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Sample records for renormalisation group calculations

  1. A Renormalisation Group Method. V. A Single Renormalisation Group Step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brydges, David C.; Slade, Gordon

    2015-05-01

    This paper is the fifth in a series devoted to the development of a rigorous renormalisation group method applicable to lattice field theories containing boson and/or fermion fields, and comprises the core of the method. In the renormalisation group method, increasingly large scales are studied in a progressive manner, with an interaction parametrised by a field polynomial which evolves with the scale under the renormalisation group map. In our context, the progressive analysis is performed via a finite-range covariance decomposition. Perturbative calculations are used to track the flow of the coupling constants of the evolving polynomial, but on their own perturbative calculations are insufficient to control error terms and to obtain mathematically rigorous results. In this paper, we define an additional non-perturbative coordinate, which together with the flow of coupling constants defines the complete evolution of the renormalisation group map. We specify conditions under which the non-perturbative coordinate is contractive under a single renormalisation group step. Our framework is essentially combinatorial, but its implementation relies on analytic results developed earlier in the series of papers. The results of this paper are applied elsewhere to analyse the critical behaviour of the 4-dimensional continuous-time weakly self-avoiding walk and of the 4-dimensional -component model. In particular, the existence of a logarithmic correction to mean-field scaling for the susceptibility can be proved for both models, together with other facts about critical exponents and critical behaviour.

  2. Optimised Renormalisation Group Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Litim, Daniel F

    2001-01-01

    Exact renormalisation group (ERG) flows interpolate between a microscopic or classical theory and the corresponding macroscopic or quantum effective theory. For most problems of physical interest, the efficiency of the ERG is constrained due to unavoidable approximations. Approximate solutions of ERG flows depend spuriously on the regularisation scheme which is determined by a regulator function. This is similar to the spurious dependence on the ultraviolet regularisation known from perturbative QCD. Providing a good control over approximated ERG flows is at the root for reliable physical predictions. We explain why the convergence of approximate solutions towards the physical theory is optimised by appropriate choices of the regulator. We study specific optimised regulators for bosonic and fermionic fields and compare the optimised ERG flows with generic ones. This is done up to second order in the derivative expansion at both vanishing and non-vanishing temperature. An optimised flow for a ``proper-time ren...

  3. Calculating the renormalisation group equations of a SUSY model with Susyno

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Renato M.

    2012-10-01

    Susyno is a Mathematica package dedicated to the computation of the 2-loop renormalisation group equations of a supersymmetric model based on any gauge group (the only exception being multiple U(1) groups) and for any field content. Program summary Program title: Susyno Catalogue identifier: AEMX_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMX_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 30829 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 650170 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica 7 or higher. Computer: All systems that Mathematica 7+ is available for (PC, Mac). Operating system: Any platform supporting Mathematica 7+ (Windows, Linux, Mac OS). Classification: 4.2, 5, 11.1. Nature of problem: Calculating the renormalisation group equations of a supersymmetric model involves using long and complicated general formulae [1, 2]. In addition, to apply them it is necessary to know the Lagrangian in its full form. Building the complete Lagrangian of models with small representations of SU(2) and SU(3) might be easy but in the general case of arbitrary representations of an arbitrary gauge group, this task can be hard, lengthy and error prone. Solution method: The Susyno package uses group theoretical functions to calculate the super-potential and the soft-SUSY-breaking Lagrangian of a supersymmetric model, and calculates the two-loop RGEs of the model using the general equations of [1, 2]. Susyno works for models based on any representation(s) of any gauge group (the only exception being multiple U(1) groups). Restrictions: As the program is based on the formalism of [1, 2], it shares its limitations. Running time can also be a significant restriction, in particular for models with many fields. Unusual features

  4. Dynamical mean-field theory and path integral renormalisation group calculations of strongly correlated electronic states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heilmann, D.B.

    2007-02-15

    The two-plane HUBBARD model, which is a model for some electronic properties of undoped YBCO superconductors as well as displays a MOTT metal-to-insulator transition and a metal-to-band insulator transition, is studied within Dynamical Mean-Field Theory using HIRSCH-FYE Monte Carlo. In order to find the different transitions and distinguish the types of insulator, we calculate the single-particle spectral densities, the self-energies and the optical conductivities. We conclude that there is a continuous transition from MOTT to band insulator. In the second part, ground state properties of a diagonally disordered HUBBARD model is studied using a generalisation of Path Integral Renormalisation Group, a variational method which can also determine low-lying excitations. In particular, the distribution of antiferromagnetic properties is investigated. We conclude that antiferromagnetism breaks down in a percolation-type transition at a critical disorder, which is not changed appreciably by the inclusion of correlation effects, when compared to earlier studies. Electronic and excitation properties at the system sizes considered turn out to primarily depend on the geometry. (orig.)

  5. Dynamical mean-field theory and path integral renormalisation group calculations of strongly correlated electronic states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilmann, D.B.

    2007-02-01

    The two-plane HUBBARD model, which is a model for some electronic properties of undoped YBCO superconductors as well as displays a MOTT metal-to-insulator transition and a metal-to-band insulator transition, is studied within Dynamical Mean-Field Theory using HIRSCH-FYE Monte Carlo. In order to find the different transitions and distinguish the types of insulator, we calculate the single-particle spectral densities, the self-energies and the optical conductivities. We conclude that there is a continuous transition from MOTT to band insulator. In the second part, ground state properties of a diagonally disordered HUBBARD model is studied using a generalisation of Path Integral Renormalisation Group, a variational method which can also determine low-lying excitations. In particular, the distribution of antiferromagnetic properties is investigated. We conclude that antiferromagnetism breaks down in a percolation-type transition at a critical disorder, which is not changed appreciably by the inclusion of correlation effects, when compared to earlier studies. Electronic and excitation properties at the system sizes considered turn out to primarily depend on the geometry. (orig.)

  6. Universality and the Renormalisation Group

    CERN Document Server

    Litim, D F

    2005-01-01

    Several functional renormalisation group (RG) equations including Polchinski flows and Exact RG flows are compared from a conceptual point of view and in given truncations. Similarities and differences are highlighted with special emphasis on stability properties. The main observations are worked out at the example of O(N) symmetric scalar field theories where the flows, universal critical exponents and scaling potentials are compared within a derivative expansion. To leading order, it is established that Polchinski flows and ERG flows - despite their inequivalent derivative expansions - have identical universal content, if the ERG flow is amended by an adequate optimisation. The results are also evaluated in the light of stability and minimum sensitivity considerations. Extensions to higher order and further implications are emphasized.

  7. Quantum gravity and the renormalisation group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litim, D.

    2011-01-01

    The Standard Model of particle physics is remarkably successful in describing three out of the four known fundamental forces of Nature. But what is up with gravity? Attempts to understand quantum gravity on the same footing as the other forces still face problems. Some time ago, it has been pointed out that gravity may very well exist as a fundamental quantum field theory provided its high-energy behaviour is governed by a fixed point under the renormalisation group. In recent years, this 'asymptotic safety' scenario has found significant support thanks to numerous renormalisation group studies, lattice simulations, and new ideas within perturbation theory. The lectures will give an introduction into the renormalisation group approach for quantum gravity, aimed at those who haven't met the topic before. After an introduction and overview, the key ideas and concepts of asymptotic safety for gravity are fleshed out. Results for gravitational high-energy fixed points and scaling exponents are discussed as well as key features of the gravitational phase diagram. The survey concludes with some phenomenological implications of fixed point gravity including the physics of black holes and particle physics beyond the Standard Model. (author)

  8. Derivative expansion and renormalisation group flows

    CERN Document Server

    Litim, Daniel F

    2001-01-01

    We study the convergence of the derivative expansion for flow equations. The convergence strongly depends on the choice for the infrared regularisation. Based on the structure of the flow, we explain why optimised regulators lead to better physical predictions. This is applied to O(N)-symmetric real scalar field theories in 3d, where critical exponents are computed for all N. In comparison to the sharp cut-off regulator, an optimised flow improves the leading order result up to 10%. An analogous reasoning is employed for a proper time renormalisation group. We compare our results with those obtained by other methods.

  9. Aspects of the functional renormalisation group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawlowski, Jan M.

    2007-01-01

    We discuss structural aspects of the functional renormalisation group. Flows for a general class of correlation functions are derived, and it is shown how symmetry relations of the underlying theory are lifted to the regularised theory. A simple equation for the flow of these relations is provided. The setting includes general flows in the presence of composite operators and their relation to standard flows, an important example being NPI quantities. We discuss optimisation and derive a functional optimisation criterion. Applications deal with the interrelation between functional flows and the quantum equations of motion, general Dyson-Schwinger equations. We discuss the combined use of these functional equations as well as outlining the construction of practical renormalisation schemes, also valid in the presence of composite operators. Furthermore, the formalism is used to derive various representations of modified symmetry relations in gauge theories, as well as to discuss gauge-invariant flows. We close with the construction and analysis of truncation schemes in view of practical optimisation

  10. A geometrical interpretation of renormalisation group flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolan, B.P.

    1993-05-01

    The renormalisation group (RG) equation in D-dimensional Euclidean space, R D , is analysed from a geometrical point of view. A general form of the RG equation is derived which is applicable to composite operators as well tensor operators (on R D ) which may depend on the Euclidean metric. It is argued that physical N-point amplitudes should be interpreted as rank N co-variant tensors on the space of couplings, G, and that the RG equation can be viewed as an equation for Lie transport on G with respect to the vector field generated by the β-functions of the theory. In one sense it is nothing more than the definition of a Lie derivative. The source of the anomalous dimensions can be interpreted as being due to the change of the basis vectors on G under Lie transport. The RG equation acts as a bridge between Euclidean space and coupling constant space in that the effect on amplitudes of a diffeomorphism of R D (that of dilations) is completely equivalent to a diffeomorphism of G generated by the β-functions of the theory. A form of the RG equation for operators is also given. These ideas are developed in detail for the example of massive λΦ 4 theory in 4 dimensions. (orig.)

  11. Weyl consistency conditions and a local renormalisation group equation for general renormalisable field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborn, H.

    1991-01-01

    A local renormalisation group equation which realises infinitesimal Weyl rescalings of the metric and which is an extension of the usual Callan-Symanzik equation is described. In order to ensure that any local composite operators, with dimensions so that on addition to the basic lagrangian they preserve renormalisability, are well defined for arbitrarily many insertions into correlation functions the couplings are assumed to depend on χ. Local operators are then defined by functional differentiation with respect to the couplings just as the energy-momentum tensor is given by functional differentiation with respect to the metric. The local renormalisation group equation contains terms depending on derivatives of the couplings as well as the curvature tensor formed from the metric, constrained by power counting. Various consistency relations arising from the commutativity of Weyl transformations are derived, extending previous one-loop results for the trace anomaly to all orders. In two dimensions the relations give an alternative derivation of the c-theorem and similar extensions are obtained in four dimensions. The equations are applied in detail to general renormalisable σ-models in two dimensions. The Curci-Paffuti relation is derived without any commitment to a particular regularisation scheme and further equations used to construct an action for the vanishing of the β-functions are also obtained. The discussion is also extended to σ-models with a boundary, as appropriate for open strings, and relations for the additional β-functions present in such models are obtained. (orig.)

  12. Renormalisation group behaviour of O+ and 2+ glueball masses in SU(2) lattice gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, K.; Schierholz, G.

    1982-07-01

    We calculate the 0 + and 2 + glueball masses at several values of the coupling and verify compatibility with the desired renormalisation group behaviour. The calculation uses momentum smeared glueball wave functions on a large 8 4 lattice and confirms our previous results obtained on smaller lattices. (orig.)

  13. The time-dependent density matrix renormalisation group method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Haibo; Luo, Zhen; Yao, Yao

    2018-04-01

    Substantial progress of the time-dependent density matrix renormalisation group (t-DMRG) method in the recent 15 years is reviewed in this paper. By integrating the time evolution with the sweep procedures in density matrix renormalisation group (DMRG), t-DMRG provides an efficient tool for real-time simulations of the quantum dynamics for one-dimensional (1D) or quasi-1D strongly correlated systems with a large number of degrees of freedom. In the illustrative applications, the t-DMRG approach is applied to investigate the nonadiabatic processes in realistic chemical systems, including exciton dissociation and triplet fission in polymers and molecular aggregates as well as internal conversion in pyrazine molecule.

  14. Bootstrap percolation: a renormalisation group approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branco, N.S.; Santos, Raimundo R. dos; Queiroz, S.L.A. de.

    1984-02-01

    In bootstrap percolation, sites are occupied at random with probability p, but each site is considered active only if at least m of its neighbours are also active. Within an approximate position-space renormalization group framework on a square lattice we obtain the behaviour of the critical concentration p (sub)c and of the critical exponents ν and β for m = 0 (ordinary percolation), 1,2 and 3. We find that the bootstrap percolation problem can be cast into different universality classes, characterized by the values of m. (author) [pt

  15. Renormalisation-group specific heat of the square lattice Potts ferromagnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, H.O.; Tsallis, C.

    1982-01-01

    The free and internal energies and specific heat of the q-state Potts ferromagnet are discussed. A real space renormalisation group approach is presented which recovers a considerable amount of exact particular results for all dimensionalities (hypercubic lattices). The square lattice case is calculated in detail by using self-dual clusters (which provide the exact critical point for all q). Comparison with Onsager results (q=2) is satisfactory; the general tendencies for q different 2 (1 [pt

  16. Functional renormalisation group equations for supersymmetric field theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Synatschke-Czerwonka, Franziska

    2011-01-11

    This work is organised as follows: In chapter 2 the basic facts of quantum field theory are collected and the functional renormalisation group equations are derived. Chapter 3 gives a short introduction to the main concepts of supersymmetry that are used in the subsequent chapters. In chapter 4 the functional RG is employed for a study of supersymmetric quantum mechanics, a supersymmetric model which are studied intensively in the literature. A lot of results have previously been obtained with different methods and we compare these to the ones from the FRG. We investigate the N=1 Wess-Zumino model in two dimensions in chapter 5. This model shows spontaneous supersymmetry breaking and an interesting fixed-point structure. Chapter 6 deals with the three dimensional N=1 Wess-Zumino model. Here we discuss the zero temperature case as well as the behaviour at finite temperature. Moreover, this model shows spontaneous supersymmetry breaking, too. In chapter 7 the two-dimensional N=(2,2) Wess-Zumino model is investigated. For the superpotential a non-renormalisation theorem holds and thus guarantees that the model is finite. This allows for a direct comparison with results from lattice simulations. (orig.)

  17. Renormalisation group analysis of single right-handed neutrino dominance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, S.F.; Nimai Singh, N.

    2000-01-01

    We perform a renormalisation group (RG) analysis of neutrino masses and mixing angles in the see-saw mechanism in the minimal supersymmetric standard model with three right-handed neutrinos, including the effects of the heavy neutrino thresholds. We focus on the case that one of the right-handed neutrinos provides the dominant contribution to the 23 block of the light Majorana matrix, causing its determinant to approximately vanish and giving an automatic neutrino mass hierarchy, so-called single right-handed neutrino dominance which may arise from a U(1) family symmetry. In these models radiative corrections can increase atmospheric and solar neutrino mixing by up to about 10% and 5%, respectively, and may help to achieve bi-maximal mixing. Significantly we find that the radiative corrections over the heavy neutrino threshold region are at least as important as those usually considered from the lightest right-handed neutrino down to low energies

  18. Penson-Kolb-Hubbard model: a renormalisation group study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, Bibhas; Roy, G.K.

    1995-01-01

    The Penson-Kolb-Hubbard (PKH) model in one dimension (1d) by means of real space renormalisation group (RG) method for the half-filled band has been studied. Different phases are identified by studying the RG-flow pattern, the energy gap and different correlation functions. The phase diagram consists of four phases: a spin density wave (SDW), a strong coupling superconducting phase (SSC), a weak coupling superconducting phase (WSC) and a nearly metallic phase. For the negative value of the pair hopping amplitude introduced in this model it was found that the pair-pair correlation indicates a superconducting phase for which the centre-of-mass of the pairs move with a momentum π. (author). 7 refs., 4 figs

  19. Renormalisation group improved leptogenesis in family symmetry models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, Iain K.; King, Stephen F.; Luhn, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    We study renormalisation group (RG) corrections relevant for leptogenesis in the case of family symmetry models such as the Altarelli-Feruglio A 4 model of tri-bimaximal lepton mixing or its extension to tri-maximal mixing. Such corrections are particularly relevant since in large classes of family symmetry models, to leading order, the CP violating parameters of leptogenesis would be identically zero at the family symmetry breaking scale, due to the form dominance property. We find that RG corrections violate form dominance and enable such models to yield viable leptogenesis at the scale of right-handed neutrino masses. More generally, the results of this paper show that RG corrections to leptogenesis cannot be ignored for any family symmetry model involving sizeable neutrino and τ Yukawa couplings.

  20. Higgs inflation and quantum gravity: an exact renormalisation group approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saltas, Ippocratis D.

    2016-01-01

    We use the Wilsonian functional Renormalisation Group (RG) to study quantum corrections for the Higgs inflationary action including the effect of gravitons, and analyse the leading-order quantum gravitational corrections to the Higgs' quartic coupling, as well as its non-minimal coupling to gravity and Newton's constant, at the inflationary regime and beyond. We explain how within this framework the effect of Higgs and graviton loops can be sufficiently suppressed during inflation, and we also place a bound on the corresponding value of the infrared RG cut-off scale during inflation. Finally, we briefly discuss the potential embedding of the model within the scenario of Asymptotic Safety, while all main equations are explicitly presented

  1. Critical surface of the quenched bond-diluted cubic model in self-dual lattice: renormalisation group approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, E.P. da; Tsallis, C.

    1991-01-01

    We propose a quite simple real space renormalisation group which enables us to calculate (for the first time as far as we know, and presumably with high precision) the critical surface of the quenched bond-diluted discrete N-vector ferromagnet. (author)

  2. Anisotropic cubic lattice potts ferromagnet: renormalisation group treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsallis, C.; Schwaccheim, G.; Silva, L.R. da; Rio Grande do Norte Univ., Natal

    1983-01-01

    Within a real space renormalisation group framework, the criticality of the fully anisotropic (arbitrary J sub(x), J sub(y) and J sub(z)) q-state Potts ferromagnet in simple cubic lattice is discussed. Several already known exact results for the d=1 and d=2 particular cases are recovered. Furthermore it is obtained: (i) the q-dependence of the d=3 correlation length critical exponent ν 3 (in particular, if q→0, ν 3 (q) approximatelly ν 3 (0)+ν 3 '(0)q) where the present approximate values are ν 3 (0) or approx.= 1.105 and ν 3 '(0) or approx.=-0.66; (ii) the q-dependence d=2 d=3 crossover critical exponent phi 23 (in particular, phi 23 varies as 1/√q if q Q→0); (iii) through a convenient numerical extrapolation, a quite accurate proposal for the critical temperatures corresponding to arbitrary ratios J sub(y)/ J sub(x) and J sub(z) / J sub(x) and values of q. (Author) [pt

  3. Renormalisation group corrections to the littlest seesaw model and maximal atmospheric mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Stephen F.; Zhang, Jue; Zhou, Shun

    2016-01-01

    The Littlest Seesaw (LS) model involves two right-handed neutrinos and a very constrained Dirac neutrino mass matrix, involving one texture zero and two independent Dirac masses, leading to a highly predictive scheme in which all neutrino masses and the entire PMNS matrix is successfully predicted in terms of just two real parameters. We calculate the renormalisation group (RG) corrections to the LS predictions, with and without supersymmetry, including also the threshold effects induced by the decoupling of heavy Majorana neutrinos both analytically and numerically. We find that the predictions for neutrino mixing angles and mass ratios are rather stable under RG corrections. For example we find that the LS model with RG corrections predicts close to maximal atmospheric mixing, θ_2_3=45"∘±1"∘, in most considered cases, in tension with the latest NOvA results. The techniques used here apply to other seesaw models with a strong normal mass hierarchy.

  4. Renormalisation group corrections to the littlest seesaw model and maximal atmospheric mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Stephen F. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton,SO17 1BJ Southampton (United Kingdom); Zhang, Jue [Center for High Energy Physics, Peking University,Beijing 100871 (China); Zhou, Shun [Center for High Energy Physics, Peking University,Beijing 100871 (China); Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100049 (China)

    2016-12-06

    The Littlest Seesaw (LS) model involves two right-handed neutrinos and a very constrained Dirac neutrino mass matrix, involving one texture zero and two independent Dirac masses, leading to a highly predictive scheme in which all neutrino masses and the entire PMNS matrix is successfully predicted in terms of just two real parameters. We calculate the renormalisation group (RG) corrections to the LS predictions, with and without supersymmetry, including also the threshold effects induced by the decoupling of heavy Majorana neutrinos both analytically and numerically. We find that the predictions for neutrino mixing angles and mass ratios are rather stable under RG corrections. For example we find that the LS model with RG corrections predicts close to maximal atmospheric mixing, θ{sub 23}=45{sup ∘}±1{sup ∘}, in most considered cases, in tension with the latest NOvA results. The techniques used here apply to other seesaw models with a strong normal mass hierarchy.

  5. Series expansion solution of the Wegner-Houghton renormalisation group equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margaritis, A.; Odor, G.; Patkos, A.

    1987-11-01

    The momentum independent projection of the Wegner-Houghton renormalisation group equation is solved with power series expansion. Convergence rate is analyzed for the n-vector model. Further evidence is presented for the first order nature of the chiral symmetry restoration at finite temperature in QCD with 3 light flavors. (author) 16 refs

  6. Renormalisation group approach to the ideal Bose gas in d dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, K.K.

    1981-01-01

    Critical behaviour of a d-dimensional ideal Bose gas is investigated from the point of view of the renormalisation-group approach. Rescaling of quantum-field amplitudes is avoided by introducing a scaling variable inversely proportional to the thermal momentum of the particles. The scaling properties of various thermodynamic quantities are seen to emerge as a consequence of the irrelevant nature of this variable. Critical behaviour is discussed at fixed particle density as well as at fixed pressure. Connection between susceptibility and correlation function of the order-parameter for a quantum system is elucidated. (author)

  7. Application du groupe de renormalisation aux conducteurs organiques quasi-unidimensionnels soumis a un champ magnetique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Laurent

    Des conducteurs organiques fortement anisotropes presentent, sous l'effet d'un champ magnetique, une etonnante variete de proprietes physiques tel que: l'effet Shubnikov-de Haas, l'effet de Haas-van-Alphen, l'existence de cascades d'ondes de densite de spin apparentees a l'effet Hall quantique, reentrance vers la phase metallique pouvant provenir d'un 'breakdown' magnetique, et tout recemment la possibilite d'un confinement charge induit par le champ magnetique. A cela s'ajoute les nombreuses caracteristiques deja apparues en variant la pression hydrostatique ou la substitution chimique: separation spin-charge, localisation de la charge, transition spin-Peierls, antiferromagnetisme itinerant ou non, supraconductivite, et l'existence d'une frontiere commune entre les phases supraconductrice et antiferromagnetique. En vue de completer la description theorique du diagramme de phase generalise des conducteurs organiques, nous adaptons et elargissons la methode du groupe de renormalisation quantique (GRQ) au cas ou le champ magnetique est non nul. On sait deja que cette methode permet de resoudre le dilemme tout particulier des composes Q-1D, soit leur capacite de produire des transitions de phase malgre leur forte anisotropie et consequemment de leur faible dimensionalite. Cette methode est deja utilisee pour decrire le diagramme de phase temperature versus pression des sels de Bechgaard, de leurs analogues souffres et mixtes. Le GRQ permet aussi de comprendre comment des systemes anisotropes comme les conducteurs organiques peuvent se comporter comme des liquides de Luttinger a haute temperature et comme des liquides de Fermi ou condenses a basse temperature. Nous montrons que l'introduction d'un champ magnetique dans un regime de saut coherent interchai ne a deux particules n'apporte que de simples corrections aux lois d'echelles dans le canal zero son, alors qu'il introduit un mecanisme de brisure de paire dans le canal Cooper. Dans le regime de saut coherent a une

  8. One-loop renormalisation for the second moment of GPDs with Wilson fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeckeler, M.; Horsley, R.; Perlt, H.; Rakow, P.E.L.; Schaefer, A.; Schierholz, G.; Schiller, A.

    2005-01-01

    We calculate the non-forward quark matrix elements for operators with two covariant derivatives in one-loop lattice perturbation theory using Wilson fermions. These matrix elements are needed in the renormalisation of the second moment of generalised parton distributions measured in lattice QCD. For some commonly used representations of the hypercubic group we determine the sets of all mixing operators and find the matrices of mixing and renormalisation factors

  9. Testing the renormalisation group theory of cooperative transitions at the lambda point of helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipa, J. A.; Li, Q.; Chui, T. C. P.; Marek, D.

    1988-01-01

    The status of high resolution tests of the renormalization group theory of cooperative phase transitions performed near the lambda point of helium is described. The prospects for performing improved tests in space are discussed.

  10. Zero temperature renormalisation group study of the random systems: The Ising model in a transverse field in two dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamieniarz, G.

    1984-12-01

    A zero temperature real space renormalization group block method is applied to the random quantum Ising model with a transverse field on the planar honeycomb and square lattices. For the bond diluted system the magnetisation and the separation of the ground state energy level (in the paramagnetic phase) are presented for several bond concentrations p. The critical exponents extracted both from the fixed-points and from direct numerical computations preserve some scaling relations, and the critical curve displays a characteristic discontinuity at the percolation concentration. For the McCoy and Wu distribution the random fields and bonds are found to introduce a strong relevant disorder. The order parameter still falls off continuously to zero for well-defined values of the parameters, but a new fixed point yields a slight change in the critical exponents. (author)

  11. Quantum field theory and phase transitions: universality and renormalization group; Theorie quantique des champs et transitions de phase: universalite et groupe de renormalisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinn-Justin, J

    2003-08-01

    In the quantum field theory the problem of infinite values has been solved empirically through a method called renormalization, this method is satisfying only in the framework of renormalization group. It is in the domain of statistical physics and continuous phase transitions that these issues are the easiest to discuss. Within the framework of a course in theoretical physics the author introduces the notions of continuous limits and universality in stochastic systems operating with a high number of freedom degrees. It is shown that quasi-Gaussian and mean field approximation are unable to describe phase transitions in a satisfying manner. A new concept is required: it is the notion of renormalization group whose fixed points allow us to understand universality beyond mean field. The renormalization group implies the idea that long distance correlations near the transition temperature might be described by a statistical field theory that is a quantum field in imaginary time. Various forms of renormalization group equations are presented and solved in particular boundary limits, namely for fields with high numbers of components near the dimensions 4 and 2. The particular case of exact renormalization group is also introduced. (A.C.)

  12. Phase transitions, scaling and renormalisation in nonequilibrium systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanney, T.E.

    2002-01-01

    Nonequilibrium phase transitions and critical phenomena in simple lattice-based interacting particle models are considered. Specific models of interest are exclusion models in low dimensions, with particular reference to the asymmetric simple exclusion process (ASEP) which provides a testbed for many of the calculations. The aim of the thesis is to devise approximate scaling techniques for such models which account for fluctuations and which are more widely applicable than methods pursuing an exact solution. Scaling techniques which have been applied to models described by a linear equation of motion are extended to the case where the equation of motion is nonlinear. These methods capture the dynamic transition in the ASEP but fail to properly account for the nonlinearity in their predictions for the dynamic exponent, z. A new and widely applicable real space renormalisation group procedure is developed. It provides a direct and transparent scaling method to extract universal and non-universal properties of the steady state and dynamic critical behaviour in the boundary-driven ASEP in one dimension. In particular, we obtain a flow diagram for the problem from which we can interpret all the qualitative features of the (exactly known) steady state phase diagram and which predicts the exact value for the critical point. Further, the dynamic scaling is consistent with a crossover between diflusive behaviour near the zero current fixed point and z = 3/2 dynamics at the critical fixed point. Extensions to include disorder, to higher dimensions, and to other models are all possible using the method. Using the mapping between the Master equation and the Schroedinger equation in imaginary time, this scaling procedure is rephrased as a new blocking for quantum-spin systems. Existing methods of real space renormalisation for quantum-spin systems are applied to a variety of previously unconsidered exclusion models. In particular, it is shown how such techniques can be applied

  13. Non-renormalisation theorems in string theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhove, P.

    2007-10-01

    In this thesis we describe various non renormalisation theorems for the string effective action. These results are derived in the context of the M theory conjecture allowing to connect the four gravitons string theory S matrix elements with that of eleven dimensional supergravity. These theorems imply that N = 8 supergravity theory has the same UV behaviour as the N = 4 supersymmetric Yang Mills theory at least up to three loops, and could be UV finite in four dimensions. (author)

  14. On the OSp(1,4) renormalisable theory of supergravity with higher derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namazie, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    Supergravity Langrangian invariant under local orthosymplectic and general coordinate transformations is presented. It is conjectured that the Lagrangian describes a renormalisable theory. New features in this formulation are the introduction of a group invariant metric tensor and the corresponding connection. As in other higher-derivative theories metric ghosts are present. (author)

  15. Unambiguity of renormalization group calculations in QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimirov, A.A.

    1979-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the reduction of ambiguities determined by an arbitrary renormalization scheme is presented for the renormalization group calculations of physical quantities in quantum chromodynamics (QCD). Some basic formulas concerning the renormalization-scheme dependence of Green's and renormalization group functions are given. A massless asymptotically free theory with one coupling constant g is considered. In conclusion, several rules for renormalization group calculations in QCD are formulated

  16. Renormalisation in perturbative quantum gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodigast, Andreas

    2012-07-02

    In this thesis, we derive the gravitational one-loop corrections to the propagators and interactions of the Standard Model field. We consider a higher dimensional brane world scenario: Here, gravitons can propagate in the whole D dimensional space-time whereas the matter fields are confined to a d dimensional sub-manifold (brane). In order to determine the divergent part of the one-loop diagrams, we develop a new regularisation scheme which is both sensitive for polynomial divergences and respects the Ward identities of the Yang-Mills theory. We calculate the gravitational contributions to the {beta} functions of non-Abelian gauge theories, the quartic scalar self-interaction and the Yukawa coupling between scalars and fermions. In the physically interesting case of a four dimensional matter brane, the gravitational contributions to the running of the Yang-Mills coupling constant vanish. The leading contributions to the other two couplings are positive. These results do not depend on the number of extra dimensions. We further compute the gravitationally induced one-loop counterterms with higher covariant derivatives for scalars, Dirac fermions and gauge bosons. In is shown that these counterterms do not coincide with the higher derivative terms in the Lee-Wick standard model. A possible connection between quantum gravity and the latter cannot be inferred.

  17. Parallel computational in nuclear group constant calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su'ud, Zaki; Rustandi, Yaddi K.; Kurniadi, Rizal

    2002-01-01

    In this paper parallel computational method in nuclear group constant calculation using collision probability method will be discuss. The main focus is on the calculation of collision matrix which need large amount of computational time. The geometry treated here is concentric cylinder. The calculation of collision probability matrix is carried out using semi analytic method using Beckley Naylor Function. To accelerate computation speed some computer parallel used to solve the problem. We used LINUX based parallelization using PVM software with C or fortran language. While in windows based we used socket programming using DELPHI or C builder. The calculation results shows the important of optimal weight for each processor in case there area many type of processor speed

  18. Non-perturbative renormalisation of {delta}F=2 four-fermion operators in two-flavour QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimopoulos, P.; Vladikas, A. [INFN, Sezione di Roma II (Italy)]|[Rome-3 Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Herdoiza, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Palombi, F.; Papinutto, M. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland). Physics Dept., TH Division; Pena, C. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica C-XI]|[Univ. Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Fisica Teorica UAM/CSIC C-XVI; Wittig, H. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik

    2007-12-15

    Using Schroedinger Functional methods, we compute the non-perturbative renormalisation and renormalisation group running of several four-fermion operators, in the framework of lattice simulations with two dynamical Wilson quarks. Two classes of operators have been targeted: (i) those with left-left current structure and four propagating quark fields; (ii) all operators containing two static quarks. In both cases, only the parity-odd contributions have been considered, being the ones that renormalise multiplicatively. Our results, once combined with future simulations of the corresponding lattice hadronic matrix elements, may be used for the computation of phenomenological quantities of interest, such as B{sub K} and B{sub B} (the latter also in the static limit). (orig.)

  19. The renormalised π NN coupling constant and the P-wave phase shifts in the cloudy bag model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearce, B.C.; Afnan, I.R.

    1986-02-01

    Most applications of the cloudy bag model to π N scattering involve unitarising the bare diagrams arising from the Lagrangian by iterating in a Lippmann-Schwinger equation. However analyses of the renormalisation of the coupling constant proceed by iterating the Lagrangian to a given order in the bare coupling constant. These two different approaches means there is an inconsistency between the calculation of phase shifts and the calculation of renormalisation. A remedy to this problem is presented that has the added advantage of improving the fit to the phase shifts in the P 11 channel. This is achieved by using physical values of the coupling constant in the crossed diagram which reduces the repulsion rather than adds attraction. This approach can be justified by examining equations for the π π N system that incorporate three-body unitarity

  20. On renormalisation of the quantum stress tensor in curved space-time by dimensional regularisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunch, T.S.

    1979-01-01

    Using dimensional regularisation, a prescription is given for obtaining a finite renormalised stress tensor in curved space-time. Renormalisation is carried out by renormalising coupling constants in the n-dimensional Einstein equation generalised to include tensors which are fourth order in derivatives of the metric. Except for the special case of a massless conformal field in a conformally flat space-time, this procedure is not unique. There exists an infinite one-parameter family of renormalisation ansatze differing from each other in the finite renormalisation that takes place. Nevertheless, the renormalised stress tensor for a conformally invariant field theory acquires a nonzero trace which is independent of the renormalisation ansatz used and which has a value in agreement with that obtained by other methods. A comparison is made with some earlier work using dimensional regularisation which is shown to be in error. (author)

  1. Coupled scalar fields in a flat FRW universe. Renormalisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baacke, Juergen [Technische Univ. Dortmund (Germany). Fakultaet Physik; Covi, Laura [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Kevlishvili, Nina [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Andronikashvili Institute of Physics, Tbilisi (Georgia)

    2010-06-15

    We study the non-equilibrium dynamics of a system of coupled scalar fields in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe. We consider the evolution of spatially homogeneous ''classical'' fields and of their quantum fluctuations including the quantum backreaction in the one-loop approximation. We discuss in particular the dimensional regularisation of the coupled system and a special subtraction procedure in order to obtain the renormalised equations of motion and the renormalised energy-momentum tensor and ensure that the energy is well-defined and covariantly conserved. These results represent at the same time a theoretical analysis and a viable scheme for stable numerical simulations. As an example for an application of the general formalism, we present simulations for a hybrid inflationary model. (orig.)

  2. Dependence of the current renormalisation constants on the quark mass

    CERN Document Server

    Crisafulli, M.; Martinelli, G.; Vladikas, A.; Crisafulli, M; Lubicz, V; Martinelli, G; Vladikas, A

    1995-01-01

    We study the behaviour of the vector and axial current renormalisation constants Z_V and Z_A as a function of the quark mass, m_q. We show that sizeable O(am_q) and O(g_0^2 a m_q) systematic effects are present in the Wilson and Clover cases respectively. We find that the prescription of Kronfeld, Lepage and Mackenzie for correcting these artefacts is not always successful.

  3. On the calculation of multi-group fission spectrum vectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, E.Z.

    1984-05-01

    In this report, the problem of calculating fission spectrum vectors in a consistent manner is formulated. The practical implications of using fission spectrum vectors in multi-group transport calculations are also addressed. The significance of the weighting spectra used for the calculation of fission spectrum vectors is illustrated for the case of a simple neutronic assembly

  4. GRUCAL, a computer program for calculating macroscopic group constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woll, D.

    1975-06-01

    Nuclear reactor calculations require material- and composition-dependent, energy averaged nuclear data to describe the interaction of neutrons with individual isotopes in material compositions of reactor zones. The code GRUCAL calculates these macroscopic group constants for given compositions from the material-dependent data of the group constant library GRUBA. The instructions for calculating group constants are not fixed in the program, but will be read at the actual execution time from a separate instruction file. This allows to accomodate GRUCAL to various problems or different group constant concepts. (orig.) [de

  5. Asymptomatic freedom in renormalisable gravity and supergravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fradkin, E.S.; Tseytlin, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter demonstrates that renormalizable supergravity, which is a superextension of renormalizable quantum gravity, can be the basis for a natural ''induced supergravity'' theory. A perturbatively operational unified theory is needed for a description of the early stages of the Universe, and renormalizable quantum gravity is well suited for unification with the renormalizable Grand Unified Models of matter. Topics considered include one-loop counter-terms and renormalization group (RG) equations for pure renormalizable gravity; the consequences of asymptotic freedom; the inclusion of matter; conformal supergravities; and renormalizable supergravity models. It is concluded that the presented lagrangian, which contains a locally superconformal extension of the Yang-Mills and massless spinor lagrangians and the conformal supergravity term, shows that conformal supergravity may play an important role in a fundamental theory

  6. HAMMER, 1-D Multigroup Neutron Transport Infinite System Cell Calculation for Few-Group Diffusion Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honeck, H.C.

    1984-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: HAMMER performs infinite lattice, one-dimensional cell multigroup calculations, followed (optionally) by one-dimensional, few-group, multi-region reactor calculations with neutron balance edits. 2 - Method of solution: Infinite lattice parameters are calculated by means of multigroup transport theory, composite reactor parameters by few-group diffusion theory. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: - Cell calculations - maxima of: 30 thermal groups; 54 epithermal groups; 20 space points; 20 regions; 18 isotopes; 10 mixtures; 3 thermal up-scattering mixtures; 200 resonances per group; no overlap or interference; single level only. - Reactor calculations - maxima of : 40 regions; 40 mixtures; 250 space points; 4 groups

  7. Exact renormalization group as a scheme for calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, G.

    1985-10-01

    In this lecture I report on recent work to use exact renormalization group methods to construct a scheme for calculations in quantum field theory and classical statistical mechanics on the continuum. (orig./HSI)

  8. Preparation of small group constants for calculation of shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khokhlov, V.F.; Shejno, I.N.; Tkachev, V.D.

    1979-01-01

    Studied is the effect of the shielding calculation error connected with neglect of the angular and spatial neutron flux dependences while determining the small-group constants on the basis of the many-group ones. The economical method allowing for dependences is proposed. The spatial dependence is substituted by the average value according to the zones singled out in the limits of the zones of the same content; the angular cross section dependence is substituted by the average values in the half-ranges of the angular variable. To solve the transfer equation the ALGOL-ROSA-M program using the method of characteristic interpolation and trial run method is developed. The program regards correctly for nonscattered and single scattered radiations. Compared are the calculation results of neutron transmission (10.5 MeV-0.01 eV) in the 21-group approximation with the 3-group calculations for water (the layer thickness is 30 cm) and 5-group calculations for heterogeneous shielding of alternating stainless steel layers (3 layers, each of the 16 cm thickness) and graphite layers (2 layers, each of the 20 cm thickness). The analysis shows that the method proposed permits to obtain rather accurate results in the course of preparation of the small-group cross sections, decreasing considerably the number of the groups (from 21 to 3-5) and saving the machine time

  9. Multi-group diffusion perturbation calculation code. PERKY (2002)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iijima, Susumu; Okajima, Shigeaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-12-01

    Perturbation calculation code based on the diffusion theory ''PERKY'' is designed for nuclear characteristic analyses of fast reactor. The code calculates reactivity worth on the multi-group diffusion perturbation theory in two or three dimensional core model and kinetics parameters such as effective delayed neutron fraction, prompt neutron lifetime and absolute reactivity scale factor ({rho}{sub 0} {delta}k/k) for FCA experiments. (author)

  10. Resonating group calculation for a three particle system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Kiran; Jain, A.K.

    1979-01-01

    The elastic scattering of a projectile comprising of a loosely bound pair of particles by a target has been investigated in the Resonating Group Method (RGM). An effective interaction between the projectile and the target has also been derived in terms of the individual particle-target interaction. Phenomenological potentials are employed to describe, with reasonable accuracy, the antisymmetrized particle-target wavefunctions. This simplifies the analysis from an N-particle calculation to a three body RGM calculation. Results obtained for d-α scattering are compared with a full six nucleon calculation as well as with experiment. Results on 6 Li scattering on 40 Ca are discussed. (auth.)

  11. Heavy superpartners with less tuning from hidden sector renormalisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, Edward

    2014-01-01

    In supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, superpartner masses consistent with collider bounds typically introduce significant tuning of the electroweak scale. We show that hidden sector renormalisation can greatly reduce such a tuning if the supersymmetry breaking, or mediating, sector runs through a region of strong coupling not far from the weak scale. In the simplest models, only the tuning due to the gaugino masses is improved, and a weak scale gluino mass in the region of 5 TeV may be obtained with an associated tuning of only one part in ten. In models with more complex couplings between the visible and hidden sectors, the tuning with respect to sfermions can also be reduced. We give an example of a model, with low scale gauge mediation and superpartner masses allowed by current LHC bounds, that has an overall tuning of one part in twenty

  12. On unitarity in renormalisable R2sub(μν) quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomboulis, E.T.

    1987-01-01

    The paper on unitarity in renormalisable quantum gravity is a contribution to the book commemorating the sixtieth birthday of E.S. Fradkin. Arguments are presented for the unitarity of the general fourth-order action (non-supersymmetric) of the renormalisable higher derivative theories of gravity directly in the continuum. Graviton propagators, propagator poles, massless matter fields and gauge theories are all discussed. (U.K.)

  13. Non-perturbative renormalisation of left-left four-fermion operators with Neuberger fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimopoulos, P.; Giusti, L.; Hernandez, P.; Palombi, F.; Pena, C.; Vladikas, A.; Wennekers, J.; Wittig, H.

    2006-01-01

    We outline a general strategy for the non-perturbative renormalisation of composite operators in discretisations based on Neuberger fermions, via a matching to results obtained with Wilson-type fermions. As an application, we consider the renormalisation of the four-quark operators entering the ΔS=1 and ΔS=2 effective Hamiltonians. Our results are an essential ingredient for the determination of the low-energy constants governing non-leptonic kaon decays

  14. MURALB - a programme for calculating neutron fluxes in many groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDougall, J.

    1977-09-01

    The program MURALB solves the multi-group transport equation (with no upscatter) in many equal lethargy groups to produce neutron fluxes in these groups. The code has been made very flexible by confining the spatial flux solution to a single subroutine which takes as input the cross section data and source for a single group and calculates the flux for that group. In this way by supplying different versions of this routine different geometries and methods of solution of the transport equation may be treated. At present plane, cylindrical and spherical diffusion theory and collision probability solutions are available, together with a two region collision probability solution for a rod in a square cell. There is no basic restriction to one dimension but the practical size of problem tends to be limited to about 30 spatial regions by core storage requirements. In addition to the flux solution, the code calculates neutron balance, reaction rates and few groups cross sections for each mesh region, together with the values averaged over the system (cell or reactor). The program is available both as a stand-alone code and integrated into the COSMOS system. (author)

  15. Automatic calculation of supersymmetric renormalization group equations and loop corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staub, Florian

    2011-03-01

    SARAH is a Mathematica package for studying supersymmetric models. It calculates for a given model the masses, tadpole equations and all vertices at tree-level. This information can be used by SARAH to write model files for CalcHep/ CompHep or FeynArts/ FormCalc. In addition, the second version of SARAH can derive the renormalization group equations for the gauge couplings, parameters of the superpotential and soft-breaking parameters at one- and two-loop level. Furthermore, it calculates the one-loop self-energies and the one-loop corrections to the tadpoles. SARAH can handle all N=1 SUSY models whose gauge sector is a direct product of SU(N) and U(1) gauge groups. The particle content of the model can be an arbitrary number of chiral superfields transforming as any irreducible representation with respect to the gauge groups. To implement a new model, the user has just to define the gauge sector, the particle, the superpotential and the field rotations to mass eigenstates. Program summaryProgram title: SARAH Catalogue identifier: AEIB_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEIB_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 97 577 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2 009 769 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica Computer: All systems that Mathematica is available for Operating system: All systems that Mathematica is available for Classification: 11.1, 11.6 Nature of problem: A supersymmetric model is usually characterized by the particle content, the gauge sector and the superpotential. It is a time consuming process to obtain all necessary information for phenomenological studies from these basic ingredients. Solution method: SARAH calculates the complete Lagrangian for a given model whose

  16. Activities of the ICRP task group on dose calculations (DOCAL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertelli, Luiz

    1997-01-01

    Full text. The International Commission of Radiological Protection has been doing many efforts to improve dose calculations due to intake of radionuclides by workers and members of the public. More specifically, the biokinetic models have become more and more physiologically based and developed for age-groups ranging from the embryo to the adult. The dosimetric aspects have also been very carefully revised and a new series of phantoms encompassing all developing stages of embryo and fetus were also envisaged. In order to assure the quality of the calculations, dose coefficients have been derived by two different laboratories and the results and methods have been frequently compared and discussed. A CD-ROM has been prepared allowing the user to obtain dose coefficients for the several age-groups for ingestion and inhalation of all important radionuclides. Inhalation dose coefficients will be available for several AMADs. For the particular case of embryo and fetus, doses will be calculated when the intake occurred before and during gestation for single and chronic patterns of intake

  17. Calculation of restricted rotational states in the methyl group

    CERN Document Server

    Ozaki, Y

    2002-01-01

    A methyl group attached to a molecule in the solid phase has a certain amount of hindrance in its rotational motion. The rotational potential can usually be expressed by the 3rd-order and the 6th-order terms of periodic functions. In the intermediate region with respect to the field strength and also the degree of mixing of two components, much variety appears in the structure of the rotational energy levels. The energy values correspond to the various molecular surroundings. The matrix elements are also derived, which yield the intensity of inelastic neutron scattering spectra. One example of calculated intensities is given. (orig.)

  18. On renormalisation of lambda phi4 field theory in curved space-time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunch, T.S.; Panangaden, P.

    1980-01-01

    An explicit renormalisation of all second-order physical processes occurring in lambdaphi 4 field theory in conformally flat space-time, including vacuum-to-vacuum processes, is performed. Although divergences dependent on the definition of the vacuum state appear in some Feynman diagrams, physical amplitudes obtained by summing all diagrams which contribute to a single physical process are independent of these divergences. Consequently, the theory remains renormalisable in curved space-time, at least to second order in lambda. Renormalisations of the mass m, the coupling constant lambda and the constant xi which couples the field to the Ricci scalar are required to make two- and four-particle creation amplitudes finite. (author)

  19. Renormalisation constants of quark bilinears in lattice QCD with four dynamical Wilson quarks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blossier, B.; Brinet, M.; Carrasco, N.; Dimopoulos, P.; Du, X.; Frezzotti, R.; Gimenez, V.; Herdoiza, G.; Jansen, K.; Lubicz, V.; Palao, D.; Pallante, E.; Pene, O.; Petrov, K.; Reker, S.; Rossi, G. C.; Sanfilippo, F.; Scorzato, L.; Simula, S.; Urbach, C.

    2011-01-01

    We present preliminary results of the non-perturbative computation of the RI-MOM renormalisation constants in a mass-independent scheme for the action with Iwasaki glue and four dynamical Wilson quarks employed by ETMC. Our project requires dedicated gauge ensembles with four degenerate sea quark

  20. Advanced density matrix renormalization group method for nuclear structure calculations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Legeza, Ö.; Veis, Libor; Poves, A.; Dukelsky, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 5 (2015), 051303 ISSN 0556-2813 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : INITIO QUANTUM- CHEMISTRY * GROUP ALGORITHM * SHELL-MODEL Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.146, year: 2015

  1. A strategy for implementing non-perturbative renormalisation of heavy-light four-quark operators in the static approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palombi, F. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Gruppe Theorie; Papinutto, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Rome (Italy); Pena, C. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland). Theoretical Physics Div.; Wittig, H. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik

    2006-04-15

    We discuss the renormalisation properties of the complete set of {delta}B=2 four-quark operators with the heavy quark treated in the static approximation. We elucidate the role of heavy quark symmetry and other symmetry transformations in constraining their mixing under renormalisation. By employing the Schroedinger functional, a set of non-perturbative renormalisation conditions can be defined in terms of suitable correlation functions. As a first step in a fully non-perturbative determination of the scale-dependent renormalisation factors, we evaluate these conditions in lattice perturbation theory at one loop. Thereby we verify the expected mixing patterns and determine the anomalous dimensions of the operators at NLO in the Schroedinger functional scheme. Finally, by employing twisted-mass QCD it is shown how finite subtractions arising from explicit chiral symmetry breaking can be avoided completely. (Orig.)

  2. A strategy for implementing non-perturbative renormalisation of heavy-light four-quark operators in the static approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palombi, F.; Pena, C.; Wittig, H.

    2006-04-01

    We discuss the renormalisation properties of the complete set of ΔB=2 four-quark operators with the heavy quark treated in the static approximation. We elucidate the role of heavy quark symmetry and other symmetry transformations in constraining their mixing under renormalisation. By employing the Schroedinger functional, a set of non-perturbative renormalisation conditions can be defined in terms of suitable correlation functions. As a first step in a fully non-perturbative determination of the scale-dependent renormalisation factors, we evaluate these conditions in lattice perturbation theory at one loop. Thereby we verify the expected mixing patterns and determine the anomalous dimensions of the operators at NLO in the Schroedinger functional scheme. Finally, by employing twisted-mass QCD it is shown how finite subtractions arising from explicit chiral symmetry breaking can be avoided completely. (Orig.)

  3. A library of neutron data for calculating group constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshcheev, V.N.; Nikolaev, M.N.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the first version of a computerized library evaluated neutron data files (FOND) which includes data on the 67 most important nuclear reactor and radiation shielding materials. The data are represented in the ENDF/B format. The sources of data were the results of evaluations of data from differential neutron physics experiments conducted both in the USSR and abroad. The first version of the FOND library is not intended for use in reactor and shielding design calculations, but rather to serve as the basis for developing a corrected version which will guarantee adequate description of the results of a representative set of macroscopic experiments, and for generating multigroup constant systems in methodological research. (author)

  4. One-group transport theory calculation for three slabs cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maia, C.R.M.

    1979-01-01

    As an idealized model of plate type fuel assemblies for nuclear reactors, three-slab cells are analysed numerically based on the exact solution of the transport equation in the one-group isotropic scattering model. From the equations describing the interface conditions, a set of regular integral equations for the coefficients of the singular eigenfunctions expansions is derived using the half-range orthogonality relations of the eigenfunctions and the recently developed method of regularization. Numerical solutions are obtained by solving this set of equations iteratively. The thermal utilization factor and thermal disadvantage factors as well as flux and current distributions are reported for the first time for various sets of parameters. The accuracy of the P sub(N) approximations is also analysed compared to the exact results. (Author) [pt

  5. Scalar 3-point functions in CFT: renormalisation, beta functions and anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bzowski, Adam; McFadden, Paul; Skenderis, Kostas

    2016-03-01

    We present a comprehensive discussion of renormalisation of 3-point functions of scalar operators in conformal field theories in general dimension. We have previously shown that conformal symmetry uniquely determines the momentum-space 3-point functions in terms of certain integrals involving a product of three Bessel functions (triple- K integrals). The triple- K integrals diverge when the dimensions of operators satisfy certain relations and we discuss how to obtain renormalised 3-point functions in all cases. There are three different types of divergences: ultralocal, semilocal and nonlocal, and a given divergent triple- K integral may have any combination of them. Ultralocal divergences may be removed using local counterterms and this results in new conformal anomalies. Semilocal divergences may be removed by renormalising the sources, and this results in CFT correlators that satisfy Callan-Symanzik equations with beta functions. In the case of non-local divergences, it is the triple- K representation that is singular, not the 3-point function. Here, the CFT correlator is the coefficient of the leading nonlocal singularity, which satisfies all the expected conformal Ward identities. Such correlators exhibit enhanced symmetry: they are also invariant under dual conformal transformations where the momenta play the role of coordinates. When both anomalies and beta functions are present the correlators exhibit novel analytic structure containing products of logarithms of momenta. We illustrate our discussion with numerous examples, including free field realisations and AdS/CFT computations.

  6. Convergence to equilibrium of renormalised solutions to nonlinear chemical reaction–diffusion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellner, Klemens; Tang, Bao Quoc

    2018-06-01

    The convergence to equilibrium for renormalised solutions to nonlinear reaction-diffusion systems is studied. The considered reaction-diffusion systems arise from chemical reaction networks with mass action kinetics and satisfy the complex balanced condition. By applying the so-called entropy method, we show that if the system does not have boundary equilibria, i.e. equilibrium states lying on the boundary of R_+^N, then any renormalised solution converges exponentially to the complex balanced equilibrium with a rate, which can be computed explicitly up to a finite-dimensional inequality. This inequality is proven via a contradiction argument and thus not explicitly. An explicit method of proof, however, is provided for a specific application modelling a reversible enzyme reaction by exploiting the specific structure of the conservation laws. Our approach is also useful to study the trend to equilibrium for systems possessing boundary equilibria. More precisely, to show the convergence to equilibrium for systems with boundary equilibria, we establish a sufficient condition in terms of a modified finite-dimensional inequality along trajectories of the system. By assuming this condition, which roughly means that the system produces too much entropy to stay close to a boundary equilibrium for infinite time, the entropy method shows exponential convergence to equilibrium for renormalised solutions to complex balanced systems with boundary equilibria.

  7. Consistent on shell renormalisation of electroweakinos in the complex MSSM. LHC and LC predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bharucha, Aoife; Weiglein, Georg

    2012-11-01

    We extend the formalism developed earlier (A. C. Fowler and G. Weiglein, 2010) for the renormalisation of the chargino-neutralino sector to the most general case of the MSSM with complex parameters. We show that products of imaginary parts arising from MSSM parameters and from absorptive parts of loop integrals can already contribute to predictions for physical observables at the one-loop level, and demonstrate that the consistent treatment of such contributions gives rise to non-trivial structure, either in the field renormalisation constants or the corrections associated with the external legs of the considered diagrams. We furthermore show that the phases of the parameters in the chargino-neutralino sector do not need to be renormalised at the one-loop level, and demonstrate that the appropriate choice for the mass parameters used as input for the on-shell conditions depends both on the process and the region of MSSM parameter space under consideration. As an application, we compute the complete one-loop results in the MSSM with complex parameters for the process h a →χ + i χ - j (Higgs-propagator corrections have been incorporated up to the two-loop level), which may be of interest for SUSY Higgs searches at the LHC, and for chargino pair-production at an e + e - Linear Collider, e + e - →χ + i χ - j . We investigate the dependence of the theoretical predictions on the phases of the MSSM parameters, analysing in particular the numerical relevance of the absorptive parts of loop integrals.

  8. Consistent on shell renormalisation of electroweakinos in the complex MSSM. LHC and LC predictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bharucha, Aoife [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Fowler, Alison [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom). IPPP, Dept. of Physics; Moortgat-Pick, Gudrid [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Weiglein, Georg [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    We extend the formalism developed earlier (A. C. Fowler and G. Weiglein, 2010) for the renormalisation of the chargino-neutralino sector to the most general case of the MSSM with complex parameters. We show that products of imaginary parts arising from MSSM parameters and from absorptive parts of loop integrals can already contribute to predictions for physical observables at the one-loop level, and demonstrate that the consistent treatment of such contributions gives rise to non-trivial structure, either in the field renormalisation constants or the corrections associated with the external legs of the considered diagrams. We furthermore show that the phases of the parameters in the chargino-neutralino sector do not need to be renormalised at the one-loop level, and demonstrate that the appropriate choice for the mass parameters used as input for the on-shell conditions depends both on the process and the region of MSSM parameter space under consideration. As an application, we compute the complete one-loop results in the MSSM with complex parameters for the process h{sub a}{yields}{chi}{sup +}{sub i}{chi}{sup -}{sub j} (Higgs-propagator corrections have been incorporated up to the two-loop level), which may be of interest for SUSY Higgs searches at the LHC, and for chargino pair-production at an e{sup +}e{sup -} Linear Collider, e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{chi}{sup +}{sub i}{chi}{sup -}{sub j}. We investigate the dependence of the theoretical predictions on the phases of the MSSM parameters, analysing in particular the numerical relevance of the absorptive parts of loop integrals.

  9. Renormalisation scale uncertainty in the DIS 2+1 jet cross-section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingelman, G.

    1994-05-01

    The Deep Inelastic Scattering 2+1 jet cross-section is a useful observable for precision tests of QCD, e.g. measuring the strong coupling constant α s . A consistent analysis requires a good understanding of the theoretical uncertainties and one of the fundamental ones in QCD is due to the renormalisation scheme and scale ambiguity. Different methods, which have been proposed to resolve the scale ambiguity, are applied to the 2+1 jet cross-section and the uncertainty is estimated. It is shown that the uncertainty can be made smaller by choosing the jet definition in a suitable way. (orig.)

  10. Lattice renormalisation of O(a) improved heavy-light operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blossier, B.

    2007-05-01

    Analytical expressions and numerical values of renormalisation constants of O(a) improved heavy-light currents are given at 1-loop order of perturbation theory in the framework of Heavy Quark Effective Theory: the heavy quark is described by the HYP action and the light quark is described either with the Clover or the Neuberger action. These factors are relevant to extract from a lattice computation the decay constants f B , f B S and the set of bag parameters B i associated with B- anti B mixing phenomenology in the Standard Model and beyond. (orig.)

  11. GRUCAL: a program system for the calculation of macroscopic group constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woll, D.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear reactor calculations require material- and composition-dependent, energy-averaged neutron physical data in order to decribe the interaction between neutrons and isotopes. The multigroup cross section code GRUCAL calculates these macroscopic group constants for given material compositions from the material-dependent data of the group constant library GRUBA. The instructions for calculating group constants are not fixed in the program, but are read in from an instruction file. This makes it possible to adapt GRUCAL to various problems or different group constant concepts

  12. {alpha}{sub s} from the non-perturbatively renormalised lattice three-gluon vertex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alles, B. [Pisa Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Henty, D.S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Panagopoulos, H. [Department of Natural Sciences, University of Cyprus, CY-1678 Nicosia (Cyprus); Parrinello, C. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom); Pittori, C. [L.P.T.H.E., Universite de Paris Sud, Centre d`Orsay, 91405 Orsay (France); Richards, D.G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom)]|[Fermilab, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)

    1997-09-29

    We compute the running QCD coupling on the lattice by evaluating two-point and three-point off-shell gluon Green`s functions in a fixed gauge and imposing non-perturbative renormalisation conditions on them. Our exploratory study is performed in the quenched approximation at {beta}=6.0 on 16{sup 4} and 24{sup 4} lattices. We show that, for momenta in the range 1.8-2.3 GeV, our coupling runs according to the two-loop asymptotic formula, allowing a precise determination of the corresponding {Lambda} parameter. The role of lattice artifacts and finite-volume effects is carefully analysed and these appear to be under control in the momentum range of interest. Our renormalisation procedure corresponds to a momentum subtraction scheme in continuum field theory, and therefore lattice perturbation theory is not needed in order to match our results to the anti M anti S scheme, thus eliminating a major source of uncertainty in the determination of {alpha} {sub anti} {sub M} {sub anti} {sub S}. Our method can be applied directly to the unquenched case. (orig.). 20 refs.

  13. Comparison of measurements and calculations of fuel for different structures in the libraries of effective sections (44 groups/238 groups)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Rivada, A.; Tore, C.

    2013-01-01

    The study was conducted for the use of the sections effective in 44 groups, based on the libraries of effective sections ENDF/B-V, for the calculation of the isotopy of the spent fuel. These effective sections have been developed to be used in the system codes SCALE for the analysis the fresh nuclear fuel as the spent and their radioactive waste.

  14. Calculating the knowledge-based similarity of functional groups using crystallographic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Paul; Willett, Peter; Gillet, Valerie J.; Verdonk, Marcel L.

    2001-09-01

    A knowledge-based method for calculating the similarity of functional groups is described and validated. The method is based on experimental information derived from small molecule crystal structures. These data are used in the form of scatterplots that show the likelihood of a non-bonded interaction being formed between functional group A (the `central group') and functional group B (the `contact group' or `probe'). The scatterplots are converted into three-dimensional maps that show the propensity of the probe at different positions around the central group. Here we describe how to calculate the similarity of a pair of central groups based on these maps. The similarity method is validated using bioisosteric functional group pairs identified in the Bioster database and Relibase. The Bioster database is a critical compilation of thousands of bioisosteric molecule pairs, including drugs, enzyme inhibitors and agrochemicals. Relibase is an object-oriented database containing structural data about protein-ligand interactions. The distributions of the similarities of the bioisosteric functional group pairs are compared with similarities for all the possible pairs in IsoStar, and are found to be significantly different. Enrichment factors are also calculated showing the similarity method is statistically significantly better than random in predicting bioisosteric functional group pairs.

  15. Evaluation of the accuracy of group calculations for reactor criticality perturbations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dulin, V.A.

    1985-09-01

    For calculations of criticality perturbations it is necessary to use group constants which take into account not only the peculiarities of the intra-group flux but also those of the behaviour of the adjoint flux. A new method is proposed for obtaining bilinear-averaged constants of this type on the basis of the resonance characteristics of the importance function and the difference between the value of neutron importance at the group boundary and the group-averaged value (the bsup(+j) factor). A number of calculations are made for the ratios of reactivity coefficients in the BFS assemblies. Values have been obtained for the difference between the results of calculation with bilinear-averaged constants and those averaged conventionally (over flux). In many cases, this difference exceeds the experimental error. (author)

  16. Nuclear Data Uncertainty Propagation in Depletion Calculations Using Cross Section Uncertainties in One-group or Multi-group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Díez, C.J., E-mail: cj.diez@upm.es [Dpto. de Ingeníera Nuclear, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Cabellos, O. [Dpto. de Ingeníera Nuclear, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Fusión Nuclear, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Martínez, J.S. [Dpto. de Ingeníera Nuclear, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-01-15

    Several approaches have been developed in last decades to tackle nuclear data uncertainty propagation problems of burn-up calculations. One approach proposed was the Hybrid Method, where uncertainties in nuclear data are propagated only on the depletion part of a burn-up problem. Because only depletion is addressed, only one-group cross sections are necessary, and hence, their collapsed one-group uncertainties. This approach has been applied successfully in several advanced reactor systems like EFIT (ADS-like reactor) or ESFR (Sodium fast reactor) to assess uncertainties on the isotopic composition. However, a comparison with using multi-group energy structures was not carried out, and has to be performed in order to analyse the limitations of using one-group uncertainties.

  17. Nuclear Data Uncertainty Propagation in Depletion Calculations Using Cross Section Uncertainties in One-group or Multi-group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Díez, C.J.; Cabellos, O.; Martínez, J.S.

    2015-01-01

    Several approaches have been developed in last decades to tackle nuclear data uncertainty propagation problems of burn-up calculations. One approach proposed was the Hybrid Method, where uncertainties in nuclear data are propagated only on the depletion part of a burn-up problem. Because only depletion is addressed, only one-group cross sections are necessary, and hence, their collapsed one-group uncertainties. This approach has been applied successfully in several advanced reactor systems like EFIT (ADS-like reactor) or ESFR (Sodium fast reactor) to assess uncertainties on the isotopic composition. However, a comparison with using multi-group energy structures was not carried out, and has to be performed in order to analyse the limitations of using one-group uncertainties

  18. Nuclear Data Uncertainty Propagation in Depletion Calculations Using Cross Section Uncertainties in One-group or Multi-group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, C. J.; Cabellos, O.; Martínez, J. S.

    2015-01-01

    Several approaches have been developed in last decades to tackle nuclear data uncertainty propagation problems of burn-up calculations. One approach proposed was the Hybrid Method, where uncertainties in nuclear data are propagated only on the depletion part of a burn-up problem. Because only depletion is addressed, only one-group cross sections are necessary, and hence, their collapsed one-group uncertainties. This approach has been applied successfully in several advanced reactor systems like EFIT (ADS-like reactor) or ESFR (Sodium fast reactor) to assess uncertainties on the isotopic composition. However, a comparison with using multi-group energy structures was not carried out, and has to be performed in order to analyse the limitations of using one-group uncertainties.

  19. First lattice calculation of the B-meson binding and kinetic energies

    CERN Document Server

    Crisafulli, M; Martinelli, G; Sachrajda, Christopher T C

    1995-01-01

    We present the first lattice calculation of the B-meson binding energy \\labar and of the kinetic energy -\\lambda_1/2 m_Q of the heavy-quark inside the pseudoscalar B-meson. This calculation has required the non-perturbative subtraction of the power divergences present in matrix elements of the Lagrangian operator \\bar h D_4 h and of the kinetic energy operator \\bar h \\vec D^2 h. The non-perturbative renormalisation of the relevant operators has been implemented by imposing suitable renormalisation conditions on quark matrix elements, in the Landau gauge. Our numerical results have been obtained from several independent numerical simulations at \\beta=6.0 and 6.2, and using, for the meson correlators, the results obtained by the APE group at the same values of \\beta. Our best estimate, obtained by combining results at different values of \\beta, is \\labar =190 \\err{50}{30} MeV. For the \\overline{MS} running mass, we obtain \\overline {m}_b(\\overline {m}_b) =4.17 \\pm 0.06 GeV, in reasonable agreement with previous...

  20. Simple renormalization group method for calculating geometrical and other equations of states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsallis, C.; Schwaccheim, G.; Coniglio, A.

    1984-01-01

    A real space renormalization group procedure to calculate geometrical and thermal equations of states for the entire range of values of the external parameters is described. Its use is as simple as a Mean Field Approximation; however, it yields non trivial results and can be systematically improved. Such a procedure is illustrated by calculating, for all bond concentrations, the site mass density for the complete and the backbone percolating infinite clusters in square lattice: the results are quite satisfactory. (Author) [pt

  1. A program for calculating group constants on the basis of libraries of evaluated neutron data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinitsa, V.V.

    1987-01-01

    The GRUKON program is designed for processing libraries of evaluated neutron data into group and fine-group (having some 300 groups) microscopic constants. In structure it is a package of applications programs with three basic components: a monitor, a command language and a library of functional modules. The first operative version of the package was restricted to obtaining mid-group non-block cross-sections from evaluated neutron data libraries in the ENDF/B format. This was then used to process other libraries. In the next two versions, cross-section table conversion modules and self-shielding factor calculation modules, respectively, were added to the functions already in the package. Currently, a fourth version of the GRUKON applications program package, for calculation of sub-group parameters, is under preparation. (author)

  2. Application of the variational method for calculation of neutron spectra and group constants - Master thesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milosevic, M.

    1979-01-01

    One-dimensional variational method for cylindrical configuration was applied for calculating group constants, together with effects of elastic slowing down, anisotropic elastic scattering, inelastic scattering, heterogeneous resonance absorption with the aim to include the presence of a number of different isotopes and effects of neutron leakage from the reactor core. Neutron flux shape P 3 and adjoint function are proposed in order to enable calculation of smaller size reactors and inclusion of heterogeneity effects by cell calculations. Microscopic multigroup constants were prepared based on the UKNDL data library. Analytical-numerical approach was applied for solving the equations of the P 3 approximation to obtain neutron flux moments and adjoint functions

  3. Multi-Group Covariance Data Generation from Continuous-Energy Monte Carlo Transport Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Hyuk; Shim, Hyung Jin

    2015-01-01

    The sensitivity and uncertainty (S/U) methodology in deterministic tools has been utilized for quantifying uncertainties of nuclear design parameters induced by those of nuclear data. The S/U analyses which are based on multi-group cross sections can be conducted by an simple error propagation formula with the sensitivities of nuclear design parameters to multi-group cross sections and the covariance of multi-group cross section. The multi-group covariance data required for S/U analysis have been produced by nuclear data processing codes such as ERRORJ or PUFF from the covariance data in evaluated nuclear data files. However in the existing nuclear data processing codes, an asymptotic neutron flux energy spectrum, not the exact one, has been applied to the multi-group covariance generation since the flux spectrum is unknown before the neutron transport calculation. It can cause an inconsistency between the sensitivity profiles and the covariance data of multi-group cross section especially in resolved resonance energy region, because the sensitivities we usually use are resonance self-shielded while the multi-group cross sections produced from an asymptotic flux spectrum are infinitely-diluted. In order to calculate the multi-group covariance estimation in the ongoing MC simulation, mathematical derivations for converting the double integration equation into a single one by utilizing sampling method have been introduced along with the procedure of multi-group covariance tally

  4. Calculating differential Galois groups of parametrized differential equations, with applications to hypertranscendence

    OpenAIRE

    Hardouin, Charlotte; Minchenko, Andrei; Ovchinnikov, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    The main motivation of our work is to create an efficient algorithm that decides hypertranscendence of solutions of linear differential equations, via the parameterized differential and Galois theories. To achieve this, we expand the representation theory of linear differential algebraic groups and develop new algorithms that calculate unipotent radicals of parameterized differential Galois groups for differential equations whose coefficients are rational functions. P. Berman and M.F. Singer ...

  5. Multi-Group Library Generation with Explicit Resonance Interference Using Continuous Energy Monte Carlo Calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ho Jin; Cho, Jin Young [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kang Seog [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge (United States); Hong, Ser Gi [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this study, multi-group cross section libraries for the DeCART code were generated using a new procedure. The new procedure includes generating the RI tables based on the MC calculations, correcting the effective fission product yield calculations, and considering most of the fission products as resonant nuclides. KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) has developed the transport lattice code KARMA (Kernel Analyzer by Ray-tracing Method for fuel Assembly) and DeCART (Deterministic Core Analysis based on Ray Tracing) for a multi-group neutron transport analysis of light water reactors (LWRs). These codes adopt the method of characteristics (MOC) to solve the multi-group transport equation and resonance fixed source problem, the subgroup and the direct iteration method with resonance integral tables for resonance treatment. With the development of the DeCART and KARMA code, KAERI has established its own library generation system for a multi-group transport calculation. In the KAERI library generation system, the multi-group average cross section and resonance integral (RI) table are generated and edited using PENDF (point-wise ENDF) and GENDF (group-wise ENDF) produced by the NJOY code. The new method does not need additional processing because the MC method can handle any geometry information and material composition. In this study, the new method is applied to the dominant resonance nuclide such as U{sup 235} and U{sup 238} and the conventional method is applied to the minor resonance nuclides. To examine the newly generated multi-group cross section libraries, various benchmark calculations such as pin-cell, FA, and core depletion problem are performed and the results are compared with the reference solutions. Overall, the results by the new method agree well with the reference solution. The new procedure based on the MC method were verified and provided the multi-group library that can be used in the SMR nuclear design analysis.

  6. Influence of the number of energy groups on the accuracy of neutron fluence calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barz, H.U.; Konheiser, J.

    1999-01-01

    The question how many groups are necessary to obtain all needed integral quantities for the neutron load of pressure vessels and detector positions outside the vessel with sufficient accuracy is of general interest. Until now, there are no systematic investigations on this question. In principle 3-dimensional consideration is required for such neutron load calculations. Therefore, an estimation of the needed number of groups can be of interest to minimize calculation time. One general problem is the P L -approximation of the angular distributions for the transfers between different groups. For elastic scattering this P L -approximation becomes poorer with increasing number of groups. As deterministic methods generally use the P L -approximation they cannot be used for investigations of the errors caused by the group approximation. We have investigated this problem applying group Monte-Carlo but nearly exact representation of this elastic slowing down without P L -approximation. The calculations were directed to assess the neutron fluence of a Russian WWER-1000 reactor. For that a simplified geometrical model of this reactor type has been used. (orig.)

  7. One group neutron flux at a point in a cylindrical reactor cell calculated by Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocic, A [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1974-01-15

    Mean values of the neutron flux over material regions and the neutron flux at space points in a cylindrical annular cell (one group model) have been calculated by Monte Carlo. The results are compared with those obtained by an improved collision probability method (author)

  8. Small groups, large profits: Calculating interest rates in community-managed microfinance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Ole Dahl

    2012-01-01

    Savings groups are a widely used strategy for women’s economic resilience – over 80% of members worldwide are women, and in the case described here, 72.5%. In these savings groups it is common to see the interest rate on savings reported as "20-30% annually". Using panel data from 204 groups...... in Malawi, I show that the right figure is likely to be at least twice this figure. For these groups, the annual return is 62%. The difference comes from sector-wide application of a non-standard interest rate calculations and unrealistic assumptions about the savings profile in the groups. As a result......, it is impossible to compare returns in savings groups with returns elsewhere. Moreover, the interest on savings is incomparable to the interest rate on loans. I argue for the use of a standardized comparable metric and suggest easy ways to implement it. Developments of new tools and standard along these lines...

  9. Distribution of the minimum path on percolation clusters: A renormalization group calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hipsh, Lior.

    1993-06-01

    This thesis uses the renormalization group for the research of the chemical distance or the minimal path on percolation clusters on a 2 dimensional square lattice. Our aims are to calculate analytically (iterative calculation) the fractal dimension of the minimal path. d min. , and the distributions of the minimum paths, l min for different lattice sizes and for different starting densities (including the threshold value p c ). For the distributions. We seek for an analytic form which describes them. The probability to get a minimum path for each linear size L is calculated by iterating the distribution of l min for the basic cell of size 2*2 to the next scale sizes, using the H cell renormalization group. For the threshold value of p and for values near to p c . We confirm a scaling in the form: P(l,L) =f1/l(l/(L d min ). L - the linear size, l - the minimum path. The distribution can be also represented in the Fourier space, so we will try to solve the renormalization group equations in this space. A numerical fitting is produced and compared to existing numerical results. In order to improve the agreement between the renormalization group and the numerical simulations, we also present attempts to generalize the renormalization group by adding more parameters, e.g. correlations between bonds in different directions or finite densities for occupation of bonds and sites. (author) 17 refs

  10. Depletion Calculations for MTR Core Using MCNPX and Multi-Group Nodal Diffusion Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaradata, Mustafa K.; Park, Chang Je; Lee, Byungchul

    2013-01-01

    In order to maintain a self-sustaining steady-state chain reaction, more fuel than is necessary in order to maintain a steady state chain reaction must be loaded. The introduction of this excess fuel increases the net multiplication capability of the system. In this paper MCNPX and multi-group nodal diffusion theory will be used for depletion calculations for MTR core. The eigenvalue and power distribution in the core will be compared for different burnup. Multi-group nodal diffusion theory with combination of NEWT-TRITON system was used to perform depletion calculations for 3Χ3 MTR core. 2G and 6G approximations were used and compared with MCNPX results for 2G approximation the maximum difference from MCNPX was 40 mk and for 6G approximation was 6 mk which is comparable to the MCNPX results. The calculated power using nodal code was almost the same MCNPX results. Finally the results of the multi-group nodal theory were acceptable and comparable to the calculated using MCNPX

  11. Functional renormalization group approach to electronic structure calculations for systems without translational symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Christian; Evers, Ferdinand

    2016-10-01

    A formalism for electronic-structure calculations is presented that is based on the functional renormalization group (FRG). The traditional FRG has been formulated for systems that exhibit a translational symmetry with an associated Fermi surface, which can provide the organization principle for the renormalization group (RG) procedure. We here advance an alternative formulation, where the RG flow is organized in the energy-domain rather than in k space. This has the advantage that it can also be applied to inhomogeneous matter lacking a band structure, such as disordered metals or molecules. The energy-domain FRG (ɛ FRG) presented here accounts for Fermi-liquid corrections to quasiparticle energies and particle-hole excitations. It goes beyond the state of the art G W -BSE , because in ɛ FRG the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE) is solved in a self-consistent manner. An efficient implementation of the approach that has been tested against exact diagonalization calculations and calculations based on the density matrix renormalization group is presented. Similar to the conventional FRG, also the ɛ FRG is able to signalize the vicinity of an instability of the Fermi-liquid fixed point via runaway flow of the corresponding interaction vertex. Embarking upon this fact, in an application of ɛ FRG to the spinless disordered Hubbard model we calculate its phase boundary in the plane spanned by the interaction and disorder strength. Finally, an extension of the approach to finite temperatures and spin S =1 /2 is also given.

  12. Calculation of the Thermal Loading of the Cylinder-Piston Group of the Automobile Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchenko, F. B.; Bakulin, V. N.

    2017-05-01

    We propose a mathematical model for calculating thermal loods of parts of the cylinder-piston group of the automobile engine operating under unstable conditions in its complete life cycle. Methods have been described for calculating the boundary conditions to determine the thermal state of the parts of the cylinder-piston group of such an engine with the use of theoretical formulas, empirical and semiempirical relations, and tabulated data. In modeling, we calculated the work of all systems of the engine (pumps, pipelines, heat exchangers) influencing directly or indirectly the thermal state of its cylinder-piston group. The nonstationary thermal state was calculated once in the operating cycle of the engine with the use of the cycle-averaged values of the local heat transfer coefficients and the resulting temperature of the medium. The personal computer counting time for one time step of a transport diesel engine of typical design with a number of units of the order of 500 was 5 s.

  13. An optimized ultra-fine energy group structure for neutron transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huria, Harish; Ouisloumen, Mohamed

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes an optimized energy group structure that was developed for neutron transport calculations in lattices using the Westinghouse lattice physics code PARAGON. The currently used 70-energy group structure results in significant discrepancies when the predictions are compared with those from the continuous energy Monte Carlo methods. The main source of the differences is the approximations employed in the resonance self-shielding methodology. This, in turn, leads to ambiguous adjustments in the resonance range cross-sections. The main goal of developing this group structure was to bypass the self-shielding methodology altogether thereby reducing the neutronic calculation errors. The proposed optimized energy mesh has 6064 points with 5877 points spanning the resonance range. The group boundaries in the resonance range were selected so that the micro group cross-sections matched reasonably well with those derived from reaction tallies of MCNP for a number of resonance absorbers of interest in reactor lattices. At the same time, however, the fast and thermal energy range boundaries were also adjusted to match the MCNP reaction rates in the relevant ranges. The resulting multi-group library was used to obtain eigenvalues for a wide variety of reactor lattice numerical benchmarks and also the Doppler reactivity defect benchmarks to establish its adequacy. (authors)

  14. Calculation of quasi-stationary states parameters within the algebraic version of the resonating group method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okhrimenko, I.P.

    1984-01-01

    The dynamical equations of the algebraic version of the resonating group method are used to determine the positions and the widths of quasi-stationary states or to find the poles of the S-matrix in the fourth quadrant of the K-plane. Concrete calculations are performed by the example of an α-decay of 8 Be. A comparison with the results of the other authors and experiment is made

  15. NULIF: neutron spectrum generator, few-group constant calculator, and fuel depletion code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittkopf, W.A.; Tilford, J.M.; Andrews, J.B. II; Kirschner, G.; Hassan, N.M.; Colpo, P.N.

    1977-02-01

    The NULIF code generates a microgroup neutron spectrum and calculates spectrum-weighted few-group parameters for use in a spatial diffusion code. A wide variety of fuel cells, non-fuel cells, and fuel lattices, typical of PWR (or BWR) lattices, are treated. A fuel depletion routine and change card capability allow a broad range of problems to be studied. Coefficient variation with fuel burnup, fuel temperature change, moderator temperature change, soluble boron concentration change, burnable poison variation, and control rod insertion are readily obtained. Heterogeneous effects, including resonance shielding and thermal flux depressions, are treated. Coefficients are obtained for one thermal group and up to three epithermal groups. A special output routine writes the few-group coefficient data in specified format on an output tape for automated fitting in the PDQ07-HARMONY system of spatial diffusion-depletion codes

  16. Multi-scale modeling of diffusion-controlled reactions in polymers: renormalisation of reactivity parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everaers, Ralf; Rosa, Angelo

    2012-01-07

    The quantitative description of polymeric systems requires hierarchical modeling schemes, which bridge the gap between the atomic scale, relevant to chemical or biomolecular reactions, and the macromolecular scale, where the longest relaxation modes occur. Here, we use the formalism for diffusion-controlled reactions in polymers developed by Wilemski, Fixman, and Doi to discuss the renormalisation of the reactivity parameters in polymer models with varying spatial resolution. In particular, we show that the adjustments are independent of chain length. As a consequence, it is possible to match reactions times between descriptions with different resolution for relatively short reference chains and to use the coarse-grained model to make quantitative predictions for longer chains. We illustrate our results by a detailed discussion of the classical problem of chain cyclization in the Rouse model, which offers the simplest example of a multi-scale descriptions, if we consider differently discretized Rouse models for the same physical system. Moreover, we are able to explore different combinations of compact and non-compact diffusion in the local and large-scale dynamics by varying the embedding dimension.

  17. Continuous energy Monte Carlo method based homogenization multi-group constants calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Mancang; Wang Kan; Yao Dong

    2012-01-01

    The efficiency of the standard two-step reactor physics calculation relies on the accuracy of multi-group constants from the assembly-level homogenization process. In contrast to the traditional deterministic methods, generating the homogenization cross sections via Monte Carlo method overcomes the difficulties in geometry and treats energy in continuum, thus provides more accuracy parameters. Besides, the same code and data bank can be used for a wide range of applications, resulting in the versatility using Monte Carlo codes for homogenization. As the first stage to realize Monte Carlo based lattice homogenization, the track length scheme is used as the foundation of cross section generation, which is straight forward. The scattering matrix and Legendre components, however, require special techniques. The Scattering Event method was proposed to solve the problem. There are no continuous energy counterparts in the Monte Carlo calculation for neutron diffusion coefficients. P 1 cross sections were used to calculate the diffusion coefficients for diffusion reactor simulator codes. B N theory is applied to take the leakage effect into account when the infinite lattice of identical symmetric motives is assumed. The MCMC code was developed and the code was applied in four assembly configurations to assess the accuracy and the applicability. At core-level, A PWR prototype core is examined. The results show that the Monte Carlo based multi-group constants behave well in average. The method could be applied to complicated configuration nuclear reactor core to gain higher accuracy. (authors)

  18. HERESY, 2-D Few-Group Static Eigenvalues Calculation for Thermal Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, D.R.

    1965-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: HERESY3 solves the two- dimensional, few-group, static reactor eigenvalue problem using the heterogeneous (source-sink or Feinburg-Galanin) formalism. The solution yields the reactor k-effective and absorption reaction rates for each rod normalized to the most absorptive rod in the thermal level. Epithermal fissions are allowed at each resonance level, and lattice-averaged values of thermal utilization, resonance escape probability, thermal and resonance eta values, and the fast fission factor are calculated. Kernels in the calculation are based on age-diffusion theory. Both finite reactor lattices and infinitely repeating reactor super-cells may be calculated. Rod parameters may be calculated by several internal options, and a direct interface is provided to a HAMMER system (NESC Abstract 277) lattice library tape to obtain cell parameters. Criticality searches are provided on thermal utilization, thermal eta, and axial leakage buckling. 2 - Method of solution: Direct power iteration on matrix form of the heterogeneous critical equation is used. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Maxima of - 50 flux/geometry symmetry positions; 20 physically different assemblies; 9 resonance levels; 5000 rod coordinate positions

  19. One-velocity neutron diffusion calculations based on a two-group reactor model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingulac, S; Radanovic, L; Lazarevic, B; Matausek, M; Pop-Jordanov, J [Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1965-07-01

    Many processes in reactor physics are described by the energy dependent neutron diffusion equations which for many practical purposes can often be reduced to one-dimensional two-group equations. Though such two-group models are satisfactory from the standpoint of accuracy, they require rather extensive computations which are usually iterative and involve the use of digital computers. In many applications, however, and particularly in dynamic analyses, where the studies are performed on analogue computers, it is preferable to avoid iterative calculations. The usual practice in such situations is to resort to one group models, which allow the solution to be expressed analytically. However, the loss in accuracy is rather great particularly when several media of different properties are involved. This paper describes a procedure by which the solution of the two-group neutron diffusion. equations can be expressed analytically in the form which, from the computational standpoint, is as simple as the one-group model, but retains the accuracy of the two-group treatment. In describing the procedure, the case of a multi-region nuclear reactor of cylindrical geometry is treated, but the method applied and the results obtained are of more general application. Another approach in approximate solution of diffusion equations, suggested by Galanin is applicable only in special ideal cases.

  20. Ab initio effective core potentials for molecular calculations. Potentials for main group elements Na to Bi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadt, W.R.; Hay, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    A consistent set of ab initio effective core potentials (ECP) has been generated for the main group elements from Na to Bi using the procedure originally developed by Kahn. The ECP's are derived from all-electron numerical Hartree--Fock atomic wave functions and fit to analytical representations for use in molecular calculations. For Rb to Bi the ECP's are generated from the relativistic Hartree--Fock atomic wave functions of Cowan which incorporate the Darwin and mass--velocity terms. Energy-optimized valence basis sets of (3s3p) primitive Gaussians are presented for use with the ECP's. Comparisons between all-electron and valence-electron ECP calculations are presented for NaF, NaCl, Cl 2 , Cl 2 - , Br 2 , Br 2 - , and Xe 2 + . The results show that the average errors introduced by the ECP's are generally only a few percent

  1. Numerical renormalization group calculation of impurity internal energy and specific heat of quantum impurity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merker, L.; Costi, T. A.

    2012-08-01

    We introduce a method to obtain the specific heat of quantum impurity models via a direct calculation of the impurity internal energy requiring only the evaluation of local quantities within a single numerical renormalization group (NRG) calculation for the total system. For the Anderson impurity model we show that the impurity internal energy can be expressed as a sum of purely local static correlation functions and a term that involves also the impurity Green function. The temperature dependence of the latter can be neglected in many cases, thereby allowing the impurity specific heat Cimp to be calculated accurately from local static correlation functions; specifically via Cimp=(∂Eionic)/(∂T)+(1)/(2)(∂Ehyb)/(∂T), where Eionic and Ehyb are the energies of the (embedded) impurity and the hybridization energy, respectively. The term involving the Green function can also be evaluated in cases where its temperature dependence is non-negligible, adding an extra term to Cimp. For the nondegenerate Anderson impurity model, we show by comparison with exact Bethe ansatz calculations that the results recover accurately both the Kondo induced peak in the specific heat at low temperatures as well as the high-temperature peak due to the resonant level. The approach applies to multiorbital and multichannel Anderson impurity models with arbitrary local Coulomb interactions. An application to the Ohmic two-state system and the anisotropic Kondo model is also given, with comparisons to Bethe ansatz calculations. The approach could also be of interest within other impurity solvers, for example, within quantum Monte Carlo techniques.

  2. VAMPIR - A two-group two-dimensional diffusion computer code for burnup calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zmijarevic, I.; Petrovic, I.

    1985-01-01

    VAMPIR is a computer code which simulates the burnup within a reactor coe. It computes the neutron flux, power distribution and burnup taking into account spatial variations of temperature and xenon poisoning. Its overall reactor calculation uses diffusion theory with finite differences approximation in X-Y or R-Z geometry. Two-group macroscopic cross section data are prepared by the lattice cell code WIMS-D4 and stored in the library form of multi entry tabulation against the various parameters that significantly affect the physical conditions in the reactor core. herein, the main features of the program are presented. (author)

  3. Percolation with first-and-second neighbour bonds: a renormalization-group calculation of critical exponents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riera, R.; Oliveira, P.M.C. de; Chaves, C.M.G.F.; Queiroz, S.L.A. de.

    1980-04-01

    A real-space renormalization group approach for the bond percolation problem in a square lattice with first- and second- neighbour bonds is proposed. The respective probabilities are treated, as independent variables. Two types of cells are constructed. In one of them the lattice is considered as two interpenetrating sublattices, first-neighbour bonds playing the role of intersublattice links. This allows the calculation of both critical exponents ν and γ, without resorting to any external field. Values found for the critical indices are in good agreement with data available in the literature. The phase diagram in parameter space is also obtained in each case. (Author) [pt

  4. Reports of the Working Group on Precision Calculations for the Z Resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardin, D.; Hollik, W.; Passarino, G.

    1995-01-01

    This Report summarizes the results of 12 months' activities of the Working Group on Precision Calculations for the Z Resonance, run at CERN in 1994. The main goal of the Working Group was to present a update of studies on radiative corrections for Z-resonance processes, integrating all new results that had appeared since the previous Workshop on ''Z Physics at LEP 1'', held in 1989. The Report is, however, more than a mere collection of the proceedings of the three general meetings held on January 14, March 31 and June 13, 1994. Three subgroups have been working in three related fields: electroweak physics, QCD at the Z resonance and Bhabha scattering in the luminosity region. An attempt has been made to present the final reports from these subgroups in a complete and homogeneous form. The subgroups' contributions in the three fields correspondingly comprise the three main parts of the Report. (orig.)

  5. Influence of six-quark bags on the NN interaction in a resonating group scattering calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zongye; Braeuer, K.; Faessler, A.; Shimizu, K.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of six-quark bags oin the nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction is studied in a dynamical calculation of the NN scattering process. The NN interaction is described by the exchange of gluons and pions between quarks and a phenomenological sigma-meson exchange between nucleons. The quark wave functions are harmonic oscillators and the relative wave function between the two nucleons is determined by the resonating group method. At short distances the NN system is allowed to fuse to a six-quark bag where all six quarks are in a ground state or where two quarks are in excited Op states. The sizes of these six-quark bags are dynamical parameters in the resonating group calculation allowing for spatial polarisation effects during the interaction. The S-wave NN scattering data can be reproduced by adjusting the sigma-coupling strength. The main result is that the six-quark bags with an increased radius have a large influence on the NN scattering process. (orig.)

  6. Development of a fine and ultra-fine group cell calculation code SLAROM-UF for fast reactor analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazama, Taira; Chiba, Go; Sugino, Kazuteru

    2006-01-01

    A cell calculation code SLAROM-UF has been developed for fast reactor analyses to produce effective cross sections with high accuracy in practical computing time, taking full advantage of fine and ultra-fine group calculation schemes. The fine group calculation covers the whole energy range in a maximum of 900-group structure. The structure is finer above 52.5 keV with a minimum lethargy width of 0.008. The ultra-fine group calculation solves the slowing down equation below 52.5 keV to treat resonance structures directly and precisely including resonance interference effects. Effective cross sections obtained in the two calculations are combined to produce effective cross sections over the entire energy range. Calculation accuracy and improvements from conventional 70-group cell calculation results were investigated through comparisons with reference values obtained with continuous energy Monte Carlo calculations. It was confirmed that SLAROM-UF reduces the difference in k-infinity from 0.15 to 0.01% for a JOYO MK-I fuel subassembly lattice cell calculation, and from - 0.21% to less than a statistical uncertainty of the reference calculation of 0.03% for a ZPPR-10A core criticality calculation. (author)

  7. Critical groups vs. representative person: dose calculations due to predicted releases from USEXA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, N.L.D., E-mail: nelson.luiz@ctmsp.mar.mil.br [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha (CTM/SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rochedo, E.R.R., E-mail: elainerochedo@gmail.com [Instituto de Radiprotecao e Dosimetria (lRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Mazzilli, B.P., E-mail: mazzilli@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The critical group cf Centro Experimental Aramar (CEA) site was previously defined based 00 the effluents releases to the environment resulting from the facilities already operational at CEA. In this work, effective doses are calculated to members of the critical group considering the predicted potential uranium releases from the Uranium Hexafluoride Production Plant (USEXA). Basically, this work studies the behavior of the resulting doses related to the type of habit data used in the analysis and two distinct situations are considered: (a) the utilization of average values obtained from official institutions (IBGE, IEA-SP, CNEN, IAEA) and from the literature; and (b) the utilization of the 95{sup tb} percentile of the values derived from distributions fit to the obtained habit data. The first option corresponds to the way that data was used for the definition of the critical group of CEA done in former assessments, while the second one corresponds to the use of data in deterministic assessments, as recommended by ICRP to estimate doses to the so--called 'representative person' . (author)

  8. Critical groups vs. representative person: dose calculations due to predicted releases from USEXA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, N.L.D.; Rochedo, E.R.R.; Mazzilli, B.P.

    2013-01-01

    The critical group cf Centro Experimental Aramar (CEA) site was previously defined based 00 the effluents releases to the environment resulting from the facilities already operational at CEA. In this work, effective doses are calculated to members of the critical group considering the predicted potential uranium releases from the Uranium Hexafluoride Production Plant (USEXA). Basically, this work studies the behavior of the resulting doses related to the type of habit data used in the analysis and two distinct situations are considered: (a) the utilization of average values obtained from official institutions (IBGE, IEA-SP, CNEN, IAEA) and from the literature; and (b) the utilization of the 95 tb percentile of the values derived from distributions fit to the obtained habit data. The first option corresponds to the way that data was used for the definition of the critical group of CEA done in former assessments, while the second one corresponds to the use of data in deterministic assessments, as recommended by ICRP to estimate doses to the so--called 'representative person' . (author)

  9. An analysis of confidence limit calculations used in AAPM Task Group No. 119

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knill, Cory; Snyder, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The report issued by AAPM Task Group No. 119 outlined a procedure for evaluating the effectiveness of IMRT commissioning. The procedure involves measuring gamma pass-rate indices for IMRT plans of standard phantoms and determining if the results fall within a confidence limit set by assuming normally distributed data. As stated in the TG report, the assumption of normally distributed gamma pass rates is a convenient approximation for commissioning purposes, but may not accurately describe the data. Here the authors attempt to better describe gamma pass-rate data by fitting it to different distributions. The authors then calculate updated confidence limits using those distributions and compare them to those derived using TG No. 119 method. Methods: Gamma pass-rate data from 111 head and neck patients are fitted using the TG No. 119 normal distribution, a truncated normal distribution, and a Weibull distribution. Confidence limits to 95% are calculated for each and compared. A more general analysis of the expected differences between the TG No. 119 method of determining confidence limits and a more time-consuming curve fitting method is performed. Results: The TG No. 119 standard normal distribution does not fit the measured data. However, due to the small range of measured data points, the inaccuracy of the fit has only a small effect on the final value of the confidence limits. The confidence limits for the 111 patient plans are within 0.1% of each other for all distributions. The maximum expected difference in confidence limits, calculated using TG No. 119's approximation and a truncated distribution, is 1.2%. Conclusions: A three-parameter Weibull probability distribution more accurately fits the clinical gamma index pass-rate data than the normal distribution adopted by TG No. 119. However, the sensitivity of the confidence limit on distribution fit is low outside of exceptional circumstances.

  10. Ab Initio Calculations on Halogen Bond Between N-Br and Electron-donating Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yan-hua; CHEN Xue-song; ZOU Jian-wei; YU Qing-sen

    2007-01-01

    Ab initio calculations of complexes formed between N-bromosuccinimide and a series of electron-donating groups were performed at the level of MP2/Lanl2DZ* to gain a deeper insight into the nature of the N-Br halogen stronger halogen-bonding complex than the C-Br. A comparison of neutral hydrogen bond complex series reveals that the electron-donating capacities of the atoms decrease in the order, N>O>S; O(sp3)>O(sp2), which is adequate for the C-Br halogen bonding. Interaction energies, in conjunction with the geometrical parameters show that the affinitive capacity of trihalide anions X-3 with N-bromosuccinimide are markedly lower than that of the corresponding X- with N-bromosuccinimide, even lower than those of neutral molecules with N-bromosuccinimide. AIM analyses further confirmed the above results.

  11. Dissipative exciton transfer in donor-bridge-acceptor systems: numerical renormalization group calculation of equilibrium properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tornow, Sabine [Theoretische Physik III, Elektronische Korrelationen und Magnetismus, Universitaet Augsburg, 86135 Augsburg (Germany); Tong, Ning-Hua [Institut fuer Theorie der Kondensierten Materie, Universitaet Karlsruhe, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bulla, Ralf [Theoretische Physik III, Elektronische Korrelationen und Magnetismus, Universitaet Augsburg, 86135 Augsburg (Germany)

    2006-07-05

    We present a detailed model study of exciton transfer processes in donor-bridge-acceptor (DBA) systems. Using a model which includes the intermolecular Coulomb interaction and the coupling to a dissipative environment we calculate the phase diagram, the absorption spectrum as well as dynamic equilibrium properties with the numerical renormalization group. This method is non-perturbative and therefore allows one to cover the full parameter space, especially the case when the intermolecular Coulomb interaction is of the same order as the coupling to the environment and perturbation theory cannot be applied. For DBA systems with up to six sites we found a transition to the localized phase (self-trapping) depending on the coupling to the dissipative environment. We discuss various criteria which favour delocalized exciton transfer.

  12. Dissipative exciton transfer in donor-bridge-acceptor systems: numerical renormalization group calculation of equilibrium properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornow, Sabine; Tong, Ning-Hua; Bulla, Ralf

    2006-07-05

    We present a detailed model study of exciton transfer processes in donor-bridge-acceptor (DBA) systems. Using a model which includes the intermolecular Coulomb interaction and the coupling to a dissipative environment we calculate the phase diagram, the absorption spectrum as well as dynamic equilibrium properties with the numerical renormalization group. This method is non-perturbative and therefore allows one to cover the full parameter space, especially the case when the intermolecular Coulomb interaction is of the same order as the coupling to the environment and perturbation theory cannot be applied. For DBA systems with up to six sites we found a transition to the localized phase (self-trapping) depending on the coupling to the dissipative environment. We discuss various criteria which favour delocalized exciton transfer.

  13. First principles calculation of material properties of group IV elements and III-V compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Brad Dean

    This thesis presents first principles calculations on the properties of group IV elements and group III-V compounds. It includes investigations into what structure a material is likely to form in, and given that structure, what are its electronic, optical, and lattice dynamical properties as well as what are the properties of defects that might be introduced into the sample. The thesis is divided as follows: • Chapter 1 contains some of the conceptual foundations used in the present work. These involve the major approximations which allow us to approach the problem of systems with huge numbers of interacting electrons and atomic cores. • Then, in Chapter 2, we discuss one of the major limitations to the DFT formalism introduced in Chapter 1, namely its inability to predict the quasiparticle spectra of materials and in particular the band gap of a semiconductor. We introduce a Green's function approach to the electron self-energy Sigma known as the GW approximation and use it to compute the quasiparticle band structures of a number of group IV and III-V semiconductors. • In Chapter 3 we present a first-principles study of a number of high-pressure metastable phases of Si with tetrahedral bonding. The phases studied include all experimentally determined phases that result from decompression from the metallic beta-Sn phase, specifically the BC8 (Si-III), hexagonal diamond (Si-IV), and R8 (Si-XII). In addition to these, we also study the hypothetical ST12 structure found upon decompression from beta-Sn in germanium. • Our attention is then turned to the first principles calculations of optical properties in Chapter 4. The Bethe-Salpeter equation is then solved to obtain the optical spectrum of this material including electron-hole interactions. The calculated optical spectrum is compared with experimental data for other forms of silicon commonly used in photovoltaic devices, namely the cubic, polycrystalline, and amorphous forms. • In Chapter 5 we present

  14. Impact of obesity on pregnancy outcome in different ethnic groups: calculating population attributable fractions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Oteng-Ntim

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To quantify the proportion of adverse pregnancy outcome attributable to maternal obesity. DESIGN: Cross sectional analysis of routine obstetric dataset. SETTING: Guy's and St Thomas's NHS Foundation Trust (GSTFT. POPULATION: 23,668 women who had singleton deliveries at GSTFT between 2004 and 2008. METHODS: Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between BMI and outcome in different ethnic groups. Adjusted odds ratios, and the proportions of obese women, were used to calculate population attributable risk fractions (PAFs. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: (I MATERNAL OUTCOMES: diabetes, type of delivery, post-partum haemorrhage, and preterm delivery. (ii Perinatal outcomes: macrosomia, low birth weight, admission to neonatal intensive care/special care baby unit, and perinatal death. RESULTS: The prevalence of maternal obesity was 14%. Increasing BMI was independently associated with increasing risk of adverse obstetric and neonatal outcome. At the individual level, the effect of obesity on diabetes was highest in Asian women compared to white women (p for interaction = 0.03. Calculation of population attributable risk fractions demonstrated that one third of diabetes cases and one in six Caesarean sections could be avoided in this population if all obese women were of normal BMI. At the population level, the contribution of obesity to diabetes was highest for Black women (42%, and lowest for oriental women (8%. Seven percent of neonatal macrosomia in all the population, and 13% in Black mothers, were attributable to obesity. CONCLUSIONS: Preventing obesity prior to pregnancy will substantially reduce the burden of obstetric and neonatal morbidity in this population. This reduction will be higher in Black women.

  15. Superposition of configurations in semiempirical calculation of iron group ion spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantseryavichyus, A.Yu.; Ramonas, A.A.

    1976-01-01

    The energy spectra of ions from the iron group in the dsup(N), dsup(N)s, dsup(N)p configurations are studied. A semiempirical method is used in which the effective hamiltonian contains configuration superposition. The sdsup(N+1), psup(4)dsup(N+2) quasidegenerated configurations, as well as configurations which differ by one electron are taken as correction configurations. It follows from the calculations that the most important role among the quasidegenerate configurations is played by the sdsup(N+1) correctional configuration. When it is taken into account, the introduction of the psup(4)dsup(N+2) correctional configuration practically does not affect the results. Account of the dsup(N-1)s configuration in the second order of the perturbation theory is equivalent to that of sdsup(N+1) in the sense that it results in the identical mean square deviation. As follows from the comparison of the results of the approximate and complete account of the configuration superposition, in many cases one can be satisfied with its approximate and complete account of the configuration superposition, in many cases one can be satisfied with its approximate version. The results are presented in the form of tables including the values of empirical parameters, radial integrals, mean square errors, etc

  16. Study on the surface hydroxyl group on solid breeding materials by ab-initio calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Satoru; Taniguchi, Masaki [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-10-01

    The nature of -OH on the surface of Li{sub 2}O was analyzed with the ab-initio quantum chemical calculation technique. Calculation results showed that the stretching vibration of O-H is affected by the chemical species around the -OH. (author)

  17. A group of neutronics calculations in the MNSR using the MCNP-4C code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattab, K.; Sulieman, I.

    2009-11-01

    The MCNP-4C code was used to model the 3-D core configuration for the Syrian Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR). The continuous energy neutron cross sections were evaluated from ENDF/B-VI library to calculate the thermal and fast neutron fluxes in the MNSR inner and outer irradiation sites. The thermal fluxes in the MNSR inner irradiation sites were measured for the first time using the multiple foil activation method. Good agreements were noticed between the calculated and measured results. This model is used as well to calculate neutron flux spectrum in the reactor inner and outer irradiation sites and the reactor thermal power. Three 3-D neutronic models for the Syrian MNSR reactor using the MCNP-4C code were developed also to assess the possibility of fuel conversion from 89.87 % HEU fuel (UAl 4 -Al) to 19.75 % LEU fuel (UO 2 ). This model is used in this paper to calculate the following reactor core physics parameters: clean cold core excess reactivity, calibration of the control rod worth and calculation its shut down margin, calibration of the top beryllium shim plate reflector, axial neutron flux distributions in the inner and outer irradiation sites and the kinetics parameters ( ι p l and β e ff). (authors)

  18. Large-dimension configuration-interaction calculations of positron binding to the group-II atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromley, M. W. J.; Mitroy, J.

    2006-01-01

    The configuration-interaction (CI) method is applied to the calculation of the structures of a number of positron binding systems, including e + Be, e + Mg, e + Ca, and e + Sr. These calculations were carried out in orbital spaces containing about 200 electron and 200 positron orbitals up to l=12. Despite the very large dimensions, the binding energy and annihilation rate converge slowly with l, and the final values do contain an appreciable correction obtained by extrapolating the calculation to the l→∞ limit. The binding energies were 0.00317 hartree for e + Be, 0.0170 hartree for e + Mg, 0.0189 hartree for e + Ca, and 0.0131 hartree for e + Sr

  19. Electronic, vibrational and related properties of group IV metal oxides by ab initio calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite Alves, H.W.; Silva, C.C.; Lino, A.T.; Borges, P.D.; Scolfaro, L.M.R.; Silva, E.F. da

    2008-01-01

    We present our theoretical results for the structural, electronic, vibrational and optical properties of MO 2 (M = Sn, Zr, Hf and Ti) obtained by first-principles calculations. Relativistic effects are demonstrated to be important for a realistic description of the detailed structure of the electronic frequency-dependent dielectric function, as well as of the carrier effective masses. Based on our results, we found that the main contribution of the high values calculated for the oxides dielectric constants arises from the vibrational properties of these oxides, and the vibrational static dielectric constant values diminish with increasing pressure

  20. An efficient methodology of two groups spatial calculation for neutronic state and sensisivity coefficients in fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jachic, J.

    1985-01-01

    It is presented the ONEDM neutronic simulator for RZ spatial calculation, two energy groups, aiming at researching and optimization of a low power fast reactor design. The simulator's methodology is based in RZ calculation from radial and axial calculation iteractively coupled and in macroscopic cross sections corrected by power density and asymmetry of the spectrum in the feedback process with phase library for reference neutronic state. The transversal area which are determined by energy groups and material region in the iteration are introduced in the spatial calculation. The simulator efficiency is tested and compared with the CITATION and 2DB codes. The cross sections are generated by 1DX code. (M.C.K.) [pt

  1. Global calculation of PWR reactor core using the two group energy solution by the response matrix method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conti, C.F.S.; Watson, F.V.

    1991-01-01

    A computational code to solve a two energy group neutron diffusion problem has been developed base d on the Response Matrix Method. That method solves the global problem of PWR core, without using the cross sections homogenization process, thus it is equivalent to a pontwise core calculation. The present version of the code calculates the response matrices by the first order perturbative method and considers developments on arbitrary order Fourier series for the boundary fluxes and interior fluxes. (author)

  2. Miniworkshop on Methods of Electronic Structure Calculations and Working Group on Disordered Alloys

    CERN Document Server

    Andersen, O K; Mookerjee, A

    1994-01-01

    Developments in the density functional theory and the methods of electronic structure calculations have made it possible to carry out ab-initio studies of a variety of materials efficiently and at a predictable level. This book covers many of those state-of-the-art developments and their applications to ordered and disordered materials, surfaces and interfaces and clusters, etc.

  3. Calculating the Ionization Constant of Functional Groups of Carboxyl Ion Exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meychik, N. R.; Stepanov, S. I.; Nikolaeva, Yu. I.

    2018-02-01

    The potentiometric titration of a weakly basic carboxyl cation exchanger, obtained via alkaline hydrolysis of an acrylonitrile copolymer with divinyl benzene (degree of crosslinking, 12%) in a wide range of variation in a solution of pH (2-12) and NaCl (concentration 0.01, 0.1, 0.5, 1 M), is considered. The maximum ion-exchange capacity of the ion exchanger for Na+ is determined (10.10 ± 0.088 mmol/g of the dry mass) and found to be independent of the solution's ionic strength. It is established that in the investigated range of NaCl concentrations and pH, the acid-base balance is adequately described by Gregor's equation. The parameters of this equation are calculated as a function of the NaCl concentration: p K a = 8.13 ± 0.04, n = 1.50 ± 0.02 for 0.01 M; p K a = 6.56 ± 0.04, n = 2.60 ± 0.07 for 0.1 M; and p K a = 5.66 ± 0.6, n = 2.62 ± 0.06 for 0.5 and 1 M. It is shown that to describe the acid-base balance correctly within the proposed model we must estimate the adequacy of the experimental and calculated values of the ion exchanger's capacity at each pH value according to the calculated parameters of Gregor's equation.

  4. Reference quantum chemical calculations on RNA base pairs directly involving the 2'-OH group of ribose

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šponer, Jiří; Zgarbová, M.; Jurečka, Petr; Riley, K.E.; Šponer, Judit E.; Hobza, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 4 (2009), s. 1166-1179 ISSN 1549-9618 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040802; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400550701; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06030; GA MŠk(CZ) LC512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : RNA * ribose * quantum calculations Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.804, year: 2009

  5. Monte Carlo electron-transport calculations for clinical beams using energy grouping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, S P; Anderson, D W; Lindstrom, D G

    1986-01-01

    A Monte Carlo program has been utilized to study the penetration of broad electron beams into a water phantom. The MORSE-E code, originally developed for neutron and photon transport, was chosen for adaptation to electrons because of its versatility. The electron energy degradation model employed logarithmic spacing of electron energy groups and included effects of elastic scattering, inelastic-moderate-energy-loss-processes and inelastic-large-energy-loss-processes (catastrophic). Energy straggling and angular deflections were modeled from group to group, using the Moeller cross section for energy loss, and Goudsmit-Saunderson theory to describe angular deflections. The resulting energy- and electron-deposition distributions in depth were obtained at 10 and 20 MeV and are compared with ETRAN results and broad beam experimental data from clinical accelerators.

  6. Extreme group index measured and calculated in 2D SOI-based photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavrinenko, Andrei; Jacobsen, Rune Shim; Fage-Pedersen, Jacob

    2005-01-01

    lattice of air-holes in the 216-nm thick silicon layer in an SOI material. Experimental transmission spectra show a mode cut-off around 1562.5 nm for the fundamental photonic bandgap mode. In order to measure and model the group index of modes in the PCW, a time-of-flight (ToF) method is applied....

  7. Reports of the working groups on precision calculations for LEP2 physics. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jadach, S.; Passarino, G.; Pittau, R.

    2000-01-01

    This is the report of the LEP2 Monte Carlo Workshop held at CERN from 1999 to 2000. It consists of four parts. In the first part, the most recent developments in the calculation of four-fermion processes in electron-positron collisions at LEP2 are presented, concentrating on predictions for four main reactions: W-pair production, visible photons in four-fermion events, single-W production, and Z-pair production. Based on a comparison of results within different approaches, theoretical uncertainties on these prediction are established. The second part is devoted to QCD issues, focusing on improving the understanding and the Monte Carlo simulation of multijet final states due to hard QCD processes at LEP, i.e. quark-antiquark plus multigluon and/or secondary quark production, with particular emphasis on four-jet final states and b-quark mass effects. Specific topics covered are: relevant developments in the main event generators; description and tuning of inclusive (all-flavour) jet rates; quark mass effects in the three- and four-jet rates; mass, higher-order and hadronization effects in four-jet angular and shape distributions; b-quark fragmentation and gluon splitting into b-quarks. In the third part, γγ physics is discussed. After a detailed description of the physics modelling of the most recent versions of the currently available codes, comparisons between the results of the different event generators, as well as between LEP data and the theoretical predictions are presented, together with the problem of background due to γγ processes in searches for new particles. In the last part, recent developments in the theoretical calculation of two-fermion processes are reported. The Bhabha process and the production of muon, tau, neutrino and quark pairs is covered. On the basis of comparison of various calculations, theoretical uncertainties are estimated and compared with those needed for the final LEP2 data analysis. The subjects for further study are identified

  8. Calculation of anisotropic few-group constants in asymptotic cells: the code ANICELL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devenyi, A.

    1985-10-01

    The theoretical background of the ANICELL computer program together with a user's manual is presented. ANICELL is a nuclear reactor neutron transport code which solves the traditional asymptotic and the so-called tilted flux transport problems in one-dimensional cylindrical geometry using linearly anisotropic scattering. The method of solution used is the first flight collision probability technique. Few-group constants including radial and axial diffusion coefficients for the cell are also prepared by the program. (author)

  9. Calculation of the mean differential group delay of periodically spun, randomly birefringent fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galtarossa, Andrea; Griggio, Paola; Pizzinat, Anna; Palmieri, Luca

    2002-05-01

    Spinning is one of the most effective and well-known ways to reduce polarization mode dispersion of optical fibers. In spite of the popularity of spinning, a detailed theory of spin effects is still lacking. We report an analytical expression for the mean differential group delay of a randomly birefringent spun fiber. The result holds for any periodic spin function with a period shorter than the fiber's beat length.

  10. A one-dimensional, one-group absorption-production nodal method for neutron flux and power distributions calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, C.R.

    1984-01-01

    It is presented the absorption-production nodal method for steady and dynamical calculations in one-dimension and one group energy. It was elaborated the NOD1D computer code (in FORTRAN-IV language). Calculations of neutron flux and power distributions, burnup, effective multiplication factors and critical boron concentration were made with the NOD1D code and compared with results obtained through the CITATION code, which uses the finite difference method. The nuclear constants were produced by the LEOPARD code. (M.C.K.) [pt

  11. ESELEM 4: a code for calculating fine neutron spectrum and multi-group cross sections in plate lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Masayuki; Katsuragi, Satoru; Narita, Hideo.

    1976-07-01

    The multi-group treatment has been used in the design study of fast reactors and analysis of experiments at fast critical assemblies. The accuracy of the multi-group cross sections therefore affects strongly the results of these analyses. The ESELEM 4 code has been developed to produce multi-group cross sections with an advanced method from the nuclear data libraries used in the JAERI Fast set. ESELEM 4 solves integral transport equation by the collision probability method in plate lattice geometry to obtain the fine neutron spectrum. A typical fine group mesh width is 0.008 in lethargy unit. The multi-group cross sections are calculated by weighting the point data with the fine structure neutron flux. Some devices are applied to reduce computation time and computer core storage required for the calculation. The slowing down sources are calculated with the use of a recurrence formula derived for elastic and inelastic scattering. The broad group treatment is adopted above 2 MeV for dealing with both light any heavy elements. Also the resonance cross sections of heavy elements are represented in a broad group structure, for which we use the values of the JAERI Fast set. The library data are prepared by the PRESM code from ENDF/A type nuclear data files. The cross section data can be compactly stored in the fast computer core memory for saving the core storage and data processing time. The programme uses the variable dimensions to increase its flexibility. The users' guide for ESELEM 4 and PRESM is also presented in this report. (auth.)

  12. Monitor unit calculations for external photon and electron beams: Report of the AAPM Therapy Physics Committee Task Group No. 71

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbons, John P., E-mail: john.gibbons@marybird.com [Department of Physics, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70809 (United States); Antolak, John A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Followill, David S. [Department of Radiation Physics, UT M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Huq, M. Saiful [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15232 (United States); Klein, Eric E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Lam, Kwok L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Palta, Jatinder R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Roback, Donald M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Centers of North Carolina, Raleigh, North Carolina 27607 (United States); Reid, Mark [Department of Medical Physics, Fletcher-Allen Health Care, Burlington, Vermont 05401 (United States); Khan, Faiz M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    A protocol is presented for the calculation of monitor units (MU) for photon and electron beams, delivered with and without beam modifiers, for constant source-surface distance (SSD) and source-axis distance (SAD) setups. This protocol was written by Task Group 71 of the Therapy Physics Committee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and has been formally approved by the AAPM for clinical use. The protocol defines the nomenclature for the dosimetric quantities used in these calculations, along with instructions for their determination and measurement. Calculations are made using the dose per MU under normalization conditions, D{sub 0}{sup ′}, that is determined for each user's photon and electron beams. For electron beams, the depth of normalization is taken to be the depth of maximum dose along the central axis for the same field incident on a water phantom at the same SSD, where D{sub 0}{sup ′} = 1 cGy/MU. For photon beams, this task group recommends that a normalization depth of 10 cm be selected, where an energy-dependent D{sub 0}{sup ′} ≤ 1 cGy/MU is required. This recommendation differs from the more common approach of a normalization depth of d{sub m}, with D{sub 0}{sup ′} = 1 cGy/MU, although both systems are acceptable within the current protocol. For photon beams, the formalism includes the use of blocked fields, physical or dynamic wedges, and (static) multileaf collimation. No formalism is provided for intensity modulated radiation therapy calculations, although some general considerations and a review of current calculation techniques are included. For electron beams, the formalism provides for calculations at the standard and extended SSDs using either an effective SSD or an air-gap correction factor. Example tables and problems are included to illustrate the basic concepts within the presented formalism.

  13. Migros-3: a code for the generation of group constants for reactor calculations from neutron nuclear data in KEDAK format

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broeders, I.; Krieg, B.

    1977-01-01

    The code MIGROS-3 was developed from MIGROS-2. The main advantage of MIGROS-3 is its compatibility with the new conventions of the latest version of the Karlsruhe nuclear data library, KEDAK-3. Moreover, to some extent refined physical models were used and numerical methods were improved. MIGROS-3 allows the calculation of microscopic group cross sections of the ABBN type from isotopic neutron data given in KEDAK-format. All group constants, necessary for diffusion-, consistent P 1 - and Ssub(N)-calculations can be generated. Anisotropy of elastic scattering can be taken into account up to P 5 . A description of the code and the underlying theory is given. The input and output description, a sample problem and the program lists are provided. (orig.) [de

  14. Ammonia IRMS-TPD measurements and DFT calculation on acidic hydroxyl groups in CHA-type zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Katsuki; Sastre, German; Katada, Naonobu; Niwa, Miki

    2007-12-07

    Brønsted acidity of H-chabazite (CHA) zeolites (Si : Al(2) = 4.2) was investigated by means of ammonia infrared-mass spectrometry/temperature-programmed desorption (IRMS-TPD) methods and density functional calculations. Four IR bands were observed at 3644, 3616, 3575 and 3538 cm(-1), and they were ascribable to the acidic OH groups on four nonequivalent oxygen sites in the CHA structure. The absorption band at 3538 cm(-1) was attributed to the O(4)H in the 6-membered ring (MR), and ammonia adsorption energy (DeltaU) of this OH group was the lowest among the 4 kinds of OH groups. The other 3 bands were assigned to the acidic OH groups in 8MR. It was observed that the DeltaU in 8 and 6MR were 131 (+/-3) and 101 kJ mol(-1), respectively. On the other hand, the density functional theory (DFT) calculations within periodic boundary conditions yielded the adsorption energies on these OH groups in 8 and 6MR to be ca. 130 and 110 kJ mol(-1), respectively, in good agreement with the experimentally-observed values.

  15. The effect of hydroxyl groups on the stability and thermodynamic properties of polyhydroxylated xanthones as calculated by density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu, Ruijuan; Liu, Hongxia; Zhang, Qi; Flamm, Alison; Yang, Xi; Wang, Zunyao

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The strength of the hydrogen bonds existed in PHOXTHs is ascertained. ► Good linear relations exist between the thermodynamic properties and N PHOS . ► The relative stability order of PHOXTH congeners is theoretically proposed. ► There is a good relation between C p,m and the temperature. - Abstract: There are three types of intramolecular hydrogen bonds with bond energy about 52 kJ mol −1 , 12 kJ mol −1 , 20 kJ mol −1 , respectively in PHOXTHs which were determined by computation on B3LYP/6-311G** level. The internal rotational potentials of the hydroxy group of 1-MHOXTH and 4′-MHOXTH are evaluated, and the influences of the spatial orientation of the hydroxy groups on the intramolecular hydrogen bonds and molecular stability are illustrated. The standard enthalpy of formation (Δ f H θ ) and standard Gibbs energy of formation (Δ f G θ ) for the most stable conformation of 135 PHOXTHs are calculated by the combination of Gaussian 03 and isodesmic reactions and the theoretical order of relative stability is proposed according to the relative magnitude of calculated Δ f G θ values. In addition, the values of molar heat capacities at constant pressure (C p,m ) from 200 to 1000 K for PHOXTH congeners are calculated.

  16. Spin orbit coupling for molecular ab initio density matrix renormalization group calculations: Application to g-tensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roemelt, Michael, E-mail: michael.roemelt@theochem.rub.de [Lehrstuhl für Theoretische Chemie, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum, Germany and Max-Planck Institut für Kohlenforschung, Kaiser-Wilhelm-Platz 1, 45470 Mülheim an der Ruhr (Germany)

    2015-07-28

    Spin Orbit Coupling (SOC) is introduced to molecular ab initio density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) calculations. In the presented scheme, one first approximates the electronic ground state and a number of excited states of the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) Hamiltonian with the aid of the DMRG algorithm. Owing to the spin-adaptation of the algorithm, the total spin S is a good quantum number for these states. After the non-relativistic DMRG calculation is finished, all magnetic sublevels of the calculated states are constructed explicitly, and the SOC operator is expanded in the resulting basis. To this end, spin orbit coupled energies and wavefunctions are obtained as eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the full Hamiltonian matrix which is composed of the SOC operator matrix and the BO Hamiltonian matrix. This treatment corresponds to a quasi-degenerate perturbation theory approach and can be regarded as the molecular equivalent to atomic Russell-Saunders coupling. For the evaluation of SOC matrix elements, the full Breit-Pauli SOC Hamiltonian is approximated by the widely used spin-orbit mean field operator. This operator allows for an efficient use of the second quantized triplet replacement operators that are readily generated during the non-relativistic DMRG algorithm, together with the Wigner-Eckart theorem. With a set of spin-orbit coupled wavefunctions at hand, the molecular g-tensors are calculated following the scheme proposed by Gerloch and McMeeking. It interprets the effective molecular g-values as the slope of the energy difference between the lowest Kramers pair with respect to the strength of the applied magnetic field. Test calculations on a chemically relevant Mo complex demonstrate the capabilities of the presented method.

  17. Calculation procedure for formulating lauric and palmitic fat blends based on the grouping of triacylglycerol melting points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. P. Nusantoro

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A calculation procedure for formulating lauric and palmitic fat blends has been developed based on grouping TAG melting points. This procedure offered more flexibility in choosing the initial fats and oils and eventually gave deeper insight into the existing chemical compositions and better prediction on the physicochemical properties and microstructure of the fat blends. The amount of high, medium and low melting TAGs could be adjusted using the given calculation procedure to obtain the desired functional properties in the fat blends. Solid fat contents and melting behavior of formulated fat blends showed particular patterns with respect to ratio adjustments of the melting TAG groups. These outcomes also suggested that both TAG species and their quantity had a significant influence on the crystallization behavior of the fat blends. Palmitic fat blends, in general, were found to exhibit higher SFC values than those of Lauric fat blends. Instead of the similarity in crystal microstructure, lauric fat blends were stabilized at β polymorph while palmitic fat blends were stabilized at β’ polymorph.

  18. Calculation procedure for formulating lauric and palmitic fat blends based on the grouping of triacylglycerol melting points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nusantoro, B.P.; Yanty, N.A.M.; Van de Walle, D.; Hidayat, C.; Danthine, S.; Dewettinck, K.

    2017-01-01

    A calculation procedure for formulating lauric and palmitic fat blends has been developed based on grouping TAG melting points. This procedure offered more flexibility in choosing the initial fats and oils and eventually gave deeper insight into the existing chemical compositions and better prediction on the physicochemical properties and microstructure of the fat blends. The amount of high, medium and low melting TAGs could be adjusted using the given calculation procedure to obtain the desired functional properties in the fat blends. Solid fat contents and melting behavior of formulated fat blends showed particular patterns with respect to ratio adjustments of the melting TAG groups. These outcomes also suggested that both TAG species and their quantity had a significant influence on the crystallization behavior of the fat blends. Palmitic fat blends, in general, were found to exhibit higher SFC values than those of Lauric fat blends. Instead of the similarity in crystal microstructure, lauric fat blends were stabilized at β polymorph while palmitic fat blends were stabilized at β’ polymorph. [es

  19. Calculations of two new dose metrics proposed by AAPM Task Group 111 using the measurements with standard CT dosimetry phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: AAPM Task Group 111 proposed to measure the equilibrium dose-pitch product D-caret eq for scan modes involving table translation and the midpoint dose D L (0) for stationary-table modes on the central and peripheral axes of sufficiently long (e.g., at least 40 cm) phantoms. This paper presents an alternative approach to calculate both metrics using the measurements of scanning the standard computed tomographic (CT) dosimetry phantoms on CT scanners.Methods: D-caret eq was calculated from CTDI 100 and ε(CTDI 100 ) (CTDI 100 efficiency), and D L (0) was calculated from D-caret eq and the approach to equilibrium function H(L) =D L (0)/D eq , where D eq was the equilibrium dose. CTDI 100 may be directly obtained from several sources (such as medical physicist's CT scanner performance evaluation or the IMPACT CT patient dosimetry calculator), or be derived from CTDI Vol using the central to peripheral CTDI 100 ratio (R 100 ). The authors have provided the required ε(CTDI 100 ) and H(L) data in two previous papers [X. Li, D. Zhang, and B. Liu, Med. Phys. 39, 901–905 (2012); and ibid. 40, 031903 (10pp.) (2013)]. R 100 was assessed for a series of GE, Siemens, Philips, and Toshiba CT scanners with multiple settings of scan field of view, tube voltage, and bowtie filter.Results: The calculated D L (0) and D L (0)/D eq in PMMA and water cylinders were consistent with the measurements on two GE CT scanners (LightSpeed 16 and VCT) by Dixon and Ballard [Med. Phys. 34, 3399–3413 (2007)], the measurements on a Siemens CT scanner (SOMATOM Spirit Power) by Descamps et al. [J. Appl. Clin. Med. Phys. 13, 293–302 (2012)], and the Monte Carlo simulations by Boone [Med. Phys. 36, 4547–4554 (2009)].Conclusions: D-caret eq and D L (0) can be calculated using the alternative approach. The authors have provided the required ε(CTDI 100 ) and H(L) data in two previous papers. R 100 is presented for a majority of multidetector CT scanners currently on the market, and can be

  20. Two-group k-eigenvalue benchmark calculations for planar geometry transport in a binary stochastic medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, I.M.; Palmer, T.S.

    2005-01-01

    Benchmark calculations are performed for neutron transport in a two material (binary) stochastic multiplying medium. Spatial, angular, and energy dependence are included. The problem considered is based on a fuel assembly of a common pressurized water reactor. The mean chord length through the assembly is determined and used as the planar geometry system length. According to assumed or calculated material distributions, this system length is populated with alternating fuel and moderator segments of random size. Neutron flux distributions are numerically computed using a discretized form of the Boltzmann transport equation employing diffusion synthetic acceleration. Average quantities (group fluxes and k-eigenvalue) and variances are calculated from an ensemble of realizations of the mixing statistics. The effects of varying two parameters in the fuel, two different boundary conditions, and three different sets of mixing statistics are assessed. A probability distribution function (PDF) of the k-eigenvalue is generated and compared with previous research. Atomic mix solutions are compared with these benchmark ensemble average flux and k-eigenvalue solutions. Mixing statistics with large standard deviations give the most widely varying ensemble solutions of the flux and k-eigenvalue. The shape of the k-eigenvalue PDF qualitatively agrees with previous work. Its overall shape is independent of variations in fuel cross-sections for the problems considered, but its width is impacted by these variations. Statistical distributions with smaller standard deviations alter the shape of this PDF toward a normal distribution. The atomic mix approximation yields large over-predictions of the ensemble average k-eigenvalue and under-predictions of the flux. Qualitatively correct flux shapes are obtained in some cases. These benchmark calculations indicate that a model which includes higher statistical moments of the mixing statistics is needed for accurate predictions of binary

  1. Avoiding the Goldstone Boson Catastrophe in general renormalisable field theories at two loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braathen, Johannes; Goodsell, Mark D. [LPTHE, UPMC University Paris 06, Sorbonne Universités,4 Place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris (France); LPTHE, CNRS,4 Place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris (France)

    2016-12-14

    We show how the infra-red divergences associated to Goldstone bosons in the minimum condition of the two-loop Landau-gauge effective potential can be avoided in general field theories. This extends the resummation formalism recently developed for the Standard Model and the MSSM, and we give compact, infra-red finite expressions in closed form for the tadpole equations. We also show that the results at this loop order are equivalent to (and are most easily obtained by) imposing an “on-shell” condition for the Goldstone bosons. Moreover, we extend the approach to show how the infra-red divergences in the calculation of the masses of neutral scalars (such as the Higgs boson) can be eliminated. For the mass computation, we specialise to the gaugeless limit and extend the effective potential computation to allow the masses to be determined without needing to solve differential equations for the loop functions — opening the door to fast, infra-red safe determinations of the Higgs mass in general theories.

  2. METHODOLOGY AND CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF WASTE GROUPS FOR THE LARGE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WEBER RA

    2009-01-16

    a waste group B (or A) tank identifies the potential for an induced flammable gas release hazard, the hazard only exists for specific operations that can release the retained gas in the tank at a rate and quantity that results in reaching 100% of the lower flammability limit in the tank headspace. The identification and evaluation of tank farm operations that could cause an induced flammable gas release hazard in a waste group B (or A) tank are included in other documents. The third criterion is the buoyancy ratio. This criterion addresses tanks that are not waste group C double-shell tanks and have an energy ratio {ge} 3.0. For these double-shell tanks, the buoyancy ratio considers whether the saturated solids can retain sufficient gas to exceed neutral buoyancy relative to the supernatant layer and therefore have buoyant displacement gas release events. If the buoyancy ratio is {ge} 1.0, that double-shell tank is assigned to waste group A. These tanks are considered to have a potential spontaneous buoyant displacement flammable gas release hazard in addition to a potential induced flammable gas release hazard. This document categorizes each of the large waste storage tanks into one of several categories based on each tank's waste characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement event. Revision 8 is the annual update of the calculations of the flammable gas Waste Groups for DSTs and SSTs.

  3. METHODOLOGY AND CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF WASTE GROUPS FOR THE LARGE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOWLER KD

    2007-12-27

    This document categorizes each of the large waste storage tanks into one of several categories based on each tank's waste characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement event. Revision 7 is the annual update of the calculations of the flammable gas Waste Groups for DSTs and SSTs. The Hanford Site contains 177 large underground radioactive waste storage tanks (28 double-shell tanks and 149 single-shell tanks). These tanks are categorized into one of three waste groups (A, B, and C) based on their waste and tank characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement gas release event. Assignments of waste groups to the 177 double-shell tanks and single-shell tanks, as reported in this document, are based on a Monte Carlo analysis of three criteria. The first criterion is the headspace flammable gas concentration following release of retained gas. This criterion determines whether the tank contains sufficient retained gas such that the well-mixed headspace flammable gas concentration would reach 100% of the lower flammability limit if the entire tank's retained gas were released. If the volume of retained gas is not sufficient to reach 100% of the lower flammability limit, then flammable conditions cannot be reached and the tank is classified as a waste group C tank independent of the method the gas is released. The second criterion is the energy ratio and considers whether there is sufficient supernatant on top of the saturated solids such that gas-bearing solids have the potential energy required to break up the material and release gas. Tanks that are not waste group C tanks and that have an energy ratio < 3.0 do not have sufficient

  4. Few-group constants for the calculation of ksub(eff) and Δ(1/ksub(eff)) of fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svarny, J.

    1978-01-01

    A theoretical and numerical analysis is presented of the linear and bilinear weighting of group constants. Special attention is paid to error accumulation in the few-group calculations of reactivity (ksub(eff)) and its first order perturbations caused by inaccuracies in weighting functions. Some theoretical conclusions are supported by calculations of the BN-600 fast breeder reactor. (author)

  5. MICROX-2: an improved two-region flux spectrum code for the efficient calculation of group cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathews, D.; Koch, P.

    1979-12-01

    The MICROX-2 code is an improved version of the MICROX code. The improvements allow MICROX-2 to be used for the efficient and rigorous preparation of broad group neutron cross sections for poorly moderated systems such as fast breeder reactors in addition to the well moderated thermal reactors for which MICROX was designed. MICROX-2 is an integral transport theory code which solves the neutron slowing down and thermalization equations on a detailed energy grid for two-region lattice cells. The fluxes in the two regions are coupled by transport corrected collision probabilities. The inner region may include two different types of grains (particles). Neutron leakage effects are treated by performing B 1 slowing down and P 0 plus DB 2 thermalization calculations in each region. Cell averaged diffusion coefficients are prepared with the Benoist cell homogenization prescription

  6. OECD/NEA expert group on uncertainty analysis for criticality safety assessment: Results of benchmark on sensitivity calculation (phase III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanova, T.; Laville, C. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire IRSN, BP 17, 92262 Fontenay aux Roses (France); Dyrda, J. [Atomic Weapons Establishment AWE, Aldermaston, Reading, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Mennerdahl, D. [E Mennerdahl Systems EMS, Starvaegen 12, 18357 Taeby (Sweden); Golovko, Y.; Raskach, K.; Tsiboulia, A. [Inst. for Physics and Power Engineering IPPE, 1, Bondarenko sq., 249033 Obninsk (Russian Federation); Lee, G. S.; Woo, S. W. [Korea Inst. of Nuclear Safety KINS, 62 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-338 (Korea, Republic of); Bidaud, A.; Sabouri, P. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie LPSC, CNRS-IN2P3/UJF/INPG, Grenoble (France); Patel, A. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Washington, DC 20555-0001 (United States); Bledsoe, K.; Rearden, B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory ORNL, M.S. 6170, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Gulliford, J.; Michel-Sendis, F. [OECD/NEA, 12, Bd des Iles, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux (France)

    2012-07-01

    The sensitivities of the k{sub eff} eigenvalue to neutron cross sections have become commonly used in similarity studies and as part of the validation algorithm for criticality safety assessments. To test calculations of the sensitivity coefficients, a benchmark study (Phase III) has been established by the OECD-NEA/WPNCS/EG UACSA (Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment). This paper presents some sensitivity results generated by the benchmark participants using various computational tools based upon different computational methods: SCALE/TSUNAMI-3D and -1D, MONK, APOLLO2-MORET 5, DRAGON-SUSD3D and MMKKENO. The study demonstrates the performance of the tools. It also illustrates how model simplifications impact the sensitivity results and demonstrates the importance of 'implicit' (self-shielding) sensitivities. This work has been a useful step towards verification of the existing and developed sensitivity analysis methods. (authors)

  7. Albedo boundary conditions for global calculations of thermal nuclear reactors with the model of discrete ordinates to two energy groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunes, Carlos Eduardo de Araujo

    2011-01-01

    As neutron fission events do not take place in the non-multiplying regions of nuclear reactors, e.g., moderator, reflector, and structural core, these regions do not generate power and the computational efficiency of nuclear reactor global calculations can hence be improved by eliminating the explicit numerical calculations within the non-multiplying regions around the active domain. Discussed here is the computational efficiency of approximate discrete ordinates (SN) albedo boundary conditions for two-energy group eigenvalue problems in X, Y geometry. Albedo, the Latin word for w hiteness , was originally defined as the fraction of incident light reflected diffusely by a surface. This Latin word has remained the usual scientific term in astronomy and in this dissertation this concept is extended for the reflection of neutrons. The non-standard SN albedo substitutes approximately the reflector region around the active domain, as we neglect the transverse leakage terms within the non-multiplying reflector. Should the problem have no transverse leakage terms, i.e., one dimensional slab geometry, then the offered albedo boundary conditions are exact. By computational efficiency we mean analyzing the accuracy of the numerical results versus the CPU execution time of each run for a given model problem. Numerical results to two 1/4 symmetric test problems are shown to illustrate this efficiency analysis. (author)

  8. Analytic Coarse-Mesh Finite-Difference Method Generalized for Heterogeneous Multidimensional Two-Group Diffusion Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Herranz, Nuria; Cabellos, Oscar; Aragones, Jose M.; Ahnert, Carol

    2003-01-01

    In order to take into account in a more effective and accurate way the intranodal heterogeneities in coarse-mesh finite-difference (CMFD) methods, a new equivalent parameter generation methodology has been developed and tested. This methodology accounts for the dependence of the nodal homogeneized two-group cross sections and nodal coupling factors, with interface flux discontinuity (IFD) factors that account for heterogeneities on the flux-spectrum and burnup intranodal distributions as well as on neighbor effects.The methodology has been implemented in an analytic CMFD method, rigorously obtained for homogeneous nodes with transverse leakage and generalized now for heterogeneous nodes by including IFD heterogeneity factors. When intranodal mesh node heterogeneity vanishes, the heterogeneous solution tends to the analytic homogeneous nodal solution. On the other hand, when intranodal heterogeneity increases, a high accuracy is maintained since the linear and nonlinear feedbacks on equivalent parameters have been shown to be as a very effective way of accounting for heterogeneity effects in two-group multidimensional coarse-mesh diffusion calculations

  9. METHODOLOGY & CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF WASTE GROUPS FOR THE LARGE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BARKER, S.A.

    2006-07-27

    Waste stored within tank farm double-shell tanks (DST) and single-shell tanks (SST) generates flammable gas (principally hydrogen) to varying degrees depending on the type, amount, geometry, and condition of the waste. The waste generates hydrogen through the radiolysis of water and organic compounds, thermolytic decomposition of organic compounds, and corrosion of a tank's carbon steel walls. Radiolysis and thermolytic decomposition also generates ammonia. Nonflammable gases, which act as dilutents (such as nitrous oxide), are also produced. Additional flammable gases (e.g., methane) are generated by chemical reactions between various degradation products of organic chemicals present in the tanks. Volatile and semi-volatile organic chemicals in tanks also produce organic vapors. The generated gases in tank waste are either released continuously to the tank headspace or are retained in the waste matrix. Retained gas may be released in a spontaneous or induced gas release event (GRE) that can significantly increase the flammable gas concentration in the tank headspace as described in RPP-7771. The document categorizes each of the large waste storage tanks into one of several categories based on each tank's waste characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement event. Revision 5 is the annual update of the methodology and calculations of the flammable gas Waste Groups for DSTs and SSTs.

  10. Automated one-loop calculations with GOSAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullen, Gavin; Greiner, Nicolas; Heinrich, Gudrun; Reiter, Thomas; Luisoni, Gionata

    2011-11-01

    We present the program package GoSam which is designed for the automated calculation of one-loop amplitudes for multi-particle processes in renormalisable quantum field theories. The amplitudes, which are generated in terms of Feynman diagrams, can be reduced using either D-dimensional integrand-level decomposition or tensor reduction. GoSam can be used to calculate one-loop QCD and/or electroweak corrections to Standard Model processes and offers the flexibility to link model files for theories Beyond the Standard Model. A standard interface to programs calculating real radiation is also implemented. We demonstrate the flexibility of the program by presenting examples of processes with up to six external legs attached to the loop. (orig.)

  11. Automated one-loop calculations with GOSAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cullen, Gavin [Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Physics and Astronomy; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Zeuthen [DESY; Germany; Greiner, Nicolas [Illinois Univ., Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). Dept. of Physics; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Heinrich, Gudrun; Reiter, Thomas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Luisoni, Gionata [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom). Inst. for Particle Physics Phenomenology; Mastrolia, Pierpaolo [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Padua Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Ossola, Giovanni [New York City Univ., NY (United States). New York City College of Technology; New York City Univ., NY (United States). The Graduate School and University Center; Tramontano, Francesco [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland)

    2011-11-15

    We present the program package GoSam which is designed for the automated calculation of one-loop amplitudes for multi-particle processes in renormalisable quantum field theories. The amplitudes, which are generated in terms of Feynman diagrams, can be reduced using either D-dimensional integrand-level decomposition or tensor reduction. GoSam can be used to calculate one-loop QCD and/or electroweak corrections to Standard Model processes and offers the flexibility to link model files for theories Beyond the Standard Model. A standard interface to programs calculating real radiation is also implemented. We demonstrate the flexibility of the program by presenting examples of processes with up to six external legs attached to the loop. (orig.)

  12. The development of a collapsing method for the mixed group and point cross sections and its application on multi-dimensional deep penetration calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bor-Jing Chang; Yen-Wan H. Liu

    1992-01-01

    The HYBRID, or mixed group and point, method was developed to solve the neutron transport equation deterministically using detailed treatment at cross section minima for deep penetration calculations. Its application so far is limited to one-dimensional calculations due to the enormous computing time involved in multi-dimensional calculations. In this article, a collapsing method is developed for the mixed group and point cross section sets to provide a more direct and practical way of using the HYBRID method in the multi-dimensional calculations. A testing problem is run. The method is then applied to the calculation of a deep penetration benchmark experiment. It is observed that half of the window effect is smeared in the collapsing treatment, but it still provide a better cross section set than the VITAMIN-C cross sections for the deep penetrating calculations

  13. Group additivity calculations of the thermodynamic properties of unfolded proteins in aqueous solution: a critical comparison of peptide-based and HKF models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakin, A W; Hedwig, G R

    2001-02-15

    A recent paper in this journal [Amend and Helgeson, Biophys. Chem. 84 (2000) 105] presented a new group additivity model to calculate various thermodynamic properties of unfolded proteins in aqueous solution. The parameters given for the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equations of state for all the constituent groups of unfolded proteins can be used, in principle, to calculate the partial molar heat capacity, C(o)p.2, and volume, V2(0), at infinite dilution of any polypeptide. Calculations of the values of C(o)p.2 and V2(0) for several polypeptides have been carried out to test the predictive utility of the HKF group additivity model. The results obtained are in very poor agreement with experimental data, and also with results calculated using a peptide-based group additivity model. A critical assessment of these two additivity models is presented.

  14. ACCEPTABILITY EVALUATION FOR USING ICRP TISSUE WEIGHTING FACTORS TO CALCULATE EFFECTIVE DOSE VALUE FOR SEPARATE GENDER-AGE GROUPS OF RUSSIAN FEDERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Repin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An article describes radiation risk factors for several gender-age population groups according to Russian statistical and medical-demographic data, evaluates the lethality rate for separate nosologic forms of malignant neoplasms based on Russian cancer registries according to the method of the International Agency for Cancer Research. Relative damage factors are calculated for the gender-age groups under consideration. The tissue weighting factors recommended by ICRP to calculate effective doses are compared with relative damage factors calculated by ICRP for the nominal population and with similar factors calculated in this work for separate population cohorts in theRussian Federation. The significance of differences and the feasibility of using tissue weighting factors adapted for the Russian population in assessing population risks in cohorts of different gender-age compositions have been assessed.

  15. Generation of multigroup cross-sections from micro-group ones in code system SUHAM-U used for VVER-1000 reactor core calculations with MOX loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyarinov, V.F.; Davidenko, V.D.; Polismakov, A.A.; Tsybulsky, V.F. [RRC Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2005-07-01

    At the present time, the new code system SUHAM-U for calculation of the neutron-physical processes in nuclear reactor core with triangular and square lattices based both on the modern micro-group (about 7000 groups) cross-sections library of code system UNK and on solving the multigroup (up to 89 groups) neutron transport equation by Surface Harmonics Method is elaborated. In this paper the procedure for generation of multigroup cross-sections from micro-group ones for calculation of VVER-1000 reactor core with MOX loading is described. The validation has consisted in computing VVER-1000 fuel assemblies with uranium and MOX fuel and has shown enough high accuracy under corresponding selection of the number and boundaries of the energy groups. This work has been fulfilled in the frame of ISTC project 'System Analyses of Nuclear Safety for VVER Reactors with MOX Fuels'.

  16. Cliff´s Delta Calculator: A non-parametric effect size program for two groups of observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Macbeth

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The Cliff´s Delta statistic is an effect size measure that quantifies the amount of difference between two non-parametric variables beyond p-values interpretation. This measure can be understood as a useful complementary analysis for the corresponding hypothesis testing. During the last two decades the use of effect size measures has been strongly encouraged by methodologists and leading institutions of behavioral sciences. The aim of this contribution is to introduce the Cliff´s Delta Calculator software that performs such analysis and offers some interpretation tips. Differences and similarities with the parametric case are analysed and illustrated. The implementation of this free program is fully described and compared with other calculators. Alternative algorithmic approaches are mathematically analysed and a basic linear algebra proof of its equivalence is formally presented. Two worked examples in cognitive psychology are commented. A visual interpretation of Cliff´s Delta is suggested. Availability, installation and applications of the program are presented and discussed.

  17. Temperature, pressure, and electrochemical constraints on protein speciation: Group additivity calculation of the standard molal thermodynamic properties of ionized unfolded proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Dick

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermodynamic calculations can be used to quantify environmental constraints on the speciation of proteins, such as the pH and temperature dependence of ionization state, and the relative chemical stabilities of proteins in different biogeochemical settings. These calculations depend in part on values of the standard molal Gibbs energies of proteins and their ionization reactions as a function of temperature and pressure. Because these values are not generally available, we calculated values of the standard molal thermodynamic properties at 25°C and 1 bar as well as the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers equations of state parameters of neutral and charged zwitterionic reference model compounds including aqueous amino acids, polypeptides, and unfolded proteins. The experimental calorimetric and volumetric data for these species taken from the literature were combined with group additivity algorithms to calculate the properties and parameters of neutral and ionized sidechain and backbone groups in unfolded proteins. The resulting set of group contributions enables the calculation of the standard molal Gibbs energy, enthalpy, entropy, isobaric heat capacity, volume, and isothermal compressibility of unfolded proteins in a range of proton ionization states to temperatures and pressures exceeding 100°C and 1000 bar. This approach provides a useful frame of reference for thermodynamic studies of protein folding and complexation reactions. It can also be used to assign provisional values of the net charge and Gibbs energy of ionized proteins as a function of temperature and pH. Using these values, an Eh-pH diagram for a reaction representing the speciation of extracellular proteins from Pyrococcus furiosus and Bacillus subtilis was generated. The predicted predominance limits of these proteins correspond with the different electrochemical conditions of hydrothermal vents and soils. More comprehensive calculations of this kind may reveal pervasive

  18. The Renormalization-Group Method in the Problem on Calculation of the Spectral Energy Density of Fluid Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodorovich, E. V.

    2018-03-01

    In order to find the shape of energy spectrum within the framework of the model of stationary homogeneous isotropic turbulence, the renormalization-group equations, which reflect the Markovian nature of the mechanism of energy transfer along the wavenumber spectrum, are used in addition to the dimensional considerations and the energy balance equation. For the spectrum, the formula depends on three parameters, namely, the wavenumber, which determines the upper boundary of the range of the turbulent energy production, the spectral flux through this boundary, and the fluid kinematic viscosity.

  19. Half-metallicity and electronic structures for carbon-doped group III-nitrides: Calculated with a modified Becke-Johnson potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shuai-wei; Wang, Ri-gao; Xu, Pemg

    2016-09-01

    The electronic structures and magnetism for carbon-doped group III-nitrides are investigated by utilizing the first principle method with the modified Becke-Johnson potential. Calculations show that carbon substituting cations (anions) would induce the group III-nitrides to be paramagnetic metals (half-metallic ferromagnets). Single carbon substituting nitrogen could produce 1.00μB magnetic moment. Electronic structures indicate that the carriers-mediated double-exchange interaction plays a crucial role in forming the ferromagnetism. Based on the mean-field theory, the Curie temperature for carbon-doped group III-nitrides would be above the room temperature. Negative chemical pair interactions imply that carbon dopants tend to form clustering distribution in group III-nitrides. The nitrogen vacancy would make the carbon-doped group III-nitrides lose the half-metallic ferromagnetism.

  20. Application of the variational method for calculation of neutron spectra and group constants - Master thesis; Primena varijacione metode na odredjivanje spektra neutrona i grupnih konstanti - Magistarski rad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milosevic, M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1979-07-01

    One-dimensional variational method for cylindrical configuration was applied for calculating group constants, together with effects of elastic slowing down, anisotropic elastic scattering, inelastic scattering, heterogeneous resonance absorption with the aim to include the presence of a number of different isotopes and effects of neutron leakage from the reactor core. Neutron flux shape P{sub 3} and adjoint function are proposed in order to enable calculation of smaller size reactors and inclusion of heterogeneity effects by cell calculations. Microscopic multigroup constants were prepared based on the UKNDL data library. Analytical-numerical approach was applied for solving the equations of the P{sub 3} approximation to obtain neutron flux moments and adjoint functions.

  1. Performance of a fine-grained parallel model for multi-group nodal-transport calculations in three-dimensional pin-by-pin reactor geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masahiro, Tatsumi; Akio, Yamamoto

    2003-01-01

    A production code SCOPE2 was developed based on the fine-grained parallel algorithm by the red/black iterative method targeting parallel computing environments such as a PC-cluster. It can perform a depletion calculation in a few hours using a PC-cluster with the model based on a 9-group nodal-SP3 transport method in 3-dimensional pin-by-pin geometry for in-core fuel management of commercial PWRs. The present algorithm guarantees the identical convergence process as that in serial execution, which is very important from the viewpoint of quality management. The fine-mesh geometry is constructed by hierarchical decomposition with introduction of intermediate management layer as a block that is a quarter piece of a fuel assembly in radial direction. A combination of a mesh division scheme forcing even meshes on each edge and a latency-hidden communication algorithm provided simplicity and efficiency to message passing to enhance parallel performance. Inter-processor communication and parallel I/O access were realized using the MPI functions. Parallel performance was measured for depletion calculations by the 9-group nodal-SP3 transport method in 3-dimensional pin-by-pin geometry with 340 x 340 x 26 meshes for full core geometry and 170 x 170 x 26 for quarter core geometry. A PC cluster that consists of 24 Pentium-4 processors connected by the Fast Ethernet was used for the performance measurement. Calculations in full core geometry gave better speedups compared to those in quarter core geometry because of larger granularity. Fine-mesh sweep and feedback calculation parts gave almost perfect scalability since granularity is large enough, while 1-group coarse-mesh diffusion acceleration gave only around 80%. The speedup and parallel efficiency for total computation time were 22.6 and 94%, respectively, for the calculation in full core geometry with 24 processors. (authors)

  2. Automated one-loop calculations with GoSam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullen, Gavin; Greiner, Nicolas; Heinrich, Gudrun; Reiter, Thomas; Luisoni, Gionata; Mastrolia, Pierpaolo; Ossola, Giovanni; Tramontano, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    We present the program package GoSam which is designed for the automated calculation of one-loop amplitudes for multi-particle processes in renormalisable quantum field theories. The amplitudes, which are generated in terms of Feynman diagrams, can be reduced using either D-dimensional integrand-level decomposition or tensor reduction. GoSam can be used to calculate one-loop QCD and/or electroweak corrections to Standard Model processes and offers the flexibility to link model files for theories Beyond the Standard Model. A standard interface to programs calculating real radiation is also implemented. We demonstrate the flexibility of the program by presenting examples of processes with up to six external legs attached to the loop. (orig.)

  3. Automated One-Loop Calculations with GoSam

    CERN Document Server

    Cullen, Gavin; Heinrich, Gudrun; Luisoni, Gionata; Mastrolia, Pierpaolo; Ossola, Giovanni; Reiter, Thomas; Tramontano, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    We present the program package GoSam which is designed for the automated calculation of one-loop amplitudes for multi-particle processes in renormalisable quantum field theories. The amplitudes, which are generated in terms of Feynman diagrams, can be reduced using either D-dimensional integrand-level decomposition or tensor reduction. GoSam can be used to calculate one-loop QCD and/or electroweak corrections to Standard Model processes and offers the flexibility to link model files for theories Beyond the Standard Model. A standard interface to programs calculating real radiation is also implemented. We demonstrate the flexibility of the program by presenting examples of processes with up to six external legs attached to the loop.

  4. Calculation of thermodynamic properties of sodium and potassium vapors on the base of semiempirical state equation. Group integrals and virial coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reva, T.D.; Semenov, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    Statistically significant estimations of the second, third and fourth group integrals of sodium and potassium vapors were obtained in the framework of the initial atom method on the basis of semiempirical equation of state derived by the authors. Possibility is duscussed of estimating dimer, trimer and tetramer concentrations from these data with account of unideality of vapors. High rate of convergence of density and pressure group expansion is demonstrated. Virial coefficients were calculated. It is shown that virial expansions of thermodynamic functions diverge at elevated densities of the gases under study. The estimations of senior virial coefficients of sodium and potassium vapors available in literature were proved to be faulty

  5. Improved spectral absorption coefficient grouping strategy of wide band k-distribution model used for calculation of infrared remote sensing signal of hot exhaust systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haiyang; Wang, Qiang

    2018-07-01

    A new strategy for grouping spectral absorption coefficients, considering the influences of both temperature and species mole ratio inhomogeneities on correlated-k characteristics of the spectra of gas mixtures, has been deduced to match the calculation method of spectral overlap parameter used in multiscale multigroup wide band k-distribution model. By comparison with current spectral absorption coefficient grouping strategies, for which only the influence of temperature inhomogeneity on the correlated-k characteristics of spectra of single species was considered, the improvements in calculation accuracies resulting from the new grouping strategy were evaluated using a series of 0D cases in which radiance under 3-5-μm wave band emitted by hot combustion gas of hydrocarbon fuel was attenuated by atmosphere with quite different temperature and mole ratios of water vapor and carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide. Finally, evaluations are presented on the calculation of remote sensing thermal images of transonic hot jet exhausted from a chevron ejecting nozzle with solid wall cooling system.

  6. Solid state {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation and isolated-molecule and cluster electronic structure calculations in organic molecular solids: The relationship between structure and methyl group and t-butyl group rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xianlong, E-mail: WangXianlong@uestc.edu.cn, E-mail: pbeckman@brynmawr.edu [Key Laboratory for NeuroInformation of Ministry of Education, School of Life Science and Technology, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, 4 North Jianshe Rd., 2nd Section, Chengdu 610054 (China); Mallory, Frank B. [Department of Chemistry, Bryn Mawr College, 101 North Merion Ave., Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 19010-2899 (United States); Mallory, Clelia W. [Department of Chemistry, Bryn Mawr College, 101 North Merion Ave., Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 19010-2899 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6323 (United States); Odhner, Hosanna R.; Beckmann, Peter A., E-mail: WangXianlong@uestc.edu.cn, E-mail: pbeckman@brynmawr.edu [Department of Physics, Bryn Mawr College, 101 North Merion Ave., Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 19010-2899 (United States)

    2014-05-21

    We report ab initio density functional theory electronic structure calculations of rotational barriers for t-butyl groups and their constituent methyl groups both in the isolated molecules and in central molecules in clusters built from the X-ray structure in four t-butyl aromatic compounds. The X-ray structures have been reported previously. We also report and interpret the temperature dependence of the solid state {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spin-lattice relaxation rate at 8.50, 22.5, and 53.0 MHz in one of the four compounds. Such experiments for the other three have been reported previously. We compare the computed barriers for methyl group and t-butyl group rotation in a central target molecule in the cluster with the activation energies determined from fitting the {sup 1}H NMR spin-lattice relaxation data. We formulate a dynamical model for the superposition of t-butyl group rotation and the rotation of the t-butyl group's constituent methyl groups. The four compounds are 2,7-di-t-butylpyrene, 1,4-di-t-butylbenzene, 2,6-di-t-butylnaphthalene, and 3-t-butylchrysene. We comment on the unusual ground state orientation of the t-butyl groups in the crystal of the pyrene and we comment on the unusually high rotational barrier of these t-butyl groups.

  7. Risk assessment calculations using MEPAS, an accepted screening methodology, and an uncertainty analysis for the reranking of Waste Area Groupings at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shevenell, L.; Hoffman, F.O.; MacIntosh, D.

    1992-03-01

    The Waste Area Groupings (WAGs) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) were reranked with respect to on- and off-site human health risks using two different methods. Risks associated with selected contaminants from each WAG for occupants of WAG 2 or an off-site area were calculated using a modified formulation of the Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) and a method suitable for screening, referred to as the ORNL/ESD method (the method developed by the Environmental Sciences Division at ORNL) in this report. Each method resulted in a different ranking of the WAGs. The rankings from the two methods are compared in this report. All risk assessment calculations, except the original MEPAS calculations, indicated that WAGs 1; 2, 6, 7 (WAGs 2, 6 and 7 as one combined WAG); and 4 pose the greatest potential threat to human health. However, the overall rankings of the WAGs using constant parameter values in the different methods were inconclusive because uncertainty in parameter values can change the calculated risk associated with particular pathways, and hence, the final rankings. Uncertainty analysis using uncertainties about all model parameters were used to reduce biases associated with parameter selection and to more reliably rank waste sites according to potential risks associated with site contaminants. Uncertainty analysis indicates that the WAGs should be considered for further investigation, or remediation, in the following order: (1) WAG 1; (2) WAGs 2, 6, and 7 (combined); and 4; (3) WAGs 3, 5, and 9; and, (4) WAG 8

  8. Calculation of average molecular parameters, functional groups, and a surrogate molecule for heavy fuel oils using 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Abdul Jameel, Abdul Gani

    2016-04-22

    Heavy fuel oil (HFO) is primarily used as fuel in marine engines and in boilers to generate electricity. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a powerful analytical tool for structure elucidation and in this study, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy were used for the structural characterization of 2 HFO samples. The NMR data was combined with elemental analysis and average molecular weight to quantify average molecular parameters (AMPs), such as the number of paraffinic carbons, naphthenic carbons, aromatic hydrogens, olefinic hydrogens, etc. in the HFO samples. Recent formulae published in the literature were used for calculating various derived AMPs like aromaticity factor 〖(f〗_a), C/H ratio, average paraffinic chain length (¯n), naphthenic ring number 〖(R〗_N), aromatic ring number〖 (R〗_A), total ring number〖 (R〗_T), aromatic condensation index (φ) and aromatic condensation degree (Ω). These derived AMPs help in understanding the overall structure of the fuel. A total of 19 functional groups were defined to represent the HFO samples, and their respective concentrations were calculated by formulating balance equations that equate the concentration of the functional groups with the concentration of the AMPs. Heteroatoms like sulfur, nitrogen, and oxygen were also included in the functional groups. Surrogate molecules were finally constructed to represent the average structure of the molecules present in the HFO samples. This surrogate molecule can be used for property estimation of the HFO samples and also serve as a surrogate to represent the molecular structure for use in kinetic studies.

  9. Calculation of average molecular parameters, functional groups, and a surrogate molecule for heavy fuel oils using 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Abdul Jameel, Abdul Gani; Elbaz, Ayman M.; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.; Roberts, William L.; Sarathy, Mani

    2016-01-01

    Heavy fuel oil (HFO) is primarily used as fuel in marine engines and in boilers to generate electricity. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a powerful analytical tool for structure elucidation and in this study, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy were used for the structural characterization of 2 HFO samples. The NMR data was combined with elemental analysis and average molecular weight to quantify average molecular parameters (AMPs), such as the number of paraffinic carbons, naphthenic carbons, aromatic hydrogens, olefinic hydrogens, etc. in the HFO samples. Recent formulae published in the literature were used for calculating various derived AMPs like aromaticity factor 〖(f〗_a), C/H ratio, average paraffinic chain length (¯n), naphthenic ring number 〖(R〗_N), aromatic ring number〖 (R〗_A), total ring number〖 (R〗_T), aromatic condensation index (φ) and aromatic condensation degree (Ω). These derived AMPs help in understanding the overall structure of the fuel. A total of 19 functional groups were defined to represent the HFO samples, and their respective concentrations were calculated by formulating balance equations that equate the concentration of the functional groups with the concentration of the AMPs. Heteroatoms like sulfur, nitrogen, and oxygen were also included in the functional groups. Surrogate molecules were finally constructed to represent the average structure of the molecules present in the HFO samples. This surrogate molecule can be used for property estimation of the HFO samples and also serve as a surrogate to represent the molecular structure for use in kinetic studies.

  10. Quadratic divergences and dimensional regularisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jack, I.; Jones, D.R.T.

    1990-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of quadratic and quartic divergences in dimensionally regulated renormalisable theories. We perform explicit three-loop calculations for a general theory of scalars and fermions. We find that the higher-order quartic divergences are related to the lower-order ones by the renormalisation group β-functions. (orig.)

  11. Method to Calculate the Financial Value of the Commercial Brands. Case “Cubita y diseño”, Brand Ownership of the CIMEX Group Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Esperanza González–del Foyo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The intangible assets constitute an income generation source for companies in which, the brand, is one of the most important and commercial impact. However, the formal determination or the scientific base of the value of this type of assets is a not well known in Cubans companies, like the case of the CIMEX Group of Companies, which has a wide brand market capital. The paper has the theoretic fundaments about brands, making emphasis in this definition from a financial perspective, and so like a diagnosis about the background and the present of studies of this kind, made in the Group of Companies. Several international models are presented that from this financial approach, are used to calculate the value of a brand, and finally a method is propose, that adapted to the company characteristics and the development environment of its activity, allows to determinate its value. 

  12. Population parameters for dose calculations: initial estimates of municipal, city and provincial age group population within 20, 50 and 80 kilometers of the PNPP-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The study attempts to determine the total population and population growth rates of four (4) age groups per municipality/city within twenty (20), fifty (50) and eighty (80) kilometers from the Philippine Nuclear Power Plant (PNPP-1). The population estimates were done at five (5) year intervals covering the next fifty years. The latest National Census and Statistics Office (NCSO) population projections at the provincial level under the assumption of moderate fertility and moderate mentality decline (series no. 2) were used to derive the estimates of the total population and population growth rates at the minicipality/city levels. The Bureau of Coastal and Geodetic Survey (BCGS) and the NCSO maps served as the bases for delineating the geographic and political boundaries covered by the study. The results will complement the findings of the PAEC project on agricultural parameters for radiation dose calculations and useful for related environmental studies. (author)

  13. PopAffiliator: online calculator for individual affiliation to a major population group based on 17 autosomal short tandem repeat genotype profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Luísa; Alshamali, Farida; Andreassen, Rune; Ballard, Ruth; Chantratita, Wasun; Cho, Nam Soo; Coudray, Clotilde; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel; Espinoza, Marta; González-Andrade, Fabricio; Hadi, Sibte; Immel, Uta-Dorothee; Marian, Catalin; Gonzalez-Martin, Antonio; Mertens, Gerhard; Parson, Walther; Perone, Carlos; Prieto, Lourdes; Takeshita, Haruo; Rangel Villalobos, Héctor; Zeng, Zhaoshu; Zhivotovsky, Lev; Camacho, Rui; Fonseca, Nuno A

    2011-09-01

    Because of their sensitivity and high level of discrimination, short tandem repeat (STR) maker systems are currently the method of choice in routine forensic casework and data banking, usually in multiplexes up to 15-17 loci. Constraints related to sample amount and quality, frequently encountered in forensic casework, will not allow to change this picture in the near future, notwithstanding the technological developments. In this study, we present a free online calculator named PopAffiliator ( http://cracs.fc.up.pt/popaffiliator ) for individual population affiliation in the three main population groups, Eurasian, East Asian and sub-Saharan African, based on genotype profiles for the common set of STRs used in forensics. This calculator performs affiliation based on a model constructed using machine learning techniques. The model was constructed using a data set of approximately fifteen thousand individuals collected for this work. The accuracy of individual population affiliation is approximately 86%, showing that the common set of STRs routinely used in forensics provide a considerable amount of information for population assignment, in addition to being excellent for individual identification.

  14. Calculating and reporting effect sizes on scientific papers (1: p < 0.05 limitations in the analysis of mean differences of two groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Espirito Santo

    2015-02-01

    Since p-values from the results of the statistical tests do not indicate the magnitude or importance of a difference, then effect sizes (ES should reported. In fact, ES give meaning to statistical tests; emphasize the power of statistical tests; reduce the risk of interpret mere sampling variation as real relationship; can increase the reporting of “non-significant"results, and allow the accumulation of knowledge from several studies using meta-analysis. Thus, the objectives of this paper are to present the limits of the significance level; describe the foundations of presentation of ES of statistical tests to analyze differences between two groups; present the formulas to calculate directly ES, providing examples of our own previous studies; show how to calculate confidence intervals; provide the conversion formulas for the review of the literature; indicate how to interpret the ES; and show that, although interpretable, the meaning (small, medium or large effect for an arbitrary metric could be inaccurate, requiring that interpretation should be made in the context of the research area and in the context of real world variables.

  15. Universal factorization of 3n-j(j > 2) symbols of the first and second kinds for SU(2) group and their direct and exact calculation and tabulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Liqiang; Dalgarno, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    We show that general 3n-j(n > 2) symbols of the first and second kinds for the group SU(2) can be reformulated in terms of binomial coefficients. The proof is based on the graphical technique established by Yutsis et al and through a definition of a reduced 6-j symbol. The resulting 3n-j symbols thereby take a combinatorial form which is simply the product of two factors. The one is an integer or polynomial which is the single sum over the products of reduced 6-j symbols. They are in the form of summing over the products of binomial coefficients. The other is a multiplication of all the triangle relations appearing in the symbols, which can also be rewritten using binomial coefficients. The new formulation indicates that the intrinsic structure for the general recoupling coefficients is much nicer and simpler, which might serve as a bridge for study with other fields. Along with our newly developed algorithms, this also provides a basis for a direct, exact and efficient calculation or tabulation of all the 3n-j symbols of the SU(2) group for all the range of quantum angular momentum arguments. As an illustration, we present the results for the 12-j symbols of the first kind

  16. Green's functions, states and renormalisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.R.; Ottewill, A.C.

    1982-01-01

    The significance that is to be attached to different operator orderings of free quantum field theories in curved space-time is examined. It is hoped thus to elucidate the renormalization of such theories. It is argued that as in flat space, these theories should be rendered finite by normal ordering with respect to a local geometrical vacuum state. Flat space is considered first, then an analogous local, geometrical Green's function for curved space-time is defined. Examples given are the Einstein static universe, the open Einstein universe and the de Sitter universe. It is observed that normalization provides some insight into the nature of vacuum stress. (U.K.)

  17. Group cross sections in the resolved resonance region calculated for a CANDU-PHW reactor operating on closed thorium-uranium and thorium-plutonium-uranium fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamel, D.; Wilkin, G.B.

    1979-09-01

    Group cross sections in the resolved resonance region are commonly computed for each nuclide independently of other resonance nuclides present in the fuel mixture. While this technique is usually entirely adequate for uranium fuel cycles, it is necessary to establish its legitimacy for closed thorium fuel cycles topped with fissile uranium or plutonium by analysis of a number of representative cases. At the same time cross sections originating from WIMS (Winfrith Improved Multigroup Scheme) calculations are compared with values computed in this study. In this context, particular attention is paid to the adequacy of the lower boundary for the WIMS resonance treatment. All calculations are based on heavy nuclide cross sections from the ENDF/B-IV data compilaton (Evaluated Nuclear Data File). Appreciable interaction effects have been determined for all nuclides except for 232 Th. In most cases, these are due to the strong 232 Th resonance doublet at 21.8 eV and 23.5 eV but some effects also result from resonances of 234 U (5.19 eV, 48.75 eV), 236 U (5.45 eV), 242 Pu (2.67 eV) and others. The influence of mutual interaction on the infinite lattice multiplicaton factor is very small in comparison to the effects of self-shielding. WIMS cross sections do not always compare well with the values computed in the study, but discrepancies are in most cases related to the different sources of data. Interaction effects are not explicitly taken into account in WIMS. Several nuclides ( 233 Pa, 233 U, 240 Pu, 242 Pu) show appreciable self-shielding below the WIMS resonance region and are therefore not treated adequately. The impact of these discrepancies on the multiplication factor is relatively small, however, because of error cancellation. (author)

  18. Electronic, structural and magnetic studies of niobium borides of group 8 transition metals, Nb2MB2 (M=Fe, Ru, Os) from first principles calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touzani, Rachid St.; Fokwa, Boniface P.T.

    2014-01-01

    The Nb 2 FeB 2 phase (U 3 Si 2 -type, space group P4/mbm, no. 127) is known for almost 50 years, but until now its magnetic properties have not been investigated. While the synthesis of Nb 2 OsB 2 (space group P4/mnc, no. 128, a twofold superstructure of U 3 Si 2 -type) with distorted Nb-layers and Os 2 -dumbbells was recently achieved, “Nb 2 RuB 2 ” is still not synthesized and its crystal structure is yet to be revealed. Our first principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations have confirmed not only the experimental structures of Nb 2 FeB 2 and Nb 2 OsB 2 , but also predict “Nb 2 RuB 2 ” to crystalize with the Nb 2 OsB 2 structure type. According to chemical bonding analysis, the homoatomic B–B interactions are optimized and very strong, but relatively strong heteroatomic M–B, B–Nb and M–Nb bonds (M=Fe, Ru, Os) are also found. These interactions, which together build a three-dimensional network, are mainly responsible for the structural stability of these ternary borides. The density-of-states at the Fermi level predicts metallic behavior, as expected, from metal-rich borides. Analysis of possible magnetic structures concluded preferred antiferromagnetic ordering for Nb 2 FeB 2 , originating from ferromagnetic interactions within iron chains and antiferromagnetic exchange interactions between them. -- Graphical abstract: Nb 2 FeB 2 (U 3 Si 2 structure type, space group P4/mbm, no. 127) is predicted to order antiferromagnetically, due to the presence of iron chains which show ferromagnetic interactions in the chains and antiferromagnetic interactions between them. “Nb 2 RuB 2 ” is predicted to crystallize with the recently discovered Nb 2 OsB 2 twofold superstructure (space group P4/mnc, no. 128) of U 3 Si 2 structure type. The building of ruthenium dumbbells instead of chains along [001] is found to be responsible for the stabilization of this superstructure. Highlights: • Nb 2 FeB 2 is predicted to order antiferromagnetically.

  19. INDAR: a computer code for the calculation of critical group radiation exposure from routine discharges of radioactivity to seas and estuaries - description and users' guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maul, P.R.; Wilmott, S.

    1988-12-01

    The computer program INDAR enables detailed estimates to be made of critical group radiation exposure arising from routine discharges of radioactivity for coastal sites where the discharge is close to the shore and the shoreline is reasonably straight, and for estuarine sites where radioactivity is rapidly mixed across the width of the estuary. Important processes which can be taken into account include the turbulence generated by the discharge, the effects of a sloping sea bed and the variation with time of the lateral dispersion coefficient. The significance of the timing of discharges can also be assessed. INDAR uses physically meaningful hydrographic parameters directly. For most sites the most important exposure pathways are seafood consumption, external exposure over estuarine sediments and beaches, and the handling of fishing gear. As well as for these primary pathways, INDAR enables direct calculations to be made for some additional exposure pathways. The secondary pathways considered are seaweed consumption, swimming, the handling of materials other than fishing gear and the inhalation of activity. (author)

  20. On the renormalization group perspective of α-attractors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narain, Gaurav, E-mail: gaunarain@itp.ac.cn [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China (KITPC), Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics (ITP), Chinese Academy of Sciences -CAS, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2017-10-01

    In this short paper we outline a recipe for the reconstruction of F ( R ) gravity starting from single field inflationary potentials in the Einstein frame. For simple potentials one can compute the explicit form of F ( R ), whilst for more involved examples one gets a parametric form of F ( R ). The F ( R ) reconstruction algorithm is used to study various examples: power-law φ {sup n} , exponential and α -attractors. In each case it is seen that for large R (corresponding to large value of inflaton field), F ( R ) ∼ R {sup 2}. For the case of α -attractors F ( R ) ∼ R {sup 2} for all values of inflaton field (for all values of R ) as α → 0. For generic inflaton potential V (φ), it is seen that if V {sup '}/ V →0 (for some φ) then the corresponding F ( R ) ∼ R {sup 2}. We then study α-attractors in more detail using non-perturbative renormalisation group methods to analyse the reconstructed F ( R ). It is seen that α →0 is an ultraviolet stable fixed point of the renormalisation group trajectories.

  1. RIFIFI: Analytical calculation method of the critical condition and flux in a varied regions reactor by two-group theory and one dimension developed for the Mercury-Ferranti computer; Rififi: methode de calcul analytique de la condition critique et des flux d'une pile a regions variees en theorie a deux groupes et a une dimension programmee pour le calculateur electronique Mercury (Ferranti)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amouyal, A; Bacher, P; Lago, B; Mengin, F L; Parker, E [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-07-01

    The calculation method presented in this report has been developed for the Mercury-Ferranti computer of the C.E.N.S. This calculation method allows to resolve the diffusion equations and continuity equations of flux and flow with two groups of neutrons and one dimension in spherical, cylindrical and linear geometry. In the cylindrical and linear configurations, we can take the height and extrapolated radius into account. The critical condition can be realised by varying linearly one or more parameters: k{sub {infinity}}, medium frontier, height or extrapolated radius. The calculation method enables also to calculate the flux, adjoint flux and various integrals. In the first part, it explains what is needed to know before using the method: data presentation, method possibilities, results presentation with some information about restrictions, accuracy and calculation time. The complete formulation of the calculation method is given in the second part. (M.P.)

  2. E-cigarettes, a safer alternative for teenagers? A UK focus group study of teenagers' views

    OpenAIRE

    Hilton, Shona; Weishaar, Heide; Sweeting, Helen; Trevisan, Filippo; Katikireddi, Srinivasa Vital

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Concerns exist that e-cigarettes may be a gateway to traditional cigarettes and/or (re)normalise teenage smoking. This qualitative study explores how teenagers in the UK currently perceive e-cigarettes and how and why they do or do not use them.\\ud \\ud Design: 16 focus groups were conducted across the UK between November 2014 and February 2015, with 83 teenagers aged 14–17. All discussions were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim, imported into NVivo 10 and thematically analys...

  3. 13C GIAO DFT calculation as a tool for configuration prediction of N-O group in saturated heterocyclic N-oxides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pohl, Radek; Potmischil, F.; Dračínský, Martin; Vaněk, Václav; Slavětínská, Lenka; Buděšínský, Miloš

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 6 (2012), s. 415-423 ISSN 0749-1581 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/1919 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : NMR * 13C * 1H * saturated heterocyclic N-oxides * chemical shift calculations * DFT Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.528, year: 2012

  4. Calculation of demands for nuclear fuels and fuel cycle services. Description of computer model and strategies developed by Working Group 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Working Group 1 examined a range of reactor deployment strategies and fuel cycle options, in oder to estimate the range of nuclear fuel requirements and fuel cycle service needs which would result. The computer model, its verification in comparison with other models, the strategies to be examined through use of the model, and the range of results obtained are described

  5. Experimental verification of reflector savings calculated by REDIR code using two-group method; Eksperimentalna provera dvogrupnog racunanja reflektorske ustede koriscenog u REDIR-u

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sotic, O; Martinc, R [Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1968-12-15

    Radial buckling and reflector savings for heavy water reactor with 2% enriched uranium fuel were measured and calculated by the REDIR code. A comparison of the obtained values is presented in this paper dependent on the reactor lattice pitch and reflector thickness. Experimental results obtained for lattice pitch of 16 cm prove the validity of applying the REDIR code for power reactors. U radu je dato uporedjenje izmedju izmerenih i teorijski izracunatih vrednosti (prema programu REDIR) radijalnih baklinga i reflektorske ustede za teskovodni reaktorski sistem sa 2% obogacenim uranskim gorivom u zavisnosti od koraka resetke i debljine reflektora. Rezultati dobijeni eksperimentima pri koraku resetke od 16 cm potvdjuju ispravnost primene programa REDIR za energetske reaktore. (author)

  6. Benchmark shielding calculations for the NEACRP [Nuclear Energy Agency-Committee on Reactor Physics] Working Group on shielding assessment of transportation packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broadhead, B.L.; Brady, M.C.; Parks, C.V.

    1990-11-01

    In 1985, the Nuclear Energy Agency-Committee on Reactor Physics (NEACRP) established a working group on shielding assessment of transportation packages. Following the initial distribution of a set of six problems, discussions were held at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Headquarters in Paris, France, in June/July 1986, May 1988, and February/March 1990. The US contribution to the working group is documented in this report. The results from this effort permit the evaluation of a number of approximations and effects that must be considered in a typical shielding analysis of a transportation cask. Among the effects reported here are the performance of multiple cross-section sets, the comparison of several source generation codes, and multidimensional versus one-dimensional (1-D) analyses. 18 refs., 16 figs., 33 tabs

  7. Declination Calculator

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Declination is calculated using the current International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) model. Declination is calculated using the current World Magnetic Model...

  8. Passage of radiation through inhomogeneous, moving media. XIII. Causality, analyticity, group speed, transparency, and allied phenomena with emphasis on some recent calculations by Ko and Chuang

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerche, I.

    1978-01-01

    A critical examination is made of some recent calculations by Ko and Chuang. They seek to show that original work by ourselves, and others, concerning the behavior of light propagating through differentially moving media is in error and that the fundamental structure of the results is, in fact, very different from the results we obtained: not excluding reversal of sign of some of the effects. We demonstrate that the results reported by Ko and Chuang are a consequence of two basic kinds of errors in their analysis. The first, and paramount, error is their use of fundamental basic kinds of errors in their analysis. The first, and paramount error is their use of fundamental relations in physics (such as the Kramers-Kronig dispersion relation) without due regard being given to the conditons imposed in arriving at the basic relationship in the first place, and thier use of particular relationships far outside their domains of validity as though they still held true.The second basic error is in a particular form of the refractive index, n, that Ko and Chuang use to illustrate their general points (which already suffer from the first basic error). The particular refractive index they use has the following unsatisfactory features: (i) it contains unstable modes in the upper half complex frequency plane: contrary to the conventional Kramers-Kronig relationship they invoke as a general principle; (ii) n 2 0 [n 2 (ω)-1]dω=0; (iii) the imaginary part of the dielectric positive (corresponding to absorption), yet the real part contains unstable modes, and the whole of the complex dielectric constant is nonanalytic in the upper half complex frequency plane; (iv) the form of n given by Ko and Chuang is purported to represent a warm, isotropic, Maxwellian plasma which is well known to be absolutely stable, so that no unstable modes can exist

  9. Generic calculation of two-body partial decay widths at the full one-loop level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodsell, Mark D.; Liebler, Stefan; Staub, Florian

    2017-11-01

    We describe a fully generic implementation of two-body partial decay widths at the full one-loop level in the SARAH and SPheno framework compatible with most supported models. It incorporates fermionic decays to a fermion and a scalar or a gauge boson as well as scalar decays into two fermions, two gauge bosons, two scalars or a scalar and a gauge boson. We present the relevant generic expressions for virtual and real corrections. Whereas wave-function corrections are determined from on-shell conditions, the parameters of the underlying model are by default renormalised in a \\overline{ {DR}} (or \\overline{ {MS}}) scheme. However, the user can also define model-specific counter-terms. As an example we discuss the renormalisation of the electric charge in the Thomson limit for top-quark decays in the standard model. One-loop-induced decays are also supported. The framework additionally allows the addition of mass and mixing corrections induced at higher orders for the involved external states. We explain our procedure to cancel infrared divergences for such cases, which is achieved through an infrared counter-term taking into account corrected Goldstone boson vertices. We compare our results for sfermion, gluino and Higgs decays in the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) against the public codes SFOLD, FVSFOLD and HFOLD and explain observed differences. Radiatively induced gluino and neutralino decays are compared against the original implementation in SPheno in the MSSM. We exactly reproduce the results of the code CNNDecays for decays of neutralinos and charginos in R-parity violating models. The new version SARAH 4.11.0 by default includes the calculation of two-body decay widths at the full one-loop level. Current limitations for certain model classes are described.

  10. Generic calculation of two-body partial decay widths at the full one-loop level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodsell, Mark D. [UPMC Univ. Paris 06 (France); Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 75 - Paris (France); Sorbonne Univ., Paris (France); Liebler, Stefan [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Staub, Florian [Karlsruhe Institute for Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Karlsruhe Institute for Technology, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. for Nuclear Physics

    2017-04-15

    We describe a fully generic implementation of two-body partial decay widths at the full one-loop level in the SARAH and SPheno framework compatible with most supported models. It incorporates fermionic decays to a fermion and a scalar or a gauge boson as well as scalar decays into two fermions, two gauge bosons, two scalars or a scalar and a gauge boson. We present the relevant generic expressions for virtual and real corrections. Whereas wavefunction corrections are determined from on-shell conditions, the parameters of the underlying model are by default renormalised in a DR (or MS) scheme. However, the user can also define model-specific counter-terms. As an example we discuss the renormalisation of the electric charge in the Thomson limit for top-quark decays in the standard model. One-loop induced decays are also supported. The framework additionally allows the addition of mass and mixing corrections induced at higher orders for the involved external states. We explain our procedure to cancel infra-red divergences for such cases, which is achieved through an infra-red counter-term taking into account corrected Goldstone boson vertices. We compare our results for sfermion, gluino and Higgs decays in the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) against the public codes SFOLD, FVSFOLD and HFOLD and explain observed differences. Radiative induced gluino and neutralino decays are compared against the original implementation in SPheno in the MSSM. We exactly reproduce the results of the code CNNDecays for decays of neutralinos and charginos in R-parity violating models. The new version SARAH 4.11.0 by default includes the calculation of two-body decay widths at the full one-loop level. Current limitations for certain model classes are described.

  11. Generic calculation of two-body partial decay widths at the full one-loop level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodsell, Mark D. [Sorbonne Universites, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7589, LPTHE, Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7589, LPTHE, Paris (France); Liebler, Stefan [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Staub, Florian [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Theoretical Physics (ITP), Karlsruhe (Germany); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Nuclear Physics (IKP), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    We describe a fully generic implementation of two-body partial decay widths at the full one-loop level in the SARAH and SPheno framework compatible with most supported models. It incorporates fermionic decays to a fermion and a scalar or a gauge boson as well as scalar decays into two fermions, two gauge bosons, two scalars or a scalar and a gauge boson. We present the relevant generic expressions for virtual and real corrections. Whereas wave-function corrections are determined from on-shell conditions, the parameters of the underlying model are by default renormalised in a DR (or MS) scheme. However, the user can also define model-specific counter-terms. As an example we discuss the renormalisation of the electric charge in the Thomson limit for top-quark decays in the standard model. One-loop-induced decays are also supported. The framework additionally allows the addition of mass and mixing corrections induced at higher orders for the involved external states. We explain our procedure to cancel infrared divergences for such cases, which is achieved through an infrared counter-term taking into account corrected Goldstone boson vertices. We compare our results for sfermion, gluino and Higgs decays in the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) against the public codes SFOLD, FVSFOLD and HFOLD and explain observed differences. Radiatively induced gluino and neutralino decays are compared against the original implementation in SPheno in the MSSM. We exactly reproduce the results of the code CNNDecays for decays of neutralinos and charginos in R-parity violating models. The new version SARAH 4.11.0 by default includes the calculation of two-body decay widths at the full one-loop level. Current limitations for certain model classes are described. (orig.)

  12. Generic calculation of two-body partial decay widths at the full one-loop level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodsell, Mark D.; Liebler, Stefan; Staub, Florian; Karlsruhe Institute for Technology, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen

    2017-04-01

    We describe a fully generic implementation of two-body partial decay widths at the full one-loop level in the SARAH and SPheno framework compatible with most supported models. It incorporates fermionic decays to a fermion and a scalar or a gauge boson as well as scalar decays into two fermions, two gauge bosons, two scalars or a scalar and a gauge boson. We present the relevant generic expressions for virtual and real corrections. Whereas wavefunction corrections are determined from on-shell conditions, the parameters of the underlying model are by default renormalised in a DR (or MS) scheme. However, the user can also define model-specific counter-terms. As an example we discuss the renormalisation of the electric charge in the Thomson limit for top-quark decays in the standard model. One-loop induced decays are also supported. The framework additionally allows the addition of mass and mixing corrections induced at higher orders for the involved external states. We explain our procedure to cancel infra-red divergences for such cases, which is achieved through an infra-red counter-term taking into account corrected Goldstone boson vertices. We compare our results for sfermion, gluino and Higgs decays in the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) against the public codes SFOLD, FVSFOLD and HFOLD and explain observed differences. Radiative induced gluino and neutralino decays are compared against the original implementation in SPheno in the MSSM. We exactly reproduce the results of the code CNNDecays for decays of neutralinos and charginos in R-parity violating models. The new version SARAH 4.11.0 by default includes the calculation of two-body decay widths at the full one-loop level. Current limitations for certain model classes are described.

  13. Application of a General Computer Algorithm Based on the Group-Additivity Method for the Calculation of Two Molecular Descriptors at Both Ends of Dilution: Liquid Viscosity and Activity Coefficient in Water at Infinite Dilution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Naef

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of a commonly used computer algorithm based on the group-additivity method for the calculation of the liquid viscosity coefficient at 293.15 K and the activity coefficient at infinite dilution in water at 298.15 K of organic molecules is presented. The method is based on the complete breakdown of the molecules into their constituting atoms, further subdividing them by their immediate neighborhood. A fast Gauss–Seidel fitting method using experimental data from literature is applied for the calculation of the atom groups’ contributions. Plausibility tests have been carried out on each of the calculations using a ten-fold cross-validation procedure which confirms the excellent predictive quality of the method. The goodness of fit (Q2 and the standard deviation (σ of the cross-validation calculations for the viscosity coefficient, expressed as log(η, was 0.9728 and 0.11, respectively, for 413 test molecules, and for the activity coefficient log(γ∞ the corresponding values were 0.9736 and 0.31, respectively, for 621 test compounds. The present approach has proven its versatility in that it enabled the simultaneous evaluation of the liquid viscosity of normal organic compounds as well as of ionic liquids.

  14. CONTAIN calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholtyssek, W.

    1995-01-01

    In the first phase of a benchmark comparison, the CONTAIN code was used to calculate an assumed EPR accident 'medium-sized leak in the cold leg', especially for the first two days after initiation of the accident. The results for global characteristics compare well with those of FIPLOC, MELCOR and WAVCO calculations, if the same materials data are used as input. However, significant differences show up for local quantities such as flows through leakages. (orig.)

  15. Definition and calculation of bottom quark cross-sections in deep-inelastic scattering at HERA and De termination of their uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carli, T. E-mail: tancredi.carli@cern.ch; Chiochia, V.; Klimek, K

    2003-09-01

    The uncertainties involved in the calculation of bottom quark cross-sections in deep-inelastic scattering at HERA are studied in different phase space regions. Besides the inclusive bottom quark cross-section, definitions closer to the detector acceptance requiring at least one high energetic muon from the semi-leptonic bottom quark decay or a jet with high transverse energy are investigated. For each case the uncertainties due to the choice of the renormalisation and factorisation scale as well as the bottom quark mass are estimated in the perturbative NLO QCD calculation and furthermore uncertainties in the fragmentation of the bottom quark to a B-meson and in its semi-leptonic decay are discussed. (author)

  16. Definition and calculation of bottom quark cross-sections in deep-inelastic scattering at HERA and determination of their uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carli, T.; Chiochia, V. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)]|[Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik; Klimek, K. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik

    2003-05-01

    The uncertainties involved in the calculation of bottom quark (b-quark) cross-sections in deep-inelastic scattering at HERA are studied in different phase space regions. Besides the inclusive b-quark cross-section, definitions closer to the detector acceptance requiring at least one high energetic muon from the semi-leptonic b-quark decay or a jet with high transverse energy are investigated. For each case the uncertainties due to the choice of the renormalisation and factorisation scale as well as the b-quark mass are estimated in the perturbative NLO QCD calculation and furthermore uncertainties in the fragmentation of the b-quark to a B-meson and in its semi-leptonic decay are discussed. (orig.)

  17. New and extended parameterization of the thermodynamic model AIOMFAC: calculation of activity coefficients for organic-inorganic mixtures containing carboxyl, hydroxyl, carbonyl, ether, ester, alkenyl, alkyl, and aromatic functional groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zuend

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a new and considerably extended parameterization of the thermodynamic activity coefficient model AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients at room temperature. AIOMFAC combines a Pitzer-like electrolyte solution model with a UNIFAC-based group-contribution approach and explicitly accounts for interactions between organic functional groups and inorganic ions. Such interactions constitute the salt-effect, may cause liquid-liquid phase separation, and affect the gas-particle partitioning of aerosols. The previous AIOMFAC version was parameterized for alkyl and hydroxyl functional groups of alcohols and polyols. With the goal to describe a wide variety of organic compounds found in atmospheric aerosols, we extend here the parameterization of AIOMFAC to include the functional groups carboxyl, hydroxyl, ketone, aldehyde, ether, ester, alkenyl, alkyl, aromatic carbon-alcohol, and aromatic hydrocarbon. Thermodynamic equilibrium data of organic-inorganic systems from the literature are critically assessed and complemented with new measurements to establish a comprehensive database. The database is used to determine simultaneously the AIOMFAC parameters describing interactions of organic functional groups with the ions H+, Li+, Na+, K+, NH4+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl, Br, NO3, HSO4, and SO42−. Detailed descriptions of different types of thermodynamic data, such as vapor-liquid, solid-liquid, and liquid-liquid equilibria, and their use for the model parameterization are provided. Issues regarding deficiencies of the database, types and uncertainties of experimental data, and limitations of the model, are discussed. The challenging parameter optimization problem is solved with a novel combination of powerful global minimization

  18. Burnout calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, D.

    1980-01-01

    Reviewed is the effect of heat flux of different system parameters on critical density in order to give an initial view on the value of several parameters. A thorough analysis of different equations is carried out to calculate burnout is steam-water flows in uniformly heated tubes, annular, and rectangular channels and rod bundles. Effect of heat flux density distribution and flux twisting on burnout and storage determination according to burnout are commended [ru

  19. IRIS core criticality calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jecmenica, R.; Trontl, K.; Pevec, D.; Grgic, D.

    2003-01-01

    Three-dimensional Monte Carlo computer code KENO-VI of CSAS26 sequence of SCALE-4.4 code system was applied for pin-by-pin calculations of the effective multiplication factor for the first cycle IRIS reactor core. The effective multiplication factors obtained by the above mentioned Monte Carlo calculations using 27-group ENDF/B-IV library and 238-group ENDF/B-V library have been compared with the effective multiplication factors achieved by HELIOS/NESTLE, CASMO/SIMULATE, and modified CORD-2 nodal calculations. The results of Monte Carlo calculations are found to be in good agreement with the results obtained by the nodal codes. The discrepancies in effective multiplication factor are typically within 1%. (author)

  20. Development of the neutron-transport code TransRay and studies on the two- and three-dimensional calculation of effective group cross sections; Entwicklung des Neutronentransportcodes TransRay und Untersuchungen zur zwei- und dreidimensionalen Berechnung effektiver Gruppenwirkungsquerschnitte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckert, C.

    2007-12-19

    Conventionally the data preparation of the neutron cross sections for reactor-core calculations pursues with 2D cell codes. Aim of this thesis was, to develop a 3D cell code, to study with this code 3D effects, and to evaluate the necessarity of a 3D data preparation of the neutron cross sections. For the calculation of the neutron transport the method of the first-collision probabilities, which are calculated with the ray-tracing method, was chosen. The mathematical algorithms were implemented in the 2D/3D cell code TransRay. For the geometry part of the program the geometry module of a Monte Carlo code was used.The ray tracing in 3D was parallelized because of the high computational time. The program TransRay was verified on 2D test problems. For a reference pressured-water reactor following 3D problems were studied: A partly immersed control rod and void (vacuum or steam) around a fuel rod as model of a steam void. All problems were for comparison calculated also with the programs HELIOS(2D) and MCNP(3D). The dependence of the multiplication factor and the averaged two-group cross section on the immersion depth of the control rod respectively of the height of the steam void were studied. The 3D-calculated two-group cross sections were compared with three conventional approximations: Linear interpolation, interpolation with flux weighting, and homogenization, At the 3D problem of the control rod it was shown that the interpolation with flux weighting is a good approximation. Therefore here a 3D data preparation is not necessary. At the test case of the single control rod, which is surrounded by the void, the three approximation for the two-group cross sections were proved as unsufficient. Therefore a 3D data preparation is necessary. The single fuel-rod cell with void can be considered as the limiting case of a reactor, in which a phase interface has been formed. [German] Standardmaessig erfolgt die Datenaufbereitung der Neutronenwirkungsquerschnitte fuer

  1. Reliability calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, K.E.

    1986-03-01

    Risk and reliability analysis is increasingly being used in evaluations of plant safety and plant reliability. The analysis can be performed either during the design process or during the operation time, with the purpose to improve the safety or the reliability. Due to plant complexity and safety and availability requirements, sophisticated tools, which are flexible and efficient, are needed. Such tools have been developed in the last 20 years and they have to be continuously refined to meet the growing requirements. Two different areas of application were analysed. In structural reliability probabilistic approaches have been introduced in some cases for the calculation of the reliability of structures or components. A new computer program has been developed based upon numerical integration in several variables. In systems reliability Monte Carlo simulation programs are used especially in analysis of very complex systems. In order to increase the applicability of the programs variance reduction techniques can be applied to speed up the calculation process. Variance reduction techniques have been studied and procedures for implementation of importance sampling are suggested. (author)

  2. Calculator calculus

    CERN Document Server

    McCarty, George

    1982-01-01

    How THIS BOOK DIFFERS This book is about the calculus. What distinguishes it, however, from other books is that it uses the pocket calculator to illustrate the theory. A computation that requires hours of labor when done by hand with tables is quite inappropriate as an example or exercise in a beginning calculus course. But that same computation can become a delicate illustration of the theory when the student does it in seconds on his calculator. t Furthermore, the student's own personal involvement and easy accomplishment give hi~ reassurance and en­ couragement. The machine is like a microscope, and its magnification is a hundred millionfold. We shall be interested in limits, and no stage of numerical approximation proves anything about the limit. However, the derivative of fex) = 67.SgX, for instance, acquires real meaning when a student first appreciates its values as numbers, as limits of 10 100 1000 t A quick example is 1.1 , 1.01 , 1.001 , •••• Another example is t = 0.1, 0.01, in the functio...

  3. The renormalization group in effective chiral theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varin, T.

    2007-09-01

    The dilepton production within the heavy ions collisions (CERN/SPS, SIS/HADES, RHIC) and the behaviour of vector mesons (in particular the rho meson) are among the main topics of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) in hadronic matter. One of the main goals is the study of partial or total restoration of chiral symmetry SU(2) x SU(2), for which effective theories need to be used. One of the important difficulties is to build a theory which allows to obtain predictions when approaching the phase transition by taking into account the phenomenological constraints at low temperature and/or density. The model used here (developed by M. Urban) is based on the gauged (rho and al mesons) linear sigma model adjusted (in practice the local symmetry is only approximate) to reproduce the phenomenology very well. The first part of this thesis consists in presenting a new cut-off based regularization scheme preserving symmetry requirements. The motivation of such a method is a correct accounting of quadratic and logarithmic divergences in view of their intensive use for the renormalisation group equations. For illustrative purposes we have applied it to QED in 4 and 5 dimensions. The second part of this work is devoted to the derivation of the RGE and their resolution. In particular, we show that both restorations (traditional and vector manifestation) can be obtained from our equations, but the most likely remains the 'traditional' Ginzburg-Landau scenario. (author)

  4. Reliability Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kurt Erling

    1986-01-01

    Risk and reliability analysis is increasingly being used in evaluations of plant safety and plant reliability. The analysis can be performed either during the design process or during the operation time, with the purpose to improve the safety or the reliability. Due to plant complexity and safety...... and availability requirements, sophisticated tools, which are flexible and efficient, are needed. Such tools have been developed in the last 20 years and they have to be continuously refined to meet the growing requirements. Two different areas of application were analysed. In structural reliability probabilistic...... approaches have been introduced in some cases for the calculation of the reliability of structures or components. A new computer program has been developed based upon numerical integration in several variables. In systems reliability Monte Carlo simulation programs are used especially in analysis of very...

  5. Nuclear data library in design calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Go; Kosaka, Shinya

    2006-01-01

    In core design calculation, nuclear data takes part as multi group cross section library during the assembly calculation, which is the first stage of a core design calculation. This report summarizes the multi group cross section libraries used in assembly calculations and also presents the methods adopted for resonance and assembly calculation. (author)

  6. Reactor dynamics calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devooght, J.; Lefvert, T.; Stankiewiez, J.

    1981-01-01

    This chapter deals with the work done in reactor dynamics within the Coordinated Research Program on Transport Theory and Advanced Reactor Calculations by three groups in Belgium, Poland, Sweden and Italy. Discretization methods in diffusion theory, collision probability methods in time-dependent neutron transport and singular perturbation method are represented in this paper

  7. Câbles électriques - Calcul du courant admissible - Partie 2: Résistance thermique - Section 2: Méthode de calcul des coefficients de réduction de l'intensité de courant admissible pour des groupes de câbles posés à l'air libre et protégés du rayonnement solaire direct

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    Câbles électriques - Calcul du courant admissible - Partie 2: Résistance thermique - Section 2: Méthode de calcul des coefficients de réduction de l'intensité de courant admissible pour des groupes de câbles posés à l'air libre et protégés du rayonnement solaire direct

  8. Dose calculation for electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, Hideo

    1995-01-01

    The joint working group of ICRP/ICRU is advancing the works of reviewing the ICRP publication 51 by investigating the data related to radiation protection. In order to introduce the 1990 recommendation, it has been demanded to carry out calculation for neutrons, photons and electrons. As for electrons, EURADOS WG4 (Numerical Dosimetry) rearranged the data to be calculated at the meeting held in PTB Braunschweig in June, 1992, and the question and request were presented by Dr. J.L. Chartier, the responsible person, to the researchers who are likely to undertake electron transport Monte Carlo calculation. The author also has carried out the requested calculation as it was the good chance to do the mutual comparison among various computation codes regarding electron transport calculation. The content that the WG requested to calculate was the absorbed dose at depth d mm when parallel electron beam enters at angle α into flat plate phantoms of PMMA, water and ICRU4-element tissue, which were placed in vacuum. The calculation was carried out by the versatile electron-photon shower computation Monte Carlo code, EGS4. As the results, depth dose curves and the dependence of absorbed dose on electron energy, incident angle and material are reported. The subjects to be investigated are pointed out. (K.I.)

  9. A punched-card library of neutron cross-sections and its use in the mechanized preparation of group cross-sections for use in Monte Carlo, Carlson S{sub n} and other multi-group neutronics calculations on high-speed computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, K [Atomic Weapons Research Establishment, Aldermaston (United Kingdom)

    1962-03-15

    The AWRE punched-card library of neutron cross-sections is described together with associated IBM-7090 programmes which process this data to give group-averaged cross-sections for use in Monte Carlo, Carlson S{sub n} and other multi-group neutronics calculations. The methods developed to deal with both isotropic and anisotropic elastic scattering are described. These include the multi-group transport approximation and the full treatment of anisotropic scattering using the Legendre polynomial moments of the scattering transfer matrix. The principles of group-constant formation are considered and illustrated by describing systems of group constants suitable for fast-reactor calculations. Practical problems such as the empirical adjustment of group constants to reproduce integral results and the collapsing of a many-group set of constants to give a few-group set are discussed. (author) [French] L'auteur decrit le fichier de cartes perforees sur lesquelles on enregistre a l'Atomic Weapons Research Establishment (AWRE) les sections efficaces neutroniques ainsi que les programmes IBM-7090 associes qui sont employes pour le traitement de ces informations, en vue d'obtenir des sections efficaces moyennes par groupe pouvant servir aux calculs de neutroniques a plusieurs groupes, effectues a l'aide des methodes de Monte-Carlo, S{sub n} de Carlson et autres methodes. L'auteur expose ensuite les methodes mises au point roda etudier la diffusion elastique, tant isotrope qu'anisotrope. Elles comprennent l'approximation de transport a plusieurs groupes, ainsi que le traitement complet de la diffusion anisotrope par les moments polynomiaux de Legendre de la matrice de transfert de la diffusion. L'auteur examine les principes de la formation des constantes de groupes; a titre d'illustration, il decrit les systemes de constantes de groupes qui se pretent aux calculs de reacteurs a neutrons rapides. Il expose quelques problemes pratiques, tels que l'ajustement empirique des

  10. Radiative corrections in supersymmetry and application to relic density calculation beyond leading order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalons, G.

    2010-07-01

    This thesis focuses on the evaluation of supersymmetric radiative corrections for processes involved in the calculation of the relic density of dark matter, in the MSSM (Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model) and the standard cosmological scenario, as well as the impact of the choice renormalisation scheme in the neutralino/chargino sector based on the measure of three physical masses. This study has been carried out with the help of an automatic program dedicated the the computation of physical observables at one-loop in the MSSM, called SloopS. For the relic density calculation we investigated scenarios where the most studied dark matter candidate, the neutralino, annihilates into gauge boson pair. We covered cases where its mass was of the order of hundreds of GeV to 2 TeV. The full set of electroweak and strong corrections has been taken into account, involved in sub-leading channels with quarks. In the case of very heavy neutralinos, two important effects were outlined: the Sommerfeld enhancement due to massive gauge bosons and maybe even more important some corrections of Sudakov type. (authors)

  11. Electronic, structural and magnetic studies of niobium borides of group 8 transition metals, Nb{sub 2}MB{sub 2} (M=Fe, Ru, Os) from first principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Touzani, Rachid St.; Fokwa, Boniface P.T., E-mail: Boniface.Fokwa@ac.rwth-aachen.de

    2014-03-15

    The Nb{sub 2}FeB{sub 2} phase (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-type, space group P4/mbm, no. 127) is known for almost 50 years, but until now its magnetic properties have not been investigated. While the synthesis of Nb{sub 2}OsB{sub 2} (space group P4/mnc, no. 128, a twofold superstructure of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-type) with distorted Nb-layers and Os{sub 2}-dumbbells was recently achieved, “Nb{sub 2}RuB{sub 2}” is still not synthesized and its crystal structure is yet to be revealed. Our first principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations have confirmed not only the experimental structures of Nb{sub 2}FeB{sub 2} and Nb{sub 2}OsB{sub 2}, but also predict “Nb{sub 2}RuB{sub 2}” to crystalize with the Nb{sub 2}OsB{sub 2} structure type. According to chemical bonding analysis, the homoatomic B–B interactions are optimized and very strong, but relatively strong heteroatomic M–B, B–Nb and M–Nb bonds (M=Fe, Ru, Os) are also found. These interactions, which together build a three-dimensional network, are mainly responsible for the structural stability of these ternary borides. The density-of-states at the Fermi level predicts metallic behavior, as expected, from metal-rich borides. Analysis of possible magnetic structures concluded preferred antiferromagnetic ordering for Nb{sub 2}FeB{sub 2}, originating from ferromagnetic interactions within iron chains and antiferromagnetic exchange interactions between them. -- Graphical abstract: Nb{sub 2}FeB{sub 2} (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} structure type, space group P4/mbm, no. 127) is predicted to order antiferromagnetically, due to the presence of iron chains which show ferromagnetic interactions in the chains and antiferromagnetic interactions between them. “Nb{sub 2}RuB{sub 2}” is predicted to crystallize with the recently discovered Nb{sub 2}OsB{sub 2} twofold superstructure (space group P4/mnc, no. 128) of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} structure type. The building of ruthenium dumbbells instead of chains along [001] is found to be

  12. Monte Carlo alpha calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brockway, D.; Soran, P.; Whalen, P.

    1985-01-01

    A Monte Carlo algorithm to efficiently calculate static alpha eigenvalues, N = ne/sup ..cap alpha..t/, for supercritical systems has been developed and tested. A direct Monte Carlo approach to calculating a static alpha is to simply follow the buildup in time of neutrons in a supercritical system and evaluate the logarithmic derivative of the neutron population with respect to time. This procedure is expensive, and the solution is very noisy and almost useless for a system near critical. The modified approach is to convert the time-dependent problem to a static ..cap alpha../sup -/eigenvalue problem and regress ..cap alpha.. on solutions of a/sup -/ k/sup -/eigenvalue problem. In practice, this procedure is much more efficient than the direct calculation, and produces much more accurate results. Because the Monte Carlo codes are intrinsically three-dimensional and use elaborate continuous-energy cross sections, this technique is now used as a standard for evaluating other calculational techniques in odd geometries or with group cross sections.

  13. Integrated system for production of neutronics and photonics calculational constants. Volume XVI. Tabular and graphical presentation of 175 neutron group constants derived from the LLL evaluated neutron data library (ENDL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plechaty, E.F.; Cullen, D.E.; Howerton, R.J.; Kimlinger, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    As of February 3, 1975, 175 neutron group constants had been derived from the Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (ENDL) at LLL. In this volume, tables and graphs of the constants are presented along with the conventions used in their preparation. (U.S.)

  14. Magnetic Field Calculator

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Magnetic Field Calculator will calculate the total magnetic field, including components (declination, inclination, horizontal intensity, northerly intensity,...

  15. The fourth-order non-linear sigma models and asymptotic freedom in four dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchbinder, I.L.; Ketov, S.V.

    1991-01-01

    Starting with the most general Lagrangian of the fourth-order non-linear sigma model in four space-time dimensions, we calculate the one-loop, on-shell ultra-violet-divergent part of the effective action. The formalism is based on the background field method and the generalised Schwinger-De Witt technique. The multiplicatively renormalisable case is investigated in some detail. The renormalisation group equations are obtained, and the conditions for a realisation of asymptotic freedom are considered. (orig.)

  16. Simulations with complex measure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markham, J.K.; Kieu, T.D.

    1997-01-01

    A method is proposed to handle the sign problem in the simulation of systems having indefinite or complex-valued measures. In general, this new approach, which is based on renormalisation blocking, is shown to yield statistical errors smaller that the crude Monte Carlo method using absolute values of the original measures. The improved method is applied to the 2D Ising model with temperature generalised to take on complex values. It is also adapted to implement Monte Carlo Renormalisation Group calculations of the magnetic and thermal critical exponents. 10 refs., 4 tabs., 7 figs

  17. Configuration space Faddeev calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, G.L.; Klink, W.H.; Polyzou, W.N.

    1989-01-01

    The detailed study of few-body systems provides one of the most effective means for studying nuclear physics at subnucleon distance scales. For few-body systems the model equations can be solved numerically with errors less than the experimental uncertainties. We have used such systems to investigate the size of relativistic effects, the role of meson-exchange currents, and the importance of quark degrees of freedom in the nucleus. Complete calculations for momentum-dependent potentials have been performed, and the properties of the three-body bound state for these potentials have been studied. Few-body calculations of the electromagnetic form factors of the deuteron and pion have been carried out using a front-form formulation of relativistic quantum mechanics. The decomposition of the operators transforming convariantly under the Poincare group into kinematical and dynamical parts has been studies. New ways for constructing interactions between particles, as well as interactions which lead to the production of particles, have been constructed in the context of a relativistic quantum mechanics. To compute scattering amplitudes in a nonperturbative way, classes of operators have been generated out of which the phase operator may be constructed. Finally, we have worked out procedures for computing Clebsch-Gordan and Racah coefficients on a computer, as well as giving procedures for dealing with the multiplicity problem

  18. Tutorial to SARAH

    CERN Document Server

    Staub, Florian

    2016-01-01

    I give in this brief tutorial a short practical introduction to the Mathematica package SARAH. First, it is shown how an existing model file can be changed to implement a new model in SARAH. In the second part, masses, vertices and renormalisation group equations are calculated with SARAH. Finally, the main commands to generate model files and output for other tools are summarised.

  19. CO2 flowrate calculator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carossi, Jean-Claude

    1969-02-01

    A CO 2 flowrate calculator has been designed for measuring and recording the gas flow in the loops of Pegase reactor. The analog calculator applies, at every moment, Bernoulli's formula to the values that characterize the carbon dioxide flow through a nozzle. The calculator electronics is described (it includes a sampling calculator and a two-variable function generator), with its amplifiers, triggers, interpolator, multiplier, etc. Calculator operation and setting are presented

  20. KENO, Multigroup P1 Scattering Monte-Carlo Transport Calculation for Criticality, Keff, Flux in 3-D. KENO-5, SCALE-1 Module with Pn Scattering, Super-grouping, Diffusion Albedo Reflection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrie, L.M.; Landers, N.F.

    2001-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: KENO is a multigroup, Monte Carlo criticality code containing a special geometry package which allows easy description of systems composed of cylinders, spheres, and cuboids (rectangular parallelepipeds) arranged in any order with only one restriction. They cannot be rotated or translated. Each geometrical region must be described as completely enclosing all regions interior to it. For systems not describable using this special geometry package, the program can use the generalized geometry package (GEOM) developed for the O5R Monte Carlo code. It allows any system that can be described by a collection of planes and/or quadratic surfaces, arbitrarily oriented and intersecting in arbitrary fashion. The entire problem can be mocked up in generalized geometry, or one generalized geometry unit or box type can be used alone or in combination with standard KENO units or box types. Rectangular arrays of fissile units are allowed with or without external reflector regions. Output from KENO consists of k eff for the system plus an estimate of its standard deviation and the leakage, absorption, and fissions for each energy group plus the totals for all groups. Flux as a function of energy group and region and fission densities as a function of region are optional output. KENO-4: Added features include a neutron balance edit, PICTURE routines to check the input geometry, and a random number sequencing subroutine written in FORTRAN-4. 2 - Method of solution: The scattering treatment used in KENO assumes that the differential neutron scattering cross section can be represented by a P1 Legendre polynomial. Absorption of neutrons in KENO is not allowed. Instead, at each collision point of a neutron tracking history the weight of the neutron is reduced by the absorption probability. When the neutron weight has been reduced below a specified point for the region in which the collision occurs, Russian roulette is played to determine if the

  1. Reactor core performance calculating device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tominaga, Kenji; Bando, Masaru; Sano, Hiroki; Maruyama, Hiromi.

    1995-01-01

    The device of the present invention can calculate a power distribution efficiently at high speed by a plurality of calculation means while taking an amount of the reactor state into consideration. Namely, an input device takes data from a measuring device for the amount of the reactor core state such as a large number of neutron detectors disposed in the reactor core for monitoring the reactor state during operation. An input data distribution device comprises a state recognition section and a data distribution section. The state recognition section recognizes the kind and amount of the inputted data and information of the calculation means. The data distribution section analyzes the characteristic of the inputted data, divides them into a several groups, allocates them to each of the calculation means for the purpose of calculating the reactor core performance efficiently at high speed based on the information from the state recognition section. A plurality of the calculation means calculate power distribution of each of regions based on the allocated inputted data, to determine the power distribution of the entire reactor core. As a result, the reactor core can be evaluated at high accuracy and at high speed irrespective of the whole reactor core or partial region. (I.S.)

  2. Neutronic calculation of reactor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaliff, J.O.

    1981-01-01

    Multigroup calculations of cylindrical pin cells were programmed, in Fortran IV, upon the basis of collision probabilities in each energy group. A rational approximation to the fuel-to-fuel collision probability in resonance groups was used. Together with the intermediate resonance theory, cross sections corrected for heterogeneity and absorber interactions were found. For the optimization of the program, the cell of a BWR reactor was taken as reference. Data for such a cell and the reactor's operating conditions are presented. PINCEL is a fast and flexible program, with checked results, around a 69-group library. (M.E.L.) [es

  3. Heterogeneous Calculation of {epsilon}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, Alf

    1961-02-15

    A heterogeneous method of calculating the fast fission factor given by Naudet has been applied to the Carlvik - Pershagen definition of {epsilon}. An exact calculation of the collision probabilities is included in the programme developed for the Ferranti - Mercury computer.

  4. Heterogeneous Calculation of ε

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonsson, Alf

    1961-02-01

    A heterogeneous method of calculating the fast fission factor given by Naudet has been applied to the Carlvik - Pershagen definition of ε. An exact calculation of the collision probabilities is included in the programme developed for the Ferranti - Mercury computer

  5. Buckling feedback of the spectral calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing Xingqing; Shan Wenzhi; Luo Jingyu

    1992-01-01

    This paper studies the problems about buckling feedback of spectral calculations in physical calculations of the reactor and presents a useful method by which the buckling feedback of spectral calculations is implemented. The effect of the buckling feedback in spectra and the broad group cross section, convergence of buckling feedback iteration and the effect of the spectral zones dividing are discussed in the calculations. This method has been used for the physical design of HTR-10 MW Test Module

  6. Computational methods working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, T.A.

    1997-09-01

    During the Cold Moderator Workshop several working groups were established including one to discuss calculational methods. The charge for this working group was to identify problems in theory, data, program execution, etc., and to suggest solutions considering both deterministic and stochastic methods including acceleration procedures.

  7. Core calculations of JMTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, Yoshiharu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    In material testing reactors like the JMTR (Japan Material Testing Reactor) of 50 MW in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the neutron flux and neutron energy spectra of irradiated samples show complex distributions. It is necessary to assess the neutron flux and neutron energy spectra of an irradiation field by carrying out the nuclear calculation of the core for every operation cycle. In order to advance core calculation, in the JMTR, the application of MCNP to the assessment of core reactivity and neutron flux and spectra has been investigated. In this study, in order to reduce the time for calculation and variance, the comparison of the results of the calculations by the use of K code and fixed source and the use of Weight Window were investigated. As to the calculation method, the modeling of the total JMTR core, the conditions for calculation and the adopted variance reduction technique are explained. The results of calculation are shown. Significant difference was not observed in the results of neutron flux calculations according to the difference of the modeling of fuel region in the calculations by K code and fixed source. The method of assessing the results of neutron flux calculation is described. (K.I.)

  8. Electronics Environmental Benefits Calculator

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Electronics Environmental Benefits Calculator (EEBC) was developed to assist organizations in estimating the environmental benefits of greening their purchase,...

  9. Electrical installation calculations basic

    CERN Document Server

    Kitcher, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    All the essential calculations required for basic electrical installation workThe Electrical Installation Calculations series has proved an invaluable reference for over forty years, for both apprentices and professional electrical installation engineers alike. The book provides a step-by-step guide to the successful application of electrical installation calculations required in day-to-day electrical engineering practice. A step-by-step guide to everyday calculations used on the job An essential aid to the City & Guilds certificates at Levels 2 and 3Fo

  10. Electrical installation calculations advanced

    CERN Document Server

    Kitcher, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    All the essential calculations required for advanced electrical installation workThe Electrical Installation Calculations series has proved an invaluable reference for over forty years, for both apprentices and professional electrical installation engineers alike. The book provides a step-by-step guide to the successful application of electrical installation calculations required in day-to-day electrical engineering practiceA step-by-step guide to everyday calculations used on the job An essential aid to the City & Guilds certificates at Levels 2 and 3For apprentices and electrical installatio

  11. Radar Signature Calculation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: The calculation, analysis, and visualization of the spatially extended radar signatures of complex objects such as ships in a sea multipath environment and...

  12. Waste Package Lifting Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    H. Marr

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the structural response of the waste package during the horizontal and vertical lifting operations in order to support the waste package lifting feature design. The scope of this calculation includes the evaluation of the 21 PWR UCF (pressurized water reactor uncanistered fuel) waste package, naval waste package, 5 DHLW/DOE SNF (defense high-level waste/Department of Energy spent nuclear fuel)--short waste package, and 44 BWR (boiling water reactor) UCF waste package. Procedure AP-3.12Q, Revision 0, ICN 0, calculations, is used to develop and document this calculation

  13. MOx Depletion Calculation Benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    San Felice, Laurence; Eschbach, Romain; Dewi Syarifah, Ratna; Maryam, Seif-Eddine; Hesketh, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Under the auspices of the NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC), the Working Party on Scientific Issues of Reactor Systems (WPRS) has been established to study the reactor physics, fuel performance, radiation transport and shielding, and the uncertainties associated with modelling of these phenomena in present and future nuclear power systems. The WPRS has different expert groups to cover a wide range of scientific issues in these fields. The Expert Group on Reactor Physics and Advanced Nuclear Systems (EGRPANS) was created in 2011 to perform specific tasks associated with reactor physics aspects of present and future nuclear power systems. EGRPANS provides expert advice to the WPRS and the nuclear community on the development needs (data and methods, validation experiments, scenario studies) for different reactor systems and also provides specific technical information regarding: core reactivity characteristics, including fuel depletion effects; core power/flux distributions; Core dynamics and reactivity control. In 2013 EGRPANS published a report that investigated fuel depletion effects in a Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR). This was entitled 'International Comparison of a Depletion Calculation Benchmark on Fuel Cycle Issues' NEA/NSC/DOC(2013) that documented a benchmark exercise for UO 2 fuel rods. This report documents a complementary benchmark exercise that focused on PuO 2 /UO 2 Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel rods. The results are especially relevant to the back-end of the fuel cycle, including irradiated fuel transport, reprocessing, interim storage and waste repository. Saint-Laurent B1 (SLB1) was the first French reactor to use MOx assemblies. SLB1 is a 900 MWe PWR, with 30% MOx fuel loading. The standard MOx assemblies, used in Saint-Laurent B1 reactor, include three zones with different plutonium enrichments, high Pu content (5.64%) in the center zone, medium Pu content (4.42%) in the intermediate zone and low Pu content (2.91%) in the peripheral zone

  14. Calculation of Five Thermodynamic Molecular Descriptors by Means of a General Computer Algorithm Based on the Group-Additivity Method: Standard Enthalpies of Vaporization, Sublimation and Solvation, and Entropy of Fusion of Ordinary Organic Molecules and Total Phase-Change Entropy of Liquid Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naef, Rudolf; Acree, William E

    2017-06-25

    The calculation of the standard enthalpies of vaporization, sublimation and solvation of organic molecules is presented using a common computer algorithm on the basis of a group-additivity method. The same algorithm is also shown to enable the calculation of their entropy of fusion as well as the total phase-change entropy of liquid crystals. The present method is based on the complete breakdown of the molecules into their constituting atoms and their immediate neighbourhood; the respective calculations of the contribution of the atomic groups by means of the Gauss-Seidel fitting method is based on experimental data collected from literature. The feasibility of the calculations for each of the mentioned descriptors was verified by means of a 10-fold cross-validation procedure proving the good to high quality of the predicted values for the three mentioned enthalpies and for the entropy of fusion, whereas the predictive quality for the total phase-change entropy of liquid crystals was poor. The goodness of fit ( Q ²) and the standard deviation (σ) of the cross-validation calculations for the five descriptors was as follows: 0.9641 and 4.56 kJ/mol ( N = 3386 test molecules) for the enthalpy of vaporization, 0.8657 and 11.39 kJ/mol ( N = 1791) for the enthalpy of sublimation, 0.9546 and 4.34 kJ/mol ( N = 373) for the enthalpy of solvation, 0.8727 and 17.93 J/mol/K ( N = 2637) for the entropy of fusion and 0.5804 and 32.79 J/mol/K ( N = 2643) for the total phase-change entropy of liquid crystals. The large discrepancy between the results of the two closely related entropies is discussed in detail. Molecules for which both the standard enthalpies of vaporization and sublimation were calculable, enabled the estimation of their standard enthalpy of fusion by simple subtraction of the former from the latter enthalpy. For 990 of them the experimental enthalpy-of-fusion values are also known, allowing their comparison with predictions, yielding a correlation coefficient R

  15. Calculation of Five Thermodynamic Molecular Descriptors by Means of a General Computer Algorithm Based on the Group-Additivity Method: Standard Enthalpies of Vaporization, Sublimation and Solvation, and Entropy of Fusion of Ordinary Organic Molecules and Total Phase-Change Entropy of Liquid Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Naef

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The calculation of the standard enthalpies of vaporization, sublimation and solvation of organic molecules is presented using a common computer algorithm on the basis of a group-additivity method. The same algorithm is also shown to enable the calculation of their entropy of fusion as well as the total phase-change entropy of liquid crystals. The present method is based on the complete breakdown of the molecules into their constituting atoms and their immediate neighbourhood; the respective calculations of the contribution of the atomic groups by means of the Gauss-Seidel fitting method is based on experimental data collected from literature. The feasibility of the calculations for each of the mentioned descriptors was verified by means of a 10-fold cross-validation procedure proving the good to high quality of the predicted values for the three mentioned enthalpies and for the entropy of fusion, whereas the predictive quality for the total phase-change entropy of liquid crystals was poor. The goodness of fit (Q2 and the standard deviation (σ of the cross-validation calculations for the five descriptors was as follows: 0.9641 and 4.56 kJ/mol (N = 3386 test molecules for the enthalpy of vaporization, 0.8657 and 11.39 kJ/mol (N = 1791 for the enthalpy of sublimation, 0.9546 and 4.34 kJ/mol (N = 373 for the enthalpy of solvation, 0.8727 and 17.93 J/mol/K (N = 2637 for the entropy of fusion and 0.5804 and 32.79 J/mol/K (N = 2643 for the total phase-change entropy of liquid crystals. The large discrepancy between the results of the two closely related entropies is discussed in detail. Molecules for which both the standard enthalpies of vaporization and sublimation were calculable, enabled the estimation of their standard enthalpy of fusion by simple subtraction of the former from the latter enthalpy. For 990 of them the experimental enthalpy-of-fusion values are also known, allowing their comparison with predictions, yielding a correlation

  16. PWR core design calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trkov, A.; Ravnik, M.; Zeleznik, N.

    1992-01-01

    Functional description of the programme package Cord-2 for PWR core design calculations is presented. Programme package is briefly described. Use of the package and calculational procedures for typical core design problems are treated. Comparison of main results with experimental values is presented as part of the verification process. (author) [sl

  17. Uneconomical top calculation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Noord, M.; Vanm Sambeek, E.J.W.

    2003-08-01

    The methodology used to calculate the financial gap of renewable electricity sources and technologies is described. This methodology is used for calculating the production subsidy levels (MEP subsidies) for new renewable electricity projects in 2004 and 2005 in the Netherlands [nl

  18. Group X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, Susannah

    2007-08-16

    This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

  19. Group Flow and Group Genius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Keith Sawyer views the spontaneous collaboration of group creativity and improvisation actions as "group flow," which organizations can use to function at optimum levels. Sawyer establishes ideal conditions for group flow: group goals, close listening, complete concentration, being in control, blending egos, equal participation, knowing…

  20. Large scale GW calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govoni, Marco; Argonne National Lab., Argonne, IL; Galli, Giulia; Argonne National Lab., Argonne, IL

    2015-01-01

    We present GW calculations of molecules, ordered and disordered solids and interfaces, which employ an efficient contour deformation technique for frequency integration and do not require the explicit evaluation of virtual electronic states nor the inversion of dielectric matrices. We also present a parallel implementation of the algorithm, which takes advantage of separable expressions of both the single particle Green's function and the screened Coulomb interaction. The method can be used starting from density functional theory calculations performed with semilocal or hybrid functionals. The newly developed technique was applied to GW calculations of systems of unprecedented size, including water/semiconductor interfaces with thousands of electrons

  1. Radioactive cloud dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Healy, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    Radiological dosage principles, as well as methods for calculating external and internal dose rates, following dispersion and deposition of radioactive materials in the atmosphere are described. Emphasis has been placed on analytical solutions that are appropriate for hand calculations. In addition, the methods for calculating dose rates from ingestion are discussed. A brief description of several computer programs are included for information on radionuclides. There has been no attempt to be comprehensive, and only a sampling of programs has been selected to illustrate the variety available

  2. The use of stochastic method for the calculation of liquid-vapor multicomponent equilibrium and the contribution of groups theory for the evaluation of fugacity coefficient; Uso de um metodo estocastico para calculo do equilibrio liquido-vapor de sistemas multicomponentes e avaliacao de uma abordagem por contribuicao de grupos para o calculo do coeficiente de fugacidade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalcanti, Rafaelly L.; Oliveira, Jackson A. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica; Rojas, Leopoldo O.A. [Centro de Tecnologias do Gas (CTGAS), Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    This work has the main objective of evaluating the mathematical model developed by Jaubert e Mutelet (2004) in terms of the prediction capacity for the calculation of the vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE). This model is based on Peng-Robinson equation of state (EOS) and it considers the binary interaction parameters (Kij(T)) estimated by a contribution group method and dependent of the temperature. The model proposed by Jaubert e Mutelet (2004), named PPR78 (Predictive Peng-Robinson), was implemented in this work by using the Fortran language. An optimization approach based on the stochastic algorithm of Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) was used in order to calculate the vapor-liquid equilibrium. Simulations were accomplished for several binary systems and the results were concordant with some experimental data of the investigated systems. However, for some systems different from those presented by Jaubert and Mutelet (2004), the model presented low prediction capacity. In spite of the great demand of computational performance, the algorithm PSO demonstrated robustness during the calculation of VLE and it assured convergence in most of the cases. (author)

  3. A Generally Applicable Computer Algorithm Based on the Group Additivity Method for the Calculation of Seven Molecular Descriptors: Heat of Combustion, LogPO/W, LogS, Refractivity, Polarizability, Toxicity and LogBB of Organic Compounds; Scope and Limits of Applicability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Naef

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A generally applicable computer algorithm for the calculation of the seven molecular descriptors heat of combustion, logPoctanol/water, logS (water solubility, molar refractivity, molecular polarizability, aqueous toxicity (protozoan growth inhibition and logBB (log (cblood/cbrain is presented. The method, an extendable form of the group-additivity method, is based on the complete break-down of the molecules into their constituting atoms and their immediate neighbourhood. The contribution of the resulting atom groups to the descriptor values is calculated using the Gauss-Seidel fitting method, based on experimental data gathered from literature. The plausibility of the method was tested for each descriptor by means of a k-fold cross-validation procedure demonstrating good to excellent predictive power for the former six descriptors and low reliability of logBB predictions. The goodness of fit (Q2 and the standard deviation of the 10-fold cross-validation calculation was >0.9999 and 25.2 kJ/mol, respectively, (based on N = 1965 test compounds for the heat of combustion, 0.9451 and 0.51 (N = 2640 for logP, 0.8838 and 0.74 (N = 1419 for logS, 0.9987 and 0.74 (N = 4045 for the molar refractivity, 0.9897 and 0.77 (N = 308 for the molecular polarizability, 0.8404 and 0.42 (N = 810 for the toxicity and 0.4709 and 0.53 (N = 383 for logBB. The latter descriptor revealing a very low Q2 for the test molecules (R2 was 0.7068 and standard deviation 0.38 for N = 413 training molecules is included as an example to show the limits of the group-additivity method. An eighth molecular descriptor, the heat of formation, was indirectly calculated from the heat of combustion data and correlated with published experimental heat of formation data with a correlation coefficient R2 of 0.9974 (N = 2031.

  4. Handout on shielding calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilbron Filho, P.F.L.

    1991-01-01

    In order to avoid the difficulties of the radioprotection supervisors in the tasks related to shielding calculations, is presented in this paper the basic concepts of shielding theory. It also includes exercises and examples. (author)

  5. Unit Cost Compendium Calculations

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Unit Cost Compendium (UCC) Calculations raw data set was designed to provide for greater accuracy and consistency in the use of unit costs across the USEPA...

  6. PHYSICOCHEMICAL PROPERTY CALCULATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computer models have been developed to estimate a wide range of physical-chemical properties from molecular structure. The SPARC modeling system approaches calculations as site specific reactions (pKa, hydrolysis, hydration) and `whole molecule' properties (vapor pressure, boilin...

  7. Magnetic Field Grid Calculator

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Magnetic Field Properties Calculator will computes the estimated values of Earth's magnetic field(declination, inclination, vertical component, northerly...

  8. Intercavitary implants dosage calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehder, B.P.

    The use of spacial geometry peculiar to each treatment for the attainment of intercavitary and intersticial implants dosage calculation is presented. The study is made in patients with intercavitary implants by applying a modified Manchester technique [pt

  9. Casio Graphical Calculator Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, Nick

    2001-01-01

    Shares experiences of a project aimed at developing and refining programs written on a Casio FX9750G graphing calculator. Describes in detail some programs used to develop mental strategies and problem solving skills. (MM)

  10. Small portable speed calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, J. L.; Billions, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    Calculator is adapted stopwatch calibrated for fast accurate measurement of speeds. Single assembled unit is rugged, self-contained, and relatively inexpensive to manufacture. Potential market includes automobile-speed enforcement, railroads, and field-test facilities.

  11. Calculativeness and trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Williamson’s characterisation of calculativeness as inimical to trust contradicts most sociological trust research. However, a similar argument is found within trust phenomenology. This paper re-investigates Williamson’s argument from the perspective of Løgstrup’s phenomenological theory of trust....... Contrary to Williamson, however, Løgstrup’s contention is that trust, not calculativeness, is the default attitude and only when suspicion is awoken does trust falter. The paper argues that while Williamson’s distinction between calculativeness and trust is supported by phenomenology, the analysis needs...... to take actual subjective experience into consideration. It points out that, first, Løgstrup places trust alongside calculativeness as a different mode of engaging in social interaction, rather conceiving of trust as a state or the outcome of a decision-making process. Secondly, the analysis must take...

  12. Activities for Calculators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiatt, Arthur A.

    1987-01-01

    Ten activities that give learners in grades 5-8 a chance to explore mathematics with calculators are provided. The activity cards involve such topics as odd addends, magic squares, strange projects, and conjecturing rules. (MNS)

  13. Permutation groups

    CERN Document Server

    Passman, Donald S

    2012-01-01

    This volume by a prominent authority on permutation groups consists of lecture notes that provide a self-contained account of distinct classification theorems. A ready source of frequently quoted but usually inaccessible theorems, it is ideally suited for professional group theorists as well as students with a solid background in modern algebra.The three-part treatment begins with an introductory chapter and advances to an economical development of the tools of basic group theory, including group extensions, transfer theorems, and group representations and characters. The final chapter feature

  14. Two-dimensional sensitivity calculation code: SENSETWO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, Michinori; Nakayama, Mitsuo; Minami, Kazuyoshi; Seki, Yasushi; Iida, Hiromasa.

    1979-05-01

    A SENSETWO code for the calculation of cross section sensitivities with a two-dimensional model has been developed, on the basis of first order perturbation theory. It uses forward neutron and/or gamma-ray fluxes and adjoint fluxes obtained by two-dimensional discrete ordinates code TWOTRAN-II. The data and informations of cross sections, geometry, nuclide density, response functions, etc. are transmitted to SENSETWO by the dump magnetic tape made in TWOTRAN calculations. The required input for SENSETWO calculations is thus very simple. The SENSETWO yields as printed output the cross section sensitivities for each coarse mesh zone and for each energy group, as well as the plotted output of sensitivity profiles specified by the input. A special feature of the code is that it also calculates the reaction rate with the response function used as the adjoint source in TWOTRAN adjoint calculation and the calculated forward flux from the TWOTRAN forward calculation. (author)

  15. Current interruption transients calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Peelo, David F

    2014-01-01

    Provides an original, detailed and practical description of current interruption transients, origins, and the circuits involved, and how they can be calculated Current Interruption Transients Calculationis a comprehensive resource for the understanding, calculation and analysis of the transient recovery voltages (TRVs) and related re-ignition or re-striking transients associated with fault current interruption and the switching of inductive and capacitive load currents in circuits. This book provides an original, detailed and practical description of current interruption transients, origins,

  16. Source and replica calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whalen, P.P.

    1994-01-01

    The starting point of the Hiroshima-Nagasaki Dose Reevaluation Program is the energy and directional distributions of the prompt neutron and gamma-ray radiation emitted from the exploding bombs. A brief introduction to the neutron source calculations is presented. The development of our current understanding of the source problem is outlined. It is recommended that adjoint calculations be used to modify source spectra to resolve the neutron discrepancy problem

  17. Shielding calculations using FLUKA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Chiri; Tesch, K.; Dinter, H.

    1988-06-01

    The dose equivalent on the surface of concrete shielding has been calculated using the Monte Carlo code FLUKA86 for incident proton energies from 10 to 800 GeV. The results have been compared with some simple equations. The value of the angular dependent parameter in Moyer's equation has been calculated from the locations where the values of the maximum dose equivalent occur. (author)

  18. Group devaluation and group identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leach, C.W.; Rodriguez Mosquera, P.M.; Vliek, M.L.W.; Hirt, E.

    2010-01-01

    In three studies, we showed that increased in-group identification after (perceived or actual) group devaluation is an assertion of a (preexisting) positive social identity that counters the negative social identity implied in societal devaluation. Two studies with real-world groups used order

  19. Lie groups and algebraic groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We give an exposition of certain topics in Lie groups and algebraic groups. This is not a complete ... of a polynomial equation is equivalent to the solva- bility of the equation ..... to a subgroup of the group of roots of unity in k (in particular, it is a ...

  20. Uncertainty calculations made easier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogenbirk, A.

    1994-07-01

    The results are presented of a neutron cross section sensitivity/uncertainty analysis performed in a complicated 2D model of the NET shielding blanket design inside the ITER torus design, surrounded by the cryostat/biological shield as planned for ITER. The calculations were performed with a code system developed at ECN Petten, with which sensitivity/uncertainty calculations become relatively simple. In order to check the deterministic neutron transport calculations (performed with DORT), calculations were also performed with the Monte Carlo code MCNP. Care was taken to model the 2.0 cm wide gaps between two blanket segments, as the neutron flux behind the vacuum vessel is largely determined by neutrons streaming through these gaps. The resulting neutron flux spectra are in excellent agreement up to the end of the cryostat. It is noted, that at this position the attenuation of the neutron flux is about 1 l orders of magnitude. The uncertainty in the energy integrated flux at the beginning of the vacuum vessel and at the beginning of the cryostat was determined in the calculations. The uncertainty appears to be strongly dependent on the exact geometry: if the gaps are filled with stainless steel, the neutron spectrum changes strongly, which results in an uncertainty of 70% in the energy integrated flux at the beginning of the cryostat in the no-gap-geometry, compared to an uncertainty of only 5% in the gap-geometry. Therefore, it is essential to take into account the exact geometry in sensitivity/uncertainty calculations. Furthermore, this study shows that an improvement of the covariance data is urgently needed in order to obtain reliable estimates of the uncertainties in response parameters in neutron transport calculations. (orig./GL)

  1. Online plasma calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, H.; Gourdain, P.-A.

    2017-10-01

    APOLLO is an online, Linux based plasma calculator. Users can input variables that correspond to their specific plasma, such as ion and electron densities, temperatures, and external magnetic fields. The system is based on a webserver where a FastCGI protocol computes key plasma parameters including frequencies, lengths, velocities, and dimensionless numbers. FastCGI was chosen to overcome security problems caused by JAVA-based plugins. The FastCGI also speeds up calculations over PHP based systems. APOLLO is built upon the WT library, which turns any web browser into a versatile, fast graphic user interface. All values with units are expressed in SI units except temperature, which is in electron-volts. SI units were chosen over cgs units because of the gradual shift to using SI units within the plasma community. APOLLO is intended to be a fast calculator that also provides the user with the proper equations used to calculate the plasma parameters. This system is intended to be used by undergraduates taking plasma courses as well as graduate students and researchers who need a quick reference calculation.

  2. Daylight calculations in practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Anne; Roy, Nicolas; Hvass, Mette

    The aim of the project was to obtain a better understanding of what daylight calculations show and also to gain knowledge of how the different daylight simulation programs perform compared with each other. Experience has shown that results for the same room, obtained from two daylight simulation...... programs can give different results. This can be due to restrictions in the program itself and/or be due to the skills of the persons setting up the models. This is crucial as daylight calculations are used to document that the demands and recommendations to daylight levels outlined by building authorities....... The aim of the project was to obtain a better understanding of what daylight calculations show and also to gain knowledge of how the different daylight simulation programs perform compared with each other. Furthermore the aim was to provide knowledge of how to build up the 3D models that were...

  3. Calculating Quenching Weights

    CERN Document Server

    Salgado, C A; Salgado, Carlos A.; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2003-01-01

    We calculate the probability (``quenching weight'') that a hard parton radiates an additional energy fraction due to scattering in spatially extended QCD matter. This study is based on an exact treatment of finite in-medium path length, it includes the case of a dynamically expanding medium, and it extends to the angular dependence of the medium-induced gluon radiation pattern. All calculations are done in the multiple soft scattering approximation (Baier-Dokshitzer-Mueller-Peign\\'e-Schiff--Zakharov ``BDMPS-Z''-formalism) and in the single hard scattering approximation (N=1 opacity approximation). By comparison, we establish a simple relation between transport coefficient, Debye screening mass and opacity, for which both approximations lead to comparable results. Together with this paper, a CPU-inexpensive numerical subroutine for calculating quenching weights is provided electronically. To illustrate its applications, we discuss the suppression of hadronic transverse momentum spectra in nucleus-nucleus colli...

  4. Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kristy J.; Brickman, Peggy; Brame, Cynthia J.

    2018-01-01

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics faculty are increasingly incorporating both formal and informal group work in their courses. Implementing group work can be improved by an understanding of the extensive body of educational research studies on this topic. This essay describes an online, evidence-based teaching guide published by…

  5. Reflection groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggermont, G.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, PISA organised proactive meetings of reflection groups on involvement in decision making, expert culture and ethical aspects of radiation protection.All reflection group meetings address particular targeted audiences while the output publication in book form is put forward

  6. Three recent TDHF calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, M.S.

    1981-05-01

    Three applications of TDHF are discussed. First, vibrational spectra of a post grazing collision 40 Ca nucleus is examined and found to contain many high energy components, qualitatively consistent with recent Orsay experiments. Second, the fusion cross section in energy and angular momentum are calculated for 16 O + 24 Mg to exhibit the parameters of the low l window for this system. A sensitivity of the fusion cross section to the effective two body potential is discussed. Last, a preliminary analysis of 86 Kr + 139 La at E/sub lab/ = 505 MeV calculated in the frozen approximation is displayed, compared to experiment and discussed

  7. Fission neutron multiplicity calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maerten, H.; Ruben, A.; Seeliger, D.

    1991-01-01

    A model for calculating neutron multiplicities in nuclear fission is presented. It is based on the solution of the energy partition problem as function of mass asymmetry within a phenomenological approach including temperature-dependent microscopic energies. Nuclear structure effects on fragment de-excitation, which influence neutron multiplicities, are discussed. Temperature effects on microscopic energy play an important role in induced fission reactions. Calculated results are presented for various fission reactions induced by neutrons. Data cover the incident energy range 0-20 MeV, i.e. multiple chance fission is considered. (author). 28 refs, 13 figs

  8. Lattice cell burnup calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop-Jordanov, J.

    1977-01-01

    Accurate burnup prediction is a key item for design and operation of a power reactor. It should supply information on isotopic changes at each point in the reactor core and the consequences of these changes on the reactivity, power distribution, kinetic characters, control rod patterns, fuel cycles and operating strategy. A basic stage in the burnup prediction is the lattice cell burnup calculation. This series of lectures attempts to give a review of the general principles and calculational methods developed and applied in this area of burnup physics

  9. PWR core design calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trkov, A; Ravnik, M; Zeleznik, N [Inst. Jozef Stefan, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    1992-07-01

    Functional description of the programme package Cord-2 for PWR core design calculations is presented. Programme package is briefly described. Use of the package and calculational procedures for typical core design problems are treated. Comparison of main results with experimental values is presented as part of the verification process. (author) [Slovenian] Opisali smo programski paket CORD-2, ki se uporablja pri projektnih izracunih sredice pri upravljanju tlacnovodnega reaktorja. Prikazana je uporaba paketa in racunskih postopkov za tipicne probleme, ki nastopajo pri projektiranju sredice. Primerjava glavnih rezultatov z eksperimentalnimi vrednostmi je predstavljena kot del preveritvenega procesa. (author)

  10. Calculating Student Grades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allswang, John M.

    1986-01-01

    This article provides two short microcomputer gradebook programs. The programs, written in BASIC for the IBM-PC and Apple II, provide statistical information about class performance and calculate grades either on a normal distribution or based on teacher-defined break points. (JDH)

  11. Cardiovascular risk calculation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    James A. Ker

    2014-08-20

    Aug 20, 2014 ... smoking and elevated blood sugar levels (diabetes mellitus). These risk ... These are risk charts, e.g. FRS, a non-laboratory-based risk calculation, and ... for hard cardiovascular end-points, such as coronary death, myocardial ...

  12. Cooling tower calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonkova, J.

    1988-01-01

    The problems are summed up of the dynamic calculation of cooling towers with forced and natural air draft. The quantities and relations are given characterizing the simultaneous exchange of momentum, heat and mass in evaporative water cooling by atmospheric air in the packings of cooling towers. The method of solution is clarified in the calculation of evaporation criteria and thermal characteristics of countercurrent and cross current cooling systems. The procedure is demonstrated of the calculation of cooling towers, and correction curves and the effect assessed of the operating mode at constant air number or constant outlet air volume flow on their course in ventilator cooling towers. In cooling towers with the natural air draft the flow unevenness is assessed of water and air relative to its effect on the resulting cooling efficiency of the towers. The calculation is demonstrated of thermal and resistance response curves and cooling curves of hydraulically unevenly loaded towers owing to the water flow rate parameter graded radially by 20% along the cross-section of the packing. Flow rate unevenness of air due to wind impact on the outlet air flow from the tower significantly affects the temperatures of cooled water in natural air draft cooling towers of a design with lower demands on aerodynamics, as early as at wind velocity of 2 m.s -1 as was demonstrated on a concrete example. (author). 11 figs., 10 refs

  13. Hypervelocity impact cratering calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, D. E.; Moises, H.

    1971-01-01

    A summary is presented of prediction calculations on the mechanisms involved in hypervelocity impact cratering and response of earth media. Considered are: (1) a one-gram lithium-magnesium alloys impacting basalt normally at 6.4 km/sec, and (2) a large terrestrial impact corresponding to that of Sierra Madera.

  14. Languages for structural calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.B.; Chambon, M.R.

    1988-01-01

    The differences between human and computing languages are recalled. It is argued that they are to some extent structured in antagonistic ways. Languages in structural calculation, in the past, present, and future, are considered. The contribution of artificial intelligence is stressed [fr

  15. Equilibrium fission model calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckerman, M.; Blann, M.

    1976-01-01

    In order to aid in understanding the systematics of heavy ion fission and fission-like reactions in terms of the target-projectile system, bombarding energy and angular momentum, fission widths are calculated using an angular momentum dependent extension of the Bohr-Wheeler theory and particle emission widths using angular momentum coupling

  16. Renormalisation in Quantum Mechanics, Quantum Instantons and Quantum Chaos

    OpenAIRE

    Jirari, H.; Kröger, H.; Luo, X. Q.; Moriarty, K. J. M.

    2001-01-01

    We suggest how to construct non-perturbatively a renormalized action in quantum mechanics. We discuss similarties and differences with the standard effective action. We propose that the new quantum action is suitable to define and compute quantum instantons and quantum chaos.

  17. Renormalisation of Nonequilibrium Phonons Under Strong Perturbative Influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sushrut Madhukar

    Effects of strong perturbative influences, namely the presence of a narrow distribution of acoustic phonons, and the presence of an electron plasma, on the dynamics of nonequilibrium, near zone center, longitudinal optical phonons in GaP have been investigated in two separate experiments. The study of the effects of the interaction between the LO phonons and a heavily populated, narrow distribution of acoustic phonons lead to the observation of a new optically driven nonequilibrium phonon state. Time Resolved Coherent Antistokes Raman Scattering (TR-CARS), with picosecond resolution, was used to investigate the new mode. In order to achieve high occupation numbers in the acoustic branch, the picosecond laser pulses used were amplified up to 1.0 GW/cm^2 peak power per laser beam. An important characteristic property of the new state which differentiates it from the well known LO phonon state is the fact that rather than having the single decay rate observed under thermal equilibrium, the new state has two decay rates. Moreover, these two decay rates depend strongly on the distribution of the acoustic phonon occupation number. The coupling of the LO phonons with an electron plasma, on the other hand, was investigated by measurements of the shape of the Raman scattered line associated with the phonon-plasmon coupled mode. The plasma was generated by thermal excitation of carriers in doped samples. It was possible to study a large variety of plasma excitations by controlling the concentration of the dopant and the ambient temperature. A complete, self consistant model based on standard dielectric response theory is presented, and applied to the measurements of the phonon-plasmon coupled mode. It is possible to recover, via this model, the effective coupled mode damping rate, the plasma damping rate, and the plasma frequency as functions of ambient temperature, or the carrier concentration.

  18. Group theory

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, W R

    2010-01-01

    Here is a clear, well-organized coverage of the most standard theorems, including isomorphism theorems, transformations and subgroups, direct sums, abelian groups, and more. This undergraduate-level text features more than 500 exercises.

  19. Group Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this article Karen Adams demonstrates how to incorporate group grammar techniques into a classroom activity. In the activity, students practice using the target grammar to do something they naturally enjoy: learning about each other.

  20. Computer group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, H.; Black, I.; Heusler, A.; Hoeptner, G.; Krafft, F.; Lang, R.; Moellenkamp, R.; Mueller, W.; Mueller, W.F.; Schati, C.; Schmidt, A.; Schwind, D.; Weber, G.

    1983-01-01

    The computer groups has been reorganized to take charge for the general purpose computers DEC10 and VAX and the computer network (Dataswitch, DECnet, IBM - connections to GSI and IPP, preparation for Datex-P). (orig.)

  1. Group learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pimentel, Ricardo; Noguira, Eloy Eros da Silva; Elkjær, Bente

    The article presents a study that aims at the apprehension of the group learning in a top management team composed by teachers in a Brazilian Waldorf school whose management is collective. After deciding to extend the school, they had problems recruiting teachers who were already trained based...... on the Steiner´s ideas, which created practical problems for conducting management activities. The research seeks to understand how that group of teachers collectively manage the school, facing the lack of resources, a significant heterogeneity in the relationships, and the conflicts and contradictions......, and they are interrelated to the group learning as the construction, maintenance and reconstruction of the intelligibility of practices. From this perspective, it can be said that learning is a practice and not an exceptional phenomenon. Building, maintaining and rebuilding the intelligibility is the group learning...

  2. Group technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rome, C.P.

    1976-01-01

    Group Technology has been conceptually applied to the manufacture of batch-lots of 554 machined electromechanical parts which now require 79 different types of metal-removal tools. The products have been grouped into 7 distinct families which require from 8 to 22 machines in each machine-cell. Throughput time can be significantly reduced and savings can be realized from tooling, direct-labor, and indirect-labor costs

  3. Abelian groups

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, László

    2015-01-01

    Written by one of the subject’s foremost experts, this book focuses on the central developments and modern methods of the advanced theory of abelian groups, while remaining accessible, as an introduction and reference, to the non-specialist. It provides a coherent source for results scattered throughout the research literature with lots of new proofs. The presentation highlights major trends that have radically changed the modern character of the subject, in particular, the use of homological methods in the structure theory of various classes of abelian groups, and the use of advanced set-theoretical methods in the study of undecidability problems. The treatment of the latter trend includes Shelah’s seminal work on the undecidability in ZFC of Whitehead’s Problem; while the treatment of the former trend includes an extensive (but non-exhaustive) study of p-groups, torsion-free groups, mixed groups, and important classes of groups arising from ring theory. To prepare the reader to tackle these topics, th...

  4. RHEIN, Modular System for Reactor Design Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiche, Christian; Barz, Hansulrich; Kunzmann, Bernd; Seifert, Eberhard; Wand, Hartmut

    1990-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: RHEIN is a modular reactor code system for neutron physics calculations. It consists of a small number of system codes for execution control, data management, and handling support, as well as of the physical calculation routines. The execution is controlled by input data containing mathematical and physical parameters and simple commands for routine calls and data manipulations. The calculation routines are in tune with one another and the system takes care of the data transfer between them. Cross-section libraries with self shielding parameters are added to the system. 2 - Method of solution: The calculation routines can be used for solving the following physics problems: - Calculation of cross-section sets for infinite mediums, taking into account chord length. - Zero-dimensional spectrum calculation in diffusion, P1, or B1 approximation. - One-dimensional calculation in diffusion, P1, or collision probability approximation. - Two-dimensional diffusion calculation. - Cell calculation by THERMOS. - Zone-wise homogenized group collapsing within zero, one, or two-dimensional models. - Normalization, summarizing, etc. - Output of cross-section sets to off systems Sn and Monte-Carlo calculations

  5. Course on hybrid calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weill, J.; Tellier; Bonnemay; Craigne; Chareton; Di Falco

    1969-02-01

    After a definition of hybrid calculation (combination of analogue and digital calculation) with a distinction between series and parallel hybrid computing, and a description of a hybrid computer structure and of task sharing between computers, this course proposes a description of hybrid hardware used in Saclay and Cadarache computing centres, and of operations performed by these systems. The next part addresses issues related to programming languages and software. The fourth part describes how a problem is organised for its processing on these computers. Methods of hybrid analysis are then addressed: resolution of optimisation problems, of partial differential equations, and of integral equations by means of different methods (gradient, maximum principle, characteristics, functional approximation, time slicing, Monte Carlo, Neumann iteration, Fischer iteration)

  6. Calculation of projected ranges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biersack, J.P.

    1980-09-01

    The concept of multiple scattering is reconsidered for obtaining the directional spreading of ion motion as a function of energy loss. From this the mean projection of each pathlength element of the ion trajectory is derived which - upon summation or integration - leads to the desired mean projected range. In special cases, the calculation can be carried out analytically, otherwise a simple general algorithm is derived which is suitable even for the smallest programmable calculators. Necessary input for the present treatment consists only of generally accessable stopping power and straggling formulas. The procedure does not rely on scattering cross sections, e.g. power potential or f(t 1 sup(/) 2 ) approximations. The present approach lends itself easily to include electronic straggling or to treat composed target materials, or even to account for the so-called time integral. (orig.)

  7. Group dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scandiffio, A L

    1990-12-01

    Group dynamics play a significant role within any organization, culture, or unit. The important thing to remember with any of these structures is that they are made up of people--people with different ideas, motivations, background, and sometimes different agendas. Most groups, formal or informal, look for a leader in an effort to maintain cohesiveness of the unit. At times, that cultural bond must be developed; once developed, it must be nurtured. There are also times that one of the group no longer finds the culture comfortable and begins to act out behaviorally. It is these times that become trying for the leader as she or he attempts to remain objective when that which was once in the building phase of group cohesiveness starts to fall apart. At all times, the manager must continue to view the employee creating the disturbance as an integral part of the group. It is at this time that it is beneficial to perceive the employee exhibiting problem behaviors as a special employee, as one who needs the benefit of your experience and skills, as one who is still part of the group. It is also during this time that the manager should focus upon her or his own views in the area of power, communication, and the corporate culture of the unit that one has established before attempting to understand another's point of view. Once we understand our own motivation and accept ourselves, it is then that we may move on to offer assistance to another. Once we understand our insecurities recognizing staff dysfunction as a symptom of system dysfunction will not be so threatening to the concept of the manager that we perceive ourselves to be. It takes a secure person to admit that she or he favors staff before deciding to do something to change things. The important thing to know is that it can be done. The favored staff can find a new way of relating to others, the special employee can find new modes of behavior (and even find self-esteem in the process), the group can find new ways

  8. Spallation reactions: calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertini, H.W.

    1975-01-01

    Current methods for calculating spallation reactions over various energy ranges are described and evaluated. Recent semiempirical fits to existing data will probably yield the most accurate predictions for these reactions in general. However, if the products in question have binding energies appreciably different from their isotropic neighbors and if the cross section is approximately 30 mb or larger, then the intranuclear-cascade-evaporation approach is probably better suited. (6 tables, 12 figures, 34 references) (U.S.)

  9. Methods for calculating anisotropic transfer cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Shaohui; Zhang, Yixin.

    1985-01-01

    The Legendre moments of the group transfer cross section, which are widely used in the numerical solution of the transport calculation can be efficiently and accurately constructed from low-order (K = 1--2) successive partial range moments. This is convenient for the generation of group constants. In addition, a technique to obtain group-angle correlation transfer cross section without Legendre expansion is presented. (author)

  10. Performance assessment calculational exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnard, R.W.; Dockery, H.A.

    1990-01-01

    The Performance Assessment Calculational Exercises (PACE) are an ongoing effort coordinated by Yucca Mountain Project Office. The objectives of fiscal year 1990 work, termed PACE-90, as outlined in the Department of Energy Performance Assessment (PA) Implementation Plan were to develop PA capabilities among Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) participants by calculating performance of a Yucca Mountain (YM) repository under ''expected'' and also ''disturbed'' conditions, to identify critical elements and processes necessary to assess the performance of YM, and to perform sensitivity studies on key parameters. It was expected that the PACE problems would aid in development of conceptual models and eventual evaluation of site data. The PACE-90 participants calculated transport of a selected set of radionuclides through a portion of Yucca Mountain for a period of 100,000 years. Results include analyses of fluid-flow profiles, development of a source term for radionuclide release, and simulations of contaminant transport in the fluid-flow field. Later work included development of a problem definition for perturbations to the originally modeled conditions and for some parametric sensitivity studies. 3 refs

  11. Group representations

    CERN Document Server

    Karpilovsky, G

    1994-01-01

    This third volume can be roughly divided into two parts. The first part is devoted to the investigation of various properties of projective characters. Special attention is drawn to spin representations and their character tables and to various correspondences for projective characters. Among other topics, projective Schur index and projective representations of abelian groups are covered. The last topic is investigated by introducing a symplectic geometry on finite abelian groups. The second part is devoted to Clifford theory for graded algebras and its application to the corresponding theory

  12. Lego Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Larsen, Marcus; Pedersen, Torben; Slepniov, Dmitrij

    2010-01-01

    The last years’ rather adventurous journey from 2004 to 2009 had taught the fifth-largest toy-maker in the world - the LEGO Group - the importance of managing the global supply chain effectively. In order to survive the largest internal financial crisis in its roughly 70 years of existence......, the management had, among many initiatives, decided to offshore and outsource a major chunk of its production to Flextronics. In this pursuit of rapid cost-cutting sourcing advantages, the LEGO Group planned to license out as much as 80 per cent of its production besides closing down major parts...

  13. Pregnancy Weight Gain Calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Store Tips for Every Aisle Understand the Price Tag Read the Food Label Kitchen Timesavers Cooking ... from each food group. Try adding a healthy snack each day, or increasing portion sizes at meals. ...

  14. Informal groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van den Berg; P. van Houwelingen; J. de Hart

    2011-01-01

    Original title: Informele groepen Going out running with a group of friends, rather than joining an official sports club. Individuals who decide to take action themselves rather than giving money to good causes. Maintaining contact with others not as a member of an association, but through an

  15. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  16. Zero Temperature Hope Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozsnyai, B. F.

    2002-01-01

    The primary purpose of the HOPE code is to calculate opacities over a wide temperature and density range. It can also produce equation of state (EOS) data. Since the experimental data at the high temperature region are scarce, comparisons of predictions with the ample zero temperature data provide a valuable physics check of the code. In this report we show a selected few examples across the periodic table. Below we give a brief general information about the physics of the HOPE code. The HOPE code is an ''average atom'' (AA) Dirac-Slater self-consistent code. The AA label in the case of finite temperature means that the one-electron levels are populated according to the Fermi statistics, at zero temperature it means that the ''aufbau'' principle works, i.e. no a priory electronic configuration is set, although it can be done. As such, it is a one-particle model (any Hartree-Fock model is a one particle model). The code is an ''ion-sphere'' model, meaning that the atom under investigation is neutral within the ion-sphere radius. Furthermore, the boundary conditions for the bound states are also set at the ion-sphere radius, which distinguishes the code from the INFERNO, OPAL and STA codes. Once the self-consistent AA state is obtained, the code proceeds to generate many-electron configurations and proceeds to calculate photoabsorption in the ''detailed configuration accounting'' (DCA) scheme. However, this last feature is meaningless at zero temperature. There is one important feature in the HOPE code which should be noted; any self-consistent model is self-consistent in the space of the occupied orbitals. The unoccupied orbitals, where electrons are lifted via photoexcitation, are unphysical. The rigorous way to deal with that problem is to carry out complete self-consistent calculations both in the initial and final states connecting photoexcitations, an enormous computational task. The Amaldi correction is an attempt to address this problem by distorting the

  17. Calculation of the inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilbron Filho, P.F.L.; Oliveira Brandao, R. de.

    1988-04-01

    The theory of Point Kernel applied to a source uniformelly distributed in a cylindrical geometry was utilized to estimated the Cs-137 content of each package of radioactive waste collected. The Taylor equation was employed to calculate the build-up factor and the Green function G was adjusted by means of a least square method. The theory also takes into account factors such as aditional shielding, heterogeneity and humidity of the medium as well as associated uncertanties of the parameters envolved. (author) [pt

  18. Calculations in furnace technology

    CERN Document Server

    Davies, Clive; Hopkins, DW; Owen, WS

    2013-01-01

    Calculations in Furnace Technology presents the theoretical and practical aspects of furnace technology. This book provides information pertinent to the development, application, and efficiency of furnace technology. Organized into eight chapters, this book begins with an overview of the exothermic reactions that occur when carbon, hydrogen, and sulfur are burned to release the energy available in the fuel. This text then evaluates the efficiencies to measure the quantity of fuel used, of flue gases leaving the plant, of air entering, and the heat lost to the surroundings. Other chapters consi

  19. Deep penetration calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, W.L.; Deutsch, O.L.; Booth, T.E.

    1980-04-01

    Several Monte Carlo techniques are compared in the transport of neutrons of different source energies through two different deep-penetration problems each with two parts. The first problem involves transmission through a 200-cm concrete slab. The second problem is a 90 0 bent pipe jacketed by concrete. In one case the pipe is void, and in the other it is filled with liquid sodium. Calculations are made with two different Los Alamos Monte Carlo codes: the continuous-energy code MCNP and the multigroup code MCMG

  20. Biology task group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The accomplishments of the task group studies over the past year are reviewed. The purposes of biological investigations, in the context of subseabed disposal, are: an evaluation of the dose to man; an estimation of effects on the ecosystem; and an estimation of the influence of organisms on and as barriers to radionuclide migration. To accomplish these ends, the task group adopted the following research goals: (1) acquire more data on biological accumulation of specific radionuclides, such as those of Tc, Np, Ra, and Sr; (2) acquire more data on transfer coefficients from sediment to organism; (3) Calculate mass transfer rates, construct simple models using them, and estimate collective dose commitment; (4) Identify specific pathways or transfer routes, determine the rates of transfer, and make dose limit calculations with simple models; (5) Calculate dose rates to and estimate irradiation effects on the biota as a result of waste emplacement, by reference to background irradiation calculations. (6) Examine the effect of the biota on altering sediment/water radionuclide exchange; (7) Consider the biological data required to address different accident scenarios; (8) Continue to provide the basic biological information for all of the above, and ensure that the system analysis model is based on the most realistic and up-to-date concepts of marine biologists; and (9) Ensure by way of free exchange of information that the data used in any model are the best currently available

  1. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group, established at the start of 2010, has been busy in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure There are now 55 CMS Centres worldwide that are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, is the centre of the CMS offline and computing operations, hosting dedicated analysis efforts such as during the CMS Heavy Ion lead-lead running. With a majority of CMS sub-detectors now operating in a “shifterless” mode, many monitoring operations are now routinely performed from there, rather than in the main Control Room at P5. The CMS Communications Group, CERN IT and the EVO team are providing excellent videoconferencing support for the rapidly-increasing number of CMS meetings. In parallel, CERN IT and ...

  2. Group therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Full text: In his review 'Genesis of Unified Gauge Theories' at the symposium in Honour of Abdus Salam (June, page 23), Tom Kibble of Imperial College, London, looked back to the physics events around Salam from 1959-67. He described how, in the early 1960s, people were pushing to enlarge the symmetry of strong interactions beyond the SU(2) of isospin and incorporate the additional strangeness quantum number. Kibble wrote - 'Salam had students working on every conceivable symmetry group. One of these was Yuval Ne'eman, who had the good fortune and/or prescience to work on SU(3). From that work, and of course from the independent work of Murray Gell- Mann, stemmed the Eightfold Way, with its triumphant vindication in the discovery of the omega-minus in 1964.' Yuval Ne'eman writes - 'I was the Defence Attaché at the Israeli Embassy in London and was admitted by Salam as a part-time graduate student when I arrived in 1958. I started research after resigning from the Embassy in May 1960. Salam suggested a problem: provide vector mesons with mass - the problem which was eventually solved by Higgs, Guralnik, Kibble,.... (as described by Kibble in his article). I explained to Salam that I had become interested in symmetry. Nobody at Imperial College at the time, other than Salam himself, was doing anything in groups, and attention further afield was focused on the rotation - SO(N) - groups. Reacting to my own half-baked schemes, Salam told me to forget about the rotation groups he taught us, and study group theory in depth, directing me to Eugene Dynkin's classification of Lie subalgebras, about which he had heard from Morton Hamermesh. I found Dynkin incomprehensible without first learning about Lie algebras from Henri Cartan's thesis, which luckily had been reproduced by Dynkin in his 1946 thesis, using his diagram method. From a copy of a translation of Dynkin's thesis which I found in the British Museum Library, I

  3. Feasibility study on embedded transport core calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, B.; Zikatanov, L.; Ivanov, K.

    2007-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to develop an advanced core calculation methodology based on embedded diffusion and transport calculations. The scheme proposed in this work is based on embedded diffusion or SP 3 pin-by-pin local fuel assembly calculation within the framework of the Nodal Expansion Method (NEM) diffusion core calculation. The SP 3 method has gained popularity in the last 10 years as an advanced method for neutronics calculation. NEM is a multi-group nodal diffusion code developed, maintained and continuously improved at the Pennsylvania State University. The developed calculation scheme is a non-linear iteration process, which involves cross-section homogenization, on-line discontinuity factors generation, and boundary conditions evaluation by the global solution passed to the local calculation. In order to accomplish the local calculation, a new code has been developed based on the Finite Elements Method (FEM), which is capable of performing both diffusion and SP 3 calculations. The new code will be used in the framework of the NEM code in order to perform embedded pin-by-pin diffusion and SP 3 calculations on fuel assembly basis. The development of the diffusion and SP 3 FEM code is presented first following by its application to several problems. Description of the proposed embedded scheme is provided next as well as the obtained preliminary results of the C3 MOX benchmark. The results from the embedded calculations are compared with direct pin-by-pin whole core calculations in terms of accuracy and efficiency followed by conclusions made about the feasibility of the proposed embedded approach. (authors)

  4. Weldon Spring dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, H.W.; Hill, G.S.; Perdue, P.T.

    1978-09-01

    In response to a request by the Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) Office of the Department of Energy (DOE) for assistance to the Department of the Army (DA) on the decommissioning of the Weldon Spring Chemical Plant, the Health and Safety Research Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) performed limited dose assessment calculations for that site. Based upon radiological measurements from a number of soil samples analyzed by ORNL and from previously acquired radiological data for the Weldon Spring site, source terms were derived to calculate radiation doses for three specific site scenarios. These three hypothetical scenarios are: a wildlife refuge for hunting, fishing, and general outdoor recreation; a school with 40 hr per week occupancy by students and a custodian; and a truck farm producing fruits, vegetables, meat, and dairy products which may be consumed on site. Radiation doses are reported for each of these scenarios both for measured uranium daughter equilibrium ratios and for assumed secular equilibrium. Doses are lower for the nonequilibrium case

  5. Buoyant plume calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penner, J.E.; Haselman, L.C.; Edwards, L.L.

    1985-01-01

    Smoke from raging fires produced in the aftermath of a major nuclear exchange has been predicted to cause large decreases in surface temperatures. However, the extent of the decrease and even the sign of the temperature change, depend on how the smoke is distributed with altitude. We present a model capable of evaluating the initial distribution of lofted smoke above a massive fire. Calculations are shown for a two-dimensional slab version of the model and a full three-dimensional version. The model has been evaluated by simulating smoke heights for the Hamburg firestorm of 1943 and a smaller scale oil fire which occurred in Long Beach in 1958. Our plume heights for these fires are compared to those predicted by the classical Morton-Taylor-Turner theory for weakly buoyant plumes. We consider the effect of the added buoyancy caused by condensation of water-laden ground level air being carried to high altitude with the convection column as well as the effects of background wind on the calculated smoke plume heights for several fire intensities. We find that the rise height of the plume depends on the assumed background atmospheric conditions as well as the fire intensity. Little smoke is injected into the stratosphere unless the fire is unusually intense, or atmospheric conditions are more unstable than we have assumed. For intense fires significant amounts of water vapor are condensed raising the possibility of early scavenging of smoke particles by precipitation. 26 references, 11 figures

  6. Shielding calculations for NET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verschuur, K.A.; Hogenbirk, A.

    1991-05-01

    In the European Fusion Technology Programme there is only a small activity on research and development for fusion neutronics. Never-the-less, looking further than blanket design now, as ECN is getting involved in design of radiation shields for the coils and biological shields, it becomes apparent that fusion neutronics as a whole still needs substantial development. Existing exact codes for calculation of complex geometries like MCNP and DORT/TORT are put over the limits of their numerical capabilities, whilst approximate codes for complex geometries like FURNACE and MERCURE4 are put over the limits of their modelling capabilities. The main objective of this study is just to find out how far we can get with existing codes in obtaining reliable values for the radiation levels inside and outside the cryostat/shield during operation and after shut-down. Starting with a 1D torus model for preliminary parametric studies, more dimensional approximation of the torus or parts of it including the main heterogeneities should follow. Regular contacts with the NET-Team are kept, to be aware of main changes in NET design that might affect our calculation models. Work on the contract started 1 July 1990. The technical description of the contract is given. (author). 14 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  7. Group Capability Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejarski, Michael; Appleton, Amy; Deltorchio, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The Group Capability Model (GCM) is a software tool that allows an organization, from first line management to senior executive, to monitor and track the health (capability) of various groups in performing their contractual obligations. GCM calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI) by comparing actual head counts, certifications, and/or skills within a group. The model can also be used to simulate the effects of employee usage, training, and attrition on the GCI. A universal tool and common method was required due to the high risk of losing skills necessary to complete the Space Shuttle Program and meet the needs of the Constellation Program. During this transition from one space vehicle to another, the uncertainty among the critical skilled workforce is high and attrition has the potential to be unmanageable. GCM allows managers to establish requirements for their group in the form of head counts, certification requirements, or skills requirements. GCM then calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI), where a score of 1 indicates that the group is at the appropriate level; anything less than 1 indicates a potential for improvement. This shows the health of a group, both currently and over time. GCM accepts as input head count, certification needs, critical needs, competency needs, and competency critical needs. In addition, team members are categorized by years of experience, percentage of contribution, ex-members and their skills, availability, function, and in-work requirements. Outputs are several reports, including actual vs. required head count, actual vs. required certificates, CGI change over time (by month), and more. The program stores historical data for summary and historical reporting, which is done via an Excel spreadsheet that is color-coded to show health statistics at a glance. GCM has provided the Shuttle Ground Processing team with a quantifiable, repeatable approach to assessing and managing the skills in their organization. They now have a common

  8. Thermodynamic Calculations for Systems Biocatalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu, Rohana; Gundersen, Maria T.; Woodley, John M.

    2015-01-01

    the transamination of a pro-chiral ketone into a chiral amine (interesting in many pharmaceutical applications). Here, the products are often less energetically stable than the reactants, meaning that the reaction may be thermodynamically unfavourable. As in nature, such thermodynamically-challenged reactions can...... on the basis of kinetics. However, many of the most interesting non-natural chemical reactions which could potentially be catalysed by enzymes, are thermodynamically unfavourable and are thus limited by the equilibrium position of the reaction. A good example is the enzyme ω-transaminase, which catalyses...... be altered by coupling with other reactions. For instance, in the case of ω-transaminase, such a coupling could be with alanine dehydrogenase. Herein, the aim of this work is to identify thermodynamic bottlenecks within a multi-enzyme process, using group contribution method to calculate the Gibbs free...

  9. Calculating graduation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starck, Patricia L; Love, Karen; McPherson, Robert

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the focus has been on increasing the number of registered nurse (RN) graduates. Numerous states have initiated programs to increase the number and quality of students entering nursing programs, and to expand the capacity of their programs to enroll additional qualified students. However, little attention has been focused on an equally, if not more, effective method for increasing the number of RNs produced-increasing the graduation rate of students enrolling. This article describes a project that undertook the task of compiling graduation data for 15 entry-level programs, standardizing terms and calculations for compiling the data, and producing a regional report on graduation rates of RN students overall and by type of program. Methodology is outlined in this article. This effort produced results that were surprising to program deans and directors and is expected to produce greater collaborative efforts to improve these rates both locally and statewide.

  10. Mice take calculated risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheifets, Aaron; Gallistel, C R

    2012-05-29

    Animals successfully navigate the world despite having only incomplete information about behaviorally important contingencies. It is an open question to what degree this behavior is driven by estimates of stochastic parameters (brain-constructed models of the experienced world) and to what degree it is directed by reinforcement-driven processes that optimize behavior in the limit without estimating stochastic parameters (model-free adaptation processes, such as associative learning). We find that mice adjust their behavior in response to a change in probability more quickly and abruptly than can be explained by differential reinforcement. Our results imply that mice represent probabilities and perform calculations over them to optimize their behavior, even when the optimization produces negligible material gain.

  11. Smile esthetics: calculated beauty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecocq, Guillaume; Truong Tan Trung, Lisa

    2014-06-01

    Esthetic demand from patients continues to increase. Consequently, the treatments we offer are moving towards more discreet or invisible techniques using lingual brackets in order to achieve harmonious, balanced results in line with our treatment goals. As orthodontists, we act upon relationships between teeth and bone. And the equilibrium they create impacts the entire face via the smile. A balanced smile is essential to an esthetic outcome and is governed by rules, which guide both the practitioner and patient. A smile can be described in terms of mathematical ratios and proportions but beauty cannot be calculated. For the smile to sit harmoniously within the face, we need to take into account facial proportions and the possibility of their being modified by our orthopedic appliances or by surgery. Copyright © 2014 CEO. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2010-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group, established at the start of 2010, has been strengthening the activities in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure The Communications Group has invested a lot of effort to support the operations needs of CMS. Hence, the CMS Centres where physicists work on remote CMS shifts, Data Quality Monitoring, and Data Analysis are running very smoothly. There are now 55 CMS Centres worldwide, up from just 16 at the start of CMS data-taking. The latest to join are Imperial College London, the University of Iowa, and the Università di Napoli. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, which is now full repaired after the major flooding at the beginning of the year, has been at the centre of CMS offline and computing operations, most recently hosting a large fraction of the CMS Heavy Ion community during the lead-lead run. A number of sub-detector shifts can now take pla...

  13. Group play

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tychsen, Anders; Hitchens, Michael; Brolund, Thea

    2008-01-01

    Role-playing games (RPGs) are a well-known game form, existing in a number of formats, including tabletop, live action, and various digital forms. Despite their popularity, empirical studies of these games are relatively rare. In particular there have been few examinations of the effects of the v......Role-playing games (RPGs) are a well-known game form, existing in a number of formats, including tabletop, live action, and various digital forms. Despite their popularity, empirical studies of these games are relatively rare. In particular there have been few examinations of the effects...... of the various formats used by RPGs on the gaming experience. This article presents the results of an empirical study, examining how multi-player tabletop RPGs are affected as they are ported to the digital medium. Issues examined include the use of disposition assessments to predict play experience, the effect...... of group dynamics, the influence of the fictional game characters and the comparative play experience between the two formats. The results indicate that group dynamics and the relationship between the players and their digital characters, are integral to the quality of the gaming experience in multiplayer...

  14. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group has been busy in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure The 55 CMS Centres worldwide are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, is the centre of the CMS Offline and Computing operations, and a number of subdetector shifts can now take place there, rather than in the main Control Room at P5. A new CMS meeting room has been equipped for videoconferencing in building 42, next to building 40. Our building 28 meeting room and the facilities at P5 will be refurbished soon and plans are underway to steadily upgrade the ageing equipment in all 15 CMS meeting rooms at CERN. The CMS evaluation of the Vidyo tool indicates that it is not yet ready to be considered as a potential replacement for EVO. The Communications Group provides the CMS-TV (web) cha...

  15. Nuclear calculation of the thorium reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirakawa, Naohiro

    1998-01-01

    Even if for a reactor using thorium (and 233-U), its nuclear design calculation procedure is similar to the case using conventional 235-U, 238-U and plutonium. As nuclear composition varies with time on operation of nuclear reactor, calculation of its mean cross section should be conducted in details. At that time, one-group cross section obtained by integration over a whole of energy range is used for small member group. And, as the nuclear data for a base of its calculation is already prepared by JENDL3.2 and nuclear data library derived from it, the nuclear calculation of a nuclear reactor using thorium has no problem. From such a veiwpoint, IAEA has organized a coordinated research program of 'Potential of Th-based Fuel Cycles to Constrain Pu and to reduce Long-term Waste Toxicities' since 1996. All nations entering this program were regulated so as to institute by selecting a nuclear fuel cycle thinking better by each nation and to examine what cycle is expected by comparing their results. For a promise to conduct such neutral comparison, a comparison of bench mark calculations aiming at PWR was conducted to protect that the obtained results became different because of different calculation method and cross section adopted by each nation. Therefore, it was promoted by entrance of China, Germany, India, Israel, Japan, Korea, Russia and USA. The SWAT system developed by Tohoku University is used for its calculation code, by using which calculated results on the bench mark calculation at the fist and second stages and the nuclear reactor were reported. (G.K.)

  16. Critical groups - basic concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, M.W.

    1992-01-01

    The potential exposure pathways from the land application site to man are presented. It is emphasised that the critical group is not necessary the population group closest to the source. It could be the group impact by the most significant pathways(s). Only by assessing the importance of each of these pathways and then combining them can a proper choice of critical group be made. It would be wrong to select a critical group on the basis that it seems the most probable one, before the pathways have been properly assessed. A calculation in Carter (1983) suggested that for the operating mine site, the annual doses to an Aboriginal person, a service worker and a local housewife, were all about the same and were in the range 0.1 to 0.2 mSv per year. Thus it may be that for the land application area, the critical group turns out to be non-Aboriginal rather than the expected Aboriginal group. 6 refs., 3 figs

  17. Seismic analysis program group: SSAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Masaaki

    2002-05-01

    A group of programs SSAP has been developed, each member of which performs seismic calculation using simple single-mass system model or multi-mass system model. For response of structures to a transverse s-wave, a single-mass model program calculating response spectrum and a multi-mass model program are available. They perform calculation using the output of another program, which produces simulated earthquakes having the so-called Ohsaki-spectrum characteristic. Another program has been added, which calculates the response of one-dimensional multi-mass systems to vertical p-wave input. It places particular emphasis on the analysis of the phenomena observed at some shallow earthquakes in which stones jump off the ground. Through a series of test calculations using these programs, some interesting information has been derived concerning the validity of superimposing single-mass model calculation, and also the condition for stones to jump. (author)

  18. Relative Hazard Calculation Methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DL Strenge; MK White; RD Stenner; WB Andrews

    1999-01-01

    The methodology presented in this document was developed to provide a means of calculating the RH ratios to use in developing useful graphic illustrations. The RH equation, as presented in this methodology, is primarily a collection of key factors relevant to understanding the hazards and risks associated with projected risk management activities. The RH equation has the potential for much broader application than generating risk profiles. For example, it can be used to compare one risk management activity with another, instead of just comparing it to a fixed baseline as was done for the risk profiles. If the appropriate source term data are available, it could be used in its non-ratio form to estimate absolute values of the associated hazards. These estimated values of hazard could then be examined to help understand which risk management activities are addressing the higher hazard conditions at a site. Graphics could be generated from these absolute hazard values to compare high-hazard conditions. If the RH equation is used in this manner, care must be taken to specifically define and qualify the estimated absolute hazard values (e.g., identify which factors were considered and which ones tended to drive the hazard estimation)

  19. Experimental Young's modulus calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.; Jayakumar, R.; Yu, K.

    1994-01-01

    Coil is a very important magnet component. The turn location and the coil size impact both mechanical and magnetic behavior of the magnet. The Young's modulus plays a significant role in determining the coil location and size. Therefore, Young's modulus study is essential in predicting both the analytical and practical magnet behavior. To determine the coil Young's modulus, an experiment has been conducted to measure azimuthal sizes of a half quadrant QSE101 inner coil under different loading. All measurements are made at four different positions along an 8-inch long inner coil. Each measurement is repeated three times to determine the reproducibility of the experiment. To ensure the reliability of this experiment, the same measurement is performed twice with a open-quotes dummy coil,close quotes which is made of G10 and has the same dimension and similar azimuthal Young's modulus as the inner coil. The difference between the G10 azimuthal Young's modulus calculated from the experiments and its known value from the manufacturer will be compared. Much effort has been extended in analyzing the experimental data to obtain a more reliable Young's modulus. Analysis methods include the error analysis method and the least square method

  20. Relativistic few body calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, F.

    1988-01-01

    A modern treatment of the nuclear few-body problem must take into account both the quark structure of baryons and mesons, which should be important at short range, and the relativistic exchange of mesons, which describes the long range, peripheral interactions. A way to model both of these aspects is described. The long range, peripheral interactions are calculated using the spectator model, a general approach in which the spectators to nucleon interactions are put on their mass-shell. Recent numerical results for a relativistic OBE model of the NN interaction, obtained by solving a relativistic equation with one-particle on mass-shell, will be presented and discussed. Two meson exchange models, one with only four mesons (π,σ,/rho/,ω) but with a 25% admixture of γ 5 coupling for the pion, and a second with six mesons (π,σ,/rho/,ω,δ,/eta/) but pure γ 5 γ/sup μ/ pion coupling, are shown to give very good quantitative fits to the NN scattering phase shifts below 400 MeV, and also a good description of the /rvec p/ 40 Ca elastic scattering observables. Applications of this model to electromagnetic interactions of the two body system, with emphasis on the determination of relativistic current operators consistent with the dynamics and the exact treatment of current conservation in the presence of phenomenological form factors, will be described. 18 refs., 8 figs

  1. Equilibrium calculations, ch. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deursen, A.P.J. van

    1976-01-01

    A calculation is presented of dimer intensities obtained in supersonic expansions. There are two possible limiting considerations; the dimers observed are already present in the source, in thermodynamic equilibrium, and are accelerated in the expansion. Destruction during acceleration is neglected, as are processes leading to newly formed dimers. On the other hand one can apply a kinetic approach, where formation and destruction processes are followed throughout the expansion. The difficulty of this approach stems from the fact that the density, temperature and rate constants have to be known at all distances from the nozzle. The simple point of view has been adopted and the measured dimer intensities are compared with the equilibrium concentration in the source. The comparison is performed under the assumption that the detection efficiency for dimers is twice the detection efficiency for monomers. The experimental evidence against the simple point of view that the dimers of the onset region are formed in the source already, under equilibrium conditions, is discussed. (Auth.)

  2. Configuration space Faddeev calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, G.L.; Klink, W.H.; Ployzou, W.N.

    1991-01-01

    The detailed study of few-body systems provides one of the most precise tools for studying the dynamics of nuclei. Our research program consists of a careful theoretical study of the nuclear few-body systems. During the past year we have completed several aspects of this program. We have continued our program of using the trinucleon system to investigate the validity of various realistic nucleon-nucleon potentials. Also, the effects of meson-exchange currents in nuclear systems have been studied. Initial calculations using the configuration-space Faddeev equations for nucleon-deuteron scattering have been completed. With modifications to treat relativistic systems, few-body methods can be applied to phenomena that are sensitive to the structure of the individual hadrons. We have completed a review of Relativistic Hamiltonian Dynamics in Nuclear and Particle Physics for Advances in Nuclear Physics. Although it is called a review, it is a large document that contains a significant amount of new research

  3. FENDL-2 and associated benchmark calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashchenko, A.B.; Muir, D.W.

    1992-03-01

    The present Report contains the Summary of the IAEA Advisory Group Meeting on ''The FENDL-2 and Associated Benchmark Calculations'' convened on 18-22 November 1991, at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, Austria, by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. The Advisory Group Meeting Conclusions and Recommendations and the Report on the Strategy for the Future Development of the FENDL and on Future Work towards establishing FENDL-2 are also included in this Summary Report. (author). 1 ref., 4 tabs

  4. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2010-01-01

    The recently established CMS Communications Group, led by Lucas Taylor, has been busy in all three of its main are areas of responsibility: Communications Infrastructure, Information Systems, and Outreach and Education Communications Infrastructure The damage caused by the flooding of the CMS Centre@CERN on 21st December has been completely repaired and all systems are back in operation. Major repairs were made to the roofs, ceilings and one third of the floor had to be completely replaced. Throughout these works, the CMS Centre was kept operating and even hosted a major press event for first 7 TeV collisions, as described below. Incremental work behind the scenes is steadily improving the quality of the CMS communications infrastructure, particularly Webcasting, video conferencing, and meeting rooms at CERN. CERN/IT is also deploying a pilot service of a new videoconference tool called Vidyo, to assess whether it might provide an enhanced service at a lower cost, compared to the EVO tool currently in w...

  5. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Communications Infrastructure The 55 CMS Centres worldwide are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin is particularly busy at the moment, hosting about 50 physicists taking part in the heavy-ion data-taking and analysis. Three new CMS meeting room will be equipped for videoconferencing in early 2012: 40/5B-08, 42/R-031, and 28/S-029. The CMS-TV service showing LHC Page 1, CMS Page 1, etc. (http://cmsdoc.cern.ch/cmscc/projector/index.jsp) is now also available for mobile devices: http://cern.ch/mcmstv. Figure 12: Screenshots of CMS-TV for mobile devices Information Systems CMS has a new web site: (http://cern.ch/cms) using a modern web Content Management System to ensure content and links are managed and updated easily and coherently. It covers all CMS sub-projects and groups, replacing the iCMS internal pages. It also incorporates the existing CMS public web site (http:/...

  6. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2012-01-01

      Outreach and Education We are fortunate that our research has captured the public imagination, even though this inevitably puts us under the global media spotlight, as we saw with the Higgs seminar at CERN in December, which had 110,000 distinct webcast viewers. The media interest was huge with 71 media organisations registering to come to CERN to cover the Higgs seminar, which was followed by a press briefing with the DG and Spokespersons. This event resulted in about 2,000 generally positive stories in the global media. For this seminar, the CMS Communications Group prepared up-to-date news and public material, including links to the CMS results, animations and event displays [http://cern.ch/go/Ch8thttp://cern.ch/go/Ch8t]. There were 44,000 page-views on the CMS public website, with the Higgs news article being by far the most popular item. CMS event displays from iSpy are fast becoming the iconic media images, featuring on numerous major news outlets (BBC, CNN, MSN...) as well as in the sci...

  7. The rating reliability calculator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon David J

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rating scales form an important means of gathering evaluation data. Since important decisions are often based on these evaluations, determining the reliability of rating data can be critical. Most commonly used methods of estimating reliability require a complete set of ratings i.e. every subject being rated must be rated by each judge. Over fifty years ago Ebel described an algorithm for estimating the reliability of ratings based on incomplete data. While his article has been widely cited over the years, software based on the algorithm is not readily available. This paper describes an easy-to-use Web-based utility for estimating the reliability of ratings based on incomplete data using Ebel's algorithm. Methods The program is available public use on our server and the source code is freely available under GNU General Public License. The utility is written in PHP, a common open source imbedded scripting language. The rating data can be entered in a convenient format on the user's personal computer that the program will upload to the server for calculating the reliability and other statistics describing the ratings. Results When the program is run it displays the reliability, number of subject rated, harmonic mean number of judges rating each subject, the mean and standard deviation of the averaged ratings per subject. The program also displays the mean, standard deviation and number of ratings for each subject rated. Additionally the program will estimate the reliability of an average of a number of ratings for each subject via the Spearman-Brown prophecy formula. Conclusion This simple web-based program provides a convenient means of estimating the reliability of rating data without the need to conduct special studies in order to provide complete rating data. I would welcome other researchers revising and enhancing the program.

  8. WIMSD5, Deterministic Multigroup Reactor Lattice Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The Winfrith improved multigroup scheme (WIMS) is a general code for reactor lattice cell calculation on a wide range of reactor systems. In particular, the code will accept rod or plate fuel geometries in either regular arrays or in clusters and the energy group structure has been chosen primarily for thermal calculations. The basic library has been compiled with 14 fast groups, 13 resonance groups and 42 thermal groups, but the user is offered the choice of accurate solutions in many groups or rapid calculations in few groups. Temperature dependent thermal scattering matrices for a variety of scattering laws are included in the library for the principal moderators which include hydrogen, deuterium, graphite, beryllium and oxygen. WIMSD5 is a successor version of WIMS-D/4. 2 - Method of solution: The treatment of resonances is based on the use of equivalence theorems with a library of accurately evaluated resonance integrals for equivalent homogeneous systems at a variety of temperatures. The collision theory procedure gives accurate spectrum computations in the 69 groups of the library for the principal regions of the lattice using a simplified geometric representation of complicated lattice cells. The computed spectra are then used for the condensation of cross-sections to the number of groups selected for solution of the transport equation in detailed geometry. Solution of the transport equation is provided either by use of the Carlson DSN method or by collision probability methods. Leakage calculations including an allowance for streaming asymmetries may be made using either diffusion theory or the more elaborate B1-method. The output of the code provides Eigenvalues for the cases where a simple buckling mode is applicable or cell-averaged parameters for use in overall reactor calculations. Various reaction rate edits are provided for direct comparison with experimental measurements. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of

  9. Normal mode calculations of trigonal selenium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; McMurry, H. L.

    1980-01-01

    The phonon dispersion relations for trigonal selenium have been calculated on the basis of a short range potential field model. Electrostatic long range forces have not been included. The force field is defined in terms of symmetrized coordinates which reflect partly the symmetry of the space group...

  10. Criticality calculation method for mixer-settlers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonda, Kozo; Aoyagi, Haruki; Nakano, Ko; Kamikawa, Hiroshi.

    1980-01-01

    A new criticality calculation code MACPEX has been developed to evaluate and manage the criticality of the process in the extractor of mixer-settler type. MACPEX can perform the combined calculation with the PUREX process calculation code MIXSET, to get the neutron flux and the effective multiplication constant in the mixer-settlers. MACPEX solves one-dimensional diffusion equation by the explicit difference method and the standard source-iteration technique. The characteristics of MACPEX are as follows. 1) Group constants of 4 energy groups for the 239 Pu-H 2 O solution, water, polyethylene and SUS 28 are provided. 2) The group constants of the 239 Pu-H 2 O solution are given by the functional formulae of the plutonium concentration, which is less than 50 g/l. 3) Two boundary conditions of the vacuum condition and the reflective condition are available in this code. 4) The geometrical bucklings can be calculated for a certain energy group and/or region by using the three dimentional neutron flux profiles obtained by CITATION. 5) The buckling correction search can be carried out in order to get a desired k sub(eff). (author)

  11. Witten index calculation in supersymmetric gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smilga, A.V.

    1984-01-01

    Direct calculation of the Witten index Isub(W) in the SU(2) SUSY Yang-Mills theiory is performed using the periodic boundary conditions. Our result is Isub(W)--1 which disagrees with the Witten's result: Isub(W)=N for the SU(N) gauge group. The principle physical conclusion of SUSY unbreaking in this theory remains intact

  12. E-cigarettes, a safer alternative for teenagers? A UK focus group study of teenagers' views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Shona; Weishaar, Heide; Sweeting, Helen; Trevisan, Filippo; Katikireddi, Srinivasa Vittal

    2016-11-16

    Concerns exist that e-cigarettes may be a gateway to traditional cigarettes and/or (re)normalise teenage smoking. This qualitative study explores how teenagers in the UK currently perceive e-cigarettes and how and why they do or do not use them. 16 focus groups were conducted across the UK between November 2014 and February 2015, with 83 teenagers aged 14-17. All discussions were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim, imported into NVivo 10 and thematically analysed. Teenagers generally agreed that e-cigarettes are useful products for smokers, including teenage smokers, to quit or reduce traditional cigarette use. Concerns were expressed about lack of information on their precise ingredients and any unknown risks for users and bystanders. However, teenagers typically viewed e-cigarettes as substantially less harmful than traditional cigarettes. They perceived e-cigarettes as attractive, with products described as 'fun' and having 'great flavourings'. Seeing websites or social media featuring e-cigarettes, especially YouTube 'vaping tricks', prompted some experimentation and imitation. E-cigarettes were used in a variety of situations, including at parties or when they could not smoke traditional cigarettes. A very few participants suggested covert use was a possibility and that e-cigarettes might help maintain a fledgling nicotine habit. Teenagers support the use of e-cigarettes as smoking cessation aids for established adult smokers. However, they engage with these products differently from adults, with the novel hypothesis that covert use could potentially reinforce traditional cigarette smoking requiring further investigation. Policy responses should more clearly meet the needs of young people, as well as helping established adult smokers. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. On the Calculation of the Fast Fission Factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almgren, B

    1960-06-15

    Definitions of the fast fission factor {epsilon} are discussed. Different methods of calculation of {epsilon} are compared. Group constants for one - , two- and three-group calculations have been evaluated using the best obtainable basic data. The effects of back-scattering, coupling and (n,2n) reactions are discussed.

  14. Calculation procedure for formulating lauric and palmitic fat blends based on the grouping of triacylglycerol melting points; Procedimiento de cálculo para la formulación de mezclas de grasas lauricas y palmíticas basadas en el agrupamiento de puntos de fusión de triacilgliceroles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nusantoro, B.P.; Yanty, N.A.M.; Van de Walle, D.; Hidayat, C.; Danthine, S.; Dewettinck, K.

    2017-07-01

    A calculation procedure for formulating lauric and palmitic fat blends has been developed based on grouping TAG melting points. This procedure offered more flexibility in choosing the initial fats and oils and eventually gave deeper insight into the existing chemical compositions and better prediction on the physicochemical properties and microstructure of the fat blends. The amount of high, medium and low melting TAGs could be adjusted using the given calculation procedure to obtain the desired functional properties in the fat blends. Solid fat contents and melting behavior of formulated fat blends showed particular patterns with respect to ratio adjustments of the melting TAG groups. These outcomes also suggested that both TAG species and their quantity had a significant influence on the crystallization behavior of the fat blends. Palmitic fat blends, in general, were found to exhibit higher SFC values than those of Lauric fat blends. Instead of the similarity in crystal microstructure, lauric fat blends were stabilized at β polymorph while palmitic fat blends were stabilized at β’ polymorph. [Spanish] Se ha desarrollado un procedimiento de cálculo para la formulación de mezclas de grasas lauricas y palmíticas basándose en la agrupación de puntos de fusión de TAG. Este procedimiento ofreció más flexibilidad en la elección de las grasas y aceites iniciales y, dio una visión más profunda de las composiciones químicas existentes y una mejor predicción sobre las propiedades físico-químicas y la microestructura de las mezclas de grasas. La cantidad de TAGs de fusión alta, media y baja se pudo ajustar usando el procedimiento de cálculo dado para obtener las propiedades funcionales deseadas en las mezclas de grasas. El contenido de grasa sólida y el comportamiento de fusión de las mezclas de grasas formuladas mostraron patrones particulares con respecto a los ajustes de relación de los grupos de fusión de TAG. Estos resultados tambi

  15. Parallel processing of neutron transport in fuel assembly calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Jae Seung

    1992-02-01

    Group constants, which are used for reactor analyses by nodal method, are generated by fuel assembly calculations based on the neutron transport theory, since one or a quarter of the fuel assembly corresponds to a unit mesh in the current nodal calculation. The group constant calculation for a fuel assembly is performed through spectrum calculations, a two-dimensional fuel assembly calculation, and depletion calculations. The purpose of this study is to develop a parallel algorithm to be used in a parallel processor for the fuel assembly calculation and the depletion calculations of the group constant generation. A serial program, which solves the neutron integral transport equation using the transmission probability method and the linear depletion equation, was prepared and verified by a benchmark calculation. Small changes from the serial program was enough to parallelize the depletion calculation which has inherent parallel characteristics. In the fuel assembly calculation, however, efficient parallelization is not simple and easy because of the many coupling parameters in the calculation and data communications among CPU's. In this study, the group distribution method is introduced for the parallel processing of the fuel assembly calculation to minimize the data communications. The parallel processing was performed on Quadputer with 4 CPU's operating in NURAD Lab. at KAIST. Efficiencies of 54.3 % and 78.0 % were obtained in the fuel assembly calculation and depletion calculation, respectively, which lead to the overall speedup of about 2.5. As a result, it is concluded that the computing time consumed for the group constant generation can be easily reduced by parallel processing on the parallel computer with small size CPU's

  16. The strong running coupling from an approximate gluon Dyson-Schwinger equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkofer, R.; Hauck, A.

    1996-01-01

    Using Mandelstam's approximation to the gluon Dyson-Schwinger equation we calculate the gluon self-energy in a renormalisation group invariant fashion. We obtain a non-perturbative Β function. The scaling behavior near the ultraviolet stable fixed point is in good agreement with perturbative QCD. No further fixed point for positive values of the coupling is found: α S increases without bound in the infrared

  17. From Kondo model and strong coupling lattice QCD to the Isgur-Wise function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Apoorva

    1995-01-01

    Isgur-Wise functions parametrise the leading behaviour of weak decay form factors of mesons and baryons containing a single heavy quark. The form factors for the quark mass operator are calculated in strong coupling lattice QCD, and Isgur-Wise functions extracted from them. Based on renormalisation group invariance of the operators involved, it is argued that the Isgur-Wise functions would be the same in the weak coupling continuum theory. (author)

  18. ENRAF gauge reference level calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, J.H., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-06

    This document describes the method for calculating reference levels for Enraf Series 854 Level Detectors as installed in the tank farms. The reference level calculation for each installed level gauge is contained herein.

  19. HEU benchmark calculations and LEU preliminary calculations for IRR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caner, M.; Shapira, M.; Bettan, M.; Nagler, A.; Gilat, J.

    2004-01-01

    We performed neutronics calculations for the Soreq Research Reactor, IRR-1. The calculations were done for the purpose of upgrading and benchmarking our codes and methods. The codes used were mainly WIMS-D/4 for cell calculations and the three dimensional diffusion code CITATION for full core calculations. The experimental flux was obtained by gold wire activation methods and compared with our calculated flux profile. The IRR-1 is loaded with highly enriched uranium fuel assemblies, of the plate type. In the framework of preparation for conversion to low enrichment fuel, additional calculations were done assuming the presence of LEU fresh fuel. In these preliminary calculations we investigated the effect on the criticality and flux distributions of the increase of U-238 loading, and the corresponding uranium density.(author)

  20. MCNP and OMEGA criticality calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, E.

    1998-04-01

    The reliability of OMEGA criticality calculations is shown by a comparison with calculations by the validated and widely used Monte Carlo code MCNP. The criticality of 16 assemblies with uranium as fissionable is calculated with the codes MCNP (Version 4A, ENDF/B-V cross sections), MCNP (Version 4B, ENDF/B-VI cross sections), and OMEGA. Identical calculation models are used for the three codes. The results are compared mutually and with the experimental criticality of the assemblies. (orig.)

  1. CALCULATION OF LASER CUTTING COSTS

    OpenAIRE

    Bogdan Nedic; Milan Eric; Marijana Aleksijevic

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents description methods of metal cutting and calculation of treatment costs based on model that is developed on Faculty of mechanical engineering in Kragujevac. Based on systematization and analysis of large number of calculation models of cutting with unconventional methods, mathematical model is derived, which is used for creating a software for calculation costs of metal cutting. Software solution enables resolving the problem of calculating the cost of laser cutting, compar...

  2. Transient anisotropic magnetic field calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesenik, Marko; Gorican, Viktor; Trlep, Mladen; Hamler, Anton; Stumberger, Bojan

    2006-01-01

    For anisotropic magnetic material, nonlinear magnetic characteristics of the material are described with magnetization curves for different magnetization directions. The paper presents transient finite element calculation of the magnetic field in the anisotropic magnetic material based on the measured magnetization curves for different magnetization directions. For the verification of the calculation method some results of the calculation are compared with the measurement

  3. Effective action calculation in lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoek, J.

    1983-01-01

    A method (called the effective action method) devised to make analytic calculations in Quantum Chromodynamics in the region of strong coupling is presented. First, the author deals with developing the calculation of a strong coupling expansion of the generating functional for gauge systems on a lattice with arbitrary sources. An accompanying manual describes the implementation of this calculation on a computer. The next step consists of substituting the expressions for the one-link free energies for a specific gauge group in the result of the previous calculation. This process of substitution, together with the replacement of the sources by a bilinear combination of fermion fields, is described for the group SU(3). More details on the implementation of the substitution scheme on a computer can be found in the accompanying manual. From the effective action thus obtained in terms of meson fields and baryon fields the Green functions of the theory can be derived. As an illustrative application the effective potential determining the vacuum expectation value of the meson field is calculated. (Auth.)

  4. Three dimensions transport calculations for PWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richebois, E.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this work is to define improved 3-D core calculation methods based on the transport theory. These methods can be particularly useful and lead to more precise computations in areas of the core where anisotropy and steep flux gradients occur, especially near interface and boundary conditions and in regions of high heterogeneity (bundle with absorbent rods). In order to apply the transport theory a new method for calculating reflector constants has been developed, since traditional methods were only suited for 2-group diffusion core calculations and could not be extrapolated to transport calculations. In this thesis work, the new method for obtaining reflector constants is derived regardless of the number of energy groups and of the operator used. The core calculations results using the reflector constants thereof obtained have been validated on the EDF's power reactor Saint Laurent B1 with MOX loading. The advantages of a 3-D core transport calculation scheme have been highlighted as opposed to diffusion methods; there are a considerable number of significant effects and potential advantages to be gained in rod worth calculations for instance. These preliminary results obtained with on particular cycle will have to be confirmed by more systematic analysis. Accidents like MSLB (main steam line break) and LOCA (loss of coolant accident) should also be investigated and constitute challenging situations where anisotropy is high and/or flux gradients are steep. This method is now being validated for others EDF's PWRs' reactors, as well as for experimental reactors and other types of commercial reactors. (author)

  5. Evaluation bases for calculation methods in radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleck-Neuhaus, J.; Boikat, U.; Franke, B.; Hinrichsen, K.; Hoepfner, U.; Ratka, R.; Steinhilber-Schwab, B.; Teufel, D.; Urbach, M.

    1982-03-01

    The seven contributions in this book deal with the state and problems of radioecology. In particular it analyses: The propagation of radioactive materials in the atmosphere, the transfer of radioactive substances from the soil into plants, respectively from animal feed into meat, the exposure pathways for, and high-risk groups of the population, the uncertainties and the band width of the ingestion factor, as well as the treatment of questions of radioecology in practice. The calculation model is assessed and the difficulty evaluated of laying down data in the general calculation basis. (DG) [de

  6. 42 CFR 411.352 - Group practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., verifiable, and documented. (2) The data used to calculate compliance with this substantially all test and... should not be used to calculate whether the group practice has met the substantially all test, regardless... productivity bonuses and profit shares. (1) A physician in the group practice may be paid a share of overall...

  7. Development of the code package KASKAD for calculations of WWERs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolobov, P.A.; Lazarenko, A.P.; Tomilov, M.Ju.

    2008-01-01

    The new version of software package for neutron calculation of WWER cores KASKAD 2007 consists of some calculating and service modules, which are integrated in the common framework. The package is based on the old version, which was expanded with some new functions and the new calculating modules, such as: -the BIPR-2007 code is the new one which performs calculation of power distribution in three-dimensional geometry for 2-group neutron diffusion calculation. This code is based on the BIPR-8KN model, provides all possibilities of BIPR-7A code and uses the same input data; -the PERMAK-2007 code is pin-by-pin few-group multilayer and 3-D code for neutron diffusion calculation; -graphical user interface for input data preparation of the TVS-M code. The report also includes some calculation results obtained with modified version of the KASKAD 2007 package. (Authors)

  8. Methods for thermal reactor lattice calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, A.

    1976-12-01

    The American code HAMMER and the British code WIMS, for the analysis of thermal reactor lattices, have been investigated. The primary objective of this investigation was to identify the causes for the discrepancies that exist between the calculated and the experimentally determined reactivity of clean critical experiments. Three phases have been undertaken in the research: (a) Detailed comparison between the group cross-sections used by the codes; (b) Definition of the various approximations incorporated into the codes; (c) Comparison between the values of a variety of reaction rates calculated by the two codes. It was concluded that the main cause of discrepancy between calculations and experiments is due to data inaccuracies, while approximations introduced in solving the transport equation are of smaller importance

  9. Invert Effective Thermal Conductivity Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M.J. Anderson; H.M. Wade; T.L. Mitchell

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the temperature-dependent effective thermal conductivities of a repository-emplaced invert steel set and surrounding ballast material. The scope of this calculation analyzes a ballast-material thermal conductivity range of 0.10 to 0.70 W/m · K, a transverse beam spacing range of 0.75 to 1.50 meters, and beam compositions of A 516 carbon steel and plain carbon steel. Results from this calculation are intended to support calculations that identify waste package and repository thermal characteristics for Site Recommendation (SR). This calculation was developed by Waste Package Department (WPD) under Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) procedure AP-3.12Q, Revision 1, ICN 0, Calculations

  10. Global nuclear-structure calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, P.; Nix, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    The revival of interest in nuclear ground-state octupole deformations that occurred in the 1980's was stimulated by observations in 1980 of particularly large deviations between calculated and experimental masses in the Ra region, in a global calculation of nuclear ground-state masses. By minimizing the total potential energy with respect to octupole shape degrees of freedom in addition to ε 2 and ε 4 used originally, a vastly improved agreement between calculated and experimental masses was obtained. To study the global behavior and interrelationships between other nuclear properties, we calculate nuclear ground-state masses, spins, pairing gaps and Β-decay and half-lives and compare the results to experimental qualities. The calculations are based on the macroscopic-microscopic approach, with the microscopic contributions calculated in a folded-Yukawa single-particle potential

  11. The Potts models and flows. III, standard and subgraph break-collapse methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magalhaes, A.C.N. de; Essam, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    An algorithm is developed for the exact calculation of the many spin correlation functions of Potts model clusters which is more efficient than the standard break-collapse method traditionally used in real space renormalization group calculations. The improved performance is based on a relationship which, at any stage of the calculation, allows the replacement of certain subgraphs by single effective edges. Our method avoids, as in the standard one, the time consuming summation over spin states and can be very useful in series expansions and real space renormalisation group calculations on crystal lattices. (Author) [pt

  12. CALCULATION OF LASER CUTTING COSTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Nedic

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents description methods of metal cutting and calculation of treatment costs based on model that is developed on Faculty of mechanical engineering in Kragujevac. Based on systematization and analysis of large number of calculation models of cutting with unconventional methods, mathematical model is derived, which is used for creating a software for calculation costs of metal cutting. Software solution enables resolving the problem of calculating the cost of laser cutting, comparison' of costs made by other unconventional methods and provides documentation that consists of reports on estimated costs.

  13. Calculation of Rydberg interaction potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Sebastian; Tresp, Christoph; Menke, Henri

    2017-01-01

    for calculating the required electric multipole moments and the inclusion of electromagnetic fields with arbitrary direction. We focus specifically on symmetry arguments and selection rules, which greatly reduce the size of the Hamiltonian matrix, enabling the direct diagonalization of the Hamiltonian up...... to higher multipole orders on a desktop computer. Finally, we present example calculations showing the relevance of the full interaction calculation to current experiments. Our software for calculating Rydberg potentials including all features discussed in this tutorial is available as open source....

  14. Improvements in EBR-2 core depletion calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finck, P.J.; Hill, R.N.; Sakamoto, S.

    1991-01-01

    The need for accurate core depletion calculations in Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 2 (EBR-2) is discussed. Because of the unique physics characteristics of EBR-2, it is difficult to obtain accurate and computationally efficient multigroup flux predictions. This paper describes the effect of various conventional and higher order schemes for group constant generation and for flux computations; results indicate that higher-order methods are required, particularly in the outer regions (i.e. the radial blanket). A methodology based on Nodal Equivalence Theory (N.E.T.) is developed which allows retention of the accuracy of a higher order solution with the computational efficiency of a few group nodal diffusion solution. The application of this methodology to three-dimensional EBR-2 flux predictions is demonstrated; this improved methodology allows accurate core depletion calculations at reasonable cost. 13 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Electron stopping powers for transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    The reliability of radiation transport calculations depends on the accuracy of the input cross sections. Therefore, it is essential to review and update the cross sections from time to time. Even though the main interest of the author's group at NBS is in transport calculations and their applications, the group spends almost as much time on the analysis and preparation of cross sections as on the development of transport codes. Stopping powers, photon attenuation coefficients, bremsstrahlung cross sections, and elastic-scattering cross sections in recent years have claimed attention. This chapter deals with electron stopping powers (with emphasis on collision stopping powers), and reviews the state of the art as reflected by Report 37 of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements

  16. Calculators

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ounces of regular beer, 5 ounces of table wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof distilled spirits. Distilled spirits include vodka, whiskey, gin, rum, and ... is 5% alcohol by volume (alc/vol), table wine is about 12% alc/vol, and straight 80-proof distilled spirits is 40% alc/vol. The percent alcohol by ...

  17. Core calculational techniques and procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano, J.J.

    1977-10-01

    Described are the procedures and techniques employed by B and W in core design analyses of power peaking, control rod worths, and reactivity coefficients. Major emphasis has been placed on current calculational tools and the most frequently performed calculations over the operating power range

  18. Economic calculation in socialist countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellman, M.; Durlauf, S.N.; Blume, L.E.

    2008-01-01

    In the 1930s, when the classical socialist system emerged, economic decisions were based not on detailed and precise economic methods of calculation but on rough and ready political methods. An important method of economic calculation - particularly in the post-Stalin period - was that of

  19. Calculation of Spectra of Solids:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1975-01-01

    The Gilat-Raubenheimer method simplified to tetrahedron division is used to calculate the real and imaginary part of the dynamical response function for electrons. A frequency expansion for the real part is discussed. The Lindhard function is calculated as a test for numerical accuracy...

  20. Calculator. Owning a Small Business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parma City School District, OH.

    Seven activities are presented in this student workbook designed for an exploration of small business ownership and the use of the calculator in this career. Included are simulated situations in which students must use a calculator to compute property taxes; estimate payroll taxes and franchise taxes; compute pricing, approximate salaries,…

  1. Shielding calculational system for plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, M.G.; Thomsen, D.H.

    1975-08-01

    A computer calculational system has been developed and assembled specifically for calculating dose rates in AEC plutonium fabrication facilities. The system consists of two computer codes and all nuclear data necessary for calculation of neutron and gamma dose rates from plutonium. The codes include the multigroup version of the Battelle Monte Carlo code for solution of general neutron and gamma shielding problems and the PUSHLD code for solution of shielding problems where low energy gamma and x-rays are important. The nuclear data consists of built in neutron and gamma yields and spectra for various plutonium compounds, an automatic calculation of age effects and all cross-sections commonly used. Experimental correlations have been performed to verify portions of the calculational system. (23 tables, 7 figs, 16 refs) (U.S.)

  2. Renormalization group and Mayer expansions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, G.

    1984-02-01

    Mayer expansions promise to become a powerful tool in exact renormalization group calculations. Iterated Mayer expansions were sucessfully used in the rigorous analysis of 3-dimensional U(1) lattice gauge theory by Goepfert and the author, and it is hoped that they will also be useful in the 2-dimensional nonlinear sigma-model, and elsewhere. (orig.)

  3. Renormalization group and mayer expansions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, G.

    1984-01-01

    Mayer expansions promise to become a powerful tool in exact renormalization group calculations. Iterated Mayer expansions were sucessfully used in the rigorous analysis of 3-dimensional U (1) lattice gauge theory by Gopfert and the author, and it is hoped that they will also be useful in the 2-dimensional nonlinear σ-model, and elsewhere

  4. Group analysis and renormgroup symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalev, V.F.; Pustovalov, V.V.; Shirkov, D.V.

    1996-01-01

    An original regular approach to constructing special type symmetries for boundary-value problems, namely renormgroup symmetries, is presented. Different methods of calculating these symmetries based on modern group analysis are described. An application of the approach to boundary value problems is demonstrated with the help of a simple mathematical model. 35 refs

  5. Closure and Sealing Design Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T. Lahnalampi; J. Case

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the ''Closure and Sealing Design Calculation'' is to illustrate closure and sealing methods for sealing shafts, ramps, and identify boreholes that require sealing in order to limit the potential of water infiltration. In addition, this calculation will provide a description of the magma that can reduce the consequences of an igneous event intersecting the repository. This calculation will also include a listing of the project requirements related to closure and sealing. The scope of this calculation is to: summarize applicable project requirements and codes relating to backfilling nonemplacement openings, removal of uncommitted materials from the subsurface, installation of drip shields, and erecting monuments; compile an inventory of boreholes that are found in the area of the subsurface repository; describe the magma bulkhead feature and location; and include figures for the proposed shaft and ramp seals. The objective of this calculation is to: categorize the boreholes for sealing by depth and proximity to the subsurface repository; develop drawing figures which show the location and geometry for the magma bulkhead; include the shaft seal figures and a proposed construction sequence; and include the ramp seal figure and a proposed construction sequence. The intent of this closure and sealing calculation is to support the License Application by providing a description of the closure and sealing methods for the Safety Analysis Report. The closure and sealing calculation will also provide input for Post Closure Activities by describing the location of the magma bulkhead. This calculation is limited to describing the final configuration of the sealing and backfill systems for the underground area. The methods and procedures used to place the backfill and remove uncommitted materials (such as concrete) from the repository and detailed design of the magma bulkhead will be the subject of separate analyses or calculations. Post-closure monitoring will not

  6. TRIGA fuel element burnup determination by measurement and calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagar, T.; Ravnik, M.; Persic, A.; Jeraj, R.

    2000-01-01

    To estimate the accuracy of the fuel element burnup calculation different factors influencing the calculation were studied. To cover different aspects of burnup calculations, two in-house developed computer codes were used in calculations. The first (TRIGAP) is based on a one-dimensional two-group diffusion approximation, and the second (TRIGLAV) is based on a two-dimensional four-group diffusion equation. Both codes use WIMSD program with different libraries forunit-cell cross section data calculation. The burnup accumulated during the operating history of the TRIGA reactor at Josef Stefan Institute was calculated for all fuel elements. Elements used in the core during this period were standard SS 8.5% fuel elements, standard SS 12% fuel elements and highly enriched FLIP fuel elements. During the considerable period of operational history, FLIP and standard fuel elements were used simultaneously in mixed cores. (authors)

  7. Alaska Village Electric Load Calculator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devine, M.; Baring-Gould, E. I.

    2004-10-01

    As part of designing a village electric power system, the present and future electric loads must be defined, including both seasonal and daily usage patterns. However, in many cases, detailed electric load information is not readily available. NREL developed the Alaska Village Electric Load Calculator to help estimate the electricity requirements in a village given basic information about the types of facilities located within the community. The purpose of this report is to explain how the load calculator was developed and to provide instructions on its use so that organizations can then use this model to calculate expected electrical energy usage.

  8. Reactor calculations and nuclear information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, D.W.

    1977-12-01

    The relationship of sets of nuclear parameters and the macroscopic reactor quantities that can be calculated from them is examined. The framework of the study is similar to that of Usachev and Bobkov. The analysis is generalised and some properties required by common sense are demonstrated. The form of calculation permits revision of the parameter set. It is argued that any discrepancy between a calculation and measurement of a macroscopic quantity is more useful when applied directly to prediction of other macroscopic quantities than to revision of the parameter set. The mathematical technique outlined is seen to describe common engineering practice. (Author)

  9. Practical astronomy with your calculator

    CERN Document Server

    Duffett-Smith, Peter

    1989-01-01

    Practical Astronomy with your Calculator, first published in 1979, has enjoyed immense success. The author's clear and easy to follow routines enable you to solve a variety of practical and recreational problems in astronomy using a scientific calculator. Mathematical complexity is kept firmly in the background, leaving just the elements necessary for swiftly making calculations. The major topics are: time, coordinate systems, the Sun, the planetary system, binary stars, the Moon, and eclipses. In the third edition there are entirely new sections on generalised coordinate transformations, nutr

  10. Calculation of 14 MeV neutron transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyrskij, M.Yu.; Dubinin, A.A.; Zhuravlev, V.I.; Isaev, N.V.; Klintsov, A.A.; Krivtsov, A.S.; Linge, I.I.; Panfilov, E.I.; Prit'mov, A.P.

    1979-01-01

    The possibility of using the 28 group constant system (28-GCS) for calculating the transport of neutrons with initial energy of 14 MeV in thermonuclear reactor blankets is studied. A blanket project suggested by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is used as a test version to estimate applicability of the 28-GCS. Niobium is used in a blanket as a structural material. A mixture of lithium nuclides is used for tritium production. The results of blanket test calculation and the calculational results obtained using the 28-GCS from the UKNDL library are compared. The numerical 28-group calculation of blonket is carried out by means of the ROZ-6 and ROZ-9 codes but not by the Monte-Carlo method as compared with the test calculation. Time of the blanket calculation on the BESM-6 computer by means of the ROZ-9 code in 2P 5 approximation using the 28-GCS amounts to 10 min. It is noted that to create effective codes for the numerical blanket calculation different calculational grids are necessary for different energy grups. The calculations carried out have shown the possibility of using the 28-group library of cross sections for the numerical solution of the neutron transport equation in estimating analysis of blankets

  11. Calculation of pion form factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahedi, N.; Amirarjomand, S.

    1975-09-01

    The pion form factor is calculated using the structure function Wsub(2), which incorporates kinematical constraints, threshold behaviour and scaling. The Bloom-Gilman sum rule is used and only the two leading Regge trajectories are taken into account

  12. Landfill Gas Energy Benefits Calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains the LFG Energy Benefits Calculator to estimate direct, avoided, and total greenhouse gas reductions, as well as environmental and energy benefits, for a landfill gas energy project.

  13. Calculate Your Body Mass Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Can! ) Health Professional Resources Calculate Your Body Mass Index Body mass index (BMI) is a measure of body fat based ... Health Information Email Alerts Jobs and Careers Site Index About NHLBI National Institute of Health Department of ...

  14. Transfer Area Mechanical Handling Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dianda, B.

    2004-01-01

    This calculation is intended to support the License Application (LA) submittal of December 2004, in accordance with the directive given by DOE correspondence received on the 27th of January 2004 entitled: ''Authorization for Bechtel SAX Company L.L. C. to Include a Bare Fuel Handling Facility and Increased Aging Capacity in the License Application, Contract Number DE-AC--28-01R W12101'' (Arthur, W.J., I11 2004). This correspondence was appended by further Correspondence received on the 19th of February 2004 entitled: ''Technical Direction to Bechtel SAIC Company L.L. C. for Surface Facility Improvements, Contract Number DE-AC--28-OIRW12101; TDL No. 04-024'' (BSC 2004a). These documents give the authorization for a Fuel Handling Facility to be included in the baseline. The purpose of this calculation is to establish preliminary bounding equipment envelopes and weights for the Fuel Handling Facility (FHF) transfer areas equipment. This calculation provides preliminary information only to support development of facility layouts and preliminary load calculations. The limitations of this preliminary calculation lie within the assumptions of section 5 , as this calculation is part of an evolutionary design process. It is intended that this calculation is superseded as the design advances to reflect information necessary to support License Application. The design choices outlined within this calculation represent a demonstration of feasibility and may or may not be included in the completed design. This calculation provides preliminary weight, dimensional envelope, and equipment position in building for the purposes of defining interface variables. This calculation identifies and sizes major equipment and assemblies that dictate overall equipment dimensions and facility interfaces. Sizing of components is based on the selection of commercially available products, where applicable. This is not a specific recommendation for the future use of these components or their

  15. Calculations of radiation levels during reactor operations for safeguard inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobhy, M.

    1996-01-01

    When an internal core spent fuel storage is used in the shield tank to accommodate a large number of spent fuel baskets, physical calculations are performed to determine the number of these spent fuel elements which can be accommodated and still maintain the gamma activity outside under the permissible limit. The corresponding reactor power level is determined. The radioactivity calculations are performed for this internal storage at different axial levels to avoid the criticality of the reactor core. Transport theory is used in calculations based on collision probability for multi group cell calculations. Diffusion theory is used in three dimensions in the core calculations. The nuclear fuel history is traced and radioactive decay is calculated, since reactor fission products are very sensitive to power level. The radioactivity is calculated with a developed formula based on fuel basket loading integrity. (author)

  16. CONTAIN calculations; CONTAIN-Rechnungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholtyssek, W.

    1995-08-01

    In the first phase of a benchmark comparison, the CONTAIN code was used to calculate an assumed EPR accident `medium-sized leak in the cold leg`, especially for the first two days after initiation of the accident. The results for global characteristics compare well with those of FIPLOC, MELCOR and WAVCO calculations, if the same materials data are used as input. However, significant differences show up for local quantities such as flows through leakages. (orig.)

  17. Numerical calculations near spatial infinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenginoglu, Anil

    2007-01-01

    After describing in short some problems and methods regarding the smoothness of null infinity for isolated systems, I present numerical calculations in which both spatial and null infinity can be studied. The reduced conformal field equations based on the conformal Gauss gauge allow us in spherical symmetry to calculate numerically the entire Schwarzschild-Kruskal spacetime in a smooth way including spacelike, null and timelike infinity and the domain close to the singularity

  18. Calculating radiation exposure and dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hondros, J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses the methods and procedures used to calculate the radiation exposures and radiation doses to designated employees of the Olympic Dam Project. Each of the three major exposure pathways are examined. These are: gamma irradiation, radon daughter inhalation and radioactive dust inhalation. A further section presents ICRP methodology for combining individual pathway exposures to give a total dose figure. Computer programs used for calculations and data storage are also presented briefly

  19. Which finite simple groups are unit groups?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Christopher James; Occhipinti, Tommy

    2014-01-01

    We prove that if G is a finite simple group which is the unit group of a ring, then G is isomorphic to either (a) a cyclic group of order 2; (b) a cyclic group of prime order 2^k −1 for some k; or (c) a projective special linear group PSLn(F2) for some n ≥ 3. Moreover, these groups do all occur a...

  20. Calculation of Rydberg interaction potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Sebastian; Büchler, Hans Peter; Tresp, Christoph; Urvoy, Alban; Hofferberth, Sebastian; Menke, Henri; Firstenberg, Ofer

    2017-01-01

    The strong interaction between individual Rydberg atoms provides a powerful tool exploited in an ever-growing range of applications in quantum information science, quantum simulation and ultracold chemistry. One hallmark of the Rydberg interaction is that both its strength and angular dependence can be fine-tuned with great flexibility by choosing appropriate Rydberg states and applying external electric and magnetic fields. More and more experiments are probing this interaction at short atomic distances or with such high precision that perturbative calculations as well as restrictions to the leading dipole–dipole interaction term are no longer sufficient. In this tutorial, we review all relevant aspects of the full calculation of Rydberg interaction potentials. We discuss the derivation of the interaction Hamiltonian from the electrostatic multipole expansion, numerical and analytical methods for calculating the required electric multipole moments and the inclusion of electromagnetic fields with arbitrary direction. We focus specifically on symmetry arguments and selection rules, which greatly reduce the size of the Hamiltonian matrix, enabling the direct diagonalization of the Hamiltonian up to higher multipole orders on a desktop computer. Finally, we present example calculations showing the relevance of the full interaction calculation to current experiments. Our software for calculating Rydberg potentials including all features discussed in this tutorial is available as open source. (tutorial)

  1. Nuclear Data Processing for Reactor Physics Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suwoto; Zuhair; Pandiangan, Tumpal

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear data processing for reactor physics calculation has been done. Raw nuclear data cross-sections on file ENDF should be prepared and processed before it used in neutronic calculation. The processing code system such as NJOY-PC code has been used from linearization of nuclear cross-sections data and background contribution of resonance parameter (MF2) using RECONR module (0K) with energy range from 10 -5 to 10 7 eV. Afterward, the neutron cross-sections data should be processed and broadened to desire temperature (i.e. 293K) by using BROADR module. The Grouper and Therma modules will be applied for multi-groups calculation which suitable for WIMS/D4 (69 groups) and thermalization of nuclear constants. The final stage of processing nuclear cross-sections is updating WIMS/D4 library. The WIMSR module in NJOY-PC and WILLIE code will be applied in this stage. The evaluated nuclear data file, especially for 1 H 1 isotope, was taken from JENDL-3.2 and ENDF/B-VI for preliminary study. The results of nuclear data processing 1 H 1 shows that the old-WIMS (WIMS-lama) library have much discrepancies comparing with JENDL-3.2 or ENDF/B-VI files, especially in energy around 5 keV

  2. Opacity calculations for laser plasma applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magee, N.H. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The Los Alamos LTE light element detailed configuration opacity code (LEDCOP) has been revised to provide more accurate absorption coefficients and group means for modern radiation-hydrodynamic codes. The new group means will be especially useful for computing the transport of thermal radiation from laser deposition. The principal improvement is the inclusion of a complete set of accurate and internally consistent LS term energies and oscillator strengths in both the EOS and absorption coefficients. Selected energies and oscillator strengths were calculated from a Hartree-Fock code, then fitted by a quantum defect method. This allowed transitions at all wavelengths to be treated consistently and accurately instead of being limited to wavelength regions covered by experimental observations or isolated theoretical calculations. A second improvement is the use of more accurate photoionization cross sections for excited as well as ground state configurations. These cross sections are now more consistent with the bound-bound oscillator strengths, leading to a smooth transition across the continuum limit. Results will be presented showing the agreement of the LS term energies and oscillator strengths with observed values. The new absorption coefficients will be compared with previous calculations. 5 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  3. Batch calculations in CalcHEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pukhov, A.

    2003-01-01

    CalcHEP is a clone of the CompHEP project which is developed by the author outside of the CompHEP group. CompHEP/CalcHEP are packages for automatic calculations of elementary particle decay and collision properties in the lowest order of perturbation theory. The main idea prescribed into the packages is to make available passing on from the Lagrangian to the final distributions effectively with a high level of automation. According to this, the packages were created as a menu driven user friendly programs for calculations in the interactive mode. From the other side, long-time calculations should be done in the non-interactive regime. Thus, from the beginning CompHEP has a problem of batch calculations. In CompHEP 33.23 the batch session was realized by mean of interactive menu which allows to the user to formulate the task for batch. After that the not-interactive session was launched. This way is too restricted, not flexible, and leads to doubling in programming. In this article I discuss another approach how one can force an interactive program to work in non-interactive mode. This approach was realized in CalcHEP 2.1 disposed on http://theory.sinp.msu.ru/~pukhov/calchep.html

  4. Microscopic calculation of the 4He system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, H.M.

    1996-01-01

    We report on a consistent, microscopic calculation of the bound and scattering states in the 4 He system employing a realistic nucleon-nucleon potential in the framework of the resonating group model (RGM). We present for comparison with these microscopic RGM calculations the results from a charge-independent, Coulomb-corrected R-matrix analysis of all types of data for reactions in the A=4 system. Comparisons are made between the phase shifts, and with a selection of measurements from each reaction, as well as between the resonance spectra obtained from both calculations. In general, the comparisons are favorable, but distinct differences are observed between the RGM calculations and some of the polarisation data. The partial-wave decomposition of the experimental data produced by the R-matrix analysis shows that these differences can be attributed to just a few S-matrix elements, for which inadequate tensor-force strength in the N-N interaction used appears to be responsible. (orig.)

  5. Group Life Insurance

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Administration would like to remind you that staff members and fellows have the possibility to take out a life insurance contract on favourable terms through a Group Life Insurance.   This insurance is provided by the company Helvetia and is available to you on a voluntary basis. The premium, which varies depending on the age and gender of the person insured, is calculated on the basis of the amount of the death benefit chosen by the staff member/fellow and can be purchased in slices of 10,000 CHF.    The contract normally ends at the retirement age (65/67 years) or when the staff member/fellow leaves the Organization. The premium is deducted monthly from the payroll.   Upon retirement, the staff member can opt to maintain his membership under certain conditions.   More information about Group Life Insurance can be found at: Regulations (in French) Table of premiums The Pension Fund Benefit Service &...

  6. Calculation of source terms for NUREG-1150

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breeding, R.J.; Williams, D.C.; Murfin, W.B.; Amos, C.N.; Helton, J.C.

    1987-10-01

    The source terms estimated for NUREG-1150 are generally based on the Source Term Code Package (STCP), but the actual source term calculations used in computing risk are performed by much smaller codes which are specific to each plant. This was done because the method of estimating the uncertainty in risk for NUREG-1150 requires hundreds of source term calculations for each accident sequence. This is clearly impossible with a large, detailed code like the STCP. The small plant-specific codes are based on simple algorithms and utilize adjustable parameters. The values of the parameters appearing in these codes are derived from the available STCP results. To determine the uncertainty in the estimation of the source terms, these parameters were varied as specified by an expert review group. This method was used to account for the uncertainties in the STCP results and the uncertainties in phenomena not considered by the STCP

  7. Group Cohesion in Experiential Growth Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Sam; Vasserman-Stokes, Elaina; Vannatta, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the effect of web-based journaling on changes in group cohesion within experiential growth groups. Master's students were divided into 2 groups. Both used a web-based platform to journal after each session; however, only 1 of the groups was able to read each other's journals. Quantitative data collected before and…

  8. Mordred: a molecular descriptor calculator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriwaki, Hirotomo; Tian, Yu-Shi; Kawashita, Norihito; Takagi, Tatsuya

    2018-02-06

    Molecular descriptors are widely employed to present molecular characteristics in cheminformatics. Various molecular-descriptor-calculation software programs have been developed. However, users of those programs must contend with several issues, including software bugs, insufficient update frequencies, and software licensing constraints. To address these issues, we propose Mordred, a developed descriptor-calculation software application that can calculate more than 1800 two- and three-dimensional descriptors. It is freely available via GitHub. Mordred can be easily installed and used in the command line interface, as a web application, or as a high-flexibility Python package on all major platforms (Windows, Linux, and macOS). Performance benchmark results show that Mordred is at least twice as fast as the well-known PaDEL-Descriptor and it can calculate descriptors for large molecules, which cannot be accomplished by other software. Owing to its good performance, convenience, number of descriptors, and a lax licensing constraint, Mordred is a promising choice of molecular descriptor calculation software that can be utilized for cheminformatics studies, such as those on quantitative structure-property relationships.

  9. Propagation calculation for reactor cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Yanhua [School of Power and Energy Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ., Shanghai (China); Moriyama, K.; Maruyama, Y.; Nakamura, H.; Hashimoto, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-11-01

    The propagation of steam explosion for real reactor geometry and conditions are investigated by using the computer code JASMINE-pro. The ex-vessel steam explosion is considered, which is described as follow: during the accident of reactor core meltdown, the molten core melts a hole at the bottom of reactor vessel and causes the higher temperature core fuel being leaked into the water pool below reactor vessel. During the melt-water mixing interaction process, the high temperature melt evaporates the cool water at an extreme high rate and might induce a steam explosion. A steam explosion could experience first the premixing phase and then the propagation explosion phase. For a propagation calculation, we should know the information about the initial fragmentation time, the total melt mass, premixing region size, initial void fraction and distribution of the melt volume fraction, and so on. All the initial conditions used in this calculation are based on analyses from some simple assumptions and the observation from the experiments. The results show that the most important parameter for the initial condition of this phase is the total mass and its initial distribution. This gives the requirement for a premixing calculation. On the other hand, for higher melt volume fraction case, the fragmentation is strong so that the local pressure can exceed over the EOS maximum pressure of the code, which lead to the incorrect calculation or divergence of the calculation. (Suetake, M.)

  10. Method and program for complex calculation of heterogeneous reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalashnikov, A.G.; Glebov, A.P.; Elovskaya, L.F.; Kuznetsova, L.I.

    1988-01-01

    An algorithm and the GITA program for complex one-dimensional calculation of a heterogeneous reactor which permits to conduct calculations for the reactor and its cell simultaneously using the same algorithm are described. Multigroup macrocross sections for reactor zones in the thermal energy range are determined according to the technique for calculating a cell with complicate structure and then the continuous multi group calculation of the reactor in the thermal energy range and in the range of neutron thermalization is made. The kinetic equation is solved using the Pi- and DSn- approximations [fr

  11. Group Work Publication-1991.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimpfer, David G.

    1992-01-01

    Lists 21 new publications in group work, of which 9 are reviewed. Those discussed include publications on group counseling and psychotherapy, structured groups, support groups, psychodrama, and social group work. (Author/NB)

  12. Quantum isometry groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jyotishman Bhowmick

    2015-11-07

    Nov 7, 2015 ... Classical. Quantum. Background. Compact Hausdorff space. Unital C∗ algebra. Gelfand-Naimark. Compact Group. Compact Quantum Group. Woronowicz. Group Action. Coaction. Woronowicz. Riemannian manifold. Spectral triple. Connes. Isometry group. Quantum Isometry Group. To be discussed.

  13. Calculation of magnetic hyperfine constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bufaical, R.F.; Maffeo, B.; Brandi, H.S.

    1975-01-01

    The magnetic hyperfine constants of the V sub(K) center in CaF 2 , SrF 2 and BaF 2 have been calculated assuming a phenomenological model, based on the F 2 - 'central molucule', to describe the wavefunction of the defect. Calculations have shown that introduction of a small degree of covalence, between this central molecule and neighboring ions, is necessary to improve the electronic structure description of the defect. It was also shown that the results for the hyperfine constants are strongly dependent on the relaxations of the ions neighboring the central molecule; these relaxations have been determined by fitting the experimental data. The present results are compared with other previous calculations where similar and different theoretical methods have been used

  14. Parameters calculation of shielding experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavazza, S.

    1986-02-01

    The radiation transport methodology comparing the calculated reactions and dose rates for neutrons and gama-rays, with experimental measurements obtained on iron shield, irradiated in the YAYOI reactor is evaluated. The ENDF/B-IV and VITAMIN-C libraries and the AMPX-II modular system, for cross sections generation collapsed by the ANISN code were used. The transport calculations were made using the DOT 3.5 code, adjusting the boundary iron shield source spectrum to the reactions and dose rates, measured at the beginning of shield. The neutron and gamma ray distributions calculated on the iron shield presented reasonable agreement with experimental measurements. An experimental arrangement using the IEA-R1 reactor to determine a shielding benchmark is proposed. (Author) [pt

  15. Insertion device calculations with mathematica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, R. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab., CA (United States); Lidia, S. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The design of accelerator insertion devices such as wigglers and undulators has usually been aided by numerical modeling on digital computers, using code in high level languages like Fortran. In the present era, there are higher level programming environments like IDL{reg_sign}, MatLab{reg_sign}, and Mathematica{reg_sign} in which these calculations may be performed by writing much less code, and in which standard mathematical techniques are very easily used. The authors present a suite of standard insertion device modeling routines in Mathematica to illustrate the new techniques. These routines include a simple way to generate magnetic fields using blocks of CSEM materials, trajectory solutions from the Lorentz force equations for given magnetic fields, Bessel function calculations of radiation for wigglers and undulators and general radiation calculations for undulators.

  16. PHEBUS-FPTO Benchmark calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepherd, I.; Ball, A.; Trambauer, K.; Barbero, F.; Olivar Dominguez, F.; Herranz, L.; Biasi, L.; Fermandjian, J.; Hocke, K.

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes a set of pre-test predictions made for the first Phebus-FP test, FPT-O. There were many different calculations, performed by various organizations and they represent the first attempt to calculate the whole experimental sequence, from bundle to containment. Quantitative agreement between the various calculations was not good but the particular models in the code responsible for disagreements were mostly identified. A consensus view was formed as to how the test would proceed. It was found that a successful execution of the test will require a different operating procedure than had been assumed here. Critical areas which require close attention are the need to devize a strategy for the power and flow in the bundle that takes account of uncertainties in the modelling and the shroud conductivity and the necessity to develop a reliable method to achieve the desired thermalhydraulic conditions in the containment

  17. JNC results of BN-600 benchmark calculation (phase 4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Makoto

    2003-01-01

    The present work is the results of JNC, Japan, for the Phase 4 of the BN-600 core benchmark problem (Hex-Z fully MOX fuelled core model) organized by IAEA. The benchmark specification is based on 1) the RCM report of IAEA CRP on 'Updated Codes and Methods to Reduce the Calculational Uncertainties of LMFR Reactivity Effects, Action 3.12' (Calculations for BN-600 fully fuelled MOX core for subsequent transient analyses). JENDL-3.2 nuclear data library was used for calculating 70 group ABBN-type group constants. Cell models for fuel assembly and control rod calculations were applied: homogeneous and heterogeneous (cylindrical supercell) model. Basic diffusion calculation was three-dimensional Hex-Z model, 18 group (Citation code). Transport calculations were 18 group, three-dimensional (NSHEC code) based on Sn-transport nodal method developed at JNC. The generated thermal power per fission was based on Sher's data corrected on the basis of ENDF/B-IV data library. Calculation results are presented in Tables for intercomparison

  18. Automatic calculations of electroweak processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, T.; Kawabata, S.; Kurihara, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Kaneko, T.; Kato, K.; Tanaka, H.

    1996-01-01

    GRACE system is an excellent tool for calculating the cross section and for generating event of the elementary process automatically. However it is not always easy for beginners to use. An interactive version of GRACE is being developed so as to be a user friendly system. Since it works exactly in the same environment as PAW, all functions of PAW are available for handling any histogram information produced by GRACE. As its application the cross sections of all elementary processes with up to 5-body final states induced by e + e - interaction are going to be calculated and to be summarized as a catalogue. (author)

  19. Calculation methods in program CCRMN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chonghai, Cai [Nankai Univ., Tianjin (China). Dept. of Physics; Qingbiao, Shen [Chinese Nuclear Data Center, Beijing, BJ (China)

    1996-06-01

    CCRMN is a program for calculating complex reactions of a medium-heavy nucleus with six light particles. In CCRMN, the incoming particles can be neutrons, protons, {sup 4}He, deuterons, tritons and {sup 3}He. the CCRMN code is constructed within the framework of the optical model, pre-equilibrium statistical theory based on the exciton model and the evaporation model. CCRMN is valid in 1{approx} MeV energy region, it can give correct results for optical model quantities and all kinds of reaction cross sections. This program has been applied in practical calculations and got reasonable results.

  20. Friction and wear calculation methods

    CERN Document Server

    Kragelsky, I V; Kombalov, V S

    1981-01-01

    Friction and Wear: Calculation Methods provides an introduction to the main theories of a new branch of mechanics known as """"contact interaction of solids in relative motion."""" This branch is closely bound up with other sciences, especially physics and chemistry. The book analyzes the nature of friction and wear, and some theoretical relationships that link the characteristics of the processes and the properties of the contacting bodies essential for practical application of the theories in calculating friction forces and wear values. The effect of the environment on friction and wear is a

  1. Selfconsistent calculations at finite temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brack, M.; Quentin, P.

    1975-01-01

    Calculations have been done for the spherical nuclei 40 Ca, 208 Pb and the hypothetical superheavy nucleus with Z=114, A=298, as well as for the deformed nucleus 168 Yb. The temperature T was varied from zero up to 5 MeV. For T>3 MeV, some numerical problems arise in connection with the optimization of the basis when calculating deformed nuclei. However, at these high temperatures the occupation numbers in the continuum are sufficiently large so that the nucleus starts evaporating particles and no equilibrium state can be described. Results are obtained for excitation energies and entropies. (Auth.)

  2. Benchmark neutron porosity log calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, R.C.; Michael, M.; Verghese, K.; Gardner, R.P.

    1989-01-01

    Calculations have been made for a benchmark neutron porosity log problem with the general purpose Monte Carlo code MCNP and the specific purpose Monte Carlo code McDNL. For accuracy and timing comparison purposes the CRAY XMP and MicroVax II computers have been used with these codes. The CRAY has been used for an analog version of the MCNP code while the MicroVax II has been used for the optimized variance reduction versions of both codes. Results indicate that the two codes give the same results within calculated standard deviations. Comparisons are given and discussed for accuracy (precision) and computation times for the two codes

  3. Molecular calculations with B functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinborn, E.O.; Homeier, H.H.H.; Ema, I.; Lopez, R.; Ramirez, G.

    2000-01-01

    A program for molecular calculations with B functions is reported and its performance is analyzed. All the one- and two-center integrals and the three-center nuclear attraction integrals are computed by direct procedures, using previously developed algorithms. The three- and four-center electron repulsion integrals are computed by means of Gaussian expansions of the B functions. A new procedure for obtaining these expansions is also reported. Some results on full molecular calculations are included to show the capabilities of the program and the quality of the B functions to represent the electronic functions in molecules

  4. Lattice calculations in gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebbi, C.

    1985-01-01

    The lattice formulation of quantum gauge theories is discussed as a viable technique for quantitative studies of nonperturbative effects in QCD. Evidence is presented to ascertain that whole classes of lattice actions produce a universal continuum limit. Discrepancies between numerical results from Monto Carlo simulations for the pure gauge system and for the system with gauge and quark fields are discussed. Numerical calculations for QCD require very substantial computational resources. The use of powerful vector processors of special purpose machines, in extending the scope and magnitude or the calculations is considered, and one may reasonably expect that in the near future good quantitative predictions will be obtained for QCD

  5. Calculation of electron transmission through aluminium foil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abroyan, M.A.; Mel'ker, A.I.; Mikhajlin, A.I.; Sirotinkin, V.V.; Tokmakov, I.L.

    1987-01-01

    Calculated by Monte Carlo method energy and angular distributions of electrons transmitted through aluminium foil with 50 μm thickness are presented. 200-500 electron energy ranges and angles of electron incidence on foil from 0 to 40 deg C are considered. That allows to use results for more universal accelerator group, for example, for accelerators with scanning beam used in industry. The received values of angular and energy characteristics allow to increase essentially estimation accuracy of accelerator extraction devices and dose distribution on irradiating item

  6. Benchmark calculations for fusion blanket development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawan, M.E.; Cheng, E.T.

    1985-01-01

    Benchmark problems representing the leading fusion blanket concepts are presented. Benchmark calculations for self-cooled Li/sub 17/Pb/sub 83/ and helium-cooled blankets were performed. Multigroup data libraries generated from ENDF/B-IV and V files using the NJOY and AMPX processing codes with different weighting functions were used. The sensitivity of the TBR to group structure and weighting spectrum increases and Li enrichment decrease with up to 20% discrepancies for thin natural Li/sub 17/Pb/sub 83/ blankets

  7. Benchmark calculations for fusion blanket development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawan, M.L.; Cheng, E.T.

    1986-01-01

    Benchmark problems representing the leading fusion blanket concepts are presented. Benchmark calculations for self-cooled Li 17 Pb 83 and helium-cooled blankets were performed. Multigroup data libraries generated from ENDF/B-IV and V files using the NJOY and AMPX processing codes with different weighting functions were used. The sensitivity of the tritium breeding ratio to group structure and weighting spectrum increases as the thickness and Li enrichment decrease with up to 20% discrepancies for thin natural Li 17 Pb 83 blankets. (author)

  8. Methods for Melting Temperature Calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Qi-Jun

    Melting temperature calculation has important applications in the theoretical study of phase diagrams and computational materials screenings. In this thesis, we present two new methods, i.e., the improved Widom's particle insertion method and the small-cell coexistence method, which we developed in order to capture melting temperatures both accurately and quickly. We propose a scheme that drastically improves the efficiency of Widom's particle insertion method by efficiently sampling cavities while calculating the integrals providing the chemical potentials of a physical system. This idea enables us to calculate chemical potentials of liquids directly from first-principles without the help of any reference system, which is necessary in the commonly used thermodynamic integration method. As an example, we apply our scheme, combined with the density functional formalism, to the calculation of the chemical potential of liquid copper. The calculated chemical potential is further used to locate the melting temperature. The calculated results closely agree with experiments. We propose the small-cell coexistence method based on the statistical analysis of small-size coexistence MD simulations. It eliminates the risk of a metastable superheated solid in the fast-heating method, while also significantly reducing the computer cost relative to the traditional large-scale coexistence method. Using empirical potentials, we validate the method and systematically study the finite-size effect on the calculated melting points. The method converges to the exact result in the limit of a large system size. An accuracy within 100 K in melting temperature is usually achieved when the simulation contains more than 100 atoms. DFT examples of Tantalum, high-pressure Sodium, and ionic material NaCl are shown to demonstrate the accuracy and flexibility of the method in its practical applications. The method serves as a promising approach for large-scale automated material screening in which

  9. Group typicality, group loyalty and cognitive development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Meagan M

    2014-09-01

    Over the course of childhood, children's thinking about social groups changes in a variety of ways. Developmental Subjective Group Dynamics (DSGD) theory emphasizes children's understanding of the importance of conforming to group norms. Abrams et al.'s study, which uses DSGD theory as a framework, demonstrates the social cognitive skills underlying young elementary school children's thinking about group norms. Future research on children's thinking about groups and group norms should explore additional elements of this topic, including aspects of typicality beyond loyalty. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  10. Automorphisms of free groups with boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A. Jensen, Craig; Wahl, Nathalie

    2004-01-01

    The automorphisms of free groups with boundaries form a family of groups A_{n,k} closely related to mapping class groups, with the standard automorphisms of free groups as A_{n,0} and (essentially) the symmetric automorphisms of free groups as A_{0,k}. We construct a contractible space L_{n,k} on......The automorphisms of free groups with boundaries form a family of groups A_{n,k} closely related to mapping class groups, with the standard automorphisms of free groups as A_{n,0} and (essentially) the symmetric automorphisms of free groups as A_{0,k}. We construct a contractible space L......_{n,k} on which A_{n,k} acts with finite stabilizers and finite quotient space and deduce a range for the virtual cohomological dimension of A_{n,k}. We also give a presentation of the groups and calculate their first homology group....

  11. Dimensional analysis in field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, P.M.

    1981-01-01

    Dimensional Transmutation (the breakdown of scale invariance in field theories) is reconciled with the commonsense notions of Dimensional Analysis. This makes possible a discussion of the meaning of the Renormalisation Group equations, completely divorced from the technicalities of renormalisation. As illustrations, I describe some very farmiliar QCD results in these terms

  12. A group theoretic approach to quantum information

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashi, Masahito

    2017-01-01

    This textbook is the first one addressing quantum information from the viewpoint of group symmetry. Quantum systems have a group symmetrical structure. This structure enables to handle systematically quantum information processing. However, there is no other textbook focusing on group symmetry for quantum information although there exist many textbooks for group representation. After the mathematical preparation of quantum information, this book discusses quantum entanglement and its quantification by using group symmetry. Group symmetry drastically simplifies the calculation of several entanglement measures although their calculations are usually very difficult to handle. This book treats optimal information processes including quantum state estimation, quantum state cloning, estimation of group action and quantum channel etc. Usually it is very difficult to derive the optimal quantum information processes without asymptotic setting of these topics. However, group symmetry allows to derive these optimal solu...

  13. Development of My Footprint Calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mummidisetti, Karthik

    The Environmental footprint is a very powerful tool that helps an individual to understand how their everyday activities are impacting environmental surroundings. Data shows that global climate change, which is a growing concern for nations all over the world, is already affecting humankind, plants and animals through raising ocean levels, droughts & desertification and changing weather patterns. In addition to a wide range of policy measures implemented by national and state governments, it is necessary for individuals to understand the impact that their lifestyle may have on their personal environmental footprint, and thus over the global climate change. "My Footprint Calculator" (myfootprintcalculator.com) has been designed to be one the simplest, yet comprehensive, web tools to help individuals calculate and understand their personal environmental impact. "My Footprint Calculator" is a website that queries users about their everyday habits and activities and calculates their personal impact on the environment. This website was re-designed to help users determine their environmental impact in various aspects of their lives ranging from transportation and recycling habits to water and energy usage with the addition of new features that will allow users to share their experiences and their best practices with other users interested in reducing their personal Environmental footprint. The collected data is stored in the database and a future goal of this work plans to analyze the collected data from all users (anonymously) for developing relevant trends and statistics.

  14. Calculations of nucleon structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Signal, A.I.

    1990-01-01

    We present a method of calculating deep inelastic nucleon structure functions using bag model wavefunctions. Our method uses the Peierls - Yoccoz projection to form translation invariant bag states. We obtain the correct support for the structure functions and satisfy the positivity requirements for quark and anti-quark distribution functions. (orig.)

  15. Data Acquisition and Flux Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebmann, C.; Kolle, O; Heinesch, B

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, the basic theory and the procedures used to obtain turbulent fluxes of energy, mass, and momentum with the eddy covariance technique will be detailed. This includes a description of data acquisition, pretreatment of high-frequency data and flux calculation....

  16. Ab Initio Calculations of Oxosulfatovanadates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøberg, Torben; Johansen, Helge

    1996-01-01

    Restricted Hartree-Fock and multi-configurational self-consistent-field calculations together with secondorder perturbation theory have been used to study the geometry, the electron density, and the electronicspectrum of (VO2SO4)-. A bidentate sulphate attachment to vanadium was found to be stabl...

  17. Coil protection calculator for TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsala, R.J.; Lawson, J.E.; Persing, R.G.; Senko, T.R.; Woolley, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    A new coil protection system (CPS) is being developed to replace the existing TFTR magnetic coil fault detector. The existing fault detector sacrifices TFTR operating capability for simplicity. The new CPS, when installed in October of 1988, will permit operation up to the actual coil stress limits parameters in real-time. The computation will be done in a microprocessor based Coil Protection Calculator (CPC) currently under construction at PPL. THe new CPC will allow TFTR to operate with higher plasma currents and will permit the optimization of pulse repetition rates. The CPC will provide real-time estimates of critical coil and bus temperatures and stresses based on real-time redundant measurements of coil currents, coil cooling water inlet temperature, and plasma current. The critical parameter calculations are compared to prespecified limits. If these limits are reached or exceeded, protection action will be initiated to a hard wired control system (HCS), which will shut down the power supplies. The CPC consists of a redundant VME based microprocessor system which will sample all input data and compute all stress quantities every ten milliseconds. Thermal calculations will be approximated every 10ms with an exact solution occurring every second. The CPC features continuous cross-checking of redundant input signal, automatic detection of internal failure modes, monitoring and recording of calculated results, and a quick, functional verification of performance via an internal test system. (author)

  18. Ab-initio ZORA calculations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faas, S.; Snijders, Jaap; van Lenthe, J.H.; HernandezLaguna, A; Maruani, J; McWeeny, R; Wilson, S

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we present the first application of the ZORA (Zeroth Order Regular Approximation of the Dirac Fock equation) formalism in Ab Initio electronic structure calculations. The ZORA method, which has been tested previously in the context of Density Functional Theory, has been implemented in

  19. Introduction to calculations of recuperators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dollar, M.

    1977-01-01

    Physical principles of heat transfer between fluid under turbulent flow conditions and a wall of a duct are described. The methods of calculations of heat transfer coefficient and the theory of recuperative heat exchangers are presented. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the theory. (author)

  20. Photoproduction data for heating calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Marck, Steven C.; Koning, Arjan J.; Rochman, Dimitri

    2008-01-01

    For irradiations in a materials test reactor, the prediction of the amount of gamma heating in the reactor is important. Only a good predictive calculation will lead to an irradiation in which the specified temperatures are reached. The photons produced by fission product decay are often missing in spectrum calculations for a reactor, but the contribution of the photons can be computed effectively using engineering correlations for the amount of fission product decay and the ensuing photon spectrum. The prompt photons are usually calculated by a spectrum code based on the underlying nuclear data libraries. For most of the important nuclides, the nuclear data libraries contain data for the photon productions rates. However, there are still many nuclides for which the photon production data are missing, and some of these nuclides contribute to gamma heating. In this paper it is estimated what the contributions to heating are from photon production on nuclides such as 236 U, 238 Pu, 135 I, 135 Xe, 147 Pm, 148 Pm, 148m Pm, and 149 Sm. Also, simple arguments are given to judge the effect from photon production on all other (lumped) fission products, and from 28 Al decay. For all these calculations the High Flux Reactor is used as an example. (authors)

  1. Methods for magnetostatic field calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorozhtsov, S.B.

    1984-01-01

    Two methods for magnetostatic field calculation: differential and integrat are considered. Both approaches are shown to have certain merits and drawbacks, choice of the method depend on the type of the solved problem. An opportunity of combination of these tWo methods in one algorithm (hybrid method) is considered

  2. COSANI-2, Gamma Doses from SABINE Calculation, Activity from ANISN Flux Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupont, C.

    1975-01-01

    1 - Nature of physical problem solved: Retrieval of SABINE and/or ANISN results. Calculates in case of SABINE results the individual contributions of capture gamma rays in each region to the total gamma dose and to the total gamma heating may calculate in case of ANISN new activity rates starting from ANISN flux saved on tape and activity cross sections taken on an ANISN binary library tape. The program can draw on a BENSON plotter any of the following quantities: - group flux; - activity rates; - dose rates; - neutron spectra for SABINE; - neutron or gamma direct or adjoint spectra for ANISN; - gamma heating and dose rate for SABINE including individual contributions from each region. Several ANISN and/or SABINE cases can be drawn on the same graph for comparison purposes. 2 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Maximum number of: - tapes containing ANISN and/or SABINE results: 5; - curves per graph: 3; - regions: 40; - points per curve: 500; - energy groups: 200

  3. Prenatal radiation exposure. Dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharwaechter, C.; Schwartz, C.A.; Haage, P.; Roeser, A.

    2015-01-01

    The unborn child requires special protection. In this context, the indication for an X-ray examination is to be checked critically. If thereupon radiation of the lower abdomen including the uterus cannot be avoided, the examination should be postponed until the end of pregnancy or alternative examination techniques should be considered. Under certain circumstances, either accidental or in unavoidable cases after a thorough risk assessment, radiation exposure of the unborn may take place. In some of these cases an expert radiation hygiene consultation may be required. This consultation should comprise the expected risks for the unborn while not perturbing the mother or the involved medical staff. For the risk assessment in case of an in-utero X-ray exposition deterministic damages with a defined threshold dose are distinguished from stochastic damages without a definable threshold dose. The occurrence of deterministic damages depends on the dose and the developmental stage of the unborn at the time of radiation. To calculate the risks of an in-utero radiation exposure a three-stage concept is commonly applied. Depending on the amount of radiation, the radiation dose is either estimated, roughly calculated using standard tables or, in critical cases, accurately calculated based on the individual event. The complexity of the calculation thereby increases from stage to stage. An estimation based on stage one is easily feasible whereas calculations based on stages two and especially three are more complex and often necessitate execution by specialists. This article demonstrates in detail the risks for the unborn child pertaining to its developmental phase and explains the three-stage concept as an evaluation scheme. It should be noted, that all risk estimations are subject to considerable uncertainties.

  4. HELIOS calculations for UO2 lattice benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosteller, R.D.

    1998-01-01

    Calculations for the ANS UO 2 lattice benchmark have been performed with the HELIOS lattice-physics code and six of its cross-section libraries. The results obtained from the different libraries permit conclusions to be drawn regarding the adequacy of the energy group structures and of the ENDF/B-VI evaluation for 238 U. Scandpower A/S, the developer of HELIOS, provided Los Alamos National Laboratory with six different cross section libraries. Three of the libraries were derived directly from Release 3 of ENDF/B-VI (ENDF/B-VI.3) and differ only in the number of groups (34, 89 or 190). The other three libraries are identical to the first three except for a modification to the cross sections for 238 U in the resonance range

  5. Magnetic susceptibility of functional groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herr, T.; Ferraro, M.B.; Contreras, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    Proceeding with a series of works where new criteria are applied to the the calculation of the contribution of molecular fragments to certain properties, results are presented for a group of 1-X-benzenes and 1-X-naphtalenes for the magnetic susceptibility constant. Both the diamagnetic and paramagnetic parts are taken into account. To reduce the problems associated with the Gauge dependence originated in the approximations made, Gauge independent atomic orbitals (GIAO) orbitals are used in the atomic orbital basis. Results are discussed in terms of functional groups. (Author). 17 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  6. Calculating zeros: Non-equilibrium free energy calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oostenbrink, Chris; Gunsteren, Wilfred F. van

    2006-01-01

    Free energy calculations on three model processes with theoretically known free energy changes have been performed using short simulation times. A comparison between equilibrium (thermodynamic integration) and non-equilibrium (fast growth) methods has been made in order to assess the accuracy and precision of these methods. The three processes have been chosen to represent processes often observed in biomolecular free energy calculations. They involve a redistribution of charges, the creation and annihilation of neutral particles and conformational changes. At very short overall simulation times, the thermodynamic integration approach using discrete steps is most accurate. More importantly, reasonable accuracy can be obtained using this method which seems independent of the overall simulation time. In cases where slow conformational changes play a role, fast growth simulations might have an advantage over discrete thermodynamic integration where sufficient sampling needs to be obtained at every λ-point, but only if the initial conformations do properly represent an equilibrium ensemble. From these three test cases practical lessons can be learned that will be applicable to biomolecular free energy calculations

  7. AREVA group overview; Presentation du groupe AREVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-02-08

    This document presents the Group Areva, a world nuclear industry leader, from a financial holding company to an industrial group, operating in two businesses: the nuclear energy and the components. The structure and the market of the group are discussed, as the financial assets. (A.L.B.)

  8. Overgroups of root groups in classical groups

    CERN Document Server

    Aschbacher, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The author extends results of McLaughlin and Kantor on overgroups of long root subgroups and long root elements in finite classical groups. In particular he determines the maximal subgroups of this form. He also determines the maximal overgroups of short root subgroups in finite classical groups and the maximal overgroups in finite orthogonal groups of c-root subgroups.

  9. Interagency mechanical operations group numerical systems group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    This report consists of the minutes of the May 20-21, 1971 meeting of the Interagency Mechanical Operations Group (IMOG) Numerical Systems Group. This group looks at issues related to numerical control in the machining industry. Items discussed related to the use of CAD and CAM, EIA standards, data links, and numerical control.

  10. Pseudopotentials for quantum-Monte-Carlo-calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkatzki, Mark Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The author presents scalar-relativistic energy-consistent Hartree-Fock pseudopotentials for the main-group and 3d-transition-metal elements. The pseudopotentials do not exhibit a singularity at the nucleus and are therefore suitable for quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations. The author demonstrates their transferability through extensive benchmark calculations of atomic excitation spectra as well as molecular properties. In particular, the author computes the vibrational frequencies and binding energies of 26 first- and second-row diatomic molecules using post Hartree-Fock methods, finding excellent agreement with the corresponding all-electron values. The author shows that the presented pseudopotentials give superior accuracy than other existing pseudopotentials constructed specifically for QMC. The localization error and the efficiency in QMC are discussed. The author also presents QMC calculations for selected atomic and diatomic 3d-transitionmetal systems. Finally, valence basis sets of different sizes (VnZ with n=D,T,Q,5 for 1st and 2nd row; with n=D,T for 3rd to 5th row; with n=D,T,Q for the 3d transition metals) optimized for the pseudopotentials are presented. (orig.)

  11. DRAGON, Reactor Cell Calculation System with Burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: DRAGON is a collection of models to simulate the neutronic behavior of a unit cell or a fuel assembly in a nuclear reactor. It includes all of the functions that characterize a lattice cell code, namely: interpolation of microscopic cross sections supplied by means of standard libraries; resonance self-shielding calculations in multidimensional geometries; multigroup and multidimensional neutron flux calculations which can take into account neutron leakage; transport-transport or transport-diffusion equivalence calculations as well as editing of condensed and homogenized nuclear properties for reactor calculations; and finally isotopic depletion calculations. The user must supply cross sections. DRAGON can access directly standard microscopic cross-section libraries in the following formats: DRAGON, MATXS (TRANSX-CTR), WIMSD4, WIMS-AECL, and APOLLO. It has the capability of exchanging macroscopic and microscopic cross-section libraries with a code such as PSR-0206/TRANSX-CTR or PSR-0317/TRANSX-2 by the use of the GOXS and ISOTXS format files. Macroscopic cross sections can also be read in DRAGON via the input data stream. 2 - Method of solution: DRAGON contains a multigroup iterator conceived to control a number of different algorithms for the solution of the neutron transport equation. Each of these algorithms is presented in the form of a one-group solution procedure where the contributions from other energy groups are included in a source term. The current version, DRAGON 9 71124 (Release 3.02), which was released in January 1998, contains three such algorithms. The JPM option solves the integral transport equation using the interface current method applied to homogeneous blocks; the SYBIL option solves the integral transport equation using the collision probability method for simple one-dimensional (1-D) or two-dimensional (2-D) geometries and the interface current method for 2-D Cartesian or hexagonal assemblies; and the

  12. Quandle and Biquandle Homology Calculation in R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Fenn

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In knot theory several knot invariants have been found over the last decades. This paper concerns itself with invariants of several of those invariants, namely the Homology of racks, quandles, biracks and biquandles. The software described in this paper calculates the rack, quandle and degenerate homology groups of racks and biracks. It works for any rack/quandle with finite elements where there are homology coefficients in 'Z'k. The up and down actions can be given either as a function of the elements of 'Z'k or provided as a matrix. When calculating a rack, the down action should coincide with the identity map. We have provided actions for both the general dihedral quandle and the group quandle over 'S'3. We also provide a second function to test if a set with a given action (or with both actions gives rise to a quandle or biquandle. The program is provided as an R package and can be found at https://github.com/ansgarwenzel/quhomology.   AMS subject classification: 57M27; 57M25

  13. Improvements in the model of neutron calculations for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calzetta, Osvaldo; Leszczynski, Francisco

    1987-01-01

    Within the research program in the field of neutron physics calculations being carried out in the Nuclear Engineering Division at the Centro Atomico Bariloche, the errors which due to some typical approximations appear in the final results are researched. For research MTR type reactors, two approximations, for high and low enrichment are investigated: the treatment of the geometry and the method of few-group cell cross-sections calculation, particularly in the resonance energy region. Commonly, the cell constants used for the entire reactor calculation are obtained making an homogenization of the full fuel elements, by one-dimensional calculations. An improvement is made that explicitly includes the fuel element frames in the core calculation geometry. Besides, a detailed treatment-in energy and space- is used to find the resonance few-group cross sections, and a comparison of the results with detailed and approximated calculations is made. The least number and the best mesh of energy groups needed for cell calculations is fixed too. (Author) [es

  14. Theory of Lie groups

    CERN Document Server

    Chevalley, Claude

    2018-01-01

    The standard text on the subject for many years, this introductory treatment covers classical linear groups, topological groups, manifolds, analytic groups, differential calculus of Cartan, and compact Lie groups and their representations. 1946 edition.

  15. Mechanical calculation of heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osweiller, Francis.

    1977-01-01

    Many heat exchangers are still being dimensioned at the present time by means of the American TEMA code (Tubular Exchanger Manufacturers Association). The basic formula of this code often gives rise to significant tubular plate thicknesses which, apart from the cost of materials, involve significant machining. Some constructors have brought into use calculation methods that are more analytic so as to take into better consideration the mechanical phenomena which come into play in a heat exchanger. After a brief analysis of these methods it is shown, how the original TEMA formulations have changed to reach the present version and how this code has incorporated Gardner's results for treating exchangers with two fixed heads. A formal and numerical comparison is then made of the analytical and TEMA methods by attempting to highlight a code based on these methods or a computer calculation programme in relation to the TEMA code [fr

  16. CONTRIBUTION FOR MINING ATMOSPHERE CALCULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franica Trojanović

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available Humid air is an unavoidable feature of mining atmosphere, which plays a significant role in defining the climate conditions as well as permitted circumstances for normal mining work. Saturated humid air prevents heat conduction from the human body by means of evaporation. Consequently, it is of primary interest in the mining practice to establish the relative air humidity either by means of direct or indirect methods. Percentage of water in the surrounding air may be determined in various procedures including tables, diagrams or particular calculations, where each technique has its specific advantages and disadvantages. Classical calculation is done according to Sprung's formula, in which case partial steam pressure should also be taken from the steam table. The new method without the use of diagram or tables, established on the functional relation of pressure and temperature on saturated line, is presented here for the first time (the paper is published in Croatian.

  17. The Collective Practice of Calculation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Ida

    The calculation of costs plays an increasingly large role in the decision-making processes of public sector human service organizations. This has brought scholars of management accounting to investigate the relationship between caring professions and demands to make economic entities of the service...... productions as either a process of hybridization or conflict. With these approaches, though, they fail to interrogate the possibility that professional action might not be either the one or the other, but entail a broad variety of relationships between calculations and judgements. This paper elaborates...... and judgement to reach decisions to invest in social services. The line is not drawn between the two, but between the material arrangements that make decisions possible. This implies that the insisting on qualitatively based decisions gives the professionals agency to collectively engage in practical...

  18. Computer programs for lattice calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keil, E.; Reich, K.H.

    1984-01-01

    The aim of the workshop was to find out whether some standardisation could be achieved for future work in this field. A certain amount of useful information was unearthed, and desirable features of a ''standard'' program emerged. Progress is not expected to be breathtaking, although participants (practically from all interested US, Canadian and European accelerator laboratories) agreed that the mathematics of the existing programs is more or less the same. Apart from the NIH (not invented here) effect, there is a - to quite some extent understandable - tendency to stay with a program one knows and to add to it if unavoidable rather than to start using a new one. Users of the well supported program TRANSPORT (designed for beam line calculations) would prefer to have it fully extended for lattice calculations (to some extent already possible now), while SYNCH users wish to see that program provided with a user-friendly input, rather than spending time and effort for mastering a new program

  19. Early fusion reactor neutronic calculations: A reevaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, R.T.

    1996-01-01

    Several fusion power plant design studies were made at a number of universities and laboratories in the late 1960s and early 1970s. These studies included such designs as the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Fusion Power Plan and the University of Wisconsin UWMAK-I Reactor Neutronic analyses of the blankets and shields were part of the studies. During this time there were dissertations written on neutronic analysis systems and the results of neutronic analysis on several blanket and shield designs. The results were presented in the literature. Now in the fifth decade of fusion research, investigators often return to the earlier analyses for the neutronic results that are applicable to current blanket and shield designs, with the idea of using the older work as a basis for the new. However, the analyses of the past were made with cross-section data sets that have long been replaced with more modern versions. In addition, approximations were often made to the cross sections used because more exact data were not available. Because these results are used as guides, it is important to know if they are reproducible using more modern data. In this paper, several of the neutronic calculations made in the early studies are repeated using the MATXS-11 data library. This library is the ENDF/B-VI version of the MATXS-5 library. The library has 80 neutron groups. Tritium breeding ratios, heating rates, and fluxes are calculated and compared. This transport code used here is the one- dimensional S n code, ONEDANT. It is important to note that the calculations here are not to be considered as benchmarks because parameter and sensitivity studies were not made. They are used only to see if the results of older calculations are in reasonable agreement with a more modern library

  20. Energy mesh optimization for multi-level calculation schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosca, P.; Taofiki, A.; Bellier, P.; Prevost, A.

    2011-01-01

    The industrial calculations of third generation nuclear reactors are based on sophisticated strategies of homogenization and collapsing at different spatial and energetic levels. An important issue to ensure the quality of these calculation models is the choice of the collapsing energy mesh. In this work, we show a new approach to generate optimized energy meshes starting from the SHEM 281-group library. The optimization model is applied on 1D cylindrical cells and consists of finding an energy mesh which minimizes the errors between two successive collision probability calculations. The former is realized over the fine SHEM mesh with Livolant-Jeanpierre self-shielded cross sections and the latter is performed with collapsed cross sections over the energy mesh being optimized. The optimization is done by the particle swarm algorithm implemented in the code AEMC and multigroup flux solutions are obtained from standard APOLLO2 solvers. By this new approach, a set of new optimized meshes which encompass from 10 to 50 groups has been defined for PWR and BWR calculations. This set will allow users to adapt the energy detail of the solution to the complexity of the calculation (assembly, multi-assembly, two-dimensional whole core). Some preliminary verifications, in which the accuracy of the new meshes is measured compared to a direct 281-group calculation, show that the 30-group optimized mesh offers a good compromise between simulation time and accuracy for a standard 17 x 17 UO 2 assembly with and without control rods. (author)

  1. Coil protection calculator for TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsala, R.J.; Woolley, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    A new coil protection calculator (CPC) is presented in this paper. It is now being developed for TFTR's magnetic field coils will replace the existing coil fault detector. The existing fault detector sacrifices TFTR operating capability for simplicity. The new CPC will permit operation up to the actual coil limits by accurately and continuously computing coil parameters in real-time. The improvement will allow TFTR to operate with higher plasma currents and will permit the optimization of pulse repetition rates

  2. Rotor calculations for neutron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gobert, G.

    1968-01-01

    The determination of stress in a rotating disk plane of symmetry normal to the axis of rotation has been studied by a number of investigators. In a recent paper Reich gives an operating process for an analytical solution in an asymmetric rotating disk. In the report we give the calculation of finite difference stress solutions applicable to the two rotating disks. The equations are then programmed for the 360.75 computer by Fortran methods concerning the rotors of choppers. (author) [fr

  3. Void coefficient of reactivity calculation for AP-600 core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suparlina, L.; Budiono, T.A.; Mardha, A.; Tukiran

    1998-01-01

    Void coefficient of reactivity as one of reactor kinetics parameters has been carried out. The calculation was done into two steps which is cell calculation using WIMSD/4 and core calculation using Batan-2DIFF code programs with the condition of beginning of cycle with all fresh fuels elements and all control rods withdrawn. The one dimension transport program in four neutron energy groups is used to calculate the cell generation of various core materials cell has been calculated in 1/4 fuel element with cluster model and square pitch arrange. Moderator density have been reduced until 20% for the void coefficient of reactivity calculation. Macroscopic cross-section as the out put of WIMSD/4 is being used as the input at the diffusion neutron program for core calculation. The void coefficient of reactivity of the AP-600 core can be determined with regular neutron flux and adjoint in four energy groups and X-Y geometry. The results is shown that the K eff calculation value is different 5.2% from the design data

  4. Parallel plasma fluid turbulence calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leboeuf, J.N.; Carreras, B.A.; Charlton, L.A.; Drake, J.B.; Lynch, V.E.; Newman, D.E.; Sidikman, K.L.; Spong, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    The study of plasma turbulence and transport is a complex problem of critical importance for fusion-relevant plasmas. To this day, the fluid treatment of plasma dynamics is the best approach to realistic physics at the high resolution required for certain experimentally relevant calculations. Core and edge turbulence in a magnetic fusion device have been modeled using state-of-the-art, nonlinear, three-dimensional, initial-value fluid and gyrofluid codes. Parallel implementation of these models on diverse platforms--vector parallel (National Energy Research Supercomputer Center's CRAY Y-MP C90), massively parallel (Intel Paragon XP/S 35), and serial parallel (clusters of high-performance workstations using the Parallel Virtual Machine protocol)--offers a variety of paths to high resolution and significant improvements in real-time efficiency, each with its own advantages. The largest and most efficient calculations have been performed at the 200 Mword memory limit on the C90 in dedicated mode, where an overlap of 12 to 13 out of a maximum of 16 processors has been achieved with a gyrofluid model of core fluctuations. The richness of the physics captured by these calculations is commensurate with the increased resolution and efficiency and is limited only by the ingenuity brought to the analysis of the massive amounts of data generated

  5. Microcomputer generated pipe support calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hankinson, R.F.; Czarnowski, P.; Roemer, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    The cost and complexity of pipe support design has been a continuing challenge to the construction and modification of commercial nuclear facilities. Typically, pipe support design or qualification projects have required large numbers of engineers centrally located with access to mainframe computer facilities. Much engineering time has been spent repetitively performing a sequence of tasks to address complex design criteria and consolidating the results of calculations into documentation packages in accordance with strict quality requirements. The continuing challenges of cost and quality, the need for support engineering services at operating plant sites, and the substantial recent advances in microcomputer systems suggested that a stand-alone microcomputer pipe support calculation generator was feasible and had become a necessity for providing cost-effective and high quality pipe support engineering services to the industry. This paper outlines the preparation for, and the development of, an integrated pipe support design/evaluation software system which maintains all computer programs in the same environment, minimizes manual performance of standard or repetitive tasks, and generates a high quality calculation which is consistent and easily followed

  6. Calculational methods for lattice cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askew, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    At the current stage of development, direct simulation of all the processes involved in the reactor to the degree of accuracy required is not an economic proposition, and this is achieved by progressive synthesis of models for parts of the full space/angle/energy neutron behaviour. The split between reactor and lattice calculations is one such simplification. Most reactors are constructed of repetitions of similar geometric units, the fuel elements, having broadly similar properties. Thus the provision of detailed predictions of their behaviour is an important step towards overall modelling. We shall be dealing with these lattice methods in this series of lectures, but will refer back from time to time to their relationship with overall reactor calculation The lattice cell is itself composed of somewhat similar sub-units, the fuel pins, and will itself often rely upon a further break down of modelling. Construction of a good model depends upon the identification, on physical and mathematical grounds, of the most helpful division of the calculation at this level

  7. Calculation of groundwater travel time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnett, R.C.; Sagar, B.; Baca, R.G.

    1984-12-01

    Pre-waste-emplacement groundwater travel time is one indicator of the isolation capability of the geologic system surrounding a repository. Two distinct modeling approaches exist for prediction of groundwater flow paths and travel times from the repository location to the designated accessible environment boundary. These two approaches are: (1) the deterministic approach which calculates a single value prediction of groundwater travel time based on average values for input parameters and (2) the stochastic approach which yields a distribution of possible groundwater travel times as a function of the nature and magnitude of uncertainties in the model inputs. The purposes of this report are to (1) document the theoretical (i.e., mathematical) basis used to calculate groundwater pathlines and travel times in a basalt system, (2) outline limitations and ranges of applicability of the deterministic modeling approach, and (3) explain the motivation for the use of the stochastic modeling approach currently being used to predict groundwater pathlines and travel times for the Hanford Site. Example calculations of groundwater travel times are presented to highlight and compare the differences between the deterministic and stochastic modeling approaches. 28 refs

  8. Homogenized group cross sections by Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Der Marck, S. C.; Kuijper, J. C.; Oppe, J.

    2006-01-01

    Homogenized group cross sections play a large role in making reactor calculations efficient. Because of this significance, many codes exist that can calculate these cross sections based on certain assumptions. However, the application to the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten, the Netherlands, the limitations of such codes imply that the core calculations would become less accurate when using homogenized group cross sections (HGCS). Therefore we developed a method to calculate HGCS based on a Monte Carlo program, for which we chose MCNP. The implementation involves an addition to MCNP, and a set of small executables to perform suitable averaging after the MCNP run(s) have completed. Here we briefly describe the details of the method, and we report on two tests we performed to show the accuracy of the method and its implementation. By now, this method is routinely used in preparation of the cycle to cycle core calculations for HFR. (authors)

  9. Introduction to Sporadic Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis J. Boya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This is an introduction to finite simple groups, in particular sporadic groups, intended for physicists. After a short review of group theory, we enumerate the 1+1+16=18 families of finite simple groups, as an introduction to the sporadic groups. These are described next, in three levels of increasing complexity, plus the six isolated ''pariah'' groups. The (old five Mathieu groups make up the first, smallest order level. The seven groups related to the Leech lattice, including the three Conway groups, constitute the second level. The third and highest level contains the Monster group M, plus seven other related groups. Next a brief mention is made of the remaining six pariah groups, thus completing the 5+7+8+6=26 sporadic groups. The review ends up with a brief discussion of a few of physical applications of finite groups in physics, including a couple of recent examples which use sporadic groups.

  10. Improvement of calculation method for temperature coefficient of HTTR by neutronics calculation code based on diffusion theory. Analysis for temperature coefficient by SRAC code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Minoru; Takamatsu, Kuniyoshi

    2007-03-01

    The HTTR temperature coefficients required for the core dynamics calculations had been calculated from the HTTR core calculation results by the diffusion code with which the corrections had been performed using the core calculation results by the Monte-Carlo code MVP. This calculation method for the temperature coefficients was considered to have some issues to be improved. Then, the calculation method was improved to obtain the temperature coefficients in which the corrections by the Monte-Carlo code were not required. Specifically, from the point of view of neutron spectrum calculated by lattice calculations, the lattice model was revised which had been used for the calculations of the temperature coefficients. The HTTR core calculations were performed by the diffusion code with the group constants which were generated by the lattice calculations with the improved lattice model. The core calculations and the lattice calculations were performed by the SRAC code system. The HTTR core dynamics calculation was performed with the temperature coefficient obtained from the core calculation results. In consequence, the core dynamics calculation result showed good agreement with the experimental data and the valid temperature coefficient could be calculated only by the diffusion code without the corrections by Monte-Carlo code. (author)

  11. The Symmetry Group of the Permutahedron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisman, Karl-Dieter

    2011-01-01

    Although it can be visualized fairly easily and its symmetry group is easy to calculate, the permutahedron is a somewhat neglected combinatorial object. We propose it as a useful case study in abstract algebra. It supplies concrete examples of group actions, the difference between right and left actions, and how geometry and algebra can work…

  12. Calculation of molecular free energies in classical potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farhi, Asaf; Singh, Bipin

    2016-01-01

    Free energies of molecules can be calculated by quantum chemistry computations or by normal mode classical calculations. However, the first can be computationally impractical for large molecules and the second is based on the assumption of harmonic dynamics. We present a novel, accurate and complete calculation of molecular free energies in standard classical potentials. In this method we transform the molecule by relaxing potential terms which depend on the coordinates of a group of atoms in that molecule and calculate the free energy difference associated with the transformation. Then, since the transformed molecule can be treated as non-interacting systems, the free energy associated with these atoms is analytically or numerically calculated. This two-step calculation can be applied to calculate free energies of molecules or free energy difference between (possibly large) molecules in a general environment. We demonstrate the method in free energy calculations for methanethiol and butane molecules in vacuum and solvent. We suggest the potential application of free energy calculation of chemical reactions in classical molecular simulations. (paper)

  13. Calculation of gas turbine characteristic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamaev, B. I.; Murashko, V. L.

    2016-04-01

    The reasons and regularities of vapor flow and turbine parameter variation depending on the total pressure drop rate π* and rotor rotation frequency n are studied, as exemplified by a two-stage compressor turbine of a power-generating gas turbine installation. The turbine characteristic is calculated in a wide range of mode parameters using the method in which analytical dependences provide high accuracy for the calculated flow output angle and different types of gas dynamic losses are determined with account of the influence of blade row geometry, blade surface roughness, angles, compressibility, Reynolds number, and flow turbulence. The method provides satisfactory agreement of results of calculation and turbine testing. In the design mode, the operation conditions for the blade rows are favorable, the flow output velocities are close to the optimal ones, the angles of incidence are small, and the flow "choking" modes (with respect to consumption) in the rows are absent. High performance and a nearly axial flow behind the turbine are obtained. Reduction of the rotor rotation frequency and variation of the pressure drop change the flow parameters, the parameters of the stages and the turbine, as well as the form of the characteristic. In particular, for decreased n, nonmonotonic variation of the second stage reactivity with increasing π* is observed. It is demonstrated that the turbine characteristic is mainly determined by the influence of the angles of incidence and the velocity at the output of the rows on the losses and the flow output angle. The account of the growing flow output angle due to the positive angle of incidence for decreased rotation frequencies results in a considerable change of the characteristic: poorer performance, redistribution of the pressure drop at the stages, and change of reactivities, growth of the turbine capacity, and change of the angle and flow velocity behind the turbine.

  14. Calculation of Rydberg interaction potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Sebastian; Tresp, Christoph; Menke, Henri

    2017-01-01

    The strong interaction between individual Rydberg atoms provides a powerful tool exploited in an ever-growing range of applications in quantum information science, quantum simulation and ultracold chemistry. One hallmark of the Rydberg interaction is that both its strength and angular dependence...... for calculating the required electric multipole moments and the inclusion of electromagnetic fields with arbitrary direction. We focus specifically on symmetry arguments and selection rules, which greatly reduce the size of the Hamiltonian matrix, enabling the direct diagonalization of the Hamiltonian up...

  15. FIPRED Project - Experiments and calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohai, D.; Dumitrescu, I.; Doca, C.; Meleg, T.; Benga, D.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The FIPRED (Fission Products Release from Debris Bed) Project was developed by INR in the framework of EC FP6 SARNET (2004-2008) and will be continued in EC FP6 SARNET2 (2009-2013). The project objective is the evaluation of fission product release from debris bed resulted after reactor severe accident by natural UO 2 sintered pellets self disintegration by oxidation. A large experimental program was performed covering the main parameters influencing granulometric distribution of powders (fragments) resulted from UO 2 sintered pellets self disintegration by air oxidation. The paper presents experimental results obtained and material equation obtained by mathematical calculations. (authors)

  16. The Dental Trauma Internet Calculator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerds, Thomas Alexander; Lauridsen, Eva Fejerskov; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aim Prediction tools are increasingly used to inform patients about the future dental health outcome. Advanced statistical methods are required to arrive at unbiased predictions based on follow-up studies. Material and Methods The Internet risk calculator at the Dental Trauma Guide...... provides prognoses for teeth with traumatic injuries based on the Copenhagen trauma database: http://www.dentaltraumaguide.org The database includes 2191 traumatized permanent teeth from 1282 patients that were treated at the dental trauma unit at the University Hospital in Copenhagen (Denmark...

  17. Perturbation calculations with Wilson loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peixoto Junior, L.B.

    1984-01-01

    We present perturbative calculations with the Wilson loop (WL). The dimensional regularization method is used with a special attention concerning to the problem of divergences in the WL expansion in second and fourth orders, in three and four dimensions. We show that the residue in the pole, in 4d, of the fourth order graphs contribution sum is important for the charge renormalization. We compute up to second order the exact expression of the WL, in three-dimensional gauge theories with topological mass as well as its assimptotic behaviour for small and large distances. the author [pt

  18. Symmetries applied to reactor calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makai, M.

    1982-03-01

    Three problems of a reactor-calculational model are discussed with the help of symmetry considerations. 1/ A coarse mesh method applicable to any geometry is derived. It is shown that the coarse mesh solution can be constructed from a few standard boundary value problems. 2/ A second stage homogenization method is given based on the Bloch theorem. This ensures the continuity of the current and the flux at the boundary. 3/ The validity of the micro-macro separation is shown for heterogeneous lattices. A formula for the neutron density is derived for cell homogenization. (author)

  19. Criticality calculations for safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vellozo, S.O.

    1981-01-01

    Criticality studies in uranium nitrate and plutonium nitrate aqueous solutions were done. For uranium compound three basic computer codes are used: GAMTEC-II, DTF-IV, KENO-IV. Water was used as refletor and the results obtained with the different computer codes were analyzed and compared with the 'Handbuck zur Kriticalitat'. The cross sections and the cylindrical geometry were generated by Gamtec-II computer code. In the second compound the thickness of the recipient with plutonium nitrate are used with rectangular geometry and concret reflector. The effective multiplication constant was calculated with the Gamtec-II and Keno-IV library. The results show many differences. (E.G) [pt

  20. Calculable resistors of coaxial design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucera, J; Vollmer, E; Schurr, J; Bohacek, J

    2009-01-01

    1000 Ω and 1290.64 Ω coaxial resistors with calculable frequency dependence have been realized at PTB to be used in quantum Hall effect-based impedance measurements. In contradistinction to common designs of coaxial resistors, the design described in this paper makes it possible to remove the resistive element from the shield and to handle it without cutting the outer cylindrical shield of the resistor. Emphasis has been given to manufacturing technology and suppressing unwanted sources of frequency dependence. The adjustment accuracy is better than 10 µΩ Ω −1

  1. Radiation shielding calculation using MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masukawa, Fumihiro

    2001-01-01

    To verify the Monte Carlo code MCNP4A as a tool to generate the reference data in the shielding designs and the safety evaluations, various shielding benchmark experiments were analyzed using this code. These experiments were categorized in three types of the shielding subjects; bulk shielding, streaming, and skyshine. For the variance reduction technique, which is indispensable to get meaningful results with the Monte Carlo shielding calculation, we mainly used the weight window, the energy dependent Russian roulette and spitting. As a whole, our analyses performed enough small statistical errors and showed good agreements with these experiments. (author)

  2. Techniques of nuclear structure calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyson, R.D.

    1967-04-01

    The quasiparticle method for identical particles interacting through pairing forces has been extended by others for use with systems of neutrons and protons. The method is to project isospin from separately considered neutron and proton quasiparticle wavefunctions. This is discussed in detail, and it seems that the projection may not be important. Therefore unprojected quasiparticle wavefunctions are tried with some success as a basis of states in which to diagonalize a realistic nuclear Hamiltonian. Brief unrelated calculations on nuclei of mass 19 and the SU(3) classification of states in the p-f shell are also presented. (author)

  3. Electronics reliability calculation and design

    CERN Document Server

    Dummer, Geoffrey W A; Hiller, N

    1966-01-01

    Electronics Reliability-Calculation and Design provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts of reliability. The increasing complexity of electronic equipment has made problems in designing and manufacturing a reliable product more and more difficult. Specific techniques have been developed that enable designers to integrate reliability into their products, and reliability has become a science in its own right. The book begins with a discussion of basic mathematical and statistical concepts, including arithmetic mean, frequency distribution, median and mode, scatter or dispersion of mea

  4. Digital calculations of engine cycles

    CERN Document Server

    Starkman, E S; Taylor, C Fayette

    1964-01-01

    Digital Calculations of Engine Cycles is a collection of seven papers which were presented before technical meetings of the Society of Automotive Engineers during 1962 and 1963. The papers cover the spectrum of the subject of engine cycle events, ranging from an examination of composition and properties of the working fluid to simulation of the pressure-time events in the combustion chamber. The volume has been organized to present the material in a logical sequence. The first two chapters are concerned with the equilibrium states of the working fluid. These include the concentrations of var

  5. Methods for calculating nonconcave entropies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touchette, Hugo

    2010-01-01

    Five different methods which can be used to analytically calculate entropies that are nonconcave as functions of the energy in the thermodynamic limit are discussed and compared. The five methods are based on the following ideas and techniques: (i) microcanonical contraction, (ii) metastable branches of the free energy, (iii) generalized canonical ensembles with specific illustrations involving the so-called Gaussian and Betrag ensembles, (iv) the restricted canonical ensemble, and (v) the inverse Laplace transform. A simple long-range spin model having a nonconcave entropy is used to illustrate each method

  6. FRELIB, Failure Reliability Index Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkinson, D.B.; Oestergaard, C.

    1984-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: Calculation of the reliability index given the failure boundary. A linearization point (design point) is found on the failure boundary for a stationary reliability index (min) and a stationary failure probability density function along the failure boundary, provided that the basic variables are normally distributed. 2 - Method of solution: Iteration along the failure boundary which must be specified - together with its partial derivatives with respect to the basic variables - by the user in a subroutine FSUR. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: No distribution information included (first-order-second-moment-method). 20 basic variables (could be extended)

  7. Group Work: How to Use Groups Effectively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Alison

    2011-01-01

    Many students cringe and groan when told that they will need to work in a group. However, group work has been found to be good for students and good for teachers. Employers want college graduates to have developed teamwork skills. Additionally, students who participate in collaborative learning get better grades, are more satisfied with their…

  8. DIGA/NSL new calculational model in slab geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makai, M.; Gado, J.; Kereszturi, A.

    1987-04-01

    A new calculational model is presented based on a modified finite-difference algorithm, in which the coefficients are determined by means of the so-called gamma matrices. The DIGA program determines the gamma matrices and the NSL program realizes the modified finite difference model. Both programs assume slab cell geometry, DIGA assumes 2 energy groups and 3 diffusive regions. The DIGA/NSL programs serve to study the new calculational model. (author)

  9. Calculating the Rate of Senescence From Mortality Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koopman, Jacob J E; Rozing, Maarten P; Kramer, Anneke

    2016-01-01

    , they do not fit mortality rates at young and old ages. Therefore, we developed a method to calculate senescence rates from the acceleration of mortality directly without modeling the mortality rates. We applied the different methods to age group-specific mortality data from the European Renal Association......, the rate of senescence can be calculated directly from non-modeled mortality rates, overcoming the disadvantages of an indirect estimation based on modeled mortality rates....

  10. The analytic method for calculating the control rod worth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Han Gon; Lee, Byeong Ho; Chang, Soon Heung

    1989-01-01

    We calculated the control rod worth in this paper. To avoid complexity, we did not consider burnable poisons and soluble boron. The system was localized within one assembly. The control rod was treated as not an absorber but an another boundary. Thus all of the group constants were unchanged before and after control rod insertion. And we discussed the method for calculation of the reactivity of the whole core

  11. Reactor group constants and benchmark test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takano, Hideki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-08-01

    The evaluated nuclear data files such as JENDL, ENDF/B-VI and JEF-2 are validated by analyzing critical mock-up experiments for various type reactors and assessing applicability for nuclear characteristics such as criticality, reaction rates, reactivities, etc. This is called Benchmark Testing. In the nuclear calculations, the diffusion and transport codes use the group constant library which is generated by processing the nuclear data files. In this paper, the calculation methods of the reactor group constants and benchmark test are described. Finally, a new group constants scheme is proposed. (author)

  12. Calculating the albedo characteristics by the method of transmission probabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukhvich, A.A.; Rakhno, I.L.; Rubin, I.E.

    1983-01-01

    The possibility to use the method of transmission probabilities for calculating the albedo characteristics of homogeneous and heterogeneous zones is studied. The transmission probabilities method is a numerical method for solving the transport equation in the integrated form. All calculations have been conducted as a one-group approximation for the planes and rods with different optical thicknesses and capture-to-scattering ratios. Above calculations for plane and cylindrical geometries have shown the possibility to use the numerical method of transmission probabilities for calculating the albedo characteristics of homogeneous and heterogeneous zones with high accuracy. In this case the computer time consumptions are minimum even with the cylindrical geometry, if the interpolation calculation of characteristics is used for the neutrons of the first path

  13. Free Boolean Topological Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ol’ga Sipacheva

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Known and new results on free Boolean topological groups are collected. An account of the properties that these groups share with free or free Abelian topological groups and properties specific to free Boolean groups is given. Special emphasis is placed on the application of set-theoretic methods to the study of Boolean topological groups.

  14. Small Group Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Joseph E.

    1978-01-01

    Summarizes research on small group processes by giving a comprehensive account of the types of variables primarily studied in the laboratory. These include group structure, group composition, group size, and group relations. Considers effects of power, leadership, conformity to social norms, and role relationships. (Author/AV)

  15. Calculational Tool for Skin Contamination Dose Assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, R L

    2002-01-01

    Spreadsheet calculational tool was developed to automate the calculations preformed for dose assessment of skin contamination. This document reports on the design and testing of the spreadsheet calculational tool.

  16. Relativistic Few-Body Hadronic Physics Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyzou, Wayne [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2016-06-20

    The goal of this research proposal was to use ``few-body'' methods to understand the structure and reactions of systems of interacting hadrons (neutrons, protons, mesons, quarks) over a broad range of energy scales. Realistic mathematical models of few-hadron systems have the advantage that they are sufficiently simple that they can be solved with mathematically controlled errors. These systems are also simple enough that it is possible to perform complete accurate experimental measurements on these systems. Comparison between theory and experiment puts strong constraints on the structure of the models. Even though these systems are ``simple'', both the experiments and computations push the limits of technology. The important property of ``few-body'' systems is that the ``cluster property'' implies that the interactions that appear in few-body systems are identical to the interactions that appear in complicated many-body systems. Of particular interest are models that correctly describe physics at distance scales that are sensitive to the internal structure of the individual nucleons. The Heisenberg uncertainty principle implies that in order to be sensitive to physics on distance scales that are a fraction of the proton or neutron radius, a relativistic treatment of quantum mechanics is necessary. The research supported by this grant involved 30 years of effort devoted to studying all aspects of interacting two and three-body systems. Realistic interactions were used to compute bound states of two- and three-nucleon, and two- and three-quark systems. Scattering observables for these systems were computed for a broad range of energies - from zero energy scattering to few GeV scattering, where experimental evidence of sub-nucleon degrees of freedom is beginning to appear. Benchmark calculations were produced, which when compared with calculations of other groups provided an essential check on these complicated calculations. In

  17. Dissecting Reactor Antineutrino Flux Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonzogni, A. A.; McCutchan, E. A.; Hayes, A. C.

    2017-09-01

    Current predictions for the antineutrino yield and spectra from a nuclear reactor rely on the experimental electron spectra from 235U, 239Pu, 241Pu and a numerical method to convert these aggregate electron spectra into their corresponding antineutrino ones. In the present work we investigate quantitatively some of the basic assumptions and approximations used in the conversion method, studying first the compatibility between two recent approaches for calculating electron and antineutrino spectra. We then explore different possibilities for the disagreement between the measured Daya Bay and the Huber-Mueller antineutrino spectra, including the 238U contribution as well as the effective charge and the allowed shape assumption used in the conversion method. We observe that including a shape correction of about +6 % MeV-1 in conversion calculations can better describe the Daya Bay spectrum. Because of a lack of experimental data, this correction cannot be ruled out, concluding that in order to confirm the existence of the reactor neutrino anomaly, or even quantify it, precisely measured electron spectra for about 50 relevant fission products are needed. With the advent of new rare ion facilities, the measurement of shape factors for these nuclides, for many of which precise beta intensity data from TAGS experiments already exist, would be highly desirable.

  18. NATIONAL STORMWATER CALCULATOR USER'S GUIDE ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Stormwater Calculator is a simple to use tool for computing small site hydrology for any location within the US. It estimates the amount of stormwater runoff generated from a site under different development and control scenarios over a long term period of historical rainfall. The analysis takes into account local soil conditions, slope, land cover and meteorology. Different types of low impact development (LID) practices (also known as green infrastructure) can be employed to help capture and retain rainfall on-site. Future climate change scenarios taken from internationally recognized climate change projections can also be considered. The calculator provides planning level estimates of capital and maintenance costs which will allow planners and managers to evaluate and compare effectiveness and costs of LID controls.The calculator’s primary focus is informing site developers and property owners on how well they can meet a desired stormwater retention target. It can be used to answer such questions as:• What is the largest daily rainfall amount that can be captured by a site in either its pre-development, current, or post-development condition?• To what degree will storms of different magnitudes be captured on site?• What mix of LID controls can be deployed to meet a given stormwater retention target?• How well will LID controls perform under future meteorological projections made by global climate change models?• What are the relativ

  19. Adjoint electron Monte Carlo calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, T.M.

    1986-01-01

    Adjoint Monte Carlo is the most efficient method for accurate analysis of space systems exposed to natural and artificially enhanced electron environments. Recent adjoint calculations for isotropic electron environments include: comparative data for experimental measurements on electronics boxes; benchmark problem solutions for comparing total dose prediction methodologies; preliminary assessment of sectoring methods used during space system design; and total dose predictions on an electronics package. Adjoint Monte Carlo, forward Monte Carlo, and experiment are in excellent agreement for electron sources that simulate space environments. For electron space environments, adjoint Monte Carlo is clearly superior to forward Monte Carlo, requiring one to two orders of magnitude less computer time for relatively simple geometries. The solid-angle sectoring approximations used for routine design calculations can err by more than a factor of 2 on dose in simple shield geometries. For critical space systems exposed to severe electron environments, these potential sectoring errors demand the establishment of large design margins and/or verification of shield design by adjoint Monte Carlo/experiment

  20. Dispersion relations in loop calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kniehl, B.A.

    1996-01-01

    These lecture notes give a pedagogical introduction to the use of dispersion relations in loop calculations. We first derive dispersion relations which allow us to recover the real part of a physical amplitude from the knowledge of its absorptive part along the branch cut. In perturbative calculations, the latter may be constructed by means of Cutkosky's rule, which is briefly discussed. For illustration, we apply this procedure at one loop to the photon vacuum-polarization function induced by leptons as well as to the γf anti-f vertex form factor generated by the exchange of a massive vector boson between the two fermion legs. We also show how the hadronic contribution to the photon vacuum polarization may be extracted from the total cross section of hadron production in e + e - annihilation measured as a function of energy. Finally, we outline the application of dispersive techniques at the two-loop level, considering as an example the bosonic decay width of a high-mass Higgs boson. (author)

  1. Neutronics calculation of RTP core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabir, Mohamad Hairie B.; Zin, Muhammad Rawi B. Mohamed; Karim, Julia Bt. Abdul; Bayar, Abi Muttaqin B. Jalal; Usang, Mark Dennis Anak; Mustafa, Muhammad Khairul Ariff B.; Hamzah, Na'im Syauqi B.; Said, Norfarizan Bt. Mohd; Jalil, Muhammad Husamuddin B.

    2017-01-01

    Reactor calculation and simulation are significantly important to ensure safety and better utilization of a research reactor. The Malaysian's PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor (RTP) achieved initial criticality on June 28, 1982. The reactor is designed to effectively implement the various fields of basic nuclear research, manpower training, and production of radioisotopes. Since early 90s, neutronics modelling were used as part of its routine in-core fuel management activities. The are several computer codes have been used in RTP since then, based on 1D neutron diffusion, 2D neutron diffusion and 3D Monte Carlo neutron transport method. This paper describes current progress and overview on neutronics modelling development in RTP. Several important parameters were analysed such as keff, reactivity, neutron flux, power distribution and fission product build-up for the latest core configuration. The developed core neutronics model was validated by means of comparison with experimental and measurement data. Along with the RTP core model, the calculation procedure also developed to establish better prediction capability of RTP's behaviour.

  2. A new calculation of atmospheric neutrino flux: the FLUKA approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battistoni, G.; Bloise, C.; Cavalli, D.; Ferrari, A.; Montaruli, T.; Rancati, T.; Resconi, S.; Ronga, F.; Sala, P.R.

    1999-01-01

    Preliminary results from a full 3-D calculation of atmospheric neutrino fluxes using the FLUKA interaction model are presented and compared to previous existing calculations. This effort is motivated mainly by the 3-D capability and the satisfactory degree of accuracy of the hadron-nucleus models embedded in the FLUKA code. Here we show examples of benchmarking tests of the model with cosmic ray experiment results. A comparison of our calculation of the atmospheric neutrino flux with that of the Bartol group, for E ν > 1 GeV, is presented

  3. Influence of external source location in the reactivity calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Adilson Costa da; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da; Martinez, Aquilino Senra

    2011-01-01

    We used the neutron diffusion equation with external neutron sources, in cartesian geometry and the two groups of energy, to verify the influence of external neutron source locations in the reactivity calculation. For this, a coarse mesh finite difference method was developed for the adjoint flux calculation and simplifies reactivity calculation in PWR type reactor, which uses the output of the nodal expansion method. The results were obtained for different locations on the two-dimensional plane, as well as for different types of fuel elements in the reactor core. (author)

  4. Calculation results and experimental testing of doppler feedback coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Shunhai

    1989-01-01

    The Doppler feedback coefficients are calculated by the interpolation and group collapsing method from multigroup self-shielding factors and infinite dilution cross sections rather than effective resonance integrals by using resonance data base. Since many updated sets of multigroup data are in existence to be selected, the calculation process can be simplified. The heterogeneous effects are taken into account by equivalence relation. The computer code of Doppler feedback coefficients is created on computer CYBER-825 and PDP-11. The results calculated are in good agreement with the experiments

  5. Influence of external source location in the reactivity calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Adilson Costa da; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da; Martinez, Aquilino Senra, E-mail: asilva@con.ufrj.b, E-mail: fernando@con.ufrj.b, E-mail: Aquilino@lmp.ufrj.b [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    We used the neutron diffusion equation with external neutron sources, in cartesian geometry and the two groups of energy, to verify the influence of external neutron source locations in the reactivity calculation. For this, a coarse mesh finite difference method was developed for the adjoint flux calculation and simplifies reactivity calculation in PWR type reactor, which uses the output of the nodal expansion method. The results were obtained for different locations on the two-dimensional plane, as well as for different types of fuel elements in the reactor core. (author)

  6. Calculation of sound propagation in fibrous materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, Viggo

    1996-01-01

    Calculations of attenuation and velocity of audible sound waves in glass wools are presented. The calculations use only the diameters of fibres and the mass density of glass wools as parameters. The calculations are compared with measurements.......Calculations of attenuation and velocity of audible sound waves in glass wools are presented. The calculations use only the diameters of fibres and the mass density of glass wools as parameters. The calculations are compared with measurements....

  7. First-principles calculations of novel materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jifeng

    relatively modest band masses for both electrons and holes suggesting applications. Optical properties show a infrared-red absorption when doped. This could potentially be useful for combining wavelength filtering and transparent conducting functions. Furthermore, our defect calculations show that Ba 2TeO is intrinsically p-type conducting under Ba-poor condition. However, the spontaneous formation of the donor defects may constrain the p-type transport properties and would need to be addressed to enable applications. Chapter 4 mainly devotes to the thermoelectric properties of the famous phase change material, Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST). GST has been used in data storage for more than a decade because of their fast phase switching between metastable crystalline (cubic) and amorphous phases. It also exhibits interesting thermoelectric properties, and we did a systematic study on the two crystalline phases (hexagonal and cubic) and the amorphous phase. We found a high Seebeck coefficient with a broad doping concentrations for both n-type and p-type, at and below room temperatures (300 K) for both the cubic and amorphous phases. This finding will be of crucial interests in further understand the thermoelectric properties experimentally and find device applications in the ultimate goal. Several magnetic materials that involve lanthanide elements are reported in Chapter 5. First of all, the electronic and magnetic properties of the BaLn2O4 (Ln = La-Lu, Y) family compound are studied. The series has been synthesized for the first time in single crystalline form, using a molten metal flux. They crystallize in the CaV 2O4 structure type with primitive orthorhombic symmetry (space group Pnma, #62). Our calculations show an insulating character with band gaps ranging from 3 eV to 4.5 eV for the three representative compounds, BaLa2O4, BaGd2O4 and BaLu 2O4. Moreover, the superexchange magnetism is also studied. Secondly, a strong correlated system with cerium is investigated. As expected, we

  8. Geometric group theory

    CERN Document Server

    Druţu, Cornelia

    2018-01-01

    The key idea in geometric group theory is to study infinite groups by endowing them with a metric and treating them as geometric spaces. This applies to many groups naturally appearing in topology, geometry, and algebra, such as fundamental groups of manifolds, groups of matrices with integer coefficients, etc. The primary focus of this book is to cover the foundations of geometric group theory, including coarse topology, ultralimits and asymptotic cones, hyperbolic groups, isoperimetric inequalities, growth of groups, amenability, Kazhdan's Property (T) and the Haagerup property, as well as their characterizations in terms of group actions on median spaces and spaces with walls. The book contains proofs of several fundamental results of geometric group theory, such as Gromov's theorem on groups of polynomial growth, Tits's alternative, Stallings's theorem on ends of groups, Dunwoody's accessibility theorem, the Mostow Rigidity Theorem, and quasiisometric rigidity theorems of Tukia and Schwartz. This is the f...

  9. Profinite graphs and groups

    CERN Document Server

    Ribes, Luis

    2017-01-01

    This book offers a detailed introduction to graph theoretic methods in profinite groups and applications to abstract groups. It is the first to provide a comprehensive treatment of the subject. The author begins by carefully developing relevant notions in topology, profinite groups and homology, including free products of profinite groups, cohomological methods in profinite groups, and fixed points of automorphisms of free pro-p groups. The final part of the book is dedicated to applications of the profinite theory to abstract groups, with sections on finitely generated subgroups of free groups, separability conditions in free and amalgamated products, and algorithms in free groups and finite monoids. Profinite Graphs and Groups will appeal to students and researchers interested in profinite groups, geometric group theory, graphs and connections with the theory of formal languages. A complete reference on the subject, the book includes historical and bibliographical notes as well as a discussion of open quest...

  10. SR 97 - Radionuclide transport calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindgren, Maria [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Lindstroem, Fredrik [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1999-12-01

    An essential component of a safety assessment is to calculate radionuclide release and dose consequences for different scenarios and cases. The SKB tools for such a quantitative assessment are used to calculate the maximum releases and doses for the hypothetical repository sites Aberg, Beberg and Ceberg for the initial canister defect scenario and also for the glacial melting case for Aberg. The reasonable cases, i.e. all parameters take reasonable values, results in maximum biosphere doses of 5x10{sup -8} Sv/yr for Aberg, 3x10{sup -8} Sv/yr for Beberg and 1x10{sup -8} Sv/yr for Ceberg for peat area. These doses lie significantly below 0.15 mSv/yr. (A dose of 0.15 mSv/yr for unit probability corresponds to the risk limit of 10{sup -5} per year for the most exposed individuals recommended in regulations.) The conclusion that the maximum risk would lie well below 10{sup -5} per year is also demonstrated by results from the probabilistic calculations, which directly assess the resulting risk by combining dose and probability estimates. The analyses indicate that the risk is 2x10{sup -5} Sv/yr for Aberg, 8x10{sup -7} Sv/yr for Beberg and 3x10{sup -8} Sv/yr for Ceberg. The analysis shows that the most important parameters in the near field are the number of defective canisters and the instant release fraction. The influence from varying one parameter never changes the doses as much as an order of magnitude. In the far field the most important uncertainties affecting release and retention are associated with permeability and connectivity of the fractures in the rock. These properties affect several parameters. Highly permeable and well connected fractures imply high groundwater fluxes and short groundwater travel times. Sparsely connected or highly variable fracture properties implies low flow wetted surface along migration paths. It should, however, be remembered that the far-field parameters have little importance if the near-field parameters take their reasonable

  11. SR 97 - Radionuclide transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindgren, Maria; Lindstroem, Fredrik

    1999-12-01

    An essential component of a safety assessment is to calculate radionuclide release and dose consequences for different scenarios and cases. The SKB tools for such a quantitative assessment are used to calculate the maximum releases and doses for the hypothetical repository sites Aberg, Beberg and Ceberg for the initial canister defect scenario and also for the glacial melting case for Aberg. The reasonable cases, i.e. all parameters take reasonable values, results in maximum biosphere doses of 5x10 -8 Sv/yr for Aberg, 3x10 -8 Sv/yr for Beberg and 1x10 -8 Sv/yr for Ceberg for peat area. These doses lie significantly below 0.15 mSv/yr. (A dose of 0.15 mSv/yr for unit probability corresponds to the risk limit of 10 -5 per year for the most exposed individuals recommended in regulations.) The conclusion that the maximum risk would lie well below 10 -5 per year is also demonstrated by results from the probabilistic calculations, which directly assess the resulting risk by combining dose and probability estimates. The analyses indicate that the risk is 2x10 -5 Sv/yr for Aberg, 8x10 -7 Sv/yr for Beberg and 3x10 -8 Sv/yr for Ceberg. The analysis shows that the most important parameters in the near field are the number of defective canisters and the instant release fraction. The influence from varying one parameter never changes the doses as much as an order of magnitude. In the far field the most important uncertainties affecting release and retention are associated with permeability and connectivity of the fractures in the rock. These properties affect several parameters. Highly permeable and well connected fractures imply high groundwater fluxes and short groundwater travel times. Sparsely connected or highly variable fracture properties implies low flow wetted surface along migration paths. It should, however, be remembered that the far-field parameters have little importance if the near-field parameters take their reasonable values. In that case almost all

  12. Numerical precision calculations for LHC physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reuschle, Christian Andreas

    2013-02-05

    In this thesis I present aspects of QCD calculations, which are related to the fully numerical evaluation of next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD amplitudes, especially of the one-loop contributions, and the efficient computation of associated collider observables. Two interrelated topics have thereby been of concern to the thesis at hand, which give rise to two major parts. One large part is focused on the general group-theoretical behavior of one-loop QCD amplitudes, with respect to the underlying SU(N{sub c}) theory, in order to correctly and efficiently handle the color degrees of freedom in QCD one-loop amplitudes. To this end a new method is introduced that can be used in order to express color-ordered partial one-loop amplitudes with multiple quark-antiquark pairs as shuffle sums over cyclically ordered primitive one-loop amplitudes. The other large part is focused on the local subtraction of divergences off the one-loop integrands of primitive one-loop amplitudes. A method for local UV renormalization has thereby been developed, which uses local UV counterterms and efficient recursive routines. Together with suitable virtual soft and collinear subtraction terms, the subtraction method is extended to the virtual contributions in the calculations of NLO observables, which enables the fully numerical evaluation of the one-loop integrals in the virtual contributions. The method has been successfully applied to the calculation of jet rates in electron-positron annihilation to NLO accuracy in the large-N{sub c} limit.

  13. Numerical precision calculations for LHC physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuschle, Christian Andreas

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis I present aspects of QCD calculations, which are related to the fully numerical evaluation of next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD amplitudes, especially of the one-loop contributions, and the efficient computation of associated collider observables. Two interrelated topics have thereby been of concern to the thesis at hand, which give rise to two major parts. One large part is focused on the general group-theoretical behavior of one-loop QCD amplitudes, with respect to the underlying SU(N c ) theory, in order to correctly and efficiently handle the color degrees of freedom in QCD one-loop amplitudes. To this end a new method is introduced that can be used in order to express color-ordered partial one-loop amplitudes with multiple quark-antiquark pairs as shuffle sums over cyclically ordered primitive one-loop amplitudes. The other large part is focused on the local subtraction of divergences off the one-loop integrands of primitive one-loop amplitudes. A method for local UV renormalization has thereby been developed, which uses local UV counterterms and efficient recursive routines. Together with suitable virtual soft and collinear subtraction terms, the subtraction method is extended to the virtual contributions in the calculations of NLO observables, which enables the fully numerical evaluation of the one-loop integrals in the virtual contributions. The method has been successfully applied to the calculation of jet rates in electron-positron annihilation to NLO accuracy in the large-N c limit.

  14. Some aspects of preparation and testing of group constants group constant system ABBN-90

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaev, M.N.; Tsiboulia, A.M.; Manturov, G.N.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of activities performed to prepare and test the group constants ABBN-90. The ABBN-90 set is designed for application calculations of fast, intermediate and thermal nuclear reactors. The calculations of subgroup parameters are discussed. The processing code system GRUCON is mentioned in comparison to the NJOY code system. Proposals are made for future activities. (author). Figs, tabs

  15. Group purchasing: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetrich, J G

    1987-07-01

    The various types and operational methods of purchasing groups are described, and evaluation of groups is discussed. Since group purchasing is increasing in popularity as a method of controlling drug costs, community and hospital pharmacy managers may need to evaluate various groups to determine the appropriateness of their services. Groups are categorized as independent, system based, or alliance or association based. Instead of "purchasing," some groups develop contracts for hospitals, which then purchase directly from the vendor. Aside from this basic difference between groups that purchase and groups that contract, comparisons among groups are difficult because of the wide variation in sizes and services. Competition developing from diversification among groups has led to "super groups," formed from local and regional groups. In evaluating groups, advantages and disadvantages germane to accomplishing the member's objectives must be considered. To ensure a group's success, members must be committed and support the group's philosophies; hospital pharmacists must help to establish a strong formulary system. To select vendors, groups should develop formal qualification and selection criteria and should not base a decision solely on price. The method of solicitation (bidding or negotiating), as well as the role of the prime vendor, should be studied. Legal implications of group purchasing, especially in the areas of administrative fees and drug diversion, must also be considered. The most advantageous group for each organization will include members with common missions and will be able to implement strategies for future success.

  16. JNC results of BN-600 benchmark calculation (phase 3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, M.

    2002-01-01

    The present work is the result of phase 3 BN-600 core benchmark problem, meaning burnup and heterogeneity. Analytical method applied consisted of: JENDL-3.2 nuclear data library, group constants (70 group, ABBN type self shielding transport factors), heterogeneous cell model for fuel and control rod, basic diffusion calculation (CITATION code), transport theory and mesh size correction (NSHEX code based on SN transport nodal method developed by JNC). Burnup and heterogeneity calculation results are presented obtained by applying both diffusion and transport approach for beginning and end of cycle

  17. Direct Discrete Method for Neutronic Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vosoughi, Naser; Akbar Salehi, Ali; Shahriari, Majid

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to introduce a new direct method for neutronic calculations. This method which is named Direct Discrete Method, is simpler than the neutron Transport equation and also more compatible with physical meaning of problems. This method is based on physic of problem and with meshing of the desired geometry, writing the balance equation for each mesh intervals and with notice to the conjunction between these mesh intervals, produce the final discrete equations series without production of neutron transport differential equation and mandatory passing from differential equation bridge. We have produced neutron discrete equations for a cylindrical shape with two boundary conditions in one group energy. The correction of the results from this method are tested with MCNP-4B code execution. (authors)

  18. A procedure for effective Dancoff factor calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milosevic, M.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, a procedure for Dancoff factors calculation based on equivalence principle and its application in the SCALE-4.3 code system is described. This procedure is founded on principle of conservation of neutron absorption for resolved resonance range in a heterogeneous medium and an equivalent medium consisted of an infinite array of two-region pin cells, where the presence of other fuel rods is taken into account through a Dancoff factor. The neutron absorption in both media is obtained using a fine-group elastic slowing-down calculation. This procedure is implemented in a design oriented lattice physics code, which is applicable for any geometry where the method of collision probability is possible to apply to get a flux solution. Proposed procedure was benchmarked for recent exercise that represents a system with a fuel double heterogeneity, i.e., fuel in solid form (pellets) surrounded by fissile material in solution, and for a 5x5 irregular pressurised water reactor assembly, which requires different Dancoff factors. (author)

  19. Methodologies of Uncertainty Propagation Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chojnacki, Eric

    2002-01-01

    After recalling the theoretical principle and the practical difficulties of the methodologies of uncertainty propagation calculation, the author discussed how to propagate input uncertainties. He said there were two kinds of input uncertainty: - variability: uncertainty due to heterogeneity, - lack of knowledge: uncertainty due to ignorance. It was therefore necessary to use two different propagation methods. He demonstrated this in a simple example which he generalised, treating the variability uncertainty by the probability theory and the lack of knowledge uncertainty by the fuzzy theory. He cautioned, however, against the systematic use of probability theory which may lead to unjustifiable and illegitimate precise answers. Mr Chojnacki's conclusions were that the importance of distinguishing variability and lack of knowledge increased as the problem was getting more and more complex in terms of number of parameters or time steps, and that it was necessary to develop uncertainty propagation methodologies combining probability theory and fuzzy theory

  20. Calculating utility prudency issue costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, K.R.

    1985-01-01

    The nuclear industry, particularly utilities and their construction, engineering and vendor agents, is faced with a surging increase in prudency management audits. What started as primarily a nuclear project-oriented requirement has spread to encompass most significant utility capital construction projects. Such audits are often a precedent condition to commencement of rate hearings. The cost engineer, a primary major capital construction project participant, is required to develop or critique ''prudency issue'' costs as part of such audits. Although utility costs in the broadest sense are potentially at issue, this paper concentrates on the typical project/construction management costs. The costs of design, procurement and construction are all subject to the calculation process