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Sample records for render oxygenated cells

  1. Spatially monitoring oxygen level in 3D microfabricated cell culture systems using optical oxygen sensing beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Acosta, Miguel A; Leach, Jennie B; Carrier, Rebecca L

    2013-04-21

    Capability of measuring and monitoring local oxygen concentration at the single cell level (tens of microns scale) is often desirable but difficult to achieve in cell culture. In this study, biocompatible oxygen sensing beads were prepared and tested for their potential for real-time monitoring and mapping of local oxygen concentration in 3D micro-patterned cell culture systems. Each oxygen sensing bead is composed of a silica core loaded with both an oxygen sensitive Ru(Ph2phen3)Cl2 dye and oxygen insensitive Nile blue reference dye, and a poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) shell rendering biocompatibility. Human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells were cultivated on a series of PDMS and type I collagen based substrates patterned with micro-well arrays for 3 or 7 days, and then brought into contact with oxygen sensing beads. Using an image analysis algorithm to convert florescence intensity of beads to partial oxygen pressure in the culture system, tens of microns-size oxygen sensing beads enabled the spatial measurement of local oxygen concentration in the microfabricated system. Results generally indicated lower oxygen level inside wells than on top of wells, and local oxygen level dependence on structural features of cell culture surfaces. Interestingly, chemical composition of cell culture substrates also appeared to affect oxygen level, with type-I collagen based cell culture systems having lower oxygen concentration compared to PDMS based cell culture systems. In general, results suggest that oxygen sensing beads can be utilized to achieve real-time and local monitoring of micro-environment oxygen level in 3D microfabricated cell culture systems.

  2. Oxygen enhancement ratios in synchronous HeLa cells exposed to low-LET radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapozink, M.D.

    1977-01-01

    HeLa cells were synchronized by the mitotic selection method and rendered hypoxic by coincubation with an excess of heavily irradiated, but metabolically active, feeder cells. An oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) of about 3 was obtained in interphase HeLa cells irradiated with x or gamma rays. A significantly lower OER was obtained with cells in, or close to, mitosis. The significance of this decrease in the oxygen effect in mitotic cells is discussed

  3. Parallel rendering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    This article provides a broad introduction to the subject of parallel rendering, encompassing both hardware and software systems. The focus is on the underlying concepts and the issues which arise in the design of parallel rendering algorithms and systems. We examine the different types of parallelism and how they can be applied in rendering applications. Concepts from parallel computing, such as data decomposition, task granularity, scalability, and load balancing, are considered in relation to the rendering problem. We also explore concepts from computer graphics, such as coherence and projection, which have a significant impact on the structure of parallel rendering algorithms. Our survey covers a number of practical considerations as well, including the choice of architectural platform, communication and memory requirements, and the problem of image assembly and display. We illustrate the discussion with numerous examples from the parallel rendering literature, representing most of the principal rendering methods currently used in computer graphics.

  4. Oxygen Concentration Inside a Functioning Photosynthetic Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Kihara, Shigeharu; Hartzler, Daniel A.; Savikhin, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    The excess oxygen concentration in the photosynthetic membranes of functioning oxygenic photosynthetic cells was estimated using classical diffusion theory combined with experimental data on oxygen production rates of cyanobacterial cells. The excess oxygen concentration within the plesiomorphic cyanobacterium Gloeobactor violaceus is only 0.025 μM, or four orders of magnitude lower than the oxygen concentration in air-saturated water. Such a low concentration suggests that the first oxygenic...

  5. Transcriptional Changes during Naturally Acquired Zika Virus Infection Render Dendritic Cells Highly Conducive to Viral Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoming; Hua, Stephane; Chen, Hsiao-Rong; Ouyang, Zhengyu; Einkauf, Kevin; Tse, Samantha; Ard, Kevin; Ciaranello, Andrea; Yawetz, Sigal; Sax, Paul; Rosenberg, Eric S; Lichterfeld, Mathias; Yu, Xu G

    2017-12-19

    Although dendritic cells are among the human cell population best equipped for cell-intrinsic antiviral immune defense, they seem highly susceptible to infection with the Zika virus (ZIKV). Using highly purified myeloid dendritic cells isolated from individuals with naturally acquired acute infection, we here show that ZIKV induces profound perturbations of transcriptional signatures relative to healthy donors. Interestingly, we noted a remarkable downregulation of antiviral interferon-stimulated genes and innate immune sensors, suggesting that ZIKV can actively suppress interferon-dependent immune responses. In contrast, several host factors known to support ZIKV infection were strongly upregulated during natural ZIKV infection; these transcripts included AXL, the main entry receptor for ZIKV; SOCS3, a negative regulator of ISG expression; and IDO-1, a recognized inducer of regulatory T cell responses. Thus, during in vivo infection, ZIKV can transform the transcriptome of dendritic cells in favor of the virus to render these cells highly conducive to ZIKV infection. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Inhibition of c-Abl kinase activity renders cancer cells highly sensitive to mitoxantrone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal Alpay

    Full Text Available Although c-Abl has increasingly emerged as a key player in the DNA damage response, its role in this context is far from clear. We studied the effect of inhibition of c-Abl kinase activity by imatinib with chemotherapy drugs and found a striking difference in cell survival after combined mitoxantrone (MX and imatinib treatment compared to a panel of other chemotherapy drugs. The combinatory treatment induced apoptosis in HeLa cells and other cancer cell lines but not in primary fibroblasts. The difference in MX and doxorubicin was related to significant augmentation of DNA damage. Transcriptionally active p53 accumulated in cells in which human papillomavirus E6 normally degrades p53. The combination treatment resulted in caspase activation and apoptosis, but this effect did not depend on either p53 or p73 activity. Despite increased p53 activity, the cells arrested in G2 phase became defective in this checkpoint, allowing cell cycle progression. The effect after MX treatment depended partially on c-Abl: Short interfering RNA knockdown of c-Abl rendered HeLa cells less sensitive to MX. The effect of imatinib was decreased by c-Abl siRNA suggesting a role for catalytically inactive c-Abl in the death cascade. These findings indicate that MX has a unique cytotoxic effect when the kinase activity of c-Abl is inhibited. The treatment results in increased DNA damage and c-Abl-dependent apoptosis, which may offer new possibilities for potentiation of cancer chemotherapy.

  7. Oxygen concentration inside a functioning photosynthetic cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Shigeharu; Hartzler, Daniel A; Savikhin, Sergei

    2014-05-06

    The excess oxygen concentration in the photosynthetic membranes of functioning oxygenic photosynthetic cells was estimated using classical diffusion theory combined with experimental data on oxygen production rates of cyanobacterial cells. The excess oxygen concentration within the plesiomorphic cyanobacterium Gloeobactor violaceus is only 0.025 μM, or four orders of magnitude lower than the oxygen concentration in air-saturated water. Such a low concentration suggests that the first oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria in solitary form could have evolved ∼2.8 billion years ago without special mechanisms to protect them against reactive oxygen species. These mechanisms instead could have been developed during the following ∼500 million years while the oxygen level in the Earth's atmosphere was slowly rising. Excess oxygen concentrations within individual cells of the apomorphic cyanobacteria Synechocystis and Synechococcus are 0.064 and 0.25 μM, respectively. These numbers suggest that intramembrane and intracellular proteins in isolated oxygenic photosynthetic cells are not subjected to excessively high oxygen levels. The situation is different for closely packed colonies of photosynthetic cells. Calculations show that the excess concentration within colonies that are ∼40 μm or larger in diameter can be comparable to the oxygen concentration in air-saturated water, suggesting that species forming colonies require protection against reactive oxygen species even in the absence of oxygen in the surrounding atmosphere. Copyright © 2014 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Fuel cell serves as oxygen level detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Monitoring the oxygen level in the air is accomplished by a fuel cell detector whose voltage output is proportional to the partial pressure of oxygen in the sampled gas. The relationship between output voltage and partial pressure of oxygen can be calibrated.

  9. The oxygen effect and adaptive response of cells. Report 3. Simulation of respiratory oxygenation and oxygen permeability of cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehpshtejn, I.M.

    1978-01-01

    Variations in the oxygen concentration in extracellural [O 2 ] 0 and intracellular [Osub(2)]sub(i) media of cells small in size (d = 2 ] 0 - t-curves). It is shown that the Value of [Osub(2)]sub(i) may be expressed by four variants of its functional dependence: (a) on enzymic reaction of oxygen consumption, (b) on the order of reaction with respect to oxygen, (c) on physiological parameters of cells, and (d) on characteristic oxygen concentrations in the system. Items (c) and (d) are based on the postulated diffusion-kinetic model of oxygen consumption by an idealized cell of small size that consists of a drop of homogenous solution of the respiratory enzyme which is characterized by an equivalent Michaelis constant. The drop is enveloped in a uniform membrane that possesses a definite diffuse resistance to oxygen

  10. Single-cell measurement of red blood cell oxygen affinity

    OpenAIRE

    Caprio, Di; Stokes, Chris; Higgins, John M.; Schonbrun, Ethan

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is transported throughout the body by hemoglobin in red blood cells. While the oxygen affinity of blood is well understood and is routinely assessed in patients by pulse oximetry, variability at the single-cell level has not been previously measured. In contrast, single-cell measurements of red blood cell volume and hemoglobin concentration are taken millions of times per day by clinical hematology analyzers and are important factors in determining the health of the hematologic system....

  11. Single-cell measurement of red blood cell oxygen affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Caprio, Giuseppe; Stokes, Chris; Higgins, John M; Schonbrun, Ethan

    2015-08-11

    Oxygen is transported throughout the body by hemoglobin (Hb) in red blood cells (RBCs). Although the oxygen affinity of blood is well-understood and routinely assessed in patients by pulse oximetry, variability at the single-cell level has not been previously measured. In contrast, single-cell measurements of RBC volume and Hb concentration are taken millions of times per day by clinical hematology analyzers, and they are important factors in determining the health of the hematologic system. To better understand the variability and determinants of oxygen affinity on a cellular level, we have developed a system that quantifies the oxygen saturation, cell volume, and Hb concentration for individual RBCs in high throughput. We find that the variability in single-cell saturation peaks at an oxygen partial pressure of 2.9%, which corresponds to the maximum slope of the oxygen-Hb dissociation curve. In addition, single-cell oxygen affinity is positively correlated with Hb concentration but independent of osmolarity, which suggests variation in the Hb to 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2-3 DPG) ratio on a cellular level. By quantifying the functional behavior of a cellular population, our system adds a dimension to blood cell analysis and other measurements of single-cell variability.

  12. Hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vondrák, Jiří; Klápště, Břetislav; Velická, Jana; Sedlaříková, M.; Černý, R.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 1 (2003), s. 44-47 ISSN 1432-8488 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/02/0983; GA AV ČR IAA4032002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4032918 Keywords : electrocatalysis * hydrogen electrode Ionex membrane * membrane fuel cell Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.195, year: 2003

  13. Human cytomegalovirus renders cells non-permissive for replication of herpes simplex viruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cockley, K.D.

    1988-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus (HSV) genome during production infection in vitro may be subject to negative regulation which results in modification of the cascade of expression of herpes virus macromolecular synthesis leading to establishment of HSV latency. In the present study, human embryonic lung (HEL) cells infected with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) restricted the replication of HSV type-1 (HSV-1). A delay in HSV replication of 15 hr as well as a consistent, almost 1000-fold inhibition of HSV replication in HCMV-infected cell cultures harvested 24 to 72 hr after superinfection were observed compared with controls infected with HSV alone. HSV type-2 (HSV-2) replication was similarly inhibited in HCMV-infected HEL cells. Prior ultraviolet-irradiation (UV) of HCMV removed the block to HSV replication, demonstrating the requirement for an active HCMV genome. HCMV deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) negative temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants inhibited HSV replications as efficiently as wild-type (wt) HCMV at the non-permissive temperature. Evidence for penetration and replication of superinfecting HSV into HCMV-infected cells was provided by blot hybridization of HSV DNA synthesized in HSV-superinfected cell cultures and by cesium chloride density gradient analysis of [ 3 H]-labeled HSV-1-superinfected cells

  14. Loss of functional E-cadherin renders cells more resistant to the apoptotic agent taxol in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Paulo; Oliveira, Maria Jose; Beraldi, Eliana; Mateus, Ana Rita; Nakajima, Takashi; Gleave, Martin; Yokota, Jun; Carneiro, Fatima; Huntsman, David; Seruca, Raquel; Suriano, Gianpaolo

    2005-01-01

    Experimental evidence supports a role for E-cadherin in suppressing invasion, metastasis, and proliferation. Germline mutations of the E-cadherin represent the genetic cause of hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC). In this type of tumor, isolated cancer cells permeate the basal membrane and paradoxically survive in the gastric wall in the absence of contact with neighbor epithelial cells or with the extracellular matrix. This suggests that upon E-cadherin deregulation, cells acquired resistance to apoptosis. To test this hypothesis, CHO cells stably expressing either wild-type E-cadherin or the HDGC-related germline mutations T340A and V832M were seeded either on a thin layer of collagen type I or on plastic and then subjected to the apoptotic agent taxol. We found that in vitro functional E-cadherin renders cells more sensitive to the effect of taxol. Our results also indicate that this effect is associated to decreased level of the anti-apoptotic bcl-2 protein

  15. Acute dyskerin depletion triggers cellular senescence and renders osteosarcoma cells resistant to genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Ping; Mobasher, Maral E.; Alawi, Faizan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Dyskerin depletion triggers cellular senescence in U2OS osteosarcoma cells. • Dyskerin-depleted cells are resistant to apoptosis induced by genotoxic stress. • Chromatin relaxation sensitizes dyskerin-depleted cells to apoptosis. - Abstract: Dyskerin is a conserved, nucleolar RNA-binding protein implicated in an increasing array of fundamental cellular processes. Germline mutation in the dyskerin gene (DKC1) is the cause of X-linked dyskeratosis congenita (DC). Conversely, wild-type dyskerin is overexpressed in sporadic cancers, and high-levels may be associated with poor prognosis. It was previously reported that acute loss of dyskerin function via siRNA-mediated depletion slowed the proliferation of transformed cell lines. However, the mechanisms remained unclear. Using human U2OS osteosarcoma cells, we show that siRNA-mediated dyskerin depletion induced cellular senescence as evidenced by proliferative arrest, senescence-associated heterochromatinization and a senescence-associated molecular profile. Senescence can render cells resistant to apoptosis. Conversely, chromatin relaxation can reverse the repressive effects of senescence-associated heterochromatinization on apoptosis. To this end, genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis was suppressed in dyskerin-depleted cells. In contrast, agents that induce chromatin relaxation, including histone deacetylase inhibitors and the DNA intercalator chloroquine, sensitized dyskerin-depleted cells to apoptosis. Dyskerin is a core component of the telomerase complex and plays an important role in telomere homeostasis. Defective telomere maintenance resulting in premature senescence is thought to primarily underlie the pathogenesis of X-linked DC. Since U2OS cells are telomerase-negative, this leads us to conclude that loss of dyskerin function can also induce cellular senescence via mechanisms independent of telomere shortening

  16. The oxygen effect in E. coli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myasnik, M.N.; Skvortsov, V.G.; Sokolov, V.A.

    1982-01-01

    In experiments on E. coli strains deficient in some stages of DNA repair from radiation damages, it was demonstrated that the value of the oxygen effect, under optimal conditions for manifestation thereof, decreases in the following order: E. coli WP2 (the wild type) → E. coli WP2 exr - and E. coli B → E. coli WP2 uvr A6 → E. coli WP2 rec Al and E. coli WP2 hcr - exr - . It was detected that 0.14 M NaCl solution sensitizes the anoxic cells of some E. coli strains to the effect of γ-radiation. It was established that mutation of the uvr A-gene increases sharply the sensitivity of cells to iradiation under the anoxic conditions in the presence of NaCl, the reverse'' oxygen effect being observed

  17. Spatially monitoring oxygen level in 3D microfabricated cell culture systems using optical oxygen sensing beads

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lin; Acosta, Miguel A.; Leach, Jennie B.; Carrier, Rebecca L.

    2013-01-01

    Capability of measuring and monitoring local oxygen concentration at the single cell level (tens of microns scale) is often desirable but difficult to achieve in cell culture. In this study, biocompatible oxygen sensing beads were prepared and tested for their potential for real-time monitoring and mapping of local oxygen concentration in 3D micro-patterned cell culture systems. Each oxygen sensing bead is composed of a silica core loaded with both an oxygen sensitive Ru(Ph2phen3)Cl2 dye and ...

  18. Single Cell Oxygen Mapping (SCOM) by Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy Uncovers Heterogeneous Intracellular Oxygen Consumption

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Carla Santana; Kowaltowski, Alicia J.; Bertotti, Mauro

    2017-01-01

    We developed a highly sensitive oxygen consumption scanning microscopy system using platinized platinum disc microelectrodes. The system is capable of reliably detecting single-cell respiration, responding to classical regulators of mitochondrial oxygen consumption activity as expected. Comparisons with commercial multi-cell oxygen detection systems show that the system has comparable errors (if not smaller), with the advantage of being able to monitor inter and intra-cell heterogeneity in ox...

  19. Oxygen sensitization of mammalian cells under different irradiation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, C.C.; Michaels, H.B.; Gerweck, L.E.; Epp, E.R.; Peterson, E.C.

    1981-01-01

    The oxygen dependence of the radiosensitivity of cultured CHO cells was examined in detail with particular attention paid to avoiding possible artifacts due to radiolytic oxygen depletion. Two methods of gas equilibration and irradiation were used. In the first approach, cells were irradiated with 50-kVp X rays in a thin-layer geometry which offered maximum interchange between the cells and the surrounding gas. The second technique employed 280-kVp X irradiation of cells under full-medium conditions with mechanical agitation to minimize the effect of radiochemical oxygen consumption by promoting rapid oxygen replenishment. With these techniques oxygen radiosensitization was clearly resolved at an oxygen concentration of 0.03% in the gas phase. The oxygen K curves measured by these two methods were similar in shape over a wide range of oxygen concentration

  20. Oxygen-dependent sensitization of irradiated cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewing, D.; Powers, E.L.

    1979-01-01

    Attention is focused primarily on O 2 effects in three biological systems, all tested in suspension: bacterial spores, vegetative bacterial cells, and mammalian cells. Information from these systems shows that O 2 has more than one process through which it can act. Studies with bacterial spore suspensions provide clear evidence that multiple components to oxygen-dependent radiation sensitization exist. Studies with mammalian cell suspensions also show that at least two oxygen-dependent sensitization processes can be distinguished. Similar studies with vegetative bacteria in suspension have not resolved oxic sensitization into components. The roles of water-derived radicals in radiation sensitivity and, specifically, in sensitization by O 2 were examined. OH radicals are clearly implicated in damage in all three biological test systems. However, the specific roles proposed for OH radicals are different in these organisms. In bacterial spores, OH radical removal in itself does not protect in anoxia or in high concentrations of O 2 . OH radical removal over a limited intermediate range of O 2 concentrations will, however, protect. OH radical scavenging probably results in the formation of the actual protector. In bacteria, the supposition is that OH radical removal will protect both in anoxia and in the presence of O 2 . OH radicals probably react with a cellular target molecule and leave a radicalsite; this is the site which can then react with O 2 to cause damage; DNA is the likely cellular target. In mammalian cells, a reaction scheme, similar to that proposed for bacteria, has been suggested for O 2 -dependent sensitization

  1. Mechanisms of oxygen radiosensitization in CHO cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whillans, D.W.

    1981-01-01

    A model is presented for repair and fixation pathways when CHO cells are irradiated in the presence of O 2 . This analysis predicts that an increase in the repair path such as has been postulated for addition of a radioprotective sulfhydryl should increase OER/sub max/ in porportion to k prime, the new repair rate constant and also increase K with k prime. Any radiosensitizer which mimics the action of O 2 simply increases k prime 2 , so that the OER/sub max/ decreases at 1/k prime 2 but K increases as k prime 2 . These predictions have been tested in mammalian CHO cells making use of a Clark-type oxygen probe with defined conditions to ensure that O 2 is not depleted by radiation or cellular consumption, and so O 2 levels are known with accuracy. In a complementary study, the technique of rapid-mixing was used to measure the rate of development of O 2 sensitization in these same cells. By a variation of this rapid-mixing approach, the rate of diffusion into these cells has also been measured independently. Neither the dependence of OER on O 2 concentration nor the development of radiosensitivity with time of incubation in O 2 gives evidence in CHO cells for two components of sensitization indicative of two sites or two mechanisms of action, as seen in some V79 sublines. 13 references, 4 figures

  2. FOXP3 renders activated human regulatory T cells resistant to restimulation-induced cell death by suppressing SAP expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Gil; Voss, Kelsey; Yan, Toria F; Kim, Yong Chan; Kortum, Robert L; Scott, David W; Snow, Andrew L

    2018-05-01

    Restimulation-induced cell death (RICD) is an apoptotic program that regulates effector T cell expansion, triggered by repeated stimulation through the T cell receptor (TCR) in the presence of interleukin-2 (IL-2). Although CD4 + regulatory T cells (Tregs) consume IL-2 and experience frequent TCR stimulation, they are highly resistant to RICD. Resistance in Tregs is dependent on the forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) transcription factor, although the mechanism remains unclear. T cells from patients with X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP-1), that lack the adaptor molecule SLAM-associated protein (SAP), are also resistant to RICD. Here we demonstrate that normal Tregs express very low levels of SAP compared to conventional T cells. FOXP3 reduces SAP expression by directly binding to and repressing the SH2D1A (SAP) promoter. Indeed, ectopic SAP expression restores RICD sensitivity in human FOXP3 + Tregs. Our findings illuminate the mechanism behind FOXP3-mediated RICD resistance in Tregs, providing new insight into their long-term persistence. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Radiosensitizers and the oxygen effects in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millar, B.C.; Fielden, E.M.; Steele, J.J.

    1979-01-01

    The survival curves for Chinese Hamster cells irradiated under various oxygen tensions have been determined. The variation in OER with oxygen concentration shows two distinct components. Between 1.4 and 7.0 μM the OER is constant with a value of 1.9. Experiments with nitroaromatic radiosensitizers in combination with low concentrations of oxygen show that they can all mimic the 'low concentration' oxygen effect. Of the compounds tested only misonidazole can apparently mimic the 'high concentration' oxygen effect although the full OER cannot be obtained with the authors cell line because of toxicity by the sensitizer. (Auth.)

  4. Molecular and Cell Mechanisms of Singlet Oxygen Effect on Biosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Martusevich А.А.; Peretyagin S.P.; Martusevich А.К.

    2012-01-01

    There has been considered a poorly studied form of activated oxygen — singlet oxygen. Its physicochemical properties (electron configuration of a molecule, reactive capacity, features) are analyzed, and enzymic and nonenzymic ways of singlet oxygen generation in body are specified. There are shown in detail biological effects of the compound as a regulator of cell activity including that determining the mechanism of apoptosis initiation. The relation of singlet oxygen and photodynamic effect ...

  5. Cyclophilin Inhibitors Remodel the Endoplasmic Reticulum of HCV-Infected Cells in a Unique Pattern Rendering Cells Impervious to a Reinfection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udayan Chatterji

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of action by which cyclophilin inhibitors (CypI interfere with the HCV life cycle remain poorly understood. We reported that CypI and NS5A inhibitors (NS5Ai, but not other classes of anti-HCV agents, prevent assembly of double membrane vesicles (DMVs, which protect replication complexes. We demonstrated that both NS5A and the isomerase cyclophilin A (CypA are required for DMV formation. Here, we examined whether CypI mediate an additional antiviral effect that could further explain the high efficacy of CypI. We identified a unique action of CypI. CypI remodel the organization of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER of HCV-infected cells, but not of uninfected cells. This effect is specific since it was not observed for other classes of anti-HCV agents including NS5Ai, and has no effect on the viability of CypI-treated cells. Since ER serves as platform for the establishment of HCV replication complexes, we asked whether the ER reorganization by CypI would prevent cells from being newly infected. Remarkably, CypI-treated HCV-pre-infected cells remain totally impervious to a reinfection, suggesting that the CypI-mediated ER reorganization prevents a reinfection. This block is not due to residual CypI since CypI-resistant HCV variants also fail to infect these cells. The ER reorganization by CypI is rapid and reversible. This study provides the first evidence that CypI trigger a unique ER reorganization of infected cells, rendering cells transiently impervious to a reinfection. This study further suggests that the HCV-induced ER rearrangement represents a key target for the development of new therapies.

  6. Intervention of oxygen-control ability to radiation sensitivity, cell aging and cell transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Hanako; Watanabe, Masami

    2009-01-01

    Oxygen is essential for life, and cells have therefore developed numerous adaptive responses to oxygen change. Here, we examined the difference in oxygen-control functions of human (HE), mouse (ME), and Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells cultured under different oxygen conditions (0.5%, 2% and 20%), and also examined whether oxygen tensions contributed to cellular lifespan and transformation. HE cells had their replicative lifespan slightly extended under hypoxic (0.5% and 2% oxygen) conditions, but were not immortalized under any of the oxygen concentrations. On the other hand, although ME cells cultured under 20% oxygen tension decreased their proliferation potency temporarily at early stage, all rodent cells were immortalized and acquired anchorage-independency, regardless of oxygen tension. These results suggest that cellular oxygen control function is related to sensitivities cellular immortalization and transformation. To understand intervention of oxygen control ability on cellular immortalization and transformation, we examined the intracellular oxidative level, mitochondria functions and radiation sensitivity. Intracellular oxidative levels of hypoxically cultured rodent cells were significantly enhanced. Mitochondrial membrane potential was altered depend on oxygen tensions, but the change was not parallel to mitochondria number in rodent cells. ME cells were particularly sensitive to oxygen change, and showed a clear oxygen effect on the X-ray survival. However, there was no difference in frequency of radiation-induced micronuclei between HE and ME cells. These results suggest that the response to oxygen change differs markedly in HE and rodent cells. (author)

  7. Optical detection of singlet oxygen from single cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snyder, John; Skovsen, Esben; Lambert, John D. C.

    2006-01-01

    The lowest excited electronic state of molecular oxygen, singlet molecular oxygen, O2(a 1g), is a reactive species involved in many chemical and biological processes. To better understand the roles played by singlet oxygen in biological systems, particularly at the sub-cellular level, optical tools...... including across the cell membrane into the extracellular environment. On one hand, these results demonstrate that the behavior of singlet oxygen in an intact cell can be significantly different from that inferred from model bulk studies. More generally, these results provide a new perspective...

  8. Oxygen Source for Underwater Vehicle Fuel Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Batton, William

    2002-01-01

    Four successful tests were conducted to demonstrate the usefulness of lithium oxide as a catalyst and manganese as a fuel for the release of oxygen by the decomposition of lithium perchlorate at low temperature...

  9. Video-based rendering

    CERN Document Server

    Magnor, Marcus A

    2005-01-01

    Driven by consumer-market applications that enjoy steadily increasing economic importance, graphics hardware and rendering algorithms are a central focus of computer graphics research. Video-based rendering is an approach that aims to overcome the current bottleneck in the time-consuming modeling process and has applications in areas such as computer games, special effects, and interactive TV. This book offers an in-depth introduction to video-based rendering, a rapidly developing new interdisciplinary topic employing techniques from computer graphics, computer vision, and telecommunication en

  10. Oxygen diffusion kinetics and reactive lifetimes in bacterial and mammalian cells irradiated with nanosecond pulses of high intensity electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epp, E.R.; Weiss, H.; Ling, C.C.; Djordjevic, B.; Kessaris, N.D.

    1975-01-01

    Experiaments have been designed to gain information on the lifetime of oxygen-sensitive species suspected to be produced in critical molecules in irradiated cells and on the time-diffusion of oxygen in cells. An approach developed in this laboratory involves the delivery of two high intensity electron pulses each of 3 ns duration to a thin layer of cells equilibrated with a known concentration of oxygen. The first pulse serves to render the cells totally anoxic by the radiochemical depletion of oxygen; the second is delivered at a time electronically delayed after the first allowing for diffusion of oxygen during this time. Under these conditions the radiosensitivity of E coli B/r has been measured over six decades of interpulse time. Cellular time-diffusion curves constructed from the measurements show that oxygen establishes its sensitizing effect within 10 -4 s after the creation of intracellular anoxia establishing this time as an upper limit to the lifetime of the species. Unusual behaviour of the diffusion curve observed for longer delay times can be explained by a model wherein it is postulated that a radiation-induced inhibiting agent slows down diffusion. Application of this model to the experimental data yields a value of 0.4x10 -5 cm 2 s -1 for the cellular oxygen diffusion coefficient. Similar experiments recently carried out for Serratia marcescens will also be described. The oxygen effect in cultured HeLa cells exposed to single short electron pulses has been examined over a range of oxygen concentrations. A family of breaking survival curves was obtained similar to those previously measured for E coli B/r by this laboratory. The data appear to be reasonably consistent with a physicochemical mechanism involving the radiochemical depletion of oxygen previously invoked for bacteria. (author)

  11. Rendering of Gemstones

    OpenAIRE

    Krtek, Lukáš

    2012-01-01

    The distinctive appearance of gemstones is caused by the way light reflects and refracts multiple times inside of them. The goal of this thesis is to design and implement an application for photorealistic rendering of gems. The most important effects we aim for are realistic dispersion of light and refractive caustics. For rendering we use well-known algorithm of path tracing with an experimental modification for faster computation of caustic effects. In this thesis we also design and impleme...

  12. Fast kinetics of the oxygen effect in irradiated mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, M.E.; Maughan, R.L.; Michael, B.D.

    1978-01-01

    A technique using a fast gas transfer with a single pulse of electrons (the gas-explosion technique) has been used to investigate the time-dependence of the dose-modifying action of oxygen in irradiated V79 Chinese hamster cells. Oxygen did not significantly alter the shapes of the survival curves. The dose-modifying factor between the fully oxic and fully hypoxic (oxygen at 9000 ms) curve was 2.6. The dose-modifying factor for the survival curve drawn for oxygen contact at 0.3 ms after irradiation was 1.5 relative to the hypoxic curve. The duration of the post-effect (oxygen contact after irradiation) indicated that oxygen-dependent damage has a lifetime extending into the ms time-range. In the pre-effect time region (oxygen contact before irradiation) 1 to 2 ms oxygen contact was required to achieve the full sensitization. The results are discussed with reference to the diffusion time for oxygen to reach the sensitive site within the cell. (U.K.)

  13. Obviating the requirement for oxygen in SnO2-based solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docampo, Pablo; Snaith, Henry J.

    2011-06-01

    Organic semiconductors employed in solar cells are perfectly stable to solar irradiation provided oxygen content can be kept below 1 ppm. Paradoxically, the state-of-the-art molecular hole-transporter-based solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells only operate efficiently if measured in an atmosphere containing oxygen. Without oxygen, these devices rapidly lose photovoltage and photocurrent and are rendered useless. Clearly this peculiar requirement has detrimental implications to the long term stability of these devices. Through characterizing the solar cells in air and in oxygen-free atmospheres, and considering the device architecture, we identify that direct contact between the metallic cathode and the mesoporous metal oxide photo-anode is responsible for a shunting path through the device. This metal-metal oxide contact forms a Schottky barrier under ambient conditions and the barrier is suitably high so as to prevent significant shunting of the solar cells. However, under light absorption in an anaerobic atmosphere the barrier reduces significantly, opening a low resistance shunting path which dominates the current-voltage characteristics in the solar cell. By incorporating an extra interlayer of insulating mesoporous aluminum oxide, on top of the mesoporous semiconducting metal oxide electrode, we successfully block this shunting path and subsequently the devices operate efficiently in an oxygen-free atmosphere, enabling the possibility of long term stability of solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells.

  14. Obviating the requirement for oxygen in SnO2-based solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Docampo, Pablo; Snaith, Henry J

    2011-01-01

    Organic semiconductors employed in solar cells are perfectly stable to solar irradiation provided oxygen content can be kept below 1 ppm. Paradoxically, the state-of-the-art molecular hole-transporter-based solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells only operate efficiently if measured in an atmosphere containing oxygen. Without oxygen, these devices rapidly lose photovoltage and photocurrent and are rendered useless. Clearly this peculiar requirement has detrimental implications to the long term stability of these devices. Through characterizing the solar cells in air and in oxygen-free atmospheres, and considering the device architecture, we identify that direct contact between the metallic cathode and the mesoporous metal oxide photo-anode is responsible for a shunting path through the device. This metal-metal oxide contact forms a Schottky barrier under ambient conditions and the barrier is suitably high so as to prevent significant shunting of the solar cells. However, under light absorption in an anaerobic atmosphere the barrier reduces significantly, opening a low resistance shunting path which dominates the current-voltage characteristics in the solar cell. By incorporating an extra interlayer of insulating mesoporous aluminum oxide, on top of the mesoporous semiconducting metal oxide electrode, we successfully block this shunting path and subsequently the devices operate efficiently in an oxygen-free atmosphere, enabling the possibility of long term stability of solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells.

  15. Deficiency in the nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 renders pancreatic β-cells vulnerable to arsenic-induced cell damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Bei; Fu, Jingqi; Zheng, Hongzhi; Xue, Peng; Yarborough, Kathy; Woods, Courtney G.; Hou, Yongyong; Zhang, Qiang; Andersen, Melvin E.; Pi, Jingbo

    2012-01-01

    Chronic human exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs), a potent environmental oxidative stressor, is associated with increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes, where impairment of pancreatic β-cell function is a key pathogenic factor. Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a central transcription factor regulating cellular adaptive response to oxidative stress. However, persistent activation of Nrf2 in response to chronic oxidative stress, including inorganic arsenite (iAs 3+ ) exposure, blunts glucose-triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling and impairs glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). In the current study, we found that MIN6 pancreatic β-cells with stable knockdown of Nrf2 (Nrf2-KD) by lentiviral shRNA and pancreatic islets isolated from Nrf2-knockout (Nrf2−/−) mice exhibited reduced expression of several antioxidant and detoxification enzymes in response to acute iAs 3+ exposure. As a result, Nrf2-KD MIN6 cells and Nrf2−/− islets were more susceptible to iAs 3+ and monomethylarsonous acid (MMA 3+ )-induced cell damage, as measured by decreased cell viability, augmented apoptosis and morphological change. Pretreatment of MIN6 cells with Nrf2 activator tert-butylhydroquinone protected the cells from iAs 3+ -induced cell damage in an Nrf2-dependent fashion. In contrast, antioxidant N‐acetyl cysteine protected Nrf2-KD MIN6 cells against acute cytotoxicity of iAs 3+ . The present study demonstrates that Nrf2-mediated antioxidant response is critical in the pancreatic β-cell defense mechanism against acute cytotoxicity by arsenic. The findings here, combined with our previous results on the inhibitory effect of antioxidants on ROS signaling and GSIS, suggest that Nrf2 plays paradoxical roles in pancreatic β-cell dysfunction induced by environmental arsenic exposure. -- Highlights: ► Lack of Nrf2 reduced expression of antioxidant genes induced by iAs 3+ in β-cells. ► Deficiency of Nrf2 in β-cells sensitized to iAs 3+ and MMA 3

  16. Deficiency in the nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 renders pancreatic β-cells vulnerable to arsenic-induced cell damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Bei [Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Department of Histology and Embryology, College of Basic Medical Sciences, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Fu, Jingqi; Zheng, Hongzhi; Xue, Peng; Yarborough, Kathy; Woods, Courtney G.; Hou, Yongyong; Zhang, Qiang; Andersen, Melvin E. [Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Pi, Jingbo, E-mail: jpi@thehamner.org [Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Chronic human exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs), a potent environmental oxidative stressor, is associated with increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes, where impairment of pancreatic β-cell function is a key pathogenic factor. Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a central transcription factor regulating cellular adaptive response to oxidative stress. However, persistent activation of Nrf2 in response to chronic oxidative stress, including inorganic arsenite (iAs{sup 3+}) exposure, blunts glucose-triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling and impairs glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). In the current study, we found that MIN6 pancreatic β-cells with stable knockdown of Nrf2 (Nrf2-KD) by lentiviral shRNA and pancreatic islets isolated from Nrf2-knockout (Nrf2−/−) mice exhibited reduced expression of several antioxidant and detoxification enzymes in response to acute iAs{sup 3+} exposure. As a result, Nrf2-KD MIN6 cells and Nrf2−/− islets were more susceptible to iAs{sup 3+} and monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup 3+})-induced cell damage, as measured by decreased cell viability, augmented apoptosis and morphological change. Pretreatment of MIN6 cells with Nrf2 activator tert-butylhydroquinone protected the cells from iAs{sup 3+}-induced cell damage in an Nrf2-dependent fashion. In contrast, antioxidant N‐acetyl cysteine protected Nrf2-KD MIN6 cells against acute cytotoxicity of iAs{sup 3+}. The present study demonstrates that Nrf2-mediated antioxidant response is critical in the pancreatic β-cell defense mechanism against acute cytotoxicity by arsenic. The findings here, combined with our previous results on the inhibitory effect of antioxidants on ROS signaling and GSIS, suggest that Nrf2 plays paradoxical roles in pancreatic β-cell dysfunction induced by environmental arsenic exposure. -- Highlights: ► Lack of Nrf2 reduced expression of antioxidant genes induced by iAs{sup 3+} in β-cells. ► Deficiency of Nrf2 in β-cells

  17. A microfluidic cell culture array with various oxygen tensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chien-Chung; Liao, Wei-Hao; Chen, Ying-Hua; Wu, Chueh-Yu; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2013-08-21

    Oxygen tension plays an important role in regulating various cellular functions in both normal physiology and disease states. Therefore, drug testing using conventional in vitro cell models under normoxia often possesses limited prediction capability. A traditional method of setting an oxygen tension in a liquid medium is by saturating it with a gas mixture at the desired level of oxygen, which requires bulky gas cylinders, sophisticated control, and tedious interconnections. Moreover, only a single oxygen tension can be tested at the same time. In this paper, we develop a microfluidic cell culture array platform capable of performing cell culture and drug testing under various oxygen tensions simultaneously. The device is fabricated using an elastomeric material, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and the well-developed multi-layer soft lithography (MSL) technique. The prototype device has 4 × 4 wells, arranged in the same dimensions as a conventional 96-well plate, for cell culture. The oxygen tensions are controlled by spatially confined oxygen scavenging chemical reactions underneath the wells using microfluidics. The platform takes advantage of microfluidic phenomena while exhibiting the combinatorial diversities achieved by microarrays. Importantly, the platform is compatible with existing cell incubators and high-throughput instruments (liquid handling systems and plate readers) for cost-effective setup and straightforward operation. Utilizing the developed platform, we successfully perform drug testing using an anti-cancer drug, triapazamine (TPZ), on adenocarcinomic human alveolar basal epithelial cell line (A549) under three oxygen tensions ranging from 1.4% to normoxia. The developed platform is promising to provide a more meaningful in vitro cell model for various biomedical applications while maintaining desired high throughput capabilities.

  18. Transcriptional Reprogramming during Effector-to-Memory Transition Renders CD4+ T Cells Permissive for Latent HIV-1 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Liang; Deng, Kai; Gao, Hongbo; Xing, Sifei; Capoferri, Adam A; Durand, Christine M; Rabi, S Alireza; Laird, Gregory M; Kim, Michelle; Hosmane, Nina N; Yang, Hung-Chih; Zhang, Hao; Margolick, Joseph B; Li, Linghua; Cai, Weiping; Ke, Ruian; Flavell, Richard A; Siliciano, Janet D; Siliciano, Robert F

    2017-10-17

    The latent reservoir for HIV-1 in resting memory CD4 + T cells is the major barrier to curing HIV-1 infection. Studies of HIV-1 latency have focused on regulation of viral gene expression in cells in which latent infection is established. However, it remains unclear how infection initially becomes latent. Here we described a unique set of properties of CD4 + T cells undergoing effector-to-memory transition including temporary upregulation of CCR5 expression and rapid downregulation of cellular gene transcription. These cells allowed completion of steps in the HIV-1 life cycle through integration but suppressed HIV-1 gene transcription, thus allowing the establishment of latency. CD4 + T cells in this stage were substantially more permissive for HIV-1 latent infection than other CD4 + T cells. Establishment of latent HIV-1 infection in CD4 + T could be inhibited by viral-specific CD8 + T cells, a result with implications for elimination of latent HIV-1 infection by T cell-based vaccines. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide signaling in bystander cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jella, Kishore Kumar; Moriarty, Roisin; McClean, Brendan; Byrne, Hugh J; Lyng, Fiona M

    2018-01-01

    It is now well accepted that radiation induced bystander effects can occur in cells exposed to media from irradiated cells. The aim of this study was to follow the bystander cells in real time following addition of media from irradiated cells and to determine the effect of inhibiting these signals. A human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT cells, was irradiated (0.005, 0.05 and 0.5 Gy) with γ irradiation, conditioned medium was harvested after one hour and added to recipient bystander cells. Reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, Glutathione levels, caspase activation, cytotoxicity and cell viability was measured after the addition of irradiated cell conditioned media to bystander cells. Reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide levels in bystander cells treated with 0.5Gy ICCM were analysed in real time using time lapse fluorescence microscopy. The levels of reactive oxygen species were also measured in real time after the addition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and c-Jun amino-terminal kinase pathway inhibitors. ROS and glutathione levels were observed to increase after the addition of irradiated cell conditioned media (0.005, 0.05 and 0.5 Gy ICCM). Caspase activation was found to increase 4 hours after irradiated cell conditioned media treatment (0.005, 0.05 and 0.5 Gy ICCM) and this increase was observed up to 8 hours and there after a reduction in caspase activation was observed. A decrease in cell viability was observed but no major change in cytotoxicity was found in HaCaT cells after treatment with irradiated cell conditioned media (0.005, 0.05 and 0.5 Gy ICCM). This study involved the identification of key signaling molecules such as reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, glutathione and caspases generated in bystander cells. These results suggest a clear connection between reactive oxygen species and cell survival pathways with persistent production of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide in bystander cells following exposure to irradiated cell

  20. Performance optimization of a PEM hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell

    OpenAIRE

    Maher A.R. Sadiq Al-Baghdadi

    2013-01-01

    The objective was to develop a semi-empirical model that would simulate the performance of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells without extensive calculations. A fuel cell mathematical module has been designed and constructed to determine the performance of a PEM fuel cell. The influence of some operating parameters on the performance of PEM fuel cell has been investigated using pure hydrogen on the anode side and oxygen on the cathode side. The present model can be used to investigate t...

  1. Deletion of IL-4Ralpha on CD4 T cells renders BALB/c mice resistant to Leishmania major infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Radwanska

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Effector responses induced by polarized CD4+ T helper 2 (Th2 cells drive nonhealing responses in BALB/c mice infected with Leishmania major. Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 are known susceptibility factors for L. major infection in BALB/c mice and induce their biological functions through a common receptor, the IL-4 receptor alpha chain (IL-4Ralpha. IL-4Ralpha-deficient BALB/c mice, however, remain susceptible to L. major infection, indicating that IL-4/IL-13 may induce protective responses. Therefore, the roles of polarized Th2 CD4+ T cells and IL-4/IL-13 responsiveness of non-CD4+ T cells in inducing non-healer or healer responses have yet to be elucidated. CD4+ T cell-specific IL-4Ralpha (Lck(creIL-4Ralpha(-/lox deficient BALB/c mice were generated and characterized to elucidate the importance of IL-4Ralpha signaling during cutaneous leishmaniasis in the absence of IL-4-responsive CD4+ T cells. Efficient deletion was confirmed by loss of IL-4Ralpha expression on CD4+ T cells and impaired IL-4-induced CD4+ T cell proliferation and Th2 differentiation. CD8+, gammadelta+, and NK-T cells expressed residual IL-4Ralpha, and representative non-T cell populations maintained IL-4/IL-13 responsiveness. In contrast to IL-4Ralpha(-/lox BALB/c mice, which developed ulcerating lesions following infection with L. major, Lck(creIL-4Ralpha(-/lox mice were resistant and showed protection to rechallenge, similar to healer C57BL/6 mice. Resistance to L. major in Lck(creIL-4Ralpha(-/lox mice correlated with reduced numbers of IL-10-secreting cells and early IL-12p35 mRNA induction, leading to increased delayed type hypersensitivity responses, interferon-gamma production, and elevated ratios of inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA/parasite, similar to C57BL/6 mice. These data demonstrate that abrogation of IL-4 signaling in CD4+ T cells is required to transform non-healer BALB/c mice to a healer phenotype. Furthermore, a beneficial role for IL-4Ralpha signaling in L

  2. Slow mitochondrial repair of 5'-AMP renders mtDNA susceptible to damage in APTX deficient cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akbari, Mansour; Sykora, Peter; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-01-01

    deficient cells. Moreover, the removal of 5'-AMP from DNA was significantly slower in the mitochondrial extracts from human cell lines and mouse tissues compared with their corresponding nuclear extracts. These results suggest that, contrary to nuclear DNA repair, mitochondrial DNA repair is not able...... elucidated. Here, we monitored the repair of 5'-AMP DNA damage in nuclear and mitochondrial extracts from human APTX(+/+) and APTX(-/-) cells. The efficiency of repair of 5'-AMP DNA was much lower in mitochondrial than in nuclear protein extracts, and resulted in persistent DNA repair intermediates in APTX......Aborted DNA ligation events in eukaryotic cells can generate 5'-adenylated (5'-AMP) DNA termini that can be removed from DNA by aprataxin (APTX). Mutations in APTX cause an inherited human disease syndrome characterized by early-onset progressive ataxia with ocular motor apraxia (AOA1). APTX...

  3. Formation of reactive oxygen species in rat epithelial cells upon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In our study, we investigated the influence of fly ash on the promotion of early inflammatory reactions like the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in rat lung epithelial cells (RLE-6TN). Furthermore, we determined the formation of nitric oxide (NO). The cells show a clear dose-response relationship concerning the ...

  4. New electrocatalysts for hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattabriga, R. A.; Giner, J.; Parry, J.; Swette, L. L.

    1970-01-01

    Platinum-silver, palladium-gold, and platinum-gold alloys serve as oxygen reduction catalysts in high-current-density cells. Catalysts were tested on polytetrafluoroethylene-bonded cathodes and a hydrogen anode at an operating cell temperature of 80 degrees C.

  5. SPE (tm) regenerative hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells for extraterrestrial surface and microgravity applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcelroy, J. F.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on SPE regenerative hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells for extraterrestrial surface and microgravity applications are presented. Topics covered include: hydrogen-oxygen regenerative fuel cell energy storage system; electrochemical cell reactions; SPE cell voltage stability; passive water removal SPE fuel cell; fuel cell performance; SPE water electrolyzers; hydrophobic oxygen phase separator; hydrophilic/electrochemical hydrogen phase separator; and unitized regenerative fuel cell.

  6. Rational design of competitive electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction in hydrogen fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolbov, Sergey; Alcántara Ortigoza, Marisol

    2012-02-01

    The large-scale application of one of the most promising clean and renewable sources of energy, hydrogen fuel cells, still awaits efficient and cost-effective electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) occurring on the cathode. We demonstrate that truly rational design renders electrocatalysts possessing both qualities. By unifying the knowledge on surface morphology, composition, electronic structure and reactivity, we solve that sandwich-like structures are an excellent choice for optimization. Their constituting species couple synergistically yielding reaction-environment stability, cost-effectiveness and tunable reactivity. This cooperative-action concept enabled us to predict two advantageous ORR electrocatalysts. Density functional theory calculations of the reaction free-energy diagrams confirm that these materials are more active toward ORR than the so far best Pt-based catalysts. Our designing concept advances also a general approach for engineering materials in heterogeneous catalysis.

  7. Photoelectrochemical water splitting in separate oxygen and hydrogen cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman, Avigail; Dotan, Hen; Shter, Gennady E.; Wullenkord, Michael; Houaijia, Anis; Maljusch, Artjom; Grader, Gideon S.; Rothschild, Avner

    2017-06-01

    Solar water splitting provides a promising path for sustainable hydrogen production and solar energy storage. One of the greatest challenges towards large-scale utilization of this technology is reducing the hydrogen production cost. The conventional electrolyser architecture, where hydrogen and oxygen are co-produced in the same cell, gives rise to critical challenges in photoelectrochemical water splitting cells that directly convert solar energy and water to hydrogen. Here we overcome these challenges by separating the hydrogen and oxygen cells. The ion exchange in our cells is mediated by auxiliary electrodes, and the cells are connected to each other only by metal wires, enabling centralized hydrogen production. We demonstrate hydrogen generation in separate cells with solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of 7.5%, which can readily surpass 10% using standard commercial components. A basic cost comparison shows that our approach is competitive with conventional photoelectrochemical systems, enabling safe and potentially affordable solar hydrogen production.

  8. Rendering the Topological Spines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieves-Rivera, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-05-05

    Many tools to analyze and represent high dimensional data already exits yet most of them are not flexible, informative and intuitive enough to help the scientists make the corresponding analysis and predictions, understand the structure and complexity of scientific data, get a complete picture of it and explore a greater number of hypotheses. With this in mind, N-Dimensional Data Analysis and Visualization (ND²AV) is being developed to serve as an interactive visual analysis platform with the purpose of coupling together a number of these existing tools that range from statistics, machine learning, and data mining, with new techniques, in particular with new visualization approaches. My task is to create the rendering and implementation of a new concept called topological spines in order to extend ND²AV's scope. Other existing visualization tools create a representation preserving either the topological properties or the structural (geometric) ones because it is challenging to preserve them both simultaneously. Overcoming such challenge by creating a balance in between them, the topological spines are introduced as a new approach that aims to preserve them both. Its render using OpenGL and C++ and is currently being tested to further on be implemented on ND²AV. In this paper I will present what are the Topological Spines and how they are rendered.

  9. Plant cells : immobilization and oxygen transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulst, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    The study described in this thesis is part of the integrated project 'Biotechnological production of non-persistent bioinsecticides by means of plant cells invitro ' and was done in close cooperation with the research Institute Ital within the framework

  10. Development of a membraneless ethanol/oxygen biofuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topcagic, Sabina; Minteer, Shelley D.

    2006-01-01

    Biofuel cells are similar to traditional fuel cells, except the metallic electrocatalyst is replaced with a biological electrocatalyst. This paper details the development of an enzymatic biofuel cell, which employs alcohol dehydrogenase to oxidize ethanol at the anode and bilirubin oxidase to reduce oxygen at the cathode. This ethanol/oxygen biofuel cell has an active lifetime of about 30 days and shows power densities of up to 0.46 mW/cm 2 . The biocathode described in this paper is unique in that bilirubin oxidase is immobilized within a modified Nafion polymer that acts both to entrap and stabilize the enzyme, while also containing the redox mediator in concentrations large enough for self-exchange based conduction of electrons between the enzyme and the electrode. This biocathode is fuel tolerant, which leads to a unique fuel cell that employs both renewable catalysts and fuel, but does not require a separator membrane to separate anolyte from catholyte

  11. Lessons from single-cell transcriptome analysis of oxygen-sensing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ting; Matsunami, Hiroaki

    2018-05-01

    The advent of single-cell RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology has enabled transcriptome profiling of individual cells. Comprehensive gene expression analysis at the single-cell level has proven to be effective in characterizing the most fundamental aspects of cellular function and identity. This unbiased approach is revolutionary for small and/or heterogeneous tissues like oxygen-sensing cells in identifying key molecules. Here, we review the major methods of current single-cell RNA-Seq technology. We discuss how this technology has advanced the understanding of oxygen-sensing glomus cells in the carotid body and helped uncover novel oxygen-sensing cells and mechanisms in the mice olfactory system. We conclude by providing our perspective on future single-cell RNA-Seq research directed at oxygen-sensing cells.

  12. NF-κB RelA renders tumor-associated macrophages resistant to and capable of directly suppressing CD8+ T cells for tumor promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liwen; Han, Lei; Sun, Fan; Zhou, Jingjiao; Ohaegbulam, Kim C; Tang, Xudong; Zang, Xingxing; Steinbrecher, Kris A; Qu, Zhaoxia; Xiao, Gutian

    2018-01-01

    Activation of the inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB in tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) is assumed to contribute to tumor promotion. However, whether and how NF-κB drives the antitumor macrophages to become pro-tumorigenic have not been determined in any cancer type yet. Similarly, how TAMs repress CD8 + cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) remains largely unknown, although their importance in regulatory T (Treg) cell regulation and tumor promotion has been well appreciated. Here, using an endogenous lung cancer model we uncover a direct crosstalk between TAMs and CTLs. TAMs suppress CTLs through the T-cell inhibitory molecule B7x (B7-H4/B7S1) in a cell-cell contact manner, whereas CTLs kill TAMs in a tumor antigen-specific manner. Remarkably, TAMs secrete the known T-cell suppressive cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) to activate, but not to repress, CTLs. Notably, one major role of cell-intrinsic NF-κB RelA is to drive TAMs to suppress CTLs for tumor promotion. It induces B7x expression in TAMs directly, and restricts IL-10 expression indirectly by repressing expression of the NF-κB cofactor Bcl3 and subsequent Bcl3/NF-κB1-mediated transcription of IL-10. It also renders TAMs resistant to CTLs by up-regulating anti-apoptotic genes. These studies help understand how immunity is shaped in lung tumorigenesis, and suggest a RelA-targeted immunotherapy for this deadliest cancer.

  13. High Fidelity Haptic Rendering

    CERN Document Server

    Otaduy, Miguel A

    2006-01-01

    The human haptic system, among all senses, provides unique and bidirectional communication between humans and their physical environment. Yet, to date, most human-computer interactive systems have focused primarily on the graphical rendering of visual information and, to a lesser extent, on the display of auditory information. Extending the frontier of visual computing, haptic interfaces, or force feedback devices, have the potential to increase the quality of human-computer interaction by accommodating the sense of touch. They provide an attractive augmentation to visual display and enhance t

  14. Mathematical modeling of oxygen transport in solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, Ann Mari

    1997-12-31

    This thesis develops mathematical models to describe the electrochemical performance of a solid oxide fuel cell cathode based on electrochemical kinetics and mass transfer. The individual effects of various coupled processes are investigated. A one-dimensional model is developed based on porous electrode theory. Two different mechanisms are investigated for the charge transfer reaction. One of these assumes that intermediately adsorbed oxygen atoms are reduced at the electrode/electrolyte interface, similar to the models proposed for metal electrodes. Simulated polarization curves exhibit limited currents due to depletion of oxygen adsorbates at high cathodic overvoltages. An empirical correlation is confirmed to exist between the limiting current an the oxygen partial pressure, however, a similar correlation often assumed to exist between the measured polarization resistance and the oxygen partial pressure could not be justified. For the other model, oxygen vacancies are assumed to be exchanged directly at the electrode/electrolyte interface. The electrochemical behaviour is improved by reducing the oxygen partial pressure, due to increased vacancy concentration of the electrode material. Simulated polarization curves exhibit Tafel-like slopes in the cathodic direction, which are due to polarization concentration, and not activation polarization in the conventional sense. Anodic limiting currents are predicted due to lack of available free sites for vacancy exchange at the cathode side. The thesis also presents a theoretical treatment of current and potential distributions in simple two-dimensional cell geometries, and a two-dimensional model for a porous electrode-electrolyte system for investigation of the effect of interfacial diffusion of adsorbates along the electrode/electrolyte interface. 172 refs., 60 figs., 11 tabs.

  15. Recent advances on enzymatic glucose/oxygen and hydrogen/oxygen biofuel cells: Achievements and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosnier, Serge; J. Gross, Andrew; Le Goff, Alan; Holzinger, Michael

    2016-09-01

    The possibility of producing electrical power from chemical energy with biological catalysts has induced the development of biofuel cells as viable energy sources for powering portable and implanted electronic devices. These power sources employ biocatalysts, called enzymes, which are highly specific and catalytic towards the oxidation of a biofuel and the reduction of oxygen or hydrogen peroxide. Enzymes, on one hand, are promising candidates to replace expensive noble metal-based catalysts in fuel cell research. On the other hand, they offer the exciting prospect of a new generation of fuel cells which harvest energy from body fluids. Biofuel cells which use glucose as a fuel are particularly interesting for generating electricity to power electronic devices inside a living body. Hydrogen consuming biofuel cells represent an emerging alternative to platinum catalysts due to comparable efficiencies and the capability to operate at lower temperatures. Currently, these technologies are not competitive with existing commercialised fuel cell devices due to limitations including insufficient power outputs and lifetimes. The advantages and challenges facing glucose biofuel cells for implantation and hydrogen biofuel cells will be summarised along with recent promising advances and the future prospects of these exotic energy-harvesting devices.

  16. Singlet oxygen-mediated formation of protein peroxides within cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, A.; Policarpio, V.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Singlet oxygen is generated by a number of cellular, enzymatic and chemical reactions as well as by exposure to UV, or visible light in the presence of a sensitizer; as a consequence this oxidant has been proposed as a damaging agent in a number of pathologies including photo-aging and skin cancer. Proteins are major targets for singlet oxygen as a result of their abundance and high rate constants for reaction. In this study it is shown that illumination of viable, sensitizer-loaded, THP-1 (human monocyte-like) cells with visible light gives rise to intra-cellular protein-derived peroxides. The peroxide yield increases with illumination time, requires the presence of the sensitizer, is enhanced in D 2 O, and decreased by azide; these data are consistent with the mediation of singlet oxygen. The concentration of peroxides detected, which is not affected by glucose or ascorbate loading of the cells, corresponds to ca. 1.5 nmoles peroxide per 10 6 cells using rose bengal as sensitizer, or 10 nmoles per mg cell protein and account for up to ca. 15% of the O 2 consumed by the cells. Similar peroxides have been detected on isolated cellular proteins exposed to light in the presence of rose bengal and oxygen. After cessation of illumination, the cellular protein peroxide levels decreases with t 1/2 ca. 4 hrs at 37 deg C, and this is associated with increased cell lysis. Decomposition of protein peroxides formed within cells, or on isolated cellular proteins, by metal ions, gives rise to radicals as detected by EPR spin trapping. These protein peroxides, and radicals derived from them, can inactivate key cellular enzymes (including caspases, GAPDH and glutathione reductase) and induce DNA base oxidation, strand breaks and DNA-protein cross-links. These studies demonstrate that exposure of intact cells to visible light in the presence of a sensitizer gives rise to novel long-lived, but reactive, intra-cellular protein peroxides via singlet oxygen

  17. T cell receptor (TCR-transgenic CD8 lymphocytes rendered insensitive to transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ signaling mediate superior tumor regression in an animal model of adoptive cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quatromoni Jon G

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tumor antigen-reactive T cells must enter into an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, continue to produce cytokine and deliver apoptotic death signals to affect tumor regression. Many tumors produce transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ, which inhibits T cell activation, proliferation and cytotoxicity. In a murine model of adoptive cell therapy, we demonstrate that transgenic Pmel-1 CD8 T cells, rendered insensitive to TGFβ by transduction with a TGFβ dominant negative receptor II (DN, were more effective in mediating regression of established B16 melanoma. Smaller numbers of DN Pmel-1 T cells effectively mediated tumor regression and retained the ability to produce interferon-γ in the tumor microenvironment. These results support efforts to incorporate this DN receptor in clinical trials of adoptive cell therapy for cancer.

  18. High-Efficiency and High-Color-Rendering-Index Semitransparent Polymer Solar Cells Induced by Photonic Crystals and Surface Plasmon Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ping; Wang, Guoxin; Kang, Bonan; Guo, Wenbin; Shen, Liang

    2018-02-21

    Semitransparent polymer solar cells (ST-PSCs) show attractive potential in power-generating windows or building-integrated photovoltaics. However, the development of ST-PSCs is lagging behind opaque PSCs because of the contradiction between device efficiency and transmission. Herein, Ag/Au alloy nanoparticles and photonic crystals (PCs) were simultaneously introduced into ST-PSCs, acting compatibly as localized surface plasmon resonances and distributed Bragg reflectors to enhance light absorption and transmission. As a result, ST-PSCs based on a hybrid PTB7-Th:PC 71 BM active layer contribute an efficiency as high as 7.13 ± 0.15% and an average visible transmission beyond 20%, which are superior to most of the reported results. Furthermore, PCs can partly compensate valley range of transmission by balancing reflection and transmission regions, yielding a high color rendering index of 95. We believe that the idea of two light management methods compatibly enhancing the performance of ST-PSCs can offer a promising path to develop photovoltaic applications.

  19. Effects of normobaric versus hyperbaric oxygen on cell injury induced by oxygen and glucose deprivation in acute brain slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Chazalviel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Normobaric oxygen (NBO and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO are emerging as a possible co-treatment of acute ischemic stroke. Both have been shown to reduce infarct volume, to improve neurologic outcome, to promote endogenous tissue plasminogen activator-induced thrombolysis and cerebral blood flow, and to improve tissue oxygenation through oxygen diffusion in the ischemic areas, thereby questioning the interest of HBO compared to NBO. In the present study, in order to investigate and compare the oxygen diffusion effects of NBO and HBO on acute ischemic stroke independently of their effects at the vascular level, we used acute brain slices exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation, an ex vivo model of brain ischemia that allows investigating the acute effects of NBO (partial pressure of oxygen (pO 2 = 1 atmospheres absolute (ATA = 0.1 MPa and HBO (pO 2 = 2.5 ATA = 0.25 MPa through tissue oxygenation on ischemia-induced cell injury as measured by the release of lactate dehydrogenase. We found that HBO, but not NBO, reduced oxygen and glucose deprivation-induced cell injury, indicating that passive tissue oxygenation (i.e. without vascular support of the brain parenchyma requires oxygen partial pressure higher than 1 ATA.

  20. [Relationship among the Oxygen Concentration, Reactive Oxygen Species and the Biological Characteristics of Mouse Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Stem Cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Si-Hua; He, Yu-Xin; Ma, Yi-Ran; Jin, Jing-Chun; Kang, Dan

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the effects of oxygen concentration and reactive oxygen species (ROS) on the biological characteristics of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and to analyzed the relationship among the oxygen concentration, ROS and the biological characteristics of mouse HSC through simulation of oxygen environment experienced by PB HSC during transplantation. The detection of reactive oxygen species (ROS), in vitro amplification, directional differentiation (BFU-E, CFU-GM, CFU-Mix), homing of adhesion molecules (CXCR4, CD44, VLA4, VLA5, P-selectin), migration rate, CFU-S of NOD/SCID mice irradiated with sublethal dose were performed to study the effect of oxgen concentration and reactive oxygen species on the biological characteristics of mouse BM-HSC and the relationship among them. The oxygen concentrations lower than normal oxygen concentration (especially hypoxic oxygen environment) could reduce ROS level and amplify more Lin(-) c-kit(+) Sca-1(+) BM HSC, which was more helpful to the growth of various colonies (BFU-E, CFU-GM, CFU-Mix) and to maintain the migratory ability of HSC, thus promoting CFU-S growth significantly after the transplantation of HSC in NOD/SCID mice irradiated by a sublethal dose. BM HSC exposed to oxygen environments of normal, inconstant oxygen level and strenuously thanging of oxygen concentration could result in higher level of ROS, at the same time, the above-mentioned features and functional indicators were relatively lower. The ROS levels of BM HSC in PB HSCT are closely related to the concentrations and stability of oxygen surrounding the cells. High oxygen concentration results in an high level of ROS, which is not helpful to maintain the biological characteristics of BM HSC. Before transplantation and in vitro amplification, the application of antioxidancs and constant oxygen level environments may be beneficial for transplantation of BMMSC.

  1. ARE: Ada Rendering Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Penge

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available E' ormai pratica diffusa, nello sviluppo di applicazioni web, l'utilizzo di template e di potenti template engine per automatizzare la generazione dei contenuti da presentare all'utente. Tuttavia a volte la potenza di tali engine è€ ottenuta mescolando logica e interfaccia, introducendo linguaggi diversi da quelli di descrizione della pagina, o addirittura inventando nuovi linguaggi dedicati.ARE (ADA Rendering Engine è€ pensato per gestire l'intero flusso di creazione del contenuto HTML/XHTML dinamico, la selezione del corretto template, CSS, JavaScript e la produzione dell'output separando completamente logica e interfaccia. I templates utilizzati sono puro HTML senza parti in altri linguaggi, e possono quindi essere gestiti e visualizzati autonomamente. Il codice HTML generato è€ uniforme e parametrizzato.E' composto da due moduli, CORE (Common Output Rendering Engine e ALE (ADA Layout Engine.Il primo (CORE viene utilizzato per la generazione OO degli elementi del DOM ed è pensato per aiutare lo sviluppatore nella produzione di codice valido rispetto al DTD utilizzato. CORE genera automaticamente gli elementi del DOM in base al DTD impostato nella configurazioneIl secondo (ALE viene utilizzato come template engine per selezionare automaticamente in base ad alcuni parametri (modulo, profilo utente, tipologia del nodo, del corso, preferenze di installazione il template HTML, i CSS e i file JavaScript appropriati. ALE permette di usare templates di default e microtemplates ricorsivi per semplificare il lavoro del grafico.I due moduli possono in ogni caso essere utilizzati indipendentemente l'uno dall'altro. E' possibile generare e renderizzare una pagina HTML utilizzando solo CORE oppure inviare gli oggetti CORE al template engine ALE che provvede a renderizzare la pagina HTML. Viceversa è possibile generare HTML senza utilizzare CORE ed inviarlo al template engine ALECORE è alla prima release ed è€ già utilizzato all

  2. Oxygen Tension Regulates Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Paracrine Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Paquet, Joseph; Deschepper, Mickael; Moya, Adrien; Logeart-Avramoglou, Delphine; Boisson-Vidal, Catherine; Petite, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the shift of the human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) cytokine signature induced by oxygen tension. Conditioned media obtained from hMSCs cultured under near anoxia exhibited significantly enhanced chemotactic and proangiogenic properties and a significant decrease in the inflammatory mediator content. These results elucidate important aspects of using MSCs in regenerative medicine, contribute to improving the efficacy of such therapies, and highlight the interest in using c...

  3. Hydrogen-Oxygen PEM Regenerative Fuel Cell Energy Storage System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bents, David J.; Scullin, Vincent J.; Chang, Bei-Jiann; Johnson, Donald W.; Garcia, Christopher P.

    2005-01-01

    An introduction to the closed cycle hydrogen-oxygen polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) regenerative fuel cell (RFC), recently constructed at NASA Glenn Research Center, is presented. Illustrated with explanatory graphics and figures, this report outlines the engineering motivations for the RFC as a solar energy storage device, the system requirements, layout and hardware detail of the RFC unit at NASA Glenn, the construction history, and test experience accumulated to date with this unit.

  4. Parallel hierarchical radiosity rendering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, Michael [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1993-07-01

    In this dissertation, the step-by-step development of a scalable parallel hierarchical radiosity renderer is documented. First, a new look is taken at the traditional radiosity equation, and a new form is presented in which the matrix of linear system coefficients is transformed into a symmetric matrix, thereby simplifying the problem and enabling a new solution technique to be applied. Next, the state-of-the-art hierarchical radiosity methods are examined for their suitability to parallel implementation, and scalability. Significant enhancements are also discovered which both improve their theoretical foundations and improve the images they generate. The resultant hierarchical radiosity algorithm is then examined for sources of parallelism, and for an architectural mapping. Several architectural mappings are discussed. A few key algorithmic changes are suggested during the process of making the algorithm parallel. Next, the performance, efficiency, and scalability of the algorithm are analyzed. The dissertation closes with a discussion of several ideas which have the potential to further enhance the hierarchical radiosity method, or provide an entirely new forum for the application of hierarchical methods.

  5. Silibinin activates AMP-activated protein kinase to protect neuronal cells from oxygen and glucose deprivation-re-oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhi; Ding, Sheng-quan; Shen, Ya-fang

    2014-11-14

    In this study, we explored the cytoprotective potential of silibinin against oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced neuronal cell damages, and studied underling mechanisms. In vitro model of ischemic stroke was created by keeping neuronal cells (SH-SY5Y cells and primary mouse cortical neurons) in an OGD condition followed by re-oxygenation. Pre-treatment of silibinin significantly inhibited OGD/re-oxygenation-induced necrosis and apoptosis of neuronal cells. OGD/re-oxygenation-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) reduction were also inhibited by silibinin. At the molecular level, silibinin treatment in SH-SY5Y cells and primary cortical neurons led to significant AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling activation, detected by phosphorylations of AMPKα1, its upstream kinase liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and the downstream target acetyl-CoA Carboxylase (ACC). Pharmacological inhibition or genetic depletion of AMPK alleviated the neuroprotective ability of silibinin against OGD/re-oxygenation. Further, ROS scavenging ability by silibinin was abolished with AMPK inhibition or silencing. While A-769662, the AMPK activator, mimicked silibinin actions and suppressed ROS production and neuronal cell death following OGD/re-oxygenation. Together, these results show that silibinin-mediated neuroprotection requires activation of AMPK signaling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Performance optimization of a PEM hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadiq Al-Baghdadi, Maher A.R. [Fuel Cell Research Center, International Energy and Environment Foundation, Al-Najaf, P.O.Box 39 (Iraq)

    2013-07-01

    The objective was to develop a semi-empirical model that would simulate the performance of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells without extensive calculations. A fuel cell mathematical module has been designed and constructed to determine the performance of a PEM fuel cell. The influence of some operating parameters on the performance of PEM fuel cell has been investigated using pure hydrogen on the anode side and oxygen on the cathode side. The present model can be used to investigate the influence of process variables for design optimization of fuel cells, stacks, and complete fuel cell power system. The possible mechanisms of the parameter effects and their interrelationships are discussed. In order to assess the validity of the developed model a real PEM fuel cell system has been used to generate experimental data. The comparison shows good agreements between the modelling results and the experimental data. The model is shown a very useful for estimating the performance of PEM fuel cell stacks and optimization of fuel cell system integration and operation.

  7. Oxygen transfer rate identifies priming compounds in parsley cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Jana Viola; Schillheim, Britta; Mahr, Stefan; Reufer, Yannik; Sanjoyo, Sandi; Conrath, Uwe; Büchs, Jochen

    2015-11-25

    In modern agriculture, the call for an alternative crop protection strategy increases because of the desired reduction of fungicide and pesticide use and the continuously evolving resistance of pathogens and pests to agrochemicals. The direct activation of the plant immune system does not provide a promising plant protection measure because of high fitness costs. However, upon treatment with certain natural or synthetic compounds, plant cells can promote to a fitness cost-saving, primed state of enhanced defense. In the primed state, plants respond to biotic and abiotic stress with faster and stronger activation of defense, and this is often associated with immunity and abiotic stress tolerance. Until now, the identification of chemical compounds with priming-inducing activity (so-called plant activators) relied on tedious and invasive approaches, or required the late detection of secreted furanocoumarin phytoalexins in parsley cell cultures. Thus, simple, fast, straightforward, and noninvasive techniques for identifying priming-inducing compounds for plant protection are very welcome. This report demonstrates that a respiration activity-monitoring system (RAMOS) can identify compounds with defense priming-inducing activity in parsley cell suspension in culture. RAMOS relies on the quasi-continuous, noninvasive online determination of the oxygen transfer rate (OTR). Treatment of parsley culture cells with the known plant activator salicylic acid (SA), a natural plant defense signal, resulted in an OTR increase. Addition of the defense elicitor Pep13, a cell wall peptide of Phythophthora sojae, induced two distinctive OTR peaks that were higher in SA-primed cells than in unprimed cells upon Pep13 challenge. Both, the OTR increase after priming with SA and the Pep13 challenge were dose-dependent. Furthermore, there was a close correlation of a compound's activity to enhance the oxygen consumption in parsley cells and its capacity to prime Pep13-induced furanocoumarin

  8. Radiosensitization conferred by oxygen and hypoxic cell sensitizers on human cells cultivated in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersen, E.O.

    1978-01-01

    The main purpose was to provide additional information on two questions; (1) How does the radiosensitising effect of oxygen depend on oxygen concentration and cellular age, and (2) How does the radiosensitising effect of hypoxic cell sensitisers depend on concentration of sensitiser and cellular age. The general conclusions reached were as follows. The radiosensitising effect of oxygen on NHIK 3025 cells in G1 increased with increasing dose of radiation. For cells irradiated in S oxygen acted as a dose-modifying agent. For small doses of radiation the sensitising effect of oxygen was weaker for cells irradiated in G1 than for cells irradiated in S. The capacity of NHIK 3025 cells to repair sublethal damage after irradiation under extremely hypoxic conditions was low or even lost (even though the cells were subsequently incubated under aerobic conditions). The radiosensitising effect conferred by TMPN, diamide and misonidazole on NHIK 3025 cells was higher at high doses of radiation than at small doses of radiation (except for the dose-modifying radiosensitisation of cells in S by misonidazole). This observation supports arguments for using high dose fractions in fractionated radiotherapy where such chemicals are involved. (JIW)

  9. Transformative Rendering of Internet Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    using either the Firefox or Google Chrome rendering engine. The rendering server then captures a screen shot of the page and creates code that positions...be compromised at web pages the hackers had built for that hacking competition to exploit that particular OS /browser configuration. During...of risk with no benefit. They include: - The rendering server is hosted on a Linux-based operating system ( OS ). The OS is much more secure than the

  10. Cell physiology regulation by hypoxia inducible factor-1: Targeting oxygen-related nanomachineries of hypoxic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandani, Morteza; Vandghanooni, Somayeh; Barar, Jaleh; Nazemiyeh, Hossein; Omidi, Yadollah

    2017-06-01

    Any dysfunctionality in maintaining the oxygen homeostasis by mammalian cells may elicit hypoxia/anoxia, which results in inescapable oxidative stress and possible subsequent detrimental impacts on certain cells/tissues with high demands to oxygen molecules. The ischemic damage in turn can trigger initiation of a number of diseases including organs ischemia, metabolic disorders, inflammatory diseases, different types of malignancies, and alteration in wound healing process. Thus, full comprehension of molecular mechanism(s) and cellular physiology of the oxygen homeostasis is the cornerstone of the mammalian cells metabolism, energetic pathways and health and disease conditions. An imbalance in oxygen content within the cellular microenvironment activates a cascade of molecular events that are often compensated, otherwise pathologic condition occurs through a complexed network of biomolecules. Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) plays a key transcriptional role in the adaptation of cell physiology in relation with the oxygen content within a cell. In this current study, we provide a comprehensive review on the molecular mechanisms of oxygen sensing and homeostasis and the impacts of HIF-1 in hypoxic/anoxic conditions. Moreover, different molecular and biochemical responses of the cells to the surrounding environment are discussed in details. Finally, modern technological approaches for targeting the hypoxia related proteins are articulated. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Effect of oxygen levels on the physiology of dendritic cells: implications for adoptive cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futalan, Diahnn; Huang, Chien-Tze; Schmidt-Wolf, Ingo G H; Larsson, Marie; Messmer, Davorka

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC)-based adoptive tumor immunotherapy approaches have shown promising results, but the incidence of tumor regression is low and there is an evident call for identifying culture conditions that produce DCs with a more potent Th1 potential. Routinely, DCs are differentiated in CO(2) incubators under atmospheric oxygen conditions (21% O(2)), which differ from physiological oxygen levels of only 3-5% in tissue, where most DCs reside. We investigated whether differentiation and maturation of DCs under physiological oxygen levels could produce more potent T-cell stimulatory DCs for use in adoptive immunotherapy. We found that immature DCs differentiated under physiological oxygen levels showed a small but significant reduction in their endocytic capacity. The different oxygen levels did not influence their stimuli-induced upregulation of cluster of differentiation 54 (CD54), CD40, CD83, CD86, C-C chemokine receptor type 7 (CCR7), C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR or the secretion of interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-10 in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or a cytokine cocktail. However, DCs differentiated under physiological oxygen level secreted higher levels of IL-12(p70) after exposure to LPS or CD40 ligand. Immature DCs differentiated at physiological oxygen levels caused increased T-cell proliferation, but no differences were observed for mature DCs with regard to T-cell activation. In conclusion, we show that although DCs generated under atmospheric or physiological oxygen conditions are mostly similar in function and phenotype, DCs differentiated under physiological oxygen secrete larger amounts of IL-12(p70). This result could have implications for the use of ex vivo-generated DCs for clinical studies, since DCs differentiated at physiological oxygen could induce increased Th1 responses in vivo.

  12. Modeling and experimental methods to predict oxygen distribution in bone defects following cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heylman, Christopher M; Santoso, Sharon; Krebs, Melissa D; Saidel, Gerald M; Alsberg, Eben; Muschler, George F

    2014-04-01

    We have developed a mathematical model that allows simulation of oxygen distribution in a bone defect as a tool to explore the likely effects of local changes in cell concentration, defect size or geometry, local oxygen delivery with oxygen-generating biomaterials (OGBs), and changes in the rate of oxygen consumption by cells within a defect. Experimental data for the oxygen release rate from an OGB and the oxygen consumption rate of a transplanted cell population are incorporated into the model. With these data, model simulations allow prediction of spatiotemporal oxygen concentration within a given defect and the sensitivity of oxygen tension to changes in critical variables. This information may help to minimize the number of experiments in animal models that determine the optimal combinations of cells, scaffolds, and OGBs in the design of current and future bone regeneration strategies. Bone marrow-derived nucleated cell data suggest that oxygen consumption is dependent on oxygen concentration. OGB oxygen release is shown to be a time-dependent function that must be measured for accurate simulation. Simulations quantify the dependency of oxygen gradients in an avascular defect on cell concentration, cell oxygen consumption rate, OGB oxygen generation rate, and OGB geometry.

  13. Thermally regenerative hydrogen/oxygen fuel cell power cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morehouse, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    Two innovative thermodynamic power cycles are analytically examined for future engineering feasibility. The power cycles use a hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell for electrical energy production and use the thermal dissociation of water for regeneration of the hydrogen and oxygen. The TDS (thermal dissociation system) uses a thermal energy input at over 2000 K to thermally dissociate the water. The other cycle, the HTE (high temperature electrolyzer) system, dissociates the water using an electrolyzer operating at high temperature (1300 K) which receives its electrical energy from the fuel cell. The primary advantages of these cycles is that they are basically a no moving parts system, thus having the potential for long life and high reliability, and they have the potential for high thermal efficiency. Both cycles are shown to be classical heat engines with ideal efficiency close to Carnot cycle efficiency. The feasibility of constructing actual cycles is investigated by examining process irreversibilities and device efficiencies for the two types of cycles. The results show that while the processes and devices of the 2000 K TDS exceed current technology limits, the high temperature electrolyzer system appears to be a state-of-the-art technology development. The requirements for very high electrolyzer and fuel cell efficiencies are seen as determining the feasbility of the HTE system, and these high efficiency devices are currently being developed. It is concluded that a proof-of-concept HTE system experiment can and should be conducted.

  14. Oxygen Tension Regulates Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Paracrine Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquet, Joseph; Deschepper, Mickael; Moya, Adrien; Logeart-Avramoglou, Delphine; Boisson-Vidal, Catherine; Petite, Hervé

    2015-07-01

    : Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have captured the attention and research endeavors of the scientific world because of their differentiation potential. However, there is accumulating evidence suggesting that the beneficial effects of MSCs are predominantly due to the multitude of bioactive mediators secreted by these cells. Because the paracrine potential of MSCs is closely related to their microenvironment, the present study investigated and characterized select aspects of the human MSC (hMSC) secretome and assessed its in vitro and in vivo bioactivity as a function of oxygen tension, specifically near anoxia (0.1% O2) and hypoxia (5% O2), conditions that reflect the environment to which MSCs are exposed during MSC-based therapies in vivo. In contrast to supernatant conditioned media (CM) obtained from hMSCs cultured at either 5% or 21% of O2, CM from hMSCs cultured under near anoxia exhibited significantly (p mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) secretome and assessed its in vitro and in vivo biological bioactivity as a function of oxygen tension, specifically near anoxia (0.1% O2) and hypoxia (5% O2), conditions that reflect the environment to which MSCs are exposed during MSC-based therapies in vivo. The present study provided the first evidence of a shift of the hMSC cytokine signature induced by oxygen tension, particularly near anoxia (0.1% O2). Conditioned media obtained from hMSCs cultured under near anoxia exhibited significantly enhanced chemotactic and proangiogenic properties and a significant decrease in the inflammatory mediator content. These findings provide new evidence that elucidates aspects of great importance for the use of MSCs in regenerative medicine, could contribute to improving the efficacy of such therapies, and most importantly highlighted the interest in using conditioned media in therapeutic modalities. ©AlphaMed Press.

  15. Oxygen-Reducing Biocathodes Operating with Passive Oxygen Transfer in Microbial Fuel Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Xia, Xue

    2013-02-19

    Oxygen-reducing biocathodes previously developed for microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have required energy-intensive aeration of the catholyte. To avoid the need for aeration, the ability of biocathodes to function with passive oxygen transfer was examined here using air cathode MFCs. Two-chamber, air cathode MFCs with biocathodes produced a maximum power density of 554 ± 0 mW/m 2, which was comparable to that obtained with a Pt cathode (576 ± 16 mW/m2), and 38 times higher than that produced without a catalyst (14 ± 3 mW/m2). The maximum current density with biocathodes in this air-cathode MFC was 1.0 A/m2, compared to 0.49 A/m2 originally produced in a two-chamber MFC with an aqueous cathode (with cathode chamber aeration). Single-chamber, air-cathode MFCs with the same biocathodes initially produced higher voltages than those with Pt cathodes, but after several cycles the catalytic activity of the biocathodes was lost. This change in cathode performance resulted from direct exposure of the cathodes to solutions containing high concentrations of organic matter in the single-chamber configuration. Biocathode performance was not impaired in two-chamber designs where the cathode was kept separated from the anode solution. These results demonstrate that direct-air biocathodes can work very well, but only under conditions that minimize heterotrophic growth of microorganisms on the cathodes. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  16. Sketchy Rendering for Information Visualization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wood, Jo; Isenberg, Petra; Isenberg, Tobias; Dykes, Jason; Boukhelifa, Nadia; Slingsby, Aidan

    2012-01-01

    We present and evaluate a framework for constructing sketchy style information visualizations that mimic data graphics drawn by hand. We provide an alternative renderer for the Processing graphics environment that redefines core drawing primitives including line, polygon and ellipse rendering. These

  17. Oxygen Modulates Human Decidual Natural Killer Cell Surface Receptor Expression and Interactions with Trophoblasts1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Alison E.; Goulwara, Sonu S.; Whitley, Guy S.; Cartwright, Judith E.

    2014-01-01

    Decidual natural killer (dNK) cells have been shown to both promote and inhibit trophoblast behavior important for decidual remodeling in pregnancy and have a distinct phenotype compared to peripheral blood NK cells. We investigated whether different levels of oxygen tension, mimicking the physiological conditions of the decidua in early pregnancy, altered cell surface receptor expression and activity of dNK cells and their interactions with trophoblast. dNK cells were isolated from terminated first-trimester pregnancies and cultured in oxygen tensions of 3%, 10%, and 21% for 24 h. Cell surface receptor expression was examined by flow cytometry, and the effects of secreted factors in conditioned medium (CM) on the trophoblast cell line SGHPL-4 were assessed in vitro. SGHPL-4 cells treated with dNK cell CM incubated in oxygen tensions of 10% were significantly more invasive (P cells treated with dNK cell CM incubated in oxygen tensions of 3% or 21%. After 24 h, a lower percentage of dNK cells expressed CD56 at 21% oxygen (P cells expressed NKG2D at 10% oxygen (P oxygen tensions, with large patient variation. This study demonstrates dNK cell phenotype and secreted factors are modulated by oxygen tension, which induces changes in trophoblast invasion and endovascular-like differentiation. Alterations in dNK cell surface receptor expression and secreted factors at different oxygen tensions may represent regulation of function within the decidua during the first trimester of pregnancy. PMID:25232021

  18. Designer interphases for the lithium-oxygen electrochemical cell

    KAUST Repository

    Choudhury, Snehashis; Wan, Charles Tai-Chieh; Al Sadat, Wajdi I.; Tu, Zhengyuan; Lau, Sampson; Zachman, Michael J.; Kourkoutis, Lena F.; Archer, Lynden A.

    2017-01-01

    An electrochemical cell based on the reversible oxygen reduction reaction: 2Li+ + 2e− + O2 ↔ Li2O2, provides among the most energy dense platforms for portable electrical energy storage. Such Lithium-Oxygen (Li-O2) cells offer specific energies competitive with fossil fuels and are considered promising for electrified transportation. Multiple, fundamental challenges with the cathode, anode, and electrolyte have limited practical interest in Li-O2 cells because these problems lead to as many practical shortcomings, including poor rechargeability, high overpotentials, and specific energies well below theoretical expectations. We create and study in-situ formation of solid-electrolyte interphases (SEIs) based on bromide ionomers tethered to a Li anode that take advantage of three powerful processes for overcoming the most stubborn of these challenges. The ionomer SEIs are shown to protect the Li anode against parasitic reactions and also stabilize Li electrodeposition during cell recharge. Bromine species liberated during the anchoring reaction also function as redox mediators at the cathode, reducing the charge overpotential. Finally, the ionomer SEI forms a stable interphase with Li, which protects the metal in high Gutmann donor number liquid electrolytes. Such electrolytes have been reported to exhibit rare stability against nucleophilic attack by Li2O2 and other cathode reaction intermediates, but also react spontaneously with Li metal anodes. We conclude that rationally designed SEIs able to regulate transport of matter and ions at the electrolyte/anode interface provide a promising platform for addressing three major technical barriers to practical Li-O2 cells.

  19. Designer interphases for the lithium-oxygen electrochemical cell

    KAUST Repository

    Choudhury, Snehashis

    2017-04-20

    An electrochemical cell based on the reversible oxygen reduction reaction: 2Li+ + 2e− + O2 ↔ Li2O2, provides among the most energy dense platforms for portable electrical energy storage. Such Lithium-Oxygen (Li-O2) cells offer specific energies competitive with fossil fuels and are considered promising for electrified transportation. Multiple, fundamental challenges with the cathode, anode, and electrolyte have limited practical interest in Li-O2 cells because these problems lead to as many practical shortcomings, including poor rechargeability, high overpotentials, and specific energies well below theoretical expectations. We create and study in-situ formation of solid-electrolyte interphases (SEIs) based on bromide ionomers tethered to a Li anode that take advantage of three powerful processes for overcoming the most stubborn of these challenges. The ionomer SEIs are shown to protect the Li anode against parasitic reactions and also stabilize Li electrodeposition during cell recharge. Bromine species liberated during the anchoring reaction also function as redox mediators at the cathode, reducing the charge overpotential. Finally, the ionomer SEI forms a stable interphase with Li, which protects the metal in high Gutmann donor number liquid electrolytes. Such electrolytes have been reported to exhibit rare stability against nucleophilic attack by Li2O2 and other cathode reaction intermediates, but also react spontaneously with Li metal anodes. We conclude that rationally designed SEIs able to regulate transport of matter and ions at the electrolyte/anode interface provide a promising platform for addressing three major technical barriers to practical Li-O2 cells.

  20. Implementing oxygen control in chip-based cell and tissue culture systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oomen, Pieter E; Skolimowski, Maciej D; Verpoorte, Elisabeth

    2016-09-21

    Oxygen is essential in the energy metabolism of cells, as well as being an important regulatory parameter influencing cell differentiation and function. Interest in precise oxygen control for in vitro cultures of tissues and cells continues to grow, especially with the emergence of the organ-on-a-chip and the desire to emulate in vivo conditions. This was recently discussed in this journal in a Critical Review by Brennan et al. (Lab Chip (2014). DOI: ). Microfluidics can be used to introduce flow to facilitate nutrient supply to and waste removal from in vitro culture systems. Well-defined oxygen gradients can also be established. However, cells can quickly alter the oxygen balance in their vicinity. In this Tutorial Review, we expand on the Brennan paper to focus on the implementation of oxygen analysis in these systems to achieve continuous monitoring. Both electrochemical and optical approaches for the integration of oxygen monitoring in microfluidic tissue and cell culture systems will be discussed. Differences in oxygen requirements from one organ to the next are a challenging problem, as oxygen delivery is limited by its uptake into medium. Hence, we discuss the factors determining oxygen concentrations in solutions and consider the possible use of artificial oxygen carriers to increase dissolved oxygen concentrations. The selection of device material for applications requiring precise oxygen control is discussed in detail, focusing on oxygen permeability. Lastly, a variety of devices is presented, showing the diversity of approaches that can be employed to control and monitor oxygen concentrations in in vitro experiments.

  1. Effect of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate on oxygen affinity of blood in sickle cell anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charache, Samuel; Grisolia, Santiago; Fiedler, Adam J.; Hellegers, Andre E.

    1970-01-01

    Blood of patients with sickle cell anemia (SS) exhibits decreased affinity for oxygen, although the oxygen affinity of hemoglobin S is the same as that of hemoglobin A. SS red cells contain more 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (DPG) than normal erythrocytes. The oxygen affinity of hemolyzed red cells is decreased by added DPG, and hemolysates prepared from SS red cells do not differ from normal hemolysates in this regard. Reduction of oxygen affinity to the levels found in intact SS red cells required DPG concentrations in excess of those found in most SS patients. The same was true of oxygen affinity of patients with pyruvate kinase deficiency. Other organic phosphates, as well as inorganic ions, are known to alter the oxygen affinity of dilute solutions of hemoglobin. These substances, the state of aggregation of hemoglobin molecules, and cytoarchitectural factors probably play roles in determining oxygen affinity of both normal and SS red cells. PMID:5443181

  2. Metabolic adaptations of Azospirillum brasilense to oxygen stress by cell-to-cell clumping and flocculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Amber N; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai K; Mukherjee, Tanmoy; Green, Calvin S; Mishra, Priyanka; Purcell, Alicia; Aksenova, Anastasia; Hurst, Gregory B; Alexandre, Gladys

    2015-12-01

    The ability of bacteria to monitor their metabolism and adjust their behavior accordingly is critical to maintain competitiveness in the environment. The motile microaerophilic bacterium Azospirillum brasilense navigates oxygen gradients by aerotaxis in order to locate low oxygen concentrations that can support metabolism. When cells are exposed to elevated levels of oxygen in their surroundings, motile A. brasilense cells implement an alternative response to aerotaxis and form transient clumps by cell-to-cell interactions. Clumping was suggested to represent a behavior protecting motile cells from transiently elevated levels of aeration. Using the proteomics of wild-type and mutant strains affected in the extent of their clumping abilities, we show that cell-to-cell clumping represents a metabolic scavenging strategy that likely prepares the cells for further metabolic stresses. Analysis of mutants affected in carbon or nitrogen metabolism confirmed this assumption. The metabolic changes experienced as clumping progresses prime cells for flocculation, a morphological and metabolic shift of cells triggered under elevated-aeration conditions and nitrogen limitation. The analysis of various mutants during clumping and flocculation characterized an ordered set of changes in cell envelope properties accompanying the metabolic changes. These data also identify clumping and early flocculation to be behaviors compatible with the expression of nitrogen fixation genes, despite the elevated-aeration conditions. Cell-to-cell clumping may thus license diazotrophy to microaerophilic A. brasilense cells under elevated oxygen conditions and prime them for long-term survival via flocculation if metabolic stress persists. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Fabrication of corneal epithelial cell sheets maintaining colony-forming cells without feeder cells by oxygen-controlled method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Ryota; Takeda, Shizu

    2014-01-01

    The use of murine 3T3 feeder cells needs to be avoided when fabricating corneal epithelial cell sheets for use in treating ocular surface diseases. However, the expression level of the epithelial stem/progenitor cell marker, p63, is down-regulated in feeder-free culture systems. In this study, in order to fabricate corneal epithelial cell sheets that maintain colony-forming cells without using any feeder cells, we investigated the use of an oxygen-controlled method that was developed previously to fabricate cell sheets efficiently. Rabbit limbal epithelial cells were cultured under hypoxia (1-10% O2) and under normoxia during stratification after reaching confluence. Multilayered corneal epithelial cell sheets were fabricated using an oxygen-controlled method, and immunofluorescence analysis showed that cytokeratin 3 and p63 was expressed in appropriate localization in the cell sheets. The colony-forming efficiency of the cell sheets fabricated by the oxygen-controlled method without feeder cells was significantly higher than that of cell sheets fabricated under 20% O2 without feeder cells. These results indicate that the oxygen-controlled method has the potential to achieve a feeder-free culture system for fabricating corneal epithelial cell sheets for corneal regeneration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Factors Determining the Oxygen Permeability of Biological Membranes: Oxygen Transport Across Eye Lens Fiber-Cell Plasma Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subczynski, Witold Karol; Widomska, Justyna; Mainali, Laxman

    2017-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-label oximetry allows the oxygen permeability coefficient to be evaluated across homogeneous lipid bilayer membranes and, in some cases, across coexisting membrane domains without their physical separation. The most pronounced effect on oxygen permeability is observed for cholesterol, which additionally induces the formation of membrane domains. In intact biological membranes, integral proteins induce the formation of boundary and trapped lipid domains with a low oxygen permeability. The effective oxygen permeability coefficient across the intact biological membrane is affected not only by the oxygen permeability coefficients evaluated for each lipid domain but also by the surface area occupied by these domains in the membrane. All these factors observed in fiber cell plasma membranes of clear human eye lenses are reviewed here.

  5. Single Cell Responses to Spatially Controlled Photosensitized Production of Extracellular Singlet Oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Brian Wett; Sinks, Louise E.; Breitenbach, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The response of individual HeLa cells to extracellularly produced singlet oxygen was examined. The spatial domain of singlet oxygen production was controlled using the combination of a membrane-impermeable Pd porphyrin-dendrimer, which served as a photosensitizer, and a focused laser, which served...... to localize the sensitized production of singlet oxygen. Cells in close proximity to the domain of singlet oxygen production showed morphological changes commonly associated with necrotic cell death. The elapsed post-irradiation “waiting period” before necrosis became apparent depended on (a) the distance...... between the cell membrane and the domain irradiated, (b) the incident laser fluence and, as such, the initial concentration of singlet oxygen produced, and (c) the lifetime of singlet oxygen. The data imply that singlet oxygen plays a key role in this process of light-induced cell death. The approach...

  6. New strategies to produce and detect singlet oxygen in a cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gollmer, Anita

    2012-01-01

    of the general methodology to generate and detect singlet oxygen is currently of great importance in order to better understand the roles played by singlet oxygen in photo-induced cell death. From a mechanistic perspective, experiments performed at the level of a single cell provide unique insight......Singlet oxygen, the first excited electronic state of molecular oxygen, plays a major role in oxygen-dependent photo-induced cell death. In such systems, singlet oxygen is generally produced in a photosensitized process wherein light is absorbed by a molecule (the so-called sensitizer) which......, and that is the perspective of this study. Although the direct optical detection of singlet oxygen by its near IR phosphorescence is the ideal way to monitor this species, it suffers from the problem of weak signal intensity. Fluorescent probes can be a more sensitive way to detect singlet oxygen. The photochemical behavior...

  7. Radiosensitivity of Hela cells in various O2 concentrations and consideration of oxygen effect in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, Yoshikazu; Nyunoya, Koichiro

    1979-01-01

    The aim of this paper is the study of the radiosensitivity of HeLa cells in vitro in various oxygen concentrations and the consideration of the utilization of oxygen effect in radiation therapy, based on the data of HeLa cells and tumor oxygen tension. Survival curves of HeLa cells are found to be exponential as a function of radiation dose and the radiosensitivity is dependent on oxygen tension of culture medium. Relative radiosensitivity decreases remarkably at low level of oxygen, especially under 9 mmHg pO 2 . The utilization of oxygen effect in radiation may be useful in hyperbaric oxygen inhalation and not useful under local tissue hypoxia induced by tourniquet application. Reoxygenation occurs with shrinkage of tumor after irradiation and this phenomenon will diminish the value of hyperbaric oxygen in radiation therapy. (author)

  8. Tissue oxygen demand in regulation of the behavior of the cells in the vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barvitenko, Nadezhda N; Aslam, Muhammad; Filosa, Jessica; Matteucci, Elena; Nikinmaa, Mikko; Pantaleo, Antonella; Saldanha, Carlota; Baskurt, Oguz K

    2013-08-01

    The control of arteriolar diameters in microvasculature has been in the focus of studies on mechanisms matching oxygen demand and supply at the tissue level. Functionally, important vascular elements include EC, VSMC, and RBC. Integration of these different cell types into functional units aimed at matching tissue oxygen supply with tissue oxygen demand is only achieved when all these cells can respond to the signals of tissue oxygen demand. Many vasoactive agents that serve as signals of tissue oxygen demand have their receptors on all these types of cells (VSMC, EC, and RBC) implying that there can be a coordinated regulation of their behavior by the tissue oxygen demand. Such functions of RBC as oxygen carrying by Hb, rheology, and release of vasoactive agents are considered. Several common extra- and intracellular signaling pathways that link tissue oxygen demand with control of VSMC contractility, EC permeability, and RBC functioning are discussed. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Model of Oxygen and Glucose Deprivation in PC12 Cells and Detection of HSP70 Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jinting; Yang, Le; Shao, Yankun

    2018-01-01

    Objective: PC12 cell was used to set up a ischemia model by OGD and detected HSP70 protein. Methods: Use of PC12 cells induced by NGF stimulation into nerve cells, oxygen and glucose deprivation to build the nerve cells of oxygen and glucose deprivation model; using Western blot analysis of PC12 cells into neuron-like cells and oxygen-glucose deprivation model established. Results: The application of a final concentration of 50 ng / ml of NGF in DMEM complete mediumPC12 cells showed a typical neuronal morphology with the increase in cell culture time. NGF culture time showed a positive correlation, the establishment of oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) training environment, the OGD after nerve element appears different degrees of damage, OGD can effectively induce the expression of HSP70. Conclusion: PC12 cell transformed into cells by NGF; the cell model of OGD was established.

  10. Singlet Oxygen Sensor Green: Photochemical Behavior in Solution and in a Mammalian Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gollmer, Anita; Arnbjerg, Jacob; Blaikie, Frances Helen

    2011-01-01

    The development of efficient and selective luminescent probes for reactive oxygen species, particularly for singlet molecular oxygen, is currently of great importance. In this study, the photochemical behavior of Singlet Oxygen Sensor Green® (SOSG), a commercially available fluorescent probe...... of the reaction between SOSG and singlet oxygen is, itself, an efficient singlet oxygen photosensitizer. Second, SOSG appears to efficiently bind to proteins which, in turn, can influence uptake by a cell as well as behavior in the cell. As such, incorrect use of SOSG can yield misleading data on yields...

  11. The role of changes in the oxygen concentration in modification of reproductive death of cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korystov, Yu.N.

    1983-01-01

    In this report the data are discussed and summarized concerning cell oxygenation in culture. Formulae are proposed for calculation of the oxygen concentration in suspension, monolayer and spheroid, as well as numerical parameters are submitted determining the oxygenation of cells in vitro. This permits to estimate quantitatively the oxygen concentration at the cell surface upon irradiation in different experimental conditions

  12. Determination of in vitro oxygen consumption rates for tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas-Navia, L.I.; Moeller, B.J.; Kirkpatrick, J.P.; Laursen, T.A.; Dewhirst, M.W.

    2003-01-01

    To determine pO 2 at the surface of a monolayer of confluent HCT 116 cells, and to then determine consumption rate in vitro by examining the pO 2 profile in media above the cells. Materials and Methods: A recessed-tip polarographic oxygen microelectrode (diameter ∼10μm) was used to measure pO 2 profiles of media above a confluent monolayer of HCT 116 human colon adenocarcinoma cells in a T25 flask exposed to a 95% air, 5% CO 2 mixture. A two-dimensional finite element analysis of the diffusion equation was used to fit the data, thereby extracting a steady-state O 2 consumption rate. The diffusion equation was solved for zeroth and first-order expressions. No-flux boundary conditions were imposed on its bottom and side boundaries and experimental data was used for boundary conditions at the gas-media boundary. All flasks show an O 2 gradient in the media, with a mean (SE) media layer of 1677 (147) μm and a mean pO 2 at the cell layer/media interface of 44 (8) mm Hg (n=9). pO 2 gradient over the entire media layer is 630 (90) mm Hg/cm, equivalent to a consumption rate of 6.3 x 10 -4 (9.0 x 10 -5 ) mm Hg/s. The mean values for the zeroth and first order rate constants are 8.1 x 10 -9 (1.3 x 10 -9 ) g mol O 2 /cm 3 s and 1.0 x 10 3 (0.46 x 10 3 ) /s, respectively. Control experiments in flasks containing no cells show slight gradients in pO 2 of 38 (12) mm Hg/cm, resulting from some O 2 diffusion through the flask into the surrounding water bath. An addition of 10 -3 M NaCN to the media results in a dramatic increase in pO 2 at the cell layer, consistent with a shut-down in respiration. Under normal cell culture conditions there is an O 2 gradient present in the media of cull culture systems, resulting in physiologic O 2 concentrations at the cell layer, despite the non-physiologic O 2 concentration of the gas mixture to which the cell culture system is exposed. This significant (p -6 ) O 2 gradient in the media of cell culture systems is a result of cell O 2

  13. Hydrogen peroxide production is affected by oxygen levels in mammalian cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddalena, Lucas A; Selim, Shehab M; Fonseca, Joao; Messner, Holt; McGowan, Shannon; Stuart, Jeffrey A

    2017-11-04

    Although oxygen levels in the extracellular space of most mammalian tissues are just a few percent, under standard cell culture conditions they are not regulated and are often substantially higher. Some cellular sources of reactive oxygen species, like NADPH oxidase 4, are sensitive to oxygen levels in the range between 'normal' physiological (typically 1-5%) and standard cell culture (up to 18%). Hydrogen peroxide in particular participates in signal transduction pathways via protein redox modifications, so the potential increase in its production under standard cell culture conditions is important to understand. We measured the rates of cellular hydrogen peroxide production in some common cell lines, including C2C12, PC-3, HeLa, SH-SY5Y, MCF-7, and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) maintained at 18% or 5% oxygen. In all instances the rate of hydrogen peroxide production by these cells was significantly greater at 18% oxygen than at 5%. The increase in hydrogen peroxide production at higher oxygen levels was either abolished or substantially reduced by treatment with GKT 137831, a selective inhibitor of NADPH oxidase subunits 1 and 4. These data indicate that oxygen levels experienced by cells in culture influence hydrogen peroxide production via NADPH oxidase 1/4, highlighting the importance of regulating oxygen levels in culture near physiological values. However, we measured pericellular oxygen levels adjacent to cell monolayers under a variety of conditions and with different cell lines and found that, particularly when growing at 5% incubator oxygen levels, pericellular oxygen was often lower and variable. Together, these observations indicate the importance, and difficulty, of regulating oxygen levels experienced by cells in culture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Advanced Material Rendering in Blender

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hatka, Martin; Haindl, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 2 (2012), s. 15-23 ISSN 1081-1451 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP103/11/0335; GA ČR GA102/08/0593 Grant - others:CESNET(CZ) 387/2010; CESNET(CZ) 409/2011 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : realistic material rendering * bidirectional texture function * Blender Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2013/RO/haindl-advanced material rendering in blender.pdf

  15. Oxygen consumption through metabolism and photodynamic reactions in cells cultured on microbeads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schunck, T.; Poulet, P.

    2000-01-01

    Oxygen consumption by cultured cells, through metabolism and photosensitization reactions, has been calculated theoretically. From this result, we have derived the partial oxygen pressure P O 2 in the perfusion medium flowing across sensitized cultured cells during photodynamic experiments. The P O 2 variations in the perfusate during light irradiation are related to the rate of oxygen consumption through photoreactions, and to the number of cells killed per mole of oxygen consumed through metabolic processes. After irradiation, the reduced metabolic oxygen consumption yields information on the cell death rate, and on the photodynamic cell killing efficiency. The aim of this paper is to present an experimental set-up and the corresponding theoretical model that allows us to control the photodynamic efficiency for a given cell-sensitizer pair, under well defined and controlled conditions of irradiation and oxygen supply. To demonstrate the usefulness of the methodology described, CHO cells cultured on microbeads were sensitized with pheophorbide a and irradiated with different light fluence rates. The results obtained, i.e. oxygen consumption of about 0.1 μMs -1 m -3 under a light fluence rate of 1 W m -2 , 10 5 cells killed per mole of oxygen consumed and a decay rate of about 1 h -1 of living cells after irradiation, are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions and with previously published data. (author)

  16. Modelling radiation-induced cell death and tumour re-oxygenation: local versus global and instant versus delayed cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gago-Arias, Araceli; Espinoza, Ignacio; Sánchez-Nieto, Beatriz; Aguiar, Pablo; Pardo-Montero, Juan

    2016-01-01

    The resistance of hypoxic cells to radiation, due to the oxygen dependence of radiosensitivity, is well known and must be taken into account to accurately calculate the radiation induced cell death. A proper modelling of the response of tumours to radiation requires deriving the distribution of oxygen at a microscopic scale. This usually involves solving the reaction-diffusion equation in tumour voxels using a vascularization distribution model. Moreover, re-oxygenation arises during the course of radiotherapy, one reason being the increase of available oxygen caused by cell killing, which can turn hypoxic tumours into oxic. In this work we study the effect of cell death kinetics in tumour oxygenation modelling, analysing how it affects the timing of re-oxygenation, surviving fraction and tumour control. Two models of cell death are compared, an instantaneous cell killing, mimicking early apoptosis, and a delayed cell death scenario in which cells can die shortly after being damaged, as well as long after irradiation. For each of these scenarios, the decrease in oxygen consumption due to cell death can be computed globally (macroscopic voxel average) or locally (microscopic). A re-oxygenation model already used in the literature, the so called full re-oxygenation, is also considered. The impact of cell death kinetics and re-oxygenation on tumour responses is illustrated for two radiotherapy fractionation schemes: a conventional schedule, and a hypofractionated treatment. The results show large differences in the doses needed to achieve 50% tumour control for the investigated cell death models. Moreover, the models affect the tumour responses differently depending on the treatment schedule. This corroborates the complex nature of re-oxygenation, showing the need to take into account the kinetics of cell death in radiation response models. (paper)

  17. [Effect of different oxygen concentrations on biological properties of bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells of mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yi-Ran; Ren, Si-Hua; He, Yu-Xin; Wang, Lin-Lin; Jin, Li; Hao, Yi-Wen

    2012-10-01

    This study purposed to investigate the effects of different oxygen concentrations and reactive oxygen species (ROS) on the biological characteristics of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and their possible mechanisms through simulating oxygen environment to which the peripheral blood HSC are subjected in peripheral blood HSCT. The proliferation ability, cell cycle, directed differentiation ability, ROS level and hematopoietic reconstitution ability of Lin(-)c-kit(+)Sca-1(+) BMHSC were detected by using in vitro amplification test, directional differentiation test, cell cycle analysis, ROS assay and transplantation of Lin(-)c-kit(+)Sca-1(+) HSC from sublethally irradiated mice respectively. The results showed that oxygen concentrations lower than normal oxygen concentration, especially in hypoxic oxygen environment, could reduce ROS generation and amplify more primitive CD34(+)AC133(+) HSC and active CD34(+) HSC, and maintain more stem cells in the G(0)/G(1) phase, which is more helpful to the growth of CFU-S and viability of mice. At the same time, BMHSC exposed to normal oxygen level or inconstant and greatly changed oxygen concentrations could produce a high level of ROS, and the above-mentioned features and functional indicators are relatively low. It is concluded that ROS levels of HSC in BMHSCT are closely related with the oxygen concentration surrounding the cells and its stability. Low oxygen concentration and antioxidant intervention are helpful to transplantation of BMHSC.

  18. Low physiologic oxygen tensions reduce proliferation and differentiation of human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handgretinger Rupert

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC can be isolated from various tissues including bone marrow. Here, MSC participate as bone lining cells in the formation of the hematopoietic stem cell niche. In this compartment, the oxygen tension is low and oxygen partial pressure is estimated to range from 1% to 7%. We analyzed the effect of low oxygen tensions on human MSC cultured with platelet-lysate supplemented media and assessed proliferation, morphology, chromosomal stability, immunophenotype and plasticity. Results After transferring MSC from atmospheric oxygen levels of 21% to 1%, HIF-1α expression was induced, indicating efficient oxygen reduction. Simultaneously, MSC exhibited a significantly different morphology with shorter extensions and broader cell bodies. MSC did not proliferate as rapidly as under 21% oxygen and accumulated in G1 phase. The immunophenotype, however, was unaffected. Hypoxic stress as well as free oxygen radicals may affect chromosomal stability. However, no chromosomal abnormalities in human MSC under either culture condition were detected using high-resolution matrix-based comparative genomic hybridization. Reduced oxygen tension severely impaired adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation of human MSC. Elevation of oxygen from 1% to 3% restored osteogenic differentiation. Conclusion Physiologic oxygen tension during in vitro culture of human MSC slows down cell cycle progression and differentiation. Under physiological conditions this may keep a proportion of MSC in a resting state. Further studies are needed to analyze these aspects of MSC in tissue regeneration.

  19. Photosensitized production of singlet oxygen: spatially-resolved optical studies in single cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breitenbach, Thomas; Kuimova, Marina; Gbur, Peter

    2009-01-01

    be monitored using viability assays. Time- and spatially-resolved optical measurements of both singlet oxygen and its precursor, the excited state sensitizer, reflect the complex and dynamic morphology of the cell. These experiments help elucidate photoinduced, oxygen-dependent events that compromise cell...

  20. Dissolved oxygen concentration in the medium during cell culture: Defects and improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kuan; Zhao, Tong; Huang, Xin; He, Yunlin; Zhou, Yanzhao; Wu, Liying; Wu, Kuiwu; Fan, Ming; Zhu, Lingling

    2016-03-01

    In vitro cell culture has provided a useful model to study the effects of oxygen on cellular behavior. However, it remains unknown whether the in vitro operations themselves affect the medium oxygen levels and the living states of cells. In addition, a prevailing controversy is whether reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is induced by continuous hypoxia or reoxygenation. In this study, we have measured the effects of different types of cell culture containers and the oxygen environment where medium replacement takes place on the actual oxygen tension in the medium. We found that the deviations of oxygen concentrations in the medium are much greater in 25-cm(2) flasks than in 24-well plates and 35-mm dishes. The dissolved oxygen concentrations in the medium were increased after medium replacement in normoxia, but remained unchanged in glove boxes in which the oxygen tension remained at a low level (11.4, 5.7, and 0.5% O2 ). We also found that medium replacement in normoxia increased the number of ROS-positive cells and reduced the cell viability; meanwhile, medium replacement in a glove box did not produce the above effects. Therefore, we conclude that the use of 25-cm(2) flasks should be avoided and demonstrate that continuous hypoxia does not produce ROS, whereas the reoxygenation that occurs during the harvesting of cells leads to ROS and induces cell death. © 2015 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  1. Solid oxide fuel cell cathode with oxygen-reducing layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surdoval, Wayne A.; Berry, David A.; Shultz, Travis

    2018-04-03

    The disclosure provides a SOFC comprised of an electrolyte, anode, and cathode, where the cathode comprises an MIEC and an oxygen-reducing layer. The oxygen-reducing layer is in contact with the MIEC, and the MIEC is generally between and separating the oxygen-reducing layer and the electrolyte. The oxygen-reducing layer is comprised of single element oxides, single element carbonates, or mixtures thereof, and has a thickness of less than about 30 nm. In a particular embodiment, the thickness is less than 5 nm. In another embodiment, the thickness is about 3 monolayers or less. The oxygen-reducing layer may be a continuous film or a discontinuous film with various coverage ratios. The oxygen-reducing layer at the thicknesses described may be generated on the MIEC surface using means known in the art such as, for example, ALD processes.

  2. Photoacoustic measurements of red blood cell oxygen saturation in blood bags in situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Ruben N.; Bagga, Karan; Douplik, Alexandre; Acker, Jason P.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2017-03-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is a critical component of the health care services. RBCs are stored in blood bags in hypothermic temperatures for a maximum of 6 weeks post donation. During this in vitro storage period, RBCs have been documented to undergo changes in structure and function due to mechanical and biochemical stress. Currently, there are no assessment methods that monitor the quality of RBCs within blood bags stored for transfusion. Conventional assessment methods require the extraction of samples, consequently voiding the sterility of the blood bags and potentially rendering them unfit for transfusions. It is hypothesized that photoacoustic (PA) technology can provide a rapid and non-invasive indication of RBC quality. In this study, a novel PA setup was developed for the acquisition of oxygen saturation (SO2) of two blood bags in situ. These measurements were taken throughout the lifespan of the blood bags (42 days) and compared against the clinical gold standard method of the blood gas analyzer (BGA). SO2 values of the blood bags increased monotonically throughout the storage period. A strong correlation between PA SO2 and BGA SO2 was found, however, PA values were on average 3.5% lower. Both techniques found the bags to increase by an SO2 of approximately 20%, and measured very similar rates of SO2 change. Future work will be focused on determining the cause of discrepancy between SO2 values acquired from PA versus BGA, as well as establishing links between the measured SO2 increase and other changes in RBC in situ.

  3. Effects of oxygen and misonidazole on cell transformation and cell killing in C3H 10T1/2 cells by X rays in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borsa, J.; Sargent, M.D.; Einspenner, M.; Azzam, E.I.; Raaphorst, G.P.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of oxygen (air) and misonidazole on the transformation and killing of 10T1/2 cells by X rays were examined. The oxygen effect for the cell transformation end point was very similar to that for cell killing. Misonidazole enhanced both cell killing and cell transformation to a similar extent. The enhancement of both end points by misonidazole occurred only in the absence of oxygen during irradiation and was of lesser magnitude than that observed for oxygen. These results demonstrate that the radiation chemical processes leading to cell killing and cell transformation, respectively, are affected similarly by these two enhancers of radiation action. 22 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  4. Singlet Oxygen Sensor Green: Photochemical Behavior in Solution and in a Mammalian Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gollmer, Anita; Arnbjerg, Jacob; Blaikie, Frances Helen

    2011-01-01

    The development of efficient and selective luminescent probes for reactive oxygen species, particularly for singlet molecular oxygen, is currently of great importance. In this study, the photochemical behavior of Singlet Oxygen Sensor Green® (SOSG), a commercially available fluorescent probe...... for singlet oxygen, was examined. Despite published claims to the contrary, the data presented herein indicate that SOSG can, in fact, be incorporated into a living mammalian cell. However, for a number of reasons, caution must be exercised when using SOSG. First, it is shown that the immediate product...... of the reaction between SOSG and singlet oxygen is, itself, an efficient singlet oxygen photosensitizer. Second, SOSG appears to efficiently bind to proteins which, in turn, can influence uptake by a cell as well as behavior in the cell. As such, incorrect use of SOSG can yield misleading data on yields...

  5. Hydrogen gas alleviates oxygen toxicity by reducing hydroxyl radical levels in PC12 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junchao Yu

    Full Text Available Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO therapy through breathing oxygen at the pressure of above 1 atmosphere absolute (ATA is useful for varieties of clinical conditions, especially hypoxic-ischemic diseases. Because of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, breathing oxygen gas at high pressures can cause oxygen toxicity in the central nervous system, leading to multiple neurological dysfunction, which limits the use of HBO therapy. Studies have shown that Hydrogen gas (H2 can diminish oxidative stress and effectively reduce active ROS associated with diseases. However, the effect of H2 on ROS generated from HBO therapy remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of H2 on ROS during HBO therapy using PC12 cells. PC12 cells cultured in medium were exposed to oxygen gas or mixed oxygen gas and H2 at 1 ATA or 5 ATA. Cells viability and oxidation products and ROS were determined. The data showed that H2 promoted the cell viability and inhibited the damage in the cell and mitochondria membrane, reduced the levels of lipid peroxidation and DNA oxidation, and selectively decreased the levels of •OH but not disturbing the levels of O2•-, H2O2, or NO• in PC12 cells during HBO therapy. These results indicated that H2 effectively reduced •OH, protected cells against oxygen toxicity resulting from HBO therapy, and had no effect on other ROS. Our data supported that H2 could be potentially used as an antioxidant during HBO therapy.

  6. Real-time monitoring of specific oxygen uptake rates of embryonic stem cells in a microfluidic cell culture device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Super, Alexandre; Jaccard, Nicolas; Cardoso Marques, Marco Paulo; Macown, Rhys Jarred; Griffin, Lewis Donald; Veraitch, Farlan Singh; Szita, Nicolas

    2016-09-01

    Oxygen plays a key role in stem cell biology as a signaling molecule and as an indicator of cell energy metabolism. Quantification of cellular oxygen kinetics, i.e. the determination of specific oxygen uptake rates (sOURs), is routinely used to understand metabolic shifts. However current methods to determine sOUR in adherent cell cultures rely on cell sampling, which impacts on cellular phenotype. We present real-time monitoring of cell growth from phase contrast microscopy images, and of respiration using optical sensors for dissolved oxygen. Time-course data for bulk and peri-cellular oxygen concentrations obtained for Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and mouse embryonic stem cell (mESCs) cultures successfully demonstrated this non-invasive and label-free approach. Additionally, we confirmed non-invasive detection of cellular responses to rapidly changing culture conditions by exposing the cells to mitochondrial inhibiting and uncoupling agents. For the CHO and mESCs, sOUR values between 8 and 60 amol cell(-1) s(-1) , and 5 and 35 amol cell(-1) s(-1) were obtained, respectively. These values compare favorably with literature data. The capability to monitor oxygen tensions, cell growth, and sOUR, of adherent stem cell cultures, non-invasively and in real time, will be of significant benefit for future studies in stem cell biology and stem cell-based therapies. © 2016 The Authors. Biotechnology Journal published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Loss of peroxisomes causes oxygen insensitivity of the histochemical assay of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity to detect cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frederiks, Wilma M.; Vreeling-Sindelárová, Heleen; van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.

    2007-01-01

    Oxygen insensitivity of carcinoma cells and oxygen sensitivity of non-cancer cells in the histochemical assay of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) enables detection of carcinoma cells in unfixed cell smears or cryostat sections of biopsies. The metabolic background of oxygen insensitivity is

  8. Pericellular oxygen monitoring with integrated sensor chips for reproducible cell culture experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieninger, J; Aravindalochanan, K; Sandvik, J A; Pettersen, E O; Urban, G A

    2014-04-01

    Here we present an application, in two tumour cell lines, based on the Sensing Cell Culture Flask system as a cell culture monitoring tool for pericellular oxygen sensing. T-47D (human breast cancer) and T98G (human brain cancer) cells were cultured either in atmospheric air or in a glove-box set at 4% oxygen, in both cases with 5% CO2 in the gas phase. Pericellular oxygen tension was measured with the help of an integrated sensor chip comprising oxygen sensor arrays. Obtained results illustrate variation of pericellular oxygen tension in attached cells covered by stagnant medium. Independent of incubation conditions, low pericellular oxygen concentration levels, usually associated with hypoxia, were found in dense cell cultures. Respiration alone brought pericellular oxygen concentration down to levels which could activate hypoxia-sensing regulatory processes in cultures believed to be aerobic. Cells in culture believed to experience conditions of mild hypoxia may, in reality, experience severe hypoxia. This would lead to incorrect assumptions and suggests that pericellular oxygen concentration readings are of great importance to obtain reproducible results when dealing with hypoxic and normoxic (aerobic) incubation conditions. The Sensing Cell Culture Flask system allows continuous monitoring of pericellular oxygen concentration with outstanding long-term stability and no need for recalibration during cell culture experiments. The sensor is integrated into the flask bottom, thus in direct contact with attached cells. No additional equipment needs to be inserted into the flask during culturing. Transparency of the electrochemical sensor chip allows optical inspection of cells attached on top of the sensor. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. A biphasic radiation survival response of mammalian cells to molecular oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millar, B.C.; Fielden, E.M.; Steele, J.J.

    1979-01-01

    A study has been made of the responses of exponentially growing monolayers of Chinese hamster cells to γ-irradiation at low oxygen concentrations. Survival data showed progressively more sensitization with increasing oxygen concentration in the range 0.4 to 1.5 μM, but a constant amount of sensitization between 1.5 and 7.0 μM. Further sensitization was achieved at greater oxygen concentrations. The data imply that there are at least two components to the radiation inactivation of this cell line, and the full oxygen effect curve cannot be described in terms of a single competitive mechanism. (UK)

  10. ent-Jungermannenone C Triggers Reactive Oxygen Species-Dependent Cell Differentiation in Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Zongwei; Xiao, Xinhua; Wu, Jinbao; Zhou, Xiaozhou; Liu, Weilong; Liu, Yaxi; Li, Houhua; Chen, Guoqiang; Wu, Yingli; Lei, Xiaoguang

    2018-02-23

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a hematologic malignancy that is characterized by clonal proliferation of myeloid blasts. Despite the progress that has been made in the treatment of various malignant hematopoietic diseases, the effective treatment of AML remains very challenging. Differentiation therapy has emerged as a promising approach for leukemia treatment, and new and effective chemical agents to trigger the differentiation of AML cells, especially drug-resistant cells, are urgently required. Herein, the natural product jungermannenone C, a tetracyclic diterpenoid isolated from liverworts, is reported to induce cell differentiation in AML cells. Interestingly, the unnatural enantiomer of jungermannenone C (1) was found to be more potent than jungermannenone C in inducing cell differentiation. Furthermore, compound 1 targets peroxiredoxins I and II by selectively binding to the conserved cysteine residues and leads to cellular reactive oxygen species accumulation. Accordingly, ent-jungermannenone C (1) shows potential for further investigation as an effective differentiation therapy against AML.

  11. Influence of variable oxygen concentration on the response of cells to heat or x irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerweck, L.E.; Richards, B.; Jennings, M.

    1981-01-01

    The influence of oxygen concentration on the lethal response of cells exposed to 43 0 C hyperthermia was determined and compared to the response of cells exposed to radiation under equivalent culturing and environmental conditions. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were heated or irradiated 0.5 h after induction of hypoxia and then reoxygenated following treatment. The oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) for heat or radiation was determined at the 1% survival level from least-squares fit of survival curves. A maximum OER of 3.1 +- 0.2 was observed in the 20 to 95% oxygen concentration range. The OER for heat, however, was 1.0 +- 0.1 irrespective of the gas-phase oxygen concentration. These results show that the lethal effects of heat are not influenced by the oxygen concentration at the time of treatment in CHO cells exposed to 43 0 C hyperthermia

  12. Sketchy Rendering for Information Visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, J; Isenberg, P; Isenberg, T; Dykes, J; Boukhelifa, N; Slingsby, A

    2012-12-01

    We present and evaluate a framework for constructing sketchy style information visualizations that mimic data graphics drawn by hand. We provide an alternative renderer for the Processing graphics environment that redefines core drawing primitives including line, polygon and ellipse rendering. These primitives allow higher-level graphical features such as bar charts, line charts, treemaps and node-link diagrams to be drawn in a sketchy style with a specified degree of sketchiness. The framework is designed to be easily integrated into existing visualization implementations with minimal programming modification or design effort. We show examples of use for statistical graphics, conveying spatial imprecision and for enhancing aesthetic and narrative qualities of visualization. We evaluate user perception of sketchiness of areal features through a series of stimulus-response tests in order to assess users' ability to place sketchiness on a ratio scale, and to estimate area. Results suggest relative area judgment is compromised by sketchy rendering and that its influence is dependent on the shape being rendered. They show that degree of sketchiness may be judged on an ordinal scale but that its judgement varies strongly between individuals. We evaluate higher-level impacts of sketchiness through user testing of scenarios that encourage user engagement with data visualization and willingness to critique visualization design. Results suggest that where a visualization is clearly sketchy, engagement may be increased and that attitudes to participating in visualization annotation are more positive. The results of our work have implications for effective information visualization design that go beyond the traditional role of sketching as a tool for prototyping or its use for an indication of general uncertainty.

  13. Cell wide responses to low oxygen exposure in Desulfovibriovulgaris Hildenborough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhopadhyay, A.; Redding, A.; Joachimiak, M.; Arkin, A.; Borglin, S.; Dehal, P.; Chakraborty, R.; Geller, J.; Hazen, T.; He, Q.; Joyner, D.; Martin, V.; Wall, J.; Yang, Z.; Zhou, J.; Keasling, J.

    2007-03-11

    The responses of the anaerobic, sulfate-reducing Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to low oxygen exposure (0.1% O{sub 2}) were monitored via transcriptomics and proteomics. Exposure to 0.1% O{sub 2} caused a decrease in growth rate without affecting viability. A concerted up regulation in the predicted peroxide stress response regulon (PerR) genes was observed in response to the 0.1% O{sub 2} exposure. Several of these candidates also showed increases in protein abundance. Among the remaining small number of transcript changes was the up regulation of the predicted transmembrane tetraheme cytochrome c3 complex. Other known oxidative stress response candidates remained unchanged during this low O{sub 2} exposure. To fully understand the results of the 0.1% O{sub 2} exposure, transcriptomics and proteomics data were collected for exposure to air using a similar experimental protocol. In contrast to the 0.1% O{sub 2} exposure, air exposure was detrimental to both the growth rate and viability and caused dramatic changes at both the transcriptome and proteome levels. Interestingly, the transcripts of the predicted PerR regulon genes were down regulated during air exposure. Our results highlight the differences in the cell wide response to low and high O{sub 2} levels of in D. vulgaris and suggest that while exposure to air is highly detrimental to D. vulgaris, this bacterium can successfully cope with periodic exposure to low O{sub 2} levels in its environment.

  14. Oxygen, a Key Factor Regulating Cell Behavior during Neurogenesis and Cerebral Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kuan; Zhu, Lingling; Fan, Ming

    2011-01-01

    Oxygen is vital to maintain the normal functions of almost all the organs, especially for brain which is one of the heaviest oxygen consumers in the body. The important roles of oxygen on the brain are not only reflected in the development, but also showed in the pathological processes of many cerebral diseases. In the current review, we summarized the oxygen levels in brain tissues tested by real-time measurements during the embryonic and adult neurogenesis, the cerebral diseases, or in the hyperbaric/hypobaric oxygen environment. Oxygen concentration is low in fetal brain (0.076-7.6 mmHg) and in adult brain (11.4-53.2 mmHg), decreased during stroke, and increased in hyperbaric oxygen environment. In addition, we reviewed the effects of oxygen tensions on the behaviors of neural stem cells (NSCs) in vitro cultures at different oxygen concentration (15.2-152 mmHg) and in vivo niche during different pathological states and in hyperbaric/hypobaric oxygen environment. Moderate hypoxia (22.8-76 mmHg) can promote the proliferation of NSCs and enhance the differentiation of NSCs into the TH-positive neurons. Next, we briefly presented the oxygen-sensitive molecular mechanisms regulating NSCs proliferation and differentiation recently found including the Notch, Bone morphogenetic protein and Wnt pathways. Finally, the future perspectives about the roles of oxygen on brain and NSCs were given.

  15. Oxygen, a key factor regulating cell behaviour during neurogenesis and cerebral diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan eZhang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen is vital to maintain the normal functions of alomost all the organs, especially for brain which is one of the heaviest oxygen consumers in the body. The important roles of oxygen on the brain are not only reflected in the development, but also showed in the pathological processes of many cerebral diseases. In the current review, we summarized the oxygen levels in brain tissues tested by real-time measurements during the embryonic and adult neurogenesis, the cerebral diseases or in the hyperbaric/hypobaric oxygen environment. Oxygen concentration is low in fetal brain (0.01%- 1% and in adult brain (1.5%-7%, decreased during stroke, and increased in hyperbaric oxygen environment. In addition, we reviewed the effects of oxygen tensions on the behaviors of neural stem cells (NSCs in vitro cultures at different oxygen concentration (2%-20% and in vivo niche during different pathological states and in hyperbaric/hypobaric oxygen environment. Moderate hypoxia (3%-10% is known can promote the proliferation of NSCs and enhance the differentiation of NSCs into the TH-positive neurons. Next, we briefly presented the oxygen-sensitive molecular mechanisms regulating NSCs proliferation and differentiation recently found including the Notch, BMP and Wnt pathways. Finally, the future perspectives about the roles of oxygen on brain and NSCs were given.

  16. The effects of oxygen level and glucose concentration on the metabolism of porcine TMJ disc cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisewski, S E; Zhang, L; Kuo, J; Wright, G J; Wu, Y; Kern, M J; Yao, H

    2015-10-01

    To determine the combined effect of oxygen level and glucose concentration on cell viability, ATP production, and matrix synthesis of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc cells. TMJ disc cells were isolated from pigs aged 6-8 months and cultured in a monolayer. Cell cultures were preconditioned for 48 h with 0, 1.5, 5, or 25 mM glucose DMEM under 1%, 5%, 10%, or 21% O2 level, respectively. The cell viability was measured using the WST-1 assay. ATP production was determined using the Luciferin-Luciferase assay. Collagen and proteoglycan synthesis were determined by measuring the incorporation of [2, 3-(3)H] proline and [(35)S] sulfate into the cells, respectively. TMJ disc cell viability significantly decreased (P oxygen levels significantly increased viability (P oxygen levels significantly reduced ATP production (P oxygen was significant in regards to cell viability (P oxygen are important, glucose is the limiting nutrient for TMJ disc cell survival. At low oxygen levels, the production of ATP, collagen, and proteoglycan are severely inhibited. These results suggest that steeper nutrient gradients may exist in the TMJ disc and it may be vulnerable to pathological events that impede nutrient supply. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Reactive oxygen species-driven HIF1α triggers accelerated glycolysis in endothelial cells exposed to low oxygen tension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paik, Jin-Young; Jung, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Jin-Hee; Park, Jin-Won; Lee, Kyung-Han

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial cells and their metabolic state regulate glucose transport into underlying tissues. Here, we show that low oxygen tension stimulates human umbilical vein endothelial cell 18 F–fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F–FDG) uptake and lactate production. This was accompanied by augmented hexokinase activity and membrane Glut-1, and increased accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF1α). Restoration of oxygen reversed the metabolic effect, but this was blocked by HIF1α stabilization. Hypoxia-stimulated 18 F–FDG uptake was completely abrogated by silencing of HIF1α expression or by a specific inhibitor. There was a rapid and marked increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by hypoxia, and ROS scavenging or NADPH oxidase inhibition completely abolished hypoxia-stimulated HIF1α and 18 F–FDG accumulation, placing ROS production upstream of HIF1α signaling. Hypoxia-stimulated HIF1α and 18 F–FDG accumulation was blocked by the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, staurosporine. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, wortmannin, blocked hypoxia-stimulated 18 F–FDG uptake and attenuated hypoxia-responsive element binding of HIF1α without influencing its accumulation. Thus, ROS-driven HIF1α accumulation, along with PKC and PI3K signaling, play a key role in triggering accelerated glycolysis in endothelial cells under hypoxia, thereby contributing to 18 F–FDG transport.

  18. Rate of oxygen consumption of hamster melanoma cells as a factor influencing their radioresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajak, S.; Subczynski, W.; Panz, T.; Lukiewicz, S.

    1980-01-01

    It has been reported in recent years that the level of radiosensitivity of neoplasmic cells in vivo and of sphaeroids in vitro can be modified by controlling their rate of oxygen consumption. Thus, an attempt was made to compare this rate in the case of the melanotic and amelanotic lines of Bomirski hamster melanoma in vitro, as it is known that these two lines distinctly differ in their reactivity to ionizing radiations. The measurements carried out by the use of a new ESR method revealed that pigmented and pigmentless cells consume oxygen at significantly different rates. This means that oxygen utilization may contribute to the overall level of radioresistance of melanoma cells. (author)

  19. Tumor Cells Surviving Exposure to Proton or Photon Radiation Share a Common Immunogenic Modulation Signature, Rendering Them More Sensitive to T Cell–Mediated Killing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gameiro, Sofia R.; Malamas, Anthony S. [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Bernstein, Michael B. [Division of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tsang, Kwong Y. [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Vassantachart, April; Sahoo, Narayan; Tailor, Ramesh; Pidikiti, Rajesh [Division of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Guha, Chandan P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States); Hahn, Stephen M.; Krishnan, Sunil [Division of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hodge, James W., E-mail: jh241d@nih.gov [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To provide the foundation for combining immunotherapy to induce tumor antigen–specific T cells with proton radiation therapy to exploit the activity of those T cells. Methods and Materials: Using cell lines of tumors frequently treated with proton radiation, such as prostate, breast, lung, and chordoma, we examined the effect of proton radiation on the viability and induction of immunogenic modulation in tumor cells by flow cytometric and immunofluorescent analysis of surface phenotype and the functional immune consequences. Results: These studies show for the first time that (1) proton and photon radiation induced comparable up-regulation of surface molecules involved in immune recognition (histocompatibility leukocyte antigen, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, and the tumor-associated antigens carcinoembryonic antigen and mucin 1); (2) proton radiation mediated calreticulin cell-surface expression, increasing sensitivity to cytotoxic T-lymphocyte killing of tumor cells; and (3) cancer stem cells, which are resistant to the direct cytolytic activity of proton radiation, nonetheless up-regulated calreticulin after radiation in a manner similar to non-cancer stem cells. Conclusions: These findings offer a rationale for the use of proton radiation in combination with immunotherapy, including for patients who have failed radiation therapy alone or have limited treatment options.

  20. Singlet oxygen treatment of tumor cells triggers extracellular singlet oxygen generation, catalase inactivation and reactivation of intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riethmüller, Michaela; Burger, Nils; Bauer, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular singlet oxygen generation in photofrin-loaded cells caused cell death without discrimination between nonmalignant and malignant cells. In contrast, extracellular singlet oxygen generation caused apoptosis induction selectively in tumor cells through singlet oxygen-mediated inactivation of tumor cell protective catalase and subsequent reactivation of intercellular ROS-mediated apoptosis signaling through the HOCl and the NO/peroxynitrite signaling pathway. Singlet oxygen generation by extracellular photofrin alone was, however, not sufficient for optimal direct inactivation of catalase, but needed to trigger the generation of cell-derived extracellular singlet oxygen through the interaction between H2O2 and peroxynitrite. Thereby, formation of peroxynitrous acid, generation of hydroxyl radicals and formation of perhydroxyl radicals (HO2.) through hydroxyl radical/H2O2 interaction seemed to be required as intermediate steps. This amplificatory mechanism led to the formation of singlet oxygen at a sufficiently high concentration for optimal inactivation of membrane-associated catalase. At low initial concentrations of singlet oxygen, an additional amplification step needed to be activated. It depended on singlet oxygen-dependent activation of the FAS receptor and caspase-8, followed by caspase-8-mediated enhancement of NOX activity. The biochemical mechanisms described here might be considered as promising principle for the development of novel approaches in tumor therapy that specifically direct membrane-associated catalase of tumor cells and thus utilize tumor cell-specific apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling. PMID:26225731

  1. Singlet oxygen treatment of tumor cells triggers extracellular singlet oxygen generation, catalase inactivation and reactivation of intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riethmüller, Michaela; Burger, Nils; Bauer, Georg

    2015-12-01

    Intracellular singlet oxygen generation in photofrin-loaded cells caused cell death without discrimination between nonmalignant and malignant cells. In contrast, extracellular singlet oxygen generation caused apoptosis induction selectively in tumor cells through singlet oxygen-mediated inactivation of tumor cell protective catalase and subsequent reactivation of intercellular ROS-mediated apoptosis signaling through the HOCl and the NO/peroxynitrite signaling pathway. Singlet oxygen generation by extracellular photofrin alone was, however, not sufficient for optimal direct inactivation of catalase, but needed to trigger the generation of cell-derived extracellular singlet oxygen through the interaction between H2O2 and peroxynitrite. Thereby, formation of peroxynitrous acid, generation of hydroxyl radicals and formation of perhydroxyl radicals (HO2(.)) through hydroxyl radical/H2O2 interaction seemed to be required as intermediate steps. This amplificatory mechanism led to the formation of singlet oxygen at a sufficiently high concentration for optimal inactivation of membrane-associated catalase. At low initial concentrations of singlet oxygen, an additional amplification step needed to be activated. It depended on singlet oxygen-dependent activation of the FAS receptor and caspase-8, followed by caspase-8-mediated enhancement of NOX activity. The biochemical mechanisms described here might be considered as promising principle for the development of novel approaches in tumor therapy that specifically direct membrane-associated catalase of tumor cells and thus utilize tumor cell-specific apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Reactive oxygen species induced by Streptococcus pyogenes invasion trigger apoptotic cell death in infected epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, Chihiro; Nozawa, Takashi; Maruyama, Fumito; Tsumoto, Kohei; Hamada, Shigeyuki; Nakagawa, Ichiro

    2010-06-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus, GAS), one of the most common pathogens of humans, attaches and invades into human pharyngeal or skin epithelial cells. We have previously reported that induction of apoptosis is associated with GAS invasion, which induces mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptotic cell death. We demonstrate here that GAS-induced apoptosis is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Both the induction of apoptosis and ROS production markedly increased upon invasion of wild-type GAS strain JRS4 into HeLa cells; however, the apoptotic response was not observed in fibronectin-binding protein F1-disrupted mutant SAM1-infected cells. In Bcl-2-overexpressing HeLa cells (HBD98-2-4), the induction of apoptosis, ROS production and mitochondrial dysfunction were significantly suppressed, whereas the numbers of invaded GAS was not different between HeLa (mock cells) and the HeLa HBD98-2-4 cells. Whereas Rac1 activation occurred during GAS invasion, ROS production in GAS-infected cells was clearly inhibited by transfection with the Rac1 mutants (L37 or V12L37), but not by the dominant active mutant (V12L61) or by the dominant negative mutant (N17). These observations indicate that GAS invasion triggers ROS production through Rac1 activation and generated ROS induced mitochondrial dysfunction leading to cellular apoptosis.

  3. GPU Pro advanced rendering techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Engel, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    This book covers essential tools and techniques for programming the graphics processing unit. Brought to you by Wolfgang Engel and the same team of editors who made the ShaderX series a success, this volume covers advanced rendering techniques, engine design, GPGPU techniques, related mathematical techniques, and game postmortems. A special emphasis is placed on handheld programming to account for the increased importance of graphics on mobile devices, especially the iPhone and iPod touch.Example programs and source code can be downloaded from the book's CRC Press web page. 

  4. The relationship between tumor oxygenation and cell proliferation in human soft tissue sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordsmark, Marianne; Hoeyer, Morten; Keller, Johnny; Nielsen, Ole Steen; Jensen, Oluf Myhre; Overgaard, Jens

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: In malignant tumors the oxygenation status and tumor cell proliferation are known to influence local tumor control after radiotherapy. However, the relationship between oxygenation status and tumor cell kinetics in human tumors has not yet been described. Newly developed clinically applicable techniques such as oxygen electrode measurements and assessment of tumor cell proliferation rates have been suggested as promising predictive assays. The purpose of the present study was to characterize tumor oxygenation status in soft tissue sarcomas and to compare this with tumor cell kinetics and clinical parameters. Methods and Materials: Pretreatment tumor oxygenation status was measured by polarographic oxygen needle electrodes and evaluated as the median pO 2 and the percentage of pO 2 values ≤ 5 mmHg and ≤ 2.5 mmHg in 22 patients with primary soft tissue sarcomas. All tumors were characterized by histology, grade of malignancy, the level of microscopic necrosis, the level of effective hemoglobin, and magnetic resonance imaging estimation of tumor volume. The tumor cell potential doubling time and labeling index were measured by flow cytometric and immunohistochemical analysis of tumor biopsy specimens after in vivo incorporation of iododeoxyuridine. Results: There was a significant correlation between the median pO 2 and the tumor cell potential doubling time (p = 0.041), whereas no correlation was found between the level of hypoxia expressed by the percentage of pO 2 values ≤ 2.5 and ≤ 5 mmHg, respectively, and tumor cell potential doubling time. Furthermore, no correlation was found between either of the three tumor oxygenation parameters and labeling index. The material represented large intertumor heterogeneity in oxygenation status, cell kinetics, and tumor volume, and no correlation was found between oxygenation status and either volume, histopathology, grade of malignancy, or effective hemoglobin. Conclusion: This report is the first to suggest

  5. Closed-Loop Pure Oxygen Static Feed Fuel Cell for Lunar Missions, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In order to address the NASA lunar mission, DESC proposes to develop a proton exchange membrane (PEM) closed-loop pure oxygen fuel cell for application to lunar...

  6. Red blood cell transfusions and tissue oxygenation in anemic hematology outpatients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuruk, Koray; Bartels, Sebastiaan A.; Milstein, Dan M. J.; Bezemer, Rick; Biemond, Bart J.; Ince, Can

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is little clinical evidence that red blood cell (RBC) transfusions improve oxygen availability at the microcirculatory level. We tested the hypotheses that anemia in chronically anemic patients with relatively healthy microcirculation would be associated with low tissue hemoglobin

  7. Vorinostat Renders the Replication-Competent Latent Reservoir of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV Vulnerable to Clearance by CD8 T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia A. Sung

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Latently human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected cells are transcriptionally quiescent and invisible to clearance by the immune system. To demonstrate that the latency reversing agent vorinostat (VOR induces a window of vulnerability in the latent HIV reservoir, defined as the triggering of viral antigen production sufficient in quantity and duration to allow for recognition and clearance of persisting infection, we developed a latency clearance assay (LCA. The LCA is a quantitative viral outgrowth assay (QVOA that includes the addition of immune effectors capable of clearing cells expressing viral antigen. Here we show a reduction in the recovery of replication-competent virus from VOR exposed resting CD4 T cells following addition of immune effectors for a discrete period. Take home message: VOR exposure leads to sufficient production of viral protein on the cell surface, creating a window of vulnerability within this latent reservoir in antiretroviral therapy (ART-suppressed HIV-infected individuals that allows the clearance of latently infected cells by an array of effector mechanisms.

  8. [Long-term expansion of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells under reduced oxygen tension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylova, Iu V; Buravkova, L B

    2013-01-01

    We have shown that the decrease in oxygen tension in the culture medium of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MMSCs) results in a short-term reduction in the proportion of CD73(+)-cells in the population, without effecting the number of cells expressing other constitutive surface markers (CD90 and CD105). In this case, the heterogeneity of the cell population declined: large spread cells disappeared. The proliferative activity of MMSCs significantly increased and remained stable in conditions in which the oxygen content was close to the tissue oxygen levels (5% O2). At lower oxygen concentration, proliferative activity of the cells gradually reduced from passages 3-4. The increase in proliferative activity was not accompanied by increased expression of telomerase gene indicateding the alsance of cell transformation. However, genome-wide analysis of MMSC gene expression level revealed changes in expression of cyclins (CCND2 and PCNA), regulatory subunit cyclin-dependent kinase (CKS2) and an inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDKN2C), regulating the cell cycle, which is obviously facilitated the increase in the proliferative capacity of cells at lower oxygen tension.

  9. Inhaled nitric oxide augments nitric oxide transport on sickle cell hemoglobin without affecting oxygen affinity

    OpenAIRE

    Gladwin, Mark T.; Schechter, Alan N.; Shelhamer, James H.; Pannell, Lewis K.; Conway, Deirdre A.; Hrinczenko, Borys W.; Nichols, James S.; Pease-Fye, Margaret E.; Noguchi, Constance T.; Rodgers, Griffin P.; Ognibene, Frederick P.

    1999-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) inhalation has been reported to increase the oxygen affinity of sickle cell erythrocytes. Also, proposed allosteric mechanisms for hemoglobin, based on S-nitrosation of β-chain cysteine 93, raise the possibilty of altering the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease by inhibiting polymerization or by increasing NO delivery to the tissue. We studied the effects of a 2-hour treatment, using varying concentrations of inhaled NO. Oxygen affinity, as measured by P50, did not respo...

  10. FORMING SELF-ASSEMBLED CELL ARRAYS AND MEASURING THE OXYGEN CONSUMPTION RATE OF A SINGLE LIVE CELL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etzkorn, James R; McQuaide, Sarah C; Anderson, Judy B; Meldrum, Deirdre R; Parviz, Babak A

    2009-06-01

    We report a method for forming arrays of live single cells on a chip using polymer micro-traps made of SU8. We have studied the toxicity of the microfabricated structures and the associated environment for two cell lines. We also report a method for measuring the oxygen consumption rate of a single cell using optical interrogation of molecular oxygen sensors placed in micromachined micro-wells by temporarily sealing the cells in the micro-traps. The new techniques presented here add to the collection of tools available for performing "single-cell" biology. A single-cell self-assembly yield of 61% was achieved with oxygen draw down rates of 0.83, 0.82, and 0.71 fmol/minute on three isolated live A549 cells.

  11. Tracking the Oxygen Status in the Cell Nucleus with a Hoechst-Tagged Phosphorescent Ruthenium Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Daiki; Umehara, Yui; Son, Aoi; Asahi, Wataru; Misu, Sotaro; Kurihara, Ryohsuke; Kondo, Teruyuki; Tanabe, Kazuhito

    2018-05-04

    Molecular oxygen in living cells is distributed and consumed inhomogeneously, depending on the activity of each organelle. Therefore, tractable methods that can be used to monitor the oxygen status in each organelle are needed to understand cellular function. Here we report the design of a new oxygen-sensing probe for use in the cell nucleus. We prepared "Ru-Hoechsts", each consisting of a phosphorescent ruthenium complex linked to a Hoechst 33258 moiety, and characterized their properties as oxygen sensors. The Hoechst unit shows strong DNA-binding properties in the nucleus, and the ruthenium complex shows oxygen-dependent phosphorescence. Thus, Ru-Hoechsts accumulated in the cell nucleus and showed oxygen-dependent signals that could be monitored. Of the Ru-Hoechsts prepared in this study, Ru-Hoechst b, in which the ruthenium complex and the Hoechst unit were linked through a hexyl chain, showed the most suitable properties for monitoring the oxygen status. Ru-Hoechsts are probes with high potential for visualizing oxygen fluctuations in the nucleus. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. CCR5 Gene Disruption via Lentiviral Vectors Expressing Cas9 and Single Guided RNA Renders Cells Resistant to HIV-1 Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingjing; Zhang, Di; Kimata, Jason T.; Zhou, Paul

    2014-01-01

    CCR5, a coreceptor for HIV-1 entry, is a major target for drug and genetic intervention against HIV-1. Genetic intervention strategies have knocked down CCR5 expression levels by shRNA or disrupted the CCR5 gene using zinc finger nucleases (ZFN) or Transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN). In the present study, we silenced CCR5 via CRISPR associated protein 9 (Cas9) and single guided RNAs (sgRNAs). We constructed lentiviral vectors expressing Cas9 and CCR5 sgRNAs. We show that a single round transduction of lentiviral vectors expressing Cas9 and CCR5 sgRNAs into HIV-1 susceptible human CD4+ cells yields high frequencies of CCR5 gene disruption. CCR5 gene-disrupted cells are not only resistant to R5-tropic HIV-1, including transmitted/founder (T/F) HIV-1 isolates, but also have selective advantage over CCR5 gene-undisrupted cells during R5-tropic HIV-1 infection. Importantly, using T7 endonuclease I assay we did not detect genome mutations at potential off-target sites that are highly homologous to these CCR5 sgRNAs in stably transduced cells even at 84 days post transduction. Thus we conclude that silencing of CCR5 via Cas9 and CCR5-specific sgRNAs could be a viable alternative strategy for engineering resistance against HIV-1. PMID:25541967

  13. Marked induction of the helix-loop-helix protein Id3 promotes the gammadelta T cell fate and renders their functional maturation Notch independent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Jens Peter Holst; Wong, Gladys W; Lee, Sang-Yun

    2009-01-01

    )-inhibitor of DNA binding 3 (Id3) pathway plays a defining role in this process. In particular, Id3 expression served to regulate adoption of the gammadelta fate. Moreover, Id3 was both necessary and sufficient to enable gammadelta-lineage cells to differentiate independently of Notch signaling and become competent...

  14. IL-15 Renders Conventional Lymphocytes Resistant to Suppressive Functions of Regulatory T Cells through Activation of the Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, Melika Ben; Hmida, Nadia Belhadj; Moes, Nicolette; Buyse, Sophie; Abdeladhim, Maha; Louzir, Hechmi; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine

    2009-01-01

    IL-15 drives chronic inflammation in several human diseases. We have recently shown that IL-15 inhibits the immunosuppressive effects of TGF-beta through blockage of the Smad3-signaling pathway. Data pointing to reciprocal interactions between TGF-beta and CD4(+) regulatory T cells led us to

  15. Ectopic expression of X-linked lymphocyte-regulated protein pM1 renders tumor cells resistant to antitumor immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Tae Heung; Noh, Kyung Hee; Kim, Jin Hee; Bae, Hyun Cheol; Lin, Ken Y; Monie, Archana; Pai, Sara I; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T-C; Kim, Tae Woo

    2010-04-15

    Tumor immune escape is a major obstacle in cancer immunotherapy, but the mechanisms involved remain poorly understood. We have previously developed an immune evasion tumor model using an in vivo immune selection strategy and revealed Akt-mediated immune resistance to antitumor immunity induced by various cancer immunotherapeutic agents. In the current study, we used microarray gene analysis to identify an Akt-activating candidate molecule overexpressed in immune-resistant tumors compared with parental tumors. X-linked lymphocyte-regulated protein pM1 (XLR) gene was the most upregulated in immune-resistant tumors compared with parental tumor cells. Furthermore, the retroviral transduction of XLR in parental tumor cells led to activation of Akt, resulting in upregulation of antiapoptotic proteins and the induction of immune resistance phenotype in parental tumor cells. In addition, we found that transduction of parental tumor cells with other homologous genes from the mouse XLR family, such as synaptonemal complex protein 3 (SCP3) and XLR-related, meiosis-regulated protein (XMR) and its human counterpart of SCP3 (hSCP3), also led to activation of Akt, resulting in the upregulation of antiapoptotic proteins and induction of immune resistance phenotype. Importantly, characterization of a panel of human cervical cancers revealed relatively higher expression levels of hSCP3 in human cervical cancer tissue compared with normal cervical tissue. Thus, our data indicate that ectopic expression of XLR and its homologues in tumor cells represents a potentially important mechanism for tumor immune evasion and serves as a promising molecular target for cancer immunotherapy. (c) 2010 AACR.

  16. Uptake rate of cationic mitochondrial inhibitor MKT-077 determines cellular oxygen consumption change in carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John L Chunta

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Since tumor radiation response is oxygen-dependent, radiosensitivity can be enhanced by increasing tumor oxygenation. Theoretically, inhibiting cellular oxygen consumption is the most efficient way to increase oxygen levels. The cationic, rhodacyanine dye-analog MKT-077 inhibits mitochondrial respiration and could be an effective metabolic inhibitor. However, the relationship between cellular MKT-077 uptake and metabolic inhibition is unknown. We hypothesized that rat and human mammary carcinoma cells would take up MKT-077, causing a decrease in oxygen metabolism related to drug uptake. METHODS: R3230Ac rat breast adenocarcinoma cells were exposed to MKT-077. Cellular MKT-077 concentration was quantified using spectroscopy, and oxygen consumption was measured using polarographic electrodes. MKT-077 uptake kinetics were modeled by accounting for uptake due to both the concentration and potential gradients across the plasma and mitochondrial membranes. These kinetic parameters were used to model the relationship between MKT-077 uptake and metabolic inhibition. MKT-077-induced changes in oxygen consumption were also characterized in MDA-MB231 human breast carcinoma cells. RESULTS: Cells took up MKT-077 with a time constant of ∼1 hr, and modeling showed that over 90% of intracellular MKT-077 was bound or sequestered, likely by the mitochondria. The uptake resulted in a rapid decrease in oxygen consumption, with a time constant of ∼30 minutes. Surprisingly the change in oxygen consumption was proportional to uptake rate, not cellular concentration. MKT-077 proved a potent metabolic inhibitor, with dose-dependent decreases of 45-73% (p = 0.003. CONCLUSIONS: MKT-077 caused an uptake rate-dependent decrease in cellular metabolism, suggesting potential efficacy for increasing tumor oxygen levels and radiosensitivity in vivo.

  17. Interaction of nitroimidazole sensitizers and oxygen in the radiosensitization of mammalian cells at ultrahigh dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaels, H.B.; Ling, C.C.; Epp, E.R.; Peterson, E.C.

    1981-01-01

    When CHO cells, equilibrated with 0.44% oxygen, are irradiated with single 3-nsec pulses of electrons from a 600-kV-field emission source, a breaking survival curve is observed. The breaking behavior, believed to be the result of radiolytic oxygen depletion, can be prevented by the presence of a relatively low concentration of the hypoxic cell sensitizer misonidazole; similar results are obtained with metronidazole and Ro-05-9963. The resulting survival curves exhibit a sensitized response similar to that obtained with conventional dose rate radiation for CHO cells under this oxygen concentration. This degree of sensitization is greater than that observed for CHO cells irradiated at ultrahigh dose rates under the same concentration of sensitizer in nitrogen. The data suggest that the nitroimidazole compounds interfere with the radiation chemical oxygen depletion process and that the radiosensitization observed in the nonbreaking survival curve is the consequence of sensitization by both the nitroimidazole and, primarily, the oxygen rather than a direct subsitution for oxygen by the sensitizer. This conclusion is also supported by data obtained in double-pulse experiments. The results are discussed with regard to the mechanisms of the oxygen depletion process and radiosensitization

  18. Using micro-patterned sensors and cell self-assembly for measuring the oxygen consumption rate of single cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etzkorn, James R; Parviz, Babak A; Wu, Wen-Chung; Tian, Zhiyuan; Kim, Prince; Jang, Sei-Hum; Jen, Alex K-Y; Meldrum, Deirdre R

    2010-01-01

    We present a method for self-assembling arrays of live single cells on a glass chip using a photopatternable polymer to form micro-traps. We have studied the single-cell self-assembly method and optimized the process to obtain a 52% yield of single-trapped cells. We also report a method to measure the oxygen consumption rate of a single cell using micro-patterned sensors. These molecular oxygen sensors were fabricated around each micro-trap allowing optical interrogation of oxygen concentration in the immediate environment of the trapped cell. Micromachined micro-wells were then used to seal the trap, sensor and cell in order to determine the oxygen consumption rate of single cells. These techniques reported here add to the collection of tools for performing 'singe-cell' biology. An oxygen consumption rate of 1.05 ± 0.28 fmol min −1 was found for a data set consisting of 25 single A549 cells.

  19. Anti-PD-L1/TGFβR2 (M7824) fusion protein induces immunogenic modulation of human urothelial carcinoma cell lines, rendering them more susceptible to immune-mediated recognition and lysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenga, Italia; Donahue, Renee N; Gargulak, Morgan L; Lepone, Lauren M; Roselli, Mario; Bilusic, Marijo; Schlom, Jeffrey

    2018-03-01

    Avelumab has recently been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the therapy of Merkel cell carcinoma and urothelial carcinoma. M7824 is a novel first-in-class bifunctional fusion protein comprising a monoclonal antibody against programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1, avelumab), fused to the extracellular domain of human transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) receptor 2, which functions as a TGFβ "trap." Advanced urothelial tumors have been shown to express TGFβ, which possesses immunosuppressive properties that promote cancer progression and metastasis. The rationale for a combined molecule is to block the PD-1/PD-L1 interaction between tumor cells and immune cell infiltrate and simultaneously reduce or eliminate TGFβ from the tumor microenvironment. In this study, we explored the effect of M7824 on invasive urothelial carcinoma cell lines. Human urothelial (transitional cell) carcinoma cell lines HTB-4, HTB-1, and HTB-5 were treated with M7824, M7824mut (M7824 that is mutated in the anti-PD-L1 portion of the molecule and thus does not bind PD-L1), anti-PD-L1 (avelumab), or IgG1 isotype control monoclonal antibody, and were assessed for gene expression, cell-surface phenotype, and sensitivity to lysis by TRAIL, antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. M7824 retains the ability to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity of tumor cells, although in some cases to a lesser extent than anti-PD-L1. However, compared to anti-PD-L1, M7824 increases (A) gene expression of molecules involved in T-cell trafficking in the tumor (e.g., CXCL11), (B) TRAIL-mediated tumor cell lysis, and (C) antigen-specific CD8 + T-cell-mediated lysis of tumor cells. These studies demonstrate the immunomodulatory properties of M7824 on both tumor cell phenotype and immune-mediated lysis. Compared to anti-PD-L1 or M7824mut, M7824 induces immunogenic modulation of urothelial carcinoma cell lines, rendering them more susceptible to immune

  20. Accurate control of oxygen level in cells during culture on silicone rubber membranes with application to stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Daryl E; Millman, Jeffrey R; Bonner-Weir, Susan; Rappel, Michael J; Colton, Clark K

    2010-01-01

    Oxygen level in mammalian cell culture is often controlled by placing culture vessels in humidified incubators with a defined gas phase partial pressure of oxygen (pO(2gas)). Because the cells are consuming oxygen supplied by diffusion, a difference between pO(2gas) and that experienced by the cells (pO(2cell)) arises, which is maximal when cells are cultured in vessels with little or no oxygen permeability. Here, we demonstrate theoretically that highly oxygen-permeable silicone rubber membranes can be used to control pO(2cell) during culture of cells in monolayers and aggregates much more accurately and can achieve more rapid transient response following a disturbance than on polystyrene and fluorinated ethylene-propylene copolymer membranes. Cell attachment on silicone rubber was achieved by physical adsorption of fibronectin or Matrigel. We use these membranes for the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells to cardiomyocytes and compare the results with culture on polystyrene or on silicone rubber on top of polystyrene. The fraction of cells that are cardiomyocyte-like increases with decreasing pO(2) only when using oxygen-permeable silicone membrane-based dishs, which contract on silicone rubber but not polystyrene. The high permeability of silicone rubber results in pO(2cell) being equal to pO(2gas) at the tissue-membrane interface. This, together with geometric information from histological sections, facilitates development of a model from which the pO(2) distribution within the resulting aggregates is computed. Silicone rubber membranes have significant advantages over polystyrene in controlling pO(2cell), and these results suggest they are a valuable tool for investigating pO(2) effects in many applications, such as stem cell differentiation. Copyright 2009 American Institute of Chemical Engineers

  1. Genetic control of yeast cell radiosensitivity modification by oxygen and hypoxic sensitizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuranovskaya, G.P.; Petin, V.G.

    1984-01-01

    Diploid yeast cells Saccharomyces cerevisiae ''of the wild type'', individual mutants, homozygous in rad 2 and rad 54 and double mutants, containing both these loci in homozygous state are considered to prove genetic determination of radiosensitivity modification of hypoxic cells by oxygen and electron acceptor compounds previously demonstrated on yeast cells of other genotypes. It is shown that both ''oxygen effect'' and the effect of hypoxic sensitizers depend on the activity of repair systems. The possible mechanism of participation of post-radiation restoration processes in the modification of cell radiosensitivity, is discussed

  2. Experience at J.E.N. with electrochemical cells for measurement of oxygen activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Torre, M.de; Lapena, J.; Couchoud, M.

    1981-01-01

    The experience gained at the J.E.N. with oxygen meters since 1974 till 1980 is presented. Thirteen oxygen meters were tested. Eight with Cu/Cu/ 2 O reference electrode and the rest with Sn/SnO 2 , and two types of electrolyte tube produced by zircoa under specifications development by UNC and HEDL. The cells equiped with Cu/Cu 2 O showed an anomalous performance giving an e.m.f. higher than the theoretical value, and one of them was in close agreement to cells using air as reference electrode. An explanation is given. The performance of the cells with Sn/SnO 2 is in good agreement with those obtained in others laboratories. To calculate the theoretical value, it has derived a correlation colubility for oxygen with 262 data obtained by the vacuum distillation method. Various recommendations are pointed out on the future development of the oxygen meters to improve its performance. (author)

  3. Metal-free and Oxygen-free Graphene as Oxygen Reduction Catalysts for Highly Efficient Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-30

    analysis was carried out by a TA instrument with a heating rate of 10 °C in N2. The Raman spectra were collected on a Raman spectrometer (Renishaw...kinematics viscosity for KOH (v = 0.01 cm 2 s -1 ) and CO2 is concentration of O2 in the solution (CO2 = 1.2 × 10 -6 mol cm -3 ). The constant 0.2 is...functionalizing graphene to impart electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells. Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic

  4. Oxygen-controlled automated neural differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondragon-Teran, Paul; Tostoes, Rui; Mason, Chris; Lye, Gary J; Veraitch, Farlan S

    2013-03-01

    Automation and oxygen tension control are two tools that provide significant improvements to the reproducibility and efficiency of stem cell production processes. the aim of this study was to establish a novel automation platform capable of controlling oxygen tension during both the cell-culture and liquid-handling steps of neural differentiation processes. We built a bespoke automation platform, which enclosed a liquid-handling platform in a sterile, oxygen-controlled environment. An airtight connection was used to transfer cell culture plates to and from an automated oxygen-controlled incubator. Our results demonstrate that our system yielded comparable cell numbers, viabilities, metabolism profiles and differentiation efficiencies when compared with traditional manual processes. Interestingly, eliminating exposure to ambient conditions during the liquid-handling stage resulted in significant improvements in the yield of MAP2-positive neural cells, indicating that this level of control can improve differentiation processes. This article describes, for the first time, an automation platform capable of maintaining oxygen tension control during both the cell-culture and liquid-handling stages of a 2D embryonic stem cell differentiation process.

  5. Overactivation of phospholipase C-gamma1 renders platelet-derived growth factor beta-receptor-expressing cells independent of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway for chemotaxis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rönnstrand, L; Siegbahn, A; Rorsman, C

    1999-01-01

    ., Siegbahn, A. , Rorsman, C., Engström, U., Wernstedt, C., Heldin, C.-H., and Rönnstrand, L. (1996) EMBO J. 15, 5299-5313). Here we show that the increased chemotaxis correlates with increased activation of phospholipase C-gamma1 (PLC-gamma1), measured as inositol-1,4, 5-trisphosphate release. By two......-dimensional phosphopeptide mapping, the increase in phosphorylation of PLC-gamma1 was shown not to be selective for any site, rather a general increase in phosphorylation of PLC-gamma1 was seen. Specific inhibitors of protein kinase C, bisindolylmaleimide (GF109203X), and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase), LY294002......, did not affect the activation of PLC-gamma1. To assess whether increased activation of PLC-gamma1 is the cause of the hyperchemotactic behavior of the Y934F mutant cell line, we constructed cell lines expressing either wild-type or a catalytically compromised version of PLC-gamma1 under a tetracycline...

  6. Oxygenation decreases elastin secretion from rat ductus arteriosus smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Shoji; Minamisawa, Susumu

    2015-08-01

    The ductus arteriosus (DA), a fetal arterial connection between the main pulmonary artery and the descending aorta, normally closes immediately after birth. The oxygen concentration in the blood rises after birth, and in the DA this increase in oxygen concentration causes functional closure, which is induced by smooth muscle contraction. Previous studies have demonstrated that hypoxia and/or oxygenation affect vascular remodeling of various vessels. Therefore, we hypothesized that the rise in oxygen concentration would affect the vascular structure of the DA due to production of proteins secreted from DA smooth muscle cells (SMC). Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was used to comprehensively investigate the secreted proteins in the supernatant of rat DA SMC harvested under hypoxic conditions (1% oxygen) or under normoxic conditions (21% oxygen). We found that the rise in oxygen concentration reduced the secretion of elastin from DA SMC. On reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, the expression of elastin mRNA was not significantly changed in DA SMC from hypoxic to normoxic conditions. Given that elastin forms internal elastic lamina and elastic fibers in the vascular muscle layers, and that a rise in oxygen concentration reduced the secretion of elastin, this suggests that the rise in blood oxygen concentration after birth reduces the secretion of elastin, and therefore may play a role in DA structural remodeling after birth. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  7. Experimental and analytical study of oxygen depletion in stirred cell suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whillans, D.W.; Rauth, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    The determination and maintenance of constant low but non-zero levels of oxygen is critical in the study of the radiation chemical interactions of nitroimidazoles in mammalian cells in vitro. As well, many of these chemicals have increased toxicity toward hypoxic compared to aerobic cells, although absolute hypoxia probably is not required. Both of these phenomena must be investigated in systems where significant consumption of oxygen takes place, either through radiation depletion or by cellular metabolism. In this paper an analysis has been made of the form of oxygen depletion in stirred cell suspensions with overlying gas phase, and it has been found to conform to the relationship (C[t] - C/sub infinity/) = (C[0] - C/sub infinity/) exp(-k 1 t), where C/sub infinity/ = C/sub g/ - R/k 1 . Here C[t] is the oxygen tension throughout the solution; C/sub g/, the equivalent level in the overlying gas phase; R (concentration units per sec), the depletion rate; k 1 (sec/sup -1/), a physical constant independent of oxygen concentration and depletion rate; and C/sub infinity/, the oxygen level in solution approached at long times. This relationship has been confirmed in detail using a Clark-type oxygen sensor and a high-stability amplifier design due to Koch. Since oxygen levels down to a few hundred parts per million can be determined with accuracy, it has been possible to measure precisely the oxygen levels present in our experimental systems. Implications of these results for the interpretation of data obtained in stirred cell suspension with overlying gas phase under conditions of consumption are discussed

  8. Design and development of microbioreactors for long-term cell culture in controlled oxygen microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaci, Hasan E; Devendra, Raghavendra; Smith, Quinton; Gerecht, Sharon; Drazer, German

    2012-02-01

    The ability to control the oxygen level to which cells are exposed in tissue culture experiments is crucial for many applications. Here, we design, develop and test a microbioreactor (MBR) for long-term cell culture studies with the capability to accurately control and continuously monitor the dissolved oxygen (DO) level in the cell microenvironment. In addition, the DO level can be controlled independently from other cues, such as the viscous shear-stress acting on the cells. We first analyze the transport of oxygen in the proposed device and determine the materials and dimensions that are compatible with uniform oxygen tension and low shear-stress at the cell level. The device is also designed to culture a statistically significant number of cells. We use fully transparent materials and the overall design of the device is compatible with live-cell imaging. The proposed system includes real-time read-out of actual DO levels, is simple to fabricate at low cost, and can be easily expanded to control the concentration of other microenvironmental solutes. We performed control experiments in the absence of cells to demonstrate that the MBR can be used to accurately modulate DO levels ranging from atmospheric level to 1%, both under no flow and perfusion conditions. We also demonstrate cancer cell attachment and viability within the MBR. The proposed MBR offers the unprecedented capability to perform on-line measurement and analysis of DO levels in the microenvironment of adherent cultures and to correlate them with various cellular responses.

  9. Towards a quantitative understanding of oxygen tension and cell density evolution in fibrin hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demol, Jan; Lambrechts, Dennis; Geris, Liesbet; Schrooten, Jan; Van Oosterwyck, Hans

    2011-01-01

    The in vitro culture of hydrogel-based constructs above a critical size is accompanied by problems of unequal cell distribution when diffusion is the primary mode of oxygen transfer. In this study, an experimentally-informed mathematical model was developed to relate cell proliferation and death inside fibrin hydrogels to the local oxygen tension in a quantitative manner. The predictive capacity of the resulting model was tested by comparing its outcomes to the density, distribution and viability of human periosteum derived cells (hPDCs) that were cultured inside fibrin hydrogels in vitro. The model was able to reproduce important experimental findings, such as the formation of a multilayered cell sheet at the hydrogel periphery and the occurrence of a cell density gradient throughout the hydrogel. In addition, the model demonstrated that cell culture in fibrin hydrogels can lead to complete anoxia in the centre of the hydrogel for realistic values of oxygen diffusion and consumption. A sensitivity analysis also identified these two parameters, together with the proliferation parameters of the encapsulated cells, as the governing parameters for the occurrence of anoxia. In conclusion, this study indicates that mathematical models can help to better understand oxygen transport limitations and its influence on cell behaviour during the in vitro culture of cell-seeded hydrogels. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Ebselen Induced C6 Glioma Cell Death in Oxygen and Glucose Deprivation

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Honglian; Liu, Shimin; Miyake, Minoru; Liu, Ke Jian

    2006-01-01

    Studies have shown that ebselen is an anti-inflammatory and antioxidative agent. Its protective effect has been investigated in oxidative stress related diseases such as cerebral ischemia in recent years. However, experimental evidence also shows that ebselen causes cell death in several different cell types. Whether ebselen will have beneficial or detrimental effect on cells under ischemic condition is not known. Herein, we studied the effect of ebselen on C6 glioma cell under oxygen and glu...

  11. Preservation of high glycolytic phenotype by establishing new acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines at physiologic oxygen concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheard, Michael A., E-mail: msheard@chla.usc.edu [Developmental Therapeutics Program, USC-CHLA Institute for Pediatric Clinical Research, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, 4650 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90027 (United States); Ghent, Matthew V., E-mail: mattghent@gmail.com [Department of Pathology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Health Sciences Campus, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Cabral, Daniel J., E-mail: dcabral14@gmail.com [Cancer Center and Departments of Cell Biology & Biochemistry, Pharmacology & Neuroscience, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX 79430 (United States); Lee, Joanne C., E-mail: joannebarnhart@gmail.com [Cancer Center and Departments of Cell Biology & Biochemistry, Pharmacology & Neuroscience, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX 79430 (United States); Khankaldyyan, Vazgen, E-mail: khangaldian@yahoo.com [Developmental Therapeutics Program, USC-CHLA Institute for Pediatric Clinical Research, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, 4650 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90027 (United States); Ji, Lingyun, E-mail: lingyun.ji@med.usc.edu [Developmental Therapeutics Program, USC-CHLA Institute for Pediatric Clinical Research, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, 4650 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90027 (United States); Wu, Samuel Q., E-mail: swu@chla.usc.edu [Medical Genetics, Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, 4650 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90027 (United States); Kang, Min H., E-mail: min.kang@ttuhsc.edu [Cancer Center and Departments of Cell Biology & Biochemistry, Pharmacology & Neuroscience, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX 79430 (United States); and others

    2015-05-15

    Cancer cells typically exhibit increased glycolysis and decreased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, and they continue to exhibit some elevation in glycolysis even under aerobic conditions. However, it is unclear whether cancer cell lines employ a high level of glycolysis comparable to that of the original cancers from which they were derived, even if their culture conditions are changed to physiologically relevant oxygen concentrations. From three childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients we established three new pairs of cell lines in both atmospheric (20%) and physiologic (bone marrow level, 5%) oxygen concentrations. Cell lines established in 20% oxygen exhibited lower proliferation, survival, expression of glycolysis genes, glucose consumption, and lactate production. Interestingly, the effects of oxygen concentration used during cell line initiation were only partially reversible when established cell cultures were switched from one oxygen concentration to another for eight weeks. These observations indicate that ALL cell lines established at atmospheric oxygen concentration can exhibit relatively low levels of glycolysis and these levels are semi-permanent, suggesting that physiologic oxygen concentrations may be needed from the time of cell line initiation to preserve the high level of glycolysis commonly exhibited by leukemias in vivo. - Highlights: • Establishing new ALL cell lines in 5% oxygen resulted in higher glycolytic expression and function. • Establishing new ALL cell lines in 5% oxygen resulted in higher proliferation and lower cell death. • The divergent metabolic phenotypes selected in 5% and 20% oxygen are semi-permanent.

  12. Preservation of high glycolytic phenotype by establishing new acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines at physiologic oxygen concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheard, Michael A.; Ghent, Matthew V.; Cabral, Daniel J.; Lee, Joanne C.; Khankaldyyan, Vazgen; Ji, Lingyun; Wu, Samuel Q.; Kang, Min H.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells typically exhibit increased glycolysis and decreased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, and they continue to exhibit some elevation in glycolysis even under aerobic conditions. However, it is unclear whether cancer cell lines employ a high level of glycolysis comparable to that of the original cancers from which they were derived, even if their culture conditions are changed to physiologically relevant oxygen concentrations. From three childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients we established three new pairs of cell lines in both atmospheric (20%) and physiologic (bone marrow level, 5%) oxygen concentrations. Cell lines established in 20% oxygen exhibited lower proliferation, survival, expression of glycolysis genes, glucose consumption, and lactate production. Interestingly, the effects of oxygen concentration used during cell line initiation were only partially reversible when established cell cultures were switched from one oxygen concentration to another for eight weeks. These observations indicate that ALL cell lines established at atmospheric oxygen concentration can exhibit relatively low levels of glycolysis and these levels are semi-permanent, suggesting that physiologic oxygen concentrations may be needed from the time of cell line initiation to preserve the high level of glycolysis commonly exhibited by leukemias in vivo. - Highlights: • Establishing new ALL cell lines in 5% oxygen resulted in higher glycolytic expression and function. • Establishing new ALL cell lines in 5% oxygen resulted in higher proliferation and lower cell death. • The divergent metabolic phenotypes selected in 5% and 20% oxygen are semi-permanent

  13. Exogenous pyruvate facilitates cancer cell adaptation to hypoxia by serving as an oxygen surrogate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Chengqian; He, Dan; Chen, Shuyang; Tan, Xiaoling; Sang, Nianli

    2016-07-26

    Molecular oxygen is the final electron acceptor in cellular metabolism but cancer cells often become adaptive to hypoxia, which promotes resistance to chemotherapy and radiation. The reduction of endogenous glycolytic pyruvate to lactate is known as an adaptive strategy for hypoxic cells. Whether exogenous pyruvate is required for hypoxic cell proliferation by either serving as an electron acceptor or a biosynthetic substrate remains unclear. By using both hypoxic and ρ0 cells defective in electron transfer chain, we show that exogenous pyruvate is required to sustain proliferation of both cancer and non-cancer cells that cannot utilize oxygen. Particularly, we show that absence of pyruvate led to glycolysis inhibition and AMPK activation along with decreased NAD+ levels in ρ0 cells; and exogenous pyruvate increases lactate yield, elevates NAD+/NADH ratio and suppresses AMPK activation. Knockdown of lactate dehydrogenase significantly inhibits the rescuing effects of exogenous pyruvate. In contrast, none of pyruvate-derived metabolites tested (including acetyl-CoA, α-ketoglutarate, succinate and alanine) can replace pyruvate in supporting ρ0 cell proliferation. Knockdown of pyruvate carboxylase, pyruvate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase do not impair exogenous pyruvate to rescue ρ0 cells. Importantly, we show that exogenous pyruvate relieves ATP insufficiency and mTOR inhibition and promotes proliferation of hypoxic cells, and that well-oxygenated cells release pyruvate, providing a potential in vivo source of pyruvate. Taken together, our data support a novel pyruvate cycle model in which oxygenated cells release pyruvate for hypoxic cells as an oxygen surrogate. The pyruvate cycle may be targeted as a new therapy of hypoxic cancers.

  14. [Effect of different oxygen tension on the cytoskeleton remodeling of goat temporomandibular joint disc cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaolan, He; Guangjie, Bao; Linglu, Sun; Xue, Zhang; Shanying, Bao; Hong, Kang

    2017-08-01

    Objective The effect of different oxygen tensions on the cytoskeleton remodeling of goat temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc cells were investigated. Methods Goat TMJ disc cells were cultured under normoxia (21% O₂) and hypoxia (2%, 4%, and 8% O₂). Toluidine blue, picrosirius red, and type Ⅰ collagen immunocytochemical staining were performed to observe the changes in cell phenotype under different oxygen levels. Immunofluorescent staining and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis were then performed to identify actin, tubulin, and vimentin in the cultured disc cells. Results TMJ disc cells still displayed fibroblast characteristics under different oxygen levels and their cytoskeletons had regular arrangement. The fluorescence intensities of actin and vimentin were lowest at 4% O₂(P0.05). Actin mRNA levels were considerably decreased at 2% O₂ and 4% O₂ in hypoxic conditions, while actin mRNA expression was highest in 21% O₂. Tubulin mRNA levels considerably increased at 2% O₂, while tubulin mRNA expression was lowest in 8% O₂ (Plevels among these oxygen levels (Poxygen tensions, and 2% O₂ may be the optimal oxygen level required to proliferate TMJ disc cells.

  15. The effect of storage time of human red cells on intestinal microcirculatory oxygenation in a rat isovolemic exchange model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raat, N. J.; Verhoeven, A. J.; Mik, E. G.; Gouwerok, C. W.; Verhaar, R.; Goedhart, P. T.; de Korte, D.; Ince, C.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether the storage time of human leukodepleted red blood cell concentrates compromises intestinal microvascular oxygen concentration oxygen (muPo(2)) during isovolemic exchange transfusion at low hematocrit. Design: Prospective, randomized, controlled study. Setting:

  16. Oxygen therapy - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breathe increased amounts of oxygen to get normal levels of oxygen in their blood. Oxygen therapy provides babies with the extra oxygen. Information Oxygen is a gas that the cells in your body need to work properly. The ...

  17. Formation and action of oxygen activated species in cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, M.E.; Meneghini, R.

    1982-01-01

    The differences of hydrogen peroxide sensibility of mammal cell lineages (man, mouse, chinese hamster) in culture are studied. The cellular survival and the frequency of DNA induced breaks by hydrogen peroxide are analysed. The efficiency of elimination of DNA breaks by cells is determined. The possible relation between the cell capacity of repair and its survival to hydrogen peroxide action is also discussed. (M.A.) [pt

  18. A microfluidic-based lid device for conventional cell culture dishes to automatically control oxygen level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Yeob; Yang, Sung

    2018-04-25

    Most conventional hypoxic cell culture systems undergo reoxygenation during experimental manipulations, resulting in undesirable effects including the reduction of cell viability. A lid device was developed herein for conventional cell culture dishes to resolve this limitation. The integration of multilayered microfluidic channels inside a thin membrane was designed to prevent the reoxygenation caused by reagent infusion and automatically control the oxygen level. The experimental data clearly show the reducibility of the dissolved oxygen in the infusing reagent and the controllability of the oxygen level inside the dish. The feasibility of the device for hypoxia studies was confirmed by HIF-1α experiments. Therefore, the device could be used as a compact and convenient hypoxic cell culture system to prevent reoxygenation-related issues.

  19. Optimized chondrogenesis of ATCD5 cells through sequential regulation of oxygen conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Li; Fink, Trine; Ebbesen, Peter

    2006-01-01

    , chondrocyte-specific extracellular matrix (ECM) production was monitored. Furthermore, the transcription of collagen II, an early-phase marker, and collagen X, a marker of hypertrophic conversion, was followed by real-time RT-PCR. Low oxygen concentrations between 1 and 9% inhibited chondrogenic conversion......, as evidenced by reduced glycosaminoglycan deposition in the ECM in a manner proportional to the degree of hypoxia. Cells cultured at oxygen concentrations of 12 and 15% underwent a faster and higher degree of early-phase chondrogenesis when compared to control cells cultured at ambient air (21% O2......). For the hypertrophic conversion of the ATDC5 cells, all degrees of hypoxia inhibited collagen X expression in a dose-dependent manner. Short-term culturing of the ATDC5 cells for 6 to 8 days at 12% oxygen with subsequent culturing at 21% for the remainder of the experiment resulted in maximal production of major ECM...

  20. Vitamin E alters alveolar type II cell phospholipid synthesis in oxygen and air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, K.A.; Snyder, J.M.; Stenzel, W.; Saito, K.; Warshaw, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    Newborn rats were injected with vitamin E or placebo daily until 6 days after birth. The effect of vitamin E pretreatment on in vitro surfactant phospholipid synthesis was examined in isolated type II cells exposed to oxygen or air form 24 h in vitro. Type II cells were also isolated from untreated 6-day-old rats and cultured for 24 h in oxygen or air with control medium or vitamin E supplemented medium. These cells were used to examine the effect of vitamin E exposure in vitro on type II cell phospholipid synthesis and ultrastructure. Phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis was reduced in cells cultured in oxygen as compared with air. This decrease was not prevented by in vivo pretreatment or in vitro supplementation with vitamin E. Vitamin E pretreatment increased the ratio of disaturated PC to total PC and increased phosphatidylglycerol synthesis. The volume density of lamellar bodies in type II cells was increased in cells maintained in oxygen. Vitamin E did not affect the volume density of lamellar bodies. We conclude that in vitro hyperoxia inhibits alveolar type II cell phosphatidylcholine synthesis without decreasing lamellar body volume density and that supplemental vitamin E does not prevent hyperoxia-induced decrease in phosphatidylcholine synthesis

  1. Physiological oxygen concentration alters glioma cell malignancy and responsiveness to photodynamic therapy in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Ina; Hefti, Martin; Luginbuehl, Vera

    2014-11-01

    The partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) in brain tumors ranges from 5 to 15%. Nevertheless, the majority of in vitro experiments with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cell lines are carried out under an atmospheric pO2 of 19 to 21%. Recently, 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA), a precursor of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), has been introduced to neurosurgery to allow for photodynamic diagnosis and photodynamic therapy (PDT) in high-grade gliomas. Here, we investigate whether low pO2 affects GBM cell physiology, PpIX accumulation, or PDT efficacy. GBM cell lines (U-87 MG and U-251 MG) were cultured under atmospheric (pO2  =  19%) and physiological (pO2  =  9%) oxygen concentrations. PpIX accumulation and localization were investigated, and cell survival and cell death were observed following in vitro PDT. A physiological pO2 of 9% stimulated GBM cell migration, increased hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1 alpha levels, and elevated resistance to camptothecin in U-87 MG cells compared to cultivation at a pO2 of 19%. This oxygen reduction did not alter 5-ALA-induced intracellular PpIX accumulation. However, physiological pO2 changed the responsiveness of U-87 MG but not of U-251 MG cells to in vitro PDT. Around 20% more irradiation light was required to kill U-87 MG cells at physiological pO2, resulting in reduced lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release (one- to two-fold) and inhibition of caspase 3 activation. Reduction of oxygen concentration from atmospheric to a more physiological level can influence the malignant behavior and survival of GBM cell lines after in vitro PDT. Therefore, precise oxygen concentration control should be considered when designing and performing experiments with GBM cells.

  2. Quantifying oxygen in paper-based cell cultures with luminescent thin film sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Matthew W; Kenney, Rachael M; Truong, Andrew S; Lockett, Matthew R

    2016-04-01

    Paper-based scaffolds are an attractive material for generating 3D tissue-like cultures because paper is readily available and does not require specialized equipment to pattern, cut, or use. By controlling the exchange of fresh culture medium with the paper-based scaffolds, we can engineer diffusion-dominated environments similar to those found in spheroids or solid tumors. Oxygen tension directly regulates cellular phenotype and invasiveness through hypoxia-inducible transcription factors and also has chemotactic properties. To date, gradients of oxygen generated in the paper-based cultures have relied on cellular response-based readouts. In this work, we prepared a luminescent thin film capable of quantifying oxygen tensions in apposed cell-containing paper-based scaffolds. The oxygen sensors, which are polystyrene films containing a Pd(II) tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)porphyrin dye, are photostable, stable in culture conditions, and not cytotoxic. They have a linear response for oxygen tensions ranging from 0 to 160 mmHg O2, and a Stern-Volmer constant (K sv) of 0.239 ± 0.003 mmHg O2 (-1). We used these oxygen-sensing films to measure the spatial and temporal changes in oxygen tension for paper-based cultures containing a breast cancer line that was engineered to constitutively express a fluorescent protein. By acquiring images of the oxygen-sensing film and the fluorescently labeled cells, we were able to approximate the oxygen consumption rates of the cells in our cultures.

  3. Cisplatin toxicity reduced in human cultured renal tubular cells by oxygen pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeidi, Ayat; Rasoulian, Bahram; Hajializadeh, Zahra; Pourkhodadad, Soheila; Rezaei, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin is an effective and widely used chemotherapy agent and its side effects, particularly nephrotoxicity, limit its usage and related platinum-based drugs. Cisplatin nephrotoxicity is mainly due to extremely increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation leading to kidney tubular cell death. Preconditioning with oxidative stress has been demonstrated to stimulate the cellular adaptation to subsequent severe oxidative stress. Short term oxygen pre-exposure as a mild oxidative stress may enhance some endogenous defense mechanisms, so its effect on Cisplatin induced cell death was investigated in present research. We studied the effects of hyperoxic environment pre-exposure on Cisplatin toxicity in an in-vitro model of cultured human embryonic tubular epithelial cells (AD293). Viability of AD293 cells, as evaluated by MTT-assay, was affected by Cisplatin in a time (1-4 h) dependent model. Biochemical markers of cell apoptosis were evaluated using immunoblotting. Pretreatment with nearly pure oxygen (≥90%) for 2 h significantly reduced the level of cell damage. Activated caspase 3 and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio were significantly increased in Cisplatin-treated cells. Oxygen pretreatment inhibited caspase 3 activation and decreased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Oxygen pre-treatment itself not showed any cytotoxicity in exposure times up to 3 h. Our data indicate that hyperoxic preconditioning reduces Cisplatin toxicity in cultured human tubular epithelial cells. The exact mechanism of protection is unclear, though enhancement of some endogenous defense mechanisms and subsequently scavenging of free oxygen radicals may play an important role.

  4. Radiation survival of cells from spheroids grown in different oxygen concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franko, A.J.; Sutherland, R.M.

    1979-01-01

    The position of the internal, chronically hypoxic cells in spheroids was varied by alterations in the oxygen concentration in the growth medium. Such alterations were expected to cause large changes in the size of the radiobiologically hypoxic fraction. This was tested by growing and irradiating spheroids in oxygen concentrations between 5 and 20.3%, ensuring that the irradiation and growth conditions were as similar as possible. The survival curves appeared to be linear below a surviving fraction of 3 x 10 -2 , and the slopes were intermediate between the slopes of control curves for cells from spheroids irradiated in nitrogen or when fully oxygenated. Thus direct estimates of the hypoxic fractions could not be made. Two models of oxygen diffusion might explain the data. One model assumes that a large fraction of cells was fully hypoxic (radiobiologically) and that these internal, G 1 -confined, chronically hypoxic cells had a lower inherent radioresistance than the outer proliferating cells. Evidence was presented which indicated that this model was unlikely to be correct. The other model assumes that the inherent radioresistance was equal throughout the spheroid, and that the innermost cells died before the oxygen concentration was reduced sufficiently to cause full hypoxic protection. Theoretical survival curves based on this model were generated using the measured geometries ofthe spheroids and multitarget single-hit survival theory. Acceptable agreement with the postulate that the innermost cells of spheroids die at between 0.2 and 0.4% oxygen was obtained. These data may have implications regarding the relative contributions of chronic and acute hypoxia to the fraction of hypoxic cells in tumors

  5. Binaural Rendering in MPEG Surround

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristofer Kjörling

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes novel methods for evoking a multichannel audio experience over stereo headphones. In contrast to the conventional convolution-based approach where, for example, five input channels are filtered using ten head-related transfer functions, the current approach is based on a parametric representation of the multichannel signal, along with either a parametric representation of the head-related transfer functions or a reduced set of head-related transfer functions. An audio scene with multiple virtual sound sources is represented by a mono or a stereo downmix signal of all sound source signals, accompanied by certain statistical (spatial properties. These statistical properties of the sound sources are either combined with statistical properties of head-related transfer functions to estimate “binaural parameters” that represent the perceptually relevant aspects of the auditory scene or used to create a limited set of combined head-related transfer functions that can be applied directly on the downmix signal. Subsequently, a binaural rendering stage reinstates the statistical properties of the sound sources by applying the estimated binaural parameters or the reduced set of combined head-related transfer functions directly on the downmix. If combined with parametric multichannel audio coders such as MPEG Surround, the proposed methods are advantageous over conventional methods in terms of perceived quality and computational complexity.

  6. Severe anemia is associated with poor tumor oxygenation in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Axel; Stadler, Peter; Lavey, Robert S.; Haensgen, Gabriele; Kuhnt, Thomas; Lautenschlaeger, Christine; Feldmann, Horst Juergen; Molls, Michael; Dunst, Juergen

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between tumor oxygenation and the blood hemoglobin (Hb) concentration in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Methods and Materials: A total of 133 patients with SCCHN underwent pretreatment polarographic pO 2 measurements of their tumors. In 66 patients measurements were also made in sternocleidomastoid muscles. The patients were divided into three groups according to their Hb concentration--severe anemia (Hb 2 . Conclusion: Our data suggest that a low Hb concentration and cigarette smoking contribute to inadequate oxygenation of SCCHN and thus for increased radioresistance. Consequently, Hb correction and abstinence from smoking may significantly improve tumor oxygenation

  7. Artificial oxygen carriers as a possible alternative to red cells in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Timbó Barbosa

    Full Text Available Fluid resuscitation is intended to eliminate microcirculatory disorders and restore adequate tissue oxygenation. The safety limits for a restrictive transfusion policy are given by patients' individual tolerance of acute normovolemic anemia. Artificial oxygen carriers based on perfluorocarbon or hemoglobin are attractive alternatives to allogenic red blood cells. There are many risks involved in allogenic blood transfusions and they include transmission of infections, delayed postoperative wound healing, transfusion reactions, immunomodulation and cancer recurrence. Regardless of whether artificial oxygen carriers are available for routine clinical use, further studies are needed in order to show the safety and efficacy of these substances for clinical practice.

  8. [Oxidative power and intracellular distribution of mitochondria control cell oxygen regime when arterial hypoxemia occurs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liabakh, E G; Lissov, P N

    2012-01-01

    The regulatory impact of the mitochondria spatial distribution and enlargement in their oxidative power qO2 on the tissue oxygenation of skeletal muscle during hypoxia were studied. Investigations were performed by the mathematical modeling of 3D O2 diffusion-reaction in muscle fiber. The oxygen consumption rate VO2 and tissue pO2 were analyzed in response to a decrease in arterial blood oxygen concentration from 19.5 to 10 vol. % at a moderate load (3.5 ml/min per 100 g). The cells with evenly (case 1) and unevenly (case 2) distributed mitochondria were considered. According to calculations due to a rise in mitochondria oxidative power from 3.5 to 6.5 ml/min. per 100 g of tissue it is possible to maintain muscle oxygen V(O2) at constant level of 3.5 ml/min per 100 g despite a decrease in O2 delivery. Minimum value of tissue pO2 was about 0 and an area of hypoxia appeared inside the cell in case 1. But hypoxia disappeared and minimum value of pO2 increased from 0 to 4 mm Hg if mitochondria were distributed unevenly (case 2). It is shown that the possibilities of such regulation were limited and depended on the ratio of "the degree of hypoxemia--the level of oxygen delivery." It was assumed that an increase in mitochondria enzyme activity and mitochondria migration to the places of the greatest oxygen consumption rate can improve oxygen regime in the cells in terms of their adaptation to hypoxia. It is possible that changes in mitochondrial oxidative power and their intracellular redistribution may be considered as a new dimension in regulation of cell oxygen regime.

  9. Study and development of a hydrogen/oxygen fuel cell in solid polymer electrolyte technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosdale, R

    1992-10-29

    The hydrogen/oxygen fuel cell appears today as the best candidate to the replacing of the internal combustion engine for automobile traction. This system uses the non explosive electrochemical recombination of hydrogen and oxygen. It is a clean generator whom only reactive product is water. This thesis shows a theoretical study of this system, the synthesis of different kinds of used electrodes and finally an analysis of water movements in polymer electrolyte by different original technologies. 70 refs., 73 figs., 15 tabs.

  10. Blood banking-induced alteration of red blood cell oxygen release ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaojin; Xiong, Yanlian; Wang, Ruofeng; Tang, Fuzhou; Wang, Xiang

    2016-05-01

    Current blood banking procedures may not fully preserve red blood cell (RBC) function during storage, contributing to the decrease of RBC oxygen release ability. This study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of routine cold storage on RBC oxygen release ability. RBC units were collected from healthy donors and each unit was split into two parts (whole blood and suspended RBC) to exclude possible donor variability. Oxygen dissociation measurements were performed on blood units stored at 4 °C during a 5-week period. 2,3-diphosphoglycerate levels and fluorescent micrographs of erythrocyte band 3 were also analysed. P50 and oxygen release capacity decreased rapidly during the first 3 weeks, and then did not change significantly. In contrast, the kinetic properties (PO2-t curve and T*50) of oxygen release changed slowly during the first 3 weeks of storage, but then decreased significantly in the last 2 weeks. 2,3-diphosphoglycerate decreased quickly during the first 3 weeks of storage to almost undetectable levels. Band 3 aggregated significantly during the last 2 weeks of storage. RBC oxygen release ability appears to be sensitive to routine cold storage. The thermodynamic characteristics of RBC oxygen release ability changed mainly in the first 3 weeks of storage, due to the decrease of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, whereas the kinetic characteristics of RBC oxygen release ability decreased significantly at the end of storage, probably affected by alterations of band 3.

  11. Effect of oxygen on formation of micronuclei and binucleated cells and cell survival in γ-irradiated 3T3 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Peng; Zheng Xiulong

    1991-01-01

    Formation of micronuclei and binucleate cells and their relationships with cell survival were studied in the aerobically- and anaerobically-irradiated 3T3 cells. The results showed taht frequency of micronuclei, percentage of micronucleus cells and percentage of binucleate cells increased linearly with the radiation dose in certain range. Oxygen enhancement ratios (OER) of micronucleus frequency, percentage of micronucleus cells, percentage of binucleate cells and cell survival were 2.02, 1.96, 1.87 and 1.83 respectively. The percentage of micronucleus cells or the percentage of micronucleus cells plus binucleate cells correlated negatively well with cell survival. The mechanism of oxygen effect in the radiation response of 3T3 cells and the significance of formation of micronuclei and binucleate cells were discussed

  12. Oxygen effects on senescence in chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells: consequences for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussavi-Harami, Farid; Duwayri, Yazan; Martin, James A; Moussavi-Harami, Farshid; Buckwalter, Joseph A

    2004-01-01

    Primary isolates of chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells are often insufficient for cell-based autologous grafting procedures, necessitating in vitro expansion of cell populations. However, the potential for expansion is limited by cellular senescence, a form of irreversible cell cycle arrest regulated by intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Intrinsic mechanisms common to most somatic cells enforce senescence at the so-called "Hayflick limit" of 60 population doublings. Termed "replicative senescence", this mechanism prevents cellular immortalization and suppresses oncogenesis. Although it is possible to overcome the Hayflick limit by genetically modifying cells, such manipulations are regarded as prohibitively dangerous in the context of tissue engineering. On the other hand, senescence associated with extrinsic factors, often called "stress-induced" senescence, can be avoided simply by modifying culture conditions. Because stress-induced senescence is "premature" in the sense that it can halt growth well before the Hayflick limit is reached, growth potential can be significantly enhanced by minimizing culture related stress. Standard culture techniques were originally developed to optimize the growth of fibroblasts but these conditions are inherently stressful to many other cell types. In particular, the 21% oxygen levels used in standard incubators, though well tolerated by fibroblasts, appear to induce oxidative stress in other cells. We reasoned that chondrocytes and MSCs, which are adapted to relatively low oxygen levels in vivo, might be sensitive to this form of stress. To test this hypothesis we compared the growth of MSC and chondrocyte strains in 21% and 5% oxygen. We found that incubation in 21% oxygen significantly attenuated growth and was associated with increased oxidant production. These findings indicated that sub-optimal standard culture conditions sharply limited the expansion of MSC and chondrocyte populations and suggest that cultures for

  13. [Vitamin K3-induced activation of molecular oxygen in glioma cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krylova, N G; Kulagova, T A; Semenkova, G N; Cherenkevich, S N

    2009-01-01

    It has been shown by the method of fluorescent analysis that the rate of hydrogen peroxide generation in human U251 glioma cells under the effect of lipophilic (menadione) or hydrophilic (vikasol) analogues of vitamin K3 was different. Analyzing experimental data we can conclude that menadione underwent one- and two-electron reduction by intracellular reductases in glioma cells. Reduced forms of menadione interact with molecular oxygen leading to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. The theoretical model of ROS generation including two competitive processes of one- and two-electron reduction of menadione has been proposed. Rate constants of ROS generation mediated by one-electron reduction process have been estimated.

  14. RenderToolbox3: MATLAB tools that facilitate physically based stimulus rendering for vision research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heasly, Benjamin S; Cottaris, Nicolas P; Lichtman, Daniel P; Xiao, Bei; Brainard, David H

    2014-02-07

    RenderToolbox3 provides MATLAB utilities and prescribes a workflow that should be useful to researchers who want to employ graphics in the study of vision and perhaps in other endeavors as well. In particular, RenderToolbox3 facilitates rendering scene families in which various scene attributes and renderer behaviors are manipulated parametrically, enables spectral specification of object reflectance and illuminant spectra, enables the use of physically based material specifications, helps validate renderer output, and converts renderer output to physical units of radiance. This paper describes the design and functionality of the toolbox and discusses several examples that demonstrate its use. We have designed RenderToolbox3 to be portable across computer hardware and operating systems and to be free and open source (except for MATLAB itself). RenderToolbox3 is available at https://github.com/DavidBrainard/RenderToolbox3.

  15. Low oxygen level increases proliferation and metabolic changes in bovine granulosa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiratsuki, Shogo; Hara, Tomotaka; Munakata, Yasuhisa; Shirasuna, Koumei; Kuwayama, Takehito; Iwata, Hisataka

    2016-12-05

    The present study addresses molecular backgrounds underlying low oxygen induced metabolic changes and 1.2-fold change in bovine granulosa cell (GCs) proliferation. RNA-seq revealed that low oxygen (5%) upregulated genes associated with HIF-1 and glycolysis and downregulated genes associated with mitochondrial respiration than that in high oxygen level (21%). Low oxygen level induced high glycolytic activity and low mitochondrial function and biogenesis. Low oxygen level enhanced GC proliferation with high expression levels of HIF-1, VEGF, AKT, mTOR, and S6RP, whereas addition of anti-VEGF antibody decreased cellular proliferation with low phosphorylated AKT and mTOR expression levels. Low oxygen level reduced SIRT1, whereas activation of SIRT1 by resveratrol increased mitochondrial replication and decreased cellular proliferation with reduction of phosphorylated mTOR. These results suggest that low oxygen level stimulates the HIF1-VEGF-AKT-mTOR pathway and up-regulates glycolysis, which contributes to GC proliferation, and downregulation of SIRT1 contributes to hypoxia-associated reduction of mitochondria and cellular proliferation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. USING OXYGEN-CONSUMING THERMOSET PLASTICS TO GENERATE HYPOXIC CONDITIONS IN MICROFLUIDIC DEVICES FOR POTENTIAL CELL CULTURE APPLICATIONS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sticker, Drago; Rothbauer, Mario; Ehgartner, Josef

    The precise control of the oxygen concentration in a cellular environment allows the study of cells under physiologically relevant conditions. This work reports on a novel method for the generation of reduced dissolved oxygen concentrations in microfluidic chambers for cell- and organ-on-chip app......The precise control of the oxygen concentration in a cellular environment allows the study of cells under physiologically relevant conditions. This work reports on a novel method for the generation of reduced dissolved oxygen concentrations in microfluidic chambers for cell- and organ...

  17. [Ambient air interference in oxygen intake measurements in liquid incubating media with the use of open polarographic cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miniaev, M V; Voronchikhina, L I

    2007-01-01

    A model of oxygen intake by aerobic bio-objects in liquid incubating media was applied to investigate the influence air-media interface area on accuracy of measuring the oxygen intake and error value. It was shown that intrusion of air oxygen increases the relative error to 24% in open polarographic cells and to 13% in cells with a reduced interface area. Results of modeling passive media oxygenation laid a basis for proposing a method to reduce relative error by 66% for open cells and by 15% for cells with a reduced interface area.

  18. Measurement of cell respiration and oxygenation in standard multichannel biochips using phosphorescent O2-sensitive probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrashina, Alina V; Papkovsky, Dmitri B; Dmitriev, Ruslan I

    2013-09-07

    Measurement of cell oxygenation and oxygen consumption is useful for studies of cell bioenergetics, metabolism, mitochondrial function, drug toxicity and common pathophysiological conditions. Here we present a new platform for such applications which uses commercial multichannel biochips (μ-slides, Ibidi) and phosphorescent O2 sensitive probes. This platform was evaluated with both extracellular and intracellular O2 probes, several different cell types and treatments including mitochondrial uncoupling and inhibition, depletion of extracellular Ca(2+) and inhibition of V-ATPase and histone deacetylases. The results show that compared to the standard microwell plates currently used, the μ-slide platform provides facile O2 measurements with both suspension and adherent cells, higher sensitivity and reproducibility, and faster measurement time. It also allows re-perfusion and multiple treatments of cells and multi-parametric analyses in conjunction with other probes. Optical measurements are conducted on standard fluorescence readers and microscopes.

  19. Production of Reactive Oxygen Species by Multipotent Stromal Cells/Mesenchymal Stem Cells Upon Exposure to Fas Ligand

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Melanie; Turner, Omari; Stolz, Donna; Griffith, Linda G.; Wells, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) can be differentiated into osteoblasts and chondrocytes, making these cells candidates to regenerate cranio-facial injuries and lesions in long bones. A major problem with cell replacement therapy, however, is the loss of transplanted MSCs at the site of graft. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nonspecific inflammation generated at the ischemic site have been hypothesized to lead to MSCs loss; studies in vitro show MSCs dying both in the presence of ROS or cyt...

  20. Effectiveness of anode in a solid oxide fuel cell with hydrogen/oxygen mixed gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellogg, Isaiah D. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO (United States); Koylu, Umit O. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO (United States); Petrovsky, Vladimir; Dogan, Fatih [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO (United States)

    2009-06-15

    A porous Ni/YSZ cermet in mixed hydrogen and oxygen was investigated for its ability to decrease oxygen activity as the anode of a single chamber SOFC. A cell with a dense 300 {mu}m YSZ electrolyte was operated in a double chamber configuration. The Ni-YSZ anode was exposed to a mixture of hydrogen and oxygen of varying compositions while the cathode was exposed to oxygen. Double chamber tests with mixed gas on the anode revealed voltage oscillations linked to lowered power generation and increased resistance. Resistance measurements of the anode during operation revealed a Ni/NiO redox cycle causing the voltage oscillations. The results of these tests, and future tests of similar format, could be useful in the development of single chamber SOFC using hydrogen as fuel. (author)

  1. Oxygen microenvironment affects the uptake of nanoparticles in head and neck tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Eunice Y.; Hodge, Sasson; Tai, Katherine; Hou, Huagang; Khan, Nadeem; Hoopes, P. Jack; Samkoe, Kimberley S.

    2013-02-01

    Survival of head and neck cancer patients has not improved in several decades despite advances in diagnostic and therapeutic techniques. Tumor hypoxia in head and neck cancers is a critical factor that leads to poor prognosis, resistance to radiation and chemotherapies, and increased metastatic potential. Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia (mNPHT) is a promising therapy for hypoxic tumors because nanoparticles (NP) can be directly injected into, or targeted to, hypoxic tumor cells and exposed to alternating magnetic fields (AMF) to induce hyperthermia. Magnetic NPHT can improve therapeutic effectiveness by two modes of action: 1) direct killing of hypoxic tumor cells; and 2) increase in tumor oxygenation, which has the potential to make the tumor more susceptible to adjuvant therapies such as radiation and chemotherapy. Prior studies in breast cancer cells demonstrated that a hypoxic microenvironment diminished NP uptake in vitro; however, mNPHT with intratumoral NP injection in hypoxic tumors increased tumor oxygenation and delayed tumor growth. In this study, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines were incubated in normoxic, hypoxic, and hyperoxic conditions with iron oxide NP for 4-72 hours. After incubation, the cells were analyzed for iron uptake by mass spectrometry, Prussian blue staining, and electron microscopy. In contrast to breast cancer cells, uptake of NPs was increased in hypoxic microenvironments as compared to normoxic conditions in HNSCC cells. In future studies, we will confirm the effect of the oxygen microenvironment on NP uptake and efficacy of mNPHT both in vitro and in vivo.

  2. Effects of topographical and mechanical property alterations induced by oxygen plasma modification on stem cell behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Kulangara, Karina; Lam, Ruby T S; Dharmawan, Rena; Leong, Kam W

    2012-10-23

    Polymeric substrates intended for cell culture and tissue engineering are often surface-modified to facilitate cell attachment of most anchorage-dependent cell types. The modification alters the surface chemistry and possibly topography. However, scant attention has been paid to other surface property alterations. In studying oxygen plasma treatment of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), we show that oxygen plasma treatment alters the surface chemistry and, consequently, the topography and elasticity of PDMS at the nanoscale level. The elasticity factor has the predominant effect, compared with the chemical and topographical factors, on cell adhesions of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The enhanced focal adhesions favor cell spreading and osteogenesis of hMSCs. Given the prevalent use of PDMS in biomedical device construction and cell culture experiments, this study highlights the importance of understanding how oxygen plasma treatment would impact subsequent cell-substrate interactions. It helps explain inconsistency in the literature and guides preparation of PDMS-based biomedical devices in the future.

  3. Silicon solar cell performance deposited by diamond like carbon thin film ;Atomic oxygen effects;

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaei, Abbas Ail; Eshaghi, Akbar; Karami, Esmaeil

    2017-09-01

    In this research, a diamond-like carbon thin film was deposited on p-type polycrystalline silicon solar cell via plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method by using methane and hydrogen gases. The effect of atomic oxygen on the functioning of silicon coated DLC thin film and silicon was investigated. Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the structure and morphology of the DLC thin film. Photocurrent-voltage characteristics of the silicon solar cell were carried out using a solar simulator. The results showed that atomic oxygen exposure induced the including oxidation, structural changes, cross-linking reactions and bond breaking of the DLC film; thus reducing the optical properties. The photocurrent-voltage characteristics showed that although the properties of the fabricated thin film were decreased after being exposed to destructive rays, when compared with solar cell without any coating, it could protect it in atomic oxygen condition enhancing solar cell efficiency up to 12%. Thus, it can be said that diamond-like carbon thin layer protect the solar cell against atomic oxygen exposure.

  4. Influence of oxygen levels on chondrogenesis of porcine mesenchymal stem cells cultured in polycaprolactone scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenas-Rochina, Joaquin; Kelly, Daniel J; Gómez Ribelles, Jose Luis; Lebourg, Myriam

    2017-06-01

    Chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is known to be regulated by a number of environmental factors, including local oxygen levels. The hypothesis of this study is that the response of MSCs to hypoxia is dependent on the physical and chemical characteristics of the substrate used. The objective of this study was to explore how different modifications to polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds influenced the response of MSCs to hypoxia. PCL, PCL-hyaluronic acid (HA), and PCL-Bioglass ® (BG) scaffolds were seeded with MSCs derived from bone marrow and cultured for 35 days under normoxic or low oxygen conditions, and the resulting biochemical properties of the MSC laden construct were assessed. Low oxygen tension has a positive effect over cell proliferation and macromolecules biosynthesis. Furthermore, hypoxia enhanced the distribution of collagen and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) deposition through the scaffold. On the other hand, MSCs displayed certain material dependent responses to hypoxia. Low oxygen tension had a positive effect on cell proliferation in BG and HA scaffolds, but only a positive effect on GAGs synthesis in PCL and HA scaffolds. In conclusion, hypoxia increased cell viability and expression of chondrogenic markers but the cell response was modulated by the type of scaffold used. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 1684-1691, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Cell respiration under hypoxia: facts and artefacts in mitochondrial oxygen kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scandurra, Francesca M; Gnaiger, Erich

    2010-01-01

    When oxygen supply to tissues is limiting, mitochondrial respiration and ATP production are compromised. To assess the bioenergetic consequences under normoxia and hypoxia, quantitative evaluation of mitochondrial oxygen kinetics is required. Using high-resolution respirometry, the "apparent K (m)" for oxygen or p (50) of respiration in 32D cells was determined at 0.05 +/- 0.01 kPa (0.4 mmHg, 0.5 microM, 0.25% air saturation). Close agreement with p (50) of isolated mitochondria indicates that intracellular gradients are small in small cells at routine activity. At intracellular p (O2) respiration is limited by >2% with a p (50) of 0.05 kPa. Over-estimation of p (50) at 0.4 kPa (3 mmHg) would imply significant (>17%) oxygen limitation of respiration under intracellular normoxia. Based on a critical review, we conclude that p (50) ranges from 0.01 to 0.10 kPa in mitochondria and small cells in the absence of inhibitors of cytochrome c oxidase, whereas experimental artefacts explain the controversial >200-fold range of p (50) in the literature on mitochondrial oxygen kinetics.

  6. Reactive Oxygen Species Regulate the Inflammatory Function of NKT Cells through Promyelocytic Leukemia Zinc Finger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeung-Hyen; Kumar, Ajay; Chang, Cheong-Hee; Pyaram, Kalyani

    2017-11-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are byproducts of aerobic metabolism and contribute to both physiological and pathological conditions as second messengers. ROS are essential for activation of T cells, but how ROS influence NKT cells is unknown. In the present study, we investigated the role of ROS in NKT cell function. We found that NKT cells, but not CD4 or CD8 T cells, have dramatically high ROS in the spleen and liver of mice but not in the thymus or adipose tissues. Accordingly, ROS-high NKT cells exhibited increased susceptibility and apoptotic cell death with oxidative stress. High ROS in the peripheral NKT cells were primarily produced by NADPH oxidases and not mitochondria. We observed that sorted ROS-high NKT cells were enriched in NKT1 and NKT17 cells, whereas NKT2 cells were dominant in ROS-low cells. Furthermore, treatment of NKT cells with antioxidants led to reduced frequencies of IFN-γ- and IL-17-expressing cells, indicating that ROS play a role in regulating the inflammatory function of NKT cells. The transcription factor promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF) seemed to control the ROS levels. NKT cells from adipose tissues that do not express PLZF and those from PLZF haplodeficient mice have low ROS. Conversely, ROS were highly elevated in CD4 T cells from mice ectopically expressing PLZF. Thus, our findings demonstrate that PLZF controls ROS levels, which in turn governs the inflammatory function of NKT cells. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  7. Effects of normobaric versus hyperbaric oxygen on cell injury induced by oxygen and glucose deprivation in acute brain slices

    OpenAIRE

    Laurent Chazalviel; Jean-Eric Blatteau; Nicolas Vallée; Jean-Jacques Risso; Stéphane Besnard; Jacques H Abraini

    2016-01-01

    Normobaric oxygen (NBO) and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) are emerging as a possible co-treatment of acute ischemic stroke. Both have been shown to reduce infarct volume, to improve neurologic outcome, to promote endogenous tissue plasminogen activator-induced thrombolysis and cerebral blood flow, and to improve tissue oxygenation through oxygen diffusion in the ischemic areas, thereby questioning the interest of HBO compared to NBO. In the present study, in order to investigate and compare the oxy...

  8. Image Based Rendering and Virtual Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livatino, Salvatore

    The Presentation concerns with an overview of Image Based Rendering approaches and their use on Virtual Reality, including Virtual Photography and Cinematography, and Mobile Robot Navigation.......The Presentation concerns with an overview of Image Based Rendering approaches and their use on Virtual Reality, including Virtual Photography and Cinematography, and Mobile Robot Navigation....

  9. Moisture movements in render on brick wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Munch, Thomas Astrup; Thorsen, Peter Schjørmann

    2003-01-01

    A three-layer render on brick wall used for building facades is studied in the laboratory. The vertical render surface is held in contact with water for 24 hours simulating driving rain while it is measured with non-destructive X-ray equipment every hour in order to follow the moisture front...

  10. Effect of oxygen tension on bioenergetics and proteostasis in young and old myoblast precursor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konigsberg, M; Pérez, V I; Ríos, C; Liu, Y; Lee, S; Shi, Y; Van Remmen, H

    2013-01-01

    In the majority of studies using primary cultures of myoblasts, the cells are maintained at ambient oxygen tension (21% O2), despite the fact that physiological O2 at the tissue level in vivo is much lower (~1-5% O2). We hypothesized that the cellular response in presence of high oxygen concentration might be particularly important in studies comparing energetic function or oxidative stress in cells isolated from young versus old animals. To test this, we asked whether oxygen tension plays a role in mitochondrial bioenergetics (oxygen consumption, glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation) or oxidative damage to proteins (protein disulfides, carbonyls and aggregates) in myoblast precursor cells (MPCs) isolated from young (3-4 m) and old (29-30 m) C57BL/6 mice. MPCs were grown under physiological (3%) or ambient (21%) O2 for two weeks prior to exposure to an acute oxidative insult (H2O2). Our results show significantly higher basal mitochondrial respiration in young versus old MPCs, an increase in basal respiration in young MPCs maintained at 3% O2 compared to cells maintained at 21% O2, and a shift toward glycolytic metabolism in old MPCs grown at 21% O2. H2O2 treatment significantly reduced respiration in old MPCs grown at 3% O2 but did not further repress respiration at 21% O2 in old MPCs. Oxidative damage to protein was higher in cells maintained at 21% O2 and increased in response to H2O2 in old MPCs. These data underscore the importance of understanding the effect of ambient oxygen tension in cell culture studies, in particular studies measuring oxidative damage and mitochondrial function.

  11. Synergistic inhibitory effect of hyperbaric oxygen combined with sorafenib on hepatoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Shan Peng

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Hypoxia is a common phenomenon in solid tumors, associated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistance, recurrence and metastasis. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO therapy can increase tissue oxygen pressure and content to prevent the resistance, recurrence and metastasis of cancer. Presently, Sorafenib is a first-line drug, targeted for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC but effective in only a small portion of patients and can induce hypoxia. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of HBO in combination with sorafenib on hepatoma cells. METHODS: Hepatoma cell lines (BEL-7402 and SK-Hep1 were treated with HBO at 2 atmosphere absolute pressure for 80 min per day or combined with sorafenib or cisplatin. At different time points, cells were tested for cell growth, colony formation, apoptosis, cell cycle and migration. Finally, miRNA from the hepatoma cells was detected by microRNA array and validated by qRT-PCR. RESULTS: Although HBO, sorafenib or cisplatin alone could inhibit growth of hepatoma cells, HBO combined with sorafenib or cisplatin resulted in much greater synergistic growth inhibition (cell proliferation and colony formation in hepatoma cells. Similarly, the synergistic effect of HBO and sorafenib on induction of apoptosis was also observed in hepatoma cells. HBO induced G1 arrest in SK-Hep1 not in BEL-7402 cells, but enhanced cell cycle arrest induced by sorafenib in BEL-7402 treated cells. However, HBO had no obvious effect on the migration of hepatoma cells, and microRNA array analysis showed that hepatoma cells with HBO treatment had significantly different microRNA expression profiles from those with blank control. CONCLUSIONS: We show for the first time that HBO combined with sorafenib results in synergistic growth inhibition and apoptosis in hepatoma cells, suggesting a potential application of HBO combined with sorafenib in HCC patients. Additionally, we also show that HBO significantly altered microRNA expression

  12. Physically based rendering from theory to implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Pharr, Matt

    2010-01-01

    "Physically Based Rendering, 2nd Edition" describes both the mathematical theory behind a modern photorealistic rendering system as well as its practical implementation. A method - known as 'literate programming'- combines human-readable documentation and source code into a single reference that is specifically designed to aid comprehension. The result is a stunning achievement in graphics education. Through the ideas and software in this book, you will learn to design and employ a full-featured rendering system for creating stunning imagery. This book features new sections on subsurface scattering, Metropolis light transport, precomputed light transport, multispectral rendering, and much more. It includes a companion site complete with source code for the rendering system described in the book, with support for Windows, OS X, and Linux. Code and text are tightly woven together through a unique indexing feature that lists each function, variable, and method on the page that they are first described.

  13. The dual roles of red blood cells in tissue oxygen delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo

    2009-01-01

    Vertebrate red blood cells (RBCs) seem to serve tissue oxygen delivery in two distinct ways. Firstly, RBCs enable the adequate transport of O2 between respiratory surfaces and metabolizing tissues by means of their high intracellular concentration of hemoglobin (Hb), appropriate allosteric...

  14. Hydrogen-Oxygen PEM Regenerative Fuel Cell at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bents, David J.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has constructed a closed-cycle hydrogen-oxygen PEM regenerative fuel cell (RFC) to explore its potential use as an energy storage device for a high altitude solar electric aircraft. Built up over the last 2 years from specialized hardware and off the shelf components the Glenn RFC is a complete "brassboard" energy storage system which includes all the equipment required to (1) absorb electrical power from an outside source and store it as pressurized hydrogen and oxygen and (2) make electrical power from the stored gases, saving the product water for re-use during the next cycle. It consists of a dedicated hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell stack and an electrolyzer stack, the interconnecting plumbing and valves, cooling pumps, water transfer pumps, gas recirculation pumps, phase separators, storage tanks for oxygen (O2) and hydrogen (H2), heat exchangers, isolation valves, pressure regulators, nitrogen purge provisions, instrumentation, and other components. It specific developmental functions include: (1) Test fuel cells and fuel cell components under repeated closed-cycle operation (nothing escapes; everything is used over and over again). (2) Simulate diurnal charge-discharge cycles (3) Observe long-term system performance and identify degradation and loss mechanisms. (4) Develop safe and convenient operation and control strategies leading to the successful development of mission-capable, flight-weight RFC's.

  15. Microscopic time-resolved imaging of singlet oxygen by delayed fluorescence in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Marek; Dědic, Roman; Hála, Jan

    2017-11-08

    Singlet oxygen is a highly reactive species which is involved in a number of processes, including photodynamic therapy of cancer. Its very weak near-infrared emission makes imaging of singlet oxygen in biological systems a long-term challenge. We address this challenge by introducing Singlet Oxygen Feedback Delayed Fluorescence (SOFDF) as a novel modality for semi-direct microscopic time-resolved wide-field imaging of singlet oxygen in biological systems. SOFDF has been investigated in individual fibroblast cells incubated with a well-known photosensitizer aluminium phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate. The SOFDF emission from the cells is several orders of magnitude stronger and much more readily detectable than the very weak near-infrared phosphorescence of singlet oxygen. Moreover, the analysis of SOFDF kinetics enables us to estimate the lifetimes of the involved excited states. Real-time SOFDF images with micrometer spatial resolution and submicrosecond temporal-resolution have been recorded. Interestingly, a steep decrease in the SOFDF intensity after the photodynamically induced release of a photosensitizer from lysosomes has been demonstrated. This effect could be potentially employed as a valuable diagnostic tool for monitoring and dosimetry in photodynamic therapy.

  16. Surgery-induced reactive oxygen species enhance colon carcinoma cell binding by disrupting the liver endothelial cell lining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gül, Nuray; Bögels, Marijn; Grewal, Simran; van der Meer, Anne Jan; Rojas, Lucy Baldeon; Fluitsma, Donna M.; van den Tol, M. Petrousjka; Hoeben, Kees A.; van Marle, Jan; de Vries, Helga E.; Beelen, Robert H. J.; van Egmond, Marjolein

    2011-01-01

    Resection of primary colorectal cancer is associated with enhanced risk of development of liver metastases. It was previously demonstrated that surgery initiated an early inflammatory response resulting in elevated tumour cell adhesion in the liver. Because reactive oxygen species (ROS) are shown to

  17. Surgery-induced reactive oxygen species enhance colon carcinoma cell binding by disrupting the liver endothelial cell lining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gül, N.; Bögels, M.; Grewal, S.; van der Meer, A.J.; Rojas, L.B.; Fluitsma, D.M.; van den Tol, M.P.; Hoeben, K.A.; van Marle, J.; de Vries, H.E.; Beelen, R.H.J.; van Egmond, M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Resection of primary colorectal cancer is associated with enhanced risk of development of liver metastases. It was previously demonstrated that surgery initiated an early inflammatory response resulting in elevated tumour cell adhesion in the liver. Because reactive oxygen species (ROS)

  18. Surgery-induced reactive oxygen species enhance colon carcinoma cell binding by disrupting the liver endothelial cell lining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gul, N.; Bogels, M.; Grewal, S.; van der Meer, A.J.; Rojas, L.B.; Fluitsma, D.M.; van den Tol, M.P.; Hoeben, K.A.; van Marle, J.; de Vries, H.E.; Beelen, R.H.J.; van Egmond, M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Resection of primary colorectal cancer is associated with enhanced risk of development of liver metastases. It was previously demonstrated that surgery initiated an early inflammatory response resulting in elevated tumour cell adhesion in the liver. Because reactive oxygen species (ROS)

  19. Diffusion of Oxygen in Alginate Gels Related to the Kinetics of Methanol Oxidation by Immobilized Hansenula polymorpha Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiemstra, Harry; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Harder, Willem

    1983-01-01

    In the yeast Hansenula polymorpha an oxygen-requiring enzyme, alcohol oxidase, catalyzes the conversion of methanol into formaldehyde. After growth on methanol cells of the organism were harvested and entrapped in barium-alginate gels. The diffusion of oxygen towards these cells is seriously

  20. Restraining reactive oxygen species in Listeria monocytogenes promotes the apoptosis of glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sen; Li, Yixuan; Chen, Guowei; Zhang, Jingchen; Xu, Fei; Wu, Man

    2017-07-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative anaerobic foodborne pathogen that can traverse the blood-brain barrier and cause brain infection. L. monocytogenes infection induces host cell apoptosis in several cell types. In this study, we investigated the apoptosis of human glioma cell line U251 invaded by L. monocytogenes and evaluated the function of bacterial reactive oxygen species (ROS) during infection. Bacterial ROS level was reduced by carrying out treatment with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI). After infection, the apoptosis of U251 cells was examined by flow cytometry assay and propidium iodide staining. DPI and NAC efficiently decreased ROS level in L. monocytogenes without affecting bacterial growth. Moreover, the apoptosis of glial cells was enhanced upon invasion of DPI- and NAC-pretreated L. monocytogenes. Results indicate that the apoptosis of glial cells can be induced by L. monocytogenes, and that the inhibition of bacterial ROS increases the apoptosis of host cells.

  1. Perovskites as electrodes of solid cells in sensitive elements of oxygen ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandurska, J.; Sniezynska, I.; Marek, A.; Szwagierczak, D.; Kulawik, J.

    1997-01-01

    The perovskite family comprises many compounds used in electronic applications. In this work perovskite materials based on LaCrO 3 were investigated, destined for electrodes of solid electrolyte oxygen sensors. lanthanum chromite powders modified by calcium, strontium and aluminium were prepared by the coprecipitation-calcination technique. The powders were examined using thermal analysis, x-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Introductory studies of electromotive force of oxygen cells with yttria stabilized zirconia as solid electrolyte and perovskite-based electrodes proved that it is possible to replace expensive Pt electrodes by much cheaper perovskite ones. (author)

  2. Effect of selective blockade of oxygen consumption, glucose transport, and Ca2+ influx on thyroxine action in human mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvetny, J; Matzen, L E

    1990-01-01

    The effect of selective blockade of cellular glucose transporters, Ca2+ influx, and mitochondrial oxygen consumption on thyroxine (T4)-stimulated oxygen consumption and glucose uptake was examined in human mononuclear blood cells. Blockade of glucose transporters by cytochalasin B (1 x 10(-5) mol....../L) and of Ca2+ influx by alprenolol (1 x 10(-5) mol/L) and verapamil (4 x 10(-4) mol/L) inhibited T4-activated glucose uptaken and reduced T4-stimulated oxygen consumption by 20%. Uncoupling of mitochondrial oxygen consumption by azide (1 x 10(-3) mol/L) inhibited T4-stimulated oxygen consumption, but had...... no effect on glucose uptake. We conclude that T4-stimulated glucose uptake in human mononuclear blood cells is dependent on intact glucose transporters and Ca2+ influx, but not on mitochondrial oxygen consumption. However, oxygen consumption is, in part, dependent on intact glucose uptake....

  3. Oxygen radical detoxification enzymes in doxorubicin-sensitive and -resistant P388 murine leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramu, A.; Cohen, L.; Glaubiger, D.

    1984-01-01

    One of the proposed mechanisms for the cytotoxic effects of anthracycline compounds suggests that the effect is mediated through the formation of intracellular superoxide radicals. It is therefore possible that doxorubicin resistance is associated with increased intracellular enzyme capacity to convert these superoxide radicals to inactive metabolites. We have measured the relative activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase in P388 mouse leukemia cells and in a doxorubicin-resistant subline. Since oxygen-reactive metabolites also play a role in mediating the cytotoxicity of ionizing radiation, the radiosensitivity of both cell lines was also studied. No significant differences in superoxide dismutase activity between these cell lines was observed, indicating that they have a similar capacity to convert superoxide anion radicals to hydrogen peroxide. P388 cells that are resistant to doxorubicin have 1.5 times the glutathione content and 1.5 times the activity of glutathione peroxidase measured in drug-sensitive P388 cells. However, incubation with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, which covalently binds glutathione, had no effect on the sensitivity of either cell line to doxorubicin. Measured catalase activity in drug-resistant P388 cells was one-third of the activity measured in doxorubicin-sensitive P388 cells. The activity of this enzyme was much higher than that of glutathione peroxidase in terms of H 2 O 2 deactivation in both cell lines. It is therefore unlikely that doxorubicin-resistant P388 cells have an increased ability to detoxify reactive oxygen metabolites when compared to drug-sensitive cells. Doxorubicin-resistant P388 cells were significantly more sensitive to X-irradiation than were drug-sensitive P388 cells. These observations suggest that the difference in catalase activity in these cell lines may be associated with the observed differences in radiosensitivity

  4. Changes in hemoglobin-oxygen affinity with shape variations of red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Aniket; Dasgupta, Raktim; Majumder, Shovan K.

    2017-10-01

    Shape variations of red blood cells (RBCs) are known to occur upon exposure to various drugs or under diseased conditions. The commonly observed discocytic RBCs can be transformed to echinocytic or stomatocytic shape under such conditions. Raman spectra of the three major shape variations, namely discocyte, echinocyte, and stomatocyte, of RBCs were studied while subjecting the cells to oxygenated and deoxygenated conditions. Analysis of the recorded spectra suggests an increased level of hemoglobin (Hb)-oxygen affinity for the echinocytes. Also, some level of Hb degradation could be noticed for the deoxygenated echinocytes. The effects may arise from a reduced level of intracellular adenosine triphosphate in echinocytic cells and an increased fraction of submembrane Hb.

  5. Experience at JEN with electrochemical cells for measurement of oxygen activity in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De la Torre, M.; Lapena, J.; Couchoud, M.

    1981-01-01

    This report presents the experience gained at the JEN with Oxygen Meters since 1974 till 1980. Thirteen O.H. were tested. Eight with Cu/Cu 2 O reference electrode and the rest with Sn/SnO 2 , and two types of electrolyte tube produced by Zircon under specifications development by UNC and HEDL. The cells equipped with Cu/Cu 2 O showed an anomalous performance giving an e.m.f. higher than the theoretical value, and one of them was in close agreement cells using air as reference electrode. An explanation is given. The performance of the cells with Sn/SnO 2 is in good agreement with those obtained in others laboratories. To calculate the theoretical value, it has derived a correlation solubility for oxygen with 262 data obtained by the vacuum distillation on method. Various recommendations are pointed out on the future development of the O.H. to improve its performance. (Author) 25 refs

  6. Regulation of myogenesis and skeletal muscle regeneration: effects of oxygen levels on satellite cell activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaillou, Thomas; Lanner, Johanna T

    2016-12-01

    Reduced oxygen (O 2 ) levels (hypoxia) are present during embryogenesis and exposure to altitude and in pathologic conditions. During embryogenesis, myogenic progenitor cells reside in a hypoxic microenvironment, which may regulate their activity. Satellite cells are myogenic progenitor cells localized in a local environment, suggesting that the O 2 level could affect their activity during muscle regeneration. In this review, we present the idea that O 2 levels regulate myogenesis and muscle regeneration, we elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying myogenesis and muscle regeneration in hypoxia and depict therapeutic strategies using changes in O 2 levels to promote muscle regeneration. Severe hypoxia (≤1% O 2 ) appears detrimental for myogenic differentiation in vitro, whereas a 3-6% O 2 level could promote myogenesis. Hypoxia impairs the regenerative capacity of injured muscles. Although it remains to be explored, hypoxia may contribute to the muscle damage observed in patients with pathologies associated with hypoxia (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and peripheral arterial disease). Hypoxia affects satellite cell activity and myogenesis through mechanisms dependent and independent of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α. Finally, hyperbaric oxygen therapy and transplantation of hypoxia-conditioned myoblasts are beneficial procedures to enhance muscle regeneration in animals. These therapies may be clinically relevant to treatment of patients with severe muscle damage.-Chaillou, T. Lanner, J. T. Regulation of myogenesis and skeletal muscle regeneration: effects of oxygen levels on satellite cell activity. © FASEB.

  7. Artificial membrane-binding proteins stimulate oxygenation of stem cells during engineering of large cartilage tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, James P. K.; Shakur, Rameen; Horne, Joseph P.; Dickinson, Sally C.; Armstrong, Craig T.; Lau, Katherine; Kadiwala, Juned; Lowe, Robert; Seddon, Annela; Mann, Stephen; Anderson, J. L. Ross; Perriman, Adam W.; Hollander, Anthony P.

    2015-06-01

    Restricted oxygen diffusion can result in central cell necrosis in engineered tissue, a problem that is exacerbated when engineering large tissue constructs for clinical application. Here we show that pre-treating human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with synthetic membrane-active myoglobin-polymer-surfactant complexes can provide a reservoir of oxygen capable of alleviating necrosis at the centre of hyaline cartilage. This is achieved through the development of a new cell functionalization methodology based on polymer-surfactant conjugation, which allows the delivery of functional proteins to the hMSC membrane. This new approach circumvents the need for cell surface engineering using protein chimerization or genetic transfection, and we demonstrate that the surface-modified hMSCs retain their ability to proliferate and to undergo multilineage differentiation. The functionalization technology is facile, versatile and non-disruptive, and in addition to tissue oxygenation, it should have far-reaching application in a host of tissue engineering and cell-based therapies.

  8. Mitochondrial modulation of oxygen-dependent radiosensitivity in some human tumour cell lines.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Anoopkumar-Dukie, S

    2009-10-01

    Oxygen-dependent radiosensitivity of tumour cells reflects direct oxidative damage to DNA, but non-nuclear mechanisms including signalling pathways may also contribute. Mitochondria are likely candidates because not only do they integrate signals from each of the main kinase pathways but mitochondrial kinases responsive to oxidative stress communicate to the rest of the cell. Using pharmacological and immunochemical methods, we tested the role of mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) and the Bcl-2 proteins in oxygen-dependent radiosensitivity. Drug-treated or untreated cervical cancer HeLa, breast cancer MCF-7 and melanoma MeWo cell lines were irradiated at 6.2 Gy under normoxic and hypoxic conditions then allowed to proliferate for 7 days. The MPT blocker cyclosporin A (2 microM) strongly protected HeLa but not the other two lines against oxygen-dependent radiosensitivity. By contrast, bongkrekic acid (50 microM), which blocks MPT by targeting the adenine nucleotide transporter, had only marginal effect and calcineurin inhibitor FK-506 (0.1 microM) had none. Nor was evidence found for the modulation of oxygen-dependent radiosensitivity by Bax\\/Bcl-2 signalling, mitochondrial ATP-dependent potassium (mitoK(ATP)) channels or mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. In conclusion, calcineurin-independent protection by cyclosporin A suggests that MPT but not mitoK(ATP) or the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway plays a causal role in oxygen-dependent radiosensitivity of HeLa cells. Targeting MPT may therefore improve the effectiveness of radiotherapy in some solid tumours.

  9. Sub-sets of cancer stem cells differ intrinsically in their patterns of oxygen metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Gammon

    Full Text Available The glycolytic response of hypoxic cells is primarily mediated by the hypoxia inducible factor alpha (HIF-1α but even in the presence of abundant oxygen tumours typically show high rates of glycolysis. Higher levels of HIF-1α in tumours are associated with a poorer prognosis and up-regulation of markers of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT due to HIF-1α actions. We have recently shown that EMT occurs within the CD44(high cancer stem cell (CSC fraction and that epithelial and EMT CSCs are distinguished by high and low ESA expression, respectively. We here show that hypoxia induces a marked shift of the CSC fraction towards EMT leading to altered cell morphology, an increased proportion of CD44(high/ESA(low cells, patterns of gene expression typical of EMT, and enhanced sphere-forming ability. The size of EMT fractions returned to control levels in normoxia indicating a reversible process. Surprisingly, however, even under normoxic conditions a fraction of EMT CSCs was present and maintained high levels of HIF-1α, apparently due to actions of cytokines such as TNFα. Functionally, this EMT CSC fraction showed decreased mitochondrial mass and membrane potential, consumed far less oxygen per cell, and produced markedly reduced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS. These differences in the patterns of oxygen metabolism of sub-fractions of tumour cells provide an explanation for the general therapeutic resistance of CSCs and for the even greater resistance of EMT CSCs. They also identify potential mechanisms for manipulation of CSCs.

  10. Towards a Biohybrid Lung: Endothelial Cells Promote Oxygen Transfer through Gas Permeable Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Sarah; Finocchiaro, Nicole; Donay, Christine; Thiebes, Anja Lena; Hesselmann, Felix; Arens, Jutta; Djeljadini, Suzana; Wessling, Matthias; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Jockenhoevel, Stefan; Cornelissen, Christian Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    In patients with respiratory failure, extracorporeal lung support can ensure the vital gas exchange via gas permeable membranes but its application is restricted by limited long-term stability and hemocompatibility of the gas permeable membranes, which are in contact with the blood. Endothelial cells lining these membranes promise physiological hemocompatibility and should enable prolonged application. However, the endothelial cells increase the diffusion barrier of the blood-gas interface and thus affect gas transfer. In this study, we evaluated how the endothelial cells affect the gas exchange to optimize performance while maintaining an integral cell layer. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were seeded on gas permeable cell culture membranes and cultivated in a custom-made bioreactor. Oxygen transfer rates of blank and endothelialized membranes in endothelial culture medium were determined. Cell morphology was assessed by microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Both setups provided oxygenation of the test fluid featuring small standard deviations of the measurements. Throughout the measuring range, the endothelial cells seem to promote gas transfer to a certain extent exceeding the blank membranes gas transfer performance by up to 120%. Although the underlying principles hereof still need to be clarified, the results represent a significant step towards the development of a biohybrid lung.

  11. Effect of oxygen deprivation on metabolism of arachidonic acid by cultures of rat heart cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freyss-Beguin, M.; Millanvoye-van Brussel, E.; Duval, D.

    1989-01-01

    To investigate the mechanisms responsible for the impairment of phospholipid metabolism observed in ischemic cells, we have studied the effect of conditions simulating ischemia on the metabolism of arachidonic acid (AA) by muscle (M-) and nonmuscle (F-) cells isolated from newborn rat hearts and cultured separately. In muscle cells, oxygen deprivation induces a significant stimulation of the release of [ 14 C]AA from prelabeled cells associated with a preferential redistribution of [ 14 C]AA into cell triglycerides but not formation of radioactive prostaglandins. Moreover, the fatty acid content of phospholipids, as measured by capillary gas chromatography, appears markedly reduced in ischemic myocardial cells. This fact may be related to phospholipase stimulation during ischemia as suggested by the antagonistic effect of mepacrine or p-bromophenacyl bromide. In contrast, oxygen deprivation failed to induce any significant alteration of AA metabolism in fibroblast-like heart cells. Our results indicate that these cultures of newborn rat heart cells, which exhibit many of the features observed in intact organ during ischemia, may represent a useful experimental model to investigate the pharmacological control of the membrane phospholipid turnover

  12. Irradiation of cells by single and double pulses of high intensity radiation: oxygen sensitization and diffusion kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epp, E.R.; Ling, C.C.; Weiss, H.

    1976-01-01

    This paper discusses advances made on both experimental and theoretical approaches involving single and double pulses of high intensity ionizing radiation delivered to cultured bacterial and mammalian cells where the effect of oxygen is concerned. Information gained on the lifetime of oxygen-sensitive species suspected to be produced in critical molecules in irradiated cells and perhaps intimately related to the still unknown mechanisms of oxygen sensitization is described. The diffusion characteristics of oxygen at the cellular level obtained from experimental data are discussed. Current knowledge on intracellular radiolytic oxygen depletion is also presented. Future work on the use of high intensity pulsed radiation as a tool in cellular radiobiological research is outlined. It is expected that obtaining knowledge of the time available for damaged molecules to enter into chemical reactions may lead to insights into the mechanisms of radiation injury in cells, such as those involved in the oxygen effect. (Auth.)

  13. CDK2 differentially controls normal cell senescence and cancer cell proliferation upon exposure to reactive oxygen species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Chae Young; Lee, Seung-Min; Park, Sung Sup; Kwon, Ki-Sun

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► H 2 O 2 differently adjusted senescence and proliferation in normal and cancer cells. ► H 2 O 2 exposure transiently decreased PCNA levels in normal cells. ► H 2 O 2 exposure transiently increased CDK2 activity in cancer cells. ► p21 Cip1 is likely dispensable when H 2 O 2 induces senescence in normal cells. ► Suggestively, CDK2 and PCNA play critical roles in H 2 O 2 -induced cell fate decision. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species modulate cell fate in a context-dependent manner. Sublethal doses of H 2 O 2 decreased the level of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in normal cells (including primary human dermal fibroblasts and IMR-90 cells) without affecting cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) activity, leading to cell cycle arrest and subsequent senescence. In contrast, exposure of cancer cells (such as HeLa and MCF7 cells) to H 2 O 2 increased CDK2 activity with no accompanying change in the PCNA level, leading to cell proliferation. A CDK2 inhibitor, CVT-313, prevented H 2 O 2 -induced cancer cell proliferation. These results support the notion that the cyclin/CDK2/p21 Cip1 /PCNA complex plays an important role as a regulator of cell fate decisions.

  14. Oxygen tension regulates the osteogenic, chondrogenic and endochondral phenotype of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheehy, Eamon J.; Buckley, Conor T. [Trinity Centre for Bioengineering, School of Engineering, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Kelly, Daniel J., E-mail: kellyd9@tcd.ie [Trinity Centre for Bioengineering, School of Engineering, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expansion in low oxygen enhances MSC proliferation and osteogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentiation in low oxygen enhances chondrogenesis and suppresses hypertrophy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxygen can regulate the MSC phenotype for use in tissue engineering applications. -- Abstract: The local oxygen tension is a key regulator of the fate of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a low oxygen tension during expansion and differentiation on the proliferation kinetics as well as the subsequent osteogenic and chondrogenic potential of MSCs. We first hypothesised that expansion in a low oxygen tension (5% pO{sub 2}) would improve both the subsequent osteogenic and chondrogenic potential of MSCs compared to expansion in a normoxic environment (20% pO{sub 2}). Furthermore, we hypothesised that chondrogenic differentiation in a low oxygen environment would suppress hypertrophy of MSCs cultured in both pellets and hydrogels used in tissue engineering strategies. MSCs expanded at 5% pO{sub 2} proliferated faster forming larger colonies, resulting in higher cell yields. Expansion at 5% pO{sub 2} also enhanced subsequent osteogenesis of MSCs, whereas differentiation at 5% pO{sub 2} was found to be a more potent promoter of chondrogenesis than expansion at 5% pO{sub 2}. Greater collagen accumulation, and more intense staining for collagen types I and X, was observed in pellets maintained at 20% pO{sub 2} compared to 5% pO{sub 2}. Both pellets and hydrogels stained more intensely for type II collagen when undergoing chondrogenesis in a low oxygen environment. Differentiation at 5% pO{sub 2} also appeared to inhibit hypertrophy in both pellets and hydrogels, as demonstrated by reduced collagen type X and Alizarin Red staining and alkaline phosphatase activity. This study demonstrates that the local oxygen environment can be manipulated in vitro to either stabilise a

  15. Ionized gas (plasma) delivery of reactive oxygen species (ROS) into artificial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Sung-Ha; Jenkins, A Toby A; Szili, Endre J; Short, Robert D

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to enhance our understanding of how reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated ex situ by ionized gas (plasma), can affect the regulation of signalling processes within cells. A model system, comprising of a suspension of phospholipid vesicles (cell mimics) encapsulating a ROS reporter, was developed to study the plasma delivery of ROS into cells. For the first time it was shown that plasma unequivocally delivers ROS into cells over a sustained period and without compromising cell membrane integrity. An important consideration in cell and biological assays is the presence of serum, which significantly reduced the transfer efficiency of ROS into the vesicles. These results are key to understanding how plasma treatments can be tailored for specific medical or biotechnology applications. Further, the phospholipid vesicle ROS reporter system may find use in other studies involving the application of free radicals in biology and medicine. (fast track communication)

  16. Ionized gas (plasma) delivery of reactive oxygen species (ROS) into artificial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung-Ha; Szili, Endre J.; Jenkins, A. Toby A.; Short, Robert D.

    2014-09-01

    This study was designed to enhance our understanding of how reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated ex situ by ionized gas (plasma), can affect the regulation of signalling processes within cells. A model system, comprising of a suspension of phospholipid vesicles (cell mimics) encapsulating a ROS reporter, was developed to study the plasma delivery of ROS into cells. For the first time it was shown that plasma unequivocally delivers ROS into cells over a sustained period and without compromising cell membrane integrity. An important consideration in cell and biological assays is the presence of serum, which significantly reduced the transfer efficiency of ROS into the vesicles. These results are key to understanding how plasma treatments can be tailored for specific medical or biotechnology applications. Further, the phospholipid vesicle ROS reporter system may find use in other studies involving the application of free radicals in biology and medicine.

  17. RenderGAN: Generating Realistic Labeled Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Sixt

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Deep Convolutional Neuronal Networks (DCNNs are showing remarkable performance on many computer vision tasks. Due to their large parameter space, they require many labeled samples when trained in a supervised setting. The costs of annotating data manually can render the use of DCNNs infeasible. We present a novel framework called RenderGAN that can generate large amounts of realistic, labeled images by combining a 3D model and the Generative Adversarial Network framework. In our approach, image augmentations (e.g., lighting, background, and detail are learned from unlabeled data such that the generated images are strikingly realistic while preserving the labels known from the 3D model. We apply the RenderGAN framework to generate images of barcode-like markers that are attached to honeybees. Training a DCNN on data generated by the RenderGAN yields considerably better performance than training it on various baselines.

  18. Multiple bandgap combination of thin film photovoltaic cells and a photoanode for efficient hydrogen and oxygen generation by water splitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avachat, Upendra S.; Jahagirdar, Anant H.; Dhere, Neelkanth G. [Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), University of Central Florida 1679 Clearlake Road, Cocoa, FL, 32922-5703 (United States)

    2006-09-22

    The objective of this research is to develop cheaper and more efficient photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells for the production of highly pure hydrogen and oxygen by water splitting. FSEC PV Materials Lab has developed PEC set up consisting of two thin film photovoltaic (PV) cells, a RuS{sub 2} photoanode for efficient oxygen evolution and a platinum cathode for hydrogen evolution. A p-type transparent-conducting layer is prepared at the back of PV cell to transmit unabsorbed infrared photons onto the photoanode for efficient oxygen evolution. This paper presents the preparation and characterization of p- type ZnTe:Cu transparent conducting back layer and PEC cell. (author)

  19. Oxygen reduction kinetics on graphite cathodes in sediment microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renslow, Ryan; Donovan, Conrad; Shim, Matthew; Babauta, Jerome; Nannapaneni, Srilekha; Schenk, James; Beyenal, Haluk

    2011-12-28

    Sediment microbial fuel cells (SMFCs) have been used as renewable power sources for sensors in fresh and ocean waters. Organic compounds at the anode drive anodic reactions, while oxygen drives cathodic reactions. An understanding of oxygen reduction kinetics and the factors that determine graphite cathode performance is needed to predict cathodic current and potential losses, and eventually to estimate the power production of SMFCs. Our goals were to (1) experimentally quantify the dependence of oxygen reduction kinetics on temperature, electrode potential, and dissolved oxygen concentration for the graphite cathodes of SMFCs and (2) develop a mechanistic model. To accomplish this, we monitored current on polarized cathodes in river and ocean SMFCs. We found that (1) after oxygen reduction is initiated, the current density is linearly dependent on polarization potential for both SMFC types; (2) current density magnitude increases linearly with temperature in river SMFCs but remains constant with temperature in ocean SMFCs; (3) the standard heterogeneous rate constant controls the current density temperature dependence; (4) river and ocean SMFC graphite cathodes have large potential losses, estimated by the model to be 470 mV and 614 mV, respectively; and (5) the electrochemical potential available at the cathode is the primary factor controlling reduction kinetic rates. The mechanistic model based on thermodynamic and electrochemical principles successfully fit and predicted the data. The data, experimental system, and model can be used in future studies to guide SMFC design and deployment, assess SMFC current production, test cathode material performance, and predict cathode contamination.

  20. Amorphous metallic alloys for oxygen reduction reaction in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Huerta, R.; Guerra-Martinez, I.; Lopez, J.S. [Inst. Politecnico Nacional, ESIQIE, Mexico City (Mexico). Lab. de Electroquimica; Pierna, A.R. [Basque Country Univ., San Sebastian (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Environment; Solorza-Feria, O. [Inst. Politenico Nacional, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Mexico City (Mexico). Dept. de Quimica

    2010-07-15

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) and polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) represent an important, environmentally clean energy source. This has motivated extensive research on the synthesis, characterization and evaluation of novel and stable oxygen reduction electrocatalysts for the direct four-electron transfer process to water formation. Studies have shown that amorphous alloyed compounds can be used as electrode materials in electrochemical energy conversion devices. Their use in PEMFCs can optimize the electrocatalyst loading in the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). In this study, amorphous metallic PtSn, PtRu and PtRuSn alloys were synthesized by mechanical milling and used as cathodes for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in sulphuric acid and in a single PEM fuel cell. Two different powder morphologies were observed before and after the chemical activation in a hydrofluoric acid (HF) solution at 25 degrees C. The kinetics of the ORR on the amorphous catalysts were investigated. The study showed that the amorphous metallic PtSn electrocatalyst was the most active of the 3 electrodes for the cathodic reaction. Fuel cell experiments were conducted at various temperatures at 30 psi for hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and at 34 psi for oxygen (O{sub 2}). MEAs made of Nafion 115 and amorphous metallic PtSn dispersed on carbon powder in a PEMFC had a power density of 156 mW per cm{sup 2} at 0.43V and 80 degrees C. 12 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  1. Oxygen concentration modulates cellular senescence and autophagy in human trophoblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seno, Kotomi; Tanikawa, Nao; Takahashi, Hironori; Ohkuchi, Akihide; Suzuki, Hirotada; Matsubara, Shigeki; Iwata, Hisataka; Kuwayama, Takehito; Shirasuna, Koumei

    2018-02-15

    We investigated the effect of oxygen concentrations on cellular senescence and autophagy and examined the role of autophagy in human trophoblast cells. Human first-trimester trophoblast cells (Sw.71) were incubated under 21%, 5%, or 1% O 2 concentrations for 24 hours. We examined the extent of senescence caused using senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-Gal) and senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) as markers. Moreover, we examined the role of autophagy in causing cellular senescence using an autophagy inhibitor (3-methyladenine, 3MA). Physiological normoxia (5% O 2 ) decreased SA-β-Gal-positive cells and SASP including interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 compared with cultured cells in 21% O 2 . Pathophysiological hypoxia (1% O 2 ) caused cytotoxicity, including extracellular release of ATP and lactate dehydrogenase, and decreased senescence phenotypes. 3MA-treated trophoblast cells significantly suppressed senescence markers (SA-β-Gal-positive cells and SASP secretion) in O 2 -independent manner. We conclude that O 2 concentration modulates cellular senescence phenotypes regulating autophagy in the human trophoblast cells. Moreover, inhibiting autophagy suppresses cellular senescence, suggesting that autophagy contributes to oxygen stress-induced cellular senescence. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. E-Cigarette Aerosol Exposure Induces Reactive Oxygen Species, DNA Damage, and Cell Death in Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Chastain; Majeste, Andrew; Hanus, Jakub; Wang, Shusheng

    2016-12-01

    Cigarette smoking remains one of the leading causes of preventable death worldwide. Vascular cell death and dysfunction is a central or exacerbating component in the majority of cigarette smoking related pathologies. The recent development of the electronic nicotine delivery systems known as e-cigarettes provides an alternative to conventional cigarette smoking; however, the potential vascular health risks of e-cigarette use remain unclear. This study evaluates the effects of e-cigarette aerosol extract (EAE) and conventional cigarette smoke extract (CSE) on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). A laboratory apparatus was designed to produce extracts from e-cigarettes and conventional cigarettes according to established protocols for cigarette smoking. EAE or conventional CSE was applied to human vascular endothelial cells for 4-72 h, dependent on the assay. Treated cells were assayed for reactive oxygen species, DNA damage, cell viability, and markers of programmed cell death pathways. Additionally, the anti-oxidants α-tocopherol and n-acetyl-l-cysteine were used to attempt to rescue e-cigarette induced cell death. Our results indicate that e-cigarette aerosol is capable of inducing reactive oxygen species, causing DNA damage, and significantly reducing cell viability in a concentration dependent fashion. Immunofluorescent and flow cytometry analysis indicate that both the apoptosis and programmed necrosis pathways are triggered by e-cigarette aerosol treatment. Additionally, anti-oxidant treatment provides a partial rescue of the induced cell death, indicating that reactive oxygen species play a causal role in e-cigarette induced cytotoxicity. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Preservation of high glycolytic phenotype by establishing new acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines at physiologic oxygen concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheard, Michael A; Ghent, Matthew V; Cabral, Daniel J; Lee, Joanne C; Khankaldyyan, Vazgen; Ji, Lingyun; Wu, Samuel Q; Kang, Min H; Sposto, Richard; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Reynolds, C Patrick

    2015-05-15

    Cancer cells typically exhibit increased glycolysis and decreased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, and they continue to exhibit some elevation in glycolysis even under aerobic conditions. However, it is unclear whether cancer cell lines employ a high level of glycolysis comparable to that of the original cancers from which they were derived, even if their culture conditions are changed to physiologically relevant oxygen concentrations. From three childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients we established three new pairs of cell lines in both atmospheric (20%) and physiologic (bone marrow level, 5%) oxygen concentrations. Cell lines established in 20% oxygen exhibited lower proliferation, survival, expression of glycolysis genes, glucose consumption, and lactate production. Interestingly, the effects of oxygen concentration used during cell line initiation were only partially reversible when established cell cultures were switched from one oxygen concentration to another for eight weeks. These observations indicate that ALL cell lines established at atmospheric oxygen concentration can exhibit relatively low levels of glycolysis and these levels are semi-permanent, suggesting that physiologic oxygen concentrations may be needed from the time of cell line initiation to preserve the high level of glycolysis commonly exhibited by leukemias in vivo. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Distributed rendering for multiview parallax displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annen, T.; Matusik, W.; Pfister, H.; Seidel, H.-P.; Zwicker, M.

    2006-02-01

    3D display technology holds great promise for the future of television, virtual reality, entertainment, and visualization. Multiview parallax displays deliver stereoscopic views without glasses to arbitrary positions within the viewing zone. These systems must include a high-performance and scalable 3D rendering subsystem in order to generate multiple views at real-time frame rates. This paper describes a distributed rendering system for large-scale multiview parallax displays built with a network of PCs, commodity graphics accelerators, multiple projectors, and multiview screens. The main challenge is to render various perspective views of the scene and assign rendering tasks effectively. In this paper we investigate two different approaches: Optical multiplexing for lenticular screens and software multiplexing for parallax-barrier displays. We describe the construction of large-scale multi-projector 3D display systems using lenticular and parallax-barrier technology. We have developed different distributed rendering algorithms using the Chromium stream-processing framework and evaluate the trade-offs and performance bottlenecks. Our results show that Chromium is well suited for interactive rendering on multiview parallax displays.

  5. Radiosensitization of mammalian cells by misonidazole and oxygen: DNA damage exposed by Micrococcus luteus enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skov, K.A.; Palcic, B.; Skarsgard, L.D.

    1979-01-01

    When misonidazole is present during irradiation of hypoxic mammalian cells, an enhancement of single-strand breaks (SSB) in DNA is observed. Oxygen also enhances SSB, presumably in a manner similar to that of misonidazole. The dose-modifying factor (DMF) for 15 mM misonidazole was found to be 3.4, compared to an oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) of 3.5. Another class of DNA damage, namely, sites exposed by an extract of Micrococcus luteus, was examined. Radiation-induced M. luteus extract-sensitive sites (MLS) were also found to be enhanced by the presence of misonidazole or molecular oxygen. The DMF for this damage by 15 mM misonidazole was 1.6 while the OER was 2.5. The ratio of MLS to SSB is approximately 1.25 under hypoxia, 0.9 in the presence of oxygen, and 0.6 in the presence of 15 mM misonidazole under hypoxic conditions. Incubation with misonidazole under conditions which are toxic to mammalian cells (37 0 C, hypoxia), and which result in many SSB, produces no detectable lesions sensitive to the M. luteus extract

  6. High performance electrode for electrochemical oxygen generator cell based on solid electrolyte ion transport membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Wei; Shao, Zongping; Ran, Ran; Chen, Zhihao; Zeng, Pingying; Gu, Hongxia; Jin, Wanqin; Xu, Nanping [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, No. 5 Xin Mofan Road, Nanjing 210009, JiangSu (China)

    2007-06-30

    A double-layer composite electrode based on Ba{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-{delta}} + Sm{sub 0.2}Ce{sub 0.8}O{sub 1.9} (BSCF + SDC) and BSCF + SDC + Ag was investigated to be a promising cathode and also anode for the electrochemical oxygen generator based on samaria doped ceria electrolyte. The Ag particles in the second layer were not only the current collector but also the improver for the oxygen adsorption at the electrode. a.c. impedance results indicated that the electrode polarization resistance, as low as 0.0058 {omega} cm{sup 2} was reached at 800 C under air. In oxygen generator cell performance test, the electrode resistance dropped to half of the value at zero current density under an applied current density of 2.34 A cm{sup -2} at 700 C, and on the same conditions the oxygen generator cell was continual working for more than 900 min with a Faradic efficiency of {proportional_to}100%. (author)

  7. Effects of radiation quality and oxygen on clustered DNA lesions and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Robert D; Yu, Victor K; Georgakilas, Alexandros G; Koumenis, Constantinos; Park, Joo Han; Carlson, David J

    2011-11-01

    Radiation quality and cellular oxygen concentration have a substantial impact on DNA damage, reproductive cell death and, ultimately, the potential efficacy of radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer. To better understand and quantify the effects of radiation quality and oxygen on the induction of clustered DNA lesions, we have now extended the Monte Carlo Damage Simulation (MCDS) to account for reductions in the initial lesion yield arising from enhanced chemical repair of DNA radicals under hypoxic conditions. The kinetic energy range and types of particles considered in the MCDS have also been expanded to include charged particles up to and including (56)Fe ions. The induction of individual and clustered DNA lesions for arbitrary mixtures of different types of radiation can now be directly simulated. For low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiations, cells irradiated under normoxic conditions sustain about 2.9 times as many double-strand breaks (DSBs) as cells irradiated under anoxic conditions. New experiments performed by us demonstrate similar trends in the yields of non-DSB (Fpg and Endo III) clusters in HeLa cells irradiated by γ rays under aerobic and hypoxic conditions. The good agreement among measured and predicted DSBs, Fpg and Endo III cluster yields suggests that, for the first time, it may be possible to determine nucleotide-level maps of the multitude of different types of clustered DNA lesions formed in cells under reduced oxygen conditions. As particle LET increases, the MCDS predicts that the ratio of DSBs formed under normoxic to hypoxic conditions by the same type of radiation decreases monotonically toward unity. However, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of higher-LET radiations compared to (60)Co γ rays (0.24 keV/μm) tends to increase with decreasing oxygen concentration. The predicted RBE of a 1 MeV proton (26.9 keV/μm) relative to (60)Co γ rays for DSB induction increases from 1.9 to 2.3 as oxygen concentration

  8. Enhanced dopaminergic differentiation of human neural stem cells by synergistic effect of Bcl-xL and reduced oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, Christina; Courtois, Elise; Jensen, Pia

    2009-01-01

    Neural stem cells constitute a promising source of cells for transplantation in Parkinson's disease, but a protocol for controlled dopaminergic differentiation is not yet available. Here we investigated the effect of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-x(L) and oxygen tension on dopaminergic different......Neural stem cells constitute a promising source of cells for transplantation in Parkinson's disease, but a protocol for controlled dopaminergic differentiation is not yet available. Here we investigated the effect of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-x(L) and oxygen tension on dopaminergic...... days at 20% oxygen, hVMbcl-x(L) cultures contained proportionally more tyrosine hydroxylase(TH)-positive cells than hVM1 control cultures. This difference was significantly potentiated from 11 +/- 0.8% to 17.2 +/- 0.2% of total cells when the oxygen tension was lowered to 3%. Immunocytochemistry and Q...

  9. Release of intracellular Calcium increase production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in renal distal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Henning F.

    peroxide (H2O2) has traditionally been regarded as toxic by-products of aerobic metabolism. However, recent findings indicate that H2O2 act as a signalling molecule. The aim of the present study was to monitor, in real time, the rates of ROS generation in order to directly determine their production......Release of intracellular Calcium increase production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in renal distal epithelial cells. Henning F. Bjerregaard, Roskilde University, Department of Science, Systems and Models , 4000 Roskilde, Denmark. HFB@ RUC.DK Reactive oxygen species (ROS) like, hydrogen...... to G-protein stimulation of phospholipase C and release of inositol -3 phosphate. Cd (0.4 mM) treatment of A6 cells enhanced the ROS production after one minutes incubation. The production rate was constant for at least 10 to 20 min. Experiments showed that the Cd induced increase in ROS production...

  10. High performance methanol-oxygen fuel cell with hollow fiber electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Daniel D. (Inventor); Ingham, John D. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A methanol/air-oxygen fuel cell including an electrode formed by open-ended ion-exchange hollow fibers having a layer of catalyst deposited on the inner surface thereof and a first current collector in contact with the catalyst layer. A second current collector external of said fibers is provided which is immersed along with the hollow fiber electrode in an aqueous electrolyte body. Upon passage of air or oxygen through the hollow fiber electrode and introduction of methanol into the aqueous electrolyte, a steady current output is obtained. Two embodiments of the fuel cell are disclosed. In the first embodiment the second metal electrode is displaced away from the hollow fiber in the electrolyte body while in the second embodiment a spiral-wrap electrode is provided about the outer surface of the hollow fiber electrode.

  11. Salinomycin induces autophagy in colon and breast cancer cells with concomitant generation of reactive oxygen species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berlinda Verdoodt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Salinomycin is a polyether ionophore antibiotic that has recently been shown to induce cell death in human cancer cells displaying multiple mechanisms of drug resistance. The underlying mechanisms leading to cell death after salinomycin treatment have not been well characterized. We therefore investigated the role of salinomycin in caspase dependent and independent cell death in colon cancer (SW480, SW620, RKO and breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D, MDA-MB-453. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We detected features of apoptosis in all cell lines tested, but the executor caspases 3 and 7 were only strongly activated in RKO and MDA-MB-453 cells. MCF-7 and SW620 cells instead presented features of autophagy such as cytoplasmic vacuolization and LC3 processing. Caspase proficient cell lines activated autophagy at lower salinomycin concentrations and before the onset of caspase activation. Salinomycin also led to the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS eliciting JNK activation and induction of the transcription factor JUN. Salinomycin mediated cell death could be partially inhibited by the free radical scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine, implicating ROS formation in the mechanism of salinomycin toxicity. CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate that, in addition to its previously reported induction of caspase dependent apoptosis, the initiation of autophagy is an important and early effect of salinomycin in tumor cells.

  12. High cell density fed-batch fermentations for lipase production: feeding strategies and oxygen transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehmin, M N I; Annuar, M S M; Chisti, Y

    2013-11-01

    This review is focused on the production of microbial lipases by high cell density fermentation. Lipases are among the most widely used of the enzyme catalysts. Although lipases are produced by animals and plants, industrial lipases are sourced almost exclusively from microorganisms. Many of the commercial lipases are produced using recombinant species. Microbial lipases are mostly produced by batch and fed-batch fermentation. Lipases are generally secreted by the cell into the extracellular environment. Thus, a crude preparation of lipases can be obtained by removing the microbial cells from the fermentation broth. This crude cell-free broth may be further concentrated and used as is, or lipases may be purified from it to various levels. For many large volume applications, lipases must be produced at extremely low cost. High cell density fermentation is a promising method for low-cost production: it allows a high concentration of the biomass and the enzyme to be attained rapidly and this eases the downstream recovery of the enzyme. High density fermentation enhances enzyme productivity compared with the traditional submerged culture batch fermentation. In production of enzymes, a high cell density is generally achieved through fed-batch operation, not through perfusion culture which is cumbersome. The feeding strategies used in fed-batch fermentations for producing lipases and the implications of these strategies are discussed. Most lipase-producing microbial fermentations require oxygen. Oxygen transfer in such fermentations is discussed.

  13. (3) Melatonin Protects Oocytes and Granulosa Cells from Reactive Oxygen Species during the Ovulatory Process

    OpenAIRE

    田村, 博史; Hiroshi, TAMURA; 山口大学大学院医学系研究科産科婦人科学; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine

    2009-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced within the follicle especially during the ovulatory process. ROS play a physiological role in the process of ovulation, e.g. follicle rapture. However, excessive amount of ROS causes oxidative stress and damages oocytes and luteinized granulosa cells. On the other hand, antioxidant defense systems including superoxide dismutase (SOD) or glutathione (GSH) are present in follicles. The balance between ROS and antioxidants within the follicle seems to b...

  14. Effect of low oxygen tension on the biological characteristics of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Dae Seong; Ko, Young Jong; Lee, Myoung Woo; Park, Hyun Jin; Park, Yoo Jin; Kim, Dong-Ik; Sung, Ki Woong; Koo, Hong Hoe; Yoo, Keon Hee

    2016-01-01

    Culture of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) under ambient conditions does not replicate the low oxygen environment of normal physiological or pathological states and can result in cellular impairment during culture. To overcome these limitations, we explored the effect of hypoxia (1 % O2) on the biological characteristics of MSCs over the course of different culture periods. The following biological characteristics were examined in human bone marrow-derived MSCs cultured under hypoxia for 8 week...

  15. The role of oxygen in CdS/CdTe solar cells deposited by close-spaced sublimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, D.H.; Levi, D.H.; Matson, R.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    The presence of oxygen during close-spaced sublimation (CSS) of CdTe has been previously reported to be essential for high-efficiency CdS/CdTe solar cells because it increases the acceptor density in the absorber. The authors find that the presence of oxygen during CSS increases the nucleation site density of CdTe, thus decreasing pinhole density and grain size. Photoluminescence showed that oxygen decreases material quality in the bulk of the CdTe film, but positively impacts the critical CdS/CdTe interface. Through device characterization the authors were unable to verify an increase in acceptor density with increased oxygen. These results, along with the achievement of high-efficiency cells (13% AM1.5) without the use of oxygen, led the authors to conclude that the use of oxygen during CSS deposition of CdTe can be useful but is not essential.

  16. Analysing impact of oxygen and water exposure on roll-coated organic solar cell performance using impedance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arredondo, B.; Romero, B.; Beliatis, M. J.

    2018-01-01

    In this work we study the degradation of roll-coated flexible inverted organic solar cells in different atmospheres. We demonstrate that impedance spectroscopy is a powerful tool for elucidating degradation mechanisms; it is used here to distinguish the different degradation mechanisms due to water...... and oxygen. Identical cells were exposed to different accelerated degradation environments using water only, oxygen only, and both water and oxygen simultaneously, all of them enhanced with UV light. The photocurrent is dramatically reduced in the oxygen-degraded samples. Impedance measurements indicate...... of degradation differs for the water and oxygen degraded samples. While oxygen + UV light decreases the conductivity of the PEDOT:PSS layer, water + UV light changes the PEDOT:PSS work function inducing a depletion region at the anode....

  17. Non-catalyzed cathodic oxygen reduction at graphite granules in microbial fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freguia, Stefano; Rabaey, Korneel; Yuan Zhiguo; Keller, Juerg

    2007-01-01

    Oxygen is the most sustainable electron acceptor currently available for microbial fuel cell (MFC) cathodes. However, its high overpotential for reduction to water limits the current that can be produced. Several materials and catalysts have previously been investigated in order to facilitate oxygen reduction at the cathode surface. This study shows that significant stable currents can be delivered by using a non-catalyzed cathode made of granular graphite. Power outputs up to 21 W m -3 (cathode total volume) or 50 W m -3 (cathode liquid volume) were attained in a continuous MFC fed with acetate. These values are higher than those obtained in several other studies using catalyzed graphite in various forms. The presence of nanoscale pores on granular graphite provides a high surface area for oxygen reduction. The current generated with this cathode can sustain an anodic volume specific COD removal rate of 1.46 kg COD m -3 d -1 , which is higher than that of a conventional aerobic process. This study demonstrates that microbial fuel cells can be operated efficiently using high surface graphite as cathode material. This implies that research on microbial fuel cell cathodes should not only focus on catalysts, but also on high surface area materials

  18. Non-catalyzed cathodic oxygen reduction at graphite granules in microbial fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freguia, Stefano; Rabaey, Korneel; Yuan, Zhiguo; Keller, Juerg [The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Qld (Australia). Advanced Wastewater Management Centre

    2007-12-01

    Oxygen is the most sustainable electron acceptor currently available for microbial fuel cell (MFC) cathodes. However, its high overpotential for reduction to water limits the current that can be produced. Several materials and catalysts have previously been investigated in order to facilitate oxygen reduction at the cathode surface. This study shows that significant stable currents can be delivered by using a non-catalyzed cathode made of granular graphite. Power outputs up to 21 W m{sup -3} (cathode total volume) or 50 W m{sup -3} (cathode liquid volume) were attained in a continuous MFC fed with acetate. These values are higher than those obtained in several other studies using catalyzed graphite in various forms. The presence of nanoscale pores on granular graphite provides a high surface area for oxygen reduction. The current generated with this cathode can sustain an anodic volume specific COD removal rate of 1.46 kg{sub COD} m{sup -3} d{sup -1}, which is higher than that of a conventional aerobic process. This study demonstrates that microbial fuel cells can be operated efficiently using high surface graphite as cathode material. This implies that research on microbial fuel cell cathodes should not only focus on catalysts, but also on high surface area materials. (author)

  19. Retinal Oxygen Delivery and Metabolism in Healthy and Sickle Cell Retinopathy Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahidi, Mahnaz; Felder, Anthony E; Tan, Ou; Blair, Norman P; Huang, David

    2018-04-01

    Reduction in inner retinal oxygen delivery (DO2) can cause retinal hypoxia and impair inner retinal oxygen metabolism (MO2), leading to vision loss. The purpose of the current study was to establish measurements of DO2 and MO2 in healthy subjects and test the hypothesis that DO2 and MO2 are reduced in sickle cell retinopathy (SCR) subjects. Dual wavelength retinal oximetry and Doppler optical coherence tomography were performed in 12 healthy control and 12 SCR subjects. Images were analyzed to measure retinal arterial and venous oxygen content (O2A and O2V), venous diameter (DV), and total retinal blood flow (TRBF). Retinal arteriovenous oxygen content difference (O2AV), DO2, MO2, and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) were calculated according to the following equations: O2AV = O2A - O2V; DO2 = TRBF * O2A; MO2 = TRBF * O2AV; OEF = MO2/DO2. Retinal DV and TRBF were higher in the SCR group as compared to the control group, whereas, O2A, O2V, and O2AV were lower in SCR group as compared to the control group. DO2, MO2, and OEF were not significantly different between control and SCR groups. MO2 and DO2 were linearly related, such that higher MO2 was associated with higher DO2. There was an inverse relationship between TRBF and OEF, such that lower TRBF was associated with higher OEF. Increased blood flow compensated for decreased oxygen content, thereby maintaining DO2, MO2, and OEF at predominately lower stages of SCR. Quantitative assessment of these parameters has the potential to advance knowledge and improve diagnostic evaluation of retinal ischemic conditions.

  20. Effect of electron affinic hypoxic cell sensitizers on the radiolytic depletion of oxygen in mammalian cells irradiated at ultrahigh dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaels, H.B.

    1982-01-01

    When CHO cells are equilibrated with a low level of oxygen (e.g. 0.4% O 2 ) and irradiated with single 3 ns pulses of electrons, a breaking survival curve is observed. This effect is believed to be the result of radiolytic oxygen depletion and can be prevented by the presence of a relatively low concentraton of hypoxic cell radiosensitizer. This prevention of the breaking survival curve has been observed for 2- and 5-nitroimidazoles, nitrofurans, and diamide. It is hypothesized that the sensitizer acts by competing wth oxygen for the radiation-induced intracellular oxygen-binding species, perhaps a hydrated electron adduct, leaving oxygen free to participate in radiosensitization reactions during the lifetime of the oxygen-sensitive radiation-induced target sites for lethal damage, probably DNA radicals produced by hydroxyl radical attack. The proposed role of the sensitizer in the interference with oxygen depletion is a transient phenomenon, occuring on the microsecond to millisecond time scale

  1. Quantifying the correlation between spatially defined oxygen gradients and cell fate in an engineered three-dimensional culture model

    OpenAIRE

    Ardakani, Amir G.; Cheema, Umber; Brown, Robert A.; Shipley, Rebecca J.

    2014-01-01

    A challenge in three-dimensional tissue culture remains the lack of quantitative information linking nutrient delivery and cellular distribution. Both in vivo and in vitro, oxygen is delivered by diffusion from its source (blood vessel or the construct margins). The oxygen level at a defined distance from its source depends critically on the balance of diffusion and cellular metabolism. Cells may respond to this oxygen environment through proliferation, death and chemotaxis, resulting in spat...

  2. The participation of singlet oxygen in a photocitotoxicity of extract from amazon plant to cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tcibulnikova, Anna V.; Degterev, Igor A.; Bryukhanov, Valery V.; Roberto, Mantuanelly M.; Campos Pereira, F. D.; Marin-Morales, M. A.; Slezhkin, Vasily A.; Samusev, Ilya G.

    2018-01-01

    We have been searching for new photosensitizers (PS) for photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer based on extracts from Amazonian plants since 2009. In this paper, we demonstrate that, under certain conditions, the extract from fruits of the Amazonian palm Euterpe oleraceae (popular name Açaí) can serve as a PS for PDT treatment of murine breast cancer cells (4T1 cell line). We have been first to show directly that the photodynamic effect of plant PS is due to singlet oxygen.

  3. Cells with dysfunctional telomeres are susceptible to reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide via generation of multichromosomal fusions and chromosomal fragments bearing telomeres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Seon Rang [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong-Eun; Juhn, Kyoung-Mi; Ju, Yeun-Jin; Jeong, Jaemin [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Chang-Mo; Yun, Hyun Jin [Division of Radiation Effect, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Mi Yong; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Joo, Hyun-Yoo; Park, Eun-Ran; Park, In-Chul; Hong, Sung Hee; Hwang, Sang-Gu [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Haekwon [Department of Biotechnology, Seoul Woman' s University, Seoul 139-774 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Myung-Haing [Laboratory of Toxicology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Hoon [Department of Biology, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Gil Hong [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kee-Ho, E-mail: khlee@kirams.re.kr [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Under conditions of telomere erosion, cells become extremely sensitive to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chromosomal regions adjacent to telomeres are cleaved by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} under such conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} thus causes multichromosomal fusions and generation of small chromosomal fragments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N-acetylcysteine prevents H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced chromosomal aberrations. -- Abstract: During genotoxic stress, reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) is a prime mediator of the DNA damage response. Telomeres function both to assist in DNA damage repair and to inhibit chromosomal end-to-end fusion. Here, we show that telomere dysfunction renders cells susceptible to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, via generation of multichromosomal fusion and chromosomal fragments. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} caused formation of multichromosomal end-to-end fusions involving more than three chromosomes, preferentially when telomeres were erosive. Interestingly, extensive chromosomal fragmentation (yielding small-sized fragments) occurred only in cells exhibiting such multichromosomal fusions. Telomeres were absent from fusion points, being rather present in the small fragments, indicating that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} cleaves chromosomal regions adjacent to telomeres. Restoration of telomere function or addition of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine prevented development of chromosomal aberrations and rescued the observed hypersensitivity to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Thus, chromosomal regions adjacent to telomeres become sensitive to reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide when telomeres are dysfunctional, and are cleaved to produce multichromosomal fusions and small chromosomal fragments bearing the telomeres.

  4. Reactive Oxygen Species and Their Implications on CD4+ T Cells in Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previte, Dana M; Piganelli, Jon D

    2017-11-28

    Previous work has indicated that type 1 diabetes (T1D) pathology is highly driven by reactive oxygen species (ROS). One way in which ROS shape the autoimmune response demonstrated in T1D is by promoting CD4 + T cell activation and differentiation. As CD4 + T cells are a significant contributor to pancreatic β cell destruction in T1D, understanding how ROS impact their development, activation, and differentiation is critical. Recent Advances: CD4 + T cells themselves generate ROS via nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase expression and electron transport chain activity. Moreover, T cells can also be exposed to exogenous ROS generated by other immune cells (e.g., macrophages and dendritic cells) and β cells. Genetically modified animals and ROS inhibitors have demonstrated that ROS blockade during activation results in CD4 + T cell hyporesponsiveness and reduced diabetes incidence. Critical Issues and Future Directions: Although the majority of studies with regard to T1D and CD4 + T cells have been done to examine the influence of redox on CD4 + T cell activation, this is not the only circumstance in which a T cell can be impacted by redox. ROS and redox have also been shown to play roles in CD4 + T cell-related tolerogenic mechanisms, including thymic selection and regulatory T cell-mediated suppression. However, the effect of these mechanisms with respect to T1D pathogenesis remains elusive. Therefore, pursuing these avenues may provide valuable insight into the global role of ROS and redox in autoreactive CD4 + T cell formation and function. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  5. Standardized rendering from IR surveillance motion imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokoski, F. J.

    2014-06-01

    Government agencies, including defense and law enforcement, increasingly make use of video from surveillance systems and camera phones owned by non-government entities.Making advanced and standardized motion imaging technology available to private and commercial users at cost-effective prices would benefit all parties. In particular, incorporating thermal infrared into commercial surveillance systems offers substantial benefits beyond night vision capability. Face rendering is a process to facilitate exploitation of thermal infrared surveillance imagery from the general area of a crime scene, to assist investigations with and without cooperating eyewitnesses. Face rendering automatically generates greyscale representations similar to police artist sketches for faces in surveillance imagery collected from proximate locations and times to a crime under investigation. Near-realtime generation of face renderings can provide law enforcement with an investigation tool to assess witness memory and credibility, and integrate reports from multiple eyewitnesses, Renderings can be quickly disseminated through social media to warn of a person who may pose an immediate threat, and to solicit the public's help in identifying possible suspects and witnesses. Renderings are pose-standardized so as to not divulge the presence and location of eyewitnesses and surveillance cameras. Incorporation of thermal infrared imaging into commercial surveillance systems will significantly improve system performance, and reduce manual review times, at an incremental cost that will continue to decrease. Benefits to criminal justice would include improved reliability of eyewitness testimony and improved accuracy of distinguishing among minority groups in eyewitness and surveillance identifications.

  6. Influence of oxygen partial pressure on the characteristics of human hepatocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepiana, Jenifer; Meijide, Susana; Navarro, Rosaura; Hernández, M Luisa; Ruiz-Sanz, José Ignacio; Ruiz-Larrea, M Begoña

    2017-08-01

    Most of the in vitro studies using liver cell lines have been performed under atmospheric oxygen partial pressure (21% O 2 ). However, the oxygen concentrations in the liver and cancer cells are far from this value. In the present study, we have evaluated the influence of oxygen on 1) the tumor cell lines features (growth, steady-state ROS levels, GSH content, activities of antioxidant enzymes, p66 Shc and SOD expressions, metalloproteinases secretion, migration, invasion, and adhesion) of human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines, and b) the response of the cells to an oxidant stimulus (aqueous leaf extract of the V. baccifera plant species). For this purpose, three hepatocarcinoma cell lines with different p53 status, HepG2 (wild-type), Huh7 (mutated), and Hep3B (deleted), were cultured (6-30 days) under atmospheric (21%) and more physiological (8%) pO 2 . Results showed that after long-term culturing at 8% versus 21% O 2 , the cellular proliferation rate and the steady-state levels of mitochondrial O 2 - were unaffected. However, the intracellular basal ROS levels were higher independently of the characteristics of the cell line. Moreover, the lower pO 2 was associated with lower glutathione content, the induction of p66 Shc and Mn-SOD proteins, and increased SOD activity only in HepG2. This cell line also showed a higher migration rate, secretion of active metalloproteinases, and a faster invasion. HepG2 cells were more resistant to the oxidative stress induced by V. baccifera. Results suggest that the long-term culturing of human hepatoma cells at a low, more physiological pO 2 induces antioxidant adaptations that could be mediated by p53, and may alter the cellular response to a subsequent oxidant challenge. Data support the necessity of validating outcomes from studies performed with hepatoma cell cultures under ambient O 2 . Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cell design concepts for aqueous lithium-oxygen batteries: A model-based assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grübl, Daniel; Bessler, Wolfgang G.

    2015-11-01

    Seven cell design concepts for aqueous (alkaline) lithium-oxygen batteries are investigated using a multi-physics continuum model for predicting cell behavior and performance in terms of the specific energy and specific power. Two different silver-based cathode designs (a gas diffusion electrode and a flooded cathode) and three different separator designs (a porous separator, a stirred separator chamber, and a redox-flow separator) are compared. Cathode and separator thicknesses are varied over a wide range (50 μm-20 mm) in order to identify optimum configurations. All designs show a considerable capacity-rate effect due to spatiotemporally inhomogeneous precipitation of solid discharge product LiOH·H2O. In addition, a cell design with flooded cathode and redox-flow separator including oxygen uptake within the external tank is suggested. For this design, the model predicts specific power up to 33 W/kg and specific energy up to 570 Wh/kg (gravimetric values of discharged cell including all cell components and catholyte except housing and piping).

  8. Effect of low oxygen tension on the biological characteristics of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Seong; Ko, Young Jong; Lee, Myoung Woo; Park, Hyun Jin; Park, Yoo Jin; Kim, Dong-Ik; Sung, Ki Woong; Koo, Hong Hoe; Yoo, Keon Hee

    2016-11-01

    Culture of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) under ambient conditions does not replicate the low oxygen environment of normal physiological or pathological states and can result in cellular impairment during culture. To overcome these limitations, we explored the effect of hypoxia (1 % O 2 ) on the biological characteristics of MSCs over the course of different culture periods. The following biological characteristics were examined in human bone marrow-derived MSCs cultured under hypoxia for 8 weeks: proliferation rate, morphology, cell size, senescence, immunophenotypic characteristics, and the expression levels of stemness-associated factors and cytokine and chemokine genes. MSCs cultured under hypoxia for approximately 2 weeks showed increased proliferation and viability. During long-term culture, hypoxia delayed phenotypic changes in MSCs, such as increased cell volume, altered morphology, and the expression of senescence-associated-β-gal, without altering their characteristic immunophenotypic characteristics. Furthermore, hypoxia increased the expression of stemness and chemokine-related genes, including OCT4 and CXCR7, and did not decrease the expression of KLF4, C-MYC, CCL2, CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCR4 compared with levels in cells cultured under normoxia. In conclusion, low oxygen tension improved the biological characteristics of MSCs during ex vivo expansion. These data suggest that hypoxic culture could be a useful method for increasing the efficacy of MSC cell therapies.

  9. Physiologic oxygen concentration enhances the stem-like properties of CD133+ human glioblastoma cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCord, Amy M; Jamal, Muhammad; Shankavaram, Uma T; Shankavarum, Uma T; Lang, Frederick F; Camphausen, Kevin; Tofilon, Philip J

    2009-04-01

    In vitro investigations of tumor stem-like cells (TSC) isolated from human glioblastoma (GB) surgical specimens have been done primarily at an atmospheric oxygen level of 20%. To determine whether an oxygen level more consistent with in situ conditions affects their stem cell-like characteristics, we compared GB TSCs grown under conditions of 20% and 7% oxygen. Growing CD133(+) cells sorted from three GB neurosphere cultures at 7% O(2) reduced their doubling time and increased the self-renewal potential as reflected by clonogenicity. Furthermore, at 7% oxygen, the cultures exhibited an enhanced capacity to differentiate along both the glial and neuronal pathways. As compared with 20%, growth at 7% oxygen resulted in an increase in the expression levels of the neural stem cell markers CD133 and nestin as well as the stem cell markers Oct4 and Sox2. In addition, whereas hypoxia inducible factor 1alpha was not affected in CD133(+) TSCs grown at 7% O(2), hypoxia-inducible factor 2alpha was expressed at higher levels as compared with 20% oxygen. Gene expression profiles generated by microarray analysis revealed that reducing oxygen level to 7% resulted in the up-regulation and down-regulation of a significant number of genes, with more than 140 being commonly affected among the three CD133(+) cultures. Furthermore, Gene Ontology categories up-regulated at 7% oxygen included those associated with stem cells or GB TSCs. Thus, the data presented indicate that growth at the more physiologically relevant oxygen level of 7% enhances the stem cell-like phenotype of CD133(+) GB cells.

  10. Endogenous adaptation to low oxygen modulates T-cell regulatory pathways in EAE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esen, Nilufer; Katyshev, Vladimir; Serkin, Zakhar; Katysheva, Svetlana; Dore-Duffy, Paula

    2016-01-19

    In the brain, chronic inflammatory activity may lead to compromised delivery of oxygen and glucose suggesting that therapeutic approaches aimed at restoring metabolic balance may be useful. In vivo exposure to chronic mild normobaric hypoxia (10 % oxygen) leads to a number of endogenous adaptations that includes vascular remodeling (angioplasticity). Angioplasticity promotes tissue survival. We have previously shown that induction of adaptive angioplasticity modulates the disease pattern in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In the present study, we define mechanisms by which adaptation to low oxygen functionally ameliorates the signs and symptoms of EAE and for the first time show that tissue hypoxia may fundamentally alter neurodegenerative disease. C57BL/6 mice were immunized with MOG, and some of them were kept in the hypoxia chambers (day 0) and exposed to 10 % oxygen for 3 weeks, while the others were kept at normoxic environment. Sham-immunized controls were included in both hypoxic and normoxic groups. Animals were sacrificed at pre-clinical and peak disease periods for tissue collection and analysis. Exposure to mild hypoxia decreased histological evidence of inflammation. Decreased numbers of cluster of differentiation (CD)4+ T cells were found in the hypoxic spinal cords associated with a delayed Th17-specific cytokine response. Hypoxia-induced changes did not alter the sensitization of peripheral T cells to the MOG peptide. Exposure to mild hypoxia induced significant increases in anti-inflammatory IL-10 levels and an increase in the number of spinal cord CD25+FoxP3+ T-regulatory cells. Acclimatization to mild hypoxia incites a number of endogenous adaptations that induces an anti-inflammatory milieu. Further understanding of these mechanisms system may pinpoint possible new therapeutic targets to treat neurodegenerative disease.

  11. Quantifying the correlation between spatially defined oxygen gradients and cell fate in an engineered three-dimensional culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardakani, Amir G; Cheema, Umber; Brown, Robert A; Shipley, Rebecca J

    2014-09-06

    A challenge in three-dimensional tissue culture remains the lack of quantitative information linking nutrient delivery and cellular distribution. Both in vivo and in vitro, oxygen is delivered by diffusion from its source (blood vessel or the construct margins). The oxygen level at a defined distance from its source depends critically on the balance of diffusion and cellular metabolism. Cells may respond to this oxygen environment through proliferation, death and chemotaxis, resulting in spatially resolved gradients in cellular density. This study extracts novel spatially resolved and simultaneous data on tissue oxygenation, cellular proliferation, viability and chemotaxis in three-dimensional spiralled, cellular collagen constructs. Oxygen concentration gradients drove preferential cellular proliferation rates and viability in the higher oxygen zones and induced chemotaxis along the spiral of the collagen construct; an oxygen gradient of 1.03 mmHg mm(-1) in the spiral direction induced a mean migratory speed of 1015 μm day(-1). Although this movement was modest, it was effective in balancing the system to a stable cell density distribution, and provided insights into the natural cell mechanism for adapting cell number and activity to a prevailing oxygen regime.

  12. Streptococcus sanguinis induces foam cell formation and cell death of macrophages in association with production of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okahashi, Nobuo; Okinaga, Toshinori; Sakurai, Atsuo; Terao, Yutaka; Nakata, Masanobu; Nakashima, Keisuke; Shintani, Seikou; Kawabata, Shigetada; Ooshima, Takashi; Nishihara, Tatsuji

    2011-10-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis, a normal inhabitant of the human oral cavity, is a common streptococcal species implicated in infective endocarditis. Herein, we investigated the effects of infection with S. sanguinis on foam cell formation and cell death of macrophages. Infection with S. sanguinis stimulated foam cell formation of THP-1, a human macrophage cell line. At a multiplicity of infection >100, S. sanguinis-induced cell death of the macrophages. Viable bacterial infection was required to trigger cell death because heat-inactivated S. sanguinis did not induce cell death. The production of cytokines interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α from macrophages was also stimulated during bacterial infection. Inhibition of the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) resulted in reduced cell death, suggesting an association of ROS with cell death. Furthermore, S. sanguinis-induced cell death appeared to be independent of activation of inflammasomes, because cleavage of procaspase-1 was not evident in infected macrophages. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Non-volatile MOS RAM cell with capacitor-isolated nodes that are radiation accessible for rendering a non-permanent programmed information in the cell of a non-volatile one

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widdershoven, Franciscus P.; Annema, Anne J.; Storms, Maurits M.N.; Pelgrom, Marcellinus J.M.; Pelgrom, Marcel J M

    2001-01-01

    A non-volatile, random access memory cell comprises first and second inverters each having an output node cross-coupled by cross-coupling means to an input node of the other inverter for forming a MOS RAM cell. The output node of each inverter is selectively connected via the conductor paths of

  14. Enhanced reactive oxygen species overexpression by CuO nanoparticles in poorly differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Mei-Lang; Hsieh, Shu-Ling; Wu, Chih-Chung; Chu, Tian-Huei; Lin, Yu-Chun; Yeh, Bi-Wen; Hsieh, Shuchen

    2015-01-01

    Copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) are known to exhibit toxic effects on a variety of cell types and organs. To determine the oxidative impact of CuO NPs on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, well-differentiated (HepG2) and poorly differentiated (SK-Hep-1) cells were exposed to CuO NPs. Cell viability assay showed that the median inhibition concentration (IC50) for SK-Hep-1 and HepG2 cells was 25 μg ml-1 and 85 μg ml-1, respectively. Cellular fluorescence intensity using DCFH-DA staining analysis revealed significant intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation of up to 242% in SK-Hep-1 cells, compared with 86% in HepG2 cells. HPLC analysis demonstrated that a CuO NP treatment caused cellular GSH depletion of 58% and a GSH/GSSG ratio decrease to ~0.1 in SK-Hep-1 cells. The oxidative stress caused by enhanced superoxide anion production was observed in both HepG2 (146%) and SK-Hep-1 (192%) cells. The Griess assay verified that CuO NPs induced NO production (170%) in SK-Hep-1 cells. Comet assay and western blot further demonstrated that CuO NPs induced severe DNA strand breakage (70%) in SK-Hep-1 cells and caused DNA damage via increased γ-H2AX levels. These results suggest that well-differentiated HepG2 cells possess a robust antioxidant defense system against CuO NP-induced ROS stress and exhibit more tolerance to oxidative stress. Conversely, poorly differentiated SK-Hep-1 cells exhibited a deregulated antioxidant defense system that allowed accumulation of CuO NP-induced ROS and resulted in severe cytotoxicity.Copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) are known to exhibit toxic effects on a variety of cell types and organs. To determine the oxidative impact of CuO NPs on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, well-differentiated (HepG2) and poorly differentiated (SK-Hep-1) cells were exposed to CuO NPs. Cell viability assay showed that the median inhibition concentration (IC50) for SK-Hep-1 and HepG2 cells was 25 μg ml-1 and 85 μg ml-1, respectively

  15. Earth mortars and earth-lime renders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernandes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Earth surface coatings play a decorative architectural role, apart from their function as wall protection. In Portuguese vernacular architecture, earth mortars were usually applied on stone masonry, while earth renders and plasters were used on indoors surface coatings. Limestone exists only in certain areas of the country and consequently lime was not easily available everywhere, especially on granite and schist regions where stone masonry was a current building technique. In the central west coast of Portugal, the lime slaking procedure entailed slaking the quicklime mixed with earth (sandy soil, in a pit; the resulting mixture would then be combined in a mortar or plaster. This was also the procedure for manufactured adobes stabilized with lime. Adobe buildings with earth-lime renderings and plasters were also traditional in the same region, using lime putty and lime wash for final coat and decoration. Classic decoration on earth architecture from the 18th-19th century was in many countries a consequence of the François Cointeraux (1740-1830 manuals - Les Cahiers d'Architecture Rurale" (1793 - a French guide for earth architecture and building construction. This manual arrived to Portugal in the beginning of XIX century, but was never translated to Portuguese. References about decoration for earth houses were explained on this manual, as well as procedures about earth-lime renders and ornamentation of earth walls; in fact, these procedures are exactly the same as the ones used in adobe buildings in this Portuguese region. The specific purpose of the present paper is to show some cases of earth mortars, renders and plasters on stone buildings in Portugal and to explain the methods of producing earth-lime renders, and also to show some examples of rendering and coating with earth-lime in Portuguese adobe vernacular architecture.

  16. Microbial nar-GFP cell sensors reveal oxygen limitations in highly agitated and aerated laboratory-scale fermentors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao Govind

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small-scale microbial fermentations are often assumed to be homogeneous, and oxygen limitation due to inadequate micromixing is often overlooked as a potential problem. To assess the relative degree of micromixing, and hence propensity for oxygen limitation, a new cellular oxygen sensor has been developed. The oxygen responsive E. coli nitrate reductase (nar promoter was used to construct an oxygen reporter plasmid (pNar-GFPuv which allows cell-based reporting of oxygen limitation. Because there are greater than 109 cells in a fermentor, one can outfit a vessel with more than 109 sensors. Our concept was tested in high density, lab-scale (5 L, fed-batch, E. coli fermentations operated with varied mixing efficiency – one verses four impellers. Results In both cases, bioreactors were maintained identically at greater than 80% dissolved oxygen (DO during batch phase and at approximately 20% DO during fed-batch phase. Trends for glucose consumption, biomass and DO showed nearly identical behavior. However, fermentations with only one impeller showed significantly higher GFPuv expression than those with four, indicating a higher degree of fluid segregation sufficient for cellular oxygen deprivation. As the characteristic time for GFPuv expression (approx 90 min. is much larger than that for mixing (approx 10 s, increased specific fluorescence represents an averaged effect of oxygen limitation over time and by natural extension, over space. Conclusion Thus, the pNar-GFPuv plasmid enabled bioreactor-wide oxygen sensing in that bacterial cells served as individual recirculating sensors integrating their responses over space and time. We envision cell-based oxygen sensors may find utility in a wide variety of bioprocessing applications.

  17. Carboxylated nanodiamond and re-oxygenation process of gamma irradiated red blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acosta-Elias, M.; Sarabia-Sainz, A.; Silva-Campa, E.; Angulo-Molina, A.; Soto-Puebla, D.; Barboza-Flores, M.; Melendrez, R.; Alvarez-Garcia, S.; Pedroza-Montero, M.; Pedroso-Santana, S.; Santacruz-Gomez, K.; Castaneda, B.

    2015-01-01

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) possess exceptional physical, chemical, and biological properties, which make them suitable for potential biomedical applications. They are biocompatible and their usefulness as effective Raman/fluorescence probes for labeling as well as for drug delivery has been demonstrated. Related to their biocompatibility, the interaction between NDs and red blood cells (RBCs) is of great interest. In this work, the influence of carboxylated NDs (cNDs) in the re-oxygenation capability of both γ-irradiated and stored RBCs was studied. The standard 25 Gy γ dose recommended to prevent transfusion associated graft-versus-host disease was used. A 5-day maximum storage time was used to evaluate the ''storage lesion''. The hemoglobin (Hb) oxygenation state was assessed by Raman microspectroscopy and the morphologic changes on cells were tracked by optical imaging. Our results show that irradiated RBCs have a better re-oxygenation capability and morphological recovery when they are in presence of cNDs. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Carboxylated nanodiamond and re-oxygenation process of gamma irradiated red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta-Elias, M. [Doctorado en Nanotecnologia, Universidad de Sonora (Mexico); Sarabia-Sainz, A.; Silva-Campa, E.; Angulo-Molina, A.; Soto-Puebla, D.; Barboza-Flores, M.; Melendrez, R.; Alvarez-Garcia, S.; Pedroza-Montero, M. [Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo (Mexico); Pedroso-Santana, S. [Doctorado en Ciencias (Fisica), Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo (Mexico); Santacruz-Gomez, K.; Castaneda, B. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo (Mexico)

    2015-11-15

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) possess exceptional physical, chemical, and biological properties, which make them suitable for potential biomedical applications. They are biocompatible and their usefulness as effective Raman/fluorescence probes for labeling as well as for drug delivery has been demonstrated. Related to their biocompatibility, the interaction between NDs and red blood cells (RBCs) is of great interest. In this work, the influence of carboxylated NDs (cNDs) in the re-oxygenation capability of both γ-irradiated and stored RBCs was studied. The standard 25 Gy γ dose recommended to prevent transfusion associated graft-versus-host disease was used. A 5-day maximum storage time was used to evaluate the ''storage lesion''. The hemoglobin (Hb) oxygenation state was assessed by Raman microspectroscopy and the morphologic changes on cells were tracked by optical imaging. Our results show that irradiated RBCs have a better re-oxygenation capability and morphological recovery when they are in presence of cNDs. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Digital color acquisition, perception, coding and rendering

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez-Maloigne, Christine; Macaire, Ludovic

    2013-01-01

    In this book the authors identify the basic concepts and recent advances in the acquisition, perception, coding and rendering of color. The fundamental aspects related to the science of colorimetry in relation to physiology (the human visual system) are addressed, as are constancy and color appearance. It also addresses the more technical aspects related to sensors and the color management screen. Particular attention is paid to the notion of color rendering in computer graphics. Beyond color, the authors also look at coding, compression, protection and quality of color images and videos.

  20. Haptic rendering for simulation of fine manipulation

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Dangxiao; Zhang, Yuru

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces the latest progress in six degrees of freedom (6-DoF) haptic rendering with the focus on a new approach for simulating force/torque feedback in performing tasks that require dexterous manipulation skills. One of the major challenges in 6-DoF haptic rendering is to resolve the conflict between high speed and high fidelity requirements, especially in simulating a tool interacting with both rigid and deformable objects in a narrow space and with fine features. The book presents a configuration-based optimization approach to tackle this challenge. Addressing a key issue in man

  1. Blender cycles lighting and rendering cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Iraci, Bernardo

    2013-01-01

    An in-depth guide full of step-by-step recipes to explore the concepts behind the usage of Cycles. Packed with illustrations, and lots of tips and tricks; the easy-to-understand nature of the book will help the reader understand even the most complex concepts with ease.If you are a digital artist who already knows your way around Blender, and you want to learn about the new Cycles' rendering engine, this is the book for you. Even experts will be able to pick up new tips and tricks to make the most of the rendering capabilities of Cycles.

  2. GPU Pro 5 advanced rendering techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Engel, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    In GPU Pro5: Advanced Rendering Techniques, section editors Wolfgang Engel, Christopher Oat, Carsten Dachsbacher, Michal Valient, Wessam Bahnassi, and Marius Bjorge have once again assembled a high-quality collection of cutting-edge techniques for advanced graphics processing unit (GPU) programming. Divided into six sections, the book covers rendering, lighting, effects in image space, mobile devices, 3D engine design, and compute. It explores rasterization of liquids, ray tracing of art assets that would otherwise be used in a rasterized engine, physically based area lights, volumetric light

  3. Oxygen-Dependent Cell-to-Cell Variability in the Output of the Escherichia coli Tor Phosphorelay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggiani, Manuela; Goulian, Mark

    2015-06-15

    Escherichia coli senses and responds to trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) in the environment through the TorT-TorS-TorR signal transduction system. The periplasmic protein TorT binds TMAO and stimulates the hybrid kinase TorS to phosphorylate the response regulator TorR through a phosphorelay. Phosphorylated TorR, in turn, activates transcription of the torCAD operon, which encodes the proteins required for anaerobic respiration via reduction of TMAO to trimethylamine. Interestingly, E. coli respires TMAO in both the presence and absence of oxygen, a behavior that is markedly different from the utilization of other alternative electron acceptors by this bacterium. Here we describe an unusual form of regulation by oxygen for this system. While the average level of torCAD transcription is the same for aerobic and anaerobic cultures containing TMAO, the behavior across the population of cells is strikingly different under the two growth conditions. Cellular levels of torCAD transcription in aerobic cultures are highly heterogeneous, in contrast to the relatively homogeneous distribution in anaerobic cultures. Thus, oxygen regulates the variance of the output but not the mean for the Tor system. We further show that this oxygen-dependent variability stems from the phosphorelay. Trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) is utilized by numerous bacteria as an electron acceptor for anaerobic respiration. In E. coli, expression of the proteins required for TMAO respiration is tightly regulated by a signal transduction system that is activated by TMAO. Curiously, although oxygen is the energetically preferred electron acceptor, TMAO is respired even in the presence of oxygen. Here we describe an interesting and unexpected form of regulation for this system in which oxygen produces highly variable expression of the TMAO utilization proteins across a population of cells without affecting the mean expression of these proteins. To our knowledge, this is the first reported example of a stimulus

  4. In vitro oxygen-dependent survival of two human cell lines after combined radiations tirapazamin and cisplatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lartigau, E.; Stern, S.; Guichard, M.

    2000-01-01

    Recent data have shown that the in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity of bioreductive drugs could be significantly cytotoxicity of bioreductive drugs could be significantly increased by combination with ionising radiation or chemotherapy. Various parameters such as oxygen tension and timing of administration of the drugs could play a crucial role in the efficacy of combined treatment modalities. The aim of this study was to define the oxygen dependency of cell survival after in vitro irradiation and incubation with tirapazamin, a bioreductive drug, and cisplatin given alone or simultaneously. Two human cell lines were studied: one cell line sensitive to tirapazamin, Na11+, a pigmented melanoma with a high percentage of hypoxic cells, and a less sensitive cell line to tirapazamin, HRT18, a rectal adenocarcinoma. Gas changes were made to study cell survival at four different oxygen concentrations (pO 2 ): air (20.9 % O 2 ), 10.2 and 0.2 %. Cells were incubated with tirapazamin and cisplatin alone or combined for one hour at 37 deg C, then irradiated and cultured. For Na11+, cell survival after irradiation was comparable in air and at 10 % oxygen with the two drugs given alone or combined. At 2 and 0.2 % oxygen, cell killing was largely increased by tirapazamin and was not modified by the addition of cisplatin. For HRT18, cell survival was not modified when cisplatin was added to radiation, whatever the oxygen partial pressure. At low pO 2 (2 and 0.2 %) the cytotoxic effect of tirapazamin was not significantly decreased by the addition of cisplatin. When cytotoxic and bioreductive drugs are combined to radiation, the magnitude of the observed effect is highly dependent on the partial oxygen pressure and on the sensitivity of the cell line to the individual drugs. This has very important implications for clinical strategies based on combined chemo-radiotherapy. (authors)

  5. Characterization of a continuous agitated cell reactor for oxygen dependent biocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toftgaard Pedersen, Asbjørn; de Carvalho, Teresa Melo; Sutherland, Euan; Rehn, Gustav; Ashe, Robert; Woodley, John M

    2017-06-01

    Biocatalytic oxidation reactions employing molecular oxygen as the electron acceptor are difficult to conduct in a continuous flow reactor because of the requirement for high oxygen transfer rates. In this paper, the oxidation of glucose to glucono-1,5-lactone by glucose oxidase was used as a model reaction to study a novel continuous agitated cell reactor (ACR). The ACR consists of ten cells interconnected by small channels. An agitator is placed in each cell, which mixes the content of the cell when the reactor body is shaken by lateral movement. Based on tracer experiments, a hydrodynamic model for the ACR was developed. The model consisted of ten tanks-in-series with back-mixing occurring within and between each cell. The back-mixing was a necessary addition to the model in order to explain the observed phenomenon that the ACR behaved as two continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) at low flow rates, while it at high flow rates behaved as the expected ten CSTRs in series. The performance of the ACR was evaluated by comparing the steady state conversion at varying residence times with the conversion observed in a stirred batch reactor of comparable size. It was found that the ACR could more than double the overall reaction rate, which was solely due to an increased oxygen transfer rate in the ACR caused by the intense mixing as a result of the spring agitators. The volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient, k L a, was estimated to be 344 h -1 in the 100 mL ACR, opposed to only 104 h -1 in a batch reactor of comparable working volume. Interestingly, the large deviation from plug flow behavior seen in the tracer experiments was found to have little influence on the conversion in the ACR, since both a plug flow reactor (PFR) model and the backflow cell model described the data sufficiently well. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 1222-1230. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Photoluminescent Gold Nanoclusters in Cancer Cells: Cellular Uptake, Toxicity, and Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matulionyte, Marija; Dapkute, Dominyka; Budenaite, Laima; Jarockyte, Greta; Rotomskis, Ricardas

    2017-02-10

    In recent years, photoluminescent gold nanoclusters have attracted considerable interest in both fundamental biomedical research and practical applications. Due to their ultrasmall size, unique molecule-like optical properties, and facile synthesis gold nanoclusters have been considered very promising photoluminescent agents for biosensing, bioimaging, and targeted therapy. Yet, interaction of such ultra-small nanoclusters with cells and other biological objects remains poorly understood. Therefore, the assessment of the biocompatibility and potential toxicity of gold nanoclusters is of major importance before their clinical application. In this study, the cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) of bovine serum albumin-encapsulated (BSA-Au NCs) and 2-(N-morpholino) ethanesulfonic acid (MES)capped photoluminescent gold nanoclusters (Au-MES NCs) were investigated. The results showed that BSA-Au NCs accumulate in cells in a similar manner as BSA alone, indicating an endocytotic uptake mechanism while ultrasmall Au-MES NCs were distributed homogeneously throughout the whole cell volume including cell nucleus. The cytotoxicity of BSA-Au NCs was negligible, demonstrating good biocompatibility of such BSA-protected Au NCs. In contrast, possibly due to ultrasmall size and thin coating layer, Au-MES NCs exhibited exposure time-dependent high cytotoxicity and higher reactivity which led to highly increased generation of reactive oxygen species. The results demonstrate the importance of the coating layer to biocompatibility and toxicity of ultrasmall photoluminescent gold nanoclusters.

  7. Photoluminescent Gold Nanoclusters in Cancer Cells: Cellular Uptake, Toxicity, and Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Matulionyte

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, photoluminescent gold nanoclusters have attracted considerable interest in both fundamental biomedical research and practical applications. Due to their ultrasmall size, unique molecule-like optical properties, and facile synthesis gold nanoclusters have been considered very promising photoluminescent agents for biosensing, bioimaging, and targeted therapy. Yet, interaction of such ultra-small nanoclusters with cells and other biological objects remains poorly understood. Therefore, the assessment of the biocompatibility and potential toxicity of gold nanoclusters is of major importance before their clinical application. In this study, the cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS of bovine serum albumin-encapsulated (BSA-Au NCs and 2-(N-morpholino ethanesulfonic acid (MEScapped photoluminescent gold nanoclusters (Au-MES NCs were investigated. The results showed that BSA-Au NCs accumulate in cells in a similar manner as BSA alone, indicating an endocytotic uptake mechanism while ultrasmall Au-MES NCs were distributed homogeneously throughout the whole cell volume including cell nucleus. The cytotoxicity of BSA-Au NCs was negligible, demonstrating good biocompatibility of such BSA-protected Au NCs. In contrast, possibly due to ultrasmall size and thin coating layer, Au-MES NCs exhibited exposure time-dependent high cytotoxicity and higher reactivity which led to highly increased generation of reactive oxygen species. The results demonstrate the importance of the coating layer to biocompatibility and toxicity of ultrasmall photoluminescent gold nanoclusters.

  8. Oxygen-sensitive potassium channels in chemoreceptor cell physiology: making a virtue of necessity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Constancio; Vaquero, Luis M; López-López, José Ramón; Pérez-García, M Teresa

    2009-10-01

    The characterization of the molecular mechanisms involved in low-oxygen chemotransduction has been an active field of research since the first description of an oxygen-sensitive K(+) channel in rabbit carotid body (CB) chemoreceptor cells. As a result, a large number of components of the transduction cascade, from O(2) sensors to O(2)-sensitive ion channels, have been found. Although the endpoints of the process are analogous, the heterogeneity of the elements involved in the different chemoreceptor tissues precludes a unifying theory of hypoxic signaling, and it has been a source of controversy. However, when these molecular constituents of the hypoxic cascade are brought back to their physiological context, it becomes clear that the diversity of mechanisms is necessary to build up an integrated cellular response that demands the concerted action of several O(2) sensors and several effectors.

  9. Regulation of radiation protective agents on cell damage induced by reactive oxygen species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Hee; Lee, Si Eun; Ju, Eun Mi; Gao, Eu Feng [Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea)

    2002-04-01

    In this study, we developed candidates of new radio-protective agents and elucidated the regulation mechanism of these candidates on cell damage induced by reactive oxygen species. The methanol extracts and ethylacetate fractions of NP-1, NP-5, NP-7, NP-11, NP-12 and NP-14 showed higher radical scavenging activity. The extracts of NP-7, NP-12 and NP-14 showed strong protective effect against oxidative damage induced by UV and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The most of samples enhanced SOD, CAT and GPX activity in V79-4 cells. The protective effect of samples on H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced apoptosis was observed with microscope and flow cytometer. Cells exposed to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} exhibit distinct morphological features of programmed cell death, such as nuclear fragmentation and increase in the percentage of cells with a sub-G1 DNA content. However, cells which was pretreated with samples significantly reduced the characteristics of apoptotic cells. Their morphological observation and DNA profiles were similar to those of the control cells. NP-14 which had excellent antioxidant activity restored G2/M arrest induced by oxidative stress. These data suggested that natural medicinal plants protected H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced apoptosis. 42 refs., 29 figs., 11 tabs. (Author)

  10. Generation of reactive oxygen species from porous silicon microparticles in cell culture medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Suet Peng; Williams, Keryn A; Canham, Leigh T; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2010-06-01

    Nanostructured (porous) silicon is a promising biodegradable biomaterial, which is being intensively researched as a tissue engineering scaffold and drug-delivery vehicle. Here, we tested the biocompatibility of non-treated and thermally-oxidized porous silicon particles using an indirect cell viability assay. Initial direct cell culture on porous silicon determined that human lens epithelial cells only poorly adhered to non-treated porous silicon. Using an indirect cell culture assay, we found that non-treated microparticles caused complete cell death, indicating that these particles generated a toxic product in cell culture medium. In contrast, thermally-oxidized microparticles did not reduce cell viability significantly. We found evidence for the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by means of the fluorescent probe 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin. Our results suggest that non-treated porous silicon microparticles produced ROS, which interacted with the components of the cell culture medium, leading to the formation of cytotoxic species. Oxidation of porous silicon microparticles not only mitigated, but also abolished the toxic effects.

  11. Induction of reactive oxygen species-stimulated distinctive autophagy by chelerythrine in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zheng-Hai; Cao, Wen-Xiang; Wang, Zhao-Yu; Lu, Jia-Hong; Liu, Bo; Chen, Xiuping; Lu, Jin-Jian

    2017-08-01

    Chelerythrine (CHE), a natural benzo[c]phenanthridine alkaloid, shows anti-cancer effect through a number of mechanisms. Herein, the effect and mechanism of the CHE-induced autophagy, a type II programmed cell death, in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells were studied for the first time. CHE induced cell viability decrease, colony formation inhibition, and apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner in NSCLC A549 and NCI-H1299 cells. In addition, CHE triggered the expression of phosphatidylethanolamine-modified microtubule-associated protein light-chain 3 (LC3-II). The CHE-induced expression of LC3-II was further increased in the combination treatment with chloroquine (CQ), an autophagy inhibitor, and large amounts of red-puncta were observed in the CHE-treated A549 cells with stable expression of mRFP-EGFP-LC3, indicating that CHE induces autophagy flux. Silence of beclin 1 reversed the CHE-induced expression of LC3-II. Inhibition of autophagy remarkably reversed the CHE-induced cell viability decrease and apoptosis in NCI-H1299 cells but not in A549 cells. Furthermore, CHE triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in both cell lines. A decreased level of ROS through pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine reversed the CHE-induced cell viability decrease, apoptosis, and autophagy. Taken together, CHE induced distinctive autophagy in A549 (accompanied autophagy) and NCI-H1299 (pro-death autophagy) cells and a decreased level of ROS reversed the effect of CHE in NSCLC cells in terms of cell viability, apoptosis, and autophagy. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Thermodynamic analysis of direct internal reforming of methane and butane in proton and oxygen conducting fuel cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesheuvel, P.M.; Geerlings, J.J.C.

    2008-01-01

    We present results of a thermodynamic analysis of direct internal reforming fuel cells, based on either a proton conducting fuel cell (FC-H+) or an oxygen ion conducting fuel cell (FC-O2-). We analyze the option of methane as fuel as well as butane. The model self-consistently combines all chemical

  13. Emerging roles of hypoxia-inducible factors and reactive oxygen species in cancer and pluripotent stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeo Saito

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic organisms require oxygen homeostasis to maintain proper cellular function for survival. During conditions of low oxygen tension (hypoxia, cells activate the transcription of genes that induce an adaptive response, which supplies oxygen to tissues. Hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs may contribute to the maintenance of putative cancer stem cells, which can continue self-renewal indefinitely and express stemness genes in hypoxic stress environments (stem cell niches. Reactive oxygen species (ROS have long been recognized as toxic by-products of aerobic metabolism that are harmful to living cells, leading to DNA damage, senescence, or cell death. HIFs may promote a cancer stem cell state, whereas the loss of HIFs induces the production of cellular ROS and activation of proteins p53 and p16Ink4a, which lead to tumor cell death and senescence. ROS seem to inhibit HIF regulation in cancer cells. By contrast, controversial data have suggested that hypoxia increases the generation of ROS, which prevents hydroxylation of HIF proteins by inducing their transcription as negative feedback. Moreover, hypoxic conditions enhance the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. During reprogramming of somatic cells into a PSC state, cells attain a metabolic state typically observed in embryonic stem cells (ESCs. ESCs and iPSCs share similar bioenergetic metabolisms, including decreased mitochondrial number and activity, and induced anaerobic glycolysis. This review discusses the current knowledge regarding the emerging roles of ROS homeostasis in cellular reprogramming and the implications of hypoxic regulation in cancer development.

  14. Extracellular matrix production by nucleus pulposus and bone marrow stem cells in response to altered oxygen and glucose microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Syeda M; Buckley, Conor T

    2015-12-01

    Bone marrow (BM) stem cells may be an ideal source of cells for intervertebral disc (IVD) regeneration. However, the harsh biochemical microenvironment of the IVD may significantly influence the biological and metabolic vitality of injected stem cells and impair their repair potential. This study investigated the viability and production of key matrix proteins by nucleus pulposus (NP) and BM stem cells cultured in the typical biochemical microenvironment of the IVD consisting of altered oxygen and glucose concentrations. Culture-expanded NP cells and BM stem cells were encapsulated in 1.5% alginate and ionically crosslinked to form cylindrical hydrogel constructs. Hydrogel constructs were maintained under different glucose concentrations (1, 5 and 25 mM) and external oxygen concentrations (5 and 20%). Cell viability was measured using the Live/Dead® assay and the production of sulphated glycosaminoglycans (sGAG), and collagen was quantified biochemically and histologically. For BM stem cells, IVD-like micro-environmental conditions (5 mM glucose and 5% oxygen) increased the accumulation of sGAG and collagen. In contrast, low glucose conditions (1 mM glucose) combined with 5% external oxygen concentration promoted cell death, inhibiting proliferation and the accumulation of sGAG and collagen. NP-encapsulated alginate constructs were relatively insensitive to oxygen concentration or glucose condition in that they accumulated similar amounts of sGAG under all conditions. Under IVD-like microenvironmental conditions, NP cells were found to have a lower glucose consumption rate compared with BM cells and may in fact be more suitable to adapt and sustain the harsh microenvironmental conditions. Considering the highly specialised microenvironment of the central NP, these results indicate that IVD-like concentrations of low glucose and low oxygen are critical and influential for the survival and biological behaviour of stem cells. Such findings may promote and accelerate

  15. Oxygen consumption in Plasmodium berghei-infected murine red cells: a direct spectrophotometric assay in intact erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deslauriers, R; Moffatt, D J; Smith, I C

    1986-05-29

    A spectrophotometric assay has been devised to measure oxygen consumption non-invasively in intact murine red cells parasitized by Plasmodium berghei. The method uses oxyhemoglobin in the erythrocytes both as a source of oxygen and as an indicator of oxygen consumption. Spectra of intact cells show broad peaks and sloping baselines due to light-scattering. In order to ascertain the number of varying components in the 370-450 nm range, the resolution of the spectra was enhanced using Fourier transforms of the frequency domain spectra. Calculation of oxygen consumption was carried out for two-component systems (oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin) using absorbances at 415 and 431 nm. Samples prepared from highly parasitized mice (greater than 80% parasitemia, 5% hematocrit) showed oxygen consumption rates of (4-8) X 10(-8) microliter/cell per h. This rate was not attributable to the presence of white cells or reticulocytes. The rate of oxygen consumption in the erythrocytes is shown to be modulated by various agents: the respiratory inhibitors NaN3 and KCN (1 mM) reduced oxygen consumption 2-3-fold; salicylhydroxamic acid (2.5 mM) caused a 20% reduction in rate and 10 mM NaN3, completely blocked deoxygenation. Antimalarial drugs and metal-chelating agents were also tested. Chloroquine, EDTA and desferal (desferoxamine mesylate) did not decrease the deoxygenation rate of hemoglobin in parasitized cells. Quinacrine, quinine and primaquine reduced the rate of formation of deoxyhemoglobin but also produced substantial quantities of methemoglobin. The lipophilic chelator, 5-hydroxyquinoline, decreased the rate of deoxygenation one-third. The spectrophotometric assay provides a convenient means to monitor oxygen consumption in parasitized red cells, to test the effects of various agents thereon, and potentially to explore possible mechanisms for oxygen utilization.

  16. Relation of Mitochondrial Oxygen Consumption in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells to Vascular Function in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Mor-Li; Shirihai, Orian S.; Holbrook, Monika; Xu, Guoquan; Kocherla, Marsha; Shah, Akash; Fetterman, Jessica L.; Kluge, Matthew A.; Frame, Alissa A.; Hamburg, Naomi M.; Vita, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown mitochondrial dysfunction and increased production of reactive oxygen species in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC’s) and endothelial cells from patients with diabetes mellitus. Mitochondria oxygen consumption is coupled to ATP production and also occurs in an uncoupled fashion during formation of reactive oxygen species by components of the electron transport chain and other enzymatic sites. We therefore hypothesized that diabetes would be associated with higher total and uncoupled oxygen consumption in PBMC’s that would correlate with endothelial dysfunction. We developed a method to measure oxygen consumption in freshly isolated PBMC’s and applied it to 26 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 28 non-diabetic controls. Basal (192±47 vs. 161±44 pMoles/min, P=0.01), uncoupled (64±16 vs. 53±16 pMoles/min, P=0.007), and maximal (795±87 vs. 715±128 pMoles/min, P=0.01) oxygen consumption rates were higher in diabetic patients compared to controls. There were no significant correlations between oxygen consumption rates and endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilation measured by vascular ultrasound. Non-endothelium-dependent nitroglycerin-mediated dilation was lower in diabetics (10.1±6.6 vs. 15.8±4.8%, P=0.03) and correlated with maximal oxygen consumption (R= −0.64, P=0.001). In summary, we found that diabetes mellitus is associated with a pattern of mitochondrial oxygen consumption consistent with higher production of reactive oxygen species. The correlation between oxygen consumption and nitroglycerin-mediated dilation may suggest a link between mitochondrial dysfunction and vascular smooth muscle cell dysfunction that merits further study. Finally, the described method may have utility for assessment of mitochondrial function in larger scale observational and interventional studies in humans. PMID:24558030

  17. HEMOXCell, a New Oxygen Carrier Usable as an Additive for Mesenchymal Stem Cell Culture in Platelet Lysate-Supplemented Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pape, Fiona; Cosnuau-Kemmat, Lucie; Richard, Gaëlle; Dubrana, Frédéric; Férec, Claude; Zal, Franck; Leize, Elisabeth; Delépine, Pascal

    2017-04-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are promising candidates for therapeutic applications such as tissue engineering. However, one of the main challenges is to improve oxygen supply to hypoxic areas to reduce oxygen gradient formation while preserving MSC differentiation potential and viability. For this purpose, a marine hemoglobin, HEMOXCell, was evaluated as an oxygen carrier for culturing human bone marrow MSCs in vitro for future three-dimensional culture applications. Impact of HEMOXCell on cell growth and viability was assessed in human platelet lysate (hPL)-supplemented media. Maintenance of MSC features, such as multipotency and expression of MSC specific markers, was further investigated by biochemical assays and flow cytometry analysis. Our experimental results highlight its oxygenator potential and indicate that an optimal concentration of 0.025 g/L HEMOXCell induces a 25%-increase of the cell growth rate, preserves MSC phenotype, and maintains MSC differentiation properties; a two-fold higher concentration induces cell detachment without altering cell viability. Our data suggest the potential interest of HEMOXCell as a natural oxygen carrier for tissue engineering applications to oxygenate hypoxic areas and to maintain cell viability, functions and "stemness." These features will be further tested within three-dimensional scaffolds. © 2017 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Fast rendering of scanned room geometries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Søren Krarup; Markovic, Milos; Hammershøi, Dorte

    2014-01-01

    Room acoustics are rendered in Virtual Realities based on models of the real world. These are typically rather coarse representations of the true geometry resulting in room impulse responses with a lack of natural detail. This problem can be overcome by using data scanned by sensors, such as e...

  19. Rendering Visible: Painting and Sexuate Subjectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Linda

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, I examine Luce Irigaray's aesthetic of sexual difference, which she develops by extrapolating from Paul Klee's idea that the role of painting is to render the non-visible rather than represent the visible. This idea is the premise of her analyses of phenomenology and psychoanalysis and their respective contributions to understanding…

  20. Free-viewpoint depth image based rendering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zinger, S.; Do, Q.L.; With, de P.H.N.

    2010-01-01

    In 3D TV research, one approach is to employ multiple cameras for creating a 3D multi-view signal with the aim to make interactive free-viewpoint selection possible in 3D TV media. This paper explores a new rendering algorithm that enables to compute a free-viewpoint between two reference views from

  1. Real-Time In Vivo Monitoring of Reactive Oxygen Species in Guard Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ky Young; Roubelakis-Angelakis, Kalliopi A

    2018-01-01

    The intra-/intercellular homeostasis of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and especially of superoxides (O 2 .- ) and hydrogen peroxide (O 2 .- ) participate in signalling cascades which dictate developmental processes and reactions to biotic/abiotic stresses. Polyamine oxidases terminally oxidize/back convert polyamines generating H 2 O 2 . Recently, an NADPH-oxidase/Polyamine oxidase feedback loop was identified to control oxidative burst under salinity. Thus, the real-time localization/monitoring of ROS in specific cells, such as the guard cells, can be of great interest. Here we present a detailed description of the real-time in vivo monitoring of ROS in the guard cells using H 2 O 2 - and O 2 .- specific fluorescing probes, which can be used for studying ROS accumulation generated from any source, including the amine oxidases-dependent pathway, during development and stress.

  2. Enhanced oxygen reduction activity and solid oxide fuel cell performance with a nanoparticles-loaded cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Liu, Li; Zhao, Zhe; Tu, Baofeng; Ou, Dingrong; Cui, Daan; Wei, Xuming; Chen, Xiaobo; Cheng, Mojie

    2015-03-11

    Reluctant oxygen-reduction-reaction (ORR) activity has been a long-standing challenge limiting cell performance for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) in both centralized and distributed power applications. We report here that this challenge has been tackled with coloading of (La,Sr)MnO3 (LSM) and Y2O3 stabilized zirconia (YSZ) nanoparticles within a porous YSZ framework. This design dramatically improves ORR activity, enhances fuel cell output (200-300% power improvement), and enables superior stability (no observed degradation within 500 h of operation) from 600 to 800 °C. The improved performance is attributed to the intimate contacts between nanoparticulate YSZ and LSM particles in the three-phase boundaries in the cathode.

  3. Mechanism of artemisinin phytotoxicity action: induction of reactive oxygen species and cell death in lettuce seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Dan-Dan; Ding, Lan; Cui, Hai-Yan; Jin, Hui; Yang, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Jian-She; Qin, Bo

    2015-03-01

    Artemisinin has been recognized as an allelochemical that inhibits growth of several plant species. However, its mode of action is not well clarified. In this study, the mechanism of artemisinin phytotoxicity on lettuce seedlings was investigated. Root and shoot elongation of lettuce seedlings were inhibited by artemisinin in a concentration-dependent manner. The compound effectively arrested cell division and caused loss of cell viability in root tips of lettuce. Overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was induced by artemisinin. Lipid peroxidation, proline overproduction and reduction of chlorophyll content in lettuce seedlings were found after treatments. These results suggested that artemisinin could induce ROS overproduction, which caused membrane lipids peroxidation and cell death, and impacted mitosis and physiological processes, resulting in growth inhibition of receptor plants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. p53-competent cells and p53-deficient cells display different susceptibility to oxygen functionalized graphene cytotoxicity and genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petibone, Dayton M; Mustafa, Thikra; Bourdo, Shawn E; Lafont, Andersen; Ding, Wei; Karmakar, Alokita; Nima, Zeid A; Watanabe, Fumiya; Casciano, Daniel; Morris, Suzanne M; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N; Biris, Alexandru S

    2017-11-01

    Due to the distinctive physical, electrical, and chemical properties of graphene nanomaterials, numerous efforts pursuing graphene-based biomedical and industrial applications are underway. Oxidation of pristine graphene surfaces mitigates its otherwise hydrophobic characteristic thereby improving its biocompatibility and functionality. Yet, the potential widespread use of oxidized graphene derivatives raises concern about adverse impacts on human health. The p53 tumor suppressor protein maintains cellular and genetic stability after toxic exposures. Here, we show that p53 functional status correlates with oxygen functionalized graphene (f-G) cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in vitro. The f-G exposed p53-competent cells, but not p53-deficient cells, initiated G 0 /G 1 phase cell cycle arrest, suppressed reactive oxygen species, and entered apoptosis. There was p53-dependent f-G genotoxicity evident as increased structural chromosome damage, but not increased gene mutation or chromatin loss. In conclusion, the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential for f-G in exposed cells was dependent on the p53 functional status. These findings have broad implications for the safe and effective implementation of oxidized graphene derivatives into biomedical and industrial applications. Published 2017. This article has been contributed to by US Government employees and their work is in the public domain in the USA. Published 2017. This article has been contributed to by US Government employees and their work is in the public domain in the USA.

  5. Reactive Oxygen Species and Mitochondrial Homeostasis as Regulators of Stem Cell Fate and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Darren Q; Suda, Toshio

    2018-07-10

    The precise role and impact of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in stem cells, which are essential for lifelong tissue homeostasis and regeneration, remain of significant interest to the field. The long-term regenerative potential of a stem cell compartment is determined by the delicate balance between quiescence, self-renewal, and differentiation, all of which can be influenced by ROS levels. Recent Advances: The past decade has seen a growing appreciation for the importance of ROS and redox homeostasis in various stem cell compartments, particularly those of hematopoietic, neural, and muscle tissues. In recent years, the importance of proteostasis and mitochondria in relation to stem cell biology and redox homeostasis has garnered considerable interest. Here, we explore the reciprocal relationship between ROS and stem cells, with significant emphasis on mitochondria as a core component of redox homeostasis. We discuss how redox signaling, involving cell-fate determining protein kinases and transcription factors, can control stem cell function and fate. We also address the impact of oxidative stress on stem cells, especially oxidative damage of lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. We further discuss ROS management in stem cells, and present recent evidence supporting the importance of mitochondrial activity and its modulation (via mitochondrial clearance, biogenesis, dynamics, and distribution [i.e., segregation and transfer]) in stem cell redox homeostasis. Therefore, elucidating the intricate links between mitochondria, cellular metabolism, and redox homeostasis is envisioned to be critical for our understanding of ROS in stem cell biology and its therapeutic relevance in regenerative medicine. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  6. Modeling Stem/Progenitor Cell-Induced Neovascularization and Oxygenation Around Solid Implants

    KAUST Repository

    Jain, Harsh Vardhan

    2012-07-01

    Tissue engineering constructs and other solid implants with biomedical applications, such as drug delivery devices or bioartificial organs, need oxygen (O(2)) to function properly. To understand better the vascular integration of such devices, we recently developed a novel model sensor containing O(2)-sensitive crystals, consisting of a polymeric capsule limited by a nanoporous filter. The sensor was implanted in mice with hydrogel alone (control) or hydrogel embedded with mouse CD117/c-kit+ bone marrow progenitor cells in order to stimulate peri-implant neovascularization. The sensor provided local partial O(2) pressure (pO(2)) using noninvasive electron paramagnetic resonance signal measurements. A consistently higher level of peri-implant oxygenation was observed in the cell-treatment case than in the control over a 10-week period. To provide a mechanistic explanation of these experimental observations, we present in this article a mathematical model, formulated as a system of coupled partial differential equations, that simulates peri-implant vascularization. In the control case, vascularization is considered to be the result of a foreign body reaction, while in the cell-treatment case, adipogenesis in response to paracrine stimuli produced by the stem cells is assumed to induce neovascularization. The model is validated by fitting numerical predictions of local pO(2) to measurements from the implanted sensor. The model is then used to investigate further the potential for using stem cell treatment to enhance the vascular integration of biomedical implants. We thus demonstrate how mathematical modeling combined with experimentation can be used to infer how vasculature develops around biomedical implants in control and stem cell-treated cases.

  7. Modeling Stem/Progenitor Cell-Induced Neovascularization and Oxygenation Around Solid Implants

    KAUST Repository

    Jain, Harsh Vardhan; Moldovan, Nicanor I.; Byrne, Helen M.

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering constructs and other solid implants with biomedical applications, such as drug delivery devices or bioartificial organs, need oxygen (O(2)) to function properly. To understand better the vascular integration of such devices, we recently developed a novel model sensor containing O(2)-sensitive crystals, consisting of a polymeric capsule limited by a nanoporous filter. The sensor was implanted in mice with hydrogel alone (control) or hydrogel embedded with mouse CD117/c-kit+ bone marrow progenitor cells in order to stimulate peri-implant neovascularization. The sensor provided local partial O(2) pressure (pO(2)) using noninvasive electron paramagnetic resonance signal measurements. A consistently higher level of peri-implant oxygenation was observed in the cell-treatment case than in the control over a 10-week period. To provide a mechanistic explanation of these experimental observations, we present in this article a mathematical model, formulated as a system of coupled partial differential equations, that simulates peri-implant vascularization. In the control case, vascularization is considered to be the result of a foreign body reaction, while in the cell-treatment case, adipogenesis in response to paracrine stimuli produced by the stem cells is assumed to induce neovascularization. The model is validated by fitting numerical predictions of local pO(2) to measurements from the implanted sensor. The model is then used to investigate further the potential for using stem cell treatment to enhance the vascular integration of biomedical implants. We thus demonstrate how mathematical modeling combined with experimentation can be used to infer how vasculature develops around biomedical implants in control and stem cell-treated cases.

  8. Modeling Stem/Progenitor Cell-Induced Neovascularization and Oxygenation Around Solid Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan, Nicanor I.; Byrne, Helen M.

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering constructs and other solid implants with biomedical applications, such as drug delivery devices or bioartificial organs, need oxygen (O2) to function properly. To understand better the vascular integration of such devices, we recently developed a novel model sensor containing O2-sensitive crystals, consisting of a polymeric capsule limited by a nanoporous filter. The sensor was implanted in mice with hydrogel alone (control) or hydrogel embedded with mouse CD117/c-kit+ bone marrow progenitor cells in order to stimulate peri-implant neovascularization. The sensor provided local partial O2 pressure (pO2) using noninvasive electron paramagnetic resonance signal measurements. A consistently higher level of peri-implant oxygenation was observed in the cell-treatment case than in the control over a 10-week period. To provide a mechanistic explanation of these experimental observations, we present in this article a mathematical model, formulated as a system of coupled partial differential equations, that simulates peri-implant vascularization. In the control case, vascularization is considered to be the result of a foreign body reaction, while in the cell-treatment case, adipogenesis in response to paracrine stimuli produced by the stem cells is assumed to induce neovascularization. The model is validated by fitting numerical predictions of local pO2 to measurements from the implanted sensor. The model is then used to investigate further the potential for using stem cell treatment to enhance the vascular integration of biomedical implants. We thus demonstrate how mathematical modeling combined with experimentation can be used to infer how vasculature develops around biomedical implants in control and stem cell-treated cases. PMID:22224628

  9. Oxygen-induced retinopathy in mice with retinal photoreceptor cell degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Zuo-Ming

    2014-04-25

    It is reported that retinal neovascularization seems to rarely co-exist with retinitis pigmentosa in patients and in some mouse models; however, it is not widely acknowledged as a universal phenomenon in all strains of all animal species. We aimed to further explore this phenomenon with an oxygen-induced retinopathy model in mice with retinal photoreceptor cell degeneration. Oxygen-induced retinopathy of colored and albino mice with rapid retinal degeneration were compared to homologous wild-type mice. The retinas were analyzed using high-molecular-weight FITC-dextran stained flat-mount preparation, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained cross-sections, an immunohistochemical test for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) distribution and Western blotting for VEGF expression after exposure to hyperoxia between postnatal days 17 (P17) and 21. Leakage and areas of non-perfusion of the retinal blood vessels were alleviated in the retinal degeneration mice. The number of preretinal vascular endothelial cell nuclei in the retinal degeneration mice was smaller than that in the homologous wild-type mice after exposure to hyperoxia (Poxygen-induced retinopathy was positively correlated with the VEGF expression level. However, the VEGF expression level was lower in the retinal degeneration mice. Proliferative retinopathy occurred in mice with rapid retinal degeneration, but retinal photoreceptor cell degeneration could partially restrain the retinal neovascularization in this rapid retinal degeneration mouse model. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. CoPd x oxygen reduction electrocatalysts for polymer electrolyte membrane and direct methanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustain, William E.; Kepler, Keith; Prakash, Jai

    2007-01-01

    The electrochemical activity of carbon-supported cobalt-palladium alloy electrocatalysts of various compositions have been investigated for the oxygen reduction reaction in a 5 cm 2 single cell polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell. The polarization experiments have been conducted at various temperatures between 30 and 60 deg. C and the reduction performance compared with data from a commercial Pt catalyst under identical conditions. Investigation of the catalytic activity of the CoPd x PEMFC system with varying composition reveals that a nominal cobalt-palladium atomic ratio of 1:3, CoPd 3 , exhibits the best performance of all studied catalysts, exhibiting a catalytic activity comparable to the commercial Pt catalyst. The ORR on CoPd 3 has a low activation energy, 52 kJ/mol, and a Tafel slope of approximately 60 mV/decade, indicating that the rate-determining step is a chemical step following the first electron transfer step and may involve the breaking of the oxygen bond. The CoPd 3 catalyst also exhibits excellent chemical stability, with the open circuit cell voltage decreasing by only 3% and the observed current decreasing by only 10% at 0.8 V over 25 h. The CoPd 3 catalyst also exhibits superior tolerance to methanol crossover poisoning than Pt

  11. Enzymatic fuel cells with an oxygen resistant variant of pyranose-2-oxidase as anode biocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahin, Samet; Wongnate, Thanyaporn; Chuaboon, Litavadee; Chaiyen, Pimchai; Yu, Eileen Hao

    2018-06-01

    In enzymatic fuel cells (EnFCs), hydrogen peroxide formation is one of the main problems when enzymes, such as, glucose oxidase (GOx) is used due to the conversion of oxygen to hydrogen peroxide in the catalytic reaction. To address this problem, we here report the first demonstration of an EnFC using a variant of pyranose-2-oxidase (P2O-T169G) which has been shown to have low activity towards oxygen. A simple and biocompatible immobilisation approach incorporating multi-walled-carbon nanotubes within ferrocene (Fc)-Nafion film was implemented to construct EnFCs. Successful immobilisation of the enzymes was demonstrated showing 3.2 and 1.7-fold higher current than when P2O-T169G and GOx were used in solution, respectively. P2O-T169G showed 25% higher power output (maximum power density value of 8.45 ± 1.6 μW cm -2 ) and better stability than GOx in aerated glucose solutions. P2O-T169G maintained > 70% of its initial current whereas GOx lost activity > 90% during the first hour of 12 h operation at 0.15 V (vs Ag/Ag + ). A different fuel cell configuration using gas-diffusion cathode and carbon paper electrodes were used to improve the power output of the fuel cell to 29.8 ± 6.1 µW cm -2 . This study suggests that P2O-T169G with low oxygen activity could be a promising anode biocatalyst for EnFC applications. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Polypyrrole/Co-tetraphenylporphyrin modified carbon fibre paper as a fuel cell electrocatalyst of oxygen reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Weimin; Chen, Jun; Wagner, Pawel; Wallace, Gordon G. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science, Intelligent Polymer Research Institute, University of Wollongong, Wollongong NSW 2522 (Australia); Swiegers, Gerhard F. [CSIRO Molecular and Health Technologies, Bag 10, Clayton VIC 3169 (Australia)

    2008-04-15

    A thin-layer of polypyrrole (PPy) film, immobilized with neutral 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrinato cobalt (II) (Co-TPP), was successfully and uniformly deposited onto mesoporous carbon fibre paper (CFP) via vapor-phase polymerization. The resulting PPy/Co-TPP-modified carbon fibre paper (PPy/Co-TPP-CFP) electrode was characterized by cyclic voltammetry, SEM and EDX-ray mapping. Its electrochemical stability and long-term electrocatalytic performance were investigated in a half-fuel cell testing system. The electrode displayed significant electrocatalytic performance for oxygen reduction at 0.0 V (vs. Ag/AgCl), with notable long-term stability. (author)

  13. Solid oxide fuel cells having porous cathodes infiltrated with oxygen-reducing catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meilin; Liu, Ze; Liu, Mingfei; Nie, Lifang; Mebane, David Spencer; Wilson, Lane Curtis; Surdoval, Wayne

    2014-08-12

    Solid-oxide fuel cells include an electrolyte and an anode electrically coupled to a first surface of the electrolyte. A cathode is provided, which is electrically coupled to a second surface of the electrolyte. The cathode includes a porous backbone having a porosity in a range from about 20% to about 70%. The porous backbone contains a mixed ionic-electronic conductor (MIEC) of a first material infiltrated with an oxygen-reducing catalyst of a second material different from the first material.

  14. Properties of solid polymer electrolyte fluorocarbon film. [used in hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alston, W. B.

    1973-01-01

    The ionic fluorocarbon film used as the solid polymer electrolyte in hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells was found to exhibit delamination failures. Polarized light microscopy of as-received film showed a lined region at the center of the film thickness. It is shown that these lines were not caused by incomplete saponification but probably resulted from the film extrusion process. The film lines could be removed by an annealing process. Chemical, physical, and tensile tests showed that annealing improved or sustained the water contents, spectral properties, thermo-oxidative stability, and tensile properties of the film. The resistivity of the film was significantly decreased by the annealing process.

  15. A conceptual design of catalytic gasification fuel cell hybrid power plant with oxygen transfer membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wangying; Han, Minfang

    2017-09-01

    A hybrid power generation system integrating catalytic gasification, solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), oxygen transfer membrane (OTM) and gas turbine (GT) is established and system energy analysis is performed. In this work, the catalytic gasifier uses steam, recycled anode off-gas and pure oxygen from OTM system to gasify coal, and heated by hot cathode off-gas at the same time. A zero-dimension SOFC model is applied and verified by fitting experimental data. Thermodynamic analysis is performed to investigate the integrated system performance, and system sensitivities on anode off-gas back flow ratio, SOFC fuel utilization, temperature and pressure are discussed. Main conclusions are as follows: (1) System overall electricity efficiency reaches 60.7%(HHV) while the gasifier operates at 700 °C and SOFC at 850 °C with system pressure at 3.04 bar; (2) oxygen enriched combustion simplify the carbon-dioxide capture process, which derives CO2 of 99.2% purity, but results in a penalty of 6.7% on system electricity efficiency; (3) with SOFC fuel utilization or temperature increasing, the power output of SOFC increases while GT power output decreases, and increasing system pressure can improve both the performance of SOFC and GT.

  16. Detection of the Level of Reactive Oxygen Species Induced by Ionizing Radiation in Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Chung, Dong Min; Kim, Jin-Hong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    By definition, the direct effect is referred to interaction between photon and DNA molecule, whereas the indirect effect is mediated by the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by radiolysis and subsequent reaction. It has been reported that ROS produced after exposure to IR can react with cellular materials such as DNA, proteins, carbohydrates and lipids. ROS is free radicals such as the superoxide anion, hydroxyl radicals and the non-radical hydrogen peroxide. Cells generate ROS during aerobic metabolism. Excessive production of ROS can lead to oxidative stress, genetic alteration and even cell death. It has been reported that ROS plays a critical role in radiation-induced cell injury. Thus, it is of great interest to determine the radiation-induced ROS level. Many kinds of methods to detect the level of ROS have been developed so far. There were random changes of fluorescence intensity in the treatment after irradiation. This result meant that this protocol was not appropriate for determination of radiation-induced ROS. On the other hand, the fluorescence intensity was increased in a dose-dependent manner when the cells were treated with the DCFH-DA solution before irradiation. Conclusions can be drawn from the experimental results of this study. In order to properly measure the ROS level in the cells exposed to ionizing radiation, the cells should be treated with the DCFH-DA solution before irradiation.

  17. Test of Hydrogen-Oxygen PEM Fuel Cell Stack at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bents, David J.; Scullin, Vincent J.; Chang, Bei-Jiann; Johnson, Donald W.; Garcia, Christopher P.; Jakupca, Ian J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes performance characterization tests of a 64 cell hydrogen oxygen PEM fuel cell stack at NASA Glenn Research Center in February 2003. The tests were part of NASA's ongoing effort to develop a regenerative fuel cell for aerospace energy storage applications. The purpose of the tests was to verify capability of this stack to operate within a regenerative fuel cell, and to compare performance with earlier test results recorded by the stack developer. Test results obtained include polarization performance of the stack at 50 and 100 psig system pressure, and a steady state endurance run at 100 psig. A maximum power output of 4.8 kWe was observed during polarization runs, and the stack sustained a steady power output of 4.0 kWe during the endurance run. The performance data obtained from these tests compare reasonably close to the stack developer's results although some additional spread between best to worst performing cell voltages was observed. Throughout the tests, the stack demonstrated the consistent performance and repeatable behavior required for regenerative fuel cell operation.

  18. Volume-dependent K+ transport in rabbit red blood cells comparison with oxygenated human SS cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Rohil, N.; Jennings, M.L.

    1989-07-01

    In this study the volume-dependent or N-ethylmaleimide (NEM)-stimulated, ouabain-insensitive K+ influx and efflux were measured with the tracer 86Rb+ in rabbit red blood cells. The purpose of the work was to examine the rabbit as a potential model for cell volume regulation in human SS red blood cells and also to investigate the relationship between the NEM-reactive sulfhydryl group(s) and the signal by which cell swelling activates the transport. Ouabain-resistant K+ efflux and influx increase nearly threefold in cells swollen hypotonically by 15%. Pretreatment with 2 mM NEM stimulates efflux 5-fold and influx 10-fold (each measured in an isotonic medium). The ouabain-resistant K+ efflux was dependent on the major anion in the medium. The anion dependence of K+ efflux in swollen or NEM-stimulated cells was as follows: Br- greater than Cl- much greater than NO3- = acetate. The magnitudes of both the swelling- and the NEM-stimulated fluxes are much higher in young cells (density separated but excluding reticulocytes) than in older cells. Swelling- or NEM-stimulated K+ efflux in rabbit red blood cells was inhibited 50% by 1 mM furosemide, and the inhibitory potency of furosemide was enhanced by extracellular K+, as is known to be true for human AA and low-K+ sheep red blood cells. The swelling-stimulated flux in both rabbit and human SS cells has a pH optimum at approximately 7.4. We conclude that rabbit red blood cells are a good model for swelling-stimulated K+ transport in human SS cells.

  19. RAY TRACING RENDER MENGGUNAKAN FRAGMENT ANTI ALIASING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Febriliyan Samopa

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Rendering is generating surface and three-dimensional effects on an object displayed on a monitor screen. Ray tracing as a rendering method that traces ray for each image pixel has a drawback, that is, aliasing (jaggies effect. There are some methods for executing anti aliasing. One of those methods is OGSS (Ordered Grid Super Sampling. OGSS is able to perform aliasing well. However, this method requires more computation time since sampling of all pixels in the image will be increased. Fragment Anti Aliasing (FAA is a new alternative method that can cope with the drawback. FAA will check the image when performing rendering to a scene. Jaggies effect is only happened at curve and gradient object. Therefore, only this part of object that will experience sampling magnification. After this sampling magnification and the pixel values are computed, then downsample is performed to retrieve the original pixel values. Experimental results show that the software can implement ray tracing well in order to form images, and it can implement FAA and OGSS technique to perform anti aliasing. In general, rendering using FAA is faster than using OGSS

  20. Copper ions stimulate the proliferation of hepatic stellate cells via oxygen stress in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, San-qing; Zhu, Hui-yun; Lin, Jian-guo; Su, Tang-feng; Liu, Yan; Luo, Xiao-ping

    2013-02-01

    This study examined the effect of copper ions on the proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and the role of oxidative stress in this process in order to gain insight into the mechanism of hepatic fibrosis in Wilson's disease. LX-2 cells, a cell line of human HSCs, were cultured in vitro and treated with different agents including copper sulfate, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) for different time. The proliferation of LX-2 cells was measured by non-radioactive cell proliferation assay. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were used to detect the mRNA and protein expression of platelet-derived growth factor receptor β subunit (PDGFβR), ELISA to determine the level of glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG), dichlorofluorescein assay to measure the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and lipid hydroperoxide assay to quantify the level of lipid peroxide (LPO). The results showed that copper sulfate over a certain concentration range could promote the proliferation of LX-2 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The effect was most manifest when LX-2 cells were treated with copper sulfate at a concentration of 100 μmol/L for 24 h. Additionally, copper sulfate could dose-dependently increase the levels of ROS and LPO, and decrease the ratio of GSH/GSSG in LX-2 cells. The copper-induced increase in mRNA and protein expression of PDGFβR was significantly inhibited in LX-2 cells pre-treated with NAC, a precursor of GSH, and this phenomenon could be reversed by the intervention of BSO, an inhibitor of NAC. It was concluded that copper ions may directly stimulate the proliferation of HSCs via oxidative stress. Anti-oxidative stress therapies may help suppress the copper-induced activation and proliferation of HSCs.

  1. Human endothelial progenitor cells rescue cortical neurons from oxygen-glucose deprivation induced death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacigaluppi, Susanna; Donzelli, Elisabetta; De Cristofaro, Valentina; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; D'Amico, Giovanna; Scuteri, Arianna; Tredici, Giovanni

    2016-09-19

    Cerebral ischemia is characterized by both acute and delayed neuronal injuries. Neuro-protection is a major issue that should be properly addressed from a pharmacological point of view, and cell-based treatment approaches are of interest due to their potential pleiotropic effects. Endothelial progenitor cells have the advantage of being mobilized from the bone marrow into the circulation, but have been less studied than other stem cells, such as mesenchymal stem cells. Therefore, the comparison between human endothelial progenitor cells (hEPC) and human mesenchymal progenitor cells (hMSC) in terms of efficacy in rescuing neurons from cell death after transitory ischemia is the aim of the current study, in the effort to address further directions. In vitro model of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) on a primary culture of rodent cortical neurons was set up with different durations of exposure: 1, 2 and 3hrs with assessment of neuron survival. The 2hrs OGD was chosen for the subsequent experiments. After 2hrs OGD neurons were either placed in indirect co-culture with hMSC or hEPC or cultured in hMSC or hEPC conditioned medium and cell viability was evaluated by MTT assay. At day 2 after 2hrs OGD exposure, mean neuronal survival was 47.9±24.2%. In contrast, after treatment with hEPC and hMSC indirect co-culture was 74.1±27.3%; and 69.4±18.8%, respectively. In contrast, treatment with conditioned medium did not provide any advantage in terms of survival to OGD neurons The study shows the efficacy of hEPC in indirect co-culture to rescue neurons from cell death after OGD, comparable to that of hMSC. hEPC deserve further studies given their potential interest for ischemia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A human-like senescence-associated secretory phenotype is conserved in mouse cells dependent on physiological oxygen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Coppé

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence irreversibly arrests cell proliferation in response to oncogenic stimuli. Human cells develop a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP, which increases the secretion of cytokines and other factors that alter the behavior of neighboring cells. We show here that "senescent" mouse fibroblasts, which arrested growth after repeated passage under standard culture conditions (20% oxygen, do not express a human-like SASP, and differ from similarly cultured human cells in other respects. However, when cultured in physiological (3% oxygen and induced to senesce by radiation, mouse cells more closely resemble human cells, including expression of a robust SASP. We describe two new aspects of the human and mouse SASPs. First, cells from both species upregulated the expression and secretion of several matrix metalloproteinases, which comprise a conserved genomic cluster. Second, for both species, the ability to promote the growth of premalignant epithelial cells was due primarily to the conserved SASP factor CXCL-1/KC/GRO-alpha. Further, mouse fibroblasts made senescent in 3%, but not 20%, oxygen promoted epithelial tumorigenesis in mouse xenographs. Our findings underscore critical mouse-human differences in oxygen sensitivity, identify conditions to use mouse cells to model human cellular senescence, and reveal novel conserved features of the SASP.

  3. High oxygen partial pressure increases photodynamic effect on HeLa cell lines in the presence of chloraluminium phthalocyanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajgar, Robert; Kolarova, Hana; Bolek, Lukas; Binder, Svatopluk; Pizova, Klara; Hanakova, Adela

    2014-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is linked with oxidative damage of biomolecules causing significant impairment of essential cellular functions that lead to cell death. It is the reason why photodynamic therapy has found application in treatment of different oncological, cardiovascular, skin and eye diseases. Efficacy of PDT depends on combined action of three components; sensitizer, light and oxygen. In the present study, we examined whether higher partial pressure of oxygen increases lethality in HeLa cell lines exposed to light in the presence of chloraluminium phthalocyanine disulfonate (ClAlPcS2). ClAlPcS2- sensitized HeLa cells incubated under different oxygen conditions were exposed to PDT. Production of singlet oxygen ((1)O2) and other forms of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as changes in mitochondrial membrane potential were determined by appropriately sensitive fluorescence probes. The effect of PDT on HeLa cell viability under different oxygen conditions was quantified using the standard methylthiazol tetrazolium (MTT) test. At the highest oxygen concentration of 28 ± 2 mg/l HeLa cells were significantly more sensitive to light-activated ClAlPcS2 (EC50=0.29 ± 0.05 μM) in comparison to cells incubated at lower oxygen concentrations of 8 ± 0.5 and 0.5 ± 0.1 mg/l, where the half maximal effective concentration was 0.42 ± 0.06 μM and 0.94 ± 0.14 μM, respectively. Moreover, we found that the higher presence of oxygen is accompanied with higher production of singlet oxygen, a higher rate of type II photodynamic reactions, and a significant drop in the mitochondrial membrane potential. These results demonstrate that the photodynamic effect in cervical cancer cells utilizing ClAlPcS2 significantly depends on oxygen level. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  4. Copper-substituted perovskite compositions for solid oxide fuel cell cathodes and oxygen reduction electrodes in other electrochemical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieke, Peter C [Pasco, WA; Coffey, Gregory W [Richland, WA; Pederson, Larry R [Kennewick, WA; Marina, Olga A [Richland, WA; Hardy, John S [Richland, WA; Singh, Prabhaker [Richland, WA; Thomsen, Edwin C [Richland, WA

    2010-07-20

    The present invention provides novel compositions that find advantageous use in making electrodes for electrochemical cells. Also provided are electrochemical devices that include active oxygen reduction electrodes, such as solid oxide fuel cells, sensors, pumps and the like. The compositions comprises a copper-substituted ferrite perovskite material. The invention also provides novel methods for making and using the electrode compositions and solid oxide fuel cells and solid oxide fuel cell assemblies having cathodes comprising the compositions.

  5. Degradation Patterns in Water and Oxygen of an Inverted Polymer Solar Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrman, Kion; Vesterager Madsen, Morten; Gevorgyan, Suren

    2010-01-01

    The spatial distribution of reaction products in multilayer polymer solar cells induced by water and oxygen atmospheres was mapped and used to elucidate the degradation patterns and failure mechanisms in an inverted polymer solar cell. The active material comprised a bulk heterojunction formed...... by poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) sandwiched between a layer of zinc oxide and a layer of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) that acted as, respectively, electron and hole transporting layers between the active material...... and the two electrodes indium−tin−oxide (ITO) and printed silver. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) in conjunction with isotopic labeling using H218O and 18O2 enabled detailed information on where and to what extent uptake took place...

  6. Rendering Falling Leaves on Graphics Hardware

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos Balsa; Pere-Pau Vázquez

    2008-01-01

    There is a growing interest in simulating natural phenomena in computer graphics applications. Animating natural scenes in real time is one of the most challenging problems due to the inherent complexity of their structure, formed by millions of geometric entities, and the interactions that happen within. An example of natural scenario that is needed for games or simulation programs are forests. Forests are difficult to render because the huge amount of geometric entities and the large amount...

  7. Moscatilin Inhibits Lung Cancer Cell Motility and Invasion via Suppression of Endogenous Reactive Oxygen Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akkarawut Kowitdamrong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of death among cancer patients worldwide, and most of them have died from metastasis. Migration and invasion are prerequisite processes associated with high metastasis potential in cancers. Moscatilin, a bibenzyl derivative isolated from the Thai orchid Dendrobium pulchellum, has been shown to have anticancer effect against numerous cancer cell lines. However, little is known regarding the effect of moscatilin on cancer cell migration and invasion. The present study demonstrates that nontoxic concentrations of moscatilin were able to inhibit human nonsmall cell lung cancer H23 cell migration and invasion. The inhibitory effect of moscatilin was associated with an attenuation of endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS, in which hydroxyl radical (OH∙ was identified as a dominant species in the suppression of filopodia formation. Western blot analysis also revealed that moscatilin downregulated activated focal adhesion kinase (phosphorylated FAK, Tyr 397 and activated ATP-dependent tyrosine kinase (phosphorylated Akt, Ser 473, whereas their parental counterparts were not detectable changed. In conclusion, our results indicate the novel molecular basis of moscalitin-inhibiting lung cancer cell motility and invasion and demonstrate a promising antimetastatic potential of such an agent for lung cancer therapy.

  8. Emission of VOC's from modified rendering process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatti, Z.A.; Raja, I.A.; Saddique, M.; Langenhove, H.V.

    2005-01-01

    Rendering technique for processing of dead animal and slaughterhouse wastes into valuable products. It involves cooking of raw material and later Sterilization was added to reduce the Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE). Studies have been carried out on rendering emission, with the normal cooking process. Our study shows, that the sterilization step in rendering process increases the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOC's). Gas samples, containing VOC's, were analyzed by the GC/MS (Gas Chromatograph and Mass Spectrometry). The most important groups of compounds- alcohols and cyclic hydrocarbons were identified. In the group of alcohol; 1-butanol, l-pentanol and l-hexanol compounds were found while in the group of cyclic hydrocarbon; methyl cyclopentane and cyclohexane compounds were detected. Other groups like aldehyde, sulphur containing compounds, ketone and furan were also found. Some compounds, like l-pentanol, 2-methyl propanal, dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl trisulfide, which belong to these groups, cause malodor. It is important to know these compounds to treat odorous gasses. (author)

  9. DRAM1 Protects Neuroblastoma Cells from Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation/Reperfusion-Induced Injury via Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengqiang Yu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage-regulated autophagy modulator protein 1 (DRAM1, a multi-pass membrane lysosomal protein, is reportedly a tumor protein p53 (TP53 target gene involved in autophagy. During cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury, DRAM1 protein expression is increased, and autophagy is activated. However, the functional significance of DRAM1 and the relationship between DRAM1 and autophagy in brain I/R remains uncertain. The aim of this study is to investigate whether DRAM1 mediates autophagy activation in cerebral I/R injury and to explore its possible effects and mechanisms. We adopt the oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion (OGD/R Neuro-2a cell model to mimic cerebral I/R conditions in vitro, and RNA interference is used to knock down DRAM1 expression in this model. Cell viability assay is performed using the LIVE/DEAD viability/cytotoxicity kit. Cell phenotypic changes are analyzed through Western blot assays. Autophagy flux is monitored through the tandem red fluorescent protein–Green fluorescent protein–microtubule associated protein 1 light chain 3 (RFP–GFP–LC3 construct. The expression levels of DRAM1 and microtubule associated protein 1 light chain 3II/I (LC3II/I are strongly up-regulated in Neuro-2a cells after OGD/R treatment and peaked at the 12 h reperfusion time point. The autophagy-specific inhibitor 3-Methyladenine (3-MA inhibits the expression of DRAM1 and LC3II/I and exacerbates OGD/R-induced cell injury. Furthermore, DRAM1 knockdown aggravates OGD/R-induced cell injury and significantly blocks autophagy through decreasing autophagosome-lysosome fusion. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that DRAM1 knockdown in Neuro-2a cells inhibits autophagy by blocking autophagosome-lysosome fusion and exacerbated OGD/R-induced cell injury. Thus, DRAM1 might constitute a new therapeutic target for I/R diseases.

  10. Anticancer Effect of Ginger Extract against Pancreatic Cancer Cells Mainly through Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Autotic Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, Miho; Iizuka, Mari; Kanematsu, Rie; Yoshida, Masato; Takenaga, Keizo

    2015-01-01

    The extract of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) and its major pungent components, [6]-shogaol and [6]-gingerol, have been shown to have an anti-proliferative effect on several tumor cell lines. However, the anticancer activity of the ginger extract in pancreatic cancer is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the ethanol-extracted materials of ginger suppressed cell cycle progression and consequently induced the death of human pancreatic cancer cell lines, including Panc-1 cells. The underlying mechanism entailed autosis, a recently characterized form of cell death, but not apoptosis or necroptosis. The extract markedly increased the LC3-II/LC3-I ratio, decreased SQSTM1/p62 protein, and enhanced vacuolization of the cytoplasm in Panc-1 cells. It activated AMPK, a positive regulator of autophagy, and inhibited mTOR, a negative autophagic regulator. The autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine and chloroquine partially prevented cell death. Morphologically, however, focal membrane rupture, nuclear shrinkage, focal swelling of the perinuclear space and electron dense mitochondria, which are unique morphological features of autosis, were observed. The extract enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and the antioxidant N-acetylcystein attenuated cell death. Our study revealed that daily intraperitoneal administration of the extract significantly prolonged survival (P = 0.0069) in a peritoneal dissemination model and suppressed tumor growth in an orthotopic model of pancreatic cancer (P < 0.01) without serious adverse effects. Although [6]-shogaol but not [6]-gingerol showed similar effects, chromatographic analyses suggested the presence of other constituent(s) as active substances. Together, these results show that ginger extract has potent anticancer activity against pancreatic cancer cells by inducing ROS-mediated autosis and warrants further investigation in order to develop an efficacious candidate drug. PMID:25961833

  11. Anticancer Effect of Ginger Extract against Pancreatic Cancer Cells Mainly through Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Autotic Cell Death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miho Akimoto

    Full Text Available The extract of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe and its major pungent components, [6]-shogaol and [6]-gingerol, have been shown to have an anti-proliferative effect on several tumor cell lines. However, the anticancer activity of the ginger extract in pancreatic cancer is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the ethanol-extracted materials of ginger suppressed cell cycle progression and consequently induced the death of human pancreatic cancer cell lines, including Panc-1 cells. The underlying mechanism entailed autosis, a recently characterized form of cell death, but not apoptosis or necroptosis. The extract markedly increased the LC3-II/LC3-I ratio, decreased SQSTM1/p62 protein, and enhanced vacuolization of the cytoplasm in Panc-1 cells. It activated AMPK, a positive regulator of autophagy, and inhibited mTOR, a negative autophagic regulator. The autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine and chloroquine partially prevented cell death. Morphologically, however, focal membrane rupture, nuclear shrinkage, focal swelling of the perinuclear space and electron dense mitochondria, which are unique morphological features of autosis, were observed. The extract enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, and the antioxidant N-acetylcystein attenuated cell death. Our study revealed that daily intraperitoneal administration of the extract significantly prolonged survival (P = 0.0069 in a peritoneal dissemination model and suppressed tumor growth in an orthotopic model of pancreatic cancer (P < 0.01 without serious adverse effects. Although [6]-shogaol but not [6]-gingerol showed similar effects, chromatographic analyses suggested the presence of other constituent(s as active substances. Together, these results show that ginger extract has potent anticancer activity against pancreatic cancer cells by inducing ROS-mediated autosis and warrants further investigation in order to develop an efficacious candidate drug.

  12. Influence of oxygen in the cultivation of human mesenchymal stem cells in simulated microgravity: an explorative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versari, S.; Klein-Nulend, J.; van Loon, J.; Bradamante, S.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that human Adipose Tissue-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells (AT-MSCs) cultured in simulated microgravity (sim-μg) in standard laboratory incubators alter their proliferation and differentiation. Recent studies on the stem cell (SC) niches and the influence of oxygen on SC

  13. Influence of Oxygen in the Cultivation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Simulated Microgravity: An Explorative Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versari, S.; Klein-Nulend, J.; van Loon, J.J.W.A.; Bradamante, S.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that human Adipose Tissue-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells (AT-MSCs) cultured in simulated microgravity (sim-μg) in standard laboratory incubators alter their proliferation and differentiation. Recent studies on the stem cell (SC) niches and the influence of oxygen on SC

  14. Reactive oxygen species are crucial for hydroxychavicol toxicity toward KB epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, J H; Wang, Y J; Chang, W H; Wu, H L; Li, C H; Uang, B J; Kang, J J; Lee, J J; Hahn, L J; Lin, B R; Chang, M C

    2004-01-01

    Betel quid (BQ) chewing shows a strong correlation to the incidence of oral submucous fibrosis (OSF), leukoplakia and oral cancer. BQ contains mainly areca nut, lime, Piper betle leaf (PBL) and the inflorescence of P. betle (IPB). Hydroxychavicol (4-allyl-catechol, HC), as a major phenolic compound in PBL and IPB, is shown to induce oxidative stress, glutathione (GSH) depletion and cell cycle deregulation. Using bivariate BrdU/PI flow cytometry, KB cells in DNA synthesis (S phase) are shown to be sensitive to the toxic effect of HC and show cell cycle arrest and apoptosis following exposure to 0.1 and 0.3 mM HC. HC-induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest are associated with mitochondrial membrane potential (delta Psim) depolarization as revealed by a decrease in rhodamine fluorescence. N-acetyl-L-cysteine (1 mM), superoxide dismutase (100 U/ml) and catalase (1000 U/ml) were effective in prevention of HC-induced GSH depletion (as indicated by chloromethylfluorescein fluorescence), reactive oxygen species (ROS) production (by dichlorofluorescein fluorescence), cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. However, dimethylthiourea (2 mM), neocuproine (1 mM), 1,10-phenanthroline (200 microM) and desferrioxamine (0.5 mM) showed little effect on HC-induced cell changes. HC elevated the cellular and mitochondrial GSH levels at moderate concentrations (0.05-0.1 mM), whereas at a concentration of 0.3 mM, inhibitory effects were noted. These results indicate that HC consumption may be associated with BQ-chewing-related oral mucosal diseases via GSH depletion, ROS production, mitochondrial dysfunction, cell cycle disturbance and the induction of apoptosis. These events are related to the production of superoxide radicals and hydrogen peroxide.

  15. Role of reactive oxygen species in the radiation response of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru Yamaguchi

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs, which are present in small numbers in hematopoietic tissues, can differentiate into all hematopoietic lineages and self-renew to maintain their undifferentiated phenotype. HSPCs are extremely sensitive to oxidative stressors such as anti-cancer agents, radiation, and the extensive accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. The quiescence and stemness of HSPCs are maintained by the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, ROS, and energy homeostasis in a special microenvironment called the stem cell niche. The present study evaluated the relationship between the production of intracellular ROS and mitochondrial function during the proliferation and differentiation of X-irradiated CD34(+ cells prepared from human placental/umbilical cord blood HSPCs. Highly purified CD34(+ HSPCs exposed to X-rays were cultured in liquid and semi-solid medium supplemented with hematopoietic cytokines. X-irradiated CD34(+ HSPCs treated with hematopoietic cytokines, which promote their proliferation and differentiation, exhibited dramatically suppressed cell growth and clonogenic potential. The amount of intracellular ROS in X-irradiated CD34(+ HSPCs was significantly higher than that in non-irradiated cells during the culture period. However, neither the intracellular mitochondrial content nor the mitochondrial superoxide production was elevated in X-irradiated CD34(+ HSPCs compared with non-irradiated cells. Radiation-induced gamma-H2AX expression was observed immediately following exposure to 4 Gy of X-rays and gradually decreased during the culture period. This study reveals that X-irradiation can increase persistent intracellular ROS in human CD34(+ HSPCs, which may not result from mitochondrial ROS due to mitochondrial dysfunction, and indicates that substantial DNA double-strand breakage can critically reduce the stem cell function.

  16. The oxygen effect in E.coli K-12 cells of various repair genotypes exposed to neutrons and gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komova, O.V.; Golovacheva, E.V.

    1988-01-01

    The oxygen enchancement ratio, as estimated after the effect of 137 Cs-γ-quanta, depends on the repair genotype of E. coli K-12 cells and increases in the studied strains in the following order: recA - uvrA - →recA - →wild type→polA - . These variations are levelled with the effect of fast neutrons of divison spectrum (0.75 MeV); the oxygen enhancement ratio for the strains under study decrease, while the oxygen effect is virtually absent in recA - uvrA - -mutant

  17. Antimony trichloride induces a loss of cell viability via reactive oxygen species-dependent autophagy in A549 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinyuan; Xing, Fengjun; Cong, Yewen; Zhuang, Yin; Han, Muxi; Wu, Zhiqiang; Yu, Shali; Wei, Haiyan; Wang, Xiaoke; Chen, Gang

    2017-12-01

    Antimony (Sb) is one of the most prevalent heavy metals and frequently leads to biological toxicity. Although autophagy is believed to be involved in metal-associated cytotoxicity, there is no evidence of its involvement following exposure. Moreover, the underlying mechanism of autophagy remains unclear. In this study, treatment with antimony trichloride caused autophagy in a dose- and time-dependent manner in A549 cells but did not affect the level of Atg5 or Atg7 mRNA expression. Furthermore, Sb enhanced autophagic flux while upregulating p62 gene and protein levels. The classic mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is not involved in Sb-induced autophagy. However, Sb-induced autophagy and the upregulation of p62 were inhibited by treatment with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Subsequent analyses demonstrated that the inhibition of autophagy protected A549 cells from a loss of cell viability, while the activation of autophagy by rapamycin had the opposite effect. These data suggest that reactive oxygen species-dependent autophagy mediates Sb-stimulated cell viability loss in A549 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of menadione, a reactive oxygen generator, on leukotriene secretion from RBL-2H3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Fumio; Nakanishi, Mamoru; Hirashima, Naohide

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced in various cells and affect many biological processes. We previously reported that 2-methyl-1,4-naphtoquinone (menadione) inhibited Ca(2+) influx from the extracellular medium and exocytosis evoked by antigen stimulation in the mast cell line, RBL-2H3. Mast cells release various inflammatory mediators such as leukotrienes (LTs) and cytokines in addition to the exocytotic secretion of histamine. In this study, we investigated the effects of menadione on LT release in RBL-2H3. Treatment of RBL cells with menadione inhibited LTC(4) secretion induced by antigen stimulation. To elucidate the mechanism of this inhibition, we examined the effects of menadione on the activation process of 5-lipoxygenase that is responsible for the synthesis of LTs from arachidonic acid. Menadione did not affect the phosophorylation of mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinases, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38, which regulates phosphorylation of 5-lipoxygenase. However, menadione inhibited the translocation of 5-lipoxygenase from the cytoplasm to the nuclear membrane. Together with the result that LT secretion was severely impaired in the absence of extracellular Ca2(2+), it is suggested that ROS produced by menadione inhibited LT secretion through impaired Ca2(2+) influx and 5-lipoxygenase translocation to the nuclear membrane.

  19. Effects of combined radiofrequency radiation exposure on levels of reactive oxygen species in neuronal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Kyoung Ah; Lee, Hyung Chul; Lee, Je-Jung

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of the combined RF radiation (837 MHz CDMA plus 1950 MHz WCDMA) signal on levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in neuronal cells. Exposure of the combined RF signal was conducted at specific absorption rate values of 2 W/kg of CDMA plus 2 W/kg of WCDMA for 2 h. Co-exposure to combined RF radiation with either H 2 O 2 or menadione was also performed. The experimental exposure groups were incubator control, sham-exposed, combined RF radiation-exposed with or without either H 2 O 2 or menadione groups. The intracellular ROS level was measured by flow cytometry using the fluorescent probe dichlorofluorescein diacetate. Intracellular ROS levels were not consistently affected by combined RF radiation exposure alone in a time-dependent manner in U87, PC12 or SH-SY5Y cells. In neuronal cells exposed to combined RF radiation with either H 2 O 2 or menadione, intracellular ROS levels showed no statically significant alteration compared with exposure to menadione or H 2 O 2 alone. These findings indicate that neither combined RF radiation alone nor combined RF radiation with menadione or H 2 O 2 influences the intracellular ROS level in neuronal cells such as U87, PC12 or SH-SY5Y. (author)

  20. Cold stress increases reactive oxygen species formation via TRPA1 activation in A549 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenwu; Wang, Zhonghua; Cao, Jianping; Cui, Haiyang; Ma, Zhuang

    2016-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are responsible for lung damage during inhalation of cold air. However, the mechanism of the ROS production induced by cold stress in the lung is still unclear. In this work, we measured the changes of ROS and the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c) in A549 cell. We observed that cold stress (from 20 to 5 °C) exposure of A549 cell resulted in an increase of ROS and [Ca(2+)]c, which was completely attenuated by removing Ca(2+) from medium. Further experiments showed that cold-sensing transient receptor potential subfamily member 1 (TRPA1) agonist (allyl isothiocyanate, AITC) increased the production of ROS and the level of [Ca(2+)]c in A549 cell. Moreover, HC-030031, a TRPA1 selective antagonist, significantly inhibited the enhanced ROS and [Ca(2+)]c induced by AITC or cold stimulation, respectively. Taken together, these data demonstrated that TRPA1 activation played an important role in the enhanced production of ROS induced by cold stress in A549 cell.

  1. Biphasic effect of oxygen radicals on prostaglandin production by rat mesangial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, S.; Stahl, R.A.K.; Baker, P.J.; Chen, Y.P.; Pritzl, P.M.; Couser, W.G.

    1987-01-01

    Cultured rat mesangial cells were exposed to a reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating system (xanthine plus xanthine oxidase) to explore the effect of ROS on their metabolism of arachidonic acid (AA). Cell viability, as assessed by 51 Cr release, was not affected by the concentrations of xanthine plus xanthine oxidase used. Prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ) production following exposure to increasing quantities of xanthine plus xanthine oxidase was significantly decreased when cells were stimulated with the calcium ionophore A23187 or AA. Maximum suppression of production was seen within 10 min of ROS exposure. Thromboxane B 2 production was similarly decreased. This effect was reversed by addition of catalase to the ROS generating system but not by superoxide dismutase or mannitol, which suggested that H 2 O 2 was the responsible metabolite. High levels of H 2 O 2 suppressed PGE 2 production. Lower levels of H 2 O 2 resulted in significant stimulation of base-line PGE 2 production. Analysis of release of 3 H]AA-labeled metabolites from A23187-stimulated cells showed no effect of H 2 O 2 on phospholipase activity. Thus ROS can stimulate or inhibitor AA metabolism in the glomerular mesangium, which may have important effects on glomerular hemodynamics during glomerular injury

  2. Lack of oxygen effect in glutathione-deficient human cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edgren, M.; Larsson, A.; Nilsson, K.; Revesz, L.; Scott, O.C.A.

    1980-01-01

    The frequency of X-ray-induced DNA breaks was determined in human cell lines which are deficient in glutathione synthetase and have a greatly reduced glutathione content. Hydroxyapatite chromatography was used for the estimation of the DNA breaks in cell cultures, which were derived either from lymphoblasts transformed by infection with EB virus or from fibroblasts. The dose-effect relationship for the induction of breaks when radiation exposure was made in argon, was similar to that found when exposure was made in air. In control cultures with normal glutathione content, the induction of breaks was enhanced when irradiation was made under aerobic, instead of anaerobic, conditions. Treatment of the glutathione-deficient cells with the hypoxic radiosensitizer misonidazole did not enhance the induction of breaks by radiation delivered either in air or in argon. In control cultures, radiation induction of breaks was enhanced by misonidazole under anaerobic but not under aerobic conditions. When the glutathione-deficient cells were pretreated with cysteamine however, irradiation in the absence of oxygen resulted in a decreased frequency of DNA breaks. (author)

  3. Sibutramine provokes apoptosis of aortic endothelial cells through altered production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Yoshifumi; Shibata, Akinobu; Okumura, Naoko; Ikari, Akira; Sasajima, Yasuhide; Suenami, Koichi; Sato, Kiyohito; Takekoshi, Yuji; El-Kabbani, Ossama; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    Overdose administration of sibutramine, a serotonin-noradrenalin reuptake inhibitor, is considered to elicit severe side effects including hypertension, whose pathogenic mechanism remains unclear. Here, we found that 48-h incubation with >10μM sibutramine provokes apoptosis of human aortic endothelial (HAE) cells. Treatment with the lethal concentration of sibutramine facilitated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), altered expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress response genes (heat shock protein 70 and C/EBP homologous protein), and inactivated 26S proteasome-based proteolysis. The treatment also decreased cellular level of nitric oxide (NO) through lowering of expression and activity of endothelial NO synthase. These results suggest that ROS production and depletion of NO are crucial events in the apoptotic mechanism and may be linked to the pathogenesis of vasoconstriction elicited by the drug. Compared to sibutramine, its metabolites (N-desmethylsibutramine and N-didesmethylsibutramine) were much less cytotoxic to HAE cells, which hardly metabolized sibutramine. In contrast, both the drug and metabolites showed low cytotoxicity to hepatic HepG2 cells with high metabolic potency and expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4. The cytotoxicity of sibutramine to HepG2 and Chang Liver cells was remarkably augmented by inhibition and knockdown of CYP3A4. This study also suggests an inverse relationship between sibutramine cytotoxicity and CYP3A4-mediated metabolism into the N-desmethyl metabolites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of Pd-Ni nanoalloy electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Juan; Sarkar, Arindam; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2010-01-01

    Carbon-supported Pd-Ni nanoalloy electrocatalysts with different Pd/Ni atomic ratios have been synthesized by a modified polyol method, followed by heat treatment in a reducing atmosphere at 500-900 deg. C. The samples have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), cyclic voltammetry (CV), rotating disk electrode (RDE) measurements, and single-cell proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) tests for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). XRD and TEM data reveal an increase in the degree of alloying and particle size with increasing heat-treatment temperature. XPS data indicate surface segregation with Pd enrichment on the surface of Pd 80 Ni 20 after heat treatment at ≥500 deg. C, suggesting possible lattice strains in the outermost layers. Electrochemical data based on CV, RDE, and single-cell PEMFC measurement show that Pd 80 Ni 20 heated at 500 deg. C has the highest mass catalytic activity for ORR among the Pd-Ni samples investigated, with stability and catalytic activity significantly higher than that found with Pd. With a lower cost, the Pd-Ni catalysts exhibit higher tolerance to methanol than Pt, offering an added advantage in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC).

  5. Pre-Transplantation Blockade of TNF-α-Mediated Oxygen Species Accumulation Protects Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Takashi; Suzuki, Sachie; Lai, Chen-Yi; Yamazaki, Satoshi; Kakuta, Shigeru; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Nojima, Masanori; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Higashihara, Masaaki; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Otsu, Makoto

    2017-04-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation (HSCT) for malignancy requires toxic pre-conditioning to maximize anti-tumor effects and donor-HSC engraftment. While this induces bone marrow (BM)-localized inflammation, how this BM environmental change affects transplanted HSCs in vivo remains largely unknown. We here report that, depending on interval between irradiation and HSCT, residence within lethally irradiated recipient BM compromises donor-HSC reconstitution ability. Both in vivo and in vitro we demonstrate that, among inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α plays a role in HSC damage: TNF-α stimulation leads to accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in highly purified hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSCs/HSPCs). Transplantation of flow-cytometry-sorted murine HSCs reveals damaging effects of accumulated ROS on HSCs. Short-term incubation either with an specific inhibitor of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 signaling or an antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) prevents TNF-α-mediated ROS accumulation in HSCs. Importantly, pre-transplantation exposure to NAC successfully demonstrats protective effects in inflammatory BM on graft-HSCs, exhibiting better reconstitution capability than that of nonprotected control grafts. We thus suggest that in vivo protection of graft-HSCs from BM inflammation is a feasible and attractive approach, which may lead to improved hematopoietic reconstitution kinetics in transplantation with myeloablative conditioning that inevitably causes inflammation in recipient BM. Stem Cells 2017;35:989-1002. © 2016 The Authors STEM CELLS published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  6. Role of dissolved oxygen on the degradation mechanism of Reactive Green 19 and electricity generation in photocatalytic fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sin-Li; Ho, Li-Ngee; Ong, Soon-An; Wong, Yee-Shian; Voon, Chun-Hong; Khalik, Wan Fadhilah; Yusoff, Nik Athirah; Nordin, Noradiba

    2018-03-01

    In this study, a membraneless photocatalytic fuel cell with zinc oxide loaded carbon photoanode and platinum loaded carbon cathode was constructed to investigate the impact of dissolved oxygen on the mechanism of dye degradation and electricity generation of photocatalytic fuel cell. The photocatalytic fuel cell with high and low aeration rate, no aeration and nitrogen purged were investigated, respectively. The degradation rate of diazo dye Reactive Green 19 and the electricity generation was enhanced in photocatalytic fuel cell with higher dissolved oxygen concentration. However, the photocatalytic fuel cell was still able to perform 37% of decolorization in a slow rate (k = 0.033 h -1 ) under extremely low dissolved oxygen concentration (approximately 0.2 mg L -1 ) when nitrogen gas was introduced into the fuel cell throughout the 8 h. However, the change of the UV-Vis spectrum indicates that the intermediates of the dye could not be mineralized under insufficient dissolved oxygen level. In the aspect of electricity generation, the maximum short circuit current (0.0041 mA cm -2 ) and power density (0.00028 mW cm -2 ) of the air purged photocatalytic fuel cell was obviously higher than that with nitrogen purging (0.0015 mA cm -2 and 0.00008 mW cm -2 ). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Influences of dissolved oxygen concentration on biocathodic microbial communities in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rago, Laura; Cristiani, Pierangela; Villa, Federica; Zecchin, Sarah; Colombo, Alessandra; Cavalca, Lucia; Schievano, Andrea

    2017-08-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) at cathodic interface is a critical factor influencing microbial fuel cells (MFC) performance. In this work, three MFCs were operated with cathode under different DO conditions: i) air-breathing (A-MFC); ii) water-submerged (W-MFC) and iii) assisted by photosynthetic microorganisms (P-MFC). A plateau of maximum current was reached at 1.06±0.03mA, 1.48±0.06mA and 1.66±0.04mA, increasing respectively for W-MFC, P-MFC and A-MFC. Electrochemical and microbiological tools (Illumina sequencing, confocal microscopy and biofilm cryosectioning) were used to explore anodic and cathodic biofilm in each MFC type. In all cases, biocathodes improved oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) as compared to abiotic condition and A-MFC was the best performing system. Photosynthetic cultures in the cathodic chamber supplied high DO level, up to 16mg O2 L -1 , which sustained aerobic microbial community in P-MFC biocathode. Halomonas, Pseudomonas and other microaerophilic genera reached >50% of the total OTUs. The presence of sulfur reducing bacteria (Desulfuromonas) and purple non-sulfur bacteria in A-MFC biocathode suggested that the recirculation of sulfur compounds could shuttle electrons to sustain the reduction of oxygen as final electron acceptor. The low DO concentration limited the cathode in W-MFC. A model of two different possible microbial mechanisms is proposed which can drive predominantly cathodic ORR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Red blood cell transfusions and tissue oxygenation in anemic hematology outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuruk, Koray; Bartels, Sebastiaan A; Milstein, Dan M J; Bezemer, Rick; Biemond, Bart J; Ince, Can

    2012-03-01

    There is little clinical evidence that red blood cell (RBC) transfusions improve oxygen availability at the microcirculatory level. We tested the hypotheses that anemia in chronically anemic patients with relatively healthy microcirculation would be associated with low tissue hemoglobin (Hb) and tissue oxygenation levels and that these conditions would be improved after RBC transfusions. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was used to determine tissue oxygen saturation (StO(2)) and tissue Hb index (THI; an index of the amount of Hb in the NIRS measurement volume) in the thenar eminence and sublingual tissue before and 30 minutes after RBC transfusions in 20 chronically anemic hematology outpatients. Data are presented as median (25%-75%). The patients received three (two to three) bags of RBCs in saline-adenine-glucose-mannitol with an age of 21 (7-21) days, which was infused intravenously at the rate of 0.7 bag/hr. RBC transfusions significantly increased hematocrit level from 26% (24%-28%) to 32% (30%-34%; p viscosity from 3.4 (3.1-3.5) mPa/sec to 4.2 (4.0-4.5) mPa/sec (p < 0.0001), thenar StO(2) from 81% (80%-84%) to 86% (81%-89%; p = 0.002), thenar THI from 11.2 (9.3-13.3) AU to 13.7 (9.7-15.3) AU (p = 0.024), sublingual StO(2) from 86% (81%-89%) to 91% (86%-92%; p < 0.0001), and sublingual THI from 15.2 (13.0-17.4) AU to 17.2 (13.5-19.7) AU (p = 0.040). Although anemia in chronically anemic hematology outpatients was not associated with low StO(2) and THI levels, RBC transfusions were successful in improving these variables. © 2011 American Association of Blood Banks.

  9. Luminescence materials for pH and oxygen sensing in microbial cells - structures, optical properties, and biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xianshao; Pan, Tingting; Chen, Lei; Tian, Yanqing; Zhang, Weiwen

    2017-09-01

    Luminescence including fluorescence and phosphorescence sensors have been demonstrated to be important for studying cell metabolism, and diagnosing diseases and cancer. Various design principles have been employed for the development of sensors in different formats, such as organic molecules, polymers, polymeric hydrogels, and nanoparticles. The integration of the sensing with fluorescence imaging provides valuable tools for biomedical research and applications at not only bulk-cell level but also at single-cell level. In this article, we critically reviewed recent progresses on pH, oxygen, and dual pH and oxygen sensors specifically for their application in microbial cells. In addition, we focused not only on sensor materials with different chemical structures, but also on design and applications of sensors for better understanding cellular metabolism of microbial cells. Finally, we also provided an outlook for future materials design and key challenges in reaching broad applications in microbial cells.

  10. Selenoprotein P Inhibits Radiation-Induced Late Reactive Oxygen Species Accumulation and Normal Cell Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckers, Jaimee C.; Kalen, Amanda L.; Xiao, Wusheng; Sarsour, Ehab H.; Goswami, Prabhat C., E-mail: prabhat-goswami@uiowa.edu

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Radiation is a common mode of cancer therapy whose outcome is often limited because of normal tissue toxicity. We have shown previously that the accumulation of radiation-induced late reactive oxygen species (ROS) precedes cell death, suggesting that metabolic oxidative stress could regulate cellular radiation response. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether selenoprotein P (SEPP1), a major supplier of selenium to tissues and an antioxidant, regulates late ROS accumulation and toxicity in irradiated normal human fibroblasts (NHFs). Methods and Materials: Flow cytometry analysis of cell viability, cell cycle phase distribution, and dihydroethidium oxidation, along with clonogenic assays, were used to measure oxidative stress and toxicity. Human antioxidant mechanisms array and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assays were used to measure gene expression during late ROS accumulation in irradiated NHFs. Sodium selenite addition and SEPP1 overexpression were used to determine the causality of SEPP1 regulating late ROS accumulation and toxicity in irradiated NHFs. Results: Irradiated NHFs showed late ROS accumulation (4.5-fold increase from control; P<.05) that occurs after activation of the cell cycle checkpoint pathways and precedes cell death. The mRNA levels of CuZn- and Mn-superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxiredoxin 3, and thioredoxin reductase 1 increased approximately 2- to 3-fold, whereas mRNA levels of cold shock domain containing E1 and SEPP1 increased more than 6-fold (P<.05). The addition of sodium selenite before the radiation treatment suppressed toxicity (45%; P<.05). SEPP1 overexpression suppressed radiation-induced late ROS accumulation (35%; P<.05) and protected NHFs from radiation-induced toxicity (58%; P<.05). Conclusion: SEPP1 mitigates radiation-induced late ROS accumulation and normal cell injury.

  11. Imaging of oxygen gradients in giant umbrella cells: an ex vivo PLIM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, A V; Golubeva, A V; Okkelman, I A; Cryan, J F; Papkovsky, D B

    2015-10-01

    O2 plays a pivotal role in aerobic metabolism and regulation of cell and tissue function. Local differences and fluctuations in tissue O2 levels are well documented; however, the physiological significance of O2 microgradients, particularly at the subcellular level, remains poorly understood. Using the cell-penetrating phosphorescent O2 probe Pt-Glc and confocal fluorescence microscopy, we visualized O2 distribution in individual giant (>100-μm) umbrella cells located superficially in the urinary bladder epithelium. We optimized conditions for in vivo phosphorescent staining of the inner surface of the mouse bladder and subsequent ex vivo analysis of excised live tissue. Imaging experiments revealed significant (≤85 μM) and heterogeneous deoxygenation within respiring umbrella cells, with radial O2 gradients of up to 40 μM across the cell, or ∼0.6 μM/μm. Deeply deoxygenated (5-15 μM O2) regions were seen to correspond to the areas enriched with polarized mitochondria. Pharmacological activation of mitochondrial respiration decreased oxygenation and O2 gradients in umbrella cells, while inhibition with antimycin A dissipated the gradients and caused gradual reoxygenation of the tissue to ambient levels. Detailed three-dimensional maps of O2 distribution potentially can be used for the modeling of intracellular O2-dependent enzymatic reactions and downstream processes, such as hypoxia-inducible factor signaling. Further ex vivo and in vivo studies on intracellular and tissue O2 gradients using confocal imaging can shed light on the molecular mechanisms regulating O2-dependent (patho)physiological processes in the bladder and other tissues. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Osimertinib induces autophagy and apoptosis via reactive oxygen species generation in non-small cell lung cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Zheng-Hai; Cao, Wen-Xiang; Su, Min-Xia; Chen, Xiuping; Lu, Jin-Jian, E-mail: jinjianlu@umac.mo

    2017-04-15

    Osimertinib (OSI), also known as AZD9291, is a third-generation epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor that has been approved for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients harboring EGFR T790M mutation. Herein, we indicated for the first time that OSI increased the accumulations of cytoplasmic vacuoles, the expression of phosphatidylethanolamine-modified microtubule-associated protein light-chain 3 (LC3-II), and the formation of GFP-LC3 puncta in various cancer cells. The OSI-induced expression of LC3-II was further increased when combined treatment with chloroquine (CQ), an autophagy inhibitor, and the mRFP-EGFP-LC3 plasmid-transfected cells exposed to OSI led to the production of more red-fluorescent puncta than green-fluorescent puncta, indicating OSI induced autophagic flux in the NSCLC cells. Knockdown of EGFR showed no effect on the OSI-induced expression of LC3-II in NCI-H1975 cells. In addition, OSI increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and scavenge of ROS via pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), catalase (CAT), or vitamin E (Vita E) significantly inhibited OSI-induced the accumulations of cytoplasmic vacuoles, the expression of LC3-II, as well as the formation of GFP-LC3 puncta. Combinative treatment with CQ could not remarkably change the OSI-induced cell viability decrease, whereas the OSI-induced cell viability decrease and apoptosis could be reversed through pretreatment with NAC, CAT, and Vita E, respectively. Taken together, this is the first report that OSI induces an accompanied autophagy and the generation of ROS is critical for the OSI-induced autophagy, cell viability decrease, and apoptosis in NSCLC cells. - Highlights: • Osimertinib induced the expressions of cytoplasmic vacuoles and autophagic markers in different cancer cells. • Osimertinib induced autophagic flux in NSCLC NCI-H1975 and HCC827 cell lines. • ROS generation contributed to osimertinib-induced cytoplasmic

  13. Osimertinib induces autophagy and apoptosis via reactive oxygen species generation in non-small cell lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Zheng-Hai; Cao, Wen-Xiang; Su, Min-Xia; Chen, Xiuping; Lu, Jin-Jian

    2017-01-01

    Osimertinib (OSI), also known as AZD9291, is a third-generation epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor that has been approved for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients harboring EGFR T790M mutation. Herein, we indicated for the first time that OSI increased the accumulations of cytoplasmic vacuoles, the expression of phosphatidylethanolamine-modified microtubule-associated protein light-chain 3 (LC3-II), and the formation of GFP-LC3 puncta in various cancer cells. The OSI-induced expression of LC3-II was further increased when combined treatment with chloroquine (CQ), an autophagy inhibitor, and the mRFP-EGFP-LC3 plasmid-transfected cells exposed to OSI led to the production of more red-fluorescent puncta than green-fluorescent puncta, indicating OSI induced autophagic flux in the NSCLC cells. Knockdown of EGFR showed no effect on the OSI-induced expression of LC3-II in NCI-H1975 cells. In addition, OSI increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and scavenge of ROS via pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), catalase (CAT), or vitamin E (Vita E) significantly inhibited OSI-induced the accumulations of cytoplasmic vacuoles, the expression of LC3-II, as well as the formation of GFP-LC3 puncta. Combinative treatment with CQ could not remarkably change the OSI-induced cell viability decrease, whereas the OSI-induced cell viability decrease and apoptosis could be reversed through pretreatment with NAC, CAT, and Vita E, respectively. Taken together, this is the first report that OSI induces an accompanied autophagy and the generation of ROS is critical for the OSI-induced autophagy, cell viability decrease, and apoptosis in NSCLC cells. - Highlights: • Osimertinib induced the expressions of cytoplasmic vacuoles and autophagic markers in different cancer cells. • Osimertinib induced autophagic flux in NSCLC NCI-H1975 and HCC827 cell lines. • ROS generation contributed to osimertinib-induced cytoplasmic

  14. Method of controlling injection of oxygen into hydrogen-rich fuel cell feed stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltser, Mark Alexander; Gutowski, Stanley; Weisbrod, Kirk

    2001-01-01

    A method of operating a H.sub.2 --O.sub.2 fuel cell fueled by hydrogen-rich fuel stream containing CO. The CO content is reduced to acceptable levels by injecting oxygen into the fuel gas stream. The amount of oxygen injected is controlled in relation to the CO content of the fuel gas, by a control strategy that involves (a) determining the CO content of the fuel stream at a first injection rate, (b) increasing the O.sub.2 injection rate, (c) determining the CO content of the stream at the higher injection rate, (d) further increasing the O.sub.2 injection rate if the second measured CO content is lower than the first measured CO content or reducing the O.sub.2 injection rate if the second measured CO content is greater than the first measured CO content, and (e) repeating steps a-d as needed to optimize CO consumption and minimize H.sub.2 consumption.

  15. Surface strontium enrichment on highly active perovskites for oxygen electrocatalysis in solid oxide fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Crumlin, Ethan J.; Mutoro, Eva; Liu, Zhi; Grass, Michael E.; Biegalski, Michael D.; Lee, Yueh-Lin; Morgan, Dane; Christen, Hans M.; Bluhm, Hendrik; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Perovskite oxides have high catalytic activities for oxygen electrocatalysis competitive to platinum at elevated temperatures. However, little is known about the oxide surface chemistry that influences the activity near ambient oxygen partial pressures, which hampers the design of highly active catalysts for many clean-energy technologies such as solid oxide fuel cells. Using in situ synchrotron-based, ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to study the surface chemistry changes, we show that the coverage of surface secondary phases on a (001)-oriented La 0.8Sr 0.2CoO 3-δ (LSC) film becomes smaller than that on an LSC powder pellet at elevated temperatures. In addition, strontium (Sr) in the perovskite structure enriches towards the film surface in contrast to the pellet having no detectable changes with increasing temperature. We propose that the ability to reduce surface secondary phases and develop Sr-enriched perovskite surfaces of the LSC film contributes to its enhanced activity for O 2 electrocatalysis relative to LSC powder-based electrodes. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  16. [The influence of low partial oxygen pressure on the biolodical process of mesenchymal stromal cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezovskyĭ, V Ia; Plotnikova, L M; Vesel'skyĭ, S P; Litovka, I H

    2014-01-01

    The influence of low partial oxygen pressure (Po2) on the amino acid composition in culture medium of human mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) lines 4BL has been studied. At 23 mm Hg (3% oxygen), a significant decrease (by 31%) in the concentration of proline and hydroxyproline was registered. Under these conditions, the concentration of serine and aspartic acid decreased by 45% compared to the control. Maximum consumption of free amino acids from the culture medium required for the synthesis of collagen (proline and hydroxyproline by 42%, serine and aspartic acid by 62%) was observed at a gas-phase Po2 of 38 mm Hg (5% O2). At Po2 76 mm Hg (10% O2), a lack of amino acids proline and hydroxyproline was only 21%, while that of glutamine and alanine amounted 12% compared to the control. This intensity ratio of consumption of amino acids may indicate that the maximum of MSC vital functions occurs at Po2 38 mm Hg.

  17. Effect of hydrophobic additive on oxygen transport in catalyst layer of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shunzhong; Li, Xiaohui; Wan, Zhaohui; Chen, Yanan; Tan, Jinting; Pan, Mu

    2018-03-01

    Oxygen transport resistance (OTR) is a critical factor influencing the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). In this paper, an effective method to reduce the OTR of catalyst layers (CLs) by introducing a hydrophobic additive into traditional CLs is proposed. A low-molecular-weight polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is selected for its feasibility to prepare an emulsion, which is mixed with a traditional catalyst ink to successfully fabricate the CL with PTFE of 10 wt%. The PTFE film exists in the mesopores between the carbon particles. The limiting current of the hydrophobic CL was almost 4000 mA/cm2, which is 500 mA/cm2 higher than that of the traditional CL. PTFE reduces the OTR of the CL in the dry region by as much as 24 s/m compared to the traditional CL and expands the dry region from 2000 mA/cm2 in the traditional CL to 2500 mA/cm2. Furthermore, the CL with the hydrophobic agent can improve the oxygen transport in the wet region (>2000 mA/cm2) more effectively than that in the dry region. All these results indicate that the CL with the hydrophobic agent shows a superior performance in terms of optimizing water management and effectively reduces the OTR in PEMFCs.

  18. Final Report: Cathode Catalysis in Hydrogen/Oxygen Fuel Cells: New Catalysts, Mechanism, and Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gewirth, Andrew A. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Kenis, Paul J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Nuzzo, Ralph G. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Rauchfuss, Thomas B. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2016-01-18

    In this research, we prosecuted a comprehensive plan of research directed at developing new catalysts and new understandings relevant to the operation of low temperature hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells. The focal point of this work was one centered on the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR), the electrochemical process that most fundamentally limits the technological utility of these environmentally benign energy conversion devices. Over the period of grant support, we developed new ORR catalysts, based on Cu dimers and multimers. In this area, we developed substantial new insight into design rules required to establish better ORR materials, inspired by the three-Cu active site in laccase which has the highest ORR onset potential of any material known. We also developed new methods of characterization for the ORR on conventional (metal-based) catalysts. Finally, we developed a new platform to study the rate of proton transfer relevant to proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions, of which the ORR is an exemplar. Other aspects of work involved theory and prototype catalyst testing.

  19. Differential signal pathway activation and 5-HT function: the role of gut enterochromaffin cells as oxygen sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen, Martin; Dammen, Rikard; Svejda, Bernhard; Gustafsson, Bjorn I; Pfragner, Roswitha; Modlin, Irvin; Kidd, Mark

    2012-11-15

    The chemomechanosensory function of the gut enterochromaffin (EC) cell enables it to respond to dietary agents and mechanical stretch. We hypothesized that the EC cell, which also sensed alterations in luminal or mucosal oxygen level, was physiologically sensitive to fluctuations in O(2). Given that low oxygen levels induce 5-HT production and secretion through a hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α)-dependent pathway, we also hypothesized that increasing O(2) would reduce 5-HT production and secretion. Isolated normal EC cells as well as the well-characterized EC cell model KRJ-I were used to examine HIF signaling (luciferase-assays), hypoxia transcriptional response element (HRE)-mediated transcription (PCR), signaling pathways (Western blot), and 5-HT release (ELISA) during exposure to different oxygen levels. Normal EC cells and KRJ-I cells express HIF-1α, and transient transfection with Renilla luciferase under HRE control identified a hypoxia-mediated pathway in these cells. PCR confirmed activation of HIF-downstream targets, GLUT1, IGF2, and VEGF under reduced O(2) levels (0.5%). Reducing O(2) also elevated 5-HT secretion (2-3.2-fold) as well as protein levels of HIF-1α (1.7-3-fold). Increasing O(2) to 100% inhibited HRE-mediated signaling, transcription, reduced 5-HT secretion, and significantly lowered HIF-1α levels (∼75% of control). NF-κB signaling was also elevated during hypoxia (1.2-1.6-fold), but no significant changes were noted in PKA/cAMP. We concluded that gut EC cells are oxygen responsive, and alterations in O(2) levels differentially activate HIF-1α and tryptophan hydroxylase 1, as well as NF-κB signaling. This results in alterations in 5-HT production and secretion and identifies that the chemomechanosensory role of EC cells extends to oxygen sensing.

  20. Low Oxygen Modulates Multiple Signaling Pathways, Increasing Self-Renewal, While Decreasing Differentiation, Senescence, and Apoptosis in Stromal MIAMI Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Carmen; D'Ippolito, Gianluca; Curtis, Kevin M.; Delcroix, Gaëtan J.-R.; Gomez, Lourdes A.; El Hokayem, Jimmy; Rieger, Megan; Parrondo, Ricardo; de las Pozas, Alicia; Perez-Stable, Carlos; Howard, Guy A.

    2016-01-01

    Human bone marrow multipotent mesenchymal stromal cell (hMSC) number decreases with aging. Subpopulations of hMSCs can differentiate into cells found in bone, vasculature, cartilage, gut, and other tissues and participate in their repair. Maintaining throughout adult life such cell subpopulations should help prevent or delay the onset of age-related degenerative conditions. Low oxygen tension, the physiological environment in progenitor cell-rich regions of the bone marrow microarchitecture, stimulates the self-renewal of marrow-isolated adult multilineage inducible (MIAMI) cells and expression of Sox2, Nanog, Oct4a nuclear accumulation, Notch intracellular domain, notch target genes, neuronal transcriptional repressor element 1 (RE1)-silencing transcription factor (REST), and hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α), and additionally, by decreasing the expression of (i) the proapoptotic proteins, apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and Bak, and (ii) senescence-associated p53 expression and β-galactosidase activity. Furthermore, low oxygen increases canonical Wnt pathway signaling coreceptor Lrp5 expression, and PI3K/Akt pathway activation. Lrp5 inhibition decreases self-renewal marker Sox2 mRNA, Oct4a nuclear accumulation, and cell numbers. Wortmannin-mediated PI3K/Akt pathway inhibition leads to increased osteoblastic differentiation at both low and high oxygen tension. We demonstrate that low oxygen stimulates a complex signaling network involving PI3K/Akt, Notch, and canonical Wnt pathways, which mediate the observed increase in nuclear Oct4a and REST, with simultaneous decrease in p53, AIF, and Bak. Collectively, these pathway activations contribute to increased self-renewal with concomitant decreased differentiation, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and/or senescence in MIAMI cells. Importantly, the PI3K/Akt pathway plays a central mechanistic role in the oxygen tension-regulated self-renewal versus osteoblastic differentiation of progenitor cells. PMID:27059084

  1. Reactive oxygen species, cell growth, cell cycle progression and vascular remodeling in hypertension

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vokurková, Martina; Xu, S.; Touyz, R.M.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 1 (2007), s. 53-63 ISSN 1479-6678 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : cyclins * oxidative stress * cell proliferation Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  2. Metabolic programming of mesenchymal stromal cells by oxygen tension directs chondrogenic cell fate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; Georgi, Nicole; Moreira Teixeira, Liliana; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Post, Janine Nicole; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Actively steering the chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) into either permanent cartilage or hypertrophic cartilage destined to be replaced by bone has not yet been possible. During limb development, the developing long bone is exposed to a concentration gradient of

  3. Influence of the oxygen electrode and inter-diffusion barrier on the degradation of solid oxide electrolysis cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjalmarsson, Per; Sun, Xiufu; Liu, Yi-Lin

    2013-01-01

    -diffusion barrier sandwiched between the YSZ electrolyte and an LSCF:CGO oxygen electrode. Impedance Spectroscopy was used during the tests to diagnose the change in electrochemical response of the different components of the SOECs. The results showed a significantly lower degradation rate for the cell with an LSCF......Two Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells (SOECs) with different oxygen electrodes have been tested in galvanostatic tests carried out at −1.5 Acm−2 and 800 °C converting 60% of a 50:50% mixture of H2O and CO2 (co-electrolysis). One of the cells had an LSM:YSZ oxygen electrode. The other had an CGO inter...

  4. Stability and Performance of Oxygen Electrodes for Reversible Solid Oxide Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Railsback, Justin Gary

    Worldwide, governments are beginning to take action to reduce anthropogenic CO2 emissions in order to mitigate the extent of global climate change. The largest fraction of global CO2 emission comes from electrical power generation, which is rapidly being converted to wind and solar installations. The intermittent nature of renewable resources requires that large scale energy storage be implemented to ensure grid stability. Pumped hydro storage is currently the only technology available for large scale energy storage; however, pumped hydro remains geographically confined and susceptible to seasonal fluctuations and offers limited discharge hours. Recent system level models predict that reversible solid oxide cells may be a competitive solution, but two key advancements are required to realize the technology: low cell resistance (cell resistance, and when a cell is operated in electrolysis the oxygen electrode is known to degrade quickly. This work focuses on both aspects of the oxygen electrode. A Pr2NiO4 based electrode is developed that has improved phase stability and good polarization resistance ( 0.1 O•cm2 at 650 °C). The electrode is prepared by wet chemical impregnation (infiltration) of Pr2NiO4 precursors into a La0.9Sr 0.1Ga0.8Mg0.2O3 scaffold. Electrochemical data for a number cells is presented and the number of infiltrations is optimized. Preliminary life tests and x-ray data are presented. Pressurization of the oxygen electrode is predicted to decrease its polarization resistance and pressurization of the reversible solid oxide cell system is desirable to achieve high round-trip efficiency. The electrochemical performance of mixed electronic-ionic conducting electrodes has not been reported above 1 atm. Four candidate electrodes are examined under pressurization up to 10 atm: Pr2NiO4 infiltrated La0.9Sr0.1 Ga0.8Mg0.2O3, Sm0.5Sr 0.5CoO3 infiltrated Ce0.9Gd0.1O 2, single phase La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe 0.8O3, and single phase Nd2NiO4. The role of the ion

  5. Haptic rendering foundations, algorithms, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Ming C

    2008-01-01

    For a long time, human beings have dreamed of a virtual world where it is possible to interact with synthetic entities as if they were real. It has been shown that the ability to touch virtual objects increases the sense of presence in virtual environments. This book provides an authoritative overview of state-of-theart haptic rendering algorithms and their applications. The authors examine various approaches and techniques for designing touch-enabled interfaces for a number of applications, including medical training, model design, and maintainability analysis for virtual prototyping, scienti

  6. GPU Pro 4 advanced rendering techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Engel, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    GPU Pro4: Advanced Rendering Techniques presents ready-to-use ideas and procedures that can help solve many of your day-to-day graphics programming challenges. Focusing on interactive media and games, the book covers up-to-date methods producing real-time graphics. Section editors Wolfgang Engel, Christopher Oat, Carsten Dachsbacher, Michal Valient, Wessam Bahnassi, and Sebastien St-Laurent have once again assembled a high-quality collection of cutting-edge techniques for advanced graphics processing unit (GPU) programming. Divided into six sections, the book begins with discussions on the abi

  7. GPU PRO 3 Advanced rendering techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Engel, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    GPU Pro3, the third volume in the GPU Pro book series, offers practical tips and techniques for creating real-time graphics that are useful to beginners and seasoned game and graphics programmers alike. Section editors Wolfgang Engel, Christopher Oat, Carsten Dachsbacher, Wessam Bahnassi, and Sebastien St-Laurent have once again brought together a high-quality collection of cutting-edge techniques for advanced GPU programming. With contributions by more than 50 experts, GPU Pro3: Advanced Rendering Techniques covers battle-tested tips and tricks for creating interesting geometry, realistic sha

  8. Enhanced proliferation and dopaminergic differentiation of ventral mesencephalic precursor cells by synergistic effect of FGF2 and reduced oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pia; Gramsbergen, Jan-Bert; Zimmer, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Effective numerical expansion of dopaminergic precursors might overcome the limited availability of transplantable cells in replacement strategies for Parkinson's disease. Here we investigated the effect of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2) and FGF8 on expansion and dopaminergic differentiation o...... enzyme activity, which may explain the elevated dopamine levels. Our findings demonstrate that modulation of oxygen tension is a recognizable factor for in vitro expansion and dopaminergic differentiation of rat embryonic midbrain precursor cells....... of rat embryonic ventral mesencephalic neuroblasts cultured at high (20%) and low (3%) oxygen tension. More cells incorporated bromodeoxyuridine in cultures expanded at low as compared to high oxygen tension, and after 6 days of differentiation there were significantly more neuronal cells in low than......, switching FGF2-expanded cultures from low to high oxygen tension during the last two days of differentiation significantly enhanced dopamine release and intracellular dopamine levels as compared to all other treatment groups. In addition, the short-term exposure to high oxygen enhanced in situ assessed TH...

  9. Oxygen permeation through Nafion 117 membrane and its impact on efficiency of polymer membrane ethanol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, Andrzej; Kulesza, Pawel J.; Lewera, Adam

    2011-05-01

    We investigate oxygen permeation through Nafion 117 membrane in a direct ethanol fuel cell and elucidate how it affects the fuel cell efficiency. An obvious symptom of oxygen permeation is the presence of significant amounts of acetaldehyde and acetic acid in the mixture leaving anode when no current was drawn from the fuel cell (i.e. under the open circuit conditions). This parasitic process severely lowers efficiency of the fuel cell because ethanol is found to be directly oxidized on the surface of catalyst by oxygen coming through membrane from cathode in the absence of electric current flowing in the external circuit. Three commonly used carbon-supported anode catalysts are investigated, Pt, Pt/Ru and Pt/Sn. Products of ethanol oxidation are determined qualitatively and quantitatively at open circuit as a function of temperature and pressure, and we aim at determining whether the oxygen permeation or the catalyst's activity limits the parasitic ethanol oxidation. Our results strongly imply the need to develop more selective membranes that would be less oxygen permeable.

  10. Conservation of old renderings - the consolidation of rendering with loss of cohesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Tavares

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of external renderings in the scope of conservation and restoration has acquired in the last years great methodological, scientific and technical advances. These renderings are important elements of the built structure, for besides possessing a protection function, they possess often a decorative function of great relevance for the image of the monument. The maintenance of these renderings implies the conservation of traditional constructive techniques and the use of compatible materials, as similar to the originals as possible. The main objective of this study is to define a methodology of conservative restoration using strategies of maintenance of renderings and traditional constructive techniques. The minimum intervention principle is maintained as well as the use of materials compatible with the original ones. This paper describes the technique and products used for the consolidation of the loss of cohesion. The testing campaign was developed under controlled conditions, in laboratory, and in situ in order to evaluate their efficacy for the consolidation of old renders. A set of tests is presented to evaluate the effectiveness of the process. The results are analysed and a reflection is added referring to the applicability of these techniques. Finally the paper presents a proposal for further research.

  11. Water and oxygen induced degradation of small molecule organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermenau, Martin; Riede, Moritz; Leo, Karl

    2011-01-01

    Small molecule organic solar cells were studied with respect to water and oxygen induced degradation by mapping the spatial distribution of reaction products in order to elucidate the degradation patterns and failure mechanisms. The active layers consist of a 30 nm bulk heterojunction formed......,4′-diamine p-doped with C60F36 (MeO-TPD:C60F36), which acted as hole transporting layer. Indium-tin-oxide (ITO) and aluminum served as hole and electron collecting electrode, respectively. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in conjunction...... of aluminum oxide at the BPhen/Al interface, and diffusion of water into the ZnPc:C60 layer where ZnPc becomes oxidized. Finally, diffusion from the electrodes was found to have no or a negligible effect on the device lifetime....

  12. Particle-in-cell simulation of Trichel pulses in pure oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soria-Hoyo, C; Pontiga, F; Castellanos, A

    2007-01-01

    The development and propagation of Trichel pulses in oxygen have been numerically simulated using an improved fluid particle-in-cell (PIC) method. The numerical method has been optimized to accurately reproduce sequences of about 100 Trichel pulses (∼1 ms). A classical one-dimensional model of negative corona in sphere-to-plane geometry has been used to formulate the continuity equations for electrons and ions. The effects of ionization, attachment and secondary-electron emission from the cathode have all been considered. The electric field has been obtained from the solution of Poisson's equation in two dimensions. Using this model, the temporal and electrical characteristics of Trichel pulses have been investigated, in particular, the relation between applied voltage, pulse frequency and time-averaged current intensity and charge

  13. Particle-in-cell simulation of Trichel pulses in pure oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soria-Hoyo, C [Dpto. Electronica y Electromagnetismo, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda. Reina Mercedes s/n, Sevilla 41012 (Spain); Pontiga, F [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada II, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda. Reina Mercedes s/n, Sevilla 41012 (Spain); Castellanos, A [Dpto. Electronica y Electromagnetismo, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda. Reina Mercedes s/n, Sevilla 41012 (Spain)

    2007-08-07

    The development and propagation of Trichel pulses in oxygen have been numerically simulated using an improved fluid particle-in-cell (PIC) method. The numerical method has been optimized to accurately reproduce sequences of about 100 Trichel pulses ({approx}1 ms). A classical one-dimensional model of negative corona in sphere-to-plane geometry has been used to formulate the continuity equations for electrons and ions. The effects of ionization, attachment and secondary-electron emission from the cathode have all been considered. The electric field has been obtained from the solution of Poisson's equation in two dimensions. Using this model, the temporal and electrical characteristics of Trichel pulses have been investigated, in particular, the relation between applied voltage, pulse frequency and time-averaged current intensity and charge.

  14. Hydrogen-Oxygen PEM Regenerative Fuel Cell Development at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bents, David J.; Scullin, Vincent J.; Chang, Bei-Jiann; Johnson, Donald W.; Garcia, Christoher P.; Jakupca, Ian J.

    2005-01-01

    The closed-cycle hydrogen-oxygen PEM regenerative fuel cell (RFC) at the NASA Glenn Research Center has successfully demonstrated closed cycle operation at rated power for multiple charge-discharge cycles. During charge cycle the RFC has absorbed input electrical power simulating a solar day cycle ranging from zero to 15 kWe peak, and delivered steady 5 kWe output power for periods exceeding 8 hr. Orderly transitions from charge to discharge mode, and return to charging after full discharge, have been accomplished without incident. Continuing test operations focus on: (1) Increasing the number of contiguous uninterrupted charge discharge cycles; (2) Increasing the performance envelope boundaries; (3) Operating the RFC as an energy storage device on a regular basis; (4) Gaining operational experience leading to development of fully automated operation; and (5) Developing instrumentation and in situ fluid sampling strategies to monitor health and anticipate breakdowns.

  15. Endoplasmic reticulum-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) is involved in toxicity of cell wall stress to Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qilin; Zhang, Bing; Li, Jianrong; Zhang, Biao; Wang, Honggang; Li, Mingchun

    2016-10-01

    The cell wall is an important cell structure in both fungi and bacteria, and hence becomes a common antimicrobial target. The cell wall-perturbing agents disrupt synthesis and function of cell wall components, leading to cell wall stress and consequent cell death. However, little is known about the detailed mechanisms by which cell wall stress renders fungal cell death. In this study, we found that ROS scavengers drastically attenuated the antifungal effect of cell wall-perturbing agents to the model fungal pathogen Candida albicans, and these agents caused remarkable ROS accumulation and activation of oxidative stress response (OSR) in this fungus. Interestingly, cell wall stress did not cause mitochondrial dysfunction and elevation of mitochondrial superoxide levels. Furthermore, the iron chelator 2,2'-bipyridyl (BIP) and the hydroxyl radical scavengers could not attenuate cell wall stress-caused growth inhibition and ROS accumulation. However, cell wall stress up-regulated expression of unfold protein response (UPR) genes, enhanced protein secretion and promoted protein folding-related oxidation of Ero1, an important source of ROS production. These results indicated that oxidation of Ero1 in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), rather than mitochondrial electron transport and Fenton reaction, contributed to cell wall stress-related ROS accumulation and consequent growth inhibition. Our findings uncover a novel link between cell wall integrity (CWI), ER function and ROS production in fungal cells, and shed novel light on development of strategies promoting the antifungal efficacy of cell wall-perturbing agents against fungal infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Controlled intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species in human mesenchymal stem cells using porphyrin conjugated nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavado, Andrea S; Chauhan, Veeren M; Zen, Amer Alhaj; Giuntini, Francesca; Jones, D Rhodri E; Boyle, Ross W; Beeby, Andrew; Chan, Weng C; Aylott, Jonathan W

    2015-09-14

    Nanoparticles capable of generating controlled amounts of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), that advance the study of oxidative stress and cellular communication, were synthesized by functionalizing polyacrylamide nanoparticles with zinc(II) porphyrin photosensitisers. Controlled ROS production was demonstrated in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) through (1) production of nanoparticles functionalized with varying percentages of Zn(II) porphyrin and (2) modulating the number of doses of excitation light to internalized nanoparticles. hMSCs challenged with nanoparticles functionalized with increasing percentages of Zn(II) porphyrin and high numbers of irradiations of excitation light were found to generate greater amounts of ROS. A novel dye, which is transformed into fluorescent 7-hydroxy-4-trifluoromethyl-coumarin in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, provided an indirect indicator for cumulative ROS production. The mitochondrial membrane potential was monitored to investigate the destructive effect of increased intracellular ROS production. Flow cytometric analysis of nanoparticle treated hMSCs suggested irradiation with excitation light signalled controlled apoptotic cell death, rather than uncontrolled necrotic cell death. Increased intracellular ROS production did not induce phenotypic changes in hMSC subcultures.

  17. Reactive oxygen species are key mediators of the nitric oxide apoptotic pathway in anterior pituitary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machiavelli, Leticia I; Poliandri, Ariel H; Quinteros, Fernanda A; Cabilla, Jimena P; Duvilanski, Beatriz H

    2007-03-01

    We previously showed that long-term exposure of anterior pituitary cells to nitric oxide (NO) induces apoptosis. The intracellular signals underlying this effect remained unclear. In this study, we searched for possible mechanisms involved in the early stages of the NO apoptotic cascade. Caspase 3 was activated by NO with no apparent disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential. NO caused a rapid increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and this increase seems to be dependent of mitochondrial electron transport chain. The antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine avoided ROS increase, prevented the NO-induced caspase 3 activation, and reduced the NO apoptotic effect. Catalase was inactivated by NO, while glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity and reduced glutathione (GSH) were not modified at first, but increased at later times of NO exposure. The increase of GSH level is important for the scavenging of the NO-induced ROS overproduction. Our results indicate that ROS have an essential role as a trigger of the NO apoptotic cascade in anterior pituitary cells. The permanent inhibition of catalase may strengthen the oxidative damage induced by NO. GPx activity and GSH level augment in response to the oxidative damage, though this increase seems not to be enough to rescue the cells from the NO effect.

  18. Hydrogen-Oxygen PEM Regenerative Fuel Cell Development at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bents, David J.; Scullin, Vincent J.; Chang, B. J.; Johnson, Donald W.; Garcia, Christopher P.; Jakupca, Ian J.

    2006-01-01

    The closed-cycle hydrogen-oxygen PEM regenerative fuel cell (RFC) at NASA Glenn Research Center has demonstrated multiple back to back contiguous cycles at rated power, and round trip efficiencies up to 52 percent. It is the first fully closed cycle regenerative fuel cell ever demonstrated (entire system is sealed: nothing enters or escapes the system other than electrical power and heat). During FY2006 the system has undergone numerous modifications and internal improvements aimed at reducing parasitic power, heat loss and noise signature, increasing its functionality as an unattended automated energy storage device, and in-service reliability. It also serves as testbed towards development of a 600 W-hr/kg flight configuration, through the successful demonstration of lightweight fuel cell and electrolyser stacks and supporting components. The RFC has demonstrated its potential as an energy storage device for aerospace solar power systems such as solar electric aircraft, lunar and planetary surface installations; any airless environment where minimum system weight is critical. Its development process continues on a path of risk reduction for the flight system NASA will eventually need for the manned lunar outpost.

  19. Comparison of Preterm and Term Wharton's Jelly-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Properties in Different Oxygen Tensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balgi-Agarwal, Saloni; Winter, Caitlyn; Corral, Alexis; Mustafa, Shamimunisa B; Hornsby, Peter; Moreira, Alvaro

    2018-06-27

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have shown promise as therapeutic agents in treating morbidities associated with premature birth. MSCs derived from the human umbilical cord are easy to isolate and have low immunogenicity and a robust ability to secrete paracrine factors. To date, there are no studies evaluating preterm versus term umbilical cord tissue-derived MSCs. Therefore, our aim was twofold: (1) to compare stem cell properties in preterm versus term MSCs and (2) to examine the impact of oxygen tension on stem cell behavior. Umbilical cord tissue was obtained from 5 preterm and 5 term neonates. The cells were isolated and characterized as MSCs in accordance with the International Society for Cellular Therapy. We exposed MSCs to different oxygen tensions to examine the impact of environmental factors on cell performance. We studied the following stem cell properties: (i) motility, (ii) proliferation, (iii) senescence, (iv) cell viability, (v) colony-forming unit efficiency, and (vi) inflammatory cytokine expression. Under normoxia (21% O2), cells from preterm and term infants had similar properties. Under hypoxic conditions (1% O2), term MSCs had better cell proliferation; however, cells exposed to hyperoxia (90% O2) had the slowest motility and lowest cell viability (p cytokine expression between the groups. The term cells demonstrated more colony-forming efficiency than the preterm cells. In sum, our preliminary findings suggest that MSCs derived from term and preterm umbilical cords have similar characteristics, offering the potential of future autologous/allogeneic MSC transplants in neonates. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Sibutramine provokes apoptosis of aortic endothelial cells through altered production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morikawa, Yoshifumi [Forensic Science Laboratory, Gifu Prefectural Police Headquarters, Gifu 500-8501 (Japan); Shibata, Akinobu; Okumura, Naoko; Ikari, Akira [Laboratory of Biochemistry, Gifu Pharmaceutical University, Gifu 501-1196 (Japan); Sasajima, Yasuhide; Suenami, Koichi; Sato, Kiyohito; Takekoshi, Yuji [Forensic Science Laboratory, Gifu Prefectural Police Headquarters, Gifu 500-8501 (Japan); El-Kabbani, Ossama [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Matsunaga, Toshiyuki, E-mail: matsunagat@gifu-pu.ac.jp [Laboratory of Biochemistry, Gifu Pharmaceutical University, Gifu 501-1196 (Japan)

    2017-01-01

    Overdose administration of sibutramine, a serotonin-noradrenalin reuptake inhibitor, is considered to elicit severe side effects including hypertension, whose pathogenic mechanism remains unclear. Here, we found that 48-h incubation with > 10 μM sibutramine provokes apoptosis of human aortic endothelial (HAE) cells. Treatment with the lethal concentration of sibutramine facilitated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), altered expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress response genes (heat shock protein 70 and C/EBP homologous protein), and inactivated 26S proteasome-based proteolysis. The treatment also decreased cellular level of nitric oxide (NO) through lowering of expression and activity of endothelial NO synthase. These results suggest that ROS production and depletion of NO are crucial events in the apoptotic mechanism and may be linked to the pathogenesis of vasoconstriction elicited by the drug. Compared to sibutramine, its metabolites (N-desmethylsibutramine and N-didesmethylsibutramine) were much less cytotoxic to HAE cells, which hardly metabolized sibutramine. In contrast, both the drug and metabolites showed low cytotoxicity to hepatic HepG2 cells with high metabolic potency and expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4. The cytotoxicity of sibutramine to HepG2 and Chang Liver cells was remarkably augmented by inhibition and knockdown of CYP3A4. This study also suggests an inverse relationship between sibutramine cytotoxicity and CYP3A4-mediated metabolism into the N-desmethyl metabolites. - Highlights: • Treatment with sibutramine, an anorexiant, induces endothelial cell apoptosis. • The apoptotic mechanism includes induction of ROS and NO depletion. • There is an inverse relationship between sibutramine cytotoxicity and its metabolism.

  1. Hexadecacarbonylhexarhodium as a novel electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction and hydrogen oxidation in the presence of fuel cell contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uribe-Godinez, J.; Jimenez-Sandoval, O. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional (Cinvestav), Unidad Queretaro. Apartado Postal 1-798, Queretaro, Qro. 76001 (Mexico); Hernandez-Castellanos, R. [Universidad Tecnologica de San Juan del Rio, Av. La Palma No. 125, Col. Vista Hermosa, San Juan del Rio, Qro. 76800 (Mexico)

    2010-11-01

    The electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction and hydrogen oxidation of a discrete metal carbonyl cluster with a well defined molecular and crystal structure, Rh{sub 6}(CO){sub 16}, is reported. The exchange current density of this compound for oxygen reduction is one order of magnitude higher than that of platinum, and its resistance degree to PEM fuel cell contaminants such as methanol and CO is as high as 2 mol L{sup -1} and 0.5%, respectively. These properties make the metal complex a potential alternative for use as electrode in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. (author)

  2. A proposed agglomerate model for oxygen reduction in the catalyst layer of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiaoxian; Gao, Yuan; Ostadi, Hossein; Jiang, Kyle; Chen, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We developed a new agglomerate model to describe oxygen reduction reaction. • We showed how to calculate the model parameters from catalyst layer structure. • We verified the agglomerate model. - Abstract: Oxygen diffusion and reduction in the catalyst layer of PEM fuel cell is an important process in fuel cell modelling, but models able to link the reduction rate to catalyst-layer structure are lack; this paper makes such an effort. We first link the average reduction rate over the agglomerate within a catalyst layer to a probability that an oxygen molecule, which is initially on the agglomerate surface, will enter and remain in the agglomerate at any time in the absence of any electrochemical reaction. We then propose a method to directly calculate distribution function of this probability and apply it to two catalyst layers with contrasting structures. A formula is proposed to describe these calculated distribution functions, from which the agglomerate model is derived. The model has two parameters and both can be independently calculated from catalyst layer structures. We verify the model by first showing that it is an improvement and able to reproduce what the spherical model describes, and then testing it against the average oxygen reductions directly calculated from pore-scale simulations of oxygen diffusion and reaction in the two catalyst layers. The proposed model is simple, but significant as it links the average oxygen reduction to catalyst layer structures, and its two parameters can be directly calculated rather than by calibration

  3. Induction of Tca8113 tumor cell apoptosis by icotinib is associated with reactive oxygen species mediated p38-MAPK activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cailing; Yan, Jianguo; Yuan, Guoyan; Zhang, Yinghua; Lu, Derong; Ren, Mingxin; Cui, Weigang

    2014-08-01

    Icotinib, a selective EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI), has been shown to exhibit anti-tumor activity against several tumor cell lines. However, the exact molecular mechanism of icotinib's anti-tumor effect remains unknown. This study aims to examine the zytotoxic effect of icotinib on Tca8113 cells and its potential molecular mechanism. Icotinib significantly resulted in dose-dependent cell death as determined by MTT assay, accompanied by increased levels of Bax and DNA fragmentation. Icotinib could also induce Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) generation. Further studies confirmed that scavenging of reactive oxygen species by N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), and pharmacological inhibition of MAPK reversed icotinib-induced apoptosis in Tca8113 cells. Our data provide evidence that icotinib induces apoptosis, possibly via ROS-mediated MAPK pathway in Tca8113 cells.

  4. Effects of oxygen and TMPN on the initial part of the dose-effect curves of human cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersen, E.O.; Wibe, E.; Lovhaug, D.; Oftebro, R.; Brustad, T.

    1975-01-01

    Human cells of the established cell line NHIK 3025 have been irradiated under various conditions of oxygen and TMPN concentrations. Complete survival curves are presented for each concentration of both oxygen and TMPN. The survival curves for extremely hypoxic cells in the absence of TMPN were found to be strictly exponential in the dose range below about 2300 rad, irrespective of the technique used. Oxygen at a concentration of 37 ppm was found to protect the cells at least above the dose range up to 2500 rad, while 250 ppm of oxygen exerted a protective effect in the dose range below 1200 rad and a sensitizing effect (OER = 1.43) for higher doses. However, the protective effect below 700 rad was found to be higher in the presence of 250 ppm O 2 , than 37 ppm O 2 , indicating that the degree of protection in this low-dose range is optimal for an oxygen concentration higher than 37 ppm. TMPN provides a protective and a sensitizing effect in about the same way as oxygen does, but TMPN is less effective. When the TMPN concentration is increased from 0.5 to 10 mM the maximum dose for which TMPN exerts a protective effect on the hypoxic cells decreases from 700 to 400 rad. However the degree of protection in the dose range below 300 rad is higher for TMPN concentrations of 1 mM and 3 mM than for 0.5 mM and 10 mM. Results indicate that the degree of protection is optimal in the low-dose range (< 300 rad) for a TMPN concentration somewhere between 0.5 mM and 3 mM. (author)

  5. Oxygen, a key factor regulating cell behaviour during neurogenesis and cerebral diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Kuan eZhang; Lingling eZhu; Ming eFan

    2011-01-01

    Oxygen is vital to maintain the normal functions of alomost all the organs, especially for brain which is one of the heaviest oxygen consumers in the body. The important roles of oxygen on the brain are not only reflected in the development, but also showed in the pathological processes of many cerebral diseases. In the current review, we summarized the oxygen levels in brain tissues tested by real-time measurements during the embryonic and adult neurogenesis, the cerebral diseases or in the ...

  6. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathodes. Unraveling the Relationship Between Structure, Surface Chemistry and Oxygen Reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopalan, Srikanth [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    2013-03-31

    In this work we have considered oxygen reduction reaction on LSM and LSCF cathode materials. In particular we have used various spectroscopic techniques to explore the surface composition, transition metal oxidation state, and the bonding environment of oxygen to understand the changes that occur to the surface during the oxygen reduction process. In a parallel study we have employed patterned cathodes of both LSM and LSCF cathodes to extract transport and kinetic parameters associated with the oxygen reduction process.

  7. Impact of low oxygen tension on stemness, proliferation and differentiation potential of human adipose-derived stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jane Ru; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Lembah Pantai, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Noor Azmi, Mat Adenan; Omar, Siti Zawiah [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Lembah Pantai, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Chua, Kien Hui [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Raja Muda Abdul Aziz, 50300 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Wan Safwani, Wan Kamarul Zaman, E-mail: wansafwani@um.edu.my [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Lembah Pantai, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-05-30

    Highlights: • Hypoxia maintains the stemness of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs). • ASCs show an increased proliferation rate under low oxygen tension. • Oxygen level as low as 2% enhances the chondrogenic differentiation potential of ASCs. • HIF-1α may regulate the proliferation and differentiation activities of ASCs under hypoxia. - Abstract: Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have been found adapted to a specific niche with low oxygen tension (hypoxia) in the body. As an important component of this niche, oxygen tension has been known to play a critical role in the maintenance of stem cell characteristics. However, the effect of O{sub 2} tension on their functional properties has not been well determined. In this study, we investigated the effects of O{sub 2} tension on ASCs stemness, differentiation and proliferation ability. Human ASCs were cultured under normoxia (21% O{sub 2}) and hypoxia (2% O{sub 2}). We found that hypoxia increased ASC stemness marker expression and proliferation rate without altering their morphology and surface markers. Low oxygen tension further enhances the chondrogenic differentiation ability, but reduces both adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation potential. These results might be correlated with the increased expression of HIF-1α under hypoxia. Taken together, we suggest that growing ASCs under 2% O{sub 2} tension may be important in expanding ASCs effectively while maintaining their functional properties for clinical therapy, particularly for the treatment of cartilage defects.

  8. High oxygen condition facilitates the differentiation of mouse and human pluripotent stem cells into pancreatic progenitors and insulin-producing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Farzana; Kaitsuka, Taku; Raeed, Jamiruddin Mohd; Wei, Fan-Yan; Shiraki, Nobuaki; Akagi, Tadayuki; Yokota, Takashi; Kume, Shoen; Tomizawa, Kazuhito

    2014-04-04

    Pluripotent stem cells have potential applications in regenerative medicine for diabetes. Differentiation of stem cells into insulin-producing cells has been achieved using various protocols. However, both the efficiency of the method and potency of differentiated cells are insufficient. Oxygen tension, the partial pressure of oxygen, has been shown to regulate the embryonic development of several organs, including pancreatic β-cells. In this study, we tried to establish an effective method for the differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) into insulin-producing cells by culturing under high oxygen (O2) conditions. Treatment with a high O2 condition in the early stage of differentiation increased insulin-positive cells at the terminus of differentiation. We found that a high O2 condition repressed Notch-dependent gene Hes1 expression and increased Ngn3 expression at the stage of pancreatic progenitors. This effect was caused by inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α protein level. Moreover, a high O2 condition activated Wnt signaling. Optimal stage-specific treatment with a high O2 condition resulted in a significant increase in insulin production in both mouse embryonic stem cells and human iPSCs and yielded populations containing up to 10% C-peptide-positive cells in human iPSCs. These results suggest that culturing in a high O2 condition at a specific stage is useful for the efficient generation of insulin-producing cells.

  9. Iron and Reactive Oxygen Species: Friends or Foes of Cancer Cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bystrom, Laura M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: In this review, the dual nature of both iron and reactive oxygen species (ROS) will be explored in normal and cancer cell metabolism. Although iron and ROS play important roles in cellular homeostasis, they may also contribute to carcinogenesis. On the other hand, many studies have indicated that abrogation of iron metabolism, elevation of ROS, or modification of redox regulatory mechanisms in cancer cells, should be considered as therapeutic approaches for cancer. Recent Advances: Drugs that target different aspects of iron metabolism may be promising therapeutics for cancer. The ability of iron chelators to cause iron depletion and/or elevate ROS levels indicates that these types of compounds have more potential as antitumor medicines than originally expected. Other natural and synthetic compounds that target pathways involved in ROS homeostasis also have potential value alone or in combination with current chemotherapeutics. Critical Issues: Although ROS induction and iron depletion may be targets for cancer therapies, the optimal therapeutic strategies have yet to be identified. This review highlights some of the research that strives to identify such therapeutics. Future Directions: More studies are needed to better understand the role of iron and ROS in carcinogenesis not only as cancer promoters, but also as cytotoxic agents to cancer cells and cancer stem cells (CSCs). Moreover, the structure–activity effects of iron chelators and other compounds that increase ROS and/or disrupt iron metabolism need to be further evaluated to assess the effectiveness and selectivity of these compounds against both cancer and CSCs. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1917–1924. PMID:23198911

  10. Enhanced Cell Capture on Functionalized Graphene Oxide Nanosheets through Oxygen Clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Neelkanth M; Kumar, Priyank V; Li, Zeyang; Ploegh, Hidde L; Grossman, Jeffrey C; Belcher, Angela M; Chen, Guan-Yu

    2017-02-28

    With the global rise in incidence of cancer and infectious diseases, there is a need for the development of techniques to diagnose, treat, and monitor these conditions. The ability to efficiently capture and isolate cells and other biomolecules from peripheral whole blood for downstream analyses is a necessary requirement. Graphene oxide (GO) is an attractive template nanomaterial for such biosensing applications. Favorable properties include its two-dimensional architecture and wide range of functionalization chemistries, offering significant potential to tailor affinity toward aromatic functional groups expressed in biomolecules of interest. However, a limitation of current techniques is that as-synthesized GO nanosheets are used directly in sensing applications, and the benefits of their structural modification on the device performance have remained unexplored. Here, we report a microfluidic-free, sensitive, planar device on treated GO substrates to enable quick and efficient capture of Class-II MHC-positive cells from murine whole blood. We achieve this by using a mild thermal annealing treatment on the GO substrates, which drives a phase transformation through oxygen clustering. Using a combination of experimental observations and MD simulations, we demonstrate that this process leads to improved reactivity and density of functionalization of cell capture agents, resulting in an enhanced cell capture efficiency of 92 ± 7% at room temperature, almost double the efficiency afforded by devices made using as-synthesized GO (54 ± 3%). Our work highlights a scalable, cost-effective, general approach to improve the functionalization of GO, which creates diverse opportunities for various next-generation device applications.

  11. Benefits of oxygen and nitrogen plasma treatment in Vero cell affinity to poly(lactide-co-glycolide acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Rodrigues Esposito

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion on materials surface is critical because this phenomenon occurs before other events, as cell spreading, cell migration and cell differentiation. it is commonly accepted that the adhesion of cells on solid substrate is influenced by several substratum surface properties, such as wettability, surface charge, roughness and topography. plasma technique is a convenient method for modifying surface properties of materials without affecting physical properties. in this study, poly(lactide-co-glycolide, plga, membranes were modified by oxygen and nitrogen plasma to improve polymer hydrophilicity and verify their effect on vero cells culture. the plga membranes, which were characterized by sem and contact angle, showed increased surface rugosity and narrower contact angles. cell adhesion, cytotoxicity assay, sem and cytochemistry analysis showed that plasma treatment was beneficial to cell growth by improving cell-polymer interaction. Cell adhesion on materials surface is critical because this phenomenon occurs before other events, as cell spreading, cell migration and cell differentiation. It is commonly accepted that the adhesion of cells on solid substrate is influenced by several substratum surface properties, such as wettability, surface charge, roughness and topography. Plasma technique is a convenient method for modifying surface properties of materials without affecting physical properties. In this study, poly(lactide-co-glycolide, PLGA, membranes were modified by oxygen and nitrogen plasma to improve polymer hydrophilicity and verify their effect on Vero cells culture. The PLGA membranes, which were characterized by SEM and contact angle, showed increased surface rugosity and narrower contact angles. Cell adhesion, cytotoxicity assay, SEM and cytochemistry analysis showed that plasma treatment was beneficial to cell growth by improving cell-polymer interaction.

  12. CELL RESPIRATION STUDIES : II. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE OXYGEN CONSUMPTION OF BLOOD FROM NORMAL INDIVIDUALS AND PATIENTS WITH INCREASED LEUCOCYTE COUNTS (SEPSIS; CHRONIC MYELOGENOUS LEUCEMIA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daland, G A; Isaacs, R

    1927-06-30

    1. The oxygen consumption of blood of normal individuals, when the hemoglobin is saturated with oxygen, is practically zero within the limits of experimental error of the microspirometer used. 2. The oxygen consumed in a microspirometer by the blood of patients with chronic myelogenous leucemia with a high white blood cell count, and of one with leucocytosis from sepsis, was proportional to the number of adult polymorphonuclear neutrophils in the blood. 3. No correlation could be made between the rate of oxygen absorption and the total number of white blood cells in the blood, or the total number of immature cells, or the number of red blood cells, or the amount of oxyhemoglobin. 4. The blood of patients with chronic myelogenous leucemia continued to use oxygen in the microspirometer longer than that of normal individuals, and the hemoglobin, in the leucemic bloods, became desaturated even though exposed to air. 5. In blood in which the bulk. of the cells were immature and the mature cells few, the oxygen consumption was lower than in blood in which the mature cells predominated. The rate of oxygen consumption of the immature cells was relatively low as compared to the mature. 6. The slower rate of oxygen absorption by the immature leucocytes in chronic myelogenous leucemia as compared to the mature cells, places them, in accord with Warburg's reports, in the class of the malignant tissues in this respect rather than in the group of young or embryonic cells.

  13. Validation of a colour rendering index based on memory colours

    OpenAIRE

    Smet, Kevin; Jost-Boissard, Sophie; Ryckaert, Wouter; Deconinck, Geert; Hanselaer, Peter

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the performance of a colour rendering index based on memory colours is investigated in comparison with the current CIE Colour Rendering Index, the NIST Colour Quality Scale and visual appreciation results obtained at CNRS at Lyon University for a set of 3000K and 4000K LED light sources. The Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients between each colour rendering metric and the two sets of visual results were calculated. It was found that the memory colour based colour render...

  14. Physiological oxygen prevents frequent silencing of the DLK1-DIO3 cluster during human embryonic stem cells culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Pingyuan; Sun, Yi; Ouyang, Qi; Hu, Liang; Tan, Yueqiu; Zhou, Xiaoying; Xiong, Bo; Zhang, Qianjun; Yuan, Ding; Pan, Yi; Liu, Tiancheng; Liang, Ping; Lu, Guangxiu; Lin, Ge

    2014-02-01

    Genetic and epigenetic alterations are observed in long-term culture (>30 passages) of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs); however, little information is available in early cultures. Through a large-scale gene expression analysis between initial-passage hESCs (ihESCs, cell derivatives, possibly through attenuation of the expression and phosphorylation of p53. Furthermore, we demonstrated that 5% oxygen, instead of the commonly used 20% oxygen, is required for preserving the expression of the DLK1-DIO3 cluster. Overall, the data suggest that active expression of the DLK1-DIO3 cluster represents a new biomarker for epigenetic stability of hESCs and indicates the importance of using a proper physiological oxygen level during the derivation and culture of hESCs. © AlphaMed Press.

  15. Neuroprotective Effects of Exogenous Activin A on Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation in PC12 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Xin Xu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic cerebrovascular disease is one of the most common causes of death in the World. Exogenous activin A (ActA protects neurons against toxicity and plays a central role in regulating the brain’s response to injury. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms involved in the neuroprotective effects of ActA in a model of hypoxic-ischemic brain disease. We found that ActA could effectively increase the survival rate of PC12 cells and relieve oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD damage. To clarify the neuroprotective mechanisms of ActA, the effects of ActA on the ActA/Smad pathway and on the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS and superoxide dismutase (SOD were investigated using OGD in PC12 cells. The results showed that ActA could increase the expression of activin receptor IIA (ActRIIA, Smad3 and Smad4 and that 50 ng/mL and 100 ng/mL of ActA could reduce NO levels and increase SOD activity by 78.9% and 79.9%, respectively. These results suggested that the neuroprotective effects of ActA in ischemia could be related to the activation of the ActA/Smad signaling pathway and to its anti-oxidant activities.

  16. Reactive oxygen species mediates homocysteine-induced mitochondrial biogenesis in human endothelial cells: Modulation by antioxidants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-de-Arce, Karen; Foncea, Rocio; Leighton, Federico

    2005-01-01

    It has been proposed that homocysteine (Hcy)-induces endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis by generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). A previous report has shown that Hcy promotes mitochondrial damage. Considering that oxidative stress can affect mitochondrial biogenesis, we hypothesized that Hcy-induced ROS in endothelial cells may lead to increased mitochondrial biogenesis. We found that Hcy-induced ROS (1.85-fold), leading to a NF-κB activation and increase the formation of 3-nitrotyrosine. Furthermore, expression of the mitochondrial biogenesis factors, nuclear respiratory factor-1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A, was significantly elevated in Hcy-treated cells. These changes were accompanied by increase in mitochondrial mass and higher mRNA and protein expression of the subunit III of cytochrome c oxidase. These effects were significantly prevented by pretreatment with the antioxidants, catechin and trolox. Taken together, our results suggest that ROS is an important mediator of mitochondrial biogenesis induced by Hcy, and that modulation of oxidative stress by antioxidants may protect against the adverse vascular effects of Hcy

  17. Immersive volume rendering of blood vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Gregory; Kim, Han Suk; Marsden, Alison; Bazilevs, Yuri; Schulze, Jürgen P.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we present a novel method of visualizing flow in blood vessels. Our approach reads unstructured tetrahedral data, resamples it, and uses slice based 3D texture volume rendering. Due to the sparse structure of blood vessels, we utilize an octree to efficiently store the resampled data by discarding empty regions of the volume. We use animation to convey time series data, wireframe surface to give structure, and utilize the StarCAVE, a 3D virtual reality environment, to add a fully immersive element to the visualization. Our tool has great value in interdisciplinary work, helping scientists collaborate with clinicians, by improving the understanding of blood flow simulations. Full immersion in the flow field allows for a more intuitive understanding of the flow phenomena, and can be a great help to medical experts for treatment planning.

  18. Photon Differential Splatting for Rendering Caustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jeppe Revall; Schjøth, Lars; Erleben, Kenny

    2014-01-01

    We present a photon splatting technique which reduces noise and blur in the rendering of caustics. Blurring of illumination edges is an inherent problem in photon splatting, as each photon is unaware of its neighbours when being splatted. This means that the splat size is usually based...... on heuristics rather than knowledge of the local flux density. We use photon differentials to determine the size and shape of the splats such that we achieve adaptive anisotropic flux density estimation in photon splatting. As compared to previous work that uses photon differentials, we present the first method...... where no photons or beams or differentials need to be stored in a map. We also present improvements in the theory of photon differentials, which give more accurate results and a faster implementation. Our technique has good potential for GPU acceleration, and we limit the number of parameters requiring...

  19. MG132 as a proteasome inhibitor induces cell growth inhibition and cell death in A549 lung cancer cells via influencing reactive oxygen species and GSH level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yong Hwan; Park, Woo Hyun

    2010-07-01

    Carbobenzoxy-Leu-Leu-leucinal (MG132) as a proteasome inhibitor has been shown to induce apoptotic cell death through formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the present study, we evaluated the effects of MG132 on the growth of A549 lung cancer cells in relation to cell growth, ROS and glutathione (GSH) levels. Treatment with MG132 inhibited the growth of A549 cells with an IC(50) of approximately 20 microM at 24 hours. DNA flow cytometric analysis indicated that 0.5 approximately 30 microM MG132 induced a G1 phase arrest of the cell cycle in A549 cells. Treatment with 10 or 30 microM MG132 also induced apoptosis, as evidenced by sub-G1 cells and annexin V staining cells. This was accompanied by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP; Delta psi m). The intracellular ROS levels including O(2) (*-) were strongly increased in 10 or 30 microM MG132-treated A549 cells but were down-regulated in 0.1, 0.5 or 1 microM MG132-treated cells. Furthermore, 10 or 30 microM MG132 increased mitochondrial O(2) (*- ) level but 0.1, 0.5 or 1 microM MG132 decreased that. In addition, 10 or 30 microM MG132 induced GSH depletion in A549 cells. In conclusion, MG132 inhibited the growth of human A549 cells via inducing the cell cycle arrest as well as triggering apoptosis, which was in part correlated with the changes of ROS and GSH levels. Our present data provide important information on the anti-growth mechanisms of MG132 in A549 lung cancer cells in relation to ROS and GSH.

  20. Extreme simplification and rendering of point sets using algebraic multigrid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reniers, D.; Telea, A.C.

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel approach for extreme simplification of point set models, in the context of real-time rendering. Point sets are often rendered using simple point primitives, such as oriented discs. However, this requires using many primitives to render even moderately simple shapes. Often, one

  1. Exposure to ultrafine particles, intracellular production of reactive oxygen species in leukocytes and altered levels of endothelial progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, Kim; Møller, Peter; Karottki, Dorina Gabriela; Olsen, Yulia; Bekö, Gabriel; Clausen, Geo; Hersoug, Lars-Georg; Loft, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to particles in the fine and ultrafine size range has been linked to induction of low-grade systemic inflammation, oxidative stress and development of cardiovascular diseases. Declining levels of endothelial progenitor cells within systemic circulation have likewise been linked to progression of cardiovascular diseases. The objective was to determine if exposure to fine and ultrafine particles from indoor and outdoor sources, assessed by personal and residential indoor monitoring, is associated with altered levels of endothelial progenitor cells, and whether such effects are related to leukocyte-mediated oxidative stress. The study utilized a cross sectional design performed in 58 study participants from a larger cohort. Levels of circulating endothelial progenitor cells, defined as either late (CD34 + KDR + cells) or early (CD34 + CD133 + KDR + cells) subsets were measured using polychromatic flow cytometry. We additionally measured production of reactive oxygen species in leukocyte subsets (lymphocytes, monocytes and granulocytes) by flow cytometry using intracellular 2′,7′-dichlorofluoroscein. The measurements encompassed both basal levels of reactive oxygen species production and capacity for reactive oxygen species production for each leukocyte subset. We found that the late endothelial progenitor subset was negatively associated with levels of ultrafine particles measured within the participant residences and with reactive oxygen species production capacity in lymphocytes. Additionally, the early endothelial progenitor cell levels were positively associated with a personalised measure of ultrafine particle exposure and negatively associated with both basal and capacity for reactive oxygen species production in lymphocytes and granulocytes, respectively. Our results indicate that exposure to fine and ultrafine particles derived from indoor sources may have adverse effects on human vascular health.

  2. Adverse effects of reduced oxygen tension on the proliferative capacity of rat kidney and insulin-secreting cell lines involve DNA damage and stress responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jianhua; Jones, R. Huw; Tarry-Adkins, Jane; Smith, Noel H.; Ozanne, Susan E.

    2008-01-01

    Standard cell culture conditions do not reflect the physiological environment in terms of oxygen tension (20% vs 3%). The effects of lowering oxygen tension on cell proliferation in culture can be beneficial as well as detrimental depending on the cell line studied, but the molecular mechanism underlying such effects is not fully understood. We observed that the proliferative capacity of the rat cell lines NRK and INS-1 was inhibited when cultured under 3% oxygen as compared to 20% oxygen. Suppression of proliferation in NRK cells was accompanied by induction of DNA double strand breaks whereas in INS-1 cells it was accompanied by up-regulation of p53 and p27. Although Sirt1 was up-regulated in both cell lines by 3% oxygen the effects on antioxidant enzymes (MnSOD, CuZnSOD and catalase) were cell line specific. Marked up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was detected in both NRK and INS-1 cells when cultured in 3% oxygen. HO-1 expression can be readily induced by exposure to hydrogen peroxide in culture. These results suggest that reduced oxygen tension suppresses the proliferative capacity of these two cell lines through a stress response that is similar to an oxidative stress response but the molecular events that lead to the reduced cell proliferation are cell line specific

  3. Investigations on the kinetics of the oxygen reduction in high temperature fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erning, J.W.

    1998-07-01

    Lanthan-Strontium-Manganite perowskites are the most widespread materials in use for solid oxide fuel cell cathodes. The electrode reaction taking place, i.e. the reduction of oxygen supplied by air, was investigated by electrochemical means to obtain further knowledge about the electrode processes. The high activation energy of this reaction (200 kJ/mol), preventing lower operation temperatures of the SOFC, was the starting point for the investigation. Quasi steady state current voltage measurements and impedance spectroscopy were performed in a three electrode configuration. The electrodes were of circular shape with a diameter of 10 mm. The preparation was made by screen printing as well as wet powder spraying onto plates made of Yttria-stabilized zirconia. Perowskite powders of varying chemical and stoichiometric composition were used. To obtain higher power densities and, more important, lower apparent activation energies, catalytic layers were added at the interface electrode/electrolyte. Additionally, a less complex system, a model electrode/electrolyte setup made from single-crystal YSZ as electrolyte and gold in liquid and solid state as electrode was developed to create a better defined system. This setup was used to investigate the behaviour of the electrode/electrolyte interface. Reliable, reproducible results could be obtained using either setup. The experimental conditions i.e. oxygen partial pressure, temperature and overpotential were varied in order to determine the kinetic properties of the electrodes. Apparent activation energies, pre-exponential factors, apparent charge-transfer coefficients and electrochemical orders of reaction were calculated from the current-voltage data in order to propose possible reaction steps. (orig.)

  4. Oxygen sensitivity of potassium- and angiotensin II-stimulated aldosterone release by bovine adrenal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brickner, R C; Raff, H

    1991-04-01

    Angiotensin II (AII) and extracellular K+, acting through different intracellular mechanisms, stimulate aldosterone release in a synergistic fashion. We have previously shown that decreases in oxygen (O2) within the physiological range inhibit AII, cyclic AMP (cAMP) and ACTH-stimulated aldosterone release. The present experiment evaluated the effect of various concentrations of O2 on K+-stimulated aldosterone release in the presence and absence of AII. Dispersed bovine adrenal glomerulosa cells were incubated with different concentrations of K+ (0.9-5.4 mmol/l) without and with AII (10 nmol/l) under different concentrations of O2 (0, 5 or 50%); 21% O2 (pO2 = 19.9 +/- 0.5 kPa,n = 9) was used as reference control for comparison. In all cases, increases in K+ stimulated aldosterone release, an effect augmented by AII. Under 0% O2 (pO2 = 8.1 +/- 0.3 kPa, n = 3) and 5% O2 (pO2 = 12.8 +/- 0.5 kPa, n = 3), aldosterone release stimulated by K+ or K+/AII was significantly inhibited compared with that under 21% O2. Conversely, under 50% O2 (pO2 = 36.3 +/- 2.5 kPa, n = 3), aldosterone release stimulated by K+ or K+/AII was significantly augmented. Cortisol secretion was not significantly affected by 5% or 50% O2 but was significantly decreased under 0% O2. The effect of O2 on K+/AII stimulation of aldosterone release, as well as previous experiments with cAMP, progesterone and ACTH, suggest a final common post-receptor oxygen-sensitive component of the aldosterone synthetic pathway. It is suggested that one or more enzymes in the aldosterone synthetic pathway is/are exquisitely sensitive to small changes in O2 within the physiological range.

  5. Modifying TiO{sub 2} surface architecture by oxygen plasma to increase dye sensitized solar cell efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajmohan, Gayathri Devi [Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong Waurn Ponds, Victoria 3216 (Australia); Dai, Xiujuan J., E-mail: jane.dai@deakin.edu.au [Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong Waurn Ponds, Victoria 3216 (Australia); Tsuzuki, Takuya; Lamb, Peter R. [Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong Waurn Ponds, Victoria 3216 (Australia); Plessis, Johan du [School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, GPO Box 2476 V, Melbourne, Victoria 3001 (Australia); Huang, Fuzhi; Cheng, Yi-Bing [Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2013-10-31

    Oxygen plasma treatment of TiO{sub 2} films has been used to improve the efficiency of dye sensitized solar cells. Both a commercial TiO{sub 2} sample and a TiO{sub 2} thin film synthesized by a sol-gel technique were treated using a custom built inductively coupled plasma apparatus. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that oxygen-plasma treatment increased the number of oxygen functional groups (hydroxyl groups) and introduced some Ti{sup 3+} species on the surface of TiO{sub 2}. A sample solar cell with plasma treated TiO{sub 2} showed an overall solar-to-electricity conversion efficiency of 4.3%, about a 13% increase over untreated TiO{sub 2}. The photon conversion efficiency for the plasma treated TiO{sub 2} was 34% higher than untreated TiO{sub 2}. This enhanced cell-performance is partly due to increased dye adsorption from an increase in surface oxygen functional groups and also may be partly due to Ti{sup 3+} states on the surface of TiO{sub 2}. - Highlights: • Oxygen plasma is used to generate hydroxyl groups on the surface of TiO{sub 2} • Parallel study was conducted using a spin coated TiO{sub 2} and a Commercial TiO{sub 2} film. • The plasma functionalization caused increased dye uptake. • Some species in Ti{sup 3+} state are also generated after oxygen plasma. • Dye sensitised solar cell with functionalised electrode showed improved efficiency.

  6. Induction of molecular endpoints by reactive oxygen species in human lung cells predicted by physical chemical properties of engineered nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    A series of six titanium dioxide and two cerium oxide engineered nanomaterials were assessed for their ability to induce cytotoxicity, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and various types of DNA and protein damage in human respiratory BEAS-2B cells exposed in vitro for 72 hours at se...

  7. Highly dispersed TaOx nanoparticles prepared by electrodeposition as oxygen reduction electrocatalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Seo, Jeongsuk; Zhao, Lan; Cha, Dong Kyu; Takanabe, Kazuhiro; Katayama, Masao; Kubota, Jun; Domen, Kazunari

    2013-01-01

    for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Electrodeposition conditions of Ta complexes and subsequent various heat treatments for the deposited TaOx were examined for the best performance of the ORR. TaOx particles

  8. Aberrant patterns of X chromosome inactivation in a new line of human embryonic stem cells established in physiological oxygen concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Georges, Juliana Andrea; Vergani, Naja; Fonseca, Simone Aparecida Siqueira; Fraga, Ana Maria; de Mello, Joana Carvalho Moreira; Albuquerque, Maria Cecília R Maciel; Fujihara, Litsuko Shimabukuro; Pereira, Lygia Veiga

    2014-08-01

    One of the differences between murine and human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) is the epigenetic state of the X chromosomes in female lines. Murine ESCs (mESCs) present two transcriptionally active Xs that will undergo the dosage compensation process of XCI upon differentiation, whereas most human ESCs (hESCs) spontaneously inactivate one X while keeping their pluripotency. Whether this reflects differences in embryonic development of mice and humans, or distinct culture requirements for the two kinds of pluripotent cells is not known. Recently it has been shown that hESCs established in physiological oxygen levels are in a stable pre-XCI state equivalent to that of mESCs, suggesting that culture in low oxygen concentration is enough to preserve that epigenetic state of the X chromosomes. Here we describe the establishment of two new lines of hESCs under physiological oxygen level and the characterization of the XCI state in the 46,XX line BR-5. We show that a fraction of undifferentiated cells present XIST RNA accumulation and single H3K27me foci, characteristic of the inactive X. Moreover, analysis of allele specific gene expression suggests that pluripotent BR-5 cells present completely skewed XCI. Our data indicate that physiological levels of oxygen are not sufficient for the stabilization of the pre-XCI state in hESCs.

  9. Rejuvenation of stored human red blood cells reverses the renal microvascular oxygenation deficit in an isovolemic transfusion model in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raat, Nicolaas J. H.; Hilarius, Petra M.; Johannes, Tanja; de Korte, Dirk; Ince, Can; Verhoeven, Arthur J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Storage of red blood cells (RBCs) results in various biochemical changes, including a decrease in cellular adenosine triphosphate and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate acid. Previously it was shown that stored human RBCs show a deficit in the oxygenation of the microcirculation in the gut of

  10. Hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls increase reactive oxygen species formation and induce cell death in cultured cerebellar granule cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreiem, Anne; Rykken, Sidsel; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Robertson, Larry W.; Fonnum, Frode

    2009-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent organic pollutants that bioaccumulate in the body, however, they can be metabolized to more water-soluble products. Although they are more readily excreted than the parent compounds, some of the metabolites are still hydrophobic and may be more available to target tissues, such as the brain. They can also cross the placenta and reach a developing foetus. Much less is known about the toxicity of PCB metabolites than about the parent compounds. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of eight hydroxylated (OH) PCB congeners (2'-OH PCB 3, 4-OH PCB 14, 4-OH PCB 34, 4'-OH PCB 35, 4-OH PCB 36, 4'-OH PCB 36, 4-OH PCB 39, and 4'-OH PCB 68) on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and cell viability in rat cerebellar granule cells. We found that, similar to their parent compounds, OH-PCBs are potent ROS inducers with potency 4-OH PCB 14 < 4-OH PCB 36 < 4-OH PCB 34 < 4'-OH PCB 36 < 4'-OH PCB 68 < 4-OH PCB 39 < 4'-OH PCB 35. 4-OH PCB 36 was the most potent cell death inducer, and caused apoptotic or necrotic morphology depending on concentration. Inhibition of ERK1/2 kinase with U0126 reduced both cell death and ROS formation, suggesting that ERK1/2 activation is involved in OH-PCB toxicity. The results indicate that the hydroxylation of PCBs may not constitute a detoxification reaction. Since OH-PCBs like their parent compounds are retained in the body and may be more widely distributed to sensitive tissues, it is important that not only the levels of the parent compounds but also the levels of their metabolites are taken into account during risk assessment of PCBs and related compounds.

  11. Controlled intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species in human mesenchymal stem cells using porphyrin conjugated nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavado, Andrea S.; Chauhan, Veeren M.; Alhaj Zen, Amer; Giuntini, Francesca; Jones, D. Rhodri E.; Boyle, Ross W.; Beeby, Andrew; Chan, Weng C.; Aylott, Jonathan W.

    2015-08-01

    Nanoparticles capable of generating controlled amounts of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), that advance the study of oxidative stress and cellular communication, were synthesized by functionalizing polyacrylamide nanoparticles with zinc(ii) porphyrin photosensitisers. Controlled ROS production was demonstrated in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) through (1) production of nanoparticles functionalized with varying percentages of Zn(ii) porphyrin and (2) modulating the number of doses of excitation light to internalized nanoparticles. hMSCs challenged with nanoparticles functionalized with increasing percentages of Zn(ii) porphyrin and high numbers of irradiations of excitation light were found to generate greater amounts of ROS. A novel dye, which is transformed into fluorescent 7-hydroxy-4-trifluoromethyl-coumarin in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, provided an indirect indicator for cumulative ROS production. The mitochondrial membrane potential was monitored to investigate the destructive effect of increased intracellular ROS production. Flow cytometric analysis of nanoparticle treated hMSCs suggested irradiation with excitation light signalled controlled apoptotic cell death, rather than uncontrolled necrotic cell death. Increased intracellular ROS production did not induce phenotypic changes in hMSC subcultures.Nanoparticles capable of generating controlled amounts of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), that advance the study of oxidative stress and cellular communication, were synthesized by functionalizing polyacrylamide nanoparticles with zinc(ii) porphyrin photosensitisers. Controlled ROS production was demonstrated in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) through (1) production of nanoparticles functionalized with varying percentages of Zn(ii) porphyrin and (2) modulating the number of doses of excitation light to internalized nanoparticles. hMSCs challenged with nanoparticles functionalized with increasing percentages of Zn

  12. Hypoxia/reoxygenation increases the permeability of endothelial cell monolayers: Role of oxygen radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inauen, W.; Payne, D.K.; Kvietys, P.R.; Granger, D.N.

    1990-01-01

    We assessed the effect of hypoxia/reoxygenation on 14C-albumin flux across endothelial monolayers. Cultured bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells were grown to confluence on nitrocellulose filters (pore size 12 microns). The endothelialized filters were mounted in Ussing-type chambers which were filled with cell culture medium (M 199). Equimolar amounts (33 nM) of 14C-labeled and unlabeled albumin were added to the hot and cold chambers, respectively. The monolayers were then exposed to successive periods (90 min) of normoxia (pO2 145 mmHg), hypoxia (pO2 20 mmHg), and reoxygenation (pO2 145 mmHg). A gas bubbling system was used to control media pO2 and to ensure adequate mixing. Four aliquots of culture media were taken during each period in order to calculate the 14C-albumin permeability across the endothelialized filter. In some experiments, either the xanthine oxidase inhibitor, oxypurinol (10 microM), or superoxide dismutase (600 U/mL), was added to the media immediately prior to the experiments. As compared to the normoxic control period, albumin permeability was 1.5 times higher during hypoxia (p less than 0.01) and 2.3 times higher during reoxygenation (p less than 0.01). The reoxygenation-induced increase in albumin permeability was prevented by either oxypurinol or superoxide dismutase. These data indicate that xanthine oxidase-derived oxygen radicals contribute to the hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced endothelial cell dysfunction. The altered endothelial barrier function induced by hypoxia/reoxygenation is consistent with the microvascular dysfunction observed following reperfusion of ischemic tissues

  13. Single-cell imaging of bioenergetic responses to neuronal excitotoxicity and oxygen and glucose deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Niamh M C; Düssmann, Heiko; Anilkumar, Ujval; Huber, Heinrich J; Prehn, Jochen H M

    2014-07-30

    Excitotoxicity is a condition occurring during cerebral ischemia, seizures, and chronic neurodegeneration. It is characterized by overactivation of glutamate receptors, leading to excessive Ca(2+)/Na(+) influx into neurons, energetic stress, and subsequent neuronal injury. We and others have previously investigated neuronal populations to study how bioenergetic parameters determine neuronal injury; however, such experiments are often confounded by population-based heterogeneity and the contribution of effects of non-neuronal cells. Hence, we here characterized bioenergetics during transient excitotoxicity in rat and mouse primary neurons at the single-cell level using fluorescent sensors for intracellular glucose, ATP, and activation of the energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). We identified ATP depletion and recovery to energetic homeostasis, along with AMPK activation, as surprisingly rapid and plastic responses in two excitotoxic injury paradigms. We observed rapid recovery of neuronal ATP levels also in the absence of extracellular glucose, or when glycolytic ATP production was inhibited, but found mitochondria to be critical for fast and complete energetic recovery. Using an injury model of oxygen and glucose deprivation, we identified a similarly rapid bioenergetics response, yet with incomplete ATP recovery and decreased AMPK activity. Interestingly, excitotoxicity also induced an accumulation of intracellular glucose, providing an additional source of energy during and after excitotoxicity-induced energy depletion. We identified this to originate from extracellular, AMPK-dependent glucose uptake and from intracellular glucose mobilization. Surprisingly, cells recovering their elevated glucose levels faster to baseline survived longer, indicating that the plasticity of neurons to adapt to bioenergetic challenges is a key indicator of neuronal viability. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3410192-14$15.00/0.

  14. White Matter Damage Relates to Oxygen Saturation in Children With Sickle Cell Anemia Without Silent Cerebral Infarcts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawadler, Jamie M; Kirkham, Fenella J; Clayden, Jonathan D; Hollocks, Matthew J; Seymour, Emma L; Edey, Rosanna; Telfer, Paul; Robins, Andrew; Wilkey, Olu; Barker, Simon; Cox, Tim C S; Clark, Chris A

    2015-07-01

    Sickle cell anemia is associated with compromised oxygen-carrying capability of hemoglobin and a high incidence of overt and silent stroke. However, in children with no evidence of cerebral infarction, there are changes in brain morphometry relative to healthy controls, which may be related to chronic anemia and oxygen desaturation. A whole-brain tract-based spatial statistics analysis was carried out in 25 children with sickle cell anemia with no evidence of abnormality on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (13 male, age range: 8-18 years) and 14 age- and race-matched controls (7 male, age range: 10-19 years) to determine the extent of white matter injury. The hypotheses that white matter damage is related to daytime peripheral oxygen saturation and steady-state hemoglobin were tested. Fractional anisotropy was found to be significantly lower in patients in the subcortical white matter (corticospinal tract and cerebellum), whereas mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity were higher in patients in widespread areas. There was a significant negative relationship between radial diffusivity and oxygen saturation (Plevel negative relationship between radial diffusivity and hemoglobin (Pcell anemia, and provides for the first time direct evidence of a relationship between brain microstructure and markers of disease severity (eg, peripheral oxygen saturation and steady-state hemoglobin). This study suggests that diffusion tensor imaging metrics may serve as a biomarker for future trials of reducing hypoxic exposure. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Cell viability, reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, and necrosis in myoblast cultures exposed to low-level infrared laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexsandra da Silva Neto Trajano, Larissa; da Silva, Camila Luna; de Carvalho, Simone Nunes; Cortez, Erika; Mencalha, André Luiz; de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson; Stumbo, Ana Carolina

    2016-07-01

    Low-level infrared laser is considered safe and effective for treatment of muscle injuries. However, the mechanism involved on beneficial effects of laser therapy are not understood. The aim was to evaluate cell viability, reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, and necrosis in myoblast cultures exposed to low-level infrared laser at therapeutic fluences. C2C12 myoblast cultures at different (2 and 10 %) fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentrations were exposed to low-level infrared laser (808 nm, 100 mW) at different fluences (10, 35, and 70 J/cm(2)) and evaluated after 24, 48, and 72 h. Cell viability was evaluated by WST-1 assay; reactive oxygen species (ROS), apoptosis, and necrosis were evaluated by flow cytometry. Cell viability was decreased atthe lowest FBS concentration. Laser exposure increased the cell viability in myoblast cultures at 2 % FBS after 48 and 72 h, but no significant increase in ROS was observed. Apoptosis was decreased at the higher fluence and necrosis was increased at lower fluence in myoblast cultures after 24 h of laser exposure at 2 % FBS. No laser-induced alterations were obtained at 10 % FBS. Results show that level of reactive oxygen species is not altered, at least to those evaluated in this study, but low-level infrared laser exposure affects cell viability, apoptosis, and necrosis in myoblast cultures depending on laser fluence and physiologic conditions of cells.

  16. Influence of oxygen and hydrogen treated graphene on cell adhesion in the presence or absence of fetal bovine serum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdanova, Martina; Broz, Antonin; Kalbac, Martin; Kalbacova, Marie

    2012-01-01

    The influence of differently treated graphene on human osteoblasts after 2 h of incubation with regard to the presence/absence of fetal bovine serum (FBS) was investigated. Cell adhesion plays an important role in further cell fate and it is influenced by cell surrounding. It was found that treatment of graphene (by hydrogen or oxygen) does not play role in number of cells which adhere to substrate after 2 h of incubation. However, it is important for cell size - cells are larger on the hydrogen treated graphene than on the oxygen treated graphene. The presence of FBS is crucial for a type of interaction between cells and their substrate - in the presence of FBS, interactions are mediated by specific proteins and thus formation of focal adhesions (FAs) can occur. However, in the absence of FBS, a contact is carried out by non-specific bonds without FAs formation. It was observed that cells on graphene samples without FBS have star-like shape and larger area in contrast to cells adhering with FBS which have round shape and are smaller. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Reactive oxygen species contribute to arsenic-induced EZH2 phosphorylation in human bronchial epithelial cells and lung cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lingzhi; Qiu, Ping; Chen, Bailing; Lu, Yongju; Wu, Kai; Thakur, Chitra; Chang, Qingshan; Sun, Jiaying; Chen, Fei, E-mail: fchen@wayne.edu

    2014-05-01

    Our previous studies suggested that arsenic is able to induce serine 21 phosphorylation of the EZH2 protein through activation of JNK, STAT3, and Akt signaling pathways in the bronchial epithelial cell line, BEAS-2B. In the present report, we further demonstrated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) were involved in the arsenic-induced protein kinase activation that leads to EZH2 phosphorylation. Several lines of evidence supported this notion. First, the pretreatment of the cells with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), a potent antioxidant, abolishes arsenic-induced EZH2 phosphorylation along with the inhibition of JNK, STAT3, and Akt. Second, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, the most important form of ROS in the cells in response to extracellular stress signals, can induce phosphorylation of the EZH2 protein and the activation of JNK, STAT3, and Akt. By ectopic expression of the myc-tagged EZH2, we additionally identified direct interaction and phosphorylation of the EZH2 protein by Akt in response to arsenic and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Furthermore, both arsenic and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} were able to induce the translocation of ectopically expressed or endogenous EZH2 from nucleus to cytoplasm. In summary, the data presented in this report indicate that oxidative stress due to ROS generation plays an important role in the arsenic-induced EZH2 phosphorylation. - Highlights:: • Arsenic (As{sup 3+}) induces EZH phosphorylation. • JNK, STAT3, and Akt contribute to EZH2 phosphorylation. • Oxidative stress is involved in As{sup 3+}-induced EZH2 phosphorylation. • As{sup 3+} induces direct interaction of Akt and EZH2. • Phosphorylated EZH2 localized in cytoplasm.

  18. Oxygen Recovery via Carbon Dioxide Electrolysis with Microtubular Solid Oxide Cells

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Carbon dioxide reduction is considered a major shortcoming for the current Atmosphere Revitalization System. Novel technologies are desired so that the oxygen...

  19. Plasma Deposited Thin Iron Oxide Films as Electrocatalyst for Oxygen Reduction Reaction in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz JOZWIAK

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of using plasma deposited thin films of iron oxides as electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC was examined. Results of energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS analysis indicated that the plasma deposit consisted mainly of FeOX structures with the X parameter close to 1.5. For as deposited material iron atoms are almost exclusively in the Fe3+ oxidation state without annealing in oxygen containing atmosphere. However, the annealing procedure can be used to remove the remains of carbon deposit from surface. The single cell test (SCT was performed to determine the suitability of the produced material for ORR. Preliminary results showed that power density of 0.23 mW/cm2 could be reached in the tested cell.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.1.14406

  20. Impact of Dissolved Oxygen during UV-Irradiation on the Chemical Composition and Function of CHO Cell Culture Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Sarah M; Todorovic, Biljana; Dare, Emma V; Begum, Afroza; Guillemette, Simon; Wenger, Andrew; Saxena, Priyanka; Campbell, J Larry; Sasges, Michael; Aucoin, Marc G

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation is advantageous as a sterilization technique in the biopharmaceutical industry since it is capable of targeting non-enveloped viruses that are typically challenging to destroy, as well as smaller viruses that can be difficult to remove via conventional separation techniques. In this work, we investigated the influence of oxygen in the media during UV irradiation and characterized the effect on chemical composition using NMR and LC-MS, as well as the ability of the irradiated media to support cell culture. Chemically defined Chinese hamster ovary cell growth media was irradiated at high fluences in a continuous-flow UV reactor. UV-irradiation caused the depletion of pyridoxamine, pyridoxine, pyruvate, riboflavin, tryptophan, and tyrosine; and accumulation of acetate, formate, kynurenine, lumichrome, and sarcosine. Pyridoxamine was the only compound to undergo complete degradation within the fluences considered; complete depletion of pyridoxamine was observed at 200 mJ/cm2. Although in both oxygen- and nitrogen-saturated media, the cell culture performance was affected at fluences above 200 mJ/cm2, there was less of an impact on cell culture performance in the nitrogen-saturated media. Based on these results, minimization of oxygen in cell culture media prior to UV treatment is recommended to minimize the negative impact on sensitive media.

  1. Cell-free oxygen carriers: scientific foundations, clinical development, and new directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, Robert M

    2008-10-01

    The most significant hurdle to the development of a safe and effective hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier ("blood substitute") is generally thought to be its propensity to cause vasoconstriction in the microcirculation and hypertension. Two theories for this effect are currently being studied: in one, scavenging NO by hemoglobin reduces vasorelaxation; in the other, cell-free hemoglobin oversupplies O2 (a known vasoconstrictor) to vascular walls by facilitated diffusion. While both mechanisms might lead to reduction of local NO concentration, the important distinction between the two is that if the NO scavenging theory is correct, it greatly diminishes the prospects to develop any solution based on free hemoglobin. However, if the O2-oversupply theory is correct, modifications to the hemoglobin molecule can be envisioned that can prevent oversupply and reduce toxicity. This review summarizes the development of Hemospan, a novel modification of human hemoglobin whose design is based on the O2-oversupply theory. Because of its low P50 and increased molecular size, the release of O2 in resistance vessels (arterioles) by Hemospan is restricted, and vasoconstriction is greatly reduced.

  2. PTFE effect on the electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction in membraneless microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrini, Edoardo; Grattieri, Matteo; Faggianelli, Alessio; Cristiani, Pierangela; Trasatti, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    Influence of PTFE in the external Gas Diffusion Layer (GDL) of open-air cathodes applied to membraneless microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is investigated in this work. Electrochemical measurements on cathodes with different PTFE contents (200%, 100%, 80% and 60%) were carried out to characterize cathodic oxygen reduction reaction, to study the reaction kinetics. It is demonstrated that ORR is not under diffusion-limiting conditions in the tested systems. Based on cyclic voltammetry, an increase of the cathodic electrochemical active area took place with the decrease of PTFE content. This was not directly related to MFC productivity, but to the cathode wettability and the biocathode development. Low electrodic interface resistances (from 1 to 1.5 Ω at the start, to near 0.1 Ω at day 61) indicated a negligible ohmic drop. A decrease of the Tafel slopes from 120 to 80 mV during productive periods of MFCs followed the biological activity in the whole MFC system. A high PTFE content in the cathode showed a detrimental effect on the MFC productivity, acting as an inhibitor of ORR electrocatalysis in the triple contact zone.

  3. Role of oxygen intermediates in UV-induced epidermal cell injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danno, K.; Horio, T.; Takigawa, M.; Imamura, S.

    1984-01-01

    To investigate the role of oxygen intermediates (OIs) in sunburn cell (SC) formation and development of UV-inflammation in vivo, groups of mice were injected intravenously with OI scavengers, including bovine blood superoxide dismutase (SOD), bovine liver catalase, L-histidine, D-mannitol, and saline (controls) before and/or after UV irradiation with sunlamp tubes (mainly 280-320 nm; 300 mJ/cm2; UVR). Ear thickness was measured before and 6 and 24 h after UVR. Ears were removed 24 h after UVR and the number of SCs per unit length of ear epidermis was counted using hematoxylineosin stained sections. The number of SCs was significantly decreased (p less than 0.02) by a single injection of SOD (10-30 units/g body weight) given either just before or immediately after (less than 15 min) UVR, while SC formation was no longer suppressed by injections given more than 2 h before or after UVR. Four repeated injections of SOD (10 units/g) also reduced SC counts but did not significantly alter ear-swelling responses (ESR). Neither SC counts nor ESR were remarkably suppressed by 4 injections of any of the other active OI scavengers, inactivated SOD, or bovine serum albumin. A single injection of diethyldithiocarbamate, an SOD inactivator, significantly augmented SC formation (p less than 0.05), but did not change ESR. These findings suggest that OIs generated by UVR participate in SC formation but are not apparently involved in UV-edema

  4. Cofilin Inhibition Restores Neuronal Cell Death in Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation Model of Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madineni, Anusha; Alhadidi, Qasim; Shah, Zahoor A

    2016-03-01

    Ischemia is a condition associated with decreased blood supply to the brain, eventually leading to death of neurons. It is associated with a diverse cascade of responses involving both degenerative and regenerative mechanisms. At the cellular level, the changes are initiated prominently in the neuronal cytoskeleton. Cofilin, a cytoskeletal actin severing protein, is known to be involved in the early stages of apoptotic cell death. Evidence supports its intervention in the progression of disease states like Alzheimer's and ischemic kidney disease. In the present study, we have hypothesized the possible involvement of cofilin in ischemia. Using PC12 cells and mouse primary cultures of cortical neurons, we investigated the potential role of cofilin in ischemia in two different in vitro ischemic models: chemical induced oxidative stress and oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion (OGD/R). The expression profile studies demonstrated a decrease in phosphocofilin levels in all models of ischemia, implying stress-induced cofilin activation. Furthermore, calcineurin and slingshot 1L (SSH) phosphatases were found to be the signaling mediators of the cofilin activation. In primary cultures of cortical neurons, cofilin was found to be significantly activated after 1 h of OGD. To delineate the role of activated cofilin in ischemia, we knocked down cofilin by small interfering RNA (siRNA) technique and tested the impact of cofilin silencing on neuronal viability. Cofilin siRNA-treated neurons showed a significant reduction of cofilin levels in all treatment groups (control, OGD, and OGD/R). Additionally, cofilin siRNA-reduced cofilin mitochondrial translocation and caspase 3 cleavage, with a concomitant increase in neuronal viability. These results strongly support the active role of cofilin in ischemia-induced neuronal degeneration and apoptosis. We believe that targeting this protein mediator has a potential for therapeutic intervention in ischemic brain injury and stroke.

  5. Substrate stiffness and oxygen as regulators of stem cell differentiation during skeletal tissue regeneration: a mechanobiological model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren Paul Burke

    Full Text Available Extrinsic mechanical signals have been implicated as key regulators of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC differentiation. It has been possible to test different hypotheses for mechano-regulated MSC differentiation by attempting to simulate regenerative events such as bone fracture repair, where repeatable spatial and temporal patterns of tissue differentiation occur. More recently, in vitro studies have identified other environmental cues such as substrate stiffness and oxygen tension as key regulators of MSC differentiation; however it remains unclear if and how such cues determine stem cell fate in vivo. As part of this study, a computational model was developed to test the hypothesis that substrate stiffness and oxygen tension regulate stem cell differentiation during fracture healing. Rather than assuming mechanical signals act directly on stem cells to determine their differentiation pathway, it is postulated that they act indirectly to regulate angiogenesis and hence partially determine the local oxygen environment within a regenerating tissue. Chondrogenesis of MSCs was hypothesized to occur in low oxygen regions, while in well vascularised regions of the regenerating tissue a soft local substrate was hypothesised to facilitate adipogenesis while a stiff substrate facilitated osteogenesis. Predictions from the model were compared to both experimental data and to predictions of a well established computational mechanobiological model where tissue differentiation is assumed to be regulated directly by the local mechanical environment. The model predicted all the major events of fracture repair, including cartilaginous bridging, endosteal and periosteal bony bridging and bone remodelling. It therefore provides support for the hypothesis that substrate stiffness and oxygen play a key role in regulating MSC fate during regenerative events such as fracture healing.

  6. Simple Coatings to Render Polystyrene Protein Resistant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelle Hecker

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Non-specific protein adsorption is detrimental to the performance of many biomedical devices. Polystyrene is a commonly used material in devices and thin films. Simple reliable surface modification of polystyrene to render it protein resistant is desired in particular for device fabrication and orthogonal functionalisation schemes. This report details modifications carried out on a polystyrene surface to prevent protein adsorption. The trialed surfaces included Pluronic F127 and PLL-g-PEG, adsorbed on polystyrene, using a polydopamine-assisted approach. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D results showed only short-term anti-fouling success of the polystyrene surface modified with F127, and the subsequent failure of the polydopamine intermediary layer in improving its stability. In stark contrast, QCM-D analysis proved the success of the polydopamine assisted PLL-g-PEG coating in preventing bovine serum albumin adsorption. This modified surface is equally as protein-rejecting after 24 h in buffer, and thus a promising simple coating for long term protein rejection of polystyrene.

  7. Lighting design for globally illuminated volume rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yubo; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    2013-12-01

    With the evolution of graphics hardware, high quality global illumination becomes available for real-time volume rendering. Compared to local illumination, global illumination can produce realistic shading effects which are closer to real world scenes, and has proven useful for enhancing volume data visualization to enable better depth and shape perception. However, setting up optimal lighting could be a nontrivial task for average users. There were lighting design works for volume visualization but they did not consider global light transportation. In this paper, we present a lighting design method for volume visualization employing global illumination. The resulting system takes into account view and transfer-function dependent content of the volume data to automatically generate an optimized three-point lighting environment. Our method fully exploits the back light which is not used by previous volume visualization systems. By also including global shadow and multiple scattering, our lighting system can effectively enhance the depth and shape perception of volumetric features of interest. In addition, we propose an automatic tone mapping operator which recovers visual details from overexposed areas while maintaining sufficient contrast in the dark areas. We show that our method is effective for visualizing volume datasets with complex structures. The structural information is more clearly and correctly presented under the automatically generated light sources.

  8. The Experimental Measurement of Local and Bulk Oxygen Transport Resistances in the Catalyst Layer of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Cheng, Xiaojing; Lu, Jiabin; Shen, Shuiyun; Yan, Xiaohui; Yin, Jiewei; Wei, Guanghua; Zhang, Junliang

    2017-12-07

    Remarkable progress has been made in reducing the cathodic Pt loading of PEMFCs; however, a huge performance loss appears at high current densities, indicating the existence of a large oxygen transport resistance associated with the ultralow Pt loading catalyst layer. To reduce the Pt loading without sacrificing cell performance, it is essential to illuminate the oxygen transport mechanism in the catalyst layer. Toward this goal, an experimental approach to measure the oxygen transport resistance in catalyst layers is proposed and realized for the first time in this study. The measuring approach involves a dual-layer catalyst layer design, which consists of a dummy catalyst layer and a practical catalyst layer, followed by changing the thickness of dummy layer to respectively quantify the local and bulk resistances via limiting current measurements combined with linear extrapolation. The experimental results clearly reveal that the local resistance dominates the total resistance in the catalyst layer.

  9. A cell for extended x-ray absorption fine structure studies of oxygen sensitive products of redox reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furenlid, L.R.; Renner, M.W.; Fajer, J.

    1990-01-01

    We describe a cell suitable for extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) studies of oxygen and/or water sensitive products of redox reactions. The cell utilizes aluminized Mylar windows that are transparent to x rays, provide low gas permeability, and allow vacuum to be maintained in the cell. The windows are attached to the glassware with an epoxy that resists attack by common organic solvents. Additional side arms allow multiple spectroscopic probes of the same sample under anaerobic and anhydrous conditions

  10. A change in the oxygen effect throughout the cell-cycle of human cells of the line NHIK 3025 cultivated in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersen, E.O.; Christensen, T.; Bakke, O.; Oftebro, R.

    1977-01-01

    NHIK 3025 cells were synchronized by repeated mitotic selection. The S-phase was determined by 3 H-thymidine incorporation and scintillation counting. By comparing the age-response curves of aerobic cells irradiated with 500 rad with those of extremely hypoxic ( 2 ) cells irradiated with 1500 rad, it was found that the sensitizing effect of oxygen was not constant throughout the cycle. It was significantly higher in S, G2 and mitosis than in G1. No significant sensitizing effect of 120 p.p.m. O 2 (compared with 2 ) was found on cells in G1 when the cells were irradiated with 1500 rad. In S, G2 and mitosis, however, the sensitizing effect of oxygen at 120 p.p.m was considered to be significant. Experiment performed with cells irradiated with 2000 rad in contact with either 2 or 80 p.p.m. O 2 showed the same trend, little sensitizing effect in G1 and higher in S, G2 and mitosis. Dose-response curves for cells in mid-G1 and mid-S under aerobic and extremely hypoxic conditions were well fitted by the formula S = exp (-αD-βD 2 ). From the dose-response curves it was concluded that the change in the sensitizing effect of oxygen throughout the cell-cycle only appeared for low doses (in the dose region where α dominates). The sensitizing effect of oxygen on cells in mid-G1 was found to be increasing with increasing dose. (author)

  11. Newly synthesized bis-benzimidazole compound 8 induces apoptosis, autophagy and reactive oxygen species generation in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Naying; Yao, Guodong; Liu, Yuan; Cheng, Maosheng; Ikejima, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    Compound 8 (C8) is a newly synthesized bis-benzimidazole derivative and exerts significant anti-tumor activity in vitro. Previous studies demonstrated that C8 induced apoptosis and autophagy in human promyelocytic leukemia HL60 cells. However, cytotoxicity study on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMC) showed that C8 exhibited less toxicity in normal cells. In this study, the molecular mechanism of C8 on human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells was investigated. The results showed that C8 inhibited the growth of HeLa cells and triggered both apoptotic and autophagic cell death. Subsequent experiment also indicated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was induced in C8-treated HeLa cells. Since ROS scavenger decreased the ratio of apoptotic and autophagic cells, ROS generation contributed to C8-induced apoptosis and autophagy. Furthermore, inhibitors of apoptosis and autophagy also reduced ROS generation, respectively. Autophagy inhibition increased cell growth compared to C8-treated group and attenuated apoptotic cell death, indicating that C8-induced autophagy promoted apoptosis for cell death. However, the percentage of autophagic cells was enhanced when limiting apoptosis process. Taken together, C8 induced ROS-mediated apoptosis and autophagy in HeLa cells, autophagy promoted apoptosis but the former was antagonized by the latter. The data also gave us a new perspective on the anti-tumor effect of C8. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Characterization of a continuous agitated cell reactor for oxygen dependent biocatalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Asbjørn Toftgaard; Teresa de Melo Machado Simoes Carvalho, Ana; Sutherland, Euan

    2017-01-01

    Biocatalytic oxidation reactions employing molecular oxygen as the electron acceptor are difficult to conduct in a continuous flow reactor because of the requirement for high oxygen transfer rates. In this paper, the oxidation of glucose to glucono-1,5-lactone by glucose oxidase was used as a model...

  13. Study of transport of oxygen and water vapour between cells in valve regulated lead-acid batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Culpin, Barry [11 Bluebell Close, Whittle -le -Woods, Chorley PR6 7RH (United Kingdom); Peters, Ken [Battery Design and Manfg Systems, Glenbank, 77 Chatsworth Road, Worsley, Manchester M28 2GG (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-25

    Valve-regulated lead-acid batteries are maintenance free, safer, office compatible, and have higher volume efficiency than conventional designs. They are universally used in telecommunications and uninterruptible power supply systems. With the electrolyte immobilized in the separator or as a gel, it is feasible for a monobloc battery to have cells that are not fully sealed from one another, that is to have a common gas space, with certain attendant benefits. This study demonstrates that small differences in the saturation level, acid strength or operating temperature of the cells in such designs can initiate a cycle that may subsequently result in failure if the movement of oxygen and water vapour between cells is unrestricted. Cells that are initially out-of-balance will go further out-of-balance at an ever-increasing rate. This situation can also arise in monobloc designs with sealed cells if the intercell seal is inadequate or incomplete. Battery failure is associated with a re-distribution of water between the cells with some drying out and having high impedance. The preferential oxygen absorption in those cells produces heavily sulfated negative plates. Results on batteries tested under a range of overcharge conditions and temperatures are presented to illustrate these effects. The rate at which the cycle occurs depends on the initial relative density of the acid, the temperature or saturation imbalance between the cells, and the size of the interconnecting gas space. Batteries operating under a continuous cycling regime, particularly those with high overcharge currents and voltages that generate large volumes of oxygen, are more prone to this type of failure mode than batteries operating under low overcharge, intermittent cycling, or float conditions. (author)

  14. Differential subnetwork of chemokines/cytokines in human, mouse, and rat brain cells after oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yang; Deng, Wenjun; Wang, Zixing; Ning, MingMing; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Yiming; Lo, Eng H; Xing, Changhong

    2017-04-01

    Mice and rats are the most commonly used animals for preclinical stroke studies, but it is unclear whether targets and mechanisms are always the same across different species. Here, we mapped the baseline expression of a chemokine/cytokine subnetwork and compared responses after oxygen-glucose deprivation in primary neurons, astrocytes, and microglia from mouse, rat, and human. Baseline profiles of chemokines (CX3CL1, CXCL12, CCL2, CCL3, and CXCL10) and cytokines (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and TNFα) showed significant differences between human and rodents. The response of chemokines/cytokines to oxygen-glucose deprivation was also significantly different between species. After 4 h oxygen-glucose deprivation and 4 h reoxygenation, human and rat neurons showed similar changes with a downregulation in many chemokines, whereas mouse neurons showed a mixed response with up- and down-regulated genes. For astrocytes, subnetwork response patterns were more similar in rats and mice compared to humans. For microglia, rat cells showed an upregulation in all chemokines/cytokines, mouse cells had many down-regulated genes, and human cells showed a mixed response with up- and down-regulated genes. This study provides proof-of-concept that species differences exist in chemokine/cytokine subnetworks in brain cells that may be relevant to stroke pathophysiology. Further investigation of differential gene pathways across species is warranted.

  15. Oxidative damage of U937 human leukemic cells caused by hydroxyl radical results in singlet oxygen formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Rác

    Full Text Available The exposure of human cells to oxidative stress leads to the oxidation of biomolecules such as lipids, proteins and nuclei acids. In this study, the oxidation of lipids, proteins and DNA was studied after the addition of hydrogen peroxide and Fenton reagent to cell suspension containing human leukemic monocyte lymphoma cell line U937. EPR spin-trapping data showed that the addition of hydrogen peroxide to the cell suspension formed hydroxyl radical via Fenton reaction mediated by endogenous metals. The malondialdehyde HPLC analysis showed no lipid peroxidation after the addition of hydrogen peroxide, whereas the Fenton reagent caused significant lipid peroxidation. The formation of protein carbonyls monitored by dot blot immunoassay and the DNA fragmentation measured by comet assay occurred after the addition of both hydrogen peroxide and Fenton reagent. Oxidative damage of biomolecules leads to the formation of singlet oxygen as conformed by EPR spin-trapping spectroscopy and the green fluorescence of singlet oxygen sensor green detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy. It is proposed here that singlet oxygen is formed by the decomposition of high-energy intermediates such as dioxetane or tetroxide formed by oxidative damage of biomolecules.

  16. Vitamin K3 induces antiproliferative effect in cervical epithelial cells transformed by HPV 16 (SiHa cells) through the increase in reactive oxygen species production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho Scharf Santana, Natália; Lima, Natália Alves; Desoti, Vânia Cristina; Bidóia, Danielle Lazarin; de Souza Bonfim Mendonça, Patrícia; Ratti, Bianca Altrão; Nakamura, Tânia Ueda; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Consolaro, Marcia Edilaine Lopes; Ximenes, Valdecir Farias; de Oliveira Silva, Sueli

    2016-10-01

    Cervical cancer is characterized as an important public health problem. According to latest estimates, cancer of the cervix is the fourth most common cancer among women. Due to its high prevalence, the search for new and efficient drugs to treat this infection is continuous. The progression of HPV-associated cervical cancer involves the expression of two viral proteins, E6 and E7, which are rapidly degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system through the increase in reactive oxygen species generation. Vitamins are essential to human substances, participate in the regulation of metabolism, and facilitate the process of energy transfer. Some early studies have indicated that vitamin K3 exerts antitumor activity by inducing cell death by apoptosis through an increase in the generation of reactive oxygen species. Thus, we evaluated the antiproliferative effect and a likely mechanism of action of vitamin K3 against cervical epithelial cells transformed by HPV 16 (SiHa cells) assessing the production of total ROS, the mitochondrial membrane potential, the cell morphology, the cell volume, and the cell membrane integrity. Our results show that vitamin K3 induces an increase in ROS production in SiHa cells, triggering biochemical and morphological events, such as depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and decreasing cell volume. Our data showed that vitamin K3 generates an oxidative imbalance in SiHa cells, leading to mechanisms that induce cell death by apoptosis.

  17. Hybrid rendering of the chest and virtual bronchoscopy [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemann, M D; Seemann, O; Luboldt, W; Gebicke, K; Prime, G; Claussen, C D

    2000-10-30

    Thin-section spiral computed tomography was used to acquire the volume data sets of the thorax. The tracheobronchial system and pathological changes of the chest were visualized using a color-coded surface rendering method. The structures of interest were then superimposed on a volume rendering of the other thoracic structures, thus producing a hybrid rendering. The hybrid rendering technique exploit the advantages of both rendering methods and enable virtual bronchoscopic examinations using different representation models. Virtual bronchoscopic examinations with a transparent color-coded shaded-surface model enables the simultaneous visualization of both the airways and the adjacent structures behind of the tracheobronchial wall and therefore, offers a practical alternative to fiberoptic bronchoscopy. Hybrid rendering and virtual endoscopy obviate the need for time consuming detailed analysis and presentation of axial source images.

  18. Innovative Lime Pozzolana Renders for Reconstruction of Historical Buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vejmelkova, E.; Maca, P.; Konvalinka, P.; Cerny, R.

    2011-01-01

    Bulk density, matrix density, open porosity, compressive strength, bending strength, water sorptivity, moisture diffusivity, water vapor diffusion coefficient, thermal conductivity, specific heat capacity and thermal diffusivity of two innovative renovation renders on limepozzolana basis are analyzed. The obtained results are compared with reference lime plaster and two commercial renovation renders, and conclusions on the applicability of the particular renders in practical reconstruction works are drawn. (author)

  19. Reaction of oxygen with the respiratory chain in cells and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chance, B

    1965-09-01

    This paper considers the way in which the oxygen reaction described by Dr. Nicholls and the ADP control reactions described by Dr. Racker could cooperate to establish a purposeful metabolic control phenomenon in vivo. This has required an examination of the kinetic properties of the respiratory chain with particular reference to methods for determinations of oxygen affinity (K(m)). The constant parameter for tissue respiration is k(1), the velocity constant for the reaction of oxygen with cytochrome oxidase. Not only is this quantity a constant for a particular tissue or mitochondria; it appears to vary little over a wide range of biological material, and for practical purposes a value of 5 x 10(7) at 25 degrees close to our original value (20) is found to apply with adequate accuracy for calculation of K(m) for mammalia. The quantity which will depend upon the tissue and its metabolic state is the value of K(m) itself, and K(m) may be as large as 0.5 microM and may fall to 0.05 microM or less in resting, controlled, or inhibited states. The control characteristic for ADP may depend upon the electron flux due to the cytochrome chain (40); less ADP is required to activate the slower electron transport at lower temperatures than at higher temperatures. The affinity constants for ADP control appear to be less dependent upon substrate supplied to the system. The balance of ADP and oxygen control in vivo is amply demonstrated experimentally and is dependent on the oxygen concentration as follows. In the presence of excess oxygen, control may be due to the ADP or phosphate (or substrate), and the kinetics of oxygen utilization will be independent of the oxygen concentration. As the oxygen concentration is diminished, hemoglobin becomes disoxygenated, deep gradients of oxygen concentration develop in the tissue, and eventually cytochrome oxidase becomes partially and then completely reduced. DPN at this point will become reduced and the electron flow diminished. The rate

  20. Involvement of oxygen reactive species in the cellular response of carcinoma cells to irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulard, A.

    2004-06-01

    After a presentation of oxygen reactive species and their sources, the author describes the enzymatic and non-enzymatic anti-oxidative defenses, the physiological roles of oxygen reactive species, the oxidative stress, the water radiolysis, the anti-oxidative enzymes and the effects of ionizing radiations. The author then reports an investigation on the contribution of oxygen reactive species in the cellular response to irradiation, and an investigation on the influence of the breathing chain on the persistence of a radio-induced oxidative stress. He also reports a research on molecular mechanisms involved in the cellular radio-sensitivity

  1. Oxygen enhancement ratio as a function of neutron energy with mammalian cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rini, F.J.; Hall, E.J.; Marino, S.A.

    1979-01-01

    Chinese hamster cells (V79) in culture under oxic and hypoxic conditions were irradiated with several neutron beams spanning a wide energy range to determine the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER). Eight essentially monoenergetic neutron beams, ranging from 0.22 to 13.6 MeV and a 0.11-MeV neutron spectrum, were produced at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Additional experiments were performed at the Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC, where neutrons are produced for radiotherapy by bombarding a beryllium target with 35-MeV deuterons. This beam has a broad energy spectrum with a mean energy of about 15 MeV. A maximum OER of about 1.9 was observed for 13.6-MeV neutrons. The OER values of the monoenergetic neutrons decreased with energy, plateaued at about 1.45 for the energy range from 0.22 to 2.0 MeV and increased slightly to about 1.55 for lower energy spectrum. In the light of microdosimetric data obtained for the neutron beams at RARAF, the OER appears to depend primarily on the intermediate-LET secondaries produced by neutrons in tissue, such as protons, while in contrast high LET-secondaries, such as α-particles and recoil ions, play a minor role. The studies using the NRL neutron beam resulted in a lower OER of about 1.67 as compared to the monoenergetic 13.6-MeV beam. This is a consequence of the fact that more of the dose is deposited by intermediate LET secondaries for the NRL neutron beam

  2. Reactive Oxygen Species Are Required for Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Initiate Proliferation after the Quiescence Exit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. G. Lyublinskaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study focuses on the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS in the process of mesenchymal stem cells “waking up” and entering the cell cycle after the quiescence. Using human endometrial mesenchymal stem cells (eMSCs, we showed that intracellular basal ROS level is positively correlated with the proliferative status of the cell cultures. Our experiments with the eMSCs synchronized in the G0 phase of the cell cycle revealed a transient increase in the ROS level upon the quiescence exit after stimulation of the cell proliferation. This increase was registered before the eMSC entry to the S-phase of the cell cycle, and elimination of this increase by antioxidants (N-acetyl-L-cysteine, Tempol, and Resveratrol blocked G1–S-phase transition. Similarly, a cell cycle arrest which resulted from the antioxidant treatment was observed in the experiments with synchronized human mesenchymal stem cells derived from the adipose tissue. Thus, we showed that physiologically relevant level of ROS is required for the initiation of human mesenchymal stem cell proliferation and that low levels of ROS due to the antioxidant treatment can block the stem cell self-renewal.

  3. Fast algorithm for the rendering of three-dimensional surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritt, Mark D.

    1994-02-01

    It is often desirable to draw a detailed and realistic representation of surface data on a computer graphics display. One such representation is a 3D shaded surface. Conventional techniques for rendering shaded surfaces are slow, however, and require substantial computational power. Furthermore, many techniques suffer from aliasing effects, which appear as jagged lines and edges. This paper describes an algorithm for the fast rendering of shaded surfaces without aliasing effects. It is much faster than conventional ray tracing and polygon-based rendering techniques and is suitable for interactive use. On an IBM RISC System/6000TM workstation it renders a 1000 X 1000 surface in about 7 seconds.

  4. Modulation of cisplatin-induced reactive oxygen species production by fullerene C(60 in normal and transformed lymphoid cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Franskevych

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The early response of normal (Wistar rat thymocytes and transformed (mice lymphoid leukemia L1210 cells to treatment with anticancer drug cisplatin or to combined treatment with cisplatin and carbon nanostructure fullerene C60 was studied. We demonstrated with fluorescent probes DCFH-DA and TMRE that cisplatin at concentration 1 μg/ml induced reactive oxygen species (ROS production and decreased the value of mitochondrial membrane potential in both cell types. The combined treatment with cisplatin (1 μg/ml and fullerene C60 (7.2 μg/ml was shown to be followed by oppositely directed modulation of ROS production in thymocytes and L1210 cells. Cisplatin-induced ROS production was intensified in L1210 cells, while in thymocytes it was decreased. It is supposed that the different effects of combined treatment are associated with peculiarities of fullerene C60 accumulation and localization in normal and cancer cells.

  5. Advanced glycation end products promote ChREBP expression and cell proliferation in liver cancer cells by increasing reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hanbei; Li, Yakui; Zhu, Yemin; Wu, Lifang; Meng, Jian; Lin, Ning; Yang, Dianqiang; Li, Minle; Ding, WenJin; Tong, Xuemei; Su, Qing

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the study was to elucidate the mechanism by which advanced glycation end products (AGEs) promote cell proliferation in liver cancer cells.We treated liver cancer HepG2 cells with 200 mg/L AGEs or bovine serum albumin (BSA) and assayed for cell viability, cell cycle, and apoptosis. We performed real-time PCR and Western blot analysis for RNA and protein levels of carbohydrate responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP) in AGEs- or BSA-treated HepG2 cells. We analyzed the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HepG2 cells treated with AGEs or BSA.We found that increased S-phase cell percentage and decreased apoptosis contributed to AGEs-induced liver cancer cell proliferation. Real-time PCR and Western blot analysis showed that AGEs stimulated RNA and protein levels of ChREBP, a transcription factor promoting glycolysis and maintaining cell proliferation in liver cancer cells. Intriguingly, the level of ROS was higher in AGEs-treated liver cancer cells. Treating liver cancer cells with antioxidant N-acetyl cystein (NAC) partly blocked AGEs-induced ChREBP expression and cell proliferation.Our results suggest that the AGEs-ROS-ChREBP pathway plays a critical role in promoting ChREBP expression and liver cancer cell proliferation.

  6. Primary bovine skeletal muscle cells enters apoptosis rapidly via the intrinsic pathway when available oxygen is removed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sissel Beate Rønning

    Full Text Available Muscle cells undergo changes post-mortem during the process of converting muscle into meat, and this complex process is far from revealed. Recent reports have suggested programmed cell death (apoptosis to be important in the very early period of converting muscle into meat. The dynamic balance that occurs between anti-apoptotic members, such as Bcl-2, and pro-apoptotic members (Bid, Bim helps determine whether the cell initiates apoptosis. In this study, we used primary bovine skeletal muscle cells, cultured in monolayers in vitro, to investigate if apoptosis is induced when oxygen is removed from the growth medium. Primary bovine muscle cells were differentiated to form myotubes, and anoxia was induced for 6h. The anoxic conditions significantly increased (P<0.05 the relative gene expression of anti- and pro-apoptotic markers (Aif, Bcl-2, Bid and Bim, and the PARK7 (P<0.05 and Grp75 (Hsp70 protein expressions were transiently increased. The anoxic conditions also led to a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, which is an early apoptotic event, as well as cytochrome c release from the mitochondria. Finally, reorganization and degradation of cytoskeletal filaments occurred. These results suggest that muscle cells enters apoptosis via the intrinsic pathway rapidly when available oxygen in the muscle diminishes post-mortem.

  7. Titanium dioxide induces apoptotic cell death through reactive oxygen species-mediated Fas upregulation and Bax activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon TH

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Ki-Chun Yoo1, Chang-Hwan Yoon1, Dongwook Kwon2, Kyung-Hwan Hyun1, Soo Jung Woo1, Rae-Kwon Kim1, Eun-Jung Lim1, Yongjoon Suh1, Min-Jung Kim1, Tae Hyun Yoon2, Su-Jae Lee11Laboratory of Molecular Biochemistry, 2Laboratory of Nanoscale Characterization and Environmental Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Hanyang University, Seoul, Republic of KoreaBackground: Titanium dioxide (TiO2 has been widely used in many areas, including biomedicine, cosmetics, and environmental engineering. Recently, it has become evident that some TiO2 particles have a considerable cytotoxic effect in normal human cells. However, the molecular basis for the cytotoxicity of TiO2 has yet to be defined.Methods and results: In this study, we demonstrated that combined treatment with TiO2 nanoparticles sized less than 100 nm and ultraviolet A irradiation induces apoptotic cell death through reactive oxygen species-dependent upregulation of Fas and conformational activation of Bax in normal human cells. Treatment with P25 TiO2 nanoparticles with a hydrodynamic size distribution centered around 70 nm (TiO2P25–70 together with ultraviolet A irradiation-induced caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death, accompanied by transcriptional upregulation of the death receptor, Fas, and conformational activation of Bax. In line with these results, knockdown of either Fas or Bax with specific siRNA significantly inhibited TiO2-induced apoptotic cell death. Moreover, inhibition of reactive oxygen species with an antioxidant, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, clearly suppressed upregulation of Fas, conformational activation of Bax, and subsequent apoptotic cell death in response to combination treatment using TiO2P25–70 and ultraviolet A irradiation.Conclusion: These results indicate that sub-100 nm sized TiO2 treatment under ultraviolet A irradiation induces apoptotic cell death through reactive oxygen species-mediated upregulation of the death receptor, Fas, and activation of the preapoptotic protein

  8. Sinoporphyrin sodium, a novel sensitizer, triggers mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis in ECA-109 cells via production of reactive oxygen species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang H

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Haiping Wang,1 Xiaobing Wang,1 Shaoliang Zhang,2 Pan Wang,1 Kun Zhang,1 Quanhong Liu1 1Key Laboratory of Medicinal Resources and Natural Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Ministry of Education, National Engineering Laboratory for Resource Developing of Endangered Chinese Crude Drugs in Northwest of China, College of Life Sciences, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi'an, Shaanxi, 2Qinglong High-Tech Co, Ltd, Yichun, Jiangxi, People's Republic of China Background: Sonodynamic therapy (SDT is a promising method that uses ultrasound to activate certain chemical sensitizers for the treatment of cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the sonoactivity of a novel sensitizer, sinoporphyrin sodium (DVDMS, and its sonotoxicity in an esophageal cancer (ECA-109 cell line. Methods: The fluorescence intensity of DVDMS, hematoporphyrin, protoporphyrin IX, and Photofrin II was detected by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Generation of singlet oxygen was measured using a 1, 3-diphenylisobenzofuran experiment. A 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay was used to examine cell viability. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and destabilization of the mitochondrial membrane potential were assessed by flow cytometry. Apoptosis was analyzed using Annexin-PE/7-amino-actinomycin D staining. Confocal microscopy was performed to assess mitochondrial damage and identify release of cytochrome C after treatment. Western blots were used to determine expression of oxidative stress-related and apoptosis-associated protein. Ultrastructural changes in the cell were studied by scanning electron microscopy. Results: DVDMS showed higher autofluorescence intensity and singlet oxygen production efficiency compared with other photosensitizers in both cancerous and normal cells. Compared with hematoporphyrin, DVDMS-mediated SDT was more cytotoxic in ECA-109 cells. Abundant intracellular ROS was found in the SDT groups, and the cytotoxicity

  9. Oxygen- and water-induced degradation of an inverted polymer solar cell: the barrier effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesterager Madsen, Morten; Norrman, Kion; Krebs, Frederik C

    2011-01-01

    The work focuses on the degradation of performance induced by both water and oxygen in an inverted geometry organic photovoltaic device with emphasis on the accumulated barrier effect of the layers comprising the layer stack. By studying the exchange of oxygen in the zinc oxide (ZnO) layer...... in the humid atmosphere, correlating well with a long observed lifetime in the same atmosphere.© 2011 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers....

  10. Membrane culture and reduced oxygen tension enhances cartilage matrix formation from equine cord blood mesenchymal stromal cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Co, C; Vickaryous, M K; Koch, T G

    2014-03-01

    Ongoing research is aimed at increasing cartilage tissue yield and quality from multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) for the purpose of treating cartilage damage in horses. Low oxygen culture has been shown to enhance chondrogenesis, and novel membrane culture has been proposed to increase tissue yield and homogeneity. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the effect of reduced oxygen and membrane culture during in vitro chondrogenesis of equine cord blood (CB) MSC. CB-MSC (n = 5 foals) were expanded at 21% oxygen prior to 3-week differentiation in membrane or pellet culture at 5% and 21% oxygen. Assessment included histological examination (H&E, toluidine Blue, immunohistochemistry (IHC) for collagen type I and II), protein quantification by hydroxyproline assay and dimethylmethylene assay, and mRNA analysis for collagen IA1, collagen IIA1, collagen XA1, HIF1α and Sox9. Among treatment groups, 5% membrane culture produced neocartilage most closely resembling hyaline cartilage. Membrane culture resulted in increased wet mass, homogenous matrix morphology and an increase in total collagen content, while 5% oxygen culture resulted in higher GAG and type II collagen content. No significant differences were observed for mRNA analysis. Membrane culture at 5% oxygen produces a comparatively larger amount of higher quality neocartilage. Matrix homogeneity is attributed to a uniform diffusion gradient and reduced surface tension. Membrane culture holds promise for scale-up for therapeutic purposes, for cellular preconditioning prior to cytotherapeutic applications, and for modeling system for gas-dependent chondrogenic differentiation studies. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Role of reactive oxygen species in arsenic-induced transformation of human lung bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhuo, E-mail: zhuo.zhang@uky.edu [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Budhraja, Amit; Son, Young-Ok [Center for Research on Environmental Diseases, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Kim, Donghern [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Shi, Xianglin [Center for Research on Environmental Diseases, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

    2015-01-09

    Highlights: • Short term exposure of cells to arsenic causes ROS generation. • Chronical exposure of cells to arsenic causes malignant cell transformation. • Inhibition of ROS generation reduces cell transformation by arsenic. • Arsenic-transformed cells exhibit reduced capacity of generating ROS. • Arsenic-transformed cells exhibit increased levels of antioxidants. - Abstract: Arsenic is an environmental carcinogen, its mechanisms of carcinogenesis remain to be investigated. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are considered to be important. A previous study (Carpenter et al., 2011) has measured ROS level in human lung bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells and arsenic-transformed BEAS-2B cells and found that ROS levels were higher in transformed cells than that in parent normal cells. Based on these observations, the authors concluded that cell transformation induced by arsenic is mediated by increased cellular levels of ROS. This conclusion is problematic because this study only measured the basal ROS levels in transformed and parent cells and did not investigate the role of ROS in the process of arsenic-induced cell transformation. The levels of ROS in arsenic-transformed cells represent the result and not the cause of cell transformation. Thus question concerning whether ROS are important in arsenic-induced cell transformation remains to be answered. In the present study, we used expressions of catalase (antioxidant against H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2, antioxidant against O{sub 2}{sup ·−}) to decrease ROS level and investigated their role in the process of arsenic-induced cell transformation. Our results show that inhibition of ROS by antioxidant enzymes decreased arsenic-induced cell transformation, demonstrating that ROS are important in this process. We have also shown that in arsenic-transformed cells, ROS generation was lower and levels of antioxidants are higher than those in parent cells, in a disagreement with the previous

  12. Role of reactive oxygen species in arsenic-induced transformation of human lung bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zhuo; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Budhraja, Amit; Son, Young-Ok; Kim, Donghern; Shi, Xianglin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Short term exposure of cells to arsenic causes ROS generation. • Chronical exposure of cells to arsenic causes malignant cell transformation. • Inhibition of ROS generation reduces cell transformation by arsenic. • Arsenic-transformed cells exhibit reduced capacity of generating ROS. • Arsenic-transformed cells exhibit increased levels of antioxidants. - Abstract: Arsenic is an environmental carcinogen, its mechanisms of carcinogenesis remain to be investigated. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are considered to be important. A previous study (Carpenter et al., 2011) has measured ROS level in human lung bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells and arsenic-transformed BEAS-2B cells and found that ROS levels were higher in transformed cells than that in parent normal cells. Based on these observations, the authors concluded that cell transformation induced by arsenic is mediated by increased cellular levels of ROS. This conclusion is problematic because this study only measured the basal ROS levels in transformed and parent cells and did not investigate the role of ROS in the process of arsenic-induced cell transformation. The levels of ROS in arsenic-transformed cells represent the result and not the cause of cell transformation. Thus question concerning whether ROS are important in arsenic-induced cell transformation remains to be answered. In the present study, we used expressions of catalase (antioxidant against H 2 O 2 ) and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2, antioxidant against O 2 ·− ) to decrease ROS level and investigated their role in the process of arsenic-induced cell transformation. Our results show that inhibition of ROS by antioxidant enzymes decreased arsenic-induced cell transformation, demonstrating that ROS are important in this process. We have also shown that in arsenic-transformed cells, ROS generation was lower and levels of antioxidants are higher than those in parent cells, in a disagreement with the previous report. The

  13. Expression of T helper cell-associated inflammatory mediator mRNAs in cells of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples and oxygen concentration in arterial blood samples from healthy horses exposed to hyperbaric oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looijen, Maty G P; New, Dallas J; Fischer, Carrie D; Dardari, Rkia; Irwin, Karyn M; Berezowski, Christopher J; Bond, Stephanie L; Léguillette, Renaud

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the mRNA expression of T helper (Th)1, Th2, and Th17 cell-associated inflammatory mediators in cells of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples collected from healthy horses exposed to hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) and to monitor blood oxygen concentration during and following HBO therapy. ANIMALS 8 healthy horses. PROCEDURES In a randomized controlled crossover design study, each horse was exposed (beginning day 1) to 100% oxygen at a maximum of 3 atmospheres absolute (304 kPa) daily for 10 days or ambient air at atmospheric pressure in the HBO chamber for an equivalent amount of time (control). Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples were collected on days 0 and 10. After validation of candidate reference genes, relative mRNA expressions of various innate inflammatory, Th1 cell-derived, Th2 cell-derived (including eotaxin-2), Th17 cell-derived, and regulatory cytokines were measured by quantitative PCR assays. For 3 horses, arterial blood samples were collected for blood gas analysis during a separate HBO session. RESULTS The optimal combination of reference genes was glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, hypoxanthine ribosyltransferase, and ribosomal protein L32. Compared with day 0 findings, expression of eotaxin-2 mRNA was significantly lower (0.12-fold reduction) and the percentage of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples was significantly lower on day 10 when horses received HBO therapy. Values of Pao2 rapidly increased (> 800 mm Hg) but immediately decreased to pretreatment values when HBO sessions ended. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that HBO therapy does not increase mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines, but reduces eotaxin-2 mRNA transcription. The Pao2 increase was transient with no cumulative effects of HBO.

  14. The effect of oxygen transfer mechanism on the cathode performance based on proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Hou, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Two types of proton-blocking composites, La2NiO4+δ-LaNi0.6Fe0.4O3-δ (LNO-LNF) and Sm0.2Ce0.8O2-δ-LaNi0.6Fe0.4O3-δ (SDC-LNF), were evaluated as cathode materials for proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cells (H-SOFCs) based on the BaZr0.1Ce0.7Y0.2O3-δ (BZCY) electrolyte, in order to compare and investigate the influence of two different oxygen transfer mechanism on the performance of the cathode for H-SOFCs. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed that the chemical compatibility of the components in both compounds was excellent up to 1000°C. Electrochemical studies revealed that LNO-LNF showed lower area specific polarization resistances in symmetrical cells and better electrochemical performance in single cell tests. The single cell with LNO-LNF cathode generated remarkable higher maximum power densities (MPDs) and lower interfacial polarization resistances (Rp) than that with SDC-LNF cathode. Correspondingly, the MPDs of the single cell with the LNO-LNF cathode were 490, 364, 266, 180 mW cm-2 and the Rp were 0.103, 0.279, 0.587, 1.367 Ω cm2 at 700, 650, 600 and 550°C, respectively. Moreover, after the single cell with LNO-LNF cathode optimized with an anode functional layer (AFL) between the anode and electrolyte, the power outputs reached 708 mW cm-2 at 700°C. These results demonstrate that the LNO-LNF composite cathode with the interstitial oxygen transfer mechanism is a more preferable alternative for H-SOFCs than SDC-LNF composite cathode with the oxygen vacancy transfer mechanism.

  15. Effects of x-irradiation on cell division, oxygen consumption, and growth medium pH of an insect cell line cultured in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koval, T.M.; Myser, W.C.; Hink, W.F.

    1975-01-01

    Cultured Trichoplusia ni cells in exponential growth were administered x-ray doses of 10,000 R and then subcultured. The untreated cell population began exponential growth within a few hours after subculture, eventually reaching stationary growth phase 96 hr later at a cell density of 2.08 x 10 6 cells/ml, whereas the irradiated cell population did not change for 24 hr after irradiation and then began exponential growth at a rate similar to that of control cells, also reaching stationary phase at 96 hr, but at a cell density of 0.93 x 10 6 cells/ml, which is less than half the maximum density of controls. From 24 to 96 hr after treatment, the x-irradiated cells were characterized by an increased consumption of oxygen that was nearly twice the amount utilized by control cells. The pH of the cell growth medium increases over 96 hr from 6.3 to 6.6 for irradiated as well as for untreated cultures, but since the number of x-rayed cells is less than half the number of untreated cells, the pH increase, per cell, of medium from irradiated cultures is about twice that of medium from control cultures

  16. Granzyme B of cytotoxic T cells induces extramitochondrial reactive oxygen species production via caspase-dependent NADPH oxidase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiló, Juan I; Anel, Alberto; Catalán, Elena; Sebastián, Alvaro; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Naval, Javier; Wallich, Reinhard; Simon, Markus M; Pardo, Julián

    2010-07-01

    Induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a hallmark of granzyme B (gzmB)-mediated pro-apoptotic processes and target cell death. However, it is unclear to what extent the generated ROS derive from mitochondrial and/or extra-mitochondrial sources. To clarify this point, we have produced a mutant EL4 cell line, termed EL4-rho(0), which lacks mitochondrial DNA, associated with a decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and a defective ROS production through the electron transport chain of oxidative phosphorylation. When incubated with either recombinant gzmB plus streptolysin or ex vivo gzmB(+) cytotoxic T cells, EL4-rho(0) cells showed phosphatydylserine translocation, caspase 3 activation, Bak conformational change, cytochrome c release and apoptotic morphology comparable to EL4 cells. Moreover, EL4-rho(0) cells produced ROS at levels similar to EL4 under these conditions. GzmB-mediated ROS production was almost totally abolished in both cell lines by the pan-caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-fmk. However, addition of apocynin, a specific inhibitor of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases, led to a significant reduction of ROS production and cell death only in EL4-rho(0) but not EL4 cells. These data suggest that gzmB-induced cell death is accompanied by a caspase-dependent pathway of extra-mitochondrial ROS production, most probably through activation of NADPH oxidase.

  17. A mathematical model of the maximum power density attainable in an alkaline hydrogen/oxygen fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimble, Michael C.; White, Ralph E.

    1991-01-01

    A mathematical model of a hydrogen/oxygen alkaline fuel cell is presented that can be used to predict the polarization behavior under various power loads. The major limitations to achieving high power densities are indicated and methods to increase the maximum attainable power density are suggested. The alkaline fuel cell model describes the phenomena occurring in the solid, liquid, and gaseous phases of the anode, separator, and cathode regions based on porous electrode theory applied to three phases. Fundamental equations of chemical engineering that describe conservation of mass and charge, species transport, and kinetic phenomena are used to develop the model by treating all phases as a homogeneous continuum.

  18. Differential concentration-specific effects of caffeine on cell viability, oxidative stress, and cell cycle in pulmonary oxygen toxicity in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, Kirti Kumar; Chu, Chun; Couroucli, Xanthi; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Lingappan, Krithika

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Caffeine at 0.05 mM decreases oxidative stress in hyperoxia. • Caffeine at 1 mM decreases cell viability, increases oxidative stress in hyperoxia. • Caffeine at 1 but not 0.05 mM, abrogates hyperoxia-induced G2/M arrest. - Abstract: Caffeine is used to prevent bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in premature neonates. Hyperoxia contributes to the development of BPD, inhibits cell proliferation and decreases cell survival. The mechanisms responsible for the protective effect of caffeine in pulmonary oxygen toxicity remain largely unknown. A549 and MLE 12 pulmonary epithelial cells were exposed to hyperoxia or maintained in room air, in the presence of different concentrations (0, 0.05, 0.1 and 1 mM) of caffeine. Caffeine had a differential concentration-specific effect on cell cycle progression, oxidative stress and viability, with 1 mM concentration being deleterious and 0.05 mM being protective. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation during hyperoxia was modulated by caffeine in a similar concentration-specific manner. Caffeine at 1 mM, but not at the 0.05 mM concentration decreased the G2 arrest in these cells. Taken together this study shows the novel funding that caffeine has a concentration-specific effect on cell cycle regulation, ROS generation, and cell survival in hyperoxic conditions

  19. Differential concentration-specific effects of caffeine on cell viability, oxidative stress, and cell cycle in pulmonary oxygen toxicity in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, Kirti Kumar; Chu, Chun; Couroucli, Xanthi; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Lingappan, Krithika, E-mail: lingappa@bcm.edu

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Caffeine at 0.05 mM decreases oxidative stress in hyperoxia. • Caffeine at 1 mM decreases cell viability, increases oxidative stress in hyperoxia. • Caffeine at 1 but not 0.05 mM, abrogates hyperoxia-induced G2/M arrest. - Abstract: Caffeine is used to prevent bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in premature neonates. Hyperoxia contributes to the development of BPD, inhibits cell proliferation and decreases cell survival. The mechanisms responsible for the protective effect of caffeine in pulmonary oxygen toxicity remain largely unknown. A549 and MLE 12 pulmonary epithelial cells were exposed to hyperoxia or maintained in room air, in the presence of different concentrations (0, 0.05, 0.1 and 1 mM) of caffeine. Caffeine had a differential concentration-specific effect on cell cycle progression, oxidative stress and viability, with 1 mM concentration being deleterious and 0.05 mM being protective. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation during hyperoxia was modulated by caffeine in a similar concentration-specific manner. Caffeine at 1 mM, but not at the 0.05 mM concentration decreased the G2 arrest in these cells. Taken together this study shows the novel funding that caffeine has a concentration-specific effect on cell cycle regulation, ROS generation, and cell survival in hyperoxic conditions.

  20. Exposure of Bacterial Biofilms to Electrical Current Leads to Cell Death Mediated in Part by Reactive Oxygen Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Cassandra L; Schmidt-Malan, Suzannah M; Karau, Melissa J; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl; Hassett, Daniel J; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Patel, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms may form on indwelling medical devices such as prosthetic joints, heart valves and catheters, causing challenging-to-treat infections. We have previously described the 'electricidal effect', in which bacterial biofilms are decreased following exposure to direct electrical current. Herein, we sought to determine if the decreased bacterial quantities are due to detachment of biofilms or cell death and to investigate the role that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play in the observed effect. Using confocal and electron microscopy and flow cytometry, we found that direct current (DC) leads to cell death and changes in the architecture of biofilms formed by Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) appear to play a role in DC-associated cell death, as there was an increase in ROS-production by Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms following exposure to DC. An increase in the production of ROS response enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) was observed for S. aureus, S. epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms following exposure to DC. Additionally, biofilms were protected from cell death when supplemented with antioxidants and oxidant scavengers, including catalase, mannitol and Tempol. Knocking out SOD (sodAB) in P. aeruginosa led to an enhanced DC effect. Microarray analysis of P. aeruginosa PAO1 showed transcriptional changes in genes related to the stress response and cell death. In conclusion, the electricidal effect results in death of bacteria in biofilms, mediated, at least in part, by production of ROS.

  1. Study of magnetic field to promote oxygen transfer and its application in zinc–air fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Jicheng; Xu, Hongfeng; Lu, Lu; Sun, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► High magnetic strength reduces R ct and increases C d in oxygen reduction reaction. ► Oxygen diffusion and transfer coefficient become large in high magnetic strength. ► The magnetic ZAFC discharge performance is better than the nonmagnetic ZAFC. ► Increased NdFeB/C load density improves the magnetic ZAFC discharge performance. ► Excess NdFeB/C load density decreases the magnetic ZAFC discharge performance. -- Abstract: This study investigates the effects of magnetic field on oxygen transfer and the correlations of electrochemical parameters in different magnetic strengths. The discharge performance of zinc–air fuel cell (ZAFC) was tested under magnetic and nonmagnetic conditions using neodymium–iron–boron/carbon (NdFeB/C) magnetic particles in ZAFC cathode. The results showed that the oxygen diffusion coefficient (D Oi ) and transfer coefficient (α i ) increased by 102.14% and 52.38% when the magnetic strength increased from 0 mT to 5.0 mT, respectively. In addition, the electric double-layer capacitance (C d ) increased from 8.16 to 22.46 μF cm −2 , the charge-transfer resistance (R ct ) decreased from 9.43 Ω cm 2 to 6.02 Ω cm 2 , and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) current was improved. With the NdFeB/C load density of 2.4 mg cm −2 in ZAFC cathode, the discharge current of magnetic ZAFC increased by 13.86% compared with the nonmagnetic ZAFC at the 0.80 V discharge voltage. These results indicate that magnetic strength has a positive correlation with D Oi , α i , and the ORR current. Under magnetic attractions, the oxygen transfer process is easier at the Pt/C catalytic surface, and the discharge performance of magnetic ZAFC is superior to the nonmagnetic ZAFC. At lower NdFeB/C load density, increasing the NdFeB/C load density facilitates oxygen transfer and improves the discharge performance of ZAFC. However, the magnetic ZAFC discharge performance decreases at a higher NdFeB/C load density because of the blocked oxygen

  2. Effects of grain boundaries at the electrolyte/cathode interfaces on oxygen reduction reaction kinetics of solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Min Gi; Koo, Ja Yang; Ahn, Min Woo; Lee, Won Young [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    We systematically investigated the effects of grain boundaries (GBs) at the electrolyte/cathode interface of two conventional electrolyte materials, i.e., yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC). We deposited additional layers by pulsed laser deposition to control the GB density on top of the polycrystalline substrates, obtaining significant improvements in peak power density (two-fold for YSZ and three-fold for GDC). The enhanced performance at high GB density in the additional layer could be ascribed to the accumulation of oxygen vacancies, which are known to be more active sites for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) than grain cores. GDC exhibited a higher enhancement than YSZ, due to the easier formation, and thus higher concentration, of oxygen vacancies for ORR. The strong relation between the concentration of oxygen vacancies and the surface exchange characteristics substantiated the role of GBs at electrolyte/cathode interfaces on ORR kinetics, providing new design parameters for highly performing solid oxide fuel cells.

  3. Enhanced response of microbial fuel cell using sulfonated poly ether ether ketone membrane as a biochemical oxygen demand sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayyaru, Sivasankaran; Dharmalingam, Sangeetha, E-mail: sangeetha@annauniv.edu

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Sulfonated poly ether ether ketone (SPEEK) membrane in SCMFC used to determine the BOD. • The biosensor produces a good linear relationship with the BOD concentration up to 650 ppm. • This sensing range was 62.5% higher than that of Nafion{sup ®}. • SPEEK exhibited one order lesser oxygen permeability than Nafion{sup ®}. • Nafion{sup ®} shows high anodic internal resistance (67 Ω) than the SPEEK (39 Ω). - Abstract: The present study is focused on the development of single chamber microbial fuel cell (SCMFC) using sulfonated poly ether ether ketone (SPEEK) membrane to determine the biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) matter present in artificial wastewater (AW). The biosensor produces a good linear relationship with the BOD concentration up to 650 ppm when using artificial wastewater. This sensing range was 62.5% higher than that of Nafion{sup ®}. The most serious problem in using MFC as a BOD sensor is the oxygen diffusion into the anode compartment, which consumes electrons in the anode compartment, thereby reducing the coulomb yield and reducing the electrical signal from the MFC. SPEEK exhibited one order lesser oxygen permeability than Nafion{sup ®}, resulting in low internal resistance and substrate loss, thus improving the sensing range of BOD. The system was further improved by making a double membrane electrode assembly (MEA) with an increased electrode surface area which provide high surface area for electrically active bacteria.

  4. Study of the defects related to oxygen in Czochralski silicon destined to photovoltaic solar cells - Influence of isovalent impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanay, Florent

    2013-01-01

    This study aims at understanding the effects of two main defects related to oxygen, the boron-oxygen complexes (responsible for light-induced degradation of the carrier lifetime) and the thermal donors (among other things, responsible for variations of the conductivity), on the electric and photovoltaic properties of silicon. More precisely, the interactions of isovalent impurities, known for modifying the oxygen spatial distribution, with these defects were studied. Two experimental protocols were first developed to evaluate the light-induced degradation of the carrier lifetime in iron-rich silicon. Then, the introduction in silicon of germanium and tin in high quantity were shown not to significantly influence the conversion efficiency of the cells. However, contrary to recent studies from the literature, no reduction due to germanium co-doping or to tin co-doping of the light-induced degradation of the photovoltaic performances was observed. However carbon was shown to lead to a slowdown of the degradation due to boron-oxygen complexes. Moreover contrary to tin which has no influence on the thermal donor generation, germanium slows down their formation. An empirical expression has been proposed to take into account this effect for a large range of germanium concentrations. Eventually in highly doped and compensated silicon, the thermal donor generation is identical as in conventional silicon, which experimentally confirms that the thermal donor formation is limited by the electron density. (author) [fr

  5. Oxygen control in solid fuel fired heating systems with zirconium oxide cells. Iltstyring af fastbraendselsfyrede anlaeg med zirkoniumoxidcelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zielke, U.

    1988-10-15

    During the heating season 87-88 the Jutland Technological Institute has carried out investigations of the zirconium oxygen meters of solid fuel heating units. The aim was to investigate whether the combustion of inflammable flue gas components on the surface of the oxygen meter cell is of any importance to the running and emissions of the units. The used zirconium oxide oxygen meters normally measure lower concentrations of oxygen as the paramagnetic comparator of the laboratory. The relative deviation is lowest at coal fired units (5.5% and highest at straw fired units (20%)). At several units there is a clear tendency towards increasing development of CO at an increasing surplus of air. Because of too large a surplus of air, and in consequence of this the formation of CO, the chimney waste of the units is increased by up to 6%. Both the surplus of air and the concentration of CO have been included as long term average values. Especially at the straw fired units, periodically very high concentrations of non-inflammable flue gas components can be found, resulting in an undesirable influence on the environment. The development of improved control systems and regulation equipment is recommended.

  6. Corosolic Acid Induces Non-Apoptotic Cell Death through Generation of Lipid Reactive Oxygen Species Production in Human Renal Carcinoma Caki Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seon Min Woo

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Corosolic acid is one of the pentacyclic triterpenoids isolated from Lagerstroemia speciose and has been reported to exhibit anti-cancer and anti-proliferative activities in various cancer cells. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of corosolic acid in cancer cell death. Corosolic acid induces a decrease of cell viability and an increase of cell cytotoxicity in human renal carcinoma Caki cells. Corosolic acid-induced cell death is not inhibited by apoptosis inhibitor (z-VAD-fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor, necroptosis inhibitor (necrostatin-1, or ferroptosis inhibitors (ferrostatin-1 and deferoxamine (DFO. Furthermore, corosolic acid significantly induces reactive oxygen species (ROS levels, but antioxidants (N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC and trolox do not inhibit corosolic acid-induced cell death. Interestingly, corosolic acid induces lipid oxidation, and α-tocopherol markedly prevents corosolic acid-induced lipid peroxidation and cell death. Anti-chemotherapeutic effects of α-tocopherol are dependent on inhibition of lipid oxidation rather than inhibition of ROS production. In addition, corosolic acid induces non-apoptotic cell death in other renal cancer (ACHN and A498, breast cancer (MDA-MB231, and hepatocellular carcinoma (SK-Hep1 and Huh7 cells, and α-tocopherol markedly inhibits corosolic acid-induced cell death. Therefore, our results suggest that corosolic acid induces non-apoptotic cell death in cancer cells through the increase of lipid peroxidation.

  7. Oxygen restriction increases the infective potential of Listeria monocytogenes in vitro in Caco-2 cells and in vivo in guinea pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Bo; Roldgaard, Bent; Christensen, Bjarke Bak

    2007-01-01

    : Infection of Caco-2 cells revealed that Listeria cultivated under oxygen-restricted conditions were approximately 100 fold more invasive than similar cultures grown without oxygen restriction. This was observed for exponentially growing bacteria, as well as for stationary-phase cultures. Oral dosage...

  8. Determination of oxygen potentials and O/M ratios of oxide nuclear reactor fuels by means of an automated solid state galvanic cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toci, F.; Cambini, M.

    1987-01-01

    An automated version of the electromotive force (emf) cell for the determination of oxygen activities and oxygen to metal ratios of oxide nuclear reactor fuel, irradiated or not, is reported together with some measurements. 9 figs., 17 refs. In appendix a method is described for preparing suitable electrolyte crucibles

  9. Modeling of oxygen gas diffusion and consumption during the oxic transient in a disposal cell of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Windt, Laurent; Marsal, François; Corvisier, Jérôme; Pellegrini, Delphine

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • This paper deals with the geochemistry of underground HLW disposals. • The oxic transient is a key issue in performance assessment (e.g. corrosion, redox). • A reactive transport model is explicitly coupled to gas diffusion and reactivity. • Application to in situ experiment (Tournemire laboratory) and HLW disposal cell. • Extent of the oxidizing/reducing front is investigated by sensitivity analysis. - Abstract: The oxic transient in geological radioactive waste disposals is a key issue for the performance of metallic components that may undergo high corrosion rates under such conditions. A previous study carried out in situ in the argillite formation of Tournemire (France) has suggested that oxic conditions could have lasted several years. In this study, a multiphase reactive transport model is performed with the code HYTEC to analyze the balance between the kinetics of pyrite oxidative dissolution, the kinetics of carbon steel corrosion and oxygen gas diffusion when carbon steel components are emplaced in the geological medium. Two cases were modeled: firstly, the observations made in situ have been reproduced, and the model established was then applied to a disposal cell for high-level waste (HLW) in an argillaceous formation, taking into account carbon steel components and excavated damaged zones (EDZ). In a closed system, modeling leads to a complete and fast consumption of oxygen in both cases. Modeling results are more consistent with the in situ test while considering residual voids between materials and/or a water unsaturated state allowing for oxygen gas diffusion (open conditions). Under similar open conditions and considering ventilation of the handling drifts, a redox contrast occurs between reducing conditions at the back of the disposal cell (with anoxic corrosion of steel and H 2 production) and oxidizing conditions at the front of the cell (with oxic corrosion of steel). The extent of the oxidizing/reducing front in the

  10. Krebs Cycle Intermediates Protective against Oxidative Stress by Modulating the Level of Reactive Oxygen Species in Neuronal HT22 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenta Sawa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Krebs cycle intermediates (KCIs are reported to function as energy substrates in mitochondria and to exert antioxidants effects on the brain. The present study was designed to identify which KCIs are effective neuroprotective compounds against oxidative stress in neuronal cells. Here we found that pyruvate, oxaloacetate, and α-ketoglutarate, but not lactate, citrate, iso-citrate, succinate, fumarate, or malate, protected HT22 cells against hydrogen peroxide-mediated toxicity. These three intermediates reduced the production of hydrogen peroxide-activated reactive oxygen species, measured in terms of 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate fluorescence. In contrast, none of the KCIs—used at 1 mM—protected against cell death induced by high concentrations of glutamate—another type of oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death. Because these protective KCIs did not have any toxic effects (at least up to 10 mM, they have potential use for therapeutic intervention against chronic neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Study of interaction among silicon, lithium, oxygen and radiation-induced defects for radiation-hardened solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, P. A.

    1973-01-01

    In order to improve reliability and the useful lifetime of solar cell arrays for space use, a program was undertaken to develop radiation-hardened lithium-doped silicon solar cells. These cells were shown to be significantly more resistant to degradation by ionized particles than the presently used n-p nonlithium-doped silicon solar cells. The results of various analyses performed to develop a more complete understanding of the physics of the interaction among lithium, silicon, oxygen, and radiation-induced defects are presented. A discussion is given of those portions of the previous model of radiation damage annealing which were found to be in error and those portions which were upheld by these extensive investigations.

  12. Real-time photorealistic stereoscopic rendering of fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Benjamin M.; McAllister, David F.

    2007-02-01

    We propose a method for real-time photorealistic stereo rendering of the natural phenomenon of fire. Applications include the use of virtual reality in fire fighting, military training, and entertainment. Rendering fire in real-time presents a challenge because of the transparency and non-static fluid-like behavior of fire. It is well known that, in general, methods that are effective for monoscopic rendering are not necessarily easily extended to stereo rendering because monoscopic methods often do not provide the depth information necessary to produce the parallax required for binocular disparity in stereoscopic rendering. We investigate the existing techniques used for monoscopic rendering of fire and discuss their suitability for extension to real-time stereo rendering. Methods include the use of precomputed textures, dynamic generation of textures, and rendering models resulting from the approximation of solutions of fluid dynamics equations through the use of ray-tracing algorithms. We have found that in order to attain real-time frame rates, our method based on billboarding is effective. Slicing is used to simulate depth. Texture mapping or 2D images are mapped onto polygons and alpha blending is used to treat transparency. We can use video recordings or prerendered high-quality images of fire as textures to attain photorealistic stereo.

  13. Method of producing hydrogen, and rendering a contaminated biomass inert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Dennis N [Idaho Falls, ID; Klingler, Kerry M [Idaho Falls, ID; Wilding, Bruce M [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-02-23

    A method for rendering a contaminated biomass inert includes providing a first composition, providing a second composition, reacting the first and second compositions together to form an alkaline hydroxide, providing a contaminated biomass feedstock and reacting the alkaline hydroxide with the contaminated biomass feedstock to render the contaminated biomass feedstock inert and further producing hydrogen gas, and a byproduct that includes the first composition.

  14. Realistic Real-Time Outdoor Rendering in Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolivand, Hoshang; Sunar, Mohd Shahrizal

    2014-01-01

    Realistic rendering techniques of outdoor Augmented Reality (AR) has been an attractive topic since the last two decades considering the sizeable amount of publications in computer graphics. Realistic virtual objects in outdoor rendering AR systems require sophisticated effects such as: shadows, daylight and interactions between sky colours and virtual as well as real objects. A few realistic rendering techniques have been designed to overcome this obstacle, most of which are related to non real-time rendering. However, the problem still remains, especially in outdoor rendering. This paper proposed a much newer, unique technique to achieve realistic real-time outdoor rendering, while taking into account the interaction between sky colours and objects in AR systems with respect to shadows in any specific location, date and time. This approach involves three main phases, which cover different outdoor AR rendering requirements. Firstly, sky colour was generated with respect to the position of the sun. Second step involves the shadow generation algorithm, Z-Partitioning: Gaussian and Fog Shadow Maps (Z-GaF Shadow Maps). Lastly, a technique to integrate sky colours and shadows through its effects on virtual objects in the AR system, is introduced. The experimental results reveal that the proposed technique has significantly improved the realism of real-time outdoor AR rendering, thus solving the problem of realistic AR systems. PMID:25268480

  15. Extreme Simplification and Rendering of Point Sets using Algebraic Multigrid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reniers, Dennie; Telea, Alexandru

    2005-01-01

    We present a novel approach for extreme simplification of point set models in the context of real-time rendering. Point sets are often rendered using simple point primitives, such as oriented discs. However efficient, simple primitives are less effective in approximating large surface areas. A large

  16. Transform coding for hardware-accelerated volume rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fout, Nathaniel; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    2007-01-01

    Hardware-accelerated volume rendering using the GPU is now the standard approach for real-time volume rendering, although limited graphics memory can present a problem when rendering large volume data sets. Volumetric compression in which the decompression is coupled to rendering has been shown to be an effective solution to this problem; however, most existing techniques were developed in the context of software volume rendering, and all but the simplest approaches are prohibitive in a real-time hardware-accelerated volume rendering context. In this paper we present a novel block-based transform coding scheme designed specifically with real-time volume rendering in mind, such that the decompression is fast without sacrificing compression quality. This is made possible by consolidating the inverse transform with dequantization in such a way as to allow most of the reprojection to be precomputed. Furthermore, we take advantage of the freedom afforded by off-line compression in order to optimize the encoding as much as possible while hiding this complexity from the decoder. In this context we develop a new block classification scheme which allows us to preserve perceptually important features in the compression. The result of this work is an asymmetric transform coding scheme that allows very large volumes to be compressed and then decompressed in real-time while rendering on the GPU.

  17. Light Field Rendering for Head Mounted Displays using Pixel Reprojection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne Juhler; Klein, Jákup; Kraus, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Light field displays have advantages over traditional stereoscopic head mounted displays, for example, because they can overcome the vergence-accommodation conflict. However, rendering light fields can be a heavy task for computers due to the number of images that have to be rendered. Since much ...

  18. Realistic real-time outdoor rendering in augmented reality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoshang Kolivand

    Full Text Available Realistic rendering techniques of outdoor Augmented Reality (AR has been an attractive topic since the last two decades considering the sizeable amount of publications in computer graphics. Realistic virtual objects in outdoor rendering AR systems require sophisticated effects such as: shadows, daylight and interactions between sky colours and virtual as well as real objects. A few realistic rendering techniques have been designed to overcome this obstacle, most of which are related to non real-time rendering. However, the problem still remains, especially in outdoor rendering. This paper proposed a much newer, unique technique to achieve realistic real-time outdoor rendering, while taking into account the interaction between sky colours and objects in AR systems with respect to shadows in any specific location, date and time. This approach involves three main phases, which cover different outdoor AR rendering requirements. Firstly, sky colour was generated with respect to the position of the sun. Second step involves the shadow generation algorithm, Z-Partitioning: Gaussian and Fog Shadow Maps (Z-GaF Shadow Maps. Lastly, a technique to integrate sky colours and shadows through its effects on virtual objects in the AR system, is introduced. The experimental results reveal that the proposed technique has significantly improved the realism of real-time outdoor AR rendering, thus solving the problem of realistic AR systems.

  19. Media Presentation Synchronisation for Non-monolithic Rendering Architectures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Vaishnavi (Ishan); D.C.A. Bulterman (Dick); P.S. Cesar Garcia (Pablo Santiago); B. Gao (Bo)

    2007-01-01

    htmlabstractNon-monolithic renderers are physically distributed media playback engines. Non-monolithic renderers may use a number of different underlying network connection types to transmit media items belonging to a presentation. There is therefore a need for a media based and inter-network- type

  20. Glycidamide inhibits progesterone production through reactive oxygen species-induced apoptosis in R2C Rat Leydig Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingwei; Sun, Jianxia; Zou, Feiyan; Bai, Shun; Jiang, Xinwei; Jiao, Rui; Ou, Shiyi; Zhang, Hui; Su, Zhijian; Huang, Yadong; Bai, Weibin

    2017-10-01

    The food contaminant acrylamide (AA) is usually recognized as a probable human carcinogen. In addition, AA has also been found able to induce male infertility in animals. Interestingly, resent research work revealed that the toxic effect of AA on the ability of male reproduction in vivo may due to glycidamide (GA) which is the metabolite of AA. In this study, R2C Leydig cells was used to investigate the toxic effects of GA on progesterone production. GA caused dose-dependent inhibition on the cell growth, with IC 25 , IC 50, and IC 75 values found at 0.635, 0.872, and 1.198 mM, respectively. The results of single cell gel/Comet assay showed that GA significantly induced early-phase cell apoptosis, reduced progesterone production, as well as decreasing the protein expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) in R2C cells. Furthermore, GA induced overproduction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), upregulated Bax expression, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, and triggered mitochondria-mediated cell apoptosis. Consequently, the downstream effector caspase-3 was activated, resulting in Leydig cells apoptosis. Overall, our results showed that GA could damage R2C Leydig cells by the lesion of the ability of progesterone genesis and inducing cells apoptosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Phenethyl isothiocyanate inhibits growth of human chronic myeloid leukemia K562 cells via reactive oxygen species generation and caspases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yating; Wei, Sixi; Wang, Jishi; Fang, Qin; Chai, Qixiang

    2014-07-01

    Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), a potential cancer chemopreventive constituent of cruciferous vegetables, including watercress, has been reported to inhibit cancer cell growth by arresting the cell cycle and inducing apoptosis in various human cancer cell models. However, the role of PEITC in the inhibition of human chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) K562 cell growth and its underlying mechanisms have yet to be elucidated. In the present study, PEITC was found to induce cell death through the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) stress and oxidative damage. Heme oxygenase‑1 (HO‑1), which participates in the development of numerous tumors and the sensitivity of these tumors to chemotherapeutic drugs, plays a protective role by modulating oxidative injury. Therefore, the present study assessed the inhibitory effect of PEITC on K562 cells and whether HO‑1 facilitated cell apoptosis and ROS generation. PEITC was found to suppress cell growth and cause apoptosis by promoting Fas and Fas ligand expression, increasing ROS generation and by the successive release of cytochrome c as well as the activation of caspase‑9 and caspase‑3. PEITC was also combined with the HO‑1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin IX and the inducer hemin to assess whether HO‑1 determines cell survival and ROS generation. The results of the present study suggest that PEITC may be a potential anti‑tumor compound for CML therapy, and that HO‑1 has a critical function in PEITC‑induced apoptosis and ROS generation.

  2. On the Effects of Reactive Oxygen Species and Nitric Oxide on Red Blood Cell Deformability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Diederich

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The main function of red blood cells (RBCs is the transport of respiratory gases along the vascular tree. To fulfill their task, RBCs are able to elastically deform in response to mechanical forces and, pass through the narrow vessels of the microcirculation. Decreased RBC deformability was observed in pathological conditions linked to increased oxidative stress or decreased nitric oxide (NO bioavailability, like hypertension. Treatments with oxidants and with NO were shown to affect RBC deformability ex vivo, but the mechanisms underpinning these effects are unknown. In this study we investigate whether changes in intracellular redox status/oxidative stress or nitrosation reactions induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS or NO may affect RBC deformability. In a case-control study comparing RBCs from healthy and hypertensive participants, we found that RBC deformability was decreased, and levels of ROS were increased in RBCs from hypertensive patients as compared to RBCs from aged-matched healthy controls, while NO levels in RBCs were not significantly different. To study the effects of oxidants on RBC redox state and deformability, RBCs from healthy volunteers were treated with increasing concentrations of tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BuOOH. We found that high concentrations of t-BuOOH (≥ 1 mM significantly decreased the GSH/GSSG ratio in RBCs, decreased RBC deformability and increased blood bulk viscosity. Moreover, RBCs from Nrf2 knockout (KO mice, a strain genetically deficient in a number of antioxidant/reducing enzymes, were more susceptible to t-BuOOH-induced impairment in RBC deformability as compared to wild type (WT mice. To study the role of NO in RBC deformability we treated RBC suspensions from human volunteers with NO donors and nitrosothiols and analyzed deformability of RBCs from mice lacking the endothelial NO synthase (eNOS. We found that NO donors induced S-nitrosation of the cytoskeletal protein spectrin, but did not affect

  3. Effect of long-term culture of mouse embryonic stem cells under low oxygen concentration as well as on glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan on cell proliferation and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, M Á; Pericuesta, E; Yáñez-Mó, M; Palasz, A; Gutiérrez-Adán, A

    2011-02-01

    Maintaining undifferentiated stem cells in defined conditions is of critical importance to improve their in vitro culture. We have evaluated the effects of culturing mouse stem (mES) cells under physiological oxygen concentration as well as by replacing fibroblast feeder layer (mEF) with gelatin or glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA), on cell proliferation and differentiation. After 3 days culture or after long-term cell culture under different conditions, levels of apoptotic cell death were determined by cell cycle and TUNEL (TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labelling) assays and levels of cell proliferation by CFSE (5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester) labelling. We assessed spontaneous differentiation into cardiomyocytes and mRNA expression of pluripotency and differentiation biomarkers. After 3 days culture under hypoxic conditions, levels of proliferation and apoptosis of mES cells were higher, in correlation with increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species. However, when cells were continuously grown for 1 month under those conditions, the level of apoptosis was, in all cases, under 4%. Hypoxia reduced spontaneous differentiation of mES into cardiomyocytes. Long-term culture on HA was more effective in maintaining the pluripotent state of the mES cells when compared to that on gelatin. Level of terminal differentiation was highest on mEF, intermediate on HA and lowest on gelatin. Our data suggest that hypoxia is not necessary for maintaining pluripotency of mES cells and appeared to be detrimental during ES differentiation. Moreover, HA may offer a valuable alternative for long-term culture of mES cells in vitro. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Evaluating progressive-rendering algorithms in appearance design tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiawei Ou; Karlik, Ondrej; Křivánek, Jaroslav; Pellacini, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Progressive rendering is becoming a popular alternative to precomputational approaches to appearance design. However, progressive algorithms create images exhibiting visual artifacts at early stages. A user study investigated these artifacts' effects on user performance in appearance design tasks. Novice and expert subjects performed lighting and material editing tasks with four algorithms: random path tracing, quasirandom path tracing, progressive photon mapping, and virtual-point-light rendering. Both the novices and experts strongly preferred path tracing to progressive photon mapping and virtual-point-light rendering. None of the participants preferred random path tracing to quasirandom path tracing or vice versa; the same situation held between progressive photon mapping and virtual-point-light rendering. The user workflow didn’t differ significantly with the four algorithms. The Web Extras include a video showing how four progressive-rendering algorithms converged (at http://youtu.be/ck-Gevl1e9s), the source code used, and other supplementary materials.

  5. Local and Global Illumination in the Volume Rendering Integral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Max, N; Chen, M

    2005-10-21

    This article is intended as an update of the major survey by Max [1] on optical models for direct volume rendering. It provides a brief overview of the subject scope covered by [1], and brings recent developments, such as new shadow algorithms and refraction rendering, into the perspective. In particular, we examine three fundamentals aspects of direct volume rendering, namely the volume rendering integral, local illumination models and global illumination models, in a wavelength-independent manner. We review the developments on spectral volume rendering, in which visible light are considered as a form of electromagnetic radiation, optical models are implemented in conjunction with representations of spectral power distribution. This survey can provide a basis for, and encourage, new efforts for developing and using complex illumination models to achieve better realism and perception through optical correctness.

  6. Fast kinetics of the oxygen effe4ct for DNA double-strand breakage and cell killing in irradiated yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankenberg, D; Frankenberg-Schwager, M; Harbich, R [Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH, Frankfurt/Main (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Biophysikalische Strahlenforschung; Michael, B D [Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood (UK). G