NRP-2, and plexin-A1 and/or -A3, promote migration and possibly other activities of human DCs during innate and adaptive immune responses.

  12. Normal distribution of VGLUT1 synapses on spinal motoneuron dendrites and their reorganization after nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotterman, Travis M; Nardelli, Paul; Cope, Timothy C; Alvarez, Francisco J

    2014-03-05

    Peripheral nerve injury induces permanent alterations in spinal cord circuitries that are not reversed by regeneration. Nerve injury provokes the loss of many proprioceptive IA afferent synapses (VGLUT1-IR boutons) from motoneurons, the reduction of IA EPSPs in motoneurons, and the disappearance of stretch reflexes. After motor and sensory axons successfully reinnervate muscle, lost IA VGLUT1 synapses are not re-established and the stretch reflex does not recover; however, electrically evoked EPSPs do recover. The reasons why remaining IA synapses can evoke EPSPs on motoneurons, but fail to transmit useful stretch signals are unknown. To better understand changes in the organization of VGLUT1 IA synapses that might influence their input strength, we analyzed their distribution over the entire dendritic arbor of motoneurons before and after nerve injury. Adult rats underwent complete tibial nerve transection followed by microsurgical reattachment and 1 year later motoneurons were intracellularly recorded and filled with neurobiotin to map the distribution of VGLUT1 synapses along their dendrites. We found in control motoneurons an average of 911 VGLUT1 synapses; ~62% of them were lost after injury. In controls, VGLUT1 synapses were focused to proximal dendrites where they were grouped in tight clusters. After injury, most synaptic loses occurred in the proximal dendrites and remaining synapses were declustered, smaller, and uniformly distributed throughout the dendritic arbor. We conclude that this loss and reorganization renders IA afferent synapses incompetent for efficient motoneuron synaptic depolarization in response to natural stretch, while still capable of eliciting EPSPs when synchronously fired by electrical volleys.

  13. RE-ORG: A methodology for reorganizing museum storage developed by ICCROM and UNESCO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Lambert

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available All over the world, 60% of museum storage areas are in such appalling conditions that collections can no longer be used for public benefit through learning, research or exhibitions. A methodology for reorganizing storage (RE-ORG, developed by ICCROM (International Centre for the Study of the Preservation and Restoration of Cultural Property and UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, which is freely available online (www.re-org.info, is presented. A case study is offered to show a practical application of the methodology on the Janapada Sampada ethnographic collection of IGNCA (Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts, New Delhi, India.Partout dans le monde, environ 60% des réserves de musées sont dans un état tellement déplorable qu'il est devenu impossible pour le public d'en bénéficier, que se soit à travers la médiation, la recherche ou les expositions. Cet article propose une méthodologie pour la réorganisation des réserves (RE-ORG, développée par l'ICCROM (Centre International d'études pour la conservation et restauration des biens culturels et l'UNESCO (Organisation des Nations Unies pour l'éducation, la science et la culture disponible gratuitement en ligne (www.re-org.info. Afin d'examiner l'application pratique de RE-ORG, l'auteur présentera une étude de cas sur la collection ethnographique Janapada Sampada du IGNCA (Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts à New Delhi en Inde.

  14. Synaptic reorganization in the adult rat's ventral cochlear nucleus following its total sensory deafferentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heika Hildebrandt

    for network reorganization and synaptogenesis in the auditory brainstem after loss of hearing, even in the adult brain.

  15. The functional significance of cortical reorganization and the parallel development of CI therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward eTaub

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available For the 19th and the better part of the 20th centuries two correlative beliefs were strongly held by almost all neuroscientists and practitioners in the field of neurorehabilitation. The first was that after maturity the adult CNS was hardwired and fixed, and second that in the chronic phase after CNS injury no substantial recovery of function could take place no matter what intervention was employed. However, in the last part of the 20th century evidence began to accumulate that neither belief was correct. First, in the 1960s and 1970s, in research with primates given a surgical abolition of somatic sensation from a single forelimb, which rendered the extremity useless, it was found that behavioral techniques could convert the limb into an extremity that could be used extensively. Beginning in the late 1980s, the techniques employed with deafferented monkeys were translated into a rehabilitation treatment, termed Constraint Induced Movement therapy or CI therapy, for substantially improving the motor deficit of the upper and lower extremities in the chronic phase after stroke. CI therapy has been applied successfully to other types of damage to the CNS such as traumatic brain injury, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, and spinal cord injury, and it has also been used to improve function in focal hand dystonia and for aphasia after stroke. As this work was proceeding, it was being shown during the 1980s and 1990s that sustained modulation of afferent input could alter the structure of the CNS and that this topographic reorganization could have relevance to the function of the individual. The alteration in these once fundamental beliefs has given rise to important recent developments in neuroscience and neurorehabilitation and holds promise for further increasing our understanding of CNS function and extending the boundaries of what is possible in neurorehabilitation.

  16. Using reinforcement learning to provide stable brain-machine interface control despite neural input reorganization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A Pohlmeyer

    Full Text Available Brain-machine interface (BMI systems give users direct neural control of robotic, communication, or functional electrical stimulation systems. As BMI systems begin transitioning from laboratory settings into activities of daily living, an important goal is to develop neural decoding algorithms that can be calibrated with a minimal burden on the user, provide stable control for long periods of time, and can be responsive to fluctuations in the decoder's neural input space (e.g. neurons appearing or being lost amongst electrode recordings. These are significant challenges for static neural decoding algorithms that assume stationary input/output relationships. Here we use an actor-critic reinforcement learning architecture to provide an adaptive BMI controller that can successfully adapt to dramatic neural reorganizations, can maintain its performance over long time periods, and which does not require the user to produce specific kinetic or kinematic activities to calibrate the BMI. Two marmoset monkeys used the Reinforcement Learning BMI (RLBMI to successfully control a robotic arm during a two-target reaching task. The RLBMI was initialized using random initial conditions, and it quickly learned to control the robot from brain states using only a binary evaluative feedback regarding whether previously chosen robot actions were good or bad. The RLBMI was able to maintain control over the system throughout sessions spanning multiple weeks. Furthermore, the RLBMI was able to quickly adapt and maintain control of the robot despite dramatic perturbations to the neural inputs, including a series of tests in which the neuron input space was deliberately halved or doubled.

  17. Functional Reorganization of the Primary Somatosensory Cortex of a Phantom Limb Pain Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jia; Guo, Xiaoli; Xia, Xiaolei; Peng, Weiwei; Wang, Wuchao; Li, Shulin; Zhang, Ya; Hu, Li

    2016-07-01

    Functional reorganization of the somatosensory system was widely observed in phantom limb pain patients. Whereas some studies demonstrated that the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) of the amputated limb was engaged with the regions around it, others showed that phantom limb pain was associated with preserved structure and functional organization in the former brain region. However, according to the law of use and disuse, the sensitivity of S1 of the amputated limb to pain-related context should be enhanced due to the adaptation to the long-lasting phantom limb pain experience. Here, we collected neurophysiological data from a patient with 21-year phantom limb pain using electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) techniques. EEG data showed that both laser-evoked potentials (LEPs) and tactile-evoked potentials (TEPs) were clearly presented only when radiant-heat laser pulses and electrical pulses were delivered to the shoulder of the healthy limb, but not of the amputated limb. This observation suggested the functional deficit of somatosensory pathways at the amputated side. FMRI data showed that significant larger brain activations by painful rather than non-painful stimuli in video clips were observed not only at visual-related brain areas and anterior/mid-cingulate cortex, but also at S1 contralateral to the amputated limb. This observation suggested the increased sensitivity of S1 of the amputated limb to the pain-related context. In addition, such increase of sensitivity was significantly larger if the context was associated with the amputated limb of the patient. In summary, our findings provided novel evidence for a possible neuroplasticity of S1 of the amputated limb: in an amputee with long-lasting phantom limb pain, the sensitivity of S1 to pain-related and amputated-limb-related context was greatly enhanced.

  18. 10 CFR 611.206 - Existing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Existing facilities. 611.206 Section 611.206 Energy... PROGRAM Facility/Funding Awards § 611.206 Existing facilities. The Secretary shall, in making awards to those manufacturers that have existing facilities, give priority to those facilities that are oldest or...

  19. 45 CFR 1170.32 - Existing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Existing facilities. 1170.32 Section 1170.32... ASSISTED PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES Accessibility § 1170.32 Existing facilities. (a) Accessibility. A recipient... require a recipient to make each of its existing facilities or every part of a facility accessible to and...

  20. 45 CFR 1151.22 - Existing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Existing facilities. 1151.22 Section 1151.22... Prohibited Accessibility § 1151.22 Existing facilities. (a) A recipient shall operate each program or... make each of its existing facilities or every part of a facility accessible to and usable by...

  1. 14 CFR 1251.301 - Existing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Existing facilities. 1251.301 Section 1251... HANDICAP Accessibility § 1251.301 Existing facilities. (a) Accessibility. A recipient shall operate each... existing facilities or every part of a facility accessible to and usable by handicapped persons. (b...

  2. 45 CFR 605.22 - Existing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Existing facilities. 605.22 Section 605.22 Public... Accessibility § 605.22 Existing facilities. (a) Accessibility. A recipient shall operate each program or... existing facilities or every part of a facility accessible to and usable by qualified handicapped persons...

  3. 34 CFR 104.22 - Existing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing facilities. 104.22 Section 104.22 Education... Accessibility § 104.22 Existing facilities. (a) Accessibility. A recipient shall operate its program or activity.... This paragraph does not require a recipient to make each of its existing facilities or every part of a...

  4. 28 CFR 42.521 - Existing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing facilities. 42.521 Section 42...-Implementation of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 Accessibility § 42.521 Existing facilities. (a... section does not require a recipient to make each of its existing facilities or every part of a...

  5. 45 CFR 1232.14 - Existing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Existing facilities. 1232.14 Section 1232.14... ASSISTANCE Accessibility § 1232.14 Existing facilities. (a) A recipient shall operate each program or... existing facilities or every part of a facility accessible to and usable by handicapped persons. (b)...

  6. 28 CFR 35.150 - Existing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing facilities. 35.150 Section 35... STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT SERVICES Program Accessibility § 35.150 Existing facilities. (a) General. A... paragraph does not— (1) Necessarily require a public entity to make each of its existing...

  7. Research on Inequalities Exists in the Workplace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    布乃鹏; 樊晶晶; 刘淑华

    2013-01-01

    The is ue of inequalities exists in the workplace has been widely debated in our community recently. And then this essay wil argue inequalities exist in the workplace, in terms of ethnic, gender, and disability. This es ay would of er four perspectives about the view inequalities exist in the workplace and discuss the response from the state, employers and unions.

  8. Spatial econometrics using microdata

    CERN Document Server

    Dubé, Jean

    2014-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to spatial analyses concerning disaggregated (or micro) spatial data.Particular emphasis is put on spatial data compilation and the structuring of the connections between the observations. Descriptive analysis methods of spatial data are presented in order to identify and measure the spatial, global and local dependency.The authors then focus on autoregressive spatial models, to control the problem of spatial dependency between the residues of a basic linear statistical model, thereby contravening one of the basic hypotheses of the ordinary least squares appr

  9. Spatial Genome Organization and its emerging role as a Potential Diagnosis Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Meaburn

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic cells the genome is highly spatially organized. Functional relevance of higher order genome organization is implied by the fact that specific genes, and even whole chromosomes, alter spatial position in concert with functional changes within the nucleus, for example with modifications to chromatin or transcription. The exact molecular pathways that regulate spatial genome organization and the full implication to the cell of such an organization remain to be determined. However, there is a growing realization that the spatial organization of the genome can be used as a marker of disease. While global genome organization patterns remain largely conserved in disease, some genes and chromosomes occupy distinct nuclear positions in diseased cells compared to their normal counterparts, with the patterns of reorganization differing between diseases. Importantly, mapping the spatial positioning patterns of specific genomic loci can distinguish cancerous tissue from benign with high accuracy. Genome positioning is an attractive novel biomarker since additional quantitative biomarkers are urgently required in many cancer types. Current diagnostic techniques are often subjective and generally lack the ability to identify aggressive cancer from indolent, which can lead to over- or under-treatment of patients. Proof-of-principle for the use of genome positioning as a diagnostic tool has been provided based on small scale retrospective studies. Future large-scale studies are required to assess the feasibility of bringing spatial genome organization-based diagnostics to the clinical setting and to determine if the positioning patterns of specific loci can be useful biomarkers for cancer prognosis. Since spatial reorganization of the genome has been identified in multiple human diseases, it is likely that spatial genome positioning patterns as a diagnostic biomarker may be applied to many diseases.

  10. Spatial Relation Resolution and Spatial Relation Abstraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AI Tinghua; LIU Yaolin

    2003-01-01

    This paper attempts toregard spatial relation transformationas an important process in map gener-alization. The spatial relation generali-zation can be divided into the compo-nents of abstraction: topology, dis-tance and orientation. The concept‘ spatial relation resolution' is intro-duced to describe the constraints ofrelative spatial relation. On the basisof nine intersection models, the cardi-nal direction models and the iso-dis-tance-relation models, this paper givesthree sorts of relation resolution repre-sentations for topological, distance andorientation relation, respectively. Twomapping implementations in map gen-eralization is discussed.

  11. Existence conditions for unknown input functional observers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, T.; MacDougall, S.; Sreeram, V.; Trinh, H.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence and design of an unknown input Functional observer. The existence of the observer can be verified by computing a nullspace of a known matrix and testing some matrix rank conditions. The existence of the observer does not require the satisfaction of the observer matching condition (i.e. Equation (16) in Hou and Muller 1992, 'Design of Observers for Linear Systems with Unknown Inputs', IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, 37, 871-875), is not limited to estimating scalar functionals and allows for arbitrary pole placement. The proposed observer always exists when a state observer exists for the unknown input system, and furthermore, the proposed observer can exist even in some instances when an unknown input state observer does not exist.

  12. Cooperative Spatial Retreat for Resilient Drone Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin-Hyeok; Kwon, Young-Min; Park, Kyung-Joon

    2017-05-03

    Drones are broadening their scope to various applications such as networking, package delivery, agriculture, rescue, and many more. For proper operation of drones, reliable communication should be guaranteed because drones are remotely controlled. When drones experience communication failure due to bad channel condition, interference, or jamming in a certain area, one existing solution is to exploit mobility or so-called spatial retreat to evacuate them from the communication failure area. However, the conventional spatial retreat scheme moves drones in random directions, which results in inefficient movement with significant evacuation time and waste of battery lifetime. In this paper, we propose a novel spatial retreat technique that takes advantage of cooperation between drones for resilient networking, which is called cooperative spatial retreat (CSR). Our performance evaluation shows that the proposed CSR significantly outperforms existing schemes.

  13. Intermittent hypoxia leads to functional reorganization of mitochondria and affects cellular bioenergetics in marine molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanina, Anna V; Nesmelova, Irina; Leamy, Larry; Sokolov, Eugene P; Sokolova, Inna M

    2016-06-01

    by inactivation of the translation initiation factor EIF-2α, suppression of 26S proteasome activity and a dramatic decrease in the activity of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. The steady-state levels of adenylates were preserved during H/R exposure and AMP-dependent protein kinase was not activated in either species, indicating that the H/R exposure did not lead to severe energy deficiency. Taken together, our findings suggest that mitochondrial reorganizations sustaining high oxidative phosphorylation flux during recovery, combined with the ability to suppress ATP-demanding cellular functions during hypoxia, may contribute to high resilience of clams to H/R stress and help maintain energy homeostasis during frequent H/R cycles in the intertidal zone.

  14. Functional reorganization of motor and limbic circuits after exercise training in a rat model of bilateral parkinsonism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Wang

    Full Text Available Exercise training is widely used for neurorehabilitation of Parkinson's disease (PD. However, little is known about the functional reorganization of the injured brain after long-term aerobic exercise. We examined the effects of 4 weeks of forced running wheel exercise in a rat model of dopaminergic deafferentation (bilateral, dorsal striatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesions. One week after training, cerebral perfusion was mapped during treadmill walking or at rest using [(14C]-iodoantipyrine autoradiography. Regional cerebral blood flow-related tissue radioactivity (rCBF was analyzed in three-dimensionally reconstructed brains by statistical parametric mapping. In non-exercised rats, lesions resulted in persistent motor deficits. Compared to sham-lesioned rats, lesioned rats showed altered functional brain activation during walking, including: 1. hypoactivation of the striatum and motor cortex; 2. hyperactivation of non-lesioned areas in the basal ganglia-thalamocortical circuit; 3. functional recruitment of the red nucleus, superior colliculus and somatosensory cortex; 4. hyperactivation of the ventrolateral thalamus, cerebellar vermis and deep nuclei, suggesting recruitment of the cerebellar-thalamocortical circuit; 5. hyperactivation of limbic areas (amygdala, hippocampus, ventral striatum, septum, raphe, insula. These findings show remarkable similarities to imaging findings reported in PD patients. Exercise progressively improved motor deficits in lesioned rats, while increasing activation in dorsal striatum and rostral secondary motor cortex, attenuating a hyperemia of the zona incerta and eliciting a functional reorganization of regions participating in the cerebellar-thalamocortical circuit. Both lesions and exercise increased activation in mesolimbic areas (amygdala, hippocampus, ventral striatum, laterodorsal tegmental n., ventral pallidum, as well as in related paralimbic regions (septum, raphe, insula. Exercise, but not lesioning, resulted

  15. Red light, Phot1 and JAC1 modulate Phot2-dependent reorganization of chloroplast actin filaments and chloroplast avoidance movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Satoshi; Yamada, Noboru; Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Wada, Masamitsu; Kadota, Akeo

    2011-08-01

    The phototropin (phot)-dependent intracellular relocation of chloroplasts is a ubiquitous phenomenon in plants. We have previously revealed the involvement of a short cp-actin (chloroplast actin) filament-based mechanism in this movement. Here, the reorganization of cp-actin filaments during the avoidance movement of chloroplasts was analyzed in higher time resolution under blue GFP (green fluorescent protein) excitation light in an actin filament-visualized line of Arabidopsis thaliana. Under standard background red light of 89 μmol m(-2) s(-1), cp-actin filaments transiently disappeared at approximately 30 s and reappeared in a biased configuration on chloroplasts approximately 70 s after blue excitation light irradiation. The timing of biased cp-actin reappearance was delayed under the background of strong red light or in the absence of red light. Consistently, chloroplast movement was delayed under these conditions. In phot1 mutants, acceleration of both the disappearance and reappearance of cp-actin filaments occurred, indicating an inhibitory action of phot1 on reorganization of cp-actin filaments. Avoidance movements began sooner in phot1 than in wild-type plants. No reorganization of cp-actin filaments was seen in phot2 or phot1phot2 mutants lacking phot2, which is responsible for avoidance movements. Surprisingly, jac1 (j-domain protein required for chloroplast accumulation response 1) mutants, lacking the accumulation response, showed no avoidance movements under the whole-cell irradiation condition for GFP observation. Cp-actin filaments in jac1 did not show a biased distribution, with a small or almost no transient decrease in the number. These results indicate a close association between the biased distribution of cp-actin filaments and chloroplast movement. Further, JAC1 is suggested to function in the biased cp-actin filament distribution by regulating their appearance and disappearance.

  16. Solvent reorganization plays a temperature-dependent role in antibiotic selection by a thermostable aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase-4'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xiaomin; Serpersu, Engin H

    2014-09-02

    The aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase-4' (ANT) is an enzyme that causes resistance to a large number of aminoglycoside antibiotics by nucleotidylation of the 4'-site on these antibiotics. The effect of solvent reorganization on enzyme-ligand interactions was investigated using a thermophilic variant of the enzyme resulting from a single-site mutation (T130K). Data showed that the binding of aminoglycosides to ANT causes exposure of polar groups to solvent. However, solvent reorganization becomes the major contributor to the enthalpy of the formation of enzyme-aminoglycoside complexes only above 20 °C. The change in heat capacity (ΔCp) shows an aminoglycoside-dependent pattern such that it correlates with the affinity of the ligand for the enzyme. Differences in ΔCp values determined in H2O and D2O also correlated with the ligand affinity. The temperature-dependent increase in the offset temperature (Toff), the temperature difference required to observe equal enthalpies in both solvents, is also dependent on the binding affinity of the ligand, and the steepest increase was observed with the tightest binding aminoglycoside, neomycin. Overall, these data, together with earlier observations with a different enzyme, the aminoglycoside N3-acetyltransferase-IIIb [Norris, A. L., and Serpersu, E. H. (2011) Biochemistry 50, 9309], show that solvent reorganization or changes in soft vibrational modes of the protein are interchangeable with respect to the role of being the major contributor to complex formation depending on temperature. These data suggest that such effects may more generally apply to enzyme-ligand interactions, and studies at a single temperature may provide only a part of the whole picture of thermodynamics of enzyme-ligand interactions.

  17. Rapid and dynamic subcellular reorganization following mechanical stimulation of Arabidopsis epidermal cells mimics responses to fungal and oomycete attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takemoto Daigo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant cells respond to the presence of potential fungal or oomycete pathogens by mounting a basal defence response that involves aggregation of cytoplasm, reorganization of cytoskeletal, endomembrane and other cell components and development of cell wall appositions beneath the infection site. This response is induced by non-adapted, avirulent and virulent pathogens alike, and in the majority of cases achieves penetration resistance against the microorganism on the plant surface. To explore the nature of signals that trigger this subcellular response and to determine the timing of its induction, we have monitored the reorganization of GFP-tagged actin, microtubules, endoplasmic reticulum (ER and peroxisomes in Arabidopsis plants – after touching the epidermal surface with a microneedle. Results Within 3 to 5 minutes of touching the surface of Arabidopsis cotyledon epidermal cells with fine glass or tungsten needles, actin microfilaments, ER and peroxisomes began to accumulate beneath the point of contact with the needle. Formation of a dense patch of actin was followed by focusing of actin cables on the site of contact. Touching the cell surface induced localized depolymerization of microtubules to form a microtubule-depleted zone surrounding a dense patch of GFP-tubulin beneath the needle tip. The concentration of actin, GFP-tubulin, ER and peroxisomes remained focused on the contact site as the needle moved across the cell surface and quickly dispersed when the needle was removed. Conclusion Our results show that plant cells can detect the gentle pressure of a microneedle on the epidermal cell surface and respond by reorganizing subcellular components in a manner similar to that induced during attack by potential fungal or oomycete pathogens. The results of our study indicate that during plant-pathogen interactions, the basal defence response may be induced by the plant's perception of the physical force exerted by the

  18. Asymptotic Existence of Nearly Kirkman Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈灏; 储文松

    1994-01-01

    It is proved in this paper that,for any given positive integer k≥2,there exists a constant v0=v0(k) such that for v≥v0,the necessary condition v=0 (mod k(k-)) for the existence of a nearly Kirkman system NKS (2,k,v) is also sufficient.Thus we have completely determined the asymptotic existence of NKS.

  19. Spatial Data Management

    CERN Document Server

    Mamoulis, Nikos

    2011-01-01

    Spatial database management deals with the storage, indexing, and querying of data with spatial features, such as location and geometric extent. Many applications require the efficient management of spatial data, including Geographic Information Systems, Computer Aided Design, and Location Based Services. The goal of this book is to provide the reader with an overview of spatial data management technology, with an emphasis on indexing and search techniques. It first introduces spatial data models and queries and discusses the main issues of extending a database system to support spatial data.

  20. Do Phantom Cuntz-Krieger Algebras Exist?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arklint, Sara E.

    2013-01-01

    If phantom Cuntz-Krieger algebras do not exist, then purely infinite Cuntz-Krieger algebras can be characterized by outer properties. In this survey paper, a summary of the known results on non-existence of phantom Cuntz-Krieger algebras is given......If phantom Cuntz-Krieger algebras do not exist, then purely infinite Cuntz-Krieger algebras can be characterized by outer properties. In this survey paper, a summary of the known results on non-existence of phantom Cuntz-Krieger algebras is given...

  1. ISSUES IN ROMANIAN BANKING SYSTEM IN THE CONTEXT OF REORGANIZING ITS ADAPTATION TO THE REQUIREMENTS OF THE MARKET ECONOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IOAN DUMITRU MOTONIU

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the concept that the banking system is the engine of economic development, the paper is intended as a blueprint for the banking system in Romania since 1989, stages and parts of its reorganizing process. In the article is also carried out an analysis of the Romanian banking system in terms of numerical development banks and through the two indicators considered fundamental in the banking system: market share, expressed in terms of net balance sheet asset, that social / endowment capital and are presented the conclusions that have been drawn from this analysis.

  2. ADAM12 induces actin cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix reorganization during early adipocyte differentiation by regulating beta1 integrin function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawaguchi, Nobuko; Sundberg, Christina; Kveiborg, Marie

    2003-01-01

    -100 from cells overexpressing ADAM12 than from control cells. Collectively, these results show that surface expression of ADAM12 impairs the function of beta1 integrins and, consequently, alters the organization of the actin cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix. These events may be necessary....... Moreover, ADAM12-expressing cells were more prone to apoptosis, which could be prevented by treating the cells with beta1-activating antibodies. A reduced and re-organized fibronectin-rich extracellular matrix accompanied these changes. In addition, beta1 integrin was more readily extracted with Triton X...

  3. The role of the heating mode of the mantle in intermittent reorganization of the plate velocity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowman, Julian P.; King, Scott D.; Gable, Carl W.

    2003-02-01

    The geological record indicates that stages of relatively steady plate motion have been punctuated by comparatively brief periods in which plate velocities have reorganized. The distribution of buoyancy sources in the mantle has generally been regarded as evolving too slowly to explain these rapid transitions in plate velocity. We investigate the feedback between mantle convection and plate velocity using 2-D and 3-D mantle convection models that incorporate mobile dynamic plates. We focus on the influence of internal heating in the mantle and consider the effect of mantle viscosity stratification and different plate geometries on the plate velocity time dependence. As either the Rayleigh number or the internal heating rate is increased to magnitudes approaching mantle values, the record of the plate motion from our calculations becomes characterized by intermittent changes in direction. This behaviour is a result of the influence of plates on heat loss from the inherently unsteady, internally heated convecting system. Plate motion instills a pattern of organization on the underlying convection that reflects the plate geometry and results in the formation of sheet-like downwelling structures at convergent plate boundaries in both 2-D and 3-D calculations (in contrast, upwellings in 3-D models are not sheet-like). The role of the sheet-like downwellings is critical in the observed episodic reorganization of the plate velocities. Warm material below the plates is entrained by plate motion into regions enveloping the downwelling sheets. During periods of fairly steady plate motion, buoyancy associated with the build-up of heat around the downwelling sheets leads to the creation of an unstable convection pattern. This build-up of heat is dramatic in calculations with mantle-like internal heating rates and resists continued long-term plate motion towards mature downwellings. When there are limitations on the degree of freedom of the direction of plate movement, such as

  4. Organization of visuo-spatial serial memory: interaction of temporal order with spatial and temporal grouping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmentier, Fabrice B R; Andrés, Pilar; Elford, Greg; Jones, Dylan M

    2006-05-01

    This study investigates whether memory for sequences of spatial locations can be represented hierarchically, that is, as successive groups containing the order of constituent locations. Two grouping manipulations are used: Temporal grouping, based on the verbal serial memory literature, and spatial grouping, based on recent empirical work on visuo-spatial serial memory. In Experiment 1, we examine the relationship between spatial grouping and temporal order and showed that recall performance increases when both temporal and spatial organization correlate, but decreases when they clash. Experiments 2 and 3 show that the latter result is confounded by differences in path length (length of spatial path defined by the locations) between conditions, and that no effect of the spatial organization is observed when path length is controlled for. In Experiment 4, an alternative method to spatial grouping, temporal grouping, is used to induce hierarchical organization. A recall advantage is found in the temporal grouping condition. The results suggest that hierarchical representations can be imposed on order information for visuo-spatial sequences, either when participants have pre-existing knowledge about the form of the path formed by the sequence or when temporal boundaries delimit chunks; that increased path length is the cause of the performance decrement observed when dots from separate spatial groups are presented successively; and that path length and more generally sequence characteristics should be taken into account in designing future research on visuo-spatial serial memory.

  5. Spatial distributions of niche-constructing populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaozhuo Han

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Niche construction theory regards organisms not only as the object of natural selection but also an active subject that can change their own selective pressure through eco-evolutionary feedbacks. Through reviewing the existing works on the theoretical models of niche construction, here we present the progress made on how niche construction influences genetic structure of spatially structured populations and the spatial-temporal dynamics of metapopulations, with special focuses on mathematical models and simulation methods. The majority of results confirmed that niche construction can significantly alter the evolutionary trajectories of structured populations. Organism-environmental interactions induced by niche construction can have profound influence on the dynamics, competition and diversity of metapopulations. It can affect fine-scale spatially distribution of species and spatial heterogeneity of the environment. We further propose a few research directions with potentials, such as applying adaptive dynamics or spatial game theory to explore the effect of niche construction on phenotypic evolution and diversification.

  6. The welfare benefit of a home's location: an empirical comparison of spatial and non-spatial model estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koschinsky, Julia; Lozano-Gracia, Nancy; Piras, Gianfranco

    2012-07-01

    This article compares results from non-spatial and new spatial methods to examine the reliability of welfare estimates (direct and multiplier effects) for locational housing attributes in Seattle, WA. In particular, we assess if OLS with spatial fixed effects is able to account for the spatial structure in a way that represents a viable alternative to spatial econometric methods. We find that while OLS with spatial fixed effects accounts for more of the spatial structure than simple OLS, it does not account for all of the spatial structure. It thus does not present a viable alternative to the spatial methods. Similar to existing comparisons between results from non-spatial and established spatial methods, we also find that OLS generates higher coefficient and direct effect estimates for both structural and locational housing characteristics than spatial methods do. OLS with spatial fixed effects is closer to the spatial estimates than OLS without fixed effects but remains higher. Finally, a comparison of the direct effects with locally weighted regression results highlights spatial threshold effects that are missed in the global models. Differences between spatial estimators are almost negligible in this study.

  7. A Spatial Calculus of Wrapped Compartments

    CERN Document Server

    Bioglio, Livio; Coppo, Mario; Damiani, Ferruccio; Sciacca, Eva; Spinella, Salvatore; Troina, Angelo

    2011-01-01

    The Calculus of Wrapped Compartments (CWC) is a recently proposed modelling language for the representation and simulation of biological systems behaviour. Although CWC has no explicit structure modelling a spatial geometry, its compartment labelling feature can be exploited to model various examples of spatial interactions in a natural way. However, specifying large networks of compartments may require a long modelling phase. In this work we present a surface language for CWC that provides basic constructs for modelling spatial interactions. These constructs can be compiled away to obtain a standard CWC model, thus exploiting the existing CWC simulation tool. A case study concerning the modelling of Arbuscular Mychorrizal fungi growth is discussed.

  8. Characteristic Spatial Scales in Earthquake Data

    CERN Document Server

    Zöller, G; Hainzl, S; Kurths, J

    1997-01-01

    We present a new technique in order to quantify the dynamics of spatially extended systems. Using a test on the existence of unstable periodic orbits, we identify intermediate spatial scales, wherein the dynamics is characterized by maximum nontrivial determinism. This method is applied to earthquake catalogues containing time, coordinates and magnitude. As a result we extract a set of areas with significant deterministic and low-dimensional dynamics from the data. Finally, a simple model is used to show that these scales can be interpreted as local spatial coupling strengths.

  9. Spatial correlations in attribute communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Cerina

    Full Text Available Community detection is an important tool for exploring and classifying the properties of large complex networks and should be of great help for spatial networks. Indeed, in addition to their location, nodes in spatial networks can have attributes such as the language for individuals, or any other socio-economical feature that we would like to identify in communities. We discuss in this paper a crucial aspect which was not considered in previous studies which is the possible existence of correlations between space and attributes. Introducing a simple toy model in which both space and node attributes are considered, we discuss the effect of space-attribute correlations on the results of various community detection methods proposed for spatial networks in this paper and in previous studies. When space is irrelevant, our model is equivalent to the stochastic block model which has been shown to display a detectability-non detectability transition. In the regime where space dominates the link formation process, most methods can fail to recover the communities, an effect which is particularly marked when space-attributes correlations are strong. In this latter case, community detection methods which remove the spatial component of the network can miss a large part of the community structure and can lead to incorrect results.

  10. Spatial variation of five co-existing siluriformes in an atlantic rain forest drainage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Mazzoni

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Five species of Siluriformes were registered in the Ubatiba system. Pimelodella lateristriga was the dominant one, followed by Hypostomus gr. punctatus, Rineloricaria sp., Callichthys callichthys and Rhamdia sp. Simple correlation analysis between species density and habitat parameters indicated that hydrology explained density patterns of four species. Pimelodella densities were negatively correlated with pools, Callichthys and Hypostomus densities were positively correlated with runs and Rhamdia densities were positively correlated with riffles; Rineloricaria densities did not respond to any hydrological parameter. Substrata were an important factor to all species, but specific preferences were observed. Marginal vegetation was positively correlated only to Pimelodella densities. Sorensen dissimilarity analysis indicated that site groups, based on both species composition and habitat parameters, were very similar and corroborated the correlation analysis suggesting that Siluriformes composition should be explained by many habitat parameters. Analysis of co-variation of species densities at each sampling occasion showed to be statistically similar in at least all (100% analysed cases indicating that Siluriformes composition was strongly persistent in time.Cinco espécies de Siluriformes foram registradas no sistema fluvial do rio Ubatiba, Pimelodella lateristriga foi a espécie dominante seguida de Hypostomus gr. punctatus, Rineloricaria sp., Callichthys callichthys e Rhamdia sp. Análises de correlação simples entre as densidades das espécies e as variáveis de hábitat indicaram que a hidrologia explicou os padrões de densidade de quatro espécies; as densidades de Pimelodella foram negativamente correlacionadas com a presença de poças, as densidades de Callichthys e Hypostomus foram positivamente correlacionadas com os rápidos e as densidades de Rhamdia foram positivamente correlacionadas com as corredeiras; as densidades de Rineloricaria não responderam a nenhum dos parâmetros hydrológicos analisados. O substrato foi um importante fator para todas as espécies, mas preferências específicas foram observadas. A vegetação marginal foi positivamente correlacionada apenas com as densidades de Pimelodella. A análise de dissimilaridade de Sorensen indicou que os grupos de localidades que se formaram com base tanto na composição de espécies como nas variáveis de hábitat foram muito semelhantes e corroboraram os resultados das análises de correlação, sugerindo que a composição de Siluriformes do rio Ubatiba pode ser explicada por várias características do hábitat. As análises de co-variância das densidades das espécies em cada momento amostral mostraram-se significativamente similares em todos (100% os casos analisados, indicando que a composição de Siluriformes é persistente e se mantém em escala temporal.

  11. God exists with probability 1/(H+1)

    CERN Document Server

    Hoey, Jesse

    2012-01-01

    This note will address the issue of the existence of God from a game theoretic perspective. We will show that, under certain assumptions, man cannot simultaneously be (i) rational and (ii) believe that an infinitely powerful God exists. Game theory and decision theory have long been used to address this thorny question.

  12. Existence Regions of Shock Wave Triple Configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulat, Pavel V.; Chernyshev, Mikhail V.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the research is to create the classification for shock wave triple configurations and their existence regions of various types: type 1, type 2, type 3. Analytical solutions for limit Mach numbers and passing shock intensity that define existence region of every type of triple configuration have been acquired. The ratios that conjugate…

  13. On the existence of consistent price systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayraktar, Erhan; Pakkanen, Mikko S.; Sayit, Hasanjan

    2014-01-01

    We formulate a sufficient condition for the existence of a consistent price system (CPS), which is weaker than the conditional full support condition (CFS). We use the new condition to show the existence of CPSs for certain processes that fail to have the CFS property. In particular this condition...

  14. Non-existence of KAM Torus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chong Qing CHENG

    2011-01-01

    Given an integrable Hamiltonian ho with n-degrees of freedom and a Diophantine frequency w, then, arbitrarily close to ho in the Cr topology with r < 2n, there exists an analytical Hamiltonian h∈ with no KAM torus of rotation vector w. In contrast with it, KAM tori exist if perturbations are small in Cr topology with r > 2n.

  15. Structural reliability of existing city bridges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellebrandt, L.; Steenbergen, R.; Vrouwenvelder, T.; Blom, K.

    2015-01-01

    Full probabilistic reliability analysis may be valuable for assessing existing structures. Measures for increasing the safety level are quite costly for existing structures and may be unnecessary when such a decision is grounded on a conservative analysis for determining the structural reliability.

  16. 10 CFR 1040.72 - Existing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Existing facilities. 1040.72 Section 1040.72 Energy... § 1040.72 Existing facilities. (a) Accessibility. A recipient shall operate any program or activity to... facilities or every part of a facility accessible to and useable by handicapped persons. (b) Methods. A...

  17. On determining if a specular point exists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rusch, W; Sørensen, O

    1979-01-01

    A technique is presented whereby the existence of a specular point on a convex surface of revolution can be determined without actually finding it. Only the evaluation of two simple algebraic expressions is involved. Should a specular point be found not to exist, a search procedure has been thereby...

  18. Some existence and sufficient conditions of optimality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assefi, T.

    1976-01-01

    The role of the existence and sufficiency conditions in the field of optimal control was briefly described. The existence theorems are discussed for general nonlinear systems. However, the sufficiency conditions pertain to "nearly" linear systems with integral convex costs. Moreover, a brief discussion of linear systems with multiple-cost functions is presented.

  19. 43 CFR 17.217 - Existing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Existing facilities. 17.217 Section 17.217... facilities. (a) Accessibility. A recipient shall operate each program or activity so that when each part is... not require a recipient to make each of its existing facilities or every part of a facility...

  20. Existence test for asynchronous interval iterations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kaj; Caprani, O.; Stauning, Ole

    1997-01-01

    In the search for regions that contain fixed points ofa real function of several variables, tests based on interval calculationscan be used to establish existence ornon-existence of fixed points in regions that are examined in the course ofthe search. The search can e.g. be performed...... as a synchronous (sequential) interval iteration:In each iteration step all components of the iterate are calculatedbased on the previous iterate. In this case it is straight forward to base simple interval existence and non-existencetests on the calculations done in each step of the iteration. The search can also...... be performed as an asynchronous (parallel) iteration: Only a few components are changed in each stepand this calculation is in general based on components from differentprevious iterates. For the asynchronous iteration it turns out thatsimple tests of existence and non-existence can be based...

  1. [Reorganization of the system activity of the brain by understanding of the meaning of visually presented texts with increasing completeness of the information].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkacheva, L O; Gorbunov, I A; Nasledov, A D

    2015-01-01

    The present paper investigates the study of features of brain activity by the process of change the regimes of information associated with the stages of understanding of the meaning of visually presented texts in adult subjects (n = 148). Researchers have developed an original methodology of step-by-step presentation of the texts. This technology has allowed the researchers "to catch" a psycho-physiological markers of understanding and identify the stages in a temporal sequence of the process of understanding. EEG data was analysed using spectral and non-linear methods. Was highlighted three stages: "before understanding", "understanding" and "after understanding". The study discovered the phenomenon of V- shaped changes to the values of the fractal dimension of EEG. The first stage is characterized by the increasing of the power spectrum of EEG in the high frequency range and increase the value of the fractal dimension of EEG, what probably reflects the process of the generation of ideas and the search of solutions. At the next stage ("understanding") a decrease in the value of the fractal dimension of EEG was registered, and an increase of the power spectrum of the low-frequency range. This seems to reflect the simplification of the invariance of reality to the only valid alternative. The last stage is characterised by the increasing power spectrum of EEG in the high frequency range and increase the value of the fractal dimension of EEG, which can reflect the process of intensification of activity of the brain associated with the verification of the correctness of the decision. The results obtained allow an approach to the understanding of the physiological mechanisms of the reorganization of the system of brain activity in the process.of understanding of the meaning of visually presented texts. This, therefore, outlines the path to the elimination of existing contradictions in the literature relating to the role of high- and low-frequency components of the EEG

  2. Spatial Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zhengling

    2016-01-01

    Spatial language constitutes part of the basic fabric of language. Although languages may have the same number of terms to cover a set of spatial relations, they do not always do so in the same way. Spatial languages differ across languages quite radically, thus providing a real semantic challenge for second language learners. The essay first…

  3. Spatial Information Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Markelov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the spatial information storage, shows the features of spatial information and of such storage systems formation. Requirements for information storage technologies and for the data management in storage systems are determined. Cartographic information storage and updating features are shown. The article proves that intelligent solutions are the most efficient means of working with large amounts of spatial data.

  4. Memoz - Spatial Weblogging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoem, Jon

    The article argues that spatial webpublishing has influence on weblogging, and calls for a revision of the current weblog definition. The weblog genre should be able to incorporate spatial representation, not only the sequential ordering of articles. The article show examples of different spatial forms, including material produced in Memoz (MEMory OrganiZer).

  5. Spatial Patterns in Urban Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Huynh, Hoai Nguyen; Legara, Erika Fille; Monterola, Christopher; Chew, Lock Yue

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the morphology of an urban system is an important step toward unveiling the dynamical processes of its growth and development. At the foundation of every urban system, transportation system is undeniably a crucial component in powering the life of the entire urban system. In this work, we study the spatial pattern of $73$ cities across the globe by analysing the distribution of public transport points within the cities. The analysis reveals that different spatial distributions of points could be classified into four groups with distinct features, indicating whether the points are clustered, dispersed or regularly distributed. From visual inspection, we observe that the cities with regularly distributed patterns do not have apparent centre in contrast to the other two types in which star-node structure, i.e. monocentric, can be clearly observed. Furthermore, the results provide evidence for the existence of two different types of urban system: well-planned and organically grown. We also study the...

  6. Spatial organization of adhesion: force-dependent regulation and function in tissue morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papusheva, Ekaterina; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2010-08-18

    Integrin- and cadherin-mediated adhesion is central for cell and tissue morphogenesis, allowing cells and tissues to change shape without loosing integrity. Studies predominantly in cell culture showed that mechanosensation through adhesion structures is achieved by force-mediated modulation of their molecular composition. The specific molecular composition of adhesion sites in turn determines their signalling activity and dynamic reorganization. Here, we will review how adhesion sites respond to mecanical stimuli, and how spatially and temporally regulated signalling from different adhesion sites controls cell migration and tissue morphogenesis.

  7. Spatially resolved shear distribution in microfluidic chip for studying force transduction mechanisms in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianbin; Heo, Jinseok; Hua, Susan Z

    2010-01-21

    Fluid shear stress has profound effects on cell physiology. Here we present a versatile microfluidic method capable of generating variable magnitudes, gradients, and different modes of shear flow, to study sensory and force transduction mechanisms in cells. The chip allows cell culture under spatially resolved shear flow conditions as well as study of cell response to shear flow in real-time. Using this chip, we studied the effects of chronic shear stress on cellular functions of Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK), renal epithelial cells. We show that shear stress causes reorganization of actin cytoskeleton, which suppresses flow-induced Ca(2+) response.

  8. ABUJA SUSTAINABLE SPATIAL HOUSING DESIGN: A SPATIAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bons

    2017-02-02

    Feb 2, 2017 ... the destitutes/homeless people in the city. The informal .... solving them, this research recommends retention and sustainable spatial integration of the ... Crisis, Planning, and the Quality of life: Managing the New Historical.

  9. Wykrzyknik - istnienie - zmiana (Exclamation - Existence - Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Karpiński

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available It, what exists, so to say, demands for the addressee – the thing exists in the face of (for something (or somebody. In other words, the existence is the relation. The competitive conception of the existence outside the relation (existence isolated leads to the contradiction. The existential proposition ‘Some A exists’, understoodliterally, is the pleonasm. It tends to treat the existential proposition as the conventional figure, expressing the simple act of an A affirmation (the exclamation ‘A!’. The existence’s relation should not be narrowed down only to the relation of perception(esse est percipi. It is needed to be understood widely, as every relation, in which something influences on whatever (that is, some change occurs. This influence (change can take place both inside or outside the consciousness. The existing thing, the influence exerted by it, and the change, occurred as the result of this influence, are identical. Thanks to it, we can eliminate difficulties connected withfinding ‘the point of contact’ between modules of the existence’s relation (that is, ‘the place’ where existing thing and its addressee are connected. The existence, as the relation of influence-change, is modal and gradual (as regards both intensity and extensiveness: the thing, in different aspects, can exist more or less. Theoretically, discussed relation can be symmetrical or antisymmetrical. The concept of error should be redefined. The error concerning the existence (resp. the nonexistence of specified thing, must not mean the incompatibility between this thing and the perception (widely: between this thing and the change causedby this thing in its addressee. The existence is the unity of the thing-perception (resp. the thing-influence-change. That is why the incompatibility can occur only between the state of thing-perception (resp. the thing-influence-change and the related state of duty. The conception of the existence as the relation

  10. Existence and non-existence results for the SU(3) singular Toda system on compact surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Battaglia, Luca; Malchiodi, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We consider the SU(3) Toda system on a compact surface. We give both existence and non-existence results under some conditions on the parameters. Existence results are obtained using variational methods, which involve a geometric inequality of new type; non-existence results are obtained using blow-up analysis and localized Pohozaev identities.

  11. Estrogen induces global reorganization of chromatin structure in human breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaël Mourad

    Full Text Available In the cell nucleus, each chromosome is confined to a chromosome territory. This spatial organization of chromosomes plays a crucial role in gene regulation and genome stability. An additional level of organization has been discovered at the chromosome scale: the spatial segregation into open and closed chromatins to form two genome-wide compartments. Although considerable progress has been made in our knowledge of chromatin organization, a fundamental issue remains the understanding of its dynamics, especially in cancer. To address this issue, we performed genome-wide mapping of chromatin interactions (Hi-C over the time after estrogen stimulation of breast cancer cells. To biologically interpret these interactions, we integrated with estrogen receptor α (ERα binding events, gene expression and epigenetic marks. We show that gene-rich chromosomes as well as areas of open and highly transcribed chromatins are rearranged to greater spatial proximity, thus enabling genes to share transcriptional machinery and regulatory elements. At a smaller scale, differentially interacting loci are enriched for cancer proliferation and estrogen-related genes. Moreover, these loci are correlated with higher ERα binding events and gene expression. Taken together these results reveal the role of a hormone--estrogen--on genome organization, and its effect on gene regulation in cancer.

  12. Estrogen induces global reorganization of chromatin structure in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourad, Raphaël; Hsu, Pei-Yin; Juan, Liran; Shen, Changyu; Koneru, Prasad; Lin, Hai; Liu, Yunlong; Nephew, Kenneth; Huang, Tim H; Li, Lang

    2014-01-01

    In the cell nucleus, each chromosome is confined to a chromosome territory. This spatial organization of chromosomes plays a crucial role in gene regulation and genome stability. An additional level of organization has been discovered at the chromosome scale: the spatial segregation into open and closed chromatins to form two genome-wide compartments. Although considerable progress has been made in our knowledge of chromatin organization, a fundamental issue remains the understanding of its dynamics, especially in cancer. To address this issue, we performed genome-wide mapping of chromatin interactions (Hi-C) over the time after estrogen stimulation of breast cancer cells. To biologically interpret these interactions, we integrated with estrogen receptor α (ERα) binding events, gene expression and epigenetic marks. We show that gene-rich chromosomes as well as areas of open and highly transcribed chromatins are rearranged to greater spatial proximity, thus enabling genes to share transcriptional machinery and regulatory elements. At a smaller scale, differentially interacting loci are enriched for cancer proliferation and estrogen-related genes. Moreover, these loci are correlated with higher ERα binding events and gene expression. Taken together these results reveal the role of a hormone--estrogen--on genome organization, and its effect on gene regulation in cancer.

  13. Superheavy elements: existence, classification and experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Kostyghin, V. A.; Vaschenko, V. M.; Loza, Ye. A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes spatial periodic table developed based on classic electron shell structure model. The periodic table determines location and chemical properties of superheavy elements. 14 new long-living superheavy elements found by Proton-21 laboratory and one long-living superheavy element found by A.Marinov were identified.

  14. A simple rule for dendritic spine and axonal bouton formation can account for cortical reorganization after focal retinal lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Butz

    Full Text Available Lasting alterations in sensory input trigger massive structural and functional adaptations in cortical networks. The principles governing these experience-dependent changes are, however, poorly understood. Here, we examine whether a simple rule based on the neurons' need for homeostasis in electrical activity may serve as driving force for cortical reorganization. According to this rule, a neuron creates new spines and boutons when its level of electrical activity is below a homeostatic set-point and decreases the number of spines and boutons when its activity exceeds this set-point. In addition, neurons need a minimum level of activity to form spines and boutons. Spine and bouton formation depends solely on the neuron's own activity level, and synapses are formed by merging spines and boutons independently of activity. Using a novel computational model, we show that this simple growth rule produces neuron and network changes as observed in the visual cortex after focal retinal lesions. In the model, as in the cortex, the turnover of dendritic spines was increased strongest in the center of the lesion projection zone, while axonal boutons displayed a marked overshoot followed by pruning. Moreover, the decrease in external input was compensated for by the formation of new horizontal connections, which caused a retinotopic remapping. Homeostatic regulation may provide a unifying framework for understanding cortical reorganization, including network repair in degenerative diseases or following focal stroke.

  15. Functional magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of brain function reorganization in cerebral stroke patients after constraint-induced movement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jun; Zhang, Tong; Xu, Jianmin; Wang, Mingli; Zhao, Shengjie

    2012-05-25

    In this study, stroke patients received constraint-induced movement therapy for 3 weeks. Before and after constraint-induced movement therapy, the flexibility of their upper limbs on the affected side was assessed using the Wolf motor function test, and daily use of their affected limbs was assessed using the movement activities log, and cerebral functional reorganization was assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging. The Wolf motor function test score and the movement activities log quantity and quality scores were significantly increased, while action performance time in the Wolf motor function test was significantly decreased after constraint-induced movement therapy. By functional magnetic resonance imaging examination, only scattered activation points were visible on the affected side before therapy. In contrast, the volume of the activated area was increased after therapy. The activation volume in the sensorimotor area was significantly different before and after therapy, and the activation area increased and appeared adjusted. In addition to the activated area around the lesions being decreased, there were also some new activated areas, including the supplementary movement area, premotor area and the ipsilateral sensorimotor area. Our findings indicate that constraint-induced movement therapy significantly improves the movement ability and daily use of the affected upper limbs in stroke patients and promotes cerebral functional reorganization.

  16. Modular Reorganization of Brain Resting State Networks and Its Independent Validation in Alzheimer’s Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangyu eChen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated disruption in structural and functional connectivity occurring in the Alzheimer’s Disease (AD. However, it is not known how these disruptions alter brain network reorganization. With the modular analysis method of graph theory, and datasets acquired by the resting-state functional connectivity MRI (R-fMRI method, we investigated and compared the brain organization patterns between the AD group and the cognitively normal control (CN group. Our main finding is that the largest homotopic module (defined as the insula module in the CN group was broken down to the pieces in the AD group. Specifically, it was discovered that the eight pairs of the bilateral regions (the opercular part of inferior frontal gyrus, area triangularis, insula, putamen, globus pallidus, transverse temporal gyri, superior temporal gyrus, and superior temporal pole of the insula module had lost symmetric functional connection properties, and the corresponding gray matter concentration (GMC was significant lower in AD group. We further quantified the functional connectivity changes with an index (index A and structural changes with the GMC index in the insula module to demonstrate their great potential as AD biomarkers. We further validated these results with six additional independent datasets (271 subjects in six groups. Our results demonstrated specific underlying structural and functional reorganization from young to old, and for diseased subjects. Further, it is suggested that by combining the structural GMC analysis and functional modular analysis in the insula module, a new biomarker can be developed at the single-subject level.

  17. Reorganization of pathological control functions of memory-A neural model for tissue healing by shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wess, Othmar

    2005-04-01

    Since 1980 shock waves have proven effective in the field of extracorporeal lithotripsy. More than 10 years ago shock waves were successfully applied for various indications such as chronic pain, non-unions and, recently, for angina pectoris. These fields do not profit from the disintegration power but from stimulating and healing effects of shock waves. Increased metabolism and neo-vascularization are reported after shock wave application. According to C. J. Wang, a biological cascade is initiated, starting with a stimulating effect of physical energy resulting in increased circulation and metabolism. Pathological memory of neural control patterns is considered the reason for different pathologies characterized by insufficient metabolism. This paper presents a neural model for reorganization of pathological reflex patterns. The model acts on associative memory functions of the brain based on modification of synaptic junctions. Accordingly, pathological memory effects of the autonomous nervous system are reorganized by repeated application of shock waves followed by development of normal reflex patterns. Physiologic control of muscle and vascular tone is followed by increased metabolism and tissue repair. The memory model may explain hyper-stimulation effects in pain therapy.

  18. Functional magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of brain function reorganization in cerebral stroke patients after constraint-induced movement therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Zhao; Tong Zhang; Jianmin Xu; Mingli Wang; Shengjie Zhao

    2012-01-01

    In this study, stroke patients received constraint-induced movement therapy for 3 weeks. Before and after constraint-induced movement therapy, the flexibility of their upper limbs on the affected side was assessed using the Wolf motor function test, and daily use of their affected limbs was assessed using the movement activities log, and cerebral functional reorganization was assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging. The Wolf motor function test score and the movement activities log quantity and quality scores were significantly increased, while action performance time in the Wolf motor function test was significantly decreased after constraint-induced movement therapy. By functional magnetic resonance imaging examination, only scattered activation points were visible on the affected side before therapy. In contrast, the volume of the activated area was increased after therapy. The activation volume in the sensorimotor area was significantly different before and after therapy, and the activation area increased and appeared adjusted. In addition to the activated area around the lesions being decreased, there were also some new activated areas, including the supplementary movement area, premotor area and the ipsilateral sensorimotor area. Our findings indicate that constraint-induced movement therapy significantly improves the movement ability and daily use of the affected upper limbs in stroke patients and promotes cerebral functional reorganization.

  19. Modulators of cytoskeletal reorganization in CA1 hippocampal neurons show increased expression in patients at mid-stage Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia F Kao

    Full Text Available During the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD, hippocampal neurons undergo cytoskeletal reorganization, resulting in degenerative as well as regenerative changes. As neurofibrillary tangles form and dystrophic neurites appear, sprouting neuronal processes with growth cones emerge. Actin and tubulin are indispensable for normal neurite development and regenerative responses to injury and neurodegenerative stimuli. We have previously shown that actin capping protein beta2 subunit, Capzb2, binds tubulin and, in the presence of tau, affects microtubule polymerization necessary for neurite outgrowth and normal growth cone morphology. Accordingly, Capzb2 silencing in hippocampal neurons resulted in short, dystrophic neurites, seen in neurodegenerative diseases including AD. Here we demonstrate the statistically significant increase in the Capzb2 expression in the postmortem hippocampi in persons at mid-stage, Braak and Braak stage (BB III-IV, non-familial AD in comparison to controls. The dynamics of Capzb2 expression in progressive AD stages cannot be attributed to reactive astrocytosis. Moreover, the increased expression of Capzb2 mRNA in CA1 pyramidal neurons in AD BB III-IV is accompanied by an increased mRNA expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF receptor tyrosine kinase B (TrkB, mediator of synaptic plasticity in hippocampal neurons. Thus, the up-regulation of Capzb2 and TrkB may reflect cytoskeletal reorganization and/or regenerative response occurring in hippocampal CA1 neurons at a specific stage of AD progression.

  20. Acetic Acid Can Catalyze Succinimide Formation from Aspartic Acid Residues by a Concerted Bond Reorganization Mechanism: A Computational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Ohgi; Kirikoshi, Ryota; Manabe, Noriyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Succinimide formation from aspartic acid (Asp) residues is a concern in the formulation of protein drugs. Based on density functional theory calculations using Ace-Asp-Nme (Ace = acetyl, Nme = NHMe) as a model compound, we propose the possibility that acetic acid (AA), which is often used in protein drug formulation for mildly acidic buffer solutions, catalyzes the succinimide formation from Asp residues by acting as a proton-transfer mediator. The proposed mechanism comprises two steps: cyclization (intramolecular addition) to form a gem-diol tetrahedral intermediate and dehydration of the intermediate. Both steps are catalyzed by an AA molecule, and the first step was predicted to be rate-determining. The cyclization results from a bond formation between the amide nitrogen on the C-terminal side and the side-chain carboxyl carbon, which is part of an extensive bond reorganization (formation and breaking of single bonds and the interchange of single and double bonds) occurring concertedly in a cyclic structure formed by the amide NH bond, the AA molecule and the side-chain C=O group and involving a double proton transfer. The second step also involves an AA-mediated bond reorganization. Carboxylic acids other than AA are also expected to catalyze the succinimide formation by a similar mechanism. PMID:25588215

  1. Acetic Acid Can Catalyze Succinimide Formation from Aspartic Acid Residues by a Concerted Bond Reorganization Mechanism: A Computational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohgi Takahashi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Succinimide formation from aspartic acid (Asp residues is a concern in the formulation of protein drugs. Based on density functional theory calculations using Ace-Asp-Nme (Ace = acetyl, Nme = NHMe as a model compound, we propose the possibility that acetic acid (AA, which is often used in protein drug formulation for mildly acidic buffer solutions, catalyzes the succinimide formation from Asp residues by acting as a proton-transfer mediator. The proposed mechanism comprises two steps: cyclization (intramolecular addition to form a gem-diol tetrahedral intermediate and dehydration of the intermediate. Both steps are catalyzed by an AA molecule, and the first step was predicted to be rate-determining. The cyclization results from a bond formation between the amide nitrogen on the C-terminal side and the side-chain carboxyl carbon, which is part of an extensive bond reorganization (formation and breaking of single bonds and the interchange of single and double bonds occurring concertedly in a cyclic structure formed by the amide NH bond, the AA molecule and the side-chain C=O group and involving a double proton transfer. The second step also involves an AA-mediated bond reorganization. Carboxylic acids other than AA are also expected to catalyze the succinimide formation by a similar mechanism.

  2. Dielectric image effects in environmental reorganization free energies and inter-reactant work terms of metalloprotein electron transfer reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharkats, Yurij I.; Ulstrup, Jens

    1990-02-01

    Kinetics of electron transfer between redox metalloproteins and small inorganic reaction partners has become a powerful tool for investigations of protein electron transport. We introduce here a model for metalloprotein electron transfer which incorporates essential features omitted in previous approaches to metalloprotein electron transfer data analysis. The protein is represented by a spherical region of low dielectric constant, with a conducting sphere excentrically located inside the protein simulating the metal centre. A conducting sphere outside the protein represents the small reaction partners, and the whole system is embedded in a dielectric solvent. The inter-reactant work terms and overall protein and solvent reorganization free energy for this model have been calculated. It appears that dielectric image interactions for multiply charged small reactants are important and comparable to interactions with both the protein surface charges and the solvent. The character of work terms and reorganization free energies for proteins is thus different from those of small ionic reactants. Cross relations and other frames where these features are disregarded should therefore be used with care for protein electron transfer.

  3. Reorganization and enhanced functional connectivity of motor areas in repetitive ankle movements after training in locomotor attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, Katiuscia; Katiuscia, Sacco; Cauda, Franco; Franco, Cauda; D'Agata, Federico; Federico, D'Agata; Mate, Davide; Davide, Mate; Duca, Sergio; Sergio, Duca; Geminiani, Giuliano; Giuliano, Geminiani

    2009-11-10

    We examined the functional changes in the activity of the cerebral areas involved in motor tasks, prior to and following a 1-week period of locomotor attention training consisting of physical and mental practice, in normal subjects. In a previous study, we examined the effect of the same kind of training on motor circuits using an fMRI paradigm of motor imagery. In this work, we investigated whether the expanded activations found in the previous study were present also using an overt foot motor task consisting of ankle dorsiflexion; a control task requiring hand movements was also administered. In this article, we also discuss the changes in functional connectivity between the pretraining and posttraining conditions during foot movements. The foot task showed a posttraining reorganization of the sensorimotor areas, which is in line with earlier studies on lower limb motor learning, while the control hand movement task only produced a modification in the left premotor cortex. These results confirm the effect of training on functional reorganization and underline its task specificity. After training, we also observed enhanced connectivity in the sensorimotor areas, suggesting that functional connectivity of the sensorimotor network can be modulated by focusing attention on the movements involved in ambulation.

  4. The association between workers' employability and burnout in a reorganization context: longitudinal evidence building upon the conservation of resources theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cuyper, Nele; Raeder, Sabine; Van der Heijden, Beatrice I J M; Wittekind, Anette

    2012-04-01

    This longitudinal study probes the relationship between employability and burnout among employees from a company undergoing reorganization. We advanced employability as a personal resource that relates negatively to burnout. We expected that this hypothesis would hold for different operationalizations of employability, including (1) job-related and (2) transferable skills, (3) willingness to change jobs and (4) to develop competences, (5) opportunity awareness, (6) self-esteem, and (7) self-perceived employability (i.e., perceived employment opportunities). In a similar vein, we expected that the hypothesis would hold for the different dimensions of burnout; namely emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduced personal accomplishment. We used longitudinal Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM) to test our hypotheses. Employees from a Swiss company undergoing a major reorganization were surveyed at three times with a total time lag of 19 months (Time 1: N = 287; Time 2: N = 128; Time 3: N = 107). Our results indicate that particularly self-esteem, but also job-related and transferable skills as indicators of one's employability were important predictors of burnout, with all relationships being negative.

  5. A Review on Locomotor Training after Spinal Cord Injury: Reorganization of Spinal Neuronal Circuits and Recovery of Motor Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew C. Smith

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Locomotor training is a classic rehabilitation approach utilized with the aim of improving sensorimotor function and walking ability in people with spinal cord injury (SCI. Recent studies have provided strong evidence that locomotor training of persons with clinically complete, motor complete, or motor incomplete SCI induces functional reorganization of spinal neuronal networks at multisegmental levels at rest and during assisted stepping. This neuronal reorganization coincides with improvements in motor function and decreased muscle cocontractions. In this review, we will discuss the manner in which spinal neuronal circuits are impaired and the evidence surrounding plasticity of neuronal activity after locomotor training in people with SCI. We conclude that we need to better understand the physiological changes underlying locomotor training, use physiological signals to probe recovery over the course of training, and utilize established and contemporary interventions simultaneously in larger scale research studies. Furthermore, the focus of our research questions needs to change from feasibility and efficacy to the following: what are the physiological mechanisms that make it work and for whom? The aforementioned will enable the scientific and clinical community to develop more effective rehabilitation protocols maximizing sensorimotor function recovery in people with SCI.

  6. Lecithin Prevents Cortical Cytoskeleton Reorganization in Rat Soleus Muscle Fibers under Short-Term Gravitational Disuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogneva, Irina V; Biryukov, Nikolay S

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prevent the cortical cytoskeleton reorganization of rat soleus muscle fibers under short-term gravitational disuse. Once a day, we injected the right soleus muscle with 0.5 ml lecithin at a concentration of 200 mg/ml and the left soleus muscle with a diluted solution in an equal volume for 3 days prior to the experiment. To simulate microgravity conditions in rats, an anti-orthostatic suspension was used according to the Ilyin-Novikov method modified by Morey-Holton et al. for 6 hours. The following groups of soleus muscle tissues were examined: "C", "C+L", "HS", and "HS+L". The transversal stiffness of rat soleus muscle fibers after 6 hours of suspension did not differ from that of the control group for the corresponding legs; there were no differences between the groups without lecithin «C» and «HS» or between the groups with lecithin "C+L" and "HS+L". However, lecithin treatment for three days resulted in an increase in cell stiffness; in the "C+L" group, cell stiffness was significantly higher by 22.7% (p lecithin treatment: the beta-actin and gamma-actin mRNA content in group "C+L" increased by 200% compared with that of group "C", and beta-tubulin increased by 100% (as well as the mRNA content of tubulin-binding proteins Ckap5, Tcp1, Cct5 and Cct7). In addition, desmin mRNA content remained unchanged in all of the experimental groups. As a result of the lecithin injections, there was a redistribution of the mRNA content of genes encoding actin monomer- and filament-binding proteins in the direction of increasing actin polymerization and filament stability; the mRNA content of Arpc3 and Lcp1 increased by 3- and 5-fold, respectively, but the levels of Tmod1 and Svil decreased by 2- and 5-fold, respectively. However, gravitational disuse did not result in changes in the mRNA content of Arpc3, Tmod1, Svil or Lcp1. Anti-orthostatic suspension for 6 hours resulted in a decrease in the mRNA content of alpha-actinin-4 (Actn4) and

  7. Large Potential Exists in China's Oil & Gas Transportation System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gordon Feller

    2002-01-01

    @@ As China in the decades ahead is to go through significant reorganization in the power sector and the petrochemical industry will see considerable growth,the transportation infrastructure for petroleum and gas should have a new shape. Implementing the largest infrastructure projects and creating on this basis a modern transportation network will not only see a new reincarnation of traditional industrial centers, but also open wider opportunities for regional development.

  8. Existence theorems for ordinary differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Murray, Francis J

    2007-01-01

    Theorems stating the existence of an object-such as the solution to a problem or equation-are known as existence theorems. This text examines fundamental and general existence theorems, along with the Picard iterants, and applies them to properties of solutions and linear differential equations.The authors assume a basic knowledge of real function theory, and for certain specialized results, of elementary functions of a complex variable. They do not consider the elementary methods for solving certain special differential equations, nor advanced specialized topics; within these restrictions, th

  9. Receptor Signaling Directs Global Recruitment of Pre-existing Transcription Factors to Inducible Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockerill, Peter N.

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression programs are largely regulated by the tissue-specific expression of lineage-defining transcription factors or by the inducible expression of transcription factors in response to specific stimuli. Here I will review our own work over the last 20 years to show how specific activation signals also lead to the wide-spread re-distribution of pre-existing constitutive transcription factors to sites undergoing chromatin reorganization. I will summarize studies showing that activation of kinase signaling pathways creates open chromatin regions that recruit pre-existing factors which were previously unable to bind to closed chromatin. As models I will draw upon genes activated or primed by receptor signaling in memory T cells, and genes activated by cytokine receptor mutations in acute myeloid leukemia. I also summarize a hit-and-run model of stable epigenetic reprograming in memory T cells, mediated by transient Activator Protein 1 (AP-1) binding, which enables the accelerated activation of inducible enhancers. PMID:28018147

  10. Correlation between synaptic protein expression and synaptic reorganization in the hippocampal CA3 region in a rat model of post-traumatic epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gaolian Zhang; Jianmin Huang; Bang Zhao; Haineng Huang; Yuanyang Deng; Huadong Huang; Qirong He; Jianping Liang

    2010-01-01

    Postsynaptic density protein-95 and synaptophysin participate in synaptic reorganization in the forebrain of epilepsy models.However,the time-effect relationship between dynamic synapsin expression in hippocampus and synaptic reorganization in the post-traumatic epilepsy model remains unclear.FeCl2 was injected into the hippocampal CA3 region of the right forebrain in rats to induce post-traumatic epilepsy.Postsynaptic density protein-95 and synaptophysin expression was detected using immunohistochemistry.Epileptiform discharge induced by FeCl2 injection was determined in rat forebrain neurons,revealing decreased postsynaptic density protein-95expression at 24 hours and lowest levels at 7 days.Synaptophysin expression was markedly reduced at 24 hours,but increased at 7 days.Postsynaptic density protein-95 and synaptophysin expression was consistent with abnormal mossy fiber sprouting and synaptic reorganization following neuronal injury in the hippocampal CA3 region of FeCl2-induced epilepsy models.

  11. Spatially-Heterodyned Holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Clarence E [Knoxville, TN; Hanson, Gregory R [Clinton, TN

    2006-02-21

    A method of recording a spatially low-frequency heterodyne hologram, including spatially heterodyne fringes for Fourier analysis, includes: splitting a laser beam into a reference beam and an object beam; interacting the object beam with an object; focusing the reference beam and the object beam at a focal plane of a digital recorder to form a spatially low-frequency heterodyne hologram including spatially heterodyne fringes for Fourier analysis; digital recording the spatially low-frequency heterodyne hologram; Fourier transforming axes of the recorded spatially low-frequency heterodyne hologram including spatially heterodyne fringes in Fourier space to sit on top of a heterodyne carrier frequency defined by an angle between the reference beam and the object beam; cutting off signals around an origin; and performing an inverse Fourier transform.

  12. Spatial geometry and special relativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneubil, Fabiana Botelho

    2016-01-01

    In this work, it is shown the interplay of relative and absolute entities, which are present in both spatial geometry and special relativity. In order to strengthen the understanding of special relativity, we discuss firstly an instance of geometry and the existence of both frame......-dependent and frame-independent entities. We depart from a subject well known by students, which is the three-dimensional geometric space in order to compare, afterwards, with the treatment of four-dimensional space in the special relativity. The differences and similarities between these two subjects are also...

  13. Physical Relativism as an Interpretation of Existence

    CERN Document Server

    Heinrich, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Despite the success of modern physics in formulating mathematical theories that can predict the outcome of quantum-scale experiments, the physical interpretations of these theories remain controversial. In this manuscript, we propose a new interpretation of existence that we call physical relativism. Under physical relativism, the difference between mathematical existence and physical existence is clarified, and Wheeler's `it from bit' viewpoint can be objectively evaluated. In addition, physical relativism provides a simple answer to the question of why the universe exists at all, and permits us to derive the maximally biophilic principle, a generalization of the anthropic principle that ascribes high prior likelihood to the observation of a universe with simple physical laws supporting the overall concepts of time, space and the emergent evolution of life.

  14. US Forest Service LANDFIRE Existing Vegetation

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Forest Service, Department of Agriculture — LANDFIRE Existing Vegetation is mapped using predictive landscape models based on extensive field-referenced data, satellite imagery and biophysical gradient layers...

  15. LANDFIRE (90m) Existing Vegetation Type

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map depicts the distribution of existing vegetation types contained in the LANDFIRE dataset. All 30-meter EVT grids were resampled to 90-meter grids and merged...

  16. Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plan Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Affordable Care Act created the new Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plan (PCIP) program to make health insurance available to Americans denied coverage by...

  17. [Prediction of spatial distribution of forest carbon storage in Heilongjiang Province using spatial error model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Li, Feng-Ri; Zhen, Zhen

    2014-10-01

    Abstract: Based on the data from Chinese National Forest Inventory (CNFI) and Key Ecological Benefit Forest Monitoring plots (5075 in total) in Heilongjiang Province in 2010 and concurrent meteorological data coming from 59 meteorological stations located in Heilongjiang, Jilin and Inner Mongolia, this paper established a spatial error model (SEM) by GeoDA using carbon storage as dependent variable and several independent variables, including diameter of living trees (DBH), number of trees per hectare (TPH), elevation (Elev), slope (Slope), and product of precipitation and temperature (Rain_Temp). Global Moran's I was computed for describing overall spatial autocorrelations of model results at different spatial scales. Local Moran's I was calculated at the optimal bandwidth (25 km) to present spatial distribution residuals. Intra-block spatial variances were computed to explain spatial heterogeneity of residuals. Finally, a spatial distribution map of carbon storage in Heilongjiang was visualized based on predictions. The results showed that the distribution of forest carbon storage in Heilongjiang had spatial effect and was significantly influenced by stand, topographic and meteorological factors, especially average DBH. SEM could solve the spatial autocorrelation and heterogeneity well. There were significant spatial differences in distribution of forest carbon storage. The carbon storage was mainly distributed in Zhangguangcai Mountain, Xiao Xing'an Mountain and Da Xing'an Mountain where dense, forests existed, rarely distributed in Songnen Plains, while Wanda Mountain had moderate-level carbon storage.

  18. Do labour supply and demand curves exist?

    OpenAIRE

    Fleetwood, S.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to show that circumstantial and empirical evidence for the existence of labour supply and demand curves is at best inconclusive and at worst casts doubt on their existence. Because virtually all orthodox models of labour markets, simple and complex, are built upon the foundation stones of labour supply and demand curves, these models lack empirically supported foundations. Orthodox labour economists must, therefore, either provide stronger evidence or stop using...

  19. Constraint for the Existence of Ellipsoidal Vesicles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Yu-Zhang

    2000-01-01

    Under the spontaneous curvature model of lipid bilayers, the constraints for the existence of equilibrium axisym metric oblate and prolate ellipsoidal vesicles are obtained from the general shape equation. They degenerate either to the constraint for the existence of a spherical vesicle or to that of a circular cylindrical vesicle given by Ou-Yang and Helfrich [Phys. Rev. Lett. 59 (1987) 2486; 60(1988)120; Phys. Rev. A 39 (1989) 5280].

  20. Functional interpretation and the existence property

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Klaus Frovin

    2004-01-01

    It is shown that functional interpretation can be used to show the existence property of intuitionistic number theory. On the basis of truth variants a comparison is then made between realisability and functional interpretation showing a structural difference between the two.......It is shown that functional interpretation can be used to show the existence property of intuitionistic number theory. On the basis of truth variants a comparison is then made between realisability and functional interpretation showing a structural difference between the two....