WorldWideScience

Sample records for renewable gasoline diesel

  1. Biofiltration of gasoline and diesel aliphatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halecky, Martin; Rousova, Jana; Paca, Jan; Kozliak, Evguenii; Seames, Wayne; Jones, Kim

    2015-02-01

    The ability of a biofilm to switch between the mixtures of mostly aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons was investigated to assess biofiltration efficiency and potential substrate interactions. A switch from gasoline, which consisted of both aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, to a mixture of volatile diesel n-alkanes resulted in a significant increase in biofiltration efficiency, despite the lack of readily biodegradable aromatic hydrocarbons in the diesel mixture. This improved biofilter performance was shown to be the result of the presence of larger size (C₉-C(12)) linear alkanes in diesel, which turned out to be more degradable than their shorter-chain (C₆-C₈) homologues in gasoline. The evidence obtained from both biofiltration-based and independent microbiological tests indicated that the rate was limited by biochemical reactions, with the inhibition of shorter chain alkane biodegradation by their larger size homologues as corroborated by a significant substrate specialization along the biofilter bed. These observations were explained by the lack of specific enzymes designed for the oxidation of short-chain alkanes as opposed to their longer carbon chain homologues.

  2. Industrial fermentation of renewable diesel fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfall, Patrick J; Gardner, Timothy S

    2011-06-01

    In commodity chemicals, cost drives everything. A working class family of four drives up to the gas pumps and faces a choice of a renewable diesel or petroleum diesel. Renewable diesel costs $0.50 more per gallon. Which fuel do they pick? Petroleum diesel will be the winner every time, unless the renewable fuel can achieve cost and performance parity with petrol. Nascent producers of advanced biofuels, including Amyris, LS9, Neste and Solazyme, aim to deliver renewable diesel fuels that not only meet the cost challenge, but also exceed the storage, transport, engine performance and emissions properties of petroleum diesel. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Price discrimination and tax incidence: Evidence from gasoline and diesel cars

    OpenAIRE

    Verboven, F.L.

    1998-01-01

    The existing tax policies towards gasoline and diesel cars in European countries provide a unique opportunity to analyze quality-based price discrimination and implied tax incidence. We develop an econometric framework for the demand and pricing of gasoline and diesel cars. Consumers choose a gasoline or a diesel car based on their annual mileage. Manufacturers set gasoline and diesel car prices. Our empirical results show that the relative pricing of gasoline and diesel cars is consistent wi...

  4. Analysis of Physicochemical Properties of Mexican Gasoline and Diesel Reformulated with Ethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porfirio Caballero-Mata

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available High energy prices, environmental issues and increasing importation of fossil fuels has provoked, in some countries, a reorientation of resources towards the development of biofuels that can partially substitute the consumption of fossil fuels. Ethanol is one of the biofuels more commonly used in the world; in the United States, Brazil and Australia gasoline blends that reach up to 85% Ethanol are commercialized. This work presents the results of a physicochemical characterization of commercial Mexican gasoline (Magna and Premium and diesel blends with 10% vol. and 15% vol. anhydrous Ethanol. The analytical testing included: Research Octane Number, Motor Octane Number, Cetane Number, Reid Vapor Pressure, Distillation Curve and Heating Value. The stability of the blends was also evaluated. The theoretical emissions of CO2 were calculated based on the results of the physicochemical characterization. The ethanol-gasoline blends increased their Octane Number with respect to the commercial gasoline, while conserving an appropriate Distillation Index. The Cetane Number of the ethanol-diesel blends showed a substantial decrease, while the heating value of gasoline and diesel blends was negatively affected by the addition of ethanol. Nevertheless, taking into account the credits by the use of a renewable fuel, the use of the reformulated gasoline blends would imply a maximum theoretical reduction of 7.5% in CO2 emissions whereas in the case of ethanol-diesel blends it would represent a 9.2% decrease.

  5. Biodiesel and Other Renewable Diesel Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2006-11-01

    Present federal tax incentives apply to certain types of biomass-derived diesel fuels, which in energy policy and tax laws are described either as renewable diesel or biodiesel. To understand the distinctions between these diesel types it is necessary to understand the technologies used to produce them and the properties of the resulting products. This fact sheet contains definitions of renewable and biodiesel and discusses the processes used to convert biomass to diesel fuel and the properties of biodiesel and renewable diesel fuels.

  6. Commonised diesel and gasoline catalyst architecture; Standardisierte Katalysatorarchitektur fuer Diesel- und Ottomotoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurell, Mats; Sjoers, Johan; Wernlund, Bjoern [Volvo Car Corporation, Goeteborg (Sweden); Brueck, Rolf [Emitec Gesellschaft fuer Emissionstechnologie mbH, Lohmar (Germany). Forschung, Entwicklung und Applikation

    2013-11-01

    Volvo Cars has developed a standardised catalytic converter architecture for diesel and gasoline engines - the scalable so-called Compact Cat. The system covers both Euro 6 and SULEV applications for gasoline engines as well as Euro 6 applications for diesel engines. The standardised design using shared parts results in a considerable reduction in unit costs and tooling requirements. (orig.)

  7. CO2 emission benefit of diesel (versus gasoline) powered vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, J L; Baker, R E; Boyer, B A; Hammerle, R H; Kenney, T E; Muniz, L; Wallington, T J

    2004-06-15

    Concerns regarding global warming have increased the pressure on automobile manufacturers to decrease emissions of CO2 from vehicles. Diesel vehicles have higher fuel economy and lower CO2 emissions than their gasoline counterparts. Increased penetration of diesel powered vehicles into the market is a possible transition strategy toward a more sustainable transportation system. To facilitate discussions regarding the relative merits of diesel vehicles it is important to have a clear understanding of their CO2 emission benefits. Based on European diesel and gasoline certification data, this report quantifies such CO2 reduction opportunities for cars and light duty trucks in today's vehicles and those in the year 2015. Overall, on a well-to-wheels per vehicle per mile basis, the CO2 reduction opportunity for today's vehicles is approximately 24-33%. We anticipate that the gap between diesel and gasoline well-to-wheel vehicle CO2 emissions will decrease to approximately 14-27% by the year 2015.

  8. Strategy on Development of Gasoline and Diesel Standards in China with Reference to Overseas Practice for Upgrading Gasoline and Diesel Quality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Zhe; Yang Guoxun

    2004-01-01

    This article analyzes the standards for car exhaust emissions and gasoline and diesel quality in Europe and the US. As revealed by the evolution of gasoline and diesel standards in China, the gasoline and diesel compositions of China and the exhaust gas emissions standard are closely related with the specifics of the petroleum refining industry and automotive industry in China. After studying the current situations of gasoline and diesel quality in China while taking into account the commonly accepted practice in the overseas this article raises some suggestions on development of gasoline and diesel standards in compliance with the actual conditions of China.

  9. Diesel engines vs. spark ignition gasoline engines -- Which is ``greener``?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbanks, J.W. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Criteria emissions, i.e., NO{sub x}, PM, CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}, from recently manufactured automobiles, compared on the basis of what actually comes out of the engines, the diesel engine is greener than spark ignition gasoline engines and this advantage for the diesel engine increases with time. SI gasoline engines tend to get out of tune more than diesel engines and 3-way catalytic converters and oxygen sensors degrade with use. Highway measurements of NO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and CO revealed that for each model year, 10% of the vehicles produce 50% of the emissions and older model years emit more than recent model year vehicles. Since 1974, cars with SI gasoline engines have uncontrolled emission until the 3-way catalytic converter reaches operating temperature, which occurs after roughly 7 miles of driving. Honda reports a system to be introduced in 1998 that will alleviate this cold start problem by storing the emissions then sending them through the catalytic converter after it reaches operating temperature. Acceleration enrichment, wherein considerable excess fuel is introduced to keep temperatures down of SI gasoline engine in-cylinder components and catalytic converters so these parts meet warranty, results in 2,500 times more CO and 40 times more H{sub 2} being emitted. One cannot kill oneself, accidentally or otherwise, with CO from a diesel engine vehicle in a confined space. There are 2,850 deaths per year attributable to CO from SI gasoline engine cars. Diesel fuel has advantages compared with gasoline. Refinery emissions are lower as catalytic cracking isn`t necessary. The low volatility of diesel fuel results in a much lower probability of fires. Emissions could be improved by further reducing sulfur and aromatics and/or fuel additives. Reformulated fuel has become the term covering reducing the fuels contribution to emissions. Further PM reduction should be anticipated with reformulated diesel and gasoline fuels.

  10. Report - Production of Gasoline and Diesel from Biomass via Fast Pyrolysis, Hydrotreating and Hydrocracking: A Design Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, S. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Valkenburg, C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Walton, C. W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Elliott, D. C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Holladay, J. E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stevens, D. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kinchin, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Czernik, S. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this design case study is to evaluate a processing pathway for converting biomass into infrastructure-compatible hydrocarbon biofuels. This design case investigates production of fast pyrolysis oil from biomass and the upgrading of that bio-oil as a means for generating infrastructure-ready renewable gasoline and diesel fuels.

  11. Report - Production of Gasoline and Diesel from Biomass via Fast Pyrolysis, Hydrotreating and Hydrocracking: A Design Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, S. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Valkenburg, C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Walton, C. W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Elliott, D. C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Holladay, J. E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stevens, D. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kinchin, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Czernik, S. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this design case study is to evaluate a processing pathway for converting biomass into infrastructure-compatible hydrocarbon biofuels. This design case investigates production of fast pyrolysis oil from biomass and the upgrading of that bio-oil as a means for generating infrastructure-ready renewable gasoline and diesel fuels.

  12. Biomass to Gasoline and DIesel Using Integrated Hydropyrolysis and Hydroconversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marker, Terry; Roberts, Michael; Linck, Martin; Felix, Larry; Ortiz-Toral, Pedro; Wangerow, Jim; Tan, Eric; Gephart, John; Shonnard, David

    2013-01-02

    Cellulosic and woody biomass can be directly converted to hydrocarbon gasoline and diesel blending components through the use of integrated hydropyrolysis plus hydroconversion (IH2). The IH2 gasoline and diesel blending components are fully compatible with petroleum based gasoline and diesel, contain less than 1% oxygen and have less than 1 total acid number (TAN). The IH2 gasoline is high quality and very close to a drop in fuel. The DOE funding enabled rapid development of the IH2 technology from initial proof-of-principle experiments through continuous testing in a 50 kg/day pilot plant. As part of this project, engineering work on IH2 has also been completed to design a 1 ton/day demonstration unit and a commercial-scale 2000 ton/day IH2 unit. These studies show when using IH2 technology, biomass can be converted directly to transportation quality fuel blending components for the same capital cost required for pyrolysis alone, and a fraction of the cost of pyrolysis plus upgrading of pyrolysis oil. Technoeconomic work for IH2 and lifecycle analysis (LCA) work has also been completed as part of this DOE study and shows IH2 technology can convert biomass to gasoline and diesel blending components for less than $2.00/gallon with greater than 90% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. As a result of the work completed in this DOE project, a joint development agreement was reached with CRI Catalyst Company to license the IH2 technology. Further larger-scale, continuous testing of IH2 will be required to fully demonstrate the technology, and funding for this is recommended. The IH2 biomass conversion technology would reduce U.S. dependence on foreign oil, reduce the price of transportation fuels, and significantly lower greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. It is a breakthrough for the widespread conversion of biomass to transportation fuels.

  13. Dielectric Properties of Diesel and Gasoline by Terahertz Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arik, Enis; Altan, Hakan; Esenturk, Okan

    2014-09-01

    In this study we have investigated the dielectric properties of diesel and gasoline in the Terahertz (THz) spectral region. We present frequency dependent absorption coefficients, refractive indices, and dielectric constants calculated from the transient measurements of the fuel oils between 0.1 and 1.1 THz. Observed weak absorption coefficient of fuel oils is explained by transient dipole moments induced by collisions between individual molecules. Fuel oils were modeled successfully with Debye model to investigate the relaxation dynamics after interaction with the electric field. Significant differences in relaxation times of molecules in diesel and gasoline are attributed to the differences in their intermolecular forces. Dispersion forces are much greater in diesel due to the longer hydrocarbon chains (C8-C40) compared to that (C4-C12) of the gasoline. This leads to a comparably faster relaxation right after THz electric field is applied. Clear differences in optical properties offer a simple yet effective way to discriminate fuel oils from each other by using THz spectroscopy without any danger of combustion or decomposition of the samples. Such an approach may also be used for the quality determination of either fuels. The study presents the great potential of THz spectroscopy to study very complex mixtures like fuel oils by the use of instantaneous THz wave/matter interactions and relaxation dynamics of the constituent molecules.

  14. A tiered approach to distinguish sources of gasoline and diesel spills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wenhui; Bernesky, Ryan; Bechard, Robert; Michaud, Guy; Lang, Jeremy

    2014-07-15

    Approximately 11% and 25% of annual Canadian oil spill accidents are gasoline and diesel spills, respectively. Gasoline and diesel spills are a challenge to conventional environmental forensic techniques because refinery processes remove most of the higher molecular weight biomarkers. This study presents a tiered environmental forensics strategy that includes such information as site operational history, geology/hydrogeology, GC/FID pre-screening, volatile GC/MS, semi-volatile GC/MS, and GC/MS selected ion monitoring (SIM) chromatograms for fingerprinting of gasoline and diesel spills. GC/FID pre-screening analysis identified the presence of two individual gasoline and diesel plumes at a fuel service station (study site). The gasoline plume is present between the upgradient fuel underground storage tanks (USTs) and the downgradient diesel plume, suggesting that the diesel impacts to groundwater may not be originated from the current UST leakage. Similar distribution of C3-alkylbenzenes (the most stable chemicals in gasoline) and the consistent diagnostic ratios of the analyte pairs with similar solubility indicate that the source for the dissolved gasoline constituents in the gasoline impacted zone likely originated from a gasoline leakage from the current USTs on the study site. In the diesel impacted zone, the distinct distribution and diagnostic ratios of sesquiterpanes (biomarkers for diesel) and alkylated PAHs confirm that the diesel plume originate from different crude oil sources than the current USTs.

  15. Renewable Gasoline, Solvents, and Fuel Additives from 2,3-Butanediol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Benjamin G; Merriman, Walter W; Quintana, Roxanne L

    2016-07-21

    2,3-Butanediol (2,3-BD) is a renewable alcohol that can be prepared in high yield from biomass sugars. 2,3-BD was selectively dehydrated in a solvent-free process to a complex mixture of 2-ethyl-2,4,5-trimethyl-1,3-dioxolanes and 4,5-dimethyl-2isopropyl dioxolanes with the heterogeneous acid catalyst Amberlyst-15. The purified dioxolane mixture exhibited an anti-knock index of 90.5, comparable to high octane gasoline, and a volumetric net heat of combustion 34 % higher than ethanol. The solubility of the dioxolane mixture in water was only 0.8 g per 100 mL, nearly an order of magnitude lower than the common gasoline oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether. The dioxolane mixture has potential applications as a sustainable gasoline blending component, diesel oxygenate, and industrial solvent.

  16. Biomass to Gasoline and Diesel Using Integrated Hydropyrolysis and Hydroconversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marker, Terry [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Roberts, Michael [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Linck, Martin [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Felix, Larry [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Ortiz-Toral, Pedro [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Wangerow, Jim [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Kraus, Larry [CRI-Criterion, Houston, TX (United States); McLeod, Celeste [CRI-Criterion, Houston, TX (United States); DelPaggio, Alan [CRI-Criterion, Houston, TX (United States); Tan, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gephart, John [Johnson Timber, Hayward, WI (United States); Gromov, Dmitri [Cargill, Wayzata, MN (United States); Purtle, Ian [Cargill, Wayzata, MN (United States); Starr, Jack [Cargill, Wayzata, MN (United States); Hahn, John [Cargill, Wayzata, MN (United States); Dorrington, Paul [Aquaflow Bionomic Corporation, Nelson (New Zealand); Stevens, James [Blue Marble Biomaterials, Missoula, MT (United States); Shonnard, David [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Maleche, Edwin [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States)

    2013-01-02

    Cellulosic and woody biomass can be directly converted to hydrocarbon gasoline and diesel blending components through the use of integrated hydropyrolysis plus hydroconversion (IH2). The IH2 gasoline and diesel blending components are fully compatible with petroleum based gasoline and diesel, contain less than 1% oxygen and have less than 1 total acid number (TAN). The IH2 gasoline is high quality and very close to a drop in fuel. The DOE funding enabled rapid development of the IH2 technology from initial proof-of-principle experiments through continuous testing in a 50 kg/day pilot plant. As part of this project, engineering work on IH2 has also been completed to design a 1 ton/day demonstration unit and a commercial-scale 2000 ton/day IH2 unit. These studies show when using IH2 technology, biomass can be converted directly to transportation quality fuel blending components for the same capital cost required for pyrolysis alone, and a fraction of the cost of pyrolysis plus upgrading of pyrolysis oil. Technoeconomic work for IH2 and lifecycle analysis (LCA) work has also been completed as part of this DOE study and shows IH2 technology can convert biomass to gasoline and diesel blending components for less than $2.00/gallon with greater than 90% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. As a result of the work completed in this DOE project, a joint development agreement was reached with CRI Catalyst Company to license the IH2 technology. Further larger-scale, continuous testing of IH2 will be required to fully demonstrate the technology, and funding for this is recommended. The IH2 biomass conversion technology would reduce U.S. dependence on foreign oil, reduce the price of transportation fuels, and significantly lower greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. It is a breakthrough for the widespread conversion of biomass to transportation fuels.

  17. Simultaneous determination of hydrocarbon renewable diesel, biodiesel and petroleum diesel contents in diesel fuel blends using near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy and chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Julio Cesar Laurentino; Poppi, Ronei Jesus

    2013-11-07

    Highly polluting fuels based on non-renewable resources such as fossil fuels need to be replaced with potentially less polluting renewable fuels derived from vegetable or animal biomass, these so-called biofuels, are a reality nowadays and many countries have started the challenge of increasing the use of different types of biofuels, such as ethanol and biodiesel (fatty acid alkyl esters), often mixed with petroleum derivatives, such as gasoline and diesel, respectively. The quantitative determination of these fuel blends using simple, fast and low cost methods based on near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy combined with chemometric methods has been reported. However, advanced biofuels based on a mixture of hydrocarbons or a single hydrocarbon molecule, such as farnesane (2,6,10-trimethyldodecane), a hydrocarbon renewable diesel, can also be used in mixtures with biodiesel and petroleum diesel fuel and the use of NIR spectroscopy for the quantitative determination of a ternary fuel blend of these two hydrocarbon-based fuels and biodiesel can be a useful tool for quality control. This work presents a development of an analytical method for the quantitative determination of hydrocarbon renewable diesel (farnesane), biodiesel and petroleum diesel fuel blends using NIR spectroscopy combined with chemometric methods, such as partial least squares (PLS) and support vector machines (SVM). This development leads to a more accurate, simpler, faster and cheaper method when compared to the standard reference method ASTM D6866 and with the main advantage of providing the individual quantification of two different biofuels in a mixture with petroleum diesel fuel. Using the developed PLS model the three fuel blend components were determined simultaneously with values of root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 0.25%, 0.19% and 0.38% for hydrocarbon renewable diesel, biodiesel and petroleum diesel, respectively, the values obtained were in agreement with those suggested by

  18. Emissions from Diesel and Gasoline Vehicles Fuelled by Fischer-Tropsch Fuels and Similar Fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ulrik; Lundorff, Peter; Ivarsson, Anders

    2007-01-01

    vehicles fuelled by Fischer Tropsch (FT) based diesel and gasoline fuel, compared to the emissions from ordinary diesel and gasoline. The comparison for diesel fuels was based on a literature review, whereas the gasoline comparison had to be based on our own experiments, since almost no references were...... and an alkylate fuel (Aspen), which was taken to be the ultimate formula of FT gasoline. FT based diesel generally showed good emission performance, whereas the FT based gasoline not necessary lead to lower emissions. On the other hand, the Aspen fuel did show many advantages for the emissions from the gasoline......The described investigation was carried out under the umbrella of IEA Advanced Motor Fuels Agreement. The purpose was to evaluate the emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), unburned hydrocarbons (HC), nitrogen oxides (NOx), particulate matter (PM) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from...

  19. Phytotoxicity of fresh and weathered diesel and gasoline to willow and poplar trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trapp, Stefan; Köhler, A.; Larsen, L.C.

    2001-01-01

    The toxicity of fresh and weathered gasoline and diesel fuel to willow and poplar trees was studied using a tree transpiration toxicity test. Soils were taken from an abandoned filling station. Concentrations in the samples were measured as the sum of hydrocarbons from C5 to C10 (gasoline) and C12...... to C28 (diesel). Concentrations ranged from 145 to 921 mg/kg gasoline and 143 to 18231 mg/kg diesel. The correlation between log soil concentration and toxicity to willows (Salix viminalis x schwerinii) was highly significant for the diesel fraction (r2=0.81, n=19) and for the sum of hydrocarbons (r2...... diesel and gasoline contaminated soils, and two willow and one poplar species (S. viminalis, S. alba and Populus nigra). Fresh diesel at about 1000 mg/kg showed no effect on S. alba, although P. nigra was more sensitive. 10000 mg/kg seriously affected the transpiration of all species, silver willow (S...

  20. Quinone emissions from gasoline and diesel motor vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakober, Chris A; Riddle, Sarah G; Robert, Michael A; Destaillats, Hugo; Charles, M Judith; Green, Peter G; Kleeman, Michael J

    2007-07-01

    Gas- and particle-phase emissions from gasoline and diesel vehicles operated on chassis dynamometers were collected using annular denuders, quartz filters, and PUF substrates. Quinone species were measured using O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine derivatization in conjunction with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Nine quinones were observed, ranging from C6 to C16. New species identified in motor vehicle exhaust include methyl-1,4-benzoquinone, 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (MNQN), and aceanthrenequinone. Gas-phase motor vehicle emissions of quinones are also reported for the first time. Six gas-phase quinones were quantified with emission rates of 2-28 000 microg L(-1) fuel consumed. The most abundant gas-phase quinones were 1,4-benzoquinone (BON) and MNQN. The gas-phase fraction was > or = 69% of quinone mass for light-duty gasoline emissions, and > or = 84% for heavy-duty diesel emissions. Eight particle-phase quinones were observed between 2 and 1600 microg L(-1), with BQN the most abundant species followed by 9,10-phenanthrenequinone and 1,2-naphthoquinone. Current particle-phase quinone measurements agree well with the few available previous results. Further research is needed concerning the gas-particle partitioning behavior of quinones in ambient and combustion source conditions.

  1. Molecular hydrogen (H2) emissions from gasoline and diesel vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, S W; Alvarez, R; Vollmer, M K; Steinbacher, M; Weilenmann, M; Reimann, S

    2010-08-01

    This study assesses individual-vehicle molecular hydrogen (H2) emissions in exhaust gas from current gasoline and diesel vehicles measured on a chassis dynamometer. Absolute H2 emissions were found to be highest for motorcycles and scooters (141+/-38.6 mg km(-1)), approximately 5 times higher than for gasoline-powered automobiles (26.5+/-12.1 mg km(-1)). All diesel-powered vehicles emitted marginal amounts of H2 ( approximately 0.1 mg km(-1)). For automobiles, the highest emission factors were observed for sub-cycles subject to a cold-start (mean of 53.1+/-17.0 mg km(-1)). High speeds also caused elevated H2 emission factors for sub-cycles reaching at least 150 km h(-1) (mean of 40.4+/-7.1 mg km(-1)). We show that H2/CO ratios (mol mol(-1)) from gasoline-powered vehicles are variable (sub-cycle means of 0.44-5.69) and are typically higher (mean for automobiles 1.02, for 2-wheelers 0.59) than previous atmospheric ratios characteristic of traffic-influenced measurements. The lowest mean individual sub-cycle ratios, which correspond to high absolute emissions of both H2 and CO, were observed during cold starts (for automobiles 0.48, for 2-wheelers 0.44) and at high vehicle speeds (for automobiles 0.73, for 2-wheelers 0.45). This finding illustrates the importance of these conditions to observed H2/CO ratios in ambient air. Overall, 2-wheelers displayed lower H2/CO ratios (0.48-0.69) than those from gasoline-powered automobiles (0.75-3.18). This observation, along with the lower H2/CO ratios observed through studies without catalytic converters, suggests that less developed (e.g. 2-wheelers) and older vehicle technologies are largely responsible for the atmospheric H2/CO ratios reported in past literature. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Volatile organic compounds emissions from gasoline and diesel powered vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mugica, V [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Vega, E; Sanchez, G; Reyes, E; Arriaga, J. L [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Chow, J; Watson, J; Egami, R [Desert Research Institute, Reno, NV (United States)

    2001-01-01

    In this research, volatile organic compound emissions were characterized from gasoline and diesel vehicles. Sampling campaigns in the Metropolitan Area of Mexico City were designed and carried out in tunnels, crossroads, and truck and bus terminals. The samples were analyzed with gas chromatography getting more than 250 different compounds, being more or less 60 of them the 80% of all the emissions. The most abundant are the two carbon compounds, as a result of the combustion, and compounds related to fuels compositions, like isopentane, xylenes, toluene among others. The profiles obtained in tunnels and crossroads were very similar with the exception of the 3 and 4 carbon compounds, which were found in bigger proportion in the profiles at crossroads. This may probably be due to the blend with the ambient air. The profiles corresponding to trucks and buses have a smaller content of two carbon compounds and a bigger content of xylenes, toluene and ethylbenzene. The variations in the proportions of the compounds allow differentiating the profiles of vehicles using gasoline and diesel. [Spanish] En este trabajo se caracterizaron las emisiones de compuestos organicos volatiles provenientes de vehiculos a gasolina y a diesel. Para ello, se disenaron diversas campanas de muestreo en la zona Metropolitana de la Ciudad de Mexico, en tuneles, cruceros y estaciones de camiones de carga y autobuses. Las muestras se analizaron con cromatografia, de gases obteniendose mas de 250 compuestos distintos, de los cuales aproximadamente 60 corresponden a mas del 80% de las emisiones. Los compuestos mas abundantes son los de dos carbonos, resultado de la combustion, y 4 carbonos que se encontraron en mayor proporcion en los perfiles de cruceros, lo cual se debe probablemente a la mezcla con el aire ambiente. Los perfiles correspondientes a camiones de carga y autobuses tienen un menor contenido de compuestos de dos carbonos y un mayor contenido de xilenos, tolueno y etilbenceno. Estas

  3. Long Term Processing Using Integrated Hydropyrolysis plus Hydroconversion (IH2) for the Production of Gasoline and Diesel from Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marker, Terry [Gas Technology Institute; Roberts, Michael [Gas Technology Institute; Linck, Martin [Gas Technology Institute; Felix, Larry [Gas Technology Institute; Ortiz-Toral, Pedro [Gas Technology Institute; Wangerow, Jim [Gas Technology Institute; McLeod, Celeste [CRI Catalyst; Del Paggio, Alan [CRI Catalyst; Gephart, John [Johnson Timber; Starr, Jack [Cargill; Hahn, John [Cargill

    2013-06-09

    Cellulosic and woody biomass can be directly converted to hydrocarbon gasoline and diesel blending components through the use of a new, economical, technology named integrated hydropyrolysis plus hydroconversion (IH2). The IH2 gasoline and diesel blending components are fully compatible with petroleum based gasoline and diesel, contain less than 1% oxygen and have less than 1 total acid number (TAN). The IH2 gasoline is high quality and very close to a drop in fuel. The life cycle analysis (LCA) shows that the use of the IH2 process to convert wood to gasoline and diesel results in a greater than 90% reduction in greenhouse gas emission compared to that found with fossil derived fuels. The technoeconomic analysis showed the conversion of wood using the IH2 process can produce gasoline and diesel at less than $2.00/gallon. In this project, the previously reported semi-continuous small scale IH2 test results were confirmed in a continuous 50 kg/day pilot plant. The continuous IH2 pilot plant used in this project was operated round the clock for over 750 hours and showed good pilot plant operability while consistently producing 26-28 wt % yields of high quality gasoline and diesel product. The IH2 catalyst showed good stability, although more work on catalyst stability is recommended. Additional work is needed to commercialize the IH2 technology including running large particle size biomass, modeling the hydropyrolysis step, studying the effects of process variables and building and operating a 1-50 ton/day demonstration scale plant. The IH2 is a true game changing technology by utilizing U.S. domestic renewable biomass resources to create transportation fuels, sufficient in quantity and quality to substantially reduce our reliance on foreign crude oil. Thus, the IH2 technology offers a path to genuine energy independence for the U. S., along with the creation of a significant number of new U.S. jobs to plant, grow, harvest, and process biomass crops into fungible

  4. Gasoline cars produce more carbonaceous particulate matter than modern filter-equipped diesel cars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, S M; El Haddad, I; Pieber, S M; Zardini, A A; Suarez-Bertoa, R; Clairotte, M; Daellenbach, K R; Huang, R-J; Slowik, J G; Hellebust, S; Temime-Roussel, B; Marchand, N; de Gouw, J; Jimenez, J L; Hayes, P L; Robinson, A L; Baltensperger, U; Astorga, C; Prévôt, A S H

    2017-07-13

    Carbonaceous particulate matter (PM), comprising black carbon (BC), primary organic aerosol (POA) and secondary organic aerosol (SOA, from atmospheric aging of precursors), is a highly toxic vehicle exhaust component. Therefore, understanding vehicle pollution requires knowledge of both primary emissions, and how these emissions age in the atmosphere. We provide a systematic examination of carbonaceous PM emissions and parameterisation of SOA formation from modern diesel and gasoline cars at different temperatures (22, -7 °C) during controlled laboratory experiments. Carbonaceous PM emission and SOA formation is markedly higher from gasoline than diesel particle filter (DPF) and catalyst-equipped diesel cars, more so at -7 °C, contrasting with nitrogen oxides (NOX). Higher SOA formation from gasoline cars and primary emission reductions for diesels implies gasoline cars will increasingly dominate vehicular total carbonaceous PM, though older non-DPF-equipped diesels will continue to dominate the primary fraction for some time. Supported by state-of-the-art source apportionment of ambient fossil fuel derived PM, our results show that whether gasoline or diesel cars are more polluting depends on the pollutant in question, i.e. that diesel cars are not necessarily worse polluters than gasoline cars.

  5. Carbonyl Emissions from Gasoline and Diesel Motor Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Destaillats, Hugo; Jakober, Chris A.; Robert, Michael A.; Riddle, Sarah G.; Destaillats, Hugo; Charles, M. Judith; Green, Peter G.; Kleeman, Michael J.

    2007-12-01

    Carbonyls from gasoline powered light-duty vehicles (LDVs) and heavy-duty diesel powered vehicles (HDDVs) operated on chassis dynamometers were measured using an annular denuder-quartz filter-polyurethane foam sampler with O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine derivatization and chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses. Two internal standards were utilized based on carbonyl recovery, 4-fluorobenzaldehyde for_C8 compounds. Gas- and particle-phase emissions for 39 aliphatic and 20 aromatic carbonyls ranged from 0.1 ? 2000 ?g/L fuel for LDVs and 1.8 - 27000 mu g/L fuel for HDDVs. Gas-phase species accounted for 81-95percent of the total carbonyls from LDVs and 86-88percent from HDDVs. Particulate carbonyls emitted from a HDDV under realistic driving conditions were similar to concentrations measured in a diesel particulate matter (PM) standard reference material. Carbonyls accounted for 19percent of particulate organic carbon (POC) emissions from low-emission LDVs and 37percent of POC emissions from three-way catalyst equipped LDVs. This identifies carbonyls as one of the largest classes of compounds in LDV PM emissions. The carbonyl fraction of HDDV POC was lower, 3.3-3.9percent depending upon operational conditions. Partitioning analysis indicates the carbonyls had not achieved equilibrium between the gas- and particle-phase under the dilution factors of 126-584 used in the current study.

  6. Performance comparison of autothermal reforming for liquid hydrocarbons, gasoline and diesel for fuel cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Inyong; Bae, Joongmyeon; Bae, Gyujong

    This paper discusses the reforming of liquid hydrocarbons to produce hydrogen for fuel cell applications, focusing on gasoline and diesel due to their high hydrogen density and well-established infrastructures. Gasoline and diesel are composed of numerous hydrocarbon species including paraffins, olefins, cycloparaffins, and aromatics. We have investigated the reforming characteristics of several representative liquid hydrocarbons. In the case of paraffin reforming, H 2 yield and reforming efficiency were close to thermodynamic equilibrium status (TES), although heavier hydrocarbons required slightly higher temperatures than lighter hydrocarbons. However, the conversion efficiency was much lower for aromatics than paraffins with similar carbon number. We have also investigated the reforming performance of simulated commercial diesel and gasoline using simple synthetic diesel and gasoline compositions. Reforming performances of our formulations were in good agreement with those of commercial fuels. In addition, the reforming of gas to liquid (GTL) resulted in high H 2 yield and reforming efficiency showing promise for possible fuel cell applications.

  7. Production of Gasoline and Diesel from Biomass via Fast Pyrolysis, Hydrotreating and Hydrocracking: A Design Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Valkenburt, Corinne; Walton, Christie W.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Stevens, Don J.; Kinchin, Christopher; Czernik, Stefan

    2009-02-25

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate a processing pathway for converting biomass into infrastructure-compatible hydrocarbon biofuels. This design case investigates production of fast pyrolysis oil from biomass and the upgrading of that bio-oil as a means for generating infrastructure-ready renewable gasoline and diesel fuels. This study has been conducted using similar methodology and underlying basis assumptions as the previous design cases for ethanol. The overall concept and specific processing steps were selected because significant data on this approach exists in the public literature. The analysis evaluates technology that has been demonstrated at the laboratory scale or is in early stages of commercialization. The fast pyrolysis of biomass is already at an early stage of commercialization, while upgrading bio-oil to transportation fuels has only been demonstrated in the laboratory and at small engineering development scale. Advanced methods of pyrolysis, which are under development, are not evaluated in this study. These may be the subject of subsequent analysis by OBP. The plant is designed to use 2000 dry metric tons/day of hybrid poplar wood chips to produce 76 million gallons/year of gasoline and diesel. The processing steps include: 1.Feed drying and size reduction 2.Fast pyrolysis to a highly oxygenated liquid product 3.Hydrotreating of the fast pyrolysis oil to a stable hydrocarbon oil with less than 2% oxygen 4.Hydrocracking of the heavy portion of the stable hydrocarbon oil 5.Distillation of the hydrotreated and hydrocracked oil into gasoline and diesel fuel blendstocks 6. Hydrogen production to support the hydrotreater reactors. The "as received" feedstock to the pyrolysis plant will be "reactor ready". This development will likely further decrease the cost of producing the fuel. An important sensitivity is the possibility of co-locating the plant with an existing refinery. In this case, the plant consists only of the first three steps: feed

  8. Production of Gasoline and Diesel from Biomass via Fast Pyrolysis, Hydrotreating and Hydrocracking: A Design Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Valkenburt, Corinne; Walton, Christie W.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Stevens, Don J.; Kinchin, Christopher; Czernik, Stefan

    2009-02-28

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate a processing pathway for converting biomass into infrastructure-compatible hydrocarbon biofuels. This design case investigates production of fast pyrolysis oil from biomass and the upgrading of that bio-oil as a means for generating infrastructure-ready renewable gasoline and diesel fuels. This study has been conducted using the same methodology and underlying basis assumptions as the previous design cases for ethanol. The overall concept and specific processing steps were selected because significant data on this approach exists in the public literature. The analysis evaluates technology that has been demonstrated at the laboratory scale or is in early stages of commercialization. The fast pyrolysis of biomass is already at an early stage of commercialization, while upgrading bio-oil to transportation fuels has only been demonstrated in the laboratory and at small engineering development scale. Advanced methods of pyrolysis, which are under development, are not evaluated in this study. These may be the subject of subsequent analysis by OBP. The plant is designed to use 2000 dry metric tons/day of hybrid poplar wood chips to produce 76 million gallons/year of gasoline and diesel. The processing steps include: 1.Feed drying and size reduction 2.Fast pyrolysis to a highly oxygenated liquid product 3.Hydrotreating of the fast pyrolysis oil to a stable hydrocarbon oil with less than 2% oxygen 4.Hydrocracking of the heavy portion of the stable hydrocarbon oil 5.Distillation of the hydrotreated and hydrocracked oil into gasoline and diesel fuel blendstocks 6. Hydrogen production to support the hydrotreater reactors. The “as received” feedstock to the pyrolysis plant will be “reactor ready.” This development will likely further decrease the cost of producing the fuel. An important sensitivity is the possibility of co-locating the plant with an existing refinery. In this case, the plant consists only of the first three steps

  9. Production of Gasoline and Diesel from Biomass via Fast Pyrolysis, Hydrotreating and Hydrocracking: A Design Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Valkenburt, Corinne; Walton, Christie W.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Stevens, Don J.; Kinchin, Christopher; Czernik, Stefan

    2009-02-28

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate a processing pathway for converting biomass into infrastructure-compatible hydrocarbon biofuels. This design case investigates production of fast pyrolysis oil from biomass and the upgrading of that bio-oil as a means for generating infrastructure-ready renewable gasoline and diesel fuels. This study has been conducted using the same methodology and underlying basis assumptions as the previous design cases for ethanol. The overall concept and specific processing steps were selected because significant data on this approach exists in the public literature. The analysis evaluates technology that has been demonstrated at the laboratory scale or is in early stages of commercialization. The fast pyrolysis of biomass is already at an early stage of commercialization, while upgrading bio-oil to transportation fuels has only been demonstrated in the laboratory and at small engineering development scale. Advanced methods of pyrolysis, which are under development, are not evaluated in this study. These may be the subject of subsequent analysis by OBP. The plant is designed to use 2000 dry metric tons/day of hybrid poplar wood chips to produce 76 million gallons/year of gasoline and diesel. The processing steps include: 1.Feed drying and size reduction 2.Fast pyrolysis to a highly oxygenated liquid product 3.Hydrotreating of the fast pyrolysis oil to a stable hydrocarbon oil with less than 2% oxygen 4.Hydrocracking of the heavy portion of the stable hydrocarbon oil 5.Distillation of the hydrotreated and hydrocracked oil into gasoline and diesel fuel blendstocks 6. Hydrogen production to support the hydrotreater reactors. The “as received” feedstock to the pyrolysis plant will be “reactor ready.” This development will likely further decrease the cost of producing the fuel. An important sensitivity is the possibility of co-locating the plant with an existing refinery. In this case, the plant consists only of the first three steps

  10. Production of Gasoline and Diesel from Biomass via Fast Pyrolysis, Hydrotreating and Hydrocracking: A Design Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Valkenburt, Corinne; Walton, Christie W.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Stevens, Don J.; Kinchin, Christopher; Czernik, Stefan

    2009-02-25

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate a processing pathway for converting biomass into infrastructure-compatible hydrocarbon biofuels. This design case investigates production of fast pyrolysis oil from biomass and the upgrading of that bio-oil as a means for generating infrastructure-ready renewable gasoline and diesel fuels. This study has been conducted using similar methodology and underlying basis assumptions as the previous design cases for ethanol. The overall concept and specific processing steps were selected because significant data on this approach exists in the public literature. The analysis evaluates technology that has been demonstrated at the laboratory scale or is in early stages of commercialization. The fast pyrolysis of biomass is already at an early stage of commercialization, while upgrading bio-oil to transportation fuels has only been demonstrated in the laboratory and at small engineering development scale. Advanced methods of pyrolysis, which are under development, are not evaluated in this study. These may be the subject of subsequent analysis by OBP. The plant is designed to use 2000 dry metric tons/day of hybrid poplar wood chips to produce 76 million gallons/year of gasoline and diesel. The processing steps include: 1.Feed drying and size reduction 2.Fast pyrolysis to a highly oxygenated liquid product 3.Hydrotreating of the fast pyrolysis oil to a stable hydrocarbon oil with less than 2% oxygen 4.Hydrocracking of the heavy portion of the stable hydrocarbon oil 5.Distillation of the hydrotreated and hydrocracked oil into gasoline and diesel fuel blendstocks 6. Hydrogen production to support the hydrotreater reactors. The "as received" feedstock to the pyrolysis plant will be "reactor ready". This development will likely further decrease the cost of producing the fuel. An important sensitivity is the possibility of co-locating the plant with an existing refinery. In this case, the plant consists only of the first three steps: feed

  11. 40 CFR 80.8 - Sampling methods for gasoline and diesel fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sampling methods for gasoline and... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES General Provisions § 80.8 Sampling methods for gasoline and diesel fuel. The sampling methods specified in this section shall be used to collect...

  12. Phytotoxicity of fresh and weathered diesel and gasoline to willow and poplar trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trapp, Stefan; Köhler, A.; Larsen, L.C.

    2001-01-01

    The toxicity of fresh and weathered gasoline and diesel fuel to willow and poplar trees was studied using a tree transpiration toxicity test. Soils were taken from an abandoned filling station. Concentrations in the samples were measured as the sum of hydrocarbons from C5 to C10 (gasoline) and C1...

  13. Climate effects of emission standards: the case for gasoline and diesel cars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Katsumasa; Berntsen, Terje; Fuglestvedt, Jan S; Rypdal, Kristin

    2012-05-01

    Passenger transport affects climate through various mechanisms involving both long-lived and short-lived climate forcers. Because diesel cars generally emit less CO(2) than gasoline cars, CO(2) emission taxes for vehicle registrations and fuels enhance the consumer preference for diesel cars over gasoline cars. However, with the non-CO(2) components, which have been changed and will be changed under the previous and upcoming vehicle emission standards, what does the shift from gasoline to diesel cars mean for the climate mitigation? By using a simple climate model, we demonstrate that, under the earlier emissions standards (EURO 3 and 4), a diesel car causes a larger warming up to a decade after the emissions than a similar gasoline car due to the higher emissions of black carbon and NO(X) (enhancing the O(3) production). Beyond a decade, the warming caused by a diesel car becomes, however, weaker because of the lower CO(2) emissions. As the latter emissions standards (EURO 5 and 6) are phased in, the short-term warming due to a diesel car becomes smaller primarily due to the lower black carbon emissions. Thus, although results are subject to restrictive assumptions and uncertainties, the switch from gasoline to diesel cars encouraged by CO(2) taxes does not contradict with the climate mitigation focusing on long-term consequences. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  14. Elucidating secondary organic aerosol from diesel and gasoline vehicles through detailed characterization of organic carbon emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentner, Drew R.; Isaacman, Gabriel; Worton, David R.; Chan, Arthur W. H.; Dallmann, Timothy R.; Davis, Laura; Liu, Shang; Day, Douglas A.; Russell, Lynn M.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Weber, Robin; Guha, Abhinav; Harley, Robert A.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2012-01-01

    Emissions from gasoline and diesel vehicles are predominant anthropogenic sources of reactive gas-phase organic carbon and key precursors to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in urban areas. Their relative importance for aerosol formation is a controversial issue with implications for air quality control policy and public health. We characterize the chemical composition, mass distribution, and organic aerosol formation potential of emissions from gasoline and diesel vehicles, and find diesel exhaust is seven times more efficient at forming aerosol than gasoline exhaust. However, both sources are important for air quality; depending on a region’s fuel use, diesel is responsible for 65% to 90% of vehicular-derived SOA, with substantial contributions from aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. Including these insights on source characterization and SOA formation will improve regional pollution control policies, fuel regulations, and methodologies for future measurement, laboratory, and modeling studies. PMID:23091031

  15. A Dynamic Model for Road Gasoline and Diesel Consumption: An Application for Spanish Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Marina González Marrero

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the factors explaining the aggregate fuel consumption for road transport in Spain in a dynamic panel data framework. Three features on this study are the use of a balanced panel using regional data, the distinction between gasoline and diesel and the specification of a dynamic panel data (DPD model and estimate it by system Generalized Methods of Moments (GMM. Our results show that most explanatory variables are significant in explaining the evolution of gasoline consumption, while diesel consumption is found to be independent of most of these factors. The differences between the markets of the gasoline (most for passenger transport use and the diesel (passenger and freight transport are important could explain the results for the diesel model. Moreover, the intensive dieselization process that has taken place in Spain over the last decade, which has resulted in diesel consumption being exposed to factors - i.e., regulatory - which are not of a strictly economic nature. This finding highlights the need to consider different explanatory variables and models for gasoline and diesel consumption, and to go further in the research. Finally, we find that traditional estimation procedures, such as fixed and random effect estimators, produce important differences with respect to system-GMM, which may even change policy recommendations.

  16. Emissions from Road Vehicles Fuelled by Fischer Tropsch Based Diesel and Gasoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, U.; Lundorf, P.; Ivarsson, A.; Schramm, J. [Technical University of Denmark (Denmark); Rehnlund, B. [Atrax Energi AB (Sweden); Blinge, M. [The Swedish Transport Institute (Sweden)

    2006-11-15

    The described results were carried out under the umbrella of IEA Advanced Motor Fuels Agreement. The purpose was to evaluate the emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), unburned hydrocarbons (HC), nitrogen oxides (NOx), particulate matter (PM) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from vehicles fuelled by Fischer Tropsch (FT) based diesel and gasoline fuel, compared to the emissions from ordinary diesel and gasoline. The comparison for diesel fuels was based on a literature review, whereas the gasoline comparison had to be based on our own experiments, since almost no references were found in this field. In this context measurement according to the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) and the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) were carried out on a chassis dynamometer with a directly injected gasoline vehicle. Experiments were carried out with a reference fuel, a fuel based 70% on FT and an alkylate fuel (Aspen), which was supposed to be very similar, in many ways, to FT fuel. FT based diesel generally showed good emission performance, whereas the FT based gasoline not necessary lead to lower emissions. On the other hand, the Aspen fuel did show many advantages for the emissions from the gasoline vehicle.

  17. Emissions from Road Vehicles Fuelled by Fischer Tropsch Based Diesel and Gasoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, U.; Lundorf, P.; Ivarsson, A.; Schramm, J. [Technical University of Denmark (Denmark); Rehnlund, B. [Atrax Energi AB (Sweden); Blinge, M. [The Swedish Transport Institute (Sweden)

    2006-11-15

    The described results were carried out under the umbrella of IEA Advanced Motor Fuels Agreement. The purpose was to evaluate the emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), unburned hydrocarbons (HC), nitrogen oxides (NOx), particulate matter (PM) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from vehicles fuelled by Fischer Tropsch (FT) based diesel and gasoline fuel, compared to the emissions from ordinary diesel and gasoline. The comparison for diesel fuels was based on a literature review, whereas the gasoline comparison had to be based on our own experiments, since almost no references were found in this field. In this context measurement according to the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) and the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) were carried out on a chassis dynamometer with a directly injected gasoline vehicle. Experiments were carried out with a reference fuel, a fuel based 70% on FT and an alkylate fuel (Aspen), which was supposed to be very similar, in many ways, to FT fuel. FT based diesel generally showed good emission performance, whereas the FT based gasoline not necessary lead to lower emissions. On the other hand, the Aspen fuel did show many advantages for the emissions from the gasoline vehicle.

  18. Analysis of physicochemical properties of Mexican gasoline and diesel reformulated with ethanol; Analisis de las propiedades fisicoquimicas de gasolina y diesel mexicanos reformulados con etanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo-Hernandez, Patricia; Mendoza-Dominguez, Alberto; Caballero-Mata, Porfirio [Tecnologico de Monterrey, Campus Monterrey, Nuevo Leon (Mexico)]. E-mails: pcastillohdz@gmail.com; mendoza.alberto@itesm.mx; pcaballe@itesm.mx

    2012-07-15

    High energy prices, environmental issues and increasing importation of fossil fuels has provoked, in some countries, a reorientation of resources towards the development of biofuels that can partially substitute the consumption of fossil fuels. Ethanol is one of the biofuels more commonly used in the world; in the United States, Brazil and Australia gasoline blends that reach up to 85% Ethanol are commercialized. This work presents the results of a physicochemical characterization of commercial Mexican gasoline (Magna and Premium) and diesel blends with 10% vol. and 15% vol. anhydrous Ethanol. The analytical testing included: Research Octane Number, Motor Octane Number, Cetane Number, Reid Vapor Pressure, Distillation Curve and Heating Value. The stability of the blends was also evaluated. The theoretical emissions of CO{sub 2} were calculated based on the results of the physicochemical characterization. The ethanol-gasoline blends increased their Octane Number with respect to the commercial gasoline, while conserving an appropriate Distillation Index. The Cetane Number of the ethanol-diesel blends showed a substantial decrease, while the heating value of gasoline and diesel blends was negatively affected by the addition of ethanol. Nevertheless, taking into account the credits by the use of a renewable fuel, the use of the reformulated gasoline blends would imply a maximum theoretical reduction of 7.5% in CO{sub 2} emissions whereas in the case of ethanol-diesel blends it would represent a 9.2% decrease. [Spanish] Los altos precios de los energeticos, la problematica ambiental y las importaciones de combustibles continuamente a la alza, han ocasionado que algunos paises redirijan sus esfuerzos al desarrollo de biocombustibles con la finalidad de sustituir parcialmente a los combustibles fosiles. El Etanol es uno de los biocombustibles mas usados; Estados Unidos, Brasil y Australia comercializan gasolina con Etanol con una concentracion de hasta 85% en volumen. El

  19. HYDROGENATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR PROD—UCTION OF CLEAN GASOLINE AND DIESEL FUEL IN RIPP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIEHong; SHIYa-hua; SHIYu-lin; KANGXiao-hong; LIDa-dong

    2003-01-01

    It is necessary to produce low sulfur /low olefin gasoline and low sulfur /low aromatics diesel fuel for reducing the air pollution from automobile exhausted gas.Major component in gasoline pool in China is from FCCU,resulting in higher olefin content in product gasoline.The difficult point in producing clean gasoline is to lower down the olefin content while retaining RON of gasoline as much as possible.Based on the properties of gasoline,RIPP has developed technology(RIDOS) for reducing both sulfur and olefin contents by the same process.The technology shows that its hy-dro-iso-cracking performance to some extent can reduce the olefin content from 50%-60% to less than 20%,and road octane loss is less than 2.In deep hydro-desulfurization of diesel fuel,the key than 20%,and road octane loss is less than 2.In deep hydro-desulfurization of diesel fuel,the key point is to remove dibenzhothiophen(DBT)with methyl substitute in 4 and 6 positions.To solve this problem,RN-10 catalyst with high hydrogenation activity was developed by reinforcing the hydrogenation function.The catalyst featured with less spatial hindrance effect after the DMDBT was hydrogenated,meanwhile ,it has high activity in aromatics saturation.Diesel fuel with low sulfur and low aromatics content can be manufactured from SRGO or FCC diesel fraction.RIPP has developed more technologies such as MHUG,RMC and RICH for production of clean diesel fuel with low sulfur/aromatics and low density with increased cetane number.

  20. Particulate emissions from road transportation (gasoline and diesel). Chemical and granulometric characteristics; relative contribution; Emissions particulaires par les transports routiers (essence et diesel) caracteristiques chimiques et granulometriques contribution relative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belot, G. [PSA-Peugiot-Citroen, 92 - La Garenne-Colombes (France)

    1996-12-31

    The formation process and chemical composition of diesel, leaded and lead-free gasoline combustion particulates are presented, and the effects of engine technology, post-treatments (oxidative catalysis), automobile speed and fuel type (more especially diesel type), on the granulometry of gasoline and diesel automotive particulates are studied. The emission contributions from the various diesel vehicle types (automobiles, trucks, buses), gasoline and diesel automobiles and other natural and anthropogenic particulate sources, are presented and compared

  1. Concentric camshaft system for gasoline and diesel engines; Konzentrische Verstellnockenwellen fuer Otto- und Dieselmotoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyatt, Steve [BorgWarner Morse TEC, Auburn Hills, MI (United States); Joergl, Volker; Becker, Michael [BorgWarner, Ludwigsburg (Germany); Stapelmann, Andreas [ThyssenKrupp Presta Camshafts Gruppe, Chemnitz (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    BorgWarner and ThyssenKrupp Presta have jointly developed a system of phaser and adjustable concentric camshafts that are applicable to both diesel and gasoline engines. Comprehensive simulation work and experimental investigations on an engine dyno have proven considerable potential for reducing emissions and improving fuel consumption. (orig.)

  2. Design Case Summary: Production of Gasoline and Diesel from Biomass via Fast Pyrolysis, Hydrotreating, and Hydrocracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, S. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Valkenburg, C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Walkton, C. W. [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States); Elliott, D. C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Holladay, J. E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stevens, D. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kinchin, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Czernik, S. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2010-02-01

    The Biomass Program develops design cases to understand the current state of conversion technologies and to determine where improvements need to take place in the future. This design case is the first to establish detailed cost targest for the production of diesel and gasoline blendstock from biomass via a fast pyrolysis process.

  3. Life Cycle Assessment of Gasoline and Diesel Produced via Fast Pyrolysis and Hydroprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, D. D.

    2011-03-01

    In this work, a life cycle assessment (LCA) estimating greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and net energy value (NEV) of the production of gasoline and diesel from forest residues via fast pyrolysis and hydroprocessing, from production of the feedstock to end use of the fuel in a vehicle, is performed. The fast pyrolysis and hydrotreating and hydrocracking processes are based on a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) design report. The LCA results show GHG emissions of 0.142 kg CO2-equiv. per km traveled and NEV of 1.00 MJ per km traveled for a process using grid electricity. Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis shows a range of results, with all values better than those of conventional gasoline in 2005. Results for GHG emissions and NEV of gasoline and diesel from pyrolysis are also reported on a per MJ fuel basis for comparison with ethanol produced via gasification. Although pyrolysis-derived gasoline and diesel have lower GHG emissions and higher NEV than conventional gasoline does in 2005, they underperform ethanol produced via gasification from the same feedstock. GHG emissions for pyrolysis could be lowered further if electricity and hydrogen are produced from biomass instead of from fossil sources.

  4. Carbonyl and nitrogen dioxide emissions from gasoline- and diesel-powered motor vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban-Weiss, George A; McLaughlin, John P; Harley, Robert A; Kean, Andrew J; Grosjean, Eric; Grosjean, Daniel

    2008-06-01

    Carbonyls can be toxic and highly reactive in the atmosphere. To quantify trends in carbonyl emissions from light-duty (LD) vehicles, measurements were made in a San Francisco Bay area highwaytunnel bore containing essentially all LD vehicles during the summers of 1999, 2001, and 2006. The LD vehicle emission factor for formaldehyde, the most abundant carbonyl, did not change between 1999 and 2001, then decreased by 61 +/- 7% between 2001 and 2006. This reduction was due to fleet turnover and the removal of MTBE from gasoline. Acetaldehyde emissions decreased by 19 +/- 2% between 1999 and 2001 and by the same amount between 2001 and 2006. Absent the increased use of ethanol in gasoline after 2003, acetaldehyde emissions would have further decreased by 2006. Carbonyl emission factors for medium- (MD) and heavy-duty (HD) diesel trucks were measured in 2006 in a separate mixed-traffic bore of the tunnel. Emission factors for diesel trucks were higher than those for LD vehicles for all reported carbonyls. Diesel engine exhaust dominates over gasoline engines as a direct source of carbonyl emissions in California. Carbonyl concentrations were also measured in liquid-gasoline samples and were found to be low (gasoline brands that contained ethanol showed higher concentrations of acetaldehyde in unburned fuel versus gasoline that was formulated without ethanol. Measurements of NO2 showed a yearly rate of decrease for LD vehicle emissions similar to that of total NOx in this study. The observed NO2/NOx ratio was 1.2 +/- 0.3% and 3.7 +/- 0.3% for LD vehicles and diesel trucks, respectively.

  5. Comparative Toxicity of Combined Particle and Semi-Volatile Organic Fractions of Gasoline and Diesel Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauderly, Joe; Seagrave, JeanClare; McDonald, Jacob; Gigliotti,Andrew; Nikula, Kristen; Seilkop, Steven; Gurevich, Michael

    2002-08-25

    Little is known about the relative health hazards presented by emissions from in-use gasoline and diesel engines. Adverse health effects have been ascribed to engine emissions on the basis of: (1) the presence of known toxic agents in emissions; (2) high-dose animal and bacterial mutagenicity tests; and (3) studies indicating gradients of health effects with proximity to roadways. Most attention has been given to the particulate fraction of emissions; little attention has been given to the semi-volatile organic fraction. However, the semi-volatile fraction overlaps the particulate fraction in composition and is always present in the vicinity of fresh emissions. Although the potential health effects of diesel emissions have been frequently studied and debated during the past 20 years (EPA, 2002), relatively little attention has been given to the toxicity of emissions from gasoline engines. In view of the considerable progress in cleaning up diesel emissions, it would be useful to compare the toxicity of emissions from contemporary on-road diesel technology with that of emissions from the in-use gasoline fleet that is well-accepted by the public. It would also be useful to have a set of validated tests for rapid, cost-effective comparisons of the toxicity of emission samples, both for comparisons among competing technologies (e.g., diesel, gasoline, natural gas) and for determining the impacts of new fuel, engine, and after-treatment strategies on toxicity. The Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies has sponsored research aimed at developing and applying rapid-response toxicity tests for collected emission samples (Seagrave et al., 2000). This report presents selected results from that work, which is being published in much greater detail in the peer-reviewed literature (Seagrave et al., 2002).

  6. Chemical Transport Model Simulations of Organic Aerosol in Southern California: Model Evaluation and Gasoline and Diesel Source Contributions

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Gasoline- and diesel-fueled engines are ubiquitous sources of air pollution in urban environments. They emit both primary particulate matter and precursor gases that...

  7. Chemical characteristics and oxidative potential of particulate matter emissions from gasoline, diesel, and biodiesel cars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Ka Lam; Polidori, Andrea; Ntziachristos, Leonidas; Tzamkiozis, Theodoros; Samaras, Zissis; Cassee, Flemming R; Gerlofs, Miriam; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2009-08-15

    Three light-duty vehicles in five different configurations [a Honda Accord operating with diesel with a closed-coupled oxidation catalyst and an underfloor catalyst replaced in some tests with a diesel particle filter (DPF), a Toyota Corolla operating with gasoline, and a VW Golf alternatively operating with petrodiesel or biodiesel] were tested in a dynamometer facility to develop an improved understanding of the factors affecting the toxicity of particulate exhaust emissions. The vehicles were tested using a variety of real-world driving cycles, more than the certification test (New European Driving Cycle). Particle samples were collected and analyzed for elemental and organic carbon (EC and OC, respectively), water soluble and water insoluble organic carbon (WSOC and WISOC, respectively), and inorganic ions, and the emission rates (mg/km) for each vehicle/configuration were determined. A dithiothreitol (DTT) assay was used to assess the oxidative potential of the particulate matter (PM) samples. The DPF-equipped diesel and gasoline vehicles were characterized by the lowest overall PM mass emissions, while the diesel and biodiesel cars produced the most potent exhaust in terms of oxidative activity. When the DPF was fitted on the Honda Accord diesel vehicle, the mass emission rates and distance-based oxidative potential were both decreased by 98%, compared to the original configuration. Correlation analysis showed that the DTT consumption rate was highly associated with WSOC, WISOC, and OC (R = 0.98, 0.93, and 0.94, respectively), consistent with previous findings.

  8. New Catalytic Materials for Meeting the Challenge of Clean Gasoline & Diesel Fuel Production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zong Baoning; Min Enze; He Mingyuan; Li Dadong

    2000-01-01

    New catalytic materials, which may bring important improvement or technical breakthrough to the petroleum refining technology for producing reformulated gasoline and low sulfur and aromatics diesel fuel, are discussed. For the purpose of producing high octane number gasoline and light olefins for etherification and alkylation processes, major improvements are achieved by the use of high reactivity-stability MFI type ZRP and low cost beta zeolites. A solid P-W heteropolyacid supported on SiO2 for replacing currently used HF and H2SO4 in alkylation process of isobutane with butenes, is under the pilot trial. For the production of low sulfur and aromatics diesel fuel, high surface area supported metallic nitrides are under extensive studies.

  9. Negative Valve Overlap Mode of HCCI Operation Using Gasoline and Diesel Blended Fuels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Shaohua; CHEN Yongdong; Miroslaw Lech Wyszynski; XU Hongming

    2007-01-01

    The negative valve overlap (NVO) strategy of HCCI operation was experimentally investigated on a gasoline HCCI engine operated with variable valve timing in association with the addition of diesel fuel. The experimental results show that, by using gasoline and diesel blended fuels, the required NVO interval for suitable HCCI combustion under a given engine speed and a moderate compression ratio condition could be reduced, and the HCCI combustion region was extended remarkably without substantial increase in NO, , emissions under a given inlet and exhaust valve timing due to the improvement of charge ignitability. In addition, the possible scale of NVO was extended. A substantial increase in the lean limit of excess air ratio and the upper limit of load range can be achieved because of higher volumetric efficiency, resulting from the decrease in the required NVO and the presence of less residual gases in cylinder.

  10. The history, genotoxicity, and carcinogenicity of carbon-based fuels and their emissions. Part 3: diesel and gasoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claxton, Larry D

    2015-01-01

    Within this review the genotoxicity of diesel and gasoline fuels and emissions is placed in an historical context. New technologies have changed the composition of transportation methods considerably, reducing emissions of many of the components of health concern. The similarity of modern diesel and gasoline fuels and emissions to other carbonaceous fuels and emissions is striking. Recently an International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Working Group concluded that there was sufficient evidence in humans for the carcinogenicity of diesel exhaust (Group 1). In addition, the Working Group found that diesel exhaust has "a positive association (limited evidence) with an increased risk of bladder cancer." Like most other carbonaceous fuel emissions, diesel and gasoline exhausts contain toxic levels of respirable particles (PM gasoline emissions has declined in certain regions over time because of changes in engine design, the development of better aftertreatment devices (e.g., catalysts), increased fuel economy, changes in the fuels and additives used, and greater regulation. Additional research and better exposure assessments are needed so that decision makers and the public can decide to what extent diesel and gasoline engines should be replaced.

  11. Emissions of hydrogen cyanide from on-road gasoline and diesel vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, Samar G.; Leithead, Amy; Li, Shao-Meng; Chan, Tak W.; Wentzell, Jeremy J. B.; Stroud, Craig; Zhang, Junhua; Lee, Patrick; Lu, Gang; Brook, Jeffery R.; Hayden, Katherine; Narayan, Julie; Liggio, John

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen cyanide (HCN) is considered a marker for biomass burning emissions and is a component of vehicle exhaust. Despite its potential health impacts, vehicular HCN emissions estimates and their contribution to regional budgets are highly uncertain. In the current study, Proton Transfer Reaction-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS) was used to measure HCN emission factors from the exhaust of individual diesel, biodiesel and gasoline vehicles. Laboratory emissions data as a function of fuel type and driving mode were combined with ambient measurement data and model predictions. The results indicate that gasoline vehicles have the highest emissions of HCN (relative to diesel fuel) and that biodiesel fuel has the potential to significantly reduce HCN emissions even at realistic 5% blend levels. The data further demonstrate that gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines emit more HCN than their port fuel injection (PFI) counterparts, suggesting that the expected full transition of vehicle fleets to GDI will increase HCN emissions. Ambient measurements of HCN in a traffic dominated area of Toronto, Canada were strongly correlated to vehicle emission markers and consistent with regional air quality model predictions of ambient air HCN, indicating that vehicle emissions of HCN are the dominant source of exposure in urban areas. The results further indicate that additional work is required to quantify HCN emissions from the modern vehicle fleet, particularly in light of continuously changing engine, fuel and after-treatment technologies.

  12. Effect of tank diameter on thermal behavior of gasoline and diesel storage tanks fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Ricardo Machado; Centeno, Felipe Roman

    2017-08-24

    Studies on fire behavior are extremely important as they contribute in a firefighting situation or even to avoid such hazard. Experimental studies of fire in real scale are unfeasible, implying that reduced-scale experiments must be performed, and results extrapolated to the range of interest. This research aims to experimentally study the fire behavior in tanks of 0.04m, 0.20m, 0.40m, 0.80m and 4.28m diameter, burning regular gasoline or diesel oil S-500. The following parameters were here obtained: burning rates, burning velocities, heat release rates, flame heights, and temperature distributions adjacent to the tank. Such parameters were obtained for each tank diameter with the purpose of correlating the results and understanding the relationship of each parameter for the different geometrical scale of the tanks. Asymptotic results for larger tanks were found as (regular gasoline and diesel oil S-500, respectively): burning rates 0.050kg/(m(2)s) and 0.031kg/(m(2)s), burning velocities 4.0mm/min and 2.5mm/min, heat release rates per unit area 2200kW/m(2) and 1500kW/m(2), normalized averaged flame heights (Hi/D, where Hi is the average flame height, D is the tank diameter) 0.9 and 0.8. Maximum temperatures for gasoline pools were higher than for diesel oil pools, and temperature gradients close to the tanks were also higher for the former fuel. The behavior of the maximum temperature was correlated as a function of the tank diameter, the heat release rate of each fuel and the dimensionless distance from the tank. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Utilization of Renewable Oxygenates as Gasoline Blending Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanowitz, J.; Christensen, E.; McCormick, R. L.

    2011-08-01

    This report reviews the use of higher alcohols and several cellulose-derived oxygenates as blend components in gasoline. Material compatibility issues are expected to be less severe for neat higher alcohols than for fuel-grade ethanol. Very little data exist on how blending higher alcohols or other oxygenates with gasoline affects ASTM Standard D4814 properties. Under the Clean Air Act, fuels used in the United States must be 'substantially similar' to fuels used in certification of cars for emission compliance. Waivers for the addition of higher alcohols at concentrations up to 3.7 wt% oxygen have been granted. Limited emission testing on pre-Tier 1 vehicles and research engines suggests that higher alcohols will reduce emissions of CO and organics, while NOx emissions will stay the same or increase. Most oxygenates can be used as octane improvers for standard gasoline stocks. The properties of 2-methyltetrahydrofuran, dimethylfuran, 2-methylfuran, methyl pentanoate and ethyl pentanoate suggest that they may function well as low-concentration blends with gasoline in standard vehicles and in higher concentrations in flex fuel vehicles.

  14. Adsorption and preconcentration of divalent metal ions in fossil fuels and biofuels: gasoline, diesel, biodiesel, diesel-like and ethanol by using chitosan microspheres and thermodynamic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Alexandre G S; Pescara, Igor C; Evangelista, Sheila M; Holanda, Matheus S; Andrade, Romulo D; Suarez, Paulo A Z; Zara, Luiz F

    2011-05-15

    Biodiesel and diesel-like have been obtained from soybean oil by transesterification and thermal cracking process, respectively. These biofuels were characterized as according to ANP standards by using specific ASTM methods. Ethanol, gasoline, and diesel were purchased from a gas station. Deacetylation degree of chitosan was determined by three distinct methods (conductimetry, FTIR and NMR), and the average degree was 78.95%. The chitosan microspheres were prepared from chitosan by split-coating and these spheres were crosslinked using glutaraldehyde. The surface area of microspheres was determined by BET method, and the surface area of crosslinked microspheres was 9.2m(2)g(-1). The adsorption isotherms of cooper, nickel and zinc on microspheres of chitosan were determined in petroleum derivatives (gasoline and diesel oil), as well as in biofuels (alcohol, biodiesel and diesel-like). The adsorption order in all fuels was: Cu>Ni>Zn. The elution tests presented the following preconcentration degrees: >4.5 to ethanol, >4.4 to gasoline, >4.0 to diesel, >3.8 to biodiesel and >3.6 to diesel-like. The application of chitosan microspheres in the metal ions preconcentration showed the potential of this biopolymer to enrich fuel sample in order to be analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

  15. Combustion Heat Release Rate Comparison of Algae Hydroprocessed Renewable Diesel to F-76 in a Two-Stroke Diesel Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    by different names— Hydroprocessed or Hydrotreated Renewable Diesel or simply Renewable Diesel. For the purpose of this paper, it will be called...However, unlike first-generation biodiesel, the hydrotreating process used to create HRD removes oxygen from the chemical makeup of the fuel...resulting in a pure hydrocarbon fuel which eliminates the problems mentioned above with biodiesel. The hydrotreating process is already utilized by

  16. Experimental investigation of gasoline compression ignition combustion in a light-duty diesel engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeper, C. Paul

    Due to increased ignition delay and volatility, low temperature combustion (LTC) research utilizing gasoline fuel has experienced recent interest [1-3]. These characteristics improve air-fuel mixing prior to ignition allowing for reduced emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and soot (or particulate matter, PM). Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results at the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Engine Research Center (Ra et al. [4, 5]) have validated these attributes and established baseline operating parameters for a gasoline compression ignition (GCI) concept in a light-duty diesel engine over a large load range (3-16 bar net IMEP). In addition to validating these computational results, subsequent experiments at the Engine Research Center utilizing a single cylinder research engine based on a GM 1.9-liter diesel engine have progressed fundamental understanding of gasoline autoignition processes, and established the capability of critical controlling input parameters to better control GCI operation. The focus of this thesis can be divided into three segments: 1) establishment of operating requirements in the low-load operating limit, including operation sensitivities with respect to inlet temperature, and the capabilities of injection strategy to minimize NOx emissions while maintaining good cycle-to-cycle combustion stability; 2) development of novel three-injection strategies to extend the high load limit; and 3) having developed fundamental understanding of gasoline autoignition kinetics, and how changes in physical processes (e.g. engine speed effects, inlet pressure variation, and air-fuel mixture processes) affects operation, develop operating strategies to maintain robust engine operation. Collectively, experimental results have demonstrated the ability of GCI strategies to operate over a large load-speed range (3 bar to 17.8 bar net IMEP and 1300-2500 RPM, respectively) with low emissions (NOx and PM less than 1 g/kg-FI and 0.2 g/kg-FI, respectively), and low

  17. Differences in Infiltration and Evaporation of Diesel and Gasoline Droplets Spilled onto Concrete Pavement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernat Adrià Mora

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Pollution at gas stations due to small spills that occur during vehicle refueling have received little attention. We have performed laboratory experiments to assess evaporation and infiltration of fuel spilled onto concrete. Changes in the concrete mass after small amounts of diesel and gasoline were spilled have been analyzed. Variation in humidity, among other parameters, clearly affects the measured mass since condensed water is constantly added to or released from the concrete. This mass experiences an about exponential decay in time. The difference in behavior between both fuel types is important as the percentage of evaporated mass is much larger for gasoline, while infiltration is more significant for diesel. A statistical analysis suggests that the initial spill amount does not significantly affect the fraction of infiltrated fuel over time. This finding is in agreement with pore-scale simulations that we performed. A significant amount of fuel could be seeping into soil and groundwater underneath concrete pavement at gas stations or could be released to the atmosphere. Possible solutions for pavement and groundwater pollution are considered.

  18. Infiltration and Evaporation of Diesel and Gasoline Droplets Spilled onto Concrete Pavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilpert, M.; Adria-Mora, B.

    2015-12-01

    Pollution at gas stations due to small spills that occur during refueling of customer vehicles has received little attention. We have performed laboratory experiments in order to assess the processes of evaporation and infiltration of fuel spilled onto concrete samples. Changes in mass of both spilled diesel and gasoline droplets as a function of time have been analyzed. The infiltrated mass is affected by variations in humidity, among other parameters, which influence the amount of water condensed onto the concrete. Therefore, we used a humidity data logger and statistical tools to predict the evolution of the real mass of infiltrated fuel. The infiltrated mass roughly decreases exponentially, but the difference in behavior between both fuel types is important. The percentage of evaporated mass is much larger for gasoline, while infiltration is more significant for diesel. Also, the percentage of infiltrated liquid depends on the initial droplet mass. We also developed a multiphysics model, which couples pore-scale infiltration to turbulent atmospheric transport, to explain the experimental data. In conclusion, a substantial amount of fuel could both seep into the ground to contaminate groundwater and be released to the atmosphere. More studies are needed to quantify the public health implications of the released pollutants.

  19. Primary gas- and particle-phase emissions and secondary organic aerosol production from gasoline and diesel off-road engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Timothy D; Tkacik, Daniel S; Presto, Albert A; Zhang, Mang; Jathar, Shantanu H; Nguyen, Ngoc T; Massetti, John; Truong, Tin; Cicero-Fernandez, Pablo; Maddox, Christine; Rieger, Paul; Chattopadhyay, Sulekha; Maldonado, Hector; Maricq, M Matti; Robinson, Allen L

    2013-12-17

    Dilution and smog chamber experiments were performed to characterize the primary emissions and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from gasoline and diesel small off-road engines (SOREs). These engines are high emitters of primary gas- and particle-phase pollutants relative to their fuel consumption. Two- and 4-stroke gasoline SOREs emit much more (up to 3 orders of magnitude more) nonmethane organic gases (NMOGs), primary PM and organic carbon than newer on-road gasoline vehicles (per kg of fuel burned). The primary emissions from a diesel transportation refrigeration unit were similar to those of older, uncontrolled diesel engines used in on-road vehicles (e.g., premodel year 2007 heavy-duty diesel trucks). Two-strokes emitted the largest fractional (and absolute) amount of SOA precursors compared to diesel and 4-stroke gasoline SOREs; however, 35-80% of the NMOG emissions from the engines could not be speciated using traditional gas chromatography or high-performance liquid chromatography. After 3 h of photo-oxidation in a smog chamber, dilute emissions from both 2- and 4-stroke gasoline SOREs produced large amounts of semivolatile SOA. The effective SOA yield (defined as the ratio of SOA mass to estimated mass of reacted precursors) was 2-4% for 2- and 4-stroke SOREs, which is comparable to yields from dilute exhaust from older passenger cars and unburned gasoline. This suggests that much of the SOA production was due to unburned fuel and/or lubrication oil. The total PM contribution of different mobile source categories to the ambient PM burden was calculated by combining primary emission, SOA production and fuel consumption data. Relative to their fuel consumption, SOREs are disproportionately high total PM sources; however, the vastly greater fuel consumption of on-road vehicles renders them (on-road vehicles) the dominant mobile source of ambient PM in the Los Angeles area.

  20. Successful and failing challengers: Diesel and steam as alternatives to the gasoline automotive engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haard, M. [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology (Norway). Centre for Technology and Society; Jamison, A. [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Research Policy Inst.

    1996-07-01

    This paper aims at explaining why it is that some technologies become so entrenched in our society that it becomes virtually impossible to alter them, and why some challengers nevertheless succeed. It attempts to show that it is seldom enough to explain success and failure by reference to technical factors. By means of an historically comparative analysis of two challengers to the automobile gasoline engine - steam and diesel, the paper tries to show that history can help us understand and perhaps amend the problems that contemporary politicians and other social actors experience in trying to find niches for unconventional technologies. The central thesis is that established technologies remain because they have gained symbolic power, are carried by deeply embedded organizational structures, and have helped to create strong behavioral patterns. An alternative technology seldom succeeds if it poses an alternative at all three levels; indeed, the contention is that a too ambitious alternative is less likely to succeed than a conservative one. In this particular case, the diesel slowly but surely rid itself of the symbolism that had for a long time put it at a disadvantage compared to the gasoline engine; it was taken up by the same actors and organizations that supported the gasoline engine; its engineers managed to provide users with functions that were so familiar that they did not have to change their set patterns of behavior. The steamer, by contrast, did not succeed in any of these respects; its meaning came to be associated (negatively) with high fuel consumption; its organizational affiliations were weak; and users were never given the opportunity to test their willingness to modify their behavior. 50 refs

  1. Acute toxicity of water soluble fraction of petroleum, diesel and gasoline for newly hatched larvae of marine pejerrey Odontesthes Argentinensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Ricardo V.; Miranda-Filho, Kleber C.; Gusmao, Emeline P.; Moreira, Caue B.; Santos, Renato A.; Oliveira, Marcelo G.; Sampaio, Luis Andre [Fundacao Universidade do Rio Grande (FURG), RS (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The hydrocarbons of petroleum are the main aquatic pollutants and can cause toxicity to aquatic organisms, however, only a few toxicological studies were already conducted with early life stages of fish. The aim of this work was to determine the toxicity (LC50-96h) of water soluble fraction (WSF) of petroleum, diesel and gasoline for newly hatched larvae of marine pejerrey Odontesthes argentinensis. During the experiments the concentrations tested were: to petroleum (5%, 10%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of), to diesel (1%, 2%, 4%, 8%, 16%, 32%, e 64% of WSF) and to gasoline (1%, 2.5%, 5%, 10%, and 20% of WSF) plus a control to each pollutant. All treatments were done with 3 repetitions and 30 larvae. During the experiments the water quality were maintained at temperature 22,5 deg C, salinity 30, pH 7.95 and dissolved oxygen approximately around 4mg/L. The petroleum presented an CL50-96h equal to 70.68% (65.73 - 76.01), while the diesel and gasoline presented the toxicity values of 13.46% (10.19-17.79) and 5.48% (4.85-6.20), respectively. The results demonstrated a higher toxicity of light fuels (diesel and gasoline) compared to heavy petroleum. (author)

  2. Estimation of CO2 reduction by parallel hard-type power hybridization for gasoline and diesel vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Yunjung; Park, Junhong; Lee, Jong Tae; Seo, Jigu; Park, Sungwook

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate possible improvements in ICEVs by implementing fuzzy logic-based parallel hard-type power hybrid systems. Two types of conventional ICEVs (gasoline and diesel) and two types of HEVs (gasoline-electric, diesel electric) were generated using vehicle and powertrain simulation tools and a Matlab-Simulink application programming interface. For gasoline and gasoline-electric HEV vehicles, the prediction accuracy for four types of LDV models was validated by conducting comparative analysis with the chassis dynamometer and OBD test data. The predicted results show strong correlation with the test data. The operating points of internal combustion engines and electric motors are well controlled in the high efficiency region and battery SOC was well controlled within ±1.6%. However, for diesel vehicles, we generated virtual diesel-electric HEV vehicle because there is no available vehicles with similar engine and vehicle specifications with ICE vehicle. Using a fuzzy logic-based parallel hybrid system in conventional ICEVs demonstrated that HEVs showed superior performance in terms of fuel consumption and CO2 emission in most driving modes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. On-board measurement of emissions from liquefied petroleum gas, gasoline and diesel powered passenger cars in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikhi, Saâdane; Boughedaoui, Ménouèr; Kerbachi, Rabah; Joumard, Robert

    2014-08-01

    On-board measurements of unit emissions of CO, HC, NOx and CO₂ were conducted on 17 private cars powered by different types of fuels including gasoline, dual gasoline-liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), gasoline, and diesel. The tests performed revealed the effect of LPG injection technology on unit emissions and made it possible to compare the measured emissions to the European Artemis emission model. A sequential multipoint injection LPG kit with no catalyst installed was found to be the most efficient pollutant reduction device for all of the pollutants, with the exception of the NOx. Specific test results for a sub-group of LPG vehicles revealed that LPG-fueled engines with no catalyst cannot compete with catalyzed gasoline and diesel engines. Vehicle age does not appear to be a determining parameter with regard to vehicle pollutant emissions. A fuel switch to LPG offers many advantages as far as pollutant emissions are concerned, due to LPG's intrinsic characteristics. However, these advantages are being rapidly offset by the strong development of both gasoline and diesel engine technologies and catalyst converters. The LPG's performance on a chassis dynamometer under real driving conditions was better than expected. The enforcement of pollutant emission standards in developing countries is an important step towards introducing clean technology and reducing vehicle emissions. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Deleterious effects of water-soluble fraction of petroleum, diesel and gasoline on marine pejerrey Odontesthes argentinensis larvae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Ricardo Vieira [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Aquicultura, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Laboratorio de Piscicultura Estuarina e Marinha, CEP 96201-900, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil); Miranda-Filho, Kleber Campos, E-mail: kleber08@gmail.com [Instituto de Oceanografia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Laboratorio de Piscicultura Estuarina e Marinha, CEP 96210-030, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil); Gusmao, Emeline Pereira; Moreira, Caue Bonucci [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Aquicultura, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Laboratorio de Piscicultura Estuarina e Marinha, CEP 96201-900, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil); Romano, Luis Alberto; Sampaio, Luis Andre [Instituto de Oceanografia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Laboratorio de Piscicultura Estuarina e Marinha, CEP 96210-030, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil)

    2010-04-01

    Accidental discharges and oil spills are frequent around the world. Petroleum-derived hydrocarbons are considered one of the main pollutants of aquatic ecosystem. The importance of petroleum and refined fuels is notorious because today's society depends on them. Researches related to the toxic water-soluble fraction (WSF) of petroleum and derivatives to aquatic biota are scarce. For this reason, deleterious effects of WSF of Brazilian petroleum, automotive diesel and unleaded gasoline to marine pejerrey Odontesthes argentinensis larvae were studied employing toxicity tests and histopathological examination. Each WSF was generated in a laboratory by mixing four parts of seawater with one part of pollutant by approximately 22 h. Larvae were exposed during 96 h to different concentrations of WSF of petroleum, diesel, and gasoline, plus a control. After 96 h of exposure to the different WSFs, three larvae were sampled for histopathological studies. The median lethal concentration after 96 h (LC50) of exposure for WSF of petroleum was equal to 70.68%, it was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than the values for WSF of diesel and gasoline, which were 13.46% and 5.48%, respectively. The histological examination of pejerrey larvae exposed to WSF of petroleum, diesel and gasoline after 96 h revealed a variety of lesions in the larvae. The gills, pseudobranchs and esophagus presented epithelial hyperplasia, and the liver presented dilatation of hepatic sinusoids, hepatocitomegaly, bi-nucleated and nuclear degeneration of hepatocytes, such as pyknotic nuclei. The acute toxicity of diesel and gasoline is at least fivefold higher than Brazilian petroleum. However, all toxicants induced histopathological abnormalities in pejerrey larvae. The results are of importance since much attention has been paid to large visible surfaces of petroleum spills instead of potential toxic effects of dissolved aromatic hydrocarbons, which are more available to marine biota.

  5. Characterization of particulate matter emissions from on-road gasoline and diesel vehicles using a soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallmann, T. R.; Onasch, T. B.; Kirchstetter, T. W.; Worton, D. R.; Fortner, E. C.; Herndon, S. C.; Wood, E. C.; Franklin, J. P.; Worsnop, D. R.; Goldstein, A. H.; Harley, R. A.

    2014-07-01

    Particulate matter (PM) emissions were measured in July 2010 from on-road motor vehicles driving through a highway tunnel in the San Francisco Bay area. A soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) was used to measure the chemical composition of PM emitted by gasoline and diesel vehicles at high time resolution. Organic aerosol (OA) and black carbon (BC) concentrations were measured during various time periods that had different levels of diesel influence, as well as directly in the exhaust plumes of individual heavy-duty (HD) diesel trucks. BC emission factor distributions for HD trucks were more skewed than OA distributions (N = 293), with the highest 10% of trucks accounting for 56 and 42% of total measured BC and OA emissions, respectively. OA mass spectra measured for HD truck exhaust plumes show cycloalkanes are predominate in exhaust OA emissions relative to saturated alkanes (i.e., normal and iso-paraffins), suggesting that lubricating oil rather than fuel is the dominant source of primary organic aerosol (POA) emissions in diesel vehicle exhaust. This finding is supported by the detection of trace elements such as zinc and phosphorus in the exhaust plumes of individual trucks. Trace elements were emitted relative to total OA at levels that are consistent with typical weight fractions of commonly used additives present in lubricating oil. A comparison of measured OA and BC mass spectra across various sampling periods revealed a high degree of similarity in OA and BC emitted by gasoline and diesel engines. This finding indicates a large fraction of OA in gasoline exhaust is lubricant-derived as well. The similarity in OA and BC mass spectra for gasoline and diesel engine exhaust is likely to confound ambient source apportionment efforts to determine contributions to air pollution from these two important sources.

  6. Combustion engine diagnosis model-based condition monitoring of gasoline and diesel engines and their components

    CERN Document Server

    Isermann, Rolf

    2017-01-01

    This book offers first a short introduction to advanced supervision, fault detection and diagnosis methods. It then describes model-based methods of fault detection and diagnosis for the main components of gasoline and diesel engines, such as the intake system, fuel supply, fuel injection, combustion process, turbocharger, exhaust system and exhaust gas aftertreatment. Additionally, model-based fault diagnosis of electrical motors, electric, pneumatic and hydraulic actuators and fault-tolerant systems is treated. In general series production sensors are used. It includes abundant experimental results showing the detection and diagnosis quality of implemented faults. Written for automotive engineers in practice, it is also of interest to graduate students of mechanical and electrical engineering and computer science. The Content Introduction.- I SUPERVISION, FAULT DETECTION AND DIAGNOSIS METHODS.- Supervision, Fault-Detection and Fault-Diagnosis Methods - a short Introduction.- II DIAGNOSIS OF INTERNAL COMBUST...

  7. Evaporation of hydrocarbon compounds, including gasoline and diesel fuel, on heated metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fardad, D.; Ladommatos, N. [Brunel Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Uxbridge (United Kingdom)

    1999-11-01

    An investigation was carried out on the evaporation of various hydrocarbon liquids on heated surfaces. Single and multicomponent hydrocarbon compounds were used, including hexane, heptane, octane, a hexane-octane mixture, gasoline and diesel fuel. The heated surface included aluminium, mild steel, cast iron and copper. Tests were also carried out with different surface textures and surface coatings. The motivation for this work was a desire to improve understanding of the evaporation processes taking place in the inlet port and, to a lesser extent, within the combustion chamber of internal combustion engines. The hydrocarbon compounds were released on the heated surfaces as individual small droplets, and the subsequent evaporation was recorded using a CCD (charge coupled device) camera. These observations were then used to ascertain the effects of material, surface temperature, surface textures, surface coating and liquid composition on the heat flux and other aspects of droplet behaviour. (Author)

  8. Characterization of Extremely Low Frequency Magnetic Fields from Diesel, Gasoline and Hybrid Cars under Controlled Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronen Hareuveny

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study characterizes extremely low frequency (ELF magnetic field (MF levels in 10 car models. Extensive measurements were conducted in three diesel, four gasoline, and three hybrid cars, under similar controlled conditions and negligible background fields. Averaged over all four seats under various driving scenarios the fields were lowest in diesel cars (0.02 μT, higher for gasoline (0.04–0.05 μT and highest in hybrids (0.06–0.09 μT, but all were in-line with daily exposures from other sources. Hybrid cars had the highest mean and 95th percentile MF levels, and an especially large percentage of measurements above 0.2 μT. These parameters were also higher for moving conditions compared to standing while idling or revving at 2500 RPM and higher still at 80 km/h compared to 40 km/h. Fields in non-hybrid cars were higher at the front seats, while in hybrid cars they were higher at the back seats, particularly the back right seat where 16%–69% of measurements were greater than 0.2 μT. As our results do not include low frequency fields (below 30 Hz that might be generated by tire rotation, we suggest that net currents flowing through the cars’ metallic chassis may be a possible source of MF. Larger surveys in standardized and well-described settings should be conducted with different types of vehicles and with spectral analysis of fields including lower frequencies due to magnetization of tires.

  9. Regulated and nonregulated diesel and gasoline cold start emissions at different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weilenmann, Martin; Soltic, Patrik; Saxer, Christian; Forss, Anna-Maria; Heeb, Norbert

    The emissions of modern cars are usually reduced in warm engine conditions by catalysts. Consequently emissions are significantly higher during the cold start, i.e. the warm-up phase of the car. The duration of this period and the emissions produced during it depend on the ambient temperature as well as on the initial temperature of the car's systems. The cold start emissions of Euro-3 gasoline cars, Euro-2 diesel cars and old pre-Euro-1 gasoline cars were investigated at cold ambient temperatures. Since the goal was to get real-world emissions, the measurements were done with cars belonging to private owners taken straight from the road with no maintenance. The chassis dynamometer tests were carried out at +23, -7 and -20 °C. The test cycle employed is a representative urban ride from a real-world driving behaviour study. Besides the regulated pollutants, methane, benzene and toluene were also measured online by chemical ionisation mass spectrometry.

  10. Unravelling remote sensing signatures of plants contaminated with gasoline and diesel: an approach using the red edge spectral feature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanches, I D; Souza Filho, C R; Magalhães, L A; Quitério, G C M; Alves, M N; Oliveira, W J

    2013-03-01

    Pipeline systems used to transport petroleum products represent a potential source of soil pollution worldwide. The design of new techniques that may improve current monitoring of pipeline leakage is imperative. This paper assesses the remote detection of small leakages of liquid hydrocarbons indirectly, through the analysis of spectral features of contaminated plants. Leaf and canopy spectra of healthy plants were compared to spectra of plants contaminated with diesel and gasoline, at increasing rates of soil contamination. Contamination effects were observed both visually in the field and thorough changes in the spectral reflectance patterns of vegetation. Results indicate that the remote detection of small volumes of gasoline and diesel contaminations is feasible based on the red edge analysis of leaf and canopy spectra of plants. Brachiaria grass ranks as a favourable choice to be used as an indicator of HCs leakages along pipelines. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of molecular marker source profiles for emissions from on-road gasoline and diesel vehicle fleets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lough, Glynis C; Christensen, Charles G; Schauer, James J; Tortorelli, James; Mani, Erin; Lawson, Douglas R; Clark, Nigel N; Gabele, Peter A

    2007-10-01

    As part of the Gasoline/Diesel PM Split Study, relatively large fleets of gasoline vehicles and diesel vehicles were tested on a chassis dynamometer to develop chemical source profiles for source attribution of atmospheric particulate matter in California's South Coast Air Basin. Gasoline vehicles were tested in cold-start and warm-start conditions, and diesel vehicles were tested through several driving cycles. Tailpipe emissions of particulate matter were analyzed for organic tracer compounds, including hopanes, steranes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Large intervehicle variation was seen in emission rate and composition, and results were averaged to examine the impacts of vehicle ages, weight classes, and driving cycles on the variation. Average profiles, weighted by mass emission rate, had much lower uncertainty than that associated with intervehicle variation. Mass emission rates and elemental carbon/organic carbon (EC/OC) ratios for gasoline vehicle age classes were influenced most by use of cold-start or warm-start driving cycle (factor of 2-7). Individual smoker vehicles had a large range of mass and EC/OC (factors of 40 and 625, respectively). Gasoline vehicle age averages, data on vehicle ages and miles traveled in the area, and several assumptions about smoker contributions were used to create emissions profiles representative of on-road vehicle fleets in the Los Angeles area in 2001. In the representative gasoline fleet profiles, variation was further reduced, with cold-start or warm-start and the representation of smoker vehicles making a difference of approximately a factor of two in mass emission rate and EC/OC. Diesel vehicle profiles were created on the basis of vehicle age, weight class, and driving cycle. Mass emission rate and EC/OC for diesel averages were influenced by vehicle age (factor of 2-5), weight class (factor of 2-7), and driving cycle (factor of 10-20). Absolute and relative emissions of molecular marker compounds showed

  12. Determination of manganese in diesel, gasoline and naphtha by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using microemulsion medium for sample stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Geisamanda Pedrini; de Campos, Reinaldo Calixto; de Castro, Eustáquio Vinicius Ribeiro; de Jesus, Honério Coutinho

    2008-08-01

    The determination of Mn in diesel, gasoline and naphtha samples at µg L - 1 level by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, after sample stabilization in a three-component medium (microemulsion) was investigated. Microemulsions were prepared by mixing appropriate volumes of sample, propan-1-ol and nitric acid aqueous solution, and a stable system was immediately and spontaneously formed. After multivariate optimization by central composite design the optimum microemulsion composition as well as the temperature program was defined. In this way, calibration using aqueous analytical solution was possible, since the same sensitivity was observed in the optimized microemulsion media and 0.2% v/v HNO 3. The use of modifier was not necessary. Recoveries at the 3 µg L - 1 level using both inorganic and organic Mn standards spiked solutions ranged from 98 to 107% and the limits of detection were 0.6, 0.5 and 0.3 µg L - 1 in the original diesel, gasoline and naphtha samples, respectively. The Mn characteristic mass 3.4 pg. Typical relative standard deviation ( n = 5) of 8, 6 and 7% were found for the samples prepared as microemulsions at concentration levels of 1.3, 0.8, and 1.5 µg L - 1 , respectively. The total determination cycle lasted 4 min for diesel and 3 min for gasoline and naphtha, equivalent to a sample throughput of 7 h - 1 for duplicate determinations in diesel and 10 h - 1 for duplicate determinations in gasoline and naphtha. Accuracy was also assessed by using other method of analysis (ASTM D 3831-90). No statistically significant differences were found between the results obtained with the proposed method and the reference method in the analysis of real samples.

  13. Emission rates and comparative chemical composition from selected in-use diesel and gasoline-fueled vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinska, Barbara; Sagebiel, John; McDonald, Jacob D; Whitney, Kevin; Lawson, Douglas R

    2004-09-01

    Emission samples for toxicity testing and detailed chemical characterization were collected from a variety of gasoline- and diesel-fueled in-use vehicles operated on the Unified Driving Cycle on a chassis dynamometer. Gasoline vehicles included normal particle mass (particulate matter [PM]) emitters (tested at 72 and 30 degrees F), "black" and "white" smokers, and a new-technology vehicle (tested at 72 degrees F). Diesel vehicles included current-technology vehicles (tested at 72 and 30 degrees F) and a high PM emitter. Total PM emission rates ranged from below 3 mg/mi up to more than 700 mg/mi for the white smoker gasoline vehicle. Emission rates of organic and elemental carbon (OC/EC), elements (metals and associated analytes), ions, and a variety of particulate and semi-volatile organic compounds (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons [PAH], nitro-PAH, oxy-PAH, hopanes, and steranes) are reported for these vehicles. Speciated organic analysis also was conducted on the fuels and lube oils obtained from these vehicles after the emissions testing. The compositions of emissions were highly dependent on the fuel type (gasoline vs. diesel), the state of vehicle maintenance (low, average, or high emitters; white or black smokers), and ambient conditions (i.e., temperature) of the vehicles. Fuel and oil analyses from these vehicles showed that oil served as a repository for combustion byproducts (e.g., PAH), and oil-burning gasoline vehicles emitted PAH in higher concentrations than did other vehicles. These PAH emissions matched the PAH compositions observed in oil.

  14. Determination of arsenic in diesel, gasoline and naphtha by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using microemulsion medium for sample stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Geisamanda Pedrini; de Campos, Reinaldo Calixto; Luna, Aderval Severino; de Castro, Eustáquio Vinicius Ribeiro; de Jesus, Honério Coutinho

    2006-08-01

    A procedure for the determination of As in diesel, gasoline and naphtha at microg L(-1) levels by GFAAS is proposed. Sample stabilization was achieved by the formation of three component solutions prepared by mixing appropriate volumes of the samples propan-1-ol and nitric acid aqueous solution. This mixture resulted in a one-phase medium, which was indefinitely stable. No changes in the analyte signals were observed over several days in spiked samples, proving long-term stabilization ability. The use of conventional (Pd) and permanent (Ir) modification was investigated and the former was preferred. Central composite design multivariate optimization defined the optimum microemulsion composition as well as the temperature program. In this way, calibration using aqueous analytical solutions was possible, since the same sensitivity was observed in the investigated microemulsion media and in 0.2% v/v HNO(3). Coefficients of correlation larger than 0.999 and an As characteristic mass of 22 pg were observed. Recoveries (n=4) obtained from spiked samples were 98+/-4, 99+/-3 and 103+/-5%, and the limits of detection in the original samples were 1.8, 1.2 and 1.5 microg L(-1) for diesel, gasoline and naphtha, respectively. Validation was performed by the analysis of a set of commercial samples by independent comparative procedures. No significant difference (Student's t-test, pnaphtha, equivalent to a sample throughput of 7 h(-1) for diesel and 10 h(-1) for gasoline and naphtha.

  15. Modelling of Diesel Generator Sets That Assist Off-Grid Renewable Energy Micro-grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Salazar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on modelling diesel generators for off-grid installations based on renewable energies. Variations in Environmental Variables (for example, Solar Radiation and Wind Speed make necessary to include these auxiliary systems in off-grid renewable energy installations, in order to ensure minimal services when the produced renewable energy is not sufficient to fulfill the demand. This paper concentrates on modelling the dynamical behaviour of the diesel generator, in order to use the models and simulations for developing and testing advanced controllers for the overall off-grid system. The Diesel generator is assumed to consist of a diesel motor connected to a synchronous generator through an electromagnetic clutch, with a flywheel to damp variations. Each of the components is modelled using physical models, with the corresponding control systems also modelled: these control systems include the speed and the voltage regulation (in cascade regulation.

  16. HYDROGENATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR PRODUCTION OF CLEAN GASOLINE AND DIESEL FUEL IN RIPP%生产清洁汽柴油的加氢技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    聂红; 石亚华; 石玉林; 康小洪; 李大东

    2003-01-01

    It is necessary to produce low sulfur /low olefin gasoline and low sulfur /low aromatics diesel fuel for reducing the air pollution from automobile exhausted gas. Major component in gasoline pool in China is from FCCU, resulting in higher olefin content in product gasoline. The difficult point in producing clean gasoline is to lower down the olefin content while retaining RON of gasoline as much as possible. Based on the properties of gasoline, RIPP has developed technology (RIDOS) for reducing both sulfur and olefin contents by the same process. The technology shows that its hydro-iso-cracking performance to some extent can reduce the olefin content from 50%~60% to less than 20%, and road octane loss is less than 2. In deep hydro-desulfurization of diesel fuel, the key point is to remove dibenzhothiophen (DBT) with methyl substitute in 4 and 6 positions. To solve this problem, RN-10 catalyst with high hydrogenation activity was developed by reinforcing the hydrogenation function. The catalyst featured with less spatial hindrance effect after the DMDBT was hydrogenated, meanwhile, it has high activity in aromatics saturation. Diesel fuel with low sulfur and low aromatics content can be manufactured from SRGO or FCC diesel fraction. RIPP has deve-loped more technologies such as MHUG, RMC and RICH for production of clean diesel fuel with low sulfur/aromatics and low density with increased cetane number.

  17. Size-Resolved Particle Number and Volume Emission Factors for On-Road Gasoline and Diesel Motor Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ban-Weiss, George A.; Lunden, Melissa M.; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Harley, Robert A.

    2009-04-10

    Average particle number concentrations and size distributions from {approx}61,000 light-duty (LD) vehicles and {approx}2500 medium-duty (MD) and heavy-duty (HD) trucks were measured during the summer of 2006 in a San Francisco Bay area traffic tunnel. One of the traffic bores contained only LD vehicles, and the other contained mixed traffic, allowing pollutants to be apportioned between LD vehicles and diesel trucks. Particle number emission factors (particle diameter D{sub p} > 3 nm) were found to be (3.9 {+-} 1.4) x 10{sup 14} and (3.3 {+-} 1.3) x 10{sup 15} kg{sup -1} fuel burned for LD vehicles and diesel trucks, respectively. Size distribution measurements showed that diesel trucks emitted at least an order of magnitude more particles for all measured sizes (10 < D{sub p} < 290 nm) per unit mass of fuel burned. The relative importance of LD vehicles as a source of particles increased as D{sub p} decreased. Comparing the results from this study to previous measurements at the same site showed that particle number emission factors have decreased for both LD vehicles and diesel trucks since 1997. Integrating size distributions with a volume weighting showed that diesel trucks emitted 28 {+-} 11 times more particles by volume than LD vehicles, consistent with the diesel/gasoline emission factor ratio for PM{sub 2.5} mass measured using gravimetric analysis of Teflon filters, reported in a companion paper.

  18. Will Aerosol Hygroscopicity Change with Biodiesel, Renewable Diesel Fuels and Emission Control Technologies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Diep; Short, Daniel; Karavalakis, Georgios; Durbin, Thomas D; Asa-Awuku, Akua

    2017-02-07

    The use of biodiesel and renewable diesel fuels in compression ignition engines and aftertreatment technologies may affect vehicle exhaust emissions. In this study two 2012 light-duty vehicles equipped with direct injection diesel engines, diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), diesel particulate filter (DPF), and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) were tested on a chassis dynamometer. One vehicle was tested over the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) cycle on seven biodiesel and renewable diesel fuel blends. Both vehicles were exercised over double Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Highway fuel economy test (HWFET) cycles on ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) and a soy-based biodiesel blend to investigate the aerosol hygroscopicity during the regeneration of the DPF. Overall, the apparent hygroscopicity of emissions during nonregeneration events is consistently low (κ < 0.1) for all fuels over the FTP cycle. Aerosol emitted during filter regeneration is significantly more CCN active and hygroscopic; average κ values range from 0.242 to 0.439 and are as high as 0.843. Regardless of fuel, the current classification of "fresh" tailpipe emissions as nonhygroscopic remains true during nonregeneration operation. However, aftertreatment technologies such as DPF, will produce significantly more hygroscopic particles during regeneration. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show a significant enhancement of hygroscopic materials emitted during DPF regeneration of on-road diesel vehicles. As such, the contribution of regeneration emissions from a growing fleet of diesel vehicles will be important.

  19. Do biofuel blending mandates reduce gasoline consumption? Implications of state-level renewable fuel standards for energy security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Shinling

    In an effort to keep America's addiction to oil under control, federal and state governments have implemented a variety of policy measures including those that determine the composition of motor gasoline sold at the pump. Biofuel blending mandates known as Renewable Fuel Standards (RFS) are designed to reduce the amount of foreign crude oil needed to be imported as well as to boost the local ethanol and corn industry. Yet beyond looking at changes in gasoline prices associated with increased ethanol production, there have been no empirical studies that examine effects of state-level RFS implementation on gasoline consumption. I estimate a Generalized Least Squares model for the gasoline demand for the 1993 to 2010 period with state and time fixed effects controlling for RFS. States with active RFS are Minnesota, Hawaii, Missouri, Florida, Washington, and Oregon. I find that, despite the onset of federal biofuel mandates across states in 2007 and the lower energy content of blended gasoline, being in a state that has implemented RFS is associated with 1.5% decrease in gasoline consumption (including blended gasoline). This is encouraging evidence for efforts to lessen dependence on gasoline and has positive implications for energy security.

  20. Comprehensive particle characterization of modern gasoline and diesel passenger cars at low ambient temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathis, Urs; Mohr, Martin; Forss, Anna-Maria

    Particle measurements were performed in the exhaust of five light-duty vehicles (Euro-3) at +23, -7, and -20 °C ambient temperatures. The characterization included measurements of particle number, active surface area, number size distribution, and mass size distribution. We investigated two port-injection spark-ignition (PISI) vehicles, a direct-injection spark-ignition (DISI) vehicle, a compressed ignition (CI) vehicle with diesel particle filter (DPF), and a CI vehicle without DPF. To minimize sampling effects, particles were directly sampled from the tailpipe with a novel porous tube diluter at controlled sampling parameters. The diluted exhaust was split into two branches to measure either all or only non-volatile particles. Effect of ambient temperature was investigated on particle emission for cold and warmed-up engine. For the gasoline vehicles and the CI vehicle with DPF, the main portion of particle emission was found in the first minutes of the driving cycle at cold engine start. The particle emission of the CI vehicle without DPF was hardly affected by cold engine start. For the PISI vehicles, particle number emissions were superproportionally increased in the diameter size range from 0.1 to 0.3 μm during cold start at low ambient temperature. Based on the particle mass size distribution, the DPF removed smaller particles ( dp0.5μm). No significant effect of ambient temperature was observed when the engine was warmed up. Peak emission of volatile nanoparticles only took place at specific conditions and was poorly repeatable. Nucleation of particles was predominately observed during or after strong acceleration at high speed and during regeneration of the DPF.

  1. Inventory of concepts for mixed diesel fuels containing renewable components. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kronberg, B. [Inst. for Surface Chemistry, Stockholm (Sweden); Berg, R. [Befri Konsult, Solna (Sweden); Berg, J. [Svenska Lantmaennen/Agro Oil, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2000-08-01

    The present report has involved the assembly of two sub-reports, which have been put together to form this final report. Both of the sub-reports deal with the incorporation of ethanol in diesel fuels. The potential advantages are the decreased net emissions of carbon dioxide, due to the renewable nature of ethanol (if obtained from renewable raw materials), and the decrease of NO{sub x} emissions, due to the decreased combustion temperature. The first sub-report is a compilation of scientific articles and patents/patent applications regarding the possibility to blend ethanol into diesel to form a stable solution in the form of a so called microemulsion, with the aid of surfactants and/or co-solvents. The second sub-report briefly describes the test work, both in the laboratory and in field tests, that is being done in various countries, regarding the blending of ethanol into diesel fuel.

  2. Developments in Spray Modeling in Diesel and Direct-Injection Gasoline Engines Progrès de la modélisation des sprays dans les moteurs Diesel et à essence

    OpenAIRE

    Kong S. C.; Senecal P. K.; Reitz R. D.

    2006-01-01

    In direct-injection engines, the fuel spray characteristics influence the combustion efficiency and exhaust emissions. The performance of available spray models for predicting liquid and vapor fuel distributions, and their influence on combustion is reviewed for both diesel and gasoline direct injection engines. A phenomenological nozzle flow model is described for simulating the effects of diesel injector nozzle internal geometry on the fuel injection and spray processes. The flow model prov...

  3. Energy use and greenhouse gas emissions from an algae fractionation process for producing renewable diesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pegallapati, Ambica K; Frank, Edward D.

    2016-09-01

    In one approach to algal biofuel production, lipids are extracted and converted to renewable diesel and non-lipid remnants are converted to biogas, which is used for renewable heat and power to support the process. Since biofuel economics benefit from increased fuel yield, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory analyzed an alternative pathway that extracts lipids and also makes ethanol from carbohydrates in the biomass. In this paper, we examine the environmental sustainability of this "fractionation pathway" through life-cycle analysis (LCA) of greenhouse gas emissions and energy use. When the feedstock productivity was 30 (18) g/m(2)/d, this pathway emitted 31 (36) gCO(2)e/MJ of total fuel, which is less than the emissions associated with conventional low sulfur petroleum diesel (96 gCO(2)e/MJ). The fractionation pathway performed well in this model despite the diversion of carbon to the ethanol fuel.

  4. Impact of biodiesel and renewable diesel on emissions of regulated pollutants and greenhouse gases on a 2000 heavy duty diesel truck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Kwangsam; Biswas, Subhasis; Robertson, William; Sahay, Keshav; Okamoto, Robert; Mitchell, Alexander; Lemieux, Sharon

    2015-04-01

    As part of a broad evaluation of the environmental impacts of biodiesel and renewable diesel as alternative motor fuels and fuel blends in California, the California Air Resources Board's (CARB) Heavy-duty Diesel Emission Testing Laboratory conducted chassis dynamometer exhaust emission measurements on in-use heavy-heavy-duty diesel trucks (HHDDT). The results presented here detail the impact of biodiesel and renewable diesel fuels and fuel blends as compared to CARB ULSD on particulate matter (PM), regulated gases, and two greenhouse gases emissions from a HHDDT with a 2000 C15 Caterpillar engine with no exhaust after treatment devices. This vehicle was tested over the Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule (UDDS) and the cruise portion of the California HHDDT driving schedule. Three neat blend stocks (soy-based and animal-based fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) biodiesels, and a renewable diesel) and CARB-certified ultra-low sulfur diesel (CARB ULSD) along with their 20% and 50% blends (blended with CARB ULSD) were tested. The effects of blend level on emission characteristics were discussed on g·km-1 basis. The results showed that PM, total hydrocarbon (THC), and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions were dependent on driving cycles, showing higher emissions for the UDDS cycles with medium load than the highway cruise cycle with high load on per km basis. When comparing CARB ULSD to biodiesels and renewable diesel blends, it was observed that the PM, THC, and CO emissions decreased with increasing blend levels regardless of the driving cycles. Note that biodiesel blends showed higher degree of emission reductions for PM, THC, and CO than renewable diesel blends. Both biodiesels and renewable diesel blends effectively reduced PM emissions, mainly due to reduction in elemental carbon emissions (EC), however no readily apparent reductions in organic carbon (OC) emissions were observed. When compared to CARB ULSD, soy- and animal-based biodiesel blends showed statistically

  5. Investigation of the effects of renewable diesel fuels on engine performance, combustion, and emissions

    KAUST Repository

    Ogunkoya, Dolanimi

    2015-01-01

    A study was undertaken to investigate renewable fuels in a compression-ignition internal combustion engine. The focus of this study was the effect of newly developed renewable fuels on engine performance, combustion, and emissions. Eight fuels were investigated, and they include diesel, jet fuel, a traditional biodiesel (fatty acid methyl ester: FAME), and five next generation biofuels. These five fuels were derived using a two-step process: hydrolysis of the oil into fatty acids (if necessary) and then a thermo-catalytic process to remove the oxygen via a decarboxylation reaction. The fuels included a fed batch deoxygenation of canola derived fatty acids (DCFA), a fed batch deoxygenation of canola derived fatty acids with varying amounts of H2 used during the deoxygenation process (DCFAH), a continuous deoxygenation of canola derived fatty acids (CDCFA), fed batch deoxygenation of lauric acid (DLA), and a third reaction to isomerize the products of the deoxygenated canola derived fatty acid alkanes (IPCF). Diesel, jet fuel, and biodiesel (FAME) have been used as benchmarks for comparing with the newer renewable fuels. The results of the experiments show slightly lower mechanical efficiency but better brake specific fuel consumption for the new renewable fuels. Results from combustion show shorter ignition delays for most of the renewable (deoxygenated) fuels with the exception of fed batch deoxygenation of lauric acid. Combustion results also show lower peak in-cylinder pressures, reduced rate of increase in cylinder pressure, and lower heat release rates for the renewable fuels. Emission results show an increase in hydrocarbon emissions for renewable deoxygenated fuels, but a general decrease in all other emissions including NOx, greenhouse gases, and soot. Results also demonstrate that isomers of the alkanes resulting from the deoxygenation of the canola derived fatty acids could be a potential replacement to conventional fossil diesel and biodiesel based on the

  6. Drop-in Jet and Diesel Fuels from Renewable Oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-11

    WWII Germany • Gasify coal or other biomass to CO and H2 • Catalytically convert syngas to hydrocarbons • Paraffins and isoparaffins • Hydrotreated ...Renewable Jet (HRJ) • Converts renewable plant oils or fats • Conventional catalytic petroleum refining processes • Hydrotreating , hydrocracking...CHJatropha ~ f J I j l 1 ~ ~ -~AAA-----------====-~~~~~~ 14 GC of Hydrotreated CH Crude Jatropha Oil 9e+07 8.5e+07 8e+07 7.5e+07 Hydrotreated

  7. Diesel and gasoline engines VI. Quality injection, fuel mixture, simulation, application, metrology; Diesel- und Benzindirekteinspritzung VI. Einspritzqualitaet, Gemischbildung, Simulation, Applikation, Messtechnik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tschoeke, Helmut (ed.) [Otto-von-Guericke-Univ., Magdeburg (DE). Inst. fuer Mobile Systeme (IMS)

    2011-07-01

    Within the meeting 'Diesel and gasoline direct injection' of the Haus der Technik e.V. (Essen, Federal Republic of Germany) at 1st to 2nd December, 2010 in Berlin (Federal Republic of Germany) the following lectures were held: (1) Efficient common rail injection systems and intelligent regulation strategies for the fulfilment of future on-/off-highway emission limits (Christian Schugger); (2) Challenges for injection systems and combustion processes of large diesel engines for keeping the emission limits IMO TIER3 in 2016 (Horst Harndorf); (3) HFO operation with CR injection (Christian Poensgen); (4) Efficiency, potential and limits of shortened spraying distances at the diesel engine: Results from thermodynamic, optical and numerical investigations (Oliver Heinold); (5) Advantages of the formation of the injection process for the fuel consumption and pollutant emission of diesel engines (Maximilian Brauer); (6) Control of combustion rates: A decisive step towards a further optimization of CO{sub 2}, emissions and NVH (Florian Kremer); (7) Ultra high pressure fuel injection for minimized engine-out emissions of HD diesel engines (Olad Erik Herrmann); (8) Analysis of injection sprays by means of large high-speed engines under cold and evaporating conditions (Christian Fink); (9) Development of optimal cam contours (Hendrik Grosse-Loescher); (10) Design criteria for the CO{sub 2} optimization of the new Continental 2-piston-diesel pump platform (Peter Voigt); (11) Innovative measurement for injection systems (Bjoern Janetzky); (12) Process for the measurement of the rate of injection on engine-related conditions (Wolfgang Fimml); (13) Experimental and numerical investigations of hydro erosive grinding for injection components (Uwe Iben); (14) Application programs for the calculation of spray propagation in a moving engine's combustion chamber (Kai Uwe Muench); (15) An integrated approach for the fulfilment of future emission legislations at stationary

  8. AP fuels and the potential of renewable diesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkley, Mark; Seifkar, Navid; O' Shea, Michael; Peters, Christopher

    2010-09-15

    The decrease in demand for forestry products has been detrimental to the Province of Quebec's industrial base. With increasing energy security and environmental concerns the promotion of innovative technologies is adamant. AP Fuels Inc. has undertaken the development of a biomass-to-liquids facility proposed herein as a hybrid design, combining biomass and natural gas capable of producing diesel and other liquid fuels. The facility would consume 2,200,000 tonnewet per year of biomass and produce 10,600 bbl/day of liquid fuels. Forestry-derived F-T fuels have notable advantages including: improved performance; ultra-low sulphur content; reduced emissions, particulates and fouling; and production of fewer by-products.

  9. BIODEGRADATION OF EFFLUENT CONTAMINATED WITH DIESEL OIL AND GASOLINE USING CHITOSAN AS A NATURAL COAGULANT IN A CONTINUOUS PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. de Oliveira

    Full Text Available Abstract This study evaluated the effects of aeration (constant aeration, intermittent aeration and a lack of aeration and hydraulic retention time (HRT (2, 3 and 4 days on a continuous process with cell recycling, using chitosan as a natural coagulant for the sedimentation of a C1 mixed culture. This culture was used for the biodegradation of hydrocarbons present in the effluent contaminated with diesel oil and gasoline. The responses monitored included the turbidity removal (TR, total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH removal and volatile suspended solids (VSS. Constant aeration and an HRT of 4 days produced the best results for the continuous process, resulting in the highest TPH removals (94% and 75% reductions in the supernatant and reaction tank, respectively and TR (95%.

  10. Chemical transport model simulations of organic aerosol in southern California: model evaluation and gasoline and diesel source contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jathar, Shantanu H.; Woody, Matthew; Pye, Havala O. T.; Baker, Kirk R.; Robinson, Allen L.

    2017-03-01

    Gasoline- and diesel-fueled engines are ubiquitous sources of air pollution in urban environments. They emit both primary particulate matter and precursor gases that react to form secondary particulate matter in the atmosphere. In this work, we updated the organic aerosol module and organic emissions inventory of a three-dimensional chemical transport model, the Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ), using recent, experimentally derived inputs and parameterizations for mobile sources. The updated model included a revised volatile organic compound (VOC) speciation for mobile sources and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from unspeciated intermediate volatility organic compounds (IVOCs). The updated model was used to simulate air quality in southern California during May and June 2010, when the California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) study was conducted. Compared to the Traditional version of CMAQ, which is commonly used for regulatory applications, the updated model did not significantly alter the predicted organic aerosol (OA) mass concentrations but did substantially improve predictions of OA sources and composition (e.g., POA-SOA split), as well as ambient IVOC concentrations. The updated model, despite substantial differences in emissions and chemistry, performed similar to a recently released research version of CMAQ (Woody et al., 2016) that did not include the updated VOC and IVOC emissions and SOA data. Mobile sources were predicted to contribute 30-40 % of the OA in southern California (half of which was SOA), making mobile sources the single largest source contributor to OA in southern California. The remainder of the OA was attributed to non-mobile anthropogenic sources (e.g., cooking, biomass burning) with biogenic sources contributing to less than 5 % to the total OA. Gasoline sources were predicted to contribute about 13 times more OA than diesel sources; this difference was driven by differences in

  11. Mutagenicity and in vivo toxicity of combined particulate and semivolatile organic fractions of gasoline and diesel engine emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seagrave, JeanClare; McDonald, Jacob D; Gigliotti, Andrew P; Nikula, Kristen J; Seilkop, Steven K; Gurevich, Michael; Mauderly, Joe L

    2002-12-01

    Exposure to engine emissions is associated with adverse health effects. However, little is known about the relative effects of emissions produced by different operating conditions, fuels, or technologies. Rapid screening techniques are needed to compare the biological effects of emissions with different characteristics. Here, we examined a set of engine emission samples using conventional bioassays. The samples included combined particulate material and semivolatile organic compound fractions of emissions collected from normal- and high-emitter gasoline and diesel vehicles collected at 72 degrees F, and from normal-emitter groups collected at 30 degrees F. The relative potency of the samples was determined by statistical analysis of the dose-response curves. All samples induced bacterial mutagenicity, with a 10-fold range of potency among the samples. Responses to intratracheal instillation in rats indicated generally parallel rankings of the samples by multiple endpoints reflecting cytotoxic, inflammatory, and lung parenchymal changes, allowing selection of a more limited set of parameters for future studies. The parameters selected to assess oxidative stress and macrophage function yielded little useful information. Responses to instillation indicated little difference in potency per unit of combined particulate material and semivolatile organic compound mass between normal-emitter gasoline and diesel vehicles, or between emissions collected at different temperatures. However, equivalent masses of emissions from high-emitter vehicles of both types were more potent than those from normal-emitters. While preliminary in terms of assessing contributions of different emissions to health hazards, the results indicate that a subset of this panel of assays will be useful in providing rapid, cost-effective feedback on the biological impact of modified technology.

  12. The pH-dependent release of platinum group elements (PGEs) from gasoline and diesel fuel catalysts: Implication for weathering in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchá, Veronika; Mihaljevič, Martin; Ettler, Vojtěch; Strnad, Ladislav

    2016-04-15

    Powdered samples of new and old gasoline catalysts (Pt, Pd, Rh) and new and old diesel (Pt) catalysts were subjected to a pH-static leaching procedure (pH 2-9) coupled with thermodynamic modeling using PHREEQC-3 to verify the release and mobility of PGEs (platinum group elements). PGEs were released under acidic conditions, mostly exhibiting L-shaped leaching patterns: diesel old: 5.47, 0.005, 0.02; diesel new: 68.5, 0.23, 0.11; gasoline old: 0.1, 11.8, 4.79; gasoline new 2.6, 25.2, 35.9 in mg kg(-1) for Pt, Pd and Rh, respectively. Only the new diesel catalyst had a strikingly different leaching pattern with elevated concentrations at pH 4, probably influenced by the dissolution of the catalyst carrier and washcoat. The pH-static experiment coupled with thermodynamic modeling was found to be an effective instrument for understanding the leaching behavior of PGEs under various environmental conditions, and indicated that charged Pt and Rh species may be adsorbed on the negatively charged surface of kaolinite or Mn oxides in the soil system, whereas uncharged Pd and Rh species may remain mobile in soil solutions.

  13. Pyrolytic catalysis on activated carbon als technological option for teh production of diesel and gasoline production from biogenic waste fats; Pyrolytische Katalyse an Aktivkohlen als Verfahrensoption zur Herstellung von Diesel- und Benzinkomponenten aus biogenen Altfetten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danzig, J.; Fastabend, A.; Heil, V.; Meller, K.; Menne, A.; Unger, C.; Rossow, S.; Wozniak, K.

    2007-10-15

    This study deals with the conversion of biogenous waste fats into gasoline- and diesel-like hydrocarbon mixtures. The waste fats are converted by a thermo-chemical process at 400 C to 500 C over activated carbon. Lab-scale investigations covered the influences of the type and residence time of the activated carbon, the reaction temperature and the fat/activated carbon-ratio. The aim was to gain high amounts of liquid product with a high amount of either gasoline- or diesel-fraction components. The experiments show that all of the investigated parameters have an important impact upon the product yields. Many of the correlations are strongly nonlinear and exhibit minima or maxima within the tested ranges. While reaching liquid product yields of up to 66% of the theoretical maximum, we were able to create diesel- as well as gasoline-optimised products. Comparing our product to commercially available DIN EN 590 diesel fuel reveals a remarkable conformity of both liquids. In order to perform further long-term experiments concerning the lifetime of the catalyst and to optimise the product separation, a small technical scale-plant is just being built. (orig.)

  14. Effects of Fuel Quantity on Soot Formation Process for Biomass-Based Renewable Diesel Fuel Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Jing, Wei

    2016-12-01

    Soot formation process was investigated for biomass-based renewable diesel fuel, such as biomass to liquid (BTL), and conventional diesel combustion under varied fuel quantities injected into a constant volume combustion chamber. Soot measurement was implemented by two-color pyrometry under quiescent type diesel engine conditions (1000 K and 21% O2 concentration). Different fuel quantities, which correspond to different injection widths from 0.5 ms to 2 ms under constant injection pressure (1000 bar), were used to simulate different loads in engines. For a given fuel, soot temperature and KL factor show a different trend at initial stage for different fuel quantities, where a higher soot temperature can be found in a small fuel quantity case but a higher KL factor is observed in a large fuel quantity case generally. Another difference occurs at the end of combustion due to the termination of fuel injection. Additionally, BTL flame has a lower soot temperature, especially under a larger fuel quantity (2 ms injection width). Meanwhile, average soot level is lower for BTL flame, especially under a lower fuel quantity (0.5 ms injection width). BTL shows an overall low sooting behavior with low soot temperature compared to diesel, however, trade-off between soot level and soot temperature needs to be carefully selected when different loads are used.

  15. Towards Understanding Environmental/Health Risks of Renewable Diesel (Biodiesel, Non- ester Diesel) in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, K.; Ginn, T. R.; McKone, T. E.; Rice, D. W.

    2007-12-01

    Alternative fuels for internal combustion engines offer considerable benefits as they provide so-called "sustainable" alternatives to mined fossil fuels, reduce the nation's dependence on imported petroleum, and have the potential to reduce harmful pollutants and exhaust emissions. This has been long recognized: the first appearance and demonstration of an oil based diesel fuel was at the Paris Exhibition in 1900. The Energy Policy Act of 1992 required 75 percent of new federal/state vehicles to accomodate alternative fuels. Modern concerns and overpopulation have dramatically raised the current interest. However, since these are relatively new fuels, the risks and uncertainties associated with environmental and human health effects are as yet unaddressed. As required by Section 43830.8 California Health and Safety Code before adopting new fuel specifications the California Air Resources Board (CARB) is required to prepare a relative "multimedia" evaluation of new fuels, not only with regard to engine performance and emission requirements but also with consideration of health and environmental criteria involving airborne toxics and associated health risks, ozone formation potential, hazardous waste generation and management and surface and groundwater contamination resulting from production, distribution, and use. The assessment is relative to a standard reference fuel. As a preliminary to multimedia risk assessment of biodiesel, we report here on: a brief history of biodiesel; production of biodiesel, fuel quality, and feedstocks used; key properties of six different feedstocks for possible large scale biodiesel production; and California's production challenges. Priority characteristics that pertain to environmental fate and transport and human health are described. The longer-term objective of this study is an overall relative examination of the environmental and health effects of biodiesel within the context of a multimedia assessment.

  16. Quantifying on-road emissions from gasoline-powered motor vehicles: accounting for the presence of medium- and heavy-duty diesel trucks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallmann, Timothy R; Kirchstetter, Thomas W; DeMartini, Steven J; Harley, Robert A

    2013-12-03

    Vehicle emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO), fine particulate matter (PM2.5), organic aerosol (OA), and black carbon (BC) were measured at the Caldecott tunnel in the San Francisco Bay Area. Measurements were made in bore 2 of the tunnel, where light-duty (LD) vehicles accounted for >99% of total traffic and heavy-duty trucks were not allowed. Prior emission studies conducted in North America have often assumed that route- or weekend-specific prohibitions on heavy-duty truck traffic imply that diesel contributions to pollutant concentrations measured in on-road settings can be neglected. However, as light-duty vehicle emissions have declined, this assumption can lead to biased results, especially for pollutants such as NOx, OA, and BC, for which diesel-engine emission rates are high compared to corresponding values for gasoline engines. In this study, diesel vehicles (mostly medium-duty delivery trucks with two axles and six tires) accounted for emission factors for light-duty vehicles are, respectively, 10 and 50 times lower than for heavy-duty diesel trucks. Using measured emission factors from this study and publicly available data on taxable fuel sales, as of 2010, LD gasoline vehicles were estimated to be responsible for 85%, 18%, 18%, and 6% of emissions of CO, NOx, OA, and BC, respectively, from on-road motor vehicles in the United States.

  17. Application of positive matrix factorization to on-road measurements for source apportionment of diesel- and gasoline-powered vehicle emissions in Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Thornhill

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this research is to quantify diesel- and gasoline-powered motor vehicle emissions within the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA using on-road measurements captured by a mobile laboratory combined with positive matrix factorization (PMF receptor modeling. During the MCMA-2006 ground-based component of the MILAGRO field campaign, the Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory (AML measured many gaseous and particulate pollutants, including carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide (CO, nitrogen oxides (NOx, benzene, toluene, alkylated aromatics, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, ammonia, particle number, fine particulate mass (PM2.5, and black carbon (BC. These serve as inputs to the receptor model, which is able to resolve three factors corresponding to gasoline engine exhaust, diesel engine exhaust, and the urban background. Using the source profiles, we calculate fuel-based emission factors for each type of exhaust. The MCMA's gasoline-powered vehicles are considerably dirtier, on average, than those in the US with respect to CO and aldehydes. Its diesel-powered vehicles have similar emission factors of NOx and higher emission factors of aldehydes, particle number, and BC. In the fleet sampled during AML driving, gasoline-powered vehicles are responsible for 97% of mobile source emissions of CO, 22% of NOx, 95–97% of aromatics, 72–85% of carbonyls, 74% of ammonia, negligible amounts of particle number, 26% of PM2.5, and 2% of BC; diesel-powered vehicles account for the balance. Because the mobile lab spent 17% of its time waiting at stoplights, the results may overemphasize idling conditions, possibly resulting in an underestimate of NOx and overestimate of CO emissions. On the other hand, estimates of the inventory that do not correctly account for emissions during idling are likely to produce bias in the opposite direction. Nevertheless, the fuel-based inventory suggests that mobile

  18. Application of positive matrix factorization to on-road measurements for source apportionment of diesel- and gasoline-powered vehicle emissions in Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Thornhill

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this research is to quantify diesel- and gasoline-powered motor vehicle emissions within the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA using on-road measurements captured by a mobile laboratory combined with positive matrix factorization (PMF receptor modeling. During the MCMA-2006 ground-based component of the MILAGRO field campaign, the Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory (AML measured many gaseous and particulate pollutants, including carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide (CO, nitrogen oxides (NOx, benzene, toluene, alkylated aromatics, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, ammonia, particle number, fine particulate mass (PM2.5, and black carbon (BC. These serve as inputs to the receptor model, which is able to resolve three factors corresponding to gasoline engine exhaust, diesel engine exhaust, and the urban background. Using the source profiles, we calculate fuel-based emission factors for each type of exhaust. The MCMA's gasoline-powered vehicles are considerably dirtier, on average, than those in the US with respect to CO and aldehydes. Its diesel-powered vehicles have similar emission factors of NOx and higher emission factors of aldehydes, particle number, and BC. In the fleet sampled during AML driving, gasoline-powered vehicles are found to be responsible for 97% of total vehicular emissions of CO, 22% of NOx, 95–97% of each aromatic species, 72–85% of each carbonyl species, 74% of ammonia, negligible amounts of particle number, 26% of PM2.5, and 2% of BC; diesel-powered vehicles account for the balance. Because the mobile lab spent 17% of its time waiting at stoplights, the results may overemphasize idling conditions, possibly resulting in an underestimate of NOx and overestimate of CO emissions. On the other hand, estimates of the inventory that do not correctly account for emissions during idling are likely to produce bias in the opposite direction.The resulting fuel

  19. Application of positive matrix factorization to on-road measurements for source apportionment of diesel- and gasoline-powered vehicle emissions in Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornhill, D. A.; Williams, A. E.; Onasch, T. B.; Wood, E.; Herndon, S. C.; Kolb, C. E.; Knighton, W. B.; Zavala, M.; Molina, L. T.; Marr, L. C.

    2010-04-01

    The goal of this research is to quantify diesel- and gasoline-powered motor vehicle emissions within the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) using on-road measurements captured by a mobile laboratory combined with positive matrix factorization (PMF) receptor modeling. During the MCMA-2006 ground-based component of the MILAGRO field campaign, the Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory (AML) measured many gaseous and particulate pollutants, including carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), benzene, toluene, alkylated aromatics, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, ammonia, particle number, fine particulate mass (PM2.5), and black carbon (BC). These serve as inputs to the receptor model, which is able to resolve three factors corresponding to gasoline engine exhaust, diesel engine exhaust, and the urban background. Using the source profiles, we calculate fuel-based emission factors for each type of exhaust. The MCMA's gasoline-powered vehicles are considerably dirtier, on average, than those in the US with respect to CO and aldehydes. Its diesel-powered vehicles have similar emission factors of NOx and higher emission factors of aldehydes, particle number, and BC. In the fleet sampled during AML driving, gasoline-powered vehicles are found to be responsible for 97% of total vehicular emissions of CO, 22% of NOx, 95-97% of each aromatic species, 72-85% of each carbonyl species, 74% of ammonia, negligible amounts of particle number, 26% of PM2.5, and 2% of BC; diesel-powered vehicles account for the balance. Because the mobile lab spent 17% of its time waiting at stoplights, the results may overemphasize idling conditions, possibly resulting in an underestimate of NOx and overestimate of CO emissions. On the other hand, estimates of the inventory that do not correctly account for emissions during idling are likely to produce bias in the opposite direction.The resulting fuel-based estimates of emissions are lower than in the official inventory for CO and NOx

  20. Analysis of gasoline and diesel prices and subsidies in Mexico, 2007-2011; Analisis de los precios y de los subsidios a las gasolinas y el diesel en Mexico, 2007-2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tepach M, Reyes [LXI legislatura, Camara de Diputados (Mexico)

    2011-07-15

    Beginning in December 2009, the federal government reinitiated monthly changes in gasoline and diesel prices in order to reduce subsidies, shifting responsibility to the nation's consumers. From December 2009 to July 2011, Premium gasoline rose from 9.57 to 10.38 pesos per liter, Regular gasoline (Magna) increased from 7.77 to 9.32 pesos per liter and diesel from 8.16 to 9.68 pesos per liter. Gasoline and diesel subsidies in the year 2011 had the following behavior: in December 2009, Premium gasoline in Mexico was 27 cents per liter more expensive than in the United States, and in July 2011 it was 1.12 pesos less expensive per liter in our country. For Regular (Magna) gasoline in December 2009 a subsidy of 64 cents per liter was maintained, and in July 2011 it was 1.33 pesos less expensive per liter in our country. Finally, the subsidy for Diesel was maintained at 1 peso per liter in December 2009, increasing 2.11 pesos per liter in July 2011 with respect to the price observed in the United States. The monetary estimate of income losses by the gasoline industry due to these price differences was 41,421.27 million pesos (mp) during 2010, corresponding to -21,246.55 mp for Regular, 597.22 mp for Premium and -20,771.94 mp for Diesel. For the period January to July 2011, the total income loss experienced by the industry was 48,976.19 mp, corresponding to -28,400.9 mp for Regular, -1,707.6 mp for Premium and -18,867.8 for Diesel. Note that 57.99% of the loss in income was generated through the consumption of Regular gasoline since demand by automobiles continues to be high in the country; Premium was 3.49% and Diesel represented 38.52% of the total subsidy. With regard to the fiscal impact of the subsidy for gasoline and Diesel, during fiscal year 2007 and 2008, there was a transfer to the consumers of 48,324 and 217,609.1 mp, respectively. In fiscal year 2009, a positive balance was collected in IEPS of 3,203.1 mp in federal public funds. For fiscal year 2010 the

  1. Analysis of gasoline and diesel prices and subsidies in Mexico, 2007-2011; Analisis de los precios y de los subsidios a las gasolinas y el diesel en Mexico, 2007-2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tepach M, Reyes [LXI legislatura, Camara de Diputados (Mexico)

    2011-07-15

    Beginning in December 2009, the federal government reinitiated monthly changes in gasoline and diesel prices in order to reduce subsidies, shifting responsibility to the nation's consumers. From December 2009 to July 2011, Premium gasoline rose from 9.57 to 10.38 pesos per liter, Regular gasoline (Magna) increased from 7.77 to 9.32 pesos per liter and diesel from 8.16 to 9.68 pesos per liter. Gasoline and diesel subsidies in the year 2011 had the following behavior: in December 2009, Premium gasoline in Mexico was 27 cents per liter more expensive than in the United States, and in July 2011 it was 1.12 pesos less expensive per liter in our country. For Regular (Magna) gasoline in December 2009 a subsidy of 64 cents per liter was maintained, and in July 2011 it was 1.33 pesos less expensive per liter in our country. Finally, the subsidy for Diesel was maintained at 1 peso per liter in December 2009, increasing 2.11 pesos per liter in July 2011 with respect to the price observed in the United States. The monetary estimate of income losses by the gasoline industry due to these price differences was 41,421.27 million pesos (mp) during 2010, corresponding to -21,246.55 mp for Regular, 597.22 mp for Premium and -20,771.94 mp for Diesel. For the period January to July 2011, the total income loss experienced by the industry was 48,976.19 mp, corresponding to -28,400.9 mp for Regular, -1,707.6 mp for Premium and -18,867.8 for Diesel. Note that 57.99% of the loss in income was generated through the consumption of Regular gasoline since demand by automobiles continues to be high in the country; Premium was 3.49% and Diesel represented 38.52% of the total subsidy. With regard to the fiscal impact of the subsidy for gasoline and Diesel, during fiscal year 2007 and 2008, there was a transfer to the consumers of 48,324 and 217,609.1 mp, respectively. In fiscal year 2009, a positive balance was collected in IEPS of 3,203.1 mp in federal public funds. For fiscal year 2010 the

  2. PAH, BTEX, carbonyl compound, black-carbon, NO2 and ultrafine particle dynamometer bench emissions for Euro 4 and Euro 5 diesel and gasoline passenger cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Cédric; Liu, Yao; Tassel, Patrick; Perret, Pascal; Chaumond, Agnès; André, Michel

    2016-09-01

    Although implementing Diesel particulate filters (DPF) and other novel aftertreatment technologies makes it possible to achieve significant reductions in particle mass emissions, it may induce the release of ultrafine particles and emissions of many other unregulated compounds. This paper focuses on (i) ultrafine particles, black carbon, BTEX, PAH, carbonyl compounds, and NO2 emissions from Euro 4 and Euro 5 Diesel and gasoline passenger cars, (ii) the influence of driving conditions (e.g., cold start, urban, rural and motorway conditions), and (iii) the impact of additive and catalysed DPF devices on vehicle emissions. Chassis dynamometer tests were conducted on four Euro 5 vehicles and two Euro 4 vehicles: gasoline vehicles with and without direct injection system and Diesel vehicles equipped with additive and catalysed particulate filters. The results showed that compared to hot-start cycles, cold-start urban cycles increased all pollutant emissions by a factor of two. The sole exception was NO2, which was reduced by a factor of 1.3-6. Particulate and black carbon emissions from the gasoline engines were significantly higher than those from the Diesel engines equipped with DPF. Moreover, the catalysed DPF emitted about 3-10 times more carbonyl compounds and particles than additive DPF, respectively, during urban driving cycles, while the additive DPF vehicles emitted 2 and 5 times more BTEX and carbonyl compounds during motorway driving cycles. Regarding particle number distribution, the motorway driving cycle induced the emission of particles smaller in diameter (mode at 15 nm) than the urban cold-start cycle (mode at 80-100 nm). The results showed a clear positive correlation between particle, black carbon, and BTEX emissions, and a negative correlation between particles and NO2.

  3. The possibility of controlled auto-ignition (CAI) in gasoline engine and gas to liquid (GTL) as a fuel of diesel engine in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, D. [Korea Inst. of Machinery and Materials, Daejou (Korea)

    2005-07-01

    A significant challenge grows from the ever-increasing demands for the optimization of performance, emissions, fuel economy and drivability. The most powerful technologies in the near future to improve these factors are believed Controlled Auto-Ignition (CAI) in gasoline engine and Gas to Liquid (GTL) as a fuel of Diesel engine. In recent years there has been an increasing trend to use more complex valvetrain designs from traditional camshaft driven mechanical systems to camless electromagnetic or electrohydraulic solutions. Comparing to fixed valve actuation systems, variable valve actuation (VVA) should be powerful to optimize the engine cycle. The matching of valve events to the engine performance and to emission requirements at a given engine or vehicle operating condition can be further optimized to the Controlled Auto-Ignition (CAI) in gasoline engine, which has benefits in NOx emission, fuel consumption, combustion stability and intake throttle load. In case of Diesel engine, the increasing demands for NOx and soot emission reduction have introduced aftertreatment technologies recently, but been in need of basic solution for the future, such as a super clean fuel like Gas to Liquid (GTL), which has benefits in comparability to diesel fuel, independency from crude oil and reduction of CO, THC and soot emissions. Korea looks to the future with these kinds of technologies, and tries to find the possibility for reaching the future targets in the internal combustion engine. (orig.)

  4. Uncertainty propagation in life cycle assessment of biodiesel versus diesel: global warming and non-renewable energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jinglan

    2012-06-01

    Uncertainty information is essential for the proper use of life cycle assessment and environmental assessments in decision making. To investigate the uncertainties of biodiesel and determine the level of confidence in the assertion that biodiesel is more environmentally friendly than diesel, an explicit analytical approach based on the Taylor series expansion for lognormal distribution was applied in the present study. A biodiesel case study demonstrates the probability that biodiesel has a lower global warming and non-renewable energy score than diesel, that is 92.3% and 93.1%, respectively. The results indicate the level of confidence in the assertion that biodiesel is more environmentally friendly than diesel based on the global warming and non-renewable energy scores.

  5. Gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) emission from gasoline and diesel vehicles under real-world driving test cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Ha T; Imanishi, Katsuma; Morikawa, Tazuko; Hagino, Hiroyuki; Takenaka, Norimichi

    2017-04-01

    Reactive nitrogen species emission from the exhausts of gasoline and diesel vehicles, including nitrogen oxides (NOx) and nitrous acid (HONO), contributes as a significant source of photochemical oxidant precursors in the ambient air. Multiple laboratory and on-road exhaust measurements have been performed to estimate the NOx emission factors from various vehicles and their contribution to atmospheric pollution. Meanwhile, HONO emission from vehicle exhaust has been under-measured despite the fact that HONO can contribute up to 60% of the total hydroxyl budget during daytime and its formation pathway is not fully understood. A profound traffic-induced HONO to NOx ratio of 0.8%, established by Kurtenbach et al. since 2001, has been widely applied in various simulation studies and possibly linked to under-estimation of HONO mixing ratios and OH radical budget in the morning. The HONO/NOx ratios from direct traffic emission have become debatable when it lacks measurements for direct HONO emission from vehicles upon the fast-changing emission reduction technology. Several recent studies have reported updated values for this ratio. This study has reported the measurement of HONO and NOx emission as well as the estimation of exhaust-induced HONO/NOx ratios from gasoline and diesel vehicles using different chassis dynamometer tests under various real-world driving cycles. For the tested gasoline vehicle, which was equipped with three-way catalyst after-treatment device, HONO/NOx ratios ranged from 0 to 0.95 % with very low average HONO concentrations. For the tested diesel vehicle equipped with diesel particulate active reduction device, HONO/NOx ratios varied from 0.16 to 1.00 %. The HONO/NOx ratios in diesel exhaust were inversely proportional to the average speeds of the tested vehicles. Photolysis of HONO is a dominant source of morning OH radicals. Conventional traffic-induced HONO/NOx ratio of 0.8% has possibly linked to underestimation of the total HONO budget and

  6. 甲醇与汽柴油在汽车上的使用方式研究%Research on Application of Methanol, Gasoline or Diesel on Automobiles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张文广; 范例; 司利增

    2011-01-01

    With rapid economic development in China, methanol as a new energy is being used widely in automobiles. Methanol fuelled automobile is not only good for environmental protection, but also costs lower compared with gasoline and diesel. This article mainly introduces three kinds of uses of methanol and gasoline or diesel in the automobiles and discusses characteristics of these ways, providing a reference for the development of methanol fuelled automobiles.%我国经济的快速发展为新能源的推广开辟了广阔的前景,甲醇作为新能源的一种,在汽车上的应用越来越广泛。甲醇燃料汽车不仅环保,而且使用成本比汽油和柴油低。本文主要介绍了甲醇与汽油或柴油在汽车上的三种使用方式,并指出了这三种方式各自的特点,希望能对甲醇燃料汽车的发展有所帮助。

  7. Developments in Spray Modeling in Diesel and Direct-Injection Gasoline Engines Progrès de la modélisation des sprays dans les moteurs Diesel et à essence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kong S. C.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In direct-injection engines, the fuel spray characteristics influence the combustion efficiency and exhaust emissions. The performance of available spray models for predicting liquid and vapor fuel distributions, and their influence on combustion is reviewed for both diesel and gasoline direct injection engines. A phenomenological nozzle flow model is described for simulating the effects of diesel injector nozzle internal geometry on the fuel injection and spray processes. The flow model provides initial conditions for the liquid jet breakup model that considers wave instabilities due to Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT mechanisms. A linearized instability analysis has also been extended to consider the breakup of liquid sheets for modeling pressure-swirl gasoline injectors. Diesel engine predictions have been compared with extensive data from in-cylinder laser diagnostics carried out in optically accessible heavy-duty, DI Diesel engines over a wide range of operating conditions. The results show that the nozzle flow model used in combination with the KH and RT models gives realistic spray predictions. In particular, the limited liquid fuel penetration length observed experimentally and the flame shape details are captured accurately. The liquid sheet breakup model has also been compared favorably with experimental spray penetration and drop size data for gasoline hollow-cone sprays. This model is currently being applied to study stratified charge combustion in GDI engines. Dans les moteurs à injection directe, les caractéristiques du spray de carburant influent directement sur le rendement et les émissions. Les performances des modèles de spray existants et leur influence sur la combustion pour les moteurs Diesel et essence à injection directe sont analysées. Un modèle phénoménologique d'écoulement dans les injecteurs indiquant les effets de la géométrie sur les processus d'injection est présenté. Ce modèle donne les

  8. Total sulfur determination in gasoline, kerosene and diesel fuel using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry after direct sample introduction as detergent emulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santelli, Ricardo Erthal [Departamento de Geoquimica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Outeiro Sao Joao Batista s/n, Centro, Niteroi/RJ, 24020-150 (Brazil)], E-mail: santelli@geoq.uff.br; Padua Oliveira, Eliane [Departamento de Geoquimica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Outeiro Sao Joao Batista s/n, Centro, Niteroi/RJ, 24020-150 (Brazil); Departamento de Engenharia Quimica e de Petroleo, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Rua Passos da Patria 156, Sao Domingos, Niteroi/RJ, 24210-230 (Brazil); Batista de Carvalho, Maria de Fatima [Centro de Pesquisas e Desenvolvimento da PETROBRAS, Avaliacao e Monitoramento Ambiental, Av. Horacio Macedo, 950, Cidade Universitaria, Rio de Janeiro/RJ, 21941-598 (Brazil); Almeida Bezerra, Marcos [Departamento de Geoquimica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Outeiro Sao Joao Batista s/n, Centro, Niteroi/RJ, 24020-150 (Brazil); Universidade Estadual do Sudoeste da Bahia, Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica, Rua Jose Moreira Sobrinho s/n, Jequiezinho, Jequie/BA, 45206-190 (Brazil); Soares Freire, Aline [Departamento de Geoquimica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Outeiro Sao Joao Batista s/n, Centro, Niteroi/RJ, 24020-150 (Brazil)

    2008-07-15

    Herein, we present the development of a procedure for the determination of total sulfur in petroleum-derived products (gasoline, kerosene and diesel fuel) employing inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES). For this procedure, samples were prepared as emulsions that were made using concentrated nitric acid, Triton X-100, sample, and ultra pure water in proportions of 5/10/7/78% (v/v), respectively. Sample volumes were weighed because of the density differences, and oxygen was added to the sheat gas entrance of the ICP OES in order to decrease carbon deposition in the torch and to minimize background effects. A Doehlert design was applied as an experimental matrix to investigate the flow ratios of argon (sheat and plasma gas) and oxygen in relation to the signal-to-background ratio. A comparative study among the slopes of the analytical curves built in aqueous media, surfactant/HNO{sub 3}, and by spike addition for several sample emulsions indicates that a unique solution of surfactant in acidic media can be employed to perform the external calibration for analysis of the emulsions. The developed procedure allows for the determination of the total sulfur content in petroleum derivatives with a limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) of 0.72 and 2.4 {mu}g g{sup -1}, respectively. Precision values, expressed as the relative standard deviations (% RSD, n = 10) for 12 and 400 {mu}g g{sup -1}, were 2.2% and 1.3%, respectively. The proposed procedure was applied toward the determination of total sulfur in samples of gasoline, kerosene, and diesel fuel commercialized in the city of Niteroi/RJ, Brazil. The accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated by the determination of the total sulfur in three different standard reference materials (SRM): NIST 2723a (sulfur in diesel fuel oil), NIST 1616b (sulfur in kerosene), and NIST 2298 (sulfur in gasoline). The data indicate that the methodology can be successfully applied to these

  9. Synthetic gasoline and diesel oil produced by Fischer-Tropsch Technology. A possibility for the future? IEA/AMF annex XXXI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehnlund, B., (Atrax Energy AB, Goeteborg (SE)); Blinge, M., (The Swedish Transport Research Institute, TFK (SE)); Schramm, J.; Larsen, Ulrik, (Technical Univ. of Denmark, DTU, Kgs. Lyngby (DK))

    2007-03-15

    This report is the result of an annex (annex XXXI, Fischer-Tropsch Fuels) initiated by the International Energy Agency's Implementing Agreement on Advanced Motor Fuels. The annex has been managed by Atrax Energi AB, Bjorn Rehnlund, acting as the operating agent of the annex. The work in the annex has been carried out in co-operation with the Swedish Transportation Research Institute - TFK, Magnus Blinge and the Technical University of Denmark - DTU, Jesper Schramm and Ulrik Larsen. In this report the possibilities to produce synthetic gasoline and synthetic diesel oil from biomass, and also from natural gas, by Fischer-Tropsch (FT) Technology are analysed and discussed. After an introduction of the technology as such, environmental aspects and the life cycle perspective of synthetic gasoline and diesel oil are discussed, and some possible national/regional scenarios are analysed and presented. Vehicle emission tests with synthetic gasoline carried out at DTU are described and discussed in this report as well. Based on the result of the analysis and the vehicle emission tests presented in the report, a first SWOT analysis of Fischer-Tropsch technology is then presented, and finally some main conclusions are drawn. During the execution of the annex Sasol in South Africa, Nykomb Synergetics in Sweden, Chemrec in Sweden, the Technical University of Denmark, VTT in Finland, the Varnamo gasification research project in Sweden, and the Black liquor gasification project in Pitea, Sweden have been visited. Some of the most important conclusions are that: 1) FT-Fuels such as FT-Diesel (FTD) and FT-Gasoline (FTG) produced through CoalTo-Liquid, (CTL), Gas-To-Liquid (GTL) and Biomass-To-Liquid (BTL) technologies can contribute to reducing the dependency on crude oil. 2) FTD and FTG are attractive for use in neat form and also as components in blends with low quality diesel and gasoline, to upgrade fuels to meet the ever more stringent regulations. 3) Production and use of

  10. Size-resolved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission factors from on-road gasoline and diesel vehicles: temperature effect on the nuclei-mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiguren-Fernandez, Arantzazu; Miguel, Antonio H

    2012-03-06

    Motor vehicles are a major source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emissions in urban areas. Motor vehicle emission control strategies have included improvements in engine design, exhaust emission control, and fuel reformulation. Therefore, an updated assessment of the effects of the shifts in fuels and vehicle technologies on PAH vehicular emission factors (EFs) is needed. We have evaluated the effects of ambient temperature on the size-resolved EFs of nine US EPA Priority Pollutant PAH, down to 10 nm diameter, from on-road California gasoline light-duty vehicles with spark ignition (SI) and heavy-duty diesels with compression ignition (CI) in summer 2004 and winter 2005. During the winter, for the target PAH with the lowest subcooled equilibrium vapor pressure --benzo[a]pyrene, benzo[ghi]perylene, and indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene-- the mass in the nucleation mode, defined here as particles with dp <32 nm, ranged between 14 and 38% for SI vehicles and 29 and 64% for CI vehicles. Our observations of the effect of temperature on the mass of PAH in the nucleation mode are similar to the observed effect of temperature on the number concentration of diesel exhaust particles in the nucleation mode in a previous report.

  11. Analysis of Twenty-Two Performance Properties of Diesel, Gasoline, and Jet Fuels Using a Field-Portable Near-Infrared (NIR) Analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouillette, Carl; Smith, Wayne; Shende, Chetan; Gladding, Zack; Farquharson, Stuart; Morris, Robert E; Cramer, Jeffrey A; Schmitigal, Joel

    2016-05-01

    The change in custody of fuel shipments at depots, pipelines, and ports could benefit from an analyzer that could rapidly verify that properties are within specifications. To meet this need, the design requirements for a fuel analyzer based on near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, such as spectral region and resolution, were examined. It was found that the 1000 to 1600 nm region, containing the second CH overtone and combination vibrational modes of hydrocarbons, provided the best near-infrared to fuel property correlations when path length was taken into account, whereas 4 cm(-1) resolution provided only a modest improvement compared to 16 cm(-1) resolution when four or more latent variables were used. Based on these results, a field-portable near-infrared fuel analyzer was built that employed an incandescent light source, sample compartment optics to hold 2 mL glass sample vials with ∼1 cm path length, a transmission grating, and a 256 channel InGaAs detector that measured the above stated wavelength range with 5-6 nm (∼32 cm(-1)) resolution. The analyzer produced high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) spectra of samples in 5 s. Twenty-two property correlation models were developed for diesel, gasoline, and jet fuels with root mean squared error of correlation - cross-validated values that compared favorably to corresponding ASTM reproducibility values. The standard deviations of predicted properties for repeat measurements at 4, 24, and 38℃ were often better than ASTM documented repeatability values. The analyzer and diesel property models were tested by measuring seven diesel samples at a local ASTM certification laboratory. The standard deviations between the analyzer determined values and the ASTM measured values for these samples were generally better than the model root mean squared error of correlation-cross-validated values for each property.

  12. 重油催化裂解汽柴油二次裂解性能研究%Secondary Cracking of Gasoline and Diesel from Heavy Oil Catalytic Pyrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘植昌; 孟祥海; 徐春明; 高金森

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigated the secondary cracking of gasoline and diesel from the catalytic pyrolysis of Daqing atmospheric residue on catalyst CEP-1 in a fluidized bed reactor.The results show that the secondary cracking reactivity of gasoline and diesel is poor, and the yield of total light olefins is only about 10% (by mass).As reaction temperature increases, ethylene yield increases, butylene yield decreases, and propylene yield shows a maximum.The optimal reaction temperature is about 670 ℃ for the production of light olefins.With the enhancement of catalyst-to-oil mass ratio and steam-to-oil mass ratio, the yields of light olefins increase to some extent.About 6.30% of the mass of total aromatic rings is converted by secondary cracking, indicating that aromatic hydrocarbons are not easy to undergo ring-opening reactions under the present experimental conditions.

  13. Emissions from Medium-Duty Conventional and Diesel-Electric Hybrid Vehicles; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragatz, A.; Duran, A.; Thornton, M.; Walkowicz, K.

    2014-04-02

    This presentation discusses the results of emissions testing for medium-duty conventional and diesel-electric hybrid vehicles. Testing was based on a field evaluation approach that utilized the Fleet DNA drive cycle database and NREL’s Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory chassis dynamometer. Vehicles tested included parcel delivery (Class 6 step vans), beverage delivery (Class 8 tractors), and parcel delivery (Class 7 box trucks) vehicles, all with intended service class medium/heavy heavy-duty diesel (MHDD).
    Results for fuel economy and tailpipe NOx emissions included: diesel hybrid electric vehicles showed an average fuel economy advantage on identified test cycles: Class 6 Step Vans: 26%; Class 7 Box Trucks: 24.7%; Class 8 Tractors: 17.3%. Vehicle miles traveled is an important factor in determining total petroleum and CO2 displacement. Higher NOx emissions were observed over some test cycles: highly drive cycle dependent; engine-out differences may result from different engine operating point; and selective catalyst reduction temperature may play a role, but does not explain the whole story.

  14. Energy and Exergy Balances for Modern Diesel and Gasoline Engines Bilans d’énergie et d’exergie pour des moteurs Diesel et essence récents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bourhis G.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim is here to evaluate the difference between the energy and exergy (or available energy balances when heat recovery is considered in an internal combustion engine. In the first case, the entropy of the system is not taken into account so that, the maximum useful work recoverable from a system can not be estimated. Then, the second case is much more adapted to estimate heat recovery potential. In this paper, two modern engines are evaluated. First, an up-to-date gasoline engine: three-cylinder, downsized, low friction, then a modern common rail downsized Diesel engine. For each one, two energy and exergy balances are given for two different part-load operating points representative of the NEDC cycle using experimental data from steady state engine test benches. For the Diesel engine, it is shown that effective work represents around 30% and that around 55% of the energy introduced into the combustion chamber is lost (in the form of heat, especially in exhaust gas, in water coolant and oil. But when considering exergy balance, only 12% of the total exergy introduced through the fuel can be recovered, in order to produce useful work. Expecting a 25% exergy recovery efficiency, the effective engine efficiency could be increased by 10%. For the gasoline engine, the increase of the output work could be around 15%. L’objectif est ici d’évaluer la différence entre bilan d’énergie et d’exergie (ou énergie utile pour des moteurs à combustion interne lorsque la problématique de récupération d’énergie est prise en compte. Dans le premier cas, l’entropie du système n’est pas considérée, si bien que le travail utile maximal qu’il est possible de récupérer d’un système ne peut pas être estimé. Tandis que le second cas est bien mieux adapté pour estimer le potentiel de la récupération d’énergie. Dans cet article, deux moteurs modernes sont étudiés. Le premier est un moteur essence récent, 3 cylindres, de cylindr

  15. Parametric Study of Jatropha Blended Gasoline Fuel In Compression Ignition Engine Of A Small Capacity Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Ternenge Abur

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Jatropha Biodiesel was tested in a single cylinder direct-injection diesel engine to investigate the operational parameters of a small capacity diesel engine under six engine loads. Here the jatropha oil is used as a non edible oil to produce the biodiesel. The investigated blends were 40/60%, 30/70%, 20/80% and 100% jatropha biodiesel at various loads. The jatropha biodiesel was obtained from National Research Institute for Chemical Technology Zaria-Nigeria and was within EN, BIS and Brazil specifications for biodiesel. Each blend was tested on a short term basis of three hours. The result shows that the brake thermal efficiency increased for all tested blends at lower engine loads and decreases at higher engine loads. The specific fuel consumption (S.F.C increased for lower blends compared to neat jatropha oil while higher engine powers were obtained for lower blends compared to neat jatropha oil. In all the investigated operational parameters, the diesel reference fuel had better performance to jatropha biodiesel blends except in the percentage heat loss to the exhaust where jatropha biodiesel blends had better performance.

  16. Determination of trace Cd, Cu, Fe, Pb and Zn in diesel and gasoline by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after sample clean up with hollow fiber solid phase microextraction system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomngongo, Philiswa N.; Ngila, J. Catherine, E-mail: jcngila@uj.ac.za

    2014-08-01

    This study reports a simple and efficient method for the determination of trace Cd, Cu, Fe, Pb and Zn in diesel and gasoline samples by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after matrix removal and analyte pre-concentration using hollow fiber-solid phase microextraction (HF–SPME). The optimization of HF-SPME procedure was carried out using two-level full factorial and central composite designs. Four factors (variables), that are, sample solution pH, acceptor phase amount, extraction time and eluent concentration were optimized. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the precision was ≤ 3% (C = 10 μg L{sup −1}, n = 15), limits of detection and quantification ranged from 0.1 to 0.3 μg L{sup −1} and 0.3–0.9 μg L{sup −1}, respectively, and the maximum preconcentration factor was 30. The HF-SPME method was applied for the determination of trace metals in real gasoline and diesel samples. - Highlights: • Hollow fiber solid phase microextraction of metal ions in diesel and gasoline • Use of hollow fiber-supported sol–gel combined with cation exchange resin • Optimization of HF-SPME using multivariate techniques • Determination of Cd, Cu, Fe, Pb and Zn using ICP–MS • Relatively low LOD and LOQ.

  17. Techno-economic feasibility and life cycle assessment of dairy effluent to renewable diesel via hydrothermal liquefaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Hailey M; Ledbetter, Rhesa N; McCurdy, Alex T; Morgan, Michael R; Seefeldt, Lance C; Jena, Umakanta; Hoekman, S Kent; Quinn, Jason C

    2015-11-01

    The economic feasibility and environmental impact is investigated for the conversion of agricultural waste, delactosed whey permeate, through yeast fermentation to a renewable diesel via hydrothermal liquefaction. Process feasibility was demonstrated at laboratory-scale with data leveraged to validate systems models used to perform industrial-scale economic and environmental impact analyses. Results show a minimum fuel selling price of $4.78 per gallon of renewable diesel, a net energy ratio of 0.81, and greenhouse gas emissions of 30.0g-CO2-eqMJ(-1). High production costs and greenhouse gas emissions can be attributed to operational temperatures and durations of both fermentation and hydrothermal liquefaction. However, high lipid yields of the yeast counter these operational demands, resulting in a favorable net energy ratio. Results are presented on the optimization of the process based on economy of scale and a sensitivity analysis highlights improvements in conversion efficiency, yeast biomass productivity and hydrotreating efficiency can dramatically improve commercial feasibility.

  18. Evaluating the potential of renewable diesel production from algae cultured on wastewater: techno-economic analysis and life cycle assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankita Juneja

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Algae, a renewable energy source, has an added advantage of consuming nutrients from wastewater and consequently aiding in wastewater treatment. The algae thus produced can be processed using alternative paths for conversion to fuels. However, due to high moisture content of algae, wet algae processing methods are being encouraged to avoid the dewatering cost and energy. Hydrothermal liquefaction is one such technology that converts the algae into high heating value bio-oil under high temperature and pressure. This bio-oil can be further upgraded to renewable diesel (RD which can be used in diesel powered vehicles without any modifications. The objective of this study is to evaluate the economic viability and to estimate the energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG emissions during life cycle of RD production from algae grown in wastewater using hydrothermal liquefaction. Economic analysis of RD production on commercial scale was performed using engineering process model of RD production plant with processing capacity of 60 Mgal wastewater/day, simulated in SuperPro designer. RD yields for algae were estimated as 10.18 MML/year with unit price of production as $1.75/RD. The GHG emissions during life cycle of RD production were found to be 6.2 times less than those produced for conventional diesel. Sensitivity analysis indicated a potential to reduce ethanol production cost either by using high lipid algae or increasing the plant size. The integrated economic and ecological assessment analyses are helpful in determining long-term sustainability of a product and can be used to drive energy policies in an environmentally sustainable direction.

  19. Spray combustion of biomass-based renewable diesel fuel using multiple injection strategy in a constant volume combustion chamber

    KAUST Repository

    Jing, Wei

    2016-05-26

    Effect of a two-injection strategy associated with a pilot injection on the spray combustion process was investigated under conventional diesel combustion conditions (1000 K and 21% O2 concentration) for a biomass-based renewable diesel fuel, i.e., biomass to liquid (BTL), and a regular No. 2 diesel in a constant volume combustion chamber using multiband flame measurement and two-color pyrometry. The spray combustion flame structure was visualized by using multiband flame measurement to show features of soot formation, high temperature and low temperature reactions, which can be characterized by the narrow-band emissions of radicals or intermediate species such as OH, HCHO, and CH. The objective of this study was to identify the details of multiple injection combustion, including a pilot and a main injection, and to provide further insights on how the two injections interact. For comparison, three injection strategies were considered for both fuels including a two-injection strategy (Case TI), single injection strategy A (Case SA), and single injection strategy B (Case SB). Multiband flame results show a strong interaction, indicated by OH emissions between the pilot injection and the main injection for Case TI while very weak connection is found for the narrow-band emissions acquired through filters with centerlines of 430 nm and 470 nm. A faster flame development is found for the main injection of Case TI compared to Cases SA and SB, which could be due to the high temperature environment and large air entrainment from the pilot injection. A lower soot level is observed for the BTL flame compared to the diesel flame for all three injection types. Case TI has a lower soot level compared to Cases SA and SB for the BTL fuel, while the diesel fuel maintains a similar soot level among all three injection strategies. Soot temperature of Case TI is lower for both fuels, especially for diesel. Based on these results, it is expected that the two-injection strategy could be

  20. The new 2.5L L4 gasoline engine for LEXUS IS300h. The renewed engine series for FR hybrid vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiguro, Fumihisa; Mashiki, Zenichiro; Yamanari, Kenji [Toyota Motor Corporation, Aichi (Japan)

    2013-08-01

    performance and high thermal efficiency up to 38.5%, contributing to outstanding low CO{sub 2} and fuel consumption levels. Finally, the new 2013 LEXUS-IS, a D segment car equipped with the leading engine of this series (2AR-FSE), achieves the extremely low CO{sub 2} emission of 100g/km. This value is far better than competitors' D-E segment vehicles equipped with a conventional Gasoline or Diesel engine. Toyota will expand this new engine installation to wider range of vehicles in order to solve the problems of energy security, global warming and air quality. - 'D-4' means Direct Injection, - 'D-4S' means an engine equipped with Port Injection system and Direct Injection system. (orig.)

  1. Study of risk in gasoline and diesel transportation pipelines in Mexico; Estudio del riesgo en ductos de transporte de gasolinas y diesel en Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivera Villasenor, Ruperto Enrique [Universidad Nacional Autonoma Mexico, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Rodriguez Castellanos, Alejandro [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-10-15

    A methodology of risk operative analysis for damages, which are derived from theft of gasoline in Petroleos Mexicanos (Pemex) pipelines by third parts (clandestine pipes) is proposed. Originally, the problematic is studied from the global perspective of pipelines accidents happened in the world, in United States of America and in Mexico, and later it approaches specifically the environment that the industry of Pemex-Refinery pipelines. When the results are obtained, it is concluded that the factor of risk with more occurrence probability of pipelines, is due to damages for third parts, in first term, and followed by the damages originated by corrosion in second term. So a diagnostic is made of the physical vulnerability degree on the rights of way of Pemex. [Spanish] Se propone una metodologia de analisis de riesgo operativo en poliductos debido a danos por terceras partes (tomas clandestinas), originados del hurto de gasolinas en ductos de Petroleos Mexicanos (Pemex). La problematica se aborda desde una perspectiva global de accidentes en los ductos de Pemex-Refinacion. Del analisis y resultados obtenidos, se concluye que el factor de riesgo con mayor probabilidad de ocurrencia en poliductos, es debido a danos por terceras partes, en primer termino, seguido de los danos originados por corrosion. Asimismo se hace un diagnostico del grado de vulnerabilidad fisica de los derechos de via de Pemex.

  2. Dual fuel mode operation in diesel engines using renewable fuels: Rubber seed oil and coir-pith producer gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramadhas, A.S.; Jayaraj, S.; Muraleedharan, C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Institute of Technology Calicut, Calicut-673601 (India)

    2008-09-15

    Partial combustion of biomass in the gasifier generates producer gas that can be used as supplementary or sole fuel for internal combustion engines. Dual fuel mode operation using coir-pith derived producer gas and rubber seed oil as pilot fuel was analyzed for various producer gas-air flow ratios and at different load conditions. The engine is experimentally optimized with respect to maximum pilot fuel savings in the dual fuel mode operation. The performance and emission characteristics of the dual fuel engine are compared with that of diesel engine at different load conditions. Specific energy consumption in the dual-fuel mode of operation with oil-coir-pith operation is found to be in the higher side at all load conditions. Exhaust emission was found to be higher in the case of dual fuel mode of operation as compared to neat diesel/oil operation. Engine performance characteristics are inferior in fully renewable fueled engine operation but it suitable for stationary engine application, particularly power generation. (author)

  3. 75 FR 43522 - Notice of Supplemental Determination for Renewable Fuels Produced Under the Final RFS2 Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ... of fuel pathways such as ethanol from corn starch or biodiesel from soybean oil our reference case... transportation fuels, including gasoline and diesel fuel or renewable fuels such as ethanol and biodiesel... assumed that the co- product glycerin would displace residual oil as a fuel source on an energy...

  4. Fast emulsion-based method for simultaneous determination of Co, Cu, Pb and Se in crude oil, gasoline and diesel by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Maciel S; Nascimento, Angerson N; Oliveira, Pedro V

    2013-10-15

    A method for the simultaneous determination of Co, Cu, Pb and Se in crude oil, gasoline and diesel samples using emulsion-based sampling and GF AAS is proposed. 400mg of sample was weighted in volumetric flask following the sequential addition of 125 µL of hexane and 7.5 mL of Triton X-100(®) (20% mv(-1)). Subsequently, the mixture was stirred in ultrasonic bath, during 30 min, before dilution to 25 mL with deionized water. Aliquots of 20 μL of reference solution or sample emulsion were co-injected into the graphite tube with 10 μL of 2 g L(-1) Pd(NO3)2. The pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 1300°C and 2250°C, respectively. The limits of detection (n=10, 3σ) and characteristic masses were 0.02 μg g(-1) (0.32 μg L(-1)) and 18 pg for Co, 0.03 μg g(-1) (0.48 μg L(-1)) and 15 pg for Cu, 0.04 μg g(-1) (0.64 μg L(-1)) and 48 pg for Pb, and 0.11 μg g(-1) (1.76 μg L(-1)) and 47 pg for Se. The reliabilities of the proposed method for Co and Se were checked by SRM(®) 1634c Residual Oil analysis. The found values are in accordance to the SRM at 95% confidence level (Student's t-test). Each sample was spiked with 0.18 μg g(-1) of Co, Cu, Pb and Se and the recoveries varied from 92% to 116% for Co, 83% to 117% for Cu, 72% to 117% for Pb, and 82% to 122% for Se.

  5. Trends in the size distribution, highway use, and consumption of gasoline and diesel fuels of the U.S. Commercial Truck Fleet, 1977-2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertram, K. M.; Santini, D. J.; Anderson, J. L.; Vyas, A. D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses on various major long-range (1977-2002, 1982-2002) U.S. commercial trucking trends by using U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census Vehicle/Truck Inventory and Use Survey (VIUS/TIUS) data from this period, as well as selected 1977-2002 data from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA) and the U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA's) Highway Statistics. Analyses are made of (1) overall passenger vehicle versus truck consumption patterns of gasoline and diesel fuel and (2) the population growth and fuels used by all commercial truck classes and selected truck types (single unit and combination). Selected vehicle miles traveled, gallons per vehicle miles traveled, and gallons per cargo ton-miles traveled trends, as well as the effect of cargo tons per truck on fuel consumption, are also assessed. In addition, long-range trends of related factors (such as long-haul mileages driven by heavy trucks) and their impacts on both reducing fuel consumption per cargo-ton-mile and the relative shares of total commercial fuel use among truck classes were examined. Results of these trends on U.S. petroleum consumption are identified. The effects of basic engineering design and performance, national Interstate highway construction legislation, national demographic trends (such as suburbanization), and changes in U.S. corporate operational requirements are discussed. Their impacts on both the long-distance hauling and shorter-distance urban and suburban delivery markets of the commercial trucking industry are highlighted.

  6. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF A DIESEL ENGINE WITH BLENDS OF DIESEL-PLASTIC PYROLYSIS OIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Rajesh Guntur,

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Environmental degradation and depletion of oil reserves are matters of great concern around the globe. Developing countries like India depend heavily on crude oil import of about 125 Mt per annum (7:1diesel/gasoline. Diesel being the main transportation fuel in India, finding a suitable fuel alternative to diesel is an urgent need. In this context, pyrolysis of waste plastic solid is currently receiving renewed interest. Waste plastic pyrolysis oil is suitable for compression ignition engines and more attention is focused in India because of its potential to generate large-scale employment and relatively low environmental degradation. In the present work the performance and emission characteristics of a single cylinder, constant speed, and direct injection diesel engine using waste plastic pyrolysis oil blends as an alternate fuel were evaluated and the results are compared with the standard diesel fuel operation. Results indicated that the brake thermal efficiency was highercompared to diesel at part load condition. Carbon monoxide, Carbon dioxide and hydrocarbon emissions were higher and oxygen emission was lower compared to diesel operation.

  7. Renewable Diesel from Algal Lipids: An Integrated Baseline for Cost, Emissions, and Resource Potential from a Harmonized Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.; Fishman, D.; Frank, E. D.; Wigmosta, M. S.; Aden, A.; Coleman, A. M.; Pienkos, P. T.; Skaggs, R. J.; Venteris, E. R.; Wang, M. Q.

    2012-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Biomass Program has begun an initiative to obtain consistent quantitative metrics for algal biofuel production to establish an 'integrated baseline' by harmonizing and combining the Program's national resource assessment (RA), techno-economic analysis (TEA), and life-cycle analysis (LCA) models. The baseline attempts to represent a plausible near-term production scenario with freshwater microalgae growth, extraction of lipids, and conversion via hydroprocessing to produce a renewable diesel (RD) blendstock. Differences in the prior TEA and LCA models were reconciled (harmonized) and the RA model was used to prioritize and select the most favorable consortium of sites that supports production of 5 billion gallons per year of RD. Aligning the TEA and LCA models produced slightly higher costs and emissions compared to the pre-harmonized results. However, after then applying the productivities predicted by the RA model (13 g/m2/d on annual average vs. 25 g/m2/d in the original models), the integrated baseline resulted in markedly higher costs and emissions. The relationship between performance (cost and emissions) and either productivity or lipid fraction was found to be non-linear, and important implications on the TEA and LCA results were observed after introducing seasonal variability from the RA model. Increasing productivity and lipid fraction alone was insufficient to achieve cost and emission targets; however, combined with lower energy, less expensive alternative technology scenarios, emissions and costs were substantially reduced.

  8. Butanol/Gasoline Test Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    or diesel) is loaded into tanks previously containing low flash point products (such gasoline or naphtha ). (3) Storage tank level floats must be...Benzene (CAS-No.: 71-43-2) IARC: Gasoline, natural; Low boiling point naphtha (CAS-No.: 8006-61-9) Naphthalene (CAS-No.: 91-20-3) Benzene (CAS...Component: Gasoline, natural; Low boiling point naphtha Acute oral toxicity: LD50 rat (8006-61-9) Dose: 18.8 mg/kg Acute inhalation toxicity: LC50

  9. Reformulated Gasoline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reformulated gasoline (RFG) is gasoline blended to burn cleaner and reduce smog-forming and toxic pollutants in the air we breathe. The Clean Air Act requires that RFG be used to reduce harmful emissions of ozone.

  10. Gasoline poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002806.htm Gasoline poisoning To use the sharing features on this ... This article discusses the harmful effects from swallowing gasoline or breathing in its fumes. This article is ...

  11. Low temperature hydrogenolysis of waxes to diesel range gasoline and light alkanes: Comparison of catalytic properties of group 4, 5 and 6 metal hydrides supported on silica-alumina

    KAUST Repository

    Norsic, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    A series of metal hydrides (M = Zr, Hf, Ta, W) supported on silica-alumina were studied for the first time in hydrogenolysis of light alkanes in a continuous flow reactor. It was found that there is a difference in the reaction mechanism between d 0 metal hydrides of group 4 and d 0 ↔ d 2 metal hydrides of group 5 and group 6. Furthermore, the potential application of these catalysts has been demonstrated by the transformation of Fischer-Tropsch wax in a reactive distillation set-up into typical gasoline and diesel molecules in high selectivity (up to 86 wt%). Current results show that the group 4 metal hydrides have a promising yield toward liquid fuels.

  12. Finding synergies in fuels properties for the design of renewable fuels--hydroxylated biodiesel effects on butanol-diesel blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukjit, E; Herreros, J M; Piaszyk, J; Dearn, K D; Tsolakis, A

    2013-04-02

    This article describes the effects of hydroxylated biodiesel (castor oil methyl ester - COME) on the properties, combustion, and emissions of butanol-diesel blends used within compression ignition engines. The study was conducted to investigate the influence of COME as a means of increasing the butanol concentration in a stable butanol-diesel blend. Tests were compared with baseline experiments using rapeseed methyl esters (RME). A clear benefit in terms of the trade-off between NOX and soot emissions with respect to ULSD and biodiesel-diesel blends with the same oxygen content was obtained from the combination of biodiesel and butanol, while there was no penalty in regulated gaseous carbonaceous emissions. From the comparison between the biodiesel fuels used in this work, COME improved some of the properties (for example lubricity, density and viscosity) of butanol-diesel blends with respect to RME. The existence of hydroxyl group in COME also reduced further soot emissions and decreased soot activation energy.

  13. 40 CFR 80.553 - Under what conditions may the small refiner gasoline sulfur standards be extended for a small...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... refiner gasoline sulfur standards be extended for a small refiner of motor vehicle diesel fuel? 80.553... (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Motor Vehicle Diesel Fuel; Nonroad, Locomotive, and Marine... small refiner gasoline sulfur standards be extended for a small refiner of motor vehicle diesel fuel?...

  14. Diesel emissions in Vienna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, H.; Kreiner, I.; Norek, C.; Preining, O.; Georgi, B.

    The aerosol in a non-industrial town normally is dominated by emissions from vehicles. Whereas gasoline-powered cars normally only emit a small amount of particulates, the emission by diesel-powered cars is considerable. The aerosol particles produced by diesel engines consist of graphitic carbon (GC) with attached hydrocarbons (HCs) including also polyaromatic HCs. Therefore the diesel particles can be carcinogenic. Besides diesel vehicles, all other combustion processes are also a source for GC; thus source apportionment of diesel emissions to the GC in the town is difficult. A direct apportionment of diesel emissions has been made possible by marking all the diesel fuel used by the vehicles in Vienna by a normally not occurring and easily detectable substance. All emitted diesel particles thus were marked with the tracer and by analyzing the atmospheric samples for the marking substance we found that the mass concentrations of diesel particles in the atmosphere varied between 5 and 23 μg m -3. Busy streets and calm residential areas show less difference in mass concentration than expected. The deposition of diesel particles on the ground has been determined by collecting samples from the road surface. The concentration of the marking substance was below the detection limit before the marking period and a year after the period. During the period when marked diesel fuel was used, the concentrations of the diesel particles settling to the ground was 0.012-0.07 g g -1 of collected dust. A positive correlation between the diesel vehicle density and the sampled mass of diesel vehicles exists. In Vienna we have a background diesel particle concentration of 11 μg m -3. This value increases by 5.5 μg m -3 per 500 diesel vehicles h -1 passing near the sampling location. The mass fraction of diesel particles of the total aerosol mass varied between 12.2 and 33%; the higher values were found in more remote areas, since diesel particles apparently diffuse easily

  15. Physico-Chemical Properties of Bio-diesel from Wild Grape Seeds Oil and Petro-Diesel Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. U. Kaisan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The swiftly depleting conventional fossil fuel resources and increasing environmental distress has considerably popped up research curiosity in renewable energy fuel for internal combustion engines. Accordingly, in this research work, biodiesel from wild grape seed (Lannea Microcarpa was blended with petro-diesel in a ratio of 5:95, 10:90, 15:85 and 20:80 and pure fossil diesel designated B5, B10, B15, B20 and B0 respectively. The physico chemical properties of the biodiesel/petro diesel blends were determined. The properties are specific gravity, viscosity, flash point, calorific value, sulphur content, copper strip corrosion, colour, diesel index, cetane number, and cloud point. It was observed that, 9 out of the 10 properties determined conform to ASTM standards except for the colour which was dark brown for the oil and biodiesel, and brown for the automotive gasoline oil. The specific gravity and viscosity increase with percentage increase of biodiesel in the blends. The sulphur content, calorific values, cetane number and diesel index decrease with increase in the percentage biodiesel from the blends. The colour of the samples does not conform to the ASTM standards. All the samples have the best ASTM value for copper strip corrosion and as such, they could be run in any diesel engine without any fear of corrosion tendencies. Whence, Wild Grape seed biodiesel is physically okay, chemically stable, environmentally friendly and economically viable for use in compression ignition engine as a blend to partly replace the automotive gasoline oil.

  16. Evaluation of Hydroprocessed Renewable Diesel (HRD) Fuel in a Caterpillar Engine Using the 210 Hour TWV Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    free product that helps meet air quality requirements from the conversion of various non-petroleum resources such as natural gas, coal, biomass, fats ...used in their HRD fuel processing. The response was as follow: 1. 1.1% Petroleum Diesel, for tax crediting purposes 2. 0.5 ppm Stadis 450

  17. 77 FR 59458 - Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: 2013 Biomass-Based Diesel Renewable Fuel Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-27

    ... water supply; The impact of renewable fuels on the energy security of the United States; The expected... taking this view generally did not offer any data or information to support their belief that 1.28...

  18. FedEx Gasoline Hybrid Electric Delivery Truck Evaluation: 6-Month Interim Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnitt, R.

    2010-05-01

    This interim report presents partial (six months) results for a technology evaluation of gasoline hybrid electric parcel delivery trucks operated by FedEx in and around Los Angeles, CA. A 12 month in-use technology evaluation comparing in-use fuel economy and maintenance costs of GHEVs and comparative diesel parcel delivery trucks was started in April 2009. Comparison data was collected and analyzed for in-use fuel economy and fuel costs, maintenance costs, total operating costs, and vehicle uptime. In addition, this interim report presents results of parcel delivery drive cycle collection and analysis activities as well as emissions and fuel economy results of chassis dynamometer testing of a gHEV and a comparative diesel truck at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) ReFUEL laboratory. A final report will be issued when 12 months of in-use data have been collected and analyzed.

  19. FedEx Gasoline Hybrid Electric Delivery Truck Evaluation: 6-Month Interim Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnitt, R.

    2010-05-01

    This interim report presents partial (six months) results for a technology evaluation of gasoline hybrid electric parcel delivery trucks operated by FedEx in and around Los Angeles, CA. A 12 month in-use technology evaluation comparing in-use fuel economy and maintenance costs of GHEVs and comparative diesel parcel delivery trucks was started in April 2009. Comparison data was collected and analyzed for in-use fuel economy and fuel costs, maintenance costs, total operating costs, and vehicle uptime. In addition, this interim report presents results of parcel delivery drive cycle collection and analysis activities as well as emissions and fuel economy results of chassis dynamometer testing of a gHEV and a comparative diesel truck at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) ReFUEL laboratory. A final report will be issued when 12 months of in-use data have been collected and analyzed.

  20. Study on Disproportionation Reaction of FCC Gasoline on Acid Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Youhao; Wang Xieqing

    2004-01-01

    Based on the experimental data relating to the reaction of FCC gasoline on acid catalyst the analysis of product distribution, and composition of gasoline and diesel fractions have been analyzed. The occurrence of disproportionation reaction of FCC gasoline on acid catalyst and the network of disproportionation reaction have been identified. Study has also shown that different reaction temperatures can result in different pathways of disproportionation reactions on acid catalyst.

  1. 40 CFR 86.340-79 - Gasoline-fueled engine dynamometer test run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gasoline-fueled engine dynamometer... Emission Regulations for New Gasoline-Fueled and Diesel-Fueled Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.340-79 Gasoline-fueled engine dynamometer test run. (a) This section applies to...

  2. 26 CFR 1.164-5 - Certain retail sales taxes and gasoline taxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Certain retail sales taxes and gasoline taxes. 1....164-5 Certain retail sales taxes and gasoline taxes. For taxable years beginning before January 1...) and tax on the sale of gasoline, diesel fuel or other motor fuel paid by the consumer (other than...

  3. Alcohols/Ethers as Oxygenates in Diesel Fuel: Properties of Blended Fuels and Evaluation of Practiacl Experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nylund, N.; Aakko, P. [TEC Trans Energy Consulting Ltd (Finland); Niemi, S.; Paanu, T. [Turku Polytechnic (Finland); Berg, R. [Befri Konsult (Sweden)

    2005-03-15

    Oxygenates blended into diesel fuel can serve at least two purposes. Components based on renewable feedstocks make it possible to introduce a renewable component into diesel fuel. Secondly, oxygenates blended into diesel fuel might help to reduce emissions. A number of different oxygenates have been considered as components for diesel fuel. These oxygenates include various alcohols, ethers, esters and carbonates. Of the oxygenates, ethanol is the most common and almost all practical experiences have been generated from the use of diesel/ethanol blends (E-diesel). Biodiesel was not included in this study. Adding ethanol to diesel will reduce cetane, and therefore, both cetane improver and lubricity additives might be needed. Diesel/ethanol emulsions obtained with emulsifiers or without additives are 'milky' mixtures. Micro-emulsions of ethanol and diesel can be obtained using additives containing surfactants or co-solvents. The microemulsions are chemically and thermodynamically stable, they are clear and bright blends, unlike the emulsions. Storage and handling regulations for fuels are based on the flash point. The problem with, e.g., ethanol into diesel is that ethanol lowers the flash point of the blend significantly even at low concentrations. Regarding safety, diesel-ethanol blends fall into the same category as gasoline. Higher alcohols are more suitable for diesel blending than ethanol. Currently, various standards and specifications set rather tight limits for diesel fuel composition and properties. It should be noted that, e.g., E-diesel does not fulfil any current diesel specification and it cannot, thus, be sold as general diesel fuel. Some blends have already received approvals for special applications. The critical factors of the potential commercial use of these blends include blend properties such as stability, viscosity and lubricity, safety and materials compatibility. The effect of the fuel on engine performance, durability and emissions

  4. Development of a multi-criteria assessment model for ranking of renewable and non-renewable transportation fuel vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safaei Mohamadabadi, H.; Tichkowsky, G.; Kumar, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2009-01-15

    Several factors, including economical, environmental, and social factors, are involved in selection of the best fuel-based vehicles for road transportation. This leads to a multi-criteria selection problem for multi-alternatives. In this study, a multi-criteria assessment model was developed to rank different road transportation fuel-based vehicles (both renewable and non-renewable) using a method called Preference Ranking Organization Method for Enrichment and Evaluations (PROMETHEE). This method combines qualitative and quantitative criteria to rank various alternatives. In this study, vehicles based on gasoline, gasoline-electric (hybrid), E85 ethanol, diesel, B100 biodiesel, and compressed natural gas (CNG) were considered as alternatives. These alternatives were ranked based on five criteria: vehicle cost, fuel cost, distance between refueling stations, number of vehicle options available to the consumer, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions per unit distance traveled. In addition, sensitivity analyses were performed to study the impact of changes in various parameters on final ranking. Two base cases and several alternative scenarios were evaluated. In the base case scenario with higher weight on economical parameters, gasoline-based vehicle was ranked higher than other vehicles. In the base case scenario with higher weight on environmental parameters, hybrid vehicle was ranked first followed by biodiesel-based vehicle. (author)

  5. Biofouling of Several Marine Diesel Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    ultralow sulfur diesel, synthetic diesel, biodiesel, and hydrotreated renewable diesel fuels. Bulk chemical changes and differences in biofouing...of its large carbon footprint. NSWCCD-61-TR-2011/08 2 Biological material can be hydrotreated to produce a mixture of hydrocarbons which, with...additional treatment, is converted into a low-carbon footprint isoparaffinic fuel. Hydrotreated renewable jet (HRJ) fuel derived from Camelina

  6. Prospect for Upgrading China's Gasoline Consumption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Guangming

    2010-01-01

    @@ China's economy has maintained a steady and rapid development,the growth rate of automobiles and gasoline output and sales volume is far beyond the national economic growth rate over the same period,and much higher than that in developed countries.According to the State's"Petrochemical Industrial Restructuring and Revitalization Plan",vehicle using gasoline in 2009 should agree with the national Ⅲ standard,vehicle using diesel in 2010 should meet the national Ⅲ standard,and light oil yield in 2011 will reach 75%,high-end self-sufficiency rate of petrochemical products will increase remarkably.

  7. Diesel oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oil ... Diesel oil ... Diesel oil poisoning can cause symptoms in many parts of the body. EYES, EARS, NOSE, AND THROAT Loss of ... most dangerous effects of hydrocarbon (such as diesel oil) poisoning are due to inhaling the fumes. NERVOUS ...

  8. ESEMISSION ANALYSIS OF SINGLE CYLINDER DIESEL ENGINE FUELED WITH PYROLYSIS OIL DIESEL AND IT’S BLEND WITH ETHANOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Hirenkumar M. Patel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Around the world, initiatives are being taken to replace gasoline and diesel fuel due to the impact of the fossil fuel crisis, increase in oil price, and the adoption of stringent emission norms. Increase in energy demand, stringent emission norms and depletion of oil resources led the researchers to find alternative fuels for internalcombustion engines. Many alternate fuels like Alcohols, Biodiesel, methanol, ethanol, LPG, CNG etc have been already commercialized in the transport sector. In this context, pyrolysis of solid waste is currently receiving renewed interest. Tests have been carried out to evaluate the emission analysis of a single cylinder direct injection diesel engine fueled with 10%, 15%, and 20% of tyre pyrolysis oil (TPO blended with diesel fuel (DF. The TPO was derived from waste automobile tires through vacuum pyrolysis. HC and CO emissions werefound to be higher at all loads due to the high aromatic content. Ethanol was added in concentration of 5%, 10% and 15% to reduce emission characteristics. Results show that CO and HC both reduced due to the addition of ethanol because ethanol is an oxygenated additives.

  9. Commercial Test of Multi-functional Desulfurizing Agent TS-01 for Gasoline in FCC Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai Zhi; Wu Yingjian; Yu Weisheng

    2003-01-01

    Experimental use of multi-functional desulfurizing agent TS-01 for FCC gasoline in the FCC unitof SINOPEC Jiujiang Company shows that the multi-functional desulfurizing agent can effectivelyremove various kinds of sulfur in FCC gasoline and diesel fuel and fulfill passivation on heavy metals.

  10. Application of a Biodegradable Lubricant in a Diesel Vehicle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schramm, Jesper

    2003-01-01

    , NOx, THC, PM, lubricant-SOF and PAH from one diesel and one gasoline type vehicle using biodegradable lubricants and conventional lubricants. This paper describes the results of the experiments with the diesel type vehicle only. Lubricant consumption and fuel consumption are other important parameters...

  11. Improvement of engine emissions with conventional diesel fuel and diesel-biodiesel blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, Md Nurun; Akhter, Md Shamim; Zaglul Shahadat, Mhia Md

    2006-02-01

    In this report combustion and exhaust emissions with neat diesel fuel and diesel-biodiesel blends have been investigated. In the investigation, firstly biodiesel from non-edible neem oil has been made by esterification. Biodiesel fuel (BDF) is chemically known as mono-alkyl fatty acid ester. It is renewable in nature and is derived from plant oils including vegetable oils. BDF is non-toxic, biodegradable, recycled resource and essentially free from sulfur and carcinogenic benzene. In the second phase of this investigation, experiment has been conducted with neat diesel fuel and diesel-biodiesel blends in a four stroke naturally aspirated (NA) direct injection (DI) diesel engine. Compared with conventional diesel fuel, diesel-biodiesel blends showed lower carbon monoxide (CO), and smoke emissions but higher oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emission. However, compared with the diesel fuel, NOx emission with diesel-biodiesel blends was slightly reduced when EGR was applied.

  12. Gasoline Reid Vapor Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA regulates the vapor pressure of gasoline sold at retail stations during the summer ozone season to reduce evaporative emissions from gasoline that contribute to ground-level ozone and diminish the effects of ozone-related health problems.

  13. FedEx Express Gasoline Hybrid Electric Delivery Truck Evaluation: 12-Month Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnitt, R.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes the data obtained in a 12-month comparison of three gasoline hybrid electric delivery vehicles with three comparable diesel vehicles. The data show that there was no statistical difference between operating cost per mile of the two groups of vehicles. As expected, tailpipe emissions were considerably lower across all drive cycles for the gHEV than for the diesel vehicle.

  14. FedEx Express Gasoline Hybrid Electric Delivery Truck Evaluation: 12-Month Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnitt, R.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes the data obtained in a 12-month comparison of three gasoline hybrid electric delivery vehicles with three comparable diesel vehicles. The data show that there was no statistical difference between operating cost per mile of the two groups of vehicles. As expected, tailpipe emissions were considerably lower across all drive cycles for the gHEV than for the diesel vehicle.

  15. Gasoline from Wood via Integrated Gasification, Synthesis, and Methanol-to-Gasoline Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, S. D.; Tarud, J. K.; Biddy, M. J.; Dutta, A.

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) assessment of the feasibility of making gasoline via the methanol-to-gasoline route using syngas from a 2,000 dry metric tonne/day (2,205 U.S. ton/day) biomass-fed facility. A new technoeconomic model was developed in Aspen Plus for this study, based on the model developed for NREL's thermochemical ethanol design report (Phillips et al. 2007). The necessary process changes were incorporated into a biomass-to-gasoline model using a methanol synthesis operation followed by conversion, upgrading, and finishing to gasoline. Using a methodology similar to that used in previous NREL design reports and a feedstock cost of $50.70/dry ton ($55.89/dry metric tonne), the estimated plant gate price is $16.60/MMBtu ($15.73/GJ) (U.S. $2007) for gasoline and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) produced from biomass via gasification of wood, methanol synthesis, and the methanol-to-gasoline process. The corresponding unit prices for gasoline and LPG are $1.95/gallon ($0.52/liter) and $1.53/gallon ($0.40/liter) with yields of 55.1 and 9.3 gallons per U.S. ton of dry biomass (229.9 and 38.8 liters per metric tonne of dry biomass), respectively.

  16. Volatilization behaviors of diesel oil from the soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yu-ying; ZHENG Xi-lai; LI Bing; MA Yu-xin; CAO Jing-hua

    2004-01-01

    The volatilization of diesel oil, Shengli crude oil and 90# gasoline on glass surface of petri dishes were conducted at the ambient temperature of 25℃. Diesel oil evaporates in a power manner, where the loss of mass is approximately power with time. 90# gasoline evaporates in a logarithmic with time. Where as the volatilization of Shengli crude oil fit either the logarithmic or power equation after different time, and has similar R2. And the effects of soil type and diesel oil and water content on volatilization behavior in unsaturated soil were studied in this paper. Diesel oil and water content in the soils play a large role in volatilization from soils. Appropriate water helps the wicking action but too much water stops it. The wicking action behaves differently in four different types of soils in the same volatilization experiment of 18% diesel oil content and air-dry condition.

  17. Diesel engine cogeneration plants in the context of integration of renewable energy sources in power supply; Dieselmotor-Kraft-Waerme-Kopplungsanlagen im Kontext der Integration Erneuerbarer Energien in die Energieversorgung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sievers, John

    2010-10-29

    The aim of this thesis is to investigate and assess future options, potentials, strengths and weaknesses of cogeneration of heat and power. This is carried out against the background of global climate change and the integration of an increasing share of fluctuating renewable energies in power generation considering the necessity of guaranteeing a reliable, efficient, sustainable and cost effective power supply. It is assumed that the transition process to an entirely renewable energy-based electricity generation in Germany will considerably depend on the integration of wind energy because of its economic competitiveness, environmental friendliness and potential. However, power generation using wind energy fluctuates quite considerably. Diesel motors are here investigated as a decentralized integration instrument. Thanks to their great flexibility, high efficiency and relatively low nominal capacity, they perfectly meet the requirements for the simultaneous decentralized use of heat. Boundary conditions of Diesel motor combined heat and power plants (CHP) are analyzed and described in this work, different models for wind energy integration are elaborated, and these models are used for several variations to simulate the balance of wind energy by cogeneration. In this context, environmental impacts are discussed. Common assessment methods on environmental impacts of CHP distort the results. The so-called output method is developed and described, by which the final assessment of environmental impacts is not implicitly mixed - as is commonly the case - with the calculation of environmental impacts. This output method is used to compare CHP generation with other energy conversion processes within the context of power generation including insulation of buildings, the use of different fuels and different applications for cogeneration. This work clearly demonstrates that while bio fuel resources can be optimally used for power generation, cogenerated electricity could also

  18. Ignition studies of two low-octane gasolines

    KAUST Repository

    Javed, Tamour

    2017-07-24

    Low-octane gasolines (RON ∼ 50–70 range) are prospective fuels for gasoline compression ignition (GCI) internal combustion engines. GCI technology utilizing low-octane fuels has the potential to significantly improve well-to-wheel efficiency and reduce the transportation sector\\'s environmental footprint by offsetting diesel fuel usage in compression ignition engines. In this study, ignition delay times of two low-octane FACE (Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines) gasolines, FACE I and FACE J, were measured in a shock tube and a rapid compression machine over a broad range of engine-relevant conditions (650–1200 K, 20 and 40 bar and ϕ = 0.5 and 1). The two gasolines are of similar octane ratings with anti-knock index, AKI = (RON + MON)/2, of ∼ 70 and sensitivity, S = RON–MON, of ∼ 3. However, the molecular compositions of the two gasolines are notably different. Experimental ignition delay time results showed that the two gasolines exhibited similar reactivity over a wide range of test conditions. Furthermore, ignition delay times of a primary reference fuel (PRF) surrogate (n-heptane/iso-octane blend), having the same AKI as the FACE gasolines, captured the ignition behavior of these gasolines with some minor discrepancies at low temperatures (T < 700 K). Multi-component surrogates, formulated by matching the octane ratings and compositions of the two gasolines, emulated the autoignition behavior of gasolines from high to low temperatures. Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine simulations were used to show that the PRF and multi-component surrogates exhibited similar combustion phasing over a wide range of engine operating conditions.

  19. Diesel emission control: Catalytic filters for particulate removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Fino

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The European diesel engine industry represents a vital sector across the Continent, with more than 2 million direct work positions and a turnover of over 400 billion Euro. Diesel engines provide large paybacks to society since they are extensively used to transport goods, services and people. In recent years increasing attention has been paid to the emissions from diesel engines which, like gasoline engine emissions, include carbon monoxide (CO, hydrocarbons (HC and oxides of nitrogen (NOx. Diesel engines also produce significant levels of particulate matter (PM, which consists mostly of carbonaceous soot and a soluble organic fraction (SOF of hydrocarbons that have condensed on the soot.

  20. Misunderstood markets: The case of California gasoline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jennifer Ruth

    In 1996, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) implemented a new benchmark for cleaner burning gasoline that is unique to California. Since then, government officials have often expressed concern that the uniqueness of petroleum products in California segregates the industry, allowing for gasoline prices in the State that are too high and too volatile. The growing concern about the segmentation of the California markets lends itself to analysis of spatial pricing. Spatial price spreads of wholesale gasoline within the state exhibit some characteristics that seem, on the surface, inconsistent with spatial price theory. Particularly, some spatial price spreads of wholesale gasoline appear larger than accepted transportation rates and other spreads are negative, giving a price signal for transportation against the physical flow of product. Both characteristics suggest some limitation in the arbitrage process. Proprietary data, consisting of daily product prices for the years 2000 through 2002, disaggregated by company, product, grade, and location is used to examine more closely spatial price patterns. My discussion of institutional and physical infrastructure outlines two features of the industry that limit, but do not prohibit, arbitrage. First, a look into branding and wholesale contracting shows that contract terms, specifically branding agreements, reduces the price-responsiveness of would-be arbitrageurs. Second, review of maps and documents illustrating the layout of physical infrastructure, namely petroleum pipelines, confirms the existence of some connections among markets. My analysis of the day-of-the-week effects on wholesale prices demonstrates how the logistics of the use of transportation infrastructure affect market prices. Further examination of spatial price relationships shows that diesel prices follow closely the Augmented Law of One Price (ALOP), and that branding agreements cause gasoline prices to deviate substantially ALOP. Without branding

  1. Improvement of thermal effciency in diesel engine. Diesel engine no koritsu kojo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, H. (Isuzu Ceramics Research Inst. Co. Ltd., Kanagawa, (Japan))

    1993-04-05

    Diesel engines cause worsening air pollution due to much more discharge of nitrogen oxides than gasoline engines, however for reduction of carbon dioxide, Diesel engines consuming less fuel are better than gasoline engines for protection of the global environment. Theoretical thermal efficiency is larger as compression ratio and isochronic burnup are bigger, hence such an engine is needed that is made on the basis of a Diesel engine, whose compression ratio is twice or more larger than that of gasoline engine and which has good thermal efficiency, and reduces its nitrogen oxides by the development of the combustion technique by means of controlling combustion temperature as well as fuel equivalent ratio. With regard to the improvement of thermal efficiency of Diesel engines, it can be attained, utilizing the respective features of the antechamber-type and the direct injection-type Diesels, by burning the homogeneous mixture, whose fuel equivalent ratio is big, in the initial stage and by controlling the main combustion period in the main chamber short. inaddition, a radiation shield-type turbocompound engine has been test fabricated and rough explanations are given on its structure, its combustion and the recovery of its exhaust gas energy. 5 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Gasoline surrogate modeling of gasoline ignition in a rapid compression machine and comparison to experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehl, M; Kukkadapu, G; Kumar, K; Sarathy, S M; Pitz, W J; Sung, S J

    2011-09-15

    The use of gasoline in homogeneous charge compression ignition engines (HCCI) and in duel fuel diesel - gasoline engines, has increased the need to understand its compression ignition processes under engine-like conditions. These processes need to be studied under well-controlled conditions in order to quantify low temperature heat release and to provide fundamental validation data for chemical kinetic models. With this in mind, an experimental campaign has been undertaken in a rapid compression machine (RCM) to measure the ignition of gasoline mixtures over a wide range of compression temperatures and for different compression pressures. By measuring the pressure history during ignition, information on the first stage ignition (when observed) and second stage ignition are captured along with information on the phasing of the heat release. Heat release processes during ignition are important because gasoline is known to exhibit low temperature heat release, intermediate temperature heat release and high temperature heat release. In an HCCI engine, the occurrence of low-temperature and intermediate-temperature heat release can be exploited to obtain higher load operation and has become a topic of much interest for engine researchers. Consequently, it is important to understand these processes under well-controlled conditions. A four-component gasoline surrogate model (including n-heptane, iso-octane, toluene, and 2-pentene) has been developed to simulate real gasolines. An appropriate surrogate mixture of the four components has been developed to simulate the specific gasoline used in the RCM experiments. This chemical kinetic surrogate model was then used to simulate the RCM experimental results for real gasoline. The experimental and modeling results covered ultra-lean to stoichiometric mixtures, compressed temperatures of 640-950 K, and compression pressures of 20 and 40 bar. The agreement between the experiments and model is encouraging in terms of first

  3. Deleading of gasoline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. K. Choudhuri

    1961-01-01

    Full Text Available : Gasoline as normally supplied for running internal combustion engines contain added twtraethy lead for improving anti-knock properties. Due to the presence of lead, burning of the gasoline (for heating and illuminating purposes results in complete choking of the orifice at which it is burnt by thedeposition of lead in a short time and secondly fouls the environment with poisonous lead vapour. Two new methods based on chemical reaction and absorption to remove lead from gasoline have been discussed. The methods are simple, rapid and adaptable universally for running burner stoves, mantle lanterns and similar equipments.

  4. Alcohols as gasoline additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jawetz, P.

    1982-12-01

    This paper showed that, when using alcohol octane-boosting additives to gasoline, one attains several goals at the same time: (a) there is an increased saving in petroleum crude, since the alcohol is not merely a substitute for gasoline but rather a substitute for the octane-boosting additives used in the manufacture of unleaded gasoline; and (b) the production of fermentation ethanol for a fuel purpose can help revitalize the agricultural sector in different economics systems, thus becoming a road to economic development.

  5. Effects of ethanol on combustion and emissions of a gasoline engine operating with different combustion modes

    OpenAIRE

    Ojapah, MM; Zhao, H.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of fuel economy and CO2 emission legislations for passenger cars in many countries and regions has spurred the research and development of more efficient gasoline engines. The pumping loss at part-load operations is a major factor for the higher fuel consumption of spark ignition (SI) gasoline engines than the diesel engines. Various approaches have been identified to reduce the pumping loss at part-load operations, leading to improved fuel economy, including Early Intake Val...

  6. Gasoline Taxes and Consumer Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Shanjun; Linn, Joshua; Muehlegger, Erich J.

    2012-01-01

    Gasoline taxes can be employed to correct externalities associated with automobile use, to reduce dependency on foreign oil, and to raise government revenue. Our understanding of the optimal gasoline tax and the efficacy of existing taxes is largely based on empirical analysis of consumer responses to gasoline price changes. In this paper, we directly examine how gasoline taxes affect consumer behavior as distinct from tax-exclusive gasoline prices. Our analysis shows that a 5-cent tax increa...

  7. 40 CFR 80.595 - How does a small or GPA refiner apply for a motor vehicle diesel fuel volume baseline for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... for a motor vehicle diesel fuel volume baseline for the purpose of extending their gasoline sulfur... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Motor Vehicle Diesel Fuel; Nonroad, Locomotive... a small or GPA refiner apply for a motor vehicle diesel fuel volume baseline for the purpose...

  8. California Tribal Gasoline Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is proposing a draft general permit under the Clean Air Act Federal Indian Country Minor NSR program for gasoline dispensing facilities, such as gas stations, located in Indian country within the geographical boundaries of California.

  9. Gasoline hybrid pneumatic engine for efficient vehicle powertrain hybridization

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitrova, Zlatina; Maréchal, François

    2015-01-01

    The largest applied convertors in passenger cars are the internal combustion engines – gasoline, diesel, adapted also for operating on alternative fuels and hybrid modes. The number of components that are necessary to realize modern future propulsion system is inexorably increasing. The need for efficiency improvement of the vehicle energy system induces the search for an innovative methodology during the design process. In this article the compressed air is investigated as an innovative solu...

  10. Standby Gasoline Rationing Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-06-01

    The final rules adopted by the President for a Standby Gasoline Rationing Plan are presented. The plan provides that eligibility for ration allotments will be determined primarily on the basis of motor vehicle registrations, taking into account historical differences in the use of gasoline among states. The regulations also provide authority for supplemental allotments to firms so that their allotment will equal a specified percentage of gasoline use during a base period. Priority classifications, i.e., agriculture, defense, etc., are established to assure adequate gasoline supplies for designated essential services. Ration rights must be provided by end-users to their suppliers for each gallon sold. DOE will regulate the distribution of gasoline at the wholesale level according to the transfer by suppliers of redeemed ration rights and the gasoline allocation regulations. Ration rights are transferable. A ration banking system is created to facilitate transfers of ration rights. Each state will be provided with a reserve of ration rights to provide for hardship needs and to alleviate inequities. (DC)

  11. Experimental investigation of ethanol blends with gasoline on SI engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav tiwari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Automobile have become a very important part of our modern life style. But the future of automobile based on internal combustion engines has been badly affected by two major problems. That is less availability of fuel and environmental degradation. So it is very important to found some new renewable non polluting alternative fuels to ensure the proper and safe survival of internal combustion engines. In present study we evaluate the performance of two stroke single cylinder spark ignition engine with ratio of 10% 20% and 30% of ethanol and gasoline by volume. Performance parameters (brake thermal efficiency, brake specific energy consumption and brake specific fuel consumption were determined at various loads on engine with ethanol blended gasoline. The comparison was made on performance of conventional SI engine with pure gasoline operation. As a result, brake thermal efficiency, brake specific fuel consumption and brake specific fuel consumption showed comparable performance when compared with pure gasoline performances.

  12. General Motors perspective on the potential of diesel vehicles for the U.S. automotive market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smyth, J.G.; Indra, F.; Freese, C.; Brown, D.; Potter, M. [General Motors Powertrain, Pontiac (United States)

    2004-07-01

    The European market for diesel-powered vehicles has seen tremendous growth over the last ten years. This trend is driven by the superior fuel economy and reduced CO2 emissions of diesel engines, tax policies that favor diesel-powered vehicles, and emission regulations tailored to the capabilities of the diesel engine. The diesel growth observed in Europe has not been reproduced in the United States due in part to an economic environment that does not favor diesel-powered vehicles and U.S. light-duty emission regulations primarily based on the capability of the gasoline engine. This paper discusses the challenges associated with diesel market expansion in the United States and the technologies being developed to address these challenges. The paper concludes with an assessment of the potential for future U.S. diesel vehicle market growth.

  13. Global gasoline prices: The need to raise gasoline taxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin Lawell, C.-Y. Cynthia

    2017-01-01

    Gasoline taxes are considered to be a cost-effective policy instrument for reducing carbon emissions. A study finds that while gasoline taxes rose in 83 countries between 2003 and 2015, the global mean fell by 13.3% due to a shift in consumption towards countries that maintain gasoline subsidies or that have low taxes.

  14. Desulfurization of gasoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, J E

    1975-04-01

    Although gasoline blending streams exhibit widely varying sulfur concentrations, significant quantities of low-sulfur motor gasoline cannot be manufactured by reallocation of existing components without substantial sacrifices in the useful properties of the remaining fuels having normal sulfur levels. To meet the anticipated demand for low-sulfur unleaded gasoline which may be required for catalyst-equipped automobiles it will be necessary to install process equipment based on known hydrotreating technology. The effects which this construction program would exert on the activities, abilities and needs of one petroleum refiner are sketched for two degrees of sulfur removal. The impacts of installing the process facilities which would be necessary are discussed in terms of time requirements, capital needs, and added energy expenditures.

  15. Who Pays the Gasoline Tax?

    OpenAIRE

    Chernick, Howard; Reschovsky, Andrew

    1997-01-01

    Analyzes panel data over 11 years (both backward from 1982 and forward from 1982) to determine the average gasoline tax burden. Considers links between economic mobility, gasoline consumption, and excise tax increases.

  16. GASOLINE VEHICLE EXHAUST PARTICLE SAMPLING STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kittelson, D; Watts, W; Johnson, J; Zarling, D Schauer,J Kasper, K; Baltensperger, U; Burtscher, H

    2003-08-24

    The University of Minnesota collaborated with the Paul Scherrer Institute, the University of Wisconsin (UWI) and Ricardo, Inc to physically and chemically characterize the exhaust plume from recruited gasoline spark ignition (SI) vehicles. The project objectives were: (1) Measure representative particle size distributions from a set of on-road SI vehicles and compare these data to similar data collected on a small subset of light-duty gasoline vehicles tested on a chassis dynamometer with a dilution tunnel using the Unified Drive Cycle, at both room temperature (cold start) and 0 C (cold-cold start). (2) Compare data collected from SI vehicles to similar data collected from Diesel engines during the Coordinating Research Council E-43 project. (3) Characterize on-road aerosol during mixed midweek traffic and Sunday midday periods and determine fleet-specific emission rates. (4) Characterize bulk- and size-segregated chemical composition of the particulate matter (PM) emitted in the exhaust from the gasoline vehicles. Particle number concentrations and size distributions are strongly influenced by dilution and sampling conditions. Laboratory methods were evaluated to dilute SI exhaust in a way that would produce size distributions that were similar to those measured during laboratory experiments. Size fractionated samples were collected for chemical analysis using a nano-microorifice uniform deposit impactor (nano-MOUDI). In addition, bulk samples were collected and analyzed. A mixture of low, mid and high mileage vehicles were recruited for testing during the study. Under steady highway cruise conditions a significant particle signature above background was not measured, but during hard accelerations number size distributions for the test fleet were similar to modern heavy-duty Diesel vehicles. Number emissions were much higher at high speed and during cold-cold starts. Fuel specific number emissions range from 1012 to 3 x 1016 particles/kg fuel. A simple

  17. Renewable sources of energy in Mexico in the twenty first century; Fuentes renovables de energia en Mexico en el siglo XXI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez Vera, Jorge [Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Anahuac, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    1997-12-31

    In Mexico, more than 75% of the electric energy generated by the electric sector comes from power plants that burn fossil fuels such as fuel oil, natural gas, diesel and coal and regarding the transportation industry, the great majority of the automotive vehicles are driven by gasoline and diesel and exceptionally, gas LP is used for this purpose. This means a non-discriminated use of a non-renewable natural resource, as well as high degree emission pollutants to the atmosphere. [Espanol] En Mexico, mas del 75 por ciento de la energia electrica generada por el sector electrico proviene de centrales electricas que usan combustibles fosiles, tales como combustoleo, gas natural, diesel y carbon y por lo que se refiere a la industria del transporte, la gran mayoria de los vehiculos automotores son propulsados con gasolinas y diesel y excepcionalmente se usa para este proposito gas LP. Lo anterior significa un uso indiscriminado de un recurso natural no renovable asi como elevados grados de emision de contaminantes a la atmosfera.

  18. Butanol / Gasoline Mercury CRADA Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Butanol / Gasoline Mercury CRADA Report Distribution Statement A: Approved for Public Release; distribution is unlimited. February 2015...Report No. CG-D-11-15 Butanol / Gasoline Mercury CRADA Report UNCLAS//Public | CG-926 RDC | M. Wiggins et al. Public | February 2015 ii...States Coast Guard Research & Development Center 1 Chelsea Street New London, CT 06320 Butanol / Gasoline Mercury CRADA Report

  19. 76 FR 44405 - Regulation To Mitigate the Misfueling of Vehicles and Engines With Gasoline Containing Greater...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-25

    ... production, importation, distribution, marketing, or retailing of diesel fuel and production of gasoline... sport utility vehicles (SUVs) and minivans were not explicitly mentioned in the label even though both... of the relationship between energy content and fuel price, many consumers might intentionally misfuel...

  20. Application of a Biodegradable Lubricant in a Diesel Vehicle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schramm, Jesper

    2003-01-01

    The IEA Advanced Motor Fuels Agreement has initiated this project concerning the application of biodegradable lubricants to diesel and gasoline type vehicles. Emission measurements on a chassis dynamometer were carried out. The purpose of these measurements was to compare the emissions of CO, CO2......, NOx, THC, PM, lubricant-SOF and PAH from one diesel and one gasoline type vehicle using biodegradable lubricants and conventional lubricants. This paper describes the results of the experiments with the diesel type vehicle only. Lubricant consumption and fuel consumption are other important parameters...... lubricant, compared to the reference lubricant, was dependent on the driving pattern -the lubricant was the main contributor to the soluble organic fraction of the particulates emitted, only biodiesel gave a contribution from the fuel -a slightly higher fuel consumption and NOx emission was noticed...

  1. Motor gasoline assessment, Spring 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    The springs of 1996 and 1997 provide an excellent example of contrasting gasoline market dynamics. In spring 1996, tightening crude oil markets pushed up gasoline prices sharply, adding to the normal seasonal gasoline price increases; however, in spring 1997, crude oil markets loosened and crude oil prices fell, bringing gasoline prices down. This pattern was followed throughout the country except in California. As a result of its unique reformulated gasoline, California prices began to vary significantly from the rest of the country in 1996 and continued to exhibit distinct variations in 1997. In addition to the price contrasts between 1996 and 1997, changes occurred in the way in which gasoline markets were supplied. Low stocks, high refinery utilizations, and high imports persisted through 1996 into summer 1997, but these factors seem to have had little impact on gasoline price spreads relative to average spread.

  2. IMPACT OF OXYGENATED FUEL ON DIESEL ENGINE PERFORMANCE AND EMISSIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehman, Andre L.

    2000-08-20

    As evidenced by recent lawsuits brought against operators of large diesel truck fleets [1] and by the Consent Decree brought against the heavy-duty diesel manufacturers [2], the environmental and health effects of diesel engine emissions continue to be a significant concern. Reduction of diesel engine emissions has traditionally been achieved through a combination of fuel system, combustion chamber, and engine control modifications [3]. Catalytic aftertreatment has become common on modern diesel vehicles, with the predominant device being the diesel oxidation catalytic converter [3]. To enable advanced after-treatment devices and to directly reduce emissions, significant recent interest has focused on reformulation of diesel fuel, particularly the reduction of sulfur content. The EPA has man-dated that diesel fuel will have only 15 ppm sulfur content by 2007, with current diesel specifications requiring around 300 ppm [4]. Reduction of sulfur will permit sulfur-sensitive aftertreatment devices, continuously regenerating particulate traps, NOx control catalysts, and plasma assisted catalysts to be implemented on diesel vehicles [4]. Another method of reformulating diesel fuel to reduce emissions is to incorporate oxygen in the fuel, as was done in the reformulation of gasoline. The use of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) in reformulated gasoline has resulted in contamination of water resources across the country [5]. Nonetheless, by relying on the lessons learned from MTBE, oxygenation of diesel fuel may be accomplished without compromising water quality. Oxygenation of diesel fuel offers the possibility of reducing particulate matter emissions significantly, even for the current fleet of diesel vehicles. The mechanism by which oxygen content leads to particulate matter reductions is still under debate, but recent evidence shows clearly that ''smokeless'' engine operation is possible when the oxygen content of diesel fuel reaches roughly 38% by

  3. Evaluation on Lubricity of Diesel Blended Fuels by SRV Tester%用SRV试验机评价柴油混合燃料的润滑性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张志才; 何燕; 陈力; 王辉

    2015-01-01

    It was evaluated the impacts of gasoline ,gasoline engine oil and aviation hydraulic oil on lubricity of diesel fuel by SRV tester.Gasoline had little effect on the lubricity of diesel,fuel gasoline engine oil could sig-nificantly improve lubricity of diesel fuel ,and aviation hydraulic oil could decrease lubricity of diesel fuel.%用SRV试验机评价了汽油,汽油机油和航空液压油对柴油润滑性的影响。汽油对柴油的润滑性影响不大,汽油机油可以明显改善柴油的润滑性,而航空液压油会降低柴油的润滑性。

  4. Gasoline Vapor Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Gasoline is volatile and some of it evaporates during storage, giving off hydrocarbon vapor. Formerly, the vapor was vented into the atmosphere but anti-pollution regulations have precluded that practice in many localities, so oil companies and storage terminals are installing systems to recover hydrocarbon vapor. Recovery provides an energy conservation bonus in that most of the vapor can be reconverted to gasoline. Two such recovery systems are shown in the accompanying photographs (mid-photo at right and in the foreground below). They are actually two models of the same system, although.configured differently because they are customized to users' needs. They were developed and are being manufactured by Edwards Engineering Corporation, Pompton Plains, New Jersey. NASA technological information proved useful in development of the equipment.

  5. Performance of Diesel Engine Using Blended Crude Jatropha Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarudin, Kamarul Azhar; Mohd Sazali, Nor Shahida Akma; Mohd Ali, Mas Fauzi; Alimin, Ahmad Jais; Khir, Saffiah Abdullah

    2010-06-01

    Vegetable oil presents a very promising alternative to diesel oil since it is renewable and has similar properties to the diesel. In view of this, crude jatropha oil is selected and its viscosity is reduced by blending it with diesel. Since jatropha oil has properties which are similar to mineral diesel, it can be used in compression ignition engines without any engine modification. This paper presents the results of investigation carried out on a four-cylinder, four strokes and indirect-injection diesel engine. The engine, operated using composition blends of crude jatropha oil and diesel, were compared with mineral diesel. An experimental investigation has been carried out to analyze the performance characteristics of a compression ignition engine from the blended fuel (5%, 10%, 20% and 30%). A naturally aspirated four-stroke indirect injection diesel engine was tested at full load conditions, speeds between 1000 and 3500 rpm with intervals of 500 rpm. Results obtained from the measures of torque, power, specific fuel consumptions, thermal efficiency and brake mean effective pressure are nearly the same between blended and diesel fuel. An overall graph shows that the performance of relevant parameters from blended fuel is most likely similar to the performance produced from diesel. The experimental results proved that the use of crude jatropha oil in compression ignition engines is a viable alternative to diesel.

  6. CFD Simulation of Gasoline Compression Ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodavasal, Janardhan; Kolodziej, Christopher P.; Ciatti, Stephen A.; Som, Sibendu

    2015-05-01

    Gasoline compression ignition (GCI) is a low temperature combustion (LTC) concept that has been gaining increasing interest over the recent years owing to its potential to achieve diesel-like thermal efficiencies with significantly reduced engine-out nitrogen oxides (NOx) and soot emissions compared to diesel engines. In this work, closed-cycle computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are performed of this combustion mode using a sector mesh in an effort to understand effects of model settings on simulation results. One goal of this work is to provide recommendations for grid resolution, combustion model, chemical kinetic mechanism, and turbulence model to accurately capture experimental combustion characteristics. Grid resolutions ranging from 0.7 mm to 0.1 mm minimum cell sizes were evaluated in conjunction with both Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) based turbulence models. Solution of chemical kinetics using the multi-zone approach is evaluated against the detailed approach of solving chemistry in every cell. The relatively small primary reference fuel (PRF) mechanism (48 species) used in this study is also evaluated against a larger 312-species gasoline mechanism. Based on these studies the following model settings are chosen keeping in mind both accuracy and computation costs – 0.175 mm minimum cell size grid, RANS turbulence model, 48-species PRF mechanism, and multi-zone chemistry solution with bin limits of 5 K in temperature and 0.05 in equivalence ratio. With these settings, the performance of the CFD model is evaluated against experimental results corresponding to a low load start of injection (SOI) timing sweep. The model is then exercised to investigate the effect of SOI on combustion phasing with constant intake valve closing (IVC) conditions and fueling over a range of SOI timings to isolate the impact of SOI on charge preparation and ignition. Simulation results indicate that there is an optimum SOI

  7. Alternatives to conventional diesel fuel-some potential implications of California's TAC decision on diesel particulate.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberhardt, J. J.; Rote, D. M.; Saricks, C. L.; Stodolsky, F.

    1999-08-10

    Limitations on the use of petroleum-based diesel fuel in California could occur pursuant to the 1998 declaration by California's Air Resources Board (CARB) that the particulate matter component of diesel exhaust is a carcinogen, therefore a toxic air contaminant (TAC) subject to provisions of the state's Proposition 65. It is the declared intention of CARB not to ban or restrict diesel fuel, per se, at this time. Assuming no total ban, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) explored two feasible ''mid-course'' strategies. (1) Increased penetration of natural gas and greater gasoline use in the transportation fuels market, to the extent that some compression-ignition (CI) applications revert to spark-ignition (SI) engines. (2) New specifications requiring diesel fuel reformulation based on exhaust products of individual diesel fuel constituents. Each of these alternatives results in some degree of (conventional) diesel displacement. In the first case, diesel fuel is assumed admissible for ignition assistance as a pilot fuel in natural gas (NG)-powered heavy-duty vehicles, and gasoline demand in California increases by 32.2 million liters per day overall, about 21 percent above projected 2010 baseline demand. Natural gas demand increases by 13.6 million diesel liter equivalents per day, about 7 percent above projected (total) consumption level. In the second case, compression-ignition engines utilize substitutes for petroleum-based diesel having similar ignition and performance properties. For each case we estimated localized air emission plus generalized greenhouse gas and energy changes. Economic implications of vehicle and engine replacement were not evaluated.

  8. 26 CFR 48.4081-4 - Gasoline; special rules for gasoline blendstocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Gasoline; special rules for gasoline blendstocks..., Tread Rubber, and Taxable Fuel Taxable Fuel § 48.4081-4 Gasoline; special rules for gasoline blendstocks... gasoline blendstocks. Generally, under prescribed conditions, tax is not imposed on gasoline...

  9. Simulation of Low-Temperature Coal Tar Hydrocracking in Supercritical Gasoline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Lei; Liu Zongkuan; Gu Zhaolin

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper was preliminary design of the process for low-temperature coal tar hydrocracking in supercritical gasoline based on Aspen Plus with the concept of energy self-sustainability. In order to ensure the correct-ness and accuracy of the simulation, we did the following tasks: selecting reasonable model compounds for low-tem-perature coal tar; describing the nature of products gasoline and diesel accurately; and conifrming the proper property study method for each block by means of experience and trial. The purpose of energy self-sustainability could be pos-sibly achieved, on one hand, by using hot stream to preheat cold stream and achieving temperature control of streams, and on the other hand, by utilizing gas (byproduct of the coal tar hydrocracking) combustion reaction to provide energy. Results showed that the whole process could provide a positive net power of about 609 kW·h for processing the low-temperature coal tar with a lfowrate of 2 268 kg/h. The total heat recovery amounted to 2 229 kW·h, among which 845 kW·h was obtained from the gas combustion reaction, and 1 116 kW·h was provided by the reactor’s outlet stream, with the rest furnished by hot streams of the products gasoline, diesel and residue. In addition, the process lfow sheet could achieve products separation well, and speciifcally the purity of product gasoline and diesel reached 97.2% and 100%, respectively.

  10. Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Test Methods Additional Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supporting documents on the Direct Final Rule that allows refiners and laboratories to use more current and improved fuel testing procedures for twelve American Society for Testing and Materials analytical test methods.

  11. Comparative Toxicity of Gasoline and Diesel Engine Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JeanClare Seagrave; Joe L. Mauderly; Barbara Zielinska; John Sagebiel; Kevin Whitney; Doughlas R. Lawson; Michael Gurevich

    2000-06-19

    Better information on the comparative toxicity of airborne emissions from different types of engines is needed to guide the development of heavy vehicle engine, fuel, lubricant, and exhaust after-treatment technologies, and to place the health hazards of current heavy vehicle emissions in their proper perspective. To help fill this information gap, samples of vehicle exhaust particles and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC) were collected and analyzed. The biological activity of the combined particle-SVOC samples is being tested using standardized toxicity assays. This report provides an update on the design of experiments to test the relative toxicity of engine emissions from various sources.

  12. Characterization of Gasolines, Diesel Fuels and Their Water Soluble Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-01

    low on the basis of comparison to the dynamic headspace analysis data (Table IV.) The best estimates of the levels of aromatic hydrocarbons appear to...0.2 0.1 a determined by dynamic headspace analysis (see Table 3). bincludes ethylbenzene and xylenes. 6 Table III. Chemical Composition of the Water

  13. Data on Ethanol in Gasoline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasoline composition varies for technical, market and regulatory reasons. Knowledge of any one of these is insufficient for understanding the chemical composition of gasoline at any specific location in the U.S. Historical data collected by the National Institute of Petroleum ...

  14. Gasoline compression ignition approach to efficient, clean and affordable future engines

    KAUST Repository

    Kalghatgi, Gautam

    2017-04-03

    The worldwide demand for transport fuels will increase significantly but will still be met substantially (a share of around 90%) from petroleum-based fuels. This increase in demand will be significantly skewed towards commercial vehicles and hence towards diesel and jet fuels, leading to a probable surplus of lighter low-octane fuels. Current diesel engines are efficient but expensive and complicated because they try to reduce the nitrogen oxide and soot emissions simultaneously while using conventional diesel fuels which ignite very easily. Gasoline compression ignition engines can be run on gasoline-like fuels with a long ignition delay to make low-nitrogen-oxide low-soot combustion very much easier. Moreover, the research octane number of the optimum fuel for gasoline compression ignition engines is likely to be around 70 and hence the surplus low-octane components could be used without much further processing. Also, the final boiling point can be higher than those of current gasolines. The potential advantages of gasoline compression ignition engines are as follows. First, the engine is at least as efficient and clean as current diesel engines but is less complicated and hence could be cheaper (lower injection pressure and after-treatment focus on control of carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon emissions rather than on soot and nitrogen oxide emissions). Second, the optimum fuel requires less processing and hence would be easier to make in comparison with current gasoline or diesel fuel and will have a lower greenhouse-gas footprint. Third, it provides a path to mitigate the global demand imbalance between heavier fuels and lighter fuels that is otherwise projected and improve the sustainability of refineries. The concept has been well demonstrated in research engines but development work is needed to make it feasible on practical vehicles, e.g. on cold start, adequate control of exhaust carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons and control of noise at medium to high loads

  15. 40 CFR 80.1115 - How are equivalence values assigned to renewable fuel?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... shall have an equivalence value of 1.3. (5) Non-ester renewable diesel, including that produced from... renewable source, expressed as a percent, on an energy basis. EC = Energy content of the renewable fuel, in... renewable fuel? 80.1115 Section 80.1115 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED...

  16. 40 CFR 80.1415 - How are equivalence values assigned to renewable fuel?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) Non-ester renewable diesel with a lower heating value of at least 123,500 Btu/gal shall have an... renewable fuel that came from renewable biomass, expressed as a fraction, on an energy basis. EC = Energy... renewable fuel? 80.1415 Section 80.1415 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED...

  17. New chemical tracers for diesel source emission apportionment in ambient fine particulate matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charland, J.P.; Caravaggio, G.; MacDonald, P.; MacPhee, T. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Graham, L.A. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Hopanes and steranes are petroleum biomarkers that are commonly used in chemical mass balance (CMB)studies to determine the source of organic carbon from motor vehicle exhaust. Hopanes and steranes are found in engine lubricating oil and trace amounts are released during engine combustion. Since lubricating oils are used in both gasoline and diesel engines, the distribution and abundance of these biomarkers relative to organic carbon (OC) in exhaust particulate matter (PM) cannot be used to distinguish between these sources. The purpose of this study was to find molecular markers specific to diesel fuel that can be used to assess the contribution of diesel vehicles exhaust to ambient PM. PM filter samples were collected from gasoline and diesel vehicles. At the same time, samples of fresh and used engine specific lubricating oils were also collected along with gasoline and diesel fuel for organic speciation. Thermal desorption (TD)-gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used to analyze all samples. Ambient air PM samples were also collected and analyzed for the presence of these newly proposed tracers. It was concluded that the detection of bicycloparaffins in PM can provide new insight into diesel emissions and help determine pollution sources.

  18. High quality transportation fuels from renewable feedstock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindfors, Lars Peter

    2010-09-15

    Hydrotreating of vegetable oils is novel process for producing high quality renewable diesel. Hydrotreated vegetable oils (HVO) are paraffinic hydrocarbons. They are free of aromatics, have high cetane numbers and reduce emissions. HVO can be used as component or as such. HVO processes can also be modified to produce jet fuel. GHG savings by HVO use are significant compared to fossil fuels. HVO is already in commercial production. Neste Oil is producing its NExBTL diesel in two plants. Production of renewable fuels will be limited by availability of sustainable feedstock. Therefore R and D efforts are made to expand feedstock base further.

  19. Autoignition characteristics of oxygenated gasolines

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Changyoul

    2017-08-14

    Gasoline anti-knock quality, defined by the research and motor octane numbers (RON and MON), is important for increasing spark ignition (SI) engine efficiency. Gasoline knock resistance can be increased using a number of blending components. For over two decades, ethanol has become a popular anti-knock blending agent with gasoline fuels due to its production from bio-derived resources. This work explores the oxidation behavior of two oxygenated certification gasoline fuels and the variation of fuel reactivity with molecular composition. Ignition delay times of Haltermann (RON = 91) and Coryton (RON = 97.5) gasolines have been measured in a high-pressure shock tube and in a rapid compression machine at three pressures of 10, 20 and 40 bar, at equivalence ratios of φ = 0.45, 0.9 and 1.8, and in the temperature range of 650–1250 K. The results indicate that the effects of fuel octane number and fuel composition on ignition characteristics are strongest in the intermediate temperature (negative temperature coefficient) region. To simulate the reactivity of these gasolines, three kinds of surrogates, consisting of three, four and eight components, are proposed and compared with the gasoline ignition delay times. It is shown that more complex surrogate mixtures are needed to emulate the reactivity of gasoline with higher octane sensitivity (S = RON–MON). Detailed kinetic analyses are performed to illustrate the dependence of gasoline ignition delay times on fuel composition and, in particular, on ethanol content.

  20. Techno-economic Analysis for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Gasoline via the Methanol-to-Gasoline (MTG) Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

    2009-05-01

    Biomass is a renewable energy resource that can be converted into liquid fuel suitable for transportation applications. As a widely available biomass form, lignocellulosic biomass can have a major impact on domestic transportation fuel supplies and thus help meet the Energy Independence and Security Act renewable energy goals (U.S. Congress 2007). With gasification technology, biomass can be converted to gasoline via methanol synthesis and methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) technologies. Producing a gasoline product that is infrastructure ready has much potential. Although the MTG technology has been commercially demonstrated with natural gas conversion, combining MTG with biomass gasification has not been shown. Therefore, a techno-economic evaluation for a biomass MTG process based on currently available technology was developed to provide information about benefits and risks of this technology. The economic assumptions used in this report are consistent with previous U.S. Department of Energy Office of Biomass Programs techno-economic assessments. The feedstock is assumed to be wood chips at 2000 metric ton/day (dry basis). Two kinds of gasification technologies were evaluated: an indirectly-heated gasifier and a directly-heated oxygen-blown gasifier. The gasoline selling prices (2008 USD) excluding taxes were estimated to be $3.20/gallon and $3.68/gallon for indirectly-heated gasified and directly-heated. This suggests that a process based on existing technology is economic only when crude prices are above $100/bbl. However, improvements in syngas cleanup combined with consolidated gasoline synthesis can potentially reduce the capital cost. In addition, improved synthesis catalysts and reactor design may allow increased yield.

  1. Three-stage autoignition of gasoline in an HCCI engine: An experimental and chemical kinetic modeling investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machrafi, Hatim; Cavadias, Simeon [UPMC Universite Paris 06, LGPPTS, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Paris (France); UPMC Universite Paris 06, Institut Jean Le Rond D' Alembert (France)

    2008-12-15

    The alternative HCCI combustion mode presents a possible means for decreasing the pollution with respect to conventional gasoline or diesel engines, while maintaining the efficiency of a diesel engine or even increasing it. This paper investigates the possibility of using gasoline in an HCCI engine and analyzes the autoignition of gasoline in such an engine. The compression ratio that has been used is 13.5, keeping the inlet temperature at 70 C, varying the equivalence ratio from 0.3 to 0.54, and the EGR (represented by N{sub 2}) ratio from 0 to 37 vol%. For comparison, a PRF95 and a surrogate containing 11 vol% n-heptane, 59 vol% iso-octane, and 30 vol% toluene are used. A previously validated kinetic surrogate mechanism is used to analyze the experiments and to yield possible explanations to kinetic phenomena. From this work, it seems quite possible to use the high octane-rated gasoline for autoignition purposes, even under lean inlet conditions. Furthermore, it appeared that gasoline and its surrogate, unlike PRF95, show a three-stage autoignition. Since the PRF95 does not contain toluene, it is suggested by the kinetic mechanism that the benzyl radical, issued from toluene, causes this so-defined ''obstructed preignition'' and delaying thereby the final ignition for gasoline and its surrogate. The results of the kinetic mechanism supporting this explanation are shown in this paper. (author)

  2. Fuel and Chemicals from Renewable Alcohols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jeppe Rass

    2008-01-01

    The present work entitled Fuel and Chemicals from Renewable Alcohols covers the idea of developing routes for producing sustainable fuel and chemicals from biomass resources. Some renewable alcohols are already readily available from biomass in significant amounts and thus the potential...... of a possible production of value-added chemicals from renewable resources. High temperature dehydration of methanol and ethanol results in a range of different hydrocarbons, which can be used either as gasoline fuel or, by altering process conditions, as a way to produce important olefin products which can...... for these renewable alcohols, together with other primary renewable building blocks, has been highlighted in the introductory chapter. While the first chapter covers the general potential of a renewable chemical industry, the other chapters deal with particular possibilities. It is shown how ethanol and glycerol can...

  3. Performance Test of Engine Fuelled With Diesel and Ethanol Blends.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.K.L.Murthy

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Environmental concerns and limited amount of petroleum fuels have caused interests in the development of alternative fuels for internal combustion (ICengines. As an alternative, biodegradable and renewable fuel, ethanol is receiving increasing attention. An experimental investigation on the application of the blends of ethanol with diesel to a diesel engine was carried out. First the solubility of ethanol and diesel was conducted with and without the additive of normal butanol (n-butanol. The purpose of this project is to find the optimum percentage of ethanol that gives simultaneously better performance and lower emissions. The experiments were conducted on a water-cooled single-cylinder Direct Injection (DI diesel engine using 0% (neat diesel fuel, 10% (E10-D, 15%(E15–D, 20% (E20–D, and 25%(E25–D ethanol–diesel blended fuels. Experimental tests were carried out to study the performance of the engine fuelled with the blends compared with those fuelled by diesel. The test results show that it is feasible and applicable for the blends with n-butanol to replace pure diesel as the fuel for diesel engine.

  4. Rheological Properties of Vegetable Oil-Diesel Fuel Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Z.; Nguyen, Q. D.

    2008-07-01

    Straight vegetable oils provide cleaner burning and renewable alternatives to diesel fuels, but their inherently high viscosities compared to diesel are undesirable for diesel engines. Lowering the viscosity can be achieved by either increasing the temperature of the oil or by blending it with diesel fuel, or both. In this work the viscosity of diesel fuel and vegetable oil mixtures at differing compositions is measured as a function of temperature to determine a viscosity-temperature-composition relationship for use in design and optimization of heating and fuel injection systems. The oils used are olive, soybean, canola and peanut oils which are commercially available. All samples tested between 20°C and 80°C exhibit time-independent Newtonian behaviour. A modified Arrhenius relationship has been developed to predict the viscosity of the mixtures as functions of temperature and composition.

  5. Ethanol Demand in United States Production of Oxygenate-limited Gasoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadder, G.R.

    2000-08-16

    Ethanol competes with methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) to satisfy oxygen, octane, and volume requirements of certain gasolines. However, MTBE has water quality problems that may create significant market opportunities for ethanol. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has used its Refinery Yield Model to estimate ethanol demand in gasolines with restricted use of MTBE. Reduction of the use of MTBE would increase the costs of gasoline production and possibly reduce the gasoline output of U.S. refineries. The potential gasoline supply problems of an MTBE ban could be mitigated by allowing a modest 3 vol percent MTBE in all gasoline. In the U.S. East and Gulf Coast gasoline producing regions, the 3 vol percent MTBE option results in costs that are 40 percent less than an MTBE ban. In the U.S. Midwest gasoline producing region, with already high use of ethanol, an MTBE ban has minimal effect on ethanol demand unless gasoline producers in other regions bid away the local supply of ethanol. The ethanol/MTBE issue gained momentum in March 2000 when the Clinton Administration announced that it would ask Congress to amend the Clean Air Act to provide the authority to significantly reduce or eliminate the use of MTBE; to ensure that air quality gains are not diminished as MTBE use is reduced; and to replace the existing oxygenate requirement in the Clean Air Act with a renewable fuel standard for all gasoline. Premises for the ORNL study are consistent with the Administration announcement, and the ethanol demand curve estimates of this study can be used to evaluate the impact of the Administration principles and related policy initiatives.

  6. Biomass compounds converted to gasoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-10-08

    It is claimed that corn, castor, and jojoba oils as well as Hevea latex can be converted in high yields to gasoline by passage over zeolite catalysts at 450 degrees to 500 degrees centigrade. Gasoline yields are 60% from corn oil (essentially tristearin), compared with 50% yields from methanol. Latex depolymerizes before conversion. Fat and oil molecules adopt conformations that enable them to enter zeolite interstices, resulting in high yields of C6 to C9 aromatics.

  7. Experimental investigation of Methanol blends with gasoline on SI engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav tiwari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Automobile have become a very important part of our modern life style. And it runs on fossil fuel. But the excessive use of fossil fuels will very soon leads to the energy crises so the future of automobile based on fossil fuels has been badly affected by two major problems. That is less availability of fuel and environmental degradation. So it is very important to found some new renewable non polluting alternative fuels to ensure the proper and safe survival of internal combustion engines. In present study we evaluate the performance of two stroke single cylinder spark ignition engine with ratio of 10%, 20% and 30% of methanol and gasoline by volume. Performance parameters (brake thermal efficiency, brake specific energy consumption and brake specific fuel consumption were determined at various loads on engine with methanol blended gasoline. The comparison was made on performance of conventional SI engine with pure gasoline operation. As a result, brake thermal efficiency and brake specific fuel consumption showed improved performance when compared with pure gasoline performances.

  8. Renewable Fuels for Cross Border Transportation

    OpenAIRE

    Mehlin, Markus; Zauner, Martin; Reichmuth, Matthias; Nill, Moritz; Wacker, Manfred; Galster, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    The use of renewable energy has increased slowly in most sectors and the transport sector is predominantly depending on traditional fossil fuels notably petrol and diesel. This has created a difficult situation concerning the fuel supply and fuel prices as well as an increase of emissions of climate gasses. A number of local and regional projects have been carried out and are still ongoing regarding the use of renewable fuels in the transport sector. Most of those covers captive fleets of bus...

  9. Evaporation characteristics of ETBE-blended gasoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Katsuhiro, E-mail: okamoto@nrips.go.jp [National Research Institute of Police Science, 6-3-1 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-0882 (Japan); Hiramatsu, Muneyuki [Yamanashi Prefectural Police H.Q., 312-4 Kubonakajima, Isawa-cho, Usui, Yamanashi 406-0036 (Japan); Hino, Tomonori; Otake, Takuma [Metropolitan Police Department, 2-1-1 Kasumigaseki, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-8929 (Japan); Okamoto, Takashi; Miyamoto, Hiroki; Honma, Masakatsu; Watanabe, Norimichi [National Research Institute of Police Science, 6-3-1 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-0882 (Japan)

    2015-04-28

    Highlights: • We chose 8-component hydrocarbon mixture as a model gasoline, and defined the molar mass of gasoline. • We proposed an evaporation model assuming a 2-component mixture of gasoline and ETBE. • We predicted the change in the vapor pressure of ETBE-blended gasoline by evaporation. • The vapor pressures were measured and compared as a means of verifying the model. • We presented the method for predicting flash points of the ETBE-blended gasoline. - Abstract: To reduce greenhouse gas emissions, which contribute to global warming, production of gasoline blended with ethyl tert-buthyl ether (ETBE) is increasing annually. The flash point of ETBE is higher than that of gasoline, and blending ETBE into gasoline will change the flash point and the vapor pressure. Therefore, it is expected that the fire hazard caused by ETBE-blended gasoline would differ from that caused by normal gasoline. The aim of this study was to acquire the knowledge required for estimating the fire hazard of ETBE-blended gasoline. Supposing that ETBE-blended gasoline was a two-component mixture of gasoline and ETBE, we developed a prediction model that describes the vapor pressure and flash point of ETBE-blended gasoline in an arbitrary ETBE blending ratio. We chose 8-component hydrocarbon mixture as a model gasoline, and defined the relation between molar mass of gasoline and mass loss fraction. We measured the changes in the vapor pressure and flash point of gasoline by blending ETBE and evaporation, and compared the predicted values with the measured values in order to verify the prediction model. The calculated values of vapor pressures and flash points corresponded well to the measured values. Thus, we confirmed that the change in the evaporation characteristics of ETBE-blended gasoline by evaporation could be predicted by the proposed model. Furthermore, the vapor pressure constants of ETBE-blended gasoline were obtained by the model, and then the distillation curves were

  10. Isolation and characterization of gasoline-degrading bacteria from gas station leaking-contaminated soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Si-jin; WANG Hong-qi; YAO Zhi-hua

    2006-01-01

    The effects of culture conditions in vitro and biosurfactant detection were studied on bacterial strains capable of degrading gasoline from contaminated soils near gas station. The main results were summarized as follows. Three bacteria (strains Q10, Q14 and Q18) that were considered as efficiently degrading strains were isolated and identified as Pseudomonas sp., Flavobacterium sp. and Rhodococcus sp., respectively. The optimal growth conditions of three bacteria including pH, temperature and the concentration of gasoline were similar. The reduction in surface tension was observed with all the three bacteria, indicating the production of toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) could easily be degraded by the three isolates. The consortium was more effective than the individual cultures in degrading added gasoline, diesel oil, and BTEX. These results indicate that these strains have great potential for in situ remediation of soils contaminated by gas station leaking.

  11. Biofiltration of gasoline and ethanol-amended gasoline vapors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Marlene; Woiciechowski, Adenise L; Kozliak, Evguenii I; Paca, Jan; Soccol, Carlos R

    2012-01-01

    Assuming the projected increase in use of ethanol as a biofuel, the current study was conducted to compare the biofiltration efficiencies for plain and 25% ethanol-containing gasoline. Two biofilters were operated in a downflow mode for 7 months, one of them being compost-based whereas the other using a synthetic packing material, granulated tire rubber, inoculated with gasoline-degrading microorganisms. Inlet concentrations measured as total hydrocarbon (TH) ranged from 1.9 to 5.8 g m(-3) at a constant empty bed retention time of 6.84 min. Contrary to the expectations based on microbiological considerations, ethanol-amended gasoline was more readily biodegraded than plain hydrocarbons, with the respective steady state elimination capacities of 26-43 and 14-18 gTH m(-3) h(-1) for the compost biofilter. The efficiency of both biofilters significantly declined upon the application of higher loads of plain gasoline, yet immediately recovering when switched back to ethanol-blended gasoline. The unexpected effect of ethanol in promoting gasoline biodegradation was explained by increasing hydrocarbon partitioning into the aqueous phase, with mass transfer being rate limiting for the bulk of components. The tire rubber biofilter, after a long acclimation, surpassed the compost biofilter in performance, presumably due to the 'buffering' effect of this packing material increasing the accessibility of gasoline hydrocarbons to the biofilm. With improved substrate mass transfer, biodegradable hydrocarbons were removed in the tire rubber biofilter's first reactor stage, with most of the remaining poorly degradable smaller-size hydrocarbons being degraded in the second stage.

  12. Experimental Demonstration of RCCI in Heavy-Duty Engines using Diesel and Natural Gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doosje, E.; Willems, F.P.T.; Baert, R.S.G.

    2014-01-01

    Premixed combustion concepts like PCCI and RCCI have attracted much attention, since these concepts offer possibilities to reduce engine out emissions to a low level, while still achieving good efficiency. Most RCCI studies use a combination of a high-cetane fuel like diesel, and gasoline as

  13. Experimental Demonstration of RCCI in Heavy-Duty Engines using Diesel and Natural Gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doosje, E.; Willems, F.P.T.; Baert, R.S.G.

    2014-01-01

    Premixed combustion concepts like PCCI and RCCI have attracted much attention, since these concepts offer possibilities to reduce engine out emissions to a low level, while still achieving good efficiency. Most RCCI studies use a combination of a high-cetane fuel like diesel, and gasoline as low-cet

  14. Evaluating the effect of methanol-unleaded gasoline blends on SI engine performance

    OpenAIRE

    B Sabahi; M.J Sheikhdavoodi; Bahrami, H.; D Baveli Bahmaei

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Today, all kinds of vehicle engines work with fossil fuels. The limited fossil fuel resources and the negative effects of their consumption on the environment have led researchers to focus on clean, renewable and sustainable energy systems. In all of the fuels being considered as an alternativefor gasoline, methanol is one of the more promising ones and it has experienced major research and development. Methanol can be obtained from many sources, both fossil and renewable; these...

  15. Renewal processes

    CERN Document Server

    Mitov, Kosto V

    2014-01-01

    This monograph serves as an introductory text to classical renewal theory and some of its applications for graduate students and researchers in mathematics and probability theory. Renewal processes play an important part in modeling many phenomena in insurance, finance, queuing systems, inventory control and other areas. In this book, an overview of univariate renewal theory is given and renewal processes in the non-lattice and lattice case are discussed. A pre-requisite is a basic knowledge of probability theory.

  16. Combustion and emission characteristics of diesel engine fuelled with rice bran oil methyl ester and its diesel blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gattamaneni Rao Narayana Lakshmi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been a worldwide interest in searching for alternatives to petroleum-derived fuels due to their depletion as well as due to the concern for the environment. Vegetable oils have capability to solve this problem because they are renewable and lead to reduction in environmental pollution. The direct use of vegetable oils as a diesel engine fuel is possible but not preferable because of their extremely higher viscosity, strong tendency to polymerize and bad cold start properties. On the other hand, Biodiesels, which are derived from vegetable oils, have been recently recognized as a potential alternative to diesel oil. This study deals with the analysis of rice bran oil methyl ester (RBME as a diesel fuel. RBME is derived through the transesterification process, in which the rice bran oil reacts with methanol in the presence of KOH. The properties of RBME thus obtained are comparable with ASTM biodiesel standards. Tests are conducted on a 4.4 kW, single-cylinder, naturally aspirated, direct-injection air-cooled stationary diesel engine to evaluate the feasibility of RBME and its diesel blends as alternate fuels. The ignition delay and peak heat release for RBME and its diesel blends are found to be lower than that of diesel and the ignition delay decreases with increase in RBME in the blend. Maximum heat release is found to occur earlier for RBME and its diesel blends than diesel. As the amount of RBME in the blend increases the HC, CO, and soot concentrations in the exhaust decreased when compared to mineral diesel. The NOx emissions of the RBME and its diesel blends are noted to be slightly higher than that of diesel.

  17. Evaporation characteristics of ETBE-blended gasoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Katsuhiro; Hiramatsu, Muneyuki; Hino, Tomonori; Otake, Takuma; Okamoto, Takashi; Miyamoto, Hiroki; Honma, Masakatsu; Watanabe, Norimichi

    2015-04-28

    To reduce greenhouse gas emissions, which contribute to global warming, production of gasoline blended with ethyl tert-buthyl ether (ETBE) is increasing annually. The flash point of ETBE is higher than that of gasoline, and blending ETBE into gasoline will change the flash point and the vapor pressure. Therefore, it is expected that the fire hazard caused by ETBE-blended gasoline would differ from that caused by normal gasoline. The aim of this study was to acquire the knowledge required for estimating the fire hazard of ETBE-blended gasoline. Supposing that ETBE-blended gasoline was a two-component mixture of gasoline and ETBE, we developed a prediction model that describes the vapor pressure and flash point of ETBE-blended gasoline in an arbitrary ETBE blending ratio. We chose 8-component hydrocarbon mixture as a model gasoline, and defined the relation between molar mass of gasoline and mass loss fraction. We measured the changes in the vapor pressure and flash point of gasoline by blending ETBE and evaporation, and compared the predicted values with the measured values in order to verify the prediction model. The calculated values of vapor pressures and flash points corresponded well to the measured values. Thus, we confirmed that the change in the evaporation characteristics of ETBE-blended gasoline by evaporation could be predicted by the proposed model. Furthermore, the vapor pressure constants of ETBE-blended gasoline were obtained by the model, and then the distillation curves were developed.

  18. Photovoltaic/diesel hybrid systems: The design process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G. J.; Chapman, R. N.

    A photovoltaic/storage system by itself may be uneconomical for stand-alone applications with large energy demands. However, by combining the PV system with a back-up energy source, such as a diesel, gasoline, or propane/thermoelectric generator, system economics can be improved. Such PV/fossil hybrid systems are being used, but their design has required detailed modeling to determine the optimal mix of photovoltaics and back-up energy. Recent data on diesel field reliability and a new design technique for stand-alone systems have overcome this problem. The approach provides the means for sizing the photovoltaic system to obtain a near optimal hybrid system, with about a 90% savings in back-up fuel costs. System economics are determined by comparing PV capital cost to the present value of the displaced diesel operation and maintenance costs.

  19. Standby gasoline rationing plan: narrative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-02-01

    The objectives of the rationing plan are to provide a mechanism capable of maintaining an orderly and equitable market for gasoline in a severe supply shortfall, and capable of rapid implementation; and to comply with requirements of EPCA, which mandates the development of a contingency rationing plan. Eligibility for ration allotments will be based principally on motor vehicle registration records, maintained in a national vehicle registration file. Supplemental allotments will be granted for certain priority activities to ensure the maintenance of essential public services. Supplemental allotments will also be granted to businesses and government organizations with significant off-highway gasoline requirements. Local rationing boards or other offices will be established by states, to provide special allotments to hardship applicants, within DOE guidelines. The background and history of the plan are described. The gasoline rationing plan operations, government operations, program costs, staffing, and funding are also detailed in this report. (MCW)

  20. Incidence of Federal and State Gasoline Taxes

    OpenAIRE

    Chouinard, Hayley; Perloff, Jeffrey M.

    2003-01-01

    The federal specific gasoline tax falls equally on consumers and wholesalers; whereas state specific taxes fall almost entirely on consumers. The consumer incidence of state taxes is greater in states that use relatively little gasoline.

  1. Potential of renewable and alternative energy sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, V.; Pogharnitskaya, O.; Rostovshchikova, A.; Matveenko, I.

    2015-11-01

    The article deals with application potential of clean alternative renewable energy sources. By means of system analysis the forecast for consumption of electrical energy in Tomsk Oblast as well as main energy sources of existing energy system have been studied up to 2018. Engineering potential of renewable and alternative energy sources is evaluated. Besides, ranking in the order of their efficiency descending is performed. It is concluded that Tomsk Oblast has high potential of alternative and renewable energy sources, among which the most promising development perspective is implementation of gasification stations to save fuel consumed by diesel power stations as well as building wind-power plants.

  2. Optimal configuration of power generating systems in isolated island with renewable energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senjyu, Tomonobu; Hayashi, Daisuke; Yona, Atsushi; Urasaki, Naomitsu [Faculty of Engineering, University of the Ryukyus, 1 Senbaru, Nishihara-cho, Nakagami, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan); Funabashi, Toshihisa [Meidensha Corporation, 36-2 Nihonbashi Hakozakicho, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 103-8515 (Japan)

    2007-09-15

    In isolated islands, usually diesel generators supply electric power. However, there are problems, e.g., a lack of fossil fuel, environmental pollution etc. So, isolated island, e.g. Miyako island, installs renewable energy power production plants. However, renewable energy power production plants are very costly. This paper presents an optimal configuration of power system in isolated island installing renewable energy power production plants. The generating system consists of diesel generators, wind turbine generators, PV system and batteries. Using the proposed method, operation cost can be reduced about 10% in comparison with diesel generators only from simulation results. (author)

  3. Effect of Lethal Concentration of Commercial Gasoline on Caspian Roach (Rutilus caspicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliakbar Hedayati

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the mortality effects of commercial gasoline at different tested concentrations were evaluated on the common roach (Rutilus caspicus and LC50 values for each time period (24, 48, 72, and 96 hours have been determined. Roach with an average weight of 3.1 ± 0.45 g and lengths of 4 ± 0.25 cm were used in this study. After transferring the 200 fish to the laboratory, they were kept in tanks of 100 liters for one week to adapt them to the experimental conditions. After the adaptation period, 100 fish were selected randomly and divided into 14 treatments (0, 2, 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, 200, 400, 600, 800, and 100 ppm commercial gasoline. The treatments were completed in triplicate. The results of this study show that the 96-hour LC50 of commercial gasoline is 600.2 ± 0.44 ppm and the maximum allowable concentration (MAC is 60.02 mg/L. The study demonstrates the deadly effects of commercial gasoline on the Caspian roach. Spillage of diesel and gasoline fuels from transport tankers can enter rivers and eventually the marine ecosystem, and reach nursery and spawning areas where it can become a serious threat to fish survival.

  4. Renewable Fuels and Lubricants Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-08-01

    This fact sheet describes the Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory at the U.S. Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a state-of-the-art research and testing facility for advanced fuels and vehicles. Research and development aims to improve vehicle efficiency and overcome barriers to the increased use of renewable diesel and other nonpetroleum-based fuels, such as biodiesel and synthetic diesel derived from biomass. The ReFUEL Laboratory features a chassis dynamometer for vehicle performance and emissions research, two engine dynamometer test cells for advanced fuels research, and precise emissions analysis equipment. As a complement to these capabilities, detailed studies of fuel properties, with a focus on ignition quality, are performed at NREL's Fuel Chemistry Laboratory.

  5. Life-cycle assessment of energy use and greenhouse gas emissions of soybean-derived biodiesel and renewable fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Hong; Wang, Michael; Bloyd, Cary; Putsche, Vicky

    2009-02-01

    In this study, we used Argonne National Laboratory's Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model to assess the life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission impacts of four soybean-derived fuels: biodiesel fuel produced via transesterification, two renewable diesel fuels (I and II) produced from different hydrogenation processes, and renewable gasoline produced from catalytic cracking. Five approaches were employed to allocate the coproducts: a displacement approach; two allocation approaches, one based on the energy value and the other based on the market value; and two hybrid approaches that integrated the displacement and allocation methods. The relative rankings of soybean-based fuels in terms of energy and environmental impacts were different under the different approaches, and the reasons were analyzed. Results from the five allocation approaches showed that although the production and combustion of soybean-based fuels might increase total energy use, they could have significant benefits in reducing fossil energy use (>52%), petroleum use (>88%), and GHG emissions (>57%) relative to petroleum fuels. This study emphasized the importance of the methods used to deal with coproduct issues and provided a comprehensive solution for conducting a life-cycle assessment of fuel pathways with multiple coproducts.

  6. Combustion of Microalgae Oil and Ethanol Blended with Diesel Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saddam H. Al-lwayzy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Using renewable oxygenated fuels such as ethanol is a proposed method to reduce diesel engine emission. Ethanol has lower density, viscosity, cetane number and calorific value than petroleum diesel (PD. Microalgae oil is renewable, environmentally friendly and has the potential to replace PD. In this paper, microalgae oil (10% and ethanol (10% have been mixed and added to (80% diesel fuel as a renewable source of oxygenated fuel. The mixture of microalgae oil, ethanol and petroleum diesel (MOE20% has been found to be homogenous and stable without using surfactant. The presence of microalgae oil improved the ethanol fuel demerits such as low density and viscosity. The transesterification process was not required for oil viscosity reduction due to the presence of ethanol. The MOE20% fuel has been tested in a variable compression ratio diesel engine at different speed. The engine test results with MOE20% showed a very comparable engine performance of in-cylinder pressure, brake power, torque and brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC to that of PD. The NOx emission and HC have been improved while CO and CO2 were found to be lower than those from PD at low engine speed.

  7. 27 CFR 21.110 - Gasoline, unleaded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gasoline, unleaded. 21.110....110 Gasoline, unleaded. Conforms to specifications as established by the American Society for Testing...-79. Any of the “seasonal and geographical” volatility classes for unleaded gasoline are...

  8. 40 CFR 1065.710 - Gasoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gasoline. 1065.710 Section 1065.710... PROCEDURES Engine Fluids, Test Fuels, Analytical Gases and Other Calibration Standards § 1065.710 Gasoline. (a) Gasoline for testing must have octane values that represent commercially available fuels for...

  9. 27 CFR 21.109 - Gasoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gasoline. 21.109 Section 21.109 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF... Gasoline. (a) Distillation range. When 100 ml of gasoline are distilled, none shall distill below 90...

  10. Low grade bioethanol for fuel mixing on gasoline engine using distillation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abikusna, Setia; Sugiarto, Bambang; Suntoro, Dedi; Azami

    2017-03-01

    Utilization of renewable energy in Indonesia is still low, compared to 34% oil, 20% coal and 20% gas, utilization of energy sources for water 3%, geothermal 1%, 2% biofuels, and biomass 20%. Whereas renewable energy sources dwindling due to the increasing consumption of gasoline as a fuel. It makes us have to look for alternative renewable energy, one of which is bio ethanol. Several studies on the use of ethanol was done to the researchers. Our studies using low grade bio ethanol which begins with the disitillation independently utilize flue gas heat at compact distillator, produces high grade bio ethanol and ready to be mixed with gasoline. Stages of our study is the compact distillator design of the motor dynamic continued with good performance and emission testing and ethanol distilled. Some improvement is made is through the flue gas heat control mechanism in compact distillator using gate valve, at low, medium, and high speed engine. Compact distillator used is kind of a batch distillation column. Column design process using the shortcut method, then carried the tray design to determine the overall geometry. The distillation is done by comparing the separator with a tray of different distances. As well as by varying the volume of the feed and ethanol levels that will feed distilled. In this study, we analyzed the mixing of ethanol through variation between main jet and pilot jet in the carburetor separately interchangeably with gasoline. And finally mixing mechanism bio ethanol with gasoline improved with fuel mixer for performance.

  11. Renewable Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent Erik

    Bent Sorensen’s Renewable Energy: Physics, Engineering, Environmental Impacts, Economics and Planning, Fifth Edition, continues the tradition by providing a thorough and current overview of the entire renewable energy sphere. Since its first edition, this standard reference source helped put...... renewable energy on the map of scientific agendas. Several renewable energy solutions no longer form just a marginal addition to energy supply, but have become major players, with the promise to become the backbone of an energy system suitable for life in the sustainability lane. This volume is a problem...... structured around three parts in order to assist readers in focusing on the issues that impact them the most for a given project or question. PART I covers the basic scientific principles behind all major renewable energy resources, such as solar, wind, and biomass. PART II provides in-depth information...

  12. Reducing the viscosity of Jojoba Methyl Ester diesel fuel and effects on diesel engine performance and roughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selim, Mohamed Y.E. [Mech. Eng. Dept., UAE University, Al-Ain, Abu Dhabi 17555 (United Arab Emirates)

    2009-07-15

    An experimental investigation has been carried out to test two approaches to reduce the viscosity of the Jojoba Methyl Ester (JME) diesel fuel. The first approach is the heating of the fuel to two temperatures of 50 and 70 C as compared to the base ambient temperature and to diesel fuel too. The second approach is adding one chemical which is considered by its own as alternative and renewable fuel which is Diethyl Ether (DEE). The viscosity has been reduced by both methods to close to diesel values. The performance of a diesel engine using those fuels has been tested in a variable compression research engine Ricardo E6 with the engine speed constant at 1200 rpm. The measured parameters included the exhaust gas temperature, the ignition delay period, the maximum pressure rise rate, maximum pressure, and indicated mean effective pressure and maximum heat release rate. The engine performance is presented and the effects of both approaches are scrutinized. (author)

  13. Comparison of the toxicity of diesel exhaust produced by bio- and fossil diesel combustion in human lung cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Sandro; Czerwinski, Jan; Comte, Pierre; Popovicheva, Olga; Kireeva, Elena; Müller, Loretta; Heeb, Norbert; Mayer, Andreas; Fink, Alke; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara

    2013-12-01

    Alternative fuels are increasingly combusted in diesel- and gasoline engines and the contribution of such exhausts to the overall air pollution is on the rise. Recent findings on the possible adverse effects of biodiesel exhaust are contradictive, at least partly resulting from the various fuel qualities, engine types and different operation conditions that were tested. However, most of the studies are biased by undesired interactions between the exhaust samples and biological culture media. We here report how complete, freshly produced exhausts from fossil diesel (B0), from a blend of 20% rapeseed-methyl ester (RME) and 80% fossil diesel (B20) and from pure rapeseed methyl ester (B100) affect a complex 3D cellular model of the human airway epithelium in vitro by exposing the cells at the air-liquid interface. The induction of pro-apoptotic and necrotic cell death, cellular morphology, oxidative stress, and pro-inflammatory responses were assessed. Compared to B0 exhaust, B20 exhaust decreased oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory responses, whereas B100 exhaust, depending on exposure duration, decreased oxidative stress but increased pro-inflammatory responses. The effects are only very weak and given the compared to fossil diesel higher ecological sustainability of biodiesel, it appears that - at least RME - can be considered a valuable alternative to pure fossil diesel.

  14. Dual application of duckweed and azolla plants for wastewater treatment and renewable fuels and petrochemicals production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradov, Nazim; Taha, Mohamed; Miranda, Ana F; Kadali, Krishna; Gujar, Amit; Rochfort, Simone; Stevenson, Trevor; Ball, Andrew S; Mouradov, Aidyn

    2014-02-28

    Shortages in fresh water supplies today affects more than 1 billion people worldwide. Phytoremediation strategies, based on the abilities of aquatic plants to recycle nutrients offer an attractive solution for the bioremediation of water pollution and represents one of the most globally researched issues. The subsequent application of the biomass from the remediation for the production of fuels and petrochemicals offers an ecologically friendly and cost-effective solution for water pollution problems and production of value-added products. In this paper, the feasibility of the dual application of duckweed and azolla aquatic plants for wastewater treatment and production of renewable fuels and petrochemicals is explored. The differences in absorption rates of the key wastewater nutrients, ammonium and phosphorus by these aquatic macrophytes were used as the basis for optimization of the composition of wastewater effluents. Analysis of pyrolysis products showed that azolla and algae produce a similar range of bio-oils that contain a large spectrum of petrochemicals including straight-chain C10-C21 alkanes, which can be directly used as diesel fuel supplement, or a glycerin-free component of biodiesel. Pyrolysis of duckweed produces a different range of bio-oil components that can potentially be used for the production of "green" gasoline and diesel fuel using existing techniques, such as catalytic hydrodeoxygenation. Differences in absorption rates of the key wastewater nutrients, ammonium and phosphorus by different aquatic macrophytes can be used for optimization of composition of wastewater effluents. The generated data suggest that the composition of the petrochemicals can be modified in a targeted fashion, not only by using different species, but also by changing the source plants' metabolic profile, by exposing them to different abiotic or biotic stresses. This study presents an attractive, ecologically friendly and cost-effective solution for efficient bio

  15. Effect of organometallic fuel additives on nanoparticle emissions from a gasoline passenger car.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidney, Jeremy T; Twigg, Martyn V; Kittelson, David B

    2010-04-01

    Particle size measurements were performed on the exhaust of a car operating on a chassis dynamometer fueled with standard gasoline and gasoline containing low levels of Pb, Fe, and Mn organometallic additives. When additives were present there was a distinct nucleation mode consisting primarily of sub-10 nm nanoparticles. At equal molar dosing Mn and Fe gave similar nanoparticle concentrations at the tailpipe, whereas Pb gave a considerably lower concentration. A catalytic stripper was used to remove the organic component of these particles and revealed that they were mainly solid and, because of their association with inorganic additives, presumably inorganic. Solid nucleation mode nanoparticles of similar size and concentration to those observed here from a gasoline engine with Mn and Fe additives have also been observed from modern heavy-duty diesel engines without aftertreatment at idle, but these solid particles are a small fraction of the primarily volatile nucleation mode particles emitted. The solid nucleation mode particles emitted by the diesel engines are likely derived from metal compounds in the lubrication oil, although carbonaceous particles cannot be ruled out. Significantly, most of these solid nanoparticles emitted by both engine types fall below the 23 nm cutoff of the PMP number regulation.

  16. Potential of renewable energy sources and its applications in Yakushima Island

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uemura, Yoshimitsu; Kai, Takami; Natori, Rintarou; Takahashi, Takeshige; Hatate, Yasuo; Yoshida, Masahiro [Kagoshima University (Japan). Dept. of Applied Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

    2004-04-01

    A study was carried out to see if the potential of renewable energy sources other than hydroelectric power, such as wind, photovoltaic, solar thermal, biomass and waste energy sources, can meet the current energy consumption in Yakushima. The current electricity consumption can be covered by wind and photovoltaic energy sources. The total potential of wind and photovoltaic energy sources is 5.4 times as much as the current electricity consumption. LP gas and kerosene can be replaced by solar thermal and biogas energy. The potential of plant biomass and municipal waste is not sufficient (approximately one third) to cover the rest of the fossil fuels (gasoline, diesel oil and heavy oil). Also, plant biomass and municipal waste must be converted into fluid form. This shortage can be covered by the potential of wind and photovoltaic energy sources. We also investigated the possibility of tourism expansion using the potential of wind and photovoltaic energy sources. Taking into account three types of capacity (energy, accommodation and transportation), Yakushima can accept approximately four times as many tourists as the current number of tourists. (author)

  17. Experimental and numerical assessment of on-road diesel and biodiesel emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, B.H.; Storey, J.M.; Lewis, S.A.; Devault, G.L.; Green, J.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Sluder, C.S.; Hodgson, J.W.; Moore, B.L. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The Federal Highway Administration`s TRAF-series of models use modal data to estimate fuel consumption and emissions for different traffic scenarios. A process for producing data-based modal models from road and dynamometer measurements has been developed and applied to a number of light-duty gasoline vehicles for the FHWA. The resulting models, or lookup tables, provide emissions and fuel consumption as functions of vehicle speed and acceleration. Surface plots of the data provide a valuable visual benchmark of the emissions characteristics of the vehicles. Due to the potential fuel savings in the light-duty sector via introduction of diesels, and the concomitant growing interest in diesel engine emissions, the measurement methodology has been extended under DOE sponsorship to include a diesel pickup truck running a variety of fuels, including number 2 diesel fuel, biodiesel, Fischer-Tropsch, and blends.

  18. 77 FR 462 - Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: Identification of Additional Qualifying Renewable Fuel...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-05

    ... advanced biofuel. Naphtha and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG)--qualifying as advanced biofuel. Energy cane... renewable jet fuel and heating oil), and naphtha--qualifying as cellulosic biofuel. Renewable gasoline and... pathway for jet fuel, naphtha, and LPG produced from camelina oil through hydrotreating. This ] is based...

  19. Renewable energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destouni, Georgia; Frank, Harry

    2010-01-01

    The Energy Committee of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has in a series of projects gathered information and knowledge on renewable energy from various sources, both within and outside the academic world. In this article, we synthesize and summarize some of the main points on renewable energy from the various Energy Committee projects and the Committee's Energy 2050 symposium, regarding energy from water and wind, bioenergy, and solar energy. We further summarize the Energy Committee's scenario estimates of future renewable energy contributions to the global energy system, and other presentations given at the Energy 2050 symposium. In general, international coordination and investment in energy research and development is crucial to enable future reliance on renewable energy sources with minimal fossil fuel use.

  20. 40 CFR 80.141 - Interim detergent gasoline program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interim detergent gasoline program. 80... (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Detergent Gasoline § 80.141 Interim detergent gasoline... apply to: (i) All gasoline sold or transferred to a party who sells or transfers gasoline to...

  1. Numerical Simulations of Hollow Cone Injection and Gasoline Compression Ignition Combustion With Naphtha Fuels

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad A.

    2016-01-11

    Gasoline compression ignition (GCI), also known as partially premixed compression ignition (PPCI) and gasoline direct injection compression ignition (GDICI), engines have been considered an attractive alternative to traditional spark ignition engines. Lean burn combustion with the direct injection of fuel eliminates throttle losses for higher thermodynamic efficiencies, and the precise control of the mixture compositions allows better emission performance such as NOx and particulate matter (PM). Recently, low octane gasoline fuel has been identified as a viable option for the GCI engine applications due to its longer ignition delay characteristics compared to diesel and lighter evaporation compared to gasoline fuel [1]. The feasibility of such a concept has been demonstrated by experimental investigations at Saudi Aramco [1, 2]. The present study aims to develop predictive capabilities for low octane gasoline fuel compression ignition engines with accurate characterization of the spray dynamics and combustion processes. Full three-dimensional simulations were conducted using CONVERGE as a basic modeling framework, using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulent mixing models. An outwardly opening hollow-cone spray injector was characterized and validated against existing and new experimental data. An emphasis was made on the spray penetration characteristics. Various spray breakup and collision models have been tested and compared with the experimental data. An optimum combination has been identified and applied in the combusting GCI simulations. Linear instability sheet atomization (LISA) breakup model and modified Kelvin-Helmholtz and Rayleigh-Taylor (KH-RT) break models proved to work the best for the investigated injector. Comparisons between various existing spray models and a parametric study have been carried out to study the effects of various spray parameters. The fuel effects have been tested by using three different primary reference fuel (PRF

  2. Bio-MTBE. How to reduce CO{sub 2} footprint in fuels with a well known premium gasoline component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busch, O.; Schade, A.; Rasch, H.; Schulte-Koerne, E. [Evonik Industries AG, Marl (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    With the revision of Renewable Energy Directive (RED) and Fuels Quality Directive (FQD) in 2009 the EU Commission promoted the use of biofuels, especially of those made from residues and waste because of their favourable CO{sub 2} footprint. Crude glycerol is an inevitable residue of conventional biodiesel production and can therefore be used to make 2{sup nd} generation biofuels, in this case bio-methanol. Methanol itself has several application issues as a fuel and can only be blended into gasoline at low quantities (max. 3 vol.-% according to European gasoline specification EN 228). However, today methanol is virtually absent in European gasoline due to its detrimental properties (e.g. corrosivity, water miscibility, etc.). In contrast to this, MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether) made from methanol and isobutylene is a high value gasoline component that can be blended into gasoline at high quantities without any application issues. Current European gasoline specification allows up to 15 vol.-%% and the revised FQD has enabled the specification to be expanded to up to 22 vol.-% MTBE in gasoline. Thus, bio-methanol converted into bio-MTBE is an appropriate pathway to get a 2{sup nd} generation biofuel into the blending pool with perfect compatibility with infrastructure and the existing car fleet. (orig.)

  3. Diesel fuel component contribution to engine emissions and performance. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erwin, J.; Ryan, T.W. III; Moulton, D.S. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1994-11-01

    Contemporary diesel fuel is a blend of several refinery streams chosen to meet specifications. The need to increase yield of transportation fuel from crude oil has resulted in converting increased proportions of residual oil to lighter products. This conversion is accomplished by thermal, catalytic, and hydrocracking of high molecular weight materials rich in aromatic compounds. The current efforts to reformulate California diesel fuel for reduced emissions from existing engines is an example of another driving force affecting refining practice: regulations designed to reduce exhaust emissions. Although derived from petroleum crude oil, reformulated diesel fuel is an alternative to current specification-grade diesel fuel, and this alternative presents opportunities and questions to be resolved by fuel and engine research. Various concerned parties have argued that regulations for fuel reformulation have not been based on an adequate data base. Despite numerous studies, much ambiguity remains about the relationship of exhaust parameters to fuel composition, particularly for diesel fuel. In an effort to gather pertinent data, the automobile industry and the oil refiners have joined forces in the Air Quality Improvement Research Program (AUTO/OIL) to address this question for gasoline. The objective of that work is to define the relationship between gasoline composition and the magnitude and composition of the exhaust emissions. The results of the AUTO/OEL program will also be used, along with other data bases, to define the EPA {open_quotes}complex model{close_quotes} for reformulated gasolines. Valuable insights have been gained for compression ignition engines in the Coordinating Research Council`s VE-1 program, but no program similar to AUTO/OIL has been started for diesel fuel reformulation. A more detailed understanding of the fuel/performance relationship is a readily apparent need.

  4. Gasoline engine management systems and components

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    The call for environmentally compatible and economical vehicles necessitates immense efforts to develop innovative engine concepts. Technical concepts such as gasoline direct injection helped to save fuel up to 20 % and reduce CO2-emissions. Descriptions of the cylinder-charge control, fuel injection, ignition and catalytic emission-control systems provides comprehensive overview of today´s gasoline engines. This book also describes emission-control systems and explains the diagnostic systems. The publication provides information on engine-management-systems and emission-control regulations. Contents History of the automobile.- Basics of the gasoline engine.- Fuels.- Cylinder-charge control systems.- Gasoline injection systems over the years.- Fuel supply.- Manifold fuel injection.- Gasoline direct injection.- Operation of gasoline engines on natural gas.- Ignition systems over the years.- Inductive ignition systems.- Ignition coils.- Spark plugs.- Electronic control.- Sensors.- Electronic control unit.- Exh...

  5. EXPERIMENTAL DETERMINATION OF BRAKE THERMAL EFFICIENCY AND BRAKE SPECIFIC FUEL CONSUMPTION OF DIESEL ENGINE FUELLED WITH BIO-DIESEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. SHIVA SHANKAR

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The rapid depletion in world petroleum reserves and uncertainty in petroleum supply due to political and economical reasons, as well as, the sharp escalations in the petroleum prices have stimulated the search for alternatives to petroleum fuels. The situation is very grave in developing countries like India which imports 70% of the required fuel, spending 30% of her total foreign exchange earnings on oil imports. Petroleum fuels are being consumed by agriculture and transport sector for which diesel engine happens to be the prime mover. Diesel fuelled vehicles discharge significant amount of pollutants like CO, HC, NOx, soot, lead compounds which are harmful to the universe. Though there are wide varieties of alternative fuels available, the research has not yet provided the right renewable fuel to replace diesel. Vegetable oils due to their properties being close to diesel fuel may be a promising alternative for its use in diesel engines. The high viscosity and low volatility are the major drawbacks of the use of vegetable oils in diesel engines. India is the second largest cotton producing country in the world today. The cotton seeds are available in India at cheaper price. Experiments were conducted on 5.2 BHP single cylinder four stroke water-cooled variable compression diesel engine. Methyl ester of cottonseed oil is blended with the commercially available Xtramile diesel. Cottonseed oil methyl ester (CSOME is blended in four different compositions varying from 10% to 40% in steps of 10 vol%. Using these four blends and Xtramile diesel brake thermal efficiency (BTE and brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC are determined at 17.5 compression ratio.

  6. Changes in Chinese Standard for Ethanol Gasoline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xin; Zhang Yongguang

    2006-01-01

    At the beginning of the tests on application of ethanol gasoline in 2001, Chinese government promulgated a national standard, GB 18351-2001 "Ethanol Gasoline for Motor Vehicles". The standard specifies three kinds of ethanol gasoline, namely E10 (90 RON), E 10 (93 RON) and E10(95RON). There were ethanol gasoline grades (90 RON and 93 RON) and conventional unleaded gasoline(97 RON) available in the areas where tests were carried out. Vehicle owners were worried about the harmful action of ethanol to their vehicles because of lack of knowledge regarding ethanol fuel,and they only refueled their cars with conventional 97 RON unleaded gasoline. This idea might cause unnecessary costs to customers and could bring about difficulty to the tests as well. Besides, some other technical questions emerged during the experimental application of ethanol gasoline, such as water content, ethanol content in gasoline, etc. Based on the experiences accumulated during the application tests, the national standard GB 18351-2001 "Ethanol Gasoline for Motor Vehicles" was revised. The revised edition is designated as GB 18351-2004.

  7. Commercial Application of RN-10 Catalyst in Coker Gasoline Hydrotreating Unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Futao

    2000-01-01

    Since April 1998 the coker gasoline hydrotreating unit at Daqing refinery has been using the do mestic advanced hydrotreating catalyst RN-10. In the past 1.5 years the RN-10 catalyst has given remark able high-quality naphtha as did the two batches of RN-1 catalyst during the eight-year period. With the same feedstock and at the same process regime, the RN-10 catalyst has shown its specifics featuring a lower initial reaction temperature, a lower rate of temperature rise, a lower mean reaction temperature, and higher operating flexibility. When processing shoddy gasoline or diesel fuel to produce the same product at identical process operating conditions, the capacity of unit using the RN-10 catalyst can be greatly increased.

  8. Straight Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-01-01

    Biodiesel, a renewable fuel produced from animal fats or vegetable oils, is popular among many vehicle owners and fleet managers seeking to reduce emissions and support U.S. energy security. Questions sometimes arise about the viability of fueling vehicles with straight vegetable oil (SVO), or waste oils from cooking and other processes, without intermediate processing. But SVO and waste oils differ from biodiesel (and conventional diesel) in some important ways and are generally not considered acceptable vehicle fuels for large-scale or long-term use.

  9. Increasing Resiliency Through Renewable Energy Microgrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Katherine H [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); DiOrio, Nicholas A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cutler, Dylan S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Butt, Robert S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Richards, Allison [unaffiliated

    2017-08-01

    This paper describes a methodology to quantify the economic and resiliency benefit provided by renewable energy (RE) in a hybrid RE-storage-diesel microgrid. We present a case study to show how this methodology is applied to a multi-use/ multi-function telecommunications facility in southern California. In the case study, we first identify photovoltaic (PV) and battery energy storage system (BESS) technologies that minimize the lifecycle cost of energy at the site under normal, grid-connected operation. We then evaluate how those technologies could be incorporated alongside existing diesel generators in a microgrid to increase resiliency at the site, where resiliency is quantified in terms of the amount of time that the microgrid can sustain the critical load during a grid outage. We find that adding PV and BESS to the existing backup diesel generators with a fixed fuel supply extends the amount of time the site could survive an outage by 1.8 days, from 1.7 days for the existing diesel-only backup system to 3.5 days for the PV/diesel/BESS hybrid system. Furthermore, even after diesel fuel supplies are exhausted, the site can continue to operate critical loads during daytime hours using just the PV/BESS when there is sufficient solar resource. We find that the site can save approximately $100,000 in energy costs over the 25-year lifecycle while doubling the amount of time they can survive an outage. The methodology presented here provides a template for increasing resiliency at telecomm sites by implementing renewable energy solutions, which provide additional benefits of carbon emission reduction and energy cost savings.

  10. 40 CFR 80.35 - Labeling of retail gasoline pumps; oxygenated gasoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Labeling of retail gasoline pumps; oxygenated gasoline. 80.35 Section 80.35 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Oxygenated Gasoline § 80.35...

  11. Desempenho comparativo de um motor de ciclo diesel utilizando diesel e misturas de biodiesel Comparative performance of a cycle diesel engine using diesel and biodiesel mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Leite Barbosa

    2008-10-01

    fixation of man country life, the excellent and varied climatic conditions and several types of terrain become the country, with extensive workable areas, stand out in the world scenery if considering its great potentiality on generation of alternative fuels. The environmental preservation, important subject nowadays, makes that the human being work in searches for the development of alternative energies, mainly those originating from renewable and biodegradable sources of sustantable character. Taking in consideration those searches, the purpose of this work was to evaluate the performance of a diesel engine working in different moments with mineral diesel and mixtures of mineral diesel and biodiesel in the equivalent proportions B2 (98% mineral diesel and 2%biodiesel, B5 (95% mineral diesel and 5%biodiesel, B20 (80% mineral diesel and 20%biodiesel, and, finally, B100 (100% biodiesel. The rehearsal was accomplished in the dependences of the Engineering Department at UFLA - Federal University of Lavras, in Lavras, Minas Gerais, in July, 2005. For the accomplishment of the rehearsals it, was used an engine cycle diesel of a tractor VALMET 85 id, of 58,2kW (78 cv, following it methodology established by the norm NBR 5484 of ABNT (1985, that refers to the rehearsal dynamometric of engines cycle Otto and Diesel being proceeded. One noticed ended that the potency of the motor when using biodiesel was lower than one when using mineral diesel. One observed that, in some rotations, the mixtures B5 and B20 presented the same potency or even higher, in some situations, than the one when if using mineral diesel. The best thermal efficiency of the motor was verified in the rotation of 540 rpm of equivalent TDP to 1720 rpm of the motor.

  12. Spark Ignition Engine Combustion, Performance and Emission Products from Hydrous Ethanol and Its Blends with Gasoline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musaab O. El-Faroug

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the serviceability of hydrous ethanol as a clean, cheap and green renewable substitute fuel for spark ignition engines and discusses the comparative chemical and physical properties of hydrous ethanol and gasoline fuels. The significant differences in the properties of hydrous ethanol and gasoline fuels are sufficient to create a significant change during the combustion phase of engine operation and consequently affect the performance of spark-ignition (SI engines. The stability of ethanol-gasoline-water blends is also discussed. Furthermore, the effects of hydrous ethanol, and its blends with gasoline fuel on SI engine combustion characteristics, cycle-to-cycle variations, engine performance parameters, and emission characteristics have been highlighted. Higher water solubility in ethanol‑gasoline blends may be obviously useful and suitable; nevertheless, the continuous ability of water to remain soluble in the blend is significantly affected by temperature. Nearly all published engine experimental results showed a significant improvement in combustion characteristics and enhanced engine performance for the use of hydrous ethanol as fuel. Moreover, carbon monoxide and oxides of nitrogen emissions were also significantly decreased. It is also worth pointing out that unburned hydrocarbon and carbon dioxide emissions were also reduced for the use of hydrous ethanol. However, unregulated emissions such as acetaldehyde and formaldehyde were significantly increased.

  13. Wind energy renewable energy and the environment

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, Vaughn

    2013-01-01

    As the demand for energy increases, and fossil fuels continue to decrease, Wind Energy: Renewable Energy and the Environment, Second Edition considers the viability of wind as an alternative renewable energy source. This book examines the wind industry from its start in the 1970s until now, and introduces all aspects of wind energy. The phenomenal growth of wind power for utilities is covered along with applications such as wind-diesel, village power, telecommunications, and street lighting.. It covers the characteristics of wind, such as shear, power potential, turbulence, wind resource, wind

  14. A NMR-Based Carbon-Type Analysis of Diesel Fuel Blends From Various Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bays, J. Timothy; King, David L.

    2013-05-10

    In collaboration with participants of the Coordinating Research Council (CRC) Advanced Vehicle/Fuels/Lubricants (AVFL) Committee, and project AVFL-19, the characteristics of fuels from advanced and renewable sources were compared to commercial diesel fuels. The main objective of this study was to highlight similarities and differences among the fuel types, i.e. ULSD, renewables, and alternative fuels, and among fuels within the different fuel types. This report summarizes the carbon-type analysis from 1H and 13C{1H} nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) of 14 diesel fuel samples. The diesel fuel samples come from diverse sources and include four commercial ultra-low sulfur diesel fuels (ULSD), one gas-to-liquid diesel fuel (GTL), six renewable diesel fuels (RD), two shale oil-derived diesel fuels, and one oil sands-derived diesel fuel. Overall, the fuels examined fall into two groups. The two shale oil-derived samples and the oil-sand-derived sample closely resemble the four commercial ultra-low sulfur diesels, with SO1 and SO2 most closely matched with ULSD1, ULSD2, and ULSD4, and OS1 most closely matched with ULSD3. As might be expected, the renewable diesel fuels, with the exception of RD3, do not resemble the ULSD fuels because of their very low aromatic content, but more closely resemble the gas-to-liquid sample (GTL) in this respect. RD3 is significantly different from the other renewable diesel fuels in that the aromatic content more closely resembles the ULSD fuels. Fused-ring aromatics are readily observable in the ULSD, SO, and OS samples, as well as RD3, and are noticeably absent in the remaining RD and GTL fuels. Finally, ULSD3 differs from the other ULSD fuels by having a significantly lower aromatic carbon content and higher cycloparaffinic carbon content. In addition to providing important comparative compositional information regarding the various diesel fuels, this report also provides important information about the capabilities of NMR

  15. Anticipation, tax avoidance, and the price elasticity of gasoline demand

    OpenAIRE

    Coglianese, John; Davis, Lucas W.; KILIAN, Lutz; Stock, James H.

    2015-01-01

    Traditional least squares estimates of the responsiveness of gasoline consumption to changes in gasoline prices are biased toward zero, given the endogeneity of gasoline prices. A seemingly natural solution to this problem is to instrument for gasoline prices using gasoline taxes, but this approach tends to yield implausibly large price elasticities. We demonstrate that anticipatory behavior provides an important explanation for this result. We provide evidence that gasoline buyers increase g...

  16. Commercial Application of OCT-M Technology for Selective Hydrodesulfurization of Gasoline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Xiqing; Li Bin; Xiao Fengliang; Zhao Leping

    2006-01-01

    This article analyzed the problems arising from retrofitting the 800 kt/a virgin diesel hydrofining unit into a 1.0 Mt/a OCT-M gasoline HDS unit at the refinery of Luoyang Petrochemical Company, and the optimized measures aimed at improvements in operation of HDS unit. The preliminary calibration results have indicated the high desulfurization rate and good selectivity of the HDS technology to fulfill the demand of Luoyang Petrochemical Company for product quality upgrading with the targets of technical revamp fully implemented.

  17. Experimental investigation and modeling of an aircraft Otto engine operating with gasoline and heavier fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldivar Olague, Jose

    A Continental "O-200" aircraft Otto-cycle engine has been modified to burn diesel fuel. Algebraic models of the different processes of the cycle were developed from basic principles applied to a real engine, and utilized in an algorithm for the simulation of engine performance. The simulation provides a means to investigate the performance of the modified version of the Continental engine for a wide range of operating parameters. The main goals of this study are to increase the range of a particular aircraft by reducing the specific fuel consumption of the engine, and to show that such an engine can burn heavier fuels (such as diesel, kerosene, and jet fuel) instead of gasoline. Such heavier fuels are much less flammable during handling operations making them safer than aviation gasoline and very attractive for use in flight operations from naval vessels. The cycle uses an electric spark to ignite the heavier fuel at low to moderate compression ratios, The stratified charge combustion process is utilized in a pre-chamber where the spray injection of the fuel occurs at a moderate pressure of 1200 psi (8.3 MPa). One advantage of fuel injection into the combustion chamber instead of into the intake port, is that the air-to-fuel ratio can be widely varied---in contrast to the narrower limits of the premixed combustion case used in gasoline engines---in order to obtain very lean combustion. Another benefit is that higher compression ratios can be attained in the modified cycle with heavier fuels. The combination of injection into the chamber for lean combustion, and higher compression ratios allow to limit the peak pressure in the cylinder, and to avoid engine damage. Such high-compression ratios are characteristic of Diesel engines and lead to increase in thermal efficiency without pre-ignition problems. In this experimental investigation, operations with diesel fuel have shown that considerable improvements in the fuel efficiency are possible. The results of

  18. New Gasoline Standard in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ The Chinese government will reduce sulfur levels of lead-free gasoline to 150 parts per million (ppm) in the revised gas standard for the purpose to help improve air quality. The revised lead-free gas standard, to be announced by the end of this year, will drive gas with sulfur levels of 500 ppm out of market on Dec. 31,2009, said Li Xinmin, deputy director of the pollution control department of the State Environmental Protection Administration (SEPA), at a recent symposium on automobile pollution control. The new standard would meet the Euro-Ⅲ emission norm, which constrained sulfur levels to 150 ppm maximum.

  19. Renewable Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Godfrey

    2004-05-01

    Stimulated by recent technological developments and increasing concern over the sustainability and environmental impact of conventional fuel usage, the prospect of producing clean, sustainable power in substantial quantities from renewable energy sources arouses interest around the world. This book provides a comprehensive overview of the principal types of renewable energy--including solar, thermal, photovoltaics, bioenergy, hydro, tidal, wind, wave, and geothermal. In addition, it explains the underlying physical and technological principles of renewable energy and examines the environmental impact and prospects of different energy sources. With more than 350 detailed illustrations, more than 50 tables of data, and a wide range of case studies, Renewable Energy, 2/e is an ideal choice for undergraduate courses in energy, sustainable development, and environmental science. New to the Second Edition ·Full-color design ·Updated to reflect developments in technology, policy, attitides ·Complemented by Energy Systems and Sustainability edited by Godfrey Boyle, Bob Everett and Janet Ramage, all of the Open University, U.K.

  20. Costa de Cocos 11-kW wind-diesel hybrid system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corbus, D. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Bergey, M. [Bergey Windpower Company, Norman, OK (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Costa de Cocos is a small resort located in the state of Quintana Roo, Mexico. Using the existing diesel generator, the resort`s power system was retrofitted to a wind-hybrid diesel system. The reason for this retrofit was to supply 24-hour power, to reduce diesel fuel by using wind energy, and to reduce diesel air and noise emissions in order to promote ecotourism. The wind system was installed in October 1996 with cost-shared funding from the U.S. Department of Energy/U.S. Agency for International Development renewable energy program in Mexico. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) supplied technical assistance to the project. Discussed in this paper are the system design, installation, and initial performance.

  1. Do Daily Retail Gasoline Prices adjust Asymmetrically?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J.H. Bettendorf (Leon); S.A. van der Geest (Stéphanie); G. Kuper

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThis paper analyzes adjustments in the Dutch retail gasoline prices. We estimate an error correction model on changes in the daily retail price for gasoline (taxes excluded) for the period 1996-2004 taking care of volatility clustering by estimating an EGARCH model. It turns out the vola

  2. Do daily retail gasoline prices adjust asymmetrically?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bettendorf, L.; van der Geest, S. A.; Kuper, G. H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyses adjustments in the Dutch retail gasoline prices. We estimate an error correction model on changes in the daily retail price for gasoline (taxes excluded) for the period 1996-2004, taking care of volatility clustering by estimating an EGARCH model. It turns out that the volatility

  3. Do Daily Retail Gasoline Prices adjust Asymmetrically?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J.H. Bettendorf (Leon); S.A. van der Geest (Stéphanie); G. Kuper

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThis paper analyzes adjustments in the Dutch retail gasoline prices. We estimate an error correction model on changes in the daily retail price for gasoline (taxes excluded) for the period 1996-2004 taking care of volatility clustering by estimating an EGARCH model. It turns out the vola

  4. Inventories and upstream gasoline price dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuper, Gerard H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper sheds new light on the asymmetric dynamics in upstream U.S. gasoline prices. The model is based on Pindyck's inventory model of commodity price dynamics. We show that asymmetry in gasoline price dynamics is caused by changes in the net marginal convenience yield: higher costs of marketing

  5. Gasoline Prices and Motor Vehicle Fatalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, David C.; Morrisey, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    Fatal motor vehicle crashes per capita remained relatively stable over the 1990s, in spite of new traffic safety laws and vehicle innovations. One explanation for this stability is that the price of gasoline declined, which resulted in more vehicle miles traveled and potentially more fatalities. By using 1983-2000 monthly gasoline price and…

  6. Diesel fuel stability; Estabilidade de oleo diesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Marcelo V.; Pinto, Ricardo R.C. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Zotin, Fatima M.Z. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The demand for the reduction of the pollutants emissions by diesel engines has led to the adoption of more advanced injection systems and concern about fuel stability. The degradation of the diesel fuel can happen during storage and distribution, according to the acid-catalysed condensation of aromatic compounds such phenalenones and indolic nitrogenated heterocyclic compounds. These precursors appear in several streams used in diesel fuel formulation. In this study the sediment formation in model and real, aromatic and paraffinic fuels, containing such precursors naturally or by addition was analysed. The fuels were submitted to accelerated (16 hours at 90 deg C) and long term (13 weeks at 43 deg C) storage stability tests. The model fuels responded positively to the storage stability tests with formation of sediments, concluding that these methods can be considered adequate to verify the occurrence of the studied degradation process. The real fuels response was even more due to their chemical complexity, composition and impurities. The formation of sediments showed to be affected by the hydrocarbon distribution of the fuels. (author)

  7. Combustion Kinetic Studies of Gasolines and Surrogates

    KAUST Repository

    Javed, Tamour

    2016-11-01

    Future thrusts for gasoline engine development can be broadly summarized into two categories: (i) efficiency improvements in conventional spark ignition engines, and (ii) development of advance compression ignition (ACI) concepts. Efficiency improvements in conventional spark ignition engines requires downsizing (and turbocharging) which may be achieved by using high octane gasolines, whereas, low octane gasolines fuels are anticipated for ACI concepts. The current work provides the essential combustion kinetic data, targeting both thrusts, that is needed to develop high fidelity gasoline surrogate mechanisms and surrogate complexity guidelines. Ignition delay times of a wide range of certified gasolines and surrogates are reported here. These measurements were performed in shock tubes and rapid compression machines over a wide range of experimental conditions (650 – 1250 K, 10 – 40 bar) relevant to internal combustion engines. Using the measured the data and chemical kinetic analyses, the surrogate complexity requirements for these gasolines in homogeneous environments are specified. For the discussions presented here, gasolines are classified into three categories: (i)\\tLow octane gasolines including Saudi Aramco’s light naphtha fuel (anti-knock index, AKI = (RON + MON)/2 = 64; Sensitivity (S) = RON – MON = 1), certified FACE (Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines) gasoline I and J (AKI ~ 70, S = 0.7 and 3 respectively), and their Primary Reference Fuels (PRF, mixtures of n-heptane and iso-octane) and multi-component surrogates. (ii)\\t Mid octane gasolines including FACE A and C (AKI ~ 84, S ~ 0 and 1 respectively) and their PRF surrogates. Laser absorption measurements of intermediate and product species formed during gasoline/surrogate oxidation are also reported. (iii)\\t A wide range of n-heptane/iso-octane/toluene (TPRF) blends to adequately represent the octane and sensitivity requirements of high octane gasolines including FACE gasoline F and G

  8. Mineral spirits addition to automotive gasoline: fuel quality impacts; Adicao de aguarras a gasolina automotiva: impactos na qualidade do combustivel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Selmo Queiroz; Teixeira, Leonardo Sena Gomes; Pontes, Luiz Antonio Magalhaes; Vitor Sobrinho, Eledir; Guimaraes, Paulo Roberto Britto; Vianna, Regina Ferreira [Universidade Salvador - UNIFACS, Salvador, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia e Arquitetura]. E-mail: leonardoteixeira@unifacs.br

    2003-07-01

    The unlawful addition of hydrocarbons such as mineral spirit, kerosene, thinner and diesel oil to gasoline has been often observed in Brazil lately. This not only results in undeserved market advantage, but may also cause serious damage to the consumer and to the environment, since it may change several physicochemical properties of the fuel, reduce engine performance and increase fuel consumption. Mineral spirit is among the most widely used of those hydrocarbons, due to its low commercial value and easiness of mixing with gasoline. This research work is concerned with the influence of mineral spirit on the physicochemical properties of gasoline, in particular its distillation curve and octane number. The results of tests on gasoline samples containing different amounts of mineral spirit show that, although this hydrocarbon greatly modifies the distillation curve of gasoline, it does not breach legal limits, even at concentrations as high as 19,5%. With regard to octane number and anti-knock index it behaves likewise, since the reduction observed is too small to breach legal limits. These results indicate that it is relatively easy to adulterate fuel within legal limits, with very damaging consequences to the society as a whole. (author)

  9. Experimental investigation on a DI diesel engine fuelled with Madhuca Indica ester and diesel blend

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saravanan, N. [ERC Engines, Hall 11A, Tata Motors, Pimpri, Pune 411019, Maharashtra (India); Nagarajan, G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, Guindy, Anna University, Chennai (India); Puhan, Sukumar [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Veltech Engineering College, Avadi, Chennai (India)

    2010-06-15

    Biodiesel is a fatty acid alkyl ester, which is renewable, biodegradable and non-toxic fuel which can be derived from any vegetable oil by transesterification. One of the popularly used biodiesel in India is Mahua oil (Madhuca Indica). In the present investigation Mahua oil was transesterified using methanol in the presence of alkali catalyst and was used to study the performance and emission characteristics. The biodiesel was tested on a single cylinder, four stroke compression ignition engine. Engine performance tests showed that power loss was around 13% combined with 20% increase in fuel consumption with Mahua oil methyl ester at full load. Emissions such as carbon monoxide, hydrocarbon were lesser for Mahua ester compared to diesel by 26% and 20% respectively. Oxides of nitrogen were lesser by 4% for the ester compared to diesel. (author)

  10. Performance Characteristics and Analysis of 4-Stroke Single Cylinder Diesel Engine Blend With 50% of Honne Oil at Various Fuel Injection Pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bhaskar Reddy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In future demand for fossil fuels and environmental effects, a number of renewable sources of energy have been studied in worldwide. An attempt is made to apt of vegetable oil for diesel engine operation, without any change in its old construction. One of the important factors which influence the performance and emission characteristics of D.I diesel engine is fuel injection pressure. In this project honne oil has to be investigated in a constant speed, on D.I diesel engine with different fuel injection pressures. The scope of the project is to investigate the effect of injection pressures on a blend of 50% honne oil with 50% diesel and compare with pure diesel on performance and emission characteristics of the diesel engine. Two tested fuels were used during experiments like 100 % diesel and a blend of 50% honne oil mixing in the diesel. The performance tests were conducted at constant speed with variable loads. From experiment results it was found that with honne oil- diesel blend the performance of the engine is better compared with diesel. The break thermal efficiency and mechanical efficiencies were found to be maximum at 200 bar injection pressure with both honne oil- diesel blend, compared with 180 bar and 220 bar. The brake specific fuel consumption was to be minimum at 220bar compared with 180 bar and 200 bar. Hydro carbon emissions of honne oil-diesel operation were less than the diesel fuel mode at all fuel injection pressures.

  11. Mastering the diesel process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antila, E.; Kaario, O.; Lahtinen, T. (and others)

    2004-07-01

    This is the final report of the research project 'Mastering the Diesel Process'. The project has been a joint research effort of the Helsinki University of Technology, the Tampere University of Technology, the Technical Research Centre of Finland, and the Aabo Akademi University. Moreover, the contribution of the Michigan Technological University has been important. The project 'Mastering the Diesel Process' has been a computational research project on the physical phenomena of diesel combustion. The theoretical basis of the project lies on computational fluid dynamics. Various submodels for computational fluid dynamics have been developed or tested within engine simulation. Various model combinations in three diesel engines of different sizes have been studied. The most important submodels comprise fuel spray drop breakup, fuel evaporation, gas-fuel interaction in the spray, mixing model of combustion, heat transfer, emission mechanisms. The boundary conditions and flow field modelling have been studied, as well. The main simulation tool have been Star-CD. KIVA code have been used in the model development, as well. By the help of simulation, we are able to investigate the effect of various design parameters or operational parameters on diesel combustion and emission formation. (orig.)

  12. 75 FR 76789 - Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: 2011 Renewable Fuel Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-09

    ... qualifying domestic corn ethanol production capacity to meet the balance of the total renewable fuel standard... biomass-based diesels, advanced biofuels, and other conventional renewable fuels such as corn-ethanol... capacity of 250,000 gallons of ethanol per year and uses an enzymatic hydrolysis process to convert...

  13. Oilseeds for use in biodiesel and drop-in renewable jet fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oilseeds, primarily soybean and canola, are currently used as feedstocks for biodiesel production. Oilseeds can also be used to produce drop-in renewable jet fuel and diesel products. While soybean and canola are the most common oilseed crops used for renewable fuel production in the U.S., many othe...

  14. Operational performance of agricultural tractor in function of interior and metropolitano diesel mixture in mamona biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabile, Rubens Andre [Universidade de Sao Paulo (EESC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia; Lopes, Afonso; Toledo, Anderson de; Reis, Gustavo Naves dos; Silva, Rouverson Pereira da [Universidade Estadual Paulista (DER/UNESP), Jaboticabal, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Rural

    2008-07-01

    The great demand for energy sources by production systems allied to scarcity of fossil fuels has motivated the development and production of biodiesel, this is a fuel produced from renewable sources. Given that, the objective of this study was to compare the operating performance of an agricultural tractor, operating with interior and metropolitano diesel mixed to mamona biodiesel, in seven proportions. The tests were conducted in the Departamento de Engenharia Rural of UNESP/Jaboticabal - SP. The results showed that the kind of diesel did influence fuel consumption, and diesel metropolitano showed best quality. It was also observed that as biodiesel proportion increased, fuel consumption increased as well. (author)

  15. 40 CFR 86.007-11 - Emission standards and supplemental requirements for 2007 and later model year diesel heavy-duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 1985 and Later Model Year New Gasoline Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled, Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled and... derived from averaging, banking, or trading programs. (ii)(A) Non-Methane Hydrocarbons (NMHC) for engines fueled with either diesel fuel, natural gas, or liquefied petroleum gas. 0.14 grams per brake...

  16. Comparison study between a Renewable Energy Supply System and a supergrid for achieving 100% from renewable energy sources in Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xydis, George

    2013-01-01

    Numerous efforts have been done for achieving the maximum penetration of renewable energy sources (RESs) in the autonomous grids of Greek islands, which never exceeded 10%, despite the exceptional wind and solar potential. Large fluctuations on demand during summer, winter, and 24-h period...... in combination with the technical restrictions of diesel generators of the existing conventional power stations are a major concern of power supply system. Reversing the roles of diesel generators and wind farms (WFs), to use WF as the basic energy source and diesel generators as stand-by system changed in fact...... the stochastic behavior of wind energy to the demand, to provide the system with guaranteed power. This Wind–Hydro Plants in combination with the most adequate RES forming an Renewable Energy Supply System (RESS), increase further the economical penetration of RES into autonomous grids up to 90% or even 100...

  17. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Diesel Combustion with Oxygenated Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curran, H J; Fisher, E M; Glaude, P-A; Marinov, N M; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Flynn, P F; Durrett, R P; zur Loye, A O; Akinyemi, O C; Dryer, F L

    2000-01-11

    Emission standards for diesel engines in vehicles have been steadily reduced in recent years, and a great deal of research and development effort has been focused on reducing particulate and nitrogen oxide emissions. One promising approach to reducing emissions involves the addition of oxygen to the fuel, generally by adding an oxygenated compound to the normal diesel fuel. Miyamoto et al. [1] showed experimentally that particulate levels can be significantly reduced by adding oxygenated species to the fuel. They found the Bosch smoke number (a measure of the particulate or soot levels in diesel exhaust) falls from about 55% for conventional diesel fuel to less than 1% when the oxygen content of the fuel is above about 25% by mass, as shown in Figure 1. It has been well established that addition of oxygenates to automotive fuel, including both diesel fuel as well as gasoline, reduces NOx and CO emissions by reducing flame temperatures. This is the basis for addition of oxygenates to produce reformulated gasoline in selected portions of the country. Of course, this is also accompanied by a slight reduction in fuel economy. A new overall picture of diesel combustion has been developed by Dec [2], in which laser diagnostic studies identified stages in diesel combustion that had not previously been recognized. These stages are summarized in Figure 2. The evolution of the diesel spray is shown, starting as a liquid jet that vaporizes and entrains hot air from the combustion chamber. This relatively steady process continues as long as fuel is being injected. In particular, Dec showed that the fuel spray vaporizes and mixes with air and products of earlier combustion to provide a region in which a gas phase, premixed fuel-rich ignition and burn occurs. The products of this ignition are then observed experimentally to lead rapidly to formation of soot particles, which subsequently are consumed in a diffusion flame. Recently, Flynn et al. [3] used a chemical kinetic and

  18. Demand for Gasoline: Effects of a Durable Good

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Alfredo S.

    1981-01-01

    This paper estimates empirical demand functions for premium gasoline. Specifically, it determines the effectiveness of policies designed to conserve gasoline by considering the effects of changes in gasoline prices on the demand for premium gasoline and by accounting for the differential effect of these changes on the size and composition of the existing stock of automobiles. Regression estimate is conducted.

  19. Performance evaluation of a diesel engine fueled with methyl ester of castor seed oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.DURGA DEVI

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Diesel engines are widely used as power sources in medium and heavy-duty applications because of their lower fuel consumption and lower emissions of carbon monoxide (CO and unburned hydrocarbons (HC compared with gasoline engines. Rudolf Diesel, the inventor ofthe diesel engine, ran an engine on groundnut oil at the Paris Exposition of 1900. Since then, vegetable oils have been used as fuels when petroleum supplies were expensive or difficult to obtain. With the increased availability of petroleum in the 1940s, research into vegetable oils decreased. Since the oil crisis of the 1970s research interest has expanded in the area of alternative fuels. The difficulties associated with using raw vegetable oils in diesel engines identified in the literature are injector coking, severe engine deposits, filter gumming problems, piston ring sticking, and injector coking and thickening of the lubricating oil. The highviscosity and low volatility of raw vegetable oils are generally considered to be the major drawbacks for their utilization as fuels in diesel engines. Castor methyl ester (CME blends showed performance characteristics close to diesel. Therefore castor methylester blends can be used in CI engines in rural area for meeting energy requirement in various agricultural operations such as irrigation, threshing, indistries etc.

  20. High cetane number paraffinic diesel fuels and emission reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larmi, M.; Tilli, A.; Kaario, O.; Gong, Y.; Antila, E.; Sarjovaara, T.; Hillamo, H.; Hakkinen, K.; Lehto, K. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Helsinki (Finland); Brink, A. [Aalborg Univ., Aalborg (Finland); Aakko, P. [Saksa VTT, Espoo (Finland)

    2009-07-01

    This presentation discussed high cetane number (CN) paraffinic diesel fuels and emission reduction. The presentation outlined the synthetic and renewable fuels to be studied, including high CN paraffinic diesel fuels like hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO) and FT-diesel fuel; high CN paraffinic diesel fuels with high concentration of oxygenates; biogas/NPG and dual fuel combustion in future projects; and neat oxygenates like dimethyl ether in future projects. Fatty acid methyl ester biodiesel and diesel fuel were used as reference fuels. The project objectives were to obtain a significant reduction of carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxide and particulate matter emissions of 70 per cent without drawbacks in efficiency or power output. The presentation also described combustion implementation; milestones at Aalto University School of Science and Technology (TKK); resources at TKK; the main research engine; LEO with EHVA; a literature study on previous research; fuel properties; HVO properties, density; high cetane number in the literature; and high CN effects. Previous studies that were discussed included direct comparisons with no calibrations; heavy duty engine performance; potential with engine calibration; exhaust gas recirculation; and room for new research. In general, standard test runs have been carried out with existing engines without considering the special properties of the fuels. tabs., figs.

  1. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Cccccc... - Applicability Criteria and Management Practices for Gasoline Cargo Tanks Unloading at Gasoline...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Practices for Gasoline Cargo Tanks Unloading at Gasoline Dispensing Facilities With Monthly Throughput of 100,000 Gallons of Gasoline or More 2 Table 2 to Subpart CCCCCC of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Source Category: Gasoline Dispensing Facilities Pt. 63, Subpt. CCCCCC, Table 2 Table 2...

  2. A Comparative Study of Engine Performance and Exhaust Emissions Characteristics of Linseed Oil Biodiesel Blends with Diesel Fuel in a Direct Injection Diesel Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, B. L.; Jindal, S.

    2013-01-01

    This paper is aimed at study of the performance and emissions characteristics of direct injection diesel engine fueled with linseed oil biodiesel blends and diesel fuel. The comparison was done with base fuel as diesel and linseed oil biodiesel blends. The experiments were conducted with various blends of linseed biodiesel at different engine loads. It was found that comparable mass fraction burnt, better rate of pressure rise and BMEP, improved indicated thermal efficiency (8-11 %) and lower specific fuel consumption (3.5-6 %) were obtained with LB10 blend at full load. The emissions of CO, un-burnt hydrocarbon and smoke were less as compared to base fuel, but with slight increase in the emission of NOx. Since, linseed biodiesel is renewable in nature, so practically negligible CO2 is added to the environment. The linseed biodiesel can be one of the renewable alternative fuels for transportation vehicles and blend LB10 is preferable for better efficiency.

  3. Diesel sisustab / Jenni Juurinen

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Juurinen, Jenni

    2007-01-01

    Renzo Rosso poolt 1978. a. Itaalias asutatud rõivafirma Diesel sisustas 2007. a. kevadel Stay Inn-projekti raames katusekorteri Helsingi kesklinnas. Diesili kujundaja Vesa Kemppainen. Sisustuses on kasutatud peamiselt soome mööblit ja seintel eksponeeritud soome noorte kunstnike taieseid. Autoreid: Harri Koskinen (voodi), Thomas Pedersen (Stingrey kiiktool), Jenni Hiltunen (maalid)

  4. Diesel Engine Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tech Directions, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Diesel engine technicians maintain and repair the engines that power transportation equipment such as heavy trucks, trains, buses, and locomotives. Some technicians work mainly on farm machines, ships, compressors, and pumps. Others work mostly on construction equipment such as cranes, power shovels, bulldozers, and paving machines. This article…

  5. Diesel sisustab / Jenni Juurinen

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Juurinen, Jenni

    2007-01-01

    Renzo Rosso poolt 1978. a. Itaalias asutatud rõivafirma Diesel sisustas 2007. a. kevadel Stay Inn-projekti raames katusekorteri Helsingi kesklinnas. Diesili kujundaja Vesa Kemppainen. Sisustuses on kasutatud peamiselt soome mööblit ja seintel eksponeeritud soome noorte kunstnike taieseid. Autoreid: Harri Koskinen (voodi), Thomas Pedersen (Stingrey kiiktool), Jenni Hiltunen (maalid)

  6. Evaluation of the impacts of biodiesel and second generation biofuels on NO(x) emissions for CARB diesel fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajbabaei, Maryam; Johnson, Kent C; Okamoto, Robert A; Mitchell, Alexander; Pullman, Marcie; Durbin, Thomas D

    2012-08-21

    The impact of biodiesel and second generation biofuels on nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) emissions from heavy-duty engines was investigated using a California Air Resources Board (CARB) certified diesel fuel. Two heavy-duty engines, a 2006 engine with no exhaust aftertreatment, and a 2007 engine with a diesel particle filter (DPF), were tested on an engine dynamometer over four different test cycles. Emissions from soy- and animal-based biodiesels, a hydrotreated renewable diesel, and a gas to liquid (GTL) fuel were evaluated at blend levels from 5 to 100%. NO(x) emissions consistently increased with increasing biodiesel blend level, while increasing renewable diesel and GTL blends showed NO(x) emissions reductions with blend level. NO(x) increases ranged from 1.5% to 6.9% for B20, 6.4% to 18.2% for B50, and 14.1% to 47.1% for B100. The soy-biodiesel showed higher NO(x) emissions increases compared to the animal-biodiesel. NO(x) emissions neutrality with the CARB diesel was achieved by blending GTL or renewable diesel fuels with various levels of biodiesel or by using di-tert-butyl peroxide (DTBP). It appears that the impact of biodiesel on NO(x) emissions might be a more important consideration when blended with CARB diesel or similar fuels, and that some form of NO(x) mitigation might be needed for biodiesel blends with such fuels.

  7. COMPOSITIVE EMISSION CONTROL SYSTEM OF GASOLINE VEHICLE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Ruibin; CHEN Zijian

    2006-01-01

    The working principle of a kind of compositive emission control system is inquired into,which includes exhaust heater, secondary air supplement, exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), thermal reactor and catalytic converter, etc. The purification effect of CO, HC and NOx emission of the gasoline spark ignite (S.I.) engine is studied. The entire vehicle driving cycle tests based on the national emission standard and a series of the gasoline engine-testing bench tests including full load characteristic experiment, load characteristic experiment and idle speed experiment are done. The results show that the system has a very good emission control effect to CO, HC and NOx of gasoline engine. The construction of the system is very simple and can be mounted on the exhaust pipe conveniently without any alteration of the vehicle-use gasoline engine.

  8. Coconut Oil Based Hybrid Fuels as Alternative Fuel for Diesel Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranil Singh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The use of vegetable oils as a fuel in diesel engines causes some problems due to their high viscosity compared with diesel. Various techniques and methods are used to solve the problems resulting from high viscosity. Approach: One of the techniques is the preparation of a microemulsion fuel, called a hybrid fuel. In this study, hybrid fuels consisting of coconut oil, ethanol and octan-1-ol were prepared with an aim to test their suitability as a fuel for diesel engines. Density, viscosity and gross calorific values of these fuels were determined and the fuels were used to run a direct injection diesel engine. The engine performance and exhaust emissions were investigated and compared with that of diesel and coconut oil. Results: The experimental results show that the engine efficiency of the hybrid fuels is comparable to that of diesel. As the percentage of ethanol and/or octan-1-ol increased, the viscosity of the hybrid fuels decreased and the engine efficiency increased. The exhaust emissions were lower than those for diesel, except carbon monoxide, which increased. Conclusion/Recommendations: Hence, it is concluded that these hybrid fuels can be used successfully as an alternative fuel in diesel engines without any modifications. Their completely renewable nature ensures that they are environmentally friendly.

  9. Multivariate calibration in Fourier transform infrared spectrometry as a tool to detect adulterations in Brazilian gasoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonardo S.G. Teixeira; Fabio S. Oliveira; Hilda C. dos Santos; Paulo W.L. Cordeiro; Selmo Q. Almeida [Universidade Salvador, Salvador (Brazil)

    2008-03-15

    In the present work, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) in association with multivariate chemometrics classification techniques was employed to identify gasoline samples adulterated with diesel oil, kerosene, turpentine spirit or thinner. Results indicated that partial least squares (PLS) models based on infrared spectra were proven suitable as practical analytical methods for predicting adulterant content in gasoline in the volume fraction range from 0% to 50%. The results obtained by PLS provided prediction errors lower than 2% (v/v) for all adulterant determined. Additionally, Soft Independent Modeling of Class Analogy (SIMCA) was performed using all spectral data (650-3700 cm{sup -1}) for sample classification into adulterant classes defined by training set and the results indicated that undoubted adulteration detection was possible but identification of the adulterant was subject to misclassification errors, specially for kerosene and turpentine adulterated samples, and must be carefully examined. Quality control and police laboratories for gasoline analysis should employ the proposed methods for rapid screening analysis for qualitative monitoring purposes. 22 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Study of ethanol and gasoline fuel sprays using mie-scatter and schlieren imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Lauren; Bittle, Joshua; Puzinauskas, Paul

    2016-11-01

    Many cars today are capable of running on both gasoline and ethanol, however it is not clear how well optimized the engines are for the multiple fuels. This experiment looks specifically at the fuel spray in a direct injection system. The length and angle of direct injection sprays were characterized and a comparison between ethanol and gasoline sprays was made. Fuels were tested using a modified diesel injector in a test chamber at variable ambient pressures and temperatures in order to simulate both high and low load combustion chamber conditions. Rainbow schlieren and mie-scatter imaging were both used to investigate the liquid and vapor portions of the sprays. The sprays behaved as expected with temperature and pressure changes. There was no noticeable fuel effect on the liquid portion of the spray (mie-scatter), though the gasoline vapor spray angles were wider than ethanol spray angles (possible a result of the distillation curves of the two fuels). Funding from NSF REU site Grant EEC 1358991 is greatly appreciated.

  11. N-butanol and isobutanol as alternatives to gasoline: Comparison of port fuel injector characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenkl Michael

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports on an experimental investigation of the relationship between the pulse width of a gasoline engine port fuel injector and the quantity of the fuel injected when butanol is used as a fuel. Two isomers of butanol, n-butanol and isobutanol, are considered as potential candidates for renewable, locally produced fuels capable of serving as a drop-in replacement fuel for gasoline, as an alternative to ethanol which poses material compatibility and other drawbacks. While the injected quantity of fuel is typically a linear function of the time the injector coil is energized, the flow through the port fuel injector is complex, non ideal, and not necessarily laminar, and considering that butanol has much higher viscosity than gasoline, an experimental investigation was conducted. A production injector, coupled to a production fueling system, and driven by a pulse width generator was operated at various pulse lengths and frequencies, covering the range of engine rpm and loads on a car engine. The results suggest that at least at room temperature, the fueling rate remains to be a linear function of the pulse width for both n-butanol and isobutanol, and the volumes of fuel injected are comparable for gasoline and both butanol isomers.

  12. Study of the various factors influencing deposit formation and operation of gasoline engine injection systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepien, Z.

    2016-09-01

    Generally, ethanol fuel emits less pollutants than gasoline, it is completely renewable product and has the potential to reduce greenhouse gases emission but, at the same time can present a multitude of technical challenges to engine operation conditions including creation of very adverse engine deposits. These deposits increasing fuel consumption and cause higher exhaust emissions as well as poor performance in drivability. This paper describes results of research and determination the various factors influencing injector deposits build-up of ethanol-gasoline blends operated engine. The relationship between ethanol-gasoline fuel blends composition, their treatment, engine construction as well as its operation conditions and fuel injectors deposit formation has been investigated. Simulation studies of the deposit formation endanger proper functioning of fuel injection system were carried out at dynamometer engine testing. As a result various, important factors influencing the deposit creation process and speed formation were determined. The ability to control of injector deposits by multifunctional detergent-dispersant additives package fit for ethanol-gasoline blends requirements was also investigated.

  13. N-butanol and isobutanol as alternatives to gasoline: Comparison of port fuel injector characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenkl, Michael; Pechout, Martin; Vojtisek, Michal

    2016-03-01

    The paper reports on an experimental investigation of the relationship between the pulse width of a gasoline engine port fuel injector and the quantity of the fuel injected when butanol is used as a fuel. Two isomers of butanol, n-butanol and isobutanol, are considered as potential candidates for renewable, locally produced fuels capable of serving as a drop-in replacement fuel for gasoline, as an alternative to ethanol which poses material compatibility and other drawbacks. While the injected quantity of fuel is typically a linear function of the time the injector coil is energized, the flow through the port fuel injector is complex, non ideal, and not necessarily laminar, and considering that butanol has much higher viscosity than gasoline, an experimental investigation was conducted. A production injector, coupled to a production fueling system, and driven by a pulse width generator was operated at various pulse lengths and frequencies, covering the range of engine rpm and loads on a car engine. The results suggest that at least at room temperature, the fueling rate remains to be a linear function of the pulse width for both n-butanol and isobutanol, and the volumes of fuel injected are comparable for gasoline and both butanol isomers.

  14. Trends in auto emissions and gasoline composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, R F

    1993-01-01

    The invention of the spark-ignited internal combustion engine provided a market for a petroleum middle distillate, gasoline, about 100 years ago. The internal combustion engine and gasoline have co-evolved until motor vehicles now annually consume about 110 billion gallons of gasoline in the United States. Continuing air pollution problems and resulting regulatory pressures are driving the need for further automotive emissions reductions. Engine and emissions control technology provided most earlier reductions. Changing the composition of gasoline will play a major role in the next round of reductions. The engineering and regulatory definition of a reformulated gasoline is proceeding rapidly, largely as the result of an auto and oil industry cooperative data generation program. It is likely that this new, reformulated gasoline will be introduced in high-ozone regions of the United States in the mid-1990s. Alternative clean fuels, primarily methane, methanol, and liquid petroleum gas, will become more widely used during this same period, probably first in fleet operations. PMID:7517353

  15. Chemical fingerprinting of unevaporated automotive gasoline samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandercock, P M L; Du Pasquier, E

    2003-06-24

    The comparison of two or more samples of liquid gasoline (petrol) to establish a common origin is a difficult problem in the forensic investigation of arsons and suspicious fires. A total of 35 randomly collected samples of unevaporated gasoline, covering three different grades (regular unleaded, premium unleaded and lead replacement), were examined. The high-boiling fraction of the gasoline was targeted with a view to apply the techniques described herein to evaporated gasoline samples in the future.A novel micro solid phase extraction (SPE) technique using activated alumina was developed to isolate the polar compounds and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from a 200microl sample of gasoline. Samples were analysed using full-scan gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and potential target compounds identified. Samples were then re-analysed directly, without prior treatment, using GC-MS in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode for target compounds that exhibited variation between gasoline samples. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the chromatographic data. The first two principal components (PCs) accounted for 91.5% of the variation in the data. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) performed on the PCA results showed that the 35 samples tested could be classified into 32 different groups.

  16. Evaporative gasoline emissions and asthma symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordian, Mary Ellen; Stewart, Alistair W; Morris, Stephen S

    2010-08-01

    Attached garages are known to be associated with indoor air volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This study looked at indoor exposure to VOCs presumably from evaporative emissions of gasoline. Alaskan gasoline contains 5% benzene making benzene a marker for gasoline exposure. A survey of randomly chosen houses with attached garages was done in Anchorage Alaska to determine the exposure and assess respiratory health. Householders were asked to complete a health survey for each person and a household survey. They monitored indoor air in their primary living space for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes for one week using passive organic vapor monitoring badges. Benzene levels in homes ranged from undetectable to 58 parts per billion. The median benzene level in 509 homes tested was 2.96 ppb. Elevated benzene levels in the home were strongly associated with small engines and gasoline stored in the garage. High concentrations of benzene in gasoline increase indoor air levels of benzene in residences with attached garages exposing people to benzene at levels above ATSDR's minimal risk level. Residents reported more severe symptoms of asthma in the homes with high gasoline exposure (16%) where benzene levels exceeded the 9 ppb.

  17. Montana BioDiesel Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyton, Brent [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States)

    2017-01-29

    This initiative funding helped put Montana State University (MSU) in a position to help lead in the development of biodiesel production strategies. Recent shortages in electrical power and rising gasoline prices have focused much attention on the development of alternative energy sources that will end our dependence on fossil fuels. In addition, as the concern for environmental impact of utilizing fossil fuels increases, effective strategies must be implemented to reduce emissions or the increased regulations imposed on fossil fuel production will cause economic barriers for their use to continue to increase. Biodiesel has been repeatedly promoted as a more environmentally sound and renewable source of fuel and may prove to be a highly viable solution to provide, at the least, a proportion of our energy needs. Currently there are both practical and economic barriers to the implementation of alternative energy however the advent of these technologies is inevitable. Since many of the same strategies for the storage, transport, and utilization of biodiesel are common with that of fossil fuels, the practical barriers for biodiesel are comparatively minimal. Strategies were developed to harness the CO2 as feedstock to support the growth of biodiesel producing algae. The initiative funding led to the successful funding of highly rated projects in competitive national grant programs in the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy. This funding put MSU in a key position to develop technologies to utilize the CO2 rich emissions produced in fossil fuel utilization and assembled world experts concerning the growth characteristics of photosynthetic microorganisms capable of producing biodiesel.

  18. Filter-based control of particulate matter from a lean gasoline direct injection engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; DeBusk, Melanie Moses [ORNL; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    New regulations requiring increases in vehicle fuel economy are challenging automotive manufacturers to identify fuel-efficient engines for future vehicles. Lean gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines offer significant increases in fuel efficiency over the more common stoichiometric GDI engines already in the marketplace. However, particulate matter (PM) emissions from lean GDI engines, particularly during stratified combustion modes, are problematic for lean GDI technology to meet U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Tier 3 and other future emission regulations. As such, the control of lean GDI PM with wall-flow filters, referred to as gasoline particulate filter (GPF) technology, is of interest. Since lean GDI PM chemistry and morphology differ from diesel PM (where more filtration experience exists), the functionality of GPFs needs to be studied to determine the operating conditions suitable for efficient PM removal. In addition, lean GDI engine exhaust temperatures are generally higher than diesel engines which results in more continuous regeneration of the GPF and less presence of the soot cake layer common to diesel particulate filters. Since the soot layer improves filtration efficiency, this distinction is important to consider. Research on the emission control of PM from a lean GDI engine with a GPF was conducted on an engine dynamometer. PM, after dilution, was characterized with membrane filters, organic vs. elemental carbon characterization, and size distribution techniques at various steady state engine speed and load points. The engine was operated in three primary combustion modes: stoichiometric, lean homogeneous, and lean stratified. In addition, rich combustion was utilized to simulate PM from engine operation during active regeneration of lean NOx control technologies. High (>95%) PM filtration efficiencies were observed over a wide range of conditions; however, some PM was observed to slip through the GPF at high speed and load conditions. The

  19. Effect of Gasoline Properties on Exhaust Emissions from Tier 2 Light-Duty Vehicles -- Final Report: Phases 4, 5, & 6; July 28, 2008 - July 27, 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitney, K.; Shoffner, B.

    2014-06-01

    This report covers work the Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) Office of Automotive Engineering has conducted for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in support of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct). Section 1506 of EPAct requires the EPA to produce an updated fuel effects model representing the 2007 light-duty gasoline fleet, including determination of the emissions impacts of increased renewable fuel use.

  20. New technologies in the production of motor fuels from renewable materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnađević Borivoj K.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents resources of the Autonomous Province of Vojvodina available for bioethanol and motor fuels (gasoline and diesel fuel from sustainable resources: corn-stalks, straw, sweet sorghum, pork fat. The physicochemical basis for novel processes for motor fuel production is coupling microwave pyrolysis of oil shale and catalytic cracking of purified pyrolysis oil, hydrothermal liquefaction of algae and swine manure. The effects of the degree of purification of crude pyrolysis oil and oil shale on the degree of their conversion to gasoline and diesel fuel, as well as the product distribution are investigated. The effects of the duration and temperature of hydrothermal liquefaction of microalga, Botryoccocus braunii, and swine manure on their degrees of conversion into bio-oil and its thermal properties are investigated. The development of novel strategy of biofuel in the Autonomous Province of Vojvodina is presented.

  1. Toxicological Assessments of Rats Exposed Prenatally to Inhaled Vapors of Gasoline and Gasoline-Ethanol Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    The primary alternative to petroleum-based fuels is ethanol, which is blended with gasoline in the United States at concentrations up to 15% for most automobiles. Efforts to increase the amount of ethanol in gasoline have prompted concerns about the potential toxicity of inhaled ...

  2. Potential of Renewable Energy to Reduce the Dependence of the State of Hawaii on Oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arent, D.; Barnett, J.; Mosey, G.; Wise, A.

    2009-01-01

    Deriving nearly 90% of its primary energy resources from oil, the State of Hawaii is more dependent on oil than any other U.S. state. The price of electricity in Hawaii is also more than twice the U.S. average. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 directed assessment of the economic implications of Hawaii's oil dependence and the feasibility of using renewable energy to help meet the state's electrical generation and transportation fuel use. This paper is based on the assessments and report prepared in response to that directive.Current total installed electrical capacity for the State of Hawaii is 2,414 MWe, 83% of which is fuel-oil generated, but already including about 170 MWe of renewable capacity. The assessments identified about 2,133 MWe (plus another estimated 2,000 MWe of rooftop PV systems) of potential new renewable energy capacity. Most notable, in addition to the rooftop solar potential, is 750 MWe and 140 MWe of geothermal potential on Hawaii and Maui, respectively, 840 MWe of potential wind capacity, primarily on Lanai and Molokai, and one potential 285 MWe capacity specific solar project (PV or solar thermal) identified on Kauai. Important social, political, and electrical-grid infrastructure challenges would need to be overcome to realize this potential. Among multiple crop and acreage scenarios, biofuels assessment found 360,000 acres in Hawaii zoned for agriculture and appropriate for sugarcane, enough to produce 429 million gallons of ethanol-enough to meet about 64% of current 2005 Hawaiian gasoline use. Tropical oil seed crops-potentially grown on the same land-might meet a substantial portion of current diesel use, but there has been little experience growing such crops in Hawaii. The U.S. Department of Energy and the State of Hawaii initiated in January 2008 a program that seeks to reduce Hawaii's oil dependence and provide 70% of the state's primary energy from clean energy sources by 2030. The Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative

  3. Quality characteristics of alternative diesel from hydrotreatment of used frying oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karonis, Dimitrios; Chilari, Despina [National Technical Univ. of Athens (Greece). Lab. of Fuels Technology and Lubricants; Bezergianni, Stella [Center for Research and Technology Hellas (CERTH), Thessaloniki (Greece). Lab. of Environmental Fuels and Hydrocarbons (LEFH)

    2013-06-01

    This paper examines the properties of alternative diesel fuel that is derived from the hydrotreatment of used frying oils (UFO). Used frying oil is a difficult feedstock for biodiesel production. The hydrotreating of UFO converts triglycerides mainly into normal paraffins in the diesel fuel range. The results obtained show that the use of hydrotreated UFO has many advantages in comparison conventional diesel. Particularly, this renewable fuel has an excellent cetane number and cetane index (> 90) justified from its paraffinic character. Furthermore, this finding complies with the lower value of density in comparison to diesel, reinforcing the paraffinic nature of this fuel, comprising straight chain alkanes and negligible content of aromatic hydrocarbons in its composition. Due to the hydrotreating, these fuels do not contain olefinic bonds, therefore they are resistant to oxidation, permitting long term storage abilities. Despite these benefits, there are some considerations from the use of HFOs. Hydrotreating is a process which successfully removes heteroatoms such as S, N, O and eliminates the existence of double unstable bonds, rendering to fuel appreciable characteristics. Unfortunately, these high ignition quality oils suffer from lower lubricity and worse cold flow properties in comparison to diesel, making their use during winter period inevitable. These problems could be addressed by blending hydrotreated UFO with regular diesel. A compromise should be found in order to promote a renewable fuel with lower cetane number but with much better lubricity in order to meet the EN 590 European Standard regarding the main quality characteristics of the final fuel. (orig.)

  4. Dispensing Equipment Testing with Mid-Level Ethanol/Gasoline Test Fluid: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyce, K.; Chapin, J. T.

    2010-11-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Nonpetroleum-Based Fuel Task addresses the hurdles to commercialization of biomass-derived fuels and fuel blends. One such hurdle is the unknown compatibility of new fuels with current infrastructure, such as the equipment used at service stations to dispense fuel into automobiles. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technology Program and the Biomass Program have engaged in a joint project to evaluate the potential for blending ethanol into gasoline at levels higher than nominal 10 volume percent. This project was established to help DOE and NREL better understand any potentially adverse impacts caused by a lack of knowledge about the compatibility of the dispensing equipment with ethanol blends higher than what the equipment was designed to dispense. This report provides data about the impact of introducing a gasoline with a higher volumetric ethanol content into service station dispensing equipment from a safety and a performance perspective.

  5. Motor gasolines, winter 1981-1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelton, E M

    1982-07-01

    Analytical data for 905 samples of motor gasoline, were collected from service stations throughout the country and were analyzed in the laboratories of various refiners, motor manufacturers, and chemical companies. The data were submitted to the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center for study, necessary calculations, and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC) and the American Petroleum Institute (API). The samples represent the products of 30 companies, large and small, which manufacture and supply gasoline. These data are tabulated by groups according to brands (unlabeled) and grades for 17 marketing districts into which the country is divided. A map included in this report, shows marketing areas, districts and sampling locations. The report also includes charts indicating the trends of selected properties of motor fuels since winter 1959-1960 survey for the leaded gasolines, and since winter 1979-1980 survey for the unleaded gasolines. Sixteen octane distribution percent charts for areas 1, 2, 3, and 4 for unleaded antiknock index (R+M)/2 below 90.0, unleaded antiknock index (R+M)/2 90.0 and above, leaded antiknock index (R+M)/2 below 93.0, and leaded antiknock index (R+M)/2 93.0 and above grades of gasoline are presented in this report. The antiknock (octane) index (R+M)/2 averages of gasoline sold in this country were 87.4 for unleaded below 90.0, 91.7 for unleaded 90.0 and above, and 88.9 for leaded below 93.0. Only one sample was reported as 93.0 for leaded gasolines with an antiknock index (R+M)/2 93.0 and above.

  6. The potential for low petroleum gasoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadder, G.R.; Webb, G.M.; Clauson, M.

    1996-06-01

    The Energy Policy Act requires the Secretary of Energy to determine the feasibility of producing sufficient replacement fuels to replace at least 30 percent of the projected consumption of motor fuels by light duty vehicles in the year 2010. The Act also requires the Secretary to determine the greenhouse gas implications of the use of replacement fuels. A replacement fuel is a non-petroleum portion of gasoline, including certain alcohols, ethers, and other components. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Refinery Yield Model has been used to study the cost and refinery impacts for production of {open_quotes}low petroleum{close_quotes} gasolines, which contain replacement fuels. The analysis suggests that high oxygenation is the key to meeting the replacement fuel target, and a major contributor to cost increase is investment in processes to produce and etherify light olefins. High oxygenation can also increase the costs of control of vapor pressure, distillation properties, and pollutant emissions of gasolines. Year-round low petroleum gasoline with near-30 percent non-petroleum components might be produced with cost increases of 23 to 37 cents per gallon of gasoline, and with greenhouse gas emissions changes between a 3 percent increase and a 16 percent decrease. Crude oil reduction, with decreased dependence on foreign sources, is a major objective of the low petroleum gasoline program. For year-round gasoline with near-30 percent non-petroleum components, crude oil use is reduced by 10 to 12 percent, at a cost $48 to $89 per barrel. Depending upon resolution of uncertainties about extrapolation of the Environmental Protection Agency Complex Model for pollutant emissions, availability of raw materials and other issues, costs could be lower or higher.

  7. Decreasing the emissions of a partially premixed gasoline fueled compression ignition engine by means of injection characteristics and EGR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemati Arash

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is presented in order to elucidate some numerical investigations related to a partially premixed gasoline fuelled engine by means of three dimensional CFD code. Comparing with the diesel fuel, gasoline has lower soot emission because of its higher ignition delay. The application of double injection strategy reduces the maximum heat release rate and leads to the reduction of NOx emission. For validation of the model, the results for the mean in-cylinder pressure, H.R.R., NOx and soot emissions are compared with the corresponding experimental data and show good levels of agreement. The effects of injection characteristics such as, injection duration, spray angle, nozzle hole diameter, injected fuel temperature and EGR rate on combustion process and emission formation are investigated yielding the determination of the optimal point thereafter. The results indicated that optimization of injection characteristics leads to simultaneous reduction of NOx and soot emissions with negligible change in IMEP.

  8. The new 1.8 I DI turbo-jet gasoline engine from Fiat Powertrain Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andriesse, Dirk; Comignaghi, Emilio; Lucignano, Gennaro; Oreggioni, Aldo; Quinto, Stefano; Sacco, Dario [Fiat Powertrain Technologies, Arese-Turin (Italy)

    2008-07-01

    The newly developed 1.8 ltr gasoline DI Turbo-Jet engine extends the gasoline product portfolio of Fiat Powertrain Technologies after the successful launch of the 1.4 ltr T-jet engine family in 2007. FPT retains the turbo downsizing concept the most efficient measure to meet the required reduction of CO2 emissions enhancing in the meantime the fun to drive characteristics of the gasoline engine, with the aim to equal at least those of DI turbo diesel units. The adoption of the turbocharger permits as well to differentiate the engines by tuning according to the brand requirements of the various Fiat Group car platforms. The common mechanical base is ideal to provide both the best thermodynamic efficiency and the cost advantages given by the production volumes. Thanks to the direct injection, the double continuously variable cam phasing and turbo charging the new 1.8 ltr DI Turbo-Jet engine develops high specific maximum torque and power values: the HP variant reaches nearly 200 Nm/l and 100 kW/l. The excellent low end torque and fast turbo response are obtained by newly developed advanced EMS scavenging strategies. The final result is highlighted by the 23.1 bar BMEP value at 1400 rpm for the Soft version which is the benchmark today for all gasoline turbocharged engines on the market. Emission levels meet the new Euro 5 standards with a large margin thanks to multiple injection and high pressure stratified charge start strategies even using a packaging friendly low volume close coupled catalytic system. To reach the stringent NVH requirements the engine is mechanically optimised by adopting a slightly over square bore/stroke ratio, a long conrod, a moderate rated engine speed and low alternating masses. Excellent results are obtained which equal those of competitor engines without the use of secondary order balancing shafts. (orig.)

  9. Analysis of Mtbe as an Oxygenate Additive to Gasoline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.AnishRaman

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the major drawbacks of IC engines is low efficiency and pollution resulting from incomplete combustion. In order to improve the emission properties and performance an oxygenated additive MTBE (Methyl tertiary butyl ether, is blended with gasoline. A four cylinder, 1817 cc engine was used for analysing both emission and performance characteristics. Tests were carried out with 100% pure gasoline and MTBE – blended gasoline (M5, M10. The BSFC and BTE of MTBE blended gasoline were observed to increase when compared to pure gasoline. Significant reduction in HC and CO emissions were observed with MTBE blended gasoline; however, CO2 and NOX emissions were increased. Keywords:

  10. Improving Stability of Gasoline by Using Ionic Liquid Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Zhirong; Liu Daosheng; Liao Kejian; Jian Heng

    2003-01-01

    The composition, characteristics and preparation of ionic liquids are presented. The factors influencing the stability of gasoline and the significance of improving gasoline stability are discussed. A novel way to improve the stability of gasoline by using ionic liquid catalyst is developed. The contents of olefin, basic nitrogen and sulfur in gasoline are determined and the optimal experimental conditions for improving gasoline stability are established.The ionic liquid catalyst, which is environmentally friendly, can reduce the olefin content in gasoline, and such process is noted for mild reaction conditions, simple operation, short reaction time, easy recycling of the ionic liquid catalyst and ready separation of products and catalyst.

  11. Chemical fingerprinting of gasoline. 2. Comparison of unevaporated and evaporated automotive gasoline samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandercock, P M L; Du Pasquier, E

    2004-02-10

    Analysis of the C(0)- to C(2)-naphthalene compounds present in automotive gasoline using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with selected ion monitoring (GC-MS (SIM)) and principal component analysis (PCA) was used to discriminate between different samples of gasoline. Phase one of this study explored the ability of this method to differentiate gasoline samples at different levels of evaporation. A total of 35 random samples of unevaporated gasoline, covering three different grades (regular unleaded, premium unleaded and lead replacement), were collected in Sydney, Australia and examined. The high-boiling C(0)- to C(2)-naphthalene compounds present in the gasoline were used to chemically fingerprint each sample at different levels of evaporation. Samples of 25, 50, 75 and 90% evaporated gasoline (by weight) were generated from the 35 samples of unevaporated gasoline. Analysis of the data by PCA followed by linear discriminant analysis (LDA) showed that the 35 samples formed 18 unique groups, irrespective of the level of evaporation. Good discrimination between gasoline samples that were collected on the same day was obtained. Phase two of this study examined the change in gasoline samples over time. The C(0)- to C(2)-naphthalene composition in 96 samples of gasoline collected from three service stations over a 16-week period was examined using the method described. In most cases, it was found that the C(0)- to C(2)-naphthalene profile changed from week to week, and from station to station. In a comparison of all 96 samples together it was found that the majority could be differentiated from one another. The application of the method to forensic casework is discussed.

  12. Potential of valve train variability in passenger car diesel engines; Potenziale eines variablen Ventiltriebs beim PKW-Dieselmotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Simon; Genieser, Patric; Birke, Stiev; Buecker, Christian [Mahle International GmbH, Stuttgart (Germany). Zentrale Vorausentwicklung

    2012-03-15

    Variable valve control systems are state-of-the-art technology in today's gasoline engines, although their application in diesel engines has also become the focus of recent studies. These systems offer one possibility of resolving the conflict of objectives between a further reduction in engine-out emissions and an improvement in fuel efficiency. Mahle has examined their potentials on the basis of the Cam-in-Cam variable camshaft for the intake valves. (orig.)

  13. Real-world fuel efficiency and exhaust emissions of light-duty diesel vehicles and their correlation with road conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingnan Hu; Ye Wu; Zhishi Wang; Zhenhua Li; Yu Zhou; Haitao Wang; Xiaofeng Bao; Jiming Hao

    2012-01-01

    The real-world fuel efficiency and exhaust emission profiles of CO,HC and NOx for light-duty diesel vehicles were investigated.Using a portable emissions measurement system,16 diesel taxies were tested on different roads in Macao and the data were normalized with the vehicle specific power bin method.The 11 Toyota Corolla diesel taxies have very good fuel economy of (5.9 ± 0.6) L/100 km,while other five diesel taxies showed relatively high values at (8.5 ± 1.7) L/100 km due to the variation in transmission systems and emission control strategies.Compared to similar Corolla gasoline models,the diesel cars confirmed an advantage of ca.20% higher fuel efficiency.HC and CO emissions of all the 16 taxies are quite low,with the average at (0.05 ± 0.02) g/km and (0.38 ± 0.15) g/km,respectively.The average NOx emission factor of the 11 Corolla taxies is (0.56 ± 0.17) g/krn,about three times higher than their gasoline counterparts.Two of the three Hyundai Sonata taxies,configured with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) + diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) emission control strategies,indicated significantly higher NO2 emissions and NO2/NOx ratios than other diesel taxies and consequently trigger a concern of possibly adverse impacts on ozone pollution in urban areas with this technology combination.A clear and similar pattern for fuel consumption and for each of the three gaseous pollutant emissions with various road conditions was identified.To save energy and mitigate CO2 emissions as well as other gaseous pollutant emissions in urban area,traffic planning also needs improvement.

  14. Real-world fuel efficiency and exhaust emissions of light-duty diesel vehicles and their correlation with road conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jingnan; Wu, Ye; Wang, Zhishi; Li, Zhenhua; Zhou, Yu; Wang, Haitao; Bao, Xiaofeng; Hao, Jiming

    2012-01-01

    The real-world fuel efficiency and exhaust emission profiles of CO, HC and NOx for light-duty diesel vehicles were investigated. Using a portable emissions measurement system, 16 diesel taxies were tested on different roads in Macao and the data were normalized with the vehicle specific power bin method. The 11 Toyota Corolla diesel taxies have very good fuel economy of (5.9 +/- 0.6) L/100 km, while other five diesel taxies showed relatively high values at (8.5 +/- 1.7) L/100 km due to the variation in transmission systems and emission control strategies. Compared to similar Corolla gasoline models, the diesel cars confirmed an advantage of ca. 20% higher fuel efficiency. HC and CO emissions of all the 16 taxies are quite low, with the average at (0.05 +/- 0.02) g/km and (0.38 +/- 0.15) g/km, respectively. The average NOx emission factor of the 11 Corolla taxies is (0.56 +/- 0.17) g/km, about three times higher than their gasoline counterparts. Two of the three Hyundai Sonata taxies, configured with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) + diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) emission control strategies, indicated significantly higher NO2 emissions and NO2/NOx ratios than other diesel taxies and consequently trigger a concern of possibly adverse impacts on ozone pollution in urban areas with this technology combination. A clear and similar pattern for fuel consumption and for each of the three gaseous pollutant emissions with various road conditions was identified. To save energy and mitigate CO2 emissions as well as other gaseous pollutant emissions in urban area, traffic planning also needs improvement.

  15. Numerical Simulations of Hollow-Cone Injection and Gasoline Compression Ignition Combustion With Naphtha Fuels

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad A.

    2016-01-29

    Gasoline compression ignition (GCI), also known as partially premixed compression ignition (PPCI) and gasoline direct injection compression ignition (GDICI), engines have been considered an attractive alternative to traditional spark ignition (SI) engines. Lean-burn combustion with the direct injection of fuel eliminates throttle losses for higher thermodynamic efficiencies, and the precise control of the mixture compositions allows better emission performance such as NOx and particulate matter (PM). Recently, low octane gasoline fuel has been identified as a viable option for the GCI engine applications due to its longer ignition delay characteristics compared to diesel and lighter evaporation compared to gasoline fuel (Chang et al., 2012, "Enabling High Efficiency Direct Injection Engine With Naphtha Fuel Through Partially Premixed Charge Compression Ignition Combustion," SAE Technical Paper No. 2012-01-0677). The feasibility of such a concept has been demonstrated by experimental investigations at Saudi Aramco (Chang et al., 2012, "Enabling High Efficiency Direct Injection Engine With Naphtha Fuel Through Partially Premixed Charge Compression Ignition Combustion," SAE Technical Paper No. 2012-01-0677; Chang et al., 2013, "Fuel Economy Potential of Partially Premixed Compression Ignition (PPCI) Combustion With Naphtha Fuel," SAE Technical Paper No. 2013-01-2701). The present study aims to develop predictive capabilities for low octane gasoline fuel compression ignition (CI) engines with accurate characterization of the spray dynamics and combustion processes. Full three-dimensional simulations were conducted using converge as a basic modeling framework, using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulent mixing models. An outwardly opening hollow-cone spray injector was characterized and validated against existing and new experimental data. An emphasis was made on the spray penetration characteristics. Various spray breakup and collision models have been

  16. DNA adducts induced by in vitro activation of extracts of diesel and biodiesel exhaust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractContext: Biodiesel and biodiesel-blend fuels offer a renewable alternative to petroleum diesel, but few data are available concerning the carcinogenic potential of biodiesel exhausts. Objectives: We compared the formation of covalent DNA adducts by the in vitro metabol...

  17. DNA adducts induced by in vitro activation of extracts of diesel and biodiesel exhaust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractContext: Biodiesel and biodiesel-blend fuels offer a renewable alternative to petroleum diesel, but few data are available concerning the carcinogenic potential of biodiesel exhausts. Objectives: We compared the formation of covalent DNA adducts by the in vitro metabol...

  18. Hydrodeoxygenation of waste fat for diesel production: Study on model feed with Pt/alumina catalyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Anders Theilgaard; Ahmed, El Hadi; Christensen, Claus H.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrodeoxygenation of waste fats and oils is a viable method for producing renewable diesel oil. In this study a model feed consisting of oleic acid and tripalmitin in molar ratio 1:3 was hydrotreated at 325°C with 20bars H2 in a stirred batch autoclave with a 5wt% Pt/γ-Al2O3 catalyst, and samples...

  19. 75 FR 74044 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Gasoline Volatility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-30

    ... Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Gasoline Volatility AGENCY... entities: Entities potentially affected by this action are those who produce or import gasoline containing...: Gasoline Volatility, Reporting Requirements for Parties Which Produce of Import Gasoline Containing...

  20. Ethanol Demand in United States Gasoline Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadder, G.R.

    1998-11-24

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (OWL) Refinery Yield Model (RYM) has been used to estimate the demand for ethanol in U.S. gasoline production in year 2010. Study cases examine ethanol demand with variations in world oil price, cost of competing oxygenate, ethanol value, and gasoline specifications. For combined-regions outside California summer ethanol demand is dominated by conventional gasoline (CG) because the premised share of reformulated gasoline (RFG) production is relatively low and because CG offers greater flexibility for blending high vapor pressure components like ethanol. Vapor pressure advantages disappear for winter CG, but total ethanol used in winter RFG remains low because of the low RFG production share. In California, relatively less ethanol is used in CG because the RFG production share is very high. During the winter in California, there is a significant increase in use of ethanol in RFG, as ethanol displaces lower-vapor-pressure ethers. Estimated U.S. ethanol demand is a function of the refiner value of ethanol. For example, ethanol demand for reference conditions in year 2010 is 2 billion gallons per year (BGY) at a refiner value of $1.00 per gallon (1996 dollars), and 9 BGY at a refiner value of $0.60 per gallon. Ethanol demand could be increased with higher oil prices, or by changes in gasoline specifications for oxygen content, sulfur content, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCS), and octane numbers.

  1. 77 FR 19663 - Notice of Data Availability Concerning Renewable Fuels Produced from Palm Oil Under the RFS...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... AGENCY Notice of Data Availability Concerning Renewable Fuels Produced from Palm Oil Under the RFS... Produced from Palm Oil under the RFS Program'' (the notice is herein referred to as the ``palm oil NODA... comment on EPA's analyses of palm oil used as a feedstock to produce biodiesel and renewable diesel...

  2. 77 FR 8254 - Notice of Data Availability Concerning Renewable Fuels Produced From Palm Oil Under the RFS...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... types of biofuel shows that biodiesel and renewable diesel produced from palm oil have estimated... AGENCY Notice of Data Availability Concerning Renewable Fuels Produced From Palm Oil Under the RFS... Produced From Palm Oil Under the RFS Program'' (the notice is herein referred to as the ``palm oil...

  3. CRES` wind-diesel hybrid system: system identification and performance testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vionis, P.S.; Fragoulis, A.N.; Ladakakos, P.D. [Center for Renewable Energy Sources (C.R.E.S.), Pikermi (Greece)

    1996-12-31

    A Wind-Diesel hybrid system has been developed at CRES for investigating the parallel operation of Wind Turbines and Diesel Generators into Autonomous Weak Grids. The system`s architecture is flexible enough so that it can be effectively used for optimising the integration of renewable energy sources in such autonomous power systems, while ensuring the successful implementation of innovative control strategies and testing of new design concepts. In this paper, the design of the wind-diesel simulator and its basic operation modes are described. Results of the components identification procedure are presented. The relevant analysis reveals the components` characteristics under various modes of operation along with the subsystem`s operation limits. The methodology set up for system testing and evaluation has been verified. Results of the first performance tests of the Wind-Diesel hybrid system showing its capabilities are presented and discussed. (Author)

  4. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanisms for Primary Reference Fuels for Diesel Cetane Number and Spark-Ignition Octane Number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M; Curran, H J

    2010-03-03

    For the first time, a detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism is developed for primary reference fuel mixtures of n-hexadecane and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethyl nonane for diesel cetane ratings. The mechanisms are constructed using existing rules for reaction pathways and rate expressions developed previously for the primary reference fuels for gasoline octane ratings, n-heptane and iso-octane. These reaction mechanisms are validated by comparisons between computed and experimental results for shock tube ignition and for oxidation under jet-stirred reactor conditions. The combined kinetic reaction mechanism contains the submechanisms for the primary reference fuels for diesel cetane ratings and submechanisms for the primary reference fuels for gasoline octane ratings, all in one integrated large kinetic reaction mechanism. Representative applications of this mechanism to two test problems are presented, one describing fuel/air autoignition variations with changes in fuel cetane numbers, and the other describing fuel combustion in a jet-stirred reactor environment with the fuel varying from pure 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethyl nonane (Cetane number of 15) to pure n-hexadecane (Cetane number of 100). The final reaction mechanism for the primary reference fuels for diesel fuel and gasoline is available on the web.

  5. NOx reduction in diesel fuel flames by additions of water and CO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, S.C. [Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Natural gas has the highest heating value per unit mass (50.1 MJ/kg, LHV) of any of the hydrocarbon fuels (e.g., butane, liquid diesel fuel, gasoline, etc.). Since it has the lowest carbon content per unit mass, combustion of natural gas produces much less carbon dioxide, soot particles, and oxide of nitrogen than combustion of liquid diesel fuel. In view of anticipated strengthening of regulations on pollutant emissions from diesel engines, alternative fuels, such as compressed natural gas (CNG) and liquefied natural gas (LNG) have been experimentally introduced to replace the traditional diesel fuels in heavy-duty trucks, transit buses, off-road vehicles, locomotives, and stationary engines. To help in applying natural gas in Diesel engines and increasing combustion efficiency, the emphasis of the present paper is placed on the detailed flame chemistry of methane-air combustion. The present work is the continued effort in finding better methods to reduce NO{sub x}. The goal is to identify a reliable chemical reaction mechanism for natural gas in both premixed and diffusion flames and to establish a systematic reduced mechanism which may be useful for large-scale numerical modeling of combustion behavior in natural gas engines.

  6. STRATEGY DETERMINATION FOR DIESEL INJECTION USING AVL ESE DIESEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vrublevskiy, A.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on the design of research AVL FIRE ESE DIESEL environment they proposed to reduce noise and NOx emissions in the exhaust gases of the automobile diesel engine using two-stage injection. The parameters of the fuel for idling are determined.

  7. Investigating diesel engines as an atmospheric source of isocyanic acid in urban areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jathar, Shantanu H.; Heppding, Christopher; Link, Michael F.; Farmer, Delphine K.; Akherati, Ali; Kleeman, Michael J.; de Gouw, Joost A.; Veres, Patrick R.; Roberts, James M.

    2017-07-01

    Isocyanic acid (HNCO), an acidic gas found in tobacco smoke, urban environments, and biomass-burning-affected regions, has been linked to adverse health outcomes. Gasoline- and diesel-powered engines and biomass burning are known to emit HNCO and hypothesized to emit precursors such as amides that can photochemically react to produce HNCO in the atmosphere. Increasingly, diesel engines in developed countries like the United States are required to use selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems to reduce tailpipe emissions of oxides of nitrogen. SCR chemistry is known to produce HNCO as an intermediate product, and SCR systems have been implicated as an atmospheric source of HNCO. In this work, we measure HNCO emissions from an SCR system-equipped diesel engine and, in combination with earlier data, use a three-dimensional chemical transport model (CTM) to simulate the ambient concentrations and source/pathway contributions to HNCO in an urban environment. Engine tests were conducted at three different engine loads, using two different fuels and at multiple operating points. HNCO was measured using an acetate chemical ionization mass spectrometer. The diesel engine was found to emit primary HNCO (3-90 mg kg fuel-1) but we did not find any evidence that the SCR system or other aftertreatment devices (i.e., oxidation catalyst and particle filter) produced or enhanced HNCO emissions. The CTM predictions compared well with the only available observational datasets for HNCO in urban areas but underpredicted the contribution from secondary processes. The comparison implied that diesel-powered engines were the largest source of HNCO in urban areas. The CTM also predicted that daily-averaged concentrations of HNCO reached a maximum of ˜ 110 pptv but were an order of magnitude lower than the 1 ppbv level that could be associated with physiological effects in humans. Precursor contributions from other combustion sources (gasoline and biomass burning) and wintertime

  8. Emission reduction from a diesel engine fueled by pine oil biofuel using SCR and catalytic converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallinayagam, R.; Vedharaj, S.; Yang, W. M.; Saravanan, C. G.; Lee, P. S.; Chua, K. J. E.; Chou, S. K.

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we propose pine oil biofuel, a renewable fuel obtained from the resins of pine tree, as a potential substitute fuel for a diesel engine. Pine oil is endowed with enhanced physical and thermal properties such as lower viscosity and boiling point, which enhances the atomization and fuel/air mixing process. However, the lower cetane number of the pine oil hinders its direct use in diesel engine and hence, it is blended in suitable proportions with diesel so that the ignition assistance could be provided by higher cetane diesel. Since lower cetane fuels are prone to more NOX formation, SCR (selective catalyst reduction), using urea as reducing agent, along with a CC (catalytic converter) has been implemented in the exhaust pipe. From the experimental study, the BTE (brake thermal efficiency) was observed to be increased as the composition of pine oil increases in the blend, with B50 (50% pine oil and 50% diesel) showing 7.5% increase over diesel at full load condition. The major emissions such as smoke, CO, HC and NOX were reduced by 70.1%, 67.5%, 58.6% and 15.2%, respectively, than diesel. Further, the average emissions of B50 with SCR and CC assembly were observed to be reduced, signifying the positive impact of pine oil biofuel on atmospheric environment. In the combustion characteristics front, peak heat release rate and maximum in-cylinder pressure were observed to be higher with longer ignition delay.

  9. Penggunaan Minyak Nabati Sebagai Bahan Bakar Alternatif Pada Motor Diesel Sistim Injeksi Langsung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricky Winaya

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Vegetable oil as an example product of agricultural engineering, has potential to be developed to renewable energy called bio-diesel. This paper describes comparison study performance from a direct injection system diesel-engine fueled with composition 20%, 30% and 40% bio-diesel, with diesel engine fueled diesel oil (solar. The test results have shown that the engine fueled with 20%, 30%, and 40% bio-diesel produce slightly lower torque and power than the same engine fueled with solar. The other research before, the emission test results have shown a lower particulate matter, hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide from exhaust. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Minyak nabati sebagai suatu contoh produk dalam bidang rekayasa pertanian, berpotensi untuk dikembangkan menjadi suatu bentuk energi bahan bakar yang terperbaharui yang disebut dengan bio-disel. Tulisan ini membahas tentang studi perbandingan performansi motor disel sistim injeksi langsung berbahan bakar dengan komposisi 20%, 30% dan 40% bio-disel, dengan yang berbahan bakar minyak diesel (solar. Hasil pengujian menunjukkan bahwa motor disel yang menggunakan bahan bakar dengan komposisi 20%, 30% dan 40% biodisel menghasilkan torsi dan daya yang lebih rendah daripada motor yang sama berbahan bakar solar. Hasil penelitian sebelumnya, hasil uji emisi menujukkan adanya partikel, hidrokarbon dan karbon monoksida yang lebih rendah pada saluran buang. Kata kunci: Minyak nabati, Biodisel, Torsi, daya.

  10. Leaded gasoline to Be Phased out in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    @@ China is taking measures to phase out leaded gasoline and ensure less emission from motor vehicles. The government will implement pricing reforms so that unleaded gasoline costs less than leaded fuel.

  11. The Influence of Diesel Fuel Subsidies and Taxes on the Potential for Solar-Powered Hybrid Systems in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Bertheau

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Many people in African countries lack access to sufficient electricity supply due to missing infrastructure of the centralized conventional power generation system. In order to provide electricity to a wider part of the population, it is necessary to exploit the vast renewable resources in African countries. Therefore, this paper scrutinizes the economic advantages of photovoltaic-based hybrid systems over fossil fuel-based power generation. A simulation model is applied in order to calculate the cost advantage of hybrid systems compared to diesel-only systems for the entire continent on a long term basis by applying two scenarios: one based on world market diesel prices and the other one based on national diesel prices. The results indicate that average power generation costs per country can be reduced by up to 0.11 €/kWh considering world market diesel prices and by up to 0.48 €/kWh considering national diesel prices. Furthermore, the effect of diesel fuel subsidies and taxes on the renewable energy potential and the respective savings are examined. These findings may ameliorate the policy development according to fossil fuel subsidies and taxes and demonstrate the advantages of decentralized renewable hybrid systems especially in rural areas of Africa.

  12. Secondary organic aerosol formation exceeds primary particulate matter emissions for light-duty gasoline vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. D. Gordon

    2013-09-01

    producing SOA than the emissions from older vehicles. About 30% of the non-methane organic gas emissions from the newer (LEV1 and LEV2 vehicles could not be speciated, and the majority of the SOA formed from these vehicles appears to be associated with these unspeciated organics. These results for light-duty gasoline vehicles contrast with the results from a companion study of on-road heavy-duty diesel trucks; in that study late model (2007 and later diesel trucks equipped with catalyzed diesel particulate filters emitted very little primary PM, and the photo-oxidized emissions produced negligible amounts of SOA.

  13. Acute aqueous toxicities of diesel-biodiesel blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollebone, B.P.; Ho, N.; Landriault, M. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Emergencies Science and Technology Division, Science and Technology Branch, Environmental Science and Technology Centre; Harrison, S. [Science Applications International Corp., SAIC Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Doe, K.; Jackman, P. [Environment Canada, Moncton, NB (Canada). Toxicology Laboratory, Environmental Science Centre

    2008-07-01

    The renewed interest in biodiesels as a new transportation fuel was discussed. Although there are several advantages to using biodiesels, their environmental behaviours and effects need to be evaluated along with the risks associated with their use, such as accidental releases of these biodiesels to the environment. The wide variability of biodiesels may result in different toxicological impacts, depending on the fuel feedstock. This study evaluated the aqueous effects of biodiesels from several commonly available feedstocks and their blends with petroleum diesel. Since most of the commercial uses of these products are currently focused on road-use, this study focused on the effects of these fuels in fresh-water. Biodiesels derived from soy, canola and waste restaurant oil feedstocks were used in the study. The acute toxicities of these biodiesels and biodiesel/petroleum diesel fuel blends were reported for 3 test species used by Environment Canada for toxicological evaluation, notably rainbow trout, the water flea, and a luminescent bacterium. The correlations between acute toxicity, water accommodated fractions (WAF) concentrations and fuel property data were examined. The study revealed that biodiesel is significantly less acutely toxic than petroleum diesels in potential ecological impacts. However, the biodiesel-diesel blends were found to be more acutely toxic than a linear dilution model predicts. 11 refs., 6 tabs., 3 figs.

  14. Revised CTUIR Renewable Energy Feasibility Study Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Cox; Thomas Bailor; Theodore Repasky; Lisa Breckenridge

    2005-10-31

    This preliminary assessment of renewable energy resources on the Umatilla Indian Reservation (UIR) has been performed by CTUIR Department of Science and Engineering (DOSE). This analysis focused primarily identifying renewable resources that may be applied on or near the Umatilla Indian Reservation. In addition preliminary technical and economic feasibility of developing renewable energy resources have been prepared and initial land use planning issues identified. Renewable energies examined in the course of the investigation included solar thermal, solar photovoltaic, wind, bioethanol, bio-diesel and bio-pellet fuel. All renewable energy options studied were found to have some potential for the CTUIR. These renewable energy options are environmentally friendly, sustainable, and compliment many of the policy goals of the CTUIR. This report seeks to provide an overall review of renewable energy technologies and applications. It tries to identify existing projects near to the CTUIR and the efforts of the federal government, state government and the private sector in the renewable energy arena. It seeks to provide an understanding of the CTUIR as an energy entity. This report intends to provide general information to assist tribal leadership in making decisions related to energy, specifically renewable energy deve lopment.

  15. Narrow band flame emission from dieseline and diesel spray combustion in a constant volume combustion chamber

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zengyang

    2016-08-18

    In this paper, spray combustion of diesel (No. 2) and diesel-gasoline blend (dieseline: 80% diesel and 20% gasoline by volume) were investigated in an optically accessible constant volume combustion chamber. Effects of ambient conditions on flame emissions were studied. Ambient oxygen concentration was varied from 12% to 21% and three ambient temperatures were selected: 800 K, 1000 K and 1200 K. An intensified CCD camera coupled with bandpass filters was employed to capture the quasi-steady state flame emissions at 430 nm and 470 nm bands. Under non-sooting conditions, the narrow-band flame emissions at 430 nm and 470 nm can be used as indicators of CH∗ (methylidyne) and HCHO∗ (formaldehyde), respectively. The lift-off length was measured by imaging the OH∗ chemiluminescence at 310 nm. Flame emission structure and intensity distribution were compared between dieseline and diesel at wavelength bands. Flame emission images show that both narrow band emissions become shorter, thinner and stronger with higher oxygen concentration and higher ambient temperature for both fuels. Areas of weak intensity are observed at the flame periphery and the upstream for both fuels under all ambient conditions. Average flame emission intensity and area were calculated for 430 nm and 470 nm narrow-band emissions. At a lower ambient temperature the average intensity increases with increasing ambient oxygen concentration. However, at the 1200 K ambient temperature condition, the average intensity is not increasing monotonically for both fuels. For most of the conditions, diesel has a stronger average flame emission intensity than dieseline for the 430 nm band, and similar phenomena can be observed for the 470 nm band with 800 K and 1200 K ambient temperatures. However, for the 1000 K ambient temperature cases, dieseline has stronger average flame emission intensities than diesel for all oxygen concentrations at 470 nm band. Flame emissions for the two bands have a

  16. A Review of Centrifugal Testing of Gasoline Contamination and Remediation

    OpenAIRE

    Jay N. Meegoda; Liming Hu

    2011-01-01

    Leaking underground storage tanks (USTs) containing gasoline represent a significant public health hazard. Virtually undetectable to the UST owner, gasoline leaks can contaminate groundwater supplies. In order to develop remediation plans one must know the extent of gasoline contamination. Centrifugal simulations showed that in silty and sandy soils gasoline moved due to the physical process of advection and was retained as a pool of free products above the water table. However, in clayey soi...

  17. Turbocharging the DA465 gasoline engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Peng-qi; ZONG Li-jun; WANG Yin-yan

    2008-01-01

    In order to improve performance of the DA465Q gasoline engine,a substantial amount of research was done to optimize its turbocharging system.The research led to the GT12 turbocharger being selected and its turbocharging parameters being settled.Based on these tests,rational matching was worked out for respective components of the turbocharging system.Results show that this turbocharger allows the engine to easily meet the proposed requirements for power and economic performance,giving insight into further performance improvements for gasoline engines.

  18. NAFTA and gasoline: Canada, U. S. , Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-31

    The North American Free Trade Agreement has become a hotly debated topic all over the world, but especially in the countries involved: Mexico, United States, and Canada. Comments made by high ranking officials imply there are differences to reconcile before the agreement is passed. Toward seeing these countries in trio, this issue compares gasoline markets and some energy perspectives. The purpose of this article is to contribute to understanding of the three countries through their petroleum industry structure. Gasoline consumption and retail delivery infrastructure are compared and contrasted to illustrate the differences among the NAFTA countries.

  19. Evaluating the effect of methanol-unleaded gasoline blends on SI engine performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Sabahi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Today, all kinds of vehicle engines work with fossil fuels. The limited fossil fuel resources and the negative effects of their consumption on the environment have led researchers to focus on clean, renewable and sustainable energy systems. In all of the fuels being considered as an alternativefor gasoline, methanol is one of the more promising ones and it has experienced major research and development. Methanol can be obtained from many sources, both fossil and renewable; these include coal, natural gas, food industry and municipal waste, wood and agricultural waste. In this study, the effect of using methanol–unleaded gasoline blends on engine performance characteristics has been experimentally investigated. The main objective of the study was to determine engine performance parameters using unleaded gasoline and methanol-unleaded gasoline blends at various engine speeds and loads, and finally achieving an optimal blend of unleaded gasoline and methanol. Materials and Methods: The experimental apparatus consists of an engine test bed with a hydraulic dynamometer which is coupled with a four cylinder, four-stroke, spark ignition engine that is equipped with the carbureted fuel system. The engine has a cylinder bore of 81.5 mm, a stroke of 82.5 mm, and a compression ratio of 7.5:1 with maximum power output of 41.8 kW. The engine speed was monitored continuously by a tachometer, and the engine torque was measured with a hydraulic dynamometer. Fuel consumption was measured by using a calibrated burette (50cc and a stopwatch with an accuracy of 0.01s. In all tests, the cooling water temperature was kept at 82±3˚C. The test room temperature was kept at 29±3˚C during performing the tests. The experiments were performed with three replications. The factors in the experiments were four methanol- unleaded gasoline blends (M0, M10, M20 and M30 and six engine speeds (2000, 2500. 3000, 3500, 4000 and 4500 rpm. Methanol with a purity of

  20. Diesel-related hydrocarbons can dominate gas phase reactive carbon in megacities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. Dunmore

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocarbons are key precursors to two priority air pollutants, ozone and particulate matter. Those with two to seven carbons have historically been straightforward to observe and have been successfully reduced in many developed cities through air quality policy interventions. Longer chain hydrocarbons released from diesel vehicles are not considered explicitly as part of air quality strategies and there are few direct measurements of their gaseous abundance in the atmosphere. This study describes the chemically comprehensive and continuous measurements of organic compounds in a developed megacity (London, which demonstrate that on a seasonal median basis, diesel-related hydrocarbons represent only 20–30 % of the total hydrocarbon mixing ratio but comprise more than 50 % of the atmospheric hydrocarbon mass and are a dominant local source of secondary organic aerosols. This study shows for the first time that 60 % of the winter primary hydrocarbon hydroxyl radical reactivity is from diesel-related hydrocarbons and using the maximum incremental reactivity scale, we predict that they contribute up to 50 % of the ozone production potential in London. Comparing real-world urban composition with regulatory emissions inventories in the UK and US highlights a previously unaccounted for, but very significant, under-reporting of diesel-related hydrocarbons; an underestimation of a factor ~4 for C9 species rising to a factor of over 70 for C12 during winter. These observations show that hydrocarbons from diesel vehicles can dominate gas phase reactive carbon in cities with high diesel fleet fractions. Future control of urban particulate matter and ozone in such locations requires a shift in policy focus onto gas phase hydrocarbons released from diesels as this vehicle type continues to displace gasoline world-wide.

  1. Evaluation of Emissions Bio diesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Maroto, J. J.; Dorronsoro Arenal, J. L.; Rojas Garcia, E.; Perez Pastor, R.; Garcia Alonso, S.

    2007-09-27

    The generation of energy from vegetal products is one of the possibilities to our reach in order to reduce the atmospheric pollution. Particularly, the use of bio diesel in internal combustion engines can be one of the best options. The finest particles emitted by the combustion engines are easily breathable and on them different substances can be absorbed presumably toxic, between which it is possible to emphasize the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), by its demonstrated carcinogen character. In this work, it is studied on the one hand, the characteristics that can present the aerosol of emission in a diesel engine with a maximum power of 97 kW, working without load to 600 rpm, using as combustible mixtures of bio diesel and diesel in different proportions. On the other hand, the evolution that takes place in the concentration of PAHs in emission particles, according to the percentage of bio diesel used in the combustible mixture. (Author) 9 refs.

  2. Study and design of a hybrid wind-diesel-compressed air system for providing electricity to a remote telecommunication station; Etudes et conception d'un systeme hybride eolien-diesel-air comprime pour l'electrification d'une station de telecommunications isolee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibrahim, H.; Dimitrova, M. [TechnoCentre eolien Gaspesie-les Iles, Gaspe, PQ (Canada); Ilinca, A. [Quebec Univ., Rimouski, PQ (Canada); Perron, J. [Quebec Univ., Chicoutimi, PQ (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This poster reported on a study that examined the feasibility of using a hybrid wind-diesel-compressed air system to produce electricity at remote telecommunication stations. Low and high penetration wind-diesel hybrid systems were studied in order to reduce the diesel consumption. The use of a high penetration wind-diesel system together with compressed air energy storage (CAES) was shown to be a viable alternative to improve the overall percentage of renewable energy and reduce the cost of electricity in remote areas where a good wind resource is available. Different technical solutions for the CAES system were compared. refs., figs.

  3. A comparative study of almond biodiesel-diesel blends for diesel engine in terms of performance and emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Hamdeh, Nidal H; Alnefaie, Khaled A

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the opportunity of using almond oil as a renewable and alternative fuel source. Different fuel blends containing 10, 30, and 50% almond biodiesel (B10, B30, and B50) with diesel fuel (B0) were prepared and the influence of these blends on emissions and some performance parameters under various load conditions were inspected using a diesel engine. Measured engine performance parameters have generally shown a slight increase in exhaust gas temperature and in brake specific fuel consumption and a slight decrease in brake thermal efficiency. Gases investigated were carbon monoxide (CO) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx). Furthermore, the concentration of the total particulate and the unburned fuel emissions in the exhaust gas were tested. A blend of almond biodiesel with diesel fuel gradually reduced the engine CO and total particulate emissions compared to diesel fuel alone. This reduction increased with more almond biodiesel blended into the fuel. Finally, a slight increase in engine NO x using blends of almond biodiesel was measured.

  4. A Comparative Study of Almond Biodiesel-Diesel Blends for Diesel Engine in Terms of Performance and Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidal H. Abu-Hamdeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the opportunity of using almond oil as a renewable and alternative fuel source. Different fuel blends containing 10, 30, and 50% almond biodiesel (B10, B30, and B50 with diesel fuel (B0 were prepared and the influence of these blends on emissions and some performance parameters under various load conditions were inspected using a diesel engine. Measured engine performance parameters have generally shown a slight increase in exhaust gas temperature and in brake specific fuel consumption and a slight decrease in brake thermal efficiency. Gases investigated were carbon monoxide (CO and oxides of nitrogen (NOx. Furthermore, the concentration of the total particulate and the unburned fuel emissions in the exhaust gas were tested. A blend of almond biodiesel with diesel fuel gradually reduced the engine CO and total particulate emissions compared to diesel fuel alone. This reduction increased with more almond biodiesel blended into the fuel. Finally, a slight increase in engine NOx using blends of almond biodiesel was measured.

  5. Eucalyptus-Palm Kernel Oil Blends: A Complete Elimination of Diesel in a 4-Stroke VCR Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas Kommana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fuels derived from biomass are mostly preferred as alternative fuels for IC engines as they are abundantly available and renewable in nature. The objective of the study is to identify the parameters that influence gross indicated fuel conversion efficiency and how they are affected by the use of biodiesel relative to petroleum diesel. Important physicochemical properties of palm kernel oil and eucalyptus blend were experimentally evaluated and found within acceptable limits of relevant standards. As most of vegetable oils are edible, growing concern for trying nonedible and waste fats as alternative to petrodiesel has emerged. In present study diesel fuel is completely replaced by biofuels, namely, methyl ester of palm kernel oil and eucalyptus oil in various blends. Different blends of palm kernel oil and eucalyptus oil are prepared on volume basis and used as operating fuel in single cylinder 4-stroke variable compression ratio diesel engine. Performance and emission characteristics of these blends are studied by varying the compression ratio. In the present experiment methyl ester extracted from palm kernel oil is considered as ignition improver and eucalyptus oil is considered as the fuel. The blends taken are PKE05 (palm kernel oil 95 + eucalyptus 05, PKE10 (palm kernel oil 90 + eucalyptus 10, and PKE15 (palm kernel 85 + eucalyptus 15. The results obtained by operating with these fuels are compared with results of pure diesel; finally the most preferable combination and the preferred compression ratio are identified.

  6. 40 CFR 80.90 - Conventional gasoline baseline emissions determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline baseline emissions determination. (a) Annual average baseline values. For any facility of a... gasoline volume of the facility, per § 80.91. (b) Baseline exhaust benzene emissions—simple model. (1) Simple model exhaust benzene emissions of conventional gasoline shall be determined using the following...

  7. 40 CFR 79.32 - Motor vehicle gasoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Motor vehicle gasoline. 79.32 Section...) REGISTRATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Designation of Fuels and Additives § 79.32 Motor vehicle gasoline. (a) The following fuels commonly or commercially known or sold as motor vehicle gasoline are...

  8. 46 CFR 58.10-5 - Gasoline engine installations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gasoline engine installations. 58.10-5 Section 58.10-5... MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Internal Combustion Engine Installations § 58.10-5 Gasoline engine... drained by a device for automatic return of all drip to engine air intakes. (2) All gasoline engines...

  9. 40 CFR 80.81 - Enforcement exemptions for California gasoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline. 80.81 Section 80.81 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Reformulated Gasoline § 80.81 Enforcement exemptions for California gasoline. (a)(1) The requirements of subparts D, E, F, and J of this part...

  10. 40 CFR 52.787 - Gasoline transfer vapor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gasoline transfer vapor control. 52.787... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Indiana § 52.787 Gasoline transfer vapor control. (a) Gasoline means any petroleum distillate having a Reid vapor pressure of 4 pounds or...

  11. TEMPERATURE INFLUENCE ON PHASE STABILITY OF ETHANOL-GASOLINE MIXTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerian Cerempei

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates phase stability of ethanol-gasoline mixtures depending on their composition, water concentration in ethanol and ethanol-gasoline mixture and temperature. There have been determined the perfect functioning conditions of spark ignition engines fueled with ethanol-gasoline mixtures.

  12. 46 CFR 58.50-5 - Gasoline fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gasoline fuel tanks. 58.50-5 Section 58.50-5 Shipping... AND RELATED SYSTEMS Independent Fuel Tanks § 58.50-5 Gasoline fuel tanks. (a) Construction—(1) Shape...) Installation. (1) Gasoline fuel tanks used for propulsion shall be located in water-tight compartments...

  13. 40 CFR 63.650 - Gasoline loading rack provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gasoline loading rack provisions. 63...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Petroleum Refineries § 63.650 Gasoline... or operator of a Group 1 gasoline loading rack classified under Standard Industrial...

  14. 26 CFR 48.4081-6 - Gasoline; gasohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Gasoline; gasohol. 48.4081-6 Section 48.4081-6... Fuel Taxable Fuel § 48.4081-6 Gasoline; gasohol. (a) Overview. This section provides rules for determining the applicability of reduced rates of tax on a removal or entry of gasohol or of gasoline used...

  15. Materials Issues Related to Catalysts for Treatment of Diesel Exhaust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narula, Chaitanya Kumar [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Hoard, John W. [Ford Motor Company; Hammer, T. [Siemens AG, Germany

    2005-01-01

    The driver for lean NO{sub x} treatment is the need to meet regulatory standards for diesel engines and gasoline direct injection spark-ignited engines that offer better fuel economy. Efforts over the last decade have been focused toward finding an active lean NO{sub x} catalyst that can reduce NO{sub x} under oxidizing conditions or strategies such as selective catalytic reduction (SCR), plasma-catalysis, plasma catalyst SCR, and lean NO{sub x} traps with varying degrees of success. At present, it appears that SCR with urea and lean NO{sub x} traps are the leading contender technologies for commercial deployment. Key issues that remain to be resolved for these two technologies include byproduct formation, dosing control, and durability. In this review, we summarize material-related issues that are unique to each of these technologies, and point out the improvements necessary to facilitate their deployment.

  16. Methods of characterizing the distribution of exhaust emissions from light-duty, gasoline-powered motor vehicles in the U.S. fleet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulper, Carl R; Kishan, Sandeep; Baldauf, Richard W; Sabisch, Michael; Warila, Jim; Fujit, Eric M; Scarbro, Carl; Crews, William S; Snow, Richard; Gabele, Peter; Santos, Robert; Tierney, Eugene; Cantrell, Bruce

    2010-11-01

    Mobile sources significantly contribute to ambient concentrations of airborne particulate matter (PM). Source apportionment studies for PM10 (PM gasoline and diesel motor vehicle combustion. Several source apportionment studies conducted in the United States suggested that gasoline combustion from mobile sources contributed more to ambient PM than diesel combustion. However, existing emission inventories for the United States indicated that diesels contribute more than gasoline vehicles to ambient PM concentrations. A comprehensive testing program was initiated in the Kansas City metropolitan area to measure PM emissions in the light-duty, gasoline-powered, on-road mobile source fleet to provide data for PM inventory and emissions modeling. The vehicle recruitment design produced a sample that could represent the regional fleet, and by extension, the national fleet. All vehicles were recruited from a stratified sample on the basis of vehicle class (car, truck) and model-year group. The pool of available vehicles was drawn primarily from a sample of vehicle owners designed to represent the selected demographic and geographic characteristics of the Kansas City population. Emissions testing utilized a portable, light-duty chassis dynamometer with vehicles tested using the LA-92 driving cycle, on-board emissions measurement systems, and remote sensing devices. Particulate mass emissions were the focus of the study, with continuous and integrated samples collected. In addition, sample analyses included criteria gases (carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitric oxide/nitrogen dioxide, hydrocarbons), air toxics (speciated volatile organic compounds), and PM constituents (elemental/organic carbon, metals, semi-volatile organic compounds). Results indicated that PM emissions from the in-use fleet varied by up to 3 orders of magnitude, with emissions generally increasing for older model-year vehicles. The study also identified a strong influence of ambient temperature on

  17. Estimation of the Appropriate Output of Diesel Generator for Microgrid System in Chuja Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Seungmin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a method to estimate the appropriate minimum output of diesel generator in the microgrid system that composed of renewable energy, diesel generator and energy storage systems. While maximizing the output of the renewable energy in the microgrid, to maintain the power system stability is very important. To analyze the effectiveness of the proposed method, simulation is carried out by using the PSCAD/EMTDC program with past weather and power load data in Chuja Island located in the south area of Korean peninsula, respectively. In the simulation result, power quality of Chuja Island power system under variable renewable energy generation is stable. The proposed method is useful for operating the isolated microgrid system.

  18. Gasoline Distribution Facilities (Bulk Gasoline Terminals and Pipeline Breakout Stations) Air Toxics Rule Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains a November 1994 fact sheet for the final NESHAP for Gasoline Distribution Facilities. This page also contains a December fact sheet with information regarding the final amendments to the 2003 final rule for the NESHAP.

  19. Scenario analyses of road transport energy demand: a case study of ethanol as a diesel substitute in Thailand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chollacoop, N. [National Metal and Materials Technology Center (MTEC), Bioenergy Laboratory, Pathumthani (Thailand); Saisirirat, P. [King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi (KMUTT), Department of Mechanical Engineering, Bangkok (Thailand); Fukuda, T.; Fukuda, A. [Asian Transportation Research Society (ATRANS), Bangkok (Thailand); Fukuda, T.; Fukuda, A. [College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, Department of Transportation Engineering and Socio-Technology, Chiba (Japan)

    2011-07-01

    Ethanol is conventionally used as a blend with gasoline due to its similar properties, especially the octane number. However, ethanol has also been explored and used as a diesel substitute. While a low-blend of ethanol with diesel is possible with use of an emulsifier additive, a high-blend of ethanol with diesel may require major adjustment of compression-ignition (CI) diesel engines. Since dedicated CI engines are commercially available for a high-blend ethanol in diesel (ED95), a fuel mixture comprised of 95% ethanol and 5% additive, this technology offers an option for an oil-importing country like Thailand to reduce its fossil import by use of its own indigenous bio-ethanol fuel. Among many strong campaigns on ethanol utilization in the transportation sector under Thailand's Alternative Energy Strategic Plan (2008-2022), the Thai Ministry of Energy has, for the first time, conducted a demonstration project with ethanol (ED95) buses on the Thai road system. The current investigation thus aims to assess and quantify the impact of using this ED95 technology to reduce fossil diesel consumption by adjusting the commercially available energy demand model called the Long range Energy Alternatives Planning system (LEAP). For this purpose, first, the necessary statistical data in the Thai transportation sector were gathered and analyzed to construct the predicative energy demand model. Then, scenario analyses were conducted to assess the benefit of ED95 technology on the basis of energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emission reduction. (authors)

  20. Gasoline Engine Mechanics. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Marion

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of six terminal objectives presented in this curriculum guide for an intermediate gasoline engine mechanics course at the secondary level. (For the beginning course guide see CE 010 947.) The materials were developed for a two-semester (2 hour…

  1. Gasoline Engine Mechanics. Florida Vocational Program Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    University of South Florida, Tampa. Dept. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This vocational program guide is intended to assist in the organization, operation, and evaluation of a program in gasoline engine mechanics in school districts, area vocational centers, and community colleges. The following topics are covered: job duties of small-engine mechanics; program content (curriculum framework and student performance…

  2. Phase Partitioning from Theanol Blend Gasolines

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent years, the use of ethanol and other alcohols as motor fuel additives has increased. Additionally, ethanol production has expanded due to the potential use of ethanol as a primary fuel source. Historical patterns of gasoline composition show strong dependency on regulato...

  3. Proposed standby gasoline rationing plan: public comments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-01

    Under the proposed plan, DOE would allocate ration rights (rights to purchase gasoline) to owners of registered vehicles. All vehicles in a given class would receive the same entitlement. Essential services would receive supplemental allotments of ration rights as pririty firms. Once every 3 months, ration checks would be mailed out to all vehicle registrants, allotting them a certain amount of ration rights. These checks would then be cashed at Coupon Issuance Points, where the bearer would receive ration coupons to be used at gasoline stations. Large users of gasoline could deposit their allotment checks in accounts at ration banks. Coupons or checks would be freely exchangeable in a white market. A certain percentage of the gasoline supply would be set aside in reserve for use in national emergencies. When the plan was published in the Federal Register, public comments were requested. DOE also solicited comments from private citizens, public interest groups, business and industry, state and local governments. A total of 1126 responses were reveived and these are analyzed in this paper. The second part of the report describes how the comments were classified, and gives a statistical breakdown of the major responses. The last section is a discussion and analysis of theissue raised by commenting agencies, firms, associations, and individuals. (MCW)

  4. Competition in the retail gasoline industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Jedidiah

    2007-05-01

    This dissertation examines competition in the retail gasoline industry. The first chapter highlights the importance of gasoline in modern society, introduces my work, and places it in the context of the existing academic literature. The second chapter details the institutional structure and profitability of the industry. The vast majority of retail gasoline stations are not directly owned and operated by major oil companies. Instead, most stations are set up under other contractual relationships: lessee-dealer, open-dealer, jobber-owned-and-operated, and independent. Gasoline retailers make relatively low profits, as is the case in many other retail industries, and are substantially less profitable than major oil companies. Gas stations also make less money when retail prices are climbing than when they are falling. As prices rise, total station profits are near zero or negative. When retail prices are constant or falling, retailers can make positive profits. The third chapter describes the entry of big-box stores into the retail gasoline industry over the last decade. The growth of such large retailers, in all markets, has led to a great deal of controversy as smaller competitors with long-term ties to the local community have become less common. I estimate the price impact that big-box stores have on traditional gasoline retailers using cross-sectional data in two geographically diverse cities. I also examine changes in pricing following the entry of The Home Depot into a local retail gasoline market. The results show that big-box stores place statistically and economically significant downward pressure on the prices of nearby gas stations, offering a measure of the impact of the entry of a big-box store. Chapter 4 examines the nature of price competition in markets where some competing retailers sell the same brand. The price effect of having more retailers selling the same brand is theoretically unclear. High brand diversity could give individual retailers

  5. [Effect of ethanol gasoline and unleaded gasoline on exhaust emissions of EFI vehicles with TWC].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-jie; Wang, Wei; Tang, Da-gang; Cui, Ping

    2004-07-01

    The injectors' flow-rate of all test vehicles that each was fixed with a three-way catalytic converter (TWC) and Electronic Fuel Injection System (EFI) was tested including before and after vehicles operated on unleaded and ethanol gasoline respectively running for a long time on real road. The three main engine-out exhaust emissions (HC, CO and NOx) from vehicles operating on different fuels were also analyzed by exhaust testing procedure for the whole light-duty vehicle. Test results showed that comparing with unleaded gasoline and ethanol gasoline has a remarkable effect on decreasing engine-out exhaust emissions of CO and HC (both at about ten percent) and the exhaust emissions of CO, HC and NOx from vehicles with TWC respectively. When burning with unleaded gasoline the three main pollutants from vehicles with TWC have already or nearly reached Europe Exhaust First Standard, after changing to ethanol gasoline CO has drastically decreased at about thirty percent, while HC and NOx decreased at about eighteen and ten percent respectively, at this time which they were all above Europe Exhaust Standard First or nearly reached Europe Exhaust Second Standard; ethanol gasoline has also other better performance such as a slight cleaning function on injectors, a slower deteriorative trend of engine-out CO and HC and a longer operating life-span of TWC.

  6. Effects of ambient oxygen concentration on soot temperature and concentration for biodiesel and diesel spray combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Ji

    2015-06-01

    Ambient oxygen concentration, a key variable directly related to exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) levels in diesel engines, plays a significant role in particulate matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions. The utilization of biodiesel in diesel engines has been investigated over the last decades for its renewable characteristics and lower emissions compared to diesel. In an earlier work, we demonstrated that the soot temperature and concentration of biodiesel were lower than diesel under regular diesel engine conditions without EGR. Soot concentration was quantified by a parameter called KL factor. As a continuous effort, this paper presents an experimental investigation of the ambient oxygen concentration on soot temperature and KL factor during biodiesel and diesel spray combustion. The experiment was implemented in a constant volume chamber system, where the ambient oxygen concentration varied from 21 to 10% and the ambient temperature was kept to 1,000 K. A high speed two-color pyrometry technique was used to measure transient soot temperature and the KL factor of the spray flame. The soot temperature of biodiesel is found to be lower than that of diesel under the same conditions, which follows the same trend from our previous results found when the ambient temperature changes to 21% oxygen conditions. A reduction in ambient oxygen concentration generally reduces the soot temperature for both fuels. However, this is a complicated effect on soot processes as the change of oxygen concentration greatly affects the balance between soot formation and oxidation. The KL factor is observed to be the highest at 12% O2 for diesel and 18% O2 for biodiesel, respectively. On the other hand, the 10% O2 condition shows the lowest KL factor for both fuels. These results can provide quantitative experimental evidences to optimize the ambient oxygen concentration for diesel engines using different fuels for better emissions characteristics. © 2014 American Society of

  7. Diesel spray characterization; Dieselmoottorin polttoainesuihkujen ominaisuudet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkaenen, J.; Turunen, R.; Paloposki, T.; Rantanen, P.; Virolainen, T. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Internal Combustion Engine Lab.

    1997-10-01

    Fuel injection of diesel engines will be studied using large-scale models of fuel injectors. The advantage of large-scale models is that the measurement of large-scale diesel sprays will be easier than the measurement of actual sprays. The objective is to study the break-up mechanism of diesel sprays and to measure drop size distributions in the inner part of the spray. The results will be used in the development of diesel engines and diesel fuels. (orig.)

  8. Experimental Investigations on Conventional and Semi-Adiabatic Diesel Engine Using Simarouba Biodiesel as Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, M. U.; Reddy, C. P.; Ravindranath, K.

    2013-04-01

    In view of fast depletion of fossil fuels and the rapid rate at which the fuel consumption is taking place all over the world, scientists are searching for alternate fuels for maintaining the growth industrially and economically. Hence search for alternate fuel(s) has become imminent. Out of the limited options for internal combustion engines, the bio diesel fuel appears to be the best. Many advanced countries are implementing several biodiesel initiatives and developmental programmes in order to become self sufficient and reduce the import bills. Biodiesel is biodegradable and renewable fuel with the potential to enhance the performance and reduce engine exhaust emissions. This is due to ready usage of existing diesel engines, fuel distribution pattern, reduced emission profiles, and eco-friendly properties of biodiesel. Simarouba biodiesel (SBD), the methyl ester of Simarouba oil is one such alternative fuel which can be used as substitute to conventional petro-diesel. The present work involves experimental investigation on the use of SBD blends as fuel in conventional diesel engine and semi-adiabatic diesel engine. The oil was triple filtered to eliminate particulate matter and then transesterified to obtain biodiesel. The project envisaged aims at conducting analysis of diesel with SBD blends (10, 20, 30 and 40 %) in conventional engine and semi-adiabatic engine. Also it was decided to vary the injection pressure (180, 190 and 200 bar) and observe its effect on performance and also suggest better value of injection pressure. The engine was made semi adiabatic by coating the piston crown with partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ). Kirloskar AV I make (3.67 kW) vertical, single cylinder, water cooled diesel engine coupled to an eddy current dynamometer with suitable measuring instrumentation/accessories used for the study. Experiments were initially carried out using pure diesel fuel to provide base line data. The test results were compared based on the performance

  9. Emission Characteristics of CI Engine by using Palm BioDiesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.S.shai sundaram

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Environmental concerns and energy crisis of the world has led to the search of alternate to the fossil fuel. FAME (Fatty Acid Methyl Ester is environment friendly, alternative, and non-toxic, safe; biodegradable has a high flash point and is also termed as Bio-Diesel. The growing economic risk of relying primarily on fossil fuels with limited reserves and Increasing prices has increased the interest on alternative energy sources. Clean and renewable biofuels have been touted as the answer to the issue of diminishing fossil fuels. INDIA the largest producer of palm oil has committed to focus interest on biofuels, namely palm biodiesel. Since palm oil has a high fossil energy balance, it is a key source of raw material for biodiesel production. This paper presents palm biodiesel as an alternative source of green renewable energy through a survey conducted from previously researched findings. In this experimental study testing of emission characteristics and performances test of palm Bio-diesel at various ratios form (B25%, B 50%, B75%, B100% of Bio-diesel. As we compared with fossil fuel (diesel and palm bio-diesel on base of various emission elements (CO, CO2, NOx, O2, and HC.

  10. Performance analysis of a biodiesel fuelled diesel engine with the effect of alumina coated piston

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil Kumar Srinivasan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is one of the best alternative fuels to Diesel engine among other sources due to having potential to reduce emissions. Biodiesel is a renewable, biodegradable and environment friendly fuel in nature. The advantages of biodiesel are lower exhaust gas emissions and its biodegradability and renewability compared with petroleum-based diesel fuel. The energy of the biodiesel can be released more efficiently with the concept of semi adiabatic (thermal barrier coated piston engine. The objective of this study is to investigate the performance and emission characteristics of a single cylinder direct injection Diesel engine using 25% biodiesel blend (rubber seed oil methyl ester as fuel with thermal barrier coated piston. Initially the piston crown was coated with alumina (Al2O3 of thickness of 300 micron (0.3 mm by plasma coating method. The results revealed that the brake thermal efficiency was increased by 4% and brake specific fuel consumption was decreased by 9% for B25 with coated piston compared to un-coated piston with diesel. The smoke, CO, and HC emissions were also decreased for B25 blend with coated piston compared with the uncoated piton engine. The combustion characteristics such as peak pressure, maximum rate of pressure rise, and heat release rate were increased and the ignition delay was decreased for B25 blend for the coated piston compared with diesel fuel.

  11. Development of stratified-charge engine by impingement of fuel jet. ; Test results with gasoline fuel. Chokufunshiki shototsu kakusan sojo kyuki kikan no kaihatsu. ; Gasoline nenryo ni yoru jikken kekka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, S.; Onishi, S. (Japan Clean Engine Lab. Co. Ltd., Ishikawa (Japan))

    1991-04-25

    Development was made of direct fuel injection stratified-charge method (OSKA nethod), to make the mixture formation in the direct fuel injection engine by having fuel jet positively impinge on the impingement part, installed in the combustion chamber. In the present report, the following conclusion was obtained through experiment on gasoline fuel by a single cylinder engine with a spark ignition method, combined with the OSKA method: High compressive ratio was made adoptable by applying an OSKA method, using a single hole nozzle with low opening pressure. Due to feed air swirl, made unnecessary for the mixture formation, adoption of early injection under the high load, etc., the highest brake mean effective pressure attained to 1.04MPa, which is almost equivalent to that of carburetor type automobile gasoline engine, while the highest brake thermal efficiency did to 37.7%, which is so to that of direct fuel injection diesel engine, equal in volume. Also under the low load, obtained was a high thermal efficiency, nearing that of diesel engine. 8 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Investigations on Effect of Fuel Injection Pressure on Performance and Emissions of Linseed Blends in a Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AkkarajuH. Kiran Theja

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Ever increasing demand on fossil fuels and environmental degradation with their use concern the global utilization of internal combustion engines in industrial, automotive and power sectors.An alternate to high pollutant diesel derived from renewable energy sources should be environment friendly, economically cheaper, technically feasible without compromising the engine performance and should provide energy security. Non-edible oils such as linseed oil, karanja, jatropha, and mahua etc., are mostly preferable. In this study, linseed oil derived from flax seed plant is chosen and blended it with diesel in proportions of 10%, 20% and 30%. Performance and emission characteristics of linseed oil blends (L10,v L20 and L30 and the diesel are investigated at constant speed in a diesel engine with nozzle opening pressure of 200 bar. The experiment is repeated for different injection pressures (220 and 240 bar and the results are compared with baseline diesel. Brake specific energy consumption (BSEC for biodiesel blends is comparable to diesel fuel at all loads and fuel injection pressures (FIPs. Brake thermal efficiency (BTE is optimum for biodiesel blends at injection pressure of 200 bar. Diesel has shown high mechanical efficiency than biodiesel blends at FIPs 220 and 240 bar. Carbon emissions are less with diesel compared to biodiesel blends.

  13. Lifecycle analysis of renewable natural gas and hydrocarbon fuels from wastewater treatment plants’ sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Uisung [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Han, Jeongwoo [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Urgun Demirtas, Meltem [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wang, Michael [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Tao, Ling [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-09-01

    digester with biogas flaring. Along with the alternative HTL process, four types of AD technologies with fuel production—single-stage mesophilic, mesophilic 2-stage, single-stage mesophilic with thermohydrolysis treatment, and mesophilicmesophilic acid/gas phase—are studied. Results show that the sludge-to-CNG pathway via AD and the sludge-to-liquid pathway via HTL reduce GHG emissions consumptions significantly. When we compare the GHG emissions of the alternative fuel production pathways to that of the counterfactual case in terms of the amount of sludge treated, reductions in GHG emissions are 39%–80% and 87% for alternative AD and HTL, respectively. Compared to petroleum gasoline and diesel GHG emission results in terms of MJ, the renewable CNG production pathway via AD and the renewable diesel production pathway via HTL reduce GHG emissions by 193% and 46%, respectively. These large reductions are mainly due to GHG credits from avoiding GHGs under the counterfactual scenario, and/or fertilizer displacement credits. Similarly, reductions in fossil fuel use for sludge-based fuels are huge. However, well-defined counterfactual scenarios are needed because the results of the study depend on the counterfactual scenario, which might vary over time.

  14. Renewable energy annual 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This report presents summary data on renewable energy consumption, the status of each of the primary renewable technologies, a profile of each of the associated industries, an analysis of topical issues related to renewable energy, and information on renewable energy projects worldwide. It is the second in a series of annual reports on renewable energy. The renewable energy resources included in the report are biomass (wood and ethanol); municipal solid waste, including waste-to-energy and landfill gas; geothermal; wind; and solar energy, including solar thermal and photovoltaic. The report also includes various appendices and a glossary.

  15. Removal of gasoline vapors from air streams by biofiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, W.A.; Kant, W.D.; Colwell, F.S.; Singleton, B.; Lee, B.D.; Andrews, G.F.; Espinosa, A.M.; Johnson, E.G.

    1993-03-01

    Research was performed to develop a biofilter for the biodegradation of gasoline vapors. The overall goal of this effort was to provide information necessary for the design, construction, and operation of a commercial gasoline vapor biofilter. Experimental results indicated that relatively high amounts of gasoline vapor adsorption occur during initial exposure of the biofilter bed medium to gasoline vapors. Biological removal occurs over a 22 to 40{degrees}C temperature range with removal being completely inhibited at 54{degrees}C. The addition of fertilizer to the relatively fresh bed medium used did not increase the rates of gasoline removal in short term experiments. Microbiological analyses indicated that high levels of gasoline degrading microbes are naturally present in the bed medium and that additional inoculation with hydrocarbon degrading cultures does not appreciably increase gasoline removal rates. At lower gasoline concentrations, the vapor removal rates were considerably lower than those at higher gasoline concentrations. This implies that system designs facilitating gasoline transport to the micro-organisms could substantially increase gasoline removal rates at lower gasoline vapor concentrations. Test results from a field scale prototype biofiltration system showed volumetric productivity (i.e., average rate of gasoline degradation per unit bed volume) values that were consistent with those obtained with laboratory column biofilters at similar inlet gasoline concentrations. In addition, total benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylene (BTEX) removal over the operating conditions employed was 50 to 55%. Removal of benzene was approximately 10 to 15% and removal of the other members of the BTEX group was much higher, typically >80%.

  16. Removal of gasoline vapors from air streams by biofiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, W.A.; Kant, W.D.; Colwell, F.S.; Singleton, B.; Lee, B.D.; Andrews, G.F.; Espinosa, A.M.; Johnson, E.G.

    1993-03-01

    Research was performed to develop a biofilter for the biodegradation of gasoline vapors. The overall goal of this effort was to provide information necessary for the design, construction, and operation of a commercial gasoline vapor biofilter. Experimental results indicated that relatively high amounts of gasoline vapor adsorption occur during initial exposure of the biofilter bed medium to gasoline vapors. Biological removal occurs over a 22 to 40[degrees]C temperature range with removal being completely inhibited at 54[degrees]C. The addition of fertilizer to the relatively fresh bed medium used did not increase the rates of gasoline removal in short term experiments. Microbiological analyses indicated that high levels of gasoline degrading microbes are naturally present in the bed medium and that additional inoculation with hydrocarbon degrading cultures does not appreciably increase gasoline removal rates. At lower gasoline concentrations, the vapor removal rates were considerably lower than those at higher gasoline concentrations. This implies that system designs facilitating gasoline transport to the micro-organisms could substantially increase gasoline removal rates at lower gasoline vapor concentrations. Test results from a field scale prototype biofiltration system showed volumetric productivity (i.e., average rate of gasoline degradation per unit bed volume) values that were consistent with those obtained with laboratory column biofilters at similar inlet gasoline concentrations. In addition, total benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylene (BTEX) removal over the operating conditions employed was 50 to 55%. Removal of benzene was approximately 10 to 15% and removal of the other members of the BTEX group was much higher, typically >80%.

  17. Direct measurements of near-highway emissions in a high diesel environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, H. L.; Hellebust, S.; Temime-Roussel, B.; Ravier, S.; Polo, L.; Jacob, V.; Buisson, C.; Charron, A.; André, M.; Pasquier, A.; Besombes, J. L.; Jaffrezo, J. L.; Wortham, H.; Marchand, N.

    2014-10-01

    Diesel-powered passenger cars currently outnumber gasoline-powered cars in many countries, particularly in Europe. In France, diesel cars represented 61% of Light Duty Vehicles in 2011 and this percentage is still increasing (French Environment and Energy Management Agency, ADEME). As part of the September~2011 joint PM-DRIVE (Particulate Matter- DiRect and Indirect on-road Vehicular Emissions) and MOCOPO (Measuring and mOdeling traffic COngestion and POllution) field campaign, the concentration and high-resolution chemical composition of aerosols and volatile organic carbon (VOC) species were measured adjacent to a major urban highway south of Grenoble, France. Alongside these atmospheric measurements, detailed traffic data were collected from nearby traffic cameras and loop detectors, which allowed the identification of vehicle type and characteristics, traffic concentration, and traffic speed to be quantified and compared to measured aerosol and VOCs. Six aerosol age and source profiles were resolved using the positive matrix factorization (PMF) model on real-time high-resolution aerosol mass spectra. These six aerosol source/age categories included a hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) commonly associated with primary vehicular emissions, a nitrogen containing aerosol (NOA) with a diurnal pattern similar to that of HOA, oxidized organic aerosol (OOA), and biomass burning aerosol (BBOA). While quantitatively separating the influence of diesel vs. gasoline proved impossible, a low HOA : black carbon ratio, similar to that measured in other high-diesel environments, and high levels of NOx, also indicative of diesel emissions, were observed. A comparison between these high-diesel environment measurements and measurements taken in low-diesel (North American) environments was examined and the potential feedback between vehicular emissions and SOA formation was probed. Although the measurement site was located next to a large source of primary emissions, which are

  18. Direct measurements of near-highway emissions in a high diesel environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. L. DeWitt

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Diesel-powered passenger cars currently outnumber gasoline-powered cars in many countries, particularly in Europe. In France, diesel cars represented 61% of Light Duty Vehicles in 2011 and this percentage is still increasing (French Environment and Energy Management Agency, ADEME. As part of the September~2011 joint PM-DRIVE (Particulate Matter- DiRect and Indirect on-road Vehicular Emissions and MOCOPO (Measuring and mOdeling traffic COngestion and POllution field campaign, the concentration and high-resolution chemical composition of aerosols and volatile organic carbon (VOC species were measured adjacent to a major urban highway south of Grenoble, France. Alongside these atmospheric measurements, detailed traffic data were collected from nearby traffic cameras and loop detectors, which allowed the identification of vehicle type and characteristics, traffic concentration, and traffic speed to be quantified and compared to measured aerosol and VOCs. Six aerosol age and source profiles were resolved using the positive matrix factorization (PMF model on real-time high-resolution aerosol mass spectra. These six aerosol source/age categories included a hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA commonly associated with primary vehicular emissions, a nitrogen containing aerosol (NOA with a diurnal pattern similar to that of HOA, oxidized organic aerosol (OOA, and biomass burning aerosol (BBOA. While quantitatively separating the influence of diesel vs. gasoline proved impossible, a low HOA : black carbon ratio, similar to that measured in other high-diesel environments, and high levels of NOx, also indicative of diesel emissions, were observed. A comparison between these high-diesel environment measurements and measurements taken in low-diesel (North American environments was examined and the potential feedback between vehicular emissions and SOA formation was probed. Although the measurement site was located next to a large source of primary emissions

  19. Exergetic life cycle assessment of hydrogen production from renewables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granovskii, Mikhail; Dincer, Ibrahim; Rosen, Marc A.

    Life cycle assessment is extended to exergetic life cycle assessment and used to evaluate the exergy efficiency, economic effectiveness and environmental impact of producing hydrogen using wind and solar energy in place of fossil fuels. The product hydrogen is considered a fuel for fuel cell vehicles and a substitute for gasoline. Fossil fuel technologies for producing hydrogen from natural gas and gasoline from crude oil are contrasted with options using renewable energy. Exergy efficiencies and greenhouse gas and air pollution emissions are evaluated for all process steps, including crude oil and natural gas pipeline transportation, crude oil distillation and natural gas reforming, wind and solar electricity generation, hydrogen production through water electrolysis, and gasoline and hydrogen distribution and utilization. The use of wind power to produce hydrogen via electrolysis, and its application in a fuel cell vehicle, exhibits the lowest fossil and mineral resource consumption rate. However, the economic attractiveness, as measured by a "capital investment effectiveness factor," of renewable technologies depends significantly on the ratio of costs for hydrogen and natural gas. At the present cost ratio of about 2 (per unit of lower heating value or exergy), capital investments are about five times lower to produce hydrogen via natural gas rather than wind energy. As a consequence, the cost of wind- and solar-based electricity and hydrogen is substantially higher than that of natural gas. The implementation of a hydrogen fuel cell instead of an internal combustion engine permits, theoretically, an increase in a vehicle's engine efficiency of about of two times. Depending on the ratio in engine efficiencies, the substitution of gasoline with "renewable" hydrogen leads to (a) greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reductions of 12-23 times for hydrogen from wind and 5-8 times for hydrogen from solar energy, and (b) air pollution (AP) emissions reductions of 38

  20. Diesel Engine Tribology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Christian Kim

    Recent years have seen an increase in the wear rate of engine bearings, subsequently followed by bearing failure, for the large two-stroke diesel engines used for ship propulsion. Here, the engine bearings include main, big end and crosshead bearings, with the bearing type used being the journal...... bearing, belonging to the class of ‘hydrodynamic bearings’. This implies that the load carrying capacity is generated by a relative movement of the involved components, i.e. avelocity-driven operation. For the engine application, the velocity stems from the engine RPM. However, to comply with the latest...... emission requirements as well as attempting to minimise fuel expenses, the engine speed has been lowered together with an increase in the engine mean pressure which in terms lead to larger bearing loads. With worsened operating conditions from two sides, the encountered problems are understandable...

  1. Lean Gasoline System Development for Fuel Efficient Small Cars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Stuart R. [General Motors LLC, Pontiac, MI (United States)

    2013-11-25

    The General Motors and DOE cooperative agreement program DE-EE0003379 is completed. The program has integrated and demonstrated a lean-stratified gasoline engine, a lean aftertreatment system, a 12V Stop/Start system and an Active Thermal Management system along with the necessary controls that significantly improves fuel efficiency for small cars. The fuel economy objective of an increase of 25% over a 2010 Chevrolet Malibu and the emission objective of EPA T2B2 compliance have been accomplished. A brief review of the program, summarized from the narrative is: The program accelerates development and synergistic integration of four cost competitive technologies to improve fuel economy of a light-duty vehicle by at least 25% while meeting Tier 2 Bin 2 emissions standards. These technologies can be broadly implemented across the U.S. light-duty vehicle product line between 2015 and 2025 and are compatible with future and renewable biofuels. The technologies in this program are: lean combustion, innovative passive selective catalyst reduction lean aftertreatment, 12V stop/start and active thermal management. The technologies will be calibrated in a 2010 Chevrolet Malibu mid-size sedan for final fuel economy demonstration.

  2. Lean Gasoline System Development for Fuel Efficient Small Cars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-08-30

    The General Motors and DOE cooperative agreement program DE-EE0003379 is completed. The program has integrated and demonstrated a lean-stratified gasoline engine, a lean aftertreatment system, a 12V Stop/Start system and an Active Thermal Management system along with the necessary controls that significantly improves fuel efficiency for small cars. The fuel economy objective of an increase of 25% over a 2010 Chevrolet Malibu and the emission objective of EPA T2B2 compliance have been accomplished. A brief review of the program, summarized from the narrative is: The program accelerates development and synergistic integration of four cost competitive technologies to improve fuel economy of a light-duty vehicle by at least 25% while meeting Tier 2 Bin 2 emissions standards. These technologies can be broadly implemented across the U.S. light-duty vehicle product line between 2015 and 2025 and are compatible with future and renewable biofuels. The technologies in this program are: lean combustion, innovative passive selective catalyst reduction lean aftertreatment, 12V stop/start and active thermal management. The technologies will be calibrated in a 2010 Chevrolet Malibu mid-size sedan for final fuel economy demonstration.

  3. Simultaneous fast pyrolysis and catalytic upgrading of lignin to obtain a marine diesel fuel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Guofeng

    The topic of this Ph.D. project is to convert lignin, a by-product from a 2nd generation bio-ethanol plant, into a marine diesel fuel by fast pyrolysis followed with catalytic upgrading of the pyrolysis vapor. Lignin, a major component of lignocellulosic biomass, is underutilized in the 2nd...... generation bio-ethanol plants. Shipping industry on the other hand is looking for clean alternative fuels in order to meet stricter fuel quality and emission standards. To convert lignin into a renewable marine diesel fuel will both accelerate the development of modern bio-refinery and transfer the marine...

  4. Optimal integration of hybrid (wind--solar) system with diesel power plant \

    OpenAIRE

    SIDDIQUE, MUHAMMAD NOMAN; Ahmad, Aftab; NAWAZ, MUHAMMAD KASHIF; BUKHARI, SYED BASIT ALI

    2015-01-01

    Most energy worldwide is supplied through conventional energy sources, such as thermal, hydro, and nuclear. There have been serious energy crises in the last couple of years and so it is essential to consider renewable energy sources. This paper proposes a cost-effective solution for integrating a wind--solar system with an existing diesel power plant of a grid-connected site at Taxila, Pakistan. In the case of nonavailability of power from the grid, this diesel power plant acts as a standby ...

  5. Effects of In-Cylinder Mixing on Low Octane Gasoline Compression Ignition Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad

    2016-04-05

    Gasoline compression ignition (GCI) engines have been considered an attractive alternative to traditional spark ignition engines. Low octane gasoline fuel has been identified as a viable option for the GCI engine applications due to its longer ignition delay characteristics compared to diesel and in the volatility range of gasoline fuels. In this study, we have investigated the effect of different injection timings at part-load conditions using light naphtha stream in single cylinder engine experiments in the GCI combustion mode with injection pressure of 130 bar. A toluene primary reference fuel (TPRF) was used as a surrogate for the light naphtha in the engine simulations performed here. A physical surrogate based on the evaporation characteristics of the light naphtha has been developed and its properties have been implemented in the engine simulations. Full cycle GCI computational fluid dynamics (CFD) engine simulations have been successfully performed while changing the start of injection (SOI) timing from -50° to -11 ° CAD aTDC. The effect of SOI on mixing and combustion phasing was investigated using detailed equivalence ratio-temperature maps and ignition delay times. Both experimental and computational results consistently showed that an SOI of -30° CAD aTDC has the most advanced combustion phasing (CA50), with the highest NOx emission. The effects of the SOI on the fuel containment in the bowl of the piston, the ignition delay time, combustion rate and emissions have been carefully examined through the CFD calculations. It was found that the competition between the equivalence ratio and temperature is the controlling parameter in determining the combustion phasings.

  6. Conversion of Gasoline Vehicles to CNG Hybrid Vehicles (CNG-Electric Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Halvaei Niasar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is investigation of the feasibility and advantages of using the natural gas as an alternative to gasoline as a fuel for hybrid electric vehicles. Operating CNG vehicles are really beneficial in the Middle East region considering the fact that gasoline is offered at a heavily subsidized price and therefore, by converting a significant portion of the automobiles to run on CNG, the gasoline internal consumption could be reduced. This in turn will result in more oil being available for export which will be beneficial to the economy of country. Hybrid Vehicles mainly have a CNG engine along with an electric drive. The batteries of Hybrid Vehicles are charged by a CNG engine. The engine size is smaller and emissions may be considerably less in hybrid vehicles relative to typical vehicles since the CNG engine is employed only to recharge the electric batteries. Although CNG-Electric hybrid vehicles are less common than Diesel-Electric hybrids, but they have been tested in several U.S. cities such as Denver and Seattle. CNG-electric hybrids hold huge potential for the future in the fact that they are significantly cleaner sources of energy and are conveniently suited to serve the needs of the current economy and modes of transportation. The use of these alternative sources of fuels requires investment and significant studies need to be made to evaluate their efficiencies and reliability. This study would cover most of these aspects and also explores the use of these technologies with particular reference to Qatar and the Middle East.

  7. Diesel engine management systems and components

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This reference book provides a comprehensive insight into todays diesel injection systems and electronic control. It focusses on minimizing emissions and exhaust-gas treatment. Innovations by Bosch in the field of diesel-injection technology have made a significant contribution to the diesel boom. Calls for lower fuel consumption, reduced exhaust-gas emissions and quiet engines are making greater demands on the engine and fuel-injection systems. Contents History of the diesel engine.- Areas of use for diesel engines.- Basic principles of the diesel engine.- Fuels: Diesel fuel.- Fuels: Alternative fuels.- Cylinder-charge control systems.- Basic principles of diesel fuel-injection.- Overview of diesel fuel-injection systems.- Fuel supply to the low pressure stage.- Overview of discrete cylinder systems.- Unit injector system.- Unit pump system.- Overview of common-rail systems.- High pressure components of the common-rail system.- Injection nozzles.- Nozzle holders.- High pressure lines.- Start assist systems.-...

  8. Sulfate Salts in Gasoline and Ethanol Fuels -- Historical Perspective and Analysis of Available Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, Robert L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Alleman, Teresa [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Yanowitz, Janet [Ecoengineering, Inc.

    2017-09-21

    This report reviews the chemistry of sulfate salts dissolved in ethanol and gasoline, potential sources of sulfate salts in ethanol and gasoline, the history of consumer vehicle issues with sulfate salt deposits in the early 2000s, and the corresponding changes to the denatured fuel ethanol specification. Recommendations for future research are provided. During a period of rapid market expansion in 2004-05, issues were reported with vehicles running on E10 provided by certain suppliers in some markets. It was commonly believed that these vehicle problems were caused by sulfate salts precipitating from the fuel. Investigators identified sodium sulfate, and in one case also ammonium sulfate, as the predominate salts found in the engines. Several stakeholders believed the issue was excess sulfate ions in the ethanol portion of the E10, and in 2005 the ASTM specification for ethanol (D4806) was modified to include a 4-part per million (ppm) limit on sulfate ions. While there have been no further reports of consumer vehicle issues, the recently approved increase of ethanol in gasoline from 10 to 15 volume percent has resulted in renewed interest in the sulfate ion concentration in fuel ethanol. This report reviews published data on the solubility of sulfate salts in ethanol. The possible sources of sulfate anions and charge balancing cations (such as sodium) in fuel ethanol and petroleum derived blendstocks are discussed. Examination of historical information on the consumer vehicle issues that occurred in 2004-2005 reveals that a source of sodium or ammonium ions, required for the formation of the observed insoluble salts, was never identified. Recommendations for research to better understand sulfate salt solubility issues in ethanol, hydrocarbon blendstocks, and ethanol-gasoline blends are presented.

  9. Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs), are tradable, non-tangible energy commodities in the United States that represent proof that 1 megawatt-hour (MWh) of electricity was generated from an eligible renewable energy resource.

  10. EMISSION OF POLLUTANTS AND ENERGY CONSUMPTION IN LIFE CYCLE OF DIESEL OIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Haller

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The following article is an analysis of designed processes of the life cycle of the most popular fuel for Diesel engines: diesel oil. This fuel is produced from petroleum, which is a non-renewable source of energy. Analysis was carried out with the assumptions of Life Cycle Assessment, which is a tool to test the environmental impact of the product. The life cycle of diesel was divided into five unit processes: petroleum extraction, transport of petroleum to the refinery, refining petroleum to diesel, transport of diesel to the recipient and utilization of delivered fuel by transport company. For every process the energy consumption and emission of carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides and sulphursulphur oxides was calculated, with assumption of probable data, that could occur in real processes. The analysis has shown, that the process of refining petroleum is highly pollution-intensive. Also the combustion of diesel generates a significant amount of pollutants’ emission, which is why it is necessary to develop technologies that could contribute to the reduction of emission.

  11. Biodiesel versus diesel: a pilot study comparing exhaust exposures for employees at a rural municipal facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traviss, Nora; Thelen, Brett Amy; Ingalls, Jaime Kathryn; Treadwell, Melinda Dawn

    2010-09-01

    Many organizations interested in renewable, domestic energy have switched from petroleum diesel to biodiesel blends for use in transportation and heavy-duty equipment. Although considerable evidence exists on the negative health effects of petroleum diesel exhaust exposures in occupational settings, there has been little research examining biodiesel exposures. Working collaboratively with a local municipality, concentrations of particulate matter (PM) and other air toxics were measured at a recycling facility in southwestern New Hampshire while heavy equipment operated first on petroleum diesel and then on a B20 blend (20% soy-based biodiesel/80% petroleum diesel). This pilot study used a combination of established industrial hygiene and environmental air monitoring methods to estimate occupational exposure profiles to PM and air toxics from combustion of petroleum diesel and biodiesel. Results indicate that B20 use dramatically reduces work area respirable particle, PM2.5 (PM blend. Overall, this study suggests that biodiesel blends reduce worker exposure to and health risk from petroleum diesel exhaust, but additional exposure research is recommended.

  12. Oxidative stability of waste cooking oil and white diesel upon storage at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezergianni, Stella; Chrysikou, Loukia P

    2012-12-01

    Renewable diesel fuels are alternative fuels produced from vegetable oils or animal fats. Catalytic hydrotreating of waste cooking oil (WCO) was carried out at pilot-plant scale and a paraffinic diesel, called "white" diesel was obtained. The white diesel and WCO samples were stored for one year at room temperature under normal atmospheric conditions, but not exposed to sunlight. Viscosity, total acid number (TAN), induction period (IP), carbonaceous deposits, density, cold flow properties, distillation and water content were monitored. TAN and density of the white diesel stored in conventional bottles changed from 0 to 0.221 mg KOH/g and from 787 to 838 kg/m(3), respectively. The remaining parameters did not vary significantly. Water content of WCO increased from 482 to 2491 mg/kg, TAN from 0.744 to 0.931 mg KOH/g, whereas viscosity, IP and carbon residues fluctuated mildly. The results are indicative of the white diesel's stability, rendering it suitable for prolonged storage.

  13. Experimental Investigation Of Biogas-Biodiesel Dual Fuel Combustion In A Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesha D. K.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study is an attempt at achieving diesel fuel equivalent performance from diesel engines with maximum substitution of diesel with renewable fuels. In this context the study has been designed to analyze the influence of B20 algae biodiesel as a pilot fuel in a biodiesel biogas dual fuel engine, and results are compared to those of biodiesel and diesel operation at identical engine settings. Experiments were performed at various loads from 0 to 100 % of maximum load at a constant speed of 1500 rpm. In general, B20 algae biodiesel is compatible with diesel in terms of performance and combustion characteristics. Dual fuel mode operation displays lower thermal efficiency and higher fuel consumption than for other fuel modes of the test run across the range of engine loads. Dual fuel mode displayed lower emissions of NOx and Smoke opacity while HC and CO concentrations were considerably higher as compared to other fuels. In dual fuel mode peak pressure and heat release rate were slightly higher compared to diesel and biodiesel mode of operation for all engine loads.

  14. 30 CFR 57.5075 - Diesel particulate records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., Radiation, Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Diesel Particulate Matter-Underground Only § 57.5075 Diesel particulate records. (a) The table entitled “Diesel Particulate Matter Recordkeeping...

  15. Study of metal concentrations in the environment near diesel transport routes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chung-Yih; Wang, Jing-Ya; Chang, Shih-Hsien; Chen, Mei-Chun

    In recent years, a river-dredging project has been executed in Nantou, Taiwan. A large number of diesel vehicles carrying gravel and sand shuttle back and forth on the main traffic roads (Tai-16 and Tai-21). The purpose of this study is to figure out the levels of metals contributed by those vehicles to the surrounding environment. Eight stations along the roadside of diesel transport routes were selected as exposure sites, while a small village located about 9 km away from the diesel transport routes was selected as the control site. The mass concentrations of coarse and fine particulate matter indicated that contributions from traffic fleets resulted in a higher percentage of coarse particulate matter in the ambient air at exposure sites in comparison with that at control site. Significantly higher values of EC (elemental carbon) concentrations and ratios of EC/OC (organic carbon) at exposure sites indicate that diesel vehicles at exposure sites contributed a greater amount of pollutants than gasoline vehicles. Exposure site concentrations for all metals measured (Fe, Al, Mn, Pb, Zn, Cu, Ni, Mo and As) for fine and coarse particulate matter were all higher than those at the control site. Recorded levels of metal contents in road dust and riverside soil near Tai-16 and Tai-21 showed that while the traffic fleet did not increase the metal contents of crustal elements in the road dust, it did significantly increase the metal contents of traffic-related elements. Enrichment factors (EFs) were calculated with respect to road dust (EF road) and with respect to the samples of riverside soil (EF river). Among these metals, Mo was the most highly-enriched metal. The extremely high EF river value (4300) of Mo indicates that these stations were highly polluted by diesel emission. Whereas the significantly high EF road value (810) of Mo implies that a considerable of Mo was emitted from tailpipe of diesel vehicles.

  16. Bio diesel blends stability. Analytical aspects and test methods; Stabilita' delle miscele gasolio-biodiesel. Aspetti analitici e metodi di prova

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinelli, G. [Stazione Sperimentale per i Combustibili, San Donato Milanese, Milan (Italy)

    2001-08-01

    Bio diesel blends are receiving increasing attention as an alternative to conventional petroleum fuel for Diesel engines. This interest is based on several valuable properties of bio diesel, which, besides the production from renewable sources and its sufficient compatibility with Diesel engines, could reduce exhaust emissions. From technical point of view the main disadvantage of bio diesel is fuel un stability. As a matter of fact, bio diesel is more subject to oxidative degradation than petroleum diesel oil and this can alter the stability of bio diesel blends. In this connection the greatest controversy stability regards test methods for bio diesel blends. This review presents a synthesis of the studies performed in recent years on bio diesel blends stability. Besides considering the analytical aspects involving both products, the most important test methods for stability of bio diesel blends are discussed. [Italian] Le miscele gasolio-biodiesel stanno riscuotendo una crescente attenzione come alternative ai tradizionali comustibili diesel. Questo interesse e' dovuto ad alcune pregevoli proprieta' del biodiesel, il quale, oltre a essere prodotto da fonti rinnovabili, presenta una soddisfacente compatibilita' con i motori Diesel e potrebbe contribuire a ridurre le emissioni inquinanti. Da un punto di vista tecnico il suo grande svantaggio e' la instabilita'. Il biodiesel, infatti, e' piu' soggetto alla degradazione ossidativa rispetto al gasolio e questo puo' alterare la stabilita' delle miscele tra i due prodotti. A tal proposito l'aspetto piu' controverso riguarda i metodi di prova per la valutazione della stabilita' delle miscele gasolio-biodiesel. In questa rassegna viene presentata una sintesi degli studi condotti negli ultimi anni sulla stabilita' delle miscele gasolio-biodiesel. Oltre a considerare gli aspetti analitici riguardanti i due prodotti, vengono discussi i principali metodi di

  17. Gasoline toxicology: overview of regulatory and product stewardship programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swick, Derek; Jaques, Andrew; Walker, J C; Estreicher, Herb

    2014-11-01

    Significant efforts have been made to characterize the toxicological properties of gasoline. There have been both mandatory and voluntary toxicology testing programs to generate hazard characterization data for gasoline, the refinery process streams used to blend gasoline, and individual chemical constituents found in gasoline. The Clean Air Act (CAA) (Clean Air Act, 2012: § 7401, et seq.) is the primary tool for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to regulate gasoline and this supplement presents the results of the Section 211(b) Alternative Tier 2 studies required for CAA Fuel and Fuel Additive registration. Gasoline blending streams have also been evaluated by EPA under the voluntary High Production Volume (HPV) Challenge Program through which the petroleum industry provide data on over 80 refinery streams used in gasoline. Product stewardship efforts by companies and associations such as the American Petroleum Institute (API), Conservation of Clean Air and Water Europe (CONCAWE), and the Petroleum Product Stewardship Council (PPSC) have contributed a significant amount of hazard characterization data on gasoline and related substances. The hazard of gasoline and anticipated exposure to gasoline vapor has been well characterized for risk assessment purposes.

  18. Thermodynamic analysis of fuels in gas phase: ethanol, gasoline and ethanol - gasoline predicted by DFT method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, A F G; Lopes, F S; Carvalho, E V; Huda, M N; Neto, A M J C; Machado, N T

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study using density functional theory to calculate thermodynamics properties of major molecules compounds at gas phase of fuels like gasoline, ethanol, and gasoline-ethanol mixture in thermal equilibrium on temperature range up to 1500 K. We simulated a composition of gasoline mixture with ethanol for a thorough study of thermal energy, enthalpy, Gibbs free energy, entropy, heat capacity at constant pressure with respect to temperature in order to study the influence caused by ethanol as an additive to gasoline. We used semi-empirical computational methods as well in order to know the efficiency of other methods to simulate fuels through this methodology. In addition, the ethanol influence through the changes in percentage fractions of chemical energy released in combustion reaction and the variations on thermal properties for autoignition temperatures of fuels was analyzed. We verified how ethanol reduces the chemical energy released by gasoline combustion and how at low temperatures the gas phase fuels in thermal equilibrium have similar thermodynamic behavior. Theoretical results were compared with experimental data, when available, and showed agreement. Graphical Abstract Thermodynamic analysis of fuels in gas phase.

  19. Potentials and limitations of alternative fuels for diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gligorijević Radinko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary energy consumption in the world has increased continuously. The most important primary energy source is oil. The supply of automotive fuels today is based almost entirely on oil, and the demand for liquid transportation fuels worldwide will rise significantly in the next fifty years. Growing energy consumption and decreasing fossil resources are reasons for increasing prices of fossil fuel. Besides limited availability, contribution to greenhouse effect and pollutant emission represent another problem of fossil fuel. Both of these problems can be overcome by increased application of renewable biofuels. Therefore, great effort is made to supplement the primary energy sources by including renewable energies. There are alternative fuels 1st and 2nd generation. Some of them show high potential for reduction of engine out emission. But there are economical and technical barriers when such fuels are applied. This paper shows both advantage and disadvantage of alternative fuels, especially when used for diesel engines.

  20. Effect of measurement protocol on organic aerosol measurements of exhaust emissions from gasoline and diesel vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngseob; Sartelet, Karine; Seigneur, Christian; Charron, Aurélie; Besombes, Jean-Luc; Jaffrezo, Jean-Luc; Marchand, Nicolas; Polo, Lucie

    2016-09-01

    Exhaust emissions of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC) from passenger vehicles are usually estimated only for the particle phase via the total particulate matter measurements. However, they also need to be estimated for the gas phase, as they are semi-volatile. To better estimate SVOC emission factors of passenger vehicles, a measurement campaign using a chassis dynamometer was conducted with different instruments: (1) a constant volume sampling (CVS) system in which emissions were diluted with filtered air and sampling was performed on filters and polyurethane foams (PUF) and (2) a Dekati Fine Particle Sampler (FPS) in which emissions were diluted with purified air and sampled with on-line instruments (PTR-ToF-MS, HR-ToF-AMS, MAAP, CPC). Significant differences in the concentrations of organic carbon (OC) measured by the instruments are observed. The differences can be explained by sampling artefacts, differences between (1) the time elapsed during sampling (in the case of filter and PUF sampling) and (2) the time elapsed from emission to measurement (in the case of on-line instruments), which vary from a few seconds to 15 min, and by the different dilution factors. To relate elapsed times and measured concentrations of OC, the condensation of SVOC between the gas and particle phases is simulated with a dynamic aerosol model. The simulation results allow us to understand the relation between elapsed times and concentrations in the gas and particle phases. They indicate that the characteristic times to reach thermodynamic equilibrium between gas and particle phases may be as long as 8 min. Therefore, if the elapsed time is less than this characteristic time to reach equilibrium, gas-phase SVOC are not at equilibrium with the particle phase and a larger fraction of emitted SVOC will be in the gas phase than estimated by equilibrium theory, leading to an underestimation of emitted OC if only the particle phase is considered or if the gas-phase SVOC are estimated by equilibrium theory. Current European emission inventories for passenger cars do not yet estimate gas-phase SVOC emissions, although they may represent 60% of total emitted SVOC (gas + particle phases).

  1. SULFUR REDUCTION IN GASOLINE AND DIESEL FUELS BY EXTRACTION/ADSORPTION OF REFRACTORY DIBENZOTHIOPHENES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert J. Angelici

    2003-06-01

    Refractory 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene, which is difficult to remove from petroleum feedstocks, binds to the Ru in Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}(H{sub 2}O){sup 2+} by displacing the H{sub 2}O ligand. Thiophene, benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene (DBT) also react with Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}(H{sub 2}O){sup 2+} similarly. This binding ability of Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}(H{sub 2}O){sup 2+} has been used to remove over 50% of the DBT in simulated petroleum feedstocks by a biphasic extraction process. The extraction phase is readily regenerated by air-oxidation thereby completing a cyclic process that removes DBT from petroleum feedstocks. Solid phase extractants consisting of Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}(H{sub 2}O){sup 2+}, CpRu(CO){sub 2}(BF{sub 4}), CpFe(CO){sub 2}(C{sub 4}H{sub 8}){sup +} and AgX (where X = BF{sub 4}{sup -}, PF{sub 6}{sup -} or NO{sub 3}{sup -}) adsorbed on silica have also been used to remove DBT and 4,6-Me{sub 2}DBT from simulated petroleum feedstocks. The AgX/silica adsorbents remove 90% of the DBT and 4,6-Me{sub 2}DBT and can be regenerated and re-used for multiple extractions, which makes these adsorbents of potential industrial use for the removal of refractory dibenzothiophenes from petroleum feedstocks.

  2. 75 FR 26653 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Reformulated Gasoline and Diesel...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    ... produced with MTBE and placed a conditional ban on the use of any oxygenate other than ethanol as a... notes may occur, these possibilities do not alter our section 110(l) analysis. The likelihood of adverse air pollution impacts \\43\\ from such events is counterbalanced by a similar likelihood of air...

  3. Effect of gasoline diesel fuel mixture on the germination and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EJIRO

    survival of the seedlings and the growth of the plant were evaluated in this study. It involved adding 10, ... lead to water and oxygen deficits as well as to shortage of available forms of ... the soil environment can also limit its protective function,.

  4. Secondary organic aerosol formation exceeds primary particulate matter emissions for light-duty gasoline vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, T. D.; Presto, A. A.; May, A. A.; Nguyen, N. T.; Lipsky, E. M.; Donahue, N. M.; Gutierrez, A.; Zhang, M.; Maddox, C.; Rieger, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Maldonado, H.; Maricq, M. M.; Robinson, A. L.

    2014-05-01

    emitted by newer vehicles appears to be more efficient (higher yielding) in producing SOA than the emissions from older vehicles. About 30% of the nonmethane organic gas emissions from the newer (LEV1 and LEV2) vehicles could not be speciated, and the majority of the SOA formed from these vehicles appears to be associated with these unspeciated organics. By comparing this study with a companion study of diesel trucks, we conclude that both primary PM emissions and SOA production for light-duty gasoline vehicles are much greater than for late-model (2007 and later) on-road heavy-duty diesel trucks.

  5. 77 FR 35279 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Arizona; Update to Stage II Gasoline Vapor...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-13

    ... Gasoline Vapor Recovery Program; Change in the Definition of ``Gasoline'' To Exclude ``E85'' AGENCY... of gasoline from storage tanks to motor vehicle fuel tanks at gasoline dispensing sites, i.e., stage II vapor recovery. The revisions also amend the definition of ``gasoline'' to explicitly exclude...

  6. Calorific value for compositions with biodiesel of fat chicken and diesel oil; Valor calorifico para composicoes com biodiesel da gordura de frango e oleo diesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Marcelo Jose da [Universidade de Campinas (FEAGRI/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Agricola], email: marcelo.jose@feagri.unicamp.br; Souza, Samuel N.M. de; Souza, Abel A. de; Martins, Gislaine I. [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Parana (CCET/UNIOESTE), Cascavel, PR (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas], emails: ssouza@unioeste.br, abel.sza@hotmail.com, iastiaque@yahoo.com.br

    2011-07-01

    The biodiesel fuel is a renewable source of alternative fuel used in diesel cycle engines. The production of biodiesel involves the reaction of methanol with fatty acids of animal or vegetable. The production of biodiesel from chicken fat can be very attractive for some regions from Brazil with high poultry production, as in the Parana West and Santa Catarina West. In this study , the goal was the lower calorific value of the compositions between biodiesel and diesel oil: 100% Diesel oil (B0), 20% biodiesel (B20), 40% biodiesel (B40), 60% biodiesel (B60), 80% biodiesel (B80 ), 100% biodiesel (B100). The biodiesel used was acquired in the Centre for Development and Diffusion of technologies on the Assis Gurgacz College, in Cascavel city. The nominal production capacity of the unit is 900 liters on period of 8 hours. The model of the calorimeter used, was the E2K. The lower calorific value of B100 composition was 35.388 MJ kg-1 and the diesel oil was 41.299 MJ kg-1. With the measuring of the caloric value of six samples mix of diesel oil and biodiesel, was obtained a linear function decrease of the calorific value when increased it the proportion of biodiesel from chicken fat into fuel. (author)

  7. Coal fueled diesel system for stationary power applications-technology development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The use of coal as a fuel for diesel engines dates back to the early days of the development of the engine. Dr. Diesel envisioned his concept as a multi-fuel engine, with coal a prime candidate due to the fact that it was Germany`s primary domestic energy resource. It is interesting that the focus on coal burning diesel engines appears to peak about every twenty years as shortages of other energy resources increase the economic attractiveness of using coal. This periodic interest in coal started in Germany with the work of Diesel in the timeframe 1898-1906. Pawlikowski carried on the work from 1916 to 1928. Two German companies commercialized the technology prior to and during World War II. The next flurry of activity occurred in the United States in the period from 1957-69, with work done at Southwest Research Institute, Virginia Polytechnical University, and Howard University. The current period of activity started in 1978 with work sponsored by the Conservation and Renewable Energy Branch of the US Department of Energy. This work was done at Southwest Research Institute and by ThermoElectron at Sulzer Engine in Switzerland. In 1982, the Fossil Energy Branch of the US Department of Energy, through the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) initiated a concentrated effort to develop coal burning diesel and gas turbine engines. The diesel engine work in the METC sponsored program was performed at Arthur D. Little (Cooper-Bessemer as subcontractor), Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (now NIPER), Caterpillar, Detroit Diesel Corporation, General Motor Corporation (Electromotive Division), General Electric, Southwest Research Institute, and various universities and other research and development organizations. This DOE-METC coal engine RD & D initiative which spanned the 1982-1993 timeframe is the topic of this review document. The combustion of a coal-water fuel slurry in a diesel engine is described. The engine modifications necessary are discussed.

  8. COMBUSTION CHARACTERISTICS OF DIESEL ENGINE OPERATING ON JATROPHA OIL METHYL ESTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doddayaraganalu Amasegoda Dhananjaya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fuel crisis because of dramatic increase in vehicular population and environmental concerns have renewed interest of scientific community to look for alternative fuels of bio-origin such as vegetable oils. Vegetable oils can be produced from forests, vegetable oil crops, and oil bearing biomass materials. Non-edible vegetable oils such as jatropha oil, linseed oil, mahua oil, rice bran oil, karanji oil, etc., are potentially effective diesel substitute. Vegetable oils have reasonable energy content. Biodiesel can be used in its pure form or can be blended with diesel to form different blends. It can be used in diesel engines with very little or no engine modifications. This is because it has combustion characteristics similar to petroleum diesel. The current paper reports a study carried out to investigate the combustion, performance and emission characteristics of jatropha oil methyl ester and its blend B20 (80% petroleum diesel and 20% jatropha oil methyl ester and diesel fuel on a single-cylinder, four-stroke, direct injections, water cooled diesel engine. This study gives the comparative measures of brake thermal efficiency, brake specific energy consumption, smoke opacity, HC, NOx, ignition delay, cylinder peak pressure, and peak heat release rates. The engine performance in terms of higher thermal efficiency and lower emissions of blend B20 fuel operation was observed and compared with jatropha oil methyl ester and petroleum diesel fuel for injection timing of 20° bTDC, 23° bTDC and 26° bTDC at injection opening pressure of 220 bar.

  9. Analyses of extracted biodiesel and petroleum diesel exhaust particle and the effects on endothelial cell toxicity and antioxidant response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel (BD) is a renewable energy source and is readily substituted in diesel engines. Combustion of biodiesel is cleaner due to the efficiency of the fuel to completely combust. Biodiesel combustion emissions contain less CO, PAHs, aldehydes, and particulate matter (PM) mas...

  10. Comparative Cardiopulmonary Toxicity of exhausts from Soy-Based Biofuels and Diesel in Healthy and Hypertensive Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased use of renewable energy sources raise concerns about health effects of new emissions. We analyzed relative cardiopulmonary health effects of exhausts from (1) 100% soy biofuel (B100), (2) 20% soy biofuel + 80% low sulfur petroleum diesel (B20), and (3) 100% petroleum di...

  11. Renewable energy annual 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    The Renewable Energy Annual 1995 is the first in an expected series of annual reports the Energy Information Administration (EIA) intends to publish to provide a comprehensive assessment of renewable energy. This report presents the following information on the history, status, and prospects of renewable energy data: estimates of renewable resources; characterizations of renewable energy technologies; descriptions of industry infrastructures for individual technologies; evaluations of current market status; and assessments of near-term prospects for market growth. An international section is included, as well as two feature articles that discuss issues of importance for renewable energy as a whole. The report also contains a number of technical appendices and a glossary. The renewable energy sources included are biomass (wood), municipal solid waste, biomass-derived liquid fuels, geothermal, wind, and solar and photovoltaic.

  12. VT Renewable Energy Sites - Renewable Energy Professionals

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) The Renewable Energy Atlas of Vermont and this dataset were created to assist town energy committees, the Clean Energy Development Fund and other...

  13. Renewable Energy: Policy Considerations for Deploying Renewables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    This information paper accompanies the IEA publication Deploying Renewables 2011: Best and Future Policy Practice (IEA, 2011a). It provides more detailed data and analysis on policies for Deploying Renewables, and is intended to complement the main publication. It provides an account of the strategic drivers underpinning renewable energy (RE) technology deployment (energy security, economic development and environment protection) and assesses RE technologies with respect to these drivers, including an estimate of GHG emissions reductions due to RE technologies. The paper also explores the different barriers to deploying renewables at a given stage of market maturity and discusses what tools policy makers can avail of to succeed in removing deployment barriers. An additional topical highlight explores the challenges associated with accelerating the diffusion of RE technologies in developing countries.

  14. Practice of increasing gasoline production from processing low-quality crude oil%劣质原油加工企业增产汽油的实践

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟湘生; 雷平

    2012-01-01

    In a domestic oil refinery with a capacity of over 10.0 million tons per year processing high-sulfur low-quality crude oil, the gasoline production is increased (through reducing diesel to gasoline ratio) by 25,000 tons a month by production optimization, increasing FCC feedstocks, extending CCR feed, overall plant process flow optimization, optimized operation, optimized gasoline blending and controlling product specifications, etc. As the prices difference between gasoline and diesel is 499 RMB ¥/t, the annual economic benefit increase is 1.5 × 108 RMB ¥ . The results show that, the refineries processing low-quality crude oil can improve their profitability by increasing gasoline production and at the same time meet the market demand for gasoline.%介绍了国内某单套系列千万吨级炼油厂为降低柴汽比、增产汽油,在加工高硫劣质原油条件下,通过优化生产方案、增产催化裂化原料、拓宽连续重整原料、优化全厂工艺流程、精细化操作、优化汽油调合方案、实行产品质量卡边控制等多项措施,每月增产汽油约25kt.汽油与柴油净价差按499 RMB(¥)/t计,全年累计增效1.5 ×108 RMB(¥).实践结果表明,劣质原油加工企业增产汽油工作取得了较好的成效,提高了企业经济效益,同时为满足市场汽油需求做出了贡献.

  15. 40 CFR 80.522 - May used motor oil be dispensed into diesel motor vehicles or nonroad diesel engines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... diesel motor vehicles or nonroad diesel engines? 80.522 Section 80.522 Protection of Environment... Motor Vehicle Diesel Fuel; Nonroad, Locomotive, and Marine Diesel Fuel; and ECA Marine Fuel Motor Vehicle Diesel Fuel Standards and Requirements § 80.522 May used motor oil be dispensed into diesel...

  16. Gasoline Consumption Dynamics in Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua

    OpenAIRE

    Fullerton, Thomas M., Jr.; Munoz Sapien, Gabriel; Barraza de Anda, Martha P.; Dominguez Ruvalcaba, Lisbeily

    2011-01-01

    This research analyzes short-run gasoline consumption dynamics in Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, México. Parameter estimation is carried out using linear transfer function ARIMA analysis. This market is of interest because it is influenced by regional, national, and international economic conditions due to its location on the border with the United States. Explanatory variables that satisfy the significance criterion include the real price of gasoline in Ciudad Juárez, the price of gasoline in Ciu...

  17. Adiabatic turbocompound diesel engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamo, R.; Bryzik, W.

    1984-02-01

    The research and development of an adiabatic turbocompound engine have shown that the concept is feasible. The ability to meet the performance and sociability goals of the future power plants has been demonstrated. Low brake specific fuel consumption, low smoke and particulates, better NO /SUB x/ -BSFC trade-off, excellent multifuel capability, white smoke suppression, and potentially lower maintenance and greater reliability and durability are some of the attributes. The absence of the water cooling system adds to its attractiveness because of lower installed weight, cost, and reduction in parasitic losses. The operating environment of an adiabatic engine is shown as the basis for analysis and designing of adiabatic components. The types of material which can satisfy the needs of an adiabatic engine are presented. These materials include high temperature metals, high performance ceramics, and glass ceramics. The use of a turbocompound system to utilize the increased exhaust energy of an adiabatic engine is covered. A minimum fuel consumption of 0.285 lb/bhp-hr was achieved at 200 psi BMEP. Although the technical feasibility and viability of an adiabatic engine was demonstrated, the adiabatic diesel engine has problems which must be solved before it becomes a commercially viable product. These problem areas where more work is required are discussed.

  18. OXIDATIVE DNA DAMAGE IN DIESEL BUS MECHANICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rationale: Diesel exposure has been associated with adverse health effects, including susceptibility to asthma, allergy and cancer. Previous epidemiological studies demonstrated increased cancer incidence among workers exposed to diesel. This is likely due to oxid...

  19. The Adlard Coles book of diesel engines

    CERN Document Server

    Bartlett, Tim

    2013-01-01

    In clear, jargon-free English The Adlard Coles Book of Diesel Engines explains how a diesel engine works,and how to look after it, and takes into account developments inengine technology. Includes helpful tables and troubleshooting checklists.

  20. Micro-financing of renewable energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunse, Maike; Wallbaum, Holger [triple innova (Germany); Dienst, Carmen [Wuppertal Inst. for Climate, Environment, Energy (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    While improved energy services have many quality of life benefits like lighting or television, the productive use of electricity can also help to reduce poverty, leading to increased profitability and productivity for micro, small and medium enterprises, and small industries. The remoteness of rural locations usually makes it difficult to expand electricity supply through a centralised grid system. Therefore people living in off-grid regions often rely on expensive fossil fuels like diesel and kerosene. People in remote areas often do not have the financial background to afford the initial costs for renewable energy applications. Micro-financing of renewable energy systems is a possible answer to provide financial services and support productive activities in a sustainable manner for low-income people. There are various types of microfinance institutions (MFIs), ranging from local cooperatives, NGOs, credit unions, private commercial banks and non-bank financial institutions as well as parts of state-owned banks.To underline the benefits of micro financing renewable energy systems, good practice projects of local microfinance activities are presented. These projects have been identified in the course of WISIONS, an initiative of the Wuppertal Inst. for Climate, Environment and Energy with support of ProEvolution, a Swiss-based foundation. The two different approaches of the project support on one side the realisation of new project ideas (SEPS - Sustainable Energy Project Support) and on the other spread successful examples (PREP - Promotion of Resource Efficiency Projects). Through the PREP field of action, good practices in energy and resource efficiency are spread worldwide through the Internet and brochures. In the 5th PREP-brochure of WISIONS on 'Microfinance and Renewable Energy' five good-practice examples are shown that link this promising financing system with modern and sustainable renewable energy technologies.

  1. Investigations of effects of pilot injection with change in level of compression ratio in a common rail diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajarlawar Nilesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available These day diesel engines are gaining lots of attention as prime movers for various source of transportation. It offers better drive ability, very good low end torque and importantly the lower CO2 emission. Diesel engines are bridging the gap between gasoline and diesel engines. Better noise vibration and harshness levels of gasoline engine are realized to great extent in diesel engine, thanks to common rail direct injection system. Common rail injection system is now well known entity. Its unique advantage is flexible in operation. In common rail injection system, number of injection prior and after main injection at different injection pressure is possible. Due to multiple injections, gain in emission reduction as well as noise has been already experienced and demonstrated by researcher in the past. However, stringent emission norms for diesel engine equipped vehicle demands for further lower emission of oxides of nitrogen (NOx and particulate matter (PM. In the present paper, authors attempted to study the effect of multiple injections in combination with two level of compression ratio. The aim was to study the combustion behavior with the reduced compression ratio which is going to be tried out as low temperature combustion concept in near future. The results were compared with the current level of compression ratio. Experiments were carried out in 2.2L cubic capacity engine with two levels of compression ratios. Pilot injection separation and quantities were varied keeping the main injection, rail pressure, boost pressure and EGR rate constant. Cylinder pressure traces and gross heat release rates were measured and analyzed to understand the combustion behavior.

  2. Comparison of alcogas aviation fuel with export aviation gasoline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, V R; Sparrow, S W; Harper, D R

    1921-01-01

    Mixtures of gasoline and alcohol when used in internal combustion engines designed for gasoline have been found to possess the advantage of alcohol in withstanding high compression without "knock" while retaining advantages of gasoline with regard to starting characteristics. Test of such fuels for maximum power-producing ability and fuel economy at various rates of consumption are thus of practical importance, with especial reference to high-compression engine development. This report discusses the results of tests which compares the performance of alcogas with x gasoline (export grade) as a standard.

  3. [Analysis of sulfur compounds in residue fluid catalytic cracking gasoline].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yong-mei; Liu, Wen-hui; Liu, Yao-fang

    2002-05-01

    Sulfur compounds in residue fluid catalytic cracking (RFCC) gasolines from Refinery of SINOPEC Beijing Yanshan Company and Refinery of Shijiazhuang were analyzed by gas chromatograph connected with flame photometric detector (FPD) and atomic emission detector (AED). Twelve and 26 kinds of sulfur compounds were detected by AED in RFCC gasolines from Yanshan and Shijiazhuang respectively. Only 0 and 19 kinds of sulfur compounds were found by FPD in these two gasolines respectively. The experimental results demonstrated that AED is more sensitive and selective to sulfur compounds than FPD. It also indicated that thiophenes were the major sulfur compounds in the RFCC gasoline. In addition, mercaptan, sulfoether and disulfide species were found.

  4. Case study: flame arresters and exploding gasoline containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselbring, Lori C

    2006-03-17

    This paper describes the case study of a portable plastic gasoline container explosion and fire. While working at home on a science project to determine the burn rates of different types of wood fuel, a 14-year-old boy was severely burned after flames traveled back up into the portable gasoline container and exploded. A witness heard the explosion and reports that the flames went perhaps 10 ft in the air. It is shown by experimentation that a flame arrester installed in the pour opening of the portable gasoline container would have prevented an explosion inside the gasoline container.

  5. Solvents addition influence on the automotive gasoline gum formation; Influencia da adicao de solventes na formacao de goma em gasolinas automotivas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Diocleciano P. dos; Teixeira, Leonardo Sena Gomes; Almeida, Selmo Queiroz; Pontes, Luiz Antonio Magalhaes; Vitor Sobrinho, Eledir; Guimaraes, Paulo Roberto Britto; Vianna, Regina Ferreira [Universidade Salvador - UNIFACS, Salvador, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia e Arquitetura]. E-mail: leonardoteixeira@unifacs.br

    2003-07-01

    The unlawful addition of hydrocarbons such as kerosene, thinner, turpentine and diesel oil to gasoline has been often observed in Brazil lately. This not only results in undeserved market advantage, but may also cause serious damage to the consumer and to the environment, since it may change several physicochemical properties of the fuel, reduce engine performance and increase fuel consumption. Among the former, some of the most important are the distillation curve, octane number and the tendency for gum formation. This contribution is concerned with the analysis of the influence of a number of commercially available hydrocarbons on the tendency for gum formation of gasoline. The analytical method used was ASTM D381, and results indicate that for some of the hydrocarbons tested there is a marked increase in gum formation, and in some cases may be higher than the limit specified by law. (author)

  6. Smoke opacity in agricultural tractor in function of interior and metropolitano diesel mixture in mamona biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabile, Rubens Andre [Universidade de Sao Paulo (EESC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia; Lopes, Afonso; Camara, Felipe Thomas da; Grotta, Danilo Cesar Checchio; Furlani, Carlos Eduardo Angeli [Universidade Estadual Paulista (DER/UNESP), Jaboticabal, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Rural

    2008-07-01

    The great demand for energy sources by production systems allied to scarcity of fossil fuels has motivated the development and production of biodiesel, which is a fuel produced from renewable sources. Given that, the aim of this study was to compare smoke opacity of an agricultural tractor engine, working with metropolitano and interior diesel mixed to mamona biodiesel, in seven proportions. The tests were conducted in the Departamento de Engenharia Rural of UNESP/Jaboticabal - SP. The results showed that the diesel type did influence opacity of smoke, and metropolitano diesel showed best quality. It was also observed that, as biodiesel proportion increased, smoke opacity decreased until B75, turning to increase to B100. (author)

  7. Impacts of renewable fuel regulation and production on agriculture, energy, and welfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhail, Lihong Lu

    The purpose of this dissertation is to study the impact of U.S. federal renewable fuel regulations on energy and agriculture commodity markets and welfare. We consider two federal ethanol policies: the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) contained in the Energy Security and Independence Act of 2007 and tax credits to ethanol blenders contained in the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008. My first essay estimates the distribution of short-run impacts of changing federal ethanol policies on U.S. energy prices, agricultural commodity prices, and welfare through a stochastic partial equilibrium model of U.S. corn, ethanol, and gasoline markets. My second essay focuses on studying the price behavior of the renewable fuel credit (RFC) market, which is the mechanism developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to meet the RFS. RFCs are a tradable, bankable, and borrowable accounting mechanism to ensure that all obligated parties use a mandated level of renewable fuel. I first develop a conceptual framework to understand how the market works and then apply stochastic dynamic programming to simulate prices for RFCs, examine the sensitivity of prices to relevant shocks, and estimate RFC option premiums. My third essay assesses the impact of policy led U.S. ethanol on the markets of global crude oil and U.S. gasoline using a structural Vector Auto Regression model of global crude oil, U.S. gasoline and ethanol markets.

  8. Fuel preheater for diesel engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crossett, J.J.; Crossett, M.C.

    1987-10-13

    A unit for preheating fuel for diesel engines is described having an engine coolant system and a lubrication system utilizing a flowable lubricant. The unit comprises a housing providing a fluid-tight enclosure, a heat exchange coil positioned in and spaced above the bottom of the enclosure and having loops providing a continuous path for the flow of the fuel to be heated. The heat exchange coil has at least one foot of length for each 25 cubic inches of volume of the enclosure and a diesel fuel outlet in the housing connected to one end of the heat exchange coil, a diesel fuel outlet in the housing and connected to the other end of the heat exchange coil, an inlet in the housing for connection of the interior of the enclosure surrounding the coil to a source of a hot heat exchange medium in a diesel engine so as to provide a source of heat for heating the heat exchange coil. An outlet near the top of the housing provides for return of the heat exchange medium to a diesel engine, and spray tube means extend horizontally from the inlet for the heat exchange medium and along the bottom of the housing beneath substantially the entire length of the heat exchange coil. The means have upwardly directed openings to provide for discharge of the heat exchange medium toward the coil and agitation of the heat exchange medium in the enclosure around and over the heat exchange coil.

  9. Gasoline prices, gasoline consumption, and new-vehicle fuel economy: Evidence for a large sample of countries

    OpenAIRE

    Paul J Burke; Shuhei Nishitateno

    2011-01-01

    Countries differ considerably in terms of the price drivers pay for gasoline. This paper uses data for a large sample of countries to provide new evidence on the implications of these differences for the consumption of gasoline for road transport and the fuel economy of new vehicles. To address the potential for simultaneity bias in ordinary least squares estimation, we use a country's oil reserves as an instrument for its average gasoline pump price. We obtain estimates of the long-run price...

  10. 40 CFR 63.11087 - What requirements must I meet for gasoline storage tanks if my facility is a bulk gasoline...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline storage tanks if my facility is a bulk gasoline terminal, pipeline breakout station, or pipeline... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Source Category: Gasoline... § 63.11087 What requirements must I meet for gasoline storage tanks if my facility is a bulk...

  11. 40 CFR 63.11088 - What requirements must I meet for gasoline loading racks if my facility is a bulk gasoline...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline loading racks if my facility is a bulk gasoline terminal, pipeline breakout station, or pipeline... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Source Category: Gasoline... § 63.11088 What requirements must I meet for gasoline loading racks if my facility is a bulk...

  12. 78 FR 72033 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Florida: General Requirements and Gasoline...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-02

    ... and Gasoline Vapor Control; Correcting Amendment AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... ] Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), related to the State's gasoline vapor recovery program. This... related to Florida's gasoline vapor recovery program SIP provision. In summary, this action corrects...

  13. Clean Coal Diesel Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Wilson

    2006-10-31

    A Clean Coal Diesel project was undertaken to demonstrate a new Clean Coal Technology that offers technical, economic and environmental advantages over conventional power generating methods. This innovative technology (developed to the prototype stage in an earlier DOE project completed in 1992) enables utilization of pre-processed clean coal fuel in large-bore, medium-speed, diesel engines. The diesel engines are conventional modern engines in many respects, except they are specially fitted with hardened parts to be compatible with the traces of abrasive ash in the coal-slurry fuel. Industrial and Municipal power generating applications in the 10 to 100 megawatt size range are the target applications. There are hundreds of such reciprocating engine power-plants operating throughout the world today on natural gas and/or heavy fuel oil.

  14. Study of Micro Grid Hybrid System of Photovoltaic and Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novitasari Dwi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia has abundant potentials of new and renewable energy that can be used for electricity generation, especially in rural areas which have no access for grid electricity yet. The energy resources can be from solar, water, biomass or biofuel. Many villagers still use diesel generators to produce electricity in their villages. It is considered expensive because fuel price in rural areas increases 2-3 times than the normal price due to transportation cost. Hybrid system using renewable energy resources is one of the solutions to produce electricity in affordable cost for rural area. The idea is to combine diesel generators and photovoltaic toproduce electricity. Moreover, the diesel engine fuel can be replaced with biofuel. This study will analyze the hybrid system in a small scale which consists of 1kWp photovoltaic and 3 kW diesel engine. Electric load power will vary. The system is controlled by a single bidirectional inverter whichconverts power from DC to AC and vice versa

  15. Renewable smart materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Chan; Mun, Seongcheol; Ko, Hyun-U.; Zhai, Lindong; Kafy, Abdullahil; Kim, Jaehwan

    2016-07-01

    The use of renewable materials is essential in future technologies to harmonize with our living environment. Renewable materials can maintain our resources from the environment so as to overcome degradation of natural environmental services and diminished productivity. This paper reviews recent advancement of renewable materials for smart material applications, including wood, cellulose, chitin, lignin, and their sensors, actuators and energy storage applications. To further improve functionality of renewable materials, hybrid composites of inorganic functional materials are introduced by incorporating carbon nanotubes, titanium dioxide and tin oxide conducting polymers and ionic liquids. Since renewable materials have many advantages of biocompatible, sustainable, biodegradable, high mechanical strength and versatile modification behaviors, more research efforts need to be focused on the development of renewable smart materials.

  16. The renewable chemicals industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus H.; Rass-Hansen, J.; Marsden, Charlotte Clare

    2008-01-01

    The possibilities for establishing a renewable chemicals industry featuring renewable resources as the dominant feedstock rather than fossil resources are discussed in this Concept. Such use of biomass can potentially be interesting from both an economical and ecological perspective. Simple...... per kilogram of desired product to illustrate in which processes the use of renewable resources lead to the most substantial reduction of CO2 emissions. The steps towards a renewable chemicals industry will most likely involve intimate integration of biocatalytic and conventional catalytic processes...... and educational tools are introduced to allow initial estimates of which chemical processes could be viable. Specifically, fossil and renewables value chains are used to indicate where renewable feedstocks can be optimally valorized. Additionally, C factors are introduced that specify the amount of CO2 produced...

  17. Policies for Renewable Heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    This paper builds on IEA publications, Deploying Renewables, Principles for Effective Policies and Deploying Renewables, Best and Future Policy Practice, that discuss the 'integrated policy approach,' whereby renewable energy technologies require different support policies at different stages of their maturity pathways. The paper discusses how the integrated policy approach applies to renewable heat. It attempts to provide guidance for policy-makers on renewable heat throughout the different phases of the policy lifecycle, allowing for the specific challenges of renewable heat and needs of the many stakeholders involved. Stimulating a market for heat involves challenges that are different and, often, more difficult to overcome than in the electricity and transport sectors.

  18. Resettable regime of diesel lubrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nechaev E. P.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A new method of engine oil saturation by microelements has been presented in the paper; it has been tested on vessels of the fishing fleet and in conditions of prolonged operation in the coastal diesel-engine power plants. The paper considers the results of performance tests of the most common diesel power plants of 6ЧН 25/34 type with the tribochemical reductant oil (TRO apparatus providing tribochemical lubrication. During comparative trials of two diesels the samples of lubricating oil m-10B2 and m-10 have been periodically collected and subjected to spectral analysis. In the samples the number of the following key microelements has been determined: iron (Fe, aluminum (Al, zinc (Zn, sodium (Na, barium (Ba, calcium (Ca, tin (Sn, phosphorus (P, potassium (K, sulfur (S, chlorine (Cl, silicon (Si. During the operation the processes of microelements' extraction and destruction in diesel motor oils evaluated by the relevant coefficients have been clearly manifested. Analyzing the obtained experimental data it should be noted that in both experiments the total balance of the controlled 15 trace elements has been balanced and approached within 1640.5–1650.3 g/t. And the greater measure refers to conventional oil. Stabilization and improvement of physical and chemical properties of motor oil in operation of a diesel engine is possible from the authors' viewpoint only in the tribochemical lubrication mode using the TRO apparatus and created hydrodynamic module – dispersant. The past performance tests suggest the possibility of use as a lubricant the conventional (pure oil under actual operating conditions. When in the tribochemical mode of diesel engine lubrication it has been established that in conventional (pure oil the oily medium has been formed with a spectrum of microelements equivalent to engine oil filler.

  19. 低辛烷值汽油部分扩散压燃的燃烧与排放特性%Combustion and emission characteristics of low octane number gasoline with partially diffused compression ignition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨洪强; 帅石金; 付海超; 王志; 王建昕; 周向进

    2011-01-01

    Partially diffused compression ignition mode was combined with low octane number gasoline to meet the more strict emission and fuel economy standards in future, as well as to lower costs. Experimental comparison was carried out based on a two-cylinder diesel engine fueled with low octane number gasoline and conventional diesel fuel, respectively. Normal 0# diesel and gasoline with research octane number (RON) of 46 and 56 were tested. Smoke numbers were measured by FBY-2 Bosch smoke meter, and the gaseous emissions were measured using AVL SESAM 4.0 multi-gas analyzer. Performance of fuel economy, soot emission and gaseous pollutants were compared and analyzed to show that the fuel consumption is even lower than that of diesel when burning low octane number gasoline due to a rapid combustion of the gasoline with the smoke markedly reduced, especially under high load and high speed conditions; however, the total hydrocarbon (THC) emission is higher than that of burning conventional diesel fuel.%为满足对未来汽车发动机更加严格的排放法规和油耗标准,且降低成本,该文将汽油部分扩散压燃模式和低辛烷值汽油相结合,在一台两缸常规柴油机上进行了实验对比。实验采用0#柴油和辛烷值46、56的汽油,用FBY-2型波许烟度计测量排气烟度,用AVLSESAM4.0多组分排放仪测量气态污染物;测量并对比了发动机的油耗、烟度以及各种气态污染物的排放浓度等主要性能参数。结果表明:汽油部分扩散压燃模式的燃烧速度加快,使油耗达到甚至略低于常规柴油压燃模式的水平;高速高负荷时,碳烟排放显著降低;但总碳氢化合物排放明显高于常规柴油燃烧模式。

  20. Reeds diesel engine troubleshooting handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Pickthall, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Most diesel engines will develop a problem at some point in their lives, but armed with the right knowledge a skipper needn't worry. The Reeds Diesel Engine Troubleshooting Handbook is a compact, pocket-sized guide to finding solutions to all of the most common engine problems, and many of the less common ones too. The perfect format for quick reference on board, this book will help skippers fix troublesome engines themselves, avoiding costly engineer fees if the problem is simple to sort out, or enabling an emergency patch-up for a more serious problem until they can get back to port. Each to

  1. Demand response impacts on off-grid hybrid photovoltaic-diesel generator microgrids

    OpenAIRE

    Aaron St. Leger

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid microgrids consisting of diesel generator set(s) and converter based power sources, such as solar photovoltaic or wind sources, offer an alternative to generator based off-grid power systems. The hybrid approach has been shown to be economical in many off-grid applications and can result in reduced generator operation, fuel requirements, and maintenance. However, the intermittent nature of demand and renewable energy sources typically require energy storage, such as batteries, to prope...

  2. Renewable energy resources

    CERN Document Server

    Twidell, John

    2015-01-01

    Renewable Energy Resources is a numerate and quantitative text covering the full range of renewable energy technologies and their implementation worldwide. Energy supplies from renewables (such as from biofuels, solar heat, photovoltaics, wind, hydro, wave, tidal, geothermal, and ocean-thermal) are essential components of every nation's energy strategy, not least because of concerns for the local and global environment, for energy security and for sustainability. Thus in the years between the first and this third edition, most renewable energy technologies have grown from fledgling impact to s

  3. Laminar burning velocities at elevated pressures for gasoline and gasoline surrogates associated with RON

    KAUST Repository

    Mannaa, Ossama

    2015-06-01

    The development and validation of a new gasoline surrogate using laminar flame speed as a target parameter is presented. Laminar burning velocities were measured using a constant-volume spherical vessel with ignition at the center of the vessel. Tested fuels included iso-octane, n-heptane, toluene, various mixtures of primary reference fuels (PRFs) and toluene reference fuels (TRFs) and three gasoline fuels of 70, 85 and 95 RON (FACE J, C and F) at the initial temperature of 358K and pressures up to 0.6MPa in the equivalence ratio ranging from 0.8 to 1.6. Normalized laminar burning velocity data were mapped into a tri-component mixture space at different experimental conditions to allocate different gasoline surrogates for different gasoline fuels, having RON of 70, 85 and 95. The surrogates of TRF-70-4 (17.94% iso-C8H18 +42.06% n-C7H16 +40% C7H8), TRF-85-1 (77.4% iso-C8H18 +17.6% n-C7H16 +5% C7H8), and TRF-95-1 (88.47% iso-C8H18 +6.53% n-C7H16 +5% C7H8) of RON 70, 85 and 95, respectively, are shown to successfully emulate the burning rate characteristics of the gasoline fuels associated with these RONs under the various experimental conditions investigated. An empirical correlation was derived to obtain laminar burning velocities at pressures that are experimentally unattainable as high as 3.0MPa. Laminar burning velocities were comparable to the simulated values for lean and stoichiometric flames but they were relatively higher than the simulated values for rich flames. A flame instability assessment was conducted by determining Markstein length, critical Pecklet number, and critical Karlovitz number at the onset of flame instability.

  4. Waste cooking oil as source for renewable fuel in Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allah, F. Um Min; Alexandru, G.

    2016-08-01

    Biodiesel is non-toxic renewable fuel which has the potential to replace diesel fuel with little or no modifications in diesel engine. Waste cooking oil can be used as source to produce biodiesel. It has environmental and economic advantages over other alternative fuels. Biodiesel production from transesterification is affected by water content, type f alcohol, catalyst type and concentration, alcohol to oil ratio, temperature, reaction rate, pH, free fatty acid (FFA) and stirrer speed. These parameters and their effect on transesterification are discussed in this paper. Properties of biodiesel obtained from waste cooking oil are measured according to local standards by distributor and their comparison with European biodiesel standard is also given in this paper. Comparison has shown that these properties lie within the limits of the EN 14214 standard. Furthermore emission performance of diesel engine for biodiesel-diesel blends has resulted in reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Romanian fuel market can ensure energy security by mixing fuel share with biodiesel produced from waste cooking oil. Life cycle assessment of biodiesel produced from waste cooking oil has shown its viability economically and environmentally.

  5. Compact gasoline fuel processor for passenger vehicle APU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severin, Christopher; Pischinger, Stefan; Ogrzewalla, Jürgen

    Due to the increasing demand for electrical power in today's passenger vehicles, and with the requirements regarding fuel consumption and environmental sustainability tightening, a fuel cell-based auxiliary power unit (APU) becomes a promising alternative to the conventional generation of electrical energy via internal combustion engine, generator and battery. It is obvious that the on-board stored fuel has to be used for the fuel cell system, thus, gasoline or diesel has to be reformed on board. This makes the auxiliary power unit a complex integrated system of stack, air supply, fuel processor, electrics as well as heat and water management. Aside from proving the technical feasibility of such a system, the development has to address three major barriers:start-up time, costs, and size/weight of the systems. In this paper a packaging concept for an auxiliary power unit is presented. The main emphasis is placed on the fuel processor, as good packaging of this large subsystem has the strongest impact on overall size. The fuel processor system consists of an autothermal reformer in combination with water-gas shift and selective oxidation stages, based on adiabatic reactors with inter-cooling. The configuration was realized in a laboratory set-up and experimentally investigated. The results gained from this confirm a general suitability for mobile applications. A start-up time of 30 min was measured, while a potential reduction to 10 min seems feasible. An overall fuel processor efficiency of about 77% was measured. On the basis of the know-how gained by the experimental investigation of the laboratory set-up a packaging concept was developed. Using state-of-the-art catalyst and heat exchanger technology, the volumes of these components are fixed. However, the overall volume is higher mainly due to mixing zones and flow ducts, which do not contribute to the chemical or thermal function of the system. Thus, the concept developed mainly focuses on minimization of those

  6. Determination of Ethanol in Gasoline by FT-IR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, Alfred, Jr.; Goldcamp, Michael J.; Barrett, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Ethanol is the primary oxygenate in gasoline in the United States. Gasoline containing various percentages of ethanol is readily available in the market place. A laboratory experiment has been developed in which the percentage of ethanol in hexanes can easily be determined using the O-H and alkane C-H absorptions in an infrared spectrum. Standard…

  7. 30 CFR 57.4461 - Gasoline use restrictions underground.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gasoline use restrictions underground. 57.4461... NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Fire... underground. If gasoline is used underground to power internal combustion engines— (a) The mine shall be...

  8. 40 CFR 52.255 - Gasoline transfer vapor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gasoline transfer vapor control. 52.255... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS California § 52.255 Gasoline transfer vapor control. (a) “Gasoline” means any petroleum distillate having a Reid vapor pressure of 4 pounds or...

  9. ANALYSIS OF CONSUMER PREFERENCES ON THE MARKET AUTOMOBILE GASOLINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana A. Safina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the statistical analysis based on results of selective investigation of customers in the market of automobile gasoline is offered. The analysis makes the possibility for finding preferences of respondents in choices of gasoline brand depending of social and economics status of customers.

  10. 46 CFR 185.352 - Ventilation of gasoline machinery spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation of gasoline machinery spaces. 185.352 Section 185.352 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS... machinery spaces. The mechanical exhaust for the ventilation of a gasoline machinery space, required...

  11. Experimental investigations of the hydrogen addition effects on diesel engine performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirica, I.; Pana, C.; Negurescu, N.; Cernat, A.; Nutu, C.

    2016-08-01

    In the global content regarding the impact on the environmental of the gases emissions resulted from the fossil fuels combustion, an interest aspect discussed on the 21st Session of the Conference of the Parties from the 2015 Paris Climate Conference and the gradual diminution of the worldwide oil reserves contribute to the necessity of searching of alternative energy from durable and renewable resources. At the use of hydrogen as addition in air to diesel engine, the level of CO, HC and smoke from the exhaust gases will decrease due to the improvement of the combustion process. At low and medium partial loads and low hydrogen energetic ratios used the NOX emission level can decrease comparative to classic diesel engine. The hydrogen use as fuel for diesel engine leads to the improving of the energetic and emissions performance of the engine due to combustion improvement and reduction of carbon content. The paper presents, in a comparative way, results of the experimental researches carried on a truck compression ignition engine fuelled with diesel fuel and with hydrogen diesel fuel and hydrogen as addition in air at different engine operation regimes. The results obtained during experimental investigations show better energetic and pollution performance of the engine fuelled with hydrogen as addition in air comparative to classic engine. The influences of hydrogen addition on engine operation are shown.

  12. Production and analysis of bio-diesel from non-edible oils. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murugesan, A.; Chinnusamy, T.R.; Krishnan, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, K.S. Rangasamy College of Technology, Tiruchengode 637215, Tamil Nadu (India); Umarani, C. [Department of Chemistry, Government Arts College, Salem (India); Subramanian, R. [Department of Automobile Engineering, Institute of Road and Transport Technology, Erode, Tamil Nadu (India); Neduzchezhain, N. [Sabbatical, Department of Mechanical Engineering, BITS, Pilani, Dubai (United Arab Emirates)

    2009-05-15

    Bio-diesel has become more attractive recently because of its environmental benefits and it is derived from renewable resources, bio degradable and non-toxic in nature. Several bio-diesel production methods have been developed, among which transesterification using alkali catalyst gives high level of conversion of triglycerides to their corresponding methyl ester in short reaction time. The process of transesterification is affected by the reaction condition, molar ratio of alcohol to oil, type of alcohol, type and amount of catalysts, reaction time and temperature, purity of reactants free fatty acids and water content of oils or fats. In this work, an attempt has been made on review of bio-diesel production, methods of analyzing, bio-diesel standard, resources available, process developed performance in internal combustion engines, teardown analysis of bio-diesel B20 operated vehicle, recommendation for development of bio-fuels, environmental considerations, economic aspects and advantages. The technical tools and process for monitoring the transesterification reaction like TLC, GC, HPLC, GPC, {sup 1}H NMR and NIR have also been summarized in this paper. (author)

  13. Effect of exhaust gas recirculation on diesel engine nitrogen oxide reduction operating with jojoba methyl ester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleh, H.E. [Mechanical Power Department, Faculty of Engineering, Mattaria, Helwan University, 9 k Eltaaweniat, Nasr Road, P.O. Box 11718, Cairo (Egypt)

    2009-10-15

    Jojoba methyl ester (JME) has been used as a renewable fuel in numerous studies evaluating its potential use in diesel engines. These studies showed that this fuel is good gas oil substitute but an increase in the nitrogenous oxides emissions was observed at all operating conditions. The aim of this study mainly was to quantify the efficiency of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) when using JME fuel in a fully instrumented, two-cylinder, naturally aspirated, four-stroke direct injection diesel engine. The tests were carried out in three sections. Firstly, the measured performance and exhaust emissions of the diesel engine operating with diesel fuel and JME at various speeds under full load are determined and compared. Secondly, tests were performed at constant speed with two loads to investigate the EGR effect on engine performance and exhaust emissions including nitrogenous oxides (NO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO), unburned hydrocarbons (HC) and exhaust gas temperatures. Thirdly, the effect of cooled EGR with high ratio at full load on engine performance and emissions was examined. The results showed that EGR is an effective technique for reducing NO{sub x} emissions with JME fuel especially in light-duty diesel engines. With the application of the EGR method, the CO and HC concentration in the engine-out emissions increased. For all operating conditions, a better trade-off between HC, CO and NO{sub x} emissions can be attained within a limited EGR rate of 5-15% with very little economy penalty. (author)

  14. Effects of fossil diesel and biodiesel blends on the performances and emissions of agricultural tractor engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomić Milan D.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid growth in the energy consumption has conditioned the need for discovering the alternative energy resources which would be adapted to the existing engine constructions and which would satisfy the additional criteria related to the renewability, ecology and reliability of use. Introduction of biodiesel has been the focus of attention over the last ten years. The aim of this research is to investigate the influence of biodiesel on the performances and exhaust gas emissions of medium power agricultural tractor engines (37-66 kW. The reason for the selection of this category is that those types of tractors are most frequently used in agriculture. In this research biodiesel produced from sunflower oil was blended with fossil diesel. Biodiesel, fossil diesel and fossil diesel blends with 15, 25, 50 and 75%v/v biodiesel were tested for their influence on the engine performances and emissions. The testing was performed on a four-cylinder diesel engine with 48 kW rated power. The experimental research on the engine performances was conducted in compliance with OECD test CODE 2, and the exhaust gas emissions were tested according to the ISO 8178-4, C1. The use of biodiesel and fossil diesel blends reduced the engine power with the increase of biodiesel share in the blend. However, the exception was the blend with 15%v/v biodiesel which induced a slight increase in the engine power. Depending on the share of biodiesel in the blend all blends fuels showed increased specific fuel consumption compared to the fossil diesel. Thermal efficiency increased as a result of more complete combustion of biodiesel and fossil diesel blends. The exhaust gas emissions implied that the addition of biodiesel reduced the content of CO2 and CO, as well as the temperature of exhaust gases, but it increased the emission of NOx.

  15. Study on Reduction of Sulfur Content in FCC Gasoline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hou Dianguo

    2003-01-01

    Reduction of sulfur content in FCC gasoline was studied in a fixed fluid bed (FFB) unit by using metal-modified LV-23 FCC catalyst. The results showed that the sulfur content in FCC gasoline could be reduced with LV-23 catalyst modified with zinc, palladium, zinc-palladium, zinc-cobalt, and zinc-nickel. Among these metals or metal combinations, palladium-containing catalyst was the most effective. Desulfurization of the heavy fraction of FCC gasoline was more effective than full-range gasoline under the same conditions with palladium-containing catalysts. A high reaction temperature was favorable to desulfurization, but it would reduce the yield of liquid product. After desulfurization reaction, the olefin content of product gasoline decreased while the aromatic and iso-alkane contents increased. Removal of thiophene and benzothiophene is higher.

  16. REACTION CHEMISTRY RELATED TO FCC GASOLINE QUALITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    About 80% of the gasoline pool as a whole in China for supplying the domestic market at current stage directly originates from FCC units. Obviously, FCC gasoline quality is critical for refiners to meet the nations more and more stringent gasoline specifications. FCC process is expected to produce gasoline with reduced contents of olefins, aromatics, benzene, sulfur, and, contradictorily, still with high octane number.   Catalytic cracking process involves a series of acid catalyzed reactions. Bronsted acid sites dominate the surface of the catalyst used for FCC process. All the reactions of hydrocarbons in FCC process are based on carbonium ions of penta-coordinated, or carbenium ions of tri-coordinated. The monomolecular beta scission mechanism for alkane cracking explains that the cracking of carbon-carbon bonding occurs at the beta position to the carbon atom bearing positive charge, and hence forms two small hydrocarbon molecules: one alkane molecule and one olefin molecule. The molar ratio of alkane to olefin for the primary cracking product will be 1 and it will be less than 1 if the cracking reaction proceeds.   However, it is proved that bimolecular reaction pathways exist between surface carbenium ions and the feed molecules. The products of this bimolecular disproportionation reaction could be an alkane molecule and a newly formed carbenium ion. The better understanding of the reaction chemistry of FCC process based on monomolecular pathways and bimolecular pathways should be the basis for searching approaches to the improvement of FCC gasoline quality. In the complicated reaction scheme of the FCC process, the isomerization reaction leading to the formation of iso-alkanes is obviously a target reaction, which favors both olefin reduction and octane enhancement.   The cracking of small paraffin molecules, due to its limited number of reaction pathways and products, has been used to investigate cracking mechanism. In the present work the

  17. [Unregulated emissions from the gasoline vehicle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Qiu-Wen; Ge, Ytun-Shan; You, Ke-Wei; Wang, Jun-Fang; He, Chao

    2009-02-15

    Based on the emission test cycle of China National Regulation Stage III, the aldehyde and alkone emissions and VOCs emissions of three typical gasoline cars were studied with HPLC and TD-GC/MS and the exhausted particulates number and mass concentration were researched using ELPI. The results indicate that the unregulated emissions of different cars is diverse changed, the brake specific emission of the carbonyls in three cars are 36.44, 16.71 and 10.43 mg/km respectively and TVOC are 155.39, 103.75 and 42.29 mg/km respectively. Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, acetone and cyclohexanone are the main compounds in gasoline cars exhaust, which accounted for 77.9%-89.7% of total carbonyl compounds. Aromatic hydrocarbons and alkane are the main part of VOCs, the detected number of which is occupied 31.6%-39.2% and 23.1%-27.9% of VOCs. Toluene, xylene and benzene have high concentration, which are occupied 16.68%, 16.87% and 5.23% of TVOC in average. Ultra-fine particles (emission. Exhausted particulate number of high speeds is higher than that of slow and medium speeds.

  18. Problems diagnosis in diesel engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leugner, L.

    1986-10-01

    Diagnosis of engine problems in diesel engines used in Western Canadian coal mines is discussed. Areas to which attention must be paid include the air cleaners, turbocharger, engine compression and the fuel system. Exhaust smoke should be analysed to help diagnose combustion related problems.

  19. Coal-fired diesel generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    The objective of the proposed project is to test the technical, environmental, and economic viability of a coal-fired diesel generator for producing electric power in small power generating markets. Coal for the diesel generator would be provided from existing supplies transported for use in the University`s power plant. A cleanup system would be installed for limiting gaseous and particulate emissions. Electricity and steam produced by the diesel generator would be used to supply the needs of the University. The proposed diesel generator and supporting facilities would occupy approximately 2 acres of land adjacent to existing coal- and oil-fired power plant and research laboratory buildings at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks. The environmental analysis identified that the most notable changes to result from the proposed project would occur in the following areas: power plant configuration at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks; air emissions, water use and discharge, and the quantity of solid waste for disposal; noise levels at the power plant site; and transportation of coal to the power plant. No substantive adverse impacts or environmental concerns were identified in analyzing the effects of these changes.

  20. Assessment of Summer 1997 motor gasoline price increase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    Gasoline markets in 1996 and 1997 provided several spectacular examples of petroleum market dynamics. The first occurred in spring 1996, when tight markets, following a long winter of high demand, resulted in rising crude oil prices just when gasoline prices exhibit their normal spring rise ahead of the summer driving season. Rising crude oil prices again pushed gasoline prices up at the end of 1996, but a warm winter and growing supplies weakened world crude oil markets, pushing down crude oil and gasoline prices during spring 1997. The 1996 and 1997 spring markets provided good examples of how crude oil prices can move gasoline prices both up and down, regardless of the state of the gasoline market in the United States. Both of these spring events were covered in prior Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports. As the summer of 1997 was coming to a close, consumers experienced yet another surge in gasoline prices. Unlike the previous increase in spring 1996, crude oil was not a factor. The late summer 1997 price increase was brought about by the supply/demand fundamentals in the gasoline markets, rather than the crude oil markets. The nature of the summer 1997 gasoline price increase raised questions regarding production and imports. Given very strong demand in July and August, the seemingly limited supply response required examination. In addition, the price increase that occurred on the West Coast during late summer exhibited behavior different than the increase east of the Rocky Mountains. Thus, the Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PADD) 5 region needed additional analysis (Appendix A). This report is a study of this late summer gasoline market and some of the important issues surrounding that event.

  1. Renewable Energy in Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-03-01

    This report examines the opportunities, challenges, and costs associated with renewable energy implementation in Alaska and provides strategies that position Alaska's accumulating knowledge in renewable energy development for export to the rapidly growing energy/electric markets of the developing world.

  2. Marine Renewable Energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azzellino, Arianna; Conley, Daniel; Vicinanza, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Countries with coastlines may have valuable renewable energy resources in the form of tides, currents, waves, and offshorewind.The potential to gather energy from the sea has recently gained interest in several nations, so Marine Renewable Energy Installations (hereinafter MREIs) will likely become...

  3. Region 9 Renewable Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renewable energy production is expected to increase significantly in the next 25 years. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response (OSWER) Center for Program Analysis (OCPA) has initiated the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative to demonstrate the enormous potential that contaminated land and mining sites provide for developing renewable energy in the U.S.

  4. Renewable Energy Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugherty, Michael K.; Carter, Vinson R.

    2010-01-01

    In many ways the field of renewable energy technology is being introduced to a society that has little knowledge or background with anything beyond traditional exhaustible forms of energy and power. Dotson (2009) noted that the real challenge is to inform and educate the citizenry of the renewable energy potential through the development of…

  5. Renewable Energy Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugherty, Michael K.; Carter, Vinson R.

    2010-01-01

    In many ways the field of renewable energy technology is being introduced to a society that has little knowledge or background with anything beyond traditional exhaustible forms of energy and power. Dotson (2009) noted that the real challenge is to inform and educate the citizenry of the renewable energy potential through the development of…

  6. Performance of Diesel Engine Using Diesel B3 Mixed with Crude Palm Oil

    OpenAIRE

    Nattapong Namliwan; Tanakorn Wongwuttanasatian

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the performance of diesel engine using diesel B3 mixed with crude palm oil in ratios of 95 : 5, 90 : 10, and 85 : 15, respectively, and to compare the results with diesel B3. According to the tests, they showed that the physical properties of the mixed fuel in the ratio of 95 : 5 were closest to those of diesel B3. The performance of the diesel engine that used mixed fuels had 5–17% lower torque and power than that of diesel B3. The specific fuel consum...

  7. Renewable energy resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellabban, Omar S.; Abu-Rub, Haitham A.; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2014-01-01

    Electric energy security is essential, yet the high cost and limited sources of fossil fuels, in addition to the need to reduce greenhouse gasses emission, have made renewable resources attractive in world energy-based economies. The potential for renewable energy resources is enormous because...... they can, in principle, exponentially exceed the world's energy demand; therefore, these types of resources will have a significant share in the future global energy portfolio, much of which is now concentrating on advancing their pool of renewable energy resources. Accordingly, this paper presents how...... renewable energy resources are currently being used, scientific developments to improve their use, their future prospects, and their deployment. Additionally, the paper represents the impact of power electronics and smart grid technologies that can enable the proportionate share of renewable energy...

  8. Development of Diesel Exhaust Aftertreatment System for Tier II Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, R. C.; Cole, A. S., Stroia, B. J.; Huang, S. C. (Cummins, Inc.); Howden, Kenneth C.; Chalk, Steven (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

    2002-06-01

    Due to their excellent fuel efficiency, reliability, and durability, compression ignition direct injection (CIDI) engines have been used extensively to power almost all highway trucks, urban buses, off-road vehicles, marine carriers, and industrial equipment. CIDI engines burn 35 to 50% less fuel than gasoline engines of comparable size, and they emit far less greenhouse gases (Carbon Dioxides), which have been implicated in global warming. Although the emissions of CIDI engines have been reduced significantly over the last decade, there remains concern with the Nitrogen Oxides (NOX) and Particulate Matter (PM) emission levels. In 2000, the US EPA proposed very stringent emissions standards to be introduced in 2007 along with low sulfur (< 15ppm) diesel fuel. The California Air Resource Board (CARB) has also established the principle that future diesel fueled vehicles should meet the same emissions standards as gasoline fueled vehicles and the EPA followed suit with its Tier II emissions regulations. Meeting the Tier II standards requires NOX and PM emissions to be reduced dramatically. Achieving such low emissions while minimizing fuel economy penalty cannot be done through engine development and fuel reformulation alone, and requires application of NOX and PM aftertreatment control devices. A joint effort was made between Cummins Inc. and the Department of Energy to develop the generic aftertreatment subsystem technologies applicable for Light-Duty Vehicle (LDV) and Light-Duty Truck (LDT) engines. This paper provides an update on the progress of this joint development program. Three NOX reduction technologies including plasmaassisted catalytic NOX reduction (PACR), active lean NOX catalyst (LNC), and adsorber catalyst (AC) technology using intermittent rich conditions for NOX reduction were investigated in parallel in an attempt to select the best NOX control approach for light-duty aftertreatment subsystem integration and development. Investigations included

  9. Chemical fingerprinting of gasoline. Part 3. Comparison of unevaporated automotive gasoline samples from Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandercock, P M L; Du Pasquier, E

    2004-02-10

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with selected ion monitoring (GC-MS (SIM)) method was used to discriminate samples of unevaporated gasoline collected from Auckland, New Zealand and Sydney, Australia. This method was applied to 28 samples of unevaporated gasoline, covering three different grades (regular unleaded, premium unleaded and premium plus unleaded), that were collected from service stations in Auckland, New Zealand in summer (February) and winter (August). The 14 samples of summer gasoline collected in New Zealand could be divided into seven unique groups. The 14 samples of winter gasoline from New Zealand could be divided into 14 unique groups. The 14 samples collected in New Zealand during February 2002 were then compared to 24 samples of unevaporated gasoline collected from service stations in Sydney, Australia during the same month. Most of the samples could be differentiated based on their country of origin.

  10. Increasing Biofuel Deployment and Utilization through Development of Renewable Super Premium: Infrastructure Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriarty, K.; Kass, M.; Theiss, T.

    2014-11-01

    A high octane fuel and specialized vehicle are under consideration as a market opportunity to meet federal requirements for renewable fuel use and fuel economy. Infrastructure is often cited as a barrier for the introduction of a new fuel. This report assesses infrastructure readiness for E25 (25% ethanol; 75% gasoline) and E25+ (more than 25% ethanol). Both above-ground and below-ground equipment are considered as are the current state of stations, codes and regulations, and materials compatibility.

  11. A Fundamental Consideration on NOx Adsorber Technology for DI Diesel Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Howard L.; Huang, Shyan C.; Yu, Robert C. (Cummins, Inc.); Wan, C. Z. (Engelhard Corp.); Howden, Ken (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

    2002-10-01

    Diesel engines are far more efficient than gasoline engines of comparable size, and emit less greenhouse gases that have been implicated in global warming. In 2000, the US EPA proposed very stringent emissions standards to be introduced in 2007 along with low sulfur (< 15 ppm) diesel fuel. The California Air Resource Board (CARB) has also established the principle that future diesel fueled vehicles should meet the same low emissions standards as gasoline fueled vehicles and the EPA followed suit with its Tier II emissions regulation. Achieving such low emissions cannot be done through engine development and fuel reformulation alone, and requires application of NOx and particulate matter (PM) aftertreatment control devices. There is a widespread consensus that NOx adsorbers and particulate filter are required in order for diesel engines to meet the 2007 emissions regulations for NOx and PM. In this paper, the key exhaust characteristics from an advanced diesel engine are reviewed. Development of the NOx adsorber technology is discussed. Spectroscopic techniques are applied to understand the underlying chemical reactions over the catalyst surface during NOx trapping and regeneration periods. In-situ surface probes are useful in providing not only thermodynamic and kinetics information required for model development but also a fundamental understanding of storage capacity and degradation mechanisms. The distribution of various nitration/sulfation species is related to surface basicity. Surface displacement reactions of carbonates also play roles in affecting the trapping capability of NOx adsorbers. When ultralow-S fuel is used as a reductant during the regeneration, sulfur induced performance degradation is still observed in an aged catalyst. Other possible sources related to catalyst deactivation include incomplete reduction of surface nitration, coke formation derived from incomplete hydrocarbon burning, and lubricant formulations. Sulfur management and the

  12. Investigating diesel engines as an atmospheric source of isocyanic acid in urban areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Jathar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Isocyanic acid (HNCO, an acidic gas found in tobacco smoke, urban environments, and biomass-burning-affected regions, has been linked to adverse health outcomes. Gasoline- and diesel-powered engines and biomass burning are known to emit HNCO and hypothesized to emit precursors such as amides that can photochemically react to produce HNCO in the atmosphere. Increasingly, diesel engines in developed countries like the United States are required to use selective catalytic reduction (SCR systems to reduce tailpipe emissions of oxides of nitrogen. SCR chemistry is known to produce HNCO as an intermediate product, and SCR systems have been implicated as an atmospheric source of HNCO. In this work, we measure HNCO emissions from an SCR system-equipped diesel engine and, in combination with earlier data, use a three-dimensional chemical transport model (CTM to simulate the ambient concentrations and source/pathway contributions to HNCO in an urban environment. Engine tests were conducted at three different engine loads, using two different fuels and at multiple operating points. HNCO was measured using an acetate chemical ionization mass spectrometer. The diesel engine was found to emit primary HNCO (3–90 mg kg fuel−1 but we did not find any evidence that the SCR system or other aftertreatment devices (i.e., oxidation catalyst and particle filter produced or enhanced HNCO emissions. The CTM predictions compared well with the only available observational datasets for HNCO in urban areas but underpredicted the contribution from secondary processes. The comparison implied that diesel-powered engines were the largest source of HNCO in urban areas. The CTM also predicted that daily-averaged concentrations of HNCO reached a maximum of ∼ 110 pptv but were an order of magnitude lower than the 1 ppbv level that could be associated with physiological effects in humans. Precursor contributions from other combustion sources (gasoline and biomass

  13. Utilization of oil palm as a source of renewable energy in Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumathi, S.; Chai, S.P.; Mohamed, A.R. [School of Chemical Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2008-12-15

    Malaysia is currently the world's largest producer and exporter of palm oil. Malaysia produces about 47% of the world's supply of palm oil. Malaysia also accounts the highest percentage of global vegetable oils and fats trade in year 2005. Besides producing oils and fats, at present there is a continuous increasing interest concerning oil palm renewable energy. One of the major attentions is bio-diesel from palm oil. Bio-diesel implementation in Malaysia is important because of environmental protection and energy supply security reasons. This palm oil bio-diesel is biodegradable, non-toxic, and has significantly fewer emissions than petroleum-based diesel (petro-diesel) when burned. In addition to this oil, palm is also a well-known plant for its other sources of renewable energy, for example huge quantities of biomass by-products are developed to produce value added products such as methane gas, bio-plastic, organic acids, bio-compost, ply-wood, activated carbon, and animal feedstock. Even waste effluent; palm oil mill effluent (POME) has been converted to produce energy. Oil palm has created many opportunities and social benefits for the locals. In the above perspective, the objective of the present work is to give a concise and up-to-date picture of the present status of oil palm industry enhancing sustainable and renewable energy. This work also aims to identify the prospects of Malaysian oil palm industry towards utilization of oil palm as a source of renewable energy. (author)

  14. Comparative Study of Different Methods for Soot Sensing and Filter Monitoring in Diesel Exhausts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Feulner

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to increasingly tighter emission limits for diesel and gasoline engines, especially concerning particulate matter emissions, particulate filters are becoming indispensable devices for exhaust gas after treatment. Thereby, for an efficient engine and filter control strategy and a cost-efficient filter design, reliable technologies to determine the soot load of the filters and to measure particulate matter concentrations in the exhaust gas during vehicle operation are highly needed. In this study, different approaches for soot sensing are compared. Measurements were conducted on a dynamometer diesel engine test bench with a diesel particulate filter (DPF. The DPF was monitored by a relatively new microwave-based approach. Simultaneously, a resistive type soot sensor and a Pegasor soot sensing device as a reference system measured the soot concentration exhaust upstream of the DPF. By changing engine parameters, different engine out soot emission rates were set. It was found that the microwave-based signal may not only indicate directly the filter loading, but by a time derivative, the engine out soot emission rate can be deduced. Furthermore, by integrating the measured particulate mass in the exhaust, the soot load of the filter can be determined. In summary, all systems coincide well within certain boundaries and the filter itself can act as a soot sensor.

  15. The Detroit Diesel DELTA Engine for Light Trucks and SUVs - Year 2000 Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabil S. Hakim; Charles E. Freese; Stanley P. Miller

    2000-06-19

    Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) is developing the DELTA 4.0L V6 engine, specifically for the North American light truck market. This market poses unique requirements for a diesel engine, necessitating a clean sheet engine design. DELTA was developed from a clean sheet of paper, with the first engine firing just 228 days later. The process began with a Quality Function Deployment (QFD) analysis, which prioritized the development criteria. The development process integrated a co-located, fully cross-functional team. Suppliers were fully integrated and maintained on-site representation. The first demonstration vehicle moved under its own power 12 weeks after the first engine fired. It was demonstrated to the automotive press 18 days later. DELTA has repeatedly demonstrated its ability to disprove historical North American diesel perceptions and compete directly with gasoline engines. This paper outlines the Generation 0.0 development process and briefly defines the engine. A brief indication of the Generation 0.5 development status is given.

  16. Comparative Study of Different Methods for Soot Sensing and Filter Monitoring in Diesel Exhausts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feulner, Markus; Hagen, Gunter; Hottner, Kathrin; Redel, Sabrina; Müller, Andreas; Moos, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    Due to increasingly tighter emission limits for diesel and gasoline engines, especially concerning particulate matter emissions, particulate filters are becoming indispensable devices for exhaust gas after treatment. Thereby, for an efficient engine and filter control strategy and a cost-efficient filter design, reliable technologies to determine the soot load of the filters and to measure particulate matter concentrations in the exhaust gas during vehicle operation are highly needed. In this study, different approaches for soot sensing are compared. Measurements were conducted on a dynamometer diesel engine test bench with a diesel particulate filter (DPF). The DPF was monitored by a relatively new microwave-based approach. Simultaneously, a resistive type soot sensor and a Pegasor soot sensing device as a reference system measured the soot concentration exhaust upstream of the DPF. By changing engine parameters, different engine out soot emission rates were set. It was found that the microwave-based signal may not only indicate directly the filter loading, but by a time derivative, the engine out soot emission rate can be deduced. Furthermore, by integrating the measured particulate mass in the exhaust, the soot load of the filter can be determined. In summary, all systems coincide well within certain boundaries and the filter itself can act as a soot sensor. PMID:28218700

  17. The effect of EGR rates on NOX and smoke emissions of an IDI diesel engine fuelled with Jatropha biodiesel blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gomaa, A.J. Alimin, K.A. Kamarudin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The depletion of fossil fuels and the worst impact on environmental pollution caused of their burning have led to the search for renewable clean energies. Nowadays, there are many sources of renewable energy. Biodiesel is just one source, but a very important one. Biodiesel has been known as an attractive alternative fuel although biodiesel produced from edible oil is very expensive than conventional diesel. Therefore, the uses of biodiesel produced from non-edible oils are much better option. Currently Jatropha biodiesel (JBD is receiving attention as an alternative fuel for diesel engine. However, previous studies have reported that combustion of JBD emitted higher nitrogen oxides (NOX, while hydrocarbon (HC and smoke emissions were lower than conventional diesel fuel. Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR is one of the techniques being used to reduce NOX emission from diesel engines; because it decreases both flame temperature and oxygen concentration in the combustion chamber. Some studies succeeded to reduce NOX emission from biodiesel fuelled engines using EGR; but they observed increase in smoke emission with increasing engine load and EGR rate. The aim of the present work is to investigate the effect of EGR on an indirect injection (IDI diesel engine fuelled with JBD blends in order to reduce NOX and smoke emissions. A 4-cylinder, water-cooled, turbocharged, IDI diesel engine was used for investigation. Smoke, NOX, carbon monoxide (CO and carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions were recorded and various engine performance parameters were also evaluated. The results showed that, at 5% EGR with JB5, both NOX and smoke opacity were reduced by 27% and 17% respectively. Furthermore, JB20 along with 10% EGR was also able to reduce both NOX and smoke emission by 36% and 31%, respectively compared to diesel fuel without EGR.

  18. Ethanol Demand in United States Regional Production of Oxygenate-limited Gasoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadder, G.R.

    2000-08-01

    The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (the Act) outlined a national energy strategy that called for reducing the nation's dependency on petroleum imports. The Act directed the Secretary of Energy to establish a program to promote and expand the use of renewable fuels. The Office of Transportation Technologies (OTT) within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has evaluated a wide range of potential fuels and has concluded that cellulosic ethanol is one of the most promising near-term prospects. Ethanol is widely recognized as a clean fuel that helps reduce emissions of toxic air pollutants. Furthermore, cellulosic ethanol produces less greenhouse gas emissions than gasoline or any of the other alternative transportation fuels being considered by DOE.

  19. Effects of diesel and bio-diesel oils temperature on spray and performance of a diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekkachai Sutheerasak

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Research paper is the spray and engine performance investigation from preheated diesel and biodiesel oils at fuel temperature from 60 to 90 o C by comparing with non-preheated oil. In the experiment, there are fuel injection modeling and diesel engine testing, which is direct injection, 4 stroke and 4 cylinders. Results of fuel spray show that preheated diesel oil increase 4.7degree of spray angle and decrease 4.30 % of fuel injection pressure, as preheated bio-diesel oil increase 7.6degree of spray angle and decrease 13.90 % of fuel injection pressure to compare with non-preheated oil. As engine preformance testing results, preheated diesel oil increase 26.20% of thermal efficiency and decrease 4.30 % of BSFC, as preheated bio-diesel oil increase 30% of thermal efficiency and decrease 29.90 % of BSFC to compare with non-preheated oil.

  20. 40 CFR 80.590 - What are the product transfer document requirements for motor vehicle diesel fuel, NRLM diesel...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for motor vehicle diesel fuel, NRLM diesel fuel, heating oil, ECA marine fuel, and other... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Motor Vehicle Diesel Fuel; Nonroad, Locomotive... the product transfer document requirements for motor vehicle diesel fuel, NRLM diesel fuel,...

  1. Study of methanol-to-gasoline process for production of gasoline from coal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Tian-cai; CHENG Xiao-han; LI Ling; MENG Guo-ying

    2009-01-01

    The methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) process is an efficient way to produce liquid fuel.The academic basis of the coal-to-liquid process is described and two different syn-thesis processes are focused on: Fixed MTG process and Fluid Bed MTG process.Then,the superiority of the Fluid Bed MTG Process is pointed out relative to the Fixed MTG Process.In addition,the development of the coal-to-liquid technique in China is briefly summarized.

  2. Real-time emission factor measurements of isocyanic acid from light duty gasoline vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, James M; Crisp, Timia A; Collier, Sonya; Kuwayama, Toshihiro; Forestieri, Sara D; Perraud, Véronique; Zhang, Qi; Kleeman, Michael J; Cappa, Christopher D; Bertram, Timothy H

    2014-10-07

    Exposure to gas-phase isocyanic acid (HNCO) has been previously shown to be associated with the development of atherosclerosis, cataracts and rheumatoid arthritis. As such, accurate emission inventories for HNCO are critical for modeling the spatial and temporal distribution of HNCO on a regional and global scale. To date, HNCO emission rates from light duty gasoline vehicles, operated under driving conditions, have not been determined. Here, we present the first measurements of real-time emission factors of isocyanic acid from a fleet of eight light duty gasoline-powered vehicles (LDGVs) tested on a chassis dynamometer using the Unified Driving Cycle (UC) at the California Air Resources Board (CARB) Haagen-Smit test facility, all of which were equipped with three-way catalytic converters. HNCO emissions were observed from all vehicles, in contrast to the idealized laboratory measurements. We report the tested fleet averaged HNCO emission factors, which depend strongly on the phase of the drive cycle; ranging from 0.46 ± 0.13 mg kg fuel(-1) during engine start to 1.70 ± 1.77 mg kg fuel(-1) during hard acceleration after the engine and catalytic converter were warm. The tested eight-car fleet average fuel based HNCO emission factor was 0.91 ± 0.58 mg kg fuel(-1), within the range previously estimated for light duty diesel-powered vehicles (0.21-3.96 mg kg fuel(-1)). Our results suggest that HNCO emissions from LDGVs represent a significant emission source in urban areas that should be accounted for in global and regional models.

  3. Motor gerador ciclo diesel sob cinco proporções de biodiesel com óleo diesel Engine-generator diesel cycle under five proportions of biodiesel and diesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo J. da Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available O estudo de fontes alternativas de energia ao óleo diesel mineral, como o biodiesel, com origem renovável, é importante para o meio-ambiente e diversificação da matriz energética. Neste estudo foram levantados o consumo específico de combustível, o valor calórico do combustível e a eficiência do conjunto motor gerador da marca BRANCO em função de cargas resistivas, sob as seguintes proporções volumétricas entre o óleo diesel mineral com biodiesel: 0% (B0, 20% (B20, 40% (B40, 60% (B60 e 100% de biodiesel (B100. Para o ensaio utilizou-se motor de 7,36 kW, com gerador elétrico acoplado de 5,5 kW. As cargas utilizadas, 0,5 kW; 1,0 kW; 1,5 kW e 2,0 kW foram elevadas até 5,0 kW, oriundas de um dinamômetro de cargas resistentes. Assim, o desempenho do conjunto para cargas abaixo de 1,5 kW mostrou-se menor, pelo maior consumo específico de combustível (CEC, e redução na eficiência do conjunto motor gerador para a faixa de potência. Para as proporções de biodiesel B40, B60 e B100 os resultados descreveram redução no valor calórico e aumento do CEC. Portanto, realizando comparação das proporções de biodiesel com o óleo diesel, a proporção B20 substitui parcialmente o óleo diesel, sem perdas significativas do desempenho do motor gerador.The study of mineral diesel alternatives, such as biodiesel, a renewable fuel, is important for the environment and to diversify energy sources. This study evaluated an engine-generator BRANCO brand. Specific fuel consumption, calorific value and the overall efficiency as a function of the system load was measured, using diesel oil and biodiesel blends. The biodiesel proportions in the composition were 0% (B0, 20% (B20, 40% (B40, 60% (B60, and 100% (B100. The engine that was used during the test has a power of 7.36 kW, and the electric generator was 5.5 kW. The group was submitted to resistive loading, in the range: 0.5 kW, 1.0 kW, 1.5 kW; growing up to 5.0 kW. The results have shown

  4. Gasoline prices and their relationship to drunk-driving crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Guangqing; Zhou, Xuan; McClure, Timothy E; Gilbert, Paul A; Cosby, Arthur G; Zhang, Li; Robertson, Angela A; Levinson, David

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between changing gasoline prices and drunk-driving crashes. Specifically, we examine the effects of gasoline prices on drunk-driving crashes in Mississippi by several crash types and demographic groups at the monthly level from 2004 to 2008, a period experiencing great fluctuation in gasoline prices. An exploratory visualization by graphs shows that higher gasoline prices are generally associated with fewer drunk-driving crashes. Higher gasoline prices depress drunk-driving crashes among young and adult drivers, among male and female drivers, and among white and black drivers. Results from negative binomial regression models show that when gas prices are higher, there are fewer drunk-driving crashes, particularly among property-damage-only crashes. When alcohol consumption levels are higher, there are more drunk-driving crashes, particularly fatal and injury crashes. The effects of gasoline prices and alcohol consumption are stronger on drunk-driving crashes than on all crashes. The findings do not vary much across different demographic groups. Overall, gasoline prices have greater effects on less severe crashes and alcohol consumption has greater effects on more severe crashes.

  5. Hige Compression Ratio Turbo Gasoline Engine Operation Using Alcohol Enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heywood, John [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Jo, Young Suk [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Lewis, Raymond [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Bromberg, Leslie [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Heywood, John [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2016-01-29

    The overall objective of this project was to quantify the potential for improving the performance and efficiency of gasoline engine technology by use of alcohols to suppress knock. Knock-free operation is obtained by direct injection of a second “anti-knock” fuel such as ethanol, which suppresses knock when, with gasoline fuel, knock would occur. Suppressing knock enables increased turbocharging, engine downsizing, and use of higher compression ratios throughout the engine’s operating map. This project combined engine testing and simulation to define knock onset conditions, with different mixtures of gasoline and alcohol, and with this information quantify the potential for improving the efficiency of turbocharged gasoline spark-ignition engines, and the on-vehicle fuel consumption reductions that could then be realized. The more focused objectives of this project were therefore to: Determine engine efficiency with aggressive turbocharging and downsizing and high compression ratio (up to a compression ratio of 13.5:1) over the engine’s operating range; Determine the knock limits of a turbocharged and downsized engine as a function of engine speed and load; Determine the amount of the knock-suppressing alcohol fuel consumed, through the use of various alcohol-gasoline and alcohol-water gasoline blends, for different driving cycles, relative to the gasoline consumed; Determine implications of using alcohol-boosted engines, with their higher efficiency operation, in both light-duty and medium-duty vehicle sectors.

  6. The Economic Potential of Three Nuclear-Renewable Hybrid Energy Systems Providing Thermal Energy to Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, Mark [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cutler, Dylan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Flores-Espino, Francisco [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Stark, Greg [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jenkin, Thomas [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This report is one of a series of reports that Idaho National Laboratory and National Renewable Energy Laboratory are producing to investigate the technical and economic aspects of nuclear-renewable hybrid energy systems (N-R HESs). Previous reports provided results of an analysis of two N-R HES scenarios. This report builds that analysis with a Texas-synthetic gasoline scenario providing the basis in which the N-R HES sells heat directly to an industrial customer. Subsystems were included that convert electricity to heat, thus allowing the renewable energy subsystem to generate heat and benefit from that revenue stream. Nuclear and renewable energy sources are important to consider in the energy sector's evolution because both are considered to be clean and non-carbon-emitting energy sources.

  7. Co-feeding with DME:An effective way to enhance gasoline production via low temperature aromatization of LPG

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangxue; Zhu; Yuzhong; Wang; Xiujie; Li; Hongbing; Li; Peng; Zeng; Jie; An; Fucun; Chen; Sujuan; Xie; Hongping; Lan; Dawei; Wang; Shenglin; Liu; Longya; Xu

    2013-01-01

    The aromatization of light alkenes in liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) with and without dimethyl ether (DME) addition in the feed was investigated on a modified ZSM-5 catalyst.The results showed that under the given reaction conditions the selectivity of alkenes to high-octane gasoline blending components was markedly enhanced and the formation of propane and butanes was greatly suppressed with the addition of DME.It was also found that the distribution of C5+ components was changed a lot with DME addition into the LPG feed.The formation of branched hydrocarbons (mainly C6 C8 i-paraffin) and multi-methyl substituted aromatics,which are high octane number gasoline blending components,was promoted significantly,while the content of n-paraffins and olefins in C5+ components was decreased obviously,indicating that in addition to the oligomerization,cracking,hydrogen-transfer and dehydrogenation-cyclization of alkenes,the methylation of the formed aromatics and olefins intermediates also plays an important role in determining the product distribution due to the high reactivity of surface methoxy groups formed by DME.And this process,in combination with the syngas-to-methanol/DME technology,provides an alternative way to the production of high-octane gasoline from coal,natural gas or renewable raw materials.

  8. Method of removing sulphur and acid compounds from gasoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilokur, V.F.; Selezhev, N.I.; Starkov, N.M.; Zhordochkin, N.A.

    1980-02-12

    A method of removing sulphur and acid compounds from gasoline is proposed. In order to increase the degree of purification, maintain continuity of the process and eliminate production waste, the gasoline is washed with water with subsequent treatment with 25 percent aqueous solution of monoethanol amine (I). With rewashing using water, the relative ratios are for gasoline (solution I 0.5:1-1:1 and gasoline) and water 1:0.8-1:1. After purification I is regenerated and circulated, and gasoline impurities not removed in the regeneration process are adsorbed by activated charcoal from a flow of regenerated I. The base gasoline is sent to a washing column where continuous removal of hydrogen soluble impurities takes place. It is settled in a settling tank and sent to the pump absorber intake line. Solution I is sent there. The mixture is sent to the absorber (temperature 35-45 degrees C, pressure 4-6 atm) where a process of absorption of sulphur and acid compounds takes place and is then sent to the settling tank in which rapid separation of phases occurs to the bottom the saturated absorbent, to the top the purified gasoline. The latter is sent to be washed by water, and the absorbent is sent for desorption to the desorber (temperature towards the top 102-105 degrees C, bottom 112-115 degrees C, pressure 0.7 atm). The temperature of water washing is 30-50 degrees C. After purification this method the gasoline contains 0.2-0.25 percent total S, does not contain H/sub 2/S and features a K. Ch. (mg KON/100 ml gasoline) of approximately 0.04-0.05.

  9. Optimization of the octane response of gasoline/ethanol blends

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad

    2017-07-04

    The octane responses of gasoline/ethanol mixtures are not well understood because of the unidentified intermolecular interactions in such blends. In general, when ethanol is blended with gasoline, the Research Octane Number (RON) and the Motor Octane Number (MON) non-linearly increase or decrease, and the non-linearity is determined by the composition of the base gasoline and the amount of added ethanol. The complexity of commercial gasolines, comprising of hundreds of different components, makes it challenging to understand ethanol-gasoline synergistic/antagonistic blending effects. Understanding ethanol blending effects with simpler gasoline surrogates is critical to acquire knowledge about ethanol blending with complex multi-component gasoline fuels. In this study, the octane numbers (ON) of ethanol blends with five relevant gasoline surrogate molecules were measured. The molecules investigated in this study include: n-pentane, iso-pentane, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, cyclopentane and 1-hexene. These new measurements along with the available data of n-heptane, iso-octane, toluene, various primary reference fuels (PRF) and toluene primary reference fuels (TPRF) with ethanol are used to develop a blending rule for the octane response (RON and MON) of multi-component blends with ethanol. In addition, new ON data are collected for six Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engine (FACE) with ethanol. The relatively simple volume based model successfully predicts the octane numbers (ON) of the various ethanol/PRF and ethanol/TPRF blends with the majority of predictions being within the ASTM D2699 (RON) and D2700 (MON) reproducibility limits. The model is also successfully validated against the ON of the FACE gasolines blended with ethanol with the majority of predictions being within the reproducibility limits. Finally, insights into the possible causes of the synergistic and antagonistic effects of different molecules with ethanol are provided.

  10. 40 CFR 80.220 - What are the downstream standards for GPA gasoline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... GPA gasoline? 80.220 Section 80.220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...-in Program § 80.220 What are the downstream standards for GPA gasoline? (a) GPA gasoline. (1) During the period February 1, 2004 through January 31, 2005, the sulfur content of GPA gasoline at any...

  11. 40 CFR 80.845 - What requirements apply to California gasoline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline? 80.845 Section 80.845 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Gasoline Toxics Performance Requirements § 80.845 What requirements apply to California gasoline? (a) Definition. For purposes of...

  12. 76 FR 61062 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Arizona; Update to Stage II Gasoline Vapor...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-03

    ...; Update to Stage II Gasoline Vapor Recovery Program; Change in the Definition of ``Gasoline'' To Exclude... emissions from the transfer of gasoline from storage tanks to motor vehicle fuel tanks at gasoline dispensing sites, i.e., stage II vapor recovery. The revisions would also amend the definition of...

  13. 40 CFR 80.1235 - What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1235 What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements...

  14. 40 CFR 80.200 - What gasoline is subject to the sulfur standards and requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the sulfur... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.200 What gasoline is subject to the sulfur standards and requirements? For the purpose...

  15. 40 CFR 80.1236 - What requirements apply to California gasoline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline? 80.1236 Section 80.1236 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1236 What requirements apply to California gasoline? (a) Definition. For purposes of this...

  16. Biochemical responses in freshwater fish after exposure to water-soluble fraction of gasoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettim, Franciele Lima; Galvan, Gabrieli Limberger; Cestari, Marta Margarete; Yamamoto, Carlos Itsuo; de Assis, Helena Cristina Silva

    2016-02-01

    The water-soluble fraction of gasoline (WSFG) is a complex mixture of mono-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The study aimed to evaluate the effects of WSFG diluted 1.5% on freshwater fish. Astyanax altiparanae were exposed to the WSFG for 96 h, under a semi-static system, with renewal of 25% of the gasoline test solution every 24 h. In addition, a decay of the contamination (DC) was carried out. During DC, the fish was exposed to the WSFG for 8 d, followed by another 7 d with renewal of 25% of volume aquaria with clean water every 24 h. For depuration, fish were transferred to aquaria with clean water, and in addition, 25% of the water was replaced every 24 h. The liver and kidney biotransformation, antioxidant defenses and lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels were evaluated. In the liver, the WSFG 1.5% caused reduction of glutathione S-transferase (GST) after 96 h and DC. In the kidney, only in depuration an increased GST activity was observed, and after DC a higher LPO levels. An increase of the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity occurred at 96 h in both tissues; however, in the liver was also observed during the depuration. In WSFG 96 h, the glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in the kidney increased. As biomarkers of neurotoxicity, the brain and muscle acetylcholinesterase activities were measured, but the WSFG 1.5% did not change them. Therefore, this study brought forth more data about WSFG effects on freshwater fish after lower concentrations exposure and a DC, simulating an environmental contamination.

  17. Scenario Analyses of Road Transport Energy Demand: A Case Study of Ethanol as a Diesel Substitute in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Fukuda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol is conventionally used as a blend with gasoline due to its similar properties, especially the octane number. However, ethanol has also been explored and used as a diesel substitute. While a low-blend of ethanol with diesel is possible with use of an emulsifier additive, a high-blend of ethanol with diesel may require major adjustment of compression-ignition (CI diesel engines. Since dedicated CI engines are commercially available for a high-blend ethanol in diesel (ED95, a fuel mixture comprised of 95% ethanol and 5% additive, this technology offers an option for an oil-importing country like Thailand to reduce its fossil import by use of its own indigenous bio-ethanol fuel. Among many strong campaigns on ethanol utilization in the transportation sector under Thailand’s Alternative Energy Strategic Plan (2008–2022, the Thai Ministry of Energy has, for the first time, conducted a demonstration project with ethanol (ED95 buses on the Thai road system. The current investigation thus aims to assess and quantify the impact of using this ED95 technology to reduce fossil diesel consumption by adjusting the commercially available energy demand model called the Long range Energy Alternatives Planning system (LEAP. For this purpose, first, the necessary statistical data in the Thai transportation sector were gathered and analyzed to construct the predicative energy demand model. Then, scenario analyses were conducted to assess the benefit of ED95 technology on the basis of energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emission reduction.

  18. DELTA-DIESEL ENGINE LIGHT TRUCK APPLICATION Contract DE-FC05-97OR22606 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakim, Nabil Balnaves, Mike

    2003-05-27

    DELTA Diesel Engine Light Truck Application End of Contract Report DE-FC05-97-OR22606 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This report is the final technical report of the Diesel Engine Light Truck Application (DELTA) program under contract DE-FC05-97-OR22606. During the course of this contract, Detroit Diesel Corporation analyzed, designed, tooled, developed and applied the ''Proof of Concept'' (Generation 0) 4.0L V-6 DELTA engine and designed the successor ''Production Technology Demonstration'' (Generation 1) 4.0L V-6 DELTA engine. The objectives of DELTA Program contract DE-FC05-97-OR22606 were to: Demonstrate production-viable diesel engine technologies, specifically intended for the North American LDT and SUV markets; Demonstrate emissions compliance with significant fuel economy advantages. With a clean sheet design, DDC produced the DELTA engine concept promising the following attributes: 30-50% improved fuel economy; Low cost; Good durability and reliability; Acceptable noise, vibration and harshness (NVH); State-of-the-art features; Even firing, 4 valves per cylinder; High pressure common rail fuel system; Electronically controlled; Turbocharged, intercooled, cooled EGR; Extremely low emissions via CLEAN Combustion{copyright} technology. To demonstrate the engine technology in the SUV market, DDC repowered a 1999 Dodge Durango with the DELTA Generation 0 engine. Fuel economy improvements were approximately 50% better than the gasoline engine replaced in the vehicle.

  19. Effects of diesel and bio-diesel oils temperature on spray and performance of a diesel engine

    OpenAIRE

    Ekkachai Sutheerasak

    2014-01-01

    Research paper is the spray and engine performance investigation from preheated diesel and biodiesel oils at fuel temperature from 60 to 90 o C by comparing with non-preheated oil. In the experiment, there are fuel injection modeling and diesel engine testing, which is direct injection, 4 stroke and 4 cylinders. Results of fuel spray show that preheated diesel oil increase 4.7degree of spray angle and decrease 4.30 % of fuel injection pressure, as preheated bio-diesel oil increase 7.6degree o...

  20. Gasoline: An adaptable implementation of TreeSPH

    CERN Document Server

    Wadsley, J; Quinn, T; Wadsley, James; Stadel, Joachim; Quinn, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    The key algorithms and features of the Gasoline code for parallel hydrodynamics with self-gravity are described. Gasoline is an extension of the efficient Pkdgrav parallel N-body code using smoothed particle hydrodynamics. Accuracy measurements, performance analysis and tests of the code are presented. Recent successful Gasoline applications are summarized. These cover a diverse set of areas in astrophysics including galaxy clusters, galaxy formation and gas-giant planets. Future directions for gasdynamical simulations in astrophysics and code development strategies for tackling cutting edge problems are discussed.