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Sample records for renal scintillation camera

  1. 21 CFR 892.1100 - Scintillation (gamma) camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Scintillation (gamma) camera. 892.1100 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1100 Scintillation (gamma) camera. (a) Identification. A scintillation (gamma) camera is a device intended to image the distribution of radionuclides in...

  2. Applications in radiation therapy of a scintillating screen viewed by a CCD camera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schippers, J.M.; Boon, S.N.; van Luijk, P.

    2002-01-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) dosimetry system has been designed for position-sensitive dose-measurement applications in modem radiation therapy. The system consists of a scintillating screen (Gd2O2S:Tb), observed by a low-noise CCD camera with a long integration time. The system allows reliable and

  3. Comprehensive renal scintillation procedures in spinal cord injury: comparison with excretory urography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lloyd, L.K.; Dubovsky, E.V.; Bueschen, A.J.; Witten, D.M.; Scott, J.W.; Kuhlemeier, K.; Stover, S.L.

    1981-07-01

    A /sup 131/iodine orthoiodohippurate comprehensive renal scintillation procedure was performed and compared to results of excretory urography in 200 spinal cord injury patients. No severe urographic abnormalities were undetected by the comprehensive renal scintillation procedure. Only 1.4 per cent of renal units had greater than minimal pyelocaliectasis or ureterectasis in the presence of a normal radionuclide examination. A relatively large number of abnormalities were detected on the renal scintillation procedure when the excretory urogram was normal. Serial followup will be required to determine the significance of these findings but present data suggest that a comprehensive renal scintillation procedure and a plain film of the kidneys, ureters and bladder may be used for screening upper urinary tract abnormalities in lieu of an excretory urogram. This is particularly advantageous for the spinal cord injury population, since there have been no toxic or allergic reactions reported, no bowel preparation or dehydration is required and there is relatively low radiation exposure.

  4. Maximum-likelihood scintillation detection for EM-CCD based gamma cameras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korevaar, Marc A N; Goorden, Marlies C; Heemskerk, Jan W T; Beekman, Freek J, E-mail: M.A.N.Korevaar@TUDelft.nl [Department of Radiation, Radionuclides and Reactors, Section of Radiation Detection and Medical Imaging, Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands)

    2011-08-07

    Gamma cameras based on charge-coupled devices (CCDs) coupled to continuous scintillation crystals can combine a good detection efficiency with high spatial resolutions with the aid of advanced scintillation detection algorithms. A previously developed analytical multi-scale algorithm (MSA) models the depth-dependent light distribution but does not take statistics into account. Here we present and validate a novel statistical maximum-likelihood algorithm (MLA) that combines a realistic light distribution model with an experimentally validated statistical model. The MLA was tested for an electron multiplying CCD optically coupled to CsI(Tl) scintillators of different thicknesses. For {sup 99m}Tc imaging, the spatial resolution (for perpendicular and oblique incidence), energy resolution and signal-to-background counts ratio (SBR) obtained with the MLA were compared with those of the MSA. Compared to the MSA, the MLA improves the energy resolution by more than a factor of 1.6 and the SBR is enhanced by more than a factor of 1.3. For oblique incidence (approximately 45{sup 0}), the depth-of-interaction corrected spatial resolution is improved by a factor of at least 1.1, while for perpendicular incidence the MLA resolution does not consistently differ significantly from the MSA result for all tested scintillator thicknesses. For the thickest scintillator (3 mm, interaction probability 66% at 141 keV) a spatial resolution (perpendicular incidence) of 147 {mu}m full width at half maximum (FWHM) was obtained with an energy resolution of 35.2% FWHM. These results of the MLA were achieved without prior calibration of scintillations as is needed for many statistical scintillation detection algorithms. We conclude that the MLA significantly improves the gamma camera performance compared to the MSA.

  5. Development of a Compton camera for medical applications based on silicon strip and scintillation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krimmer, J., E-mail: j.krimmer@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Ley, J.-L. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Abellan, C.; Cachemiche, J.-P. [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS/IN2P3, CPPM UMR 7346, 13288 Marseille (France); Caponetto, L.; Chen, X.; Dahoumane, M.; Dauvergne, D. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Freud, N. [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA - Lyon, Université Lyon 1, Centre Léon Bérard (France); Joly, B.; Lambert, D.; Lestand, L. [Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); Létang, J.M. [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA - Lyon, Université Lyon 1, Centre Léon Bérard (France); Magne, M. [Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); and others

    2015-07-01

    A Compton camera is being developed for the purpose of ion-range monitoring during hadrontherapy via the detection of prompt-gamma rays. The system consists of a scintillating fiber beam tagging hodoscope, a stack of double sided silicon strip detectors (90×90×2 mm{sup 3}, 2×64 strips) as scatter detectors, as well as bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillation detectors (38×35×30 mm{sup 3}, 100 blocks) as absorbers. The individual components will be described, together with the status of their characterization.

  6. Preliminary examination of a CCD camera with a scintillator coated fiber optic plate for neutron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubayashi, Masahito; Soyama, Kazuhiko

    2004-08-01

    A charge coupled device (CCD) camera with a scintillator coated fiber optic plate (FOP) was examined for neutron imaging. The FOP coupling and the lens coupling in terms of efficient optical coupling with a CCD, and 6LiF:ZnS(Ag) and Gd 2O 2S(Tb) in terms of light emission efficiency and spatial resolution were discussed. The spatial resolution for each imaging system was obtained as edge spread functions or observations of modulation transfer function charts.

  7. Assessment of vertebral mineral content by means of a single-crystal scintillation camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandevivere, J; Dobbeleir, A; Ham, H R; Williame, L

    1988-08-01

    Increasing interest in bone mass has led to dedicated commercial dual photon absorptiometry (DPA) instruments. We describe a method for the measurement of the mineral content of the lumbar spine using a scintillation camera. The most appropriate source(s) and collimator were investigated. An especially constructed arm placed the sources in the focal point of a converging collimator. Two single-peak sources, 99Tcm and 241Am, were used instead of dual-peak 153Gd source. Phantom studies showed no degradation of the results in water depths of up to 26 cm. Acquiring 10 Mcounts per image over a 300 cm2 field, a coefficient of variation (c.v.) of 1.7% was obtained. Reducing the total counts per image to 1 Mcount gave rise to a c.v. of 6.2%. Long-term measurements showed a c.v. of 1.1% for density, with a mean value of 0.98 gHa cm-2 compared to 0.90 for a commercial DPA instrument. Repeated measurements of the lumbar spine on 10 patients with a 2 week interval showed a c.v. of 5%. Comparative measurements were made between the scintillation camera and a commercial DPA instrument on six volunteers. Systematic higher results, similar to those observed with the phantom, were obtained with the scintillation camera. The reproducibility on a phantom and in patients is in the same range as commercial DPA instruments. The low cost related to the use of standard nuclear medicine equipment and to inexpensive radioactive sources represent definite advantages.

  8. Cramer-Rao lower bound optimization of an EM-CCD-based scintillation gamma camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korevaar, Marc A N; Goorden, Marlies C; Beekman, Freek J

    2013-04-21

    Scintillation gamma cameras based on low-noise electron multiplication (EM-)CCDs can reach high spatial resolutions. For further improvement of these gamma cameras, more insight is needed into how various parameters that characterize these devices influence their performance. Here, we use the Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) to investigate the sensitivity of the energy and spatial resolution of an EM-CCD-based gamma camera to several parameters. The gamma camera setup consists of a 3 mm thick CsI(Tl) scintillator optically coupled by a fiber optic plate to the E2V CCD97 EM-CCD. For this setup, the position and energy of incoming gamma photons are determined with a maximum-likelihood detection algorithm. To serve as the basis for the CRLB calculations, accurate models for the depth-dependent scintillation light distribution are derived and combined with a previously validated statistical response model for the EM-CCD. The sensitivity of the lower bounds for energy and spatial resolution to the EM gain and the depth-of-interaction (DOI) are calculated and compared to experimentally obtained values. Furthermore, calculations of the influence of the number of detected optical photons and noise sources in the image area on the energy and spatial resolution are presented. Trends predicted by CRLB calculations agree with experiments, although experimental values for spatial and energy resolution are typically a factor of 1.5 above the calculated lower bounds. Calculations and experiments both show that an intermediate EM gain setting results in the best possible spatial or energy resolution and that the spatial resolution of the gamma camera degrades rapidly as a function of the DOI. Furthermore, calculations suggest that a large improvement in gamma camera performance is achieved by an increase in the number of detected photons or a reduction of noise in the image area. A large noise reduction, as is possible with a new generation of EM-CCD electronics, may improve the

  9. Preliminary examination of a CCD camera with a scintillator coated fiber optic plate for neutron imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsubayashi, Masahito E-mail: matsu3@popsvr.tokai.jaeri.go.jp; Soyama, Kazuhiko

    2004-08-21

    A charge coupled device (CCD) camera with a scintillator coated fiber optic plate (FOP) was examined for neutron imaging. The FOP coupling and the lens coupling in terms of efficient optical coupling with a CCD, and {sup 6}LiF:ZnS(Ag) and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S(Tb) in terms of light emission efficiency and spatial resolution were discussed. The spatial resolution for each imaging system was obtained as edge spread functions or observations of modulation transfer function charts.

  10. Development of a compact scintillator-based high-resolution Compton camera for molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishimoto, A., E-mail: daphne3h-aya@ruri.waseda.jp [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Ohkubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Kataoka, J.; Koide, A.; Sueoka, K.; Iwamoto, Y.; Taya, T. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Ohkubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Ohsuka, S. [Central Research Laboratory, Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 5000 Hirakuchi, Hamakita-ku, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2017-02-11

    The Compton camera, which shows gamma-ray distribution utilizing the kinematics of Compton scattering, is a promising detector capable of imaging across a wide range of energy. In this study, we aim to construct a small-animal molecular imaging system in a wide energy range by using the Compton camera. We developed a compact medical Compton camera based on a Ce-doped Gd{sub 3}Al{sub 2}Ga{sub 3}O{sub 12} (Ce:GAGG) scintillator and multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC). A basic performance confirmed that for 662 keV, the typical energy resolution was 7.4 % (FWHM) and the angular resolution was 4.5° (FWHM). We then used the medical Compton camera to conduct imaging experiments based on a 3-D imaging reconstruction algorithm using the multi-angle data acquisition method. The result confirmed that for a {sup 137}Cs point source at a distance of 4 cm, the image had a spatial resolution of 3.1 mm (FWHM). Furthermore, we succeeded in producing 3-D multi-color image of different simultaneous energy sources ({sup 22}Na [511 keV], {sup 137}Cs [662 keV], and {sup 54}Mn [834 keV]).

  11. Applications in radiation therapy of a scintillating screen viewed by a CCD camera

    CERN Document Server

    Schippers, J M; Luijk, P V

    2002-01-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) dosimetry system has been designed for position-sensitive dose-measurement applications in modern radiation therapy. The system consists of a scintillating screen (Gd sub 2 O sub 2 S : Tb), observed by a low-noise CCD camera with a long integration time. The system allows reliable and accurate simultaneous 2D imaging of therapeutic dose distributions in the scintillator with sub millimeter spatial resolution. This system has been applied successfully at different applications in radiation therapy. Results of dose measurements in a treatment modality using a scanning proton beam are reported. It is shown that a quick and reliable measurement can be done. The screen+CCD system has proven to perform accurate dosimetry in applications where beams with a small (1-5 mm) diameter are used and where absolute dosimetry by means of standard ionization chambers is not possible due to their relatively large size. For the routine measurements of the alignment of therapeutic beams with respect to the...

  12. Fast frame rate rodent cardiac x-ray imaging using scintillator lens coupled to CMOS camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swathi Lakshmi, B.; Sai Varsha, M. K. N.; Kumar, N. Ashwin; Dixit, Madhulika; Krishnamurthi, Ganapathy

    2017-03-01

    Micro-Computed Tomography (MCT) systems for small animal imaging plays a critical role for monitoring disease progression and therapy evaluation. In this work, an in-house built micro-CT system equipped with a X-ray scintillator lens coupled to a commercial CMOS camera was used to test the feasibility of its application to Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA). Literature has reported such studies being done with clinical X-ray tubes that can be pulsed rapidly or with rotating gantry systems, thus increasing the cost and infrastructural requirements.The feasibility of DSA was evaluated by injected Iodinated contrast agent (ICA) through the tail vein of a mouse. Projection images of the heart were acquired pre and post contrast using the high frame rate X-ray detector and processing done to visualize transit of ICA through the heart.

  13. A compact, discrete CsI(Tl) scintillator/Si photodiode gamma camera for breast cancer imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruber, Gregory J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Recent clinical evaluations of scintimammography (radionuclide breast imaging) are promising and suggest that this modality may prove a valuable complement to X-ray mammography and traditional breast cancer detection and diagnosis techniques. Scintimammography, however, typically has difficulty revealing tumors that are less than 1 cm in diameter, are located in the medial part of the breast, or are located in the axillary nodes. These shortcomings may in part be due to the use of large, conventional Anger cameras not optimized for breast imaging. In this thesis I present compact single photon camera technology designed specifically for scintimammography which strives to alleviate some of these limitations by allowing better and closer access to sites of possible breast tumors. Specific applications are outlined. The design is modular, thus a camera of the desired size and geometry can be constructed from an array (or arrays) of individual modules and a parallel hole lead collimator for directional information. Each module consists of: (1) an array of 64 discrete, optically-isolated CsI(Tl) scintillator crystals 3 x 3 x 5 mm3 in size, (2) an array of 64 low-noise Si PIN photodiodes matched 1-to-1 to the scintillator crystals, (3) an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) that amplifies the 64 photodiode signals and selects the signal with the largest amplitude, and (4) connectors and hardware for interfacing the module with a motherboard, thereby allowing straightforward computer control of all individual modules within a camera.

  14. A Theoretical Model for Fast Evaluation of Position Linearity and Spatial Resolution in Gamma Cameras Based on Monolithic Scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galasso, Matteo; Fabbri, Andrea; Borrazzo, Cristian; Cencelli, Valentino Orsolini; Pani, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we developed a model that is able to predict in a few seconds the response of a gamma camera based on continuous scintillator in terms of linearity and spatial resolution in the whole field of view (FoV). This model will be useful during the design phase of a SPECT or PET detector in order to predict and optimize gamma camera performance by varying the parameter values of its components (scintillator, light guides, and photodetector). Starting from a model of the scintillation light distribution on the photodetector sensitive surface, a theoretical analysis based on the estimation theory is carried out in order to find the analytical expressions of bias and FWHM related to four interaction position estimation methods: the classical Center of Gravity method (Anger Logic), an enhanced Center of Gravity method, a Mean Square Error fitting method, and the Maximum Likelihood Estimation method. Afterwards, spatial resolution as well as depth of interaction (DOI) distribution effects are evaluated by processing biases and FWHMs at different DOIs. The comparison between the model and GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations of four different detection systems has been carried out. Our model prediction errors of spatial resolution, in terms of percentage RMSDs with respect to the simulated spatial resolution, are lower than 13.2% in the whole FoV for three estimation methods. The computational time to calculate spatial resolutions with the model in the whole FoV is five order of magnitudes faster than an equivalent standard Monte Carlo simulation.

  15. Potential advantages of a cesium fluoride scintillator for a time-of-flight positron camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allemand, R; Gresset, C; Vacher, J

    1980-02-01

    In order to improve the quality of positron tomographic imaging, a time-of-flight technique combined with a classical reconstruction method has been investigated. The decay time of NaI(Tl) and bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillators is too long for this application, and efficiency of the plastic scintillators is too low. Cesium fluoride appears to be a very promising detector material. This paper presents preliminary results obtained with a time-of-flight technique using CsF scintillators. The expected advantages were realized.

  16. Radionuclide evaluation of renal function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bueschen, A.J.; Witten, D.M.

    1979-06-01

    The renal scintillation camera study and the excretory urogram should be considered to be complementary studies. The renal scintillation camera study provides an accurate evaluation of changes in total, differential, and segmental renal function but affords only a gross assessment of anatomic changes. The excretory urogram provides superior information about renal anatomic changes but only inferior information about functional changes of the kidney. The advantages of a renal scintillation camera study with regard to the patient are that it is done in a state of normal hydration, it requires no bowel preparation, it is not associated with allergic reactions, it provides a low radiation exposure, and it is a noninvasive procedure for differential renal function which requires no ureteral catheters.

  17. SU-C-207A-03: Development of Proton CT Imaging System Using Thick Scintillator and CCD Camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, S; Uesaka, M [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Nishio, T; Tsuneda, M [Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Matsushita, K [Rikkyo University, Tokyo (Japan); Kabuki, S [Tokai University, Isehara (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In the treatment planning of proton therapy, Water Equivalent Length (WEL), which is the parameter for the calculation of dose and the range of proton, is derived by X-ray CT (xCT) image and xCT-WEL conversion. However, about a few percent error in the accuracy of proton range calculation through this conversion has been reported. The purpose of this study is to construct a proton CT (pCT) imaging system for an evaluation of the error. Methods: The pCT imaging system was constructed with a thick scintillator and a cooled CCD camera, which acquires the two-dimensional image of integrated value of the scintillation light toward the beam direction. The pCT image is reconstructed by FBP method using a correction between the light intensity and residual range of proton beam. An experiment for the demonstration of this system was performed with 70-MeV proton beam provided by NIRS cyclotron. The pCT image of several objects reconstructed from the experimental data was evaluated quantitatively. Results: Three-dimensional pCT images of several objects were reconstructed experimentally. A finestructure of approximately 1 mm was clearly observed. The position resolution of pCT image was almost the same as that of xCT image. And the error of proton CT pixel value was up to 4%. The deterioration of image quality was caused mainly by the effect of multiple Coulomb scattering. Conclusion: We designed and constructed the pCT imaging system using a thick scintillator and a CCD camera. And the system was evaluated with the experiment by use of 70-MeV proton beam. Three-dimensional pCT images of several objects were acquired by the system. This work was supported by JST SENTAN Grant Number 13A1101 and JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 15H04912.

  18. The study of error for analysis in dynamic image from the error of count rates in Nal (Tl) scintillation camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Joo Young; Kang, Chun Goo; Kim, Jung Yul; Oh, Ki Baek; Kim, Jae Sam [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hoon Hee [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Shingu college, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    This study is aimed to evaluate the effect of T{sub 1/2} upon count rates in the analysis of dynamic scan using NaI (Tl) scintillation camera, and suggest a new quality control method with this effects. We producted a point source with '9{sup 9m}TcO{sub 4}- of 18.5 to 185 MBq in the 2 mL syringes, and acquired 30 frames of dynamic images with 10 to 60 seconds each using Infinia gamma camera (GE, USA). In the second experiment, 90 frames of dynamic images were acquired from 74 MBq point source by 5 gamma cameras (Infinia 2, Forte 2, Argus 1). There were not significant differences in average count rates of the sources with 18.5 to 92.5 MBq in the analysis of 10 to 60 seconds/frame with 10 seconds interval in the first experiment (p>0.05). But there were significantly low average count rates with the sources over 111 MBq activity at 60 seconds/frame (p<0.01). According to the second analysis results of linear regression by count rates of 5 gamma cameras those were acquired during 90 minutes, counting efficiency of fourth gamma camera was most low as 0.0064%, and gradient and coefficient of variation was high as 0.0042 and 0.229 each. We could not find abnormal fluctuation in χ{sup 2} test with count rates (p>0.02), and we could find the homogeneity of variance in Levene's F-test among the gamma cameras (p>0.05). At the correlation analysis, there was only correlation between counting efficiency and gradient as significant negative correlation (r=-0.90, p<0.05). Lastly, according to the results of calculation of T{sub 1/2} error from change of gradient with -0.25% to +0.25%, if T{sub 1/2} is relatively long, or gradient is high, the error increase relationally. When estimate the value of 4th camera which has highest gradient from the above mentioned result, we could not see T{sub 1/2} error within 60 minutes at that value. In conclusion, it is necessary for the scintillation gamma camera in medical field to manage hard for the quality of radiation

  19. Small-area fiber-coupled scintillation camera for imaging beta-ray distributions intraoperatively

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, L. R.; Tornai, Martin P.; Levin, C. S.; Park, J.; Atac, Muzaffer; Cline, David B.; Hoffman, Eric G.

    1995-09-01

    A small area, imaging, scintillation probe is being developed for locating small amounts of radio-labeled malignant tissue during surgery. Preliminary in brain surgery, avoiding the removal of excess tissue is a priority. It is possible to locate the main body of a brain tumor both before and during surgery, but once the bulk of the tumor is excised the identification of residual malignant tissue is difficult. A probe that covers an area of 1-2 cm(superscript 2) with an intrinsic resolution of 1-2 mm could locate small tumor masses that pose a threat of recurrence of the disease, and prevent removal of healthy tissue. A pre-operative injection of tumor seeking, beta emitting radiopharmaceutical (e.g. (superscript 18)fluorodeoxyuridine-FDUR-) will label the tumor. The limited range of beta-rays ensures proximity upon successful detection. Plastic scintillators are used for beta detection, and visible light photon counters (VLPCs) detect the scintillation light. For maneuverability in and around the surgical cavity, the scintillators are coupled to the VLPCs via 2 m of optical fiber. An imaging device can cover the tissue bed in a time compatible with surgery, as opposed to a single element detector on the order of 1-2 mm in size with comparable resolution. An imager also distinguishes high background rates (such as from annihilation gammas in FDUR) and concentrations of activity.

  20. Technical Note: Range verification system using edge detection method for a scintillator and a CCD camera system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saotome, Naoya, E-mail: naosao@nirs.go.jp; Furukawa, Takuji; Hara, Yousuke; Mizushima, Kota; Tansho, Ryohei; Saraya, Yuichi; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Noda, Koji [Department of Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: Three-dimensional irradiation with a scanned carbon-ion beam has been performed from 2011 at the authors’ facility. The authors have developed the rotating-gantry equipped with the scanning irradiation system. The number of combinations of beam properties to measure for the commissioning is more than 7200, i.e., 201 energy steps, 3 intensities, and 12 gantry angles. To compress the commissioning time, quick and simple range verification system is required. In this work, the authors develop a quick range verification system using scintillator and charge-coupled device (CCD) camera and estimate the accuracy of the range verification. Methods: A cylindrical plastic scintillator block and a CCD camera were installed on the black box. The optical spatial resolution of the system is 0.2 mm/pixel. The camera control system was connected and communicates with the measurement system that is part of the scanning system. The range was determined by image processing. Reference range for each energy beam was determined by a difference of Gaussian (DOG) method and the 80% of distal dose of the depth-dose distribution that were measured by a large parallel-plate ionization chamber. The authors compared a threshold method and a DOG method. Results: The authors found that the edge detection method (i.e., the DOG method) is best for the range detection. The accuracy of range detection using this system is within 0.2 mm, and the reproducibility of the same energy measurement is within 0.1 mm without setup error. Conclusions: The results of this study demonstrate that the authors’ range check system is capable of quick and easy range verification with sufficient accuracy.

  1. Technical Note: Range verification system using edge detection method for a scintillator and a CCD camera system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saotome, Naoya; Furukawa, Takuji; Hara, Yousuke; Mizushima, Kota; Tansho, Ryohei; Saraya, Yuichi; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Noda, Koji

    2016-04-01

    Three-dimensional irradiation with a scanned carbon-ion beam has been performed from 2011 at the authors' facility. The authors have developed the rotating-gantry equipped with the scanning irradiation system. The number of combinations of beam properties to measure for the commissioning is more than 7200, i.e., 201 energy steps, 3 intensities, and 12 gantry angles. To compress the commissioning time, quick and simple range verification system is required. In this work, the authors develop a quick range verification system using scintillator and charge-coupled device (CCD) camera and estimate the accuracy of the range verification. A cylindrical plastic scintillator block and a CCD camera were installed on the black box. The optical spatial resolution of the system is 0.2 mm/pixel. The camera control system was connected and communicates with the measurement system that is part of the scanning system. The range was determined by image processing. Reference range for each energy beam was determined by a difference of Gaussian (DOG) method and the 80% of distal dose of the depth-dose distribution that were measured by a large parallel-plate ionization chamber. The authors compared a threshold method and a DOG method. The authors found that the edge detection method (i.e., the DOG method) is best for the range detection. The accuracy of range detection using this system is within 0.2 mm, and the reproducibility of the same energy measurement is within 0.1 mm without setup error. The results of this study demonstrate that the authors' range check system is capable of quick and easy range verification with sufficient accuracy.

  2. PET camera performance design evaluation for BGO and BaF2 scintillators (non-time-of-flight).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, W H

    1988-03-01

    Bismuth germanate (BGO) and barium fluoride (BaF2) scintillators are presently used in positron emission tomegraphy (PET) cameras. This study evaluates the important PET performance parameters of image resolution, true sensitivity, scatter background, accidental background, and realistic maximum radioactivity in the field of view for both BGO and BaF2 in an identical non-time-of-flight, whole-body camera configuration. These performance parameters are evaluated for three phantoms simulating (a) the head, (b) whole-body cross-section and (c) heart/kidney. This study finds that the high stopping power of BGO yields higher sensitivity, higher resolution, less vignetting, better immunity from scattered gamma, and lower accident/true ratio at any dose level. The faster BaF2 timing acceptance window is traded off by its vulnerability to noncoincidental scatter-gamma which increases accidental coincidences. The BGO is found to be a better choice for non-time-of-flight systems especially with large objects which produce a lot of noncoincidental scatter-gammas. This study also found that the practical diminishing return maximum activity within the field-of-view is approximately 20-25 mCi for existing conventional cameras.

  3. Time and wavelength-resolved luminescence evaluation of several types of scintillators using streak camera system equipped with pulsed X-ray source

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Furuya, Y.; Yanagida, T.; Fujimoto, Y.; Yokota, Y.; Kamada, K.; Kawaguchi, N.; Ishizu, S.; Uchiyama, K.; Mori, K.; Kitano, K.; Nikl, Martin; Yoshikawa, A.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 634, č. 1 (2011), s. 59-63 ISSN 0168-9002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : streak camera system * scintillator * pulsed X-ray source Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.207, year: 2011

  4. The influence of electron multiplication and internal X-ray fluorescence on the performance of a scintillator-based gamma camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, David J., E-mail: d.j.hall@open.ac.uk [e2v centre for electronic imaging, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Holland, Andrew; Soman, Matthew [e2v centre for electronic imaging, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-21

    When considering the 'standard' gamma-camera, one might picture an array of photo-multiplier tubes or a similar array of small-area detectors. This array of imaging detectors would be attached to a corresponding array of scintillator modules (or a solid layer of scintillator) in order to give a high detection efficiency in the energy region of interest, usually 8-140 keV. Over recent years, developments of gamma-cameras capable of achieving much higher spatial resolutions have led to a new range of systems based on Charge-Coupled Devices with some form of signal multiplication between the scintillator and the CCD in order for one to distinguish the light output from the scintillator above the CCD noise. The use of an Electron-Multiplying Charge-Coupled Device (EM-CCD) incorporates the gain process within the CCD through a form of 'impact ionisation', however, the gain process introduces an 'excess noise factor' due to the probabilistic nature of impact ionisation and this additional noise consequently has an impact on the spatial and spectral resolution of the detector. Internal fluorescence in the scintillator, producing K-shell X-ray fluorescence photons that can be detected alongside the incident gamma-rays, also has a major impact on the imaging capabilities of gamma-cameras. This impact varies dramatically from the low spatial resolution to high spatial resolution camera system. Through a process of simulation and experimental testing focussed on the high spatial resolution (EM-CCD based) variant, the factors affecting the performance of gamma-camera systems are discussed and the results lead to important conclusions to be considered for the development of future systems. This paper presents a study into the influence of the EM-CCD gain process and the internal X-ray fluorescence in the scintillator on the performance of scintillator-based gamma cameras (CCD-based or otherwise), making use of Monte Carlo simulations to demonstrate

  5. 99mTc-mercaptoacetyltriglycine camera-based measurement of renal clearance: should the result be normalized for body surface area?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingensmith, William C

    2013-12-01

    Testing the rate of creatinine clearance by measuring the level of creatinine in the blood and in a 24-h urine collection is a common method of evaluating renal function. The result is routinely normalized for body surface area (BSA). Alternatively, renal clearance can be measured by (99m)Tc-mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG3) renal imaging without the need for urine collection. Frequently, the (99m)Tc-MAG3 camera-based result is also normalized for BSA. I evaluated the need for BSA normalization of renal clearance measurements in (99m)Tc-MAG3 imaging studies from both a conceptual and a mathematic point of view. Both approaches involved analyzing the effect of patient size, that is, BSA, on the factors blood volume, renal blood flow, and amount of test substance present in the blood in the creatinine clearance method compared with the (99m)Tc-MAG3 camera-based method. Both the conceptual and the mathematic analyses were consistent with a significant difference between the creatinine and (99m)Tc-MAG3 approaches to measuring renal clearance. Larger patients have larger kidneys, greater renal blood flow, higher renal clearances, larger blood volumes, more muscle mass, and higher BSAs than smaller patients. However, the concentration of creatinine in the blood of patients of any size with normal renal function is similar because the amount of creatinine released into the blood varies with patient muscle mass, which varies with blood volume. Because normalization for BSA is needed for creatinine clearance, a single reference range can be used for all patients. In the case of measurement of renal clearance with (99m)Tc-MAG3 imaging (assuming a constant dose), the concentration of tracer in the blood will vary inversely with patient size because blood volume varies with patient size. Thus, as patient size increases, the blood concentration of tracer will go down and compensate for the increase in renal blood flow and renal clearance, and conversely. Consequently, the (99m

  6. Scintillation Counters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Zane W.

    Scintillators find wide use in radiation detection as the detecting medium for gamma/X-rays, and charged and neutral particles. Since the first notice in 1895 by Roentgen of the production of light by X-rays on a barium platinocyanide screen, and Thomas Edison's work over the following 2 years resulting in the discovery of calcium tungstate as a superior fluoroscopy screen, much research and experimentation have been undertaken to discover and elucidate the properties of new scintillators. Scintillators with high density and high atomic number are prized for the detection of gamma rays above 1 MeV; lower atomic number, lower-density materials find use for detecting beta particles and heavy charged particles; hydrogenous scintillators find use in fast-neutron detection; and boron-, lithium-, and gadolinium-containing scintillators are used for slow-neutron detection. This chapter provides the practitioner with an overview of the general characteristics of scintillators, including the variation of probability of interaction with density and atomic number, the characteristics of the light pulse, a list and characteristics of commonly available scintillators and their approximate cost, and recommendations regarding the choice of material for a few specific applications. This chapter does not pretend to present an exhaustive list of scintillators and applications.

  7. Dynamic 99mTc-MAG3 renography: images for quality control obtained by combining pharmacokinetic modelling, an anthropomorphic computer phantom and Monte Carlo simulated scintillation camera imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brolin, Gustav; Sjögreen Gleisner, Katarina; Ljungberg, Michael

    2013-05-01

    In dynamic renal scintigraphy, the main interest is the radiopharmaceutical redistribution as a function of time. Quality control (QC) of renal procedures often relies on phantom experiments to compare image-based results with the measurement setup. A phantom with a realistic anatomy and time-varying activity distribution is therefore desirable. This work describes a pharmacokinetic (PK) compartment model for 99mTc-MAG3, used for defining a dynamic whole-body activity distribution within a digital phantom (XCAT) for accurate Monte Carlo (MC)-based images for QC. Each phantom structure is assigned a time-activity curve provided by the PK model, employing parameter values consistent with MAG3 pharmacokinetics. This approach ensures that the total amount of tracer in the phantom is preserved between time points, and it allows for modifications of the pharmacokinetics in a controlled fashion. By adjusting parameter values in the PK model, different clinically realistic scenarios can be mimicked, regarding, e.g., the relative renal uptake and renal transit time. Using the MC code SIMIND, a complete set of renography images including effects of photon attenuation, scattering, limited spatial resolution and noise, are simulated. The obtained image data can be used to evaluate quantitative techniques and computer software in clinical renography.

  8. Halide Scintillators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Loef, E.V.D.

    2003-01-01

    Scintillators have been used for decades to make ionising radiation visible. Either by direct observation of the light flash produced by the material when it is exposed to radiation, or indirect by use of a photomultiplier tube or photodiode. Despite the enormous amount of commercially available

  9. Easy method to measure radioactive waste with a gamma-camera detector; Methode simple d'evaluation de l'activite volumique d'effluents radioactifs au moyen d'une camera a scintillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murat, C. [Centre Hospitalier d' Avignon, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, 84 - Avignon (France); Barrau, C. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nimes, Service de Medecine Nucleaire et de Biophysique Medicale, 30 - Nimes (France)

    2007-01-15

    The aim of this technical note is to evaluate an easy method to measure {sup 99m}Tc samples with an activity of 1000, 100 and 10 Bq/L. This study is performed with a gamma camera detector in two departments of nuclear medicine in Avignon and in Nimes. We develop a procedure to measure{sup 99m}Tc radioactive waste at the two hospitals output in accordance with the D.G.S./D.H.O.S. no. 2001/323 circular requests of the Ministry for Employment and Solidarity. (authors)

  10. Transmission electron microscope CCD camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Kenneth H.

    1999-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of a CCD camera on a high voltage electron microscope, an electron decelerator is inserted between the microscope column and the CCD. This arrangement optimizes the interaction of the electron beam with the scintillator of the CCD camera while retaining optimization of the microscope optics and of the interaction of the beam with the specimen. Changing the electron beam energy between the specimen and camera allows both to be optimized.

  11. Scintillator technology for enhanced resolution and contrast in X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahlholm, Anna, E-mail: anna.sahlholm@scint-x.com [Scint-X AB, Kista (Sweden); Svenonius, Olof [Scint-X AB, Kista (Sweden); Petersson, Sture [Scint-X AB, Kista (Sweden); Acreo AB, Kista (Sweden)

    2011-08-21

    A structured scintillator has been fabricated by filling a deep pore array in silicon with scintillating material. The pitch of the pores is significantly smaller (15.7{mu}m, hexagonal pattern) than for scintillators previously produced by Scint-X. The resulting MTF curves are presented, and show an improvement of 50-100% compared to other scintillator types. The camera used for comparisons is a Vosskuehler CCD-11000XR detector.

  12. ' RENAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    METASTASE OSSEUSE: SOLITAIRE D'UN ADENOCARCINOME RENAL. Fig. 2: TDM ... du gène de résistance aux médicaments. NIDR1. ... vie. La néphrectomie trouve sa place dans quatre situations: En cas de métastase unique, dans un but de réduction tumorale avant immunothérapie, elle peut être adjuvante après.

  13. The DRAGO gamma camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, C; Gola, A; Peloso, R; Longoni, A; Lechner, P; Soltau, H; Strüder, L; Ottobrini, L; Martelli, C; Lui, R; Madaschi, L; Belloli, S

    2010-04-01

    In this work, we present the results of the experimental characterization of the DRAGO (DRift detector Array-based Gamma camera for Oncology), a detection system developed for high-spatial resolution gamma-ray imaging. This camera is based on a monolithic array of 77 silicon drift detectors (SDDs), with a total active area of 6.7 cm(2), coupled to a single 5-mm-thick CsI(Tl) scintillator crystal. The use of an array of SDDs provides a high quantum efficiency for the detection of the scintillation light together with a very low electronics noise. A very compact detection module based on the use of integrated readout circuits was developed. The performances achieved in gamma-ray imaging using this camera are reported here. When imaging a 0.2 mm collimated (57)Co source (122 keV) over different points of the active area, a spatial resolution ranging from 0.25 to 0.5 mm was measured. The depth-of-interaction capability of the detector, thanks to the use of a Maximum Likelihood reconstruction algorithm, was also investigated by imaging a collimated beam tilted to an angle of 45 degrees with respect to the scintillator surface. Finally, the imager was characterized with in vivo measurements on mice, in a real preclinical environment.

  14. Scintillation response of organic and inorganic scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Papadopoulos, L M

    1999-01-01

    A method to evaluate the scintillation response of organic and inorganic scintillators to different heavy ionizing particles is suggested. A function describing the rate of the energy consumed as fluorescence emission is derived, i.e., the differential response with respect to time. This function is then integrated for each ion and scintillator (anthracene, stilbene and CsI(Tl)) to determine scintillation response. The resulting scintillation responses are compared to the previously reported measured responses. Agreement to within 2.5% is observed when these data are normalized to each other. In addition, conclusions regarding the quenching parameter kB dependence on the type of the particle and the computed values of kB for certain ions are included. (author)

  15. Nonproportionality of inorganic scintillators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khodyuk, I.V.

    2013-01-01

    A scintillator is a transparent material that emits a flash of light when it absorbs a ?-ray photon or an energetic particle. Scintillation crystals are widely used as spectroscopic detectors of ionizing radiation in nuclear science, space exploration, medical imaging, homeland security, etc. This

  16. A comparison of CsI:Tl and GOS in a scintillator-CCD detector for nuclear medicine imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugby, S. L.; Jambi, L. K.; Lees, J. E.

    2016-09-01

    A number of portable gamma cameras for medical imaging use scintillator-CCD based detectors. This paper compares the performance of a scintillator-CCD based portable gamma camera with either a columnar CsI:Tl or a pixelated GOS scintillator installed. The CsI:Tl scintillator has a sensitivity of 40% at 140.5 keV compared to 54% with the GOS scintillator. The intrinsic spatial resolution of the pixelated GOS detector was 1.09 mm, over 4 times poorer than for CsI:Tl. Count rate capability was also found to be significantly lower when the GOS scintillator was used. The uniformity was comparable for both scintillators.

  17. Evaluation of renal masses including retrograde renal brushing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, W B; Bibbo, M; Thomsen, S; Lu, C T

    1976-02-01

    1. The evaluation of renal masses has become an increasingly important topic because of the increasing incidence of kidney cancer, the improved cure rate of renal carcinoma with the proper preoperative diagnosis, and the proliferation in renal mass diagnostic methodology. 2. A variety of benign entities can produce an abnormal renal mass with attendant difficulties in being distinguished from malignant neoplasms. Among these benign lesions are: simple renal cysts, polycystic kidneys, congenital variations in renal size and shape, segmental renal hypertrophy, renal infarcts, intrarenal hematomas, renal hamartomas, renal leiomyomas, renal adenomas, renal angiomas, renal fibrolipomatosis, hydronephrosis of a duplicated collecting system, renal abscesses, and xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis. 3. Nephrotomography, nephrosonography (ultrasound), adrenalin renal arteriography, selective magnification renal arteriography, renal venography and cavography, lymphangiography, renal scintillation scanning, abnormal levels of enzymes in blood and urine, immunologic studies (circulating antibodies and tumor-associated antigens), percutaneous needle aspirations, and retrograde renal brushing have all increased the diagnostic accuracy of determining the etiology of renal masses. None of these diagnostic procedures is infallible. A judicious combination of procedures gives the most reliable diagnostic results. 4. A search continues for (a) chemical agent(s) or a chemical profile in the blood or urine which is (are) specific for renal carcinoma, but as yet this is an investigational area and not a practical clinical reality.

  18. Polarized scintillator targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brandt, B.; Bunyatova, E. I.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J. A.; Mango, S.

    2000-05-01

    The hydrogen nuclei in an organic scintillator have been polarized to more than 80% and the deuterons in its fully deuterated version to 24%. The scintillator, doped with TEMPO, has been polarized dynamically in a field of 2.5 T in a vertical dilution refrigerator in which a plastic lightguide transports the scintillation light from the sample in the mixing chamber to a photomultiplier outside the cryostat. Sizeable solid samples with acceptable optical properties and light output have been prepared and successfully operated as "live" polarized targets in nuclear physics experiments.

  19. Polarized scintillator targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, B. van den E-mail: vandenbrandt@psi.ch; Bunyatova, E.I.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J.A.; Mango, S

    2000-05-21

    The hydrogen nuclei in an organic scintillator have been polarized to more than 80% and the deuterons in its fully deuterated version to 24%. The scintillator, doped with TEMPO, has been polarized dynamically in a field of 2.5 T in a vertical dilution refrigerator in which a plastic lightguide transports the scintillation light from the sample in the mixing chamber to a photomultiplier outside the cryostat. Sizeable solid samples with acceptable optical properties and light output have been prepared and successfully operated as 'live' polarized targets in nuclear physics experiments.

  20. Photonic Crystals: Enhancing the Light Output of Scintillation Based Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Knapitsch, Arno Richard

    A scintillator is a material which emits light when excited by ionizing radiation. Such materials are used in a diverse range of applications; From high energy particle physics experiments, X-ray security, to nuclear cameras or positron emission tomography. Future high-energy physics (HEP) experiments as well as next generation medical imaging applications are more and more pushing towards better scintillation characteristics. One of the problems in heavy scintillating materials is related to their high index of refraction. As a consequence, most of the scintillation light produced in the bulk material is trapped inside the crystal due to total internal reflection. The same problem also occurs with light emitting diodes (LEDs) and has for a long time been considered as a limiting factor for their overall efficiency. Recent developments in the area of nanophotonics were showing now that those limitations can be overcome by introducing a photonic crystal (PhC) slab at the outcoupling surface of the substrate. P...

  1. Scintillation and luminescence in transparent colorless single and polycrystalline bulk ceramic ZnS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCloy, John S., E-mail: john.mccloy@wsu.edu [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, P.O. Box 642920, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Program, Washington State University, PO Box 641030, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States); Bliss, Mary; Miller, Brian; Wang, Zheming; Stave, Sean [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    ZnS:Ag is a well-known, extremely bright scintillator used in powder form for α-particle detection and, mixed with powdered LiF, for thermal neutron detection. Recently, we discovered some colorless and transparent commercial bulk single-crystal and polycrystalline (chemical vapor-deposited) ZnS forms that scintillate in response to α-particles. The scintillation light transmits through the sample thickness (millimeters), challenging the commonly held assumption that ZnS is opaque to its own scintillation light. Individual α-particle events were imaged in space and time using a charged-particle camera originally developed for medical imaging applications. Photoluminescence (PL) and PL excitation show that scintillating bulk ZnS likely depends on different electronic defects than commercial ZnS powder scintillators. These defects, associated with copper and oxygen, are discussed in relation to PL results and extensive literature assessment. Commercial transparent ZnS is routinely produced by chemical vapor deposition to sizes larger than square meters, enabling potentially novel radiation detection applications requiring large, thick apertures. - Highlights: • Colorless transparent chemical vapor deposited ZnS shows α-particle scintillation. • Scintillation in CVD ZnS has been imaged spatially and temporally. • Scintillation light transmitted through 1 to 5 mm thick samples. • Photoluminescence data suggests origin of scintillation behavior. • Copper and oxygen impurities likely linked to scintillation in CVD ZnS.

  2. Lead tungstate scintillation material

    CERN Document Server

    Annenkov, A N; Lecoq, P

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we summarize the results of a research programme on lead-tungstate (PWO) crystals performed by the CMS Collaboration at CERN, as well as by other groups who promoted the progress of the PWO scintillation crystal technology. Crystal properties, mass production technology, scintillation mechanism, origin of colouring, defects in crystal and radiation induced phenomena, light yield improvement and results of beam tests are described. (96 refs).

  3. Evaluations of the new LiF-scintillator and optional brightness enhancement films for neutron imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iikura, H., E-mail: Iikura.hiroshi@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki (Japan); Tsutsui, N. [Chichibu Fuji Co., Ltd., Ogano, Chichibu, Saitama 368-0193 (Japan); Nakamura, T.; Katagiri, M.; Kureta, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki (Japan); Kubo, J. [Nissan Motor Co., Ltd., Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0126 (Japan); Matsubayashi, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2011-09-21

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency has developed the neutron scintillator jointly with Chichibu Fuji Co., Ltd. In this study, we evaluated the new ZnS(Ag):Al/{sup 6}Li scintillator developed for neutron imaging. It was confirmed that the brightness increased by about double while maintaining equal performance for the spatial resolution as compared with a conventional scintillator. High frame-rate imaging using a high-speed video camera system and this new scintillator made it possible to image beyond 10 000 frames per second while still having enough brightness. This technique allowed us to obtain a high-frame-rate visualization of oil flow in a running car engine. Furthermore, we devised a technique to increase the light intensity of reception for a camera by adding brightness enhancement films on the output surface of the scintillator. It was confirmed that the spatial resolution degraded more than double, but the brightness increased by about three times.

  4. Evaluations of the new LiF-scintillator and optional brightness enhancement films for neutron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iikura, H.; Tsutsui, N.; Nakamura, T.; Katagiri, M.; Kureta, M.; Kubo, J.; Matsubayashi, M.

    2011-09-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency has developed the neutron scintillator jointly with Chichibu Fuji Co., Ltd. In this study, we evaluated the new ZnS(Ag):Al/ 6Li scintillator developed for neutron imaging. It was confirmed that the brightness increased by about double while maintaining equal performance for the spatial resolution as compared with a conventional scintillator. High frame-rate imaging using a high-speed video camera system and this new scintillator made it possible to image beyond 10 000 frames per second while still having enough brightness. This technique allowed us to obtain a high-frame-rate visualization of oil flow in a running car engine. Furthermore, we devised a technique to increase the light intensity of reception for a camera by adding brightness enhancement films on the output surface of the scintillator. It was confirmed that the spatial resolution degraded more than double, but the brightness increased by about three times.

  5. Scintillator Measurements for SNO+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaptanoglu, Tanner; SNO+ Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    SNO+ is a neutrino detector located 2km underground in the SNOLAB facility with the primary goal of searching for neutrinoless double beta decay. The detector will be filled with a liquid scintillator target primarily composed of linear alkyl benzene (LAB). As charged particles travel through the detector the LAB produces scintillation light which is detected by almost ten thousand PMTs. The LAB is loaded with Te130, an isotope known to undergo double beta decay. Additionally, the LAB is mixed with an additional fluor and wavelength shifter to improve the light output and shift the light to a wavelength regime in which the PMTs are maximally efficient. The precise scintillator optics drastically affect the ultimate sensitivity of SNO+. I will present work being done to measure the optical properties of the SNO+ scintillator cocktail. The measured properties are used as input to a scintillation model that allows us to extrapolate to the SNO+ scale and ultimately predict the sensitivity of the experiment. Additionally, I will present measurements done to characterize the R5912 PMT, a candidate PMT for the second phase of SNO+ that provides better light collection, improved charge resolution, and a narrower spread in timing.

  6. Gamma ray camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Mendez, Victor

    1997-01-01

    A gamma ray camera for detecting rays emanating from a radiation source such as an isotope. The gamma ray camera includes a sensor array formed of a visible light crystal for converting incident gamma rays to a plurality of corresponding visible light photons, and a photosensor array responsive to the visible light photons in order to form an electronic image of the radiation therefrom. The photosensor array is adapted to record an integrated amount of charge proportional to the incident gamma rays closest to it, and includes a transparent metallic layer, photodiode consisting of a p-i-n structure formed on one side of the transparent metallic layer, and comprising an upper p-type layer, an intermediate layer and a lower n-type layer. In the preferred mode, the scintillator crystal is composed essentially of a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal preferably doped with a predetermined amount impurity, and the p-type upper intermediate layers and said n-type layer are essentially composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The gamma ray camera further includes a collimator interposed between the radiation source and the sensor array, and a readout circuit formed on one side of the photosensor array.

  7. AA, beam stopper with scintillator screen

    CERN Document Server

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    An insertable steel-plate beam stopper was located after nearly a full turn downstream of the injection point. It was fitted with a scintillator screen, a thin plate of Cr-doped alumina, imprinted with a grid and reference points. The screen was illuminated through a window and observed with a highly sensitive TV camera plus image intensifier. This allowed observation of beam position and size of a proton test beam and of the beam from the target, which consisted not only of antiprotons but contained as well electrons, pions and muons of the same momentum.

  8. Microfluidic Scintillation Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Microfluidic scintillation detectors are devices of recent introduction for the detection of high energy particles, developed within the EP-DT group at CERN. Most of the interest for such technology comes from the use of liquid scintillators, which entails the possibility of changing the active material in the detector, leading to an increased radiation resistance. This feature, together with the high spatial resolution and low thickness deriving from the microfabrication techniques used to manufacture such devices, is desirable not only in instrumentation for high energy physics experiments but also in medical detectors such as beam monitors for hadron therapy.

  9. Polarized Scintillating Targets at Psi

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brandt, B.; Bunyatova, E. I.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J. A.; Mango, S.

    2001-02-01

    Scintillating polarized targets are now routinely available: blocks of 18×18×5 mm scintillating organic polymer, doped with TEMPO, polarized dynamically in a field of 2.5 T in a vertical 3He-4He dilution refrigerator. A 19 mm diameter plastic lightguide transports the scintillation light from the sample in the mixing chamber to a photomultiplier outside the cryostat.

  10. Scintillation properties of acrylate based plastic scintillator by photoploymerization method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Hwan [Dept. of Radiological Science, Cheongju University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joo Il [Dept. of of Radiology, Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    In this study, we prepared and characterized a acrylate based UV-curable plastic scintillator. It was used co-polymers TMPTA, DHPA and Ultima GoldTM LLT organic scintillator. The emission spectrum of the plastic scintillator was located in the range of 380⁓520 nm, peaking at 423 nm. And the scintillator is more than 50% transparent in the range of 400⁓ 800 nm. The emission spectrum is well match to the quantum efficiency of photo-multiplier tube and the fast decay time of the scintillation is 12 ns, approximately. This scintillation material provides the possibility of combining 3D printing technology, and then the applications of the plastic scintillator may be expected in human dosimetry etc.

  11. Scintillator requirements for medical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, William W.

    1999-09-01

    Scintillating materials are used in a variety of medical imaging devices. This paper presents a description of four medical imaging modalities that make extensive use of scintillators: planar x-ray imaging, x-ray computed tomography (x-ray CT), SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) and PET (positron emission tomography). The discussion concentrates on a description of the underlying physical principles by which the four modalities operate. The scintillator requirements for these systems are enumerated and the compromises that are made in order to maximize imaging performance utilizing existing scintillating materials are discussed, as is the potential for improving imaging performance by improving scintillator properties.

  12. Scintillator-based fast ion loss measurements in the EAST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, J F; Isobe, M; Ogawa, K; Huang, J; Wu, C R; Xu, Z; Jin, Z; Lin, S Y; Hu, L Q

    2016-11-01

    A new scintillator-based fast ion loss detector (FILD) has been installed on Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) to investigate the fast ion loss behavior in high performance plasma with neutral beam injection (NBI) and ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH). A two dimensional 40 mm × 40 mm scintillator-coated (ZnS:Ag) stainless plate is mounted in the front of the detector, capturing the escaping fast ions. Photons from the scintillator plate are imaged with a Phantom V2010 CCD camera. The lost fast ions can be measured with the pitch angle from 60° to 120° and the gyroradius from 10 mm to 180 mm. This paper will describe the details of FILD diagnostic on EAST and describe preliminary measurements during NBI and ICRH heating.

  13. Optical artefact characterization and correction in volumetric scintillation dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Daniel; Hui, Cheukkai; Archambault, Louis; Mohan, Radhe; Beddar, Sam

    2014-01-01

    The goals of this study were (1) to characterize the optical artefacts affecting measurement accuracy in a volumetric liquid scintillation detector, and (2) to develop methods to correct for these artefacts. The optical artefacts addressed were photon scattering, refraction, camera perspective, vignetting, lens distortion, the lens point spread function, stray radiation, and noise in the camera. These artefacts were evaluated by theoretical and experimental means, and specific correction strategies were developed for each artefact. The effectiveness of the correction methods was evaluated by comparing raw and corrected images of the scintillation light from proton pencil beams against validated Monte Carlo calculations. Blurring due to the lens and refraction at the scintillator tank-air interface were found to have the largest effect on the measured light distribution, and lens aberrations and vignetting were important primarily at the image edges. Photon scatter in the scintillator was not found to be a significant source of artefacts. The correction methods effectively mitigated the artefacts, increasing the average gamma analysis pass rate from 66% to 98% for gamma criteria of 2% dose difference and 2 mm distance to agreement. We conclude that optical artefacts cause clinically meaningful errors in the measured light distribution, and we have demonstrated effective strategies for correcting these optical artefacts. PMID:24321820

  14. Renal arteriography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renal angiogram; Angiography - kidney; Renal angiography; Renal artery stenosis - arteriography ... an artery by a blood clot Renal artery stenosis Renal cell cancer Angiomyolipomas (noncancerous tumors of the ...

  15. Scintillator-based transverse proton beam profiler for laser-plasma ion sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dover, N P; Nishiuchi, M; Sakaki, H; Alkhimova, M A; Faenov, A Ya; Fukuda, Y; Kiriyama, H; Kon, A; Kondo, K; Nishitani, K; Ogura, K; Pikuz, T A; Pirozhkov, A S; Sagisaka, A; Kando, M; Kondo, K

    2017-07-01

    A high repetition rate scintillator-based transverse beam profile diagnostic for laser-plasma accelerated proton beams has been designed and commissioned. The proton beam profiler uses differential filtering to provide coarse energy resolution and a flexible design to allow optimisation for expected beam energy range and trade-off between spatial and energy resolution depending on the application. A plastic scintillator detector, imaged with a standard 12-bit scientific camera, allows data to be taken at a high repetition rate. An algorithm encompassing the scintillator non-linearity is described to estimate the proton spectrum at different spatial locations.

  16. Infrared Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A sensitive infrared camera that observes the blazing plumes from the Space Shuttle or expendable rocket lift-offs is capable of scanning for fires, monitoring the environment and providing medical imaging. The hand-held camera uses highly sensitive arrays in infrared photodetectors known as quantum well infrared photo detectors (QWIPS). QWIPS were developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Center for Space Microelectronics Technology in partnership with Amber, a Raytheon company. In October 1996, QWIP detectors pointed out hot spots of the destructive fires speeding through Malibu, California. Night vision, early warning systems, navigation, flight control systems, weather monitoring, security and surveillance are among the duties for which the camera is suited. Medical applications are also expected.

  17. Development of NEMA-based Software for Gamma Camera Quality Control

    OpenAIRE

    Rova, Andrew; Celler, Anna; Hamarneh, Ghassan

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a cross-platform software application that implements all of the basic standardized nuclear medicine scintillation camera quality control analyses, thus serving as an independent complement to camera manufacturers’ software. Our application allows direct comparison of data and statistics from different cameras through its ability to uniformly analyze a range of file types. The program has been tested using multiple gamma cameras, and its results agree with comparable analysi...

  18. Studies of scintillator response to 60 MeV protons in a proton beam imaging system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rydygier Marzena

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A Proton Beam Imaging System (ProBImS is under development at the Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences (IFJ PAN. The ProBImS will be used to optimize beam delivery at IFJ PAN proton therapy facilities, delivering two-dimensional distributions of beam profiles. The system consists of a scintillator, optical tract and a sensitive CCD camera which digitally records the light emitted from the proton-irradiated scintillator. The optical system, imaging data transfer and control software have already been developed. Here, we report preliminary results of an evaluation of the DuPont Hi-speed thick back screen EJ 000128 scintillator to determine its applicability in our imaging system. In order to optimize the light conversion with respect to the dose locally deposited by the proton beam in the scintillation detector, we have studied the response of the DuPont scintillator in terms of linearity of dose response, uniformity of light emission and decay rate of background light after deposition of a high dose in the scintillator. We found a linear dependence of scintillator light output vs. beam intensity by showing the intensity of the recorded images to be proportional to the dose deposited in the scintillator volume.

  19. CCD Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Roger R.

    1983-01-01

    A CCD camera capable of observing a moving object which has varying intensities of radiation eminating therefrom and which may move at varying speeds is shown wherein there is substantially no overlapping of successive images and wherein the exposure times and scan times may be varied independently of each other.

  20. Scintillating fiber detector

    CERN Document Server

    Vozak, Matous

    2016-01-01

    NA61 is one of the physics experiments at CERN dedicated to study hadron states coming from interactions of SPS beams with various targets. To determine the position of a secondary beam, three proportional chambers are placed along the beamline. However, these chambers tend to have slow response. In order to obtain more precise time information, use of another detector is being considered. Fast response and compact size is making scintillation fiber (SciFi) with silicon photomultiplier (Si-PM) read out a good candidate. This report is focused on analysing data from SciFi collected in a test beam at the beginning of July 2016.

  1. Laser Beam Scintillation with Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, Larry C; Young, Cynthia

    2001-01-01

    Renewed interest in laser communication systems has sparked development of useful new analytic models. This book discusses optical scintillation and its impact on system performance in free-space optical communication and laser radar applications, with a detailed look at propagation phenomena and the role of scintillation on system behavior. Intended for practicing engineers, scientists, and students.

  2. High-resolution EM-CCD scintillation gamma cameras

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korevaar, M.A.N.

    2013-01-01

    The development of medical imaging techniques has dramatically changed clinical practice and biomedical science in the 20th century. Nuclear Medicine imaging techniques reveal the function of organs and tissues in vivo with the aid of radioactively labeled tracer molecules. These techniques, such as

  3. Properties of scintillator solutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fluornoy, J.M.

    1998-06-01

    This special report summarizes measurements of the spectroscopic and other properties of the solutes that were used in the preparation of several new liquid scintillators developed at EG and G/Energy Measurements/Santa Barbara Operations (the precursor to Bechtel Nevada/Special Technologies Laboratory) on the radiation-to-light converter program. The data on the individual compounds are presented in a form similar to that used by Prof. Isadore Berlman in his classic handbook of fluorescence spectra. The temporal properties and relative efficiencies of the new scintillators are presented in Table 1, and the efficiencies as a function of wavelength are presented graphically in Figure 1. In addition, there is a descriptive glossary of the abbreviations used herein. Figure 2 illustrates the basic structures of some of the compounds and of the four solvents reported in this summary. The emission spectra generally exhibit more structure than the absorption spectra, with the result that the peak emission wavelength for a given compound may lie several nm away from the wavelength, {lambda}{sub avg}, at the geometric center of the emission spectrum. Therefore, the author has chosen to list absorption peaks, {lambda}{sub max}, and emission {lambda}{sub avg} values in Figures 3--30, as being most illustrative of the differences between the compounds. The compounds, BHTP, BTPB, ADBT, and DPTPB were all developed on this program. P-terphenyl, PBD, and TPB are commercially available blue emitters. C-480 and the other longer-wavelength emitters are laser dyes available commercially from Exciton Corporation. 1 ref., 30 figs.

  4. The balloon-borne electron telescope with scintillating fibers (BETS)

    CERN Document Server

    Torii, S; Tateyama, N; Yoshida, K; Ouchi, Y; Yamagami, T; Saitô, Y; Murakami, H; Kobayashi, T; Komori, Y; Kasahara, K; Yuda, T; Nishimura, J

    2000-01-01

    we describe a new detector system developed for high-altitude balloon flights to observe the cosmic-ray electrons above 10 GeV. The balloon borne electron telescope with Scintillating (BETS) fibers instrument is an imaging calorimeter which is capable of selecting electrons against the large background of protons. The calorimeter is composed of a sandwich of scintillating optical-fiber belts and lead plates with a combination of three plastic scintillators for the shower trigger. The total thickness of lead is 40 mm (~7.1 r.l.) and the number of fiber belts is nine. In each belt, alternating layers are oriented in orthogonal (x and y) directions. Two sets of an intensified CCD camera are adopted for read-out of the scintillating fibers in the x and y direction, respectively. The accelerator beam tests were carried out to study the performance of detector for electrons in 1996 and for protons in 1997 at CERN-SPS. The instrument was successfully flown aboard high-altitude balloon in 1997 and 1998. It is demonst...

  5. Cold neutron imaging detection with a GSO scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Tokanai, F; Oku, T; Ino, T; Suzuki, J I; Ikeda, T; Ootani, W; Otani, C; Sato, H; Shimizu, H M; Kiyanagi, Y; Hirota, T

    2000-01-01

    The pulse-height spectrum and two-dimensional image of a 0.5 mm thick GSO scintillator were investigated for a 6 A cold neutron beam. The 31 and 81 keV peaks resulting from neutron absorption by Gd nuclei were identified in the pulse-height spectrum by using a photomultiplier tube. Images of 1.5 and 2.1 mm (FWHM) in diameter were observed for 1 and 2 mm diameter incident beams with an image intensifier and viewed by a CCD camera, corresponding to a position resolution of 1.3 mm (FWHM). The result implies that a position resolution of better than 100 mu m would be achievable by employing a GSO scintillator thinner than 20 mu m.

  6. Systematic evaluation of photodetector performance for plastic scintillation dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boivin, Jonathan, E-mail: jonathan.boivin.1@ulaval.ca; Beaulieu, Luc [Département de Physique, de Génie physique et d’Optique, et Centre de recherche sur le cancer, Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6, Canada and Département de Radio-Oncologie et Axe oncologie du Centre de recherche du CHU de Québec, CHU de Québec, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Beddar, Sam [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Guillemette, Maxime [Département de Physique, de Génie physique et d’Optique, Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6, Canada and Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et de Pneumologie de Québec, Québec, Québec G1V 4G5 (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The authors’ objective was to systematically assess the performance of seven photodetectors used in plastic scintillation dosimetry. The authors also propose some guidelines for selecting an appropriate detector for a specific application. Methods: The plastic scintillation detector (PSD) consisted of a 1-mm diameter, 10-mm long plastic scintillation fiber (BCF-60), which was optically coupled to a clear 10-m long optical fiber of the same diameter. A light-tight plastic sheath covered both fibers and the scintillator end was sealed. The clear fiber end was connected to one of the following photodetectors: two polychromatic cameras (one with an optical lens and one with a fiber optic taper replacing the lens), a monochromatic camera with an optical lens, a PIN photodiode, an avalanche photodiode (APD), or a photomultiplier tube (PMT). A commercially available W1 PSD was also included in the study, but it relied on its own fiber and scintillator. Each PSD was exposed to both low-energy beams (120, 180, and 220 kVp) from an orthovoltage unit and high-energy beams (6 and 23 MV) from a linear accelerator. Various dose rates were tested to identify the operating range and accuracy of each photodetector. Results: For all photodetectors, the relative uncertainty was less than 5% for dose rates higher than 3 mGy/s. The cameras allowed multiple probes to be used simultaneously, but they are less sensitive to low-light signals. The PIN, APD, and PMT had higher sensitivity, making them more suitable for low dose rate and out-of-field dose monitoring. The relative uncertainty of the PMT was less than 1% at the lowest dose rate achieved (0.10 mGy/s), suggesting that it was optimal for use in live dosimetry. Conclusions: For dose rates higher than 3 mGy/s, the PIN diode is the most effective photodetector in terms of performance/cost ratio. For lower dose rates, such as those seen in interventional radiology or high-gradient radiotherapy, PMTs are the optimal choice.

  7. Systematic evaluation of photodetector performance for plastic scintillation dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Jonathan; Beddar, Sam; Guillemette, Maxime; Beaulieu, Luc

    2015-11-01

    The authors' objective was to systematically assess the performance of seven photodetectors used in plastic scintillation dosimetry. The authors also propose some guidelines for selecting an appropriate detector for a specific application. The plastic scintillation detector (PSD) consisted of a 1-mm diameter, 10-mm long plastic scintillation fiber (BCF-60), which was optically coupled to a clear 10-m long optical fiber of the same diameter. A light-tight plastic sheath covered both fibers and the scintillator end was sealed. The clear fiber end was connected to one of the following photodetectors: two polychromatic cameras (one with an optical lens and one with a fiber optic taper replacing the lens), a monochromatic camera with an optical lens, a PIN photodiode, an avalanche photodiode (APD), or a photomultiplier tube (PMT). A commercially available W1 PSD was also included in the study, but it relied on its own fiber and scintillator. Each PSD was exposed to both low-energy beams (120, 180, and 220 kVp) from an orthovoltage unit and high-energy beams (6 and 23 MV) from a linear accelerator. Various dose rates were tested to identify the operating range and accuracy of each photodetector. For all photodetectors, the relative uncertainty was less than 5% for dose rates higher than 3 mGy/s. The cameras allowed multiple probes to be used simultaneously, but they are less sensitive to low-light signals. The PIN, APD, and PMT had higher sensitivity, making them more suitable for low dose rate and out-of-field dose monitoring. The relative uncertainty of the PMT was less than 1% at the lowest dose rate achieved (0.10 mGy/s), suggesting that it was optimal for use in live dosimetry. For dose rates higher than 3 mGy/s, the PIN diode is the most effective photodetector in terms of performance/cost ratio. For lower dose rates, such as those seen in interventional radiology or high-gradient radiotherapy, PMTs are the optimal choice.

  8. Cherenkov and scintillation light separation in organic liquid scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaca, J.; Descamps, F. B.; Land, B. J.; Yeh, M.; Orebi Gann, G. D.

    2017-12-01

    The CHErenkov/Scintillation Separation experiment (CHESS) has been used to demonstrate the separation of Cherenkov and scintillation light in both linear alkylbenzene (LAB) and LAB with 2 g/L of PPO as a fluor (LAB/PPO). This is the first successful demonstration of Cherenkov light detection from the more challenging LAB/PPO cocktail and improves on previous results for LAB. A time resolution of 338± 12 ps FWHM results in an efficiency for identifying Cherenkov photons in LAB/PPO of 70 ± 3 % and 63± 8% for time- and charge-based separation, respectively, with scintillation contamination of 36± 5% and 38± 4%. LAB/PPO data is consistent with a rise time of τ _r=0.72± 0.33 ns.

  9. Molecular origins of scintillation in organic scintillators (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Patrick; Mengesha, Wondwosen; Myllenbeck, Nicholas

    2016-09-01

    Organic-based scintillators are indispensable materials for radiation detection owing to their high sensitivity to fast neutrons, low cost, and tailorable properties. There has been a recent resurgence of interest in organic scintillators due to exciting discoveries related to neutron discrimination and gamma-ray spectroscopy, which represent capabilities previously thought not possible in these materials. I will discuss our development of crystalline and polymer-based scintillators for these applications. Structure-property relationships related to intermolecular interactions and host-guest electronic exchange will be discussed in the context of energy-transfer pathways relevant to scintillation. An emphasis will be placed on the rational design of these materials, as guided by first principles and DFT calculations. Two related topics will be discussed: 1) Incorporation of organometallic triplet-harvesting additives to plastic scintillator matrices to confer a 'two-state' (singlet and triplet) luminescence signature to different types of ionizing radiation. This approach relies upon energetic and spatial overlap between the donor and acceptor excited states for efficient electronic exchange. Key considerations also include synthetic modification of the luminescence spectra and kinetics, as well as the addition of secondary additives to increase the recombination efficiency. 2) Design of organotin-containing plastic scintillators as a route towards gamma-ray spectroscopy. Organometallic compounds were selected on the basis of distance-dependent quenching relationships, phase compatibility with the polymer matrix, and the gamma-ray cross sections. This approach is guided by molecular modeling and radiation transport modeling to achieve the highest possible detection sensitivity luminescence intensity.

  10. New halide scintillators for gamma ray detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alekhin, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    Scintillators are used for the detection of ionizing radiation. Despite decades of intensive search and numerous compounds discovered, there is still a need for materials with improved properties. Recently, several new scintillators with excellent light yield, energy resolution, and proportionality

  11. Radiopure Metal-Loaded Liquid Scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosero, Richard [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.; Yeh, Minfang [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.

    2015-03-18

    Metal-loaded liquid scintillator plays a key role in particle and nuclear physics experiments. The applications of metal ions in various neutrino experiments and the purification methods for different scintillator components are discussed in this paper.

  12. Scintillation-Hardened GPS Receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    CommLargo, Inc., has developed a scintillation-hardened Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver that improves reliability for low-orbit missions and complies with NASA's Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) architecture standards. A software-defined radio (SDR) implementation allows a single hardware element to function as either a conventional radio or as a GPS receiver, providing backup and redundancy for platforms such as the International Space Station (ISS) and high-value remote sensing platforms. The innovation's flexible SDR implementation reduces cost, weight, and power requirements. Scintillation hardening improves mission reliability and variability. In Phase I, CommLargo refactored an open-source GPS software package with Kalman filter-based tracking loops to improve performance during scintillation and also demonstrated improved navigation during a geomagnetic storm. In Phase II, the company generated a new field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based GPS waveform to demonstrate on NASA's Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN) test bed.

  13. Fracture-resistant lanthanide scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, F Patrick [Livermore, CA

    2011-01-04

    Lanthanide halide alloys have recently enabled scintillating gamma ray spectrometers comparable to room temperature semiconductors (<3% FWHM energy resolutions at 662 keV). However brittle fracture of these materials upon cooling hinders the growth of large volume crystals. Efforts to improve the strength through non-lanthanide alloy substitution, while preserving scintillation, have been demonstrated. Isovalent alloys having nominal compositions of comprising Al, Ga, Sc, Y, and In dopants as well as aliovalent alloys comprising Ca, Sr, Zr, Hf, Zn, and Pb dopants were prepared. All of these alloys exhibit bright fluorescence under UV excitation, with varying shifts in the spectral peaks and intensities relative to pure CeBr.sub.3. Further, these alloys scintillate when coupled to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and exposed to .sup.137Cs gamma rays.

  14. Ionospheric precursors to scintillation activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S.J. Spencer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ionospheric scintillation is the rapid fluctuation of both phase and amplitude of trans-ionospheric radio waves due to small scale electron density irregularities in the ionosphere. Prediction of the occurrence of scintillation at L band frequencies is needed to mitigate the disruption of space-based communication and navigation systems. The purpose of this paper is to present a method of using tomographic inversions of the ionospheric electron density obtained from ground-based GPS data to infer the location and strength of the post-sunset plasma drift vortex. This vortex is related to the pre-reversal enhancement in the eastwards electric field which has been correlated to the subsequent occurrence of scintillation.

  15. Studies on scintillating fiber response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albers, D. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bollmann, R.; Buesser, K.; Cloth, P.; Diehl, O.; Dohrmann, F.; Drueke, V.; Engelhardt, H.P.; Ernst, J.; Eversheim, P.D.; Filges, D.; Gasthuber, M.; Gebel, R.; Greiff, J.; Gross, A.; Gross-Hardt, R.; Heine, A.; Heider, S.; Hinterberger, F.; Igelbrink, M.; Jahn, R.; Jeske, M.; Langkau, R.; Lindlein, J.; Maier, R.; Maschuw, R.; Mayer-Kuckuk, T.; Mertler, G.; Metsch, B.; Mosel, F.; Mueller, M.; Muenstermann, M.; Paetz genannt Schieck, H.; Petry, H.R.; Prasuhn, D.; Rohdjess, H.; Rosendaal, D.; Ross, U.; Rossen, P. von; Scheid, H.; Schirm, N.; Schulz-Rojahn, M.; Schwandt, F.; Scobel, W.; Steeg, B.; Sterzenbach, G.; Trelle, H.J.; Wellinghausen, A.; Wiedmann, W.; Woller, K.; Ziegler, R. [Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Universitaet Bonn, Bonn (Germany)]|[1. Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany)]|[Institut fuer Kernphysik, KFA, Juelich (Germany)]|[Institut fuer Theor. Kernphysik, Universitaet Bonn, Bonn (Germany)]|[Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Koeln, Koeln (Germany)

    1995-03-11

    Scintillating fibers of type Bicron BCF-12 with 2 x 2 mm{sup 2} cross section, up to 600 mm length, and PMMA cladding have been tested, in conjunction with the multi-channel photomultiplier Hamamatsu R 4760, with minimum ionizing electrons. The impact of cladding, extramural absorbers and/or wrapping on the light attenuation and photoelectron yield is studied in detail. Fibers have been circularly bent with radii of 171 mm and arranged in two layers to bundles forming granulated scintillator rings. Their performance in the EDDA experiment at COSY for detection of high energy protons revealed typically more than 9 (6) photoelectrons per fiber from bundles with (without) mirror on the rear side, guaranteeing detection efficiencies >99% and full compatibility with corresponding solid scintillator rings. The time resolution of 3.4 ns FWHM per fiber read out is essentially due to the R 4760. (orig.).

  16. Studies on scintillating fiber response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, D.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bollmann, R.; Büßer, K.; Cloth, P.; Diehl, O.; Dohrmann, F.; Drüke, V.; Engelhardt, H. P.; Ernst, J.; Eversheim, P. D.; Filges, D.; Gasthuber, M.; Gebel, R.; Greiff, J.; Groß, A.; Groß-Hardt, R.; Heine, A.; Heider, S.; Hinterberger, F.; Igelbrink, M.; Jahn, R.; Jeske, M.; Langkau, R.; Lindlein, J.; Maier, R.; Maschuw, R.; Mayer-Kuckuk, T.; Mertler, G.; Metsch, B.; Mosel, F.; Müller, M.; Münstermann, M.; Paetz gen. Schieck, H.; Petry, H. R.; Prasuhn, D.; Rohdjeß, H.; Rosendaal, D.; Roß, U.; von Rossen, P.; Scheid, H.; Schirm, N.; Schulz-Rojahn, M.; Schwandt, F.; Scobel, W.; Steeg, B.; Sterzenbach, G.; Trelle, H. J.; Wellinghausen, A.; Wiedmann, W.; Woller, K.; Ziegler, R.

    1996-02-01

    Scintillating fibers of type Bicron BCF-12 with 2 × 2 mm 2 cross section, up to 600 mm length, and PMMA cladding have been tested, in conjunction with the multi-channel photomultiplier Hamamatsu R 4760, with minimum ionizing electrons. The impact of cladding, extramural absorbers and/or wrapping on the light attenuation and photoelectron yield is studied in detail. Fibers have been circularly bent with radii of 171 mm and arranged in two layers to bundles forming granulated scintillator rings. Their performance in the EDDA experiment at COSY for detection of high energy protons revealed typically more than 9 (6) photoelectrons per fiber from bundles with (without) mirror on the rear side, guaranteeing detection efficiencies >99% and full compatibility with corresponding solid scintillator rings. The time resolution of 3.4 ns FWHM per fiber read out is essentially due to the R 4760.

  17. Scintillation and luminescence in transparent colorless single and polycrystalline bulk ceramic ZnS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCloy, John S.; Bliss, Mary; Miller, Brian W.; Wang, Zheming; Stave, Sean C.

    2015-01-01

    ZnS:Ag is a well-known extremely bright scintillator used in powder form for α-particle detection and, mixed with powdered LiF, for thermal neutron detection. Recently, we discovered some commercial bulk colorless and transparent, single-crystal and polycrystalline (chemical vapor-deposited) ZnS forms that scintillate in response to α-particles. The scintillation light transmits through the sample thickness (mm), challenging the commonly held assumption that ZnS is opaque to its own scintillation light. Individual α-particle events were imaged in space and time using a charged-particle camera originally developed for medical imaging applications. Photoluminescence (PL) and PL excitation show that scintillating bulk ZnS likely depends on different electronic defects than commercial ZnS powder scintillators. These defects, associated with copper and oxygen, are discussed in relation to PL results and extensive literature assessment. Commercial transparent ZnS is routinely produced by chemical vapor deposition to sizes larger than square meters, enabling potentially novel radiation detection applications requiring large, thick apertures.

  18. Composite scintillators for detection of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN; Stephan, Andrew Curtis [Knoxville, TN; Brown, Suree S [Knoxville, TN; Wallace, Steven A [Knoxville, TN; Rondinone, Adam J [Knoxville, TN

    2010-12-28

    Applicant's present invention is a composite scintillator having enhanced transparency for detecting ionizing radiation comprising a material having optical transparency wherein said material comprises nano-sized objects having a size in at least one dimension that is less than the wavelength of light emitted by the composite scintillator wherein the composite scintillator is designed to have selected properties suitable for a particular application.

  19. Photonic crystal scintillators and methods of manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Ricardo D.; Sexton, Lindsay T.; Fuentes, Roderick E.; Cortes-Concepcion, Jose

    2015-08-11

    Photonic crystal scintillators and their methods of manufacture are provided. Exemplary methods of manufacture include using a highly-ordered porous anodic alumina membrane as a pattern transfer mask for either the etching of underlying material or for the deposition of additional material onto the surface of a scintillator. Exemplary detectors utilizing such photonic crystal scintillators are also provided.

  20. Thin Scintillating Polarized Targets for Spin Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brandt, B.; Bunyatova, E. I.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J. A.

    2003-07-01

    At PSI polarized scintillating targets are available since 1996. Proton polarizations of more than 80%, and deuteron polarizations of 25% in polystyrene-based scintillators can be reached under optimum conditions in a vertical dilution refrigerator with optical access, suited for nuclear and particle physics experiments. New preparation procedures allow to provide very thin polarizable scintillating targets and widen the spectrum of conceivable experiments.

  1. Estimation of absolute renal uptake with technetium-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid: direct comparison with the radioactivity of nephrectomy specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana da Cunha Lopes de Lima

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Studies using radionuclides are the most appropriate method for estimating renal function. Dimercaptosuccinic acid chelate labeled with technetium-99m (99mTc-DMSA is the radiopharmaceutical of choice for high-resolution imaging of the renal cortex and estimation of the functional renal mass. The aim of this study was to evaluate a simplified method for determining the absolute renal uptake (ARU of 99mTc-DMSA prior to nephrectomy, using the radioactivity counts of nephrectomy specimens as the gold standard. DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective study at the Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Universidade Estadual de Campinas. METHODS: Seventeen patients (12 females; range 22-82 years old; mean age 50.8 years old underwent nephrectomy for various reasons. Renal scintigraphy was performed three to four hours after intravenous administration of a mean dose of 188.7 MBq (5.1 mCi of 99mTc-DMSA, which was done six to 24 hours before surgery. The in vivo renal uptake of 99mTc-DMSA was determined using the radioactivity of the syringe before the injection (measured using a dose calibrator and the images of the syringe and kidneys, obtained from a scintillation camera. After surgery, the reference value for renal uptake of 99mTc-DMSA was determined by measuring the radioactivity of the nephrectomy specimen using the same dose calibrator. RESULTS: The ARU measurements were very similar to those obtained using the reference method, as determined by linear regression (r-squared = 0.96. CONCLUSION: ARU estimation using the proposed method before nephrectomy seems to be accurate and feasible for routine use.

  2. Scintillation imaging of air during proton and carbon-ion beam irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center (Japan); Akagi, Takashi; Yamashita, Tomohiro [Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center (Japan); Komori, Masataka [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan)

    2016-10-11

    We previously reported that the luminescence imaging of water during proton or carbon-ion irradiation is possible using a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, and these luminescence images can be used for the range estimations for these therapies. In the images during these irradiations to water phantoms, we observed scintillation images in the air parts. We conducted analysis of these images during proton and carbon-ion irradiations to use them for beam width estimations. We set profiles on the air part of the luminescence images of water during 100.2 MeV proton and 241.5 MeV/n carbon-ion irradiations. We estimated the widths of the beams from the scintillation images and compared them with those by simulation results. We also estimated the intensity and light spectrum of the scintillation of air and compared with those of the luminescence of water. The estimated widths of the proton and carbon-ion beams from the scintillation images of air were almost the same as those measured with simulations. The intensities of the scintillation of air were 3% and 5% of those of the luminescence of water for the proton and carbon-ion beams, respectively. The light spectrum of the scintillation of air peaked around 350–450 nm while those of luminescence of water showed wide distribution which peaked 450–550 nm. We confirmed that scintillation imaging of air during proton and carbon-ion beam irradiations were possible. The scintillation imaging of air could be used for the width estimations of proton and carbon-ion beams.

  3. Scintillating Lustre Induced by Radial Fins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohske Takahashi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Radial lines of Ehrenstein patterns induce illusory scintillating lustre in gray disks inserted into the central gaps (scintillating-lustre effect. We report a novel variant of this illusion by replacing the radial lines with white and black radial fins. Both white and gray disks inserted into the central gaps were perceived as scintillating, if the ratio of the black/white fin width were balanced (ie, close to 1.0. Thus, the grayness of the central disk is not a prerequisite for the scintillation. However, the scintillation was drastically reduced when the ratio was imbalanced. Furthermore, the optimal ratio depended on the color of the center disks.

  4. SNO+ Scintillator Purification and Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, R.; Chen, M.; Chkvorets, O.; Hallman, D.; Vázquez-Jáuregui, E.

    2011-04-01

    We describe the R&D on the scintillator purification and assay methods and technology for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment. The SNO+ experiment is a replacement of the SNO heavy water with liquid scintillator comprised of 2 g/L PPO in linear alkylbenzene (LAB). During filling the LAB will be transported underground by rail car and purified by multi-stage distillation and steam stripping at a flow rate of 19 LPM. While the detector is operational the scintillator can be recirculated at 150 LPM (full detector volume in 4 days) to provide repurification as necessary by either water extraction (for Ra, K, Bi) or by functional metal scavenger columns (for Pb, Ra, Bi, Ac, Th) followed by steam stripping to remove noble gases and oxygen (Rn, O2, Kr, Ar). The metal scavenger columns also provide a method for scintillator assay for ex-situ measurement of the U and Th chain radioactivity. We have developed "natural" radioactive spikes of Pb and Ra in LAB and use these for purification testing. Lastly, we present the planned operating modes and purification strategies and the plant specifications and design.

  5. Complex Dynamics of Equatorial Scintillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piersanti, Mirko; Materassi, Massimo; Forte, Biagio; Cicone, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    Radio power scintillation, namely highly irregular fluctuations of the power of trans-ionospheric GNSS signals, is the effect of ionospheric plasma turbulence. The scintillation patterns on radio signals crossing the medium inherit the ionospheric turbulence characteristics of inter-scale coupling, local randomness and large time variability. On this basis, the remote sensing of local features of the turbulent plasma is feasible by studying radio scintillation induced by the ionosphere. The distinctive character of intermittent turbulent media depends on the fluctuations on the space- and time-scale statistical properties of the medium. Hence, assessing how the signal fluctuation properties vary under different Helio-Geophysical conditions will help to understand the corresponding dynamics of the turbulent medium crossed by the signal. Data analysis tools, provided by complex system science, appear to be best fitting to study the response of a turbulent medium, as the Earth's equatorial ionosphere, to the non-linear forcing exerted by the Solar Wind (SW). In particular we used the Adaptive Local Iterative Filtering, the Wavelet analysis and the Information theory data analysis tool. We have analysed the radio scintillation and ionospheric fluctuation data at low latitude focusing on the time and space multi-scale variability and on the causal relationship between forcing factors from the SW environment and the ionospheric response.

  6. An ISPA-camera for $\\beta$-radiography

    CERN Document Server

    Puertolas, D; Leutz, H; Gys, Thierry; D'Ambrosio, C

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a new type of beta-camera based on an Imaging Silicon Pixel Array (ISPA)-tube combined with planar plastic scintillators or with SiY2O5(Ce)-scintillating powder. The ISPA-tube consists of a photocathode viewed at 3 cm distance by a silicon anode divided into 1024 rectangular (75 microm x 500 microm) detector pixels, each bump-bonded to its equally-sized electronic pixel. Depending on the beta-detector thickness we achieved spatial resolutions (FWHM) between 105 microm (63Ni source and 30 microm thick plastic scintillator) and 240 microm (90Sr-90Y source and 120 microm thick plastic scintillator) by covering the detectors with brass templates. With their four 60 microm wide slits oriented parallel to the long pixel edges we simulated small sized beta-strips. The impact of detector thickness is explained by multiple scattering, angular aperture of the template slits and scintillating light distribution at the ISPA-photocathode. Beta detection sensitivities were measured with calibrated...

  7. A helical scintillating fiber hodoscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altmeier, M.; Bauer, F.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bissel, T.; Bollmann, R.; Busch, M.; Buesser, K.; Colberg, T.; Demiroers, L.; Diehl, O.; Dohrmann, F.; Engelhardt, H.P.; Eversheim, P.D.; Felden, O.; Gebel, R.; Glende, M.; Greiff, J.; Gross, A.; Gross-Hardt, R.; Hinterberger, F.; Jahn, R.; Jeske, M.; Jonas, E.; Krause, H.; Lahr, U.; Langkau, R.; Lindemann, T.; Lindlein, J.; Maier, R.; Maschuw, R.; Mayer-Kuckuck, T.; Meinerzhagen, A.; Naehle, O.; Pfuff, M.; Prasuhn, D.; Rohdjess, H.; Rosendaal, D.; Rossen, P. von; Sanz, B.; Schirm, N.; Schulz-Rojahn, M.; Schwarz, V.; Scobel, W.; Thomas, S.; Trelle, H.J.; Weise, E.; Wellinghausen, A.; Wiedmann, W.; Woller, K.; Ziegler, R

    1999-07-21

    A novel scintillating fiber hodoscope in helically cylindric geometry has been developed for detection of low multiplicity events of fast protons and other light charged particles in the internal target experiment EDDA at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY. The hodoscope consists of 640 scintillating fibers (2.5 mm diameter), arranged in four layers surrounding the COSY beam pipe. The fibers are helically wound in opposing directions and read out individually using 16-channel photomultipliers connected to a modified commercial encoding system. The detector covers an angular range of 9 deg. {<=}{theta}{<=}72 deg. and 0 deg. {<=}phi (cursive,open) Greek{<=}360 deg. in the lab frame. The detector length is 590 mm, the inner diameter 161 mm. Geometry and granularity of the hodoscope afford a position resolution of about 1.3 mm. The detector design took into consideration a maximum of reliability and a minimum of maintenance. An LED array may be used for monitoring purposes. (author)

  8. A helical scintillating fiber hodoscope

    CERN Document Server

    Altmeier, M; Bisplinghoff, J; Bissel, T; Bollmann, R; Busch, M; Büsser, K; Colberg, T; Demiroers, L; Diehl, O; Dohrmann, F; Engelhardt, H P; Eversheim, P D; Felden, O; Gebel, R; Glende, M; Greiff, J; Gross, A; Gross-Hardt, R; Hinterberger, F; Jahn, R; Jeske, M; Jonas, E; Krause, H; Lahr, U; Langkau, R; Lindemann, T; Lindlein, J; Maier, R; Maschuw, R; Mayer-Kuckuck, T; Meinerzhagen, A; Naehle, O; Pfuff, M; Prasuhn, D; Rohdjess, H; Rosendaal, D; Von Rossen, P; Sanz, B; Schirm, N; Schulz-Rojahn, M; Schwarz, V; Scobel, W; Thomas, S; Trelle, H J; Weise, E; Wellinghausen, A; Wiedmann, W; Woller, K; Ziegler, R

    1999-01-01

    A novel scintillating fiber hodoscope in helically cylindric geometry has been developed for detection of low multiplicity events of fast protons and other light charged particles in the internal target experiment EDDA at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY. The hodoscope consists of 640 scintillating fibers (2.5 mm diameter), arranged in four layers surrounding the COSY beam pipe. The fibers are helically wound in opposing directions and read out individually using 16-channel photomultipliers connected to a modified commercial encoding system. The detector covers an angular range of 9 deg. <= THETA<=72 deg. and 0 deg. <=phi (cursive,open) Greek<=360 deg. in the lab frame. The detector length is 590 mm, the inner diameter 161 mm. Geometry and granularity of the hodoscope afford a position resolution of about 1.3 mm. The detector design took into consideration a maximum of reliability and a minimum of maintenance. An LED array may be used for monitoring purposes. (author)

  9. A helical scintillating fiber hodoscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmeier, M.; Bauer, F.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bissel, T.; Bollmann, R.; Busch, M.; Büßer, K.; Colberg, T.; Demirörs, L.; Diehl, O.; Dohrmann, F.; Engelhardt, H. P.; Eversheim, P. D.; Felden, O.; Gebel, R.; Glende, M.; Greiff, J.; Groß, A.; Groß-Hardt, R.; Hinterberger, F.; Jahn, R.; Jeske, M.; Jonas, E.; Krause, H.; Lahr, U.; Langkau, R.; Lindemann, T.; Lindlein, J.; Maier, R.; Maschuw, R.; Mayer-Kuckuck, T.; Meinerzhagen, A.; Nähle, O.; Pfuff, M.; Prasuhn, D.; Rohdjeß, H.; Rosendaal, D.; von Rossen, P.; Sanz, B.; Schirm, N.; Schulz-Rojahn, M.; Schwarz, V.; Scobel, W.; Thomas, S.; Trelle, H. J.; Weise, E.; Wellinghausen, A.; Wiedmann, W.; Woller, K.; Ziegler, R.; EDDA Collaboration

    1999-07-01

    A novel scintillating fiber hodoscope in helically cylindric geometry has been developed for detection of low multiplicity events of fast protons and other light charged particles in the internal target experiment EDDA at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY. The hodoscope consists of 640 scintillating fibers (2.5 mm diameter), arranged in four layers surrounding the COSY beam pipe. The fibers are helically wound in opposing directions and read out individually using 16-channel photomultipliers connected to a modified commercial encoding system. The detector covers an angular range of 9°⩽ Θ⩽72° and 0°⩽ ϕ⩽360° in the lab frame. The detector length is 590 mm, the inner diameter 161 mm. Geometry and granularity of the hodoscope afford a position resolution of about 1.3 mm. The detector design took into consideration a maximum of reliability and a minimum of maintenance. An LED array may be used for monitoring purposes.

  10. Counting neutrons with a commercial S-CMOS camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Van Esch; Paolo, Mutti; Emilio, Ruiz-Martinez; Estefania, Abad Garcia; Marita, Mosconi; Jon, Ortega

    2018-01-01

    It is possible to detect individual flashes from thermal neutron impacts in a ZnS scintillator using a CMOS camera looking at the scintillator screen, and off line image processing. Some preliminary results indicated that the efficiency of recognition could be improved by optimizing the light collection and the image processing. We will report on this ongoing work which is a result from the collaboration between ESS Bilbao and the ILL. The main progress to be reported is situated on the level of the on-line treatment of the imaging data. If this technology is to work on a genuine scientific instrument, it is necessary that all the processing happens on line, to avoid the accumulation of large amounts of image data to be analyzed off line. An FPGA-based real-time full-deca mode VME-compatible CameraLink board has been developed at the SCI of the ILL, which is able to manage the data flow from the camera and convert it in a reasonable "neutron impact" data flow like from a usual neutron counting detector. The main challenge of the endeavor is the optical light collection from the scintillator. While the light yield of a ZnS scintillator is a priori rather important, the amount of light collected with a photographic objective is small. Different scintillators and different light collection techniques have been experimented with and results will be shown for different setups improving upon the light recuperation on the camera sensor. Improvements on the algorithm side will also be presented. The algorithms have to be at the same time efficient in their recognition of neutron signals, in their rejection of noise signals (internal and external to the camera) but also have to be simple enough to be easily implemented in the FPGA. The path from the idea of detecting individual neutron impacts with a CMOS camera to a practical working instrument detector is challenging, and in this paper we will give an overview of the part of the road that has already been walked.

  11. Buried plastic scintillator muon telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, F.; Medina-Tanco, G.A.; D'Olivo, J.C.; Paic, G.; Patino Salazar, M.E.; Nahmad-Achar, E.; Valdes Galicia, J.F.; Sandoval, A.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Salazar Ibarguen, H.; Diozcora Vargas Trevino, M.A.; Vergara Limon, S.; Villasenor, L.M.

    Muon telescopes can have several applications, ranging from astrophysical to solar-terrestrial interaction studies, and fundamental particle physics. We show the design parameters, characterization and end-to-end simulations of a detector composed by a set of three parallel dual-layer scintillator planes, buried at fix depths ranging from 0.30 m to 3 m. Each layer is 4 m2 and is composed by 50 rectangular pixels of 4cm x 2 m, oriented at a 90 deg angle with respect to its companion layer. The scintillators are MINOS extruded polystyrene strips with two Bicron wavelength shifting fibers mounted on machined grooves. Scintillation light is collected by multi-anode PMTs of 64 pixels, accommodating two fibers per pixel. The front-end electronics has a time resolution of 7.5 nsec. Any strip signal above threshold opens a GPS-tagged 2 micro-seconds data collection window. All data, including signal and background, are saved to hard disk. Separation of extensive air shower signals from secondary cosmic-ray background muons and electrons is done offline using the GPS-tagged threefold coincidence signal from surface water cerenkov detectors located nearby in a triangular array. Cosmic-ray showers above 6 PeV are selected. The data acquisition system is designed to keep both, background and signals from extensive air showers for a detailed offline data.

  12. Development of renal simulators for use in nuclear medicine; Desenvolvimento de simuladores renais para uso em medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dullius, Marcos Alexandre

    2014-09-01

    Quality control programs in nuclear medicine include verifying the efficiency of all equipment used for diagnosis and therapy, including scintillation cameras. To that end, we have developed and evaluated the performance of four phantom kidneys - two static anthropomorphic, one semi-dynamic, and one dynamic - to acquire static and dynamic renal scintigraphic images. The static anthropomorphic phantoms were used to characterize and evaluate the response of the processing system for different concentrations of radionuclides through static renal scintigraphy images ({sup 99m}Tc-DMSA), obtained with posterior, right posterior oblique, left posterior oblique, and anterior incidences. The static phantoms were made in two ways; one was made of acrylic from a mold of a pair of human kidneys preserved in formalin, and the second was built with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), in a 3D printer using the Slicer program, based on a computed tomography (CT) of the thorax, using the Slicer program. The semi-dynamic and dynamic phantoms were constructed to characterize and evaluate images of dynamic renal scintigraphy. In the semi-dynamic phantom, the injection of radiotracer was performed manually, whereas in the dynamic phantom, the radiotracer was automatically injected through an injector system. With the semi-dynamic phantom, it was possible to analyze the formation of a renogram with normal renal scintigraphic appearance using an imaging system. The simulations obtained from the dynamic phantom simulator enabled studies of normal renal scintigraphy and four other forms of renograms. The static anthropomorphic phantom kidneys proved to be efficient for use in evaluations of varying concentrations of radionuclides. The dynamic phantom kidney was useful for analysis of scintigraphic images and obtaining different pathways for elimination of the radioisotope, allowing for analysis of different renograms. Therefore, the new kidney phantoms would be useful for quality

  13. A Review of Ionospheric Scintillation Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadarshi, S

    This is a general review of the existing climatological models of ionospheric radio scintillation for high and equatorial latitudes. Trans-ionospheric communication of radio waves from transmitter to user is affected by the ionosphere which is highly variable and dynamic in both time and space. Scintillation is the term given to irregular amplitude and phase fluctuations of the received signals and related to the electron density irregularities in the ionosphere. Key sources of ionospheric irregularities are plasma instabilities; every irregularities model is based on the theory of radio wave propagation in random media. It is important to understand scintillation phenomena and the approach of different theories. Therefore, we have briefly discussed the theories that are used to interpret ionospheric scintillation data. The global morphology of ionospheric scintillation is also discussed briefly. The most important (in our opinion) analytical and physical models of scintillation are reviewed here.

  14. Optimisation of light output from zinc sulphide scintillators for fast neutron radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmanian, H.; Watterson, J. I. W.

    1998-04-01

    Fast neutron radiography (FNA) is a promising new application for small accelerators. The potential effectiveness of this technique depends on the development of suitable imaging detectors for fast neutrons. Zinc sulphide based scintillators have the largest light output per event in the family of imaging scintillators used so far in fast neutron radiography. but zinc sulphide is not transparent to its own light. This paper investigates different aspects of this scintillator in order to establish the factors affecting the light output. Zinc sulphide screens were prepared by suspending ZnS(Ag) particles at different concentration in a hydrogen rich matrix. The light output of these scintillators have been tested in fast neutron fields generated by the 7Li(p,n) 7Be and D(d,n) 3He reactions. The light output was detected using a CCD camera coupled to the scintillator screen by an optical fiber through an image intensifier. The results are presented in the form of graphs for different sets of particle sizes and concentrations. A comparison has been made with a simple theoretical model.

  15. Holes: Ionospheric Scintillation, GPS and Imputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    by Klobuchar [Parkinson et al., 1996]. 2.3.2 Definition, Characteristics and Models. The situation for scintillation, sadly, is not so simple.Groves...and J. A. Klobuchar (2003), Ionospheric scintillation effects on single and dual frequency gps positioning, in Proceedings of ION GPS/GNSS 2003... Klobuchar (1996), Commercial ionospheric scintillation monitoring receiver development and test results, in Proceedings of the 52nd Annual Meeting of the

  16. Advances in Yield Calibration of Scintillators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Haas, J.T.M.; Dorenbos, P.

    2008-01-01

    By means of a photomultiplier tube, a Si-photodiode, and a Si-avalanche photodiode, the absolute scintillation yield of recently developed LaBr3:Ce, LaCl3:Ce, and (Lu Y)2SiO5:Ce scintillators and traditional Lu2SiO5:Ce, Bi4Ge3O12, NaI:Tl CsI:Tl, and CsI:Na scintillators were determined. These are

  17. Designing an optimally proportional inorganic scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Jai, E-mail: jai.singh@cdu.edu.au [School of Engineering and IT, B-Purple-12, Faculty of EHSE, Charles Darwin University, NT 0909 (Australia); Koblov, Alexander [School of Engineering and IT, B-Purple-12, Faculty of EHSE, Charles Darwin University, NT 0909 (Australia)

    2012-09-01

    The nonproportionality observed in the light yield of inorganic scintillators is studied theoretically as a function of the rates of bimolecular and Auger quenching processes occurring within the electron track initiated by a gamma- or X-ray photon incident on a scintillator. Assuming a cylindrical track, the influence of the track radius and concentration of excitations created within the track on the scintillator light yield is also studied. Analysing the calculated light yield a guideline for inventing an optimally proportional scintillator with optimal energy resolution is presented.

  18. Random wave fields and scintillated beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, FS

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available fields . Artificial vortex fields CSIR National Laser Centre – p.2/29 Scintillated optical beams When an optical beam propagates through a turbulent atmosphere, the index variations cause random phase modulations that lead to distortions of the optical... beam. CSIR National Laser Centre – p.3/29 Weak scintillation If the scintillation is weak the resulting phase function of the optical beam is still continuous. Such a weakly scintillated beam can be corrected by an adaptive optical system. CSIR National...

  19. High-symmetry organic scintillator systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Patrick L.

    2017-09-05

    An ionizing radiation detector or scintillator system includes a scintillating material comprising an organic crystalline compound selected to generate photons in response to the passage of ionizing radiation. The organic compound has a crystalline symmetry of higher order than monoclinic, for example an orthorhombic, trigonal, tetragonal, hexagonal, or cubic symmetry. A photodetector is optically coupled to the scintillating material, and configured to generate electronic signals having pulse shapes based on the photons generated in the scintillating material. A discriminator is coupled to the photon detector, and configured to discriminate between neutrons and gamma rays in the ionizing radiation based on the pulse shapes of the output signals.

  20. High-symmetry organic scintillator systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Patrick L.

    2018-02-06

    An ionizing radiation detector or scintillator system includes a scintillating material comprising an organic crystalline compound selected to generate photons in response to the passage of ionizing radiation. The organic compound has a crystalline symmetry of higher order than monoclinic, for example an orthorhombic, trigonal, tetragonal, hexagonal, or cubic symmetry. A photodetector is optically coupled to the scintillating material, and configured to generate electronic signals having pulse shapes based on the photons generated in the scintillating material. A discriminator is coupled to the photon detector, and configured to discriminate between neutrons and gamma rays in the ionizing radiation based on the pulse shapes of the output signals.

  1. Making Ceramic Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squibb, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to make a clay camera. This idea of creating functional cameras from clay allows students to experience ceramics, photography, and painting all in one unit. (Contains 1 resource and 3 online resources.)

  2. Renal Leiomyosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Pastora Beardo; Maria José Ledo; Jose Luis Ruiz Campos

    2013-01-01

    Leiomyosarcoma (LMS) is a rare malignant tumor of smooth muscle origin that generally stems from soft tissues and uterine tissue. Although, a small percentage of these may originate from the smooth muscle or vessel walls, most of which are of venous origin. Renal leiomyosarcomas may arise from the smooth muscle fibers of renal pelvis, renal capsule or renal vessels, last one is the most frequent. We report a case of renal LMS that could be originated in the renal capsule.

  3. Adapting Virtual Camera Behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burelli, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    In a three-dimensional virtual environment aspects such as narrative and interaction completely depend on the camera since the camera defines the player’s point of view. Most research works in automatic camera control aim to take the control of this aspect from the player to automatically gen...

  4. Digital Pinhole Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancor, Rachael; Lancor, Brian

    2014-01-01

    In this article we describe how the classic pinhole camera demonstration can be adapted for use with digital cameras. Students can easily explore the effects of the size of the pinhole and its distance from the sensor on exposure time, magnification, and image quality. Instructions for constructing a digital pinhole camera and our method for…

  5. Fabrication and scintillation characteristics of CsI:Tl scintillator for X-ray imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Ju; Kim, Kyong Woo [NanoFocusRay, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Duk; Cho, Gyu Seong; Kim, Jong Yul [Korea Advanced Tnstitute of Science Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    The scintillator absorb X-ray and emit visible light. Thallium-doped cesium iodide(CsI:Tl) scintillator have been widely used in X-ray imaging system for medical and industrial because of high scintillation efficiency and proper emission wavelength (550nm) highly matching silicon-based photo-sensor. In this study, Scintillation film was fabricated by using a thermal evaporation method. CsI:Tl films according to fabrication condition such as different doped Tl concentrations, heat treatment temperature, chamber vacuum pressure, deposition thickness and substrate structure onto a glass. Fabricated CsI:Tl scintillators were observed using scanning electron microscopy(SEM), and scintillation characteristics were evaluated such as wavelength, light output of CsI:Tl scintillators were obtained by an X-ray measurement system.

  6. Photodetectors for scintillator proportionality measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, William W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States)], E-mail: wwmoses@lbl.gov; Choong, Woon-Seng [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States); Hull, Giulia; Payne, Steve; Cherepy, Nerine; Valentine, John D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States)

    2009-10-21

    We evaluate photodetectors for use in a Compton Coincidence apparatus designed for measuring scintillator proportionality. There are many requirements placed on the photodetector in these systems, including active area, linearity, and the ability to accurately measure low light levels (which implies high quantum efficiency and high signal-to-noise ratio). Through a combination of measurement and Monte Carlo simulation, we evaluate a number of potential photodetectors, especially photomultiplier tubes and hybrid photodetectors. Of these, we find that the most promising devices available are photomultiplier tubes with high ({approx}50%) quantum efficiency, although hybrid photodetectors with high quantum efficiency would be preferable.

  7. Pulsar scintillation patterns and strangelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez-García, M. Ángeles, E-mail: mperezga@usal.es [Department of Fundamental Physics and IUFFyM, University of Salamanca, Plaza de la Merced s/n, 37008 Salamanca (Spain); Silk, Joseph, E-mail: silk@iap.fr [Institut d' Astrophysique, UMR 7095, CNRS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 98bis Blvd Arago, 75014 Paris (France); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus, Baltimore MD 21218 (United States); Beecroft Institute of Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Pen, Ue-Li, E-mail: pen@cita.utoronto.ca [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 0N M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2013-12-18

    We propose that interstellar extreme scattering events, usually observed as pulsar scintillations, may be caused by a coherent agent rather than the usually assumed turbulence of H{sub 2} clouds. We find that the penetration of a flux of ionizing, positively charged strangelets or quark nuggets into a dense interstellar hydrogen cloud may produce ionization trails. Depending on the specific nature and energy of the incoming droplets, diffusive propagation or even capture in the cloud are possible. As a result, enhanced electron densities may form and constitute a lens-like scattering screen for radio pulsars and possibly for quasars.

  8. Supernova Neutrino Detection With Liquid Scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ianni, Aldo, E-mail: aldo.ianni@lngs.infn.it [I.N.F.N. Gran Sasso Laboratory, S.S. 17bis, 67100, Assergi (Italy)

    2011-08-10

    Core collapse supernovae are a remarkable source of neutrinos. These neutrinos can also be detected by means of massive liquid scintillators located underground. Observations of supernova neutrinos can shed light on the explosion mechanism and on neutrino properties. In this paper we review the detection channels for neutrinos in liquid scintillators. We consider present and future experiments for supernova neutrino searches.

  9. Neutron scintillators with high detection efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, T.; Katagiri, M. E-mail: kata@stsp2a0.tokai.jaeri.go.jp; Tsutsui, N.; Imai, K.; Matsubayashi, M.; Sakasai, K

    2004-08-21

    We have developed three kinds of phosphor/neutron-converter scintillators aiming to increase the detection efficiency of the neutron imaging detectors. One is the ZnS:Ag/{sup 6}LiF (powder) scintillator, which contained {sup 6}LiF about twice in amount comparing to the commercial product (Bicron, BC-704) and painted in a sheet, and the 0.4-mm-thick scintillator sheet exhibited the detection efficiency of 43.5% for thermal neutrons. This value was improved {approx}1.5 times than that of BC-704. Another developed scintillator was a ZnS:Ag/{sup 10}B{sub 2}O{sub 3} (powder), which contained {sup 10}B as a neutron converter. The scintillator was fabricated by sintering up to the temperature of 500 or 600 deg. C, and it exhibited the detection efficiency of 30% for thermal neutrons. Moreover, we developed ZnS:Ag/{sup 10}B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glass-scintillator, which was fabricated by increasing the amount of {sup 10}B{sub 2}O{sub 3} up to 70-90% of the constituents and by sintering the scintillator materials up to the temperature of 650 deg. C. The fabricated glass scintillators, which had a thickness of 0.9-1 mm, exhibited the detection efficiency of 20-40% for thermal neutrons.

  10. Epoxy resins produce improved plastic scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markley, F. W.

    1967-01-01

    Plastic scintillator produced by the substitution of epoxy resins for the commonly used polystyrene is easy to cast, stable at room temperature, and has the desirable properties of a thermoset or cross-linked system. Such scintillators can be immersed directly in strong solvents, an advantage in many chemical and biological experiments.

  11. Traffic camera system development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Toshi

    1997-04-01

    The intelligent transportation system has generated a strong need for the development of intelligent camera systems to meet the requirements of sophisticated applications, such as electronic toll collection (ETC), traffic violation detection and automatic parking lot control. In order to achieve the highest levels of accuracy in detection, these cameras must have high speed electronic shutters, high resolution, high frame rate, and communication capabilities. A progressive scan interline transfer CCD camera, with its high speed electronic shutter and resolution capabilities, provides the basic functions to meet the requirements of a traffic camera system. Unlike most industrial video imaging applications, traffic cameras must deal with harsh environmental conditions and an extremely wide range of light. Optical character recognition is a critical function of a modern traffic camera system, with detection and accuracy heavily dependent on the camera function. In order to operate under demanding conditions, communication and functional optimization is implemented to control cameras from a roadside computer. The camera operates with a shutter speed faster than 1/2000 sec. to capture highway traffic both day and night. Consequently camera gain, pedestal level, shutter speed and gamma functions are controlled by a look-up table containing various parameters based on environmental conditions, particularly lighting. Lighting conditions are studied carefully, to focus only on the critical license plate surface. A unique light sensor permits accurate reading under a variety of conditions, such as a sunny day, evening, twilight, storms, etc. These camera systems are being deployed successfully in major ETC projects throughout the world.

  12. SU-E-J-164: Verification of Commercial Respiratory Tracking System Using Scintillation Screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S

    2012-06-01

    The accuracy of the tracking system is critical for the result of four-dimensional radiation therapy. The objective of this study is to propose the method of verifying the accuracy of respiratory tracking system. The scintillation screen and the light marker between the transparent acrylic plates were designed to move according to the prerecorded respiratory organ motion of volunteers. A vertical circle photon beam with 3 cm diameters from the cyberknife unit was planned to track the motion of the scintillation screen with the plates. In dark room, the CCD camera outside of the phantom captured the scintillation from the screen and the light marker in 30 frames per second when the photon beam was incident. The pictures were captured by the CCD camera were analyzed frame by frame, and the discrepancy between the scintillating circle on the scintillation screen and the light marker depending on the time was measured. The discrepancy of the motions of the delivered photon beam and the light marker was analyzed. In the preliminary study, the maximum discrepancy was measured less than 1.5 mm in normal breathing pattern as the manufacturer specified it. As the speed of the motion was increased, the discrepancy between the position of the beam and internal marker increased. However, the error was clinically acceptable. The further study will be performed for the irregular respiratory motion patterns. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (20110004848). © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  13. Inorganic-organic rubbery scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Gektin, A V; Pogorelova, N; Neicheva, S; Sysoeva, E; Gavrilyuk, V

    2002-01-01

    Spectral-kinetic luminescence properties of films, containing homogeneously dispersed scintillation particles of CsI, CsI:Tl, CsI:Na, and NaI:Tl in optically transparent organosiloxane matrix, are presented. Material is flexible and rubbery and in consequence the detectors of convenient shapes can be produced. It is found that luminescence spectra of the received films are identical whereas decay times are much shorter compared to the same ones of the corresponding single crystals. Layers with pure CsI demonstrate only the fast UV emission (307 nm, 10 ns) without blue microsecond afterglow typical for crystals. The films containing NaI:Tl are non-hygroscopic and preserve scintillation properties for a long time in humid atmosphere unlike single crystals. Organosiloxane layers with CsI:Tl particles provide high light output with good energy resolution for sup 5 sup 5 Fe, sup 1 sup 0 sup 9 Cd, sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am sources, and are capable of detecting both X-rays and alpha-, beta-particles.

  14. A novel fully integrated handheld gamma camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massari, R.; Ucci, A.; Campisi, C. [Biostructure and Bioimaging Institute (IBB), National Research Council of Italy (CNR), Rome (Italy); Scopinaro, F. [University of Rome “La Sapienza”, S. Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy); Soluri, A., E-mail: alessandro.soluri@ibb.cnr.it [Biostructure and Bioimaging Institute (IBB), National Research Council of Italy (CNR), Rome (Italy)

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we present an innovative, fully integrated handheld gamma camera, namely designed to gather in the same device the gamma ray detector with the display and the embedded computing system. The low power consumption allows the prototype to be battery operated. To be useful in radioguided surgery, an intraoperative gamma camera must be very easy to handle since it must be moved to find a suitable view. Consequently, we have developed the first prototype of a fully integrated, compact and lightweight gamma camera for radiopharmaceuticals fast imaging. The device can operate without cables across the sterile field, so it may be easily used in the operating theater for radioguided surgery. The prototype proposed consists of a Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) array coupled with a proprietary scintillation structure based on CsI(Tl) crystals. To read the SiPM output signals, we have developed a very low power readout electronics and a dedicated analog to digital conversion system. One of the most critical aspects we faced designing the prototype was the low power consumption, which is mandatory to develop a battery operated device. We have applied this detection device in the lymphoscintigraphy technique (sentinel lymph node mapping) comparing the results obtained with those of a commercial gamma camera (Philips SKYLight). The results obtained confirm a rapid response of the device and an adequate spatial resolution for the use in the scintigraphic imaging. This work confirms the feasibility of a small gamma camera with an integrated display. This device is designed for radioguided surgery and small organ imaging, but it could be easily combined into surgical navigation systems.

  15. A nonimaging scintillation probe to measure penile hemodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckier, L S; Korupolu, G R; Gladshteyn, M; Sattenberg, R; Goldstein, R; Ricciardi, R; Goodwin, P; Melman, A; Blaufox, M D

    1995-12-01

    We have developed a penile nonimaging scintillation (PNIS) probe consisting of a plastic well-type scintillation crystal interfaced to a portable computer and acquisition board. This report describes the design of the PNIS probe, performance characteristics, mode of usage and illustrative results which demonstrate its capabilities. With the PNIS probe, penile blood-pool studies were performed in nine patients utilizing 3.7 MBq (100 microCi) autologous 99mTc-labeled red blood cells (RBCs). Venous blood standards were assayed to enable conversion of the count rate to volummetric measurements. Washin of peripherally administered 99mTc-RBCs was mathematically analyzed to estimate penile blood volume and cavernosal flow rate in the flaccid state. The rate of change of penile blood volume after intracavernosal vasodilators was used to generate measures of stimulated flow. A major advantage of this device over the gamma-camera is a 3300-fold increase in count rate sensitivity, which allows for markedly improved temporal resolution while significantly reducing the radiopharmaceutical dosage. Additionally, the PNIS probe is portable, economical and is not dependent on operator-defined regions of interest. Count rate sensitivity is relatively constant within the bore, with the exception of the proximal region adjacent to the opening, where geometric efficiency is reduced. The PNIS probe is an effective device for measuring penile activity in radionuclide studies, allowing for acquisition of time-activity curves of the penis during flaccid washin of peripherally labeled red blood cells and after pharmacologic stimulation to induce erection.

  16. The improved scintillation crystal lead tungstate scintillation for PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Youbao; WU, Rurong; Xiao, Linrong; Zhang, Jianxin; Yang, Peizhi; Yan, Hui

    2009-07-01

    As a valuable material for the detecting of γ-ray, PbWO4 and BaF2:PbWO4 crystals were grown by a novel multi-crucible temperature gradient system developed by ourselves. Utilizing a topical partial heating method, this system can form a topical partial high temperature in its hearth. Thus this system could melt raw materials in step by step as requirement. The advantage of this method is that there would be solid obstruct left on the melt in the procedure of the crystal growing up. The left obstruct could prevent the volatilization of the component in the melt. Hence it is helpful for the composition homogenization in the crystal. The system also offers a sustaining device for multi-crucibles and thus it can grow many crystals simultaneity. The optical properties and scintillation properties of the crystals were studied. The results reveal that the ions doping improves the scintillation properties of the crystal. The transmittance spectra show that the transmittance of BaF2:PbWO4 crystals are better than that of PbWO4 crystals. For the PbWO4 crystals, their absorption edge is at 325nm, and their maximum transmittance is 68%. For the BaF2:PbWO4 crystals, their absorption edge is at 325nm and their maximum transmittance is upto76%. The X-ray excited luminescence spectra shows that the luminescence peak is at 420nm for the samples of PbWO4 crystal while the peak is at 430nm for the samples of BaF2:PbWO4 crystal respectively. The luminescence intensity of the samples of BaF2:PbWO4 crystal is about two times than that of PbWO4 crystal. And their peak shape is different for the two kind of crystal. The light yield of BaF2:PbWO4 crystals is about 2.9 times than that of PbWO4 crystal Analyzing these scintillation properties, we find that the VPb 3+ and VO- defects do harm for the optical properties of the crystal. Ions doping method could reduce the defect concentration and improving its illumination performance of the crystal. Specially, the doped F- ions in O2- site can

  17. Performance modeling of a wearable brain PET (BET) camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtlein, C. R.; Turner, J. N.; Thompson, M. O.; Mandal, K. C.; Häggström, I.; Zhang, J.; Humm, J. L.; Feiglin, D. H.; Krol, A.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: To explore, by means of analytical and Monte Carlo modeling, performance of a novel lightweight and low-cost wearable helmet-shaped Brain PET (BET) camera based on thin-film digital Geiger Avalanche Photo Diode (dGAPD) with LSO and LaBr3 scintillators for imaging in vivo human brain processes for freely moving and acting subjects responding to various stimuli in any environment. Methods: We performed analytical and Monte Carlo modeling PET performance of a spherical cap BET device and cylindrical brain PET (CYL) device, both with 25 cm diameter and the same total mass of LSO scintillator. Total mass of LSO in both the BET and CYL systems is about 32 kg for a 25 mm thick scintillator, and 13 kg for 10 mm thick scintillator (assuming an LSO density of 7.3 g/ml). We also investigated a similar system using an LaBr3 scintillator corresponding to 22 kg and 9 kg for the 25 mm and 10 mm thick systems (assuming an LaBr3 density of 5.08 g/ml). In addition, we considered a clinical whole body (WB) LSO PET/CT scanner with 82 cm ring diameter and 15.8 cm axial length to represent a reference system. BET consisted of distributed Autonomous Detector Arrays (ADAs) integrated into Intelligent Autonomous Detector Blocks (IADBs). The ADA comprised of an array of small LYSO scintillator volumes (voxels with base a×a: 1.0 50% better noise equivalent count (NEC) performance relative to the CYL geometry, and >1100% better performance than a WB geometry for 25 mm thick LSO and LaBr3. For 10 mm thick LaBr3 equivalent mass systems LSO (7 mm thick) performed ~40% higher NEC than LaBr3. Analytic and Monte Carlo simulations also showed that 1×1×3 mm scintillator crystals can achieve ~1.2 mm FWHM spatial resolution. Conclusions: This study shows that a spherical cap brain PET system can provide improved NEC while preserving spatial resolution when compared to an equivalent dedicated cylindrical PET brain camera and shows greatly improved PET performance relative to a conventional

  18. Renal leiomyosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Gelincik, İ; Tok, A

    2013-01-01

    Renal leiomyosarcomas are very rare and only account for 1-3% of primary renal malignancies. The prognosis for a renal sarcoma is poor, and differentiation from sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma and a renal sarcoma is particularly necessary. The patient's clinical presentation and imaging findings are not helpful for accurate preoperative diagnosis. The primary treatment is radical nephrectomy with or without adjuvant radiotherapy chemotherapy. The prognosis is poor. We report a case of primar...

  19. Practical use of a plastic scintillator for quality assurance of electron beam therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogo, Katsunori; Tatsuno, Yuya; Tsuneda, Masato; Aono, Yuki; Mochizuki, Daiki; Fujisawa, Yoshiki; Matsushita, Akihiro; Ishigami, Minoru; Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Hayakawa, Kazushige

    2017-06-01

    Quality assurance (QA) of clinical electron beams is essential for performing accurate and safe radiation therapy. However, with advances in radiation therapy, QA has become increasingly labor-intensive and time-consuming. In this paper, we propose a tissue-equivalent plastic scintillator for quick and easy QA of clinical electron beams. The proposed tool comprises a plastic scintillator plate and a charge-coupled device camera that enable the scintillation light by electron beams to be recorded with high sensitivity and high spatial resolution. Further, the Cerenkov image is directly subtracted from the scintillation image to discriminate Cerenkov emissions and accurately measure the dose profiles of electron beams with high spatial resolution. Compared with conventional methods, discrepancies in the depth profile improved from 7% to 2% in the buildup region via subtractive corrections. Further, the output brightness showed good linearity with dose, good reproducibility (deviations below 1%), and dose rate independence (within 0.5%). The depth of 50% dose measured with the tool, an index of electron beam quality, was within  ±0.5 mm of that obtained with an ionization chamber. Lateral brightness profiles agreed with the lateral dose profiles to within 4% and no significant improvement was obtained using Cerenkov corrections. Field size agreed to within 0.5 mm with those obtained with ionization chamber. For clinical QA of electron boost treatment, a disk scintillator that mimics the shape of a patient’s breast is applied. The brightness distribution and dose, calculated using a treatment planning system, was generally acceptable for clinical use, except in limited zones. Overall, the proposed plastic scintillator plate tool efficiently performs QA for electron beam therapy and enables simultaneous verification of output constancy, beam quality, depth, and lateral dose profiles during monthly QAs at lower doses of irradiation (small monitor units, MUs).

  20. Forecasting scintillation activity and equatorial spread F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David N.; Redmon, Robert J.

    2017-03-01

    When transionospheric radio waves propagate through an irregular ionosphere with plasma depletions or "bubbles," they are subject to sporadic enhancement and fading, which is referred to as scintillation. Communication and navigation systems may be subject to these detrimental effects if the scintillation is strong enough. It is critical to have knowledge of the current ionospheric conditions so that system operators can distinguish between the natural radio environment and system-induced failures. In this paper we briefly describe the Forecasting Ionospheric Real-time Scintillation Tool UHF scintillation forecasting technique, which utilizes the observed characteristic parameter h'F from a ground-based, ionospheric sounder near the magnetic equator. The prereversal enhancement in vertical E × B drift velocity after sunset is the prime driver for creating plasma depletions and bubbles. In addition, there exists a "threshold" in the h'F value at 1930 LT, h'Fthr, such that, on any given evening, if h'F is significantly above h'Fthr, then scintillation activity is likely to occur, and if it is below h'Fthr, scintillation activity is unlikely to occur. We use this technique to explain the lack of scintillation activity prior to the Halloween storm in October 2003 in the Peruvian longitude sector. In addition, we have carried out a study which forecasts the occurrence or nonoccurrence of equatorial spread F (ESF), on a night-to-night basis, in five longitude sectors. The overall forecasting success is greater than 80% for each of the five longitude sectors.

  1. The VISTA infrared camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, G. B.; Caldwell, M.; Ward, A. K.; Whalley, M. S.; Woodhouse, G.; Edeson, R. L.; Clark, P.; Beard, S. M.; Gallie, A. M.; Todd, S. P.; Strachan, J. M. D.; Bezawada, N. N.; Sutherland, W. J.; Emerson, J. P.

    2006-06-01

    We describe the integration and test phase of the construction of the VISTA Infrared Camera, a 64 Megapixel, 1.65 degree field of view 0.9-2.4 micron camera which will soon be operating at the cassegrain focus of the 4m VISTA telescope. The camera incorporates sixteen IR detectors and six CCD detectors which are used to provide autoguiding and wavefront sensing information to the VISTA telescope control system.

  2. Streak camera meeting summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, Daniel H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bliss, David E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Streak cameras are important for high-speed data acquisition in single event experiments, where the total recorded information (I) is shared between the number of measurements (M) and the number of samples (S). Topics of this meeting included: streak camera use at the national laboratories; current streak camera production; new tube developments and alternative technologies; and future planning. Each topic is summarized in the following sections.

  3. Solid state video cameras

    CERN Document Server

    Cristol, Y

    2013-01-01

    Solid State Video Cameras reviews the state of the art in the field of solid-state television cameras as compiled from patent literature. Organized into 10 chapters, the book begins with the basic array types of solid-state imagers and appropriate read-out circuits and methods. Documents relating to improvement of picture quality, such as spurious signal suppression, uniformity correction, or resolution enhancement, are also cited. The last part considerssolid-state color cameras.

  4. Airborne Network Camera Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Optical Systems Group Document 466-15 AIRBORNE NETWORK CAMERA STANDARD DISTRIBUTION A: APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE...Airborne Network Camera Standard 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER...without the focus of standardization for interoperable command and control, storage, and data streaming has been the airborne network camera systems used

  5. POLARIS: Portable Liquid Argon Imaging Scintillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yanyu; Kovacs, Benjamin; Kamp, Nicholas; Aidala, Christine; Polaris Team

    2017-09-01

    Liquefied noble gas detectors have become widely used in nuclear and particle physics, in particular for detecting neutrinos and in dark matter searches. However, their potential for neutron detection in low-energy nuclear physics has not yet been realized. The University of Michigan has been constructing a hybrid scintillating time projection chamber for detection of neutrons in the 200 keV 10 MeV range. The scintillation material is argon, and various dopants to improve detector efficiency are being explored. With collection of both scintillation light and ionization charge, improved energy resolution for neutrons is expected compared to existing measurement techniques.

  6. Scintillation particle detection based on microfluidics

    CERN Document Server

    Mapelli, A; Renaud, P; Gorini, B; Trivino, N Vico; Jiguet, S; Vandelli, W; Haguenauer, M

    2010-01-01

    A novel type of particle detector based on scintillation, with precise spatial resolution and high radiation hardness, is being studied. It consists of a single microfluidic channel filled with a liquid scintillator and is designed to define an array of scintillating waveguides each independently coupled to a photodetector. Prototype detectors built using an SU-8 epoxy resin have been tested with electrons from a radioactive source. The experimental results show a light yield compatible with the theoretical expectations and confirm the validity of the approach. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Advanced plastic scintillators for fast neutron discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Patrick L [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Anstey, Mitchell [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Doty, F. Patrick [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Mengesha, Wondwosen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The present work addresses the need for solid-state, fast neutron discriminating scintillators that possess higher light yields and faster decay kinetics than existing organic scintillators. These respective attributes are of critical importance for improving the gamma-rejection capabilities and increasing the neutron discrimination performance under high-rate conditions. Two key applications that will benefit from these improvements include large-volume passive detection scenarios as well as active interrogation search for special nuclear materials. Molecular design principles were employed throughout this work, resulting in synthetically tailored materials that possess the targeted scintillation properties.

  8. Renal Osteodystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aynur Metin Terzibaşoğlu

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic renal insufficiency is a functional definition which is characterized by irreversible and progressive decreasing in renal functions. This impairment is in collaboration with glomeruler filtration rate and serum creatinine levels. Besides this, different grades of bone metabolism disorders develop in chronic renal insufficiency. Pathologic changes in bone tissue due to loss of renal paranchyme is interrelated with calcium, phosphorus vitamine-D and parathyroid hormone. Clinically we can see high turnover bone disease, low turnover bone disease, osteomalacia, osteosclerosis and osteoporosis in renal osteodystropy. In this article we aimed to review pathology of bone metabolism disorders due to chronic renal insufficiency, clinic aspects and treatment approaches briefly.

  9. High-resolution tracking using large capillary bundles filled with liquid scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Annis, P; Benussi, L; Bruski, N; Buontempo, S; Currat, C; D'Ambrosio, N; Van Dantzig, R; Dupraz, J P; Ereditato, A; Fabre, Jean-Paul; Fanti, V; Feyt, J; Frekers, D; Frenkel, A; Galeazzi, F; Garufi, F; Goldberg, J; Golovkin, S V; Gorin, A M; Grégoire, G; Harrison, K; Höpfner, K; Holtz, K; Konijn, J; Kozarenko, E N; Kreslo, I E; Kushnirenko, A E; Liberti, B; Martellotti, G; Medvedkov, A M; Michel, L; Migliozzi, P; Mommaert, C; Mondardini, M R; Panman, J; Penso, G; Petukhov, Yu P; Rondeshagen, D; Siegmund, W P; Tyukov, V E; Van Beek, G; Vasilchenko, V G; Vilain, P; Visschers, J L; Wilquet, G; Winter, Klaus; Wolff, T; Wörtche, H J; Wong, H; Zimyn, K V

    2000-01-01

    We have developed large high-resolution tracking detectors based on glass capillaries filled with organic liquid scintillator of high refractive index. These liquid-core scintillating optical fibres act simultaneously as detectors of charged particles and as image guides. Track images projected onto the readout end of a capillary bundle are visualized by an optoelectronic chain consisting of a set of image-intensifier tubes followed by a photosensitive CCD or by an EBCCD camera. Two prototype detectors, each composed of \\hbox{$\\approx 10^6$} capillaries with \\hbox{20$-$25 $\\mu$m} diameter and \\hbox{0.9$-$1.8 m} length, have been tested, and a spatial resolution of the order of \\hbox{20$-$40 $\\mu$m} has been attained. A high scintillation efficiency and a large light-attenuation length, in excess of 3 m, was achieved through special purification of the liquid scintillator. Along the tracks of minimum-ionizing particles, the hit densities obtained were $\\sim$ 8 hits/mm at the readout window, and \\hbox{$\\sim$ 3 ...

  10. TH-C-19A-10: Systematic Evaluation of Photodetectors Performances for Plastic Scintillation Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boivin, J; Beaulieu, L [University Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada); Centre Hospitalier University de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada); Beddar, S [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Guillemette, M [Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et de Pneumologie de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To assess and compare the performance of different photodetectors likely to be used in a plastic scintillation detector (PSD). Methods: The PSD consists of a 1 mm diameter, 10 mm long plastic scintillation fiber (BCF-60) which is optically coupled to a clear 10 m long optical fiber of the same diameter. A light-tight plastic sheath covers both fibers and the scintillator end is sealed. The clear fiber end is connected to one of the following six studied photodetectors: two polychromatic cameras (one with an optical lens and one with a fiber optic taper replacing the lens); a monochromatic camera with the same optical lens; a PIN photodiode; an avalanche photodiode (APD); and a photomultiplier tube (PMT). Each PSD is exposed to both low energy beams (120, 180, and 220 kVp) from an orthovoltage unit, and high energy beams (6 MV and 23 MV) from a linear accelerator. Various dose rates are explored to identify the photodetectors operating ranges and accuracy. Results: For all photodetectors, the relative uncertainty remains under 5 % for dose rates over 3 mGy/s. The taper camera collects four times more signal than the optical lens camera, although its standard deviation is higher since it could not be cooled. The PIN, APD and PMT have higher sensitivity, suitable for low dose rate and out-of-field dose monitoring. PMT's relative uncertainty remains under 1 % at the lowest dose rate achievable (50 μGy/s), suggesting optimal use for live dosimetry. Conclusion: A set of 6 photodetectors have been studied over a broad dose rate range at various energies. For dose rate above 3 mGy/s, the PIN diode is the most effective photodetector in term of performance/cost ratio. For lower dose rate, such as those seen in interventional radiology, PMTs are the optimal choice. FQRNT Doctoral Research Scholarship.

  11. SU-F-T-11: Scintillator Based Quality Assurance Device for HDR Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jozsef, G [New York University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To build a test device for HDR afterloaders capable of checking source positions, times at positions and estimate the activity of the source. Methods: A catheter is taped on a plastic scintillation sheet. When a source travels through the catheter, the scintillator sheet lights up around the source. The sheet is monitored with a video camera, and records the movement of the light spot. The center of the spot on each image on the video provides the source location, and the time stamps of the images can provide the dwell time the source spend in each location. Finally, the brightness of the light spot is related to the activity of the source. A code was developed for noise removal, calibrate the scale of the image to centimeters, eliminate the distortion caused by the oblique view angle, identifying the boundaries of the light spot, transforming the image into binary and detect and calculate the source motion, positions and times. The images are much less noisy if the camera is shielded. That requires that the light spot is monitored in a mirror, rather than directly. The whole assembly is covered from external light and has a size of approximately 17×35×25cm (H×L×W) Results: A cheap camera in BW mode proved to be sufficient with a plastic scintillator sheet. The best images were resulted by a 3mm thick sheet with ZnS:Ag surface coating. The shielding of the camera decreased the noise, but could not eliminate it. A test run even in noisy condition resulted in approximately 1 mm and 1 sec difference from the planned positions and dwell times. Activity tests are in progress. Conclusion: The proposed method is feasible. It might simplify the monthly QA process of HDR Brachytherapy units.

  12. Measurement of Radiation Damage of Water-based Liquid Scintillator and Liquid Scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Bignell, Lindsey J; Hans, Sunej; Jaffe, David E; Rosero, Richard; Vigdor, Steven; Viren, Brett; Worcester, Elizabeth; Yeh, Minfang; Zhang, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Liquid scintillating phantoms have been proposed as a means to perform real-time 3D dosimetry for proton therapy treatment plan verification. We have studied what effect radiation damage to the scintillator will have upon this application. We have performed measurements of the degradation of the light yield and optical attenuation length of liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator after irradiation by 201 MeV proton beams that deposited doses of approximately 52 Gy, 300 Gy, and 800 Gy in the scintillator. Liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator (composed of $5\\%$ scintillating phase) exhibit light yield reductions of $1.74 \\pm 0.55 \\%$ and $1.31 \\pm 0.59 \\%$ after $\\approx$ 800 Gy of proton dose, respectively. Whilst some increased optical attenuation was observed in the irradiated samples, the measured reduction to the light yield is also due to damage to the scintillation light production. Based on our results and conservative estimates of the expected dose in a clinical conte...

  13. Thermal Cameras and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Rikke; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal cameras are passive sensors that capture the infrared radiation emitted by all objects with a temperature above absolute zero. This type of camera was originally developed as a surveillance and night vision tool for the military, but recently the price has dropped, significantly opening up...

  14. High-efficiency organic glass scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Patrick L.; Carlson, Joseph S.

    2017-12-19

    A new family of neutron/gamma discriminating scintillators is disclosed that comprises stable organic glasses that may be melt-cast into transparent monoliths. These materials have been shown to provide light yields greater than solution-grown trans-stilbene crystals and efficient PSD capabilities when combined with 0.01 to 0.05% by weight of the total composition of a wavelength-shifting fluorophore. Photoluminescence measurements reveal fluorescence quantum yields that are 2 to 5 times greater than conventional plastic or liquid scintillator matrices, which accounts for the superior light yield of these glasses. The unique combination of high scintillation light-yields, efficient neutron/gamma PSD, and straightforward scale-up via melt-casting distinguishes the developed organic glasses from existing scintillators.

  15. GEM scintillation readout with avalanche photodiodes

    CERN Document Server

    Conceição, A S; Fernandes, L M P; Monteiro, C M B; Coelho, L C C; Azevedo, C D R; Veloso, J F C A; Lopesac, J A M; dos Santosa, J M F

    2007-01-01

    The use of the scintillation produced in the charge avalanches in GEM holes as signal amplification and readout is investigated for xenon. A VUV-sensitive avalanche photodiode has been used as photosensor. Detector gains of about 4 × 104 are achieved in scintillation readout mode, for GEM voltages of 490 V and for a photosensor gain of 150. Those gains are more than one order of magnitude larger than what is obtained using charge readout. In addition, the energy resolutions achieved with the scintillation readout are lower than those achieved with charge readout. The GEM scintillation yield in xenon was measured as a function of GEM voltage, presenting values that are about a half of those achieved for the charge yield, and reach about 730 photons per primary electron at GEM voltages of 490 V.

  16. CALICE scintillator hadron calorimeter prototype commissioning and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . J CVACH. Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2,. 182 21 Prague, Czech Republic. E-mail: cvach@fzu.cz. Abstract. First experience with construction and positron beam tests of a scintillator.

  17. Design and Construction of an X-ray Lightning Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaal, M.; Dwyer, J. R.; Rassoul, H. K.; Uman, M. A.; Jordan, D. M.; Hill, J. D.

    2010-12-01

    A pinhole-type camera was designed and built for the purpose of producing high-speed images of the x-ray emissions from rocket-and-wire-triggered lightning. The camera consists of 30 7.62-cm diameter NaI(Tl) scintillation detectors, each sampling at 10 million frames per second. The steel structure of the camera is encased in 1.27-cm thick lead, which blocks x-rays that are less than 400 keV, except through a 7.62-cm diameter “pinhole” aperture located at the front of the camera. The lead and steel structure is covered in 0.16-cm thick aluminum to block RF noise, water and light. All together, the camera weighs about 550-kg and is approximately 1.2-m x 0.6-m x 0.6-m. The image plane, which is adjustable, was placed 32-cm behind the pinhole aperture, giving a field of view of about ±38° in both the vertical and horizontal directions. The elevation of the camera is adjustable between 0 and 50° from horizontal and the camera may be pointed in any azimuthal direction. In its current configuration, the camera’s angular resolution is about 14°. During the summer of 2010, the x-ray camera was located 44-m from the rocket-launch tower at the UF/Florida Tech International Center for Lightning Research and Testing (ICLRT) at Camp Blanding, FL and several rocket-triggered lightning flashes were observed. In this presentation, I will discuss the design, construction and operation of this x-ray camera.

  18. Spectrometric characteristics of polystyrene scintillation films

    CERN Document Server

    Astvatsaturov, A R; Gavalyan, V B; Gavalyan, V G

    1999-01-01

    The spectrometric characteristics of five types of polystyrene scintillation films with thicknesses of 10, 30, 50 and 80 mu m and of analogous 250 mu m thick plates irradiated with sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu, sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 Pu and sup 2 sup 2 sup 6 Ra sources of alpha-particles have been studied. The prospects of utilization of scintillation films as radiators for detection of heavy charged particles and measurement of their energy was experimentally shown.

  19. A new technique for infrared scintillation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiossi, F., E-mail: federico.chiossi@studenti.unipd.it [Dip. di Fisica e Astronomia and INFN, University of Padua, Via F. Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Brylew, K. [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Borghesani, A.F. [CNISM Unit and Dip. di Fisica e Astronomia, University of Padua, Via F. Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Braggio, C.; Carugno, G. [Dip. di Fisica e Astronomia and INFN, University of Padua, Via F. Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Drozdowski, W. [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Guarise, M. [Dip. di Fisica e Astronomia and INFN, University of Padua, Via F. Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2017-05-21

    We propose a new technique to measure the infrared scintillation light yield of rare earth doped crystals by comparing it to near UV–visible scintillation of a calibrated Pr:(Lu{sub 0.75}Y{sub 0.25}){sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} sample. As an example, we apply this technique to provide the light yield in visible and infrared range up to 1700 nm of this crystal.

  20. Gas scintillation glass GEM detector for high-resolution X-ray imaging and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, T., E-mail: fujiwara-t@aist.go.jp [Research Institute for Measurement and Analytical Instrumentation, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Mitsuya, Y. [Nuclear Professional School, The University of Tokyo, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Fushie, T. [Radiment Lab. Inc., Setagaya, Tokyo 156-0044 (Japan); Murata, K.; Kawamura, A.; Koishikawa, A. [XIT Co., Naruse, Machida, Tokyo 194-0045 (Japan); Toyokawa, H. [Research Institute for Measurement and Analytical Instrumentation, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Takahashi, H. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan)

    2017-04-01

    A high-spatial-resolution X-ray-imaging gaseous detector has been developed with a single high-gas-gain glass gas electron multiplier (G-GEM), scintillation gas, and optical camera. High-resolution X-ray imaging of soft elements is performed with a spatial resolution of 281 µm rms and an effective area of 100×100 mm. In addition, high-resolution X-ray 3D computed tomography (CT) is successfully demonstrated with the gaseous detector. It shows high sensitivity to low-energy X-rays, which results in high-contrast radiographs of objects containing elements with low atomic numbers. In addition, the high yield of scintillation light enables fast X-ray imaging, which is an advantage for constructing CT images with low-energy X-rays.

  1. Direct measurement of Lubberts effect in CsI:Tl scintillators using single x-ray photon imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howansky, Adrian; Lubinsky, A. R.; Ghose, S. K.; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Zhao, Wei

    2017-03-01

    The imaging performance of an indirect flat panel detector (I-FPD) is fundamentally limited by that of its scintillator. The scintillator's modulation transfer function (MTF) varies as a function of the depth of x-ray interaction in the layer, due to differences in the lateral spread of light before detection by the optical sensor. This variation degrades the spatial frequency-dependent detective quantum efficiency (DQE(f)) of I-FPDs, and is quantified by the Lubberts effect. The depth-dependent MTFs of various scintillators used in I-FPDs have been estimated using Monte Carlo simulations, but have never been measured directly. This work presents the first experimental measurements of the depth-dependent MTF of thallium-doped cesium iodide (CsI) and terbium-doped Gd2O2S (GOS) scintillators with thickness ranging from 200 - 1000 μm. Light bursts from individual x-ray interactions occurring at known, fixed depths within a scintillator are imaged using an ultra-high-sensitivity II-EMCCD (image-intensifier, electron multiplying charge coupled device) camera. X-ray interaction depth in the scintillator is localized using a micro-slit beam of parallel synchrotron radiation (32 keV), and varied by translation in 50 +/- 1 µm depth intervals. Fourier analysis of the imaged light bursts is used to deduce the MTF versus x-ray interaction depth z. Measurements of MTF(z,f) are used to calculate presampling MTF(f) with RQA-M3, RQA5 and RQA9 beam qualities and compared with conventional slanted edge measurements. Images of the depth-varying light bursts are used to derive each scintillator's Lubberts function for a 32 keV beam.

  2. Kitt Peak speckle camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breckinridge, J B; McAlister, H A; Robinson, W G

    1979-04-01

    The speckle camera in regular use at Kitt Peak National Observatory since 1974 is described in detail. The design of the atmospheric dispersion compensation prisms, the use of film as a recording medium, the accuracy of double star measurements, and the next generation speckle camera are discussed. Photographs of double star speckle patterns with separations from 1.4 sec of arc to 4.7 sec of arc are shown to illustrate the quality of image formation with this camera, the effects of seeing on the patterns, and to illustrate the isoplanatic patch of the atmosphere.

  3. Mars Observer Camera

    OpenAIRE

    Malin, M. C.; Danielson, G. E.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Masursky, H.; J. Veverka(Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, U.S.A.); Ravine, M. A.; Soulanille, T.A.

    1992-01-01

    The Mars Observer camera (MOC) is a three-component system (one narrow-angle and two wide-angle cameras) designed to take high spatial resolution pictures of the surface of Mars and to obtain lower spatial resolution, synoptic coverage of the planet's surface and atmosphere. The cameras are based on the “push broom” technique; that is, they do not take “frames” but rather build pictures, one line at a time, as the spacecraft moves around the planet in its orbit. MOC is primarily a telescope f...

  4. Camera as Cultural Critique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhr, Christian

    2015-01-01

    What does the use of cameras entail for the production of cultural critique in anthropology? Visual anthropological analysis and cultural critique starts at the very moment a camera is brought into the field or existing visual images are engaged. The framing, distances, and interactions between...... researchers, cameras, and filmed subjects already inherently comprise analytical decisions. It is these ethnographic qualities inherent in audiovisual and photographic imagery that make it of particular value to a participatory anthropological enterprise that seeks to resist analytic closure and seeks instead...

  5. Renal angiomyolipoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm-Nielsen, P; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    1988-01-01

    Renal angiomyolipoma is a rare lesion composed of smooth muscle cells, adipose tissue and abnormal vessels. It is currently classified as a benign, non-epithelial renal tumor. It has a high incidence in patients suffering from tuberous sclerosis but is more frequently found as an isolated renal...... lesion. Three cases of renal angiomyolipoma, 2 of which underwent perfusion-fixation, were studied by electron microscopy to clarify the cellular composition of this lesion. In the smooth muscle cells abundant accumulation of glycogen was found, whereas the lipocytes disclosed normal ultrastructural......-specific vesicular structures. These findings suggest a secondary vascular damage, i.e. the thickened vessels may not be a primary, integral part of renal angiomyolipoma. Evidence of a common precursor cell of renal angiomyolipoma was not disclosed. It is concluded that renal angiomyolipoma is a hamartoma composed...

  6. Conference on Engineering of Scintillation Materials and Radiation Technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Gektin, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    This volume provides a broad overview of the latest achievements in scintillator development, from theory to applications, and aiming for a deeper understanding of fundamental processes, as well as the discovery and availability of components for the production of new generations of scintillation materials. It includes papers on the microtheory of scintillation and the initial phase of luminescence development, applications of the various materials, and development and characterization of ionizing radiation detection equipment. The book also touches upon the increased demand for cryogenic scintillators, the renaissance of  garnet materials for scintillator applications, nano-structuring in scintillator development, development and applications for security, and exploration of hydrocarbons and ecological monitoring.

  7. Role of hot electron transport in scintillators: A theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Huihui [SZU-NUS Collaborative Innovation Center for Optoelectronic Science and Technology, Key Lab. of Optoelectronic Devices and Systems of Ministry of Education and Guangdong Province, College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Shenzhen Univ. (China); Li, Qi [Physical Sciences Division, IBM TJ Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY (United States); Department of Computer Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States); Lu, Xinfu; Williams, R.T. [Department of Physics, Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, NC (United States); Qian, Yiyang [College of Engineering and Applied Science, Nanjing University (China); Wu, Yuntao [Scintillation Materials Research Center, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Despite recent intensive study on scintillators, several fundamental questions on scintillator properties are still unknown. In this work, we use ab-initio calculations to determine the energy dependent group velocity of the hot electrons from the electronic structures of several typical scintillators. Based on the calculated group velocities and optical phonon frequencies, a Monte-Carlo simulation of hot electron transport in scintillators is carried out to calculate the thermalization time and diffusion range in selected scintillators. Our simulations provide physical insights on a recent trend of improved proportionality and light yield from mixed halide scintillators. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. System Construction of the Stilbene Compact Neutron Scatter Camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsmith, John E. M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Gerling, Mark D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Brennan, James S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Throckmorton, Daniel J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Helm, Jonathan Ivers [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-01

    This report documents the construction of a stilbene-crystal-based compact neutron scatter camera. This system is essentially identical to the MINER (Mobile Imager of Neutrons for Emergency Responders) system previously built and deployed under DNN R&D funding,1 but with the liquid scintillator in the detection cells replaced by stilbene crystals. The availability of these two systems for side-by-side performance comparisons will enable us to unambiguously identify the performance enhancements provided by the stilbene crystals, which have only recently become commercially available in the large size required (3” diameter, 3” deep).

  9. Advanced CCD camera developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Condor, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    Two charge coupled device (CCD) camera systems are introduced and discussed, describing briefly the hardware involved, and the data obtained in their various applications. The Advanced Development Group Defense Sciences Engineering Division has been actively designing, manufacturing, fielding state-of-the-art CCD camera systems for over a decade. These systems were originally developed for the nuclear test program to record data from underground nuclear tests. Today, new and interesting application for these systems have surfaced and development is continuing in the area of advanced CCD camera systems, with the new CCD camera that will allow experimenters to replace film for x-ray imaging at the JANUS, USP, and NOVA laser facilities.

  10. TARGETLESS CAMERA CALIBRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Barazzetti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In photogrammetry a camera is considered calibrated if its interior orientation parameters are known. These encompass the principal distance, the principal point position and some Additional Parameters used to model possible systematic errors. The current state of the art for automated camera calibration relies on the use of coded targets to accurately determine the image correspondences. This paper presents a new methodology for the efficient and rigorous photogrammetric calibration of digital cameras which does not require any longer the use of targets. A set of images depicting a scene with a good texture are sufficient for the extraction of natural corresponding image points. These are automatically matched with feature-based approaches and robust estimation techniques. The successive photogrammetric bundle adjustment retrieves the unknown camera parameters and their theoretical accuracies. Examples, considerations and comparisons with real data and different case studies are illustrated to show the potentialities of the proposed methodology.

  11. FLUORESCENT X-RAY IMAGING WITH PINHOLE CAMERA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. I. Dudchik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pinhole camera is one of X-ray optics devices. The pinhole camera is used for obtaining the image of synchrotron and laboratory sources, and also as a lens in a method of X-ray fluorescent microscopy. This method allows to obtain information on a spatial distribution of various chemical elements to the areas of several square centimeters with spatial resolution at the level of 50–100 μm. As a rule energy-dispersive two-dimensional CCD cameras are used for imaging. Such cameras are expensive devices and have low sensitivity for X-rays with energy of photons higher than 8 keV. Therefore it is perspective to use for X-ray fluorescent microscopy more effective CCD cameras with a scintillator layer. The purpose of this work consists in development of the device for imaging with secondary fluorescent X-rays by using pinhole as a lens and CCD camera for registration of the X-ray image. The device for obtaining the image of objects in secondary X-rays is developed. The device consists of an X-ray tube, pinhole and CCD camera. The object of research was irradiated with radiation from the X-ray tube and emits secondary X-rays. 100-microns pinhole was used for formation of the image of the object at an entrance window of the CCD camera. Images of a number of the iron springs differing in the sizes are received. It is established that the spatial resolution of the device is about 200 μm at an exposition of 60 s. It is possible to improve permission of the device by increasing in an exposition, optimization imaging conditions and reduction of the pinhole size. 

  12. Neutron cameras for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, L.C.; Barnes, C.W.; Batistoni, P. [ITER San Diego Joint Work Site, La Jolla, CA (United States)] [and others

    1998-12-31

    Neutron cameras with horizontal and vertical views have been designed for ITER, based on systems used on JET and TFTR. The cameras consist of fan-shaped arrays of collimated flight tubes, with suitably chosen detectors situated outside the biological shield. The sight lines view the ITER plasma through slots in the shield blanket and penetrate the vacuum vessel, cryostat, and biological shield through stainless steel windows. This paper analyzes the expected performance of several neutron camera arrangements for ITER. In addition to the reference designs, the authors examine proposed compact cameras, in which neutron fluxes are inferred from {sup 16}N decay gammas in dedicated flowing water loops, and conventional cameras with fewer sight lines and more limited fields of view than in the reference designs. It is shown that the spatial sampling provided by the reference designs is sufficient to satisfy target measurement requirements and that some reduction in field of view may be permissible. The accuracy of measurements with {sup 16}N-based compact cameras is not yet established, and they fail to satisfy requirements for parameter range and time resolution by large margins.

  13. Scintillation Detectors for Charged Particles and Photons

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, P

    2011-01-01

    Scintillation Detectors for Charged Particles and Photons in 'Charged Particle Detectors - Particle Detectors and Detector Systems', part of 'Landolt-Börnstein - Group I Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms: Numerical Data and Functional Relationships in Science and Technology, Volume 21B1: Detectors for Particles and Radiation. Part 1: Principles and Methods'. This document is part of Part 1 'Principles and Methods' of Subvolume B 'Detectors for Particles and Radiation' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the Subsection '3.1.1 Scintillation Detectors for Charged Particles and Photons' of Section '3.1 Charged Particle Detectors' of Chapter '3 Particle Detectors and Detector Systems' with the content: 3.1.1 Scintillation Detectors for Charged Particles and Photons 3.1.1.1 Basic detector principles and scintillator requirements 3.1.1.1.1 Interaction of ionizing radiation with scintillator material 3.1.1.1.2 Important scint...

  14. Ruby-based inorganic scintillation detectors for 192Ir brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertzscher, Gustavo; Beddar, Sam

    2016-11-01

    We tested the potential of ruby inorganic scintillation detectors (ISDs) for use in brachytherapy and investigated various unwanted luminescence properties that may compromise their accuracy. The ISDs were composed of a ruby crystal coupled to a poly(methyl methacrylate) fiber-optic cable and a charge-coupled device camera. The ISD also included a long-pass filter that was sandwiched between the ruby crystal and the fiber-optic cable. The long-pass filter prevented the Cerenkov and fluorescence background light (stem signal) induced in the fiber-optic cable from striking the ruby crystal, which generates unwanted photoluminescence rather than the desired radioluminescence. The relative contributions of the radioluminescence signal and the stem signal were quantified by exposing the ruby detectors to a high-dose-rate brachytherapy source. The photoluminescence signal was quantified by irradiating the fiber-optic cable with the detector volume shielded. Other experiments addressed time-dependent luminescence properties and compared the ISDs to commonly used organic scintillator detectors (BCF-12, BCF-60). When the brachytherapy source dwelled 0.5 cm away from the fiber-optic cable, the unwanted photoluminescence was reduced from  >5% to  5% within 10 s from the onset of irradiation and after the source had retracted. The ruby-based ISDs generated signals of up to 20 times that of BCF-12-based detectors. The study presents solutions to unwanted luminescence properties of ruby-based ISDs for high-dose-rate brachytherapy. An optic filter should be sandwiched between the ruby crystal and the fiber-optic cable to suppress the photoluminescence. Furthermore, we recommend avoiding ruby crystals that exhibit significant time-dependent luminescence.

  15. High quantum efficiency megavoltage imaging with thick scintillator detectors for image guided radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Arun

    In image guided radiation therapy (IGRT), imaging devices serve as guidance systems to aid patient set-up and tumor volume localization. Traditionally, 2-D megavoltage x-ray imagers, referred to as electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs), have been used for planar target localization, and have recently been extended to perform 3-D volumetric reconstruction via cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). However, current EPIDs utilize thin and inefficient phosphor screen detectors and are subsequently limited by poor soft tissue visualization, which limits their use for CBCT. Therefore, the use of thick scintillation media as megavoltage x-ray detectors for greater x-ray sensitivity and enhanced image quality has recently been of significant interest. In this research, two candidates for thick scintillators: CsI(Tl) and terbium doped scintillation glass were investigated in separate imaging configurations. In the first configuration, a thick scintillation crystal (TSC) consisting of a thick, monolithic slab of CsI(Tl) was coupled to a mirror-lens-camera system. The second configuration is based on a fiber-optic scintillation glass array (FOSGA), wherein the scintillation glass is drawn into long fiber-optic conduits, inserted into a grid-type housing constructed out of polymer-tungsten alloy, and coupled to an array of photodiodes for digital read-out. The imaging prototypes were characterized using theoretical studies and imaging measurements to obtain fundamental metrics of imaging performance. Spatial resolution was measured based on a modulation transfer function (MTF), noise was evaluated in terms of a noise power spectrum (NPS), and overall contrast was characterized in the form of detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The imaging studies were used to optimize the TSC and FOSGA imagers and propose prototype configurations for order-of-magnitude improvements in overall image quality. In addition, a fast and simple technique was developed to measure the MTF, NPS, and

  16. Renal Afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frame, Alissa A; Carmichael, Casey Y; Wainford, Richard D

    2016-09-01

    The etiology of hypertension, a critical public health issue affecting one in three US adults, involves the integration of the actions of multiple organ systems, including the renal sympathetic nerves. The renal sympathetic nerves, which are comprised of both afferent (sensory input) and efferent (sympathetic outflow) arms, have emerged as a major potential therapeutic target to treat hypertension and disease states exhibiting excess renal sympathetic activity. This review highlights recent advances in both clinical and basic science that have provided new insight into the distribution, function, and reinnervation of the renal sympathetic nerves, with a focus on the renal afferent nerves, in hypertension and hypertension-evoked disease states including salt-sensitive hypertension, obesity-induced hypertension, and chronic kidney disease. Increased understanding of the differential role of the renal afferent versus efferent nerves in the pathophysiology of hypertension has the potential to identify novel targets and refine therapeutic interventions designed to treat hypertension.

  17. Isotopic response with small scintillator based gamma-ray spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Norman W [Sparks, NV; Goulding, Frederick S [Lafayette, CA; Asztalos, Stephen J [Oakland, CA

    2012-01-24

    The intrinsic background of a gamma ray spectrometer is significantly reduced by surrounding the scintillator with a second scintillator. This second (external) scintillator surrounds the first scintillator and has an opening of approximately the same diameter as the smaller central scintillator in the forward direction. The second scintillator is selected to have a higher atomic number, and thus has a larger probability for a Compton scattering interaction than within the inner region. Scattering events that are essentially simultaneous in coincidence to the first and second scintillators, from an electronics perspective, are precluded electronically from the data stream. Thus, only gamma-rays that are wholly contained in the smaller central scintillator are used for analytic purposes.

  18. RENAL CRYOABLATION

    OpenAIRE

    A. V. Govorov; A. O. Vasilyev; D. Yu. Pushkar

    2014-01-01

    Renal cryoablation is an alternative minimally-invasive method of treatment for localized renal cell carcinoma. The main advantages of this methodology include visualization of the tumor and the forming of "ice ball" in real time, fewer complications compared with other methods of treatment of renal cell carcinoma, as well as the possibility of conducting cryotherapy in patients with concomitant pathology. Compared with other ablative technologies cryoablation has a low rate of repeat session...

  19. Hybrid scintillators for x-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Clifford; Rairden, Richard L.; Betz, Robert A.

    1996-04-01

    The objective of this effort is to improve x-ray absorption and light production while maintaining high spatial resolution in x-ray imaging phosphor screens. Our current target is to improve screen absorption efficiency and screen brightness by factors of 2 or greater over existing screens that have 10-1p/mm resolution. In this program, commercial phosphor screens are combined with highly absorbing, high-resolution scintillating fiber-optic (SFO) face plates to provide a hybrid sensor that exhibits superior spatial resolution, x-ray absorption, and brightness values over the phosphor material alone. These characteristics of hybrid scintillators can be adjusted to meet specific x-ray imaging requirements over a wide range of x-ray energy. This paper discusses the design, fabrication, and testing of a new series of hybrid scintillators.

  20. Microfluidic Scintillation Detectors for High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Maoddi, Pietro; Mapelli, Alessandro

    This thesis deals with the development and study of microfluidic scintillation detectors, a technology of recent introduction for the detection of high energy particles. Most of the interest for such devices comes from the use of a liquid scintillator, which entails the possibility of changing the active material in the detector, leading to increased radiation resistance. A first part of the thesis focuses on the work performed in terms of design and modelling studies of novel prototype devices, hinting to new possibilities and applications. In this framework, the simulations performed to validate selected designs and the main technological choices made in view of their fabrication are addressed. The second part of this thesis deals with the microfabrication of several prototype devices. Two different materials were studied for the manufacturing of microfluidic scintillation detectors, namely the SU-8 photosensitive epoxy and monocrystalline silicon. For what concerns the former, an original fabrication appro...

  1. Renal liposarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo A.L. Bader

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Liposarcoma is a malignant mesenchymal tumor frequently located in retroperitoneum, and rarely presenting an isolated lesion in kidney. CASE REPORT: Female, Caucasian, 49-year old patient, with family history of renal polycystic disease, was selected for organ donation. During preoperative examinations a renal pleomorphic liposarcoma was detected. She was treated with radical nephrectomy and remains asymptomatic, without evidences of recurrence in control ecographic examinations after a 4-year follow-up. COMMENTS: Renal liposarcoma is a rare tumor. We report one case incidentally diagnosed during a routine pre-transplantation assessment in renal donor.

  2. RENAL CRYOABLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Govorov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal cryoablation is an alternative minimally-invasive method of treatment for localized renal cell carcinoma. The main advantages of this methodology include visualization of the tumor and the forming of "ice ball" in real time, fewer complications compared with other methods of treatment of renal cell carcinoma, as well as the possibility of conducting cryotherapy in patients with concomitant pathology. Compared with other ablative technologies cryoablation has a low rate of repeat sessions and good intermediate oncological results. The studies of long-term oncological and functional results of renal cryoablation are presently under way.

  3. Renal disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Espinosa-Cuevas, María de Los Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    Chronic renal failure in its various stages, requires certain nutritional restrictions associated with the accumulation of minerals and waste products that cannot be easily eliminated by the kidneys...

  4. A Compton camera prototype for prompt gamma medical imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thirolf P.G.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Compton camera prototype for a position-sensitive detection of prompt γ rays from proton-induced nuclear reactions is being developed in Garching. The detector system allows to track the Comptonscattered electrons. The camera consists of a monolithic LaBr3:Ce scintillation absorber crystal, read out by a multi-anode PMT, preceded by a stacked array of 6 double-sided silicon strip detectors acting as scatterers. The LaBr3:Ce crystal has been characterized with radioactive sources. Online commissioning measurements were performed with a pulsed deuteron beam at the Garching Tandem accelerator and with a clinical proton beam at the OncoRay facility in Dresden. The determination of the interaction point of the photons in the monolithic crystal was investigated.

  5. The VISTA IR camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Gavin B.; Caldwell, Martin; Ward, Kim; Whalley, Martin S.; Burke, Kevin; Lucas, John M.; Richards, Tony; Ferlet, Marc; Edeson, Ruben L.; Tye, Daniel; Shaughnessy, Bryan M.; Strachan, Mel; Atad-Ettedgui, Eli; Leclerc, Melanie R.; Gallie, Angus; Bezawada, Nagaraja N.; Clark, Paul; Bissonauth, Nirmal; Luke, Peter; Dipper, Nigel A.; Berry, Paul; Sutherland, Will; Emerson, Jim

    2004-09-01

    The VISTA IR Camera has now completed its detailed design phase and is on schedule for delivery to ESO"s Cerro Paranal Observatory in 2006. The camera consists of 16 Raytheon VIRGO 2048x2048 HgCdTe arrays in a sparse focal plane sampling a 1.65 degree field of view. A 1.4m diameter filter wheel provides slots for 7 distinct science filters, each comprising 16 individual filter panes. The camera also provides autoguiding and curvature sensing information for the VISTA telescope, and relies on tight tolerancing to meet the demanding requirements of the f/1 telescope design. The VISTA IR camera is unusual in that it contains no cold pupil-stop, but rather relies on a series of nested cold baffles to constrain the light reaching the focal plane to the science beam. In this paper we present a complete overview of the status of the final IR Camera design, its interaction with the VISTA telescope, and a summary of the predicted performance of the system.

  6. Commercialization of radiation tolerant camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Bum; Choi, Young Soo; Kim, Sun Ku; Lee, Jong Min; Cha, Bung Hun; Lee, Nam Ho; Byun, Eiy Gyo; Yoo, Seun Wook; Choi, Bum Ki; Yoon, Sung Up; Kim, Hyun Gun; Sin, Jeong Hun; So, Suk Il

    1999-12-01

    In this project, radiation tolerant camera which tolerates 10{sup 6} - 10{sup 8} rad total dose is developed. In order to develop radiation tolerant camera, radiation effect of camera components was examined and evaluated, and camera configuration was studied. By the result of evaluation, the components were decided and design was performed. Vidicon tube was selected to use by image sensor and non-browning optics and camera driving circuit were applied. The controller needed for CCTV camera system, lens, light, pan/tilt controller, was designed by the concept of remote control. And two type of radiation tolerant camera were fabricated consider to use in underwater environment or normal environment. (author)

  7. Near-infrared scintillation of liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, T. [Fermilab; Escobar, C. O. [Campinas State U.; Lippincott, W. H. [Fermilab; Rubinov, P. [Fermilab

    2016-03-03

    Since the 1970s it has been known that noble gases scintillate in the near infrared (NIR) region of the spectrum (0.7 $\\mu$m < $\\lambda$; < 1.5$\\mu$m). More controversial has been the question of the NIR light yield for condensed noble gases. We first present the motivation for using the NIR scintillation in liquid argon detectors, then briefly review early as well as more recent efforts and finally show encouraging preliminary results of a test performed at Fermilab.

  8. Upconverting nanoparticles for optimizing scintillator based detection systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kross, Brian; McKisson, John E; McKisson, John; Weisenberger, Andrew; Xi, Wenze; Zom, Carl

    2013-09-17

    An upconverting device for a scintillation detection system is provided. The detection system comprises a scintillator material, a sensor, a light transmission path between the scintillator material and the sensor, and a plurality of upconverting nanoparticles particles positioned in the light transmission path.

  9. HIGH SPEED CAMERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, B.T. Jr.; Davis, W.C.

    1957-12-17

    This patent relates to high speed cameras having resolution times of less than one-tenth microseconds suitable for filming distinct sequences of a very fast event such as an explosion. This camera consists of a rotating mirror with reflecting surfaces on both sides, a narrow mirror acting as a slit in a focal plane shutter, various other mirror and lens systems as well as an innage recording surface. The combination of the rotating mirrors and the slit mirror causes discrete, narrow, separate pictures to fall upon the film plane, thereby forming a moving image increment of the photographed event. Placing a reflecting surface on each side of the rotating mirror cancels the image velocity that one side of the rotating mirror would impart, so as a camera having this short a resolution time is thereby possible.

  10. Evaluation of obstructive uropathy by deconvolution analysis of {sup 99m}Tc-mercaptoacetyltriglycine ({sup 99m}Tc-MAG3) renal scintigraphic data. A comparison with diuresis renography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hada, Yoshiyuki [Mie Univ., Tsu (Japan). School of Medicine

    1997-06-01

    Clinical significance of ERPF (effective renal plasma flow) and MTT (mean transit time) calculated by deconvolution analysis was studied in patients with obstructive uropathy. Subjects were 84 kidneys of 38 patients and 4 people without renal abnormality (22 males and 20 females) whose age was 53.8 y in a mean. Scintigraphy was done with a Toshiba {gamma}-camera GCA-7200A equipped with a low energy-high resolution collimator with the energy width of 149 keV{+-}20% at 20 min after loading of 500 ml of water and rapidly after intravenous administration of {sup 99m}Tc-MAG3 (200 MBq). At 5 min later, blood was collected and at 10 min, furosemide was intravenously given. Plasma radioactivity was measured in a well-type scintillation counter and was used for correction of blood concentration-time curve obtained from heart area data. Split MTT, regional MTT and ERPF were calculated by deconvolution analysis. Impaired transit was judged from renogram after furosemide loading and was classified into 6 types. ERPF was found lowered in cases of obstruction and in low renal function. Regional MTT was prolonged only in the former cases. The examination with the deconvolution analysis was concluded to be widely used since it gave useful information for the treatment. (K.H.)

  11. Development of new Polysiloxane Based Liquid Scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalla Palma, M.; Quaranta, A. [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Trento,Via Sommarive, 9, 38123 Trento (Italy); INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro,Viale dell' Universita, 2, 35020 Legnaro - Padova (Italy); Gramegna, F.; Marchi, T.; Cinausero, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro,Viale dell' Universita, 2, 35020 Legnaro - Padova (Italy); Carturan, S.; Collazuol, G.; Checchia, C. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro,Viale dell' Universita, 2, 35020 Legnaro - Padova (Italy); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Padova, Via Marzolo, 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Degerlier, M. [Department of Physics, Nevsehir Haci Bektas Veli University, Science and Art Faculty, 50300 Nevsehir (Turkey)

    2015-07-01

    In the last decade, attention toward neutron detection has been growing in the scientific community, driven by new requirements in different fields of application ranging from homeland security to medical and material analysis, from research physics, to nuclear energy production. So far neutron detection, with particular attention to fast neutrons, has been mainly based on organic liquid scintillators, owing to their good efficiency and pulse shape discrimination (PSD) capability. Most of these liquids have however some main drawbacks given by toxicity, flammability, volatility and sensitivity to dissolved oxygen that limits the duration and the quality of their performances with worse handiness and increased costs. Phenyl-substituted polysiloxanes could address most of these issues, being characterized by low toxicity, low volatility and low flammability. Their optical properties can be tailored by changing the phenyl distribution and concentration thus allowing to increase the solubility of organic dyes, to modify the fluorescence spectra and to vary the refractive index of the medium. Furthermore, polysiloxanes have been recently exploited for the production of plastic scintillators with very good chemical and thermal stability and very good radiation hardness and the development of polysiloxane liquid scintillators could allow to combine these interesting properties with the supremacy of liquid scintillators as regarding PSD over plastics. For these reasons, the properties of several phenyl-substituted polysiloxane with different phenyl amounts and different viscosities have been investigated, with particular attention to the scintillation response and the pulse shape discrimination capability, and the results of the investigation are reported in this work. More in details, the scintillation light yield towards gamma rays ({sup 60}Co and {sup 137}Cs) of several polysiloxane liquids has been analyzed and compared with the light yield of a commercial non

  12. Robust GPS carrier tracking under ionospheric scintillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, M.; Andreotti, M.; Aquino, M. H.; Dodson, A.

    2013-12-01

    Small scale irregularities present in the ionosphere can induce fast and unpredictable fluctuations of Radio Frequency (RF) signal phase and amplitude. This phenomenon, known as scintillation, can degrade the performance of a GPS receiver leading to cycle slips, increasing the tracking error and also producing a complete loss of lock. In the most severe scenarios, if the tracking of multiple satellites links is prevented, outages in the GPS service can also occur. In order to render a GPS receiver more robust under scintillation, particular attention should be dedicated to the design of the carrier tracking stage, that is the receiver's part most sensitive to these types of phenomenon. This paper exploits the reconfigurability and flexibility of a GPS software receiver to develop a tracking algorithm that is more robust under ionospheric scintillation. For this purpose, first of all, the scintillation level is monitored in real time. Indeed the carrier phase and the post correlation terms obtained by the PLL (Phase Locked Loop) are used to estimate phi60 and S4 [1], the scintillation indices traditionally used to quantify the level of phase and amplitude scintillations, as well as p and T, the spectral parameters of the fluctuations PSD. The effectiveness of the scintillation parameter computation is confirmed by comparing the values obtained by the software receiver and the ones provided by a commercial scintillation monitoring, i.e. the Septentrio PolarxS receiver [2]. Then the above scintillation parameters and the signal carrier to noise density are exploited to tune the carrier tracking algorithm. In case of very weak signals the FLL (Frequency Locked Loop) scheme is selected in order to maintain the signal lock. Otherwise an adaptive bandwidth Phase Locked Loop (PLL) scheme is adopted. The optimum bandwidth for the specific scintillation scenario is evaluated in real time by exploiting the Conker formula [1] for the tracking jitter estimation. The performance

  13. Wide angle pinhole camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    Hemispherical refracting element gives pinhole camera 180 degree field-of-view without compromising its simplicity and depth-of-field. Refracting element, located just behind pinhole, bends light coming in from sides so that it falls within image area of film. In contrast to earlier pinhole cameras that used water or other transparent fluids to widen field, this model is not subject to leakage and is easily loaded and unloaded with film. Moreover, by selecting glass with different indices of refraction, field at film plane can be widened or reduced.

  14. Renal cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corgna, E.; Betti, M.; Gatta, G.; Roila, F.; Mulder, P.H.M. de

    2007-01-01

    In Europe, renal cancer (that is neoplasia of the kidney, renal pelvis or ureter (ICD-9 189 and ICD-10 C64-C66)) ranks as the seventh most common malignancy in men amongst whom there are 29,600 new cases each year (3.5% of all cancers). Tobacco, obesity and a diet poor in vegetables are all

  15. Renal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corgna, Enrichetta; Betti, Maura; Gatta, Gemma; Roila, Fausto; De Mulder, Pieter H. M.

    2007-01-01

    In Europe, renal cancer (that is neoplasia of the kidney, renal pelvis or ureter (ICD-9 189 and ICD-10 C64-C66)) ranks as the seventh most common malignancy in men amongst whom there are 29,600 new cases each year (3.5% of all cancers). Tobacco, obesity and a diet poor in vegetables are all

  16. Event Processing for Modular Gamma Cameras with Tiled Multi-Anode Photomultiplier Tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salçın, Esen; Furenlid, Lars R

    2012-01-01

    Multi-anode photomultiplier tubes (MAPMTs) are good candidates as light sensors for a new generation of modular scintillation cameras for Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and Positron emission tomography (PET) applications. MAPMTs can provide improved intrinsic spatial resolution (interaction (DOI). However, the area of a single MAPMT module is small for a modular gamma camera, so we are designing read-out electronics that will allow multiple individual MAPMT modules to be optically coupled to a single monolithic scintillator crystal. In order to allow such flexibility, the read-out electronics, which we refer to as the event processor, must be compact and adaptable. In combining arrays of MAPMTs, which may each have 64 to 1024 anodes per unit, issues need to be overcome with amplifying, digitizing, and recording potentially very large numbers of channels per gamma-ray event. In this study, we have investigated different event-processor strategies for gamma cameras with multiple MAPMTs that will employ maximum-likelihood (ML) methods for estimation of 3D spatial location, deposited energy and time of occurrence of events. We simulated anode signals for hypothetical gamma-camera geometries based on models of the stochastic processes inherent in scintillation cameras. The comparison between different triggering and read-out schemes was carried out by quantifying the information content in the anode signals via the Fisher Information Matrix (FIM). We observed that a decline in spatial resolution at the edges of the individual MAPMTs could be improved by the inclusion of neighboring MAPMT anode signals for events near the tiling boundaries. Thus in order to maintain spatial resolution uniformity throughout the modular camera face, we propose dividing an MAPMT's array of anode signals into regions such to help determine when triggers from one MAPMT need to be passed to a neighboring MAPMT so that it can contribute anode information for events between

  17. Calculations and measurements of the scintillator-to-water stopping power ratio of liquid scintillators for use in proton radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, W Scott; Robertson, Daniel; Beddar, Sam

    2015-03-11

    Liquid scintillators are a promising detector for high-resolution three-dimensional proton therapy dosimetry. Because the scintillator comprises both the active volume of the detector and the phantom material, an ideal scintillator will exhibit water equivalence in its radiological properties. One of the most fundamental of these is the scintillator's stopping power. The objective of this study was to compare calculations and measurements of scintillator-to-water stopping power ratios to evaluate the suitability of the liquid scintillators BC-531 and OptiPhase HiSafe 3 for proton dosimetry. We also measured the relative scintillation output of the two scintillators. Both calculations and measurements show that the linear stopping power of OptiPhase is significantly closer to water than that of BC-531. BC-531 has a somewhat higher scintillation output. OptiPhase can be mixed with water at high concentrations, which further improves its scintillator-to-water stopping power ratio. However, this causes the solution to become cloudy, which has a negative impact on the scintillation output and spatial resolution of the detector. OptiPhase is preferred over BC-531 for proton dosimetry because its density and scintillator-to-water stopping power ratio are more water equivalent.

  18. The SNO+ Scintillator Purification Plant and Projected Sensitivity to Solar Neutrinos in the Pure Scintillator Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pershing, Teal; SNO+ Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The SNO+ detector is a neutrino and neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment utilizing the renovated SNO detector. In the second phase of operation, the SNO+ detector will contain 780 tons of organic liquid scintillator composed of 2 g/L 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) in linear alkylbenzene (LAB). In this phase, SNO+ will strive to detect solar neutrinos in the sub-MeV range, including CNO production neutrinos and pp production neutrinos. To achieve the necessary detector sensitivity, a four-part scintillator purification plant has been constructed in SNOLAB for the removal of ionic and radioactive impurities. We present an overview of the SNO+ scintillator purification plant stages, including distillation, water extraction, gas stripping, and metal scavenger columns. We also give the projected SNO+ sensitivities to various solar-produced neutrinos based on the scintillator plant's projected purification efficiency.

  19. A novel design for scintillator-based neutron and gamma imaging in inertial confinement fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geppert-Kleinrath, Verena; Cutler, Theresa; Danly, Chris; Madden, Amanda; Merrill, Frank; Tybo, Josh; Volegov, Petr; Wilde, Carl

    2017-10-01

    The LANL Advanced Imaging team has been providing reliable 2D neutron imaging of the burning fusion fuel at NIF for years, revealing possible multi-dimensional asymmetries in the fuel shape, and therefore calling for additional views. Adding a passive imaging system using image plate techniques along a new polar line of sight has recently demonstrated the merit of 3D neutron image reconstruction. Now, the team is in the process of designing a new active neutron imaging system for an additional equatorial view. The design will include a gamma imaging system as well, to allow for the imaging of carbon in the ablator of the NIF fuel capsules, constraining the burning fuel shape even further. The selection of ideal scintillator materials for a position-sensitive detector system is the key component for the new design. A comprehensive study of advanced scintillators has been carried out at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center and the OMEGA Laser Facility in Rochester, NY. Neutron radiography using a fast-gated CCD camera system delivers measurements of resolution, light output and noise characteristics. The measured performance parameters inform the novel design, for which we conclude the feasibility of monolithic scintillators over pixelated counterparts.

  20. Impact of the Fano Factor on Position and Energy Estimation in Scintillation Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora, Vaibhav; Barrett, Harrison H; Jha, Abhinav K; Clarkson, Eric

    2015-02-01

    The Fano factor for an integer-valued random variable is defined as the ratio of its variance to its mean. Light from various scintillation crystals have been reported to have Fano factors from sub-Poisson (Fano factor factor > 1). For a given mean, a smaller Fano factor implies a smaller variance and thus less noise. We investigated if lower noise in the scintillation light will result in better spatial and energy resolutions. The impact of Fano factor on the estimation of position of interaction and energy deposited in simple gamma-camera geometries is estimated by two methods - calculating the Cramér-Rao bound and estimating the variance of a maximum likelihood estimator. The methods are consistent with each other and indicate that when estimating the position of interaction and energy deposited by a gamma-ray photon, the Fano factor of a scintillator does not affect the spatial resolution. A smaller Fano factor results in a better energy resolution.

  1. Use and imaging performance of CMOS flat panel imager with LiF/ZnS(Ag) and Gadox scintillation screens for neutron radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, B K; Lee, D H; Seo, C-W; Jeon, S; Huh, Y [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Ansan 426-170 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J Y; Cho, G [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, T J; Sim, C, E-mail: Goldrain99@gmail.com [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    In digital neutron radiography system, a thermal neutron imaging detector based on neutron-sensitive scintillating screens with CMOS(complementary metal oxide semiconductor) flat panel imager is introduced for non-destructive testing (NDT) application. Recently, large area CMOS APS (active-pixel sensor) in conjunction with scintillation films has been widely used in many digital X-ray imaging applications. Instead of typical imaging detectors such as image plates, cooled-CCD cameras and amorphous silicon flat panel detectors in combination with scintillation screens, we tried to apply a scintillator-based CMOS APS to neutron imaging detection systems for high resolution neutron radiography. In this work, two major Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb and {sup 6}LiF/ZnS:Ag scintillation screens with various thickness were fabricated by a screen printing method. These neutron converter screens consist of a dispersion of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb and {sup 6}LiF/ZnS:Ag scintillating particles in acrylic binder. These scintillating screens coupled-CMOS flat panel imager with 25x50mm{sup 2} active area and 48{mu}m pixel pitch was used for neutron radiography. Thermal neutron flux with 6x10{sup 6}n/cm{sup 2}/s was utilized at the NRF facility of HANARO in KAERI. The neutron imaging characterization of the used detector was investigated in terms of relative light output, linearity and spatial resolution in detail. The experimental results of scintillating screen-based CMOS flat panel detectors demonstrate possibility of high sensitive and high spatial resolution imaging in neutron radiography system.

  2. Use and imaging performance of CMOS flat panel imager with LiF/ZnS(Ag) and Gadox scintillation screens for neutron radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, B. K.; kim, J. Y.; Kim, T. J.; Sim, C.; Cho, G.; Lee, D. H.; Seo, C.-W.; Jeon, S.; Huh, Y.

    2011-01-01

    In digital neutron radiography system, a thermal neutron imaging detector based on neutron-sensitive scintillating screens with CMOS(complementary metal oxide semiconductor) flat panel imager is introduced for non-destructive testing (NDT) application. Recently, large area CMOS APS (active-pixel sensor) in conjunction with scintillation films has been widely used in many digital X-ray imaging applications. Instead of typical imaging detectors such as image plates, cooled-CCD cameras and amorphous silicon flat panel detectors in combination with scintillation screens, we tried to apply a scintillator-based CMOS APS to neutron imaging detection systems for high resolution neutron radiography. In this work, two major Gd2O2S:Tb and 6LiF/ZnS:Ag scintillation screens with various thickness were fabricated by a screen printing method. These neutron converter screens consist of a dispersion of Gd2O2S:Tb and 6LiF/ZnS:Ag scintillating particles in acrylic binder. These scintillating screens coupled-CMOS flat panel imager with 25x50mm2 active area and 48μm pixel pitch was used for neutron radiography. Thermal neutron flux with 6x106n/cm2/s was utilized at the NRF facility of HANARO in KAERI. The neutron imaging characterization of the used detector was investigated in terms of relative light output, linearity and spatial resolution in detail. The experimental results of scintillating screen-based CMOS flat panel detectors demonstrate possibility of high sensitive and high spatial resolution imaging in neutron radiography system.

  3. SU-8 microfluidic device for scintillating particle detection

    CERN Document Server

    Mapelli, A; Haguenauer, M; Jiguet, S; Vico Triviño, N; Renaud, P

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the study of a novel scintillation detector based on standard microfabrication techniques. It consists of a fine pitch array of hollow waveguides filled with a liquid scintillator and optically coupled to photodetectors. The detector has been fabricated by patterning the SU-8 photoresist on silicon wafers. Experimental studies have been performed by exciting the liquid scintillator contained in the SU-8 waveguides with electrons. The scintillation light produced was read out by an external photodetector. The results obtained with this set-up demonstrate the concept of microfluidic scintillation detection and are very encouraging for future developments.

  4. Infrared scintillation in gases, liquids and crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belogurov, S.; Bressi, G; Carugno, G.; Conti, E; Iannuzzi, D; Meneguzzo, AT

    2000-01-01

    We report about experimental evidences of infrared scintillation in gaseous, liquid and crystal samples. We firstly studied noble gases at room temperature and near atmospheric pressure in the wavelength range between 0.7 and 1.81 mum. Ar gas emits infrared photons when irradiated by a proton beam.

  5. Scintillating fibre (SciFi) tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    Caraban Gonzalez, Noemi

    2017-01-01

    128 modules – containing 11 000 km of scintillating fibres – will make up the new SciFi tracker, which will replace the outer and inner trackers of the LHCb detector as part of the experiment’s major upgrade during Long Shutdown 2 (LS2)

  6. Progress in studying scintillator proportionality: Phenomenological model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizarri, Gregory; Cherepy, Nerine; Choong, Woon-Seng; Hull, Giulia; Moses, William; Payne, Sephen; Singh, Jai; Valentine, John; Vasilev, Andrey; Williams, Richard

    2009-04-30

    We present a model to describe the origin of non-proportional dependence of scintillator light yield on the energy of an ionizing particle. The non-proportionality is discussed in terms of energy relaxation channels and their linear and non-linear dependences on the deposited energy. In this approach, the scintillation response is described as a function of the deposited energy deposition and the kinetic rates of each relaxation channel. This mathematical framework allows both a qualitative interpretation and a quantitative fitting representation of scintillation non-proportionality response as function of kinetic rates. This method was successfully applied to thallium doped sodium iodide measured with SLYNCI, a new facility using the Compton coincidence technique. Finally, attention is given to the physical meaning of the dominant relaxation channels, and to the potential causes responsible for the scintillation non-proportionality. We find that thallium doped sodium iodide behaves as if non-proportionality is due to competition between radiative recombinations and non-radiative Auger processes.

  7. The E835 scintillating fiber tracking detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrogiani, M.; Baldini, W.; Bettoni, D.; Bonora, G.; Bonsi, D.; Calabrese, R.; Carassiti, V.; Chiozzi, S.; Frabetti, S.; Luppi, E.; Milano, L.; Rossetto, L.; Stancari, G. [Ferrara Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Bombonati, M.; Mussa, R. [Ferrara Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica]|[Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, 60510, Batavia (United States); Gasteyer, T.; Rivetta, C.; Wheelwright, P. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, 60510, Batavia (United States)

    1998-02-01

    This paper describes the scintillating fiber tracking detector designed and built for the Fermilab experiment E835. This detector uses visible light photon counters (VLPC) readout system and is in use at the anti p accumulator ring at Fermilab. A description of the components of the detector and preliminary results of its performances are given. (orig.). 7 refs.

  8. Experimental evidence of infrared scintillation in crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Belogurov, S; Carugno, Giovanni; Conti, E; Iannuzzi, D; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa

    2000-01-01

    We present experimental results on infrared emission induced by protons in some solid-state samples. Infrared scintillation occurs in many crystals, with different yield values and time-response behaviours. A rough measurement of the emission wavelength of CsI(Tl) is also reported.

  9. Fluorescent compounds for plastic scintillation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pla-Dalmau, A.; Bross, A.D.

    1994-04-01

    Several 2-(2{prime}-hydroxyphenyl)benzothiazole, -benzoxazole, and -benzimidazole derivatives have been prepared. Transmittance, fluorescence, light yield, and decay time characteristics of these compounds have been studied in a polystyrene matrix and evaluated for use in plastic scintillation detectors. Radiation damage studies utilizing a {sup 60}C source have also been performed.

  10. Automatic Camera Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burelli, Paolo; Preuss, Mike

    2014-01-01

    camera. We approach this problem by modelling it as a dynamic multi-objective optimisation problem and show how this metaphor allows a much richer expressiveness than a classical single objective approach. Finally, we showcase the application of a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm to generate a shot...

  11. Make a Pinhole Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Diane K.; Novati, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    On Earth, using ordinary visible light, one can create a single image of light recorded over time. Of course a movie or video is light recorded over time, but it is a series of instantaneous snapshots, rather than light and time both recorded on the same medium. A pinhole camera, which is simple to make out of ordinary materials and using ordinary…

  12. The canopy camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harry E. Brown

    1962-01-01

    The canopy camera is a device of new design that takes wide-angle, overhead photographs of vegetation canopies, cloud cover, topographic horizons, and similar subjects. Since the entire hemisphere is photographed in a single exposure, the resulting photograph is circular, with the horizon forming the perimeter and the zenith the center. Photographs of this type provide...

  13. Development of a compact and high spatial resolution gamma camera system using LaBr 3(Ce)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Imaizumi, Masao; Shimosegawa, Eku; Hatazawa, Jun

    2010-10-01

    In small animal imaging using a single photon emitting radionuclide, a high spatial resolution gamma camera is required. However, its spatial resolution is limited by the light output of conventional scintillators such as NaI(Tl). We developed and tested a small field-of-view (FOV) gamma camera using a new scintillator, LaBr3(Ce). The LaBr3(Ce) gamma camera consists of a 2 mm thick LaBr3(Ce) scintillator, a 2 in. 8×8 multi-anode position sensitive photomultiplier tube (Hamamatsu H8500), and a personal computer-based data acquisition system. The LaBr3(Ce) scintillator was directly coupled to the PSPMT and was contained in a hermetically shielded and light tight aluminum case. The signals from the PSPMT were gain corrected, weighted summed, and digitized by 100 MHz free running A-D converters in the data acquisition system. The detector part of the gamma camera was encased in a tungsten gamma shield, and a tungsten pinhole collimator was mounted in front of the detector surface. The intrinsic spatial resolution that was measured using a tungsten slit mask was 0.75 mm FWHM, and the energy resolution was 8.9% FWHM for 122 keV gamma photons. We obtained transmission and emission images that demonstrated the high spatial resolution of the gamma camera system. Approximately two years after the fabrication of the detector, the flood image showed significant distortion due to the change in LaBr3(Ce) of its hygroscopic characteristic. These results confirm that the developed LaBr3(Ce) gamma camera is promising for small animal imaging using a low energy single photon emitting radionuclide if the hygroscopic problem of LaBr3(Ce) will be solved.

  14. Non-Carbon Dyes For Platic Scintillators- Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teprovich, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Colon-Mercado, H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Gaillard, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Sexton, L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Washington, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Ward, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Velten, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-19

    Scintillation based detectors are desirable for many radiation detection applications (portal and border monitoring, safeguards verification, contamination detection and monitoring). The development of next generation scintillators will require improved detection sensitivity for weak gamma ray sources, and fast and thermal neutron quantification. Radiation detection of gamma and neutron sources can be accomplished with organic scintillators, however, the single crystals are difficult to grow for large area detectors and subject to cracking. Alternatives to single crystal organic scintillators are plastic scintillators (PS) which offer the ability to be shaped and scaled up to produce large sized detectors. PS is also more robust than the typical organic scintillator and are ideally suited for deployment in harsh real-world environments. PS contain a mixture of dyes to down-convert incident radiation into visible light that can be detected by a PMT. This project will evaluate the potential use of nano-carbon dyes in plastic scintillators.

  15. Temporal Imaging CeBr3 Compton Camera: A New Concept for Nuclear Decommissioning and Nuclear Waste Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iltis, A.; Snoussi, H.; Magalhaes, L. Rodrigues de; Hmissi, M. Z.; Zafiarifety, C. Tata; Tadonkeng, G. Zeufack; Morel, C.

    2018-01-01

    During nuclear decommissioning or waste management operations, a camera that could make an image of the contamination field and identify and quantify the contaminants would be a great progress. Compton cameras have been proposed, but their limited efficiency for high energy gamma rays and their cost have severely limited their application. Our objective is to promote a Compton camera for the energy range (200 keV - 2 MeV) that uses fast scintillating crystals and a new concept for locating scintillation event: Temporal Imaging. Temporal Imaging uses monolithic plates of fast scintillators and measures photons time of arrival distribution in order to locate each gamma ray with a high precision in space (X,Y,Z), time (T) and energy (E). This provides a native estimation of the depth of interaction (Z) of every detected gamma ray. This also allows a time correction for the propagation time of scintillation photons inside the crystal, therefore resulting in excellent time resolution. The high temporal resolution of the system makes it possible to veto quite efficiently background by using narrow time coincidence (< 300 ps). It is also possible to reconstruct the direction of propagation of the photons inside the detector using timing constraints. The sensitivity of our system is better than 1 nSv/h in a 60 s acquisition with a 22Na source. The project TEMPORAL is funded by the ANDRA/PAI under the grant No. RTSCNADAA160019.

  16. Performance of the Tachyon Time-of-Flight PET Camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Q; Choong, W-S; Vu, C; Huber, J S; Janecek, M; Wilson, D; Huesman, R H; Qi, Jinyi; Zhou, Jian; Moses, W W

    2015-02-01

    We have constructed and characterized a time-of-flight Positron Emission Tomography (TOF PET) camera called the Tachyon. The Tachyon is a single-ring Lutetium Oxyorthosilicate (LSO) based camera designed to obtain significantly better timing resolution than the ~ 550 ps found in present commercial TOF cameras, in order to quantify the benefit of improved TOF resolution for clinically relevant tasks. The Tachyon's detector module is optimized for timing by coupling the 6.15 × 25 mm(2) side of 6.15 × 6.15 × 25 mm(3) LSO scintillator crystals onto a 1-inch diameter Hamamatsu R-9800 PMT with a super-bialkali photocathode. We characterized the camera according to the NEMA NU 2-2012 standard, measuring the energy resolution, timing resolution, spatial resolution, noise equivalent count rates and sensitivity. The Tachyon achieved a coincidence timing resolution of 314 ps +/- ps FWHM over all crystal-crystal combinations. Experiments were performed with the NEMA body phantom to assess the imaging performance improvement over non-TOF PET. The results show that at a matched contrast, incorporating 314 ps TOF reduces the standard deviation of the contrast by a factor of about 2.3.

  17. MISR radiometric camera-by-camera Cloud Mask V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This file contains the Radiometric camera-by-camera Cloud Mask dataset. It is used to determine whether a scene is classified as clear or cloudy. A new parameter has...

  18. Renal angiomyolipoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm-Nielsen, P; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    1988-01-01

    features. However, a smaller number of smooth muscle cells also contained lipid, thus simulating an intermediate cell stage between adipose- and smooth muscle cells. The abnormal thickening of the subendothelial spaces contained collagen fibrils in a homogeneous matrix, fibroblast-like cells and non......-specific vesicular structures. These findings suggest a secondary vascular damage, i.e. the thickened vessels may not be a primary, integral part of renal angiomyolipoma. Evidence of a common precursor cell of renal angiomyolipoma was not disclosed. It is concluded that renal angiomyolipoma is a hamartoma composed...

  19. Ionoluminescence analysis of glass scintillators and application to single-ion-hit real-time detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Akihito, E-mail: yokoyama.akihito@jaea.go.jp [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute (TARRI), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Kada, Wataru [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Satoh, Takahiro; Koka, Masashi [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute (TARRI), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Shimada, Keisuke; Yokoata, Yuya; Miura, Kenta; Hanaizumi, Osamu [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    In this paper, we propose and test a real-time detection system for single-ion hits using mega-electronvolt (MeV)-heavy ions. The system was constructed using G2000 and G9 glass scintillators, as well as an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) camera combined with an inverted microscope with a 10× objective lens. Commercially available G2000 and G9 glass scintillators, which have been reported to exhibit strong photoluminescence at 489, 543, 585, and 622 nm as a result of the Tb{sup 3+} f–f transition, were employed for highly accurate ionized particle detection. The EMCCD camera had a resolution of 512 × 512 pixels, each with a size of 16 μm × 16 μm, and a maximum linear gain of 8 × 10{sup 5} electrons. For 260-MeV Ne, 3 ion hits/s were detected by our system. The intensity of the ionoluminescence (IL) peak induced by the heavy ions was 140 times the noise intensity. In contrast, the luminous diameter at the full width at half maximum (FWHM) in both the horizontal and vertical directions was calculated to be approximately 4.5 μm. These results suggest that our detection system can accurately detect single-ion hits with a diameter of the order of 1 μm.

  20. Goniometer to calibrate system cameras or amateur cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkarainen, J.

    An accurate and rapid horizontal goniometer was developed to determine the optical properties of film cameras. Radial and decentering distortion, color defects, optical resolution, and small object transmission factors are measured according to light wavelengths and symmetry. The goniometer can be used to calibrate cameras for photogrammetry, to determine the effects of remoteness on image geometry, distortion symmetry, efficiency of lens lighting film systems, to develop quality criteria for lenses, and to test camera lens and camera defects after an incident.

  1. Waveguide generated mitigation of speckle and scintillation on an actively illuminated target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Trevor D.; Raynor, Robert A.; Spencer, Mark F.; Schmidt, Jason D.

    2016-09-01

    Active illumination is often used when passive illumination cannot produce enough signal intensity to be a reliable imaging method. However, an increase in signal intensity is often achieved by using highly coherent laser sources, which produce undesirable effects such as speckle and scintillation. The deleterious effects of speckle and scintillation are often so immense that the imaging camera cannot receive intelligible data, thereby rendering the active illumination technique useless. By reducing the spatial coherence of the laser beam that is actively illuminating the object, it is possible to reduce the corruption of the received data caused by speckle and scintillation. The waveguide method discussed in this paper reduces spatial coherence through multiple total internal reflections, which create multiple virtual sources of diverse path lengths. The differing path lengths between the virtual sources and the target allow for the temporal coherence properties of the laser to be translated into spatial coherence properties. The resulting partial spatial coherence helps to mitigate the self-interference of the beam as it travels through the atmosphere and reflects off of optically rough targets. This mitigation method results in a cleaner, intelligible image that may be further processed for the intended use, unlike its unmitigated counterpart. Previous research has been done to independently reduce speckle or scintillation by way of spatial incoherence, but there has been no focus on modeling the waveguide, specifically the image plane the waveguide creates. Utilizing a ray-tracing method we can determine the coherence length of the source necessary to create incoherent spots in the image plane, as well as accurately modeling the image plane.

  2. Imaging of the thyroid and parathyroid using a cardiac cadmium zinc telluride camera: Phantom studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Yosuke; Kato, Yasuhiro; Imoto, Akira; Fukuchi, Kazuki

    2017-11-10

    Purpose: Cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors have recently been introduced to the field of clinical nuclear cardiology. However, the feasibility of using them for organs other than the heart remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of a cardiac CZT camera to acquire thyroid and parathyroid images. We used custom-made phantoms and the currently available standard protocols for CZT, instead of a sodium-iodine scintillation (NaI) camera. Materials and Methods: Thyroid phantoms with or without parathyroid adenomas were made from agar using radiopharmaceuticals (99mTc or 123I) and imaged using CZT and NaI cameras. Using the CZT camera data, we prepared maximum intensity projection (MIP) images and planar equivalent (PE) images. Image counts were compared to those from the NaI camera, and the radioactivity of the phantoms was measured. For parathyroid imaging, three different protocols with the NaI camera were tested using MIP images. Results: For thyroid imaging, MIP could provide images as clear as those obtained from the NaI camera. The radioactivity and image counts correlated better for the PE images than the MIP images, especially for 123I images. We succeeded in obtaining clear parathyroid adenoma images from MIP images using all three protocols. Conclusion: A cardiac CZT camera can effectively perform qualitative and quantitative assessments of the thyroid and parathyroid organs. Copyright © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  3. Measurements of planar and depth dose distributions using a scintillating fiber-optic image sensor system for dosimetry in radiotherapeutic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang Hun; Yoo, Wook Jae; Seo, Jeong Ki; Han, Ki-Tek; Jeon, Dayeong; Jang, Kyoung Won; Sim, Hyeok In; Cho, Seunghyun; Lee, Bongsoo

    2013-03-01

    We developed a scintillating fiber-optic image sensor system (SFISS) using square plastic optical fibers (POFs), a scintillating film, a right-angle mirror, and a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image camera for dosimetry in radiotherapeutic applications. In this study, the scintillating light images were obtained for measuring two-dimensional planar dose distributions of a 6MV photon beam in a solid-water phantom. We also measured the percentage depth doses (PDDs) of 6 and 15MV photon beams using the SFISS and compared them with those obtained using conventional dosimetry films. The proposed sensor has many advantages, such as real-time readout, high-resolution measurement, and lack of corrections for temperature, pressure, and humidity. From the results of this study, it is expected that a SFISS can be developed to accurately measure the dose distribution in a small beam field for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS).

  4. Dual cameras acquisition and display system of retina-like sensor camera and rectangular sensor camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Nan; Cao, Fengmei; Lin, Yabin; Bai, Tingzhu; Song, Shengyu

    2015-04-01

    For a new kind of retina-like senor camera and a traditional rectangular sensor camera, dual cameras acquisition and display system need to be built. We introduce the principle and the development of retina-like senor. Image coordinates transformation and interpolation based on sub-pixel interpolation need to be realized for our retina-like sensor's special pixels distribution. The hardware platform is composed of retina-like senor camera, rectangular sensor camera, image grabber and PC. Combined the MIL and OpenCV library, the software program is composed in VC++ on VS 2010. Experience results show that the system can realizes two cameras' acquisition and display.

  5. Real-time Scintillation Monitoring in Alaska from a Longitudinal Chain of ASTRA's SM-211 GPS TEC and Scintillation Receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, G.; Azeem, S. I.; Reynolds, A.; Santana, J.; Hampton, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    Amplitude and phase scintillation can cause serious difficulties for GPS receivers. Intense scintillation can cause loss of lock. High latitude studies generally show that phase scintillation can be severe, but the amplitude scintillation tends to be small. The reason for this is not yet understood. Furthermore, the actual causes of the ionospheric irregularities that produce high latitude scintillation are not well understood. While the gradient drift instability is thought to be important in the F-region, there may be other structures present in either the E- or F-regions. The role of particle precipitation is also not well understood. Four of ASTRA's CASES GPS receivers were deployed in Alaska to demonstrate our ability to map scintillation in realtime, to provide space weather services to GPS users, and to initiate a detailed investigation of these effects. These dual-frequency GPS receivers measure total electron content (TEC) and scintillation. The scintillation monitors were deployed in a longitudinal chain at sites in Kaktovic, Fort Yukon, Poker Flat, and Gakona. Scintillation statistics show phase scintillations to be largest at Kaktovic and smallest at Gakona. We present GPS phase scintillation and auroral emission results from the Alaska chain to characterize the correspondence between scintillation and auroral features, and to investigate the role of high latitude auroral features in driving the phase scintillations. We will also present data showing how phase scintillation can cause other GPS receivers to lose lock. The data and results are particularly valuable because they illustrate some of the challenges of using GPS systems for positioning and navigation in an auroral region like Alaska. These challenges for snowplough drivers were recently highlighted, along with the CASES SM-211 space weather monitor, in a special video in which ASTRA and three other small businesses were presented with an entrepreneurial award from William Shatner (http://youtu.be/bIVKEQH_YPk).

  6. Assessment of scintillation proxy maps for a scintillation study during geomagnetically quiet and disturbed conditions over Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amabayo, Emirant B.; Jurua, Edward; Cilliers, Pierre J.

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this paper is demonstrate the validity and usefulness of scintillation proxies derived from IGS data, through its comparison with data from dedicated scintillation monitors and its application to GNSS scintillation patterns. The paper presents scintillation patterns developed by using data from the dedicated scintillation monitors of the scintillation network decision aid (SCINDA) network, and proxy maps derived from IGS GPS data for 2011 and 2012 over low latitude stations in Uganda. The amplitude and phase scintillation indicies (S4 and σΦ) were obtained from the Novatel GSV4004B ionospheric scintillation and total electron content (TEC) monitor managed by SCINDA at Makerere (0.340N, 32.570E). The corresponding IGS GPS proxy data were obtained from the receivers at Entebbe (0.040N, 32.440E) and Mbarara (0.600S, 30.740E). The derived amplitude (S4p) and phase (sDPR) scintillation proxy maps were compared with maps of S4 and σΦ during geomagnetic storms (moderate and strong) and geomagnetically quiet conditions. The scintillation patterns using S4 and σΦ and their respective proxies revealed similar diurnal and seasonal patterns of strong scintillation occurrence. The peaks of scintillation occurrence with mean values in the range 0.3 irregularities over Uganda irrespective of the geomagnetic conditions. Therefore, the amplitude and phase scintillation proxies presented here can be used to fill gaps in low-latitude data where there are no data available from dedicated scintillation receivers, irrespective of the geomagnetic conditions.

  7. Renal scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003790.htm Renal scan To use the sharing features on this ... anaphylaxis . Alternative Names Renogram; Kidney scan Images Kidney anatomy Kidney - blood and urine flow References Chernecky CC, ...

  8. Body worn camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aishwariya, A.; Pallavi Sudhir, Gulavani; Garg, Nemesa; Karthikeyan, B.

    2017-11-01

    A body worn camera is small video camera worn on the body, typically used by police officers to record arrests, evidence from crime scenes. It helps preventing and resolving complaints brought by members of the public; and strengthening police transparency, performance, and accountability. The main constants of this type of the system are video format, resolution, frames rate, and audio quality. This system records the video in .mp4 format with 1080p resolution and 30 frames per second. One more important aspect to while designing this system is amount of power the system requires as battery management becomes very critical. The main design challenges are Size of the Video, Audio for the video. Combining both audio and video and saving it in .mp4 format, Battery, size that is required for 8 hours of continuous recording, Security. For prototyping this system is implemented using Raspberry Pi model B.

  9. The NEAT Camera Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jr., Ray L. Newburn

    1995-01-01

    The NEAT (Near Earth Asteroid Tracking) camera system consists of a camera head with a 6.3 cm square 4096 x 4096 pixel CCD, fast electronics, and a Sun Sparc 20 data and control computer with dual CPUs, 256 Mbytes of memory, and 36 Gbytes of hard disk. The system was designed for optimum use with an Air Force GEODSS (Ground-based Electro-Optical Deep Space Surveillance) telescope. The GEODSS telescopes have 1 m f/2.15 objectives of the Ritchey-Chretian type, designed originally for satellite tracking. Installation of NEAT began July 25 at the Air Force Facility on Haleakala, a 3000 m peak on Maui in Hawaii.

  10. Renal Hemangiopericytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim Halil Bozkurt

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hemangiopericytoma is an uncommon perivascular tumor originating from pericytes in the pelvis, head and tneck, and the meninges; extremely rarely in the urinary system. We report a case of incidentally detected renal mass in which radiologic evaluation was suggestive of renal cell carcinoma. First, we performed partial nephrectomy, and then, radical nephrectomy because of positive surgical margins and the pathological examination of the surgical specimen that revealed a hemangiopericytoma. No additional treatment was administered.

  11. Nonproportionality of Scintillator Detectors: Theory and Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payne, Stephen; Cherepy, Nerine; Hull, Giulia; Valentine, John; Moses, William; Choong, Woon-Seng

    2009-08-17

    On the basis of nonproportionality data obtained for several scintillators, we have developed a theory to describe the carrier dynamics to fit the light yield versus electron energy. The theory of Onsager was adapted to explain how the carriers form excitons or sequentially arrive at the activators to promote the ion to an excited state, and the theory of Birks was employed to allow for exciton-exciton annihilation. We then developed a second theory to deduce the degradation in resolution that results from nonproportionality by evoking Landau fluctuations, which are essentially variations in the deposited energy density that occur as the high energy electron travels along its trajectory. In general there is good agreement with the data, in terms of fitting the nonproportionality curves and reproducing the literature values of nonproportionality's contribution to the scintillator resolution. With the resurgence of interest in developing scintillator detectors that have good energy resolution, an improved understanding of nonproportionality has become a crucial matter since it presents the fundamental limit to the achievable resolution. In order to hasten an improved understanding of scintillator nonproportionality, we have constructed an instrument referred to as SLYNCI (Scintillator Light Yield Nonproportionality Compton Instrument). This is a second-generation instrument to the original device developed by Valentine and coworkers, wherein several new principles of operation have served to increase the data rate by an order of magnitude as discussed in detail in References. In the present article, the focus is on a theory to describe the measured electron response, which is the light yield as a function of the electron energy. To do this, we account for transport of carriers and excitons, in terms of how they transfer their energy to the activators with competition from nonradiative decay pathways. This work builds on the original work of Murray and coworkers

  12. Neutron spectroscopy with scintillation detectors using wavelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Jessica

    The purpose of this research was to study neutron spectroscopy using the EJ-299-33A plastic scintillator. This scintillator material provided a novel means of detection for fast neutrons, without the disadvantages of traditional liquid scintillation materials. EJ-299-33A provided a more durable option to these materials, making it less likely to be damaged during handling. Unlike liquid scintillators, this plastic scintillator was manufactured from a non-toxic material, making it safer to use, as well as easier to design detectors. The material was also manufactured with inherent pulse shape discrimination abilities, making it suitable for use in neutron detection. The neutron spectral unfolding technique was developed in two stages. Initial detector response function modeling was carried out through the use of the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. The response functions were developed for a monoenergetic neutron flux. Wavelets were then applied to smooth the response function. The spectral unfolding technique was applied through polynomial fitting and optimization techniques in MATLAB. Verification of the unfolding technique was carried out through the use of experimentally determined response functions. These were measured on the neutron source based on the Van de Graff accelerator at the University of Kentucky. This machine provided a range of monoenergetic neutron beams between 0.1 MeV and 24 MeV, making it possible to measure the set of response functions of the EJ-299-33A plastic scintillator detector to neutrons of specific energies. The response of a plutonium-beryllium (PuBe) source was measured using the source available at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. The neutron spectrum reconstruction was carried out using the experimentally measured response functions. Experimental data was collected in the list mode of the waveform digitizer. Post processing of this data focused on the pulse shape discrimination analysis of the recorded response functions to remove the

  13. Streak camera techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avara, R.

    1977-06-01

    An introduction to streak camera geometry, experimental techniques, and limitations are presented. Equations, graphs and charts are included to provide useful data for optimizing the associated optics to suit each experiment. A simulated analysis is performed on simultaneity and velocity measurements. An error analysis is also performed for these measurements utilizing the Monte Carlo method to simulate the distribution of uncertainties associated with simultaneity-time measurements.

  14. Visual odometry from omnidirectional camera

    OpenAIRE

    Jiří DIVIŠ

    2012-01-01

    We present a system that estimates the motion of a robot relying solely on images from onboard omnidirectional camera (visual odometry). Compared to other visual odometry hardware, ours is unusual in utilizing high resolution, low frame-rate (1 to 3 Hz) omnidirectional camera mounted on a robot that is propelled using continuous tracks. We focus on high precision estimates in scenes, where objects are far away from the camera. This is achieved by utilizing omnidirectional camera that is able ...

  15. Hemispherical Laue camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, James C. M.; Chu, Sungnee G.

    1980-01-01

    A hemispherical Laue camera comprises a crystal sample mount for positioning a sample to be analyzed at the center of sphere of a hemispherical, X-radiation sensitive film cassette, a collimator, a stationary or rotating sample mount and a set of standard spherical projection spheres. X-radiation generated from an external source is directed through the collimator to impinge onto the single crystal sample on the stationary mount. The diffracted beam is recorded on the hemispherical X-radiation sensitive film mounted inside the hemispherical film cassette in either transmission or back-reflection geometry. The distances travelled by X-radiation diffracted from the crystal to the hemispherical film are the same for all crystal planes which satisfy Bragg's Law. The recorded diffraction spots or Laue spots on the film thereby preserve both the symmetry information of the crystal structure and the relative intensities which are directly related to the relative structure factors of the crystal orientations. The diffraction pattern on the exposed film is compared with the known diffraction pattern on one of the standard spherical projection spheres for a specific crystal structure to determine the orientation of the crystal sample. By replacing the stationary sample support with a rotating sample mount, the hemispherical Laue camera can be used for crystal structure determination in a manner previously provided in conventional Debye-Scherrer cameras.

  16. An ISPA-camera for gamma rays

    CERN Document Server

    Puertolas, D; Pani, R; Leutz, H; Gys, Thierry; De Notaristefani, F; D'Ambrosio, C

    1995-01-01

    With the recently developed ISPA (Imaging Silicon Pixel Array)-tube attached either to a planar YAlO3(Ce) (YAP) disc (1mm thick) or to a matrix of optically-separated YAP-crystals (5mm high, 0.6 x 0.6 mm2 cross-section) we achieved high spatial resolution of 57Co-122 keV photons. The vacuum-sealed ISPA-tube is only 4 cm long with 3.5 cm diameter and consists of a photocathode viewed at 3 cm distance by a silicon pixel chip, directly detecting the photoelectrons. The chip-anode consists of 1024 rectangular pixels with 75 µm x 500 µm edges, each bump-bonded to their individual front-end electronics. The total pixel array read-out time is 10 µs. The measured intrinsic spatial resolutions (FWHM) of this ISPA-camera are 700 µm (planar YAP) and 310 µm (YAP-matrix). Apart from its already demonstrated application for particle tracking with scintillating fibres, the ISPA-tube provides also an excellent tool in medicine, biology and chemistry.

  17. The study of inorganic scintillating materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudkin, G. N.; Kuznetsov, S. I.; Padalko, V. N.; Syrtanov, M. S.

    2017-05-01

    The procedure for measuring the temporal characteristics and light output of inorganic scintillating materials excited by β-, γ-, and α-particles from radioactive sources is described. Results of measurements of characteristics are presented for ∼30 scintillating compounds including cerium-doped yttrium silicate and scandium borate; europium-doped strontium phosphate; cerium-doped strontium silicate, calcium silicate and magnesium calcium silicate, etc. Upon β- and γ-excitation, cerium-doped scandium borate gives the highest light output with a fluorescent lifetime of 40 ± 4 ns. The highest light output for α-excitation was from cerium-doped yttrium aluminum perovskite, with a fluorescent lifetime of 29 ± 3 ns.

  18. Transparent Ceramic Scintillator Fabrication, Properties and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherepy, N J; Kuntz, J D; Roberts, J J; Hurst, T A; Drury, O B; Sanner, R D; Tillotson, T M; Payne, S A

    2008-08-24

    Transparent ceramics offer an alternative to single crystals for scintillator applications such as gamma ray spectroscopy and radiography. We have developed a versatile, scaleable fabrication method, using Flame Spray Pyrolysis (FSP) to produce feedstock which is readily converted into phase-pure transparent ceramics. We measure integral light yields in excess of 80,000 Ph/MeV with Cerium-doped Garnets, and excellent optical quality. Avalanche photodiode readout of Garnets provides resolution near 6%. For radiography applications, Lutetium Oxide offers a high performance metric and is formable by ceramics processing. Scatter in transparent ceramics due to secondary phases is the principal limitation to optical quality, and afterglow issues that affect the scintillation performance are presently being addressed.

  19. Neutron detection with single crystal organic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaitseva, N; Newby, J; Hamel, S; Carman, L; Faust, M; Lordi, V; Cherepy, N; Stoeffl, W; Payne, S

    2009-07-15

    Detection of high-energy neutrons in the presence of gamma radiation background utilizes pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) phenomena in organics studied previously only with limited number of materials, mostly liquid scintillators and single crystal stilbene. The current paper presents the results obtained with broader varieties of luminescent organic single crystals. The studies involve experimental tools of crystal growth and material characterization in combination with the advanced computer modeling, with the final goal of better understanding the relevance between the nature of the organic materials and their PSD properties. Special consideration is given to the factors that may diminish or even completely obscure the PSD properties in scintillating crystals. Among such factors are molecular and crystallographic structures that determine exchange coupling and exciton mobility in organic materials and the impurity effect discussed on the examples of trans-stilbene, bibenzyl, 9,10-diphenylanthracene and diphenylacetylene.

  20. Ultra-fast timing with plastic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoischen, Robert [Department of Physics, Lund University, S-22100 Lund (Sweden); Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Pietri, Stephane; Prokopowicz, Wawrzyniec; Schaffner, Henning; Gerl, Juergen; Wollersheim, Hans Juergen; Kurz, Nikolaus [Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Rudolph, Dirk [Department of Physics, Lund University, S-22100 Lund (Sweden)

    2009-07-01

    Fast timing detectors for time-of-flight measurements are essential identification tools for isotopes studied at fragment separators at major heavy-ion research facilities. While today's standard technique of utilizing a plastic scintillator read out by few photomultiplier tubes proofs to be efficient, it does not provide the required time resolution for future key experiments at, for example, the Super-FRS at FAIR. A common present-day approach is to use diamond detectors instead. While they do provide a better time resolution compared to scintillators, they are more difficult to use and far more expensive. Results from tests using a new design approach with standard materials will be presented. This leads to a much improved performance, but remains both cost-efficient, compact, and reliable. The design goals and how to accomplish them will be exemplified by the LYCCA (Lund-York-Cologne CAlorimeter) detector aiming for fast-beam experiments at HISPEC within NUSTAR.

  1. Central Tracking Detector Based on Scintillating Fibres

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Scintillating fibres form a reasonable compromise for central tracking detectors in terms of price, resolution, response time, occupancy and heat production. \\\\ \\\\ New fluorescents with large Stokes shifts have been produced, capable of working without wavelength shifters. Coherent multibundles have been developed to achieve high packing fractions. Small segments of tracker shell have been assembled and beam tests have confirmed expectations on spatial resolution. An opto-electronic delay line has been designed to delay the track patterns and enable coincidences with a first level trigger. Replacement of the conventional phosphor screen anode with a Si pixel chip is achieved. This tube is called ISPA-tube and has already been operated in beam tests with a scintillating fibres tracker. \\\\ \\\\ The aim of the proposal is to improve hit densities for small diameter fibres by increasing the fraction of trapped light, by reducing absorption and reflection losses, by reflecting light at the free fibre end, and by inc...

  2. Plastic scintillator detector for pulsed flux measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadilin, V. V.; Kaplun, A. A.; Taraskin, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    A neutron detector, providing charged particle detection capability, has been designed. The main purpose of the detector is to measure pulsed fluxes of both charged particles and neutrons during scientific experiments. The detector consists of commonly used neutron-sensitive ZnS(Ag) / 6LiF scintillator screens wrapping a layer of polystyrene based scintillator (BC-454, EJ-254 or equivalent boron loaded plastic). This type of detector design is able to log a spatial distribution of events and may be scaled to any size. Different variations of the design were considered and modelled in specialized toolkits. The article presents a review of the detector design features as well as simulation results.

  3. Nanophosphor composite scintillators comprising a polymer matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muenchausen, Ross Edward; Mckigney, Edward Allen; Gilbertson, Robert David

    2010-11-16

    An improved nanophosphor composite comprises surface modified nanophosphor particles in a solid matrix. The nanophosphor particle surface is modified with an organic ligand, or by covalently bonding a polymeric or polymeric precursor material. The surface modified nanophosphor particle is essentially charge neutral, thereby preventing agglomeration of the nanophosphor particles during formation of the composite material. The improved nanophosphor composite may be used in any conventional scintillator application, including in a radiation detector.

  4. Simulation of Scintillating Fibres in Geant4

    CERN Document Server

    Deckenhoff, Mirco

    2014-01-01

    This technical note describes a scintillating fibre (SciFi) simulation using the GEANT4 toolkit. The simulation is designed to enable comprehensive studies accounting for many different aspects, $e.g$ geometry, emission spectra and radiation damages of the SciFi and matrices build from it in the context of the LHCb tracking detector upgrade. It is a further development of the simulation presented in 1.

  5. A novel segmented-scintillator antineutrino detector

    OpenAIRE

    Abreu, Y.; Amhis, Y.; Arnold, L; Ban, G.; Beaumont, W.; Bongrand, M.; Boursette, D.; Buhour, J. M.; Castle, B.C.; Clark, K.; Coupé, B; Cucoanes, A.S.; Cussans, D; De Roeck, A.; D'Hondt, J.

    2017-01-01

    The next generation of very-short-baseline reactor experiments will require compact detectors operating at surface level and close to a nuclear reactor. This paper presents a new detector concept based on a composite solid scintillator technology. The detector target uses cubes of polyvinyltoluene interleaved with 6LiF:ZnS(Ag) phosphor screens to detect the products of the inverse beta decay reaction. A multi-tonne detector system built from these individual cells can provide precise localisa...

  6. A novel segmented-scintillator antineutrino detector

    OpenAIRE

    Abreu, Y.; Amhis, Y.; Arnold, L; Ban, G.; Beaumont, W.; Bongrand, M.; Boursette, D.; Buhour, J. M.; Castle, B.C.; Clark, K.; Coupé, B; Cucoanes, A.S.; Cussans, D; De Roeck, A.; D'Hondt, J.

    2017-01-01

    The next generation of very-short-baseline reactor experiments will require compact detectors operating at surface level and close to a nuclear reactor. This paper presents a new detector concept based on a composite solid scintillator technology. The detector target uses cubes of polyvinyltoluene interleaved with (6)LiF:ZnS(Ag) phosphor screens to detect the products of the inverse beta decay reaction. A multi-tonne detector system built from these individual cells can provide precise locali...

  7. Improved Neutron Scintillators Based on Nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis Friesel, PhD

    2008-06-30

    The development work conducted in this SBIR has so far not supported the premise that using nano-particles in LiFZnS:Ag foils improves their transparency to 420 (or other frequency) light. This conclusion is based solely on the light absorption properties of LiFZnS foils fabricated from nano- and from micro-particles. Furthermore, even for the case of the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} foils, the transmission of 420 nm light gained by using nano-particles all but disappears as the foil thickness is increased beyond about 0.2 mm, a practical scintillator thickness. This was not immediately apparent from the preliminary study since no foils thicker than about 0.04 mm were produced. Initially it was believed that the failure to see an improvement by using nano-particles for the LiFZnS foils was caused by the clumping of the particles in Toluene due to the polarity of the ZnS particles. However, we found, much to our surprise, that nano-particle ZnS alone in polystyrene, and in Epoxy, had worse light transmission properties than the micro-particle foils for equivalent thickness and density foils. The neutron detection measurements, while disappointing, are attributable to our inability to procure or fabricate Bulk Doped ZnS nanoparticles. The cause for the failure of nano-particles to improve the scintillation light, and hence improved neutron detection efficiency, is a fundamental one of light scattering within the scintillator. A consequence of PartTec's documentation of this is that several concepts for the fabrication of improved {sup 6}LiFZnS scintillators were formulated that will be the subject of a future SBIR submission.

  8. Low current charge normalization with scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plompen, A. J. M.; Munnik, F.; Wätjen, U.

    1996-04-01

    The use of ZnS(Ag) and YAG(Ce) scintillators for charge normalization at low currents (> 15 pA) was demonstrated with current gains of 2 × 10 3 using a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and up to 10 with a photodiode (PD). An accuracy of a few percent, sufficient for ion beam applications, was obtained. The potential of the method and its use for microprobe applications is discussed.

  9. Comparison of image uniformity with photon counting and conventional scintillation single-photon emission computed tomography system: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ho Chul; Lee, Young Jin [Dept. of Radiological Science, Eulji University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee Joung; Kim, Kyuseok; Lee, Min Hee [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    To avoid imaging artifacts and interpretation mistakes, an improvement of the uniformity in gamma camera systems is a very important point. We can expect excellent uniformity using cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) photon counting detector (PCD) because of the direct conversion of the gamma rays energy into electrons. In addition, the uniformity performance such as integral uniformity (IU), differential uniformity (DU), scatter fraction (SF), and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) varies according to the energy window setting. In this study, we compared a PCD and conventional scintillation detector with respect to the energy windows (5%, 10%, 15%, and 20%) using a {sup 99m}Tc gamma source with a Geant4 Application for Tomography Emission simulation tool. The gamma camera systems used in this work are a CZT PCD and NaI(Tl) conventional scintillation detector with a 1-mm thickness. According to the results, although the IU and DU results were improved with the energy window, the SF and CNR results deteriorated with the energy window. In particular, the uniformity for the PCD was higher than that of the conventional scintillation detector in all cases. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that the uniformity of the CZT PCD was higher than that of the conventional scintillation detector.

  10. Comparison of Image Uniformity with Photon Counting and Conventional Scintillation Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography System: A Monte Carlo Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Chul Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available To avoid imaging artifacts and interpretation mistakes, an improvement of the uniformity in gamma camera systems is a very important point. We can expect excellent uniformity using cadmium zinc telluride (CZT photon counting detector (PCD because of the direct conversion of the gamma rays energy into electrons. In addition, the uniformity performance such as integral uniformity (IU, differential uniformity (DU, scatter fraction (SF, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR varies according to the energy window setting. In this study, we compared a PCD and conventional scintillation detector with respect to the energy windows (5%, 10%, 15%, and 20% using a 99mTc gamma source with a Geant4 Application for Tomography Emission simulation tool. The gamma camera systems used in this work are a CZT PCD and NaI(Tl conventional scintillation detector with a 1-mm thickness. According to the results, although the IU and DU results were improved with the energy window, the SF and CNR results deteriorated with the energy window. In particular, the uniformity for the PCD was higher than that of the conventional scintillation detector in all cases. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that the uniformity of the CZT PCD was higher than that of the conventional scintillation detector.

  11. Temperature quenching in LAB based liquid scintillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sörensen, A.; Hans, S.; Junghans, A. R.; Krosigk, B. v.; Kögler, T.; Lozza, V.; Wagner, A.; Yeh, M.; Zuber, K.

    2018-01-01

    The effect of temperature changes on the light output of LAB based liquid scintillator is investigated in a range from -5 to 30°C with α -particles and electrons in a small scale setup. Two PMTs observe the scintillator liquid inside a cylindrically shaped aluminum cuvette that is heated or cooled and the temperature dependent PMT sensitivity is monitored and corrected. The α -emitting isotopes in dissolved radon gas and in natural Samarium (bound to a LAB solution) excite the liquid scintillator mixtures and changes in light output with temperature variation are observed by fitting light output spectra. Furthermore, also changes in light output by compton electrons, which are generated from external calibration γ -ray sources, is analysed with varying temperature. Assuming a linear behaviour, a combined negative temperature coefficient of {(-0.29 ± 0.01)}{ %/°}C is found. Considering hints for a particle type dependency, electrons show {(-0.17 ± 0.02)}{ %/°}C, whereas the temperature dependency seems stronger for α -particles, with {(-0.35 ± 0.03)}{ %/°}C. Due to a high sampling rate, a pulse shape analysis can be performed and shows an enhanced slow decay component at lower temperatures, pointing to reduced non-radiative triplet state de-excitations.

  12. New scintillating crystals for PET scanners

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, P

    2002-01-01

    Systematic R&D on basic mechanism in inorganic scintillators, initiated by the Crystal Clear Collaboration at CERN 10 years ago, has contributed not to a small amount, to the development of new materials for a new generation of medical imaging devices with increased resolution and sensitivity. The first important requirement for a scintillator to be used in medical imaging devices is the stopping power for the given energy range of X and gamma rays to be considered, and more precisely the conversion efficiency. A high light yield is also mandatory to improve the energy resolution, which is essentially limited by the photostatistics and the electronic noise at these energies. A short scintillation decay time allows to reduce the dead time and therefore to increase the limiting counting rate. When all these requirements are fulfilled the sensitivity and image contrast are increased for a given patient dose, or the dose can be reduced. Examples of new materials under development by the Crystal Clear Collabor...

  13. Scintillation counter with MRS APD light readout

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00061314; Malkevich, D.; Martemyanov, A.; Ryabinin, M.; Smirnitsky, A.; Voloshin, K.; Bondarenko, G.; Golovin, V.; Grigoriev, E.

    2005-01-01

    START, a high-efficiency and low-noise scintillation detector for ionizing particles, was developed for the purpose of creating a high-granular system for triggering cosmic muons. Scintillation light in START is detected by MRS APDs (Avalanche Photo-Diodes with Metal-Resistance-Semiconductor structure), operated in the Geiger mode, which have 1 mm^2 sensitive areas. START is assembled from a 15 x 15 x 1 cm^3 scintillating plastic plate, two MRS APDs and two pieces of wavelength-shifting optical fiber stacked in circular coils inside the plastic. The front-end electronic card is mounted directly on the detector. Tests with START have confirmed its operational consistency, over 99% efficiency of MIP registration and good homogeneity. START demonstrates a low intrinsic noise of about 10^{-2} Hz. If these detectors are to be mass-produced, the cost of a mosaic array of STARTs is estimated at a moderate level of 2-3 kUSD/m^2.

  14. Chloride, bromide and iodide scintillators with europium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravleva, Mariya; Yang, Kan

    2016-09-27

    A halide scintillator material is disclosed where the halide may comprise chloride, bromide or iodide. The material is single-crystalline and has a composition of the general formula ABX.sub.3 where A is an alkali, B is an alkali earth and X is a halide which general composition was investigated. In particular, crystals of the formula ACa.sub.1-yEu.sub.yI.sub.3 where A=K, Rb and Cs were formed as well as crystals of the formula CsA.sub.1-yEu.sub.yX.sub.3 (where A=Ca, Sr, Ba, or a combination thereof and X=Cl, Br or I or a combination thereof) with divalent Europium doping where 0.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.1, and more particularly Eu doping has been studied at one to ten mol %. The disclosed scintillator materials are suitable for making scintillation detectors used in applications such as medical imaging and homeland security.

  15. Boron-Loaded Silicone Rubber Scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, Z W; Maya, L; Sloop, F V J

    2003-01-01

    Silicone rubber received attention as an alternative to polyvinyltoluene in applications in which the scintillator is exposed to high doses because of the increased resistance of the rubber to the formation of blue-absorbing color centers. Work by Bowen, et al., and Harmon, et al., demonstrated their properties under gamma/x-ray irradiation, and Bell, et al. have shown their response to thermal neutrons. This last work, however, provided an example of a silicone in which both the boron and the scintillator were contained in the rubber as solutes, a formulation which led to the precipitation of solids and sublimation of the boron component. In the present work we describe a scintillator in which the boron is chemically bonded to the siloxane and so avoids the problem of precipitation and loss of boron to sublimation. Material containing up to 18% boron, by weight, was prepared, mounted on photomultipliers, and exposed to both neutron and gamma fluxes. Pulse height spectra showing the neutron and photon respons...

  16. Forecasting scintillations, the CNOFS satellite challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Beaujardiere, O.; Retterer, J.; Groves, K.; Burke, W.; Rich, F.; Basu, B.; Decker, D.; Jeong, L.

    2003-04-01

    This paper describes the science issues associated with the Communication / Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) Mission of the Air Force Research Laboratory. The primary purpose of C/NOFS is to forecast ionospheric irregularities that adversely impact communication and navigation systems. A satellite, scheduled for launch in January 2004 into a low inclination (13^o), elliptical (˜400 × 700 km) orbit, is the main component of the C/NOFS Mission. Complementary ground-based measurements are also part of the Mission. Difficulties in predicting the presence of scintillation-producing irregularities may be organized into three categories: (1) understand physical processes active in the background ionosphere and thermosphere, in order to nowcast and forecast the equatorial ionosphere; (2) identify mechanisms that trigger or quench the plasma irregularities; and (3) determine how irregularity spectra evolve. C/NOFS is the first satellite solely dedicated to forecasting ionospheric irregularities and radio wave scintillations. Its sensors will measure the following parameters: ambient and fluctuating electron densities; ion and electron temperatures; AC and DC electric fields; magnetic fields; neutral winds; ionospheric scintillations; and electron content along the lines of sight between the C/NOFS and GPS satellites. Forecasting will be based on both ground and space data. Significant international participation in pursuing C/NOFS science goals is desired and anticipated.

  17. Phase and coherence analysis of VHF scintillation over Christmas Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. Shume

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This short paper presents phase and coherence data from the cross-wavelet transform applied on longitudinally separated very high frequency (VHF equatorial ionospheric scintillation observations over Christmas Island. The phase and coherence analyses were employed on a pair of scintillation observations, namely, the east-looking and west-looking VHF scintillation monitors at Christmas Island. Our analysis includes 3 years of peak season scintillation data from 2008, 2009 (low solar activity, and 2011 (moderate solar activity. In statistically significant and high spectral coherence regions of the cross-wavelet transform, scintillation observations from the east-looking monitor lead those from the west-looking monitor by about 20 to 60 (40 ± 20 min (most frequent lead times. Using several years (seasons and solar cycle of lead (or lag and coherence information of the cross-wavelet transform, we envisage construction of a probability model for forecasting scintillation in the nighttime equatorial ionosphere.

  18. Characteristics of plastic scintillators fabricated by a polymerization reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Cheol Ho; Son, Jaebum; Kim, Tae Hoon; Kim, Yong Kyun [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Three plastic scintillators of 4.5 cm diameter and 2.5-cm length were fabricated for comparison with commercial plastic scintillators using polymerization of the styrene monomer 2.5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) and 1,4-bis benzene (POPOP). Their maximum emission wavelengths were determined at 426.06 nm, 426.06 nm, and 425.00 nm with a standard error of 0.2% using a Varian spectrophotometer (Agilent, Santa Clara, CA, USA). Compton edge spectra were measured using three gamma ray sources [i.e., cesium 137 ({sup 137}Cs), sodium 22 ({sup 22}Na), and cobalt 60 ({sup 60}Co)]. Energy was calibrated by analyzing the Compton edge spectra. The fabricated scintillators possessed more than 99.7% energy linearity. Light output was comparable to that of the BC-408 scintillator (Saint-Gobain, Paris, France). The fabricated scintillators showed a light output of approximately 59–64% of that of the BC-408 scintillator.

  19. B-Loaded Plastic Scintillator on the Base of Polystyrene

    CERN Document Server

    Brudanin, V B; Nemchenok, I B; Smolnikov, A A

    2000-01-01

    A method to produce polystyrene-based plastic scintillators with boron concentration from 0.38 to 5.0% of boron have been developed. o-Carborane was used as B-containing additive. The results of investigations of the optical, spectral and scintillation characteristics are presented and discussed. It is shown that 5% B-loaded scintillator has a light output as much as 70% relative to the unloaded one. High efficiency for thermal neutron registration achieved for produced samples makes it possible to use such scintillators in complex neutron high sensitive spectrometers. Measured level of radioactive contamination in this scintillation materials is good enough for using the B-loaded scintillators in the proposed large scale neutrino experiments.

  20. A xenon high-pressure proportional scintillation-camera for X and γ-ray imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen Ngoc, Hoan; Itoh, Hidehiko; Charpak, Georges

    1980-01-01

    A γ-ray imaging detector, working at ambient temperature, with good energy resolution, good spatial accuracy and reasonable detection efficiency has been built. Typical energy resolution is 6 KeV at 122 keV, with 3 mm spatial resolution. Criteria for evaluation of light yield and energy resolution are given.

  1. Ionospheric scintillation in Brazil: Analyses and Effects on GNSS Positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, D. B.; Souza, J. S.; Silva, H. D.

    2013-05-01

    Ionosphere has a great influence on GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) signals and its behavior depends on several variables: local time, geographic location, seasons and solar activity. Besides, there are ionospheric irregularities that also affect the GNSS signal propagation, as the ionospheric scintillation. The ionospheric scintillation can be described as a fast change in phase and amplitude of GNSS signal, caused by irregularities of electron density. Scintillation can degrade or cause the GNSS signal lost. Due to these described factors, one can say that the ionosphere can cause important effects on GNSS positioning. It can degrade the coordinate accuracy obtained by GNSS positioning methods. In this paper the goal is to evaluate the ionospheric effect, in special the ionospheric scintillation in different regions of Brazil, and its effects on GNSS Point Positioning. In order to evaluate the days where the scintillation was more significant it is used a database (http://200.145.185.118/cigala/index.php) from CIGALA (Concept for Ionospheric Scintillation Mitigation for Professional GNSS in Latin America) project (http://cigala.galileoic.org/). Using these data it is possible to obtain information about ionospheric scintillation in different GNSS stations in Brazil. It is possible to correlate the data according to time, season and other factors that can contribute to scintillation analysis. In 2013 must occur an intense solar activity, which can intensify the ionospheric effects, and consequently ionospheric scintillation, mainly in Brazil region, where the scintillation index is already intense. Preliminary evaluations, showed larger values of S4 (scintillation index) in Brazil. For example, in October 2012, it was obtained S4 values larger than 1 in several epochs. This causes severe effects in GNSS Positioning. In this paper, the results of GNSS positioning under ionosphere scintillation effects in different regions of Brazil will be presented.

  2. Determination of the scintillator decay time by the autocorrelation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, V. A.; Morozova, N. V.

    2017-09-01

    An autocorrelation method is developed for determining the composition and decay time of scintillators. This method also allows studying the spatial distribution of nuclear radiation and controlling the amount of the dopants introduced in the scintillator. The decay time is measured from a few nanoseconds to microseconds. It is found out that the decay time increases in plastic scintillators with a wavelength shifter and a Gd doped.

  3. Progress in Scintillating Polarized Targets for Spin Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brandt, B.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J. A.; Bunyatova, E. I.

    2003-06-01

    At PSI polarized scintillating targets have been operated in several particle physics experiments over extended periods of time. They proved to be very robust and reliable. Proton polarizations of more than 80%, and deuteron polarizations of 25% in fully deuterated polystyrene based scintillator have been reached in a vertical dilution refrigerator with optical access. New choices of materials and preparation procedures show potential for an improvement of the scintillation and polarization properties.

  4. Optimization of ultra-cold neutron scintillation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novopoltsev, M. I.; Pokotilovskii, Yu. N.

    1980-05-01

    The results are presented of the optimization of scintillation detectors of ultra-cold neutrons relative to the thickness of scintillator ZnS(Ag) and radiator LiOH. The method is stated and results are reported of measurements of the energy dependence of the efficiency of UCN detectors. The detector with a rotating scintillator is described. It has a high and constant efficiency over the whole UCN energy range.

  5. Scintiphotos in the diagnosis of renal allograft malfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payne, J.; Telfer, N.; Barbour, B.H.; Berne, T.V.

    1972-01-01

    Scintigraphy and other radioisotope techniques using hippuran have become a useful adjunct in the monitoring of renal allograft function. Technetium has been used in the evaluation of renal blood flow, rejection, and post-transplant anuria. Combined assessment provides a good compromise and enables various complications following transplantation to be differentiated. This review was undertaken in order to correlate the visual interpretation of 158 scintiphoto studies with the clinical course of 89 renal allografts. The accuracy and reproducibility of the techniques have been evaluated to determine practical indications for the use of gamma camera studies in the diagnosis of renal allograft malfunction.

  6. Three-dimensional camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothe, Thorsten; Gesierich, Achim; Legarda-Saenz, Ricardo; Jueptner, Werner P. O.

    2003-05-01

    Industrial- and multimedia applications need cost effective, compact and flexible 3D profiling instruments. In the talk we will show the principle of, applications for and results from a new miniaturized 3-D profiling system for macroscopic scenes. The system uses a compact housing and is usable like a camera with minimum stabilization like a tripod. The system is based on common fringe projection technique. Camera and projector are assembled with parallel optical axes having coplanar projection and imaging plane. Their axes distance is comparable to the human eyes distance altogether giving a complete system of 21x20x11 cm size and allowing to measure high gradient objects like the interior of tubes. The fringe projector uses a LCD which enables fast and flexible pattern projection. Camera and projector have a short focal length and a high system aperture as well as a large depth of focus. Thus, objects can be measured from a shorter distance compared to common systems (e.g. 1 m sized objects in 80 cm distance). Actually, objects with diameters up to 4 m can be profiled because the set-up allows working with completely opened aperture combined with bright lamps giving a big amount of available light and a high Signal to Noise Ratio. Normally a small basis has the disadvantage of reduced sensitivity. We investigated in methods to compensate the reduced sensitivity via setup and enhanced evaluation methods. For measurement we use synthetic wavelengths. The developed algorithms are completely adaptable concerning the users needs of speed and accuracy. The 3D camera is built from low cost components, robust, nearly handheld and delivers insights also into difficult technical objects like tubes and inside volumes. Besides the realized high resolution phase measurement the system calibration is an important task for usability. While calibrating with common photogrammetric models (which are typically used for actual fringe projection systems) problems were found that

  7. Digital camera in ophthalmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Mitra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ophthalmology is an expensive field and imaging is an indispensable modality in ophthalmology; and in developing countries including India, it is not possible for every ophthalmologist to afford slit-lamp photography unit. We here present our experience of slit-lamp photography using digital camera. Good quality pictures of anterior and posterior segment disorders were captured using readily available devices. It can be a used as a good teaching tool for residents learning ophthalmology and can also be a method to document lesions which at many times is necessary for medicolegal purposes. It's a technique which is simple, inexpensive, and has a short learning curve.

  8. Optics general-purpose scintillator light response simulation code

    CERN Document Server

    Frlez, E; Pocanic, D

    2001-01-01

    We present the program optics that simulates the light response of an arbitrarily shaped scintillation particle detector. Predicted light responses of pure CsI polygonal detectors, plastic scintillator staves, cylindrical plastic target scintillators and a Plexiglas light-distribution plate are illustrated. We demonstrate how different bulk and surface optical properties of a scintillator lead to specific volume and temporal light collection probability distributions. High-statistics optics simulations are calibrated against the detector responses measured in a custom-made cosmic muon tomography apparatus. The presented code can also be used to track particles intersecting complex geometrical objects.

  9. Development of Plastic Scintillation Detector of Low Energy Protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, J. K.; Lee, K. H.; Hwang, S. H.; Ko, S. K.; Park, S. H.; Kim, B. T. [Busan National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Development of Plastic Scintillator with thickness of 200 {mu}m. Development of the HV supply and Divider with the maximum voltage of -1200V. Development of Control Program using BASIC Computer Language. Development of Changed Mode Program for Start, Stop, Data Display and Data Transfer using Button Switch. Development of Monitoring Program for Data Transfer and Display Spectra. Development of high-efficiency plastic scintillator. Development of the 12-bit Resolution circuit. Development of main control program. Data Transmission via TCP/IP. Measurement of Beta Spectrum using Plastic Scintillator Detector. Identification of Electrons, Protons and Deuterons using Plastic Scintillator Detectors. Design and Fabrication of the Mock-up mode.

  10. Ionospheric scintilations over the polish LOFAR station PL610

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pożoga, Mariusz; Rothkaehl, Hanna; Matyjasiak, Barbara; Grzesiak, Marcin; Przepiórka, Dorota

    2017-04-01

    Using polish station PL610 of international LOFAR interferometer we present here observations of ionospheric scintillation over station. Scintillation phenomenon occurs as a result of variations in the refractive index of the medium through which waves are traveling. In particular Earth's ionosphere is strongly variable medium where high density gradients occure. Scintillation measurements may be successfully used to study the irregular structure of the ionosphere. The LOFAR telescope operates at frequencies from 10 to 240 MHz thus provides good opportunity to broad-band study of ionospheric irregularities. During the local mode periods four strong radio sources (LOFAR bright A-team sources) were observed in order to measure ionospheric scintillations.

  11. Lanthanide doped strontium-barium cesium halide scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizarri, Gregory; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Borade, Ramesh B.; Gundiah, Gautam; Yan, Zewu; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Chaudhry, Anurag; Canning, Andrew

    2015-06-09

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising an optionally lanthanide-doped strontium-barium, optionally cesium, halide, useful for detecting nuclear material.

  12. Investigation of organic liquid-scintillator optical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, Juergen; Feilitzsch, Franz von; Goeger-Neff, Marianne; Lewke, Timo; Meindl, Quirin; Oberauer, Lothar; Potzel, Walter; Todor, Sebastian; Wurm, Michael [Physik Department E15, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Str., 85748 Garching (Germany); Marrodan Undagoitia, Teresa [Physik Department E15, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Str., 85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Institut, Universitaet Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2009-07-01

    The characterization of different organic liquid-scintillator mixtures is an important step towards the design of a large-scale detector such as LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy). Its physics goals, extending from particle and geological to astrophysical issues, set high demands on the optical properties of the liquid scintillator. Therefore, small-scale experiments are carried out in order to optimize the final scintillator mixture. PXE, LAB, and dodecane are under consideration as solvents. Setups for the determination of scintillator properties are presented, such as attenuation length, light yield, emission spectra, fluorescence decay times, and quenching factors. Furthermore, results are discussed.

  13. Renal leiomyosarkom

    OpenAIRE

    A, Gelincik İ Tok

    2013-01-01

    Renal leiomyosarkomlar, oldukça nadirdir ve primer böbrek malignitelerinin %1-3'ünü oluştururlar. Renal sarkomların prognozu kötüdür ve özellikle sarkomatoid renal hücreli karsinomdan ayrımının yapılması gerekir. Hastanın klinik prezentasyonu ve radyolojik bulguları kesin olarak preoperatif tanı koymaya yardımcı değildir. Başlıca tedavi adjuvan radyoterapi veya kemoterapi ile birlikte veya tek başına radikal nefrektomidir. Prognozu kötüdür. Tanısını immünohistokimya ile doğruladığımız pr...

  14. First Demonstration of a Scintillating Xenon Bubble Chamber for Detecting Dark Matter and Coherent Elastic Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, D; Chen, C J; Crisler, M; Cwiok, T; Dahl, C E; Grimsted, A; Gupta, J; Jin, M; Puig, R; Temples, D; Zhang, J

    2017-06-09

    A 30-g xenon bubble chamber, operated at Northwestern University in June and November 2016, has for the first time observed simultaneous bubble nucleation and scintillation by nuclear recoils in a superheated liquid. This chamber is instrumented with a CCD camera for near-IR bubble imaging, a solar-blind photomultiplier tube to detect 175-nm xenon scintillation light, and a piezoelectric acoustic transducer to detect the ultrasonic emission from a growing bubble. The time of nucleation determined from the acoustic signal is used to correlate specific scintillation pulses with bubble-nucleating events. We report on data from this chamber for thermodynamic "Seitz" thresholds from 4.2 to 15.0 keV. The observed single- and multiple-bubble rates when exposed to a ^{252}Cf neutron source indicate that, for an 8.3-keV thermodynamic threshold, the minimum nuclear recoil energy required to nucleate a bubble is 19±6  keV (1σ uncertainty). This is consistent with the observed scintillation spectrum for bubble-nucleating events. We see no evidence for bubble nucleation by gamma rays at any of the thresholds studied, setting a 90% C.L. upper limit of 6.3×10^{-7} bubbles per gamma interaction at a 4.2-keV thermodynamic threshold. This indicates stronger gamma discrimination than in CF_{3}I bubble chambers, supporting the hypothesis that scintillation production suppresses bubble nucleation by electron recoils, while nuclear recoils nucleate bubbles as usual. These measurements establish the noble-liquid bubble chamber as a promising new technology for the detection of weakly interacting massive particle dark matter and coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  15. First Demonstration of a Scintillating Xenon Bubble Chamber for Detecting Dark Matter and Coherent Elastic Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, D.; Chen, C. J.; Crisler, M.; Cwiok, T.; Dahl, C. E.; Grimsted, A.; Gupta, J.; Jin, M.; Puig, R.; Temples, D.; Zhang, J.

    2017-06-01

    A 30-g xenon bubble chamber, operated at Northwestern University in June and November 2016, has for the first time observed simultaneous bubble nucleation and scintillation by nuclear recoils in a superheated liquid. This chamber is instrumented with a CCD camera for near-IR bubble imaging, a solar-blind photomultiplier tube to detect 175-nm xenon scintillation light, and a piezoelectric acoustic transducer to detect the ultrasonic emission from a growing bubble. The time of nucleation determined from the acoustic signal is used to correlate specific scintillation pulses with bubble-nucleating events. We report on data from this chamber for thermodynamic "Seitz" thresholds from 4.2 to 15.0 keV. The observed single- and multiple-bubble rates when exposed to a Cf 252 neutron source indicate that, for an 8.3-keV thermodynamic threshold, the minimum nuclear recoil energy required to nucleate a bubble is 19 ±6 keV (1 σ uncertainty). This is consistent with the observed scintillation spectrum for bubble-nucleating events. We see no evidence for bubble nucleation by gamma rays at any of the thresholds studied, setting a 90% C.L. upper limit of 6.3 ×10-7 bubbles per gamma interaction at a 4.2-keV thermodynamic threshold. This indicates stronger gamma discrimination than in CF3 I bubble chambers, supporting the hypothesis that scintillation production suppresses bubble nucleation by electron recoils, while nuclear recoils nucleate bubbles as usual. These measurements establish the noble-liquid bubble chamber as a promising new technology for the detection of weakly interacting massive particle dark matter and coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  16. Light output measurements and computational models of microcolumnar CsI scintillators for x-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nillius, Peter; Klamra, Wlodek; Sibczynski, Pawel; Sharma, Diksha; Danielsson, Mats; Badano, Aldo

    2015-02-01

    The authors report on measurements of light output and spatial resolution of microcolumnar CsI:Tl scintillator detectors for x-ray imaging. In addition, the authors discuss the results of simulations aimed at analyzing the results of synchrotron and sealed-source exposures with respect to the contributions of light transport to the total light output. The authors measured light output from a 490-μm CsI:Tl scintillator screen using two setups. First, the authors used a photomultiplier tube (PMT) to measure the response of the scintillator to sealed-source exposures. Second, the authors performed imaging experiments with a 27-keV monoenergetic synchrotron beam and a slit to calculate the total signal generated in terms of optical photons per keV. The results of both methods are compared to simulations obtained with hybridmantis, a coupled x-ray, electron, and optical photon Monte Carlo transport package. The authors report line response (LR) and light output for a range of linear absorption coefficients and describe a model that fits at the same time the light output and the blur measurements. Comparing the experimental results with the simulations, the authors obtained an estimate of the absorption coefficient for the model that provides good agreement with the experimentally measured LR. Finally, the authors report light output simulation results and their dependence on scintillator thickness and reflectivity of the backing surface. The slit images from the synchrotron were analyzed to obtain a total light output of 48 keV(-1) while measurements using the fast PMT instrument setup and sealed-sources reported a light output of 28 keV(-1) . The authors attribute the difference in light output estimates between the two methods to the difference in time constants between the camera and PMT measurements. Simulation structures were designed to match the light output measured with the camera while providing good agreement with the measured LR resulting in a bulk

  17. Sub-3mm spatial resolution from a large monolithic LaBr3 (Ce scintillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liprandi Silvia

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A Compton camera prototype for ion beam range monitoring via prompt (< 1 ns gamma detection in hadron therapy is being developed and characterized at the Medical Physics Department of LMU Munich. The system consists of a large (50x50x30 mm3 monolithic LaBr3(Ce scintillation crystal as absorber component to detect the multi-MeV Compton scattered photons, together with a stack of 6 double-sided silicon strip detectors (DSSSD acting as scatterer component. Key ingredient of the γ-source reconstruction is the determination of the γ-ray interaction position in the scintillator, which is read out by a 256-fold segmented multi-anode photomultiplier tube (PMT. From simulations an angular resolution of about 1.5o for the photon source reconstruction can be expected for the energy range around 3 – 5 MeV, provided that a spatial resolution of 3 mm can be reached in the absorbing scintillator [1]. Therefore, particular effort was dedicated to characterize this latter property as a function of the γ-ray energy. Intense, tightly collimated 137Cs and 60Co photon sources were used for 2D irradiation scans (step size 0.5 mm as prerequisite for studying the performance of the “k-Nearest-Neighbors” algorithm developed at TU Delft [2] (together with its variant ”Categorical Average Pattern”, CAP and extending its applicability into the energy range beyond the original 511 keV. In this paper we present our most recent interaction position analysis in the absorbing scintillator, leading to a considerably improved value for the spatial resolution: systematic studies were performed as a function of the k-NN parameters and the PMT segmentation. A trend of improving spatial resolution with increasing photon energy was confirmed, resulting in the realization of the presently optimum spatial resolution of 2.9(1 mm @1.3 MeV, thus reaching the design specifications of the Compton camera absorber. The specification goal was reached also for a reduced PMT

  18. Trauma renal

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira Júnior, Gerson Alves; Paganelli, Fernando; Scarpelini, Sandro; Stracieri, Luís Donizetti Silva; Féres, Ornar; Andrade, José Ivan de

    1999-01-01

    Apresentamos uma revisão sobre trauma renal, com ênfase na avaliação radiológica, particularmente com o uso da tomografia computadorizada, que tem se tornado o exame de eleição, ao invés da urografia excretora e arteriografia. O sucesso no tratamento conservador dos pacientes com trauma renal depende de um acurado estadiamento da extensão da lesão, classificado de acordo com a Organ Injury Scaling do Colégio Americano de Cirurgiões. O tratamento conservador não-operatório é seguro e consiste ...

  19. Sarcoidose renal

    OpenAIRE

    AQUINO, MARIA ENEDINA CLAUDINO DE; SALES, ROBERTA KARLA BARBOSA DE; SANTOS, JOSÉ ANTÔNIO FREIRE DOS; RÉGIS, ANA LIDIA; MORRONE, NELSON

    2001-01-01

    Em uma mulher de 62 anos, branca, em avaliação pré-operatória de facectomia, foram detectadas alterações urinárias, tendo sido firmados os diagnósticos de calculose renal esquerda e exclusão renal homolateral. No pré-operatório da nefrectomia foram evidenciados processo pulmonar intersticial bilateral e adenopatia torácica, cuja investigação foi adiada para após a cirurgia. No rim retirado foram detectados granulomas epitelióides não necrotizantes, o mesmo ocorrendo posteriormente em biópsia ...

  20. Renal transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Bugeja, Mark

    1983-01-01

    The first Renal Transplantation ever to be carried out in Malta was performed on the 22nd April, 1983, a day that may well be included in the Medical History of our Islands. This .event is another step -forward following the introduction, not very long'ago, at St. Luke's Hospital, of Haemodialysis or as the lay- man would call it, the 'Kidney Machine'. What follows is not meant to be a case- presentation proper but is intended to serve as a base over which some pros and cons of renal transpla...

  1. NFC - Narrow Field Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukal, J.; Srba, J.; Gorková, S.

    2015-01-01

    We have been introducing a low-cost CCTV video system for faint meteor monitoring and here we describe the first results from 5 months of two-station operations. Our system called NFC (Narrow Field Camera) with a meteor limiting magnitude around +6.5mag allows research on trajectories of less massive meteoroids within individual parent meteor showers and the sporadic background. At present 4 stations (2 pairs with coordinated fields of view) of NFC system are operated in the frame of CEMeNt (Central European Meteor Network). The heart of each NFC station is a sensitive CCTV camera Watec 902 H2 and a fast cinematographic lens Meopta Meostigmat 1/50 - 52.5 mm (50 mm focal length and fixed aperture f/1.0). In this paper we present the first results based on 1595 individual meteors, 368 of which were recorded from two stations simultaneously. This data set allows the first empirical verification of theoretical assumptions for NFC system capabilities (stellar and meteor magnitude limit, meteor apparent brightness distribution and accuracy of single station measurements) and the first low mass meteoroid trajectory calculations. Our experimental data clearly showed the capabilities of the proposed system for low mass meteor registration and for calculations based on NFC data to lead to a significant refinement in the orbital elements for low mass meteoroids.

  2. Compact 3D camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothe, Thorsten; Osten, Wolfgang; Gesierich, Achim; Jueptner, Werner P. O.

    2002-06-01

    A new, miniaturized fringe projection system is presented which has a size and handling that approximates to common 2D cameras. The system is based on the fringe projection technique. A miniaturized fringe projector and camera are assembled into a housing of 21x20x11 cm size with a triangulation basis of 10 cm. The advantage of the small triangulation basis is the possibility to measure difficult objects with high gradients. Normally a small basis has the disadvantage of reduced sensitivity. We investigated in methods to compensate the reduced sensitivity via setup and enhanced evaluation methods. Special hardware issues are a high quality, bright light source (and components to handle the high luminous flux) as well as adapted optics to gain a large aperture angle and a focus scan unit to increase the usable measurement volume. Adaptable synthetic wavelengths and integration times were used to increase the measurement quality and allow robust measurements that are adaptable to the desired speed and accuracy. Algorithms were developed to generate automatic focus positions to completely cover extended measurement volumes. Principles, setup, measurement examples and applications are shown.

  3. Mars Science Laboratory Engineering Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Justin N.; Thiessen, David L.; Pourangi, Ali M.; Kobzeff, Peter A.; Lee, Steven W.; Dingizian, Arsham; Schwochert, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover, which launched to Mars in 2011, is equipped with a set of 12 engineering cameras. These cameras are build-to-print copies of the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) cameras, which were sent to Mars in 2003. The engineering cameras weigh less than 300 grams each and use less than 3 W of power. Images returned from the engineering cameras are used to navigate the rover on the Martian surface, deploy the rover robotic arm, and ingest samples into the rover sample processing system. The navigation cameras (Navcams) are mounted to a pan/tilt mast and have a 45-degree square field of view (FOV) with a pixel scale of 0.82 mrad/pixel. The hazard avoidance cameras (Haz - cams) are body-mounted to the rover chassis in the front and rear of the vehicle and have a 124-degree square FOV with a pixel scale of 2.1 mrad/pixel. All of the cameras utilize a frame-transfer CCD (charge-coupled device) with a 1024x1024 imaging region and red/near IR bandpass filters centered at 650 nm. The MSL engineering cameras are grouped into two sets of six: one set of cameras is connected to rover computer A and the other set is connected to rover computer B. The MSL rover carries 8 Hazcams and 4 Navcams.

  4. Performance characteristics of the novel PETRRA positron camera

    CERN Document Server

    Ott, R J; Erlandsson, K; Reader, A; Duxbury, D; Bateman, J; Stephenson, R; Spill, E

    2002-01-01

    The PETRRA positron camera consists of two 60 cmx40 cm annihilation photon detectors mounted on a rotating gantry. Each detector contains large BaF sub 2 scintillators interfaced to large area multiwire proportional chambers filled with a photo-sensitive vapour (tetrakis-(dimethylamino)-ethylene). The spatial resolution of the camera has been measured as 6.5+-1.0 mm FWHM throughout the sensitive field-of-view (FoV), the timing resolution is between 7 and 10 ns FWHM and the detection efficiency for annihilation photons is approx 30% per detector. The count-rates obtained, from a 20 cm diameter by 11 cm long water filled phantom containing 90 MBq of sup 1 sup 8 F, were approx 1.25x10 sup 6 singles and approx 1.1x10 sup 5 cps raw coincidences, limited only by the read-out system dead-time of approx 4 mu s. The count-rate performance, sensitivity and large FoV make the camera ideal for whole-body imaging in oncology.

  5. Separation of Interplanetary and Ionospheric Scintillations of Cosmic Sources at Decameter Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinichenko, N. N.; Falkovich, I. S.; Konovalenko, O. O.; Brazhenko, A. I.

    2013-09-01

    The influence of Earth's ionosphere on statistic characteristics, of compact space sources scintillations (cross-correlation, function of scintillations at two frequencies, cross-correlation, function of scintillations at two radio telescopes, power spectrum, of scintillations, probability density function of scintillations), has been experimentally estimated at decameter wavelength. A new method for selection of interplanetary scintillations, from experimental data obtained with the URAN system, radio telescopes has been developed.

  6. ACCURACY EVALUATION OF STEREO CAMERA SYSTEMS WITH GENERIC CAMERA MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Rueß

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades the consumer and industrial market for non-projective cameras has been growing notably. This has led to the development of camera description models other than the pinhole model and their employment in mostly homogeneous camera systems. Heterogeneous camera systems (for instance, combine Fisheye and Catadioptric cameras can also be easily thought of for real applications. However, it has not been quite clear, how accurate stereo vision with these cameras and models can be. In this paper, different accuracy aspects are addressed by analytical inspection, numerical simulation as well as real image data evaluation. This analysis is generic, for any camera projection model, although only polynomial and rational projection models are used for distortion free, Catadioptric and Fisheye lenses. Note that this is different to polynomial and rational radial distortion models which have been addressed extensively in literature. For single camera analysis it turns out that point features towards the image sensor borders are significantly more accurate than in center regions of the sensor. For heterogeneous two camera systems it turns out, that reconstruction accuracy decreases significantly towards image borders as different projective distortions occur.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of nanocomposite scintillators for radiation detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahi, Sunil Kumar

    Inorganic single crystal and organic (plastic and liquid) scintillators are commonly used for radiation detection. Inorganic single crystals are efficient and have better energy resolution compared to organic scintillators. However, inorganic single crystals are difficult to grow in large size and hence expensive. On the other hand, fast decay time and ease of fabrication makes organic scintillators attractive for many applications. However, poor energy resolution of organic scintillators limits its applications in gamma ray spectroscopy. The poor energy resolution is due to the low Z-value and low density of organic scintillator. The Z-value of organic plastic scintillator can be increase by loading nanoparticles in plastic matrix. It is expected that the increase in Z-value would result in improve energy resolution of nanocomposite scintillator. However, the loss of optical transparency due to nanoparticles loading is one of the major concerns of nanocomposite scintillators. In this dissertation, we used different methods to synthesize La xCe1-xF3 nanoparticles with high dispersion in polymer matrix. High nanoparticle dispersion is important to load high concentration of nanoparticles into polymer matrix without losing the transparency of the polymer matrix. The as synthesized nanoparticles are dispersed into monomers and polymerized using heat initiated bulk polymerization method. Nanoparticles are characterized using TEM, XRD, FTIR and TGA. The optical and scintillation properties of nanoparticles and nanocomposites are studied using spectroscopic techniques. The pulse height spectra obtained using nanocomposite fabricated by loading up to 30 wt% nanoparticles clearly show a photopeak for the 122 keV line of the Co-57 isotope. The generation of the photopeak is due to the enhanced photoelectric effect as a result of increased effective atomic number (Zeff) and density of nanocomposite scintillator. The pulse height spectra of Cs-137 gamma source show a full

  8. Hiperparatiroidismos renales

    OpenAIRE

    Malagón Castro, Valentín

    2011-01-01

    En la presente monografía presentamos una síntesis, lo más completa posible, del gran problema de los Hiperparatirodismos secundarios a lesiones renales, enfocando su estudio con un criterio unicista, con el objeto de hacer más didáctico este amplio capítulo de la patología.

  9. Renal denervation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lene Kjær; Kamper, Anne-Lise; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Renal denervation (RDN) has, within recent years, been suggested as a novel treatment option for patients with resistant hypertension. This review summarizes the current knowledge on this procedure as well as limitations and questions that remain to be answered. RECENT FINDINGS...

  10. Trauma renal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerson Alves Pereira Júnior

    Full Text Available Apresentamos uma revisão sobre trauma renal, com ênfase na avaliação radiológica, particularmente com o uso da tomografia computadorizada, que tem se tornado o exame de eleição, ao invés da urografia excretora e arteriografia. O sucesso no tratamento conservador dos pacientes com trauma renal depende de um acurado estadiamento da extensão da lesão, classificado de acordo com a Organ Injury Scaling do Colégio Americano de Cirurgiões. O tratamento conservador não-operatório é seguro e consiste de observação contínua, repouso no leito, hidratação endovenosa adequada e antibioti- coterapia profilática, evitando-se uma exploração cirúrgica desnecessária e possível perda renal. As indicações para exploração cirúrgica imediata são abdome agudo, rápida queda do hematócrito ou lesões associadas determinadas na avaliação radiológica. Quando indicada, a exploração renal após controle vascular prévio é segura, permitindo cuidadosa inspeção do rim e sua reconstrução com sucesso, reduzindo a probabilidade de nefrectomia.

  11. X-ray framing camera for pulsed, high current, electron beam x-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Failor, B H; Riordan, j c; Lojewski, D Y

    2007-01-01

    High power x-ray sources built for nuclear weapons effects testing are evolving toward larger overall diameters and smaller anode cathode gaps. We describe a framing camera developed to measure the time-evolution of these 20-50 ns pulsed x-ray sources produced by currents in the 1.5-2.5 MA range and endpoint voltages between 0.2 and 1.5 MV. The camera has up to 4 frames with 5 ns gate widths; the frames are separated by 5 ns. The image data are recorded electronically with a gated intensified CCD camera and the data are available immediately following a shot. A fast plastic scintillator (2.1 ns decay time) converts the x-rays to visible light and, for high sensitivity, a fiber optic imaging bundle carries the light to the CCD input. Examples of image data are shown.

  12. A series approximation model for optical light transport and output intensity field distribution in large aspect ratio cylindrical scintillation crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobias, Benjamin John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-09

    A series approximation has been derived for the transport of optical photons within a cylindrically symmetric light pipe and applied to the task of evaluating both the origin and angular distribution of light reaching the output plane. This analytic expression finds particular utility in first-pass photonic design applications since it may be evaluated at a very modest computational cost and is readily parameterized for relevant design constraints. It has been applied toward quantitative exploration of various scintillation crystal preparations and their impact on both quantum efficiency and noise, reproducing sensible dependencies and providing physical justification for certain gamma ray camera design choices.

  13. Junocam: Juno's Outreach Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, C. J.; Caplinger, M. A.; Ingersoll, A.; Ravine, M. A.; Jensen, E.; Bolton, S.; Orton, G.

    2017-11-01

    Junocam is a wide-angle camera designed to capture the unique polar perspective of Jupiter offered by Juno's polar orbit. Junocam's four-color images include the best spatial resolution ever acquired of Jupiter's cloudtops. Junocam will look for convective clouds and lightning in thunderstorms and derive the heights of the clouds. Junocam will support Juno's radiometer experiment by identifying any unusual atmospheric conditions such as hotspots. Junocam is on the spacecraft explicitly to reach out to the public and share the excitement of space exploration. The public is an essential part of our virtual team: amateur astronomers will supply ground-based images for use in planning, the public will weigh in on which images to acquire, and the amateur image processing community will help process the data.

  14. High density scintillating glass proton imaging detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, C. J.; Goranson, K.; Turney, A.; Xie, Q.; Tillman, I. J.; Thune, Z. L.; Dong, A.; Pritchett, D.; McInally, W.; Potter, A.; Wang, D.; Akgun, U.

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, proton therapy has achieved remarkable precision in delivering doses to cancerous cells while avoiding healthy tissue. However, in order to utilize this high precision treatment, greater accuracy in patient positioning is needed. An accepted approximate uncertainty of +/-3% exists in the current practice of proton therapy due to conversions between x-ray and proton stopping power. The use of protons in imaging would eliminate this source of error and lessen the radiation exposure of the patient. To this end, this study focuses on developing a novel proton-imaging detector built with high-density glass scintillator. The model described herein contains a compact homogeneous proton calorimeter composed of scintillating, high density glass as the active medium. The unique geometry of this detector allows for the measurement of both the position and residual energy of protons, eliminating the need for a separate set of position trackers in the system. Average position and energy of a pencil beam of 106 protons is used to reconstruct the image rather than by analyzing individual proton data. Simplicity and efficiency were major objectives in this model in order to present an imaging technique that is compact, cost-effective, and precise, as well as practical for a clinical setting with pencil-beam scanning proton therapy equipment. In this work, the development of novel high-density glass scintillator and the unique conceptual design of the imager are discussed; a proof-of-principle Monte Carlo simulation study is performed; preliminary two-dimensional images reconstructed from the Geant4 simulation are presented.

  15. Scintillating Fibre Calorimetry at the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Good electromagnetic and hadronic calorimetry will play a central role in an LHC detector. The lead/scintillating fibre calorimeter technique provides a fast signal response well matched to the LHC rate requirements. It can be made to give equal response for electrons and hadrons (compensation) with good electromagnetic and hadronic energy resolutions.\\\\ \\\\ The aim of this R&D proposal is to study in detail the aspects that are relevant for application of this type of calorimeter in an LHC environment, including its integration in a larger system of detectors, e.g.~projective geometry, radiation hardness, light detection, calibration and stability monitoring, electron/hadron separation.....

  16. Scintillation {gamma} spectrography. Physical principles. Apparatus. Operation; Spectrographie {gamma} a scintillations. Principes physiques. Appareillage. Utilisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julliot, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-07-01

    The scintillation detector forms the main part of the instrument used, the electronic unit presenting the results produced. After a brief description of the process of {gamma} photon absorption in the material, the particular case of NaI (T1), the scintillator used, is examined. The intensity of the scintillation caused by {gamma} ray absorption and the characteristics of the photomultiplier play a determining part in the energy resolution of the instrument. For the {gamma} recording spectrograph, we show to what extent the technique for using the electronic unit can modify the results. A detailed description is given of the activity measurement of a {gamma}-emitting radioelement by the spectrographic method. (author) [French] Dans l'appareillage utilise, le detecteur a scintillations constitue la piece maitresse, l'ensemble electronique presente les resultats issus du detecteur. Apres avoir brievement decrit le processus d'absorption des photons {gamma} dans la matiere, nous examinons le cas particulier du NaI(T1), le scintillateur utilise. L'intensite de la scintillation provoque par l'absorption des rayons {gamma} et les caracteristiques du photomultiplicateur jouent un role determinant dans la resolution en energie de l'appareil. Pour le spectrographe {gamma} enregistreur, nous indiquons dans quelle mesure la technique d'utilisation de l'ensemble electronique peut modifier les resultats. La-mesure de l'activite d'un radioelement emetteur {gamma} par spectrographie fait l'objet d'une description detaillee. (auteur)

  17. Systematic studies of small scintillators for new sampling calorimeter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mirror film, teflon, white paint, black tape, gold, aluminum and white paint+teflon. The pulse height dependence on position, length and thickness of the 3M reflective mirror film and teflon wrapped scintillators are measured. Results show that the 3M radiant mirror film-wrapped scintillator has the greatest light yield with an ...

  18. Systematic studies of small scintillators for new sampling calorimeter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The wrapped scintillator that gives the best light yield is determined by comparing the measured pulse height of each 10 × 40 × 2 mm strip scintillator covered with 3M reflective mirror film, teflon, white paint, black tape, gold, aluminum and white paint+teflon. The pulse height dependence on position, length and thickness of ...

  19. Wavelet-based analogous phase scintillation index for high latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, A.; Tiwari, R.; Strangeways, H. J.; Dlay, S.; Johnsen, M. G.

    2015-08-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) performance at high latitudes can be severely affected by the ionospheric scintillation due to the presence of small-scale time-varying electron density irregularities. In this paper, an improved analogous phase scintillation index derived using the wavelet-transform-based filtering technique is presented to represent the effects of scintillation regionally at European high latitudes. The improved analogous phase index is then compared with the original analogous phase index and the phase scintillation index for performance comparison using 1 year of data from Trondheim, Norway (63.41°N, 10.4°E). This index provides samples at a 1 min rate using raw total electron content (TEC) data at 1 Hz for the prediction of phase scintillation compared to the scintillation monitoring receivers (such as NovAtel Global Navigation Satellite Systems Ionospheric Scintillation and TEC Monitor receivers) which operate at 50 Hz rate and are thus rather computationally intensive. The estimation of phase scintillation effects using high sample rate data makes the improved analogous phase index a suitable candidate which can be used in regional geodetic dual-frequency-based GPS receivers to efficiently update the tracking loop parameters based on tracking jitter variance.

  20. Temperature dependent scintillation properties of pure LaCl3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bizarri, G.; Dorenbos, P.

    2009-01-01

    The scintillation yield, scintillation decay, and x-ray excited emission of pure LaCl3 was studied as a function of temperature between 80 and 600 K. Two broad band emissions centered around 325 nm and 400 nm were identified and correlated to emissions from two localized exciton states named STE1

  1. Performance evaluation of GPS receiver under equatorial scintillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison de Oliveira Moraes

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Equatorial scintillation is a phenomenon that occurs daily in the equatorial region after the sunset and affects radio signals that propagate through the ionosphere. Depending on the temporal and spatial situation, equatorial scintillation can represent a problem in the availability and precision of the Global Positioning System (GPS. This work is concerned with evaluating the impact of equatorial scintillation on the performance of GPS receivers. First, the morphology and statistical model of equatorial scintillation is briefly presented. A numerical model that generates synthetic scintillation data to simulate the effects of equatorial scintillation is presented. An overview of the main theoretical principles on GPS receivers is presented. The analytical models that describe the effects of scintillation at receiver level are presented and compared with numerical simulations using a radio software receiver and synthetic data. The results achieved by simulation agreed quite well with those predicted by the analytical models. The only exception is for links with extreme levels of scintillation and when weak signals are received.

  2. Performance comparison of scintillators for alpha particle detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Yuki; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Izaki, Kenji; Kaneko, Junichi H.; Toui, Kohei; Tsubota, Youichi; Higuchi, Mikio

    2014-11-01

    Scintillation detectors for alpha particles are often used in nuclear fuel facilities. Alpha particle detectors have also become important in the research field of radionuclide therapy using alpha emitters. ZnS(Ag) is the most often used scintillator for alpha particle detectors because its light output is high. However, the energy resolution of ZnS(Ag)-based scintillation detectors is poor because they are not transparent. A new ceramic sample, namely the cerium doped Gd2Si2O7 (GPS) scintillator, has been tested as alpha particle detector and its performances have been compared to that one of three different scintillating materials: ZnS(Ag), GAGG and a standard plastic scintillator. The different scintillating materials have been coupled to two different photodetectors, namely a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and a Silicon Photo-multiplier (Si-PM): the performances of each detection system have been compared. Promising results as far as the energy resolution performances (10% with PMT and 14% with Si-PM) have been obtained in the case of GPS and GAGG samples. Considering the quantum efficiencies of the photodetectors under test and their relation to the emission wavelength of the different scintillators, the best results were achieved coupling the GPS with the PMT and the GAGG with the Si-PM

  3. Performance comparison of scintillators for alpha particle detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morishita, Yuki [Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, 1-1-20 Daiko-Minami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 461-8673 (Japan); Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Muramatsu 4-33, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan); Yamamoto, Seiichi [Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, 1-1-20 Daiko-Minami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 461-8673 (Japan); Izaki, Kenji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Muramatsu 4-33, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan); Kaneko, Junichi H.; Toui, Kohei; Tsubota, Youichi; Higuchi, Mikio [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan)

    2014-11-11

    Scintillation detectors for alpha particles are often used in nuclear fuel facilities. Alpha particle detectors have also become important in the research field of radionuclide therapy using alpha emitters. ZnS(Ag) is the most often used scintillator for alpha particle detectors because its light output is high. However, the energy resolution of ZnS(Ag)-based scintillation detectors is poor because they are not transparent. A new ceramic sample, namely the cerium doped Gd{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} (GPS) scintillator, has been tested as alpha particle detector and its performances have been compared to that one of three different scintillating materials: ZnS(Ag), GAGG and a standard plastic scintillator. The different scintillating materials have been coupled to two different photodetectors, namely a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and a Silicon Photo-multiplier (Si-PM): the performances of each detection system have been compared. Promising results as far as the energy resolution performances (10% with PMT and 14% with Si-PM) have been obtained in the case of GPS and GAGG samples. Considering the quantum efficiencies of the photodetectors under test and their relation to the emission wavelength of the different scintillators, the best results were achieved coupling the GPS with the PMT and the GAGG with the Si-PM.

  4. Extraction of Doppler Scintillation from Deep Space Probe Tracking Data

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Zenichi; Toriyama, Gaku; Hirosawa, Haruto; 山本, 善一; 鳥山, 学; 廣澤, 春任

    1990-01-01

    Doppler frequencies of deep space probe tracking signalsfluctuate randomly when solar wind passes across ray-pathes of the radio waves. In this paper we present a method to extract Doppler scintillations from deep space probe tracking signals by applying filterings. We discuss the Doppler scintillations extracted from the tracking data of "SAKIGAKE" and "SUISEI".

  5. Analysis of Ionospheric Scintillation Characteristics in Sub-Antarctica Region with GNSS Data at Macquarie Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kai; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Jinling

    2017-01-12

    Ionospheric scintillation has a great impact on radio propagation and electronic system performance, thus is extensively studied currently. The influence of scintillation on Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) is particularly evident, making GNSS an effective medium to study characteristics of scintillation. Ionospheric scintillation varies greatly in relation with temporal and spatial distribution. In this paper, both temporal and spatial characteristics of scintillation are investigated based on Macquarie Island's GNSS scintillation data collected from 2011 to 2015. Experiments demonstrate that occurrence rates of amplitude scintillation have a close relationship with solar activity, while phase scintillation is more likely to be generated by geomagnetic activity. In addition, scintillation distribution behaviors related to elevation and azimuth angles are statistically analyzed for both amplitude and phase scintillation. The proposed work is valuable for a deeper understanding of theoretical mechanisms of ionospheric scintillation in this region, and provides a reference for GNSS applications in certain regions around sub-Antarctica.

  6. Optimization of light collection from crystal scintillators for cryogenic experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danevich, F.A., E-mail: danevich@kinr.kiev.ua [Institute for Nuclear Research, MSP 03680, Kyiv (Ukraine); Kobychev, R.V. [Institute for Nuclear Research, MSP 03680, Kyiv (Ukraine); National Technical University of Ukraine “Kyiv Polytechnic Institute”, 03056 Kyiv (Ukraine); Kobychev, V.V. [Institute for Nuclear Research, MSP 03680, Kyiv (Ukraine); Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kraus, H. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Mikhailik, V.B. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science Campus, Didcot, OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Mokina, V.M. [Institute for Nuclear Research, MSP 03680, Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2014-04-21

    High light collection efficiency is an important requirement in any application of scintillation detectors. The purpose of this study is to investigate the possibility for improving this parameter in cryogenic scintillation bolometers, which can be considered as promising detectors in experiments investigating neutrinoless double beta decay and dark matter. Energy resolutions and relative pulse amplitudes of scintillation detectors using ZnWO{sub 4} scintillation crystals of different shapes (cylinder ∅ 20×20 mm and hexagonal prism with diagonal 20 mm and height 20 mm), reflector materials and shapes, optical contact and surface properties (polished and diffused) were measured at room temperature. Propagation of optical photons in these experimental conditions was simulated using Geant4 and ZEMAX codes. The results of the simulations are found to be in good agreement with each other and with direct measurements of the crystals. This could be applied to optimize the geometry of scintillation detectors used in the cryogenic experiments.

  7. Ionospheric irregularities causing scintillation of GHz frequency radio signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernik, A. W.; Liu, C. H.

    1974-01-01

    Consideration of the recently observed phenomenon of scintillation of satellite signals at GHz frequency range. Based on the scintillation data and results from in situ measurements, several ionospheric irregularity models with different power spectra are studied. Scintillation index is computed for the various models and compared with observed results. Both magnitude and frequency dependence of the scintillation index are investigated. It is found that a thick irregularity slab of the order of 200 km with an electron density fluctuation of about 20 per cent of its background value and with a nonmonotonic power spectrum may account for the maximum observed values of the scintillation index as well as its frequency dependence. Some future observations and measurements are suggested.

  8. Effects of hadron irradiation on scintillating fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atac, M. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States) Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)); Buchanan, C.; Chrisman, D.; Cline, D.; Kolonko, J.; Kubic, J.; Park, J. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Baumbaugh, A.; Binkley, M.; Bross, A.D.; Finley, D.; Elias, J.; Foster, G.W.; Kephart, R.; Kephart, R.; Kim, C.; Park, H.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Rivetta, C.; Tkaczyk, S.; Wagner, R. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)); Chung, M.; Goldberg, H.; Jeskik, R.; Margulies, S.; Mendez, H.; Solomon, J.; Vaca, F. (Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)); Kelley, C. (Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Sciences, Boston, MA (United States)); Baumbaugh, B.; Bishop, J.; Biswas, N.; Cason, N.; Jacques, J.; Kehoe, R.; Kelly, M.; Kenney, V.; LoSecco, J.; Ruchti, R.; Shephard, W.; Warchol, J.; Wayne, M.; Marchant, J.; Mountain, R.J. (Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)); Davis, D.; Vandergriff, D. (O

    1993-08-01

    Trackers based on scintillating-fiber technology are being considered by the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration at SSC and the D[phi] collaboration at Fermilab. An important issue is the effect of the radiation existing in the detector cores on fiber properties. Most studies of radiation damage in scintillators have irradiated small bulk samples rather than fibers, and have used X-rays, [sup 60]Co gammas, or electron beams, often at accelerated rates. The authors have irradiated some 600 fibers in the Fermilab Tevatron C[phi] area, thereby obtaining a hadronic irradiation at realistic rates. Four-meter-long samples of ten Bicron polystyrene-based fiber types, maintained in air, dry nitrogen, argon, and vacuum atmospheres within stainless-steel tubes, were irradiated for seven weeks at various distances from the accelerator beam pipes. Maximum doses, measured by thermoluminescence detectors, were about 80 Krad. Fiber properties, particularly light yield and attenuation length, have been measured over a one-year period. A description of the work together with the results is presented. At the doses achieved, corresponding to a few years of actual fiber-tracking detector operation, little degradation is observed. In addition, recovery after several days' exposure to air has been noted. Properties of unirradiated samples kept in darkness show no changes after one year.

  9. A novel segmented-scintillator antineutrino detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Y.; Amhis, Y.; Arnold, L.; Ban, G.; Beaumont, W.; Bongrand, M.; Boursette, D.; Buhour, J. M.; Castle, B. C.; Clark, K.; Coupé, B.; Cucoanes, A. S.; Cussans, D.; De Roeck, A.; D'Hondt, J.; Durand, D.; Fallot, M.; Fresneau, S.; Ghys, L.; Giot, L.; Guillon, B.; Guilloux, G.; Ihantola, S.; Janssen, X.; Kalcheva, S.; Kalousis, L. N.; Koonen, E.; Labare, M.; Lehaut, G.; Mermans, J.; Michiels, I.; Moortgat, C.; Newbold, D.; Park, J.; Petridis, K.; Piñera, I.; Pommery, G.; Popescu, L.; Pronost, G.; Rademacker, J.; Reynolds, A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Ryder, N.; Saunders, D.; Shitov, Yu. A.; Schune, M.-H.; Scovell, P. R.; Simard, L.; Vacheret, A.; Van Dyck, S.; Van Mulders, P.; van Remortel, N.; Vercaemer, S.; Waldron, A.; Weber, A.; Yermia, F.

    2017-04-01

    The next generation of very-short-baseline reactor experiments will require compact detectors operating at surface level and close to a nuclear reactor. This paper presents a new detector concept based on a composite solid scintillator technology. The detector target uses cubes of polyvinyltoluene interleaved with 6LiF:ZnS(Ag) phosphor screens to detect the products of the inverse beta decay reaction. A multi-tonne detector system built from these individual cells can provide precise localisation of scintillation signals, making efficient use of the detector volume. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that a neutron capture efficiency of over 70 % is achievable with a sufficient number of 6LiF:ZnS(Ag) screens per cube and that an appropriate segmentation enables a measurement of the positron energy which is not limited by γ-ray leakage. First measurements of a single cell indicate that a very good neutron-gamma discrimination and high neutron detection efficiency can be obtained with adequate triggering techniques. The light yield from positron signals has been measured, showing that an energy resolution of 14%/√E(MeV) is achievable with high uniformity. A preliminary neutrino signal analysis has been developed, using selection criteria for pulse shape, energy, time structure and energy spatial distribution and showing that an antineutrino efficiency of 40% can be achieved. It also shows that the fine segmentation of the detector can be used to significantly decrease both correlated and accidental backgrounds.

  10. Characterization of cerium fluoride nanocomposite scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stange, Sy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Esch, Ernst I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Leif O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Couture, Aaron J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mckigney, Edward A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Muenchausen, Ross E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Del Sesto, Rico E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gilbertson, Robert D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mccleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reifarth, Rene [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of the neutron capture cross-sections of a number of short-lived isotopes would advance both pure and applied scientific research. These cross-sections are needed for calculation of criticality and waste production estimates for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, for analysis of data from nuclear weapons tests, and to improve understanding of nucleosynthesis. However, measurement of these cross-sections would require a detector with a faster signal decay time than those used in existing neutron capture experiments. Crystals of faster detector materials are not available in sufficient sizes and quantities to supply these large-scale experiments. Instead, we propose to use nanocomposite detectors, consisting of nanoscale particles of a scintillating material dispersed in a matrix material. We have successfully fabricated cerium fluoride (CeF{sub 3}) nanoparticles and dispersed them in a liquid matrix. We have characterized this scintillator and have measured its response to neutron capture. Results of the optical, structural, and radiation characterization will be presented.

  11. A scintillating fiber dosimeter for radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartesaghi, G.; Conti, V.; Bolognini, D.; Grigioni, S.; Mascagna, V.; Prest, M.; Scazzi, S.; Mozzanica, A.; Cappelletti, P.; Frigerio, M.; Gelosa, S.; Monti, A.; Ostinelli, A.; Giannini, G.; Vallazza, E.

    2007-10-01

    Radiotherapy, together with chemotherapy and surgery, is one of the main methods applied in the fight against cancer; in order to increase the chances of a successful radiotherapy treatment the dose delivery to the tumor and the surrounding normal tissues has to be computed with high accuracy. Traditional dosimeters are accurate but single channel (ionization chambers and diodes) or non real-time (radiographic films) devices. At present there is no device water equivalent that can perform real-time and bidimensional measurements of a dose distribution. This article describes the development of a real-time dosimeter based on scintillating fibers for photon and electron beams; the fibers are made of polystyrene, that is water equivalent and thus tissue equivalent, allowing a direct dose calculation. Three prototypes (single and multichannel) have been assembled, consisting in small scintillators coupled to white fibers that carry the light to photomultiplier tubes. In this article the prototypes and the readout electronics are described, together with the results of the measurements with electron and photon beams with energy up to 20 MeV (produced by linear accelerators Varian Clinac 1800 and 2100CD).

  12. CCD camera for an autoguider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schempp, William V.

    1991-06-01

    The requirements of a charge coupled device (CCD) autoguider camera and the specifications of a camera that we propose to build to meet those requirements will be discussed. The design goals of both the package and the electronics will be considered.

  13. Renale Osteopathie

    OpenAIRE

    Horn S

    2001-01-01

    Die renale Osteopathie umfaßt Erkrankungen des Knochens, die bei Patienten mit chronischen Nierenerkrankungen auftreten, wie den sekundären bzw. tertiären Hyperparathyreoidismus, die adynamische Knochenerkrankung und die Osteopathie nach Nierentransplantation. Durch die Identifikation des Kalzium-Sensing-Rezeptors bzw. des Vitamin D-Rezeptors hat sich unser Verständnis der Zusammenhänge in den letzten Jahren erheblich verbessert. Neue Medikamente versprechen effizientere Prophylaxe- und Thera...

  14. Renale Knochenerkrankungen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayer G

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Störungen des Mineral- und Knochenstoffwechsels sind bei fast allen Patienten mit chronischen Nierenerkrankungen anzutreffen. Pathogenetisch spielt eine Neigung zur Phosphatretention bei einer Reduktion der glomerulären Filtrationsrate die zentrale Rolle. Neben typischen, aber sehr variablen Veränderungen der Knochenstruktur (renale Osteopathie besteht auch eine sehr enge Assoziation zwischen diesen Störungen und dem massiv erhöhten kardiovaskulären Risiko der Patienten.

  15. Renal tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Džamić Zoran; Dimitrijević Vladan

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis is still a significant health problem in the world, mostly in developing countries. The special significance lies in immunocompromised patients, particularly those suffering from the HIV. Urogenital tuberculosis is one of the most common forms of extrapulmonary tuberculosis, while the most commonly involved organ is the kidney. Renal tuberculosis occurs by hematogenous dissemination of mycobacterium tuberculosis from a primary tuberculosis foci in the body. Tuberculosis is charac...

  16. Hiperparatiroidismos renales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentín Malagón Castro

    1957-04-01

    Full Text Available En la presente monografía presentamos una síntesis, lo más completa posible, del gran problema de los Hiperparatirodismos secundarios a lesiones renales, enfocando su estudio con un criterio unicista, con el objeto de hacer más didáctico este amplio capítulo de la patología.

  17. Scintillation light read-out by thin photodiodes in silicon wells

    CERN Document Server

    Allier, C P; Sarro, P M; Eijk, C W E

    2000-01-01

    Several applications of X-ray and gamma ray imaging detectors, e.g. in medical diagnostics, require millimeter or sub-millimeter spatial resolution and good energy resolution. In order to achieve such features we have proposed a new type of camera, which takes advantage of micromachining technology. It consists of an array of scintillator crystals encapsulated in silicon wells with photodiodes at the bottom. Several parameters of the photodiode need to be optimised: uniformity and efficiency of the light detection, gain, electronic noise and breakdown voltage. In order to evaluate these parameters we have processed 3x3 arrays of 1.8 mm sup 2 , approx 10 mu m thick photodiodes using (1 0 0) wafers etched in a KOH solution. Their optical response at 675 nm wavelength is comparable to that of a 500 mu m thick silicon PIN diode. Their low light detection efficiency is compensated by internal amplification. Several scintillator materials have been positioned in the wells on top of the thin photodiodes, i.e. a 200 ...

  18. Scintillation light read-out by thin photodiodes in silicon wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allier, C.P. E-mail: allier@iri.tudelft.nl; Hollander, R.W.; Sarro, P.M.; Eijk, C.W.E van

    2000-03-11

    Several applications of X-ray and gamma ray imaging detectors, e.g. in medical diagnostics, require millimeter or sub-millimeter spatial resolution and good energy resolution. In order to achieve such features we have proposed a new type of camera, which takes advantage of micromachining technology. It consists of an array of scintillator crystals encapsulated in silicon wells with photodiodes at the bottom. Several parameters of the photodiode need to be optimised: uniformity and efficiency of the light detection, gain, electronic noise and breakdown voltage. In order to evaluate these parameters we have processed 3x3 arrays of 1.8 mm{sup 2}, {approx}10 {mu}m thick photodiodes using (1 0 0) wafers etched in a KOH solution. Their optical response at 675 nm wavelength is comparable to that of a 500 {mu}m thick silicon PIN diode. Their low light detection efficiency is compensated by internal amplification. Several scintillator materials have been positioned in the wells on top of the thin photodiodes, i.e. a 200 {mu}m thick film of structured CsI(Tl), single crystals of CsI(Tl) and Lu{sub 2}S{sub 3}(Ce{sup 3+}). First experiments of {gamma}-ray detection have been performed.

  19. Digital camera self-calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Clive S.

    Over the 25 years since the introduction of analytical camera self-calibration there has been a revolution in close-range photogrammetric image acquisition systems. High-resolution, large-area 'digital' CCD sensors have all but replaced film cameras. Throughout the period of this transition, self-calibration models have remained essentially unchanged. This paper reviews the application of analytical self-calibration to digital cameras. Computer vision perspectives are touched upon, the quality of self-calibration is discussed, and an overview is given of each of the four main sources of departures from collinearity in CCD cameras. Practical issues are also addressed and experimental results are used to highlight important characteristics of digital camera self-calibration.

  20. Obesity and renal hemodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, R. J.; Krikken, J. A.; van der Heide, J. J. Homan; de Jong, P. E.; Navis, G. J.

    2006-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for renal damage in native kidney disease and in renal transplant recipients. Obesity is associated with several renal risk factors such as hypertension and diabetes that may convey renal risk, but obesity is also associated with an unfavorable renal hemodynamic profile

  1. Comparing the response of PSD-capable plastic scintillator to standard liquid scintillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Richard S.; Hutcheson, Anthony L.; Gwon, Chul; Phlips, Bernard F.; Wulf, Eric A.

    2015-06-01

    This work discusses a test campaign to characterize the response of the recently developed plastic scintillator with pulse shape discrimination (PSD) capabilities (EJ-299-33). PSD is a property exhibited by certain types of scintillating material in which incident stimuli (fast neutrons or γ rays) can be separated by exploiting differences in the scintillation light pulse tail. Detector geometries used were: a 10 cm×10 cm×10 cm cube and a 10-cm diameter×10-cm long cylinder. EJ-301 and EJ-309 liquid scintillators with well-known responses were also tested. The work was conducted at the University of Massachusetts Lowell Van De Graaff accelerator. The facility accelerated protons on a thin Li target to yield quasi-monoenergetic neutrons from the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction (Q-value: -1.644 MeV). Collimated fast neutrons were obtained by placing detectors behind a neutron spectrometer. Rotating the spectrometer, and thus changing the neutron energy, allowed us to achieve 0.5-3.2 MeV neutrons in 200-300 keV steps. Data were acquired through a flash analog-to-digital converter (ADC) capable of performing digital PSD measurements. By using the PSD technique to separate the neutron events from unwanted γ background, we constructed a pulse height spectrum at each energy. Obtaining a relationship of the relative light output versus energy allowed us to construct the response function for the EJ-299-33 and liquid scintillator. The EJ-299-33 response in terms of electron equivalent energy (Ee.e.) vs. proton equivalent energy (Ep.e.), how it compared with the standard xylene-based EJ-301 (or, NE-213/BC-501 A equivalent) and EJ-309 liquid scintillator response, and how the EJ-301 and EJ-309 compared, are presented. We find that the EJ-299-33 demonstrated a lower light output by up to 40% for environment affected the detector response. We find relatively good agreement between our results and the modeling; however, the observed response could not be fully accounted for due to

  2. Optimizing ZnS/6LiF scintillators for wavelength-shifting-fiber neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crow, Lowell [ORNL; Funk, Loren L [ORNL; Hannan, Bruce W [ORNL; Hodges, Jason P [ORNL; Riedel, Richard A [ORNL; Wang, Cai-Lin [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we compare the performance of grooved and flat ZnS/6LiF scintillators in a wavelength shifting-fiber (WLSF) detector. Flat ZnS/6LiF scintillators with the thickness L=0.2-0.8 mm were characterized using photon counting and pulse-height analysis and compared to a grooved scintillator of approximately 0.8 mm thick. While a grooved scintillator considerably increases the apparent thickness of the scintillator to neutrons for a given coating thickness, we find that the flat scintillators perform better than the grooved scintillators in terms of both light yield and neutron detection efficiency. The flat 0.8-mm-thick scintillator has the highest light output, and it is 52% higher compared with a grooved scintillator of same thickness. The lower light output of the grooved scintillator as compared to the flat scintillator is consistent with the greater scintillator-WLSF separation and the much larger average emission angle of the grooved scintillator. We also find that the average light cone width, or photon travel-length as measured using time-of-flight powder diffraction of diamond and vanadium, decreases with increasing L in the range of L=0.6-0.8 mm. This result contrasts with the traditional Swank diffusion model for micro-composite scintillators, and could be explained by a decrease in photon diffusion-coefficient or an increase in micro-particle content in the flat scintillator matrix for the thicker scintillators.

  3. Bilateral Renal Mass-Renal Disorder: Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Tiryaki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 30-year-old woman has presented complaining of weakness and fatigue to her primary care physician. The renal sonography is a routine step in the evaluation of new onset renal failure. When the renal masses have been discovered by sonography in this setting, the functional imaging may be critical. We reported a case about bilateral renal masses in a young female patient with tuberculosis and renal insufficiency. Magnetic resonance (MR has revealed the bilateral renal masses in patient, and this patient has been referred to our hospital for further management. The patient’s past medical and surgical history was unremarkable.

  4. Proximal renal tubular acidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renal tubular acidosis - proximal; Type II RTA; RTA - proximal; Renal tubular acidosis type II ... by alkaline substances, mainly bicarbonate. Proximal renal tubular acidosis (Type II RTA) occurs when bicarbonate is not ...

  5. Monte Carlo simulation of electron thermalization in scintillator materials: Implications for scintillator nonproportionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prange, Micah P.; Xie, YuLong; Campbell, Luke W.; Gao, Fei; Kerisit, Sebastien

    2017-12-01

    The lack of reliable quantitative estimates of the length and time scales associated with hot electron thermalization after a gamma-ray induced energy cascade obscures the interplay of various microscopic processes controlling scintillator performance and hampers the search for improved detector materials. We apply a detailed microscopic kinetic Monte Carlo model of the creation and subsequent thermalization of hot electrons produced by gamma irradiation of six important scintillating crystals to determine the spatial extent of the cloud of excitations produced by gamma rays and the time required for the cloud to thermalize with the host lattice. The main ingredients of the model are ensembles of microscopic track structures produced upon gamma excitation (including the energy distribution of the excited carriers), numerical estimates of electron-phonon scattering rates, and a calculated particle dispersion to relate the speed and energy of excited carriers. All these ingredients are based on first-principles density functional theory calculations of the electronic and phonon band structures of the materials. The details of the Monte Carlo model are presented along with the results for thermalization time and distance distributions. These results are discussed in light of previous work. It is found that among the studied materials, calculated thermalization distances are positively correlated with measured nonproportionality. In the important class of halide scintillators, the particle dispersion is found to be more influential than the largest phonon energy in determining the thermalization distance.

  6. Bilateral renal artery variation

    OpenAIRE

    Üçerler, Hülya; Üzüm, Yusuf; İkiz, Z. Aslı Aktan

    2015-01-01

    Each kidney is supplied by a single renal artery, although renal artery variations are common. Variations of the renal arteryhave become important with the increasing number of renal transplantations. Numerous studies describe variations in renalartery anatomy. Especially the left renal artery is among the most critical arterial variations, because it is the referred side forresecting the donor kidney. During routine dissection in a formalin fixed male cadaver, we have found a bilateral renal...

  7. Drug-induced renal injury

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    induced renal toxicity into four major renal syndromes: • acute renal failure. • chronic renal failure. • glomerulonephritis. • tubulopathies. These major renal syndromes are discussed in further detail below (see summary in Table I). Acute renal failure. Drugs can cause acute renal failure by causing pre-renal, intrinsic or.

  8. Accurate Monte Carlo modelling of the back compartments of SPECT cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rault, E.; Staelens, S.; Van Holen, R.; De Beenhouwer, J.; Vandenberghe, S.

    2011-01-01

    Today, new single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) reconstruction techniques rely on accurate Monte Carlo (MC) simulations to optimize reconstructed images. However, existing MC scintillation camera models which usually include an accurate description of the collimator and crystal, lack correct implementation of the gamma camera's back compartments. In the case of dual isotope simultaneous acquisition (DISA), where backscattered photons from the highest energy isotope are detected in the imaging energy window of the second isotope, this approximation may induce simulation errors. Here, we investigate the influence of backscatter compartment modelling on the simulation accuracy of high-energy isotopes. Three models of a scintillation camera were simulated: a simple model (SM), composed only of a collimator and a NaI(Tl) crystal; an intermediate model (IM), adding a simplified description of the backscatter compartments to the previous model and a complete model (CM), accurately simulating the materials and geometries of the camera. The camera models were evaluated with point sources (67Ga, 99mTc, 111In, 123I, 131I and 18F) in air without a collimator, in air with a collimator and in water with a collimator. In the latter case, sensitivities and point-spread functions (PSFs) simulated in the photopeak window with the IM and CM are close to the measured values (error below 10.5%). In the backscatter energy window, however, the IM and CM overestimate the FWHM of the detected PSF by 52% and 23%, respectively, while the SM underestimates it by 34%. The backscatter peak fluence is also overestimated by 20% and 10% with the IM and CM, respectively, whereas it is underestimated by 60% with the SM. The results show that an accurate description of the backscatter compartments is required for SPECT simulations of high-energy isotopes (above 300 keV) when the backscatter energy window is of interest.

  9. Renal tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Džamić Zoran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is still a significant health problem in the world, mostly in developing countries. The special significance lies in immunocompromised patients, particularly those suffering from the HIV. Urogenital tuberculosis is one of the most common forms of extrapulmonary tuberculosis, while the most commonly involved organ is the kidney. Renal tuberculosis occurs by hematogenous dissemination of mycobacterium tuberculosis from a primary tuberculosis foci in the body. Tuberculosis is characterized by the formation of pathognomonic lesions in the tissues - granulomata. These granulomata may heal spontaneously or remain stable for years. In certain circumstances in the body associated with immunosuppression, the disease may be activated. Central caseous necrosis occurs within tuberculoma, leading to formation of cavities that destroy renal parenchyma. The process may gain access to the collecting system, forming the caverns. In this way, infection can be spread distally to renal pelvis, ureter and bladder. Scaring of tissue by tuberculosis process may lead to development of strictures of the urinary tract. The clinical manifestations are presented by nonspecific symptoms and signs, so tuberculosis can often be overlooked. Sterile pyuria is characteristic for urinary tuberculosis. Dysuric complaints, flank pain or hematuria may be presented in patients. Constitutional symptoms of fever, weight loss and night sweats are presented in some severe cases. Diagnosis is made by isolation of mycobacterium tuberculosis in urine samples, by cultures carried out on standard solid media optimized for mycobacterial growth. Different imaging studies are used in diagnostics - IVU, CT and NMR are the most important. Medical therapy is the main modality of tuberculosis treatment. The first line anti-tuberculosis drugs include isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide and ethambutol. Surgical treatment is required in some cases, to remove severely damaged kidney, if

  10. The theory of scintillation with applications in remote sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Rino, Charles

    2011-01-01

    "In order to truly understand data signals transmitted by satellite, one must understand scintillation theory in addition to well established theories of EM wave propagation and scattering. Scintillation is a nuisance in satellite EM communications, but it has stimulated numerous theoretical developments with science applications. This book not only presents a thorough theoretical explanation of scintillation, but it also offers a complete library of MATLAB codes that will reproduce the book examples. The library includes GPS coordinate manipulations, satellite orbit prediction, and earth mean magnetic field computations. The subect matter is for EM researchers; however, also theory is relevant to geophysics, acoustics, optics and astoronomy"--Provided by publisher.

  11. Neutron detector using lithiated glass-scintillating particle composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Steven [Knoxville, TN; Stephan, Andrew C [Knoxville, TX; Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN; Im, Hee-Jung [Knoxville, TN

    2009-09-01

    A neutron detector composed of a matrix of scintillating particles imbedded in a lithiated glass is disclosed. The neutron detector detects the neutrons by absorbing the neutron in the lithium-6 isotope which has been enriched from the natural isotopic ratio to a commercial ninety five percent. The utility of the detector is optimized by suitably selecting scintillating particle sizes in the range of the alpha and the triton. Nominal particle sizes are in the range of five to twenty five microns depending upon the specific scintillating particle selected.

  12. Scattering of light from the liquid scintillator used in SNO+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Timothy

    2012-10-01

    SNO+ is a double-beta decay experiment currently under construction in Sudbury, Ontario. It will contain approximately a kiloton of liquid scintillator loaded with a neodymium isotope that it is thought may undergo neutrinoless double-beta decay. To simulate events and to interpret data, it is important to understand how light scatters in the liquid scintillator, including the angular distribution of scattered photons. This talk will highlight the status of SNO+ and discuss a measurement of the distribution of scattered light from a sample of liquid scintillator.

  13. Design and Prototyping of a High Granularity Scintillator Calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zutshi, Vishnu [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2016-03-27

    A novel approach for constructing fine-granularity scintillator calorimeters, based on the concept of an Integrated Readout Layer (IRL) was developed. The IRL consists of a printed circuit board inside the detector which supports the directly-coupled scintillator tiles, connects to the surface-mount SiPMs and carries the necessary front-end electronics and signal/bias traces. Prototype IRLs using this concept were designed, prototyped and successfully exposed to test beams. Concepts and implementations of an IRL carried out with funds associated with this contract promise to result in the next generation of scintillator calorimeters.

  14. Alpha counting and spectrometry using liquid scintillation methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDowell, W J

    1986-01-01

    The material in this report is intended to be a practical introduction and guide to the use of liquid scintillation for alpha counting and spectrometry. Other works devoted to the development of the theory of liquid scintillation exist and a minimum of such material is repeated here. Much remains to be learned and many improvements remain to be made in the use of liquid scintillation for alpha counting and spectrometry. It is hoped that this modest work will encourage others to continue development in the field.

  15. Organic scintillators with long luminescent lifetimes for radiotherapy dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beierholm, Anders Ravnsborg; Lindvold, Lars René; Andersen, Claus Erik

    2011-01-01

    of experiments performed using two organic scintillators, one commercially available and one custom made. The luminescent lifetimes of the scintillators have been measured using i) optical excitation by pulsed UV light, and ii) irradiative excitation using high-energy X-rays from a linac. A luminescent lifetime......Organic scintillators with long luminescent lifetimes can theoretically be used to temporally filter out radiation-induced luminescence and Cerenkov light (the so-called stem signal) when used as fibre-coupled radiotherapy dosimeters. Since the medical linear accelerators (linacs1) used...

  16. A coincidental timing model for the scintillating fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zugec, Petar, E-mail: pzugec@phy.hr [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Bijenicka cesta 32, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2011-12-11

    A model describing the coincidental timing of scintillating fibers is developed. Fiber geometry, the rate of scintillation decay together with the mean number, spatial dispersion and attenuation of emitted photons are considered. For a specific selection of probability distributions and parameters involved, the entire coincidental timing distributions, corresponding FWHM values and the photon detection efficiencies are extracted. The significance of the number of photons from the scintillation process is specially emphasized. Additionally, the model is extended to include a triggering feature, experimentally realized by coupling fibers to any photon resolving device. Finally, the measurements of a coincidental timing distribution were performed, with an excellent agreement found between the experimental and predicted theoretical results.

  17. Optical readout for imaging neutron scintillation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Donald P.; Richards, Roger K.; Maxey, L. Curt; Cooper, Ronald G.; Holcomb, David E.

    2002-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) under construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be the most important new neutron scattering facility in the United States. Neutron scattering instruments for the SNS will require large area detectors with fast response (LiF/ZnS(Ag) scintillator screen coupled to a wavelength-shifting fiber optic readout array. A 25 x 25 cm prototype detector is currently under development. Initial tests at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source at the Argonne National Laboratory have demonstrated good imaging properties coupled with very low gamma ray sensitivity. The response time of this detector is approximately 1 microsecond. Details of the design and test results of the detector will be presented.

  18. Modelling of an IR scintillation counter

    CERN Document Server

    Fraga, M M F; Policarpo, Armando

    2000-01-01

    A systematic study of the excitation and de-excitation mechanisms in ternary gas mixtures Ar+CO sub 2 +N sub 2 is presented regarding the possibility of developing a proportional scintillation counter based on the detection of the infrared molecular emissions associated with the lowest vibrational states of molecules. The use of visible or near-infrared photons (lambda<1 mu m) for applications like imaging and quality control of microstructure detectors has been reported. In view of these applications we analyse the processes leading to near-infrared emissions in pure argon and give an estimation of the number of photons emitted per electron, at several pressures, as a function of the charge gain.

  19. Renale Osteopathie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horn S

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Die renale Osteopathie umfaßt Erkrankungen des Knochens, die bei Patienten mit chronischen Nierenerkrankungen auftreten, wie den sekundären bzw. tertiären Hyperparathyreoidismus, die adynamische Knochenerkrankung und die Osteopathie nach Nierentransplantation. Durch die Identifikation des Kalzium-Sensing-Rezeptors bzw. des Vitamin D-Rezeptors hat sich unser Verständnis der Zusammenhänge in den letzten Jahren erheblich verbessert. Neue Medikamente versprechen effizientere Prophylaxe- und Therapiemöglichkeiten. Wir beeinflussen dadurch nicht nur die Morbidität und Lebensqualität, sondern auch die Mortalität unserer Patienten.

  20. Spectroscopic neutron detection using composite scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovic, I.; Foster, A.; Kukharev, V.; Mayer, M.; Meddeb, A.; Nattress, J.; Ounaies, Z.; Trivelpiece, C.

    2016-09-01

    Shielded special nuclear material (SNM), especially highly enriched uranium, is exceptionally difficult to detect without the use of active interrogation (AI). We are investigating the potential use of low-dose active interrogation to realize simultaneous high-contrast imaging and photofission of SNM using energetic gamma-rays produced by low-energy nuclear reactions, such as 11B(d,nγ)12C and 12C(p,p‧)12C. Neutrons produced via fission are one reliable signature of the presence of SNM and are usually identified by their unique timing characteristics, such as the delayed neutron die-away. Fast neutron spectroscopy may provide additional useful discriminating characteristics for SNM detection. Spectroscopic measurements can be conducted by recoil-based or thermalization and capture-gated detectors; the latter may offer unique advantages since they facilitate low-statistics and event-by-event neutron energy measurements without spectrum unfolding. We describe the results of the development and characterization of a new type of capture-gated spectroscopic neutron detector based on a composite of scintillating polyvinyltoluene and lithium-doped scintillating glass in the form of millimeter-thick rods. The detector achieves >108 neutron-gamma discrimination resulting from its geometric properties and material selection. The design facilitates simultaneous pulse shape and pulse height discrimination, despite the fact that no materials intrinsically capable of pulse shape discrimination have been used to construct the detector. Accurate single-event measurements of neutron energy may be possible even when the energy is relatively low, such as with delayed fission neutrons. Simulation and preliminary measurements using the new composite detector are described, including those conducted using radioisotope sources and the low-dose active interrogation system based on low-energy nuclear reactions.

  1. Study of the feasibility of a compact gamma camera for real-time cancer assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Caballero Ontanaya, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Results from the simulations of a Compton gamma camera based on compact configuration of detectors consisting in two detection modules, each of them having two stages of high-resolution position- and energy sensitive radiation detectors operated in time-coincidence are presented. Monolithic scintillation crystals instead of pixelated crystals in order to reduce dead areas have been simulated. In order to study the system feasibility to produce real-time images, different setups are considered. Performance in terms of acquisition times have been calculated to determine the real-time capabilities and limitations of such a system.

  2. New generation of meteorology cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janout, Petr; Blažek, Martin; Páta, Petr

    2017-12-01

    A new generation of the WILLIAM (WIde-field aLL-sky Image Analyzing Monitoring system) camera includes new features such as monitoring of rain and storm clouds during the day observation. Development of the new generation of weather monitoring cameras responds to the demand for monitoring of sudden weather changes. However, new WILLIAM cameras are ready to process acquired image data immediately, release warning against sudden torrential rains, and send it to user's cell phone and email. Actual weather conditions are determined from image data, and results of image processing are complemented by data from sensors of temperature, humidity, and atmospheric pressure. In this paper, we present the architecture, image data processing algorithms of mentioned monitoring camera and spatially-variant model of imaging system aberrations based on Zernike polynomials.

  3. An Inexpensive Digital Infrared Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Allan

    2012-01-01

    Details are given for the conversion of an inexpensive webcam to a camera specifically sensitive to the near infrared (700-1000 nm). Some experiments and practical applications are suggested and illustrated. (Contains 9 figures.)

  4. Scanning laser video camera/ microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. P.; Bow, R. T.

    1984-10-01

    A laser scanning system capable of scanning at standard video rate has been developed. The scanning mirrors, circuit design and system performance, as well as its applications to video cameras and ultra-violet microscopes, are discussed.

  5. Renal calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Pyrah, Leslie N

    1979-01-01

    Stone in the urinary tract has fascinated the medical profession from the earliest times and has played an important part in the development of surgery. The earliest major planned operations were for the removal of vesical calculus; renal and ureteric calculi provided the first stimulus for the radiological investigation of the viscera, and the biochemical investigation of the causes of calculus formation has been the training ground for surgeons interested in metabolic disorders. It is therefore no surprise that stone has been the subject of a number of monographs by eminent urologists, but the rapid development of knowledge has made it possible for each one of these authors to produce something new. There is still a technical challenge to the surgeon in the removal of renal calculi, and on this topic we are always glad to have the advice of a master craftsman; but inevitably much of the interest centres on the elucidation of the causes of stone formation and its prevention. Professor Pyrah has had a long an...

  6. High count rate gamma camera with independent modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massari, R.; Ucci, A.; Campisi, C.; Scopinaro, F.; Soluri, A.

    2015-11-01

    Advances in nuclear medical imaging are based on the improvements of the detector's performance. Generally the research is focussed on the spatial resolution improvement. However, another important parameter is the acquisition time that can significantly affect performance in some clinical investigation (e.g. first-pass cardiac studies). At present, there are several clinical imaging systems which are able to solve these diagnostic requirements, such as the D-SPECT Cardiac Imaging System (Spectrum Dynamics) or the Nucline Cardiodesk Medical Imaging System (Mediso). Actually, these solutions are organ-specific dedicated systems, while it would be preferable having general purpose planar detectors with high counting rate. Our group has recently introduced the use of scintillation matrices whose size is equal to the overall area of a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT) in order to design a modular gamma camera. This study allowed optimising the overall pixel identification by improving and controlling the light collection efficiency of each PSPMT. Although we achieved a solution for the problems about the dead area at the junction of the PSPMTs when they are set side by side. In this paper, we propose a modular gamma camera design as the basis to build large area detectors. The modular detector design allows us to achieve better counting performance. In this approach, each module that is made of one or more PSPMTs, can actually acquire data independently and simultaneously, increasing the overall detection efficiency. To verify the improvement in count rate capability we have built two detectors with a field of view of 5 × 5cm2, by using four R8900-C12 PSPMTs (Hamamatsu Photonics K.K.). Each PSPMT was coupled to a dedicated discrete scintillation structure designed to obtain a good homogeneity, high imaging performance and high efficiency. One of the detectors was designed as a standard gamma camera, while the other was composed by four independent

  7. Production of the Large-area Plastic Scintillator for Beta-ray Detection using Epoxy Resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Jong Soo; Choi, Yong Seok; Hong, Sang Bum; Seo, Bum Kyung; Moon, Jei Kwon; Choi, Jong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this study, we prepared a plastic scintillator whose manufacturing process is simple and can be freely shaped. A thin plate of the plastic scintillator was manufactured using epoxy resin as a polymer. The plastic scintillator was made by mixing epoxy resin and organic scintillators under various conditions. The optimal mixture ratio to prepare the plastic scintillator was derived from the above results. Using the derived results, we made the large-area plastic scintillator which can quickly measure the contamination site and evaluated characteristics of the large-area plastic scintillator in the laboratory. A thin plate of a plastic scintillator with a simple preparation process can be freely shaped using epoxy resin and organic scintillators such as PPO and POPOP. PPO emits scintillation of light in the ultraviolet range, and POPOP is a wave shifter for moving the wavelength responsible for the PMT. The mixture ratio of PPO and POPOP was determined using their emission spectra. The optimal weight percentage of PPO and POPOP in an organic scintillator was determined to be 0.2 wt%:0.01 wt%. Based on the above results, the large-area plastic scintillator of the window size of a typical pancake-type αβ surface contamination counter was prepared. We want to evaluate the characteristics of the large-area plastic scintillator. However, there were the difficulties in evaluating characteristics of the large-area plastic scintillator. The cross-sectional area of the large-area plastic scintillator is significantly different to PMT.

  8. Improved Scintillator Materials For Compact Electron Antineutrino Detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Peter; Wortche, Heinrich J.; Browne, Wesley R.

    2012-01-01

    Recent developments provide new components holding the potential to improve the performance of liquid scintillation electron antineutrino detectors used as nuclear reactors monitors. Current systems raise issues regarding size, quantum efficiency, stability, and spatial resolution of the vertex

  9. Final LDRD report : advanced plastic scintillators for neutron detection.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vance, Andrew L.; Mascarenhas, Nicholas; O' Bryan, Greg; Mrowka, Stanley

    2010-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of a one-year, feasibility-scale LDRD project that was conducted with the goal of developing new plastic scintillators capable of pulse shape discrimination (PSD) for neutron detection. Copolymers composed of matrix materials such as poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and blocks containing trans-stilbene (tSB) as the scintillator component were prepared and tested for gamma/neutron response. Block copolymer synthesis utilizing tSBMA proved unsuccessful so random copolymers containing up to 30% tSB were prepared. These copolymers were found to function as scintillators upon exposure to gamma radiation; however, they did not exhibit PSD when exposed to a neutron source. This project, while falling short of its ultimate goal, demonstrated the possible utility of single-component, undoped plastics as scintillators for applications that do not require PSD.

  10. Large liquid-scintillator trackers for neutrino experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Benussi, L; D'Ambrosio, N; Déclais, Y; Dupraz, J P; Fabre, Jean-Paul; Fanti, V; Forton, E; Frekers, D; Frenkel, A; Girerd, C; Golovkin, S V; Grégoire, G; Harrison, K; Jonkmans, G; Jonsson, P; Katsanevas, S; Kreslo, I; Marteau, J; Martellotti, G; Martínez, S; Medvedkov, A M; Moret, G; Niwa, K; Novikov, V; Van Beek, G; Penso, G; Vasilchenko, V G; Vuilleumier, J L; Wilquet, G; Zucchelli, P; Kreslo, I E

    2002-01-01

    Results are given on tests of large particle trackers for the detection of neutrino interactions in long-baseline experiments. Module prototypes have been assembled using TiO$_2$-doped polycarbonate panels. These were subdivided into cells of $\\sim 1$~cm$^2$ cross section and 6~m length, filled with liquid scintillator. A wavelength-shifting fibre inserted in each cell captured a part of the scintillation light emitted when a cell was traversed by an ionizing particle. Two different fibre-readout systems have been tested: an optoelectronic chain comprising an image intensifier and an Electron Bombarded CCD (EBCCD); and a hybrid photodiode~(HPD). New, low-cost liquid scintillators have been investigated for applications in large underground detectors. Testbeam studies have been performed using a commercially available liquid scintillator. The number of detected photoelectrons for minimum-ionizing particles crossing a module at different distances from the fibre readout end was 6 to 12 with the EBCCD chain and ...

  11. A scintillator purification plant and fluid handling system for SNO+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Richard J.

    2015-08-01

    A large capacity purification plant and fluid handling system has been constructed for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment, located 6800 feet underground at SNOLAB, Canada. SNO+ is a refurbishment of the SNO detector to fill the acrylic vessel with liquid scintillator based on Linear Alkylbenzene (LAB) and 2 g/L PPO, and also has a phase to load natural tellurium into the scintillator for a double-beta decay experiment with 130Te. The plant includes processes multi-stage dual-stream distillation, column water extraction, steam stripping, and functionalized silica gel adsorption columns. The plant also includes systems for preparing the scintillator with PPO and metal-loading the scintillator for double-beta decay exposure. We review the basis of design, the purification principles, specifications for the plant, and the construction and installations. The construction and commissioning status is updated.

  12. High-density scintillating glasses for a proton imaging detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, I. J.; Dettmann, M. A.; Herrig, V.; Thune, Z. L.; Zieser, A. J.; Michalek, S. F.; Been, M. O.; Martinez-Szewczyk, M. M.; Koster, H. J.; Wilkinson, C. J.; Kielty, M. W.; Jacobsohn, L. G.; Akgun, U.

    2017-06-01

    High-density scintillating glasses are proposed for a novel proton-imaging device that can improve the accuracy of the hadron therapy. High-density scintillating glasses are needed to build a cost effective, compact calorimeter that can be attached to a gantry. This report summarizes the study on Europium, Terbium, and Cerium-doped scintillating glasses that were developed containing heavy elements such as Lanthanum, Gadolinium, and Tungsten. The density of the samples reach up to 5.9 g/cm3, and their 300-600 nm emission overlaps perfectly with the peak cathode sensitivity of the commercial photo detectors. The developed glasses do not require any special quenching and can be poured easily, which makes them a good candidate for production in various geometries. Here, the glass making conditions, preliminary tests on optical and physical properties of these scintillating, high-density, oxide glasses developed for a novel medical imaging application are reported.

  13. Comparison of the methods for determination of scintillation light yield

    CERN Document Server

    Sysoeva, E; Zelenskaya, O

    2002-01-01

    One of the most important characteristics of scintillators is the light yield. It depends not only on the properties of scintillators, but also on the conditions of measurements. Even for widely used crystals, such as alkali halide scintillators NaI(Tl) and CsI(Tl), light yield data, obtained by various authors, are different. Therefore, it is very important to choose the convenient method of the light yield measurements. In the present work, methods for the determination of the physical light yield, based on measurements of pulse amplitude, single-electron pulses and intrinsic photomultiplier resolution are discussed. These methods have been used for the measurements of light yield of alkali halide crystals and oxide scintillators. Repeatability and reproducibility of results were determined. All these methods are rather complicated in use, not for measurements, but for further data processing. Besides that, they demand a precise determination of photoreceiver's parameters, as well as determination of light ...

  14. Subnanosecond scintillation detector for high energy cosmic rays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The task objective is to develop a gamma ray scintillator technology with subnanosecond temporal resolution and the capability to withstand unprecedented rates and...

  15. Scintillation Particle Detectors Based on Plastic Optical Fibres and Microfluidics

    CERN Document Server

    Mapelli, Alessandro; Renaud, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    This thesis presents the design, development, and experimental validation of two types of scintillation particle detectors with high spatial resolution. The first one is based on the well established scintillating fibre technology. It will complement the ATLAS (A Toroidal Large ApparatuS) detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The second detector consists in a microfabricated device used to demonstrate the principle of operation of a novel type of scintillation detector based on microfluidics. The first part of the thesis presents the work performed on a scintillating fibre tracking system for the ATLAS experiment. It will measure the trajectory of protons elastically scattered at very small angles to determine the absolute luminosity of the CERN LHC collider at the ATLAS interaction point. The luminosity of an accelerator characterizes its performance. It is a process-independent parameter that is completely determined by the properties of the colliding beams and it relates the cross section of a ...

  16. Inorganic scintillators for detector systems physical principles and crystal engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, Paul; Korzhik, Mikhail

    2017-01-01

    This second edition features new chapters highlighting advances in our understanding of the behavior and properties of scintillators, and the discovery of new families of materials with light yield and excellent energy resolution very close to the theoretical limit. The book focuses on the discovery of next-generation scintillation materials and on a deeper understanding of fundamental processes. Such novel materials with high light yield as well as significant advances in crystal engineering offer exciting new perspectives. Most promising is the application of scintillators for precise time tagging of events, at the level of 100 ps or higher, heralding a new era in medical applications and particle physics. Since the discovery of the Higgs Boson with a clear signature in the lead tungstate scintillating blocks of the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter detector, the current trend in particle physics is toward very high luminosity colliders, in which timing performance will ultimately be essential to mitigating...

  17. A scintillator purification plant and fluid handling system for SNO+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Richard J., E-mail: ford@snolab.ca [SNOLAB, Creighton Mine #9, 1039 R.R.24, Lively, Ontario, Canada. (Canada)

    2015-08-17

    A large capacity purification plant and fluid handling system has been constructed for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment, located 6800 feet underground at SNOLAB, Canada. SNO+ is a refurbishment of the SNO detector to fill the acrylic vessel with liquid scintillator based on Linear Alkylbenzene (LAB) and 2 g/L PPO, and also has a phase to load natural tellurium into the scintillator for a double-beta decay experiment with {sup 130}Te. The plant includes processes multi-stage dual-stream distillation, column water extraction, steam stripping, and functionalized silica gel adsorption columns. The plant also includes systems for preparing the scintillator with PPO and metal-loading the scintillator for double-beta decay exposure. We review the basis of design, the purification principles, specifications for the plant, and the construction and installations. The construction and commissioning status is updated.

  18. Inorganic Scintillators for Detector Systems Physical Principles and Crystal Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2068219; Gektin, Alexander; Korzhik, Mikhail; Pédrini, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The development of new scintillators as components of modern detector systems is increasingly defined by the end user's needs. This book provides an introduction to this emerging topic at the interface of physics and materials sciences, with emphasis on bulk inorganic scintillators. After surveying the end user's needs in a vast range of applications, ranging from astrophysics to industrial R & D, the authors move on to review scintillating mechanisms and the properties of the most important materials used. A chapter on crystal engineering and examples of recent developments in the field of high-energy physics and medical imaging introduce the reader to the practical aspects. This book will benefit researchers and scientists working in academic and industrial R & D related to the development of scintillators.

  19. A ruggedized ZnS(Ag)/epoxy alpha scintillation detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElhaney, S. A.; Ramsey, J. A.; Bauer, M. L.; Chiles, M. M.

    1990-12-01

    An alpha scintillation survey instrument has been developed which is more rugged and efficient than conventional alpha scintillation detectors that use aluminized Mylar radiation entrance windows. This new detector consists of a mixture of ZnS(Ag) phosphor and optically transparent epoxy. The scintillator mixture is poured into a preformed mold to provide a thin layer of phosphor after the particles settle to the clear epoxy surface. After partial curing, an optically transparent light pipe is coupled to the ZnS(Ag)/epoxy film by using an additional thin epoxy layer, forming a monolithic scintillator assembly. Experimental results indicate that the new probe is 44% efficient (2π) for a large-area 239Pu alpha source; resistant to scratches, tears, and corrosives; watertight; and temperature independent between -20°C and 54°C. Mylar is a trademark of E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., Inc., Wilmington, DE, USA.

  20. Alpha pulse height distributions with ZnS(Ag) scintillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadd, M S; Borak, T B

    1995-03-01

    A flask coated with ZnS(Ag) scintillator is one of the most accurate detectors available for measuring 222Rn. To maintain this accuracy, the counting system consisting of a photomultiplier tube and associated electronics must be checked on a regular basis. A combination of an alpha source and a ZnS(Ag) scintillator is commonly used for these purposes. This paper compares the pulse height distributions of 4 alpha sources with the pulse height distribution from a 100 cm3 scintillation flask containing 222Rn. The source that most closely reproduced the distribution from an actual 222Rn sample in a 100 cm3 scintillation flask consisted of a sealed flask, of the same type, which contains a small piece of uranium-ore.

  1. Rational design of binary halide scintillators via data mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Chang Sun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, 2220 Hoover Hall, Ames, Iowa 50011-2300 (United States); Rajan, Krishna, E-mail: krajan@iastate.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, 2220 Hoover Hall, Ames, Iowa 50011-2300 (United States)

    2012-07-11

    We introduce a new search strategy for the development of novel inorganic scintillators. For designing new scintillation host media having the improved properties, the potential candidate materials were chosen by using a chemical selection scheme based on a multi-dimensional similarity metric. For the quantitative assessment of the chosen materials, predictive models based on informatics were built by correlating a set of key parameters which reflect the features of the host materials with the performance of inorganic scintillators. The resulting design rules generated from the relationships serve as a guide to identify HfI{sub 4} and TaI{sub 5} as two new host lattices with high light yield. The method we have outlined here serves as a new computational template based statistical learning method to search for new inorganic scintillators with targeted properties.

  2. Novel nanocrystalline Gd 2O 3(Eu) scintillator screens with a micro-pixel structure for high spatial resolution X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Bo Kyung; Lee, Seung Jun; Muralidharan, P.; Kim, Do Kyung; Kim, Jong Yul; Cho, Gyuseong; Jeon, Sungchae; Huh, Young

    2011-10-01

    We developed a novel pixel-structured scintillation screen with nanocrystalline Gd 2O 3:Eu particle sizes for high spatial resolution X-ray imaging detectors. Nanocrystalline Gd 2O 3:Eu scintillators were successfully synthesized with a hydrothermal method and a subsequent calcination treatment, which were used as a material for converting incident X-rays into visible light. In this work, silicon-based pixel structures with different 100, 50 and 30 μm pixel sizes, a 10 μm wall width and a 120 μm thickness were prepared with the standard photolithography and the deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) process. Subsequently, a micro-pixel-structured scintillation screen was fabricated by adding the synthesized nanocrystalline Gd 2O 3:Eu scintillating phosphor to pixel-structured silicon arrays. Additionally, X-ray imaging performance such as relative light intensity, X-ray to light response and the spatial resolution in terms of modulation transfer function (MTF) were measured by using an X-ray source and a lens-coupled charge coupled device (CCD) camera system. The light intensity of the pixel-structured nanocrystalline Gd 2O 3:Eu screen was much higher than that of a pixel-structured sample made with a commercial microcrystalline Gd 2O 3:Eu product due to the density of the nanocrystalline Gd 2O 3:Eu scintillating powder-filled silicon structure. As the pixel size of the pixel-structured silicon decreased, the light intensity decreased. However, as the pixel size decreased, the spatial resolution significantly improved with no evident crosstalk from the emitted optical photons between adjacent scintillating pixels. The MTF of pixel-structured nanocrystalline Gd 2O 3:Eu screens with a 100 and a 50 μm pixel size was 20% and 30% at 6 lp/mm, respectively. As a result, this new technology showed that a microchannel structure based on a nanocrystalline Gd 2O 3:Eu scintillator could provide higher light intensity and high spatial resolution imaging compared to conventional

  3. Development of compact Compton camera for 3D image reconstruction of radioactive contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Y.; Terasaka, Y.; Ozawa, S.; Nakamura Miyamura, H.; Kaburagi, M.; Tanifuji, Y.; Kawabata, K.; Torii, T.

    2017-11-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS), operated by Tokyo Electric Power Company Holdings, Inc., went into meltdown after the large tsunami caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake of March 11, 2011. Very large amounts of radionuclides were released from the damaged plant. Radiation distribution measurements inside FDNPS buildings are indispensable to execute decommissioning tasks in the reactor buildings. We have developed a compact Compton camera to measure the distribution of radioactive contamination inside the FDNPS buildings three-dimensionally (3D). The total weight of the Compton camera is lower than 1.0 kg. The gamma-ray sensor of the Compton camera employs Ce-doped GAGG (Gd3Al2Ga3O12) scintillators coupled with a multi-pixel photon counter. Angular correction of the detection efficiency of the Compton camera was conducted. Moreover, we developed a 3D back-projection method using the multi-angle data measured with the Compton camera. We successfully observed 3D radiation images resulting from the two 137Cs radioactive sources, and the image of the 9.2 MBq source appeared stronger than that of the 2.7 MBq source.

  4. FDTD Modeling and Counteraction to Scintillation Effects in the lonosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-05

    AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2014-0101 AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2014-0101 FDTD MODELING AND COUNTERACTION TO SCINTILLATION EFFECTS IN THE IONOSPHERE Christos...DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 05-04-2014 2. REPORT TYPE Final Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 24 Feb 2012 – 23 Feb 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE FDTD ...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This study investigated the Finite Difference Time Domain ( FDTD ) modeling of ionospheric scintillation

  5. Secondary scintillation in Ar-CF$_4$ mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Beschi, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In order to build a optical time projection chamber that can be used as a tracking detector, it is necessary to study the scintillation proprieties of gases in order to optimize the light emission. A detailed study of the scintillation of Ar-CF$_4$ mixtures at different concentrations has been performed to study the light emission of the gas in a triple GEM detector.

  6. Detection of {sup 8}B solar neutrinos in liquid scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ianni, A [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and INFN, I-67010 Assergi (Italy); Montanino, D [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita' di Lecce and INFN, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Villante, F L [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Ferrara and INFN, I-44100 Ferrara (Italy)

    2006-05-15

    We show that liquid organic scintillator detectors (e. g., KamLAND and Borexino) can measure the {sup 8}B solar neutrino flux by means of the {nu}{sub e} charged current interaction with the {sup 13}C nuclei naturally contained in the scintillators. The neutrino events can be identified by exploiting the time and space coincidence with the subsequent decay of the produced {sup 13}N nuclei.

  7. Li-containing scintillating bolometers for low background physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pattavina L.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the performances of Li-based compounds used as scintillating bolometer for rare decay studies such as double-beta decay and direct dark matter investigations. The compounds are tested in a dilution refrigerator installed in the underground laboratory of Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (Italy. Low temperature scintillating properties are investigated by means of different radioactive sources, and the radio-purity level for internal contaminations are estimated for possible employment for next generation experiments.

  8. Ternary liquid scintillator for optical-fiber applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franks, L.A.; Lutz, S.S.

    1981-06-01

    A multicomponent liquid scintillator solution for use as a radiation-to-light converter in conjunction with a fiber optic transmission system. The scintillator includes a quantity of 5-amino-9-diethylaminobenz (a) phenoxazonium nitrate (Nile Blue Nitrate) as a solute in a fluor solvent such as benzyl alcohol. The use of PPD as an additional solute is also disclosed. The system is controllable by addition of a suitable quenching agent, such as phenol.

  9. Scintillation index of Gaussian waves in weak turbulent ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Pengfei; Qiao, Chunhong; Lu, Lu; Fan, Chengyu; Ji, Xiaoling

    2016-12-01

    The analytical expressions of radial and the longitudinal components of scintillation index are derived in weak oceanic turbulence. The effects of off-axis distance, propagation distance, and three oceanic parameters (i.e., the ratio of temperature to salinity contribution to the refractive index spectrum w, the rate of dissipation of the mean squared temperature χT and the rate of dissipation of the turbulent kinetic energy ε) on radial component of scintillation index are examined. The influences of propagation distance and three oceanic parameters on the longitudinal component of scintillation index are investigated. It is shown that the radial component of scintillation increases as off-axis distance increases. Both radial and longitudinal components of scintillation increase as propagation distance, w and χT increase while decreases as ε increases. Besides, the longitudinal component of scintillation increases more drastically for plane wave than others, which indicates the plane wave is affected the most at the fixed turbulent strength. The longest weak turbulence distance for a plane wave is shorter than that for a Gaussian or spherical wave.

  10. Effects of atmospheric scintillation in Ka-band satellite communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgsmiller, Scott A.

    This research is motivated by the need to characterize the effects of atmospheric scintillation on Ka-band satellite communications. The builders of satellite communications systems are planning to utilize Ka-band in more than a dozen systems that have been proposed for launch in the next decade. The NASA ACTS (Advanced Communication Technology Satellite) program has provided a means to investigate the problems associated with Ka-band satellite transmissions. Experimental measurements have been conducted using a very small aperture terminal (VSAT) to evaluate the effects of scintillation on narrowband and wideband signals. The theoretical background of scintillation theory is presented, noting especially the additional performance degradation predicted for wideband Ka-band systems using VSATs. Experimental measurements of the amplitude and phase variations in received narrowband carrier signals were performed, using beacon signals transmitted by ACTS and carrier signals which are relayed through the satellite. Measured amplitude and phase spectra have been compared with theoretical models to establish the presence of scintillation. Measurements have also been performed on wideband spread spectrum signals which are relayed through ACTS to determine the bit-error rate degradation of the digital signal resulting from scintillation effects. The theory and measurements presented for the geostationary ACTS have then been applied to a low-earth orbiting satellite system, by extrapolating the effects of the moving propagation path on scintillation.

  11. Experiment to demonstrate separation of Cherenkov and scintillation signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaca, J.; Descamps, F. B.; Land, B. J.; Wallig, J.; Yeh, M.; Orebi Gann, G. D.

    2017-05-01

    The ability to separately identify the Cherenkov and scintillation light components produced in scintillating mediums holds the potential for a major breakthrough in neutrino detection technology, allowing development of a large, low-threshold, directional detector with a broad physics program. The CHESS (CHErenkov/Scintillation Separation) experiment employs an innovative detector design with an array of small, fast photomultiplier tubes and state-of-the-art electronics to demonstrate the reconstruction of a Cherenkov ring in a scintillating medium based on photon hit time and detected photoelectron density. This paper describes the physical properties and calibration of CHESS along with first results. The ability to reconstruct Cherenkov rings is demonstrated in a water target, and a time precision of 338 ±12 ps FWHM is achieved. Monte Carlo-based predictions for the ring imaging sensitivity with a liquid scintillator target predict an efficiency for identifying Cherenkov hits of 94 ±1 % and 81 ±1 % in pure linear alkyl benzene (LAB) and LAB loaded with 2 g/L of a fluor, PPO, respectively, with a scintillation contamination of 12 ±1 % and 26 ±1 % .

  12. Traumatismo Renal

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Martinez S.

    2017-01-01

    Introdução: A realização deste trabalho visa a elaboração de uma revisão sistematizada subordinada à temática da traumatologia renal. Objectivos: Os principais objectivos deste trabalho são: apurar a etiologia, definir a classificação, analisar o diagnóstico e expôr o tratamento e as complicações. Desenvolvimento: Os traumatismos são a principal causa de morte antes dos 40 anos. O rim é o órgão do aparelho génito-urinário mais frequentemente atingido. Os traumatismos renais são mais fre...

  13. TRANSPLANTE RENAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraia Geraldo Rozza Lopes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del estudio fue comprender el significado de espera del trasplante renal para las mujeres en hemodiálisis. Se trata de un estudio cualitativo-interpretativo, realizado con 12 mujeres en hemodiálisis en Florianópolis. Los datos fueron recolectados a través de entrevistas en profundidad en el domicilio. Fue utilizado el software Etnografh 6.0 para la pre-codificación y posterior al análisis interpretativo emergieron dos categorías: “las sombras del momento actual”, que mostró que las dificultades iniciales de la enfermedad están presentes, pero las mujeres pueden hacer frente mejor a la enfermedad y el tratamiento. La segunda categoría, “la luz del trasplante renal”, muestra la esperanza impulsada por la entrada en la lista de espera para un trasplante.

  14. [Hypertension and renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, A.L.; Pedersen, E.B.; Strandgaard, S.

    2009-01-01

    Renal mechanisms, in particular the renin-angiotensin system and renal salt handling, are of major importance in blood pressure regulation. Co-existence of hypertension and decreased renal function may be due to nephrosclerosis secondary to hypertension, or primary renal disease with secondary...

  15. New features in cold neutron radiography and tomography Part I: thinner scintillators and a neutron velocity selector to improve the spatial resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Baechler, S; Dierick, M; Jolie, J; Kuehne, G; Lehmann, E; Materna, T

    2002-01-01

    The tomography setup developed at the PGA facility of the Swiss spallation source SINQ has provided encouraging results in the field of cold neutron imaging. Performances of the detection system based on a CCD camera and a converter screen have been recently improved using sup 6 LiF/ZnS:Ag scintillators with different thickness. Indeed, reducing the layer of the scintillator improved considerably the spatial resolution while keeping a reasonable efficiency. Furthermore, a neutron velocity selector was temporarily added to the setup to perform radiography and tomography experiments with monochromatic neutron beams. Basic properties of transmitted beams were studied to assess the applicability of this device in neutron imaging. Of interest was the enhancement of the L/D-ratio by selecting neutron beams of short wavelengths. Cold neutron tomography demonstrated to be a useful technique in various spheres of activity, such as aerospatial industry or radioactive waste storage. Various applications of the neutron v...

  16. Influence of coma aberration on aperture averaged scintillations in oceanic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yujuan; Ji, Xiaoling; Yu, Hong

    2018-01-01

    The influence of coma aberration on aperture averaged scintillations in oceanic turbulence is studied in detail by using the numerical simulation method. In general, in weak oceanic turbulence, the aperture averaged scintillation can be effectively suppressed by means of the coma aberration, and the aperture averaged scintillation decreases as the coma aberration coefficient increases. However, in moderate and strong oceanic turbulence the influence of coma aberration on aperture averaged scintillations can be ignored. In addition, the aperture averaged scintillation dominated by salinity-induced turbulence is larger than that dominated by temperature-induced turbulence. In particular, it is shown that for coma-aberrated Gaussian beams, the behavior of aperture averaged scintillation index is quite different from the behavior of point scintillation index, and the aperture averaged scintillation index is more suitable for characterizing scintillations in practice.

  17. Optical Design Considerations for Efficient Light Collection from Liquid Scintillation Counters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Douglas, Matthew; Erchinger, Jennifer L.; Fuller, Erin S.; Keillor, Martin E.; Morley, Shannon M.; Mullen, Crystal A.; Orrell, John L.; Panisko, Mark E.; Warren, Glen A.; Wright, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Liquid scintillation counters measure charged particle-emitting radioactive isotopes and are used for environmental studies, nuclear chemistry, and life science. Alpha and beta emissions arising from the material under study interact with the scintillation cocktail to produce light. The prototypical liquid scintillation counter employs low-level photon-counting detectors to measure the arrival of the scintillation light produced as a result of the dissolved material under study interacting with the scintillation cocktail. For reliable operation the counting instrument must convey the scintillation light to the detectors efficiently and predictably. Current best practices employ the use of two or more detectors for coincidence processing to discriminate true scintillation events from background events due to instrumental effects such as photomultiplier tube dark rates, tube flashing, or other light emission not generated in the scintillation cocktail vial. In low background liquid scintillation counters additional attention is paid to shielding the scintillation cocktail from naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) present in the laboratory and within the instruments construction materials. Low background design is generally at odds with optimal light collection. This study presents the evolution of a light collection design for liquid scintillation counting in a low background shield. The basic approach to achieve both good light collection and a low background measurement is described. The baseline signals arising from the scintillation vial are modeled and methods to efficiently collect scintillation light are presented as part of the development of a customized low-background, high sensitivity liquid scintillation counting system.

  18. INT prime focus mosaic camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, Derek J.; Tulloch, Simon; Churchill, John

    1996-03-01

    The INT Prime Focus Mosaic Camera (INT PFC) is designed to provide a large field survey and supernovae search capability for the prime focus of the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope (INT). It is a joint collaboration between the Royal Greenwich Observatory (UK), Kapteyn Sterrenwacht Werkgroep (Netherlands), and the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories (USA). The INT PFC consists of a 4 chip mosaic utilizing thinned and anti-reflection coated CCDs. These are LORAL devices of the LICK3 design. They will be operated cryogenically in a purpose built camera assembly. A fifth CCD, of the same type, is co-mounted with the science array in the cryostat to provide autoguider functions. This cryostat then mounts to the main camera assembly at the prime focus. This assembly will include standard filters and a novel shutter wheel which has been specifically designed for this application. The camera will have an unvignetted field of 40 arcminutes and a focal ratio of f/3.3. This results in a very tight mechanical specification for co-planarity and flatness of the array of CCDs and also quite stringent flexure tolerance of the camera assembly. A method of characterizing the co- planarity and flatness of the array will be described. The overall system architecture will also be described. One of the main requirements is to read the whole array out within 100s, with less than 10e rms. noise and very low CCD cross talk.

  19. The Clementine longwave infrared camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priest, R.E.; Lewis, I.T.; Sewall, N.R.; Park, H.S.; Shannon, M.J.; Ledebuhr, A.G.; Pleasance, L.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Massie, M.A. [Pacific Advanced Technology, Solvang, CA (United States); Metschuleit, K. [Amber/A Raytheon Co., Goleta, CA (United States)

    1995-04-01

    The Clementine mission provided the first ever complete, systematic surface mapping of the moon from the ultra-violet to the near-infrared regions. More than 1.7 million images of the moon, earth and space were returned from this mission. The longwave-infrared (LWIR) camera supplemented the UV/Visible and near-infrared mapping cameras providing limited strip coverage of the moon, giving insight to the thermal properties of the soils. This camera provided {approximately}100 m spatial resolution at 400 km periselene, and a 7 km across-track swath. This 2.1 kg camera using a 128 x 128 Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride (MCT) FPA viewed thermal emission of the lunar surface and lunar horizon in the 8.0 to 9.5 {micro}m wavelength region. A description of this light-weight, low power LWIR camera along with a summary of lessons learned is presented. Design goals and preliminary on-orbit performance estimates are addressed in terms of meeting the mission`s primary objective for flight qualifying the sensors for future Department of Defense flights.

  20. BILATERAL DUPLICATION OF RENAL ARTERIES

    OpenAIRE

    Prajkta A Thete; Mehera Bhoir; M.V.Ambiye

    2014-01-01

    Routine dissection of a male cadaver revealed the presence of bilateral double renal arteries. On the right side the accessory renal artery originated from the abdominal aorta just above the main renal artery. On the left side the accessory renal artery originated from the abdominal aorta about 1 cm above the main renal artery. Knowledge of the variations of renal vascular anatomy has importance in exploration and treatment of renal trauma, renal transplantation, renal artery embolization, su...

  1. Iterative reconstruction of SiPM light response functions in a square-shaped compact gamma camera

    CERN Document Server

    Morozov, A; Marcos, J; Martins, R; Pereira, L; Solovov, V; Chepel, V

    2016-01-01

    Compact gamma cameras with a square-shaped monolithic scintillator crystal and an array of silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are actively being developed for applications in areas such as small animal imaging, cancer diagnostics and radiotracer guided surgery. Statistical methods of position reconstruction, which are potentially superior to the traditional centroid method, require accurate knowledge of the spatial response of each photomultiplier. Using both Monte Carlo simulations and experimental data obtained with a camera prototype, we show that the spatial response of all photomultipliers (light response functions) can be parameterized with axially symmetric functions obtained iteratively from flood field irradiation data. The study was performed with a camera prototype equipped with a 30 x 30 x 2 mm3 LYSO crystal and an 8 x 8 array of SiPMs for 140 keV gamma rays. The simulations demonstrate that the images, reconstructed with the maximum likelihood method using the response obtained with the iterative a...

  2. The LHCb Upgrade Scintillating Fibre Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Leverington, Blake D

    2014-01-01

    The Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker is designed to replace the current downstream tracking detectors in the LHCb Upgrade during 2018 (CERN/LHCC 2014-001; LHCb TDR 15). The operation and the results obtained from the data collected 2011 and 2012 demonstrate that the current detector is robust and functioning very well. However, the limit of O ( 1 fb-1) of data per year cannot be overcome without improving the detector. This will be achieved using 25 ns bunch spacing with the average number of proton-proton interactions per bunch crossing n = 7 : 6. Collecting data at this luminosity will only be possible if the detector is improved by increasing the readout of the front-end electronics to 40MHz and implementing a more flexible software-based triggering system that will increase the data rate as well as the efficiency. The increase in interactions per bunch crossing will result in an increased occupancy in the tracking detectors and will exceed the operational occupancy for the Outer Tracker. Here we presen...

  3. Liquid Scintillation High Resolution Spectral Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grau Carles, A.; Grau Malonda, A.

    2010-08-06

    The CIEMAT/NIST and the TDCR methods in liquid scintillation counting are based on the determination of the efficiency for total counting. This paper tries to expand these methods analysing the pulse-height spectrum of radionuclides. To reach this objective we have to generalize the equations used in the model and to analyse the influence of ionization and chemical quench in both spectra and counting efficiency. We present equations to study the influence of different photomultipliers response in systems with one, two or three photomultipliers. We study the effect of the electronic noise discriminator level in both spectra and counting efficiency. The described method permits one to study problems that up to now was not possible to approach, such as the high uncertainty in the standardization of pure beta-ray emitter with low energy when we apply the TDCR method, or the discrepancies in the standardization of some electron capture radionuclides, when the CIEMAT/NIST method is applied. (Author) 107 refs.

  4. Camera Movement in Narrative Cinema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jakob Isak

    2007-01-01

    Just like art historians have focused on e.g. composition or lighting, this dissertation takes a single stylistic parameter as its object of study: camera movement. Within film studies this localized avenue of middle-level research has become increasingly viable under the aegis of a perspective......, and that a given camera movement may activate one or more of the proposed functions at any given moment. Six main functions are proposed and defined: 1) Orientation: orienting the viewer spatially. 2) Pacing: contributing to the cinematic rhythm of the film. 3) Inflection: inflecting shots in a suggestive...... to illustrate how the functions may mesh in individual camera movements six concrete examples are analyzed. The analyses illustrate how the taxonomy presented can substantiate analysis and interpretation of film style. More generally, the dissertation - and particularly these in-depth analyses - illustrates how...

  5. Perceptual Color Characterization of Cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Vazquez-Corral

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Color camera characterization, mapping outputs from the camera sensors to an independent color space, such as \\(XYZ\\, is an important step in the camera processing pipeline. Until now, this procedure has been primarily solved by using a \\(3 \\times 3\\ matrix obtained via a least-squares optimization. In this paper, we propose to use the spherical sampling method, recently published by Finlayson al., to perform a perceptual color characterization. In particular, we search for the \\(3 \\times 3\\ matrix that minimizes three different perceptual errors, one pixel based and two spatially based. For the pixel-based case, we minimize the CIE \\(\\Delta E\\ error, while for the spatial-based case, we minimize both the S-CIELAB error and the CID error measure. Our results demonstrate an improvement of approximately 3for the \\(\\Delta E\\ error, 7& for the S-CIELAB error and 13% for the CID error measures.

  6. Dark Energy Camera for Blanco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binder, Gary A.; /Caltech /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    In order to make accurate measurements of dark energy, a system is needed to monitor the focus and alignment of the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) to be located on the Blanco 4m Telescope for the upcoming Dark Energy Survey. One new approach under development is to fit out-of-focus star images to a point spread function from which information about the focus and tilt of the camera can be obtained. As a first test of a new algorithm using this idea, simulated star images produced from a model of DECam in the optics software Zemax were fitted. Then, real images from the Mosaic II imager currently installed on the Blanco telescope were used to investigate the algorithm's capabilities. A number of problems with the algorithm were found, and more work is needed to understand its limitations and improve its capabilities so it can reliably predict camera alignment and focus.

  7. Radiation-Tolerant High-Speed Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Radiation -Tolerant High-Speed Camera Esko Mikkola, Andrew Levy, Matt Engelman Alphacore, Inc. Tempe, AZ 85281 Abstract: As part of an... radiation -hardened CMOS image sensor and camera system. Radiation -hardened cameras with frame rates as high as 10 kfps and resolution of 1Mpixel are not...camera solution that is under development with a similar architecture. It also includes a brief description of the radiation -hardened camera that

  8. An operative gamma camera for sentinel lymph node procedure in case of breast cancer

    CERN Document Server

    Salvador, S; Mathelin, C; Guyonne, J; Huss, D

    2007-01-01

    Large field of view gamma cameras are widely used to perform lymphoscintigraphy in the sentinel lymph nodes (SLN) procedure in case of breast cancer. However, they are not specified for this application and their sizes do not enable their use in the operative room to control the excision of the all SLN. We present the results obtained with a prototype of a new mini gamma camera developed especially for the operative lymphoscintigraphy of the axillary area in case of breast cancer. This prototype is composed of 10 mm thick parallel lead collimator, a 2 mm thick GSO:Ce inorganic scintillating crystal from Hitachi and a Hamamatsu H8500 flat panel multianode (64 channels) photomultiplier tube (MAPMT) equipped with a dedicated electronics. Its actual field of view is 50 × 50mm2. The gamma interaction position in the GSO scintillating plate is obtained by calculating the center of gravity of the fired MAPMT channels. The measurements performed with this prototype demonstrate the usefulness of this mini gamma camer...

  9. Performance of a new electron-tracking Compton camera under intense radiations from a water target irradiated with a proton beam

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuoka, Yoshihiro; Tanimori, T.; Kubo, H.; Takada, A.; Parker, J D; Mizumoto, T.; Mizumura, Y.; Iwaki, S.; Sawano, T.; Komura, S.; Kishimoto, T.; Oda, M; T. Takemura; Miyamoto, S; Sonoda, S.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed an electron-tracking Compton camera (ETCC) for use in next-generation MeV gamma ray telescopes. An ETCC consists of a gaseous time projection chamber (TPC) and pixel scintillator arrays (PSAs). Since the TPC measures the three dimensional tracks of Compton-recoil electrons, the ETCC can completely reconstruct the incident gamma rays. Moreover, the ETCC demonstrates efficient background rejection power in Compton-kinematics tests, identifies particle from the energy deposit r...

  10. Relationship between sonographic renal length and renal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Sonography, Renal length, Renal. Parenchymal Thickness, Renal Biopsy. Résumé. But: Pour determiner 1e rapport entre l'épaisseur parenchymal rénale sonographic (RPT) et la longueur rénale (RL) dans le nigérien normal (1' adulte. Conception D'Etude: Le RL et le RPT de 309 sujets normaux dans la marge ...

  11. A scintillating fission detector for neutron flux measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stange, Sy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Esch, Ernst I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Burgett, Eric A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; May, Iain [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Muenchausen, Ross E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taw, Felicia [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tovesson, Fredrik K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Neutron flux monitors are commonly used for a variety of nuclear physics applications. A scintillating neutron detector, consisting of a liquid scintillator loaded with fissionable material, has been developed, characterized, and tested in the beam line at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, and shows a significant improvement in neutron sensitivity compared with a conventional fission chamber. Recent research on nanocomposite-based scintillators for gamma-ray detection indicates that this approach can be extended to load nanoparticles of fissionable material into a scintillating matrix, with up to three orders of magnitude higher loading than typical fission chambers. This will result in a rugged, cost-efficient detector with high efficiency, a short signal rise time, and the ability to be used in low neutron-flux environments. Initial efforts to utilize the luminescence of uranyl oxide to eliminate the need for wavelength-shifting dyes were unsuccessful. Excitation of uranyl compounds has been reported at wavelengths ranging from 266 nm to 532 nm. However, neither the 300 nm emission of toluene, nor the 350 nm emission of PPO, nor the 410 nm emission of POPOP resulted in significant excitation of and emission by uranyl oxide. As indicated by UV/visible spectroscopy, light emitted at these wavelengths was absorbed by the colored solution. {sup 235}U remains the most attractive candidate for a fissionable scintillator, due to its high fission cross-section and lack of a threshold fission energy, but all solutions containing molecular uranium compounds will be colored, most more highly than the U{sup 6+} compounds used here. Research is therefore continuing toward the fabrication of uranium nanoparticles, in which, due to Rayleigh scattering, the coloration should be less pronounced. The characterization of the thorium-loaded liquid scintillator and the fabrication of the 100 mL detectors for use at LANSCE demonstrated the feasibility of loading fissionable

  12. Preliminary report on digitalization of renal microangiograms used in analysing renal parenchymal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, M; Kaneko, M

    1983-01-01

    Glomerulography is a useful method for the angiographic diagnosis of various renal parenchymal diseases. A new system for digitalization of the glomerulogram has been developed using a high resolution television camera and a CT computer. We describe the fundamental procedures involved in the clinical application of digital glomerulography by applying this method to a renal microangiogram of a cow. This new method aids a clearer understanding of the detailed microvasculatures by providing better magnification and storage and allowing for further processing of the original analogue images. With a computer printout of any part of the glomerulogram also possible, an estimation of the glomerular counts and their distribution can now be given for any unit of cross-sectional area of the renal cortex.

  13. Performance of Water-Based Liquid Scintillator: An Independent Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Beznosko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The water-based liquid scintillator (WbLS is a new material currently under development. It is based on the idea of dissolving the organic scintillator in water using special surfactants. This material strives to achieve the novel detection techniques by combining the Cerenkov rings and scintillation light, as well as the total cost reduction compared to pure liquid scintillator (LS. The independent light yield measurement analysis for the light yield measurements using three different proton beam energies (210 MeV, 475 MeV, and 2000 MeV for water, two different WbLS formulations (0.4% and 0.99%, and pure LS conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory, USA, is presented. The results show that a goal of ~100 optical photons/MeV, indicated by the simulation to be an optimal light yield for observing both the Cerenkov ring and the scintillation light from the proton decay in a large water detector, has been achieved.

  14. Bright Semiconductor Scintillator for High Resolution X-Ray Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagarkar, Vivek V.; Gaysinskiy, Valeriy; Ovechkina, Olena E.; Miller, Stuart; Singh, Bipin; Guo, Liang; Irving, Thomas (IIT); (Rad. Monitoring)

    2011-08-16

    We report on a novel approach to produce oxygen-doped zinc telluride (ZnTe:O), a remarkable group II-VI semiconductor scintillator, fabricated in the columnar-structured or polycrystalline forms needed to fulfill the needs of many demanding X-ray and {gamma}-ray imaging applications. ZnTe:O has one of the highest conversion efficiencies among known scintillators, emission around 680 nm (which is ideally suited for CCD sensors), high density of 6.4 g/cm{sup 3}, fast decay time of {approx}1 {micro}s with negligible afterglow, and orders of magnitude higher radiation resistance compared to commonly used scintillators. These properties allow the use of ZnTe:O in numerous applications, including X-ray imaging, nuclear medicine (particularly SPECT), room temperature radioisotope identification, and homeland security. Additionally, ZnTe:O offers distinct advantages for synchrotron-based high resolution imaging due to the absence of atomic absorption edges in the low energy range, which otherwise reduce resolution due to secondary X-ray formations. We have fabricated films of ZnTe:O using a vapor deposition technique that allows large-area structured scintillator fabrication in a time- and cost-efficient manner, and evaluated its performance for small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) at an Argonne National Laboratory synchrotron beamline. Details of the fabrication and characterization of the optical, scintillation and imaging properties of the ZnTe:O films are presented in this paper.

  15. High energy resolution with transparent ceramic garnet scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherepy, N. J.; Seeley, Z. M.; Payne, S. A.; Beck, P. R.; Swanberg, E. L.; Hunter, S.; Ahle, L.; Fisher, S. E.; Melcher, C.; Wei, H.; Stefanik, T.; Chung, Y.-S.; Kindem, J.

    2014-09-01

    Breakthrough energy resolution, R(662keV) Gadolinium Yttrium Gallium Aluminum Garnet, or GYGAG(Ce). Transparent ceramic GYGAG(Ce), has a peak emission wavelength of 550 nm that is better matched to Silicon photodetectors than to standard PMTs. We are therefore developing a spectrometer based on pixelated GYGAG(Ce) on a Silicon photodiode array that can provide R(662 keV) = 3.6%. In comparison, with large 1-2 in3 size GYGAG(Ce) ceramics we obtain R(662 keV) = 4.6% with PMT readout. We find that ceramic GYGAG(Ce) of a given stoichiometric chemical composition can exhibit very different scintillation properties, depending on sintering conditions and post-anneal treatments. Among the characteristics of transparent ceramic garnet scintillators that can be controlled by fabrication conditions are: scintillation decay components and their amplitudes, intensity and duration of afterglow, thermoluminescence glow curve peak positions and amplitudes, integrated light yield, light yield non-proportionality - as measured in the Scintillator Light Yield Non-Proportionality Characterization Instrument (SLYNCI), and energy resolution for gamma spectroscopy. Garnet samples exhibiting a significant fraction of Cerium dopant in the tetravalent valence also exhibit: faster overall scintillation decay, very low afterglow, high light yield, but poor light yield proportionality and degraded energy resolution.

  16. Modelling ionospheric scintillation under the crest of the equatorial anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonsi, L.; Wernik, A. W.; Materassi, M.; Spogli, L.

    2017-10-01

    WAM is realized making use of the plasma density data collected via the retarding potential analyser on board the Dynamics Explorer 2 spacecraft, capable to model the scintillation climatology over the northern hemisphere high latitude ionosphere. More recently, WAM has been tuned to model the ionospheric scintillations also over the equatorial latitudes. The effort has been done to support the CIGALA (Concept for Ionospheric Scintillation Mitigation for Professional GNSS in Latin America) project in the assessment of the scintillations climatology over Latin America. The concept of the new release of WAM is the same already adopted for the high latitudes: the in situ measurements, supplemented with an ionospheric model and with the irregularity anisotropy model, are treated to describe the morphology of scintillation, provided a suitable propagation model is used. Significant differences have been included in the low latitudes release to account for the anisotropy of the irregularities and for strong scattering regime. The paper describes the new WAM formulation and presents comparisons of the model predictions with the actual measurements collected in Brazil.

  17. Ionosphere Scintillation at Low and High Latitudes (Modelling vs Measurement)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béniguel, Yannick

    2016-04-01

    This paper will address the problem of scintillations characteristics, focusing on the parameters of interest for a navigation system. Those parameters are the probabilities of occurrence of simultaneous fading, the bubbles surface at IPP level, the cycle slips and the fades duration statistics. The scintillation characteristics obtained at low and high latitudes will be compared. These results correspond to the data analysis performed after the ESA Monitor ionosphere measurement campaign [1], [2]. A second aspect of the presentation will be the modelling aspect. It has been observed that the phase scintillation dominates at high latitudes while the intensity scintillation dominates at low latitudes. The way it can be reproduced and implemented in a propagation model (e.g. GISM model [3]) will be presented. Comparisons of measurements with results obtained by modelling will be presented on some typical scenarios. References [1] R. Prieto Cerdeira, Y. Beniguel, "The MONITOR project: architecture, data and products", Ionospheric Effects Symposium, Alexandria (Va), May 2011 [2] Y. Béniguel, R Orus-Perez , R. Prieto-Cerdeira , S. Schlueter , S. Scortan, A. Grosu "MONITOR 2: ionospheric monitoring network in support to SBAS and other GNSS and scientific purposes", IES Conference, Alexandria (Va), May 2015-05-22 [3] Y. Béniguel, P. Hamel, "A Global Ionosphere Scintillation Propagation Model for Equatorial Regions", Journal of Space Weather Space Climate, 1, (2011), doi: 10.1051/swsc/2011004

  18. Gadolinium-loaded gel scintillators for neutron and antineutrino detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riddle, Catherine Lynn; Akers, Douglas William; Demmer, Ricky Lynn; Paviet, Patricia Denise; Drigert, Mark William

    2016-11-29

    A gadolinium (Gd) loaded scintillation gel (Gd-ScintGel) compound allows for neutron and gamma-ray detection. The unique gel scintillator encompasses some of the best features of both liquid and solid scintillators, yet without many of the disadvantages associated therewith. Preferably, the gel scintillator is a water soluble Gd-DTPA compound and water soluble fluorophores such as: CdSe/ZnS (or ZnS) quantum dot (Q-dot) nanoparticles, coumarin derivatives 7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin, 7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin-3-acetic acid, 7-hydroxycoumarin-3-carboxylic acid, and Alexa Fluor 350 as well as a carbostyril compound, carbostyril 124 in a stable water-based gel, such as methylcellulose or polyacrylamide polymers. The Gd-loaded ScintGel allows for a homogenious distribution of the Gd-DTPA and the fluorophores, and yields clean fluorescent emission peaks. A moderator, such as deuterium or a water-based clear polymer, can be incorporated in the Gd-ScintGel. The gel scintillators can be used in compact detectors, including neutron and antineutrino detectors.

  19. GPS scintillations associated with cusp dynamics and polar cap patches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yaqi; Moen, Jøran I.; Oksavik, Kjellmar; Spicher, Andres; Clausen, Lasse B. N.; Miloch, Wojciech J.

    2017-10-01

    This paper investigates the relative scintillation level associated with cusp dynamics (including precipitation, flow shears, etc.) with and without the formation of polar cap patches around the cusp inflow region by the EISCAT Svalbard radar (ESR) and two GPS scintillation receivers. A series of polar cap patches were observed by the ESR between 8:40 and 10:20 UT on December 3, 2011. The polar cap patches combined with the auroral dynamics were associated with a significantly higher GPS phase scintillation level (up to 0.6 rad) than those observed for the other two alternatives, i.e., cusp dynamics without polar cap patches, and polar cap patches without cusp aurora. The cusp auroral dynamics without plasma patches were indeed related to GPS phase scintillations at a moderate level (up to 0.3 rad). The polar cap patches away from the active cusp were associated with sporadic and moderate GPS phase scintillations (up to 0.2 rad). The main conclusion is that the worst global navigation satellite system space weather events on the dayside occur when polar cap patches enter the polar cap and are subject to particle precipitation and flow shears, which is analogous to the nightside when polar cap patches exit the polar cap and enter the auroral oval.

  20. A potential base substrate for deformable scintillation materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Hidehito, E-mail: hidehito@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Kyoto University, 2, Asashiro-Nishi, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Sato, Nobuhiro [Kyoto University, 2, Asashiro-Nishi, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Kitamura, Hisashi [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Shirakawa, Yoshiyuki [Waseda University, 513, Waseda-Tsurumaki-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-0041 (Japan); Takahashi, Sentaro [Kyoto University, 2, Asashiro-Nishi, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan)

    2016-05-11

    Deformable scintillation materials for radiation detection are an original concept that will impact many applications. Here we reveal the optical characteristics of readily available, transparent grease that consists of adhesive aromatic ring polymers. The aromatic ring polymer is methyl phenyl polysiloxane, commonly used in cosmetics, lubrication, heat conduction, and mechanical damping. It has a 285-nm excitation maximum and emits short wavelength light that peaks at 315 nm. The stopping power for 1 MeV electrons is 1.78 MeV cm{sup 2}/g. The light-yield distribution has distinct peaks at 976 keV from internal conversion electrons and at 5486 keV from alpha particles. In addition, this particular methyl phenyl polysiloxane is safe for use and disposal, which is an excellent advantage. These aromatic ring polymers are potential base substrates for deformable scintillation materials and make an important addition to the categories of scintillation materials. - Highlights: • Adhesive aromatic ring polymers can be deformable base substrates for scintillation materials. • Transparent grease consisting of methyl phenyl polysiloxane was characterised. • Short-wavelength light with a 315-nm emission maximum was emitted. • Distinct peaks induced by internal conversion electrons and alpha particles were observed in light-yield distributions. • Deformable scintillation materials are an original category of materials for radiation detection.

  1. Directing Performers for the Cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, George P., Jr.

    An excellent way for an undergraduate, novice director of television and film to pick up background experience in directing performers for cameras is by participating in nonbroadcast-film activities, such as theatre, dance, and variety acts, both as performer and as director. This document describes the varieties of activities, including creative,…

  2. The Camera Comes to Court.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floren, Leola

    After the Lindbergh kidnapping trial in 1935, the American Bar Association sought to eliminate electronic equipment from courtroom proceedings. Eventually, all but two states adopted regulations applying that ban to some extent, and a 1965 Supreme Court decision encouraged the banning of television cameras at trials as well. Currently, some states…

  3. Structure and scintillation properties of CsI(Tl) films on Si single crystal substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Lina [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, School of Optoelectronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Liu, Shuang, E-mail: shuangliu@uestc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, School of Optoelectronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Chen, Dejun; Zhang, Shangjian; Liu, Yong; Zhong, Zhiyong [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, School of Optoelectronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Falco, Charles M. [University of Arizona, College of Optical Sciences, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2016-10-30

    Highlights: • We obtained the desired micro-columnar structure of CsI(Tl) films on the orienting Si substrates. • We improved the micro-columnar structure of CsI(Tl) films under the relatively large deposition rate through using the substrate with a pre-deposited CsI nanolayer. • We modeled the interface structures between the CsI(Tl) films with (200) and (310) orientation and Si(111) substrates to explain the preferred orientation of film under the influence of the orienting substrate significantly. • We gained a new spectrum of the CsI(Tl) films peaked at 740 nm wavelength. - Abstract: CsI(Tl) scintillation films fabricated on glass substrates are widely applied for X-ray imaging because their ability to grow in micro-columnar structure and proper emission wavelength matching CCD cameras. But the coupling process between the CsI(Tl) films and Si-based photo detector would cause coupling loss. In this work, CsI(Tl) films were deposited on the orienting Si substrates and the Si substrates covered by the pre-deposited CsI nanolayers. Structure and scintillation properties of films were examined by using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence and radioluminescent spectrum. The films deposited on the orienting Si substrates show the micro-columnar morphology with perfect single crystalline structure and the photoluminescence spectra with bimodal distribution. The performances of the films prepared on the pre-deposited CsI nanolayer, containing micro-columns structure and the light yield are improved.

  4. Digital Low Frequency Radio Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullekrug, M.; Mezentsev, A.; Soula, S.; van der Velde, O.; Poupeney, J.; Sudre, C.; Gaffet, S.; Pincon, J.

    2012-04-01

    This contribution reports the design, realization and operation of a novel digital low frequency radio camera towards an exploration of the Earth's electromagnetic environment with particular emphasis on lightning discharges and subsequent atmospheric effects such as transient luminous events. The design of the digital low frequency radio camera is based on the idea of radio interferometry with a network of radio receivers which are separated by spatial baselines comparable to the wavelength of the observed radio waves, i.e., ~1-100 km which corresponds to a frequency range from ~3-300 kHz. The key parameter towards the realization of the radio interferometer is the frequency dependent slowness of the radio waves within the Earth's atmosphere with respect to the speed of light in vacuum. This slowness is measured with the radio interferometer by using well documented radio transmitters. The digital low frequency radio camera can be operated in different modes. In the imaging mode, still photographs show maps of the low frequency radio sky. In the video mode, movies show the dynamics of the low frequency radio sky. The exposure time of the photograhps, the frame rate of the video, and the radio frequency of interest can be adjusted by the observer. Alternatively, the digital radio camera can be used in the monitoring mode, where a particular area of the sky is observed continuously. The first application of the digital low frequency radio camera is to characterize the electromagnetic energy emanating from sprite producing lightning discharges, but it is expected that it can also be used to identify and investigate numerous other radio sources of the Earth's electromagnetic environment.

  5. Development and characterization of a tissue equivalent plastic scintillator based dosimetry system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petric, M P; Robar, J L; Clark, B G

    2006-01-01

    High precision techniques in radiation therapy, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy, offer the potential for improved target coverage and increased normal tissue sparing compared with conformal radiotherapy. The complex fluence maps used in many of these techniques, however, often lead to more challenging quality assurance with dose verification being labor-intensive and time consuming. A prototype dose verification system has been developed using a tissue equivalent plastic scintillator that provides easy-to-acquire, rapid, digital dose measurements in a plane perpendicular to the beam. The system consists of a water-filled Lucite phantom with a scintillator screen built into the top surface. The phantom contains a silver coated plastic mirror to reflect scintillation light towards a viewing window where it is captured using a charge coupled device camera and a personal computer. Optical photon spread is removed using a microlouvre optical collimator and by deconvolving a glare kernel from the raw images. A characterization of the system was performed that included measurements of linear output response, dose rate dependence, spatial linearity, effective pixel size, signal uniformity and both short- and long-term reproducibility. The average pixel intensity for static, regular shaped fields between 3 cm X 3 cm and 12 cm x 12 cm imaged with the system was found to be linear in the dose delivered with linear regression analysis yielding a correlation coefficient r2 > 0.99. Effective pixel size was determined to be 0.53 mm/pixel. The system was found to have a signal uniformity of 5.6% and a long-term reproducibility/stability of 1.7% over a 6 month period. The system's ability to verify a dynamic treatment field was evaluated using 60 degrees dynamic wedged fields and comparing the results to two-dimensional film dosimetry. Results indicate agreement with two-dimensional film dosimetry distributions within 8% inside the field edges. With further

  6. Optimization of the wavelength shifter ratio in a polystyrene based plastic scintillator through energy spectrum analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ye Won; Kim, Myung Soo; Yoo, Hyun Jun; Lee, Dae Hee; Cho, Gyu Seong [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Myung Kook [Neutron Instrumentation Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    The scintillation efficiency of the polystyrene based plastic scintillator depends on the ratio of the wavelength shifters, organic fluors (PPO and POPOP). Thus, 24 samples of the plastic scintillator were fabricated in order to find out the optimum ratio of the wavelength shifters in the plastic scintillator. The fabricated plastic scintillators were trimmed through a cutting and polishing process. They were used in gamma energy spectrum measurement with the {sup 137}Cs emitting monoenergy photon with 662 keV for the comparison of the scintillation efficiency. As a result, it was found out that the scintillator sample with 1.00 g of PPO (2,5-Diphenyloxazole) and 0.50 g of POPOP (1,4-Bis(5-phnyl-2oxidazolyl)benzene) dissolved in 100 g of styrene solution has the optimum ratio in terms of the light yield of the polystyrene based plastic scintillator.

  7. Visual enhancement of laparoscopic nephrectomies using the 3-CCD camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Nicole J.; Kansal, Neil S.; Dhanani, Nadeem; Alemozaffar, Mehrdad; Kirk, Allan D.; Pinto, Peter A.; Elster, Eric A.; Huffman, Scott W.; Levin, Ira W.

    2006-02-01

    Many surgical techniques are currently shifting from the more conventional, open approach towards minimally invasive laparoscopic procedures. Laparoscopy results in smaller incisions, potentially leading to less postoperative pain and more rapid recoveries . One key disadvantage of laparoscopic surgery is the loss of three-dimensional assessment of organs and tissue perfusion. Advances in laparoscopic technology include high-definition monitors for improved visualization and upgraded single charge coupled device (CCD) detectors to 3-CCD cameras, to provide a larger, more sensitive color palette to increase the perception of detail. In this discussion, we further advance existing laparoscopic technology to create greater enhancement of images obtained during radical and partial nephrectomies in which the assessment of tissue perfusion is crucial but limited with current 3-CCD cameras. By separating the signals received by each CCD in the 3-CCD camera and by introducing a straight forward algorithm, rapid differentiation of renal vessels and perfusion is accomplished and could be performed real time. The newly acquired images are overlaid onto conventional images for reference and comparison. This affords the surgeon the ability to accurately detect changes in tissue oxygenation despite inherent limitations of the visible light image. Such additional capability should impact procedures in which visual assessment of organ vitality is critical.

  8. ATLAS Rewards Russian Supplier for Scintillating Tile Production

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    At a ceremony held at CERN on 30 July, the ATLAS collaboration awarded Russian firm SIA Luch from Podolsk in the Moscow region an ATLAS Suppliers Award. This follows delivery by the company of the final batch of scintillating tiles for the collaboration's Tile Calorimeter some six months ahead of schedule.   Representatives of Russian firm Luch Podolsk received the ATLAS Suppliers Award in the collaboration's Tile Calorimeter instrumentation plant at CERN on 30 July. In front of one Tile Calorimeter module instrumented by scintillating tiles are (left to right) IHEP physicists Evgueni Startchenko and Andrei Karioukhine, Luch Podolsk representatives Igor Karetnikov and Yuri Zaitsev, Tile Calorimeter Project Leader Rupert Leitner, ATLAS spokesperson Peter Jenni, and CERN Tile Calorimeter group leader Ana Henriques-Correia. Scintillating tiles form the active part of the ATLAS hadronic Tile Calorimeter, which will measure the energy and direction of particles produced in LHC collisions. They are emb...

  9. Recipe for attaining optimal energy resolution in inorganic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Jai; Koblov, Alexander [School of Engineering and IT, B-purple-12, Faculty of EHSE, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT 0909 (Australia)

    2012-12-15

    Using an approximate form of the density of excitation created within the track initiated by an incident {gamma} - photon on a scintillator, the light yield is derived as a function of linear, bimolecular and Auger radiative and quenching recombination rates. The non-proportionality in the yield is analysed as a function of the bimolecular and Auger quenching rates and also its dependence on the track radius is studied. An optimal combination of these quenching rates and track radius is presented to obtain a recipe for inventing a scintillator material with optimal energy resolution. The importance of the mobility of charge carriers in minimising the non-proportionality in a scintillator is also discussed (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Performance of the CHORUS lead-scintillating fiber calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Buontempo, S

    1997-01-01

    We report on the design and performance of the lead-scintillating fiber calorimeter of the CHORUS experiment, which searches for νμ-ντ oscillations in the CERN Wide Band Neutrino beam. Two of the three sectors in which the calorimeter is divided are made of lead and plastic scintillating fibers, and they represent the first large scale application of this technique for combined electromagnetic and hadronic calorimetry. The third sector is built using the sandwich technique with lead plates and scintillator strips and acts as a tail catcher for the hadronic energy flow. From tests performed at the CERN SPS and PS an energy resolution of σ(E)/E=(32.3±2.4)%/E(GeV)+(1.4±0.7)% was measured for pions, and σ(E)/E=(13.8±0.9)%/E(GeV)+(−0.2±0.4)% for electrons.

  11. Effect of Aspect Ratio on the Light Output of Scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Pauwels, Kristof; Gundacker, S.; Knapitsch, A.; Lecoq, P.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of the geometry of the scintillators is presented in this paper. We focus on the effect of narrowing down the section of crystals that have a given length. The light output of a set of crystals with very similar scintillating properties but different geometries measured with several coupling/wrapping configurations is provided. We observe that crystals shaped in thin rods have a lower light output as compared to bulk or sliced crystals. The effect of unpolishing the crystal faces is also investigated, and it is shown that highest light outputs are not necessarily obtained with crystals having all faces polished. Simulation results based on a realistic model of the crystal that implements light scattering on the crystal edges are in agreement with the experimental data. Fine-tuning of this model would allow us to further explore the details of light propagation in scintillators and would be highly valuable to fast timing detection and highly granular detectors.

  12. The Monte-Carlo simulation on a scintillator neutron detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chong; Tang, Bin; Sun, ZhiJia; Zhang, Qiang; Yang, Zhen; Luo, Wei; Wang, Tuo

    2013-10-01

    A simulation of the properties of the shifting scintillator neutron detector using 6LiF/ZnS(Ag) scintillation screens is performed. The simulation results show that the light attenuation length of standard BC704 scintillator is about 0.65 mm. Its thermal neutron detection efficiency, gamma sensitivity and intrinsic spatial resolution can achieve around 50.0%, 10-5 and 0.18 mm (along X-axis) respectively. For the detector, air coupling position resolution is better than the silicone oil coupling. Some of the simulation results are compared with experimental results. They are in agreement. This work will be helpful for constructing neutron detector for high intensity powder diffractometer at Chinese spallation neutron source.

  13. Prototype of a scintillation detector involving APD photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzubenko, G. B.; Zhigareva, N. M.; Mikhaylov, K. R.; Romanov, D. V.; Stavinsky, A. V.; Stolin, V. L.; Polozov, P. A.; Prokudin, M. S.; Sharkov, G. B.

    2015-11-01

    A prototype of a new scintillation detector involving APD photodetectors is discussed. The prototype in question consists of a plastic scintillator 96 × 96 × 128 mm in size. Grooves into which a wavelength-shifting fiber is laid are made on lateral faces of the scintillator. A photodiode equipped with a special amplifier is arranged at the end of this fiber. The results of testing the detector prototype in a proton beam are presented. It is shown that the amplitude of the signal in the prototype changes substantially (by a factor of three to five) with the coordinate of a particle as it traverses the prototype. Thus, the proposed design is position-sensitive. Also, the neutron-detection efficiency was calculated with the aid of the GEANT3 code package.

  14. Scintillating glasses for total absorption dual readout calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonvicini, V. [INFN, Trieste; Driutti, A. [Udine U.; Cauz, D. [Udine U.; Pauletta, G. [Udine U.; Rubinov, P. [Fermilab; Santi, L. [Udine U.; Wenzel, H. [Fermilab

    2012-01-01

    Scintillating glasses are a potentially cheaper alternative to crystal - based calorimetry with common problems related to light collection, detection and processing. As such, their use and development are part of more extensive R&D aimed at investigating the potential of total absorption, combined with the readout (DR) technique, for hadron calorimetry. A recent series of measurements, using cosmic and particle beams from the Fermilab test beam facility and scintillating glass with the characteristics required for application of the DR technique, serve to illustrate the problems addressed and the progress achieved by this R&D. Alternative solutions for light collection (conventional and silicon photomultipliers) and signal processing are compared, the separate contributions of scintillation and Cherenkov processes to the signal are evaluated and results are compared to simulation.

  15. Radioactive contamination of BaF2 crystal scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Polischuk, O G; Bernabei, R; Cappella, F; Caracciolo, V; Cerulli, R; Di Marco, A; Danevich, F A; Incicchitti, A; Poda, D V; Tretyak, V I

    2013-01-01

    Barium fluoride (BaF$_2$) crystal scintillators are promising detectors to search for double beta decay processes in $^{130}$Ba ($Q_{2{\\beta}}$ = 2619(3) keV) and $^{132}$Ba ($Q_{2{\\beta}}$ = 844(1) keV). The $^{130}$Ba isotope is of particular interest because of the indications on 2${\\beta}$ decay found in two geochemical experiments. The radioactive contamination of BaF$_2$ scintillation crystal with mass of 1.714 kg was measured over 113.4 hours in a low-background DAMA/R&D set-up deep underground (3600 m w.e.) at the Gran Sasso National Laboratories of INFN (LNGS, Italy). The half-life of $^{212}$Po (present in the crystal scintillator due to contamination by radium) was estimated as $T_{1/2}$ = 298.8 $\\pm$ 0.8(stat.) $\\pm$ 1.4(syst.) ns by analysis of the events pulse profiles.

  16. Distal renal tubular acidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this disorder. Alternative Names Renal tubular acidosis - distal; Renal tubular acidosis type I; Type I RTA; RTA - distal; Classical RTA Images Kidney anatomy Kidney - blood and urine flow References Krapf R, ...

  17. Kidney (Renal) Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How is kidney failure treated? What is kidney (renal) failure? The kidneys are designed to maintain proper fluid ... marrow and strengthen the bones. The term kidney (renal) failure describes a situation in which the kidneys have ...

  18. Cardio Renal Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KV Sahasranam

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available For a long time, physicians have recognized that the kidney and the heart are related especially when there is severe dysfunction of either of them. Dysfunction of one of these organs seldom occurs in isolation. Of late the cardio renal syndrome is assuming significance because of its increasing incidence, awareness and complications. There is no definite definition of the cardio renal syndrome. However, an attempted definition states that it is a "decline in renal function in the setting of advanced heart failure". This definition does not cover the whole gamut of the cardio renal syndrome. Cardiac diseases are associated independently with a decrease in renal function and progression of existing renal disease. Chronic Kidney disease (CKD is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events and outcome. This bidirectional nature of cardiac and renal interaction is called Cardio Renal Syndrome (CRS.

  19. Dynamic Camera Positioning and Reconfiguration for Multi-Camera Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Konda, Krishna Reddy

    2015-01-01

    The large availability of different types of cameras and lenses, together with the reduction in price of video sensors, has contributed to a widespread use of video surveillance systems, which have become a widely adopted tool to enforce security and safety, in detecting and preventing crimes and dangerous events. The possibility for personalization of such systems is generally very high, letting the user customize the sensing infrastructure, and deploying ad-hoc solutions based on the curren...

  20. Relationship between sonographic renal length and renal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To determine the relationship between sonographic renal parenchymal thickness (RPT) and renal length (RL) in normal adult Nigerian. Study design: The RL and RPT of 309 normal subjects within the age range of 18 – 80years were measured sonographically and prospectively. Correlation was performed between ...

  1. Alkali metal and alkali earth metal gadolinium halide scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Parms, Shameka; Porter-Chapman, Yetta D.; Wiggins, Latoria K.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising a gadolinium halide, optionally cerium-doped, having the formula A.sub.nGdX.sub.m:Ce; wherein A is nothing, an alkali metal, such as Li or Na, or an alkali earth metal, such as Ba; X is F, Br, Cl, or I; n is an integer from 1 to 2; m is an integer from 4 to 7; and the molar percent of cerium is 0% to 100%. The gadolinium halides or alkali earth metal gadolinium halides are scintillators and produce a bright luminescence upon irradiation by a suitable radiation.

  2. Scintillating Bolometer Monte Carlo for Rare Particle Event Searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deporzio, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    This study uses the Geant4 physics simulation toolkit to characterize various scintillating bolometer constructions for potential experimental commissioning. Emphasis is placed on detector sensitivity to neutrinoless double-beta decay. Constructions minimally include a scintillating source material for the decay and an absorber material. Tellurium, Selenium, Germanium and other candidate isotopes are studied as source materials. Various background discrimination techniques are analyzed including reflective housings and anti-reflective coatings upon the source material. Different geometric optimizations are considered. Ability to discriminate incident alpha and beta radiation, as well as photon detection efficiency for each construction is presented.

  3. Liquid-scintillation standardization of 123mTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coursey, B. M.; Golas, D. B.; Gray, D. H.; Hoppes, D. D.; Schima, F. J.

    1992-02-01

    A commercial liquid-scintillation system and calibrated germanium gamma-ray spectrometers were used to confirm the use of the 159-keV gamma ray of 123mTe as a primary efficiency calibrant for which the activity measurement is simple. The evaluated gamma-ray probability per decay is 0.840 ± 0.004. Liquid-scintillation spectra confirm that conversion electrons greater than 50 keV can be detected in at least 99.5% of the decays. The half-life was measured as 119.2 ± 0.1 days.

  4. HE upgrade beyond phase 1. Finger scintillator option.

    CERN Document Server

    Afanasiev, Sergey; Boyarintsev, A.Yu; Emeliantchik, Igor; Golutvin, Igor; Grinyov, B.V; Ershov, Yuri; Levchuk, Leonid; Litomin, Aliaksandr; Malakhov, Alexander; Moisenz, Petr; Popov, V.F; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Sorokin, Pavlo; Zhmurin, Petro

    2014-01-01

    CMS hadron calorimeters (HB, HE, HO) have been in operation for several years and contributed substantially to the success of the CMS Physics Program. The endcap calorimeter HE suffered more radiation damage than anticipated causing rapid degradation of scintillator segments (tiles) which have a higher radiation flux from secondary particles than HB and HO. A proposal to upgrade of HE calorimeter will provide a solution for survivability at future LHC higher luminosity. A finger-strip plastic scintillator option has many advantages and is a lower cost alternative to keep the excellent HE performance at high luminosity. Measurements and simulations have been performed and this method is a good upgrade strategy.

  5. Radioluminescent characteristics of the EJ 299-33 plastic scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyibule, S. [University of Rochester, Department of Physics, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Henry, E. [University of Rochester, Department of Chemistry, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Schröder, W.U., E-mail: w.udo.schroeder@rochester.edu [University of Rochester, Department of Physics, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); University of Rochester, Department of Chemistry, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Tõke, J. [University of Rochester, Department of Chemistry, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Acosta, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Huelva, Huelva (Spain); Auditore, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo Collegato di Messina and Department of Physics, Messina University, Messina (Italy); Cardella, G.; De Filippo, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Catania (Italy); Francalanza, L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Catania University, Catania (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Gìani, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Catania University, Catania (Italy); Minniti, T.; Morgana, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo Collegato di Messina and Department of Physics, Messina University, Messina (Italy); Pagano, E.V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Catania University, Catania (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Pirrone, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Catania (Italy); Politi, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Catania (Italy); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Catania University, Catania (Italy); Quattrocchi, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo Collegato di Messina and Department of Physics, Messina University, Messina (Italy); Rizzo, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Catania University, Catania (Italy); and others

    2013-11-11

    The response of the EJ 299-33 plastic scintillator to energetic charged nuclear particles ranging from isotopes of hydrogen to isotopes of carbon has been determined over a wide energy range using a complex experimental setup and nuclear reactions induced by a 20 AMeV carbon beam on an aluminum target. A strong pulse-shape dependence of the generated light bursts on the impinging particle specie is observed, which makes this scintillator suitable, among other things, for neutron vs.γ-ray identification. Fit formulas are proposed for the normalized light output as a function of particle energy for eleven isotopes of elements ranging from hydrogen to carbon.

  6. Properties of an imaging gas scintillation proportional counter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, W. H.-M.; Hailey, C. J.

    1981-01-01

    An instrument which combines the improved energy resolution offered by the gas scintillation proportional counter (GSPC) with the submillimeter imaging capabilities of the multiwire proportional counter (MWPC) is described. The imaging gas scintillation proportional counter detects the centroid of the UV light excited by X-ray photons interacting in the noble gas of the GSPC with a UV sensitive gas in the MWPC. The prototype counter yields a measured performance of 9% (FWHM) energy resolution and 0.9 mm (FWHM) spatial resolution at 6 keV. Further design refinements should achieve 18% (FWHM) energy resolution and 0.6 mm (FWHM) spatial resolution at 1 keV.

  7. Novel Scintillation Material - ZnO Transparent Ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Rodnyi, P. A.; Chernenko, K. A.; Gorokhova, E. I.; Kozlovskii, S. S.; Khanin, V. M.; Khodyuk, I. V.

    2011-01-01

    ZnO-based scintillation ceramics for application in HENPA LENPA analyzers have been investigated. The following ceramic samples have been prepared: undoped ones (ZnO), an excess of zinc in stoichiometry (ZnO:Zn), doped with gallium (ZnO:Ga) and lithium (ZnO:Li). Optical transmission, x-ray excited emission, scintillation decay and pulse height spectra were measured and analyzed. Ceramics have reasonable transparency in visible range (up to 60% for 0.4 mm thickness) and energy resolution (14.9...

  8. Influence of temperature to quenching on liquid scintillation measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, T

    2003-01-01

    The amount of quench is measured with liquid scintillation spectrometer changing the temperature of the sample. The range of the changed temperature is between 0 deg C and 35 deg C. The measurement is carried out for three kinds of unquenched standard, two quenched standards and fifteen kinds of scintillation cocktail and the mixed sample. It is confirmed that the amount of quench increases for all samples as the temperature rises. The influence of the changed amount of quench to the quench correction is examined. (author)

  9. Interstellar Scintillation and Scattering of Micro-arc-second AGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Jauncey

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of the first quasar 3C 273 led directly to the discovery of their variability at optical and radio wavelengths. We review the radio variability observations, in particular the variability found at frequencies below 1 GHz, as well as those exhibiting intra-day variability (IDV at cm wavelengths. Observations have shown that IDV arises principally from scintillation caused by scattering in the ionized interstellar medium of our Galaxy. The sensitivity of interstellar scintillation towards source angular sizes has provided a powerful tool for studying the most compact components of radio-loud AGN at microarcsecond and milliarcsecond scale resolution.

  10. Optical design considerations for efficient light collection from liquid scintillation counters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernacki, Bruce E; Douglas, Matthew; Erchinger, Jennifer L; Fuller, Erin S; Keillor, Martin E; Morley, Shannon M; Mullen, Crystal A; Orrell, John L; Panisko, Mark E; Warren, Glen A; Wright, Michael E

    2015-03-20

    Liquid scintillation counters measure charged particle-emitting radioactive isotopes and are used for environmental studies, nuclear chemistry, and life science. Alpha and beta emissions arising from the material under study interact with the scintillation cocktail to produce light. The prototypical liquid scintillation counter employs low-level photon-counting detectors to measure the arrival of the scintillation. For reliable operation, the counting instrument must convey the scintillation light to the detectors efficiently and predictably. Current best practices employ the use of two or more detectors for coincidence processing to discriminate true scintillation events from background events due to instrumental effects such as photomultiplier tube dark rates, tube flashing, or other light emission not generated in the scintillation cocktail vial. In low-background liquid scintillation counters, additional attention is paid to shielding the scintillation cocktail from naturally occurring radioactive material present in the laboratory and within the instrument's construction materials. Low-background design is generally at odds with optimal light collection. This study presents the evolution of a light collection design for liquid scintillation counting (LSC) in a low-background shield. The basic approach to achieve both good light collection and a low-background measurement is described. The baseline signals arising from the scintillation vial are modeled and methods to efficiently collect scintillation light are presented as part of the development of a customized low-background, high-sensitivity LSC system.

  11. Scintillating plastic optical fiber radiation detectors in high energy particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bross, A.D.

    1991-10-26

    We describe the application of scintillating optical fiber in instrumentation for high energy particle physics. The basic physics of the scintillation process in polymers is discussed first and then we outline the fundamentals of scintillating fiber technology. Fiber performance, optimization, and characterization measurements are given. Detector applications in the areas of particle tracking and particle energy determination are then described. 13 refs., 12 figs.

  12. Lithium-containing scintillators for thermal neutron, fast neutron, and gamma detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaitseva, Natalia P.; Carman, M. Leslie; Faust, Michelle A.

    2016-03-01

    In one embodiment, a scintillator includes a scintillator material; a primary fluor, and a Li-containing compound, where the Li-containing compound is soluble in the primary fluor, and where the scintillator exhibits an optical response signature for thermal neutrons that is different than an optical response signature for fast neutrons and gamma rays.

  13. Study on the Characteristics of a Scintillator for Beta-ray Detection using Epoxy Resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Jong Soo; Choi, Yong Seok; Hong, Sang Bum; Seo, Bum Kyung; Moon, Jei Kwon; Choi, Jong Won

    2017-09-01

    A thin plate of a plastic scintillator for detecting a beta-ray was developed. The plastic scintillator was made using epoxy resin and organic scintillators such as 2.5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) and 1,4-bis [5-phenyl-2-oxazole] benzene (POPOP). The mixture ratio of epoxy resin and the organic scintillators was determined using their absorbance, transmittance, emission spectra, and transparency. Their optimal weight percentage of PPO and POPOP in the organic scintillators was adjusted to 0.2 wt%:0.01 wt%. The prepared plastic scintillator was used to measure the standard source of Sr-90. The pulse height spectra and total counts of the prepared plastic scintillator were similar to a commercial plastic scintillator. Based on the above results, a large-area plastic scintillator was prepared for rapid investigation of a site contaminated with Sr-90. The prepared large-area plastic scintillator was evaluated for the characteristics in the laboratory. The evaluation results are expected to be usefully utilized in the development of a large-area plastic scintillation detector. The large-area plastic scintillation detector developed on the basis of the evaluation results is expected to be utilized to quickly measure the contamination of Sr-90 in the grounds used as a nuclear power facility.

  14. A novel epitaxially grown LSO-based thin-film scintillator for micro-imaging using hard synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douissard, P.A.; Martin, T.; Chevalier, V.; Rack, A. [European Synchrotron Radiat Facil, F-38043 Grenoble, (France); Cecilia, A.; Baumbach, T.; Rack, A. [Karlsruhe Inst Technol ANKA, D-76021 Karlsruhe, (Germany); Couchaud, M. [CEA LETI, F-38054 Grenoble, (France); Dupre, K. [FEE GmbH, D-55743 Idar Oberstein, (Germany); Kuhbacher, M. [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin Mat and Energie, D-14109 Berlin, (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The efficiency of high-resolution pixel detectors for hard X-rays is nowadays one of the major criteria which drives the feasibility of imaging experiments and in general the performance of an experimental station for synchrotron-based microtomography and radiography. Here the luminescent screen used for the indirect detection is focused on in order to increase the detective quantum efficiency a novel scintillator based on doped Lu{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} (LSO), epitaxially grown as thin film via the liquid phase epitaxy technique. It is shown that, by using adapted growth and doping parameters as well as a dedicated substrate, the scintillation behaviour of a LSO-based thin crystal together with the high stopping power of the material allows for high-performance indirect X-ray detection. In detail, the conversion efficiency, the radioluminescence spectra, the optical absorption spectra under UV/visible-light and the afterglow are investigated. A set-up to study the effect of the thin-film scintillator's temperature on its conversion efficiency is described as well it delivers knowledge which is important when working with higher photon flux densities and the corresponding high heat load on the material. Additionally, X-ray imaging systems based on different diffraction-limited visible-light optics and CCD cameras using among others LSO-based thin film are compared. Finally, the performance of the LSO thin film is illustrated by imaging a honey bee leg, demonstrating the value of efficient high-resolution computed tomography for life sciences. (authors)

  15. Renal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heerwagen, S T; Jensen, C; Bagi, P

    2007-01-01

    Renal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a rare soft-tissue tumor of controversial etiology with a potential for local recurrence after incomplete surgical resection. The radiological findings in renal IMT are not well described. We report two cases in adults with a renal mass treated...

  16. Cardio-renal syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph Gnanaraj; Jai Radhakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    Cardio-renal syndrome is a commonly encountered problem in clinical practice. Its pathogenesis is not fully understood. The purpose of this article is to highlight the interaction between the cardiovascular system and the renal system and how their interaction results in the complex syndrome of cardio-renal dysfunction. Additionally, we outline the available therapeutic strategies to manage this complex syndrome.

  17. A high-speed scintillation-based electronic portal imaging device to quantitatively characterize IMRT delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranade, Manisha K; Lynch, Bart D; Li, Jonathan G; Dempsey, James F

    2006-01-01

    We have developed an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) employing a fast scintillator and a high-speed camera. The device is designed to accurately and independently characterize the fluence delivered by a linear accelerator during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with either step-and-shoot or dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) delivery. Our aim is to accurately obtain the beam shape and fluence of all segments delivered during IMRT, in order to study the nature of discrepancies between the plan and the delivered doses. A commercial high-speed camera was combined with a terbium-doped gadolinium-oxy-sulfide (Gd2O2S:Tb) scintillator to form an EPID for the unaliased capture of two-dimensional fluence distributions of each beam in an IMRT delivery. The high speed EPID was synchronized to the accelerator pulse-forming network and gated to capture every possible pulse emitted from the accelerator, with an approximate frame rate of 360 frames-per-second (fps). A 62-segment beam from a head-and-neck IMRT treatment plan requiring 68 s to deliver was recorded with our high speed EPID producing approximately 6 Gbytes of imaging data. The EPID data were compared with the MLC instruction files and the MLC controller log files. The frames were binned to provide a frame rate of 72 fps with a signal-to-noise ratio that was sufficient to resolve leaf positions and segment fluence. The fractional fluence from the log files and EPID data agreed well. An ambiguity in the motion of the MLC during beam on was resolved. The log files reported leaf motions at the end of 33 of the 42 segments, while the EPID observed leaf motions in only 7 of the 42 segments. The static IMRT segment shapes observed by the high speed EPID were in good agreement with the shapes reported in the log files. The leaf motions observed during beam-on for step-and-shoot delivery were not temporally resolved by the log files.

  18. An optical metasurface planar camera

    CERN Document Server

    Arbabi, Amir; Kamali, Seyedeh Mahsa; Horie, Yu; Han, Seunghoon; Faraon, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    Optical metasurfaces are 2D arrays of nano-scatterers that modify optical wavefronts at subwavelength spatial resolution. They are poised to revolutionize optical design by enabling complex low cost systems where multiple metasurfaces are lithographically stacked on top of each other and are integrated with electronics. For imaging applications, metasurface stacks can perform sophisticated image corrections and can be directly integrated with image sensors. Here, we demonstrate this concept with a miniature flat camera integrating a monolithic metasurface lens doublet corrected for monochromatic aberrations, and an image sensor. The doublet lens, which acts as a fisheye photographic objective, has an f-number of 0.9, an angle-of-view larger than 60$^\\circ$$\\times$60$^\\circ$, and operates at 850 nm wavelength with large transmission. The camera exhibits high image quality, which indicates the potential of this technology to produce a paradigm shift in future designs of imaging systems for microscopy, photograp...

  19. GRAVITY acquisition camera: characterization results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anugu, Narsireddy; Garcia, Paulo; Amorim, Antonio; Wiezorrek, Erich; Wieprecht, Ekkehard; Eisenhauer, Frank; Ott, Thomas; Pfuhl, Oliver; Gordo, Paulo; Perrin, Guy; Brandner, Wolfgang; Straubmeier, Christian; Perraut, Karine

    2016-08-01

    GRAVITY acquisition camera implements four optical functions to track multiple beams of Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI): a) pupil tracker: a 2×2 lenslet images four pupil reference lasers mounted on the spiders of telescope secondary mirror; b) field tracker: images science object; c) pupil imager: reimages telescope pupil; d) aberration tracker: images a Shack-Hartmann. The estimation of beam stabilization parameters from the acquisition camera detector image is carried out, for every 0.7 s, with a dedicated data reduction software. The measured parameters are used in: a) alignment of GRAVITY with the VLTI; b) active pupil and field stabilization; c) defocus correction and engineering purposes. The instrument is now successfully operational on-sky in closed loop. The relevant data reduction and on-sky characterization results are reported.

  20. SPEIR: A Ge Compton Camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihailescu, L; Vetter, K M; Burks, M T; Hull, E L; Craig, W W

    2004-02-11

    The SPEctroscopic Imager for {gamma}-Rays (SPEIR) is a new concept of a compact {gamma}-ray imaging system of high efficiency and spectroscopic resolution with a 4-{pi} field-of-view. The system behind this concept employs double-sided segmented planar Ge detectors accompanied by the use of list-mode photon reconstruction methods to create a sensitive, compact Compton scatter camera.

  1. Graphic design of pinhole cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, H. B.; Chu, W. P.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes a graphic technique for the analysis and optimization of pinhole size and focal length. The technique is based on the use of the transfer function of optical elements described by Scott (1959) to construct the transfer function of a circular pinhole camera. This transfer function is the response of a component or system to a pattern of lines having a sinusoidally varying radiance at varying spatial frequencies. Some specific examples of graphic design are presented.

  2. Coordinated Sensing in Intelligent Camera Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Chong

    2013-01-01

    The cost and size of video sensors has led to camera networks becoming pervasive in our lives. However, the ability to analyze these images efficiently is very much a function of the quality of the acquired images. Human control of pan-tilt-zoom (PTZ) cameras is impractical and unreliable when high quality images are needed of multiple events distributed over a large area. This dissertation considers the problem of automatically controlling the fields of view of individual cameras in a camera...

  3. Optimising Camera Traps for Monitoring Small Mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Glen, Alistair S.; Stuart Cockburn; Margaret Nichols; Jagath Ekanayake; Bruce Warburton

    2013-01-01

    Practical techniques are required to monitor invasive animals, which are often cryptic and occur at low density. Camera traps have potential for this purpose, but may have problems detecting and identifying small species. A further challenge is how to standardise the size of each camera?s field of view so capture rates are comparable between different places and times. We investigated the optimal specifications for a low-cost camera trap for small mammals. The factors tested were 1) trigger s...

  4. Stereo Pinhole Camera: Assembly and experimental activities

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Gilmário Barbosa; Departamento de Ciência da Computação, Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina, Joinville; Cunha, Sidney Pinto; Centro de Tecnologia da Informação Renato Archer, Campinas

    2015-01-01

    This work describes the assembling of a stereo pinhole camera for capturing stereo-pairs of images and proposes experimental activities with it. A pinhole camera can be as sophisticated as you want, or so simple that it could be handcrafted with practically recyclable materials. This paper describes the practical use of the pinhole camera throughout history and currently. Aspects of optics and geometry involved in the building of the stereo pinhole camera are presented with illustrations. Fur...

  5. Equatorial scintillations in relation to the development of ionization anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, S.; Paul, A.; Dasgupta, A.

    2006-07-01

    The irregularities in the electron density distribution of the ionosphere over the equatorial region frequently disrupt space-based communication and navigation links by causing severe amplitude and phase scintillations of signals. Development of a specification and forecast system for scintillations is needed in view of the increased reliance on space-based communication and navigation systems, which are vulnerable to ionospheric scintillations. It has been suggested in recent years that a developed equatorial anomaly in the afternoon hours, with a steep gradient of the F-region ionization or Total Electron Content (TEC) in the region between the crest and the trough, may be taken as a precursor to scintillations on transionospheric links. Latitudinal gradient of TEC measured using Faraday Rotation technique from LEO NOAA 12/14 transmissions during the afternoon hours at Calcutta shows a highly significant association with L-band scintillations recorded on the INMARSAT link, also from Calcutta, during the equinoxes, August through October 2000, and February through April 2001. style="line-height: 20px;"> The daytime equatorial electrojet is believed to control the development of the equatorial anomaly and plays a crucial role in the subsequent development of F-region irregularities in the post-sunset hours. The diurnal maximum and integrated value (integrated from the time of onset of plasma influx to off-equatorial latitudes till local sunset) of the strength of the electrojet in the Indian longitude sector shows a significant association with post-sunset L-band scintillations recorded at Calcutta during the two equinoxes mentioned earlier. style="line-height: 20px;"> Generation of equatorial irregularities over the magnetic equator in the post-sunset hours is intimately related to the variation of the height of the F-layer around sunset. Ionosonde data from Kodaikanal, a station situated close to the magnetic equator, has been utilized to calculate the vertical

  6. Equatorial scintillations in relation to the development of ionization anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ray

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The irregularities in the electron density distribution of the ionosphere over the equatorial region frequently disrupt space-based communication and navigation links by causing severe amplitude and phase scintillations of signals. Development of a specification and forecast system for scintillations is needed in view of the increased reliance on space-based communication and navigation systems, which are vulnerable to ionospheric scintillations. It has been suggested in recent years that a developed equatorial anomaly in the afternoon hours, with a steep gradient of the F-region ionization or Total Electron Content (TEC in the region between the crest and the trough, may be taken as a precursor to scintillations on transionospheric links. Latitudinal gradient of TEC measured using Faraday Rotation technique from LEO NOAA 12/14 transmissions during the afternoon hours at Calcutta shows a highly significant association with L-band scintillations recorded on the INMARSAT link, also from Calcutta, during the equinoxes, August through October 2000, and February through April 2001. The daytime equatorial electrojet is believed to control the development of the equatorial anomaly and plays a crucial role in the subsequent development of F-region irregularities in the post-sunset hours. The diurnal maximum and integrated value (integrated from the time of onset of plasma influx to off-equatorial latitudes till local sunset of the strength of the electrojet in the Indian longitude sector shows a significant association with post-sunset L-band scintillations recorded at Calcutta during the two equinoxes mentioned earlier. Generation of equatorial irregularities over the magnetic equator in the post-sunset hours is intimately related to the variation of the height of the F-layer around sunset. Ionosonde data from Kodaikanal, a station situated close to the magnetic equator, has been utilized to calculate the vertical drift of the F-layer over the

  7. Toward a miniaturized fundus camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliss, Christine; Parel, Jean-Marie; Flynn, John T; Pratisto, Hans; Niederer, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) describes a pathological development of the retina in prematurely born children. In order to prevent severe permanent damage to the eye and enable timely treatment, the fundus of the eye in such children has to be examined according to established procedures. For these examinations, our miniaturized fundus camera is intended to allow the acquisition of wide-angle digital pictures of the fundus for on-line or off-line diagnosis and documentation. We designed two prototypes of a miniaturized fundus camera, one with graded refractive index (GRIN)-based optics, the other with conventional optics. Two different modes of illumination were compared: transscleral and transpupillary. In both systems, the size and weight of the camera were minimized. The prototypes were tested on young rabbits. The experiments led to the conclusion that the combination of conventional optics with transpupillary illumination yields the best results in terms of overall image quality. (c) 2004 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

  8. 16 CFR 501.1 - Camera film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Camera film. 501.1 Section 501.1 Commercial... 500 § 501.1 Camera film. Camera film packaged and labeled for retail sale is exempt from the net... should be expressed, provided: (a) The net quantity of contents on packages of movie film and bulk still...

  9. An Open Standard for Camera Trap Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forrester, Tavis; O'Brien, Tim; Fegraus, Eric; Jansen, P.A.; Palmer, Jonathan; Kays, Roland; Ahumada, Jorge; Stern, Beth; McShea, William

    2016-01-01

    Camera traps that capture photos of animals are a valuable tool for monitoring biodiversity. The use of camera traps is rapidly increasing and there is an urgent need for standardization to facilitate data management, reporting and data sharing. Here we offer the Camera Trap Metadata Standard as an

  10. Demonstration of a Far Infrared Streak Camera.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drabbels, M.M.J.E.; Lankhuijzen, G.M.; Noordam, L.D.

    1998-01-01

    An atomic infrared (IR) streak camera is demonstrated that operates in the mid- and far-infrared (λ = 5-85 μm), well beyond the long wavelength cutoff of conventional streak cameras. The temporal and spectral characteristics of the streak camera are determined using the FELIX free-electron laser as

  11. 21 CFR 892.1110 - Positron camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Positron camera. 892.1110 Section 892.1110 Food... DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1110 Positron camera. (a) Identification. A positron camera is a device intended to image the distribution of positron-emitting radionuclides in the body...

  12. 21 CFR 886.1120 - Opthalmic camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Opthalmic camera. 886.1120 Section 886.1120 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1120 Opthalmic camera. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic camera is an AC-powered device intended to take photographs of the eye and the surrounding area...

  13. Dosimetric characterization of the Exradin W1 plastic scintillator detector through comparison with an in-house developed scintillator system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beierholm, Anders Ravnsborg; Behrens, Claus F.; Andersen, Claus E.

    2014-01-01

    New commercial dosimetry systems need careful characterization and can benefit from the comparison with similar, in-house developed solutions. A comparison between such two dosimetry systems, both based on fibre-coupled organic plastic scintillator detectors, is presented. One system is the Exradin...... W1, fully commercialized by Standard Imaging, while the other system is the non-commercial ME40 system, developed by DTU Nutech with the aim of fundamental dosimetric research. Both systems employ plastic scintillator detectors that can be considered similar in design, calibrated using the same....... © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved...

  14. Insuficiencia renal aguda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Miyahira Arakaki

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute renal failure (ARF is a clinic syndrome characterized by decline in renal function occurring over a short time period. Is a relatively common complication in hospitalized critically ill patients and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. ARF has often a multi-factorial etiology syndrome usually approached diagnostically as pre-renal, post-renal, or intrinsic ARF. Most intrinsic ARF is caused by ischemia or nephrotoxins and is classically associated with acute tubular necrosis (ATN. High mortality is associated with severity of ARF, age more than 60 years old and presence of pulmonar and cardiovascular complications. Most patients who survive an episode of ARF recover sufficient renal function; however, 50% have subclinical functional defects in renal function or scarring on renal biopsy. ARF is irreversible in approximately 5% of patients, usually as a consequence of complete cortical necrosis. ( Rev Med Hered 2003; 14: 36-43.

  15. Relative camera localisation in non-overlapping camera networks using multiple trajectories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    John, V.; Englebienne, G.; Kröse, B.J.A.

    2012-01-01

    In this article we present an automatic camera calibration algorithm using multiple trajectories in a multiple camera network with non-overlapping field-of-views (FOV). Visible trajectories within a camera FOV are assumed to be measured with respect to the camera local co-ordinate system.

  16. Role of excitons in the energy resolution of scintillators used for medical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Jai [School of Engineering and IT, B-purple-12, Faculty of EHS, Charles Darwin University, Darwin NT 0909 (Australia)

    2010-11-01

    Theoretical investigations suggest that the nonproportionality in a scintillator is caused by the high excitation density created within the track of an X-ray or {gamma} ray photon entering in a scintillating crystal. In this paper an analytical expression for the scintillator yield is derived. For the case of BaF{sub 2} scintillator the role of excitons created within the {gamma}-ray track in the scintillator yield is studied. By comparing the results of two theories an analytical expression is also derived for an energy parameter which could otherwise only be determined by fitting the theoretical yield to the experimental data.

  17. Measurement of gamma quantum interaction point in plastic scintillator with WLS strips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smyrski, J., E-mail: smyrski@if.uj.edu.pl [Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Applied Computer Science, Jagiellonian University, S. Łojasiewicza 11, 30-348 Cracow (Poland); Alfs, D.; Bednarski, T.; Białas, P.; Czerwiński, E.; Dulski, K.; Gajos, A.; Głowacz, B.; Gupta-Sharma, N. [Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Applied Computer Science, Jagiellonian University, S. Łojasiewicza 11, 30-348 Cracow (Poland); Gorgol, M.; Jasińska, B. [Department of Nuclear Methods, Institute of Physics, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Kajetanowicz, M.; Kamińska, D.; Korcyl, G. [Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Applied Computer Science, Jagiellonian University, S. Łojasiewicza 11, 30-348 Cracow (Poland); Kowalski, P. [Świerk Computing Centre, National Centre for Nuclear Research, 05-400 Otwock-Świerk (Poland); Krzemień, W. [High Energy Department, National Centre for Nuclear Research, 05-400 Otwock-Świerk (Poland); Krawczyk, N.; Kubicz, E.; Mohammed, M.; Niedźwiecki, Sz. [Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Applied Computer Science, Jagiellonian University, S. Łojasiewicza 11, 30-348 Cracow (Poland); and others

    2017-04-11

    The feasibility of measuring the aśxial coordinate of a gamma quantum interaction point in a plastic scintillator bar via the detection of scintillation photons escaping from the scintillator with an array of wavelength-shifting (WLS) strips is demonstrated. Using a test set-up comprising a BC-420 scintillator bar and an array of sixteen BC-482A WLS strips we achieved a spatial resolution of 5 mm (σ) for annihilation photons from a {sup 22}Na isotope. The studied method can be used to improve the spatial resolution of a plastic-scintillator-based PET scanner which is being developed by the J-PET collaboration.

  18. Polarized nuclei in plastic scintillators: a new class of polarized targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brandt, B.; Bunyatova, E. I.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J. A.; Mango, S.; Nemchonok, I. B.

    2001-06-01

    Polarized scintillating targets are now routinely available: protons, deuterons or other nuclei in blocks of scintillating organic polymer, doped with the free radical TEMPO, are polarized dynamically in a field of 2.5 T in a vertical 3He-4He dilution refrigerator. A 19 mm diameter plastic lightguide transports the scintillation light from the sample in the mixing chamber to a photomultiplier outside the cryostat. Sizeable nuclear polarizations have been achieved newly in boron enriched polystyrene-based scintillating material. A scintillator target with high detection sensitivity for low energy neutrons has been so made available, in which both protons and boron nuclei are polarized. .

  19. Properties of the Ukrainian Polystyrene-Based Plastic Scintillator UPS 923A

    CERN Document Server

    Artikov, A M; Chirikov-Zorin, I E; Chokheli, D; Lyablin, M; Bellettini, G; Menzione, A; Tokar, S; Giokaris, N; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A

    2005-01-01

    The polystyrene-based scintillator UPS 923A was chosen for upgrading of the muon system for the CDF detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. Properties of this scintillator such as light output, light attenuation, long-term stability and also timing characteristics of scintillator and wavelength shifting fibers were investigated. The method for the Bulk Attenuation Length measurements of the scintillator to its own light emitted was proposed. Comparative measurements of the characteristics of the UPS 923A and the polyvinyltoluene-based scintillator NE 114 were performed. It was found that natural aging of the NE 114 was two times faster than that of the UPS 923A.

  20. Infrared scintillation: a comparison between gaseous and liquid xenon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bressi, G; Carugno, G.; Conti, E; Del Noce, C; Iannuzzi, D

    2001-01-01

    Light yield and spectrum of infrared (IR) scintillation in Xe are different in gaseous and liquid phases. In gas, the spectrum consists mainly of a broad line centered at 1300 nm. In liquid, light is emitted primarily below 1200 nm and with a lower yield. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights

  1. Complex Electronic Structure of Rare Earth Activators in Scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aberg, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Yu, S. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zhou, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-10-27

    To aid and further the understanding of the microscopic mechanisms behind the scintillator nonproportionality that leads to degradation of the attainable energy resolution, we have developed theoretical and experimental algorithms and procedures to determine the position of the 4f energy levels of rare earth dopants relative to the host band edge states.

  2. A helium gas scintillator active target for photoreaction measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Jebali, Ramsey; Annand, John R.M.; Buchanan, Emma; Gardner, Simon; Hamilton, David J.; Livingston, Kenneth; McGeorge, John C.; MacGregor, Ian J.D.; MacRae, Roderick; Reiter, Andreas J.H.; Rosner, Guenther; Sokhan, Daria; Strandberg, Bruno [University of Glasgow, School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom); Adler, Jan-Olof; Fissum, Kevin; Schroeder, Bent [University of Lund, Department of Physics, Lund (Sweden); Akkurt, Iskender [Sueleyman Demirel University, Fen-Edebiyat Faculty, Isparta (Turkey); Brudvik, Jason; Hansen, Kurt; Isaksson, Lennart; Lundin, Magnus [MAX IV Laboratory, PO Box 118, Lund (Sweden); Middleton, Duncan G. [Universitaet Tuebingen, Kepler Centre for Astro and Particle Physics, Physikalisches Institut, Tuebingen (Germany); Sjoegren, Johan [University of Glasgow, School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom); MAX IV Laboratory, PO Box 118, Lund (Sweden)

    2015-10-15

    A multi-cell He gas scintillator active target, designed for the measurement of photoreaction cross sections, is described. The target has four main chambers, giving an overall thickness of 0.103 g/cm{sup 3} at an operating pressure of 2 MPa. Scintillations are read out by photomultiplier tubes and the addition of small amounts of N{sub 2} to the He, to shift the scintillation emission from UV to visible, is discussed. First results of measurements at the MAX IV Laboratory tagged-photon facility show that the target has a timing resolution of around 1 ns and can cope well with a high-flux photon beam. The determination of reaction cross sections from target yields relies on a Monte Carlo simulation, which considers scintillation light transport, photodisintegration processes in {sup 4}He, background photon interactions in target windows and interactions of the reaction-product particles in the gas and target container. The predictions of this simulation are compared to the measured target response. (orig.)

  3. A scintillator purification system for the Borexino solar neutrino detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benziger, J.; Cadonati, L.; Calaprice, F.; Chen, M.; Corsi, A.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Fernholz, R.; Ford, R.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Harding, E.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Kidner, S.; Leung, M.; Loeser, F.; McCarty, K.; McKinsey, D.; Nelson, A.; Pocar, A.; Salvo, C.; Schimizzi, D.; Shutt, T.; Sonnenschein, A.

    2008-03-01

    Purification of the 278 tons of liquid scintillator and 889 tons of buffer shielding for the Borexino solar neutrino detector is performed with a system that combines distillation, water extraction, gas stripping, and filtration. This paper describes the principles of operation, design, and construction of that purification system, and reviews the requirements and methods to achieve system cleanliness and leak-tightness.

  4. Optimization of the light extraction from heavy inorganic scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Kronberger, Matthias; Lecoq, P

    2008-01-01

    Inorganic scintillators are widely used in modern medical imaging modalities as converter for the X- and gamma-radiation that is used to obtain information about the interior of the body. Likewise, they are applied in high-energy physics to measure the energy of particles that are produced in particle physics experiments. Their use is motivated by the very good detection efficiency of these materials for hard radiation which allows the construction of relatively compact and finely pixelised systems with a high spatial resolution. One key problem in the development of the next generation of particle detectors and medical imaging systems is the optimisation of the energy resolution of the detectors. This parameter is influenced by the statistical fluctuations of the light output of the scintillators, i.e. by the number of photons that are detected when a particle deposits its energy in the scintillator. The light output of the scintillator depends not only on the absolute number of generated photons but also on...

  5. A scintillator purification system for the Borexino solar neutrino detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benziger, J. [Chemical Engineering Department, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)], E-mail: benziger@princeton.edu; Cadonati, L.; Calaprice, F.; Chen, M.; Corsi, A.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Fernholz, R.; Ford, R.; Galbiati, C. [Physics Department, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Goretti, A. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionale di Gran Sasso (Italy); Harding, E. [Physics Department, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Ianni, Aldo [INFN, Laboratori Nazionale di Gran Sasso (Italy); Ianni, Andrea; Kidner, S.; Leung, M.; Loeser, F.; McCarty, K.; McKinsey, D.; Nelson, A.; Pocar, A. [Physics Department, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)] (and others)

    2008-03-21

    Purification of the 278 tons of liquid scintillator and 889 tons of buffer shielding for the Borexino solar neutrino detector is performed with a system that combines distillation, water extraction, gas stripping, and filtration. This paper describes the principles of operation, design, and construction of that purification system, and reviews the requirements and methods to achieve system cleanliness and leak-tightness.

  6. Event Localization in Bulk Scintillator Crystals Using Coded Apertures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziock, Klaus-Peter [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Braverman, Joshua B. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Fabris, Lorenzo [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Harrison, Mark J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hornback, Donald Eric [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Newby, Jason [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The localization of radiation interactions in bulk scintillators is generally limited by the size of the light distribution at the readout surface of the crystal/light-pipe system. By finding the centroid of the light spot, which is typically of order centimeters across, practical single-event localization is limited to ~2 mm/cm of crystal thickness. Similar resolution can also be achieved for the depth of interaction by measuring the size of the light spot. Through the use of near-field coded-aperture techniques applied to the scintillation light, light transport simulations show that for 3-cm-thick crystals, more than a five-fold improvement (millimeter spatial resolution) can be achieved both laterally and in event depth. At the core of the technique is the requirement to resolve the shadow from an optical mask placed in the scintillation light path between the crystal and the readout. In this paper, experimental results are presented that demonstrate the overall concept using a 1D shadow mask, a thin-scintillator crystal and a light pipe of varying thickness to emulate a 2.2-cm-thick crystal. Spatial resolutions of ~ 1 mm in both depth and transverse to the readout face are obtained over most of the crystal depth.

  7. Advanced Large Area Plastic Scintillator Project (ALPS): Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, David V.; Reeder, Paul L.; Todd, Lindsay C.; Warren, Glen A.; McCormick, Kathleen R.; Stephens, Daniel L.; Geelhood, Bruce D.; Alzheimer, James M.; Crowell, Shannon L.; Sliger, William A.

    2008-02-05

    The advanced Large-Area Plastic Scintillator (ALPS) Project at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory investigated possible technological avenues for substantially advancing the state-of-the-art in gamma-ray detection via large-area plastic scintillators. The three predominant themes of these investigations comprised the following: * Maximizing light collection efficiency from a single large-area sheet of plastic scintillator, and optimizing hardware event trigger definition to retain detection efficiency while exploiting the power of coincidence to suppress single-PMT "dark current" background; * Utilizing anti-Compton vetoing and supplementary spectral information from a co-located secondary, or "Back" detector, to both (1) minimize Compton background in the low-energy portion of the "Front" scintillator's pulse-height spectrum, and (2) sharpen the statistical accuracy of the front detector's low-energy response prediction as impelmented in suitable energy-windowing algorithms; and * Investigating alternative materials to enhance the intrinsic gamma-ray detection efficiency of plastic-based sensors.

  8. Rapid interstellar scintillation of quasar PKS 1257-326

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bignall, Hayley E.; Jauncey, David L.; Lovell, James E. J.; Tzioumis, Anastasios K.; Macquart, Jean-Pierre; Kedziora-Chudczer, Lucyna; Engvold, O

    2005-01-01

    PKS 1257-326 is one of three quasars known to show unusually large and rapid, intra-hour intensity variations, as a result of scintillation in the turbulent Galactic interstellar medium. We have measured time delays in the variability pattern arrival times at the VLA and the ATCA, as well as an

  9. First approach to radionuclide mixtures quantification by using plastic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarancon, A. [Departament de Quimica Analitica, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Garcia, J.F. [Departament de Pintura, Universitat de Barcelona, Pau Gargallo 4, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: jfgarcia@ub.edu; Rauret, G. [Departament de Quimica Analitica, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2007-05-08

    Recent studies have evaluated the capability of plastic scintillation (PS) as an alternative to liquid scintillation (LS) in radionuclide activity determination without mixed waste production. In order to complete the comparison, we now assess the extent to which PS can be used to quantify mixtures of radionuclides and the influence of the diameter of the plastic scintillation beads in detection efficiency. The results show that the detection efficiency decreases and the spectrum shrink to lower energies when the size of the plastic scintillation beads increases, and that the lower the energy of the beta particle, the greater the variation takes place. Similar behaviour has been observed for beta-gamma and alpha emitters. Two scenarios for the quantification of mixtures are considered, one including two radionuclides ({sup 14}C and {sup 60}Co) whose spectra do not overlap significantly, and the other including two radionuclides ({sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y), where the spectra of one the isotopes is totally overlapped by the other The calculation has been performed by using the conventional window selection procedure and a new approach in which the selected windows correspond to those with lower quantification errors. Relative errors obtained using the proposed approach (less than 10%) are lower than those of the conventional procedure, even when a radionuclide is completely overlapped, except for those samples with extreme activity ratios that were not included in the window optimization process.

  10. SNO+ Liquid Scintillator Characterization: Timing, Quenching, and Energy Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Sullivan, E., E-mail: eosullivan@owl.phy.queensu.ca [Queen' s University, Department of Physics, Stirling Hall, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Wan Chan Tseung, H.S., E-mail: hwan@uw.edu [Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, and Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Tolich, N. [Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, and Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); O' Keeffe, H.M.; Chen, M. [Queen' s University, Department of Physics, Stirling Hall, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-08-15

    This contribution describes laboratory measurements designed to investigate the optical properties of linear alkybenzene (LAB). Presented here is the measurement of the scintillation light timing profiles due to alpha and beta-particle excitation, the calculation of alpha/beta discrimination capability based on these timing distributions, and the investigation of electron energy scale.

  11. Tomography of the Solar Wind using Interplanetary Scintillation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy; Volume 21; Issue 3-4. Tomography of the Solar Wind using Interplanetary Scintillation. Divya Oberoi A. Pramesh Rao. Session XI – Solar Wind & Interplanetary Magnetic Fields Volume 21 Issue 3-4 September-December 2000 pp 445-446 ...

  12. New prototype scintillator detector for the Tibet ASγ experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Gou, Q.-B.; Cai, H.; Chen, T.-L.; Danzengluobu; Feng, C.-F.; Feng, Y.-L.; Feng, Z.-Y.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X.-J.; Guo, Y.-Q.; Guo, Y.-Y.; Hou, Y.-Y.; Hu, H.-B.; Jin, C.; Li, H.-J.; Liu, C.; Liu, M.-Y.; Qian, X.-L.; Tian, Z.; Wang, Z.; Xue, L.; Zhang, X.-Y.; Zhang, Xi-Ying

    2017-11-01

    The hybrid Tibet AS array was successfully constructed in 2014. It has 4500 m2 underground water Cherenkov pools used as the muon detector (MD) and 789 scintillator detectors covering 36900 m2 as the surface array. At 100 TeV, cosmic-ray background events can be rejected by approximately 99.99%, according to the full Monte Carlo (MC) simulation for γ-ray observations. In order to use the muon detector efficiently, we propose to extend the surface array area to 72900 m2 by adding 120 scintillator detectors around the current array to increase the effective detection area. A new prototype scintillator detector is developed via optimizing the detector geometry and its optical surface, by selecting the reflective material and adopting dynode readout. {This detector can meet our physics requirements with a positional non-uniformity of the output charge within 10% (with reference to the center of the scintillator), time resolution FWHM of ~2.2 ns, and dynamic range from 1 to 500 minimum ionization particles}.

  13. New advanced in alpha spectrometry by liquid scintillation methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDowell, W.J.; Case, G.N.

    1979-01-01

    Although the ability to count alpha particles by liquid scintillation methods has been long recognized, limited use has been made of the method because of problems of high background and alpha energy identification. In recent years some new developments in methods of introducing the alpha-emitting nuclide to the scintillator, in detector construction, and in electronics for processing the energy analog and time analog signals from the detector have allowed significant alleviation of the problems of alpha spectrometry by liquid scintillation. Energy resolutions of 200 to 300 keV full peak width at half maximum and background counts of < 0.01 counts/min with rejection with rejection of > 99% of all beta plus gamma interference is now possible. Alpha liquid scintillation spectrometry is now suitable for a wide range of applications, from the accurate quantitative determination of relatively large amounts of known nuclides in laboratory-generated samples to the detection and identification of very small, subpicocurie amounts of alpha emitters in environmental-type samples. Suitable nuclide separation procedures, sample preparation methods, and instrument configurations are available for a variety of analyses.

  14. Multisector scintillation detector with fiber-optic light collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampilogov, N. V.; Denisov, S. P.; Kokoulin, R. P.; Petrukhin, A. A.; Prokopenko, N. N.; Shulzhenko, I. A.; Unatlokov, I. B.; Yashin, I. I.

    2017-07-01

    A new type of scintillation detector for the use in high energy physics is described. The octagonal detector consists of eight triangular scintillator sectors with total area of 1 m2. Each sector represents two plates of 2 cm thick plastic scintillator. Seven 1 mm thick WLS fibers are laid evenly between the plates. The space between the fibers is filled with silicone compound to provide better light collection. Fiber ends from all eight sectors are gathered in the central part of the detector into a bunch and docked to the cathode of a FEU-115m photomultiplier. The read-out of the counter signals is carried out from 7th and 12th dynodes, providing a wide dynamic range up to about 10000 particles. The front-end electronics of the detector is based on the flash-ADC with a sampling frequency of 200 MHz. The features of detecting and recording systems of the multisector scintillation detector (MSD) and the results of its testing are discussed.

  15. Bright and ultra-fast scintillation from a semiconductor?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derenzo, Stephen E., E-mail: sederenzo@lbl.gov; Bourret-Courshesne, Edith; Bizarri, Gregory; Canning, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Semiconductor scintillators are worth studying because they include both the highest luminosities and shortest decay times of all known scintillators. Moreover, many semiconductors have the heaviest stable elements (Tl, Hg, Pb, and Bi) as a major constituent and a high ion pair yield that is proportional to the energy deposited. We review the scintillation properties of semiconductors activated by native defects, isoelectronic impurities, donors and acceptors with special emphasis on those that have exceptionally high luminosities (e.g. ZnO:Zn; ZnS:Ag, Cl; CdS:Ag, Cl) and those that have ultra-fast decay times (e.g. ZnO:Ga; CdS:In). We discuss underlying mechanisms that are consistent with these properties and the possibilities for achieving (1) 200,000 photons/MeV and 1% fwhm energy resolution for 662 keV gamma rays, (2) ultra-fast (ns) decay times and coincident resolving times of 30 ps fwhm for time-of-flight positron emission tomography, and (3) both a high luminosity and an ultra-fast decay time from the same scintillator at cryogenic temperatures.

  16. Bright and ultra-fast scintillation from a semiconductor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derenzo, Stephen E; Bourret-Courshesne, Edith; Bizarri, Gregory; Canning, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Semiconductor scintillators are worth studying because they include both the highest luminosities and shortest decay times of all known scintillators. Moreover, many semiconductors have the heaviest stable elements (Tl, Hg, Pb, Bi) as a major constituent and a high ion pair yield that is proportional to the energy deposited. We review the scintillation properties of semiconductors activated by native defects, isoelectronic impurities, donors and acceptors with special emphasis on those that have exceptionally high luminosities (e.g. ZnO:Zn, ZnS:Ag,Cl, CdS:Ag,Cl) and those that have ultra-fast decay times (e.g. ZnO:Ga; CdS:In). We discuss underlying mechanisms that are consistent with these properties and the possibilities for achieving (1) 200,000 photons/MeV and 1% fwhm energy resolution for 662 keV gamma rays, (2) ultra-fast (ns) decay times and coincident resolving times of 30 ps fwhm for time-of-flight positron emission tomography, and (3) both a high luminosity and an ultra-fast decay time from the same scintillator at cryogenic temperatures.

  17. Plastic scintillator-based hodoscope for the characterization of large ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-11-03

    Nov 3, 2016 ... Plastic scintillator-based hodoscope for the characterization of large-area resistive plate chambers. V K S KASHYAP1,2,∗, C YADAV1, S T SEHGAL1, R SEHGAL1, R G THOMAS1, L M PANT1,2 and A K MOHANTY3. 1Nuclear Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085, India.

  18. Plastic scintillator-based hodoscope for the characterization of large ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A scintillator-based hodoscope is fully operational at Nuclear Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (NPD-BARC). It was used for characterizing the resistive plate chambers (RPCs) assembled for the RE4 upgrade for the compact muon solenoid (CMS) experiment, installed during the long shut-down (LS1) ...

  19. Detection of ionospheric scintillation effects using LMD-DFA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadivaka, Raghavendra Vishnu; Paruchuri, Bhanu Priyanka; Miriyala, Sridhar; Koppireddi, Padma Raju; Devanaboyina, Venkata Ratnam

    2017-08-01

    The performance and measurement accuracy of global navigation satellite system (GNSS) receivers is greatly affected by ionospheric scintillations. Rapid amplitude and phase variations in the received GPS signal, known as ionospheric scintillation, affects the tracking of signals by GNSS receivers. Hence, there is a need to investigate the monitoring of various activities of the ionosphere and to develop a novel approach for mitigation of ionospheric scintillation effects. A method based on Local Mean Decomposition (LMD)-Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) has been proposed. The GNSS data recorded at Koneru Lakshmaiah (K L) University, Guntur, India were considered for analysis. The carrier to noise ratio (C/N0) of GNSS satellite vehicles were decomposed into several product functions (PF) using LMD to extract the intrinsic features in the signal. Scintillation noise was removed by the DFA algorithm by selecting a suitable threshold. It was observed that the performance of the proposed LMD-DFA was better than that of empirical mode decomposition (EMD)-DFA.

  20. Investigation of luminescence and scintillation properties of a ZnS-Ag/{sup 6}LiF scintillator in the 7-295 K temperature range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikhailik, V.B., E-mail: v.mikhailik@physics.ox.ac.uk [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Henry, S.; Horn, M.; Kraus, H.; Lynch, A.; Pipe, M. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-15

    The luminescence and scintillation properties of ZnS-Ag/{sup 6}LiF where studied in the 7-295 K temperature range to evaluate the suitability of the scintillator for neutron detection at very low temperature (<1 K). It is shown that decrease of temperature has little effect upon principal luminescence and scintillation characteristics of ZnS-Ag: the changes of emission intensity are small for photoexcitation and negligible for excitation with {alpha}-particles. The recombination kinetics of the scintillation decay exhibits modest shortening of the fast decay time constant, from 4.52 to 3.35 {mu}s with cooling to 10 K. It is concluded that ZnS-Ag/{sup 6}LiF is a promising scintillator for cryogenic application. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Luminescence and scintillations of ZnS-Ag/6LiF neutron scintillator are studied over 7-295 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interpretation of excitation spectra is offered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Scintillation properties exhibit little changes with cooling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnS-Ag/6LiF can be used as neutron scintillation detector at cryogenic temperatures.

  1. Development and Studies of Novel Microfabricated Radiation Hard Scintillation Detectors With High Spatial Resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Mapelli, A; Haguenauer, M; Jiguet, S; Renaud, P; Vico Triviño, N

    2011-01-01

    A new type of scintillation detector is being developed with standard microfabrication techniques. It consists of a dense array of scintillating waveguides obtained by coupling microfluidic channels filled with a liquid scintillator to photodetectors. Easy manipulation of liquid scintillators inside microfluidic devices allow their flushing, renewal, and exchange making the active medium intrinsically radiation hard. Prototype detectors have been fabricated by photostructuration of a radiation hard epoxy resin (SU-8) deposited on silicon wafers and coupled to a multi-anode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT) to read-out the scintillation light. They have been characterized by exciting the liquid scintillator in the 200 micrometers thick microchannels with electrons from a 90Sr yielding approximately 1 photoelectron per impinging Minimum Ionizing Particle (MIP). These promising results demonstrate the concept of microfluidic scintillating detection and are very encouraging for future developments.

  2. GAGG:ce single crystalline films: New perspective scintillators for electron detection in SEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, Jan; Lalinský, Ondřej; Hanuš, Martin; Onderišinová, Zuzana; Kelar, Jakub; Kučera, Miroslav

    2016-04-01

    Single crystal scintillators are frequently used for electron detection in scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We report gadolinium aluminum gallium garnet (GAGG:Ce) single crystalline films as a new perspective scintillators for the SEM. For the first time, the epitaxial garnet films were used in a practical application: the GAGG:Ce scintillator was incorporated into a SEM scintillation electron detector and it showed improved image quality. In order to prove the GAGG:Ce quality accurately, the scintillation properties were examined using electron beam excitation and compared with frequently used scintillators in the SEM. The results demonstrate excellent emission efficiency of the GAGG:Ce single crystalline films together with their very fast scintillation decay useful for demanding SEM applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Plastic scintillators with {beta}-diketone Eu complexes for high ionizing radiation detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adadurov, A.F., E-mail: adadurov@isma.kharkov.ua [Institute for Scintillating Materials, NAN of Ukraine, Lenin Avenue 60, 61001 Kharkov (Ukraine); Zhmurin, P.N.; Lebedev, V.N.; Kovalenko, V.N. [Institute for Scintillating Materials, NAN of Ukraine, Lenin Avenue 60, 61001 Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2011-10-15

    Luminescent and scintillation properties of polystyrene-based plastic scintillators with {beta}-diketone Eu complexes are investigated. A scintillator with dibenzoylmethane Eu complex containing two phenyl groups demonstrates the maximum scintillating efficiency. It is shown that plastic scintillators efficiency is dramatically decreased if {beta}-diketone derivatives contain no phenyl groups as substituents. This fact can be explained by exciplex mechanism of energy transfer from a matrix to Eu complex. - Highlights: > Fluorescent properties of polystyrene scintillators with {beta}-diketone complexes of Eu were studied. > Scintillating efficiency is increased with the number of phenyl groups in Eu complex. > This is related to exciplex mechanism of energy transfer from a polymer matrix to Eu complex.

  4. NEXT GENERATION NEUTRON SCINTILLATORS BASED ON SEMICONDUCTOR NANOSTRUCTURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai-Lin Wang

    2008-06-30

    The results reported here successfully demonstrate the technical feasibility of ZnS QDs/{sup 6}LiF/polymer composites as thermal neutron scintillators. PartTec has obtained stable ZnS QDs with a quantum yield of 17% induced by UV light, and light pulse decay lifetimes of 10-30 ns induced by both UV and neutrons. These lifetime values are much shorter than those of commercial ZnS microparticle and {sup 6}Li-glass scintillators. Clear pulse height peaks induced by neutron irradiation were seen for PartTec's ZnS nanocomposites. By adjusting the concentrations, particle size and degree of dispersion of ZnS QD/{sup 6}LiF in a PVA matrix, the light absorption and light yield of films at 420-440 nm can be optimized. PartTec's novel scintillators will replace traditional {sup 6}Li-glass and ZnS/{sup 6}LiF:Ag scintillators if the PL quantum yield can be improved above 30%, and/or increase the transparency of present nanoscintillators. Time and resources inhibited PartTec's total success in Phase I. For example, bulk doping preparations of ZnS QDs with Ag{sup +}, Eu{sup 3+} or Ce{sup 3+} QDs was impractical given those constraints, nor did they permit PartTec to measure systematically the change of PL decay lifetimes in different samples. PartTec will pursue these studies in the current proposal, as well as develop a better capping and dopant along with developing brighter and faster ZnS QD scintillators.

  5. Application of a free parameter model to plastic scintillation samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarancon Sanz, Alex, E-mail: alex.tarancon@ub.edu [Departament de Quimica Analitica, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Kossert, Karsten, E-mail: Karsten.Kossert@ptb.de [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2011-08-21

    In liquid scintillation (LS) counting, the CIEMAT/NIST efficiency tracing method and the triple-to-double coincidence ratio (TDCR) method have proved their worth for reliable activity measurements of a number of radionuclides. In this paper, an extended approach to apply a free-parameter model to samples containing a mixture of solid plastic scintillation microspheres and radioactive aqueous solutions is presented. Several beta-emitting radionuclides were measured in a TDCR system at PTB. For the application of the free parameter model, the energy loss in the aqueous phase must be taken into account, since this portion of the particle energy does not contribute to the creation of scintillation light. The energy deposit in the aqueous phase is determined by means of Monte Carlo calculations applying the PENELOPE software package. To this end, great efforts were made to model the geometry of the samples. Finally, a new geometry parameter was defined, which was determined by means of a tracer radionuclide with known activity. This makes the analysis of experimental TDCR data of other radionuclides possible. The deviations between the determined activity concentrations and reference values were found to be lower than 3%. The outcome of this research work is also important for a better understanding of liquid scintillation counting. In particular the influence of (inverse) micelles, i.e. the aqueous spaces embedded in the organic scintillation cocktail, can be investigated. The new approach makes clear that it is important to take the energy loss in the aqueous phase into account. In particular for radionuclides emitting low-energy electrons (e.g. M-Auger electrons from {sup 125}I), this effect can be very important.

  6. Metal-loaded liquid scintillators for neutrino experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Minfang; Williamson, Yuping; Hahn, Richard L.

    2008-11-01

    After the first direct observation of neutrino flavor transformations at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, future planned neutrino experiments are focusing on the understanding of the neutrino oscillation mechanism by determining key neutrino parameters, such as the mass differences and mass hierarchy, the mixing angles, and the possibility of CP violation. Organic liquid scintillators (LS) have been the detection medium of choice for neutrinos since the early discovery experiment of Reines and Cowan. For the delayed neutron-capture signal following antineutrino capture, the advantages of adding a metallic element to the LS (to form M-LS) are significant. Chemically, there are challenges to adding inorganic salts of metal directly to the LS. Key aspects of the metal-loaded LS for neutrino detection are (a) long-term chemical stability, (b) high optical transparency, (c) high photon production by the LS, and (d) ultra-low impurity content, mainly of natural radioactive contaminants, such as U, Th, Ra, and Rn. The BNL Neutrino & Nuclear Chemistry group has a long history of neutrino research since Ray Davis's pioneering Homestake experiment. The group has developed new chemical techniques of loading metals, such as In, Yb, Gd, Nd, and currently Li and other low-Z elements, in organic liquid scintillator that can be used for low-energy solar neutrino, reactor antineutrino, terrestrial antineutrino or double-beta decay experiments. Metals at different concentrations in a series of liquid scintillators have been studied systematically at BNL. We have successfully prepared many metal-doped scintillators, with long attenuation lengths (10-15 m) and high light yields. These have been stable for long period of time since synthesis (>2 years for Gd-LS and Nd-LS, and >3 years for In-LS), a crucial characteristic in experiments that are planned to run for at least 3 years. Our chemical-doping technologies and the performance of different organometallic liquid scintillators for

  7. Accelerated Aging Test for Plastic Scintillator Gamma Ray Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouzes, Richard T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-05-12

    Polyvinyl toluene (PVT) and polystyrene (PS), collectively referred to as “plastic scintillator,” are synthetic polymer materials used to detect gamma radiation, and are commonly used in instrumentation. Recent studies have revealed that plastic scintillator undergoes an environmentally related material degradation that adversely affects performance under certain conditions and histories. A significant decrease in gamma ray sensitivity has been seen in some detectors in systems as they age. The degradation of sensitivity of plastic scintillator over time is due to a variety of factors, and the term “aging” is used to encompass all factors. Some plastic scintillator samples show no aging effects (no significant change in sensitivity over more than 10 years), while others show severe aging (significant change in sensitivity in less than 5 years). Aging effects arise from weather (variations in heat and humidity), chemical exposure, mechanical stress, light exposure, and loss of volatile components. The damage produced by these various causes can be cumulative, causing observable damage to increase over time. Damage may be reversible up to some point, but becomes permanent under some conditions. It has been demonstrated that exposure of plastic scintillator in an environmental chamber to 30 days of high temperature and humidity (90% relative humidity and 55°C) followed by a single cycle to cold temperature (-30°C) will produce severe fogging in all PVT samples. This thermal cycle will be referred to as the “Accelerated Aging Test.” This document describes the procedure for performing this Accelerated Aging Test.

  8. Characterization of the Series 1000 Camera System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimbrough, J; Moody, J; Bell, P; Landen, O

    2004-04-07

    The National Ignition Facility requires a compact network addressable scientific grade CCD camera for use in diagnostics ranging from streak cameras to gated x-ray imaging cameras. Due to the limited space inside the diagnostic, an analog and digital input/output option in the camera controller permits control of both the camera and the diagnostic by a single Ethernet link. The system consists of a Spectral Instruments Series 1000 camera, a PC104+ controller, and power supply. The 4k by 4k CCD camera has a dynamic range of 70 dB with less than 14 electron read noise at a 1MHz readout rate. The PC104+ controller includes 16 analog inputs, 4 analog outputs and 16 digital input/output lines for interfacing to diagnostic instrumentation. A description of the system and performance characterization is reported.

  9. Beta-adrenergic blocking drugs and renal function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walters, L.; Dormehl, I. (Nuclear Development Corp. of South Africa (Pty.) Ltd., Pelindaba, Pretoria. Inst. of Life Sciences); Goosen, D.J.; Avenant, J.C.; Du Plessis, M.; Jacobs, N.; Schoeman, H.S.

    1983-10-01

    A baboon model was used to investigate the effects of atenolol, nadolol, sotalol and labetalol on renal function. The glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and renal blood flow (RBF) were measured, using radionuclides and a gamma camera, before and after 1 week's oral administration of these drugs. All the drugs caused an increase in the GFR, but this reached statistical significance only in the cases of sotalol (P smaller than 0,025) and labetalol (0,05 smaller than P smaller than 0,10). The RBF was not significantly changed, although it decreased in all cases.

  10. Refractory anemia leading to renal hemosiderosis and renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddappa, Sujatha; Mythri, K M; Kowsalya, R; Parekh, Ashish

    2011-01-01

    Renal hemosiderosis is a rare cause of renal failure and, as a result, may not be diagnosed unless a detailed history, careful interpretation of blood parameters and renal biopsy with special staining is done. Here, we present a rare case of renal hemosiderosis presenting with renal failure.

  11. Refractory anemia leading to renal hemosiderosis and renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujatha Siddappa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal hemosiderosis is a rare cause of renal failure and, as a result, may not be diagnosed unless a detailed history, careful interpretation of blood parameters and renal biopsy with special staining is done. Here, we present a rare case of renal hemosiderosis presenting with renal failure.

  12. Salvageability of renal function following renal revascularisation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tion for the aortic arch and its branches.[1,2] It is ... Renal artery revascularisation procedures are usually carried out on children with renal artery stenosis from varied causes, including ... Salvageability of renal function in children who underwent renal revascularisation for Takayasu's arteritisinduced renal artery stenosis ...

  13. [Study of scintillating luminescence spectra of lead tungstate scintillation crystal doped with ions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, You-bao; Wu, Yu-rong; Zhang, Jian-xin; Yang, Pei-zhi; Xiao, Lin-rong; Yang, Hui

    2009-09-01

    The light yield of the as-grown PbWO4, annealed PbWO4 and BaF2:PbWO4 crystals were raised by utilizing our improved crystal growth instrument and technique. Their scintillating properties including transmittance, decay time and light yield were studied. Results reveal that the scintillating performances of the crystals were improved evidently by using the crystal annealing technique and the ions doping technique, especially the negative ions doping technique. The influence results of the two techniques are different. The ions doping technique raises their transmittance intensity in the whole measuring wavelength range. But the influence of annealing PbWO4 crystal on their transmittance is complicated. It improves its transmittance intensity at the wavelength above 360 nm, but weakens the transmittance intensity of the annealed PbWO4 crystal in the wavelength range from 320 to 360 nm. These phenomena should be related to the crystal defects which have absorption peaks in this wavelength range, especially for V(Pb)3+ defect which has characterized absorption peaks in this wavelength range. Also, the absorption of the defects influences the character of the decay time of these crystals. The big defect concentration relates to the short decay time. It should be mentioned that the ions doping technique reduces the defect content in the crystal, which is beneficial to the high transmittance intensity but induces slightly longer decay time than that of as-grown crystal and well annealed PbWO4 crystal. Also, the ions doping technique of the F- ion doped crystal leads to high light yield. The annealing technique and ions doping technique improve the light yield of crystals. The light yield of BaF2:PbWO4 reaches 65 p.e./MeV, which is near to the requirement of PET. The good result is related to the degeneration of the [WO4]2- tetrahedron induced by the F- occupying the O2- site in the crystal cell.

  14. Iterative reconstruction of SiPM light response functions in a square-shaped compact gamma camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, A.; Alves, F.; Marcos, J.; Martins, R.; Pereira, L.; Solovov, V.; Chepel, V.

    2017-05-01

    Compact gamma cameras with a square-shaped monolithic scintillator crystal and an array of silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are actively being developed for applications in areas such as small animal imaging, cancer diagnostics and radiotracer guided surgery. Statistical methods of position reconstruction, which are potentially superior to the traditional centroid method, require accurate knowledge of the spatial response of each photomultiplier. Using both Monte Carlo simulations and experimental data obtained with a camera prototype, we show that the spatial response of all photomultipliers (light response functions) can be parameterized with axially symmetric functions obtained iteratively from flood field irradiation data. The study was performed with a camera prototype equipped with a 30  ×  30  ×  2 mm3 LYSO crystal and an 8  ×  8 array of SiPMs for 140 keV gamma rays. The simulations demonstrate that the images, reconstructed with the maximum likelihood method using the response obtained with the iterative approach, exhibit only minor distortions: the average difference between the reconstructed and the true positions in X and Y directions does not exceed 0.2 mm in the central area of 22  ×  22 mm2 and 0.4 mm at the periphery of the camera. A similar level of image distortions is shown experimentally with the camera prototype.

  15. Development of a single-photon-counting camera with use of a triple-stacked micro-channel plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Naruomi; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Katafuchi, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    At the quantum-mechanical level, all substances (not merely electromagnetic waves such as light and X-rays) exhibit wave–particle duality. Whereas students of radiation science can easily understand the wave nature of electromagnetic waves, the particle (photon) nature may elude them. Therefore, to assist students in understanding the wave–particle duality of electromagnetic waves, we have developed a photon-counting camera that captures single photons in two-dimensional images. As an image intensifier, this camera has a triple-stacked micro-channel plate (MCP) with an amplification factor of 10(6). The ultra-low light of a single photon entering the camera is first converted to an electron through the photoelectric effect on the photocathode. The electron is intensified by the triple-stacked MCP and then converted to a visible light distribution, which is measured by a high-sensitivity complementary metal oxide semiconductor image sensor. Because it detects individual photons, the photon-counting camera is expected to provide students with a complete understanding of the particle nature of electromagnetic waves. Moreover, it measures ultra-weak light that cannot be detected by ordinary low-sensitivity cameras. Therefore, it is suitable for experimental research on scintillator luminescence, biophoton detection, and similar topics.

  16. Recurrent renal giant leiomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öziş, Salih Erpulat; Gülpınar, Kamil; Şahlı, Zafer; Konak, Baha Burak; Keskin, Mete; Özdemir, Süleyman; Ataoğlu, Ömür

    2016-01-01

    Primary renal leiomyosarcomas are rare, aggressive tumors. They constitute 1-2% of adult malignant renal tumors. Although leiomyosarcomas are the most common histological type (50-60%) of renal sarcomas, information on renal leiomyosarcoma is limited. Local or systemic recurrences are common. The radiological appearance of renal leiomyosarcomas is not specific, therefore renal leiomyosarcoma cannot be distinguished from renal cell carcinoma by imaging methods in all patients. A 74-year-old female patient presented to our clinic complaining of a palpable mass on the right side of her abdomen in November 2012. The abdominal magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass, 25 × 24 × 23 cm in size. Her past medical history revealed that she has undergone right radical nephrectomy in 2007, due to a 11 × 12 × 13 cm renal mass that was then reported as renal cell carcinoma on abdominal magnetic resonance imaging, but the pathological diagnosis was low-grade renal leiomyosarcoma. The most recent follow-up of the patient was in 2011, with no signs of local recurrence or distant metastases within this four-year period. The patient underwent laparotomy on November 2012, and a 35 cm retroperitoneal mass was excised. The pathological examination of the mass was reported as high-grade leiomyosarcoma. The formation of this giant retroperitoneal mass in 1 year can be explained by the transformation of the lesion's pathology from low-grade to a high-grade tumor.

  17. Excellent pulse height uniformity response of a new LaBr{sub 3}:Ce scintillation crystal for gamma ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pani, R., E-mail: roberto.pani@uniroma1.it [Department of Molecular Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome (Italy); Cinti, M.N.; Fabbri, A. [Department of Molecular Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome (Italy); Orlandi, C. [Department of Molecular Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome (Italy); Medical Physics Post Graduate School, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome (Italy); Pellegrini, R.; Scafè, R. [Department of Molecular Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome (Italy); Colarieti-Tosti, M. [KTH, School of Technology and Health (Sweden)

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear Medicine SPECT imaging is taking on new challenges, regarding the improvement of quality and contrast of images. In order to reach this goal, energy resolution and Compton rejection capability have to be enhanced. For detectors based on scintillation crystal, the choice of a scintillator with high light yield is suitable; recently one of the major candidates is Lanthanum Tri-Bromide (LaBr{sub 3}:Ce), with its high 63,000 ph/MeV light yield. Unfortunately, LaBr{sub 3}:Ce suffers size limitations due to the actual growth techniques (maximum 3 in. diameter) and has also elevated cost. For these reasons, great interest is shown on small field of view detectors based on LaBr{sub 3}:Ce, thought for imaging of specific physiological process or organ. To improve energy resolution, continuous crystals are more appropriate instead than pixelated ones. Since in a continuous crystal a decrease in position linearity, due to the light reflections, is typically obtained at the edges, an absorbent treatment of surfaces is generally utilized for SPECT applications. On the other hand, light absorption causes a relevant degradation of local energy resolution and pulse height uniformity response, affecting local image contrast. In this work an analysis on a new continuous LaBr{sub 3}:Ce scintillation crystal with size proper to a small field of view gamma imager but with reflective treatment of surfaces is presented. This leads up to outstanding overall and local energy resolution results and excellent pulse height uniformity response on the whole field of view. Furthermore, preliminary imaging results are satisfactory, compared to the ones from a scintillation crystal with absorbent edges. - Highlights: • Small FOV gamma camera based on LaBr{sub 3}:Ce is presented. • A new continuous LaBr{sub 3}:Ce for imaging but with reflective surfaces is proposed. • The reflective surfaces lead up to outstanding ER results on the whole FOV. • Excellent pulse height uniformity

  18. Robot Tracer with Visual Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbar Lubis, Abdul; Dwi Lestari, Yuyun; Dafitri, Haida; Azanuddin

    2017-12-01

    Robot is a versatile tool that can function replace human work function. The robot is a device that can be reprogrammed according to user needs. The use of wireless networks for remote monitoring needs can be utilized to build a robot that can be monitored movement and can be monitored using blueprints and he can track the path chosen robot. This process is sent using a wireless network. For visual robot using high resolution cameras to facilitate the operator to control the robot and see the surrounding circumstances.

  19. Production of Inorganic Thin Scintillating Films for Ion Beam Monitoring Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Re, Maurizio; Cosentino, Luigi; Cuttone, Giacomo; Finocchiaro, Paolo; Hermanne, Alex; Lojacono, Pietro A; Ma, YingJun; Thienpont, Hugo; Van Erps, Jurgen; Vervaeke, Michael; Volckaerts, Bart; Vynck, Pedro

    2005-01-01

    In this work we present the development of beam monitoring devices consisting of thin CsI(Tl) films deposited on Aluminium support layers. The light emitted by the scintillating layer during the beam irradiation is measured by a CCD-camera. In a first prototype a thin Aluminium support layer of 6 micron allows the ion beam to easily pass through without significant energy loss and scattering effects. Therefore it turns out to be a non-destructive monitoring device to characterize on-line beam shape and beam position without interfering with the rest of the irradiation process. A second device consists of an Aluminium support layer which is thick enough to completely stop the impinging ions allowing to monitor at the same time the beam profile and the beam current intensity. Some samples have been coated by a 100 Å protective layer to prevent the film damage by atmosphere exposition. In this contribution we present our experimental results obtained by irradiating the samples with proton beams at 8.3 and 62 Me...

  20. Imaging of renal osteodystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jevtic, V. E-mail: vladimir.jevtic@mf.uni-lj.si

    2003-05-01

    Chronic renal insufficiency, hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, renal transplantation and administration of different medications provoke complex biochemical disturbances of the calcium-phosphate metabolism with wide spectrum of bone and soft tissue abnormalities termed renal osteodystrophy. Clinically most important manifestation of renal bone disease includes secondary hyperparathyroidism, osteomalacia/rickets, osteoporosis, adynamic bone disease and soft tissue calcification. As a complication of long-term hemodialysis and renal transplantation amyloid deposition, destructive spondyloarthropathy, osteonecrosis, and musculoskeletal infections may occur. Due to more sophisticated diagnostic methods and more efficient treatment classical radiographic features of secondary hyperparathyroidism and osteomalacia/rickets are now less frequently seen. Radiological investigations play an important role in early diagnosis and follow-up of the renal bone disease. Although numerous new imaging modalities have been introduced in clinical practice (scintigraphy, CT, MRI, quantitative imaging), plain film radiography, especially fine quality hand radiograph, still represents most widely used examination.

  1. Human tracking over camera networks: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Li; Wan, Wanggen; Hwang, Jenq-Neng; Muhammad, Rizwan; Yang, Mingyang; Han, Kang

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, automated human tracking over camera networks is getting essential for video surveillance. The tasks of tracking human over camera networks are not only inherently challenging due to changing human appearance, but also have enormous potentials for a wide range of practical applications, ranging from security surveillance to retail and health care. This review paper surveys the most widely used techniques and recent advances for human tracking over camera networks. Two important functional modules for the human tracking over camera networks are addressed, including human tracking within a camera and human tracking across non-overlapping cameras. The core techniques of human tracking within a camera are discussed based on two aspects, i.e., generative trackers and discriminative trackers. The core techniques of human tracking across non-overlapping cameras are then discussed based on the aspects of human re-identification, camera-link model-based tracking and graph model-based tracking. Our survey aims to address existing problems, challenges, and future research directions based on the analyses of the current progress made toward human tracking techniques over camera networks.

  2. Using DSLR cameras in digital holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hincapié-Zuluaga, Diego; Herrera-Ramírez, Jorge; García-Sucerquia, Jorge

    2017-08-01

    In Digital Holography (DH), the size of the bidimensional image sensor to record the digital hologram, plays a key role on the performance of this imaging technique; the larger the size of the camera sensor, the better the quality of the final reconstructed image. Scientific cameras with large formats are offered in the market, but their cost and availability limit their use as a first option when implementing DH. Nowadays, DSLR cameras provide an easy-access alternative that is worthwhile to be explored. The DSLR cameras are a wide, commercial, and available option that in comparison with traditional scientific cameras, offer a much lower cost per effective pixel over a large sensing area. However, in the DSLR cameras, with their RGB pixel distribution, the sampling of information is different to the sampling in monochrome cameras usually employed in DH. This fact has implications in their performance. In this work, we discuss why DSLR cameras are not extensively used for DH, taking into account the problem reported by different authors of object replication. Simulations of DH using monochromatic and DSLR cameras are presented and a theoretical deduction for the replication problem using the Fourier theory is also shown. Experimental results of DH implementation using a DSLR camera show the replication problem.

  3. Optimising camera traps for monitoring small mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair S Glen

    Full Text Available Practical techniques are required to monitor invasive animals, which are often cryptic and occur at low density. Camera traps have potential for this purpose, but may have problems detecting and identifying small species. A further challenge is how to standardise the size of each camera's field of view so capture rates are comparable between different places and times. We investigated the optimal specifications for a low-cost camera trap for small mammals. The factors tested were 1 trigger speed, 2 passive infrared vs. microwave sensor, 3 white vs. infrared flash, and 4 still photographs vs. video. We also tested a new approach to standardise each camera's field of view. We compared the success rates of four camera trap designs in detecting and taking recognisable photographs of captive stoats (Mustelaerminea, feral cats (Felis catus and hedgehogs (Erinaceuseuropaeus. Trigger speeds of 0.2-2.1 s captured photographs of all three target species unless the animal was running at high speed. The camera with a microwave sensor was prone to false triggers, and often failed to trigger when an animal moved in front of it. A white flash produced photographs that were more readily identified to species than those obtained under infrared light. However, a white flash may be more likely to frighten target animals, potentially affecting detection probabilities. Video footage achieved similar success rates to still cameras but required more processing time and computer memory. Placing two camera traps side by side achieved a higher success rate than using a single camera. Camera traps show considerable promise for monitoring invasive mammal control operations. Further research should address how best to standardise the size of each camera's field of view, maximise the probability that an animal encountering a camera trap will be detected, and eliminate visible or audible cues emitted by camera traps.

  4. Esvaziamento gástrico nos pacientes com insuficiência renal crônica submetidos à hemodiálise Gastric emptying study in patients with chronic renal failure on hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunice Sizue Hirata

    2008-09-01

    treatment. METHOD: Thirty one subjects (18-60 y were studied, 14 on hemodialysis for at least 6 months and 17 healthy subjects. Patients with diabetes, amyloidosis, collagenous disease, pregnant, dyspeptic complaints , gastric surgery and patients taking procinetics drugs were excluded. Gastric emptying was investigated with radionuclide scintigraphy, using a dual-head scintillation camera. The standard test meal consisted of 185 MBq of technetium-99m sulfur colloid mixed with three scrambled eggs. For each study group a time-activity curve of gastric retention was generated and from that the T½ of gastric emptying was obtained. RESULTS: The groups were similar both in gender and age. There was no significant statistical difference in total retention curves between the two studied groups. Also the T½ of gastric emptying was similar in the two groups. CONCLUSION: Gastric emptying of patients on hemodialysis treatment for at least 6 months was not different from the health subjects.

  5. Development and calibration of a new gamma camera detector using large square Photomultiplier Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeraatkar, N.; Sajedi, S.; Teimourian Fard, B.; Kaviani, S.; Akbarzadeh, A.; Farahani, M. H.; Sarkar, S.; Ay, M. R.

    2017-09-01

    Large area scintillation detectors applied in gamma cameras as well as Single Photon Computed Tomography (SPECT) systems, have a major role in in-vivo functional imaging. Most of the gamma detectors utilize hexagonal arrangement of Photomultiplier Tubes (PMTs). In this work we applied large square-shaped PMTs with row/column arrangement and positioning. The Use of large square PMTs reduces dead zones in the detector surface. However, the conventional center of gravity method for positioning may not introduce an acceptable result. Hence, the digital correlated signal enhancement (CSE) algorithm was optimized to obtain better linearity and spatial resolution in the developed detector. The performance of the developed detector was evaluated based on NEMA-NU1-2007 standard. The acquired images using this method showed acceptable uniformity and linearity comparing to three commercial gamma cameras. Also the intrinsic and extrinsic spatial resolutions with low-energy high-resolution (LEHR) collimator at 10 cm from surface of the detector were 3.7 mm and 7.5 mm, respectively. The energy resolution of the camera was measured 9.5%. The performance evaluation demonstrated that the developed detector maintains image quality with a reduced number of used PMTs relative to the detection area.

  6. Calcified renal oncocytoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasserman, N.F. (Veterans Administration, Minneapolis, MN); Ewing, S.L.

    1983-10-01

    Renal oncocytoma, a neoplasm thought to derive from cells of the proximal convoluted tubules, exhibits benign clinical features. Its preoperative distinction from typical renal cell carcinoma would enable the surgeon to perform a more limited procedure. In a patient who is a poor operative candidate, surgery might be deferred. However, preoperative diagnosis has been elusive. A rare case of bilateral renal oncocytoma is reported. One of these tumors represents the first reported oncocytoma showing radiologically demonstrable calcification.

  7. Thrombospondin in Renal Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hugo, Christian; Daniel, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Thrombospondins (TSPs) are multifunctional matricellular glycoproteins which are involved in the regulation of angiogenesis, proliferation, apoptosis, the NO-cGMP-dependent protein kinase pathway and transforming growth factor (TGF) _ activation. The TSP family consists of 5 members, but currently only data on effects of TSP-1 and TSP-2 in renal disease are available. Both TSPs are hardly expressed within the healthy renal cortex and can be upregulated during renal disease. Using different an...

  8. Lithium and Renal Impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, René Ernst; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Nolen, Willem A

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Lithium is established as an effective treatment of mania, of depression in bipolar and unipolar disorder, and in maintenance treatment of these disorders. However, due to the necessity of monitoring and concerns about irreversible adverse effects, in particular renal impairment......, after long-term use, lithium might be underutilized. METHODS: This study reviewed 6 large observational studies addressing the risk of impaired renal function associated with lithium treatment and methodological issues impacting interpretation of results. RESULTS: An increased risk of renal impairment...

  9. Incidental renal neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabjerg, Maj; Mikkelsen, Minne Nedergaard; Walter, Steen

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of associations between tumor size, pathological stage, histological subtype and tumor grade in incidentally detected renal cell carcinoma vs symptomatic renal cell carcinoma, we discussed the need for a screening program of renal cell carcinoma in Denmark. We analyzed a consecutive...... series of 204 patients with renal tumors in 2011 and 2012. The tumors were classified according to detection mode: symptomatic and incidental and compared to pathological parameters. Eighty-nine patients (44%) were symptomatic, 113 (55%) were incidental. Information was not available in two patients...

  10. Spontaneous renal artery dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Santhosh G; Pillai, Unnikrishnan; Vaidyan, Philip B; Ishiyama, Takaaki

    2010-01-01

    Isolated spontaneous dissection of renal arteries or its branches are extremely rare. Most cases of renal artery dissection are associated with underlying pathology of the renal arteries. We report a case of spontaneous dissection of the left main renal artery and infarction of the left kidney with positive antiphospholipid antibody. Extensive work up of the patient including imaging studies confirmed the diagnosis of SRAD. Antiphospholipid antibodies may have a role in the pathogenesis of arterial dissection by causing endothelial dysfunction. This is a first literature report.

  11. Atheroembolic renal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... risk factors for atherosclerosis, including age, male gender, cigarette smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes. Alternative Names Renal disease - atheroembolic; Cholesterol embolization syndrome; Atheroemboli - ...

  12. Primary renal angiosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osmar E. Souza

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Primary renal Angiosarcoma is a rare neoplasm and only 24 cases have been reported in specialized literature. We describe a case of primary renal angiosarcoma in a patient presenting with hematuria, palpable abdominal mass, left flank pain and anemia. A computerized tomography of the abdomen with contrast medium showed a tumor with 15 cm diameter, in the upper pole of the left kidney, with a low-density central area, suggesting necrosis or hemorrhage. Diagnosis was given in a morphologic base and proven by an immunohistochemical study. Primary renal angiosarcoma should be included among differential diagnosis of retroperitoneal hematoma and hemorrhagic renal tumors.

  13. GPS TEC, scintillation and cycle slips observed at high latitudes during solar minimum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Prikryl

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available High-latitude irregularities can impair the operation of GPS-based devices by causing fluctuations of GPS signal amplitude and phase, also known as scintillation. Severe scintillation events lead to losses of phase lock, which result in cycle slips. We have used data from the Canadian High Arctic Ionospheric Network (CHAIN to measure amplitude and phase scintillation from L1 GPS signals and total electron content (TEC from L1 and L2 GPS signals to study the relative role that various high-latitude irregularity generation mechanisms have in producing scintillation. In the first year of operation during the current solar minimum the amplitude scintillation has remained very low but events of strong phase scintillation have been observed. We have found, as expected, that auroral arc and substorm intensifications as well as cusp region dynamics are strong sources of phase scintillation and potential cycle slips. In addition, we have found clear seasonal and universal time dependencies of TEC and phase scintillation over the polar cap region. A comparison with radio instruments from the Canadian GeoSpace Monitoring (CGSM network strongly suggests that the polar cap scintillation and TEC variations are associated with polar cap patches which we therefore infer to be main contributors to scintillation-causing irregularities in the polar cap.

  14. Probing Cherenkov and Scintillation Light Separation for Next-Generation Neutrino Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaca, J.; Descamps, F. B.; Land, B. J.; Orebi Gann, G. D.; Wallig, J.; Yeh, M.

    2017-09-01

    The ability to separate Cherenkov and scintillation signals in liquid scintillator detectors would enable outstanding background rejection for next-generation neutrino experiments. Reconstruction of directional information, ring imaging, and sub-Cherenkov threshold detection all have the potential to substantially improve particle and event identification. The Cherenkov-Scintillation Separation (CHESS) experiment uses an array of small, fast photomultipliers (PMTs) and state-of-the-art electronics to demonstrate the reconstruction of a Cherenkov ring in a scintillation medium based on photon hit times and detected charge. This setup has been used to characterize the ability to detect Cherenkov light in a range of target media. We show results with pure organic scintillator (LAB) and the prospects with scintillators with a secondary fluor (LAB/PPO). There are future plans to deploy the newly developed water-based liquid scintillator, a medium with a higher Cherenkov/Scintillation light yield ratio than conventional pure liquid scintillators, enhancing the visibility of the less abundant Cherenkov light in the presence of scintillation light. These results can inform the development of future large-scale detectors, such as the proposed Theia experiment, or other large detectors at underground laboratories such as the far-site of the new Long Baseline Neutrino Facility at the Sanford Underground Research Facility. CHESS detector calibrations and commissioning will be discussed, and the latest results will be presented.

  15. Renal cell carcinoma in patient with crossed fused renal ectopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Cakmak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary renal cell carcinomas have rarely been reported in patients with crossed fused renal ectopia. We presented a patient with right to left crossed fused kidney harbouring renal tumor. The most frequent tumor encountered in crossed fused renal ectopia is renal cell carcinoma. In this case, partial nephrectomy was performed which pave way to preservation of the uninvolved both renal units. Due to unpredictable anatomy, careful preoperative planning and meticulous delineation of renal vasculature is essential for preservation of the uninvolved renal units.

  16. High Speed Digital Camera Technology Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Sandra D.

    2009-01-01

    A High Speed Digital Camera Technology Review (HSD Review) is being conducted to evaluate the state-of-the-shelf in this rapidly progressing industry. Five HSD cameras supplied by four camera manufacturers participated in a Field Test during the Space Shuttle Discovery STS-128 launch. Each camera was also subjected to Bench Tests in the ASRC Imaging Development Laboratory. Evaluation of the data from the Field and Bench Tests is underway. Representatives from the imaging communities at NASA / KSC and the Optical Systems Group are participating as reviewers. A High Speed Digital Video Camera Draft Specification was updated to address Shuttle engineering imagery requirements based on findings from this HSD Review. This draft specification will serve as the template for a High Speed Digital Video Camera Specification to be developed for the wider OSG imaging community under OSG Task OS-33.

  17. Computational imaging for miniature cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salahieh, Basel

    Miniature cameras play a key role in numerous imaging applications ranging from endoscopy and metrology inspection devices to smartphones and head-mount acquisition systems. However, due to the physical constraints, the imaging conditions, and the low quality of small optics, their imaging capabilities are limited in terms of the delivered resolution, the acquired depth of field, and the captured dynamic range. Computational imaging jointly addresses the imaging system and the reconstructing algorithms to bypass the traditional limits of optical systems and deliver better restorations for various applications. The scene is encoded into a set of efficient measurements which could then be computationally decoded to output a richer estimate of the scene as compared with the raw images captured by conventional imagers. In this dissertation, three task-based computational imaging techniques are developed to make low-quality miniature cameras capable of delivering realistic high-resolution reconstructions, providing full-focus imaging, and acquiring depth information for high dynamic range objects. For the superresolution task, a non-regularized direct superresolution algorithm is developed to achieve realistic restorations without being penalized by improper assumptions (e.g., optimizers, priors, and regularizers) made in the inverse problem. An adaptive frequency-based filtering scheme is introduced to upper bound the reconstruction errors while still producing more fine details as compared with previous methods under realistic imaging conditions. For the full-focus imaging task, a computational depth-based deconvolution technique is proposed to bring a scene captured by an ordinary fixed-focus camera to a full-focus based on a depth-variant point spread function prior. The ringing artifacts are suppressed on three levels: block tiling to eliminate boundary artifacts, adaptive reference maps to reduce ringing initiated by sharp edges, and block-wise deconvolution or

  18. The Mars Science Laboratory Engineering Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, J.; Thiessen, D.; Pourangi, A.; Kobzeff, P.; Litwin, T.; Scherr, L.; Elliott, S.; Dingizian, A.; Maimone, M.

    2012-09-01

    NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover is equipped with a set of 12 engineering cameras. These cameras are build-to-print copies of the Mars Exploration Rover cameras described in Maki et al. (J. Geophys. Res. 108(E12): 8071, 2003). Images returned from the engineering cameras will be used to navigate the rover on the Martian surface, deploy the rover robotic arm, and ingest samples into the rover sample processing system. The Navigation cameras (Navcams) are mounted to a pan/tilt mast and have a 45-degree square field of view (FOV) with a pixel scale of 0.82 mrad/pixel. The Hazard Avoidance Cameras (Hazcams) are body-mounted to the rover chassis in the front and rear of the vehicle and have a 124-degree square FOV with a pixel scale of 2.1 mrad/pixel. All of the cameras utilize a 1024×1024 pixel detector and red/near IR bandpass filters centered at 650 nm. The MSL engineering cameras are grouped into two sets of six: one set of cameras is connected to rover computer "A" and the other set is connected to rover computer "B". The Navcams and Front Hazcams each provide similar views from either computer. The Rear Hazcams provide different views from the two computers due to the different mounting locations of the "A" and "B" Rear Hazcams. This paper provides a brief description of the engineering camera properties, the locations of the cameras on the vehicle, and camera usage for surface operations.

  19. Movement-based Interaction in Camera Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Eva; Riisgaard Hansen, Thomas; Lykke-Olesen, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present three concepts that address movement-based interaction using camera tracking. Based on our work with several movement-based projects we present four selected applications, and use these applications to leverage our discussion, and to describe our three main concepts space......, relations, and feedback. We see these as central for describing and analysing movement-based systems using camera tracking and we show how these three concepts can be used to analyse other camera tracking applications....

  20. Development of biostereometric experiments. [stereometric camera system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herron, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    The stereometric camera was designed for close-range techniques in biostereometrics. The camera focusing distance of 360 mm to infinity covers a broad field of close-range photogrammetry. The design provides for a separate unit for the lens system and interchangeable backs on the camera for the use of single frame film exposure, roll-type film cassettes, or glass plates. The system incorporates the use of a surface contrast optical projector.