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Sample records for renal glutamine metabolism

  1. Intestinal and hepatic metabolism of glutamine and citrulline in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Poll, Marcel C G; Ligthart-Melis, Gerdien C; Boelens, Petra G; Deutz, Nicolaas E P; van Leeuwen, Paul A M; Dejong, Cornelis H C

    2007-06-01

    Glutamine plays an important role in nitrogen homeostasis and intestinal substrate supply. It has been suggested that glutamine is a precursor for arginine through an intestinal-renal pathway involving inter-organ transport of citrulline. The importance of intestinal glutamine metabolism for endogenous arginine synthesis in humans, however, has remained unaddressed. The aim of this study was to investigate the intestinal conversion of glutamine to citrulline and the effect of the liver on splanchnic citrulline metabolism in humans. Eight patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal surgery received a primed continuous intravenous infusion of [2-(15)N]glutamine and [ureido-(13)C-(2)H(2)]citrulline. Arterial, portal venous and hepatic venous blood were sampled and portal and hepatic blood flows were measured. Organ specific amino acid uptake (disposal), production and net balance, as well as whole body rates of plasma appearance were calculated according to established methods. The intestines consumed glutamine at a rate that was dependent on glutamine supply. Approximately 13% of glutamine taken up by the intestines was converted to citrulline. Quantitatively glutamine was the only important precursor for intestinal citrulline release. Both glutamine and citrulline were consumed and produced by the liver, but net hepatic flux of both amino acids was not significantly different from zero. Plasma glutamine was the precursor of 80% of plasma citrulline and plasma citrulline in turn was the precursor of 10% of plasma arginine. In conclusion, glutamine is an important precursor for the synthesis of arginine after intestinal conversion to citrulline in humans.

  2. Intestinal renal metabolism of L-citrulline and L-arginine following enteral or parenteral infusion of L-alanyl-L-[2,15N]glutamine or L-[2,15N]glutamine in mice.

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    Boelens, Petra G; van Leeuwen, Paul A M; Dejong, Cornelis H C; Deutz, Nicolaas E P

    2005-10-01

    Previously, we observed increased plasma arginine (ARG) concentrations after glutamine (GLN)-enriched diets, in combination with clinical benefits. GLN delivers nitrogen for ARG synthesis, and the present study was designed to quantify the interorgan relationship of exogenous L-GLN or GLN dipeptide, by enteral or parenteral route, contributing to intestinal citrulline (CIT) and renal de novo ARG synthesis in mice. To study this, we used a multicatheterized mouse model with Swiss mice (n = 43) in the postabsorptive state. Stable isotopes were infused into the jugular vein or into the duodenum {per group either free L-[2,(15)N]GLN or dipeptide L-ALA-L-[2,(15)N]GLN, all with L-[ureido-(13)C-(2)H(2)]CIT and L-[guanidino-(15)N(2)-(2)H(2)]ARG} to establish renal and intestinal ARG and CIT metabolism. Blood flow was measured using (14)C-para-aminohippuric acid. Net intestinal CIT release, renal uptake of CIT, and net renal ARG efflux was found, as assessed by arteriovenous flux measurements. Quantitatively, more de novo L-[2,(15)N]CIT was produced when free L-[2,(15)N]GLN was given than when L-ALA-L-[2,(15)N]GLN was given, whereas renal de novo L-[2,(15)N]ARG was similar in all groups. In conclusion, the intestinal-renal axis is hereby proven in mice in that L-[2,(15)N]GLN or dipeptide were both converted into de novo renal L-[2,(15)N]ARG; however, not all was derived from intestinal L-[2,(15)N]CIT production. In this model, the feeding route and form of GLN did not influence de novo renal ARG production derived from GLN.

  3. Interrelationships between glutamine and citrulline metabolism

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    This article analyzes the contribution of glutamine to the synthesis of citrulline and reviews the evidence that glutamine supplementation increases citrulline production. Glutamine supplementation has been proposed in the treatment of critically ill patients; however, a recent large multicenter ran...

  4. Effects of glutamine supplementation, GH, and IGF-I on glutamine metabolism in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, N C; Carroll, P V; Russell-Jones, D L; Sönksen, P H; Treacher, D F; Umpleby, A M

    2000-02-01

    During critical illness glutamine deficiency may develop. Glutamine supplementation can restore plasma concentration to normal, but the effect on glutamine metabolism is unknown. The use of growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) to prevent protein catabolism in these patients may exacerbate the glutamine deficiency. We have investigated, in critically ill patients, the effects of 72 h of treatment with standard parenteral nutrition (TPN; n = 6), TPN supplemented with glutamine (TPNGLN; 0.4 g x kg(-1) x day(-1), n = 6), or TPNGLN with combined GH (0.2 IU. kg(-1). day(-1)) and IGF-I (160 microg x kg (-1) x day(-1)) (TPNGLN+GH/IGF-I; n = 5) on glutamine metabolism using [2-(15)N]glutamine. In patients receiving TPNGLN and TPNGLN+GH/IGF-I, plasma glutamine concentration was increased (338 +/- 22 vs. 461 +/- 24 micromol/l, P requirement for glutamine in critically ill patients. Combined GH/IGF-I treatment with TPNGLN did not have adverse effects on glutamine metabolism.

  5. Glutamine metabolism in uricotelic species: variation in skeletal muscle glutamine synthetase, glutaminase, glutamine levels and rates of protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watford, Malcolm; Wu, Guoyao

    2005-04-01

    High intracellular glutamine levels have been implicated in promoting net protein synthesis and accretion in mammalian skeletal muscle. Little is known regarding glutamine metabolism in uricotelic species but chicken breast muscle exhibits high rates of protein accretion and would be predicted to maintain high glutamine levels. However, chicken breast muscle expresses high glutaminase activity and here we report that chicken breast muscle also expresses low glutamine synthetase activity (0.07+/-0.01 U/g) when compared to leg muscle (0.50+/-0.04 U/g). Free glutamine levels were 1.38+/-0.09 and 9.69+/-0.12 nmol/mg wet weight in breast and leg muscles of fed chickens, respectively. Glutamine levels were also lower in dove breast muscle (4.82+/-0.35 nmol/mg wet weight) when compared to leg muscle (16.2+/-1.0 nmol/mg wet weight) and much lower (1.80+/-0.46 nmol/mg wet weight) in lizard leg muscle. In fed chickens, rates of fractional protein synthesis were higher in leg than in breast muscle, and starvation (48 h) resulted in a decrease in both glutamine content and rate of protein synthesis in leg muscle. Thus, although tissue-specific glutamine metabolism in uricotelic species differs markedly from that in ureotelic animals, differences in rates of skeletal muscle protein synthesis are associated with corresponding differences in intramuscular glutamine content.

  6. Comparative aspects of tissue glutamine and proline metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolo, Robert F; Burrin, Douglas G

    2008-10-01

    The cellular metabolism of glutamine and proline are closely interrelated, because they can be interconverted with glutamate and ornithine via the mitochondrial pathway involving pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C). In adults, glutamine and proline are converted via P5C to citrulline in the gut, then citrulline is converted to arginine in the kidney. In neonates, arginine is a semiindispensable amino acid and is synthesized from proline completely in the gut; because of low P5C synthase activity, glutamine is not an important precursor for neonatal arginine synthesis. Thus, splanchnic metabolism of glutamine and proline is important, because both amino acids serve as key precursors for arginine synthesis with some developmental differences. Studies investigating splanchnic extraction demonstrate that about two-thirds of dietary glutamine and almost all dietary glutamate are extracted on first pass and the vast majority is oxidized in the gut. This capacity to extract glutamine and glutamate appears to be very large, so diets high in glutamine or glutamate probably have little impact on circulating concentrations and consequent potential toxicity. In contrast, it appears that very little proline is extracted by the gut and liver, at least in the neonate, which may result in hyperprolinemia and potential toxicity. Therefore, the upper limits of safe dietary intake for glutamine and proline, and other amino acids, appear to be substantially different depending on the extent of first-pass splanchnic extraction and irreversible catabolism.

  7. Lactate promotes glutamine uptake and metabolism in oxidative cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Escuredo, Jhudit; Dadhich, Rajesh K; Dhup, Suveera; Cacace, Andrea; Van Hée, Vincent F; De Saedeleer, Christophe J; Sboarina, Martina; Rodriguez, Fabien; Fontenille, Marie-Joséphine; Brisson, Lucie; Porporato, Paolo E; Sonveaux, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Oxygenated cancer cells have a high metabolic plasticity as they can use glucose, glutamine and lactate as main substrates to support their bioenergetic and biosynthetic activities. Metabolic optimization requires integration. While glycolysis and glutaminolysis can cooperate to support cellular proliferation, oxidative lactate metabolism opposes glycolysis in oxidative cancer cells engaged in a symbiotic relation with their hypoxic/glycolytic neighbors. However, little is known concerning the relationship between oxidative lactate metabolism and glutamine metabolism. Using SiHa and HeLa human cancer cells, this study reports that intracellular lactate signaling promotes glutamine uptake and metabolism in oxidative cancer cells. It depends on the uptake of extracellular lactate by monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1). Lactate first stabilizes hypoxia-inducible factor-2α (HIF-2α), and HIF-2α then transactivates c-Myc in a pathway that mimics a response to hypoxia. Consequently, lactate-induced c-Myc activation triggers the expression of glutamine transporter ASCT2 and of glutaminase 1 (GLS1), resulting in improved glutamine uptake and catabolism. Elucidation of this metabolic dependence could be of therapeutic interest. First, inhibitors of lactate uptake targeting MCT1 are currently entering clinical trials. They have the potential to indirectly repress glutaminolysis. Second, in oxidative cancer cells, resistance to glutaminolysis inhibition could arise from compensation by oxidative lactate metabolism and increased lactate signaling.

  8. The role of glutamine synthetase in energy production and glutamine metabolism during oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldarini, Nohaiah; Alhasawi, Azhar A; Thomas, Sean C; Appanna, Vasu D

    2017-01-17

    Oxidative stress is known to severely impede aerobic adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis. However, the metabolically-versatile Pseudomonas fluorescens survives this challenge by invoking alternative ATP-generating networks. When grown in a medium with glutamine as the sole organic nutrient in the presence of H2O2, the microbe utilizes glutamine synthetase (GS) to modulate its energy budget. The activity of this enzyme that mediates the release of energy stored in glutamine was sharply increased in the stressed cells compared to the controls. The enhanced activities of such enzymes as acetate kinase, adenylate kinase and nucleotide diphosphate kinase ensured the efficacy of this ATP producing-machine by transferring the high energy phosphate. The elevated amounts of phosphoenol pyruvate carboxylase and pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase recorded in the H2O2 exposed cells provided another route to ATP independent of the reduction of O2. This is the first demonstration of a metabolic pathway involving GS dedicated to ATP synthesis. The phospho-transfer network that is pivotal to the survival of the microorganism under oxidative stress may reveal therapeutic targets against infectious microbes reliant on glutamine for their proliferation.

  9. Lactate promotes glutamine uptake and metabolism in oxidative cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Escuredo, Jhudit; Dadhich, Rajesh K.; Dhup, Suveera; Cacace, Andrea; Van Hée, Vincent F.; De Saedeleer, Christophe J; Sboarina, Martina; Rodriguez, Fabien; Fontenille, Marie-Joséphine; Brisson, Lucie; Porporato, Paolo E.; Sonveaux, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Oxygenated cancer cells have a high metabolic plasticity as they can use glucose, glutamine and lactate as main substrates to support their bioenergetic and biosynthetic activities. Metabolic optimization requires integration. While glycolysis and glutaminolysis can cooperate to support cellular proliferation, oxidative lactate metabolism opposes glycolysis in oxidative cancer cells engaged in a symbiotic relation with their hypoxic/glycolytic neighbors. However, little is known concerning th...

  10. Mitochondrial Sirt3 supports cell proliferation by regulating glutamine-dependent oxidation in renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jieun; Koh, Eunjin; Lee, Yu Shin; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Kang, Hyeok Gu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Brain Korea 21 PLUS Project for Medical Sciences, Institute of Genetic Science, Integrated Genomic Research Center for Metabolic Regulation, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Young Eun; Han, Woong Kyu [Department of Urology, Urological Science Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kyung Hwa [Department of Urology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Seongnam 463-712 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyung-Sup, E-mail: KYUNGSUP59@yuhs.ac [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Brain Korea 21 PLUS Project for Medical Sciences, Institute of Genetic Science, Integrated Genomic Research Center for Metabolic Regulation, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-03

    Clear cell renal carcinoma (RCC), the most common malignancy arising in the adult kidney, exhibits increased aerobic glycolysis and low mitochondrial respiration due to von Hippel-Lindau gene defects and constitutive hypoxia-inducible factor-α expression. Sirt3 is a major mitochondrial deacetylase that mediates various types of energy metabolism. However, the role of Sirt3 as a tumor suppressor or oncogene in cancer depends on cell types. We show increased Sirt3 expression in the mitochondrial fraction of human RCC tissues. Sirt3 depletion by lentiviral short-hairpin RNA, as well as the stable expression of the inactive mutant of Sirt3, inhibited cell proliferation and tumor growth in xenograft nude mice, respectively. Furthermore, mitochondrial pyruvate, which was used for oxidation in RCC, might be derived from glutamine, but not from glucose and cytosolic pyruvate, due to depletion of mitochondrial pyruvate carrier and the relatively high expression of malic enzyme 2. Depletion of Sirt3 suppressed glutamate dehydrogenase activity, leading to impaired mitochondrial oxygen consumption. Our findings suggest that Sirt3 plays a tumor-progressive role in human RCC by regulating glutamine-derived mitochondrial respiration, particularly in cells where mitochondrial usage of cytosolic pyruvate is severely compromised. -- Highlights: •Sirt3 is required for the maintenance of RCC cell proliferation. •Mitochondrial usage of cytosolic pyruvate is severely compromised in RCC. •Sirt3 supports glutamine-dependent oxidation in RCC.

  11. Proximal tubule-specific glutamine synthetase deletion alters basal and acidosis-stimulated ammonia metabolism.

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    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Osis, Gunars; Handlogten, Mary E; Lamers, Wouter H; Chaudhry, Farrukh A; Verlander, Jill W; Weiner, I David

    2016-06-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the recycling of NH4 (+) with glutamate to form glutamine. GS is highly expressed in the renal proximal tubule (PT), suggesting ammonia recycling via GS could decrease net ammoniagenesis and thereby limit ammonia available for net acid excretion. The purpose of the present study was to determine the role of PT GS in ammonia metabolism under basal conditions and during metabolic acidosis. We generated mice with PT-specific GS deletion (PT-GS-KO) using Cre-loxP techniques. Under basal conditions, PT-GS-KO increased urinary ammonia excretion significantly. Increased ammonia excretion occurred despite decreased expression of key proteins involved in renal ammonia generation. After the induction of metabolic acidosis, the ability to increase ammonia excretion was impaired significantly by PT-GS-KO. The blunted increase in ammonia excretion occurred despite greater expression of multiple components of ammonia generation, including SN1 (Slc38a3), phosphate-dependent glutaminase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, and Na(+)-coupled electrogenic bicarbonate cotransporter. We conclude that 1) GS-mediated ammonia recycling in the PT contributes to both basal and acidosis-stimulated ammonia metabolism and 2) adaptive changes in other proteins involved in ammonia metabolism occur in response to PT-GS-KO and cause an underestimation of the role of PT GS expression.

  12. Perioperative glutamine supplementation restores disturbed renal arginine synthesis after open aortic surgery: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

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    Brinkmann, Saskia J H; Buijs, Nikki; Vermeulen, Mechteld A R; Oosterink, Efraim; Schierbeek, Henk; Beishuizen, Albertus; de Vries, Jean-Paul P M; Wisselink, Willem; van Leeuwen, Paul A M

    2016-09-01

    Postoperative renal failure is a common complication after open repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. The amino acid arginine is formed in the kidneys from its precursor citrulline, and citrulline is formed from glutamine in the intestines. Arginine enhances the function of the immune and cardiovascular systems, which is important for recovery after surgery. We hypothesized that renal arginine production is diminished after ischemia-reperfusion injury caused by clamping of the aorta during open abdominal aortic surgery and that parenteral glutamine supplementation might compensate for this impaired arginine synthesis. This open-label clinical trial randomized patients who underwent clamping of the aorta during open abdominal aortic surgery to receive a perioperative supplement of intravenous alanyl-glutamine (0.5 g·kg(-1)·day(-1); group A, n = 5) or no supplement (group B, n = 5). One day after surgery, stable isotopes and tracer methods were used to analyze the metabolism and conversion of glutamine, citrulline, and arginine. Whole body plasma flux of glutamine, citrulline, and arginine was significantly higher in group A than in group B (glutamine: 391 ± 34 vs. 258 ± 19 μmol·kg(-1)·h(-1), citrulline: 5.7 ± 0.4 vs. 2.8 ± 0.4 μmol·kg(-1)·h(-1), and arginine: 50 ± 4 vs. 26 ± 2 μmol·kg(-1)·h(-1), P glutamine (4.8 ± 0.7 vs. 1.6 ± 0.3 μmol·kg(-1)·h(-1)), citrulline from arginine (2.3 ± 0.3 vs. 0.96 ± 0.1 μmol·kg(-1)·h(-1)), and arginine from glutamine (7.7 ± 0.4 vs. 2.8 ± 0.2 μmol·kg(-1)·h(-1)), respectively (P arginine is severely reduced after clamping during aortic surgery. This study shows that an intravenous supplement of glutamine increases the production of citrulline and arginine and compensates for the inhibitory effect of ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  13. Renal metabolism of calcitonin

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    Simmons, R.E.; Hjelle, J.T.; Mahoney, C.; Deftos, L.J.; Lisker, W.; Kato, P.; Rabkin, R.

    1988-04-01

    The kidneys account for approximately two-thirds of the metabolism of calcitonin, but relatively little is known regarding the details thereof. To further characterize this process, we examined the renal handling and metabolism of human calcitonin (hCT) by the isolated perfused rat kidney. We also studied the degradation of radiolabeled salmon calcitonin (sCT) by subcellular fractions prepared from isolated rabbit proximal tubules. The total renal (organ) clearance of immunoreactive hCT by the isolated kidney was 1.96 +/- 0.18 ml/min. This was independent of the perfusate total calcium concentration from 5.5 to 10.2 mg/dl. Total renal clearance exceeded the glomerular filtration rate (GFR, 0.68 +/- 0.05 ml/min), indicating filtration-independent removal. Urinary calcitonin clearance as a fraction of GFR averaged 2.6%. Gel filtration chromatography of medium from isolated kidneys perfused with /sup 125/I-labeled sCT showed the principal degradation products to be low molecular weight forms eluting with monoiodotyrosine. Intermediate size products were not detected. In the subcellular fractionation experiments, when carried out at pH 5.0, calcitonin hydrolysis exclusively followed the activities of the lysosomal enzyme N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase. Typically, at pH 7.5, 42% of total degradation occurred in the region of the brush-border enzyme alanyl aminopeptidase and 29% occurred in the region of the cytosolic enzyme phosphoglucomutase. Although 9% of the calcitonin-degrading activity was associated with basolateral membrane fractions, most of this activity could be accounted for by the presence of brush-border membranes.

  14. Key Roles of Glutamine Pathways in Reprogramming the Cancer Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Piotr Michalak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine (GLN is commonly known as an important metabolite used for the growth of cancer cells but the effects of its intake in cancer patients are still not clear. However, GLN is the main substrate for DNA and fatty acid synthesis. On the other hand, it reduces the oxidative stress by glutathione synthesis stimulation, stops the process of cancer cachexia, and nourishes the immunological system and the intestine epithelium, as well. The current paper deals with possible positive effects of GLN supplementation and conditions that should be fulfilled to obtain these effects. The analysis of GLN metabolism suggests that the separation of GLN and carbohydrates in the diet can minimize simultaneous supply of ATP (from glucose and NADPH2 (from glutamine to cancer cells. It should support to a larger extent the organism to fight against the cancer rather than the cancer cells. GLN cannot be considered the effective source of ATP for cancers with the impaired oxidative phosphorylation and pyruvate dehydrogenase inhibition. GLN intake restores decreased levels of glutathione in the case of chemotherapy and radiotherapy; thus, it facilitates regeneration processes of the intestine epithelium and immunological system.

  15. Inter-relationships between renal metabolism (both in physiology and renal dysfunction) and the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, N

    2001-07-01

    Recently, evaluation of organ-specific glucose release showed that renal glucose release is of the same order of magnitude as splanchnic glucose release during the postabsorptive period. Moreover, renal glucose release appeared to be more sensitive to hormone action than did hepatic glucose release, and appeared to have a pre-eminent role during the adaptation to various physiological and pathological conditions. The kidney is now recognized as playing a key role in interorgan glucose metabolism, and particularly in the Cori cycle and glutamine-glucose cycle. During chronic renal failure the suppression of renal glucose release, together with impaired hormone action, decreased glycogen storage and abnormal liver gluconeogenesis, are responsible for an increased risk for hypoglycaemia.

  16. Treatment of pressure ulcers in patients with declining renal function using arginine, glutamine and ß-hydroxy-ß-methylbutyrate.

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    Ogura, Y; Yuki, N; Sukegane, A; Nishi, T; Miyake, Y; Sato, H; Miyamoto, C; Mihara, C

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the efficacy on healing pressure ulcers (PU) of using a supplement combination containing arginine, glutamine and ß-hydroxy-ß-methylbutyrate, which was given to two elderly patients with renal dysfunction. The PU was surgically opened, decompressed and treated by drugs. A half quantity of the defined dose of the supplement combination, with an enteral nutrition product, was administered to the patients twice a day. This combination improved the PUs, with no effect on renal function. This novel finding may provide a nutritional rationale of arginine, glutamine and ß-hydroxy-ß-methylbutyrate for PUs associated with renal dysfunction.

  17. Effect of glutamine synthetase inhibition on brain and interorgan ammonia metabolism in bile duct ligated rats.

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    Fries, Andreas W; Dadsetan, Sherry; Keiding, Susanne; Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Simonsen, Mette; Ott, Peter; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Sørensen, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Ammonia has a key role in the development of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In the brain, glutamine synthetase (GS) rapidly converts blood-borne ammonia into glutamine which in high concentrations may cause mitochondrial dysfunction and osmolytic brain edema. In astrocyte-neuron cocultures and brains of healthy rats, inhibition of GS by methionine sulfoximine (MSO) reduced glutamine synthesis and increased alanine synthesis. Here, we investigate effects of MSO on brain and interorgan ammonia metabolism in sham and bile duct ligated (BDL) rats. Concentrations of glutamine, glutamate, alanine, and aspartate and incorporation of (15)NH(4)(+) into these amino acids in brain, liver, muscle, kidney, and plasma were similar in sham and BDL rats treated with saline. Methionine sulfoximine reduced glutamine concentrations in liver, kidney, and plasma but not in brain and muscle; MSO reduced incorporation of (15)NH(4)(+) into glutamine in all tissues. It did not affect alanine concentrations in any of the tissues but plasma alanine concentration increased; incorporation of (15)NH(4)(+) into alanine was increased in brain in sham and BDL rats and in kidney in sham rats. It inhibited GS in all tissues examined but only in brain was an increased incorporation of (15)N-ammonia into alanine observed. Liver and kidney were important for metabolizing blood-borne ammonia.

  18. Urinary Metabolomic Approach Provides New Insights into Distinct Metabolic Profiles of Glutamine and N-Carbamylglutamate Supplementation in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Guangmang; Cao, Wei; Fang, Tingting; Jia, Gang; Zhao, Hua; Chen, Xiaoling; Wu, Caimei; Wang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine and N-carbamylglutamate can enhance growth performance and health in animals, but the underlying mechanisms are not yet elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the effect of glutamine and N-carbamylglutamate supplementation in rat metabolism. Thirty rats were fed a control, glutamine, or N-carbamylglutamate diet for four weeks. Urine samples were analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics, specifically high-resolution 1H NMR metabolic profiling combined with...

  19. Urea and Ammonia Metabolism and the Control of Renal Nitrogen Excretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, I David; Mitch, William E; Sands, Jeff M

    2015-08-07

    Renal nitrogen metabolism primarily involves urea and ammonia metabolism, and is essential to normal health. Urea is the largest circulating pool of nitrogen, excluding nitrogen in circulating proteins, and its production changes in parallel to the degradation of dietary and endogenous proteins. In addition to serving as a way to excrete nitrogen, urea transport, mediated through specific urea transport proteins, mediates a central role in the urine concentrating mechanism. Renal ammonia excretion, although often considered only in the context of acid-base homeostasis, accounts for approximately 10% of total renal nitrogen excretion under basal conditions, but can increase substantially in a variety of clinical conditions. Because renal ammonia metabolism requires intrarenal ammoniagenesis from glutamine, changes in factors regulating renal ammonia metabolism can have important effects on glutamine in addition to nitrogen balance. This review covers aspects of protein metabolism and the control of the two major molecules involved in renal nitrogen excretion: urea and ammonia. Both urea and ammonia transport can be altered by glucocorticoids and hypokalemia, two conditions that also affect protein metabolism. Clinical conditions associated with altered urine concentrating ability or water homeostasis can result in changes in urea excretion and urea transporters. Clinical conditions associated with altered ammonia excretion can have important effects on nitrogen balance.

  20. Effect of a short-term infusion of glutamine on muscle protein metabolism postoperatively.

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    Januszkiewicz, A; Essén, P; McNurlan, M A; Calder, G A; Andersson, K; Wernerman, J; Garlick, P J

    1996-10-01

    The acute effect of a short-term postoperative infusion of glucose supplemented with glutamine (0.285 g/kg body weight), on muscle protein metabolism, was studied by analyses of free amino acid concentrations and determinations of protein synthesis. A glutamine-glucose infusion was given for 5.5 h to 6 patients 2-3 days after elective surgery for colon cancer. The free glutamine concentration was 5.72 +/- 0.96 mmol/kg wet weight (ww) before and 6.14 +/- 1.10 mmol/kg ww 4 h after the glutamine infusion. The rate of protein synthesis was 1.26 +/- 0.15%/24 h before the infusion and 1.12 +/- 0.16%/24 h during its latter part. The percentage of polyribosomes was 42.2 +/- 3.4% before and 40.9 +/- 1.3% after the infusion. The results showed no difference in these biochemical parameters, indicating that a short-term infusion of glutamine given postoperatively is insufficient to affect protein metabolism in human skeletal muscle.

  1. Lack of cardioprotection from metabolic support with glutamine or glutamate in a porcine coronary occlusion model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Jens; Mæng, Michael; Mortensen, Ulrik;

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Previous experimental studies indicate that glutamine or glutamate may provide cardioprotection by improving the oxidative metabolism in myocardial ischemia. We investigated the effect of glutamine or glutamate, given during reperfusion, on resulting infarct size and hemodynamic recovery...... vascular resistance, while glutamate preserved cardiac output during infusion. CONCLUSION: Substrate supplementation with the anaplerotic precursors glutamine and glutamate is ineffective as adjunctive therapy for severe myocardial ischemia. Beneficial effects documented in less complex experimental....... DESIGN: A porcine coronary occlusion model was applied. Infusions were initiated 15 min before reperfusion and supplemented with intracoronary bolus doses at reperfusion. The primary outcome measure was infarct size in relation to area at risk determined by a standard tissue staining procedure. Secondary...

  2. MicroRNA-153 regulates glutamine metabolism in glioblastoma through targeting glutaminase.

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    Liu, Zhenyang; Wang, Junyu; Li, Yunjun; Fan, Juan; Chen, Lihua; Xu, Ruxiang

    2017-02-01

    Glioblastoma is the most aggressive manifestation of malignant gliomas and considered to be among the deadliest forms of human cancers. MicroRNAs are found to tightly regulate diverse biological processes and considered to play important roles in cancer etiology. In this study, we found that microRNA-153 was significantly downregulated in glioblastoma tissues compared to matched non-tumor tissues and in glioblastoma cell lines. To investigate the potential function of microRNA-153 in glioblastoma, we transfected glioblastoma cell line U87MG as well as U373MG with synthetic microRNA-153 oligos and observed decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. We further found that microRNA-153 restrained glutamine utilization and glutamate generation. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that glutaminase, which catalyzed the formation of glutamate from glutamine, is the potential target of microRNA-153. Indeed, microRNA-153 cannot further reduce glutamine utilization when glutaminase was knocked down. Overexpression of glutaminase abrogates the effect of microRNA-153 on glutamine utilization. Furthermore, the relative expression of microRNA-153 and glutaminase in glioblastoma versus matched non-tumor tissues showed a reverse correlation, further indicating that microRNA-153 may negatively regulate glutaminase in vivo. These results demonstrate an unexpected role of microRNA-153 in regulating glutamine metabolism and strengthen the role of microRNA-153 as a therapeutic target in glioblastoma.

  3. GOT1-mediated anaplerotic glutamine metabolism regulates chronic acidosis stress in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrego, Jaime; Gunda, Venugopal; Vernucci, Enza; Shukla, Surendra K; King, Ryan J; Dasgupta, Aneesha; Goode, Gennifer; Murthy, Divya; Yu, Fang; Singh, Pankaj K

    2017-08-01

    The increased rate of glycolysis and reduced oxidative metabolism are the principal biochemical phenotypes observed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) that lead to the development of an acidic tumor microenvironment. The pH of most epithelial cell-derived tumors is reported to be lower than that of plasma. However, little is known regarding the physiology and metabolism of cancer cells enduring chronic acidosis. Here, we cultured PDAC cells in chronic acidosis (pH 6.9-7.0) and observed that cells cultured in low pH had reduced clonogenic capacity. However, our physiological and metabolomics analysis showed that cells in low pH deviate from glycolytic metabolism and rely more on oxidative metabolism. The increased expression of the transaminase enzyme GOT1 fuels oxidative metabolism of cells cultured in low pH by enhancing the non-canonical glutamine metabolic pathway. Survival in low pH is reduced upon depletion of GOT1 due to increased intracellular ROS levels. Thus, GOT1 plays an important role in energy metabolism and ROS balance in chronic acidosis stress. Our studies suggest that targeting anaplerotic glutamine metabolism may serve as an important therapeutic target in PDAC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Alanine and aspartate aminotransferase and glutamine-cycling pathway: Their roles in pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Silvia Sookoian; Carlos J Pirola

    2012-01-01

    Although new research technologies are constantly used to look either for genes or biomarkers in the prediction of metabolic syndrome (MS),the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of this complex disease remains a major challenge.Interestingly,Cheng et al recently investigated possible pathways underlying MS by high-throughput metabolite profiling in two large and well characterized community-based cohorts.The authors explored by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry the plasma concentrations of 45distinct metabolites and examined their relation to cardiometabolic risk,and observed that metabolic risk factors such as obesity,insulin resistance (IR),high blood pressure,and dyslipidemia were associated with several metabolites,including branched-chain amino acids,other hydrophobic amino acids,tryptophan breakdown products,and nucleotide metabolites.In addition,the authors found a significant association of IR traits with glutamine,glutamate and the glutamineto-glutamate ratio.These data provide new insight into the pathogenesis of MS-associated phenotypes and introduce a crucial role of glutamine-cycling pathway as prominently involved in the development of metabolic risk.We consider that the hypothesis about the role of abnormal glutamate metabolism in the pathogenesis of the MS is certainly challenging and suggests the critical role of the liver in the global metabolic modulation as glutamate metabolism is linked with aminotransferase reactions.We discuss here the critical role of the "liver metabolism" in the pathogenesis of the MS and IR,and postulate that before fatty liver develops,abnormal levels of liver enzymes,such as alanine and aspartate aminotransferases might reflect high levels of hepatic transamination of amino acids in the liver.

  5. Glutamine fuels a vicious cycle of autophagy in the tumor stroma and oxidative mitochondrial metabolism in epithelial cancer cells: implications for preventing chemotherapy resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ying-Hui; Lin, Zhao; Flomenberg, Neal; Pestell, Richard G; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E

    2011-12-15

    Glutamine metabolism is crucial for cancer cell growth via the generation of intermediate molecules in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, antioxidants and ammonia. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the effects of glutamine on metabolism in the breast cancer tumor microenvironment, with a focus on autophagy and cell death in both epithelial and stromal compartments. For this purpose, MCF7 breast cancer cells were cultured alone or co-cultured with non-transformed fibroblasts in media containing high glutamine and low glucose (glutamine +) or under control conditions, with no glutamine and high glucose (glutamine -). Here, we show that MCF7 cells maintained in co-culture with glutamine display increased mitochondrial mass, as compared with control conditions. Importantly, treatment with the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine abolishes the glutamine-induced augmentation of mitochondrial mass. It is known that loss of caveolin-1 (Cav-1) expression in fibroblasts is associated with increased autophagy and an aggressive tumor microenvironment. Here, we show that Cav-1 downregulation which occurs in fibroblasts maintained in co-culture specifically requires glutamine. Interestingly, glutamine increases the expression of autophagy markers in fibroblasts, but decreases expression of autophagy markers in MCF7 cells, indicating that glutamine regulates the autophagy program in a compartment-specific manner. Functionally, glutamine protects MCF7 cells against apoptosis, via the upregulation of the anti-apoptotic and anti-autophagic protein TIGAR. Also, we show that glutamine cooperates with stromal fibroblasts to confer tamoxifen-resistance in MCF7 cancer cells. Finally, we provide evidence that co-culture with fibroblasts (1) promotes glutamine catabolism, and (2) decreases glutamine synthesis in MCF7 cancer cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that autophagic fibroblasts may serve as a key source of energy-rich glutamine to fuel cancer cell mitochondrial

  6. Haploinsufficiency of SIRT1 Enhances Glutamine Metabolism and Promotes Cancer Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Natalie S X; Ji, Ming; Tokar, Erik J; Busch, Evan L; Xu, Xiaojiang; Lewis, DeAsia; Li, Xiangchun; Jin, Aiwen; Zhang, Yanping; Wu, William K K; Huang, Weichun; Li, Leping; Fargo, David C; Keku, Temitope O; Sandler, Robert S; Li, Xiaoling

    2017-02-20

    SIRT1, the most conserved mammalian NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase, plays a vital role in the regulation of metabolism, stress responses, and genome stability. However, the role of SIRT1 in the multi-step process leading to transformation and/or tumorigenesis, as either a tumor suppressor or tumor promoter, is complex and may be dependent upon the context in which SIRT1 activity is altered, and the role of SIRT1 in tumor metabolism is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that SIRT1 dose-dependently regulates cellular glutamine metabolism and apoptosis, which in turn differentially impact cell proliferation and cancer development. Heterozygous deletion of Sirt1 induces c-Myc expression, enhancing glutamine metabolism and subsequent proliferation, autophagy, stress resistance, and cancer formation. In contrast, homozygous deletion of Sirt1 triggers cellular apoptotic pathways, increases cell death, diminishes autophagy, and reduces cancer formation. Consistent with the observed dose dependence in cells, intestine-specific Sirt1 heterozygous mice have enhanced intestinal tumor formation, whereas intestine-specific Sirt1 homozygous knockout mice have reduced development of colon cancer. Furthermore, SIRT1 reduction, but not deletion, is associated with human colorectal tumors, and colorectal cancer patients with low protein expression of SIRT1 have a poor prognosis. Taken together, our findings indicate that the dose-dependent regulation of tumor metabolism and possibly apoptosis by SIRT1 mechanistically contribute to the observed dual roles of SIRT1 in tumorigenesis. Our study highlights the importance of maintenance of a suitable SIRT1 dosage for metabolic and tissue homeostasis, which will have important implications in SIRT1-small-molecule-activator/inhibitor-based therapeutic strategies for cancers. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Lymphocyte Glucose and Glutamine Metabolism as Targets of the Anti-Inflammatory and Immunomodulatory Effects of Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Wasinski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucose and glutamine are important energetic and biosynthetic nutrients for T and B lymphocytes. These cells consume both nutrients at high rates in a function-dependent manner. In other words, the pathways that control lymphocyte function and survival directly control the glucose and glutamine metabolic pathways. Therefore, lymphocytes in different functional states reprogram their glucose and glutamine metabolism to balance their requirement for ATP and macromolecule production. The tight association between metabolism and function in these cells was suggested to introduce the possibility of several pathologies resulting from the inability of lymphocytes to meet their nutrient demands under a given condition. In fact, disruptions in lymphocyte metabolism and function have been observed in different inflammatory, metabolic, and autoimmune pathologies. Regular physical exercise and physical activity offer protection against several chronic pathologies, and this benefit has been associated with the anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of exercise/physical activity. Chronic exercise induces changes in lymphocyte functionality and substrate metabolism. In the present review, we discuss whether the beneficial effects of exercise on lymphocyte function in health and disease are associated with modulation of the glucose and glutamine metabolic pathways.

  8. Expression of glutamine synthetase in the mouse kidney: localization in multiple epithelial cell types and differential regulation by hypokalemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlander, Jill W; Chu, Diana; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Handlogten, Mary E; Weiner, I David

    2013-09-01

    Renal glutamine synthetase catalyzes the reaction of NH4+ with glutamate, forming glutamine and decreasing the ammonia available for net acid excretion. The purpose of the present study was to determine glutamine synthetase's specific cellular expression in the mouse kidney and its regulation by hypokalemia, a common cause of altered renal ammonia metabolism. Glutamine synthetase mRNA and protein were present in the renal cortex and in both the outer and inner stripes of the outer medulla. Immunohistochemistry showed glutamine synthetase expression throughout the entire proximal tubule and in nonproximal tubule cells. Double immunolabel with cell-specific markers demonstrated glutamine synthetase expression in type A intercalated cells, non-A, non-B intercalated cells, and distal convoluted tubule cells, but not in principal cells, type B intercalated cells, or connecting segment cells. Hypokalemia induced by feeding a nominally K+ -free diet for 12 days decreased glutamine synthetase expression throughout the entire proximal tubule and in the distal convoluted tubule and simultaneously increased glutamine synthetase expression in type A intercalated cells in both the cortical and outer medullary collecting duct. We conclude that glutamine synthetase is widely and specifically expressed in renal epithelial cells and that the regulation of expression differs in specific cell populations. Glutamine synthetase is likely to mediate an important role in renal ammonia metabolism.

  9. Metabolic Syndrome and Outcomes after Renal Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daynene Vykoukal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome significantly increases the risk for cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease. The increased risk for cardiovascular diseases can partly be caused by a prothrombotic state that exists because of abdominal obesity. Multiple observational studies have consistently shown that increased body mass index as well as insulin resistance and increased fasting insulin levels is associated with chronic kidney disease, even after adjustment for related disorders. Metabolic syndrome appears to be a risk factor for chronic kidney disease, likely due to the combination of dysglycemia and high blood pressure. Metabolic syndrome is associated with markedly reduced renal clinical benefit and increased progression to hemodialysis following endovascular intervention for atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis. Metabolic syndrome is associated with inferior early outcomes for dialysis access procedures.

  10. Metabolic syndrome and outcomes after renal intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vykoukal, Daynene; Davies, Mark G

    2010-12-27

    Metabolic syndrome significantly increases the risk for cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease. The increased risk for cardiovascular diseases can partly be caused by a prothrombotic state that exists because of abdominal obesity. Multiple observational studies have consistently shown that increased body mass index as well as insulin resistance and increased fasting insulin levels is associated with chronic kidney disease, even after adjustment for related disorders. Metabolic syndrome appears to be a risk factor for chronic kidney disease, likely due to the combination of dysglycemia and high blood pressure. Metabolic syndrome is associated with markedly reduced renal clinical benefit and increased progression to hemodialysis following endovascular intervention for atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis. Metabolic syndrome is associated with inferior early outcomes for dialysis access procedures.

  11. Characterisation of glutamine fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase (EC 2.6.1.16) and N-acetylglucosamine metabolism in Bifidobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Sophie; Stolarczyk, Emilie; Mouni, Fadoua; Brassart, Colette; Vidal, Olivier; Aïssi, Eliane; Bouquelet, Stéphane; Krzewinski, Frédéric

    2008-02-01

    Bifidobacterium bifidum, in contrast to other bifidobacterial species, is auxotrophic for N-acetylglucosamine. Growth experiments revealed assimilation of radiolabelled N-acetylglucosamine in bacterial cell walls and in acetate, an end-product of central metabolism via the bifidobacterial D: -fructose-6-phosphate shunt. While supplementation with fructose led to reduced N-acetylglucosamine assimilation via the D: -fructose-6-phosphate shunt, no significant difference was observed in levels of radiolabelled N-acetylglucosamine incorporated into cell walls. Considering the central role played by glutamine fructose-6-phosphate transaminase (GlmS) in linking the biosynthetic pathway for N-acetylglucosamine to hexose metabolism, the GlmS of Bifidobacterium was characterized. The genes encoding the putative GlmS of B. longum DSM20219 and B. bifidum DSM20082 were cloned and sequenced. Bioinformatic analyses of the predicted proteins revealed 43% amino acid identity with the Escherichia coli GlmS, with conservation of key amino acids in the catalytic domain. The B. longum GlmS was over-produced as a histidine-tagged fusion protein. The purified C-terminal His-tagged GlmS possessed glutamine fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase activity as demonstrated by synthesis of glucosamine-6-phosphate from fructose-6-phosphate and glutamine. It also possesses an independent glutaminase activity, converting glutamine to glutamate in the absence of fructose-6-phosphate. This is of interest considering the apparently reduced coding potential in bifidobacteria for enzymes associated with glutamine metabolism.

  12. Urinary Metabolomic Approach Provides New Insights into Distinct Metabolic Profiles of Glutamine and N-Carbamylglutamate Supplementation in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangmang; Cao, Wei; Fang, Tingting; Jia, Gang; Zhao, Hua; Chen, Xiaoling; Wu, Caimei; Wang, Jing

    2016-08-04

    Glutamine and N-carbamylglutamate can enhance growth performance and health in animals, but the underlying mechanisms are not yet elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the effect of glutamine and N-carbamylglutamate supplementation in rat metabolism. Thirty rats were fed a control, glutamine, or N-carbamylglutamate diet for four weeks. Urine samples were analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics, specifically high-resolution ¹H NMR metabolic profiling combined with multivariate data analysis. Glutamine significantly increased the urine levels of acetamide, acetate, citrulline, creatinine, and methymalonate, and decreased the urine levels of ethanol and formate (p carbamylglutamate significantly increased the urine levels of creatinine, ethanol, indoxyl sulfate, lactate, methymalonate, acetoacetate, m-hydroxyphenylacetate, and sarcosine, and decreased the urine levels of acetamide, acetate, citrulline, creatine, glycine, hippurate, homogentisate, N-acetylglutamate, phenylacetyglycine, acetone, and p-hydroxyphenylacetate (p carbamylglutamate could modify urinary metabolome related to nitrogen metabolism and gut microbiota metabolism. Moreover, N-carbamylglutamate could alter energy and lipid metabolism. These findings indicate that different arginine precursors may lead to differences in the biofluid profile in rats.

  13. Inhibition of glutamine utilization sensitizes lung cancer cells to apigenin-induced apoptosis resulting from metabolic and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoon-Mi; Lee, Gibok; Oh, Taek-In; Kim, Byeong Mo; Shim, Do-Wan; Lee, Kwang-Ho; Kim, Young Jun; Lim, Beong Ou; Lim, Ji-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown anticancer activity of apigenin by suppressing glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) expression in cultured cancer cells; however, it is not clear whether apigenin can suppress glucose metabolism in lung cancer cells or sensitize them to inhibition of glutamine utilization-mediated apoptosis through metabolic and oxidative stress. We show that apigenin significantly decreases GLUT1 expression in mice. Furthermore, we demonstrate that apigenin induces growth retardation and apoptosis through metabolic and oxidative stress caused by suppression of glucose utilization in lung cancer cells. The underlying mechanisms were defined that the anticancer effects of apigenin were reversed by ectopic GLUT1 overexpression and galactose supplementation, through activation of pentose phosphate pathway-mediated NADPH generation. Importantly, we showed that severe metabolic stress using a glutaminase inhibitor, compound 968, was involved in the mechanism of sensitization by apigenin. Taken together, the combination of apigenin with inhibitors of glutamine metabolism may provide a promising therapeutic strategy for cancer treatment.

  14. Dietary glutamine supplementation effects on amino acid metabolism, intestinal nutrient absorption capacity and antioxidant response of gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) juveniles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, F; Castro, C; Rufino-Palomares, E; Ordóñez-Grande, B; Gallardo, M A; Oliva-Teles, A; Peres, H

    2016-01-01

    A study was undertaken to evaluate dietary glutamine supplementation effects on gilthead sea bream performance, intestinal nutrient absorption capacity, hepatic and intestinal glutamine metabolism and oxidative status. For that purpose gilthead sea bream juveniles (mean weight 13.0g) were fed four isolipidic (18% lipid) and isonitrogenous (43% protein) diets supplemented with 0, 0.5, 1 and 2% glutamine for 6weeks. Fish performance, body composition and intestinal nutrient absorption capacity were not affected by dietary glutamine levels. Hepatic and intestinal glutaminase (GlNase), glutamine synthetase (GSase), alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and glutamate dehydrogenase activities were also unaffected by dietary glutamine supplementation. In the intestine GlNase activity was higher and GSase/GlNase ratio was two-fold lower than in the liver, suggesting a higher use of glutamine for energy production by the intestine than by the liver. The liver showed higher catalase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities, while the intestine presented higher glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities and oxidised glutathione content, which seems to reveal a higher glutathione dependency of the intestinal antioxidant response. Total and reduced glutathione contents in liver and intestine and superoxide dismutase activity in the intestine were enhanced by dietary glutamine, though lipid peroxidation values were not affected. Overall, differences between liver and intestine glutamine metabolism and antioxidant response were identified and the potential of dietary glutamine supplementation to gilthead sea bream's antioxidant response was elucidated.

  15. Plant growth is influenced by glutamine synthetase-catalyzed nitrogen metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langston-Unkefer, P.J.

    1991-06-11

    Ammonia assimilation has been implicated as participating in regulation of nitrogen fixation in free-living bacteria. In fact, these simple organisms utilize an integrated regulation of carbon and nitrogen metabolism; we except to observe an integration of nitrogen and carbon fixation in plants; how could these complex systems grow efficiently and compete in the ecosystem without coordinating these two crucial activities We have been investigating the role of ammonia assimilation regulating the complex symbiotic nitrogen fixation of legumes. Just as is observed in the simple bacterial systems, perturbation of ammonia assimilation in legumes results in increased overall nitrogen fixation. The perturbed plants have increased growth and total nitrogen fixation capability. Because we have targeted the first enyzme in ammonia assimilation, glutamine synthetase, this provides a marker that could be used to assist selection or screening for increased biomass yield. 45 refs., 4 tabs.

  16. Effects of Alpha-Ketoglutarate on Glutamine Metabolism in Piglet Enterocytes in Vivo and in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Liuqin; Li, Huan; Huang, Niu; Tian, Junquan; Liu, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Xihong; Yao, Kang; Li, Tiejun; Yin, Yulong

    2016-04-01

    Alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG) plays a vital part in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and is a key intermediate in the oxidation of L-glutamine (Gln). The study was to evaluate effects of AKG on Gln metabolism in vivo and in vitro. A total of twenty-one piglets were weaned at 28 days with a mean body weight (BW) of 6.0 ± 0.2 kg, and randomly divided into 3 groups: corn soybean meal based diet (CON group); the basal diet with 1% alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG treatment group); and the basal diet with 1% L-glutamine (GLN treatment group). Intestinal porcine epithelial cells-1 (IPEC-1) were incubated to investigate effects of 0.5, 2, and 3 mM AKG addition on Gln metabolism. Our results showed that there were no differences (P > 0.05) among the 3 treatments in initial BW, final BW, and average daily feed intake. However, average daily gain (P = 0.013) and gain:feed (P = 0.041) of the AKG group were greater than those of the other two groups. In comparison with the CON group, the AKG and GLN groups exhibited an improvement in villus length, mucosal thickness, and crypt depth in the jejunum of piglets. Serum concentrations of Asp, Glu, Val, Ile, Tyr, Phe, Lys, and Arg in the piglets fed the 1% AKG or Gln diet were lower than those in the CON group. Compared with the CON group, the mRNA expression of jejunal and ileal amino acid (AA) transporters in the AKG and GLN groups were significantly increased (P piglet enterocytes and enhance the utilization of AA.

  17. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D inhibits glutamine metabolism in Harvey-ras transformed MCF10A human breast epithelial cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xuanzhu; Zheng, Wei; Nagana Gowda, G A; Raftery, Daniel; Donkin, Shawn S; Bequette, Brian; Teegarden, Dorothy

    2016-10-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer among women in the US. The active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D), is proposed to inhibit cellular processes and to prevent breast cancer. The current studies investigated the effect of 1,25(OH)2D on glutamine metabolism during cancer progression employing Harvey-ras oncogene transformed MCF10A human breast epithelial cells (MCF10A-ras). Treatment with 1,25(OH)2D significantly reduced intracellular glutamine and glutamate levels measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) by 23±2% each. Further, 1,25(OH)2D treatment reduced glutamine and glutamate flux, determined by [U-(13)C5] glutamine tracer kinetics, into the TCA cycle by 31±0.2% and 17±0.4%, respectively. The relative levels of mRNA and protein abundance of the major glutamine transporter, solute linked carrier family 1 member A5 (SLC1A5), was significantly decreased by 1,25(OH)2D treatment in both MCF10A-ras cells and MCF10A which overexpress ErbB2 (HER-2/neu). Consistent with these results, glutamine uptake was reduced by 1,25(OH)2D treatment and the impact was eliminated with the SLC1A5 inhibitor L-γ-Glutamyl-p-nitroanilide (GPNA). A consensus sequence to the vitamin D responsive element (VDRE) was identified in silico in the SLC1A5 gene promoter, and site-directed mutagenesis analyses with reporter gene studies demonstrate a functional negative VDRE in the promoter of the SLC1A5 gene. siRNA-SLC1A5 transfection in MCF10A-ras cells significantly reduced SLC1A5 mRNA expression as well as decreased viable cell number similar to 1,25(OH)2D treatment. SLC1A5 knockdown also induced an increase in apoptotic cells in MCF10A-ras cells. These results suggest 1,25(OH)2D alters glutamine metabolism in MCF10A-ras cells by inhibiting glutamine uptake and utilization, in part through down-regulation of SLC1A5 transcript abundance. Thus, 1,25(OH)2D down-regulation of the glutamine transporter, SLC1A5, may facilitate vitamin D prevention of breast

  18. Glutamine transport in submitochondrial particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sastrasinh, S.; Sastrasinh, M.

    1989-12-01

    Glutamine transport was studied in submitochondrial particles (SMP) to avoid interference from glutamine metabolism. Phosphate-dependent glutaminase activity in SMP was only 0.04% of that in intact mitochondria. The uptake of glutamine in SMP represented both the transport into vesicles and membrane binding (about one-third of total uptake). Sulfhydryl reagents inhibited glutamine uptake in SMP. The uptake of L-({sup 3}H)glutamine increased more than twofold in SMP preloaded with 1 mM L-glutamine, an effect that was not seen with 1 mM D-glutamine. The uptake of L-({sup 3}H)glutamine was inhibited in the presence of either L-glutamine or L-alanine in the incubation medium. Other amino acids did not inhibit glutamine uptake. Alanine was also shown to trans-stimulate glutamine transport in SMP and cis-inhibit glutamine transport in both SMP and intact mitochondria. Glutamine transport showed a positive cooperativity effect with a Hill coefficient of 1.45. Metabolic acidosis increased the affinity of the transporter for glutamine without any change in other kinetic parameters. These data indicated that mitochondrial glutamine transport occurs via a specific carrier with multiple binding sites and that the transport of glutamine into mitochondria has an important role in increased ammoniagenesis during metabolic acidosis.

  19. Metabolic alterations in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massari, Francesco; Ciccarese, Chiara; Santoni, Matteo; Brunelli, Matteo; Piva, Francesco; Modena, Alessandra; Bimbatti, Davide; Fantinel, Emanuela; Santini, Daniele; Cheng, Liang; Cascinu, Stefano; Montironi, Rodolfo; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2015-11-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a metabolic disease, being characterized by the dysregulation of metabolic pathways involved in oxygen sensing (VHL/HIF pathway alterations and the subsequent up-regulation of HIF-responsive genes such as VEGF, PDGF, EGF, and glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT4, which justify the RCC reliance on aerobic glycolysis), energy sensing (fumarate hydratase-deficient, succinate dehydrogenase-deficient RCC, mutations of HGF/MET pathway resulting in the metabolic Warburg shift marked by RCC increased dependence on aerobic glycolysis and the pentose phosphate shunt, augmented lipogenesis, and reduced AMPK and Krebs cycle activity) and/or nutrient sensing cascade (deregulation of AMPK-TSC1/2-mTOR and PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathways). We analyzed the key metabolic abnormalities underlying RCC carcinogenesis, highlighting those altered pathways that may represent potential targets for the development of more effective therapeutic strategies.

  20. Modulation of phenolic metabolism under stress conditions in a Lotus japonicus mutant lacking plastidic glutamine synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Calderón, Margarita; Pons-Ferrer, Teresa; Mrázova, Anna; Pal'ove-Balang, Peter; Vilková, Mária; Pérez-Delgado, Carmen M; Vega, José M; Eliášová, Adriana; Repčák, Miroslav; Márquez, Antonio J; Betti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    This paper was aimed to investigate the possible implications of the lack of plastidic glutamine synthetase (GS2) in phenolic metabolism during stress responses in the model legume Lotus japonicus. Important changes in the transcriptome were detected in a GS2 mutant called Ljgln2-2, compared to the wild type, in response to two separate stress conditions, such as drought or the result of the impairment of the photorespiratory cycle. Detailed transcriptomic analysis showed that the biosynthesis of phenolic compounds was affected in the mutant plants in these two different types of stress situations. For this reason, the genes and metabolites related to this metabolic route were further investigated using a combined approach of gene expression analysis and metabolite profiling. A high induction of the expression of several genes for the biosynthesis of different branches of the phenolic biosynthetic pathway was detected by qRT-PCR. The extent of induction was always higher in Ljgln2-2, probably reflecting the higher stress levels present in this genotype. This was paralleled by accumulation of several kaempferol and quercetine glycosides, some of them described for the first time in L. japonicus, and of high levels of the isoflavonoid vestitol. The results obtained indicate that the absence of GS2 affects different aspects of phenolic metabolism in L. japonicus plants in response to stress.

  1. Modulation of phenolic metabolism under stress conditions in a Lotus japonicus mutant lacking plastidic glutamine synthetase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita eGarcía-Calderón

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper was aimed to investigate the possible implications of the lack of plastidic glutamine synthetase (GS2 in phenolic metabolism during stress responses in the model legume Lotus japonicus. Important changes in the transcriptome were detected in a GS2 mutant called Ljgln2-2, compared to the wild type, in response to two separate stress conditions, such as drought or the result of the impairment of the photorespiratory cycle. Detailed transcriptomic analysis showed that the biosynthesis of phenolic compounds was affected in the mutant plants in these two different types of stress situations. For this reason, the genes and metabolites related to this metabolic route were further investigated using a combined approach of gene expression analysis and metabolite profiling. A high induction of the expression of several genes for the biosynthesis of different branches of the phenolic biosynthetic pathway was detected by qRT-PCR. The extent of induction was always higher in Ljgln2-2, probably reflecting the higher stress levels present in this genotype. This was paralleled by accumulation of several kaempferol and quercetine glycosides, some of them described for the first time in L. japonicus, and of high levels of the isoflavonoid vestitol. The results obtained indicate that the absence of GS2 affects different aspects of phenolic metabolism in L .japonicus plants in response to stress.

  2. Glutamine supplementation alleviates vasculopathy and corrects metabolic profile in an in vivo model of endothelial cell dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Addabbo

    Full Text Available Endothelial Cell Dysfunction (ECD is a recognized harbinger of a host of chronic cardiovascular diseases. Using a mouse model of ECD triggered by treatment with L-Nω-methylarginine (L-NMMA, we previously demonstrated that renal microvasculature displays a perturbed protein profile, including diminished expression of two key enzymes of the Krebs cycle associated with a Warburg-type suppression of mitochondrial metabolism. We hypothesized that supplementation with L-glutamine (GLN, that can enter the Krebs cycle downstream this enzymatic bottleneck, would normalize vascular function and alleviate mitochondrial dysfunction. To test this hypothesis, mice with chronic L-NMMA-induced ECD were co-treated with GLN at different concentrations for 2 months. Results confirmed that L-NMMA led to a defect in acetylcholine-induced relaxation of aortic rings that was dose-dependently prevented by GLN. In caveolin-1 transgenic mice characterized by eNOS inactivation, L-NMMA further impaired vasorelaxation which was partially rescued by GLN co-treatment. Pro-inflammatory profile induced by L-NMMA was blunted in mice co-treated with GLN. Using an LC/MS platform for metabolite profiling, we sought to identify metabolic perturbations associated with ECD and offset by GLN supplementation. 3453 plasma molecules could be detected with 100% frequency in mice from at least one treatment group. Among these, 37 were found to be differentially expressed in a 4-way comparison of control vs. LNMMA both with and without GLN. One of such molecules, hippuric acid, an "uremic toxin" was found to be elevated in our non-uremic mice receiving L-NMMA, but normalized by treatment with GLN. Ex vivo analysis of hippuric acid effects on vasomotion demonstrated that it significantly reduced acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation of vascular rings. In conclusion, functional and metabolic profiling of animals with early ECD revealed macrovasculopathy and that supplementation GLN is capable

  3. Effect of glutamine synthetase inhibition on brain and interorgan ammonia metabolism in bile duct ligated rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fries, Andreas W; Dadsetan, Sherry; Keiding, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia has a key role in the development of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In the brain, glutamine synthetase (GS) rapidly converts blood-borne ammonia into glutamine which in high concentrations may cause mitochondrial dysfunction and osmolytic brain edema. In astrocyte-neuron cocultures and brains...

  4. A metabolic perturbation by U0126 identifies a role for glutamine in resveratrol-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Michael R; Kim, Jayoung; Lisanti, Michael P; Di Vizio, Dolores

    2011-12-01

    Recent evidence has identified substantial overlap between metabolic and oncogenic biochemical pathways, suggesting novel approaches to cancer intervention. For example, cholesterol lowering statins and the antidiabetes medication metformin both act as chemopreventive agents in prostate and other cancers. The natural compound resveratrol has similar properties: increasing insulin sensitivity, suppressing adipogenesis, and inducing apoptotic death of cancer cells in vitro. However, in vivo tumor xenografts acquire resistance to resveratrol by an unknown mechanism, while mouse models of metabolic disorders respond more consistently to the compound. Here we demonstrate that castration-resistant human prostate cancer C4-2 cells are more sensitive to resveratrol-induced apoptosis than isogenic androgen-dependent LNCaP cells. The MEK inhibitor U0126 antagonized resveratrol-induced apoptosis in C4-2 cells, but this effect was not seen with other MEK inhibitors. U0126 was found to inhibit mitochondrial function and shift cells to aerobic glycolysis independently of MEK. Mitochondrial activity of U0126 arose through decomposition, producing both mitochondrial fluorescence and cyanide, a known inhibitor of complex IV. Applying U0126 mitochondrial inhibition to C4-2 cell apoptosis, we tested the possibility that glutamine supplementation of citric acid cycle intermediate α-ketoglutarate may be involved. Suppression of the conversion of glutamate to α-ketoglutarate antagonized resveratrol-induced death in C4-2 cells. A similar effect was also seen by reducing extracellular glutamine concentration in the culture medium, suggesting that resveratrol-induced death is dependent on glutamine metabolism, a process frequently dysregulated in cancer. Further work on resveratrol and metabolism in cancer is warranted to ascertain if the glutamine dependence has clinical implications.

  5. Renal responses of trout to chronic respiratory and metabolic acidoses and metabolic alkalosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C M; Milligan, C L; Walsh, P J

    1999-08-01

    Exposure to hyperoxia (500-600 torr) or low pH (4.5) for 72 h or NaHCO(3) infusion for 48 h were used to create chronic respiratory (RA) or metabolic acidosis (MA) or metabolic alkalosis in freshwater rainbow trout. During alkalosis, urine pH increased, and [titratable acidity (TA) - HCO(-)(3)] and net H(+) excretion became negative (net base excretion) with unchanged NH(+)(4) efflux. During RA, urine pH did not change, but net H(+) excretion increased as a result of a modest rise in NH(+)(4) and substantial elevation in [TA - HCO(-)(3)] efflux accompanied by a large increase in inorganic phosphate excretion. However, during MA, urine pH fell, and net H(+) excretion was 3.3-fold greater than during RA, reflecting a similar increase in [TA - HCO(-)(3)] and a smaller elevation in phosphate but a sevenfold greater increase in NH(+)(4) efflux. In urine samples of the same pH, [TA - HCO(-)(3)] was greater during RA (reflecting phosphate secretion), and [NH(+)(4)] was greater during MA (reflecting renal ammoniagenesis). Renal activities of potential ammoniagenic enzymes (phosphate-dependent glutaminase, glutamate dehydrogenase, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, alanine aminotransferase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase) and plasma levels of cortisol, phosphate, ammonia, and most amino acids (including glutamine and alanine) increased during MA but not during RA, when only alanine aminotransferase increased. The differential responses to RA vs. MA parallel those in mammals; in fish they may be keyed to activation of phosphate secretion by RA and cortisol mobilization by MA.

  6. An Integrated Metabolic Atlas of Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hakimi, A Ari; Reznik, Ed; Lee, Chung-Han; Creighton, Chad J; Brannon, A Rose; Luna, Augustin; Aksoy, B Arman; Liu, Eric Minwei; Shen, Ronglai; Lee, William; Chen, Yang; Stirdivant, Steve M; Russo, Paul; Chen, Ying-Bei; Tickoo, Satish K; Reuter, Victor E; Cheng, Emily H; Sander, Chris; Hsieh, James J

    2016-01-01

    .... We performed metabolomic profiling on 138 matched clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC)/normal tissue pairs and found that ccRCC is characterized by broad shifts in central carbon metabolism, one-carbon metabolism, and antioxidant response...

  7. Breathless cancer cells get fat on glutamine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dimitrios Anastasiou; Lewis C Cantley

    2012-01-01

    Many cancer cells depend on glutamine as a fuel for proliferation,yet the mechanisms by which glutamine supports cancer metabolism are not fully understood.Two recent studies highlight an important role for glutamine in the synthesis of lipids and provide novel insights into how glutamine metabolism could be targeted for cancer therapy.

  8. Metabolic indicators of drought stress tolerance in wheat: glutamine synthetase isoenzymes and Rubisco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Zoltán; Németh, Edit; Guóth, Adrienn; Bona, Lajos; Wodala, Barnabás; Pécsváradi, Attila

    2013-06-01

    Drought stress has a considerable impact on the ecosystem and agriculture. Continuous water deficit induces early leaf senescence in plants. During this process, chloroplasts are degraded and photosynthesis drastically drops. The objective of this investigation was to look into the regulation of nitrogen and carbon metabolism during water deficit. Rubisco (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase; EC 4.1.1.39) and the total protein contents inform us of the sink-source relation in plants. Glutamine synthetase (GS, EC 6.3.1.2) isoenzymes are good markers of plastid status (GS2) and the nitrogen metabolism (GS1). Tolerant and sensitive wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) genotypes were tested, which are widely used in agriculture. The amount of protein, Rubisco and GS isoforms in leaves were measured during the grain filling period, as indicative traits that ultimately determine the onset and stage of senescence. The symptoms of senescence first appeared on the oldest and finally on the youngest leaves. Drought stress disrupted the sequentiality of senescence in the sensitive varieties. An untimely senescence appeared in flag leaves, earlier than in the older leaves. Total protein and Rubisco contents decreased and the GS2 isoenzyme declined considerably in the youngest leaves. In the tolerant varieties, however, these physiological parameters did not change under drought, only the sequential senescence of leaf levels accelerated in some cases compared to the control, well-watered plants. Our results revealed that GS is a good indicator of drought stress, which can be applied for the characterization of wheat cultivars in terms of drought stress tolerance.

  9. Ammonia metabolism capacity of HepG2 cells with high expression of human glutamine synthetase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan-Hong Tang; Xiao-Qian Wang; Xiu-Jin Li; Yan-Ling Chen

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Currently, one of the tough problems for the application of bioartiifcial liver (BAL) is the shortage of suitable hepatocytes. There are reports on different types of BAL assistance developed with porcine hepatocytes and HepG2 C3A cells, but their defects are obvious. In recent years, some studies focus more on liver cells with features of human origin and improved detoxiifcation. In this study, a hepatocyte line with high expression of human glutamine synthetase (hGS) was raised and its capacity for ammonia metabolism was investigated. METHODS:hGS cDNA and alpha-fetoprotein transcription regulatory element (AFP-TRE) were cloned with the designed primers. The eukaryotic expression vectors, pLNChGS and pLNAFhGS, were constructed and transfected into PA317 cells. Recombinant retroviruses (Retro-hGS and Retro-AFhGS) were produced and then infected into HepG2 cells. G418-resistant cell clones, HepG2/pLNChGS and HepG2/pLNAFhGS, were selected and ampliifed. Then hGS mRNA was measured by semi-quantitative RT-PCR;hGS enzymatic activity and ammonia metabolism analysis in different concentration of NH4+were detected with a quantitative biochemistry kit. The cell proliferation was also detected by MTT chromatometry. RESULTS:The expression of hGS mRNA in HepG2/pLNChGS cells (8.306±0.336) and HepG2/pLNAFhGS cells (21.358±1.716) was much stronger than in control cells (P CONCLUSION:The constructed hepatocytes (HepG2 cells) with speciifc high-expression of hGS have a powerful ability to degrade ammonia in vitro, and provide necessary experimental data for the selection of biomaterials in BAL.

  10. Renal fructose-metabolizing enzymes: significance in hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranhold, J F; Loh, D; Morris, R C

    1969-07-25

    In patients with hereditary fructose intolerance, which is characterized by deficient aldolase activity toward fructose-1-phosphate, fructose induces a renal tubular dysfunction that implicates only the proximal convoluted tubule. Because normal metabolism of fructose by way of fructose-1-phosphate requires fructokinase, aldolase "B," and triokinase, the exclusively cortical location of these enzymes indicates that the medulla is not involved in the metabolic abnormality presumably causal of the renal dysfunction.

  11. Effect of glutamine on the total antioxidant system of rats subjected to renal ischemia and reperfusion Efeito da glutamina no sistema antioxidante total de ratos submetidos a isquemia e reperfusão renal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valter Torezan Gouvêa Junior

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the protective effects of glutamine administered before renal ischemia-reperfusion on plasma antioxidant protection, and lung and renal tissue injury. METHODS: 33 rats underwent right nephrectomy. On the eighth postoperative day, animals were randomized into three groups (n=11: glutamine, control and sham. Each group of animals received, by gavage, a particular diet for 7 days. On day 14 following nephrectomy, the animals were subjected to left renal ischemia-reperfusion. After this, blood samples were collected and the animals were killed. At necropsy the kidney and lung were removed for histology. RESULTS: The levels of total antioxidant capacity were higher in the glutamine group and control group compared with the sham group. The levels of glutathione peroxidase in both the sham and glutamine groups were higher when compared with the control group (pOBJETIVO: Avaliar os efeitos na proteção antioxidante plasmática e na lesão tecidual renal e pulmonar da glutamina oral administrada precedendo a isquemia/ reperfusão renal. MÉTODOS: Trinta e três ratos foram submetidos à nefrectomia à direita. No oitavo dia de pós-operatório, os animais foram randomizados em três grupos (n=11: glutamina, controle e sham. Cada grupo de animal recebeu por gavagem uma dieta distinta por sete dias. Ao final do 14º dia da nefrectomia procedeu-se a isquemia renal esquerda e posterior reperfusão. A seguir procedeu-se a coleta de sangue, eutanásia e retirada do rim e pulmões para análise histológica. RESULTADOS: Os níveis de capacidade antioxidante total foram maiores no grupo glutamina e grupo controle em relação ao grupo sham. Os níveis de glutationa peroxidase nos grupos sham e glutamina foram mais elevados quando comparados com o grupo controle (p<0,05. A dosagem de superóxido dismutase foi maior no grupo sham quando comparado com os grupos glutamina e controle. Não houve diferença na análise histológica do rim e pulm

  12. Glutamine and glutamate as vital metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newsholme P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucose is widely accepted as the primary nutrient for the maintenance and promotion of cell function. This metabolite leads to production of ATP, NADPH and precursors for the synthesis of macromolecules such as nucleic acids and phospholipids. We propose that, in addition to glucose, the 5-carbon amino acids glutamine and glutamate should be considered to be equally important for maintenance and promotion of cell function. The functions of glutamine/glutamate are many, i.e., they are substrates for protein synthesis, anabolic precursors for muscle growth, they regulate acid-base balance in the kidney, they are substrates for ureagenesis in the liver and for hepatic and renal gluconeogenesis, they act as an oxidative fuel for the intestine and cells of the immune system, provide inter-organ nitrogen transport, and act as precursors of neurotransmitter synthesis, of nucleotide and nucleic acid synthesis and of glutathione production. Many of these functions are interrelated with glucose metabolism. The specialized aspects of glutamine/glutamate metabolism of different glutamine-utilizing cells are discussed in the context of glucose requirements and cell function.

  13. [Effect of ATP and glutaminic acid on carbohydrate-energy and nitrogen metabolism in the rat brain and liver under the effect of pulsed electromagnetic field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, L I; Kolodub, F A

    1975-01-01

    Oxidative phosphorylation, content of lactate, creatine phosphate, ammonia and glutamine were studied as affected by ATP and glutaminic acid in the brain and liver of rat subjected to the action of the pulsed electromagnetic field of 7 kHz frequency (72 kA/m, 15 seances). ATP (1 mg per 100 g of weight) was found to have a normalizing effect on the processes of nitrogen metabolism in the rat brain, ATP increasing the intenstiy of the oxidative phosphorylation in the tissues of intact rats, has no analogous influence on the irradiated animals. With administration of glutaminic acid (5 mg per 100 g of weight) the processes of oxidative phosphorylation and nitrogen metabolism, disturbed under the effect of the pulsed electromagnetic field are normalized.

  14. Increasing the culture efficiency of hybridoma cells by the use of integrated metabolic control of glucose and glutamine at low levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling; Mi, Li; Feng, Qiang; Liu, Rong; Tang, Hao; Xie, Li; Yu, Xiaoling; Chen, Zhinan

    2005-08-01

    The metabolism of HAb18 hybridoma cells was shifted to decrease metabolite accumulation and to improve culture efficiency by integrated metabolic control of glucose and glutamine at low levels. When glucose and glutamine levels were decreased to 0.5 and 0.3 mM respectively, lactate and ammonia production were reduced by 62.6 and 74% respectively, glucose-to-cell yield was increased from 0.23x10(9) to 0.66x10(9) cells.mmol-1, and glutamine-to-cell yield from 0.18x10(9) to 1.95x10(9) cells.mmol-1. Compared with high-level glucose and glutamine fed-batch cultures, low-level glucose and glutamine led to higher cell density (1.0x10(7) versus 0.3x10(7) cells.ml-1), longer culture span (14 as opposed to 8 days) and higher antibody yield (250 as against 150 mg.l-1). These results indicate that hybridoma culture efficiency would be increased by the integrated control of glucose and glutamine at 0.5 and 0.3 mM respectively. In contrast with previously reported glucose-and/or-glutamine-level-controlled fed-batch cultures, we demonstrated an efficient strategy of nutrient level selection and amino acid feeding. More importantly, our accurately and well-distributed Equable Feeding Control System opens a new avenue for reducing metabolites to low levels by controlling nutrients at low levels.

  15. Endogenous two-photon fluorescence imaging elucidates metabolic changes related to enhanced glycolysis and glutamine consumption in precancerous epithelial tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varone, Antonio; Xylas, Joanna; Quinn, Kyle P; Pouli, Dimitra; Sridharan, Gautham; McLaughlin-Drubin, Margaret E; Alonzo, Carlo; Lee, Kyongbum; Münger, Karl; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2014-06-01

    Alterations in the balance between different metabolic pathways used to meet cellular bioenergetic and biosynthetic demands are considered hallmarks of cancer. Optical imaging relying on endogenous fluorescence has been used as a noninvasive approach to assess tissue metabolic changes during cancer development. However, quantitative correlations of optical assessments with variations in the concentration of relevant metabolites or in the specific metabolic pathways that are involved have been lacking. In this study, we use high-resolution, depth-resolved imaging, relying entirely on endogenous two-photon excited fluorescence in combination with invasive biochemical assays and mass spectrometry to demonstrate the sensitivity and quantitative nature of optical redox ratio tissue assessments. We identify significant differences in the optical redox ratio of live, engineered normal and precancerous squamous epithelial tissues. We establish that while decreases in the optical redox ratio are associated with enhanced levels of glycolysis relative to oxidative phosphorylation, increases in glutamine consumption to support energy production are associated with increased optical redox ratio values. Such mechanistic insights in the origins of optical metabolic assessments are critical for exploiting fully the potential of such noninvasive approaches to monitor and understand important metabolic changes that occur in live tissues at the onset of cancer or in response to treatment.

  16. Oral supplementations with L-glutamine or L-alanyl-L-glutamine do not change metabolic alterations induced by long-term high-fat diet in the B6.129F2/J mouse model of insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Patricia Martins; Krause, Mauricio; Schroeder, Helena Trevisan; Hahn, Gabriela Fernandes; Takahashi, Hilton Kenji; Schöler, Cinthia Maria; Nicoletti, Graziella; Neto, Luiz Domingos Zavarize; Rodrigues, Maria Inês Lavina; Bruxel, Maciel Alencar; Homem de Bittencourt, Paulo Ivo

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we aimed to investigate the effects of long-term supplementations with L-glutamine or L-alanyl-L-glutamine in the high-fat diet (HFD)-fed B6.129SF2/J mouse model over insulin sensitivity response and signaling, oxidative stress markers, metabolism and HSP70 expression. Mice were fed in a standard low-fat diet (STA) or a HFD for 20 weeks. In the 21th week, mice from the HFD group were allocated in five groups and supplemented for additional 8 weeks with different amino acids: HFD control group (HFD-Con), HFD + dipeptide L-alanyl-L-glutamine group (HFD-Dip), HFD + L-alanine group (HFD-Ala), HFD + L-glutamine group (HFD-Gln), or the HFD + L-alanine + L-glutamine (in their free forms) group (HFD-Ala + Gln). HFD induced higher body weight, fat pad, fasted glucose, and total cholesterol in comparison with STA group. Amino acid supplementations did not induce any modifications in these parameters. Although insulin tolerance tests indicated insulin resistance in all HFD groups, amino acid supplementations did not improve insulin sensitivity in the present model. There were also no significant differences in the immunocontents of insulin receptor, Akt, and Toll-like receptor-4. Notably, total 70 kDa heat shock protein (HSP72 + HSP73) contents in the liver was markedly increased in HFD-Con group as compared to STA group, which might suggest that insulin resistance is only in the beginning. Apparently, B6.129SF2/J mice are more resistant to the harmful effects of HFD through a mechanism that may include gut adaptation, reducing the absorption of nutrients, including amino acids, which may explain the lack of improvements in our intervention.

  17. Adaptations of Arginine's Intestinal-Renal Axis in Cachectic Tumor-Bearing Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buijs, Nikki; Vermeulen, Mechteld A R; Weeda, Viola B; Bading, James R; Houdijk, Alexander P J; van Leeuwen, Paul A M

    2015-01-01

    Malignancies induce disposal of arginine, an important substrate for the immune system. To sustain immune function, the tumor-bearing host accelerates arginine's intestinal-renal axis by glutamine mobilization from skeletal muscle and this may promote cachexia. Glutamine supplementation stimulates argi-nine production in healthy subjects. Arginine's intestinal-renal axis and the effect of glutamine supplementation in cancer cach-exia have not been investigated. This study evaluated the long-term adaptations of the interorgan pathway for arginine production following the onset of cachexia and the metabolic effect of glutamine supplementation in the cachectic state. Fischer-344 rats were randomly divided into a tumor-bearing group (n = 12), control group (n = 7) and tumor-bearing group receiving a glutamine-enriched diet (n = 9). Amino acid fluxes and net fractional extractions across intestine, kidneys, and liver were studied. Compared to controls, the portal-drained viscera of tumor-bearing rats took up significantly more glutamine and released significantly less citrulline. Renal metabolism was unchanged in the cachectic tumor-bearing rats compared with controls. Glutamine supplementation had no effects on intestinal and renal adaptations. In conclusion, in the cachectic state, an increase in intestinal glutamine uptake is not accompanied by an increase in renal arginine production. The adaptations found in the cachectic, tumor-bearing rat do not depend on glutamine availability.

  18. Glutamine as an immunonutrient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeyoung

    2011-11-01

    Dietary supplementation with nutrients enhancing immune function is beneficial in patients with surgical and critical illness. Malnutrition and immune dysfunction are common features in hospitalized patients. Specific nutrients with immunological and pharmacological effects, when consumed in amounts above the daily requirement, are referred to as immune-enhancing nutrients or immunonutrients. Supplementation of immunonutrients is important especially for patients with immunodeficiency, virus or overwhelming infections accompanied by a state of malnutrition. Representative immunonutrients are arginine, omega-3 fatty acids, glutamine, nucleotides, beta-carotene, and/or branched-chain amino acids. Glutamine is the most abundant amino acid and performs multiple roles in human body. However, glutamine is depleted from muscle stores during severe metabolic stress including sepsis and major surgery. Therefore it is considered conditionally essential under these conditions. This review discusses the physiological role of glutamine, mode and dose for glutamine administration, as well as improvement of certain disease state after glutamine supplementation. Even though immunonutrition has not been widely assimilated by clinicians other than nutritionists, immunonutrients including glutamine may exert beneficial influence on diverse patient populations.

  19. Pb2+ exposure induced microsatellite instability in Pisum sativum in a locus related with glutamine metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, E; Azevedo, R; Moreira, H; Souto, L; Santos, Conceição

    2013-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is a toxic element, but its putative mutagenic effects in plant cells, using molecular markers, remain to unveil. To evaluate if Pb induces mutagenicity, Pisum sativum L. seedlings were exposed to Pb(2+) (up to 2000 mg L(-1)) for 28 days and the instability of microsatellites (or Simple Sequence Repeats, SSR) was analyzed in leaves and roots. The analysis of eight selected microsatellites (SSR1-SSR8) demonstrated that only at the highest dosage microsatellite instability (MSI) occurred, at a frequency of 4.2%. Changes were detected in one microsatellite (SSR6) that is inserted in the locus for glutamine synthetase. SSR6 products of roots exposed to the highest concentration of Pb were 3 bp larger than those of the control. Our data demonstrate that: (a) SSR technique is sensitive to detect Pb-induced mutagenicity in plants. MSI instability is Pb dose dependent and organ dependent (roots are more sensitive); (b) the Pb-sensitive SSR6 is inserted in the glutamine synthetase locus, with still unknown relation with functional changes of this enzyme; (c) Pb levels inducing MSI are much above the maximum admitted levels in some European Union countries for agricultural purpose waters. In conclusion, we propose here the potential use of SSR to evaluate Pb(2+)-induced mutagenicity, in combination with other genetic markers.

  20. Glutamine Modulates Macrophage Lipotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li He

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and diabetes are associated with excessive inflammation and impaired wound healing. Increasing evidence suggests that macrophage dysfunction is responsible for these inflammatory defects. In the setting of excess nutrients, particularly dietary saturated fatty acids (SFAs, activated macrophages develop lysosome dysfunction, which triggers activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and cell death. The molecular pathways that connect lipid stress to lysosome pathology are not well understood, but may represent a viable target for therapy. Glutamine uptake is increased in activated macrophages leading us to hypothesize that in the context of excess lipids glutamine metabolism could overwhelm the mitochondria and promote the accumulation of toxic metabolites. To investigate this question we assessed macrophage lipotoxicity in the absence of glutamine using LPS-activated peritoneal macrophages exposed to the SFA palmitate. We found that glutamine deficiency reduced lipid induced lysosome dysfunction, inflammasome activation, and cell death. Under glutamine deficient conditions mTOR activation was decreased and autophagy was enhanced; however, autophagy was dispensable for the rescue phenotype. Rather, glutamine deficiency prevented the suppressive effect of the SFA palmitate on mitochondrial respiration and this phenotype was associated with protection from macrophage cell death. Together, these findings reveal that crosstalk between activation-induced metabolic reprogramming and the nutrient microenvironment can dramatically alter macrophage responses to inflammatory stimuli.

  1. Synthesis and Radiolabelling of DOTA-Linked Glutamine Analogues with 67,68Ga as Markers for Increased Glutamine Metabolism in Tumour Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Greguric

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available DOTA-linked glutamine analogues with a C6- alkyl and polyethyleneglycol (PEG chain between the chelating group and the L-glutamine moiety were synthesised and labelled with 67,68Ga using established methods. High yields were achieved for the radiolabelling of the molecules with both radionuclides (>90%, although conversion of the commercially available 67Ga-citrate to the chloride species was a requirement for consistent high radiochemical yields. The generator produced 68Ga was in the [68Ga(OH4]− form. The 67Ga complexes and the 67Ga complexes were demonstrated to be stable in PBS buffer for a week. Uptake studies were performed with longer lived 67Ga analogues against four tumour cell lines, as well as uptake inhibition studies against L-glutamine, and two known amino acid transporter inhibitors. Marginal uptake was exhibited in the PEG variant radio-complex, and inhibition studies indicate this uptake is via a non-targeted amino acid pathway.

  2. The role of glutamine oxoglutarate aminotransferase and glutamate dehydrogenase in nitrogen metabolism in Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albertus J Viljoen

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that the regulation of intracellular glutamate levels could play an important role in the ability of pathogenic slow-growing mycobacteria to grow in vivo. However, little is known about the in vitro requirement for the enzymes which catalyse glutamate production and degradation in the slow-growing mycobacteria, namely; glutamine oxoglutarate aminotransferase (GOGAT and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH, respectively. We report that allelic replacement of the Mycobacterium bovis BCG gltBD-operon encoding for the large (gltB and small (gltD subunits of GOGAT with a hygromycin resistance cassette resulted in glutamate auxotrophy and that deletion of the GDH encoding-gene (gdh led to a marked growth deficiency in the presence of L-glutamate as a sole nitrogen source as well as reduction in growth when cultured in an excess of L-asparagine.

  3. Clinical use of glutamine supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernerman, Jan

    2008-10-01

    Endogenous production of glutamine may become insufficient during critical illness. The shortage of glutamine is reflected as a decrease in plasma concentration, which is a prognostic factor for poor outcome in sepsis. Because glutamine is a precursor for nucleotide synthesis, rapidly dividing cells are most likely to suffer from a shortage. Therefore, exogenous glutamine supplementation is necessary. In particular, when i.v. nutrition is given, extra glutamine supplementation becomes critical, because most present formulations for i.v. use do not contain any glutamine for technical reasons. The major part of endogenously produced glutamine comes from skeletal muscle. For patients staying a long time in the intensive care unit (ICU), the muscle mass decreases rapidly, which leaves a tissue of diminishing size to maintain the export of glutamine. The metabolic and nutritional adaptation in long-staying ICU patients is poorly studied and is one of the fields that needs more scientific evidence for clinical recommendations. To date, there is evidence to support the clinical use of glutamine supplementation in critically ill patients, in hematology patients, and in oncology patients. Strong evidence is presently available for i.v. glutamine supplementation to critically ill patients on parenteral nutrition. This must be regarded as the standard of care. For patients on enteral nutrition, more evidence is needed. To guide administration of glutamine, there are good arguments to use measurement of plasma glutamine concentration for guidance. This will give an indication for treatment as well as proper dosing. Most patients will have a normalized plasma glutamine concentration by adding 20-25 g/24 h. Furthermore, there are no reported adverse or negative effects attributable to glutamine supplementation.

  4. Arginine deiminase resistance in melanoma cells is associated with metabolic reprogramming, glucose dependence, and glutamine addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yan; Tsai, Wen-Bin; Wangpaichitr, Medhi; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Savaraj, Niramol; Feun, Lynn G; Kuo, Macus Tien

    2013-11-01

    Many malignant human tumors, including melanomas, are auxotrophic for arginine due to reduced expression of argininosuccinate synthetase-1 (ASS1), the rate-limiting enzyme for arginine biosynthesis. Pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG20), which degrades extracellular arginine, resulting in arginine deprivation, has shown favorable results in clinical trials for treating arginine-auxotrophic tumors. Drug resistance is the major obstacle for effective ADI-PEG20 usage. To elucidate mechanisms of resistance, we established several ADI-PEG20-resistant (ADI(R)) variants from A2058 and SK-Mel-2 melanoma cells. Compared with the parental lines, these ADI(R) variants showed the following characteristics: (i) all ADI(R) cell lines showed elevated ASS1 expression, resulting from the constitutive binding of the transcription factor c-Myc on the ASS1 promoter, suggesting that elevated ASS1 is the major mechanism of resistance; (ii) the ADI(R) cell lines exhibited enhanced AKT signaling and were preferentially sensitive to PI3K/AKT inhibitors, but reduced mTOR signaling, and were preferentially resistant to mTOR inhibitor; (iii) these variants showed enhanced expression of glucose transporter-1 and lactate dehydrogenase-A, reduced expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase, and elevated sensitivity to the glycolytic inhibitors 2-deoxy-glucose and 3-bromopyruvate, consistent with the enhanced glycolytic pathway (the Warburg effect); (iv) the resistant cells showed higher glutamine dehydrogenase and glutaminase expression and were preferentially vulnerable to glutamine inhibitors. We showed that c-Myc, not elevated ASS1 expression, is involved in upregulation of many of these enzymes because knockdown of c-Myc reduced their expression, whereas overexpressed ASS1 by transfection reduced their expression. This study identified multiple targets for overcoming ADI-PEG resistance in cancer chemotherapy using recombinant arginine-degrading enzymes.

  5. Metabolic and immune effects of dietary arginine, glutamine and omega-3 fatty acids supplementation in immunocompromised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuntrasakul, C; Siltharm, S; Sarasombath, S; Sittapairochana, C; Leowattana, W; Chockvivatanavanit, S; Bunnak, A

    1998-05-01

    To evaluate the nutritional, metabolic and immune effects of dietary arginine, glutamine and omega-3 fatty acids (fish oil) supplementation in immunocompromised patients, we performed a prospective study on the effect of immune formula administered to 11 severe trauma patients (average ISS = 24), 10 burn patients (average % TBSA = 48) and 5 cancer patients. Daily calorie and protein administration were based on the patient's severity (Stress factor with the range of 35-50 kcal/kg/day and 1.5-2.5 g/kg/day, respectively) Starting with half concentration liquid immune formula through nasogastric tube by continuous drip at 30 ml/h and increasing to maximum level within 4 days. The additional energy and protein requirement will be given either by parenteral or oral nutritional support. Various nutritional, metabolic, immunologic and clinical parameters were observed on day 0 (baseline), day 3, 7, and 14. Analysis was performed by paired student-t test. Initial mean serum albumin and transferrin showed mild (trauma) to moderate (burn and cancer) degree of malnutrition. Significant improvement of nutritional parameters was seen at day 7 and 14 in trauma and burn patients. Significant increase of total lymphocyte count (day 7, P patients. C-reactive protein decreased significantly on day 7 (p patients were observed. Two cases of nausea, 4 cases of vomiting, 5 cases of diarrhea (critically ill patients will be clarified.

  6. Metabolic Reconstruction of Glutamate-Glutamine Cycling: A Flux Balance Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George E. Barreto

    2015-04-01

    Cells, tissues, organs and organisms can be understood as a large number of interconnected networks of biochemical pathways, genes, transcripts and proteins which give rise to emergent and specific functions and behaviors in a complex biological system. The complexity exhibited by these systems imposes considerable challenges to understand how they behave and work. For instance, diseases or patho-physiological states are complex conditions that must be considered in a holistic approach because they involve intricate interactions between thousands of components such as genes, transcripts and proteins. In this context, diseases are considered as perturbed states of these networks which can be used to identify components (e.g. metabolites, enzymes, etc. and interactions that are gained or lost, as well as the biochemical pathways involved. Therefore, discrimination of components and interactions that are not relevant or informative is important to embrace the complexity for understanding biological processes. Systems biology, Network medicine and the recent Systems neuroscience has been successfully applied to make this complexity comprehensible in the different fields of biology, physiology, medicine and neuroscience. To illustrate these approaches within the framework of the workshop “Latin-American School on glial cells in the diseased brain”, we reconstruct the well-known glutamate/glutamine cycle to understand how glutamate can be a neurotoxic agent through glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in neurons and astrocytes.

  7. Drug metabolism in chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichette, Vincent; Leblond, François A

    2003-04-01

    Pharmacokinetic studies conducted in patients with CRF demonstrate that the nonrenal clearance of multiple drugs is reduced. Although the mechanism by which this occurs is unclear, several studies have shown that CRF affects the metabolism of drugs by inhibiting key enzymatic systems in the liver, intestine and kidney. The down-regulation of selected isoforms of the hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP450) has been reported secondary to a decrease in gene expression. This is associated with major reductions in metabolism of drugs mediated by CYP450. The main hypothesis to explain the decrease in liver CYP450 activity in CRF appears to be the accumulation of circulating factors which can modulate CYP450 activity. Liver phase II metabolic reactions are also reduced in CRF. On the other hand, intestinal drug disposition is affected in CRF. Increased bioavailability of several drugs has been reported in CRF, reflecting decrease in either intestinal first-pass metabolism or extrusion of drugs (mediated by P-glycoprotein). Indeed, intestinal CYP450 is also down-regulated secondary to reduced gene expression, whereas, decreased intestinal P-glycoprotein activity has been described. Finally, although the kidneys play a major role in the excretion of drugs, it has the capacity to metabolize endogenous and exogenous compounds. CRF will lead to a decrease in the ability of the kidney to metabolize drugs, but the repercussions on the systemic clearance of drugs is still poorly defined, except for selected xenobiotics. In conclusion, reduced drug metabolism should be taken into account when evaluating the pharmacokinetics of drugs in patients with CRF.

  8. Analysis and physiological implications of renal 2-oxoglutaramate metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissim, I; Wehrli, S; States, B; Nissim, I; Yudkoff, M

    1991-07-01

    The relative significance of the flux through the glutamine aminotransferase (glutaminase II) pathway to renal ammoniagenesis is poorly understood. A basic and unresolved question is whether 2-oxoglutaramate (2-OGM), a product of the glutaminase II reaction, is deamidated to yield 2-oxoglutarate and NH3, or whether 2-OGM accumulates as an unreactive lactam, depending on the environmental pH. In the current studies we utilized 13C n.m.r. as well as 15N n.m.r. as well as 15N n.m.r. to demonstrate that 2-OGM occurs as a lactam, i.e. 5-hydroxypyroglutamate, regardless of the environmental pH. Our additional aims were to determine whether human kidney cells (HK cells) in culture can produce 2-OGM and to ascertain a pH-dependent relationship between NH3 and 2-OGM production from glutamine. We therefore developed an isotope dilution assay for 2-OGM utilizing 5-hydroxy[4-13C,1-15N]pyroglutamate as the labelled species. Incubations of HK cells in minimal essential medium supplemented with 1 mM-[2-15N]glutamine demonstrated significantly higher production of 2-OGM at pH 6.8 and lower production at pH 7.6 compared with pH 7.4. Similarly both 15NH3 and [15N]alanine formation were significantly higher in acute acidosis (pH 6.8) and lower in acute alkalosis (pH 7.6) compared with that at physiological pH. Addition of 1 mM-amino-oxyacetate to the incubation medium at pH 7.4 significantly diminished [15N]alanine and 2-OGM production, but the production of 15NH3 via the glutamate dehydrogenase pathway was significantly stimulated. The current observations indicate that the glutaminase II pathway plays a minor role and that flux through glutamate dehydrogenase is the predominant site for regulation of ammoniagenesis in human kidney.

  9. An Integrated Metabolic Atlas of Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakimi, A Ari; Reznik, Ed; Lee, Chung-Han; Creighton, Chad J; Brannon, A Rose; Luna, Augustin; Aksoy, B Arman; Liu, Eric Minwei; Shen, Ronglai; Lee, William; Chen, Yang; Stirdivant, Steve M; Russo, Paul; Chen, Ying Bei; Tickoo, Satish K; Reuter, Victor E; Cheng, Emily H; Sander, Chris; Hsieh, James J

    2016-01-11

    Dysregulated metabolism is a hallmark of cancer, manifested through alterations in metabolites. We performed metabolomic profiling on 138 matched clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC)/normal tissue pairs and found that ccRCC is characterized by broad shifts in central carbon metabolism, one-carbon metabolism, and antioxidant response. Tumor progression and metastasis were associated with metabolite increases in glutathione and cysteine/methionine metabolism pathways. We develop an analytic pipeline and visualization tool (metabolograms) to bridge the gap between TCGA transcriptomic profiling and our metabolomic data, which enables us to assemble an integrated pathway-level metabolic atlas and to demonstrate discordance between transcriptome and metabolome. Lastly, expression profiling was performed on a high-glutathione cluster, which corresponds to a poor-survival subgroup in the ccRCC TCGA cohort. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The tacrolimus metabolism rate influences renal function after kidney transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerold Thölking

    Full Text Available The effective calcineurin inhibitor (CNI tacrolimus (Tac is an integral part of the standard immunosuppressive regimen after renal transplantation (RTx. However, as a potent CNI it has nephrotoxic potential leading to impaired renal function in some cases. Therefore, it is of high clinical impact to identify factors which can predict who is endangered to develop CNI toxicity. We hypothesized that the Tac metabolism rate expressed as the blood concentration normalized by the dose (C/D ratio is such a simple predictor. Therefore, we analyzed the impact of the C/D ratio on kidney function after RTx. Renal function was analyzed 1, 2, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after RTx in 248 patients with an immunosuppressive regimen including basiliximab, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. According to keep the approach simple, patients were split into three C/D groups: fast, intermediate and slow metabolizers. Notably, compared with slow metabolizers fast metabolizers of Tac showed significantly lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR values at all the time points analyzed. Moreover, fast metabolizers underwent more indication renal biopsies (p = 0.006 which revealed a higher incidence of CNI nephrotoxicity (p = 0.015 and BK nephropathy (p = 0.024 in this group. We herein identified the C/D ratio as an easy calculable risk factor for the development of CNI nephrotoxicity and BK nephropathy after RTx. We propose that the simple C/D ratio should be taken into account early in patient's risk management strategies.

  11. Proteomic profiling and pathway analysis of the response of rat renal proximal convoluted tubules to metabolic acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Kevin L; Freund, Dana M; Prenni, Jessica E; Curthoys, Norman P

    2013-09-01

    Metabolic acidosis is a relatively common pathological condition that is defined as a decrease in blood pH and bicarbonate concentration. The renal proximal convoluted tubule responds to this condition by increasing the extraction of plasma glutamine and activating ammoniagenesis and gluconeogenesis. The combined processes increase the excretion of acid and produce bicarbonate ions that are added to the blood to partially restore acid-base homeostasis. Only a few cytosolic proteins, such as phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, have been determined to play a role in the renal response to metabolic acidosis. Therefore, further analysis was performed to better characterize the response of the cytosolic proteome. Proximal convoluted tubule cells were isolated from rat kidney cortex at various times after onset of acidosis and fractionated to separate the soluble cytosolic proteins from the remainder of the cellular components. The cytosolic proteins were analyzed using two-dimensional liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Spectral counting along with average MS/MS total ion current were used to quantify temporal changes in relative protein abundance. In all, 461 proteins were confidently identified, of which 24 exhibited statistically significant changes in abundance. To validate these techniques, several of the observed abundance changes were confirmed by Western blotting. Data from the cytosolic fractions were then combined with previous proteomic data, and pathway analyses were performed to identify the primary pathways that are activated or inhibited in the proximal convoluted tubule during the onset of metabolic acidosis.

  12. Proteomic profiling and pathway analysis of the response of rat renal proximal convoluted tubules to metabolic acidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Kevin L.; Freund, Dana M.; Prenni, Jessica E.

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis is a relatively common pathological condition that is defined as a decrease in blood pH and bicarbonate concentration. The renal proximal convoluted tubule responds to this condition by increasing the extraction of plasma glutamine and activating ammoniagenesis and gluconeogenesis. The combined processes increase the excretion of acid and produce bicarbonate ions that are added to the blood to partially restore acid-base homeostasis. Only a few cytosolic proteins, such as phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, have been determined to play a role in the renal response to metabolic acidosis. Therefore, further analysis was performed to better characterize the response of the cytosolic proteome. Proximal convoluted tubule cells were isolated from rat kidney cortex at various times after onset of acidosis and fractionated to separate the soluble cytosolic proteins from the remainder of the cellular components. The cytosolic proteins were analyzed using two-dimensional liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Spectral counting along with average MS/MS total ion current were used to quantify temporal changes in relative protein abundance. In all, 461 proteins were confidently identified, of which 24 exhibited statistically significant changes in abundance. To validate these techniques, several of the observed abundance changes were confirmed by Western blotting. Data from the cytosolic fractions were then combined with previous proteomic data, and pathway analyses were performed to identify the primary pathways that are activated or inhibited in the proximal convoluted tubule during the onset of metabolic acidosis. PMID:23804448

  13. Calcium renal lithiasis: metabolic diagnosis and medical treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel Angel Arrabal-Polo; Miguel Arrabal-Martin; Juan Garrido-Gomez

    2013-01-01

    Calcium renal lithiasis is a frequent condition that affects the worldwide population and has a high recurrence rate. Different metabolic changes may trigger the onset of calcium stone disorders, such as hypercalciuria, hyperoxaluria, hyperuricosuria, hypocitraturia and others. There are also other very prevalent disorders that are associated with calcium calculi, such as arterial hypertension, obesity and loss of bone mineral density. A correct diagnosis needs to be obtained through examinin...

  14. Discontinued drug in 2007: renal, endocrine and metabolic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colca, Jerry R

    2008-11-01

    This perspective is the first part of an annual series of papers discussing drugs dropped from clinical development in the previous year. Specifically, this paper focuses on the 14 renal, endocrine and metabolic drugs discontinued in 2007. The candidates covered in this summary were being developed for treatment of diabetes, obesity, reproductive and urogenital health issues, and growth hormone deficiency. Information for this perspective was derived from a search of the Pharmaprojects database for drugs discontinued after reaching Phase I - III clinical trials.

  15. Calcium renal lithiasis: metabolic diagnosis and medical treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel Arrabal-Polo

    Full Text Available Calcium renal lithiasis is a frequent condition that affects the worldwide population and has a high recurrence rate. Different metabolic changes may trigger the onset of calcium stone disorders, such as hypercalciuria, hyperoxaluria, hyperuricosuria, hypocitraturia and others. There are also other very prevalent disorders that are associated with calcium calculi, such as arterial hypertension, obesity and loss of bone mineral density. A correct diagnosis needs to be obtained through examining the serum and urinary parameters of mineral metabolism in order to carry out adequate prevention and treatment of this condition. Once the metabolic diagnosis is known, it is possible to establish dietary and pharmacological treatment that may enable monitoring of the disease and prevent recurrence of stone formation. Some advances in treating this pathological condition have been made, and these include use of sodium alendronate in patients with calcium renal lithiasis and osteopenia/osteoporosis, or use of a combination of a thiazide with a bisphosphonate. In summary, calcium renal lithiasis often requires multidrug treatment with strict control and follow-up of patients.

  16. Calcium renal lithiasis: metabolic diagnosis and medical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrabal-Polo, Miguel Angel; Arrabal-Martin, Miguel; Garrido-Gomez, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Calcium renal lithiasis is a frequent condition that affects the worldwide population and has a high recurrence rate. Different metabolic changes may trigger the onset of calcium stone disorders, such as hypercalciuria, hyperoxaluria, hyperuricosuria, hypocitraturia and others. There are also other very prevalent disorders that are associated with calcium calculi, such as arterial hypertension, obesity and loss of bone mineral density. A correct diagnosis needs to be obtained through examining the serum and urinary parameters of mineral metabolism in order to carry out adequate prevention and treatment of this condition. Once the metabolic diagnosis is known, it is possible to establish dietary and pharmacological treatment that may enable monitoring of the disease and prevent recurrence of stone formation. Some advances in treating this pathological condition have been made, and these include use of sodium alendronate in patients with calcium renal lithiasis and osteopenia/osteoporosis, or use of a combination of a thiazide with a bisphosphonate. In summary, calcium renal lithiasis often requires multidrug treatment with strict control and follow-up of patients.

  17. Glutamine dipeptide and cortisol change the liver glucose metabolism and reduce the severity of insulin-induced hypoglycaemia in untreated T1DM Swiss mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataglini, Camila; Rezende, Diego G L; Primo, Marcos A; Gomes, Célia R G; Pedrosa, Maria M D; Godoi, Vilma A F

    2017-05-01

    Glutamine is conditionally essential in type 1 diabetes mellitus, and might be useful to counteract hypoglycaemia. To investigate the systemic and hepatic effects of counter-regulatory hormones and glutamine dipeptide (GDP) during hypoglycemic episodes. Diabetic Swiss mice made hypoglycaemic by insulin injection (1 U/kg) were given counter-regulatory hormones and/or GDP. Sixty minutes later, liver histology, liver glucose metabolism and plasma were assessed. Combined, cortisol and GDP improved the hypoglycemic profile. During liver perfusion, gluconeogenesis was possibly the major pathway leading to glucose release. Perfusion with gluconeogenic precursors after glycogen depletion by adrenaline increased liver glucose and urea release. The less severe hypoglycaemia could result from cortisol stimulating periportal gluconeogenesis and GDP inhibiting pericentral glycogenolysis, both favouring liver glucose release. At least some benefits of GDP and cortisol during hypoglycaemia came from their hepatic actions, and their use in diabetic patients should be explored.

  18. II. Glutamine and glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapiero, H; Mathé, G; Couvreur, P; Tew, K D

    2002-11-01

    Glutamine and glutamate with proline, histidine, arginine and ornithine, comprise 25% of the dietary amino acid intake and constitute the "glutamate family" of amino acids, which are disposed of through conversion to glutamate. Although glutamine has been classified as a nonessential amino acid, in major trauma, major surgery, sepsis, bone marrow transplantation, intense chemotherapy and radiotherapy, when its consumption exceeds its synthesis, it becomes a conditionally essential amino acid. In mammals the physiological levels of glutamine is 650 micromol/l and it is one of the most important substrate for ammoniagenesis in the gut and in the kidney due to its important role in the regulation of acid-base homeostasis. In cells, glutamine is a key link between carbon metabolism of carbohydrates and proteins and plays an important role in the growth of fibroblasts, lymphocytes and enterocytes. It improves nitrogen balance and preserves the concentration of glutamine in skeletal muscle. Deamidation of glutamine via glutaminase produces glutamate a precursor of gamma-amino butyric acid, a neurotransmission inhibitor. L-Glutamic acid is a ubiquitous amino acid present in many foods either in free form or in peptides and proteins. Animal protein may contain from 11 to 22% and plants protein as much as 40% glutamate by weight. The sodium salt of glutamic acid is added to several foods to enhance flavor. L-Glutamate is the most abundant free amino acid in brain and it is the major excitatory neurotransmitter of the vertebrate central nervous system. Most free L-glutamic acid in brain is derived from local synthesis from L-glutamine and Kreb's cycle intermediates. It clearly plays an important role in neuronal differentiation, migration and survival in the developing brain via facilitated Ca++ transport. Glutamate also plays a critical role in synaptic maintenance and plasticity. It contributes to learning and memory through use-dependent changes in synaptic efficacy and

  19. Exogenous glutamine: the clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongers, Thomas; Griffiths, Richard D; McArdle, Anne

    2007-09-01

    We know that critically ill patients suffering from undernutrition with a limited nutritional reserve have a poorer outcome. Furthermore, having a low body mass index has been shown to be an independent predictor of excess mortality in multiple organ failure. Therefore, nutritional support has gained increasing interest in critical illness with the hope of preventing or attenuating the effects of malnutrition. A negative nitrogen balance is the characteristic metabolic feature in critical illness, with the major protein loss derived from skeletal muscle. In particular, glutamine concentrations are rapidly reduced in plasma and muscle. Over the last 20 yrs or so, increasing evidence is emerging to support the use of glutamine supplementation in critical illness. Clinical trials have found a mortality and morbidity advantage with glutamine supplementation. The advantage appears to be greater the more glutamine is given and greater again when given parenterally. Various modes of action have been postulated. Glutamine seems to have an effect on the immune system, antioxidant status, glucose metabolism, and heat shock protein response. However, the benefit of exogenous glutamine on morbidity and mortality is not universally accepted. This review critically appraises the current clinical evidence regarding glutamine supplementation in critical illness.

  20. Mechanisms of the Effects of Acidosis and Hypokalemia on Renal Ammonia Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Ki-Hwan

    2011-01-01

    Renal ammonia metabolism is the predominant component of net acid excretion and new bicarbonate generation. Renal ammonia metabolism is regulated by acid-base balance. Both acute and chronic acid loads enhance ammonia production in the proximal tubule and secretion into the urine. In contrast, alkalosis reduces ammoniagenesis. Hypokalemia is a common electrolyte disorder that significantly increases renal ammonia production and excretion, despite causing metabolic alkalosis. Although the net ...

  1. Neuronal Cell Death Induced by Mechanical Percussion Trauma in Cultured Neurons is not Preceded by Alterations in Glucose, Lactate and Glutamine Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jayakumar, A R; Bak, L K; Rama Rao, K V

    2016-01-01

    contribute to the development of neuronal injury. Cell viability was assayed using the release of the cytoplasmic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), together with fluorescence-based cell staining (calcein and ethidium homodimer-1 for live and dead cells, respectively). Trauma had no effect on the LDH...... dysfunction and subsequent energy failure play a role in the pathogenesis of TBI. We therefore examined whether oxidative metabolism of (13)C-labeled glucose, lactate or glutamine is altered early following in vitro mechanical percussion-induced trauma (5 atm) to neurons (4-24 h), and whether such events...

  2. Photoperiodic regulation of glycogen metabolism, glycolysis, and glutamine synthesis in tanycytes of the Siberian hamster suggests novel roles of tanycytes in hypothalamic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilaweera, Kanishka; Herwig, Annika; Bolborea, Matei; Campbell, Gill; Mayer, Claus D; Morgan, Peter J; Ebling, Francis J P; Barrett, Perry

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the impact of photoperiod on the temporal and spatial expression of genes involved in glucose metabolism in the brain of the seasonal mammal Phodopus sungorus (Siberian hamster). In situ hybridization was performed on brain sections obtained from male hamsters held in long photoperiod (high body weight and developed testes) or short photoperiod (reduced body weight with testicular regression). This analysis revealed upregulation in expression of genes involved in glycogen and glucose metabolism in short photoperiod and localized to the tanycyte layer of the third ventricle. On the basis of these data and a previously identified photoperiod-dependent increase in activity of neighboring hypothalamic neurons, we hypothesized that the observed expression changes may reflect alteration in either metabolic fuel or precursor neurotransmitter supply to surrounding neurons. Gene expression analysis was performed for genes involved in lactate and glutamate transport. This analysis showed that the gene for the lactate transporter MCT2 and glutamate transporter GLAST was decreased in the tanycyte layer in short photoperiod. Expression of mRNA for glutamine synthetase, the final enzyme in the synthesis of the neuronal neurotransmitter precursor, glutamine, was also decreased in short photoperiod. These data suggest a role for tanycytes in modulating glutamate concentrations and neurotransmitter supply in the hypothalamic environment.

  3. Expression profiles of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism and disposition in human renal tissues and renal cell models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Hauwaert, Cynthia; Savary, Grégoire [EA4483, Université de Lille 2, Faculté de Médecine de Lille, Pôle Recherche, 59045 Lille (France); Buob, David [Institut de Pathologie, Centre de Biologie Pathologie Génétique, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire de Lille, 59037 Lille (France); Leroy, Xavier; Aubert, Sébastien [Institut de Pathologie, Centre de Biologie Pathologie Génétique, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire de Lille, 59037 Lille (France); Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, UMR837, Centre de Recherche Jean-Pierre Aubert, Equipe 5, 59045 Lille (France); Flamand, Vincent [Service d' Urologie, Hôpital Huriez, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire de Lille, 59037 Lille (France); Hennino, Marie-Flore [EA4483, Université de Lille 2, Faculté de Médecine de Lille, Pôle Recherche, 59045 Lille (France); Service de Néphrologie, Hôpital Huriez, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire de Lille, 59037 Lille (France); Perrais, Michaël [Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, UMR837, Centre de Recherche Jean-Pierre Aubert, Equipe 5, 59045 Lille (France); and others

    2014-09-15

    Numerous xenobiotics have been shown to be harmful for the kidney. Thus, to improve our knowledge of the cellular processing of these nephrotoxic compounds, we evaluated, by real-time PCR, the mRNA expression level of 377 genes encoding xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XMEs), transporters, as well as nuclear receptors and transcription factors that coordinate their expression in eight normal human renal cortical tissues. Additionally, since several renal in vitro models are commonly used in pharmacological and toxicological studies, we investigated their metabolic capacities and compared them with those of renal tissues. The same set of genes was thus investigated in HEK293 and HK2 immortalized cell lines in commercial primary cultures of epithelial renal cells and in proximal tubular cell primary cultures. Altogether, our data offers a comprehensive description of kidney ability to process xenobiotics. Moreover, by hierarchical clustering, we observed large variations in gene expression profiles between renal cell lines and renal tissues. Primary cultures of proximal tubular epithelial cells exhibited the highest similarities with renal tissue in terms of transcript profiling. Moreover, compared to other renal cell models, Tacrolimus dose dependent toxic effects were lower in proximal tubular cell primary cultures that display the highest metabolism and disposition capacity. Therefore, primary cultures appear to be the most relevant in vitro model for investigating the metabolism and bioactivation of nephrotoxic compounds and for toxicological and pharmacological studies. - Highlights: • Renal proximal tubular (PT) cells are highly sensitive to xenobiotics. • Expression of genes involved in xenobiotic disposition was measured. • PT cells exhibited the highest similarities with renal tissue.

  4. Alterations in Cerebral Cortical Glucose and Glutamine Metabolism Precedes Amyloid Plaques in the APPswe/PSEN1dE9 Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens V; Christensen, Sofie K; Aldana, Blanca I

    2017-01-01

    Alterations in brain energy metabolism have been suggested to be of fundamental importance for the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, specific changes in brain energetics in the early stages of AD are poorly known. The aim of this study was to investigate cerebral energy metabolism...... in the APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mouse prior to amyloid plaque formation. Acutely isolated cerebral cortical and hippocampal slices of 3-month-old APPswe/PSEN1dE9 and wild-type control mice were incubated in media containing [U-(13)C]glucose, [1,2-(13)C]acetate or [U-(13)C]glutamine, and tissue extracts were analyzed...... by mass spectrometry. The ATP synthesis rate of isolated whole-brain mitochondria was assessed by an on-line luciferin-luciferase assay. Significantly increased (13)C labeling of intracellular lactate and alanine and decreased tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle activity were observed from cerebral cortical...

  5. The mitochondrial 2-oxoglutarate carrier is part of a metabolic pathway that mediates glucose- and glutamine-stimulated insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odegaard, Matthew L; Joseph, Jamie W; Jensen, Mette V; Lu, Danhong; Ilkayeva, Olga; Ronnebaum, Sarah M; Becker, Thomas C; Newgard, Christopher B

    2010-05-28

    Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from pancreatic islet beta-cells is dependent in part on pyruvate cycling through the pyruvate/isocitrate pathway, which generates cytosolic alpha-ketoglutarate, also known as 2-oxoglutarate (2OG). Here, we have investigated if mitochondrial transport of 2OG through the 2-oxoglutarate carrier (OGC) participates in control of nutrient-stimulated insulin secretion. Suppression of OGC in clonal pancreatic beta-cells (832/13 cells) and isolated rat islets by adenovirus-mediated delivery of small interfering RNA significantly decreased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. OGC suppression also reduced insulin secretion in response to glutamine plus the glutamate dehydrogenase activator 2-amino-2-norbornane carboxylic acid. Nutrient-stimulated increases in glucose usage, glucose oxidation, glutamine oxidation, or ATP:ADP ratio were not affected by OGC knockdown, whereas suppression of OGC resulted in a significant decrease in the NADPH:NADP(+) ratio during stimulation with glucose but not glutamine + 2-amino-2-norbornane carboxylic acid. Finally, OGC suppression reduced insulin secretion in response to a membrane-permeant 2OG analog, dimethyl-2OG. These data reveal that the OGC is part of a mechanism of fuel-stimulated insulin secretion that is common to glucose, amino acid, and organic acid secretagogues, involving flux through the pyruvate/isocitrate cycling pathway. Although the components of this pathway must remain intact for appropriate stimulus-secretion coupling, production of NADPH does not appear to be the universal second messenger signal generated by these reactions.

  6. Renal Denervation Normalizes Arterial Pressure With No Effect on Glucose Metabolism or Renal Inflammation in Obese Hypertensive Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asirvatham-Jeyaraj, Ninitha; Fiege, Jessica K; Han, Ruijun; Foss, Jason; Banek, Christopher T; Burbach, Brandon J; Razzoli, Maria; Bartolomucci, Alessandro; Shimizu, Yoji; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Osborn, John W

    2016-10-01

    Hypertension often occurs in concurrence with obesity and diabetes mellitus, commonly referred to as metabolic syndrome. Renal denervation (RDNx) lowers arterial pressure (AP) and improves glucose metabolism in drug-resistant hypertensive patients with high body mass index. In addition, RDNx has been shown to reduce renal inflammation in the mouse model of angiotensin II hypertension. The present study tested the hypothesis that RDNx reduces AP and renal inflammation and improves glucose metabolism in obesity-induced hypertension. Eight-week-old C57BL/6J mice were fed either a low-fat diet (10 kcal%) or a high-fat diet (45 kcal%) for 10 weeks. Body weight, food intake, fasting blood glucose, and glucose metabolism (glucose tolerance test) were measured. In a parallel study, radiotelemeters were implanted in mice for AP measurement. High fat-fed C57BL/6J mice exhibited an inflammatory and metabolic syndrome phenotype, including increased fat mass, increased AP, and hyperglycemia compared with low-fat diet mice. RDNx, but not Sham surgery, normalized AP in high-fat diet mice (115.8±1.5 mm Hg in sham versus 96.6±6.7 mm Hg in RDNx). RDNx had no significant effect on AP in low-fat diet mice. Also, RDNx had no significant effect on glucose metabolism or renal inflammation as measured by the number of CD8, CD4, and T helper cells or levels of inflammatory cytokines in the kidneys. These results indicate that although renal nerves play a role in obesity-induced hypertension, they do not contribute to impaired glucose metabolism or renal inflammation in this model.

  7. Renal blood flow and metabolism after cold ischaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, J H; Petersen, H K

    1984-01-01

    Peroperative measurements of renal blood flow (RBF), renal O2-uptake, and renal venous lactate/pyruvate (L/P) ratio were performed before and after a period of 30-71 min of hypothermic (10-15 degrees C) renal ischaemia in nine patients, undergoing surgery for renal calculi. Before ischaemia, RBF.......01) immediately after re-established perfusion and 36% (P less than 0.02) 30 min later. In one additional patient, who had a short warm ischaemia (8 min), the flow pattern was the same. As arterial pressure remained constant, the reduced RBF signifies an increased renal vascular resistance. Renal O2-uptake...... and renal venous L/P ratio were almost constant, indicating no significant anaerobic processes being involved in the flow response. None of the patients showed any signs of reactive hyperaemia. It is concluded that hypothermic renal ischaemia may be followed by an increased renal vascular resistance even...

  8. Visualization of glutamine transporter activities in living cells using genetically encoded glutamine sensors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Gruenwald

    Full Text Available Glutamine plays a central role in the metabolism of critical biological molecules such as amino acids, proteins, neurotransmitters, and glutathione. Since glutamine metabolism is regulated through multiple enzymes and transporters, the cellular glutamine concentration is expected to be temporally dynamic. Moreover, differentiation in glutamine metabolism between cell types in the same tissue (e.g. neuronal and glial cells is often crucial for the proper function of the tissue as a whole, yet assessing cell-type specific activities of transporters and enzymes in such heterogenic tissue by physical fractionation is extremely challenging. Therefore, a method of reporting glutamine dynamics at the cellular level is highly desirable. Genetically encoded sensors can be targeted to a specific cell type, hence addressing this knowledge gap. Here we report the development of Föster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET glutamine sensors based on improved cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins, monomeric Teal Fluorescent Protein (mTFP1 and venus. These sensors were found to be specific to glutamine, and stable to pH-changes within a physiological range. Using cos7 cells expressing the human glutamine transporter ASCT2 as a model, we demonstrate that the properties of the glutamine transporter can easily be analyzed with these sensors. The range of glutamine concentration change in a given cell can also be estimated using sensors with different affinities. Moreover, the mTFP1-venus FRET pair can be duplexed with another FRET pair, mAmetrine and tdTomato, opening up the possibility for real-time imaging of another molecule. These novel glutamine sensors will be useful tools to analyze specificities of glutamine metabolism at the single-cell level.

  9. The Stable Level of Glutamine synthetase 2 Plays an Important Role in Rice Growth and in Carbon-Nitrogen Metabolic Balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Aili; Zhao, Zhuqing; Ding, Guangda; Shi, Lei; Xu, Fangsen; Cai, Hongmei

    2015-06-04

    Glutamine synthetase 2 (GS2) is a key enzyme involved in the ammonium metabolism in plant leaves. In our previous study, we obtained GS2-cosuppressed plants, which displayed a normal growth phenotype at the seedling stage, while at the tillering stage they showed a chlorosis phenotype. In this study, to investigate the chlorosis mechanism, we systematically analyzed the plant growth, carbon-nitrogen metabolism and gene expressions between the GS2-cosuppressed rice and wild-type plants. The results revealed that the GS2-cosuppressed plants exhibited a poor plant growth phenotype and a poor nitrogen transport ability, which led to nitrogen accumulation and a decline in the carbon/nitrogen ratio in the stems. Interestingly, there was a higher concentration of soluble proteins and a lower concentration of carbohydrates in the GS2-cosuppressed plants at the seedling stage, while a contrasting result was displayed at the tillering stage. The analysis of the metabolic profile showed a significant increase of sugars and organic acids. Additionally, gene expression patterns were different in root and leaf of GS2-cosuppressed plants between the seedling and tillering stage. These results indicated the important role of a stable level of GS2 transcription during normal rice development and the importance of the carbon-nitrogen metabolic balance in rice growth.

  10. Effect of collecting duct-specific deletion of both Rh B Glycoprotein (Rhbg) and Rh C Glycoprotein (Rhcg) on renal response to metabolic acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Verlander, Jill W; Handlogten, Mary E; Han, Ki-Hwan; Weiner, I David

    2014-02-15

    The Rhesus (Rh) glycoproteins, Rh B and Rh C Glycoprotein (Rhbg and Rhcg, respectively), are ammonia-specific transporters expressed in renal distal nephron and collecting duct sites that are necessary for normal rates of ammonia excretion. The purpose of the current studies was to determine the effect of their combined deletion from the renal collecting duct (CD-Rhbg/Rhcg-KO) on basal and acidosis-stimulated acid-base homeostasis. Under basal conditions, urine pH and ammonia excretion and serum HCO3(-) were similar in control (C) and CD-Rhbg/Rhcg-KO mice. After acid-loading for 7 days, CD-Rhbg/Rhcg-KO mice developed significantly more severe metabolic acidosis than did C mice. Acid loading increased ammonia excretion, but ammonia excretion increased more slowly in CD-Rhbg/Rhcg-KO and it was significantly less than in C mice on days 1-5. Urine pH was significantly more acidic in CD-Rhbg/Rhcg-KO mice on days 1, 3, and 5 of acid loading. Metabolic acidosis increased phosphenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE-3 and decreased glutamine synthetase (GS) expression in both genotypes, and these changes were significantly greater in CD-Rhbg/Rhcg-KO than in C mice. We conclude that 1) Rhbg and Rhcg are critically important in the renal response to metabolic acidosis; 2) the significantly greater changes in PEPCK, NHE-3, and GS expression in acid-loaded CD-Rhbg/Rhcg-KO compared with acid-loaded C mice cause the role of Rhbg and Rhcg to be underestimated quantitatively; and 3) in mice with intact Rhbg and Rhcg expression, metabolic acidosis does not induce maximal changes in PEPCK, NHE-3, and GS expression despite the presence of persistent metabolic acidosis.

  11. The glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2006-01-01

    Neurons are metabolically handicapped in the sense that they are not able to perform de novo synthesis of neurotransmitter glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) from glucose. A metabolite shuttle known as the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle describes the release of neurotransmitter glutamate...... or GABA from neurons and subsequent uptake into astrocytes. In return, astrocytes release glutamine to be taken up into neurons for use as neurotransmitter precursor. In this review, the basic properties of the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle will be discussed, including aspects of transport and metabolism...

  12. Pathophysiology of incomplete renal tubular acidosis in recurrent renal stone formers: evidence of disturbed calcium, bone and citrate metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osther, P J; Bollerslev, Jens; Hansen, A B

    1993-01-01

    Urinary acidification, bone metabolism and urinary excretion of calcium and citrate were evaluated in 10 recurrent stone formers with incomplete renal tubular acidosis (iRTA), 10 recurrent stone formers with normal urinary acidification (NUA) and 10 normal controls (NC). Patients with iRTA had......-carbonic acidosis during fasting may be a pathophysilogical factor of both nephrolithiasis and disturbed bone metabolism in stone formers with iRTA....

  13. Glutamina: aspectos bioquímicos, metabólicos, moleculares e suplementação Glutamine: biochemical, metabolic, molecular aspects and supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius Fernandes Cruzat

    2009-10-01

    influence several cell signaling ways, especially the expression of heat shock proteins (HSP. The HSPs contribute to the maintenance of the cellular homeostasis in the presence of stress agents such as oxygen reactive species (ORE. In situations of high cellular catabolism, as after intense and prolonged physical exercises, the glutamine concentration may become reduced. Lower availability of this amino acid may decrease the cell resistance to injuries, leading to cellular apoptosis processes. Therefore, L-glutamine supplementation either in free form or as dipeptide has been investigated. Some biochemical and metabolic aspects, molecular mechanism of glutamine, as well as the effects of its supplementation are approached in the present article.

  14. Glutamine: An Obligatory Parenteral Nutrition Substrate in Critical Care Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Stehle

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Critical illness is characterized by glutamine depletion owing to increased metabolic demand. Glutamine is essential to maintain intestinal integrity and function, sustain immunologic response, and maintain antioxidative balance. Insufficient endogenous availability of glutamine may impair outcome in critically ill patients. Consequently, glutamine has been considered to be a conditionally essential amino acid and a necessary component to complete any parenteral nutrition regimen. Recently, this scientifically sound recommendation has been questioned, primarily based on controversial findings from a large multicentre study published in 2013 that evoked considerable uncertainty among clinicians. The present review was conceived to clarify the most important questions surrounding glutamine supplementation in critical care. This was achieved by addressing the role of glutamine in the pathophysiology of critical illness, summarizing recent clinical studies in patients receiving parenteral nutrition with intravenous glutamine, and describing practical concepts for providing parenteral glutamine in critical care.

  15. Glutamine: An Obligatory Parenteral Nutrition Substrate in Critical Care Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehle, Peter; Kuhn, Katharina S.

    2015-01-01

    Critical illness is characterized by glutamine depletion owing to increased metabolic demand. Glutamine is essential to maintain intestinal integrity and function, sustain immunologic response, and maintain antioxidative balance. Insufficient endogenous availability of glutamine may impair outcome in critically ill patients. Consequently, glutamine has been considered to be a conditionally essential amino acid and a necessary component to complete any parenteral nutrition regimen. Recently, this scientifically sound recommendation has been questioned, primarily based on controversial findings from a large multicentre study published in 2013 that evoked considerable uncertainty among clinicians. The present review was conceived to clarify the most important questions surrounding glutamine supplementation in critical care. This was achieved by addressing the role of glutamine in the pathophysiology of critical illness, summarizing recent clinical studies in patients receiving parenteral nutrition with intravenous glutamine, and describing practical concepts for providing parenteral glutamine in critical care. PMID:26495301

  16. Oncogenic Myc Induces Expression of Glutamine Synthetase through Promoter Demethylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bott, Alex J; Peng, I-Chen; Fan, Yongjun; Faubert, Brandon; Zhao, Lu; Li, Jinyu; Neidler, Sarah; Sun, Yu; Jaber, Nadia; Krokowski, Dawid; Lu, Wenyun; Pan, Ji-An; Powers, Scott; Rabinowitz, Joshua; Hatzoglou, Maria; Murphy, Daniel J; Jones, Russell; Wu, Song; Girnun, Geoffrey; Zong, Wei-Xing

    2015-12-01

    c-Myc is known to promote glutamine usage by upregulating glutaminase (GLS), which converts glutamine to glutamate that is catabolized in the TCA cycle. Here we report that in a number of human and murine cells and cancers, Myc induces elevated expression of glutamate-ammonia ligase (GLUL), also termed glutamine synthetase (GS), which catalyzes the de novo synthesis of glutamine from glutamate and ammonia. This is through upregulation of a Myc transcriptional target thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG), which promotes active demethylation of the GS promoter and its increased expression. Elevated expression of GS promotes cell survival under glutamine limitation, while silencing of GS decreases cell proliferation and xenograft tumor growth. Upon GS overexpression, increased glutamine enhances nucleotide synthesis and amino acid transport. These results demonstrate an unexpected role of Myc in inducing glutamine synthesis and suggest a molecular connection between DNA demethylation and glutamine metabolism in Myc-driven cancers.

  17. A role for cytosolic fumarate hydratase in urea cycle metabolism and renal neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Julie; Yang, Ming; Bauerschmidt, Christina; Kitagawa, Mitsuhiro; O'Flaherty, Linda; Maheswaran, Pratheesh; Özkan, Gizem; Sahgal, Natasha; Baban, Dilair; Kato, Keiko; Saito, Kaori; Iino, Keiko; Igarashi, Kaori; Stratford, Michael; Pugh, Christopher; Tennant, Daniel A; Ludwig, Christian; Davies, Benjamin; Ratcliffe, Peter J; El-Bahrawy, Mona; Ashrafian, Houman; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Pollard, Patrick J

    2013-05-30

    The identification of mutated metabolic enzymes in hereditary cancer syndromes has established a direct link between metabolic dysregulation and cancer. Mutations in the Krebs cycle enzyme, fumarate hydratase (FH), predispose affected individuals to leiomyomas, renal cysts, and cancers, though the respective pathogenic roles of mitochondrial and cytosolic FH isoforms remain undefined. On the basis of comprehensive metabolomic analyses, we demonstrate that FH1-deficient cells and tissues exhibit defects in the urea cycle/arginine metabolism. Remarkably, transgenic re-expression of cytosolic FH ameliorated both renal cyst development and urea cycle defects associated with renal-specific FH1 deletion in mice. Furthermore, acute arginine depletion significantly reduced the viability of FH1-deficient cells in comparison to controls. Our findings highlight the importance of extramitochondrial metabolic pathways in FH-associated oncogenesis and the urea cycle/arginine metabolism as a potential therapeutic target.

  18. A Role for Cytosolic Fumarate Hydratase in Urea Cycle Metabolism and Renal Neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Adam

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The identification of mutated metabolic enzymes in hereditary cancer syndromes has established a direct link between metabolic dysregulation and cancer. Mutations in the Krebs cycle enzyme, fumarate hydratase (FH, predispose affected individuals to leiomyomas, renal cysts, and cancers, though the respective pathogenic roles of mitochondrial and cytosolic FH isoforms remain undefined. On the basis of comprehensive metabolomic analyses, we demonstrate that FH1-deficient cells and tissues exhibit defects in the urea cycle/arginine metabolism. Remarkably, transgenic re-expression of cytosolic FH ameliorated both renal cyst development and urea cycle defects associated with renal-specific FH1 deletion in mice. Furthermore, acute arginine depletion significantly reduced the viability of FH1-deficient cells in comparison to controls. Our findings highlight the importance of extramitochondrial metabolic pathways in FH-associated oncogenesis and the urea cycle/arginine metabolism as a potential therapeutic target.

  19. The Glutamine-Glutamate/GABA Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walls, Anne B; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer;

    2015-01-01

    inhibitor methionine sulfoximine and the tricarboxylic acid cycle (aconitase) inhibitors fluoro-acetate and -citrate. Acetate is metabolized exclusively by glial cells, and [(13)C]acetate is thus capable when used in combination with magnetic resonance spectroscopy or mass spectrometry, to provide......The operation of a glutamine-glutamate/GABA cycle in the brain consisting of the transfer of glutamine from astrocytes to neurons and neurotransmitter glutamate or GABA from neurons to astrocytes is a well-known concept. In neurons, glutamine is not only used for energy production and protein...... synthesis, as in other cells, but is also an essential precursor for biosynthesis of amino acid neurotransmitters. An excellent tool for the study of glutamine transfer from astrocytes to neurons is [(14)C]acetate or [(13)C]acetate and the glial specific enzyme inhibitors, i.e. the glutamine synthetase...

  20. Mineral metabolism in European children living with a renal transplant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonthuis, Marjolein; Busutti, Marco; van Stralen, Karlijn J;

    2015-01-01

    Nephrology/European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant Association Registry to study the prevalence and potential determinants of mineral abnormalities, as well as the predictive value of a disturbed mineral level on graft survival in a large cohort of European pediatric renal transplant...

  1. Cystic renal dysplasia as a leading sign of inherited metabolic disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Distelmaier, F.; Vogel, M.; Spiekerkotter, U.; Gempel, K.; Klee, D.; Braunstein, S.; Groneck, H.P.; Mayatepek, E.; Wendel, U.A.H.; Schwahn, B.

    2007-01-01

    Glutaric acidemia type II and carnitine palmitoyltransferase type II deficiency are rare, but potentially treatable, inherited metabolic diseases. Hallmarks of the early onset form of both conditions are renal abnormalities and neonatal metabolic crisis. In this article, we report on two newborns

  2. Histopathological characteristics of glutamine synthetase-positive hepatic tumor lesions in a mouse model of spontaneous metabolic syndrome (TSOD mouse).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tetsuyuki; Nishida, Takeshi; Baba, Hayato; Hatta, Hideki; Imura, Johji; Sutoh, Mitsuko; Toyohara, Syunji; Hokao, Ryoji; Watanabe, Syunsuke; Ogawa, Hirohisa; Uehara, Hisanori; Tsuneyama, Koichi

    2016-08-01

    We previously reported that Tsumura-Suzuki obese diabetic (TSOD) mice, a polygenic model of spontaneous type 2 diabetes, is a valuable model of hepatic carcinogenesis via non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). One of the characteristics of tumors in these mice is the diffuse expression of glutamine synthetase (GS), which is a diagnostic marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this study, we performed detailed histopathological examinations and found that GS expression was diffusely positive in >70% of the hepatic tumors from 15-month-old male TSOD mice. Translocation of β-catenin into nuclei with enhanced membranous expression also occurred in GS-positive tumors. Small lesions (3 mm) bore the characteristics of human HCC, exhibiting nuclear and structural atypia with invasive growth. By contrast, the majority of GS-negative tumors were hepatocellular adenomas with advanced fatty change and low nuclear grade. In GS-negative tumors, loss of liver fatty acid-binding protein expression was observed. These results suggest that the histological characteristics of GS-positive hepatic tumors in TSOD mice resemble human HCC; thus, this model may be a useful tool in translational research targeting the NAFLD/NASH-HCC sequence.

  3. A tracer bolus method for investigating glutamine kinetics in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiko Mori

    Full Text Available Glutamine transport between tissues is important for the outcome of critically ill patients. Investigation of glutamine kinetics is, therefore, necessary to understand glutamine metabolism in these patients in order to improve future intervention studies. Endogenous glutamine production can be measured by continuous infusion of a glutamine tracer, which necessitates a minimum measurement time period. In order to reduce this problem, we used and validated a tracer bolus injection method. Furthermore, this method was used to measure the glutamine production in healthy volunteers in the post-absorptive state, with extra alanine and with glutamine supplementation and parenteral nutrition. Healthy volunteers received a bolus injection of [1-13C] glutamine, and blood was collected from the radial artery to measure tracer enrichment over 90 minutes. Endogenous rate of appearance (endoRa of glutamine was calculated from the enrichment decay curve and corrected for the extra glutamine supplementation. The glutamine endoRa of healthy volunteers was 6.1±0.9 µmol/kg/min in the post-absorptive state, 6.9±1.0 µmol/kg/min with extra alanyl-glutamine (p = 0.29 versus control, 6.1±0.4 µmol/kg/min with extra alanine only (p = 0.32 versus control, and 7.5±0.9 µmol/kg/min with extra alanyl-glutamine and parenteral nutrition (p = 0.049 versus control. In conclusion, a tracer bolus injection method to measure glutamine endoRa showed good reproducibility and small variation at baseline as well as during parenteral nutrition. Additionally, we showed that parenteral nutrition including alanyl-glutamine increased glutamine endoRa in healthy volunteers, which was not attributable to the alanine part of the dipeptide.

  4. Neuronal Cell Death Induced by Mechanical Percussion Trauma in Cultured Neurons is not Preceded by Alterations in Glucose, Lactate and Glutamine Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, A. R.; Bak, L. K.; Rama Rao, K. V.; Waagepetersen, H.S.; Schousboe, A.; Norenberg, M.D.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a devastating neurological disorder that usually presents in acute and chronic forms. Brain edema and associated increased intracranial pressure in the early phase following TBI are major consequences of acute trauma. On the other hand, neuronal injury, leading to neurobehavioral and cognitive impairments, that usually develop months to years after single or repetitive episodes of head trauma, are major consequences of chronic TBI. The molecular mechanisms responsible for TBI-induced injury, however, are unclear. Recent studies have suggested that early mitochondrial dysfunction and subsequent energy failure play a role in the pathogenesis of TBI. We therefore examined whether oxidative metabolism of 13C-labeled glucose, lactate or glutamine is altered early following in vitro mechanical percussion-induced trauma (5 atm) to neurons (4–24 h), and whether such events contribute to the development of neuronal injury. Cell viability was assayed using the release of the cytoplasmic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), together with fluorescence-based cell staining (calcein and ethidium homodimer-1 for live and dead cells, respectively). Trauma had no effect on the LDH release in neurons from 1 h to 18 h. However, a significant increase in LDH release was detected at 24 h after trauma. Similar findings were identified when traumatized neurons were stained with fluorescent markers. Additionally 13C-labeling of glutamate showed a small, but statistically significant decrease at 14 h after trauma. However, trauma had no effect on the cycling ratio of the TCA cycle at any time-period examined. These findings indicate that trauma does not cause a disturbance in oxidative metabolism of any of the substrates used for neurons. Accordingly, such metabolic disturbance does not appear to contribute to the neuronal death in the early stages following trauma. PMID:26729365

  5. Dietary Acid Load and Metabolic Acidosis in Renal Transplant Recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den Else; Engberink, M.F.; Brink, E.J.; Baak, van M.A.; Joosten, M.M.; Gans, R.O.B.; Navis, G.; Bakker, S.J.L.

    2012-01-01

    Background and objectives Acidosis is prevalent among renal transplant recipients (RTRs) and adversely affects cardiometabolic processes. Factors contributing to acidosis are graft dysfunction and immunosuppressive drugs. Little is known about the potential influence of diet on acidosis in RTRs. Thi

  6. Dietary Acid Load and Metabolic Acidosis in Renal Transplant Recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den Else; Engberink, M.F.; Brink, E.J.; Baak, van M.A.; Joosten, M.M.; Gans, R.O.B.; Navis, G.; Bakker, S.J.L.

    2012-01-01

    Background and objectives Acidosis is prevalent among renal transplant recipients (RTRs) and adversely affects cardiometabolic processes. Factors contributing to acidosis are graft dysfunction and immunosuppressive drugs. Little is known about the potential influence of diet on acidosis in RTRs.

  7. Identification of key metabolic changes in renal interstitial fibrosis rats using metabonomics and pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liangcai; Dong, Minjian; Liao, Shixian; Du, Yao; Zhou, Qi; Zheng, Hong; Chen, Minjiang; Ji, Jiansong; Gao, Hongchang

    2016-01-01

    Renal fibrosis is one of the important pathways involved in end-stage renal failure. Investigating the metabolic changes in the progression of disease may enhance the understanding of its pathogenesis and therapeutic information. In this study, 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabonomics was firstly used to screen the metabolic changes in urine and kidney tissues of renal interstitial fibrotic rats induced by unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO), at 7, 14, 21, and 28 days after operation, respectively. The results revealed that reduced levels of bioenergy synthesis and branched chain amino acids (BCAAs), as well as elevated levels of indoxyl sulfate (IS) are involved in metabolic alterations of renal fibrosis rats. Next, by pharmacological treatment we found that reduction of IS levels could prevent the renal fibrotic symptoms. Therefore, we suggested that urinary IS may be used as a potential biomarker for the diagnosis of renal fibrosis, and a therapeutic target for drugs. Novel attempt combining metabonomics and pharmacology was established that have ability to provide more systematic diagnostic and therapeutic information of diseases. PMID:27256510

  8. Glutamine deficiency in extracellular fluid exerts adverse effects on protein and amino acid metabolism in skeletal muscle of healthy, laparotomized, and septic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holecek, Milan; Sispera, Ludek

    2014-05-01

    Characteristic feature of critical illness, such as trauma and sepsis, is muscle wasting associated with activated oxidation of branched-chain amino acids (valine, leucine, isoleucine) and enhanced release of glutamine (GLN) to the blood. GLN consumption in visceral tissues frequently exceeds its release from muscle resulting in GLN deficiency that may exert adverse effects on the course of the disease. In the present study, we investigated the effects of GLN depletion in extracellular fluid on GLN production and protein and amino acid metabolism in skeletal muscle of healthy, laparotomized, and septic rats. Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) was used as a model of sepsis. After 24 h, soleus muscle (SOL, slow-twitch, red muscle) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL, fast-twitch, white muscle) were isolated and incubated in a medium containing 0.5 mM GLN or without GLN. L-[1-(14)C]leucine was used to estimate protein synthesis and leucine oxidation, 3-methylhistidine release was used to evaluate myofibrillar protein breakdown. CLP increased GLN release from muscle, protein breakdown and leucine oxidation, and decreased protein synthesis. The effects were more pronounced in EDL. Alterations induced by laparotomy were similar to those observed in sepsis, but of a lower extent. GLN deficiency in medium enhanced GLN release and decreased intramuscular GLN concentration, decreased protein synthesis in muscles of intact and laparotomized rats, and enhanced leucine oxidation in SOL of intact and protein breakdown in SOL of laparotomized rats. It is concluded that (1) fast-twitch fibers are more sensitive to septic stimuli than slow-twitch fibers, (2) extracellular GLN deficiency may exert adverse effects on protein and amino acid metabolism in skeletal muscle, and (3) muscles of healthy and laparotomized animals are more sensitive to GLN deficiency than muscles of septic animals.

  9. (1)H NMR metabolomics analysis of renal cell carcinoma cells: Effect of VHL inactivation on metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuperlovic-Culf, Miroslava; Cormier, Kevin; Touaibia, Mohamed; Reyjal, Julie; Robichaud, Sarah; Belbraouet, Mehdi; Turcotte, Sandra

    2016-05-15

    Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) is an onco-suppressor involved in oxygen and energy-dependent promotion of protein ubiquitination and proteosomal degradation. Loss of function mutations of VHL (VHL-cells) result in organ specific cancers with the best studied example in renal cell carcinomas. VHL has a well-established role in deactivation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1) and in regulation of PI3K/AKT/mTOR activity. Cell culture metabolomics analysis was utilized to determined effect of VHL and HIF-1α or HIF-2α on metabolism of renal cell carcinomas (RCC). RCC cells were stably transfected with VHL or shRNA designed to silence HIF-1α or HIF-2α genes. Obtained metabolic data was analysed qualitatively, searching for overall effects on metabolism as well as quantitatively, using methods developed in our group in order to determine specific metabolic changes. Analysis of the effect of VHL and HIF silencing on cellular metabolic footprints and fingerprints provided information about the metabolic pathways affected by VHL through HIF function as well as independently of HIF. Through correlation network analysis as well as statistical analysis of significant metabolic changes we have determined effects of VHL and HIF on energy production, amino acid metabolism, choline metabolism as well as cell regulation and signaling. VHL was shown to influence cellular metabolism through its effect on HIF proteins as well as by affecting activity of other factors.

  10. Metabolic evaluation in first-time renal stone formers in north India: A single center study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhil Joshi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The risk of stone recurrence in first-time stone formers (FTSF varies from 26% to 53%. There is no consensus regarding metabolic evaluation in these individuals. We evaluated the metabolic abnormalities in first-time renal stone forming patients in North India. Thirty-nine patients, (29 males and 10 females with mean age 39.3 ± 12.9 years who presented with nephrolithiasis for the first time were evaluated. We evaluated the calcium homeostasis [serum corrected total calcium, phosphorous, creatinine, alkaline phosphatase, albumin, parathormone (iPTH, 25-hydroxy cholecalciferol (25(OHD 3 , 1-25 di-hydroxy cholecalciferol (1,25(OH 2 D 3 ] and performed the calcium load test also. Two 24-h urine collections were taken for citrate, oxalate, calcium and uric acid. Ammonium chloride loading test for diagnosis of distal renal tubular acidosis was performed in all patients. For each of the diagnostic categories, descriptive statistics were computed for all biochemical variables. A two-tailed P-value <0.05 was regarded as significant. Metabolic abnormalities were detected in 92.3% of the patients (n = 39 studied. Of them, almost 60% had two or more metabolic abnormalities. The most common metabolic abnormality was hypo-citraturia (82%, followed by hyper-oxaluria (56% and hyper-calciuria (41%. Five percent of the patients had incomplete renal tubular acidosis, signifying the importance of the ammonium chloride loading test in patients with renal stones. None of the study patients were detected to have primary hyperparathyroidism. In three patients, the etiology could not be detected. Our findings suggest that an underlying disorder is present in majority of first-time renal stone formers. Intervention with appropriate treatment can prevent recurrences. Hence, comprehensive metabolic evaluation is recommended in all FTSF.

  11. De Novo Glutamine Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao He MD

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the role of de novo glutamine (Gln synthesis in the proliferation of C6 glioma cells and its detection with 13N-ammonia. Methods: Chronic Gln-deprived C6 glioma (0.06C6 cells were established. The proliferation rates of C6 and 0.06C6 cells were measured under the conditions of Gln deprivation along with or without the addition of ammonia or glutamine synthetase (GS inhibitor. 13N-ammonia uptake was assessed in C6 cells by gamma counting and in rats with C6 and 0.06C6 xenografts by micro–positron emission tomography (PET scanning. The expression of GS in C6 cells and xenografts was assessed by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Results: The Gln-deprived C6 cells showed decreased proliferation ability but had a significant increase in GS expression. Furthermore, we found that low concentration of ammonia was sufficient to maintain the proliferation of Gln-deprived C6 cells, and 13N-ammonia uptake in C6 cells showed Gln-dependent decrease, whereas inhibition of GS markedly reduced the proliferation of C6 cells as well as the uptake of 13N-ammoina. Additionally, microPET/computed tomography exhibited that subcutaneous 0.06C6 xenografts had higher 13N-ammonia uptake and GS expression in contrast to C6 xenografts. Conclusion: De novo Gln synthesis through ammonia–glutamate reaction plays an important role in the proliferation of C6 cells. 13N-ammonia can be a potential metabolic PET tracer for Gln-dependent tumors.

  12. The effects of glutamine Supplementation on Glutamine Metabolism in Exercising mouse%补充谷氨酰胺对运动小鼠谷氨酰胺代谢的观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建春; 端礼荣

    2002-01-01

    文章研究大强度长时间运动情况下,补充谷氨酰胺(Glutamine,Gln)对血浆Gln、骨骼肌Gln合成酶和谷氨酰胺酶活性变化的影响,证明大强度运动时,经补充Gln能有效地提高血浆、骨骼肌Gln浓度,维持小鼠在运动中的Gln正常水平.

  13. Possible renoprotection by vitamin D in chronic renal disease : beyond mineral metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorenbos, Carolina R. C.; van den Born, Jacob; Navis, Gerjan; de Borst, Martin H.

    2009-01-01

    Vitamin D is typically viewed as a key player in the regulation of calcium and phosphate levels and the control of bone metabolism; however, growing evidence suggests that vitamin D deficiency may also have an important role in the progressive loss of renal function. Vitamin D deficiency is particul

  14. Obesity, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus after renal transplantation: prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissing, Karl Martin; Pipeleers, Lissa

    2014-04-01

    The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in dialysis patients is high and further increases after transplantation due to weight gain and the detrimental metabolic effects of immunosuppressive drugs. Corticosteroids cause insulin resistance, hyperlipidemia, abnormal glucose metabolism and arterial hypertension. The calcineurin inhibitor tacrolimus is diabetogenic by inhibiting insulin secretion, whereas cyclosporine causes hypertension and increases cholesterol levels. Mtor antagonists are responsible for hyperlipidemia and abnormal glucose metabolism by mechanisms that also implicate insulin resistance. The metabolic syndrome in transplant recipients has numerous detrimental effects such as increasing the risk of new onset diabetes, cardiovascular disease events and patient death. In addition, it has also been linked with accelerated loss of graft function, proteinuria and ultimately graft loss. Prevention and management of the metabolic syndrome are based on increasing physical activity, promotion of weight loss and control of cardiovascular risk factors. Bariatric surgery before or after renal transplantation in patients with body mass index >35 kg/m(2) is an option but its long term effects on graft and patient survival have not been investigated. Steroid withdrawal and replacement of tacrolimus with cyclosporine facilitate control of diabetes, whereas replacement of cyclosporine and mtor antagonists can improve hyperlipidemia. The new costimulation inhibitor belatacept has potent immunosuppressive properties without metabolic adverse effects and will be an important component of immunosuppressive regimens with better metabolic risk profile. Medical treatment of cardiovascular risk factors has to take potential drug interactions with immunosuppressive medication and drug accumulation due to renal insufficiency into account. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Corticosteroids increase glutamine utilization in human splanchnic bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glutamine is the most abundant amino acid in the body and is extensively taken up in gut and liver in healthy humans. To determine whether glucocorticosteroids alter splanchnic glutamine metabolism, the effect of prednisone was assessed in healthy volunteers using isotope tracer methods. Two groups ...

  16. Renal adaptation to metabolic acidosis in senescent rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, R.; Kinsella, J.L.; Sacktor, B. (National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1988-12-01

    In this study, the authors compared results obtained in senescent rats with young rats given an equivalent acid load. They examined the renal changes by giving equivalent acid loads for 48 h to both 6- and 24-mo-old rats. The basal excretion of ammonium was the same in both groups, whereas titratable acids, phosphate, and Ca{sup 2+} excretions were increased in the senescent animal. After administration of the acid load, ammonium, phosphate, Ca{sup 2+}, and titratable acid excretions increased in both age groups, but there were greater absolute increases in ammonium and titratable acid excretions in the young rats. The total acid excreted by the 24-mo rats was reduced 50 (day 1) and 25% (day 2) compared with the young rats, which was reflected by the more severe acidosis in those animals. The portion of total acid excreted as titratable acids in senescent animals was also increased during acidosis when compared with the young animals. In isolated proximal tubule brush-border membrane vesicles, acidosis increased Na{sup +}-H{sup +} exchange and decreased Na{sup +}-dependent phosphate transport in both age groups. They also found that the basal activity of the Na{sup +}-H{sup +} exchanger was not changed with age but the Na{sup +} dependent phosphate transporter was less in the 24-mo rat. The results suggest that physiological regulation of these renal processes remains intact in the aged rat but the responses may be reduced or delayed in the senescent animal.

  17. The effect of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) on renal function and metabolism in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Matheus Parmegiani; Gomes, Luana Ferreira; Jacob, Maria Helena Vianna Metello; da Rocha Janner, Daiane; Araújo, Alex Sander da Rosa; Belló-Klein, Adriane; Ribeiro, Maria Flávia Marques; Kucharski, Luiz Carlos

    2011-05-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is an endogenous steroid hormone involved in a number of biological actions in humans and rodents, but its effects on renal tissue have not yet been fully understood. The aim of this study is to assess the effect of DHEA treatment on diabetic rats, mainly in relation to renal function and metabolism. Diabetic rats were treated with subcutaneous injections of a 10mg/kg dose of DHEA diluted in oil. Plasma glucose and creatinine, in addition to urine creatinine, were quantified espectophotometrically. Glucose uptake and oxidation were quantified using radioactive glucose, the urinary Transforming Growth Factor β(1) (TGF-β(1)) was assessed by enzyme immunoassay, and the total glutathione in the renal tissue was also measured. The diabetic rats displayed higher levels of glycemia, and DHEA treatment reduced hyperglycemia. Plasmatic creatinine levels were higher in the diabetic rats treated with DHEA, while creatinine clearance was lower. Glucose uptake and oxidation were lower in the renal medulla of the diabetic rats treated with DHEA, and urinary TGF-β(1), as well as total gluthatione levels, were higher in the diabetic rats treated with DHEA. DHEA treatment was not beneficial to renal tissue, since it reduced the glomerular filtration rate and renal medulla metabolism, while increasing the urinary excretion of TGF-β(1) and the compensatory response by the glutathione system, probably due to a mechanism involving a pro-oxidant action or a pro-fibrotic effect of this androgen or its derivatives. In conclusion, this study reports that DHEA treatment may be harmful to renal tissue, but the mechanisms of this action have not yet been fully understood. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Hepatic zonation of carbon and nitrogen fluxes derived from glutamine and ammonia transformations

    OpenAIRE

    Constantin Jorgete; Suzuki-Kemmelmeier Fumie; Comar Jurandir F; Bracht Adelar

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Glutaminase predominates in periportal hepatocytes and it has been proposed that it determines the glutamine-derived nitrogen flow through the urea cycle. Glutamine-derived urea production should, thus, be considerably faster in periportal hepatocytes. This postulate, based on indirect observations, has not yet been unequivocally demonstrated, making a direct investigation of ureogenesis from glutamine highly desirable. Methods Zonation of glutamine metabolism was investig...

  19. Unmasking Glucose Metabolism Alterations in Stable Renal Transplant Recipients: A Multicenter Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Patricia; Diaz, Juan Manuel; Silva, Irene; Osorio, José M.; Osuna, Antonio; Bayés, Beatriz; Lauzurica, Ricardo; Arellano, Edgar; Campistol, Jose Maria; Dominguez, Rosa; Gómez-Alamillo, Carlos; Ibernon, Meritxell; Moreso, Francisco; Benitez, Rocio; Lampreave, Ildefonso; Porrini, Esteban; Torres, Armando

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Emerging information indicates that glucose metabolism alterations are common after renal transplantation and are associated with carotid atheromatosis. The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence of different glucose metabolism alterations in stable recipients as well as the factors related to the condition. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: A multicenter, cross-sectional study was conducted of 374 renal transplant recipients without pre- or posttransplantation diabetes. A standard 75-g oral glucose tolerance test was performed. Results: Glucose metabolism alterations were present in 119 (31.8%) recipients: 92 (24.6%) with an abnormal oral glucose tolerance test and 27 (7.2%) with isolated impaired fasting glucose. The most common disorder was impaired glucose tolerance (17.9%), and an abnormal oral glucose tolerance test was observed for 21.5% of recipients with a normal fasting glucose. By multivariate analysis, age, prednisone dosage, triglyceride/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, and β blocker use were shown to be factors related to glucose metabolism alterations. Remarkably, triglyceride levels, triglyceride/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, and the proportion of recipients with impaired fasting glucose were already higher throughout the first posttransplantation year in recipients with a current glucose metabolism alteration as compared with those without the condition. Conclusions: Glucose metabolism alterations are common in stable renal transplant recipients, and an oral glucose tolerance test is required for its detection. They are associated with a worse metabolic profile, which is already present during the first posttransplantation year. These findings may help planning strategies for early detection and intervention. PMID:18322043

  20. Glutamine supplementation in bone marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Thomas R

    2002-01-01

    An increasing number of clinical investigations have focused on supplementation of specialized enteral and parenteral nutrition with the amino acid glutamine. This interest derives from strong evidence in animal models and emerging clinical data on the efficacy of glutamine administration following chemotherapy, trauma, sepsis and other catabolic conditions. Glutamine has protein-anabolic effects in stressed patients and, among many key metabolic functions, is used as a major fuel/substrate by cells of the gastrointestinal epithelium and the immune system. These effects may be particularly advantageous in patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation (BMT), who exhibit post-transplant body protein wasting, gut mucosal injury and immunodeficiency. Studies to date indicate that enteral and parenteral glutamine supplementation is well tolerated and potentially efficacious after high-dose chemotherapy or BMT for cancer treatment. Although not all studies demonstrate benefits, sufficient positive data have been published to suggest that this nutrient should be considered as adjunctive metabolic support of some individuals undergoing marrow transplant. However, BMT is a rapidly evolving clinical procedure with regard to the conditioning and supportive protocols utilized. Thus, additional randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trials are indicated to define the efficacy of glutamine with current BMT regimens.

  1. Effect of metabolic acidosis on renal tubular sodium handling in rats as determined by lithium clearance

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    Menegon L.F.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic metabolic acidosis is known to cause a decrease in salt and water reabsorption by the kidney. We have used renal lithium clearance to investigate the effect of chronic, NH4Cl-induced metabolic acidosis on the renal handling of Na+ in male Wistar-Hannover rats (200-250 g. Chronic acidosis (pH 7.16 ± 0.13 caused a sustained increase in renal fractional Na+ excretion (267.9 ± 36.4%, accompanied by an increase in fractional proximal (113.3 ± 3.6% and post-proximal (179.7 ± 20.2% Na+ and urinary K+ (163.4 ± 5.6% excretion when compared to control and pair-fed rats. These differences occurred in spite of an unchanged creatinine clearance and Na+ filtered load. A lower final body weight was observed in the acidotic (232 ± 4.6 g and pair-fed (225 ± 3.6 g rats compared to the controls (258 ± 3.7 g. In contrast, there was a significant increase in the kidney weights of acidotic rats (1.73 ± 0.05 g compared to the other experimental groups (control, 1.46 ± 0.05 g; pair-fed, 1.4 ± 0.05 g. We suggest that altered renal Na+ and K+ handling in acidotic rats may result from a reciprocal relationship between the level of metabolism in renal tubules and ion transport.

  2. Bone metabolism and renal stone risk during International Space Station missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott M; Heer, Martina; Shackelford, Linda C; Sibonga, Jean D; Spatz, Jordan; Pietrzyk, Robert A; Hudson, Edgar K; Zwart, Sara R

    2015-12-01

    Bone loss and renal stone risk are longstanding concerns for astronauts. Bone resorption brought on by spaceflight elevates urinary calcium and the risk of renal stone formation. Loss of bone calcium leads to concerns about fracture risk and increased long-term risk of osteoporosis. Bone metabolism involves many factors and is interconnected with muscle metabolism and diet. We report here bone biochemistry and renal stone risk data from astronauts on 4- to 6-month International Space Station missions. All had access to a type of resistive exercise countermeasure hardware, either the Advanced Resistance Exercise Device (ARED) or the Interim Resistance Exercise Device (iRED). A subset of the ARED group also tested the bisphosphonate alendronate as a potential anti-resorptive countermeasure (Bis+ARED). While some of the basic bone marker data have been published, we provide here a more comprehensive evaluation of bone biochemistry with a larger group of astronauts. Regardless of exercise, the risk of renal stone formation increased during spaceflight. A key factor in this increase was urine volume, which was lower during flight in all groups at all time points. Thus, the easiest way to mitigate renal stone risk is to increase fluid consumption. ARED use increased bone formation without changing bone resorption, and mitigated a drop in parathyroid hormone in iRED astronauts. Sclerostin, an osteocyte-derived negative regulator of bone formation, increased 10-15% in both groups of astronauts who used the ARED (p<0.06). IGF-1, which regulates bone growth and formation, increased during flight in all 3 groups (p<0.001). Our results are consistent with the growing body of literature showing that the hyper-resorptive state of bone that is brought on by spaceflight can be countered pharmacologically or mitigated through an exercise-induced increase in bone formation, with nutritional support. Key questions remain about the effect of exercise-induced alterations in bone

  3. Retrospective review of bone mineral metabolism management in end-stage renal disease patients wait-listed for renal transplant

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    Chavlovski A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Anna Chavlovski,1 Greg A Knoll,1–3 Timothy Ramsay,4 Swapnil Hiremath,1–3 Deborah L Zimmerman1–31University of Ottawa, 2Ottawa Hospital, 3Kidney Research Centre, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, 4Ottawa Methods Centre, Ottawa, ON, CanadaBackground: In patients with end-stage renal disease, use of vitamin D and calcium-based phosphate binders have been associated with progression of vascular calcification that might have an impact on renal transplant candidacy. Our objective was to examine management of mineral metabolism in patients wait-listed for renal transplant and to determine the impact on cardiac perfusion imaging.Methods: Data was collected retrospectively on patients wait-listed for a renal transplant (n = 105, being either active (n = 73 and on hold (n = 32. Demographic data, medications, serum concentrations of calcium, phosphate, parathyroid hormone, and cardiac perfusion imaging studies were collected from the electronic health record. Chi-square and Student’s t-tests were used to compare active and on-hold patients as appropriate. Logistic regression was used to examine variables associated with worsening cardiac imaging studies.Results: The wait-listed patients were of mean age 56 ± 14 years and had been on dialysis for 1329 ± 867 days. On-hold patients had received a significantly greater total dose of calcium (2.35 ± .94 kg versus 1.49 ± 1.52 kg; P = 0.02 and were more likely to have developed worsening cardiovascular imaging studies (P = 0.03. Total doses of calcium and calcitriol were associated with worsening cardiovascular imaging studies (P = 0.05.Conclusion: Patients on hold on the renal transplant waiting list received higher total doses of calcium. A higher total dose of calcium and calcitriol was also associated with worsening cardiovascular imaging. Time on dialysis before transplant has been associated with worse post-transplant outcomes, and it is possible that the total calcium and calcitriol dose

  4. Evaluation of metabolic syndrome and associations with inflammation and graft function in renal transplant recipients

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    Mariana Gascue de Alencastro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Cardiovascular disease (CVD is a major determinant of mortality in renal transplant recipients (RTR. Metabolic syndrome (MS and chronic inflammation are currently considered non traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease. This study evaluates the frequency of these conditions their associations with graft function. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS and inflammation and their associations with graft function in renal transplant recipients. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out with 200 RTR. MS was defined by the NCEP-ATP III criteria. Inflammation was assessed by CRP levels. Renal function was assessed by GFR estimation using the MDRD equation. RESULTS: MS occurred in 71 patients (35.5%. Patients with MS had higher CPR and decreased GFR levels. Inflammation was present in 99 patients (49.5%. Mean waist perimeter, body mass index, triglycerides and serum total cholesterol were significantly higher in inflamed patients. An association between MS and inflammation was demonstrated, 48 (67.6% patients with MS were inflamed and among those without MS the rate of inflamed patients was 39.5% (51 patients (p < 0.001. A significantly higher percentage of patients with MS in the group of patients in chronic renal disease stages III and IV was observed. CONCLUSION: In RTR there is a significant association among MS and inflammation. MS is negatively associated with graft function. The clinical implications of these findings must be evaluated in longitudinal studies.

  5. Metabolic acidosis and malnutrition-inflammation complex syndrome in chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Mehrotra, Rajnish; Fouque, Denis; Kopple, Joel D

    2004-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis, a common condition in patients with renal failure, may be linked to protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) and inflammation, together also known as malnutrition-inflammation complex syndrome (MICS). Methods of serum bicarbonate measurement may misrepresent the true bicarbonate level, since the total serum carbon dioxide measurement usually overestimates the serum bicarbonate concentration. Moreover, the air transportation of blood samples to distant laboratories may lead to erroneous readings. In patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) or end-stage renal disease (ESRD), a significant number of endocrine, musculoskeletal, and metabolic abnormalities are believed to result from acidemia. Metabolic acidosis may be related to PEM and MICS due to an increased protein catabolism, decreased protein synthesis, endocrine abnormalities including insulin resistance, decreased serum leptin level, and inflammation among individuals with renal failure. Evidence suggests that the catabolic effects of metabolic acidosis may result from an increased activity of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent ubiquitin-proteasome and branched-chain keto acid dehydrogenase. In contrast to the metabolic studies, many epidemiologic studies in maintenance dialysis patients have indicated a paradoxically inverse association between mildly decreased serum bicarbonate and improved markers of protein-energy nutritional state. Hence metabolic acidosis may be considered as yet another element of the reverse epidemiology in ESRD patients. Interventional studies have yielded inconsistent results in CKD and ESRD patients, although in peritoneal dialysis patients, mitigating acidemia appears to more consistently improve nutritional status and reduce hospitalizations. Large-scale, prospective randomized interventional studies are needed to ascertain the potential benefits of correcting acidemia in malnourished and/or inflamed CKD and maintenance hemodialysis patients. Until then, all

  6. Impaired renal function is associated with greater urinary strong ion differences in critically ill patients with metabolic acidosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moviat, M.; Terpstra, A.M.; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Pickkers, P.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Urinary excretion of chloride corrects metabolic acidosis, but this may be hampered in patients with impaired renal function. We explored the effects of renal function on acid-base characteristics and urinary strong ion excretion using the Stewart approach in critically ill patients with me

  7. Association between the glomerular filtration rate of renal dysfunction and metabolic syndrome: an age-stratified analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋慧

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between the renal dysfunction rate and metabolic syndrome(MS),stratified by age.Methods People took part in physical check-up in a certain tertiary hospital from March 2010to September 2012,were enrolled in this study.Estimated glomerular filtration rate(e GFR),—a renal dysfunction indicator,was calculated by modified MDRD

  8. Accelerated renal disease is associated with the development of metabolic syndrome in a glucolipotoxic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-García, Cristina; Izquierdo, Adriana; Velagapudi, Vidya; Vivas, Yurena; Velasco, Ismael; Campbell, Mark; Burling, Keith; Cava, Fernando; Ros, Manuel; Oresic, Matej; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Medina-Gomez, Gema

    2012-09-01

    Individuals with metabolic syndrome are at high risk of developing chronic kidney disease (CKD) through unclear pathogenic mechanisms. Obesity and diabetes are known to induce glucolipotoxic effects in metabolically relevant organs. However, the pathogenic role of glucolipotoxicity in the aetiology of diabetic nephropathy is debated. We generated a murine model, the POKO mouse, obtained by crossing the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2 (PPARγ2) knockout (KO) mouse into a genetically obese ob/ob background. We have previously shown that the POKO mice showed: hyperphagia, insulin resistance, hyperglycaemia and dyslipidaemia as early as 4 weeks of age, and developed a complete loss of normal β-cell function by 16 weeks of age. Metabolic phenotyping of the POKO model has led to investigation of the structural and functional changes in the kidney and changes in blood pressure in these mice. Here we demonstrate that the POKO mouse is a model of renal disease that is accelerated by high levels of glucose and lipid accumulation. Similar to ob/ob mice, at 4 weeks of age these animals exhibited an increased urinary albumin:creatinine ratio and significantly increased blood pressure, but in contrast showed a significant increase in the renal hypertrophy index and an associated increase in p27(Kip1) expression compared with their obese littermates. Moreover, at 4 weeks of age POKO mice showed insulin resistance, an alteration of lipid metabolism and glomeruli damage associated with increased transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) and parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) expression. At this age, levels of proinflammatory molecules, such as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and fibrotic factors were also increased at the glomerular level compared with levels in ob/ob mice. At 12 weeks of age, renal damage was fully established. These data suggest an accelerated lesion through glucolipotoxic effects in the renal pathogenesis in POKO mice.

  9. Accelerated renal disease is associated with the development of metabolic syndrome in a glucolipotoxic mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Martínez-García

    2012-09-01

    Individuals with metabolic syndrome are at high risk of developing chronic kidney disease (CKD through unclear pathogenic mechanisms. Obesity and diabetes are known to induce glucolipotoxic effects in metabolically relevant organs. However, the pathogenic role of glucolipotoxicity in the aetiology of diabetic nephropathy is debated. We generated a murine model, the POKO mouse, obtained by crossing the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2 (PPARγ2 knockout (KO mouse into a genetically obese ob/ob background. We have previously shown that the POKO mice showed: hyperphagia, insulin resistance, hyperglycaemia and dyslipidaemia as early as 4 weeks of age, and developed a complete loss of normal β-cell function by 16 weeks of age. Metabolic phenotyping of the POKO model has led to investigation of the structural and functional changes in the kidney and changes in blood pressure in these mice. Here we demonstrate that the POKO mouse is a model of renal disease that is accelerated by high levels of glucose and lipid accumulation. Similar to ob/ob mice, at 4 weeks of age these animals exhibited an increased urinary albumin:creatinine ratio and significantly increased blood pressure, but in contrast showed a significant increase in the renal hypertrophy index and an associated increase in p27Kip1 expression compared with their obese littermates. Moreover, at 4 weeks of age POKO mice showed insulin resistance, an alteration of lipid metabolism and glomeruli damage associated with increased transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ and parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP expression. At this age, levels of proinflammatory molecules, such as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, and fibrotic factors were also increased at the glomerular level compared with levels in ob/ob mice. At 12 weeks of age, renal damage was fully established. These data suggest an accelerated lesion through glucolipotoxic effects in the renal pathogenesis in POKO mice.

  10. Metformin improves metabolic memory in high fat diet (HFD)-induced renal dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikoo, Kulbhushan; Sharma, Ekta; Amara, Venkateswara Rao; Pamulapati, Himani; Dhawale, Vaibhav Shrirang

    2016-08-22

    Recently, we have shown that high fat diet (HFD) in vivo and in vitro generates metabolic memory by altering H3K36me2 and H3K27me3 on the promoter of FOXO1 (transcription factor of gluconeogenic genes) (Kumar et al., 2015). Here we checked the hypothesis, whether concomitant diet reversal and metformin could overcome HFD-induced metabolic memory and renal damage. Male adult Sprague Dawley rats were rendered insulin resistant by feeding high fat diet for 16 weeks. Then the rats were subjected to diet reversal (REV) alone and along with metformin (REV+MET) for 8 weeks. Biochemical and histological markers of insulin resistance and kidney function were measured. Blood pressure and in vivo vascular reactivity to Angiotensin II (200 mgkg-1) were also checked. Diet reversal could improve lipid profile but could not prevent renal complications induced by HFD. Interestingly, metformin along with diet reversal restored the levels of blood glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine. In kidney, metformin increased the activation of AMPK, decreased inflammatory markers-COX-2, IL-1β and apoptotic markers-PARP, Caspase3. Metformin was effective in lowering the elevated basal blood pressure, acute change in mean arterial pressure (ΔMAP) in response to Ang II. It also attenuated the tubulointerstitial fibrosis and glomerulosclerosis induced by HFD-feeding in kidney. Here we report for the first time, that metformin treatment overcomes metabolic memory and prevents HFD-induced renal damage.

  11. Glutamine Synthetase: Role in Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Arumugam R; Norenberg, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is an ATP-dependent enzyme found in most species that synthesizes glutamine from glutamate and ammonia. In brain, GS is exclusively located in astrocytes where it serves to maintain the glutamate-glutamine cycle, as well as nitrogen metabolism. Changes in the activity of GS, as well as its gene expression, along with excitotoxicity, have been identified in a number of neurological conditions. The literature describing alterations in the activation and gene expression of GS, as well as its involvement in different neurological disorders, however, is incomplete. This review summarizes changes in GS gene expression/activity and its potential contribution to the pathogenesis of several neurological disorders, including hepatic encephalopathy, ischemia, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, Parkinson's disease, and astroglial neoplasms. This review also explores the possibility of targeting GS in the therapy of these conditions.

  12. Enteral Glutamine Administration in Critically Ill Nonseptic Patients Does Not Trigger Arginine Synthesis

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    Mechteld A. R. Vermeulen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine supplementation in specific groups of critically ill patients results in favourable clinical outcome. Enhancement of citrulline and arginine synthesis by glutamine could serve as a potential mechanism. However, while receiving optimal enteral nutrition, uptake and enteral metabolism of glutamine in critically ill patients remain unknown. Therefore we investigated the effect of a therapeutically relevant dose of L-glutamine on synthesis of L-citrulline and subsequent L-arginine in this group. Ten versus ten critically ill patients receiving full enteral nutrition, or isocaloric isonitrogenous enteral nutrition including 0.5 g/kg L-alanyl-L-glutamine, were studied using stable isotopes. A cross-over design using intravenous and enteral tracers enabled splanchnic extraction (SE calculations. Endogenous rate of appearance and SE of glutamine citrulline and arginine was not different (SE controls versus alanyl-glutamine: glutamine 48 and 48%, citrulline 33 versus 45%, and arginine 45 versus 42%. Turnover from glutamine to citrulline and arginine was not higher in glutamine-administered patients. In critically ill nonseptic patients receiving adequate nutrition and a relevant dose of glutamine there was no extra citrulline or arginine synthesis and glutamine SE was not increased. This suggests that for arginine synthesis enhancement there is no need for an additional dose of glutamine when this population is adequately fed. This trial is registered with NTR2285.

  13. Enteral Glutamine Administration in Critically Ill Nonseptic Patients Does Not Trigger Arginine Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Mechteld A R; Brinkmann, Saskia J H; Buijs, Nikki; Beishuizen, Albertus; Bet, Pierre M; Houdijk, Alexander P J; van Goudoever, Johannes B; van Leeuwen, Paul A M

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine supplementation in specific groups of critically ill patients results in favourable clinical outcome. Enhancement of citrulline and arginine synthesis by glutamine could serve as a potential mechanism. However, while receiving optimal enteral nutrition, uptake and enteral metabolism of glutamine in critically ill patients remain unknown. Therefore we investigated the effect of a therapeutically relevant dose of L-glutamine on synthesis of L-citrulline and subsequent L-arginine in this group. Ten versus ten critically ill patients receiving full enteral nutrition, or isocaloric isonitrogenous enteral nutrition including 0.5 g/kg L-alanyl-L-glutamine, were studied using stable isotopes. A cross-over design using intravenous and enteral tracers enabled splanchnic extraction (SE) calculations. Endogenous rate of appearance and SE of glutamine citrulline and arginine was not different (SE controls versus alanyl-glutamine: glutamine 48 and 48%, citrulline 33 versus 45%, and arginine 45 versus 42%). Turnover from glutamine to citrulline and arginine was not higher in glutamine-administered patients. In critically ill nonseptic patients receiving adequate nutrition and a relevant dose of glutamine there was no extra citrulline or arginine synthesis and glutamine SE was not increased. This suggests that for arginine synthesis enhancement there is no need for an additional dose of glutamine when this population is adequately fed. This trial is registered with NTR2285.

  14. Enteral Glutamine Administration in Critically Ill Nonseptic Patients Does Not Trigger Arginine Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Mechteld A. R.; Brinkmann, Saskia J. H.; Buijs, Nikki; Beishuizen, Albertus; Bet, Pierre M.; Houdijk, Alexander P. J.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.; van Leeuwen, Paul A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine supplementation in specific groups of critically ill patients results in favourable clinical outcome. Enhancement of citrulline and arginine synthesis by glutamine could serve as a potential mechanism. However, while receiving optimal enteral nutrition, uptake and enteral metabolism of glutamine in critically ill patients remain unknown. Therefore we investigated the effect of a therapeutically relevant dose of L-glutamine on synthesis of L-citrulline and subsequent L-arginine in this group. Ten versus ten critically ill patients receiving full enteral nutrition, or isocaloric isonitrogenous enteral nutrition including 0.5 g/kg L-alanyl-L-glutamine, were studied using stable isotopes. A cross-over design using intravenous and enteral tracers enabled splanchnic extraction (SE) calculations. Endogenous rate of appearance and SE of glutamine citrulline and arginine was not different (SE controls versus alanyl-glutamine: glutamine 48 and 48%, citrulline 33 versus 45%, and arginine 45 versus 42%). Turnover from glutamine to citrulline and arginine was not higher in glutamine-administered patients. In critically ill nonseptic patients receiving adequate nutrition and a relevant dose of glutamine there was no extra citrulline or arginine synthesis and glutamine SE was not increased. This suggests that for arginine synthesis enhancement there is no need for an additional dose of glutamine when this population is adequately fed. This trial is registered with NTR2285. PMID:27200186

  15. Neuromuscular Dysfunction in Experimental Sepsis and Glutamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çankayalı, İlkin; Boyacılar, Özden; Demirağ, Kubilay; Uyar, Mehmet; Moral, Ali Reşat

    2016-01-01

    Background: Electrophysiological studies show that critical illness polyneuromyopathy appears in the early stage of sepsis before the manifestation of clinical findings. The metabolic response observed during sepsis causes glutamine to become a relative essential amino acid. Aims: We aimed to assess the changes in neuromuscular transmission in the early stage of sepsis after glutamine supplementation. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into two groups. Rats in both groups were given normal feeding for one week. In the study group, 1 g/kg/day glutamine was added to normal feeding by feeding tube for one week. Cecal ligation and perforation (CLP) surgery was performed at the end of one week. Before and 24 hours after CLP, compound muscle action potentials were recorded from the gastrocnemius muscle. Results: Latency measurements before and 24 hours after CLP were 0.68±0.05 ms and 0.80±0.09 ms in the control group and 0.69±0.07 ms and 0.73±0.07 ms in the study group (p<0.05). Conclusion: Since enteral glutamine prevented compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) latency prolongation in the early phase of sepsis, it was concluded that enteral glutamine replacement might be promising in the prevention of neuromuscular dysfunction in sepsis; however, further studies are required. PMID:27308070

  16. Metabolic and renal adverse effects of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuny, Clàudia; Deyà-Martínez, Ángela; Chiappini, Elena; Galli, Luisa; de Martino, Maurizio; Noguera-Julian, Antoni

    2015-05-01

    Worldwide, the benefits of combined antiretroviral (ARV) therapy in morbidity and mortality due to perinatally acquired human immunodeficiency virus infection are beyond question and outweigh the toxicity these drugs have been associated with in HIV-infected children and adolescents to date. In puberty, abnormal body fat distribution is stigmatizating and leads to low adherence to ARV treatment. The other metabolic comorbidities (mitochondrial toxicity, dyslipidemias, insulin resistance and low bone mineral density) and renal toxicity, albeit nonsymptomatic in most children, are increasingly being reported and potentially put this population at risk for early cardiovascular or cerebrovascular atherosclerotic disease, diabetes, pathologic fractures or premature renal failure in the third and fourth decades of life. Evidence from available studies is limited because of methodological limitations and also because of several HIV-unrelated factors influencing, to some degree, the development of these conditions. Current recommendations for the prevention, diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of metabolic and renal adverse effects in HIV-children and adolescents are based on adult studies, observational pediatric studies and experts' consensus. Healthy lifestyle habits (regarding diet, exercise and refraining from toxic substances) and wise use of ARV options are the only preventive tools for the majority of patients. Should abnormal findings arise, switches in one or more ARV drugs have proved useful. Specific therapies are also available for some of these comorbidities, although the experience in the pediatric age is still very scarce. We aim to summarize the epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic aspects of metabolic and renal adverse effects in vertically HIV-infected children and adolescents.

  17. Proximal Tubule Glutamine Synthetase Expression is Necessary for the Normal Response to Dietary Protein Restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Osis, Gunars; Handlogten, Mary E; Verlander, Jill W; Weiner, I David

    2017-03-22

    Dietary protein restriction has multiple benefits in kidney disease. Because protein intake is a major determinant of endogenous acid production, it is important that net acid excretion change in parallel during changes in dietary protein intake. Dietary protein restriction decreases endogenous acid production and ¬decreases urinary ammonia excretion, a major component of net acid excretion. Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the reaction of NH4+ and glutamate, which regenerates the essential amino acid glutamine and decreases net ammonia generation. Because renal proximal tubule GS expression increases during dietary protein restriction, this could contribute to the decreased ammonia excretion. The current study's purpose was to determine proximal tubule GS's role in the renal response to protein restriction. We generated mice with proximal tubule-specific GS deletion (PT-GS-KO) using Cre-loxP techniques. Cre-negative (Control) and PT-GS-KO mice in metabolic cages were provided 20% protein diet for 2 days and were then changed to low protein (6%) diet for the next 7 days. Additional PT-GS-KO mice were maintained on 20% protein diet. Dietary protein restriction caused a rapid decrease in urinary ammonia excretion in both genotypes, but PT-GS-KO blunted this adaptive response significantly. This occurred despite no significant genotype-dependent differences in urinary pH or in serum electrolytes. There were no significant differences between Control and PT-GS-KO mice in expression of multiple other proteins involved in renal ammonia handling. We conclude that proximal tubule glutamine synthetase expression is necessary for the appropriate decrease in ammonia excretion during dietary protein restriction.

  18. Metabolic and Hormonal Determinants of Glomerular Filtration Rate and Renal Hemodynamics in Severely Obese Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edoardo Vitolo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Renal function is often compromised in severe obesity. A true measurement of glomerular filtration rate (GFR is unusual, and how estimation formulae (EstForm perform in such individuals is unclear. We characterized renal function and hemodynamics in severely obese individuals, assessing the reliability of EstForm. Methods: We measured GFR (mGFR by iohexol plasma clearance, renal plasma flow (RPF by 123I-ortho-iodo-hippurate, basal and stimulated vascular renal indices, endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilation using flow-mediated dilation (FMD as well as metabolic and hormonal profile in morbid, otherwise healthy, obese subjects. Results: Compared with mGFR, the better performing EstForm was CKD-EPI (5.3 ml/min/1.73 m2 bias by Bland-Altman analysis. mGFR was directly related with RPF, total and incremental glucose AUC, and inversely with PTH and h8 cortisol. Patients with mGFR below the median shown significantly higher PTH and lower vitamin D3. Basal or dynamic renal resistive index, FMD, pulse wave velocity were not related with mGFR. In an adjusted regression model, renal diameter and plasma flow remained related with mGFR (R2 = 0.67, accounting for 15% and 21% of mGFR variance, respectively. Conclusions: CKD-EPI formula should be preferred in morbid obesity; glucose increments during oral glucose tolerance test correlate with hyperfiltration; RPF and diameter are independent determinants of mGFR; slightly high PTH values, frequent in obesity, might influence mGFR.

  19. Astrocyte glutamine synthetase: pivotal in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Christopher F; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Parpura, Vladimir

    2013-12-01

    The multifunctional properties of astrocytes signify their importance in brain physiology and neurological function. In addition to defining the brain architecture, astrocytes are primary elements of brain ion, pH and neurotransmitter homoeostasis. GS (glutamine synthetase), which catalyses the ATP-dependent condensation of ammonia and glutamate to form glutamine, is an enzyme particularly found in astrocytes. GS plays a pivotal role in glutamate and glutamine homoeostasis, orchestrating astrocyte glutamate uptake/release and the glutamate-glutamine cycle. Furthermore, astrocytes bear the brunt of clearing ammonia in the brain, preventing neurotoxicity. The present review depicts the central function of astrocytes, concentrating on the importance of GS in glutamate/glutamine metabolism and ammonia detoxification in health and disease.

  20. Efeitos metabólicos da glutamina em ratos submetidos à queimadura por água fervente (escaldadura Metabolic effects of glutamine in rats subjected to scald burn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rômulo Cesar Costa Barbosa

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Investigar os efeitos metabólicos da L-glutamina (Gln em ratos anestesiados submetidos à queimadura por água fervente. MÉTODOS: Foram estudados vinte e quatro ratos Wistar machos, anestesiados, submetidos a queimaduras da pele dorsal após exposição à água quente (100ºC durante 10 segundos (30% de superfície corporal. Os ratos foram randomizados para receber, por gavagem, 2ml de água (G-1 ou igual volume de solução de Gln (0,5g/peso/dia (G-2. Amostras de tecido (pele sadia e queimada, músculo e fígado e sangue foram coletadas 24h (D1 e 48h (D2 pós-trauma para análise enzimática. RESULTADOS: A oferta de Gln induziu aumento significante nas concentrações de glicose na pele saudável em animais do G-2 no D2, e na pele queimada em G-2/D1. As concentrações de lactato também aumentaram significantemente em G-2/D1 no músculo (11,29 ± 1,25 mmol/g contra 7,43 ± 0,93 mmol/g - pPURPOSE: Investigate the metabolic effects of L- glutamine (Gln in rats subjected to scald burn. METHODS: Twenty-four anesthetized male Wistar rats were submitted to scald burn of dorsal skin secondary to exposure to hot water (100ºC for 10 sec (30% of body surface. Eighteen and 42h later rats were randomized to receive (by gavage 2ml of water (G-1 or equal volume (0,5g/Kg weight/day of Gln solution (G-2. Tissue and blood samples were collected at the end of 24h (D1 and 48h (D2 post burn for enzymatic analysis. RESULTS: Glucose concentrations were significantly increased in healthy skin in G-2/D2 and in burned skin in G-2/D1. Lactate concentrations were significantly increased in G-2/D1 in muscle (11,29 ± 1,25 mmol/g versus 7,43 ± 0,93 mmol/g - p<0.05 and in G-2/D2 subgroups in liver (7,68 ± 1,49 mmol/g versus 3,27 ±0,67 mmol/g - p<0.01 and healthy skin (5,30 ± 0,42 mmol/g versus 3,57 ± 0,38 mmol/g - p<0.05. Pyruvate concentrations were significantly decreased in G-2/D1 subgroups in muscle and liver and increased in healthy skin in G-2/D2

  1. Comprehensive evaluation of one-carbon metabolism pathway gene variants and renal cell cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd M Gibson

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Folate and one-carbon metabolism are linked to cancer risk through their integral role in DNA synthesis and methylation. Variation in one-carbon metabolism genes, particularly MTHFR, has been associated with risk of a number of cancers in epidemiologic studies, but little is known regarding renal cancer. METHODS: Tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs selected to produce high genomic coverage of 13 gene regions of one-carbon metabolism (ALDH1L1, BHMT, CBS, FOLR1, MTHFR, MTR, MTRR, SHMT1, SLC19A1, TYMS and the closely associated glutathione synthesis pathway (CTH, GGH, GSS were genotyped for 777 renal cell carcinoma (RCC cases and 1,035 controls in the Central and Eastern European Renal Cancer case-control study. Associations of individual SNPs (n = 163 with RCC risk were calculated using unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age, sex and study center. Minimum p-value permutation (Min-P tests were used to identify gene regions associated with risk, and haplotypes were evaluated within these genes. RESULTS: The strongest associations with RCC risk were observed for SLC19A1 (P(min-P = 0.03 and MTHFR (P(min-P = 0.13. A haplotype consisting of four SNPs in SLC19A1 (rs12483553, rs2838950, rs2838951, and rs17004785 was associated with a 37% increased risk (p = 0.02, and exploratory stratified analysis suggested the association was only significant among those in the lowest tertile of vegetable intake. CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge, this is the first study to comprehensively examine variation in one-carbon metabolism genes in relation to RCC risk. We identified a novel association with SLC19A1, which is important for transport of folate into cells. Replication in other populations is required to confirm these findings.

  2. Job stress strengthens the link between metabolic risk factors and renal dysfunction in adult men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurugano, Shinobu; Nakao, Mutsuhiro; Takeuchi, Takeaki; Nomura, Kyoko; Yano, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The metabolic risk factors obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia are closely associated with renal dysfunction. As psychosocial stress affects these risk factors, here, we examined relationships between metabolic risk factors and renal function, and their association with job stress. The participants were 1,231 Japanese male office workers attending annual health examinations. The estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was determined using the equation recommended by the Japanese Society for Nephrology: eGFR (mL/min/1.73 m(2)) = 194 × age(-0.287) × Cr(-1.094). Job stress was measured using the Job Content Questionnaire based on the job demand-control model. The job strain index equaled the job demand scores divided by the job control scores. The participants were classified into four ordinal groups of job strain index, based on previous studies (i.e., ≤ 0.4 the lowest, 0.4-0.5 lower, 0.5-0.6 higher, or ≥ 0.6 the highest). A significant correlation was found between lowered eGFR and each of the metabolic risk factors waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and total cholesterol (p job stress had an interactive effect on the relationships between eGFR and systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and triglycerides, depending on the job strain index (highest vs. lowest) (p < 0.05). The highly stressed workers exhibited a close association of eGFR with metabolic risk factors like hypertension and dyslipidemia. Therefore, intensive management may be important for preventing the progression of renal dysfunction and cardiovascular complications in those experiencing stress.

  3. Inhibition of GSK-3 induces differentiation and impaired glucose metabolism in renal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Krishnendu; Cao, Ying; Gaisina, Irina N.; Bhattacharya, Santanu; Dutta, Shamit K.; Wang, Enfeng; Gunosewoyo, Hendra; Kozikowski, Alan P.; Billadeau, Daniel D.; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3), a constitutively active serine/threonine kinase, is a key regulator of numerous cellular processes ranging from glycogen metabolism to cell cycle regulation and proliferation. Consistent with its involvement in many pathways, it has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of various human diseases including Type II diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, bipolar disorder, inflammation and cancer. Consequently it is recognized as an attractive target for the development of new drugs. In the present study, we investigated the effect of both pharmacological and genetic inhibition of GSK-3 in two different renal cancer cell lines. We have shown potent anti-proliferative activity of 9-ING-41, a maleimide-based GSK-3 inhibitor. The anti-proliferative activity is most likely caused by G0–G1 and G2-M phase arrest as evident from cell cycle analysis. We have established that inhibition of GSK-3 imparted a differentiated phenotype in renal cancer cells. We have also shown that GSK-3 inhibition induced autophagy, likely as a result of imbalanced energy homeostasis caused by impaired glucose metabolism. Additionally, we have demonstrated the antitumor activity of 9-ING-41 in two different subcutaneous xenograft RCC tumor models. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing autophagy induction due to GSK-3 inhibition in renal cancer cells. PMID:24327518

  4. Markers of bone metabolism are affected by renal function and growth hormone therapy in children with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doyon, Anke; Fischer, Dagmar Christiane; Bayazit, Aysun Karabay;

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The extent and relevance of altered bone metabolism for statural growth in children with chronic kidney disease is controversial. We analyzed the impact of renal dysfunction and recombinant growth hormone therapy on a panel of serum markers of bone metabolism in a large pediatric chro...

  5. Markers of bone metabolism are affected by renal function and growth hormone therapy in children with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doyon, Anke; Fischer, Dagmar Christiane; Bayazit, Aysun Karabay

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The extent and relevance of altered bone metabolism for statural growth in children with chronic kidney disease is controversial. We analyzed the impact of renal dysfunction and recombinant growth hormone therapy on a panel of serum markers of bone metabolism in a large pediatric chro...

  6. Effects of tempol on altered metabolism and renal vascular responsiveness in fructose-fed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulla, Mohammed H; Sattar, Munavvar A; Johns, Edward J

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the effect of tempol (a superoxide dismutase mimetic) on renal vasoconstrictor responses to angiotensin II (Ang II) and adrenergic agonists in fructose-fed Sprague-Dawley rats (a model of metabolic syndrome). Rats were fed 20% fructose in drinking water (F) for 8 weeks. One fructose-fed group received tempol (FT) at 1 mmol·L(-1) in drinking water for 8 weeks or as an infusion (1.5 mg·kg(-1)·min(-1)) intrarenally. At the end of the treatment regimen, the renal responses to noradrenaline, phenylephrine, methoxamine, and Ang II were determined. F rats exhibited hyperinsulinemia, hyperuricemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypertension. Tempol reduced blood glucose and insulin levels (all p fructose-fed rats.

  7. In vivo modification of Azotobacter chroococcum glutamine synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Centeno, M C; Cejudo, F J; Paneque, A

    1994-03-15

    A monospecific anti-(glutamine synthetase) antibody raised against glutamine synthetase of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 immunoreacted with glutamine synthetase from the N2-fixing heterotrophic bacterium Azotobacter chroococcum. In Western-blotting experiments this antibody recognized a single protein of a molecular mass of 59 kDa corresponding to glutamine synthetase subunit. This protein was in vivo-labelled in response to addition of ammonium, both [3H]adenine and H(3)32PO4 preincubation of the cells being equally effective. Nevertheless, the amount of glutamine synthetase present in A. chroococcum was independent of the available nitrogen source. Modified, inactive glutamine synthetase was re-activated by treatment with snake-venom phosphodiesterase but not by alkaline phosphatase. L-Methionine-DL-sulphoximine, an inhibitor of glutamine synthetase, prevented the enzyme from being covalently modified. We conclude that, in A. chroococcum, glutamine synthetase is adenylylated in response to ammonium and that for the modification to take place ammonium must be metabolized.

  8. Glutamine deprivation initiates reversible assembly of mammalian rods and rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calise, S John; Carcamo, Wendy C; Krueger, Claire; Yin, Joyce D; Purich, Daniel L; Chan, Edward K L

    2014-08-01

    Rods and rings (RR) are protein assemblies composed of cytidine triphosphate synthetase type 1 (CTPS1) and inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase type 2 (IMPDH2), key enzymes in CTP and GTP biosynthesis. Small-molecule inhibitors of CTPS1 or IMPDH2 induce RR assembly in various cancer cell lines within 15 min to hours. Since glutamine is an essential amide nitrogen donor in these nucleotide biosynthetic pathways, glutamine deprivation was examined to determine whether it leads to RR formation. HeLa cells cultured in normal conditions did not show RR, but after culturing in media lacking glutamine, short rods (5 μm) formed after 48 h. Upon supplementation with glutamine or guanosine, these RR underwent almost complete disassembly within 15 min. Inhibition of glutamine synthetase with methionine sulfoximine also increased RR assembly in cells deprived of glutamine. Taken together, our data support the hypothesis that CTP/GTP biosynthetic enzymes polymerize to form RR in response to a decreased intracellular level of glutamine. We speculate that rod and ring formation is an adaptive metabolic response linked to disruption of glutamine homeostasis.

  9. Effect of active infection on cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism of cyclosporine in renal transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegazy, S K; Adam, A G; Hamdy, N A; Khalafallah, N M

    2015-06-01

    Infections downregulate cytochrome-P activities and thus may alter drug disposition, especially for drugs with a narrow therapeutic index. Cyclosporine (CyA), still used for the prevention of allograft rejection in renal transplant recipients in Egypt, seems to be affected by these infectious changes, based on random clinical observations. In the present study, the effects of bacterial and fungal infection on CyA metabolism were studied in renal transplant patients and subsequent nephrotoxicity was monitored. Twenty renal transplant patients, diagnosed with fungal or bacterial infection, were recruited from the renal transplantation outpatient clinic in Alexandria University Hospitals. No dose adjustment in CyA was performed at least 1 week before the onset of infection. Exclusion criteria were patients with acute or chronic unstable liver disease, elderly patients, and patients on concomitant drugs affecting CyA metabolism. CyA trough levels and serum creatinine (SCR) concentrations were measured by fluorescence polarization immunoassay and enzymatic assay, respectively, pre-infection, during infection and in many cases, post infection. CyA trough levels and SCR concentrations increased significantly during the infection (P < 0.001, P = 0.002) respectively. Of the patients, 87% experienced a concomitant rise in CyA trough level and SCR concentrations. No significant difference between pre-infection and post-infection levels of CyA trough and SCR was found. CyA trough and SCR levels increased during bacterial and fungal infections and returned to pre-infection levels once the infection was resolved. The data generated stress the importance of monitoring CyA levels during episodes of infection. Our recommendations concerning CyA dose adjustment differ according to severity and duration of infection. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. PGC1α-dependent NAD biosynthesis links oxidative metabolism to renal protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Mei T.; Zsengeller, Zsuzsanna K.; Berg, Anders H.; Khankin, Eliyahu V.; Bhasin, Manoj K.; Kim, Wondong; Clish, Clary B.; Stillman, Isaac E.; Karumanchi, S. Ananth; Rhee, Eugene P.; Parikh, Samir M.

    2016-01-01

    The energetic burden of continuously concentrating solutes against gradients along the tubule may render the kidney especially vulnerable to ischemia. Indeed, acute kidney injury (AKI) affects 3% of all hospitalized patients.1,2 Here we show that the mitochondrial biogenesis regulator, PGC1α,3,4 is a pivotal determinant of renal recovery from injury by regulating NAD biosynthesis. Following renal ischemia, PGC1α−/− mice developed local deficiency of the NAD precursor niacinamide (Nam), marked fat accumulation, and failure to re-establish normal function. Remarkably, exogenous Nam improved local NAD levels, fat accumulation, and renal function in post-ischemic PGC1α−/− mice. Inducible tubular transgenic mice (iNephPGC1α) recapitulated the effects of Nam supplementation, including more local NAD and less fat accumulation with better renal function after ischemia. PGC1α coordinately upregulated the enzymes that synthesize NAD de novo from amino acids whereas PGC1α deficiency or AKI attenuated the de novo pathway. Nam enhanced NAD via the enzyme NAMPT and augmented production of the fat breakdown product beta-hydroxybutyrate (β-OHB), leading to increased prostaglandin PGE2, a secreted autocoid that maintains renal function.5 Nam treatment reversed established ischemic AKI and also prevented AKI in an unrelated toxic model. Inhibition of β-OHB signaling or prostaglandins similarly abolished PGC1α-dependent renoprotection. Given the importance of mitochondrial health in aging and the function of metabolically active organs, the results implicate Nam and NAD as key effectors for achieving PGC1α-dependent stress resistance. PMID:26982719

  11. Shock Wave Lithotripsy Does Not Impair Renal Function in a Swine Model of Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Cynthia D.; Connors, Bret A.; Evan, Andrew P.; Phillips, Carrie L.; Liu, Ziyue

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To determine whether shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) may be a risk factor for renal functional impairment in a swine model of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Materials and Methods: Nine-month-old female Ossabaw pigs were fed an excess calorie atherogenic diet to induce MetS. At 15 months of age, the MetS pigs were treated with 2000 SWs or an overtreatment dose of 4000 SWs targeted at the upper pole calyx of the left kidney (24 kV at 120 SWs/min using the unmodified Dornier HM3 lithotripter; n=5–6 per treatment group). Serum creatinine (Cr) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels were measured in conscious pigs before and ∼60 days after SWL to provide a qualitative assessment of how well both kidneys were filtering (glomerular filtration rate [GFR]). Bilateral renal function was assessed at ∼65 days post-SWL in anesthetized pigs with GFR and effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) quantified by the renal clearance of inulin and para-amino hippurate, respectively. Results: Cr and BUN values were within normal limits before SWL and remained unchanged after lithotripsy in both the 2000 SW- and 4000 SW-treated pigs. GFR and ERPF of kidneys treated with SWL at either SW dose were similar to the contralateral nontreated kidney. Chronic histological changes in the SW-treated pole of the kidney included interstitial fibrosis, sclerotic glomeruli, and dilated and atrophic tubules. Conclusions: Our results are consistent with the view that a single SWL session does not result in renal impairment, even in the presence of MetS. PMID:25285417

  12. PGC1α drives NAD biosynthesis linking oxidative metabolism to renal protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Mei T; Zsengeller, Zsuzsanna K; Berg, Anders H; Khankin, Eliyahu V; Bhasin, Manoj K; Kim, Wondong; Clish, Clary B; Stillman, Isaac E; Karumanchi, S Ananth; Rhee, Eugene P; Parikh, Samir M

    2016-03-24

    The energetic burden of continuously concentrating solutes against gradients along the tubule may render the kidney especially vulnerable to ischaemia. Acute kidney injury (AKI) affects 3% of all hospitalized patients. Here we show that the mitochondrial biogenesis regulator, PGC1α, is a pivotal determinant of renal recovery from injury by regulating nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) biosynthesis. Following renal ischaemia, Pgc1α(-/-) (also known as Ppargc1a(-/-)) mice develop local deficiency of the NAD precursor niacinamide (NAM, also known as nicotinamide), marked fat accumulation, and failure to re-establish normal function. Notably, exogenous NAM improves local NAD levels, fat accumulation, and renal function in post-ischaemic Pgc1α(-/-) mice. Inducible tubular transgenic mice (iNephPGC1α) recapitulate the effects of NAM supplementation, including more local NAD and less fat accumulation with better renal function after ischaemia. PGC1α coordinately upregulates the enzymes that synthesize NAD de novo from amino acids whereas PGC1α deficiency or AKI attenuates the de novo pathway. NAM enhances NAD via the enzyme NAMPT and augments production of the fat breakdown product β-hydroxybutyrate, leading to increased production of prostaglandin PGE2 (ref. 5), a secreted autacoid that maintains renal function. NAM treatment reverses established ischaemic AKI and also prevented AKI in an unrelated toxic model. Inhibition of β-hydroxybutyrate signalling or prostaglandin production similarly abolishes PGC1α-dependent renoprotection. Given the importance of mitochondrial health in ageing and the function of metabolically active organs, the results implicate NAM and NAD as key effectors for achieving PGC1α-dependent stress resistance.

  13. Metabolic reprogramming for producing energy and reducing power in fumarate hydratase null cells from hereditary leiomyomatosis renal cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youfeng Yang

    Full Text Available Fumarate hydratase (FH-deficient kidney cancer undergoes metabolic remodeling, with changes in mitochondrial respiration, glucose, and glutamine metabolism. These changes represent multiple biochemical adaptations in glucose and fatty acid metabolism that supports malignant proliferation. However, the metabolic linkages between altered mitochondrial function, nucleotide biosynthesis and NADPH production required for proliferation and survival have not been elucidated. To characterize the alterations in glycolysis, the Krebs cycle and the pentose phosphate pathways (PPP that either generate NADPH (oxidative or do not (non-oxidative, we utilized [U-(13C]-glucose, [U-(13C,(15N]-glutamine, and [1,2- (13C2]-glucose tracers with mass spectrometry and NMR detection to track these pathways, and measured the oxygen consumption rate (OCR and extracellular acidification rate (ECAR of growing cell lines. This metabolic reprogramming in the FH null cells was compared to cells in which FH has been restored. The FH null cells showed a substantial metabolic reorganization of their intracellular metabolic fluxes to fulfill their high ATP demand, as observed by a high rate of glucose uptake, increased glucose turnover via glycolysis, high production of glucose-derived lactate, and low entry of glucose carbon into the Krebs cycle. Despite the truncation of the Krebs cycle associated with inactivation of fumarate hydratase, there was a small but persistent level of mitochondrial respiration, which was coupled to ATP production from oxidation of glutamine-derived α-ketoglutarate through to fumarate. [1,2- (13C2]-glucose tracer experiments demonstrated that the oxidative branch of PPP initiated by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity is preferentially utilized for ribose production (56-66% that produces increased amounts of ribose necessary for growth and NADPH. Increased NADPH is required to drive reductive carboxylation of α-ketoglutarate and fatty acid

  14. Metabolic reprogramming for producing energy and reducing power in fumarate hydratase null cells from hereditary leiomyomatosis renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Youfeng; Lane, Andrew N; Ricketts, Christopher J; Sourbier, Carole; Wei, Ming-Hui; Shuch, Brian; Pike, Lisa; Wu, Min; Rouault, Tracey A; Boros, Laszlo G; Fan, Teresa W-M; Linehan, W Marston

    2013-01-01

    Fumarate hydratase (FH)-deficient kidney cancer undergoes metabolic remodeling, with changes in mitochondrial respiration, glucose, and glutamine metabolism. These changes represent multiple biochemical adaptations in glucose and fatty acid metabolism that supports malignant proliferation. However, the metabolic linkages between altered mitochondrial function, nucleotide biosynthesis and NADPH production required for proliferation and survival have not been elucidated. To characterize the alterations in glycolysis, the Krebs cycle and the pentose phosphate pathways (PPP) that either generate NADPH (oxidative) or do not (non-oxidative), we utilized [U-(13)C]-glucose, [U-(13)C,(15)N]-glutamine, and [1,2- (13)C2]-glucose tracers with mass spectrometry and NMR detection to track these pathways, and measured the oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and extracellular acidification rate (ECAR) of growing cell lines. This metabolic reprogramming in the FH null cells was compared to cells in which FH has been restored. The FH null cells showed a substantial metabolic reorganization of their intracellular metabolic fluxes to fulfill their high ATP demand, as observed by a high rate of glucose uptake, increased glucose turnover via glycolysis, high production of glucose-derived lactate, and low entry of glucose carbon into the Krebs cycle. Despite the truncation of the Krebs cycle associated with inactivation of fumarate hydratase, there was a small but persistent level of mitochondrial respiration, which was coupled to ATP production from oxidation of glutamine-derived α-ketoglutarate through to fumarate. [1,2- (13)C2]-glucose tracer experiments demonstrated that the oxidative branch of PPP initiated by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity is preferentially utilized for ribose production (56-66%) that produces increased amounts of ribose necessary for growth and NADPH. Increased NADPH is required to drive reductive carboxylation of α-ketoglutarate and fatty acid synthesis

  15. Sex differences in renal and metabolic responses to a high-fructose diet in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Nikhil; Li, Lijun

    2014-01-01

    High fructose intake has been associated with increased incidences of renal disease and hypertension, among other pathologies. Most fructose is cleared by the portal system and metabolized in the liver; however, systemic levels of fructose can rise with increased consumption. We tested whether there were sex differences in the renal responses to a high-fructose diet in mice. Two-month-old male and female C57BL6/129/SV mice (n = 6 mice per sex per treatment) were randomized to receive control or high-fructose (65% by weight) diets as pelleted chow ad libitum for 3 mo. Fructose feeding did not significantly affect body weight but led to a 19% and 10% increase in kidney weight in male and female mice, respectively. In male mice, fructose increased the expression (∼50%) of renal cortical proteins involved in metabolism, including glucose transporter 5 (facilitative fructose transporter), ketohexokinase, and the insulin receptor (β-subunit). Female mice had lower basal levels of glucose transporter 5, which were unresponsive to fructose. However, female mice had increased urine volume and plasma K+ and decreased plasma Na+ with fructose, whereas male mice were less affected. Likewise, female mice showed a two- to threefold reduction in the expression Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter 2 in the thick ascending limb and aquaporin-2 in the collecting duct with fructose relative to female control mice, whereas male mice had no change. Overall, our results support greater proximal metabolism of fructose in male animals and greater distal tubule/collecting duct (electrolyte homeostasis) alterations in female animals. These sex differences may be important determinants of the specific nature of pathologies that develop in association with high fructose consumption. PMID:25537743

  16. Prefrontal changes in the glutamate-glutamine cycle and neuronal/glial glutamate transporters in depression with and without suicide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, J.; Verwer, R.W.; Wamelen, D.J. van; Qi, X.R.; Gao, S.F.; Lucassen, P.J.; Swaab, D.F.

    2016-01-01

    There are indications for changes in glutamate metabolism in relation to depression or suicide. The glutamate-glutamine cycle and neuronal/glial glutamate transporters mediate the uptake of the glutamate and glutamine. The expression of various components of the glutamate-glutamine cycle and the neu

  17. RELATIONS BETWEEN OBESITY AND RENAL OSTEODYSTROPHY: REGULATION OF BONE METABOLISM BY LEPTIN.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina S. Martins

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the bone tissue is now recognized as the protagonist in the complex control mechanism energy because their hormone interactions with the adipose tissue. Leptin is an adipokine and its production is proportional to the amount of adipose tissue. Although leptin is associated with obesity, and this is recognized as the protector of bone tissue, little can be said about the inter-relationship in chronic kidney disease. In cross-sectional study, 32 hemodialysis patients at Botucatu Medical School - State University of Sao Paulo - Brazil, were evaluated anthropometrically regarding the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome (based on the harmonization of criteria IDF, AHA/NHLBI, ATP III, biochemically and bone biopsy. Due to variability of serum leptin was applied also values of the natural logarithm (Ln of leptin corrected by BMI. In comparisons was used Kruskal-Wallis, Pearson correlations were performed using regression analysis and considered the Ln leptin / BMI as the dependent variable was considered significant with p value less than 5%. Positive correlations of leptin have been shown in females (p=0.006, body fat percentage (p<0.001, serum albumin (p=0.035, and markers of metabolic syndrome, such as total cholesterol (p=0.01 , triglycerides (p=0.02 basal insulin (p=0.05 and BMI (p<0.001. About renal osteodystrophy, the sample has higher prevalence (69% of high turnover diseases - osteitis fibrosa cystica and mixed bone disease. BMI, percent body fat, leptin and Ln leptin/BMI showed no influence on the bone turnover and osteoporosis. In regression analysis Ln leptin/BMI was independently associated with age (p=0.006 and individuals diagnosed with metabolic syndrome (p=0.002, histological classifications of bone tissue showed no associations. In conclusion, this was a preliminary result which reinforced the strong and independent relationship between leptin and metabolic syndrome in chronic renal failure, however, has not found evidence of

  18. Metabolic acidosis in renal transplantation: neglected but of potential clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messa, Pier Giorgio; Alfieri, Carlo; Vettoretti, Simone

    2016-05-01

    Chronic metabolic acidosis (CMA) is a common complication of the more advanced stages of chronic kidney diseases (CKD), and is associated with morbidity and mortality of CKD patients and possibly with the progression of renal disease. Nevertheless, there is limited evidence or information on the prevalence, the potential causal factors, the clinical impact and the effects of correction of CMA in kidney transplant recipients. In this review, we briefly look at the more relevant, though scanty, studies which have, over time, addressed the above-mentioned points, with the hope that in the future the interest of transplant nephrologists and surgeons will grow towards this unreasonably neglected issue.

  19. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor family and its relationship to renal complications of the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Youfei

    2004-11-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors. Three PPAR isoforms, designated PPARalpha, -beta/delta, and -gamma, have been identified and attracted enormous attention as a result of the key role that these receptors play in regulating adipogenesis, lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity, inflammation, and BP. Growing evidence points to a causative relationship between PPAR activity and the metabolic syndrome, including insulin resistance, glucose intolerance or type 2 diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, atherosclerosis, and albuminuria. Importantly, both PPAR-alpha activators, such as the fibric acid class of hypolipidemic drugs, and PPAR-gamma agonists, including antidiabetic thiazolidinediones, have been proved to be effective for improving diverse aspects of the metabolic syndrome. All three PPAR isoforms seem to play important roles in the development of diabetic nephropathy in type 2 diabetes. Accumulating data suggesting that PPAR may serve as potential therapeutic targets for treating the metabolic syndrome and its related renal complications have begun to emerge. This article reviews the literature pertaining to the action, ligand selectivity, and physiologic role of PPAR. Particular emphasis is placed on their pathogenic roles in the metabolic syndrome and the therapeutic utility of PPAR modulators in the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  20. Late Metabolic Acidosis Caused by Renal Tubular Acidosis in Acute Salicylate Poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Norihiro; Hirose, Yasuo; Sato, Nobuhiro; Kondo, Daisuke; Shimada, Yuko; Hori, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    A 16-year-old man was transferred to our emergency department seven hours after ingesting 486 aspirin tablets. His blood salicylate level was 83.7 mg/dL. He was treated with fluid resuscitation and sodium bicarbonate infusion, and his condition gradually improved, with a decline in the blood salicylate level. However, eight days after admission, he again reported nausea, a venous blood gas revealed metabolic acidosis with a normal anion gap. The blood salicylate level was undetectable, and a urinalysis showed glycosuria, proteinuria and elevated beta-2 microglobulin and n-acetyl glucosamine levels, with a normal urinary pH despite the acidosis. We diagnosed him with relapse of metabolic acidosis caused by renal tubular acidosis.

  1. The importance of cytosolic glutamine synthetase in nitrogen assimilation and recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, S.M.; Habash, D.Z.

    2009-07-02

    Glutamine synthetase assimilates ammonium into amino acids, thus it is a key enzyme for nitrogen metabolism. The cytosolic isoenzymes of glutamine synthetase assimilate ammonium derived from primary nitrogen uptake and from various internal nitrogen recycling pathways. In this way, cytosolic glutamine synthetase is crucial for the remobilization of protein-derived nitrogen. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase is encoded by a small family of genes that are well conserved across plant species. Members of the cytosolic glutamine synthetase gene family are regulated in response to plant nitrogen status, as well as to environmental cues, such as nitrogen availability and biotic/abiotic stresses. The complex regulation of cytosolic glutamine synthetase at the transcriptional to post-translational levels is key to the establishment of a specific physiological role for each isoenzyme. The diverse physiological roles of cytosolic glutamine synthetase isoenzymes are important in relation to current agricultural and ecological issues.

  2. The importance of cytosolic glutamine synthetase in nitrogen assimilation and recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Stéphanie M; Habash, Dimah Z

    2009-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase assimilates ammonium into amino acids, thus it is a key enzyme for nitrogen metabolism. The cytosolic isoenzymes of glutamine synthetase assimilate ammonium derived from primary nitrogen uptake and from various internal nitrogen recycling pathways. In this way, cytosolic glutamine synthetase is crucial for the remobilization of protein-derived nitrogen. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase is encoded by a small family of genes that are well conserved across plant species. Members of the cytosolic glutamine synthetase gene family are regulated in response to plant nitrogen status, as well as to environmental cues, such as nitrogen availability and biotic/abiotic stresses. The complex regulation of cytosolic glutamine synthetase at the transcriptional to post-translational levels is key to the establishment of a specific physiological role for each isoenzyme. The diverse physiological roles of cytosolic glutamine synthetase isoenzymes are important in relation to current agricultural and ecological issues.

  3. The Genomic Landscape of Renal Oncocytoma Identifies a Metabolic Barrier to Tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Shilpy; Tolkunov, Denis; Aviv, Hana; Hakimi, Abraham A; Yao, Ming; Hsieh, James J; Ganesan, Shridar; Chan, Chang S; White, Eileen

    2015-12-01

    Oncocytomas are predominantly benign neoplasms possessing pathogenic mitochondrial mutations and accumulation of respiration-defective mitochondria, characteristics of unknown significance. Using exome and transcriptome sequencing, we identified two main subtypes of renal oncocytoma. Type 1 is diploid with CCND1 rearrangements, whereas type 2 is aneuploid with recurrent loss of chromosome 1, X or Y, and/or 14 and 21, which may proceed to more aggressive eosinophilic chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (ChRCC). Oncocytomas activate 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and Tp53 (p53) and display disruption of Golgi and autophagy/lysosome trafficking, events attributed to defective mitochondrial function. This suggests that the genetic defects in mitochondria activate a metabolic checkpoint, producing autophagy impairment and mitochondrial accumulation that limit tumor progression, revealing a novel tumor-suppressive mechanism for mitochondrial inhibition with metformin. Alleviation of this metabolic checkpoint in type 2 by p53 mutations may allow progression to eosinophilic ChRCC, indicating that they represent higher risk.

  4. The Genomic Landscape of Renal Oncocytoma Identifies a Metabolic Barrier to Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpy Joshi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Oncocytomas are predominantly benign neoplasms possessing pathogenic mitochondrial mutations and accumulation of respiration-defective mitochondria, characteristics of unknown significance. Using exome and transcriptome sequencing, we identified two main subtypes of renal oncocytoma. Type 1 is diploid with CCND1 rearrangements, whereas type 2 is aneuploid with recurrent loss of chromosome 1, X or Y, and/or 14 and 21, which may proceed to more aggressive eosinophilic chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (ChRCC. Oncocytomas activate 5′ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK and Tp53 (p53 and display disruption of Golgi and autophagy/lysosome trafficking, events attributed to defective mitochondrial function. This suggests that the genetic defects in mitochondria activate a metabolic checkpoint, producing autophagy impairment and mitochondrial accumulation that limit tumor progression, revealing a novel tumor-suppressive mechanism for mitochondrial inhibition with metformin. Alleviation of this metabolic checkpoint in type 2 by p53 mutations may allow progression to eosinophilic ChRCC, indicating that they represent higher risk.

  5. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase in barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Hanne Cecilie

    Improving crop nitrogen (N) utilization efficiency (NUE) is of major importance in modern agriculture in order to reduce the amount of N fertilizer used for crop production. There is a high demand for development of crops which are able to produce high yields but with a concomitantly lower N...... fertilizer requirement. The enzyme glutamine synthetase (GS) has been a major topic in plant nitrogen research for decades due to its central role in plant N metabolism. The cytosolic version of this enzyme (GS1) plays an important role in relation to primary N assimilation as well as in relation to N...... and wildtype control. However, when grown to maturity the differences between transgenic lines and wildtype were highly dependent on the growth conditions applied. The transgenic lines had a higher N utilization efficiency (NUtE) than wildtype control, but only when exposed to a mild N stress following...

  6. Suppression of PGC-1α is critical for reprogramming oxidative metabolism in renal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaGory, Edward L.; Wu, Colleen; Taniguchi, Cullen M.; Ding, Chien-Kuang Cornelia; Chi, Jen-Tsan; von Eyben, Rie; Scott, David A.; Richardson, Adam D.; Giaccia, Amato J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Long believed to be a byproduct of malignant transformation, reprogramming of cellular metabolism is now recognized as a driving force in tumorigenesis. In clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) frequent activation of HIF-signaling induces a metabolic switch that promotes tumorigenesis. Here we demonstrate that PGC-1α, a central regulator of energy metabolism, is suppressed in VHL-deficient ccRCC by a HIF/Dec1-dependent mechanism. In VHL wild type cells, PGC-1α suppression leads to decreased expression of the mitochondrial transcription factor Tfam and impaired mitochondrial respiration. Conversely, PGC-1α expression in VHL-deficient cells restores mitochondrial function and induces oxidative stress. ccRCC cells expressing PGC-1α exhibit impaired tumor growth and enhanced sensitivity to cytotoxic therapies. In patients, low levels of PGC-1α expression are associated with poor outcome. These studies demonstrate that suppression of PGC-1α recapitulates key metabolic phenotypes of ccRCC and highlight the potential of targeting PGC-1α expression as a therapeutic modality for the treatment of ccRCC. PMID:26119730

  7. Suppression of PGC-1α Is Critical for Reprogramming Oxidative Metabolism in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward L. LaGory

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Long believed to be a byproduct of malignant transformation, reprogramming of cellular metabolism is now recognized as a driving force in tumorigenesis. In clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC, frequent activation of HIF signaling induces a metabolic switch that promotes tumorigenesis. Here, we demonstrate that PGC-1α, a central regulator of energy metabolism, is suppressed in VHL-deficient ccRCC by a HIF/Dec1-dependent mechanism. In VHL wild-type cells, PGC-1α suppression leads to decreased expression of the mitochondrial transcription factor Tfam and impaired mitochondrial respiration. Conversely, PGC-1α expression in VHL-deficient cells restores mitochondrial function and induces oxidative stress. ccRCC cells expressing PGC-1α exhibit impaired tumor growth and enhanced sensitivity to cytotoxic therapies. In patients, low levels of PGC-1α expression are associated with poor outcome. These studies demonstrate that suppression of PGC-1α recapitulates key metabolic phenotypes of ccRCC and highlight the potential of targeting PGC-1α expression as a therapeutic modality for the treatment of ccRCC.

  8. Delusional Infestation in a Patient with Renal Failure, Metabolic Syndrome, and Chronic Cerebrovascular Disease Treated with Aripiprazole: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpiniello, Bernardo; Pinna, Federica; Tuveri, Raffaella

    2011-01-01

    Delusional infestation is an aspecific psychiatric condition manifested either as a primary psychotic disorder or a secondary disorder induced by a wide range of very different medical conditions. Both primary and secondary delusional infestations seem to respond to typical and atypical antipsychotics. The latter are considered the first-line treatment although the use of second-generation antipsychotics featuring a higher metabolic, cardiovascular, and renal tolerability is preferable in secondary cases, which often occur in patients with multiple, severe medical conditions. We report a case of a 72-year-old patient affected by delusional infestation associated with severe renal failure, metabolic syndrome, hypertensive cardiopathy, and chronic cerebrovascular disease. PMID:22174718

  9. Delusional Infestation in a Patient with Renal Failure, Metabolic Syndrome, and Chronic Cerebrovascular Disease Treated with Aripiprazole: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Carpiniello

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Delusional infestation is an aspecific psychiatric condition manifested either as a primary psychotic disorder or a secondary disorder induced by a wide range of very different medical conditions. Both primary and secondary delusional infestations seem to respond to typical and atypical antipsychotics. The latter are considered the first-line treatment although the use of second-generation antipsychotics featuring a higher metabolic, cardiovascular, and renal tolerability is preferable in secondary cases, which often occur in patients with multiple, severe medical conditions. We report a case of a 72-year-old patient affected by delusional infestation associated with severe renal failure, metabolic syndrome, hypertensive cardiopathy, and chronic cerebrovascular disease.

  10. l-Arginine metabolism in cardiovascular and renal tissue from hyper- and hypothyroid rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moliz, Juan N; Quesada, Andrés; Montoro-Molina, Sebastian; Vargas-Tendero, Pablo; Osuna, Antonio; Wangensteen, Rosemary; Vargas, Félix

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of thyroid hormones on the enzymes involved in l-arginine metabolism and the metabolites generated by the different metabolic pathways. Compounds of l-arginine metabolism were measured in the kidney, heart, aorta, and liver of euthyroid, hyperthyroid, and hypothyroid rats after 6 weeks of treatment. Enzymes studied were NOS isoforms (neuronal [nNOS], inducible [iNOS], and endothelial [eNOS]), arginases I and II, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), ornithine aminotransferase (OAT), and l-arginine decarboxylase (ADC). Metabolites studied were l-arginine, l-citrulline, spermidine, spermine, and l-proline. Kidney heart and aorta levels of eNOS and iNOS were augmented and reduced (P < 0.05, for each tissue and enzyme) in hyper- and hypothyroid rats, respectively. Arginase I abundance in aorta, heart, and kidney was increased (P < 0.05, for each tissue) in hyperthyroid rats and was decreased in kidney and aorta of hypothyroid rats (P < 0.05, for each tissue). Arginase II was augmented in aorta and kidney (P < 0.05, for each tissue) of hyperthyroid rats and remained unchanged in all organs of hypothyroid rats. The substrate for these enzymes, l-arginine, was reduced (P < 0.05, for all tissues) in hyperthyroid rats. Levels of ODC and spermidine, its product, were increased and decreased (P < 0.05) in hyper- and hypothyroid rats, respectively, in all organs studied. OAT and proline levels were positively modulated by thyroid hormones in liver but not in the other tissues. ADC protein levels were positively modulated by thyroid hormones in all tissues. According to these findings, thyroid hormone treatment positively modulates different l-arginine metabolic pathways. The changes recorded in the abundance of eNOS, arginases I and II, and ADC protein in renal and cardiovascular tissues may play a role in the hemodynamic and renal manifestations observed in thyroid disorders. Furthermore, the changes in ODC and spermidine might

  11. Derangements in phosphate metabolism in chronic kidney diseases/endstage renal disease: therapeutic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molony, Donald A; Stephens, Brett W

    2011-03-01

    The changes in phosphate (PO(4)) metabolism across the spectrum of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and specific strategies to address these abnormalities by reducing PO(4) loads are discussed in this review. This review also addresses briefly the evidence for specific PO(4) serum targets in CKD and endstage renal disease (ESRD) and the potential for other biomarkers such as fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) to define disease and monitor the effectiveness of therapy. As renal function declines, single nephron excretion of PO(4) must increase to maintain PO(4) balance. Abnormalities in PO(4) metabolism occur early in CKD. Compensatory changes in renal PO(4) handling are sufficient to maintain a normal serum PO(4) level in early stages of CKD, but in more advanced CKD, these processes no longer suffice and overt hyperphosphatemia develops. The resulting increased PO(4) burden contributes directly to development of secondary hyperparathyroidism. The FGF-23 increases early in CKD, likely in response to abnormal PO(4) metabolism, and mediates processes that help restore serum PO(4) levels to normal in CKD stage 3 and in early stage 4. The increased PO(4) burden and subsequent overt hyperphosphatemia are associated with increased mortality and morbidity. Dietary PO(4) restriction, modification of dialysis prescriptions, and administration of oral PO(4) binders can restore PO(4) balance. As CKD progresses, population-based studies demonstrate that diet alone is typically not able to prevent or treat hyperphosphatemia. Dialysis modalities that are currently used often fail to remove sufficient PO(4) to prevent hyperphosphatemia in patients with an inadequately controlled dietary PO(4) load. This is particularly likely among patients without significant residual renal function. Thus, in the majority of ESRD patients, PO(4) binders remain the mainstay of therapy for hyperphosphatemia. All currently available PO(4) binders can restore serum PO(4) to the required level when

  12. [Imbalance of system of glutamin - glutamic acid in the placenta and amniotic fluid at placental insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorelova, T N; Gunko, V O; Linde, V A

    2014-01-01

    Metabolism of glutamine and glutamic acid has been investigated in the placenta and amniotic fluid under conditions of placental insufficiency. The development of placental insufficiency is characterized by the increased content of glutamic acid and a decrease of glutamine in both placenta and amniotic fluid. These changes changes were accompanied by changes in the activity of enzymes involved in the metabolism of these amino acids. There was a decrease in glutamate dehydrogenase activity and an increase in glutaminase activity with the simultaneous decrease of glutamine synthetase activity. The compensatory decrease in the activity of glutamine keto acid aminotransferase did not prevent a decrease in the glutamine level. The impairments in the system glutamic acid-glutamine were more pronounced during the development of premature labor.

  13. Renal Osteodystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aynur Metin Terzibaşoğlu

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic renal insufficiency is a functional definition which is characterized by irreversible and progressive decreasing in renal functions. This impairment is in collaboration with glomeruler filtration rate and serum creatinine levels. Besides this, different grades of bone metabolism disorders develop in chronic renal insufficiency. Pathologic changes in bone tissue due to loss of renal paranchyme is interrelated with calcium, phosphorus vitamine-D and parathyroid hormone. Clinically we can see high turnover bone disease, low turnover bone disease, osteomalacia, osteosclerosis and osteoporosis in renal osteodystropy. In this article we aimed to review pathology of bone metabolism disorders due to chronic renal insufficiency, clinic aspects and treatment approaches briefly.

  14. Secondary NAD+ deficiency in the inherited defect of glutamine synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Liyan; Ibrahim, Khalid; Stucki, Martin; Frapolli, Michele; Shahbeck, Noora; Chaudhry, Farrukh A; Görg, Boris; Häussinger, Dieter; Penberthy, W Todd; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Häberle, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) deficiency is an ultra-rare inborn error of amino acid metabolism that has been described in only three patients so far. The disease is characterized by neonatal onset of severe encephalopathy, low levels of glutamine in blood and cerebrospinal fluid, chronic moderate hyperammonemia, and an overall poor prognosis in the absence of an effective treatment. Recently, enteral glutamine supplementation was shown to be a safe and effective therapy for this disease but there are no data available on the long-term effects of this intervention. The amino acid glutamine, severely lacking in this disorder, is central to many metabolic pathways in the human organism and is involved in the synthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) starting from tryptophan or niacin as nicotinate, but not nicotinamide. Using fibroblasts, leukocytes, and immortalized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) from a patient carrying a GLUL gene point mutation associated with impaired GS activity, we tested whether glutamine deficiency in this patient results in NAD(+) depletion and whether it can be rescued by supplementation with glutamine, nicotinamide or nicotinate. The present study shows that congenital GS deficiency is associated with NAD(+) depletion in fibroblasts, leukocytes and PBSC, which may contribute to the severe clinical phenotype of the disease. Furthermore, it shows that NAD(+) depletion can be rescued by nicotinamide supplementation in fibroblasts and leukocytes, which may open up potential therapeutic options for the treatment of this disorder.

  15. Addressing metabolic heterogeneity in clear cell renal cell carcinoma with quantitative Dixon MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Udayakumar, Durga; Cai, Ling; Hu, Zeping; Kapur, Payal; Kho, Eun-Young; Pavía-Jiménez, Andrea; Fulkerson, Michael; de Leon, Alberto Diaz; Yuan, Qing; Dimitrov, Ivan E.; Ye, Jin; Mitsche, Matthew A.; Kim, Hyeonwoo; McDonald, Jeffrey G.; Madhuranthakam, Ananth J.; Dwivedi, Durgesh K.; Lenkinski, Robert E.; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A.; Margulis, Vitaly; Brugarolas, James; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Dysregulated lipid and glucose metabolism in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) has been implicated in disease progression, and whole tumor tissue–based assessment of these changes is challenged by the tumor heterogeneity. We studied a noninvasive quantitative MRI method that predicts metabolic alterations in the whole tumor. METHODS. We applied Dixon-based MRI for in vivo quantification of lipid accumulation (fat fraction [FF]) in targeted regions of interest of 45 primary ccRCCs and correlated these MRI measures to mass spectrometry–based lipidomics and metabolomics of anatomically colocalized tissue samples isolated from the same tumor after surgery. RESULTS. In vivo tumor FF showed statistically significant (P quantitative Dixon-based MRI as a biomarker of reprogrammed lipid metabolism in ccRCC, which may serve as a predictor of tumor aggressiveness before surgical intervention. FUNDING. NIH R01CA154475 (YZ, MF, PK, IP), NIH P50CA196516 (IP, JB, RJD, JAC, PK), Welch Foundation I-1832 (JY), and NIH P01HL020948 (JGM). PMID:28768909

  16. Benzo[a]pyrene affects Jurkat T cells in the activated state via the antioxidant response element dependent Nrf2 pathway leading to decreased IL-2 secretion and redirecting glutamine metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murugaiyan, Jayaseelan; Rockstroh, Maxie; Wagner, Juliane [Department of Proteomics, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research — UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Baumann, Sven [Department of Metabolomics, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research — UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Schorsch, Katrin [Department of Proteomics, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research — UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Trump, Saskia; Lehmann, Irina [Department of Environmental Immunology, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research — UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Bergen, Martin von [Department of Proteomics, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research — UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Department of Environmental Immunology, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research — UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Department of Biotechnology, Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Aalborg University, Aalborg (Denmark); Tomm, Janina M., E-mail: Janina.tomm@ufz.de [Department of Proteomics, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research — UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    There is a clear evidence that environmental pollutants, such as benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), can have detrimental effects on the immune system, whereas the underlying mechanisms still remain elusive. Jurkat T cells share many properties with native T lymphocytes and therefore are an appropriate model to analyze the effects of environmental pollutants on T cells and their activation. Since environmental compounds frequently occur at low, not acute toxic concentrations, we analyzed the effects of two subtoxic concentrations, 50 nM and 5 μM, on non- and activated cells. B[a]P interferes directly with the stimulation process as proven by an altered IL-2 secretion. Furthermore, B[a]P exposure results in significant proteomic changes as shown by DIGE analysis. Pathway analysis revealed an involvement of the AhR independent Nrf2 pathway in the altered processes observed in unstimulated and stimulated cells. A participation of the Nrf2 pathway in the change of IL-2 secretion was confirmed by exposing cells to the Nrf2 activator tBHQ. tBHQ and 5 μM B[a]P caused similar alterations of IL-2 secretion and glutamine/glutamate metabolism. Moreover, the proteome changes in unstimulated cells point towards a modified regulation of the cytoskeleton and cellular stress response, which was proven by western blotting. Additionally, there is a strong evidence for alterations in metabolic pathways caused by B[a]P exposure in stimulated cells. Especially the glutamine/glutamate metabolism was indicated by proteome pathway analysis and validated by metabolite measurements. The detrimental effects were slightly enhanced in stimulated cells, suggesting that stimulated cells are more vulnerable to the environmental pollutant model compound B[a]P. - Highlights: • B[a]P affects the proteome of Jurkat T cells also at low concentrations. • Exposure to B[a]P (50 nM, 5 μM) did not change Jurkat T cell viability. • Both B[a]P concentrations altered the IL-2 secretion of stimulated cells.

  17. Glutamine Assimilation and Feedback Regulation of L-acetyl-N-glutamate Kinase Activity in Chlorella variabilis NC64A Results in Changes in Arginine Pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minaeva, Ekaterina; Forchhammer, Karl; Ermilova, Elena

    2015-11-01

    Glutamine is a metabolite of central importance in nitrogen metabolism of microorganisms and plants. The Chlorella PII signaling protein controls, in a glutamine-dependent manner, the key enzyme of the ornithine/arginine biosynthesis pathway, N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase (NAGK) that leads to arginine formation. We provide evidence that glutamine promotes effective growth of C. variabilis strain NC64A. The present study shows that externally supplied glutamine directly influences the internal pool of arginine in NC64A. Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the ATP-dependent conversion of glutamate and ammonium to glutamine. The results of this study demonstrate that glutamine acts as a negative effector of GS activity. These data emphasize the importance of glutamine-dependent coupling of metabolism and signaling as components of an efficient pathway allowing the maintenance of metabolic homeostasis and sustaining growth of Chlorella.

  18. Hyperkalemia after acute metabolic decompensation in two children with vitamin B12-unresponsive methylmalonic acidemia and normal renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pela, I; Gasperini, S; Pasquini, E; Donati, M A

    2006-07-01

    The patients affected by vitamin B12-unresponsive methylmalonic acidemia (MMA) on the long run develop chronic renal disease with interstitial nephropathy and progressive renal insufficiency. The mechanism of nephrotoxicity in vitamin B12-unresponsive MMA is not yet known. Chronic hyporeninemic hypoaldosteronism has been found in many cases of methylmalonic acidemia, hyperkalemia and renal tubular acidosis type 4. We report 2 patients affected by B12-unresponsive methylmalonic acidemia diagnosed at the age of 23 months and 5 years, respectively, with normal glomerular filtration and function. They showed hyporeninemic hypoaldosteronism and significant hyperkalemia requiring sodium potassium exchange resin (Kayexalate) therapy after an episode of metabolic decompensation leading to diagnosis of MMA. In both children, hyporeninemic hypoaldosteronism and hyperkalemia disappeared after 6 months of good metabolic control.

  19. Interactive effects of glutamine and gamma-aminobutyric acid on growth performance and skeletal muscle amino acid metabolism of 22-42-day-old broilers exposed to hot environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hong; Bai, Xi; Shah, Assar Ali; Dai, Sifa; Wang, Like; Hua, Jinling; Che, Chuanyan; He, Shaojun; Wen, Aiyou; Jiang, Jinpeng

    2016-06-01

    The present experiment was conducted to investigate the interactive effects between dietary glutamine (Gln, 0 and 5 g/kg) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA, 0 and 100 mg/kg) on growth performance and amino acid (AA) metabolism of broilers under hot environment. A total of 360 22-day-old Arbor Acres male chickens were randomly assigned to five treatment groups under thermoneutral chamber (PC, 23 °C) and cyclic heat stress (HS, 30-34 °C cycling) conditions. Compared with the PC group, cyclic HS decreased ( P muscle at 28, 35, and 42 days, while it increased ( P muscle, the Gln supplementation increased ( P muscle Gln concentrations, glutaminase activities, GS activities at 28 and 35 days, and DWG, GABA concentrations, and GABA-T activities at 28, 35, and 42 days in broilers under cyclic HS. In conclusion, the present results indicated that the interactions of exogenous Gln and GABA could offer a potential nutritional strategy to prevent HS-related depression in skeletal muscle Gln and GABA metabolism of broilers.

  20. Renal inflammatory and oxidative and metabolic changes after 6 weeks of cafeteria diet in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Maria Eugênia Lopes; Santos, Klinsmann Carolo Dos; Nascimento, André Ferreira do; Francisqueti, Fabiane Valentini; Minatel, Igor Otávio; Pierine, Damiana Tortolero; Luvizotto, Renata Azevedo de Melo; Ferreira, Ana Lúcia A; Campos, Dijon Henrique Salomé de; Corrêa, Camila Renata

    2016-03-01

    Obesity is a disease in which inflammation is directly involved and can lead to impaired renal function. To evaluate the influence of short term exposure to cafeteria diet on kidney tissue inflammation and advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in the rat plasma. Male Wistar rats (10 weeks of age, weighing 350 g) were assigned to receive commercial chow diet (C; n = 8 animals/group, 5% of energy from fat) or cafeteria diet (CAF-D, n = 8 animals/group: 29% energy fat) and sucrose in drinking water (300 g/L) for 6 weeks. adiposity index at six weeks was higher in CAF-D group compared to C. The same behavior was observed for plasma levels of glucose, triglycerides, leptin, insulin and AGEs. The gene expression of IL-6 and TNF-α in renal tissue was higher in CAF-D group and no significant difference in adipose tissue. There was no increase of these cytokines in plasma and kidney or histologically. There was a significant decrease of adiponectin in the CAF-D group. The short exposure CAF-D reflects changes in metabolism, increased plasma levels of AGEs, which may reflect the increased expression of inflammatory cytokines in the kidney.

  1. Renal dysfunction and state of metabolic and hemodynamic factors in patients with arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klochkov V.A.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation is to carry out comparative evaluation of metabolic and hemodynamic indices in patients with arterial hypertension (AH and renal dysfunction; to study the interrelation between arterial blood pressure level normalization and the presence or lack of microalbuminuria (MAU in the morning urine portion of patients with AH after therapy with antihypertensive preparations (APs of various groups. Methods. 121 persons have been investigated, 91 out — patients of both sexes, aged 33-55, with the diagnosis of arterial hypertension of stage II risk III, who have been taking Perindopril, Telmisartan and Bisoprolol for3 months. The control of arterial pressure level, biochemical analysis of metabolic indices and morning urine portion test for microalbuminuria has been carried out. Results. MAU has been revealed in 17,6% patients, occurring more frequently in men than in women. Microalbuminuria is accompanied by reliable decrease of total and ionized calcium and magnesium concentrations, an increase of potassium level in blood plasma, increase of cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose and levels. Patients with AH and renal dysfunction reliably demonstrate higher levels of systolic and diastolic arterial pressure in the morning and evening hours, their normalization effect after APs intake is significantly interconnected with MAU presence. Conclusion. In patients with AH and MAU the main risk factors of cardio-vascular diseases development are more expressed. Microalbuminuria is a risk factor in patients with arterial hypertension and may influence on the basic blood electrolyte balance. While carrying out antihypertensive therapy the presence of MAU should be taken into consideration

  2. The Role of the Renal Ammonia Transporter Rhcg in Metabolic Responses to Dietary Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bounoure, Lisa; Ruffoni, Davide; Müller, Ralph; Kuhn, Gisela Anna; Devuyst, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    High dietary protein imposes a metabolic acid load requiring excretion and buffering by the kidney. Impaired acid excretion in CKD, with potential metabolic acidosis, may contribute to the progression of CKD. Here, we investigated the renal adaptive response of acid excretory pathways in mice to high-protein diets containing normal or low amounts of acid-producing sulfur amino acids (SAA) and examined how this adaption requires the RhCG ammonia transporter. Diets rich in SAA stimulated expression of enzymes and transporters involved in mediating NH4+ reabsorption in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle. The SAA-rich diet increased diuresis paralleled by downregulation of aquaporin-2 (AQP2) water channels. The absence of Rhcg transiently reduced NH4+ excretion, stimulated the ammoniagenic pathway more strongly, and further enhanced diuresis by exacerbating the downregulation of the Na+/K+/2Cl− cotransporter (NKCC2) and AQP2, with less phosphorylation of AQP2 at serine 256. The high protein acid load affected bone turnover, as indicated by higher Ca2+ and deoxypyridinoline excretion, phenomena exaggerated in the absence of Rhcg. In animals receiving a high-protein diet with low SAA content, the kidney excreted alkaline urine, with low levels of NH4+ and no change in bone metabolism. Thus, the acid load associated with high-protein diets causes a concerted response of various nephron segments to excrete acid, mostly in the form of NH4+, that requires Rhcg. Furthermore, bone metabolism is altered by a high-protein acidogenic diet, presumably to buffer the acid load. PMID:24652796

  3. Identification and validation of dysregulated metabolic pathways in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Nicole M A; Newsted, Daniel W; Masui, Olena; Romaschin, Alexander D; Siu, K W Michael; Yousef, George M

    2014-03-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) is a devastating disease with a 5-year survival rate of approximately 9 % and low response to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Targeted therapies have slightly improved patient survival, but are only effective in a small subset of patients, who eventually develop resistance. A better understanding of pathways contributing to tumor progression and metastasis will allow for the development of novel targeted therapies and accurate prognostic markers. We performed extensive bioinformatics coupled with experimental validation on proteins dysregulated in mRCC. Gene ontology analysis showed that many proteins are involved in oxidation reduction, metabolic processes, and signal transduction. Pathway analysis showed metabolic pathways are altered in mRCC including glycolysis and pyruvate metabolism, the citric acid cycle, and the pentose phosphate pathway. RT-qPCR analysis showed that genes involved in the citric acid cycle were downregulated in metastatic RCC while genes of the pentose phosphate pathway were overexpressed. Protein-protein interaction analysis showed that most of the 198 proteins altered in mRCC clustered together and many were involved in glycolysis and pyruvate metabolism. We identified 29 reported regions of chromosomal aberrations in metastatic disease that correlate with the direction of protein dysregulation in mRCC. Furthermore, 36 proteins dysregulated in mRCC are predicted to be targets of metastasis-related miRNAs. A more comprehensive understanding of the pathways dysregulated in metastasis can be useful for the development of new therapies and novel prognostic markers. Also, multileveled analyses provide a unique "snapshot" of the molecular "environment" in RCC with prognostic and therapeutic implications.

  4. Oral Glutamine Supplementation Benefits Jejunum but Not Ileum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul E Hardy

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine is the primary metabolic fuel of the small intestine. The ability of enteral glutamine to support jejunal architecture and metabolism is well established, but its effect on intestinal absorptive function, especially in the terminal ileum, remains undetermined. The purpose of this study was to develop a functional ileal fluid absorption surgical injury model and to determine if oral glutamine supplementation would be beneficial in accelerating healing and restoring function. The effects of either 1 cm resection and ileal end-to-end anastomosis or sham laparotomy on rat in vivo fluid absorption at study start (day 0, one and two days was investigated. In sham-operated rats, fluid absorption was not altered. In contrast, ileal fluid absorption was significantly reduced at days 0 (17.2±4.8 μL/cm/h and 1 (31.4±13.6 μL/cm/h, but returned to normal by day 2 (71.0±6.2 μL/cm/h in anastomosed rats. To examine the effects of glutamine in this model, rats were fed either glutamine (2.4 g/kg/day or an isonitrogenous glycine-supplemented elemental oral diet for five days before their randomization to sham or anastomotic groups. This dose of glutamine reached the ileum and was completely absorbed along the small intestine. Glutamine-fed rats demonstrated no difference in recovery of in vivo ileal fluid absorption, ileal villus morphometric measurements, mg DNA:mg protein ratio, degree of inflammation or glutaminase activity. In contrast, jejunal, but not ileal, villus morphometry, mg DNA:mg protein ratio and glutaminase activity were increased in glutamine-fed ‘not operated’ rats (P<0.01, indicating that the jejunum, but not the ileum, responded to the glutamine-supplemented diet. These studies demonstrate that ileal resection and anastomosis causes transient impairments in in vivo fluid absorption, and oral glutamine supplementation offers a beneficial effect to jejunal, but not ileal, intestinal mucosa. These results suggest

  5. Chromosome 3p loss of heterozygosity is associated with a unique metabolic network in clear cell renal carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatto, Francesco; Nookaew, Intawat; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Several common oncogenic pathways have been implicated in the emergence of renowned metabolic features in cancer, which in turn are deemed essential for cancer proliferation and survival. However, the extent to which different cancers coordinate their metabolism to meet these requirements is largely unexplored. Here we show that even in the heterogeneity of metabolic regulation a distinct signature encompassed most cancers. On the other hand, clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) strongly deviated in terms of metabolic gene expression changes, showing widespread down-regulation. We observed a metabolic shift that associates differential regulation of enzymes in one-carbon metabolism with high tumor stage and poor clinical outcome. A significant yet limited set of metabolic genes that explained the partial divergence of ccRCC metabolism correlated with loss of von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor (VHL) and a potential activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1. Further network-dependent analyses revealed unique defects in nucleotide, one-carbon, and glycerophospholipid metabolism at the transcript and protein level, which contrasts findings in other tumors. Notably, this behavior is recapitulated by recurrent loss of heterozygosity in multiple metabolic genes adjacent to VHL. This study therefore shows how loss of heterozygosity, hallmarked by VHL deletion in ccRCC, may uniquely shape tumor metabolism. PMID:24550497

  6. Depressed cerebral oxygen metabolism in patients with chronic renal failure. A positron emission tomography study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirakata, Hideki; Kanai, Hidetoshi; Nakane, Hiroshi; Fujii, Ken-ichiro; Hirakata, Eriko; Ibayashi, Setsuro; Kuwabara, Yasuo; Deenitchna, S.S.; Fujishima, Masatoshi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Graduate School of Medical Sciences

    2001-07-01

    In order to elucidate brain oxygen metabolism in uremic patients, the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), oxygen extraction (rOEF) and oxygen metabolism (rCMRO{sub 2}) were measured by positron emission tomography (PET) in both 10 hemodialysis patients (HD: male [m]/female [f]=2/8, age of 49{+-}3 [SEM] years old, HD duration of 113{+-}26 months) and 13 pre-dialysis renal failure patients (CRF: m/f=10/3, age of 61{+-}2 years old, serum creatinine (SCr) of 6.3{+-}1.0 mg/dl). Data were compared with 20 non-uremic subjects (Control: m/f=7/13, age of 62{+-}2 years old, SCr of 0.9{+-}0.1 mg/dl). They had no neurological abnormalities, congestive heart failure, history of cerebrovascular accident, diabetes mellitus, or symptomatic brain lesion on magnetic resonance imaging. The age of HD was significantly younger than the other groups (p<0.02) and the hemoglobin (Hb) levels in both HD (10.5{+-}0.5 g/dl) and CRF (9.8{+-}0.9) were significantly lower than that in Control (13.3{+-}0.3) (p<0.02). In the hemisphere, rCMRO{sub 2} in both HD (1.82{+-}0.10 ml/min/100 g) and CRF (1.95{+-}0.09) showed significantly lower values as compared to Control (2.23{+-}0.05) (p<0.01, respectively). Hemispheric rCBF in HD (35.6{+-}2.1 ml/100 g/min) and in CRF (36.1{+-}2.1) were not different from that in Control (31.8{+-}1.4). Hemispheric rOEF in CRF (45.7{+-}1.6%) was significantly higher than that in Control (40.5{+-}1.2%) (p<0.02), but that in HD (43.7{+-}1.9%) did not increase significantly. These tendencies were similar in all regions of interest, especially in the cerebral cortices, but not in the cerebellum. All PET parameters in the frontal cortices tended to show the lowest value in renal failure patients. For all HD patients, rCBF in both the frontal cortex and the white matter correlated inversely with HD duration (frontal cortex: r=-0.649, p<0.05; white matter: r=-0.706, p<0.02). Based on these data, it is concluded that brain oxygen metabolism is depressed in renal failure

  7. Supplementation with L-Glutamine and L-Alanyl-L-Glutamine Changes Biochemical Parameters and Jejunum Morphophysiology in Type 1 Diabetic Wistar Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Vinicius D da Rosa

    Full Text Available We evaluated the effects of the supplementation with L-glutamine and glutamine dipeptide (GDP on biochemical and morphophysiological parameters in streptozotocin-diabetic rats. For this purpose, thirty animals were distributed into six groups treated orally (gavage during thirty days: non diabetic rats (Control + saline, diabetic + saline; Control + L-glutamine (248 mg/kg, Diabetic + L-glutamine (248 mg/kg, Control + GDP (400 mg/kg, Diabetic + GDP (400 mg/kg. Diabetes was induced by an intravenous injection of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg and confirmed by fasting glucose ≥ 200 mg/dL. Physiological parameters, i.e., body mass, food intake, blood glucose, water intake, urine and faeces were evaluated during supplementation. After the period of supplementation, the animals were euthanized. The blood was collected for biochemical assays (fructosamine, transaminases, lipid profile, total protein, urea, ammonia. Moreover, the jejunum was excised and stored for morphophysiological assays (intestinal enzyme activity, intestinal wall morphology, crypt proliferative index, number of serotoninergic cells from the mucosa, and vipergic neurons from the submucosal tunica. The physiological parameters, protein metabolism and intestinal enzyme activity did not change with the supplementation with L-glutamine or GDP. In diabetic animals, transaminases and fructosamine improved with L-glutamine and GDP supplementations, while the lipid profile improved with L-glutamine. Furthermore, both forms of supplementation promoted changes in jejunal tunicas and wall morphometry of control and diabetic groups, but only L-glutamine promoted maintenance of serotoninergic cells and vipergic neurons populations. On the other hand, control animals showed changes that may indicate negative effects of L-glutamine. Thus, the supplementation with L-glutamine was more efficient for maintaining intestinal morphophysiology and the supplementation with GDP was more efficient to the

  8. Quantitative analysis of 15N labeled positional isomers of glutamine and citrulline via electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry of their dansyl derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    The enteral metabolism of glutamine and citrulline are intertwined because, while glutamine is one of the main fuel sources for the enterocyte, citrulline is one of its products. It has been shown that the administration of 15N labeled glutamine results in the incorporation of the 15N label into cit...

  9. Comparative genome analysis of central nitrogen metabolism and its control by GlnR in the class Bacilli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kormelink, T.G.; Koenders, E.; Hagemeijer, Y.; Overmars, L.; Siezen, R.J.; Vos, de W.M.; Francke, C.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The assimilation of nitrogen in bacteria is achieved through only a few metabolic conversions between alpha-ketoglutarate, glutamate and glutamine. The enzymes that catalyze these conversions are glutamine synthetase, glutaminase, glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine alpha-ketoglutarate

  10. Comparative genome analysis of central nitrogen metabolism and its control by GlnR in the class Bacilli.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot Kormelink, T.; Koenders, E.; Hagemeijer, Y.; Overmars, L.; Siezen, R.J.; Vos, W.M. de; Francke, C.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The assimilation of nitrogen in bacteria is achieved through only a few metabolic conversions between alpha-ketoglutarate, glutamate and glutamine. The enzymes that catalyze these conversions are glutamine synthetase, glutaminase, glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine

  11. Comparative genome analysis of central nitrogen metabolism and its control by GlnR in the class Bacilli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot Kormelink, T.; Koenders, E.; Hagemeijer, Y.; Overmars, L.; Siezen, R.J.; De Vos, W.M.; Francke, C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The assimilation of nitrogen in bacteria is achieved through only a few metabolic conversions between alpha-ketoglutarate, glutamate and glutamine. The enzymes that catalyze these conversions are glutamine synthetase, glutaminase, glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine alpha-ketoglutarate

  12. Diagnosis of rare inherited glyoxalate metabolic disorders through in-situ analysis of renal stones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, D. E.; Grohe, B.; Hoppe, B.; Beck, B. B.; Tessadri, R.

    2012-04-01

    The primary hyperoxalurias type I - III constitute rare autosomal-recessive inherited disorders of the human glyoxylate metabolism. By mechanisms that are ill understood progressive nephrocalcinosis and recurrent urolithiasis (kidney stone formation) often starting in early childhood, along with their secondary complications results in loss of nephron mass which progresses to end-stage renal failure over time. In the most frequent form, end-stage renal failure (ESRF) is the rule and combined liver/kidney transplantation respectively pre-emptive liver transplantation are the only causative treatment today. Hence, this contributes significantly to healthcare costs and early diagnosis is extremely important for a positive outcome for the patient. We are developing a stone-based diagnostic method by in-detail multi-methods investigation of the crystalline moiety in concert with urine and stone proteomics. Stone analysis will allow faster analysis at low-impact for the patients in the early stages of the disease. First results from combined spectroscopic (Raman, FTIR)and geochemical micro-analyses (Electron Microprobe and Laser Ablation ICP-MS) are presented here that show significant differences between stones from hyperoxaluria patients and those formed by patients without this disorder (idiopathic stones). Major differences exist in chemistry as well as in morphology and phase composition of the stones. Ca/P ratios and Mg contents differentiate between oxalate-stones from hyperoxaluria patients and idiopathic stones. Results show that also within the different subtypes of primary hyperoxaluria significant differences can be found in stone composition. These imply differences in stone formation which could be exploited for new therapeutic pathways. Furthermore, the results provide important feedback for suspected but yet unconfirmed cases of primary hyperoxaluria when used in concert with the genetic methods routinely applied.

  13. Dietary (-)-epicatechin mitigates oxidative stress, NO metabolism alterations, and inflammation in renal cortex from fructose-fed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Paula D; Lanzi, Cecilia Rodríguez; Toblli, Jorge E; Elesgaray, Rosana; Oteiza, Patricia I; Fraga, César G; Galleano, Monica

    2016-01-01

    High fructose consumption has been associated to deleterious metabolic conditions. In the kidney, high fructose causes renal alterations that contribute to the development of chronic kidney disease. Evidence suggests that dietary flavonoids have the ability to prevent/attenuate risk factors of chronic diseases. This work investigated the capacity of (-)-epicatechin to prevent the renal damage induced by high fructose consumption in rats. Male Sprague Dawley rats received 10% (w/v) fructose in the drinking water for 8 weeks, with or without supplementation with (-)-epicatechin (20mg/kg body weight/d) in the rat chow diet. Results showed that, in the presence of mild proteinuria, the renal cortex from fructose-fed rats exhibited fibrosis and decreases in nephrin, synaptopodin, and WT1, all indicators of podocyte function in association with: (i) increased markers of oxidative stress; (ii) modifications in the determinants of NO bioavailability, i.e., NO synthase (NOS) activity and expression; and (iii) development of a pro-inflammatory condition, manifested as NF-κB activation, and associated with high expression of TNFα, iNOS, and IL-6. Dietary supplementation with (-)-epicatechin prevented or ameliorated the adverse effects of high fructose consumption. These results suggest that (-)-epicatechin ingestion would benefit when renal alterations occur associated with inflammation or metabolic diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Relation between Fructose-Induced Metabolic Syndrome and Altered Renal Haemodynamic and Excretory Function in the Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed H. Abdulla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the possible relationships between dietary fructose and altered neurohumoral regulation of renal haemodynamic and excretory function in this model of metabolic syndrome. Fructose consumption induces hyperinsulinemia, hypertriglyceridaemia, insulin resistance, and hypertension. The pathogenesis of fructose-induced hypertension is dubious and involves numerous pathways acting both singly and together. In addition, hyperinsulinemia and hypertension contribute significantly to progressive renal disease in fructose-fed rats. Moreover, increased activity of the renin-angiotensin and sympathetic nervous systems leading to downregulation of receptors may be responsible for the blunted vascular sensitivity to angiotensin II and catecholamines, respectively. Various approaches have been suggested to prevent the development of fructose-induced hypertension and/or metabolic alteration. In this paper, we address the role played by the renin-angiotensin and sympathetic nervous systems in the haemodynamic alterations that occur due to prolonged consumption of fructose.

  15. [Effect of Astragali Radix in improving early renal damage in metabolic syndrome rats through ACE2/Mas pathway].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiong-ying; Liang, Wei; Jiang, Cheng; Li, Ning-yin; Xu, Han; Yang, Mi-na; Lin, Xin; Yu, Heng; Chang, Peng; Yu, Jing

    2015-11-01

    To study the expression of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and angiotensin (Ang) 1-7 specific receptor Mas protain in renal blood vessels of metabolic syndrome ( MS) rats and its anti-oxidative effect. A total of 80 male SD rats were divided into four groups: the normal control group (NC, the same volume of normal saline), the MS group (high fat diet), the MS + Astragali Radix group (MS + HQ, 6 g x kg(-1) x d(-1) in gavage) and the MS + Valsartan group (MS + XST, 30 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1) in gavage). After four weeks of intervention, their general indexes, biochemical indexes and blood pressure were measured; plasma and renal tissue Ang II, malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide demutase (SOD) levels were measured with radioimmunoassay. The protein expressions of Mas receptor, AT1R, ACE and ACE2 were detected by western blot analysis. According to the result, compared with the NC group, the MS group and the MS + HQ group showed significant increases in systolic and diastolic pressures, body weight, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, triglycerides, free fatty acid and Ang II level of MS rats (P Mas receptor expressions (all P Mas receptor expression in renal tissues, whereas the MS + XST group showed notable decrease in AT1R (all P Mas receptor expressions in renal tissues, decrease ACE expression and change local Ang II, MDA, NO and SOD in kidneys, so as to protect early damages in renal tissues.

  16. Effects of tacrolimus and cyclosporine treatment on metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk factors after renal transplantation: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wenrui; Zhang, Qiang; Xu, Yue; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Xiaodong; Hu, Xiaopeng

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic success of renal transplantation has been largely attributable to the development of effective and balanced immunosuppressive treatment regimens. This study provides a meta-analysis of a series of randomized controlled trials that compared the effects of tacrolimus and cyclosporine on metabolic syndrome (MetS) and cardiovascular risk factors after renal transplantation. We searched various electronic databases and bibliographies, including MEDLINE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and EMBASE, for relevant studies published prior to October 2012. Our meta-analysis included five randomized controlled trials that examined a total of 923 patients. The tacrolimus group and the cyclosporine group exhibited no significant differences in MetS incidence after renal transplantation; risk ratio (RR): 1.06, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.73-1.55, P = 0.76. Cyclosporine treatment was associated with a higher incidence of hyperlipidemia (RR: 0.50, 95% CI: 0.39-0.64, P cyclosporine treatment was associated with a higher incidence of hypertension (RR: 0.91, 95% CI: 0.83-1.00, P = 0.06) after renal transplantation compared to tacrolimus treatment, and tacrolimus treatment was associated with a higher incidence of diabetes after renal transplantation (RR: 1.79, 95% CI: 0.98-3.27, P = 0.06) compared to cyclosporine treatment. Compared to tacrolimus treatment, cyclosporine treatment was associated with a higher incidence of hyperlipidemia. Future large-scale studies are expected to be conducted to further confirm our findings.

  17. [Prevalence of anemia, calcium-phosphorus abnormalities and metabolic acidosis in different stages of chronic renal failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzecki, Miłosz; Chudek, Jerzy; Kukla, Małgorzata; Kopeć, Paulina; Mamcarz, Ewelina; Wnuk, Zuzanna; Kokot, Franciszek; Wiecek, Andrzej

    2004-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with the reduction of haemoglobin concentration and a variety of biochemical abnormalities including changes in serum concentration of sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphate, bicarbonate, and hydrogen ions. However, data concerning epidemiology of these abnormalities are rare and incomplete, especially among subjects with mild to moderate CKD. Patients with a serum creatinine concentration > 110 micromol/l hospitalized in the Department of Nephrology, Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases Medical University of Silesia from 1998 to 2002 were analyzed. Patients with acute renal failure or chronic renal failure treated with renal replacement therapy were excluded from this study. A total of 653 patients (262F and 391M) were divided into 9 subgroups differing from each other by progressive decline of glomerular filtration rate (GFR). A statistically significant decrease in haemoglobin concentration and increase in the prevalence of anaemia were found in patients with GFR 50 ml/min, Hb concentration 4.44 mmol2/12) was noticed almost exclusively in patients with GFR< 30 ml/min. A decompensated metabolic acidosis was observed in 29.8% of patients with GFR <30 ml/min. Anaemia is an early symptom of chronic kidney disease preceding disturbances of calcium, phosphate and hydrogen ions metabolism. These abnormalities seem to be of therapeutic relevance.

  18. IDH1 mutations alter citric acid cycle metabolism and increase dependence on oxidative mitochondrial metabolism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grassian, Alexandra R; Parker, Seth J; Davidson, Shawn M; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Green, Courtney R; Zhang, Xiamei; Slocum, Kelly L; Pu, Minying; Lin, Fallon; Vickers, Chad; Joud-Caldwell, Carol; Chung, Franklin; Yin, Hong; Handly, Erika D; Straub, Christopher; Growney, Joseph D; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Murphy, Anne N; Pagliarini, Raymond; Metallo, Christian M

    2014-01-01

    .... We observed that under hypoxic conditions, IDH1-mutant cells exhibited increased oxidative tricarboxylic acid metabolism along with decreased reductive glutamine metabolism, but not IDH2-mutant cells...

  19. Renal blood flow and metabolism after cold ischaemia: peroperative measurements in patients with calculi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, H K; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1984-01-01

    correlated inversely to arterial-renal venous O2-difference (r = -0.74, P less than 0.05, n = 9) and directly to the preoperatively estimated unilateral glomerular filtration rate (r = 0.76, P less than 0.05, n = 8). After hypothermic ischaemia RBF decreased on the average by 42% (P less than 0.......01) immediately after re-established perfusion and 36% (P less than 0.02) 30 min later. In one additional patient, who had a short warm ischaemia (8 min), the flow pattern was the same. As arterial pressure remained constant, the reduced RBF signifies an increased renal vascular resistance. Renal O2-uptake...... and renal venous L/P ratio were almost constant, indicating no significant anaerobic processes being involved in the flow response. None of the patients showed any signs of reactive hyperaemia. It is concluded that hypothermic renal ischaemia may be followed by an increased renal vascular resistance even...

  20. L-glutamine Induces Expression of Listeria monocytogenes Virulence Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobel, Lior; Burg-Golani, Tamar; Sigal, Nadejda; Rose, Jessica; Livnat-Levanon, Nurit; Lewinson, Oded; Herskovits, Anat A.

    2017-01-01

    The high environmental adaptability of bacteria is contingent upon their ability to sense changes in their surroundings. Bacterial pathogen entry into host poses an abrupt and dramatic environmental change, during which successful pathogens gauge multiple parameters that signal host localization. The facultative human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes flourishes in soil, water and food, and in ~50 different animals, and serves as a model for intracellular infection. L. monocytogenes identifies host entry by sensing both physical (e.g., temperature) and chemical (e.g., metabolite concentrations) factors. We report here that L-glutamine, an abundant nitrogen source in host serum and cells, serves as an environmental indicator and inducer of virulence gene expression. In contrast, ammonia, which is the most abundant nitrogen source in soil and water, fully supports growth, but fails to activate virulence gene transcription. We demonstrate that induction of virulence genes only occurs when the Listerial intracellular concentration of L-glutamine crosses a certain threshold, acting as an on/off switch: off when L-glutamine concentrations are below the threshold, and fully on when the threshold is crossed. To turn on the switch, L-glutamine must be present, and the L-glutamine high affinity ABC transporter, GlnPQ, must be active. Inactivation of GlnPQ led to complete arrest of L-glutamine uptake, reduced type I interferon response in infected macrophages, dramatic reduction in expression of virulence genes, and attenuated virulence in a mouse infection model. These results may explain observations made with other pathogens correlating nitrogen metabolism and virulence, and suggest that gauging of L-glutamine as a means of ascertaining host localization may be a general mechanism. PMID:28114430

  1. Glutamine versus ammonia utilization in the NAD synthetase family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica De Ingeniis

    Full Text Available NAD is a ubiquitous and essential metabolic redox cofactor which also functions as a substrate in certain regulatory pathways. The last step of NAD synthesis is the ATP-dependent amidation of deamido-NAD by NAD synthetase (NADS. Members of the NADS family are present in nearly all species across the three kingdoms of Life. In eukaryotic NADS, the core synthetase domain is fused with a nitrilase-like glutaminase domain supplying ammonia for the reaction. This two-domain NADS arrangement enabling the utilization of glutamine as nitrogen donor is also present in various bacterial lineages. However, many other bacterial members of NADS family do not contain a glutaminase domain, and they can utilize only ammonia (but not glutamine in vitro. A single-domain NADS is also characteristic for nearly all Archaea, and its dependence on ammonia was demonstrated here for the representative enzyme from Methanocaldococcus jannaschi. However, a question about the actual in vivo nitrogen donor for single-domain members of the NADS family remained open: Is it glutamine hydrolyzed by a committed (but yet unknown glutaminase subunit, as in most ATP-dependent amidotransferases, or free ammonia as in glutamine synthetase? Here we addressed this dilemma by combining evolutionary analysis of the NADS family with experimental characterization of two representative bacterial systems: a two-subunit NADS from Thermus thermophilus and a single-domain NADS from Salmonella typhimurium providing evidence that ammonia (and not glutamine is the physiological substrate of a typical single-domain NADS. The latter represents the most likely ancestral form of NADS. The ability to utilize glutamine appears to have evolved via recruitment of a glutaminase subunit followed by domain fusion in an early branch of Bacteria. Further evolution of the NADS family included lineage-specific loss of one of the two alternative forms and horizontal gene transfer events. Lastly, we identified NADS

  2. Effect of renal shock wave lithotripsy on the development of metabolic syndrome in a juvenile swine model: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, Rajash K; Liu, Ziyue; Connors, Bret A; Alloosh, Mouhamad; Basile, David P; Tune, Johnathan D; Sturek, Michael; Evan, Andrew P; Lingeman, James E

    2015-04-01

    We performed a pilot study to assess whether renal shock wave lithotripsy influences metabolic syndrome onset and severity. Three-month-old juvenile female Ossabaw miniature pigs were treated with shock wave lithotripsy (2,000 shock waves at 24 kV with 120 shock waves per minute in 2) or sham shock wave lithotripsy (no shock waves in 2). Shock waves were targeted to the upper pole of the left kidney to model treatment that would also expose the pancreatic tail to shock waves. Pigs were then instrumented to directly measure arterial blood pressure via an implanted radiotelemetry device. They later received a hypercaloric atherogenic diet for about 7 months. Metabolic syndrome development was assessed by the intravenous glucose tolerance test. Metabolic syndrome progression and severity were similar in the sham treated and lithotripsy groups. The only exception arterial blood pressure, which remained relatively constant in sham treated pigs but began to increase at about 2 months towards hypertensive levels in lithotripsy treated pigs. Metabolic data on the 2 groups were pooled to provide a more complete assessment of metabolic syndrome development and progression in this juvenile pig model. The intravenous glucose tolerance test revealed substantial insulin resistance with impaired glucose tolerance within 2 months on the hypercaloric atherogenic diet with signs of further metabolic impairment at 7 months. These preliminary results suggest that renal shock wave lithotripsy is not a risk factor for worsening glucose tolerance or diabetes mellitus onset. However, it appears to be a risk factor for early onset hypertension in metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Metabolic status of 1088 patients after renal transplantation: Assessment of twelve years monitoring in Algiers Mustapha Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyece Yargui

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the introduction of monitoring levels of immunosuppressive medications in our service in July 2000, 1088 kidney transplant patients were received for therapeutic drug monitoring and regular follow-up. The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyze the data on these renal graft patients in Algeria and correlate with our 12 years′ experience with calcineurin inhibitor (CNI measurements. In addition, during this period, we also examined other bioche-mical parameters. The analysis was focused on the difference of effect of cyclosporin A (CsA; 623 patients and Tacrolimus (Tac; 465 patients on lipid and glucose metabolism and their side-effects, if any, on the renal function. The mean age at the time of transplantation was 36.1 years. A great majority of the transplanted kidneys had been taken from living related donors (88.6%. Three-quarters of all grafts were transplanted in our country (79.5%. Dyslipidemia and renal dysfunction were the most common adverse effects of CsA and Tac exposure, with a frequency of 21.4% and 10.3%, respectively. Both the CNIs had a similar effect on the lipid levels. The highest incidence occurred at 3-12 months after renal graft. Tac seemed to have more side-effects on glycemia, causing the onset of diabetes mellitus more than two-fold than CsA (6.9% vs. 3.1%. A significant difference was observed during 12-24 months after transplantation. However, Tac was associated with the most favorable effects on renal function estimated with the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD formula.

  4. Structural and Dynamic Basis for Low-Affinity, High-Selectivity Binding of L-Glutamine by the Glutamine Riboswitch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiming Ren

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring L-glutamine riboswitches occur in cyanobacteria and marine metagenomes, where they reside upstream of genes involved in nitrogen metabolism. By combining X-ray, NMR, and MD, we characterized an L-glutamine-dependent conformational transition in the Synechococcus elongatus glutamine riboswitch from tuning fork to L-shaped alignment of stem segments. This transition generates an open ligand-binding pocket with L-glutamine selectivity enforced by Mg2+-mediated intermolecular interactions. The transition also stabilizes the P1 helix through a long-range “linchpin” Watson-Crick G-C pair-capping interaction, while melting a short helix below P1 potentially capable of modulating downstream readout. NMR data establish that the ligand-free glutamine riboswitch in Mg2+ solution exists in a slow equilibrium between flexible tuning fork and a minor conformation, similar, but not identical, to the L-shaped bound conformation. We propose that an open ligand-binding pocket combined with a high conformational penalty for forming the ligand-bound state provide mechanisms for reducing binding affinity while retaining high selectivity.

  5. Structural and Dynamic Basis for Low-Affinity, High-Selectivity Binding of L-Glutamine by the Glutamine Riboswitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Aiming; Xue, Yi; Peselis, Alla; Serganov, Alexander; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M; Patel, Dinshaw J

    2015-12-01

    Naturally occurring L-glutamine riboswitches occur in cyanobacteria and marine metagenomes, where they reside upstream of genes involved in nitrogen metabolism. By combining X-ray, NMR, and MD, we characterized an L-glutamine-dependent conformational transition in the Synechococcus elongatus glutamine riboswitch from tuning fork to L-shaped alignment of stem segments. This transition generates an open ligand-binding pocket with L-glutamine selectivity enforced by Mg(2+)-mediated intermolecular interactions. The transition also stabilizes the P1 helix through a long-range "linchpin" Watson-Crick G-C pair-capping interaction, while melting a short helix below P1 potentially capable of modulating downstream readout. NMR data establish that the ligand-free glutamine riboswitch in Mg(2+) solution exists in a slow equilibrium between flexible tuning fork and a minor conformation, similar, but not identical, to the L-shaped bound conformation. We propose that an open ligand-binding pocket combined with a high conformational penalty for forming the ligand-bound state provide mechanisms for reducing binding affinity while retaining high selectivity.

  6. Transcription factor TnrA inhibits the biosynthetic activity of glutamine synthetase in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorova, Ksenia; Kayumov, Airat; Woyda, Kathrin; Ilinskaja, Olga; Forchhammer, Karl

    2013-05-02

    The Bacillus subtilis glutamine synthetase (GS) plays a dual role in cell metabolism by functioning as catalyst and regulator. GS catalyses the ATP-dependent synthesis of glutamine from glutamate and ammonium. Under nitrogen-rich conditions, GS becomes feedback-inhibited by high intracellular glutamine levels and then binds transcription factors GlnR and TnrA, which control the genes of nitrogen assimilation. While GS-bound TnrA is no longer able to interact with DNA, GlnR-DNA binding is shown to be stimulated by GS complex formation. In this paper we show a new physiological feature of the interaction between glutamine synthetase and TnrA. The transcription factor TnrA inhibits the biosynthetic activity of glutamine synthetase in vivo and in vitro, while the GlnR protein does not affect the activity of the enzyme.

  7. Long term metabolic syndrome induced by a high fat high fructose diet leads to minimal renal injury in C57BL/6 mice

    OpenAIRE

    Dissard, R.; Klein, J.; Caubet, C.; Breuil, B.; Siwy, J.; Hoffman, J.; Sicard, L.; Ducasse, L.; Rascalou, S.; Payre, B.; Buleon, M.; Mullen, W.; Mischak, H; Tack, I.; Bascands, J.

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome can induce chronic kidney disease in humans. Genetically engineered mice on a C57BL/6 background are highly used for mechanistic studies. Although it has been shown that metabolic syndrome induces cardiovascular lesions in C57BL/6 mice, in depth renal phenotyping has never been performed. Therefore in this study we characterized renal function and injury in C57BL/6 mice with long-term metabolic syndrome induced by a high fat and fructose diet (HFFD). C57BL/6 mice received a...

  8. Long Term Metabolic Syndrome Induced by a High Fat High Fructose Diet Leads to Minimal Renal Injury in C57BL/6 Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Dissard, Romain; Klein, Julie; Caubet, Cécile; Breuil, Benjamin; Siwy, Justyna; Hoffman, Janosch; Sicard, Laurent; Ducassé, Laure; Rascalou, Simon; Payre, Bruno; Buléon, Marie; Mullen, William; Mischak, Harald; Tack, Ivan; Bascands, Jean-Loup

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome can induce chronic kidney disease in humans. Genetically engineered mice on a C57BL/6 background are highly used for mechanistic studies. Although it has been shown that metabolic syndrome induces cardiovascular lesions in C57BL/6 mice, in depth renal phenotyping has never been performed. Therefore in this study we characterized renal function and injury in C57BL/6 mice with long-term metabolic syndrome induced by a high fat and fructose diet (HFFD). C57BL/6 mice received a...

  9. The glutamine synthetase gene family in Populus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cánovas Francisco M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutamine synthetase (GS; EC: 6.3.1.2, L-glutamate: ammonia ligase ADP-forming is a key enzyme in ammonium assimilation and metabolism of higher plants. The current work was undertaken to develop a more comprehensive understanding of molecular and biochemical features of GS gene family in poplar, and to characterize the developmental regulation of GS expression in various tissues and at various times during the poplar perennial growth. Results The GS gene family consists of 8 different genes exhibiting all structural and regulatory elements consistent with their roles as functional genes. Our results indicate that the family members are organized in 4 groups of duplicated genes, 3 of which code for cytosolic GS isoforms (GS1 and 1 which codes for the choroplastic GS isoform (GS2. Our analysis shows that Populus trichocarpa is the first plant species in which it was observed the complete GS family duplicated. Detailed expression analyses have revealed specific spatial and seasonal patterns of GS expression in poplar. These data provide insights into the metabolic function of GS isoforms in poplar and pave the way for future functional studies. Conclusions Our data suggest that GS duplicates could have been retained in order to increase the amount of enzyme in a particular cell type. This possibility could contribute to the homeostasis of nitrogen metabolism in functions associated to changes in glutamine-derived metabolic products. The presence of duplicated GS genes in poplar could also contribute to diversification of the enzymatic properties for a particular GS isoform through the assembly of GS polypeptides into homo oligomeric and/or hetero oligomeric holoenzymes in specific cell types.

  10. Glutamate and CO2 production from glutamine in incubated enterocytes of adult and very old rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meynial-Denis, Dominique; Bielicki, Guy; Beaufrère, Anne-Marie; Mignon, Michelle; Mirand, Philippe Patureau; Renou, Jean-Pierre

    2013-04-01

    Glutamine is the major fuel for enterocytes and promotes the growth of intestinal mucosa. Although oral glutamine exerts a positive effect on intestinal villus height in very old rats, how glutamine is used by enterocytes is unclear. Adult (8 months) and very old (27 months) female rats were exposed to intermittent glutamine supplementation for 50% of their age lifetime. Treated rats received glutamine added to their drinking water, and control rats received water alone. Jejunal epithelial cells (~300×10(6) cells) were incubated in oxygenated Krebs-Henseleit buffer for 30 min containing [1-(13)C] glutamine (~17 M) for analysis of glutamine metabolites by (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance ((13)C NMR). An aliquot fraction was incubated in the presence of [U-(14)C] glutamine to measure produced CO2. Glutamine pretreatment increased glutamate production and decreased CO2 production in very old rats. The ratio CO2/glutamate, which was very high in control very old rats, was similar at both ages after glutamine pretreatment, as if enterocytes from very old rats recovered the metabolic abilities of enterocytes from adult rats. Our results suggest that long-term treatment with glutamine started before advanced age (a) prevented the loss of rat body weight without limiting sarcopenia and (b) had a beneficial effect on enterocytes from very old rats probably by favoring the role of glutamate as a precursor for glutathione, arginine and proline biosynthesis, which was not detected in (13)C NMR spectra in our experimental conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The effects of oral glutamine on cyclophosphamide-induced nephrotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Premila; Isaac, Bina

    2011-07-01

    Nephrotoxicity is one of the adverse side effects of cyclophosphamide (CP) chemotherapy. In a recent study, we have demonstrated that oxidative stress and glutathione depletion play important roles in CP-induced renal damage. The aim of the study was to verify whether glutamine, the precursor for glutathione synthesis, prevents CP-induced oxidative stress and renal damage using a rat model. Adult male rats were administered a single dose of 150 mg/ kg body weight of CP intraperitoneally. The glutamine-pretreated rats were administered 1 gm/kg body weight of glutamine orally 2 h before the administration of CP. Vehicle/glutamine-treated rats served as controls. All the rats were killed 16 h after the dose of CP/vehicle. The kidneys were removed and used for light microscopic and biochemical studies. The markers of oxidative stress including malondialdehyde content, protein carbonyl content, protein thiol, reduced glutathione and myeloperoxidase activity, a marker of neutrophil infiltration, were measured in kidney homogenates. CP treatment-induced damage to kidney involved the glomeruli and the tubules. Pretreatment with glutamine reduced CP-induced glutathione depletion and increased myeloperoxidase activity. However, it did not prevent CP-induced lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation and renal damage. The results of the present study suggest that glutamine pretreatment does not prevent CP-induced lipid peroxidation and renal damage, although it prevents CP-induced glutathione depletion and neutrophil infiltration significantly. It is suggested that mechanisms other than oxidative stress may also be involved and/or oxidative stress may be consequence and not the cause of CP induced renal damage.

  12. Rh versus pH: the role of Rhesus glycoproteins in renal ammonia excretion during metabolic acidosis in a freshwater teleost fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Patricia A; Wood, Chris M; Wilson, Jonathan M

    2014-08-15

    Increased renal ammonia excretion in response to metabolic acidosis is thought to be a conserved response in vertebrates. We tested the hypothesis that Rhesus (Rh) glycoproteins in the kidney of the freshwater common carp, Cyprinus carpio, play a crucial role in regulating renal ammonia excretion during chronic metabolic acidosis. Exposure to water pH 4.0 (72 h) resulted in a classic metabolic acidosis with reduced plasma arterial pH and [HCO3(-)], no change in PCO2 and large changes in renal function. Urine [NH4(+)] as well as [titratable acidity-HCO3(-)] rose significantly over the acid exposure, but the profound reduction (fivefold) in urine flow rates eliminated the expected elevations in renal ammonia excretion. Low urine flow rates may be a primary strategy to conserve ions, as urinary excretion rates of Na(+), Cl(-) and Ca(2+) were significantly lower during the acid exposure relative to the control period. Interestingly, renal Rhcg1 mRNA and protein levels were elevated in acid-exposed relative to control groups, along with mRNA levels of several ion transporters, including the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger, H(+)-ATPase and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed a strong apical Rhcg1 signal in distal tubules. Taken together, these data show that renal Rh glycoproteins and associated ion transporters are responsive to metabolic acidosis, but conservation of ions through reduced urine flow rates takes primacy over renal acid-base regulation in the freshwater C. carpio. We propose that an 'acid/base-ion balance' compromise explains the variable renal responses to metabolic acidosis in freshwater teleosts.

  13. Characterization of Glutamine-Requiring Mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; Joosten, Han M.L.J.; Herst, Patricia M.; Drift, Chris van der

    1982-01-01

    Revertants were isolated from a glutamine-requiring mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO. One strain showed thermosensitive glutamine requirement and formed thermolabile glutamine synthetase, suggesting the presence of a mutation in the structural gene for glutamine synthetase. The mutation conferri

  14. Encapsulation of glutamine synthetase in mouse erythrocytes: a new procedure for ammonia detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosenko, Elena A; Venediktova, Natalia I; Kudryavtsev, Andrey A; Ataullakhanov, Fazoil I; Kaminsky, Yury G; Felipo, Vicente; Montoliu, Carmina

    2008-12-01

    There are a number of pathological situations in which ammonia levels increase leading to hyperammonemia, which may cause neurological alterations and can lead to coma and death. Currently, there are no efficient treatments allowing rapid and sustained decrease of ammonia levels in these situations. A way to increase ammonia detoxification would be to increase its incorporation in glutamine by glutamine synthetase. The aim of this work was to develop a procedure to encapsulate glutamine synthetase in mouse erythrocytes and to assess whether administration of these erythrocytes containing glutamine synthetase (GS) reduce ammonia levels in hyperammonemic mice. The procedure developed allowed the encapsulation of 3 +/- 0.25 IU of GS / mL of erythrocytes with a 70% cell recovery. Most metabolites, including ATP, remained unaltered in glutamine synthetase-loaded erythrocytes (named ammocytes by us) compared with native erythrocytes. The glutamine synthetase-loaded ammocytes injected in mice survived and retained essentially all of their glutamine synthetase activity for at least 48 h in vivo. Injection of these ammocytes into hyperammonemic mice reduced ammonia levels in the blood by about 50%. The results reported indicate that ammocytes are able to keep their integrity, normal energy metabolism, the inserted glutamine synthetase activity, and can be useful to reduce ammonia levels in hyperammonemic situations.

  15. Metabolism of eicosanoids and their action on renal function during ischaemia and reperfusion: the effect of alprostadil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dołegowska, B; Pikuła, E; Safranow, K; Olszewska, M; Jakubowska, K; Chlubek, D; Gutowski, P

    2006-12-01

    Eicosanoids, active metabolites of arachidonic acid (AA), play an important role in the regulation of renal haemodynamics and glomerular filtration. Our study verified the hypothesis on the positive action of exogenously administered PGE(1) on renal function during an operation with temporary ischaemia of the lower half of the body. Also the effect of alprostadil (prostaglandin E(1) analogue) administered during the operation of an abdominal aorta aneurysm on the postoperative systemic metabolism of AA and the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was investigated. The study included 42 patients with a diagnosed abdominal aorta aneurysm who have been qualified for the operation of implantation of the aortic prosthesis. The patients were randomly assigned to two groups: the study group (I) receiving alprostadil and the control group (II) without alprostadil. The levels of hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (15-HETE, 12-HETE, 5-HETE) were determined by RP-HPLC and the level of thromboxane B(2) (TxB(2)) was determined by ELISA in the plasma of the blood drawn from vena cava superior immediately before aortic clamping (A) and 5 min after aortic declamping (B). The administration of PGE(1) affects the metabolism of 15-HETE in a manner dependent on the baseline value of GFR but does not significantly change the postoperative renal function. The metabolism of 15-HETE is affected by the baseline value of GFR1 and a longer period of ischaemia is correlated with lower concentrations of 5-HETE during reperfusion. The results of our studies indicate that TxB(2) influences the postoperative function of kidneys.

  16. Rimonabant-mediated changes in intestinal lipid metabolism and improved renal vascular dysfunction in the JCR:LA-cp rat model of prediabetic metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, James C; Kelly, Sandra E; Diane, Abdoulaye; Wang, Ye; Mangat, Rabban; Novak, Susan; Vine, Donna F; Proctor, Spencer D

    2010-08-01

    Rimonabant (SR141716) is a specific antagonist of the cannabinoid-1 receptor. Activation of the receptor initiates multiple effects on central nervous system function, metabolism, and body weight. The hypothesis that rimonabant has protective effects against vascular disease associated with the metabolic syndrome was tested using JCR:LA-cp rats. JCR:LA-cp rats are obese if they are cp/cp, insulin resistant, and exhibit associated micro- and macrovascular disease with end-stage myocardial and renal disease. Treatment of obese rats with rimonabant (10 mg.kg(-1).day(-1), 12-24 wk of age) caused transient reduction in food intake for 2 wk, without reduction in body weight. However, by 4 wk, there was a modest, sustained reduction in weight gain. Glycemic control improved marginally compared with controls, but at the expense of increased insulin concentration. In contrast, rimonabant normalized fasting plasma triglyceride and reduced plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and acute phase protein haptoglobin in cp/cp rats. Furthermore, these changes were accompanied by reduced postprandial intestinal lymphatic secretion of apolipoprotein B48, cholesterol, and haptoglobin. While macrovascular dysfunction and ischemic myocardial lesion frequency were unaffected by rimonabant treatment, both microalbuminuria and glomerular sclerosis were substantially reduced. In summary, rimonabant has a modest effect on body weight in freely eating obese rats and markedly reduces plasma triglyceride levels and microvascular disease, in part due to changes in intestinal metabolism, including lymphatic secretion of apolipoprotein B48 and haptoglobin. We conclude that rimonabant improves renal disease and intestinal lipid oversecretion associated with an animal model of the metabolic syndrome that appears to be independent of hyperinsulinemia or macrovascular dysfunction.

  17. Effect of metabolic regulation on renal leakiness to dextran molecules in short-term insulin-dependent diabetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parving, H H; Rutili, F; Granath, K;

    1979-01-01

    Renal clearance of dextran of two ranges of molecular size and glomerular filtration rate (GFR, 51Cr-EDTA) were measured in seven short-term insulin-dependent diabetics (mean age 25 years). Measurements were carried out in the same patient during good and poor metabolic regulation (plasma glucose...... were normalized within one to three weeks of effective insulin treatment. This rapid reversibility can hardly be explained by the previously demonstrated enlargement in glomerular size and filtration surface area, since these alterations remain unchanged after more than one month of insulin treatment...

  18. Metabolic syndrome in hemodialysis patients as a risk factor for new-onset diabetes mellitus after renal transplant: a prospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonet J

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Josep Bonet1, Albert Martinez-Castelao2, Beatriz Bayés11Department of Nephrology, Hospital Universitari Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, Spain; 2Department of Nephrology, Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, IDIBELL, Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, SpainPurpose: Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of biochemical abnormalities including cardiovascular and diabetes risk factors. The development of diabetes mellitus after renal transplant represents a major posttransplant complication that may adversely affect graft/patient survival. The aim of this study was to assess the role of metabolic syndrome in patients on hemodialysis as a risk factor for the incidence of new-onset diabetes mellitus after renal transplant.Patients and methods: This was a prospective observational epidemiologic study carried out in adult nondiabetic patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis and on the renal transplant waiting list between November 2008 and April 2009. Patients were followed up from Visit 1 (baseline to 6 months after the renal transplant. The analysis of the role of metabolic syndrome in hemodialysis patients as a risk factor for the incidence of new-onset diabetes mellitus after renal transplant included the estimation of relative risk and its 95% confidence interval (CI.Results: A total of 383 evaluable patients were entered into the study (mean age, 52.7 years; male, 57.7%; Caucasian, 90.1%. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome on hemodialysis was 30.4% (95% CI, 25.8%–35.4%. Hypertension was the most prevalent criterion for metabolic syndrome (65.0%, followed by low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (52.7%, abdominal obesity (36.2%, hypertriglyceridemia (32.4%, and impaired glucose (8.9%. After the renal transplant, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome was still 25.8%. During the posttransplant period, the incidence of new-onset diabetes mellitus reached 13.0% (95% CI, 7.8%–20.6% and patients with pretransplant metabolic syndrome were 2

  19. Glutamine is required for snakehead fish vesiculovirus propagation via replenishing the tricarboxylic acid cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lindan; Yi, Lizhu; Zhang, Chi; Liu, Xiaodan; Feng, Shuangshuang; Chen, Wenjie; Lan, Jiangfeng; Zhao, Lijuan; Tu, Jiagang; Lin, Li

    2016-11-01

    Snakehead fish vesiculovirus (SHVV), a member of the family Rhabdoviridae, has caused mass mortality in snakehead fish culture in China. Previous transcriptomic sequencing of SHVV-infected and non-infected striped snakehead fish cells (SSN-1) showed that glutaminase (GLS), the critical enzyme of glutamine metabolism, was upregulated upon SHVV infection. It therefore drew our attention to investigating the role of glutamine in SHVV propagation. Glutamine deprivation significantly reduced the expression of the mRNAs and proteins of SHVV, and the production of virus particles, indicating that glutamine was required for SHVV propagation. Glutamine can be converted to glutamate by GLS, and then be converted to α-ketoglutarate, to join in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Addition of the TCA cycle intermediate α-ketoglutarate, oxaloacetic acid or pyruvate significantly restored SHVV propagation, indicating that the requirement of glutamine for SHVV propagation was due to its replenishment of the TCA cycle. Inhibiting the activity of GLS in SSN-1 cells by an inhibitor, bis-2-(5-phenylacetamido-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)ethyl sulfide, decreased SHVV propagation, while overexpression of GLS increased SHVV propagation. Taken together, our data have revealed the relationship between glutamine metabolism and SHVV propagation.

  20. Glutamine deprivation enhances antitumor activity of 3-bromopyruvate through the stabilization of monocarboxylate transporter-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardaci, Simone; Rizza, Salvatore; Filomeni, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Roberta; Bertocchi, Fabio; Mattei, Maurizio; Paci, Maurizio; Rotilio, Giuseppe; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa

    2012-09-01

    Anticancer drug efficacy might be leveraged by strategies to target certain biochemical adaptations of tumors. Here we show how depriving cancer cells of glutamine can enhance the anticancer properties of 3-bromopyruvate, a halogenated analog of pyruvic acid. Glutamine deprival potentiated 3-bromopyruvate chemotherapy by increasing the stability of the monocarboxylate transporter-1, an effect that sensitized cells to metabolic oxidative stress and autophagic cell death. We further elucidated mechanisms through which resistance to chemopotentiation by glutamine deprival could be circumvented. Overall, our findings offer a preclinical proof-of-concept for how to employ 3-bromopyruvate or other monocarboxylic-based drugs to sensitize tumors to chemotherapy.

  1. Plasma glutamine levels and falciparum malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, G; Planche, T; Agbenyega, T; Bedu-Addo, G; Owusu-Ofori, A; Adebe-Appiah, J; Agranoff, D; Woodrow, C; Castell, L; Elford, B; Krishna, S

    1999-01-01

    Glutamine deficiency is associated with increased rates of sepsis and mortality, which can be prevented by glutamine supplementation. Changes in glutamine concentration were examined in Ghanaian children with acute falciparum malaria and control cases. The mean (SD) plasma glutamine concentration was lower in patients with acute malaria (401 (82) mumol/L, n = 50) than in control patients (623 (67) mumol/L, n = 7; P sepsis and dyserythropoeisis.

  2. Severe Uncompensated Metabolic Alkalosis due to Plasma Exchange in a Patient with Pulmonary-Renal Syndrome: A Clinician’s Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsin Ijaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic alkalosis secondary to citrate toxicity from plasma exchange is very uncommon in patients with normal renal function. In patients with advanced renal disease this can be a fatal event. We describe a case of middle-aged woman with Goodpasture’s syndrome treated with plasma exchange who developed severe metabolic alkalosis. High citrate load in plasma exchange fluid is the underlying etiology. Citrate metabolism generates bicarbonate and once its level exceeds the excretory capacity of kidneys, the severe metabolic alkalosis ensues. Our patient presented with generalized weakness, fever, and oliguria and developed rapidly progressive renal failure. Patient had positive serology for antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibodies myeloperoxidase (ANCA-MPO and anti-glomerular basement membrane antibodies (anti-GBM. Renal biopsy showed diffuse necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis with linear glomerular basement membrane staining. Patient did not respond to intravenous steroids. Plasma exchange was started with fresh frozen plasma but patient developed severe metabolic alkalosis. This metabolic alkalosis normalized with cessation of plasma exchange and initiation of low bicarbonate hemodialysis. ANCA-MPO and anti-GBM antibodies levels normalized within 2 weeks and remained undetectable at 3 months. Patient still required maintenance hemodialysis.

  3. Acute renal metabolic effect of metformin treatment assessed with hyperpolarized magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qi, Haiyun; Nielsen, Per Mose; Schroeder, Marie

    2017-01-01

    -electrodes. A significantly altered metabolic phenotype was observed 30 min post metformin treatment. Anaerobic metabolism was elevated in the cytosol, indicated by increased lactate/pyruvate ratio, and mitochondrial aerobic metabolism was reduced, indicated by decreased bicarbonate/pyruvate ratio. Acute metformin treatment...

  4. Endotoxin-induced basal respiration alterations of renal HK-2 cells: A sign of pathologic metabolism down-regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quoilin, C., E-mail: cquoilin@ulg.ac.be [Laboratory of Biomedical Spectroscopy, Department of Physics, University of Liege, 4000 Liege (Belgium); Mouithys-Mickalad, A. [Center of Oxygen Research and Development, Department of Chemistry, University of Liege, 4000 Liege (Belgium); Duranteau, J. [Department of Anaesthesia and Surgical ICU, CHU Bicetre, University Paris XI Sud, 94275 Le Kremlin Bicetre (France); Gallez, B. [Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Group, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Universite catholique de Louvain, 1200 Brussels (Belgium); Hoebeke, M. [Laboratory of Biomedical Spectroscopy, Department of Physics, University of Liege, 4000 Liege (Belgium)

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A HK-2 cells model of inflammation-induced acute kidney injury. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two oximetry methods: high resolution respirometry and ESR spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxygen consumption rates of renal cells decrease when treated with LPS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cells do not recover normal respiration when the LPS treatment is removed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This basal respiration alteration is a sign of pathologic metabolism down-regulation. -- Abstract: To study the mechanism of oxygen regulation in inflammation-induced acute kidney injury, we investigate the effects of a bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) on the basal respiration of proximal tubular epithelial cells (HK-2) both by high-resolution respirometry and electron spin resonance spectroscopy. These two complementary methods have shown that HK-2 cells exhibit a decreased oxygen consumption rate when treated with LPS. Surprisingly, this cellular respiration alteration persists even after the stress factor was removed. We suggested that this irreversible decrease in renal oxygen consumption after LPS challenge is related to a pathologic metabolic down-regulation such as a lack of oxygen utilization by cells.

  5. [Phosphorus and calcium metabolism and the cardiovascular system status in patients with early-stage chronic renal disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, A V; Volkov, M M; Dobronravov, V A; Rafrafi, H

    2010-01-01

    To define the impact of phosphorus and calcium metabolic disturbances in patients with early-stage chronic renal disease (CRD) on the cardiovascular system. The levels of phosphate (P), calcium, parathyroid hormone (PTH), 25(OH) vitamin D and 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D, serum lipidogram, carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT), and X-ray degree of abdominal artery calcification (AAC) were determined and echocardiography, electrocardiography and blood pressure monitoring were made in 465 patients with Stages I-V CRD who did not receive renal replacement therapy (of them, 73.5% of the patients had early (I to III) stages). Blood 1,25(OH)2D was related inversely to left ventricular (LV) posterior wall thickness, blood pressure (BP), triglycerides, and the degree of AAC and correlated directly to the severity of LV diastolic dysfunction and inversely to IMT, the presence of coronary heart disease and heart failure (HF). ACC, LV hypertrophy, and arterial hypertension (AH) were more significant in patients with higher serum levels PTH and P. In patients with early-stage CRD, phosphorus and calcium metabolic disturbances promote the development of AH, vascular and cardiac valvular calcification, myocardial hypertrophy, and HF.

  6. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Hanne Cecilie; Eriksson, Ulf Dennis; Møller, Inge Skrumsager;

    2014-01-01

    that GS1 activity may be downregulated via a chain of processes elicited by metabolic imbalances and environmental constraints. We suggest that a pivotal role of GS1 may be related to the maintenance of essential nitrogen (N) flows and internal N sensing during critical stages of plant development...

  7. Glutamine as an energy substrate in cultured neurons during glucose deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Liang; Gu, Li; Zhang, Hongliang; Huang, Xueshi; Hertz, Elna; Hertz, Leif

    2007-11-15

    During glucose deprivation an increase in aspartate formation from glutamine has been observed in different brain preparations, including synaptosomes and cultured astrocytes. To what extent this reaction, which provides a substantial amount of energy, occurs in different types of neurons is unknown. The present study shows that (14)CO(2) formation from [U-(14)C]glutamine in cerebellar granule neurons, a glutamatergic preparation, increased by 60% during glucose deprivation, indicating enhanced aspartate formation or increased complete oxidative degradation of glutamine. In primary cultures of cerebrocortical interneurons, a GABAergic preparation, the rate of (14)CO(2) production from [U-(14) C] glutamine was four times lower and not stimulated by glucose deprivation. During incubation with glutamine (0.8 mM) as the only metabolic substrate, cerebellar granule cells maintained an oxygen consumption rate of 12 nmol/min/mg protein, corresponding to an aspartate formation of 8 nmol/min/mg protein (three oxidations occur between glutamine and aspartate) or to a total oxidative degradation of 3 nmol/min/mg protein. During glucose deprivation, the rate of aspartate formation increased, and during a 20-min incubation in phosphate-buffered saline it amounted to 3.3 nmol/min/mg protein at 0.2 mM glutamine, which might have been more if measured at 0.8 mM glutamine. These values are consistent with the rate of glutamine utilization calculated based on oxygen consumption and leaves open the possibility that some glutamine is completely degraded oxidatively, as has been shown by other authors based on pyruvate recycling and labeling of lactate from aspartate in cerebellar granule neurons.

  8. Glutamine: biochemical, metabolic, molecular aspects and supplementation

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    A glutamina é o aminoácido livre mais abundante no plasma e no tecido muscular. Nutricionalmente é classificada como um aminoácido não essencial, uma vez que pode ser sintetizada pelo organismo a partir de outros aminoácidos. A glutamina está envolvida em diferentes funções, tais como a proliferação e desenvolvimento de células, o balanço acidobásico, o transporte da amônia entre os tecidos, a doação de esqueletos de carbono para a gliconeogênese, a participação no sistema antioxidante e outr...

  9. Glutamine supplementation favors weight loss in nondieting obese female patients. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laviano, A; Molfino, A; Lacaria, M T; Canelli, A; De Leo, S; Preziosa, I; Rossi Fanelli, F

    2014-11-01

    Glutamine supplementation improves insulin sensitivity in critically ill patients, and prevents obesity in animals fed a high-fat diet. We hypothesized that glutamine supplementation favors weight loss in humans. Obese and overweight female patients (n=6) were enrolled in a pilot, cross-over study. After recording anthropometric (that is, body weight, waist circumference) and metabolic (that is, glycemia, insulinemia, homeostatic model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)) characteristics, patients were randomly assigned to 4-week supplementation with glutamine or isonitrogenous protein supplement (0.5 g/KgBW/day). During supplementation, patients did not change their dietary habits nor lifestyle. At the end, anthropometric and metabolic features were assessed, and after 2 weeks of washout, patients were switched to the other supplement for 4 weeks. Body weight and waist circumference significantly declined only after glutamine supplementation (85.0±10.4 Kg vs 82.2±10.1 Kg, and 102.7±2.0 cm vs 98.9±2.9 cm, respectively; P=0.01). Insulinemia and HOMA-IR declined by 20% after glutamine, but not significantly so. This pilot study shows that glutamine is safe and effective in favoring weight loss and possibly enhancing glucose metabolism.

  10. Comparative effect of olmesartan and candesartan on lipid metabolism and renal function in patients with hypertension: a retrospective observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), including olmesartan and candesartan, are widely used antihypertensive agents. Many clinical studies have demonstrated that ARBs have organ-protecting effects, e.g., cardioprotection, vasculoprotection and renoprotection. However, the effect of prolonged olmesartan monotherapy on lipid metabolism in patients with hypertension is less well studied. We performed a retrospective observational study to compare the effects of olmesartan with those of candesartan, focusing on lipid metabolism and renal function. Methods We used data from the Clinical Data Warehouse of Nihon University School of Medicine obtained between Nov 1, 2004 and Feb 28, 2011, to identify cohorts of new olmesartan users (n = 168) and candesartan users (n = 266). We used propensity-score weighting to adjust for differences in all covariates (age, sex, comorbid diseases, previous drugs) between olmesartan and candesartan users, and compared serum chemical data including serum triglyceride (TG), LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C), total cholesterol (TC), potassium, creatinine and urea nitrogen. The mean exposure of olmesartan and candesartan users was 126.1 and 122.8 days, respectively. Results After adjustment, there were no statistically significant differences in all covariates between olmesartan and candesartan users. The mean age was 60.7 and 61.0 years, and 33.4% and 33.7% of olmesartan and candesartan users were women, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in mean values for all laboratory tests between baseline and during the exposure period in both olmesartan and candesartan users. In olmesartan users, the reduction of serum TG level was significant in comparison with that in candesartan users. Other parameters of lipid profile and renal function showed no statistically significant difference in the change from baseline to during the exposure period between olmesartan and candesartan users. Conclusions In this study, we

  11. Comparative effect of olmesartan and candesartan on lipid metabolism and renal function in patients with hypertension: a retrospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakayama Tomohiro

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs, including olmesartan and candesartan, are widely used antihypertensive agents. Many clinical studies have demonstrated that ARBs have organ-protecting effects, e.g., cardioprotection, vasculoprotection and renoprotection. However, the effect of prolonged olmesartan monotherapy on lipid metabolism in patients with hypertension is less well studied. We performed a retrospective observational study to compare the effects of olmesartan with those of candesartan, focusing on lipid metabolism and renal function. Methods We used data from the Clinical Data Warehouse of Nihon University School of Medicine obtained between Nov 1, 2004 and Feb 28, 2011, to identify cohorts of new olmesartan users (n = 168 and candesartan users (n = 266. We used propensity-score weighting to adjust for differences in all covariates (age, sex, comorbid diseases, previous drugs between olmesartan and candesartan users, and compared serum chemical data including serum triglyceride (TG, LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C, total cholesterol (TC, potassium, creatinine and urea nitrogen. The mean exposure of olmesartan and candesartan users was 126.1 and 122.8 days, respectively. Results After adjustment, there were no statistically significant differences in all covariates between olmesartan and candesartan users. The mean age was 60.7 and 61.0 years, and 33.4% and 33.7% of olmesartan and candesartan users were women, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in mean values for all laboratory tests between baseline and during the exposure period in both olmesartan and candesartan users. In olmesartan users, the reduction of serum TG level was significant in comparison with that in candesartan users. Other parameters of lipid profile and renal function showed no statistically significant difference in the change from baseline to during the exposure period between olmesartan and candesartan users. Conclusions

  12. The association between renal stone disease and cholesterol gallstones: the easy to believe and not hard to retrieve theory of the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mohamed H; Barakat, Salma; Almobarak, Ahmed O

    2014-07-01

    Renal stone disease and gallstone disease are widely prevalent and costly disease across the globe. Both renal stone disease and gallstone disease are associated with a variety of diseases including obesity, metabolic syndrome, dyslipidemia, hypertension, insulin resistance diabetes and gout. Importantly, the presence of either renal stone disease or gallstone disease is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. In a recent study of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC), individuals with a history of gallstones were 54% more likely to report a history of nephrolithiasis after adjusting for age, gender, body size and other factors. Furthermore, in three large cohorts including over 240,000 subjects: the Nurses' Health Studies (NHS) I and II and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS), showed that gallstone disease is independently associated with nephrolithiasis. The mechanisms linking gallstone disease and renal stone disease are complex and not yet established. Insulin resistance, lithogenic diets, alterations of transporters in gallbladder and urinary system, and pH are possible potential mechanisms for future exploration. How the liver communicates with kidney in individuals with renal stone disease and gallstone disease is not well known and whether this communication is similar as in hepto-renal syndrome is subject for future research. Further research is needed to determine: (i) the underlying mechanisms of renal stone disease and gallstone disease; (ii) the potential treatment of renal stone disease and gallstone disease.

  13. Interorgan ammonia and amino acid metabolism in metabolically stable patients with cirrhosis and a TIPSS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olde Damink, Steven W M; Jalan, Rajiv; Redhead, Doris N; Hayes, Peter C; Deutz, Nicolaas E P; Soeters, Peter B

    2002-11-01

    Ammonia is central to the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. This study was designed to determine the quantitative dynamics of ammonia metabolism in patients with cirrhosis and previous treatment with a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent shunt (TIPSS). We studied 24 patients with cirrhosis who underwent TIPSS portography. Blood was sampled and blood flows were measured across portal drained viscera, leg, kidney, and liver, and arteriovenous differences across the spleen and the inferior and superior mesenteric veins. The highest amount of ammonia was produced by the portal drained viscera. The kidneys also produced ammonia in amounts that equaled total hepatosplanchnic area production. Skeletal muscle removed more ammonia than the cirrhotic liver. The amount of nitrogen that was taken up by muscle in the form of ammonia was less than the glutamine that was released. The portal drained viscera consumed glutamine and produced ammonia, alanine, and citrulline. Urea was released in the splenic and superior mesenteric vein, contributing to whole-body ureagenesis in these cirrhotic patients. In conclusion, hyperammonemia in metabolically stable, overnight-fasted patients with cirrhosis of the liver and a TIPSS results from portosystemic shunting and renal ammonia production. Skeletal muscle removes more ammonia from the circulation than the cirrhotic liver. Muscle releases excessive amounts of the nontoxic nitrogen carrier glutamine, which can lead to ammonia production in the portal drained viscera (PDV) and kidneys. Urinary ammonia excretion and urea synthesis appear to be the only way to remove ammonia from the body.

  14. Glutamine and glutamate supplementation raise milk glutamine concentrations in lactating gilts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manso Helena

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Glutamine is the most abundant amino acid in milk, and lactation is associated with increased glutamine utilization both for milk synthesis and as a fuel for the enlarged small intestine. A number of recent studies have indicated that lactation is accompanied by a mild catabolic state in which skeletal muscle proteins are degraded to provide amino acids that are used to synthesize additional glutamine. In this study we tested the hypothesis that supplemental L-glutamine or the commercially available glutamine supplement Aminogut (2.5% by weight mixed into daily feed provided to gilts from 30 days prior to parturition until 21 days post-parturition would prevent a decrease in skeletal muscle glutamine while increasing the glutamine content of the milk. Muscle glutamine content decreased (P P P = 0.053. Milk glutamate remained constant between day 7 and 21 of lactation in the control and L-glutamine supplemented groups, but by day 21 of lactation the free glutamine, glutamate, and glutamine plus glutamate concentrations in milk from Aminogut-treated gilts were higher than those of control gilts. Thus dietary glutamine supplementation can alleviate the fall in intramuscular glutamine content during lactation in gilts, and may alleviate some of the catabolic effects of lactation. Furthermore, the increased milk glutamine content in the supplemented gilts may provide optimum nutrition for piglet development.

  15. EFFECTS OF CORDYCEPS SINENSIS PREPARATION ON BODY PROTEIN AND AMINO ACID METABOLISM IN PATIENTS AND RATS WITH CHRONIC RENAL FAILURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱淳; 刘强; 左静南; 朱汉威; 马济民

    2002-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of Cordyceps sinensis (CS) on the metabolism of body protein and intra-extracellular amino acids in patients with chronic renal failure( CRF) , and on the rates of protein synthesis in rats with CRF. Methods In patients with CRF, free amino acid concentrations in plasma and skeletal muscle before and after CS treatment were measured by the LKB-4400 amino acid automatic analytical instrument and the changes of body protein metabolism were observed by the method of 15 N-labeled glycine.Meanwhile, the rates of protein synthesis in liver ( SL % /d ) and muscle (SM%/d) of rats with CRF were determinedd by 3f-phenylalanine radioactive tracer. Results After patients with CRF were treated by CS, the Leu, lie, Thr , Lys, Cys, Tyr concentrations in plasma approached the normal levels. In one sample of skeletal muscle the Thr and Lys concentrations approached the normal, whereas both the intracellular and extracellular Val concentrations were still remarkably decreased as compared with the normal controls. Moreover, the nitrogen flow rate (Q) , rates of protein synthesis (S) and catabolism ( C) , and amino nitrogen utilization ratio (S/Q) in patients with CRF and the SL % /d and SM%/d in rats with CRF were significantly increased as compared with those before CS treatment. Conclusion CS can notably improve the amino acid metabolism, promote the body protein synthesis in patients with CRF , and increase the rates of SL % /d and SM%/d in rats with CRF.

  16. Biodegradable Magnesium (Mg) Implantation Does Not Impose Related Metabolic Disorders in Rats with Chronic Renal Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiali; Xu, Jiankun; Liu, Waiching; Li, Yangde; Qin, Ling

    2016-05-01

    Mg and its alloys have been considered as one of the most promising biodegradable medical devices, but it was still unclear whether hypermagnesemia involved health risks would occur in persons with kidney disease due to their deteriorated kidney function for Mg ions excretion from their body. In this study, we established a chronic renal failure (CRF) model in rats induced by adenine administration prior to Mg implantation, aiming to predict if CRF patients are suitable for the use of Mg implants. The results showed that Mg levels in serum, urine, feces and internal organs had no significant changes after Mg implantation for both normal and CRF rats. Biochemical indices detection and histopathological analysis in kidney, liver and heart tissue confirmed that Mg implants did not induce any extra damage in animals even with renal failure. Our study indicates that Mg based orthopaedic medical device may be considered for use in CRF patients without biosafety concerns.

  17. The effect of losartan and carvedilol on renal haemodynamics and altered metabolism in fructose-fed Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulla, Mohammed H; Sattar, Munavvar A; Abdullah, Nor A; Johns, Edward J

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the effects of losartan and carvedilol on metabolic parameters and renal haemodynamic responses to angiotensin II (Ang II) and adrenergic agonists in the model of fructose-fed rat. Thirty-six Sprague-Dawley rats were fed for 8 weeks either 20% fructose solution (F) or tap water (C) ad libitum. F or C group received either losartan or carvedilol (10 mg/kg p.o.) daily for the last 3 weeks of the study (FL and L) and (FCV and CV), respectively, then in acute studies the renal vasoconstrictor actions of Ang II, noradrenaline (NA), phenylephrine (PE) and methoxamine (ME) were determined. Data, mean±SEM were analysed using ANOVA with significance at P glucose tolerance curve of the fructose-fed group. The responses (%) to NA, PE, ME and Ang II in F were lower (P vs. C, 17±2 vs. 38±3; 24±2 vs. 48±2; 12±2 vs. 34±2; 17±2 vs. 26±2), respectively. L had higher (P vs. C, 47±3, 9±2 vs. 38±3; 61±3, 29±3 vs. 48±2; 16±3, 4±3 vs. 26±2), respectively. FL but not FCV group had enhanced (P vs. F, 33±3 vs. 17±2; 45±3 vs. 24±2; 26±3 vs. 12±2), respectively. Losartan and carvedilol had an important ameliorating effect on fructose-induced insulin resistance. Losartan treatment could be an effective tool to restore normal vascular reactivity in the renal circulation of the fructose-fed rat.

  18. The brain subfornical organ mediates leptin-induced increases in renal sympathetic activity but not its metabolic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Colin N; Morgan, Donald A; Butler, Scott D; Mark, Allyn L; Davisson, Robin L

    2013-03-01

    The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin acts within the central nervous system to decrease food intake and body weight and to increase renal and thermogenic brown adipose tissue sympathetic nerve activity (SNA). Previous studies have focused on hypothalamic brain regions, although recent findings have identified leptin receptors (ObR) in a distributed brain network, including the circumventricular subfornical organ (SFO), a forebrain region devoid of a blood-brain barrier. We tested the hypothesis that ObR in the SFO are functionally linked to leptin-induced decreases in food intake and body weight and increases in SNA. SFO-targeted microinjections of an adenovirus encoding Cre-recombinase in ObR(flox/flox) mice resulted in selective ablation of ObR in the SFO. Interestingly, deletion of ObR in the SFO did not influence the decreases in either food intake or body weight in response to daily systemic or cerebroventricular administration of leptin. In line with these findings, reduction in SFO ObR did not attenuate leptin-mediated increases in thermogenic brown adipose tissue SNA. In contrast, increases in renal SNA induced by systemic or cerebroventricular administration of leptin were abolished in mice with SFO-targeted deletion of ObR. These results demonstrate that ObR in the SFO play an important role in leptin-induced renal sympathoexcitation, but not in the body weight, food intake, or brown adipose tissue SNA thermogenic effects of leptin. These findings highlight the concept of a distributed brain network of leptin action and illustrate that brain regions, including the SFO, can mediate distinct cardiovascular and metabolic responses to leptin.

  19. Metabolic alkalosis transition in renal proximal tubule cells facilitates an increase in CYP27B1, while blunting responsiveness to PTH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is the central activator of renal proximal 1-alpha-hydroxylase (CYP27B1), the enzyme responsible for synthesis of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3). Past studies have documented a disruption of CYP27B1 activity in chronic metabolic acidosis in vivo, while simulated ac...

  20. High anion gap metabolic acidosis induced by cumulation of ketones, L- and D-lactate, 5-oxoproline and acute renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heireman, Laura; Mahieu, Boris; Helbert, Mark; Uyttenbroeck, Wim; Stroobants, Jan; Piqueur, Marian

    2017-07-27

    Frequent causes of high anion gap metabolic acidosis (HAGMA) are lactic acidosis, ketoacidosis and impaired renal function. In this case report, a HAGMA caused by ketones, L- and D-lactate, acute renal failure as well as 5-oxoproline is discussed. A 69-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency department with lowered consciousness, hyperventilation, diarrhoea and vomiting. The patient had suffered uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus, underwent gastric bypass surgery in the past and was chronically treated with high doses of paracetamol and fosfomycin. Urosepsis was diagnosed, whilst laboratory analysis of serum bicarbonate concentration and calculation of the anion gap indicated a  HAGMA. L-lactate, D-lactate, β-hydroxybutyric acid, acetone and 5-oxoproline serum levels were markedly elevated and renal function was impaired. We concluded that this case of HAGMA was induced by a variety of underlying conditions: sepsis, hyperglycaemia, prior gastric bypass surgery, decreased renal perfusion and paracetamol intake. Risk factors for 5-oxoproline intoxication present in this case are female gender, sepsis, impaired renal function and uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus. Furthermore, chronic antibiotic treatment with fosfomycin might have played a role in the increased production of 5-oxoproline. Paracetamol-induced 5-oxoproline intoxication should be considered as a cause of HAGMA in patients with female gender, sepsis, impaired renal function or uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus, even when other more obvious causes of HAGMA such as lactate, ketones or renal failure can be identified.

  1. Enhanced mitochondrial glutamine anaplerosis suppresses pancreatic cancer growth through autophagy inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seung Min; Hwang, Sunsook; Park, Kyungsoo; Yang, Seungyeon; Seong, Rho Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells use precursors derived from tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle to support their unlimited growth. However, continuous export of TCA cycle intermediates results in the defect of mitochondrial integrity. Mitochondria glutamine metabolism plays an essential role for the maintenance of mitochondrial functions and its biosynthetic roles by refilling the mitochondrial carbon pool. Here we report that human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells have a distinct dependence on mitochondrial glutamine metabolism. Whereas glutamine flux into mitochondria contributes to proliferation of most cancer cells, enhanced glutamine anaplerosis results in a pronounced suppression of PDAC growth. A cell membrane permeable α-ketoglutarate analog or overexpression of glutamate dehydrogenase lead to decreased proliferation and increased apoptotic cell death in PDAC cells but not other cancer cells. We found that enhanced glutamine anaplerosis inhibits autophagy, required for tumorigenic growth of PDAC, by activating mammalian TORC1. Together, our results reveal that glutamine anaplerosis is a crucial regulator of growth and survival of PDAC cells, which may provide novel therapeutic approaches to treat these cancers. PMID:27477484

  2. Minireview on Glutamine Synthetase Deficiency, an Ultra-Rare Inborn Error of Amino Acid Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spodenkiewicz, Marta; Diez-Fernandez, Carmen; Rüfenacht, Véronique; Gemperle-Britschgi, Corinne; Häberle, Johannes

    2016-10-19

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is a cytosolic enzyme that produces glutamine, the most abundant free amino acid in the human body. Glutamine is a major substrate for various metabolic pathways, and is thus an important factor for the functioning of many organs; therefore, deficiency of glutamine due to a defect in GS is incompatible with normal life. Mutations in the human GLUL gene (encoding for GS) can cause an ultra-rare recessive inborn error of metabolism-congenital glutamine synthetase deficiency. This disease was reported until now in only three unrelated patients, all of whom suffered from neonatal onset severe epileptic encephalopathy. The hallmark of GS deficiency in these patients was decreased levels of glutamine in body fluids, associated with chronic hyperammonemia. This review aims at recapitulating the clinical history of the three known patients with congenital GS deficiency and summarizes the findings from studies done along with the work-up of these patients. It is the aim of this paper to convince the reader that (i) this disorder is possibly underdiagnosed, since decreased concentrations of metabolites do not receive the attention they deserve; and (ii) early detection of GS deficiency may help to improve the outcome of patients who could be treated early with metabolites that are lacking in this condition.

  3. HIF1α and HIF2α exert distinct nutrient preferences in renal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Arreola

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypoxia Inducible Factors (HIF1α and HIF2α are commonly stabilized and play key roles related to cell growth and metabolic programming in clear cell renal cell carcinoma. The relationship of these factors to discretely alter cell metabolic activities has largely been described in cancer cells, or in hypoxic conditions, where other confounding factors undoubtedly compete. These transcription factors and their specific roles in promoting cancer metabolic phenotypes from the earliest stages are poorly understood in pre-malignant cells. METHODS: We undertook an analysis of SV40-transformed primary kidney epithelial cells derived from newborn mice genetically engineered to express a stabilized HIF1α or HIF2α transgene. We examined the metabolic profile in relation to each gene. RESULTS: Although the cells proliferated similarly, the metabolic profile of each genotype of cell was markedly different and correlated with altered gene expression of factors influencing components of metabolic signaling. HIF1α promoted high levels of glycolysis as well as increased oxidative phosphorylation in complete media, but oxidative phosphorylation was suppressed when supplied with single carbon source media. HIF2α, in contrast, supported oxidative phosphorylation in complete media or single glucose carbon source, but these cells were not responsive to glutamine nutrient sources. This finding correlates to HIF2α-specific induction of Glul, effectively reducing glutamine utilization by limiting the glutamate pool, and knockdown of Glul allows these cells to perform oxidative phosphorylation in glutamine media. CONCLUSION: HIF1α and HIF2α support highly divergent patterns of kidney epithelial cell metabolic phenotype. Expression of these factors ultimately alters the nutrient resource utilization and energy generation strategy in the setting of complete or limiting nutrients.

  4. Hepatic zonation of carbon and nitrogen fluxes derived from glutamine and ammonia transformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin Jorgete

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutaminase predominates in periportal hepatocytes and it has been proposed that it determines the glutamine-derived nitrogen flow through the urea cycle. Glutamine-derived urea production should, thus, be considerably faster in periportal hepatocytes. This postulate, based on indirect observations, has not yet been unequivocally demonstrated, making a direct investigation of ureogenesis from glutamine highly desirable. Methods Zonation of glutamine metabolism was investigated in the bivascularly perfused rat liver with [U-14C]glutamine infusion (0.6 mM into the portal vein (antegrade perfusion or into the hepatic vein (retrograde perfusion. Results Ammonia infusion into the hepatic artery in retrograde and antegrade perfusion allowed to promote glutamine metabolism in the periportal region and in the whole liver parenchyma, respectively. The results revealed that the space-normalized glutamine uptake, indicated by 14CO2 production, gluconeogenesis, lactate production and the associated oxygen uptake, predominates in the periportal region. Periportal predominance was especially pronounced for gluconeogenesis. Ureogenesis, however, tended to be uniformly distributed over the whole liver parenchyma at low ammonia concentrations (up to 1.0 mM; periportal predominance was found only at ammonia concentrations above 1 mM. The proportions between the carbon and nitrogen fluxes in periportal cells are not the same along the liver acinus. Conclusions In conclusion, the results of the present work indicate that the glutaminase activity in periportal hepatocytes is not the rate-controlling step of the glutamine-derived nitrogen flow through the urea cycle. The findings corroborate recent work indicating that ureogenesis is also an important ammonia-detoxifying mechanism in cells situated downstream to the periportal region.

  5. Glutamine synthetase gene evolution: A good molecular clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesole, G.; Lanvave, C.; Saccone, C. (Consiglio Nazionale delle Richerche, Bari (Italy)); Bozzetti, M.P. (Univ. di Bari (Italy)); Preparata, G. (Univ. di Milano (Italy))

    1991-01-15

    Glutamine synthetase gene evolution in various animals, plants, and bacteria was evaluated by a general stationary Markov model. The evolutionary process proved to be unexpectedly regular even for a time span as long as that between the divergence of prokaryotes from eukaryotes. This enabled us to draw phylogenetic trees for species whose phylogeny cannot be easily reconstructed from the fossil record. The calculation of the times of divergence of the various organelle-specific enzymes led us to hypothesize that the pea and bean chloroplast genes for these enzymes originated from the duplication of nuclear genes as a result of the different metabolic needs of the various species. The data indicate that the duplication of plastid glutamine synthetase genes occurred long after the endosymbiotic events that produced the organelles themselves.

  6. Imaging oxygen metabolism with hyperpolarized magnetic resonance: a novel approach for the examination of cardiac and renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Marie; Laustsen, Christoffer

    2017-02-28

    Every tissue in the body critically depends on meeting its energetic demands with sufficient oxygen supply. Oxygen supply/demand imbalances underlie the diseases that inflict the greatest socio-economic burden globally. The purpose of this review is to examine how hyperpolarized contrast media, used in combination with MR data acquisition methods, may advance our ability to assess oxygen metabolism non-invasively and thus improve management of clinical disease. We first introduce the concept of hyperpolarization and how hyperpolarized contrast media have been practically implemented to achieve translational and clinical research. We will then analyse how incorporating hyperpolarized contrast media could enable realization of unmet technical needs in clinical practice. We will focus on imaging cardiac and renal oxygen metabolism, as both organs have unique physiological demands to satisfy their requirements for tissue oxygenation, their dysfunction plays a fundamental role in society's most prevalent diseases, and each organ presents unique imaging challenges. It is our aim that this review attracts a multi-disciplinary audience and sparks collaborations that utilize an exciting, emergent technology to advance our ability to treat patients adversely affected by an oxygen supply/demand mismatch. © 2017 The Author(s).

  7. High-risk surgical acute renal failure treated by continuous arteriovenous hemodiafiltration: metabolic control and outcome in sixty patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bommel, E F; Bouvy, N D; So, K L; Vincent, H H; Zietse, R; Bruining, H A; Weimar, W

    1995-01-01

    The outcome and metabolic control was studied in 60 critically ill patients with acute renal failure (ARF) treated by continuous arteriovenous hemodiafiltration (CAVHD) in a single surgical intensive care unit. Mean age (+/- SEM) was 60 +/- 2 years with a male predominance (80%). The majority of patients required mechanical ventilation (83%) and/or vasopressor support (70%) and suffered from multiorgan failure [mean number of organ system failures 3.3 +/- 0.3 (range 1-6)]. CAVHD resulted in a rapid decline of serum urea and creatinine levels during the first 72 h (urea 47.4 +/- 2.3 to 30.3 +/- 1.4 mmol/l, p protein alimentation and often despite hypotension, surgery and septicemia. Significant electrolyte derangements could be easily corrected and maintained within normal limits. Bicarbonate homeostasis could be restored within 48 h in patients with severe metabolic acidosis (HCO3- patients (43%) survived until discharge from the intensive care unit, of whom 23 (38%) survived to leave hospital. Requirement of mechanical ventilation or vasopressor support, higher APACHE II scores and septicemia were all associated with a poor prognosis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. The 2007 ESPEN Sir David Cuthbertson Lecture: amino acids between and within organs. The glutamate-glutamine-citrulline-arginine pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutz, Nicolaas E P

    2008-06-01

    In daily practice, the plasma concentration of amino acids is usually viewed as a parameter of production. However, both a high production and/or a reduced disposal capacity can result in an increased plasma concentration. In this presentation, I will discuss my research on interorgan relationships of the amino acids glutamate, glutamine, citrulline and arginine to explain the regulation of the plasma arginine level. The reduced glutamine disposal during liver failure is related to enhanced plasma glutamine level without any change in muscle and gut production or consumption rate. In contrast during sepsis, a small reduction in plasma glutamine is related to a substantially enhanced organ glutamate and glutamine production or consumption rate. These observations are a good example that plasma levels are directly related to production or consumption rates. Because glutamine breakdown in the gut produces citrulline, there is a good relation between the amount of metabolically active gut tissue and gut and whole body citrulline production. Arginine is produces from citrulline in the kidney and a reduced gut glutamine to citrulline conversion during sepsis explains the reduced de novo arginine production that is related to the reduced plasma arginine level. The interorgan route between muscle, gut, liver and kidney of the amino acids glutamate, glutamine, citrulline and arginine is a very good example of how complicated the regulation of plasma amino acid levels can be. However, in-depth research is necessary and will give us important clues to new nutritional strategies.

  9. The clinical physiology of water metabolism. Part II: Renal mechanisms for urinary concentration; diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzman, R E; Kleeman, C R

    1979-12-01

    The renal reabsorption of water independent of solute is the result of the coordinated function of the collecting duct and the ascending limb of the loop of Henle. The unique juxtaposition of the ascending and descending portions of the loop of Henle and of the vasa recta permits the function of a counter-current multiplier system in which water is removed from the tubular lumen and reabsorbed into the circulation. The driving force for reabsorption is the osmotic gradient in the renal medulla which is dependent, in part, on chloride (followed by sodium) pumping from the thick ascending loop of Henle. Urea trapping is also thought to play an important role in the generation of a hypertonic medullary interstitium. Arginine vasopressin (AVP) acts by binding to receptors on the cell membrane and activating adenylate cyclase. This, inturn, results in the intracellular accumulation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP) which in some fashion abruptly increases the water permeability of the luminal membrane of cells in the collecting duct. As a consequence, water flows along an osmotic gradient out of the tubular lumen into the medullary interstitium. Diabetes insipidus is the clinical condition associated with either a deficiency of or a resistance to AVP. Central diabetes insipidus is due to diminished release of AVP following damage to either the neurosecretory nuclei or the pituitary stalk. Possible causes include idiopathic, familial, trauma, tumor, infection or vascular lesions. Patients present with polyuria, usually beginning over a period of a few days. The diagnosis is made by showing that urinary concentration is impaired after water restriction but that there is a good response to exogenous vasopressin therapy. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus can be identified by a patient's lack of response to AVP. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is caused by a familial defect, although milder forms can be acquired as a result of various forms of renal disease. Central

  10. Glutamine supplementation in a child with inherited GS deficiency improves the clinical status and partially corrects the peripheral and central amino acid imbalance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Häberle Johannes

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Glutamine synthetase (GS is ubiquitously expressed in mammalian organisms and is a key enzyme in nitrogen metabolism. It is the only known enzyme capable of synthesising glutamine, an amino acid with many critical roles in the human organism. A defect in GLUL, encoding for GS, leads to congenital systemic glutamine deficiency and has been described in three patients with epileptic encephalopathy. There is no established treatment for this condition. Here, we describe a therapeutic trial consisting of enteral and parenteral glutamine supplementation in a four year old patient with GS deficiency. The patient received increasing doses of glutamine up to 1020 mg/kg/day. The effect of this glutamine supplementation was monitored clinically, biochemically, and by studies of the electroencephalogram (EEG as well as by brain magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. Treatment was well tolerated and clinical monitoring showed improved alertness. Concentrations of plasma glutamine normalized while levels in cerebrospinal fluid increased but remained below the lower reference range. The EEG showed clear improvement and spectroscopy revealed increasing concentrations of glutamine and glutamate in brain tissue. Concomitantly, there was no worsening of pre-existing chronic hyperammonemia. In conclusion, supplementation of glutamine is a safe therapeutic option for inherited GS deficiency since it corrects the peripheral biochemical phenotype and partially also improves the central biochemical phenotype. There was some clinical improvement but the patient had a long standing severe encephalopathy. Earlier supplementation with glutamine might have prevented some of the neuronal damage.

  11. Glutamine supplementation in a child with inherited GS deficiency improves the clinical status and partially corrects the peripheral and central amino acid imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häberle, Johannes; Shahbeck, Noora; Ibrahim, Khalid; Schmitt, Bernhard; Scheer, Ianina; O'Gorman, Ruth; Chaudhry, Farrukh A; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg

    2012-07-25

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is ubiquitously expressed in mammalian organisms and is a key enzyme in nitrogen metabolism. It is the only known enzyme capable of synthesising glutamine, an amino acid with many critical roles in the human organism. A defect in GLUL, encoding for GS, leads to congenital systemic glutamine deficiency and has been described in three patients with epileptic encephalopathy. There is no established treatment for this condition.Here, we describe a therapeutic trial consisting of enteral and parenteral glutamine supplementation in a four year old patient with GS deficiency. The patient received increasing doses of glutamine up to 1020 mg/kg/day. The effect of this glutamine supplementation was monitored clinically, biochemically, and by studies of the electroencephalogram (EEG) as well as by brain magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy.Treatment was well tolerated and clinical monitoring showed improved alertness. Concentrations of plasma glutamine normalized while levels in cerebrospinal fluid increased but remained below the lower reference range. The EEG showed clear improvement and spectroscopy revealed increasing concentrations of glutamine and glutamate in brain tissue. Concomitantly, there was no worsening of pre-existing chronic hyperammonemia.In conclusion, supplementation of glutamine is a safe therapeutic option for inherited GS deficiency since it corrects the peripheral biochemical phenotype and partially also improves the central biochemical phenotype. There was some clinical improvement but the patient had a long standing severe encephalopathy. Earlier supplementation with glutamine might have prevented some of the neuronal damage.

  12. GLUT1, MCT1/4 and CD147 overexpression supports the metabolic reprogramming in papillary renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, L M C A; Silva, R; Cavadas, B; Lima, J; Pereira, L; Soares, P; Sobrinho-Simões, M; Lopes, J M; Máximo, V

    2017-10-01

    Papillary Renal Cell carcinoma (pRCC) is the second most common type of RCC, accounting for about 15% of all RCCs. Surgical excision is the main treatment option. Still, 10 - 15 % of clinically localized tumours will recur and/or develop metastasis early after surgery, and no reliable prognostic biomarkers are available to identify them. It is known that pRCC cells rely on high rates of aerobic glycolysis, characterized by the up-regulation of many proteins and enzymes related with the glycolytic pathway. However, a metabolic signature enabling the identification of advanced pRCC tumours remains to be discovered. The aim of this study was to characterize the metabolic phenotype of pRCCs (subtypes 1-pRCC1 and 2-pRCC2) by evaluating the expression pattern of the glucose transporters (GLUTs) 1 and 4 and the monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) 1 and 4, as well as their chaperon CD147. We analysed the clinico-pathological data and the protein and mRNA expression of GLUT1, GLUT4 and MCT1, MCT4 and CD147 in tumours from Porto and TCGA series (http://cancergenome.nih.gov/), respectively. With the exception of GLUT4, plasma membrane expression of all proteins was frequently observed in pRCCs. GLUT1 and MCT1 membrane overexpression was significantly higher in pRCC2 and significantly associated with higher pN-stage and higher Fuhrman grade. Overexpression of GLUT1, MCT1/4 and CD147, supports the metabolic reprograming in pRCCs. MCT1 expression was associated with pRCC aggressiveness, regardless of the tumour histotype.

  13. Glutamine and antioxidants in the critically ill patient: a post hoc analysis of a large-scale randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyland, Daren K; Elke, Gunnar; Cook, Deborah; Berger, Mette M; Wischmeyer, Paul E; Albert, Martin; Muscedere, John; Jones, Gwynne; Day, Andrew G

    2015-05-01

    The recent large randomized controlled trial of glutamine and antioxidant supplementation suggested that high-dose glutamine is associated with increased mortality in critically ill patients with multiorgan failure. The objectives of the present analyses were to reevaluate the effect of supplementation after controlling for baseline covariates and to identify potentially important subgroup effects. This study was a post hoc analysis of a prospective factorial 2 × 2 randomized trial conducted in 40 intensive care units in North America and Europe. In total, 1223 mechanically ventilated adult patients with multiorgan failure were randomized to receive glutamine, antioxidants, both glutamine and antioxidants, or placebo administered separate from artificial nutrition. We compared each of the 3 active treatment arms (glutamine alone, antioxidants alone, and glutamine + antioxidants) with placebo on 28-day mortality. Post hoc, treatment effects were examined within subgroups defined by baseline patient characteristics. Logistic regression was used to estimate treatment effects within subgroups after adjustment for baseline covariates and to identify treatment-by-subgroup interactions (effect modification). The 28-day mortality rates in the placebo, glutamine, antioxidant, and combination arms were 25%, 32%, 29%, and 33%, respectively. After adjusting for prespecified baseline covariates, the adjusted odds ratio of 28-day mortality vs placebo was 1.5 (95% confidence interval, 1.0-2.1, P = .05), 1.2 (0.8-1.8, P = .40), and 1.4 (0.9-2.0, P = .09) for glutamine, antioxidant, and glutamine plus antioxidant arms, respectively. In the post hoc subgroup analysis, both glutamine and antioxidants appeared most harmful in patients with baseline renal dysfunction. No subgroups suggested reduced mortality with supplements. After adjustment for baseline covariates, early provision of high-dose glutamine administered separately from artificial nutrition was not beneficial and may be

  14. Glutamine for immunomodification and metabolic support in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease%谷氨酰胺对慢性阻塞性肺疾病免疫调理和代谢支持的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗勇; 徐卫国; 董欢霁; 杨玲; 陶晔璇; 汤庆娅

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nutritional support has become one of the most important therapeutic measures for malnutrition patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but some of the patients may fail to respond to nutritional treatment, which might be attributed to excessive inflammatory reaction that increases energy expenditure. Current nutritional support strategies have primarily focused on immunonutrition and metabolic support.OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of glutamine (Gln) on immunomodulation and metabolic support for patients with COPD.DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial.SETTING: Xinhua Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Second Medical UniversityPARTICIPANTS: Totally 44 male patients with acute episode of COPD aged (75±9) years admitted between February and July 2002 were recruited in this study and randomly divided into treatment group (n=14) and control group (n=18).INTERVENTIONS: Only nutritional support was given in the control group while the treatment group received also glutamine treatment. All the patients received nutritional support with the total calorie intake of 1.5times of resting energy expenditure and dietary counseling for a regular diet (20% protein, 30% fat, and 50% carbohydrate) provided by a nutritionist. In the treatment group, the protein intake was reduced by 30 g and replaced by 30 g of Gln given at 10 g each time for three times a day via oral therapy. The nutritional indices were measured including body mass,body mass index, triceps skinfold thickness (TSF), creatinine-height index (CHI), prealbumin (PAlb), albumin (ALB), transferrin (TRF), fat mass (FM)]and the immune indices examined including immunoglobulin, complements, T cell subsets, interleukin (IL)-2, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α),and C-reactive protein etc with also measurement of resting energy expenditure.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes in nutritional and immune indices of patients before and after treatment.RESULTS: Thirty-two patients all entered the result

  15. Recurrent seizures and brain pathology after inhibition of glutamine synthetase in the hippocampus in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Tore; Ghosh, Arko; Wang, Yue; Beckström, Henning; Zaveri, Hitten P; Lee, Tih-Shih W; Lai, James C K; Malthankar-Phatak, Gauri H; de Lanerolle, Nihal C

    2008-08-01

    An excess of extracellular glutamate in the hippocampus has been linked to the generation of recurrent seizures and brain pathology in patients with medically intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). However, the mechanism which results in glutamate excess in MTLE remains unknown. We recently reported that the glutamate-metabolizing enzyme glutamine synthetase is deficient in the hippocampus in patients with MTLE, and we postulated that this deficiency is critically involved in the pathophysiology of the disease. To further explore the role of glutamine synthetase in MTLE we created a novel animal model of hippocampal glutamine synthetase deficiency by continuous (approximately 28 days) microinfusion of methionine sulfoximine (MSO: 0.625 to 2.5 microg/h) unilaterally into the hippocampus in rats. This treatment led to a deficiency in hippocampal glutamine synthetase activity by 82-97% versus saline. The majority (>95%) of the MSO-treated animals exhibited recurrent seizures that continued for several weeks. Some of the MSO-treated animals exhibited neuropathological features that were similar to mesial temporal sclerosis, such as hippocampal atrophy and patterned loss of hippocampal neurons. However, many MSO-treated animals displayed only minimal injury to the hippocampus, with no clear evidence of mesial temporal sclerosis. These findings support the hypothesis that a deficiency in hippocampal glutamine synthetase causes recurrent seizures, even in the absence of classical mesial temporal sclerosis, and that restoration of glutamine synthetase may represent a novel approach to therapeutic intervention in this disease.

  16. Minireview on Glutamine Synthetase Deficiency, an Ultra-Rare Inborn Error of Amino Acid Biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Spodenkiewicz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine synthetase (GS is a cytosolic enzyme that produces glutamine, the most abundant free amino acid in the human body. Glutamine is a major substrate for various metabolic pathways, and is thus an important factor for the functioning of many organs; therefore, deficiency of glutamine due to a defect in GS is incompatible with normal life. Mutations in the human GLUL gene (encoding for GS can cause an ultra-rare recessive inborn error of metabolism—congenital glutamine synthetase deficiency. This disease was reported until now in only three unrelated patients, all of whom suffered from neonatal onset severe epileptic encephalopathy. The hallmark of GS deficiency in these patients was decreased levels of glutamine in body fluids, associated with chronic hyperammonemia. This review aims at recapitulating the clinical history of the three known patients with congenital GS deficiency and summarizes the findings from studies done along with the work-up of these patients. It is the aim of this paper to convince the reader that (i this disorder is possibly underdiagnosed, since decreased concentrations of metabolites do not receive the attention they deserve; and (ii early detection of GS deficiency may help to improve the outcome of patients who could be treated early with metabolites that are lacking in this condition.

  17. Pilot study with a glutamine-supplemented enteral formula in critically ill infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbosa Eliana

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Seriously ill infants often display protein-calorie malnutrition due to the metabolic demands of sepsis and respiratory failure. Glutamine has been classified as a conditionally essential amino acid, with special usefulness in critical patients. Immunomodulation, gut protection, and prevention of protein depletion are mentioned among its positive effects in such circumstances. With the intent of evaluating the tolerance and clinical impact of a glutamine supplement in seriously ill infants, a prospective randomized study was done with nine patients. Anthropometric and biochemical determinations were made, and length of stay in the intensive care unit (ICU, in the hospital, and under artificial ventilation, and septic morbidity and mortality were tabulated. Infants in the treatment group (n=5 were enterally administered 0.3 g/kg of glutamine, whereas controls received 0.3 g/kg of casein during a standard period of five days. Septic complications occurred in 75% of the controls (3/4 versus 20% of the glutamine-treated group (1/5, p<=0.10, and two patients in the control group died of bacterial infections (50% vs. 0%, p<=0.10. Days in the ICU, in the hospital, and with ventilation numerically favored glutamine therapy, although without statistical significance. The supplements were usually well tolerated, and no patient required discontinuation of the program. The conclusion was that glutamine supplementation was safe and tended to be associated with less infectious morbidity and mortality in this high-risk population.

  18. The effect of portacaval anastomosis on the expression of glutamine synthetase and ornithine aminotransferase in perivenous hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Robin; Levillain, Oliver; Brosnan, John T; Araneda, Silvia; Brosnan, Margaret E

    2013-05-01

    There is functional zonation of metabolism across the liver acinus, with glutamine synthetase restricted to a narrow band of cells around the terminal hepatic venules. Portacaval anastomosis, where there is a major rerouting of portal blood flow from the portal vein directly to the vena cava bypassing the liver, has been reported to result in a marked decrease in the activity of glutamine synthetase. It is not known whether this represents a loss of perivenous hepatocytes or whether there is a specific loss of glutamine synthetase. To answer this question, we have determined the activity of glutamine synthetase and another enzyme from the perivenous compartment, ornithine aminotransferase, as well as the immunochemical localization of both glutamine synthetase and ornithine aminotransferase in rats with a portacaval shunt. The portacaval shunt caused a marked decrease in glutamine synthetase activity and an increase in ornithine aminotransferase activity. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the glutamine synthetase and ornithine aminotransferase proteins maintained their location in the perivenous cells. These results indicate that there is no generalized loss of perivenous hepatocytes, but rather, there is a significant alteration in the expression of these proteins and hence metabolism in this cell population.

  19. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery? Choosing the Right Sport for You Shyness Metabolism KidsHealth > For Teens > Metabolism Print A A A ... food through a process called metabolism. What Is Metabolism? Metabolism (pronounced: meh-TAB-uh-lih-zem) is ...

  20. Hepatic Glucocorticoid Receptor Plays a Greater Role Than Adipose GR in Metabolic Syndrome Despite Renal Compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Sandip K; Hutson, Irina; Harris, Charles A

    2016-12-01

    Exogenous glucocorticoid administration results in hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, hepatic dyslipidemia, and hypertension, a constellation of findings known as Cushing's syndrome. These effects are mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Because GR activation in liver and adipose has been implicated in metabolic syndrome (MS), we wanted to determine the role of GR in these tissues in the development of MS. Because GR knockout (KO) mice (whole-body KO) exhibit perinatal lethality due to respiratory failure, we generated tissue-specific (liver or adipose) GRKO mice using cre-lox technology. Real-time PCR analysis of liver mRNA from dexamethasone-treated wildtype (WT) and liver GRKO mice indicated that hepatic GR regulates the expression of key genes involved in gluconeogenesis and glycogen metabolism. Interestingly, we have observed that liver-specific deletion of GR resulted in a significant increase in mRNA expression of key genes involved in gluconeogenesis and glycogen metabolism in kidney tissue, indicating a compensatory mechanism to maintain glucose homeostasis. We have also observed that GR plays an important role in regulating the mRNA expression of key genes involved in lipid metabolism. Liver GRKO mice demonstrated decreased fat mass and liver glycogen content compared with WT mice administered dexamethasone for 2 weeks. Adipose-specific deletion of GR did not alter glucose tolerance or insulin sensitivity of adipose GRKO mice compared with WT mice administrated dexamethasone. This indicates that liver GR might be more important in development of MS in dexamethasone-treated mice, whereas adipose GR plays a little role in these paradigms.

  1. Metabolic syndrome is associated with impaired long-term renal allograft function; not all component criteria contribute equally

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, APJ; Bakker, SJL; van Son, WJ; van der Heide, JJH; Ploeg, RJ; The, HT; de Jong, PE; Gans, ROB

    2004-01-01

    Chronic renal transplant dysfunction (CRTD) remains a leading cause of renal allograft loss. Evidence suggests that immunological and ischemic insults are mainly associated with CRTD occurring within the first year after transplantation, whereas nonimmunological insults are predominantly associated

  2. Streptomyces hygroscopicus Has Two Glutamine Synthetase Genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumada, Y.; Takano, E.; Nagaoka, Kozo; Thompson, C.J.

    1990-01-01

    Streptomyces hygroscopicus, which produces the glutamine synthetase inhibitor phosphinothricin, possesses at least two genes (glnA and glnB) encoding distinct glutamine synthetase isoforms (GSI and GSII). The glnB gene was cloned from S. hygroscopicus DNA by complementation in an Escherichia coli gl

  3. Identification of the glutamine synthetase adenylyltransferase of Azospirillum brasilense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dommelen, Anne; Spaepen, Stijn; Vanderleyden, Jozef

    2009-04-01

    Glutamine synthetase, a key enzyme in nitrogen metabolism of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, is strictly regulated. One means of regulation is the modulation of activity through adenylylation catalyzed by adenylyltransferases. Using PCR primers based on conserved sequences in glutamine synthetase adenylyltransferases, we amplified part of the glnE gene of Azospirillum brasilense Sp7. The complete glnE sequence of A. brasilense Sp245 was retrieved from the draft genome sequence of this organism (http://genomics.ornl.gov/research/azo/). Adenylyltransferase is a bifunctional enzyme consisting of an N-terminal domain responsible for deadenylylation activity and a C-terminal domain responsible for adenylylation activity. Both domains are partially homologous to each other. Residues important for catalytic activity were present in the deduced amino acid sequence of the A. brasilense Sp245 glnE sequence. A glnE mutant was constructed in A. brasilense Sp7 by inserting a kanamycin resistance cassette between the two active domains of the enzyme. The resulting mutant was unable to adenylylate the glutamine synthetase enzyme and was impaired in growth when shifted from nitrogen-poor to nitrogen-rich medium.

  4. Long term metabolic syndrome induced by a high fat high fructose diet leads to minimal renal injury in C57BL/6 mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Dissard

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome can induce chronic kidney disease in humans. Genetically engineered mice on a C57BL/6 background are highly used for mechanistic studies. Although it has been shown that metabolic syndrome induces cardiovascular lesions in C57BL/6 mice, in depth renal phenotyping has never been performed. Therefore in this study we characterized renal function and injury in C57BL/6 mice with long-term metabolic syndrome induced by a high fat and fructose diet (HFFD. C57BL/6 mice received an 8 months HFFD diet enriched with fat (45% energy from fat and drinking water enriched with fructose (30%. Body weight, food/water consumption, energy intake, fat/lean mass ratio, plasma glucose, HDL, LDL, triglycerides and cholesterol levels were monitored. At 3, 6 and 8 months, renal function was determined by inulin clearance and measure of albuminuria. At sacrifice, kidneys and liver were collected. Metabolic syndrome in C57BL/6 mice fed a HFFD was observed as early 4 weeks with development of type 2 diabetes at 8 weeks after initiation of diet. However, detailed analysis of kidney structure and function showed only minimal renal injury after 8 months of HFFD. HFFD induced moderate glomerular hyperfiltration (436,4 µL/min vs 289,8 µL/min; p-value=0.0418 together with a 2-fold increase in albuminuria only after 8 months of HFFD. This was accompanied by a 2-fold increase in renal inflammation (p-value=0.0217 but without renal fibrosis or mesangial matrix expansion. In addition, electron microscopy did not show alterations in glomeruli such as basal membrane thickening and foot process effacement. Finally, comparison of the urinary peptidome of these mice with the urinary peptidome from humans with diabetic nephropathy also suggested absence of diabetic nephropathy in this model. This study provides evidence that the HFFD C57BL/6 model is not the optimal model to study the effects of metabolic syndrome on the development of diabetic kidney disease.

  5. Long term metabolic syndrome induced by a high fat high fructose diet leads to minimal renal injury in C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissard, Romain; Klein, Julie; Caubet, Cécile; Breuil, Benjamin; Siwy, Justyna; Hoffman, Janosch; Sicard, Laurent; Ducassé, Laure; Rascalou, Simon; Payre, Bruno; Buléon, Marie; Mullen, William; Mischak, Harald; Tack, Ivan; Bascands, Jean-Loup; Buffin-Meyer, Bénédicte; Schanstra, Joost P

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome can induce chronic kidney disease in humans. Genetically engineered mice on a C57BL/6 background are highly used for mechanistic studies. Although it has been shown that metabolic syndrome induces cardiovascular lesions in C57BL/6 mice, in depth renal phenotyping has never been performed. Therefore in this study we characterized renal function and injury in C57BL/6 mice with long-term metabolic syndrome induced by a high fat and fructose diet (HFFD). C57BL/6 mice received an 8 months HFFD diet enriched with fat (45% energy from fat) and drinking water enriched with fructose (30%). Body weight, food/water consumption, energy intake, fat/lean mass ratio, plasma glucose, HDL, LDL, triglycerides and cholesterol levels were monitored. At 3, 6 and 8 months, renal function was determined by inulin clearance and measure of albuminuria. At sacrifice, kidneys and liver were collected. Metabolic syndrome in C57BL/6 mice fed a HFFD was observed as early 4 weeks with development of type 2 diabetes at 8 weeks after initiation of diet. However, detailed analysis of kidney structure and function showed only minimal renal injury after 8 months of HFFD. HFFD induced moderate glomerular hyperfiltration (436,4 µL/min vs 289,8 µL/min; p-value=0.0418) together with a 2-fold increase in albuminuria only after 8 months of HFFD. This was accompanied by a 2-fold increase in renal inflammation (p-value=0.0217) but without renal fibrosis or mesangial matrix expansion. In addition, electron microscopy did not show alterations in glomeruli such as basal membrane thickening and foot process effacement. Finally, comparison of the urinary peptidome of these mice with the urinary peptidome from humans with diabetic nephropathy also suggested absence of diabetic nephropathy in this model. This study provides evidence that the HFFD C57BL/6 model is not the optimal model to study the effects of metabolic syndrome on the development of diabetic kidney disease.

  6. LRH-1-dependent programming of mitochondrial glutamine processing drives liver cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Pan; Oosterveer, Maaike H.; Stein, Sokrates; Demagny, Hadrien; Ryu, Dongryeol; Moullan, Norman; Wang, Xu; Can, Emine; Zamboni, Nicola; Comment, Arnaud; Auwerx, Johan; Schoonjans, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Various tumors develop addiction to glutamine to support uncontrolled cell proliferation. Here we identify the nuclear receptor liver receptor homolog 1 (LRH-1) as a key regulator in the process of hepatic tumorigenesis through the coordination of a noncanonical glutamine pathway that is reliant on the mitochondrial and cytosolic transaminases glutamate pyruvate transaminase 2 (GPT2) and glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase 1 (GOT1), which fuel anabolic metabolism. In particular, we show that gain and loss of function of hepatic LRH-1 modulate the expression and activity of mitochondrial glutaminase 2 (GLS2), the first and rate-limiting step of this pathway. Acute and chronic deletion of hepatic LRH-1 blunts the deamination of glutamine and reduces glutamine-dependent anaplerosis. The robust reduction in glutaminolysis and the limiting availability of α-ketoglutarate in turn inhibit mTORC1 signaling to eventually block cell growth and proliferation. Collectively, these studies highlight the importance of LRH-1 in coordinating glutamine-induced metabolism and signaling to promote hepatocellular carcinogenesis. PMID:27298334

  7. Enteral glutamine: a novel mediator of PPARgamma in the postischemic gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Kechen; Kozar, Rosemary A

    2008-09-01

    Early enteral nutrition supplemented with glutamine, arginine, omega-3 fatty acids, and nucleotides has been shown to decrease infection complications in critically injured patients. Concern has been raised, however, that under conditions of hyperinflammation, these diets may be injurious through the induction of inducible NO synthase by enteral arginine. In a rodent model of gut ischemia/reperfusion, inflammation and injury are intensified by enteral arginine and abrogated by glutamine. These findings correlate with the degree of metabolic stress imposed upon the gut by hypoperfusion. Glutamine is metabolized by the gut and therefore, can contribute back energy in the form of ATP, whereas arginine is a nonmetabolizable nutrient, using but not contributing energy. Recent data suggest that one of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the gut-protective effects of enteral glutamine is the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma. This anti-inflammatory transcription factor belongs to the family of nuclear receptors, plays a key role in adipocyte development and glucose homeostasis, and has been recognized as an endogenous regulator of intestinal inflammation. Preliminary clinical studies support the use of enteral glutamine in patients with gut hypoperfusion.

  8. The link between the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and renal injury in obesity and the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thethi, Tina; Kamiyama, Masumi; Kobori, Hiroyuki

    2012-04-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and is associated with chronic kidney disease. Activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) is common in obesity. The RAAS is an important mediator of hypertension. Mechanisms involved in activation of the RAAS in obesity include sympathetic stimulation, synthesis of adipokines in the RAAS by visceral fat, and hemodynamic alterations. The RAAS is known for its role in regulating blood pressure and fluid and electrolyte homeostasis. The role of local/tissue RAAS in specific tissues has been a focus of research. Urinary angiotensinogen (UAGT) provides a specific index of the intrarenal RAAS. Investigators have demonstrated that sex steroids can modulate the expression and activity of the different components of the intrarenal RAAS and other tissues. Our data suggest that obese women without DM and hypertension have significantly higher levels of UAGT than their male counterparts. These differences existed without any background difference in the ratio of microalbumin to creatinine in the urine or the estimated glomerular filtration rate, raising a question about the importance of baseline gender differences in the endogenous RAAS in the clinical spectrum of cardiovascular diseases and the potential utility of UAGT as a marker of the intrarenal RAAS. Animal studies have demonstrated that modifying the amount of angiotensin, the biologically active component of the RAAS, directly influences body weight and adiposity. This article reviews the role of the RAAS in renal injury seen in obesity and the metabolic syndrome.

  9. Renal failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    970363 Effect on serum PTH and 1, 25(OH)2 D3levels of rapid correction of metabolic acidosis in CRFpatients with secondary hyperparathyroidism. YUANQunsheng(袁群生), et al. Renal Div, PUMC Hosp,Beijing, 100730. Chin J Nephrol 1996; 12(6): 328-331.

  10. High altitude may alter oxygen availability and renal metabolism in diabetics as measured by hyperpolarized [1-1C]pyruvate magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Christoffer; Lycke, Sara; Palm, Fredrik;

    2014-01-01

    The kidneys account for about 10% of the whole body oxygen consumption, whereas only 0.5% of the total body mass. It is known that intrarenal hypoxia is present in several diseases associated with development of kidney disease, including diabetes, and when renal blood flow is unaffected. The impo...... of nephropathy in patients with diabetes at high altitudes may originate from the increased sensitivity toward inspired oxygen. This increased lactate production shifts the metabolic routs toward hypoxic pathways.......The kidneys account for about 10% of the whole body oxygen consumption, whereas only 0.5% of the total body mass. It is known that intrarenal hypoxia is present in several diseases associated with development of kidney disease, including diabetes, and when renal blood flow is unaffected....... The importance of deranged oxygen metabolism is further supported by deterioration of kidney function in patients with diabetes living at high altitude. Thus, we argue that reduced oxygen availability alters renal energy metabolism. Here, we introduce a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approach to monitor...

  11. Plasma Glutamine Concentrations in Liver Failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnel Helling

    Full Text Available Higher than normal plasma glutamine concentration at admission to an intensive care unit is associated with an unfavorable outcome. Very high plasma glutamine levels are sometimes seen in both acute and chronic liver failure. We aimed to systematically explore the relation between different types of liver failure and plasma glutamine concentrations.Four different groups of patients were studies; chronic liver failure (n = 40, acute on chronic liver failure (n = 20, acute fulminant liver failure (n = 20, and post-hepatectomy liver failure (n = 20. Child-Pugh and Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD scores were assessed as indices of liver function. All groups except the chronic liver failure group were followed longitudinally during hospitalisation. Outcomes were recorded up to 48 months after study inclusion.All groups had individuals with very high plasma glutamine concentrations. In the total group of patients (n = 100, severity of liver failure correlated significantly with plasma glutamine concentration, but the correlation was not strong.Liver failure, regardless of severity and course of illness, may be associated with a high plasma glutamine concentration. Further studies are needed to understand whether high glutamine levels should be regarded as a biomarker or as a contributor to symptomatology in liver failure.

  12. Prognostic Value of Quantitative Metabolic Metrics on Baseline Pre-Sunitinib FDG PET/CT in Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryogo Minamimoto

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate various quantitative metrics on FDG PET/CT for monitoring sunitinib therapy and predicting prognosis in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC.Seventeen patients (mean age: 59.0 ± 11.6 prospectively underwent a baseline FDG PET/CT and interim PET/CT after 2 cycles (12 weeks of sunitinib therapy. We measured the highest maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax of all identified lesions (highest SUVmax, sum of SUVmax with maximum six lesions (sum of SUVmax, total lesion glycolysis (TLG and metabolic tumor volume (MTV from baseline PET/CT and interim PET/CT, and the % decrease in highest SUVmax of lesion (%Δ highest SUVmax, the % decrease in sum of SUVmax, the % decrease in TLG (%ΔTLG and the % decrease in MTV (%ΔMTV between baseline and interim PET/CT, and the imaging results were validated by clinical follow-up at 12 months after completion of therapy for progression free survival (PFS.At 12 month follow-up, 6/17 (35.3% patients achieved PFS, while 11/17 (64.7% patients were deemed to have progression of disease or recurrence within the previous 12 months. At baseline, PET/CT demonstrated metabolically active cancer in all cases. Using baseline PET/CT alone, all of the quantitative imaging metrics were predictive of PFS. Using interim PET/CT, the %Δ highest SUVmax, %Δ sum of SUVmax, and %ΔTLG were also predictive of PFS. Otherwise, interim PET/CT showed no significant difference between the two survival groups regardless of the quantitative metric utilized including MTV and TLG.Quantitative metabolic measurements on baseline PET/CT appears to be predictive of PFS at 12 months post-therapy in patients scheduled to undergo sunitinib therapy for mRCC. Change between baseline and interim PET/CT also appeared to have prognostic value but otherwise interim PET/CT after 12 weeks of sunitinib did not appear to be predictive of PFS.

  13. Effects of Dietary Glutamine Supplemental Level on Growth Performance, Nitrogen Metabolism and Jejunum Mucosal Enzyme Activities of Growing Rex Rabbits%饲粮谷氨酰胺添加水平对生长獭兔生长性能、氮代谢和空肠黏膜酶活性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付朝晖; 李福昌; 李冰; 张彩霞; 李万佳; 朱晓强

    2014-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to study the effects of dietary glutamine supplemental level on growth performance, nitrogen metabolism and jejunum mucosal enzyme activities of growing Rex rabbits.Two hundred weaned Rex rabbits were randomly assigned to 5 groups with 40 replicates in each group and each rep-licate contained 1 rabbit.Rabbits in 5 groups were fed experimental diets supplemented with 0, 0.3%, 0.6%, 0.9%and 1.2%glutamine, respectively.The experiment lasted for 7 days for adaptation and 60 days for test.The results showed as follows: under the condition of no significant difference in initial body weight (P>0.05), dietary glutamine supplemental level did not significantly affect average daily intake (ADI), av-erage daily gain (ADG) and feed/gain (F/G) of growing Rex rabbits (P>0.05).With the increase of diet-ary glutamine supplemental level, the average daily gain ( ADG) tended to be increased firstly and then de-creased, while the feed/gain ( F/G) showed the opposite tend, and the highest ADG and the lowest F/G both appeared in 0.9%glutamine group.Dietary glutamine supplemental level had significant effects on fecal nitro-gen (P=0.004 8), digestible nitrogen (P=0.008 1), retention nitrogen (P=0.005 3), nitrogen apparent digestibility (P =0.000 9), nitrogen utilization rate (P =0.008 1) and nitrogen biological value (P =0 .002 3 ) , but had no significant effects on urine nitrogen and nitrogen intake of growing Rex rabbits ( P>0 .05 ) .The values of the lowest fecal nitrogen and the highest digestible nitrogen, retention nitrogen, nitrogen apparent digestibility, nitrogen utilization rate and nitrogen biological value appeared in 0 .9% glutamine group.Dietary glutamine supplemental level had a significant effect on the apparent digestibility of methionine (P=0.001 0), cystine (P=0.006 3), glutamic acid (P=0.010 6) and proline (P=0.000 1), but had no significant effect on the apparent digestibility of other amino acids of growing Rex rabbits ( P>0 .05

  14. [Metabolic therapy with iodine 131 in patients with chronic renal failure. Clinical case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Rodríguez Barbero, Inmaculada; Espadas-Maeso, María José; Muñoz-Morales, Ana; Flores-Gómez, Pilar; Serrano-Carretero, María Belén; Castedo-Sal, Juan José; Sánchez Rey-Castro, Elena; Zamorano-Córdoba, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    62 year-old male with CKD stage 5 in dialysis program since 2012 who underwent surgery for papillary thyroid carcinoma with lymph node metastasis. Subsequently, the patient was admitted to the Unit of Metabolic Therapy at his reference hospital, where he is administered 80 millicuries of iodine-131 as a treatment associated with the surgery, unable to have his conventional dialysis, nursing interventions required in various stages of implementation of the continuous extrarenal clearance techniques (TCDE) were performed. The following care values were addressed targeted to patients undergoing treatment with I(131): specific equipment, personal protective measures and major diagnoses and nursing interventions. TCDE, despite being attributed to very critical patients, they can be extrapolated to other patients in a given time. TCDE allowed these patients to undergo dialysis in a safe environment for staff, ensuring proper disposal of contaminated liquids. TCDE were an effective treatment for the removal of I131, a single ssesion being necessary to normalize the levels of radioactivity. Coordination between services allewed ensure proper and effective treatment for the patient. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Distal renal tubular acidosis in recurrent renal stone formers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osther, P J; Hansen, A B; Røhl, H F

    1989-01-01

    (1.1%) had complete distal renal tubular acidosis and 14 (15.5%) incomplete distal renal tubular acidosis. Our results confirm that distal renal tubular acidification defects are associated with a more severe form of stone disease and make distal renal tubular acidosis one of the most frequent...... metabolic disturbances in renal stone formers. Distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) was relatively more common in female stone formers and most often found in patients with bilateral stone disease (36%). Since prophylactic treatment in renal stone formers with renal acidification defects is available...

  16. Glutamine enema regulates colonic ubiquitinated proteins but not proteasome activities during TNBS-induced colitis leading to increased mitochondrial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Julien; Marion-Letellier, Rachel; Azhar, Saïda; Chan, Philippe; Legrand, Romain; Goichon, Alexis; Ghouzali, Ibtissem; Aziz, Moutaz; Vaudry, David; Savoye, Guillaume; Déchelotte, Pierre; Coëffier, Moïse

    2015-07-01

    Ubiquitin proteasome system contributes to the regulation of intestinal inflammatory response as its inhibition is associated with tissue damage improvement. We aimed to evaluate whether glutamine is able to limit inflammation by targeting ubiquitin proteasome system in experimental colitis. Colitis was induced in male rats by intrarectal instillation of 2-4-6-trinitrobenzen sulfonic acid (TNBS) at day 1. From day 2 to day 6, rats daily received either an intrarectal instillation of PBS (TNBS/PBS group) or glutamine (TNBS/Gln). Rats were euthanized at day 7 and colonic samples were taken to evaluate ubiqutinated proteins by proteomic approach combining 2D electrophoresis and immunoblots directed against ubiquitin. Results were then confirmed by evaluating total expression of proteins and mRNA levels. Survival rate, TNFα, and IL-1β mRNA were improved in TNBS/Gln compared with TNBS/PBS (p TNBS but not by glutamine. We identified eight proteins that were less ubiquitinated in TNBS/PBS compared with controls with no effect of glutamine. Four proteins were more ubiquitinated in TNBS/PBS group and restored in TNBS/Gln group. Finally, 12 ubiquitinated proteins were only affected by glutamine. Among proteins affected by glutamine, eight proteins (GFPT1, Gapdh, Pkm2, LDH, Bcat2, ATP5a1, Vdac1, and Vdac2) were involved in metabolic pathways. In conclusion, glutamine may regulate ubiquitination process during intestinal inflammation.

  17. Dietary fish oil reduces glomerular injury and elevated renal hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid levels in the JCR:LA-cp rat, a model of the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aukema, Harold M; Lu, Jing; Borthwick, Faye; Proctor, Spencer D

    2013-07-14

    We have previously shown nutritional intervention with fish oil (n-3 PUFA) to reduce numerous complications associated with the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in the JCR:LA-corpulent (cp) rat. In the present study, we sought to explore the potential role of fish oil to prevent glomerulosclerosis in JCR:LA-cp rats via renal eicosanoid metabolism and lipidomic analysis. Male lean and MetS JCR:LA-cp rats were fed a lipid-balanced diet supplemented with fish oil (5 or 10 % of total fat). After 16 weeks of feeding, albuminuria was significantly reduced in MetS rats supplemented with 5 or 10 % fish oil ( - 53 and - 70 %, respectively, compared with the untreated MetS rats). The 5 % fish oil diet resulted in markedly lower glomerulosclerosis ( - 43 %) in MetS rats and to a lesser extent in those supplemented with 10 % fish oil. Interestingly, untreated MetS rats had higher levels of 11- and 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETE) v. lean rats. Dietary fish oil reduced these levels, as well as other (5-, 9- and 15-) HETE. Whilst genotype did not alter prostanoid levels, fish oil reduced endogenous renal levels of 6-keto PGF1α (PGI2 metabolite), thromboxane B2 (TxB2), PGF2α and PGD2 by approximately 60 % in rats fed 10 % fish oil, and TxB2 ( - 50 %) and PGF2α ( - 41 %) in rats fed 5 % fish oil. In conclusion, dietary fish oil prevented glomerular damage in MetS rats and mitigated the elevation in renal HETE levels. These results suggest a potential role for dietary fish oil to improve dysfunctional renal eicosanoid metabolism associated with kidney damage during conditions of the MetS.

  18. Reduced activity of glutamine synthetase in Rhodospirillum rubrum mutants lacking the adenylyltransferase GlnE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Anders; Nordlund, Stefan; Teixeira, Pedro Filipe

    2009-10-01

    In the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum, the GlnE adenylyltransferase (encoded by glnE) catalyzes reversible adenylylation of glutamine synthetase, thereby regulating nitrogen assimilation. We have generated glnE mutant strains that are unable to adenylylate glutamine synthetase (GS). Surprisingly, the activity of GS was lower in the mutants than in the wild type, even when grown in nitrogen-fixing conditions. Our results support the proposal that R. rubrum can only cope with the absence of an adenylylation system in the presence of lowered GS expression or activity. In general terms, this report also provides further support for the central role of GS in bacterial metabolism.

  19. Everolimus and sirolimus in combination with cyclosporine have different effects on renal metabolism in the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Bohra

    Full Text Available Enhancement of calcineurin inhibitor nephrotoxicity by sirolimus (SRL is limiting the clinical use of this drug combination. We compared the dose-dependent effects of the structurally related everolimus (EVL and sirolimus (SRL alone, and in combination with cyclosporine (CsA, on the rat kidney. Lewis rats were treated by oral gavage for 28 days using a checkerboard dosing format (0, 3.0, 6.0 and 10.0 CsA and 0, 0.5, 1.5 and 3.0 mg/kg/day SRL or EVL, n = 4/dose combination. After 28 days, oxidative stress, energy charge, kidney histologies, glomerular filtration rates, and concentrations of the immunosuppressants were measured along with (1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS and gas chromatography- mass spectrometry profiles of cellular metabolites in urine. The combination of CsA with SRL led to higher urinary glucose concentrations and decreased levels of urinary Krebs cycle metabolites when compared to controls, suggesting that CsA+SRL negatively impacted proximal tubule metabolism. Unsupervised principal component analysis of MRS spectra distinguished unique urine metabolite patterns of rats treated with CsA+SRL from those treated with CsA+EVL and the controls. SRL, but not EVL blood concentrations were inversely correlated with urine Krebs cycle metabolite concentrations. Interestingly, the higher the EVL concentration, the closer urine metabolite patterns resembled those of controls, while in contrast, the combination of the highest doses of CsA+SRL showed the most significant differences in metabolite patterns. Surprisingly in this rat model, EVL and SRL in combination with CsA had different effects on kidney biochemistry, suggesting that further exploration of EVL in combination with low dose calcineurin inhibitors may be of potential benefit.

  20. Addiction to Coupling of the Warburg Effect with Glutamine Catabolism in Cancer Cells

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    Bradley Smith

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic reprogramming is critical to oncogenesis, but the emergence and function of this profound reorganization remain poorly understood. Here we find that cooperating oncogenic mutations drive large-scale metabolic reprogramming, which is both intrinsic to cancer cells and obligatory for the transition to malignancy. This involves synergistic regulation of several genes encoding metabolic enzymes, including the lactate dehydrogenases LDHA and LDHB and mitochondrial glutamic pyruvate transaminase 2 (GPT2. Notably, GPT2 engages activated glycolysis to drive the utilization of glutamine as a carbon source for TCA cycle anaplerosis in colon cancer cells. Our data indicate that the Warburg effect supports oncogenesis via GPT2-mediated coupling of pyruvate production to glutamine catabolism. Although critical to the cancer phenotype, GPT2 activity is dispensable in cells that are not fully transformed, thus pinpointing a metabolic vulnerability specifically associated with cancer cell progression to malignancy.

  1. Latent KSHV Infected Endothelial Cells Are Glutamine Addicted and Require Glutaminolysis for Survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica L Sanchez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus (KSHV is the etiologic agent of Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS. KSHV establishes a predominantly latent infection in the main KS tumor cell type, the spindle cell, which is of endothelial cell origin. KSHV requires the induction of multiple metabolic pathways, including glycolysis and fatty acid synthesis, for the survival of latently infected endothelial cells. Here we demonstrate that latent KSHV infection leads to increased levels of intracellular glutamine and enhanced glutamine uptake. Depletion of glutamine from the culture media leads to a significant increase in apoptotic cell death in latently infected endothelial cells, but not in their mock-infected counterparts. In cancer cells, glutamine is often required for glutaminolysis to provide intermediates for the tri-carboxylic acid (TCA cycle and support for the production of biosynthetic and bioenergetic precursors. In the absence of glutamine, the TCA cycle intermediates alpha-ketoglutarate (αKG and pyruvate prevent the death of latently infected cells. Targeted drug inhibition of glutaminolysis also induces increased cell death in latently infected cells. KSHV infection of endothelial cells induces protein expression of the glutamine transporter, SLC1A5. Chemical inhibition of SLC1A5, or knockdown by siRNA, leads to similar cell death rates as glutamine deprivation and, similarly, can be rescued by αKG. KSHV also induces expression of the heterodimeric transcription factors c-Myc-Max and related heterodimer MondoA-Mlx. Knockdown of MondoA inhibits expression of both Mlx and SLC1A5 and induces a significant increase in cell death of only cells latently infected with KSHV, again, fully rescued by the supplementation of αKG. Therefore, during latent infection of endothelial cells, KSHV activates and requires the Myc/MondoA-network to upregulate the glutamine transporter, SLC1A5, leading to increased glutamine uptake for glutaminolysis. These findings

  2. Dysregulation of the Glutamine Transporter Slc38a3 (SNAT3 and Ammoniagenic Enzymes in Obese, Glucose-Intolerant Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M. Busque

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Uric acid nephrolithiasis is prevalent among patients with type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome; it is correlated with an acidic urine and lower urinary ammonium excretion and is likely associated with insulin resistance. Insulin stimulates ammoniagenesis in renal cell lines via increased phosphate-dependent glutaminase (PDG activity and glutamine metabolism. Ammonium excretion into the proximal tubule is mediated at least in part by the Na+/H+-exchanger NHE3 and in the collecting duct involving the Rhesus protein RhCG. Here we tested, whether obesity and insulin resistance in a diet-induced mouse model could contribute to deranged ammonium excretion. Methods: Obesity was induced by diet in mice and the impact on key molecules of proximal tubular ammoniagenesis and urinary acid excretion tested. Results: Diet-induced obesity was confirmed by pathological intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests (IPGTT. Three groups of mice were compared: control mice; obese, glucose-intolerant with abnormal IPGTT (O-GI; or moderate weight with normal IPGTT (Non-Responders, NR. Basal urinary ammonium excretion did not differ among groups. However, acid loading increased urinary ammonium excretion in all groups, but to a lesser extent in the O-GI group. SNAT3 mRNA expression was enhanced in both obese groups. PDG expression was elevated only in acid-loaded O-GI mice, whereas PEPCK was enhanced in both O-GI and NR groups given NH4CI. NHE activity in the brush border membrane of the proximal tubule was strongly reduced in the O-GI group whereas RhCG expression was similar. Conclusion: In sum, obesity and glucose intolerance impairs renal ammonium excretion in response to NH4CI feeding most likely through reduced NHE activity. The stimulation of SNAT3 and ammoniagenic enzyme expression may be compensatory but futile.

  3. p97/VCP promotes degradation of CRBN substrate glutamine synthetase and neosubstrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thang Van; Li, Jing; Lu, Chin-Chun Jean; Mamrosh, Jennifer L; Lu, Gang; Cathers, Brian E; Deshaies, Raymond J

    2017-03-20

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) plays an essential role in metabolism by catalyzing the synthesis of glutamine from glutamate and ammonia. Our recent study showed that CRBN, a direct protein target for the teratogenic and antitumor activities of immunomodulatory drugs such as thalidomide, lenalidomide, and pomalidomide, recognizes an acetyl degron of GS, resulting in ubiquitylation and degradation of GS in response to glutamine. Here, we report that valosin-containing protein (VCP)/p97 promotes the degradation of ubiquitylated GS, resulting in its accumulation in cells with compromised p97 function. Notably, p97 is also required for the degradation of all four known CRBN neo-substrates [Ikaros family zinc finger proteins 1 (IKZF1) and 3 (IKZF3), casein kinase 1α (CK1α), and the translation termination factor GSPT1] whose ubiquitylation is induced by immunomodulatory drugs. Together, these data point to an unexpectedly intimate relationship between the E3 ubiquitin ligase CRL4(CRBN) and p97 pathways.

  4. Regulation of active site coupling in glutamine-dependent NAD[superscript +] synthetase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaRonde-LeBlanc, Nicole; Resto, Melissa; Gerratana, Barbara; (Maryland)

    2009-05-21

    NAD{sup +} is an essential metabolite both as a cofactor in energy metabolism and redox homeostasis and as a regulator of cellular processes. In contrast to humans, Mycobacterium tuberculosis NAD{sup +} biosynthesis is absolutely dependent on the activity of a multifunctional glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase, which catalyzes the ATP-dependent formation of NAD{sup +} at the synthetase domain using ammonia derived from L-glutamine in the glutaminase domain. Here we report the kinetics and structural characterization of M. tuberculosis NAD{sup +} synthetase. The kinetics data strongly suggest tightly coupled regulation of the catalytic activities. The structure, the first of a glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase, reveals a homooctameric subunit organization suggesting a tight dependence of catalysis on the quaternary structure, a 40-{angstrom} intersubunit ammonia tunnel and structural elements that may be involved in the transfer of information between catalytic sites.

  5. Comparison of Changes in Biochemical Markers for Skeletal Muscles, Hepatic Metabolism, and Renal Function after Three Types of Long-distance Running: Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kyung-A; Park, Ki Deok; Ahn, Jaeki; Park, Yongbum; Kim, Young-Joo

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare changes in biochemical markers for the skeletal muscles, hepatic metabolism, and renal function based on extreme long-distance running.Among healthy amateur endurance athletes who participated in a marathon, 100 km-, or 308 km ultramarathon, 15 athletes with similar physical and demographic characteristics were chosen to be the subjects in this study, upon completion of each course. The subjects' blood was collected before and after the course to identify biochemical markers for the skeletal muscles, hepatic metabolism, and renal function.After all of the courses, creatinine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and creatinine were found to be significantly increased compared with values obtained before the race (P running a 308 km race, which is low-intensity running compared with a marathon, and a temporary decline in renal function was higher after completing a 100 km race, which is medium-to-high intensity.

  6. Omega-3 fatty acids protect renal functions by increasing docosahexaenoic acid-derived metabolite levels in SHR.Cg-Lepr(cp)/NDmcr rats, a metabolic syndrome model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katakura, Masanori; Hashimoto, Michio; Inoue, Takayuki; Al Mamun, Abdullah; Tanabe, Yoko; Iwamoto, Ryo; Arita, Makoto; Tsuchikura, Satoru; Shido, Osamu

    2014-03-17

    The omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and/or eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) protect against diabetic nephropathy by inhibiting inflammation. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of highly purified DHA and EPA or EPA only administration on renal function and renal eicosanoid and docosanoid levels in an animal model of metabolic syndrome, SHR.Cg-Lepr(cp)/NDmcr (SHRcp) rats. Male SHRcp rats were divided into 3 groups. Control (5% arabic gum), TAK-085 (300 mg/kg/day, containing 467 mg/g EPA and 365 mg/g DHA), or EPA (300 mg/kg/day) was orally administered for 20 weeks. The urinary albumin to creatinine ratio in the TAK-085-administered group was significantly lower than that in other groups. The glomerular sclerosis score in the TAK-085-administered group was significantly lower than that in the other groups. Although DHA levels were increased in total kidney fatty acids, the levels of nonesterified DHA were not significantly different among the 3 groups, whereas the levels of protectin D1, resolvin D1, and resolvin D2 were significantly increased in the TAK-085-administered group. The results show that the use of combination therapy with DHA and EPA in SHRcp rats improved or prevented renal failure associate with metabolic syndrome with decreasing triglyceride levels and increasing ω-3 PUFA lipid mediators.

  7. Omega-3 Fatty Acids Protect Renal Functions by Increasing Docosahexaenoic Acid-Derived Metabolite Levels in SHR.Cg-Leprcp/NDmcr Rats, a Metabolic Syndrome Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Katakura

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs docosahexaenoic acid (DHA and/or eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA protect against diabetic nephropathy by inhibiting inflammation. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of highly purified DHA and EPA or EPA only administration on renal function and renal eicosanoid and docosanoid levels in an animal model of metabolic syndrome, SHR.Cg-Leprcp/NDmcr (SHRcp rats. Male SHRcp rats were divided into 3 groups. Control (5% arabic gum, TAK-085 (300 mg/kg/day, containing 467 mg/g EPA and 365 mg/g DHA, or EPA (300 mg/kg/day was orally administered for 20 weeks. The urinary albumin to creatinine ratio in the TAK-085-administered group was significantly lower than that in other groups. The glomerular sclerosis score in the TAK-085-administered group was significantly lower than that in the other groups. Although DHA levels were increased in total kidney fatty acids, the levels of nonesterified DHA were not significantly different among the 3 groups, whereas the levels of protectin D1, resolvin D1, and resolvin D2 were significantly increased in the TAK-085-administered group. The results show that the use of combination therapy with DHA and EPA in SHRcp rats improved or prevented renal failure associate with metabolic syndrome with decreasing triglyceride levels and increasing ω-3 PUFA lipid mediators.

  8. Exogenous glutamine increases lipid accumulation in developing seeds of castor bean (Ricinus communis L. cultured in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes biomass production and compositional changes of developing castor seeds in response to change in the nitrogen resource (glutamine of the medium. During the early developmental period (24-36 days after pollination, oil was found to initially accumulate in the developing seeds. Carbohydrates and oil were inversely related after glutamine provision (35 mM, in the culture medium. [U-14C] sucrose labeling was used to investigate the effect of metabolic fluxes among different storage materials. Addition of glutamine led to a 7% increase of labeling in lipids and an inverse decrease of labeling in carbohydrates. It was postulated that changes in the glutamine concentration in the medium are likely to influence the partitioning of resources between the various storage products, especially carbohydrates and oil. These observations will contribute to a better understanding of assimilate partitioning in developing castor seeds and the development of molecular strategies to improve castor bean seed quality and plant breeding studies.

  9. Glutamine facilitates chemotherapy while reducing toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimberg, V S; Nwokedi, E; Hutchins, L F; Pappas, A A; Lang, N P; Broadwater, J R; Read, R C; Westbrook, K C

    1992-01-01

    Dose intensification of chemotherapy is thought to increase survival. With recent advances in hemopoietic cell modulators such as granulocyte colony stimulating factor, the limiting toxicity of intensifying chemotherapeutic regimens has become the severity of the associated enterocolitis. In animal models, glutamine protects the host from methotrexate-induced enterocolitis. This study evaluates the effects of a glutamine-supplemented diet on the tumoricidal effectiveness of methotrexate. Sarcoma-bearing Fisher 344 rats (n = 30) were pair-fed an isocaloric elemental diet containing 1% glutamine or an isonitrogenous amount of glycine beginning on day 25 of the study. Rats from each group received two intraperitoneal injections of methotrexate (5 mg/kg) or saline on days 26 and 33 of the study. On day 40, rats were killed, tumor volume and weight were recorded, and tumor glutaminase activity and tumor morphometrics were measured. Blood was taken for arterial glutamine content, complete blood count, and blood culture. The gut was processed for glutaminase activity and synthesis phase of the deoxyribonucleic acid. In rats receiving methotrexate, the tumor volume loss was nearly doubled when glutamine was added to the diet. Significant differences in tumor glutaminase activity and morphometrics were not detected. The toxicity to the host was ameliorated. Significantly increased synthesis phase of deoxyribonucleic acid of the whole jejunum, decreased bacteremia, "sepsis," and mortality were demonstrated. Glutamine supplementation enhances the tumoricidal effectiveness of methotrexate while reducing its morbidity and mortality in this sarcoma rat model.

  10. Glutamine Synthetase Sensitivity to Oxidative Modification during Nutrient Starvation in Prochlorococcus marinus PCC 9511.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Baena, Guadalupe; Domínguez-Martín, María Agustina; Donaldson, Robert P; García-Fernández, José Manuel; Diez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase plays a key role in nitrogen metabolism, thus the fine regulation of this enzyme in Prochlorococcus, which is especially important in the oligotrophic oceans where this marine cyanobacterium thrives. In this work, we studied the metal-catalyzed oxidation of glutamine synthetase in cultures of Prochlorococcus marinus strain PCC 9511 subjected to nutrient limitation. Nitrogen deprivation caused glutamine synthetase to be more sensitive to metal-catalyzed oxidation (a 36% increase compared to control, non starved samples). Nutrient starvation induced also a clear increase (three-fold in the case of nitrogen) in the concentration of carbonyl derivatives in cell extracts, which was also higher (22%) upon addition of the inhibitor of electron transport, DCMU, to cultures. Our results indicate that nutrient limitations, representative of the natural conditions in the Prochlorococcus habitat, affect the response of glutamine synthetase to oxidative inactivating systems. Implications of these results on the regulation of glutamine synthetase by oxidative alteration prior to degradation of the enzyme in Prochlorococcus are discussed.

  11. Pilot study with a glutamine-supplemented enteral formula in critically ill infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, E; Moreira, E A; Goes, J E; Faintuch, J

    1999-01-01

    Seriously ill infants often display protein-calorie malnutrition due to the metabolic demands of sepsis and respiratory failure. Glutamine has been classified as a conditionally essential amino acid, with special usefulness in critical patients. Immunomodulation, gut protection, and prevention of protein depletion are mentioned among its positive effects in such circumstances. With the intent of evaluating the tolerance and clinical impact of a glutamine supplement in seriously ill infants, a prospective randomized study was done with nine patients. Anthropometric and biochemical determinations were made, and length of stay in the intensive care unit (ICU), in the hospital, and under artificial ventilation, and septic morbidity and mortality were tabulated. Infants in the treatment group (n = 5) were enterally administered 0.3 g/kg of glutamine, whereas controls received 0.3 g/kg of casein during a standard period of five days. Septic complications occurred in 75% of the controls (3/4) versus 20% of the glutamine-treated group (1/5, p glutamine supplementation was safe and tended to be associated with less infectious morbidity and mortality in this high-risk population.

  12. New insights into the metabolism of organomercury compounds: mercury-containing cysteine S-conjugates are substrates of human glutamine transaminase K and potent inactivators of cystathionine γ-lyase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Christy C; Krasnikov, Boris F; Joshee, Lucy; Pinto, John T; Hallen, André; Li, Jianyong; Zalups, Rudolfs K; Cooper, Arthur J L

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic practices and recycling in the environment through natural processes result in release of potentially harmful levels of mercury into the biosphere. Mercury, especially organic forms, accumulates in the food chain. Mercury reacts readily with sulfur-containing compounds and often exists as a thiol S-conjugate, such as the l-cysteine (Cys)-S-conjugate of methylmercury (CH(3)Hg-S-Cys) or inorganic mercury (Cys-S-Hg-S-Cys). These S-conjugates are structurally similar to l-methionine and l-cystine/l-cystathionine, respectively. Bovine and rat glutamine transaminase K (GTK) catalyze transamination of sulfur-containing amino acids. Recombinant human GTK (rhGTK) has a relatively open catalytic active site, and we report here that this enzyme, like the rat and bovine enzymes, can also utilize sulfur-containing l-amino acids, including l-methionine, l-cystine, and l-cystathionine as substrates. The current study extends this list to include mercuric S-conjugates, and shows that CH(3)Hg-S-Cys and Cys-S-Hg-S-Cys are substrates and reversible inhibitors of rhGTK. The homocysteine S-conjugates, Hcy-S-Hg-S-Hcy and CH(3)Hg-S-Hcy, are also inhibitors. Finally, we show that HgCl(2), CH(3)Hg-S-Cys and Cys-S-Hg-S-Cys are potent irreversible inhibitors of rat cystathionine γ-lyase. The present study broadens our knowledge of the biochemistry of mercury compounds by showing that Cys S-conjugates of mercury interact with enzymes that catalyze transformations of biologically important sulfur-containing amino acids.

  13. The Glutamine Transporters and Their Role in the Glutamate/GABA-Glutamine Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leke, Renata; Schousboe, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine is a key amino acid in the CNS, playing an important role in the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle (GGC). In the GGC, glutamine is transferred from astrocytes to neurons, where it will replenish the inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmitter pools. Different transporters participate...... acids and cationic amino acids (y(+)LAT2 isoform) and have been associated with glutamine efflux from astrocytes. ASCT2 is a Na(+)-dependent antiporter, the participation of which in the GGC also remains to be better characterized. All these isoforms are tightly regulated by transcriptional...... and translational mechanisms, which are induced by several determinants such as amino acid deprivation, hormones, pH, and the activity of different signaling pathways. Dysfunctional glutamine transporter activity has been associated with the pathophysiological mechanisms of certain neurologic diseases...

  14. Glutamine synthetase desensitizes differentiated adipocytes to proinflammatory stimuli by raising intracellular glutamine levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Erika Mariana; Spera, Iolanda; Menga, Alessio; Infantino, Vittoria; Iacobazzi, Vito; Castegna, Alessandra

    2014-12-20

    The role of glutamine synthetase (GS) during adipocyte differentiation is unclear. Here, we assess the impact of GS on the adipocytic response to a proinflammatory challenge at different differentiation stages. GS expression at the late stages of differentiation desensitized mature adipocytes to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) by increasing intracellular glutamine levels. Furthermore, LPS-activated mature adipocytes were unable to produce inflammatory mediators; LPS sensitivity was rescued following GS inhibition and the associated drop in intracellular glutamine levels. The ability of adipocytes to differentially respond to LPS during differentiation negatively correlates to GS expression and intracellular glutamine levels. Hence, modulation of intracellular glutamine levels by GS expression represents an endogenous mechanism through which mature adipocytes control the inflammatory response.

  15. Blockade of Glutamine Synthetase Enhances Inflammatory Response in Microglial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Erika M.; Menga, Alessio; Lebrun, Aurore; Hooper, Douglas C.; Butterfield, D. Allan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Microglial cells are brain-resident macrophages engaged in surveillance and maintained in a constant state of relative inactivity. However, their involvement in autoimmune diseases indicates that in pathological conditions microglia gain an inflammatory phenotype. The mechanisms underlying this change in the microglial phenotype are still unclear. Since metabolism is an important modulator of immune cell function, we focused our attention on glutamine synthetase (GS), a modulator of the response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activation in other cell types, which is expressed by microglia. Results: GS inhibition enhances release of inflammatory mediators of LPS-activated microglia in vitro, leading to perturbation of the redox balance and decreased viability of cocultured neurons. GS inhibition also decreases insulin-mediated glucose uptake in microglia. In vivo, microglia-specific GS ablation enhances expression of inflammatory markers upon LPS treatment. In the spinal cords from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), GS expression levels and glutamine/glutamate ratios are reduced. Innovation: Recently, metabolism has been highlighted as mediator of immune cell function through the discovery of mechanisms that (behind these metabolic changes) modulate the inflammatory response. The present study shows for the first time a metabolic mechanism mediating microglial response to a proinflammatory stimulus, pointing to GS activity as a master modulator of immune cell function and thus unraveling a potential therapeutic target. Conclusions: Our study highlights a new role of GS in modulating immune response in microglia, providing insights into the pathogenic mechanisms associated with inflammation and new strategies of therapeutic intervention. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 26, 351–363. PMID:27758118

  16. Effects of Early Enteral Nutrition and Glutamine-supplemented EEN on the Immune Function and Nutritional Metabolism in Old Patients with Severe Acute Pancreatitis%早期肠内营养加用谷氨酰胺对重症急性胰腺炎患者细胞免疫和营养状态的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李炜

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effects of early enteral nutrition(EEN) and glutamine -supplemented EEN on the immune function and nutritional metabolism in old patients with severe acute pancreatitis.Methods:40 patients were randomly divided into two groups,normal enteral nutrition group(control group) and glutamine-supplemented EEN group(experimental group).APACHEⅡscore was used to evaluate the patients after admission. Blood samples were colleeted on day 1,7,14 after admission for Tlymphoeyte subsets;Meanwhile,the albumin(ALB),transferring(TF) and nitrogen balance(NB) were also measured.Results:CD3+,CD4+,CD8+value and CD4+/CD8+ratio in both two groups were significantly higher after treatment than that before treatment(P<0.05),and the values of experimental group on day 7,14 after treatment were significantly higher than control group after treatment(P<0.05). ALB and TF were significantly increased in two groups after treatment(P<0.05),negative nitrogen balance converted to positive nitrogen balance(P<0.05);ALB and TF values of experimental group on day 7,14 after treatment were significantly higher than control group after treatment.Conclusion:Glutamine-supplemented EEN can obviously improve the immune function and nutritional metabolism in old patients with severe acute pancreatitis.%  目的:观察丙氨酰谷氨酰胺联合早期肠内营养对重症急性胰腺炎营养状况和免疫功能的影响。方法:将40例患者随机分为两组,即常规肠内营养组(对照组)和谷氨酰胺强化的肠内营养组(治疗组)。进行APACHEⅡ评分,并检测患者第1天、治疗后第7天、第14天的CD3+、CD4+、CD8+及CD4+/CD8+,同时监测白蛋白(ALB)、转铁蛋白(TF)及氮平衡(NB)等营养代谢指标。结果:两组治疗后CD3+、CD4+、CD8+及CD4+/CD8+比值均较治疗前逐渐升高(均P<0.05),且治疗组的上述各指标在治疗后第7、14天均显著高于对照组(均P<0.05)。两组

  17. Altered metabolic pathways in clear cell renal cell carcinoma: A meta-analysis and validation study focused on the deregulated genes and their associated networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaravinos, Apostolos; Pieri, Myrtani; Mourmouras, Nikos; Anastasiadou, Natassa; Zouvani, Ioanna; Delakas, Dimitris; Deltas, Constantinos

    2014-01-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is the predominant subtype of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). It is one of the most therapy-resistant carcinomas, responding very poorly or not at all to radiotherapy, hormonal therapy and chemotherapy. A more comprehensive understanding of the deregulated pathways in ccRCC can lead to the development of new therapies and prognostic markers. We performed a meta- analysis of 5 publicly available gene expression datasets and identified a list of co- deregulated genes, for which we performed extensive bioinformatic analysis coupled with experimental validation on the mRNA level. Gene ontology enrichment showed that many proteins are involved in response to hypoxia/oxygen levels and positive regulation of the VEGFR signaling pathway. KEGG analysis revealed that metabolic pathways are mostly altered in ccRCC. Similarly, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis showed that the antigen presentation, inositol metabolism, pentose phosphate, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and fructose/mannose metabolism pathways are altered in the disease. Cellular growth, proliferation and carbohydrate metabolism, were among the top molecular and cellular functions of the co-deregulated genes. qRT-PCR validated the deregulated expression of several genes in Caki-2 and ACHN cell lines and in a cohort of ccRCC tissues. NNMT and NR3C1 increased expression was evident in ccRCC biopsies from patients using immunohistochemistry. ROC curves evaluated the diagnostic performance of the top deregulated genes in each dataset. We show that metabolic pathways are mostly deregulated in ccRCC and we highlight those being most responsible in its formation. We suggest that these genes are candidate predictive markers of the disease.

  18. Glutamine enhances glucose-induced mesangial cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagranha, Claudia J; Doi, Sonia Q; Pithon-Curi, Tania C; Curi, Rui; Sellitti, Donald F

    2008-05-01

    The proliferation of mesangial cells (MC) in the presence of glutamine (0-20 mM) was determined in both low (5 mM) and high (25 mM) glucose-containing medium. Glutamine in a high glucose (HG) environment increased cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition of glutamine:fructose 6-phosphate amidotransferase (GFAT) and of phosphodiesterase significantly reduced glutamine-induced proliferation. Supraphysiologic levels of glutamine increase MC proliferation in a HG milieu via GFAT and cAMP-dependent pathways, suggesting that glutamine could pose a risk for diabetic nephropathy.

  19. Impact of Gentamicin Coadministration along with High Fructose Feeding on Progression of Renal Failure and Metabolic Syndrome in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaid O. Ibraheem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study evaluates the impact of high fructose feeding in rat model of gentamicin induced nephrotoxicity. Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 180–200 g were randomized into four groups; (C received standard rodents chow with free access to ad libitum drinking water for 8 weeks and was considered as control, (F received standard rodents chow with free access to drinking water supplemented with 20% (W/V fructose for the same abovementioned period, (FG was fed as group F and was given 80 mg/kg (body weight/day gentamicin sulphate intraperitoneally during the last 20 days of the feeding period, and (G was given gentamicin as above and fed as group C. Renal function was assessed at the end of the treatment period through measuring serum creatinine, uric acid and albumin, creatinine clearance, absolute and fractional excretion of both sodium and potassium, twenty-four-hour urinary excretion of albumin, and renal histology. For metabolic syndrome assessment, fasting plasma glucose and insulin were measured and oral glucose tolerance test was performed throughout the treatment period. Results showed that gentamicin enhances progression of fructose induced metabolic syndrome. On the other hand, fructose pretreatment before gentamicin injection produced a comparable degree of renal dysfunction to those which were given fructose-free water but the picture of nephrotoxicity was somewhat altered as it was characterized by higher extent of glomerular congestion and protein urea. Overall, more vigilance is required when nephrotoxic drugs are prescribed for patients with fructose induced metabolic syndrome.

  20. High-fat/fructose feeding during prenatal and postnatal development in female rats increases susceptibility to renal and metabolic injury later in life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Elizabeth R; Alexander, Barbara T; Lee, Jonathan; Hutchens, Zachary M; Maric-Bilkan, Christine

    2013-02-15

    Accumulating evidence suggests that both an adverse prenatal and early postnatal environment increase susceptibility to renal and metabolic dysfunction later in life; however, whether exposure to adverse conditions during both prenatal and postnatal development act synergistically to potentiate the severity of renal and metabolic injury remains unknown. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either a standard diet or a diet high in fat/fructose throughout pregnancy and lactation. After being weaned, female offspring were randomized to either standard diet or the high-fat/high-fructose diet, resulting in the following treatment groups: NF-NF, offspring of mothers fed a standard diet and fed a standard diet postnatally; NF-HF, offspring of mothers fed a standard diet and fed a high-fat/fructose diet postnatally; HF-NF, offspring of mothers fed a high-fat/fructose diet and fed a standard diet postnatally; HF-HF, offspring of mothers fed a high-fat/fructose diet and fed a high-fat/fructose diet postnatally. At the time of euthanasia (17 wk of age), HF-HF offspring weighed 30% more and had 110% more visceral fat than NF-NF offspring. The HF-HF offspring also had elevated blood glucose levels, glucose intolerance, 286% increase in urine albumin excretion, and 60% increase in glomerulosclerosis compared with NF-NF. In addition, HF-HF offspring exhibited a 100% increase in transforming growth factor-β protein expression and 116% increase in the abundance of infiltrated macrophages compared with the NF-NF offspring. These observations suggest that high-fat/fructose feeding during prenatal and throughout postnatal life increases the susceptibility to renal and metabolic injury later in life.

  1. Glutamine-enriched enteral nutrition in very low birth weight infants. Design of a double-blind randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN73254583

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    Twisk Jos WR

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enteral feeding of very low birth weight (VLBW infants is a challenge, since metabolic demands are high and administration of enteral nutrition is limited by immaturity of the gastrointestinal tract. The amino acid glutamine plays an important role in maintaining functional integrity of the gut. In addition, glutamine is utilised at a high rate by cells of the immune system. In critically ill patients, glutamine is considered a conditionally essential amino acid. VLBW infants may be especially susceptible to glutamine depletion as nutritional supply of glutamine is limited in the first weeks after birth. Glutamine depletion has negative effects on functional integrity of the gut and leads to immunosuppression. This double-blind randomised controlled trial is designed to investigate the effect of glutamine-enriched enteral nutrition on feeding tolerance, infectious morbidity and short-term outcome in VLBW infants. Furthermore, an attempt is made to elucidate the role of glutamine in postnatal adaptation of the gut and modulation of the immune response. Methods VLBW infants (gestational age

  2. Prefrontal changes in the glutamate-glutamine cycle and neuronal/glial glutamate transporters in depression with and without suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J; Verwer, R W H; van Wamelen, D J; Qi, X-R; Gao, S-F; Lucassen, P J; Swaab, D F

    2016-11-01

    There are indications for changes in glutamate metabolism in relation to depression or suicide. The glutamate-glutamine cycle and neuronal/glial glutamate transporters mediate the uptake of the glutamate and glutamine. The expression of various components of the glutamate-glutamine cycle and the neuronal/glial glutamate transporters was determined by qPCR in postmortem prefrontal cortex. The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) were selected from young MDD patients who had committed suicide (MDD-S; n = 17), from MDD patients who died of non-suicide related causes (MDD-NS; n = 7) and from matched control subjects (n = 12). We also compared elderly depressed patients who had not committed suicide (n = 14) with matched control subjects (n = 22). We found that neuronal located components (EAAT3, EAAT4, ASCT1, SNAT1, SNAT2) of the glutamate-glutamine cycle were increased in the ACC while the astroglia located components (EAAT1, EAAT2, GLUL) were decreased in the DLPFC of MDD-S patients. In contrast, most of the components in the cycle were increased in the DLPFC of MDD-NS patients. In conclusion, the glutamate-glutamine cycle - and thus glutamine transmission - is differentially affected in depressed suicide patients and depressed non-suicide patients in an area specific way. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of glycyl-glutamine dipeptide supplementation on myocardial damage and cardiac function in rats after severe burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Yan, Hong; Lv, Shang-Gun; Wang, Lin; Liang, Guang-Ping; Wan, Qian-Xue; Peng, Xi

    2013-01-01

    Glutamine decreases myocardial damage in ischemia/reperfusion injury. However, the cardioprotective effect of glutamine after burn injury remains unclear. Present study was to explore the protective effect of glycyl-glutamine dipeptide on myocardial damage in severe burn rats. Seventy-two Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: normal control (C), burned control (B) and glycyl-glutamine dipeptide-treated (GG) groups. B and GG groups were inflicted with 30% total body surface area of full thickness burn. The GG group was given 1.5 g/kg glycyl-glutamine dipeptide per day and the B group was given the same dose of alanine via intraperitoneal injection for 3 days. The serum CK, LDH, AST, and, blood lactic acid levels, as well as the myocardium ATP and GSH contents, were measured. The indices of cardiac contractile function and histopathological change were analyzed at 12, 24, 48, and 72 post-burn hours (PBH). The serum CK, LDH, AST and blood lactic acid levels increased, and the myocardium ATP and GSH content decreased in both burned groups. Compared with B group, the CK, LDH, AST and blood lactic acid levels reduced, myocardium ATP and GSH content increased in GG group. Moreover, the inhibition of cardiac contractile function and myocardial histopathological damage were reduced significantly in GG group. We conclude that myocardial histological structure and function were damaged significantly after burn injury, glycyl-glutamine dipeptide supplementation is beneficial to myocardial preservation by improving cardiocyte energy metabolism, increasing ATP and glutathione synthesis.

  4. Renal reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate:cytochrome c reductase-mediated metabolism of the carcinogen N-(4-(5-nitro-2-furyl)-2-thiazolyl)acetamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattammal, M.B.; Zenser, T.V.; Palmier, M.O.; Davis, B.B.

    1985-01-01

    N-(4-(5-Nitro-2-furyl)-2-thiazolyl)acetamide (NFTA) metabolism was examined in vitro using microsomes prepared from rat liver and renal cortex and from rabbit liver and renal cortex and outer and inner medulla. NFTA nitroreduction was observed with each tissue. Three mol of NADPH were used per mol of NFTA reduced. Substrate and inhibitor specificity suggested that the microsomal nitroreduction was due to NADPH:cytochrome c reductase. Metabolite(s) formed bound to protein, RNA, DNA, and synthetic polyribonucleotides. Maximum covalent binding was seen with polyguanylic acid. A guanosine-NFTA adduct was isolated. Binding was inhibited by sulfhydryl compounds and vitamin E. The (/sup 14/C)NFTA:glutathione or (/sup 3/H)glutathione:NFTA conjugates obtained from microsomal incubations showed identical chromatographic properties as the product obtained by the reaction of synthetic N-hydroxy-NFTA with (/sup 3/H)glutathione. Structures of synthetic N-hydroxy-NFTA and the microsomal reduction product 1-(4-(2-acetylaminothiazolyl))-3-cyano-1-propanone were established by mass spectrometry. The latter reduction product did not bind macromolecules. These results suggest that renal NADPH:cytochrome c reductase reduces NFTA to an N-hydroxy-NFTA intermediate that binds nucleophilic sites on macromolecules.

  5. Glutamine supplementation in the critically ill: friend or foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudemans-van Straaten, Heleen M; van Zanten, Arthur R H

    2014-05-19

    In the previous issue of Critical Care, Mori and colleagues demonstrate that glutamine supplementation in mechanically ventilated patients as part of parenteral nutrition increases plasma glutamine concentration and glutamine utilization, but does not mitigate protein degradation and even increases de novo glutamine production. Studies suggest that protein degradation is regulated by the degree of inflammation. Immune cells utilize large amounts of glutamine and derive their glutamine requirements from muscle protein degradation. We hypothesize that the effects of glutamine supplementation depend on the degree of inflammation. Infusing large amounts of exogenous glutamine into patients with inflammatory conditions like sepsis and multiple organ failure may not only enhance immune competence, but may potentially augment the inflammatory response and thereby negatively influence outcome.

  6. Arginine and glutamine availability and macrophage functions in the obese insulin-resistant Zucker rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, Marie-Céline; Moinard, Christophe; Béziel, Aurélie; Darquy, Sylviane; Cynober, Luc; De Bandt, Jean-Pascal

    2005-01-01

    Increased susceptibility to infections in obese patients may be related to decreased availability of arginine and glutamine, which may affect immune cell functions. Our aim was to evaluate the in vitro effects of these amino acids on the function of macrophages from obese insulin-resistant Zucker rats. Macrophages, isolated from male Zucker obese or lean rats by peritoneal lavage, were incubated in Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium (DMEM) without arginine or glutamine. Arginine or glutamine was added to the medium at increasing final concentrations (0, 0.25, 0.5, 1 or 2 mM). After stimulation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from E. coli (40 microg/ml), productions of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) and of nitric oxide (NO) were measured after 3 or 48 h incubation, respectively. NO production, lower in macrophages from obese rats, decreased in macrophages from lean rats (0 mM: 2,423 +/- 1,174 vs. 2 mM: 198 +/- 31 microM/mg protein/24 h; P glutamine was added. TNFalpha production, lower in macrophages from obese rats, was inversely correlated with glutamine concentration. In the presence of arginine, NO production was constantly higher in macrophages from obese rats. It peaked at 0.5 mM arginine and decreased thereafter in both groups. TNFalpha production in macrophages from lean rats was unaffected by arginine, but decreased in macrophages from obese rats (0 mM: 1920 +/- 450 vs. 2 mM: 810 +/- 90 microM/mg protein/3 h; P arginine and glutamine metabolism in macrophages of obese rats, resulting in decreased TNFalpha production and increased NO release, may contribute to increased susceptibility to infection in insulin-resistant states.

  7. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are More Common in People With Type 1 Diabetes Metabolic Syndrome Your Child's Weight Healthy Eating Endocrine System Blood Test: Basic Metabolic Panel (BMP) Activity: Endocrine System Growth Disorders Diabetes Center Thyroid Disorders Your Endocrine System Movie: Endocrine ...

  8. Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008255 Serum adiponectin level declines in the elderly with metabolic syndrome.WU Xiaoyan(吴晓琰),et al.Dept Geriatr,Huashan Hosp,Fudan UnivShanghai200040.Chin J Geriatr2008;27(3):164-167.Objective To investigate the correlation between ser-um adiponectin level and metabolic syndrome in the elderly·Methods Sixty-one subjects with metabolic syndrome and140age matched subjects without metabolic

  9. DHEA-induced modulation of renal gluconeogenesis, insulin sensitivity and plasma lipid profile in the control- and dexamethasone-treated rabbits. Metabolic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiersztan, Anna; Nagalski, Andrzej; Nalepa, Paweł; Tempes, Aleksandra; Trojan, Nina; Usarek, Michał; Jagielski, Adam K

    2016-02-01

    In view of antidiabetic and antiglucocorticoid effects of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) both in vitro and in vivo studies were undertaken: (i) to elucidate the mechanism of action of both dexamethasone phosphate (dexP) and DHEA on glucose synthesis in primary cultured rabbit kidney-cortex tubules and (ii) to investigate the influence of DHEA on glucose synthesis, insulin sensitivity and plasma lipid profile in the control- and dexP-treated rabbits. Data show, that in cultured kidney-cortex tubules dexP significantly stimulated gluconeogenesis by increasing flux through fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase). DexP-induced effects were dependent only upon glucocorticoid receptor. DHEA decreased glucose synthesis via inhibition of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) and suppressed the dexP-induced stimulation of renal gluconeogenesis. Studies with the use of inhibitors of DHEA metabolism in cultured renal tubules showed for the first time that DHEA directly affects renal gluconeogenesis. However, in view of analysis of glucocorticoids and DHEA metabolites levels in urine, it seems likely, that testosterone may also contribute to DHEA-evoked effects. In dexP-treated rabbits, plasma glucose level was not altered despite increased renal and hepatic FBPase and G6Pase activities, while a significant elevation of both plasma insulin and HOMA-IR was accompanied by a decline of ISI index. It thus appears that increased insulin levels were required to maintain normoglycaemia and to compensate the insulin resistance. DHEA alone affected neither plasma glucose nor lipid levels, while it increased insulin sensitivity and diminished both renal and hepatic G6Pase activities. Surprisingly, DHEA co-administrated with dexP did not alter insulin sensitivity, while it partially suppressed the dexP-induced elevation of renal G6Pase activity and plasma cholesterol and triglyceride contents. As (i) gluconeogenic pathway in rabbit is similar to that in human, and (ii) DHEA counteracts several

  10. Alpha-ketoglutarate inhibits glutamine degradation and enhances protein synthesis in intestinal porcine epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Kang; Yin, Yulong; Li, Xilong; Xi, Pengbin; Wang, Junjun; Lei, Jian; Hou, Yongqing; Wu, Guoyao

    2012-06-01

    α-Ketoglutarate (AKG) is a key intermediate in glutamine metabolism. Emerging evidence shows beneficial effects of AKG on clinical and experimental nutrition, particularly with respect to intestinal growth and integrity. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-1) were used to test the hypothesis that AKG inhibits glutamine degradation and enhances protein synthesis. IPEC-1 cells were cultured for 3 days in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's-F12 Ham medium (DMEM-F12) containing 0, 0.2, 0.5 or 2 mM of AKG. At the end of the 3-day culture, cells were used to determine L-[U-14C]glutamine utilization, protein concentration, protein synthesis, and the total and phosphorylated levels of the mammalian target of the rapamycin (mTOR), ribosomal protein S6 kinase-1 (S6K1) and eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4E-binding protein-1 (4E-BP1). Compared with 0 mM of AKG (control), 0.2 and 0.5 mM of AKG dose-dependently reduced (P<0.05) glutamine degradation and the production of glutamate, alanine and aspartate in IPEC-1 cells. Addition of 0.5 and 2 mM of AKG to culture medium enhanced protein synthesis (P<0.05) by 78 and 101% without affecting protein degradation, compared to the control group. Rapamycin (50 nM; a potent inhibitor of mTOR) attenuated the stimulatory effect of AKG on protein synthesis. Consistent with these metabolic data, the addition of 0.5 or 2 mM of AKG to culture medium increased (P<0.05) the phosphorylated levels of mTOR, S6k1 and 4E-BP1 proteins. Collectively, these results indicate that AKG can spare glutamine and activate the mTOR signaling pathway to stimulate protein synthesis in intestinal epithelial cells.

  11. [(18)F](2S,4R)4-Fluoroglutamine PET Detects Glutamine Pool Size Changes in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer in Response to Glutaminase Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Rong; Pantel, Austin R; Li, Shihong; Lieberman, Brian P; Ploessl, Karl; Choi, Hoon; Blankemeyer, Eric; Lee, Hsiaoju; Kung, Hank F; Mach, Robert H; Mankoff, David A

    2017-03-15

    Glutaminolysis is a metabolic pathway adapted by many aggressive cancers, including triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC), to utilize glutamine for survival and growth. In this study, we examined the utility of [(18)F](2S,4R)4-fluoroglutamine ([(18)F]4F-Gln) PET to measure tumor cellular glutamine pool size, whose change might reveal the pharmacodynamic (PD) effect of drugs targeting this cancer-specific metabolic pathway. High glutaminase (GLS) activity in TNBC tumors resulted in low cellular glutamine pool size assayed via high-resolution (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). GLS inhibition significantly increased glutamine pool size in TNBC tumors. MCF-7 tumors, with inherently low GLS activity compared with TNBC, displayed a larger baseline glutamine pool size that did not change as much in response to GLS inhibition. The tumor-to-blood-activity ratios (T/B) obtained from [(18)F]4F-Gln PET images matched the distinct glutamine pool sizes of both tumor models at baseline. After a short course of GLS inhibitor treatment, the T/B values increased significantly in TNBC, but did not change in MCF-7 tumors. Across both tumor types and after GLS inhibitor or vehicle treatment, we observed a strong positive correlation between T/B values and tumor glutamine pool size measured using MRS (r(2) = 0.71). In conclusion, [(18)F]4F-Gln PET tracked cellular glutamine pool size in breast cancers with differential GLS activity and detected increases in cellular glutamine pool size induced by GLS inhibitors. This study accomplished the first necessary step toward validating [(18)F]4F-Gln PET as a PD marker for GLS-targeting drugs. Cancer Res; 77(6); 1476-84. ©2017 AACR.

  12. Risks of Decreased Renal Function and Increased Albuminuria for Glycemic Status and Metabolic Syndrome Components: Taichung Community Health Study

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    Cheng-Chieh Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The objective of this study was to assess the association of glycemic status and decreased renal function as determined by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR and albuminuria in an adult Taiwanese metropolitan population. Methods. We did a cross-sectional survey in a representative sample of 2,350 Taiwanese adults aged 40 years and over living in a metropolitan city in Taiwan from 2004 to 2005. Glycemic status was classified as normal glycemia, hyperglycemia, and type 2 diabetes (T2D. Renal function was assessed with eGFR using modified Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study equation for Chinese. Albuminuria was determined by the urinary albumin-creatinine ratio. Decreased renal function was defined as eGFR 30 mg g−1 creatinine. Results. 593 (25.23% had hyperglycemia and 287 (12.21% had T2D. As glycemia level increased, the prevalence of albuminuria and decreased eGFR increased. After adjustment, T2D was associated with an OR of 2.93 (95% CI: 2.11–4.07 for albuminuria, and an OR of 2.05 (95% CI: 1.18–3.58 for decreased eGFR. Conclusions. In a representative sample from a metropolitan city in Taiwan, T2D was associated with albuminuria and decreased eGFR.

  13. Deprive to kill: Glutamine closes the gate to anticancer monocarboxylic drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Cardaci, Simone; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Killing properties of antitumor drugs can be enhanced by strategies targeting biochemical adaptations of cancer cells. Recently, we reported that depriving cancer cells of glutamine is a feasible approach to enhance antitumor effects of the alkylating analog of pyruvic acid, 3-bromopyruvate, which rely on the induction of autophagic cell death by metabolic-oxidative stress. 3-bromopyruvate chemopotentiation is the result of its increased intracellular uptake mediated by the monocarboxylate tr...

  14. Exploring the Catalytic Mechanism of Human Glutamine Synthetase by Computer Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issoglio, Federico M; Campolo, Nicolas; Zeida, Ari; Grune, Tilman; Radi, Rafael; Estrin, Dario A; Bartesaghi, Silvina

    2016-10-13

    Glutamine synthetase is an important enzyme that catalyzes the ATP-dependent formation of glutamine from glutamate and ammonia. In mammals, it plays a key role in preventing excitotoxicity in the brain and detoxifying ammonia in the liver. In plants and bacteria, it is fundamental for nitrogen metabolism, being critical for the survival of the organism. In this work, we show how the use of classical molecular dynamics simulations and multiscale quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations allowed us to examine the structural properties and dynamics of human glutamine synthetase (HsGS), as well as the reaction mechanisms involved in the catalytic process with atomic level detail. Our results suggest that glutamine formation proceeds through a two-step mechanism that includes a first step in which the γ-glutamyl phosphate intermediate forms, with a 5 kcal/mol free energy barrier and a -8 kcal/mol reaction free energy, and then a second rate-limiting step involving the ammonia nucleophilic attack, with a free energy barrier of 19 kcal/mol and a reaction free energy of almost zero. A detailed analysis of structural features within each step exposed the relevance of the acid-base equilibrium related to protein residues and substrates in the thermodynamics and kinetics of the reactions. These results provide a comprehensive study of HsGS dynamics and establish the groundwork for further analysis regarding changes in HsGS activity, as occur in natural variants and post-translational modifications.

  15. Abnormalities in Glutamate Metabolism and Excitotoxicity in the Retinal Diseases

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    Makoto Ishikawa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the physiological condition, glutamate acts as an excitatory neurotransmitter in the retina. However, excessive glutamate can be toxic to retinal neurons by overstimulation of the glutamate receptors. Glutamate excess is primarily attributed to perturbation in the homeostasis of the glutamate metabolism. Major pathway of glutamate metabolism consists of glutamate uptake by glutamate transporters followed by enzymatic conversion of glutamate to nontoxic glutamine by glutamine synthetase. Glutamate metabolism requires energy supply, and the energy loss inhibits the functions of both glutamate transporters and glutamine synthetase. In this review, we describe the present knowledge concerning the retinal glutamate metabolism under the physiological and pathological conditions.

  16. Glutamine: precursor or nitrogen donor for citrulline synthesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Juan C; Didelija, Inka Cajo; Castillo, Leticia; Lee, Brendan

    2010-07-01

    Although glutamine is considered the main precursor for citrulline synthesis, the current literature does not differentiate between the contribution of glutamine carbon skeleton vs. nonspecific nitrogen (i.e., ammonia) and carbon derived from glutamine oxidation. To elucidate the role of glutamine and nonspecific nitrogen in the synthesis of citrulline, l-[2-(15)N]- and l-[5-(15)N]glutamine and (15)N-ammonium acetate were infused intragastrically in mice. The amino group of glutamine labeled the three nitrogen groups of citrulline almost equally. The amido group and ammonium acetate labeled the ureido and amino groups of citrulline, but not the delta-nitrogen. D(5)-glutamine also infused in this arm of the study, which traces the carbon skeleton of glutamine, was utilized poorly, accounting for only 0.2-0.4% of the circulating citrulline. Dietary glutamine nitrogen (both N groups) incorporation was 25-fold higher than the incorporation of its carbon skeleton into citrulline. To investigate the relative contributions of the carbon skeleton and nonspecific carbon of glutamine, arginine, and proline to citrulline synthesis, U-(13)C(n) tracers of these amino acids were infused intragastrically. Dietary arginine was the main precursor for citrulline synthesis, accounting for approximately 40% of the circulating citrulline. Proline contribution was minor (3.4%), and glutamine was negligible (0.4%). However, the glutamine tracer resulted in a higher enrichment in the ureido group, indicating incorporation of nonspecific carbon from glutamine oxidation into carbamylphosphate used for citrulline synthesis. In conclusion, dietary glutamine is a poor carbon skeleton precursor for the synthesis of citrulline, although it contributes both nonspecific nitrogen and carbon to citrulline synthesis.

  17. Delay in onset of metabolic alkalosis during regional citrate anti-coagulation in continous renal replacement therapy with calcium-free replacement solution

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    See Kay

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Regional citrate anti-coagulation for continuous renal replacement therapy chelates calcium to produce the anti- coagulation effect. We hypothesise that a calcium-free replacement solution will require less citrate and produce fewer metabolic side effects. Fifty patients, in a Medical Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary teaching hospital (25 in each group, received continuous venovenous hemofiltration using either calcium-containing or calcium-free replacement solutions. Both groups had no significant differences in filter life, metabolic alkalosis, hypernatremia, hypocalcemia, and hypercalcemia. However, patients using calcium-containing solution developed metabolic alkalosis earlier, compared to patients using calcium-free solution (mean 24.6 hours,CI 0.8-48.4 vs. 37.2 hours, CI 9.4-65, P = 0.020. When calcium-containing replacement solution was used, more citrate was required (mean 280ml/h, CI 227.2-332.8 vs. 265ml/h, CI 203.4-326.6, P = 0.069, but less calcium was infused (mean 21.2 ml/h, CI 1.2-21.2 vs 51.6ml/h, CI 26.8-76.4, P ≤ 0.0001.

  18. Effects of Dietary Glutamine Supplementation on the Body Composition and Protein Status of Early-Weaned Mice Inoculated with Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogero, Marcelo Macedo; Borges, Maria Carolina; de Castro, Inar Alves; Pires, Ivanir S. O.; Borelli, Primavera; Tirapegui, Julio

    2011-01-01

    Glutamine, one of the most abundant amino acids found in maternal milk, favors protein anabolism. Early-weaned babies are deprived of this source of glutamine, in a period during which endogenous biosynthesis may be insufficient for tissue needs in states of metabolic stress, mainly during infections. The objective of this study was to verify the effects of dietary glutamine supplementation on the body composition and visceral protein status of early-weaned mice inoculated with Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG). Mice were weaned early on their 14th day of life and seperated into two groups, one of which was fed a glutamine-free diet (n = 16) and the other a glutamine-supplemented diet (40 g/kg diet) (n = 16). At 21 days of age, some mice were intraperitoneally injected with BCG. Euthanasia was performed at the 28th day of age. BCG inoculation significantly reduced body weight (P < 0.001), lean mass (P = 0.002), water (P = 0.006), protein (P = 0.007) and lipid content (P = 0.001) in the carcass. Dietary glutamine supplementation resulted in a significant increase in serum IGF-1 (P = 0.019) and albumin (P = 0.025) concentration, muscle protein concentration (P = 0.035) and lipid content (P = 0.002) in the carcass. In conclusion, dietary glutamine supplementation had a positive influence on visceral protein status but did not affect body composition in early-weaned mice inoculated with BCG. PMID:22254124

  19. Effects of dietary glutamine supplementation on the body composition and protein status of early-weaned mice inoculated with Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogero, Marcelo Macedo; Borges, Maria Carolina; de Castro, Inar Alves; Pires, Ivanir S O; Borelli, Primavera; Tirapegui, Julio

    2011-09-01

    Glutamine, one of the most abundant amino acids found in maternal milk, favors protein anabolism. Early-weaned babies are deprived of this source of glutamine, in a period during which endogenous biosynthesis may be insufficient for tissue needs in states of metabolic stress, mainly during infections. The objective of this study was to verify the effects of dietary glutamine supplementation on the body composition and visceral protein status of early-weaned mice inoculated with Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG). Mice were weaned early on their 14th day of life and seperated into two groups, one of which was fed a glutamine-free diet (n = 16) and the other a glutamine-supplemented diet (40 g/kg diet) (n = 16). At 21 days of age, some mice were intraperitoneally injected with BCG. Euthanasia was performed at the 28th day of age. BCG inoculation significantly reduced body weight (P glutamine supplementation resulted in a significant increase in serum IGF-1 (P = 0.019) and albumin (P = 0.025) concentration, muscle protein concentration (P = 0.035) and lipid content (P = 0.002) in the carcass. In conclusion, dietary glutamine supplementation had a positive influence on visceral protein status but did not affect body composition in early-weaned mice inoculated with BCG.

  20. Effects of Dietary Glutamine Supplementation on the Body Composition and Protein Status of Early-Weaned Mice Inoculated with Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanir S. O. Pires

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine, one of the most abundant amino acids found in maternal milk, favors protein anabolism. Early-weaned babies are deprived of this source of glutamine, in a period during which endogenous biosynthesis may be insufficient for tissue needs in states of metabolic stress, mainly during infections. The objective of this study was to verify the effects of dietary glutamine supplementation on the body composition and visceral protein status of early-weaned mice inoculated with Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG. Mice were weaned early on their 14th day of life and seperated into two groups, one of which was fed a glutamine-free diet (n = 16 and the other a glutamine-supplemented diet (40 g/kg diet (n = 16. At 21 days of age, some mice were intraperitoneally injected with BCG. Euthanasia was performed at the 28th day of age. BCG inoculation significantly reduced body weight (P < 0.001, lean mass (P = 0.002, water (P = 0.006, protein (P = 0.007 and lipid content (P = 0.001 in the carcass. Dietary glutamine supplementation resulted in a significant increase in serum IGF-1 (P = 0.019 and albumin (P = 0.025 concentration, muscle protein concentration (P = 0.035 and lipid content (P = 0.002 in the carcass. In conclusion, dietary glutamine supplementation had a positive influence on visceral protein status but did not affect body composition in early-weaned mice inoculated with BCG.

  1. GLAST/EAAT1-induced glutamine release via SNAT3 in Bergmann glial cells: evidence of a functional and physical coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Lozada, Zila; Guillem, Alain M; Flores-Méndez, Marco; Hernández-Kelly, Luisa C; Vela, Carmelita; Meza, Enrique; Zepeda, Rossana C; Caba, Mario; Rodríguez, Angelina; Ortega, Arturo

    2013-05-01

    Glutamate, the major excitatory transmitter in the vertebrate brain, is removed from the synaptic cleft by a family of sodium-dependent glutamate transporters profusely expressed in glial cells. Once internalized, it is metabolized by glutamine synthetase to glutamine and released to the synaptic space through sodium-dependent neutral amino acid carriers of the N System (SNAT3/slc38a3/SN1, SNAT5/slc38a5/SN2). Glutamine is then taken up by neurons completing the so-called glutamate/glutamine shuttle. Despite of the fact that this coupling was described decades ago, it is only recently that the biochemical framework of this shuttle has begun to be elucidated. Using the established model of cultured cerebellar Bergmann glia cells, we sought to characterize the functional and physical coupling of glutamate uptake and glutamine release. A time-dependent Na⁺-dependent glutamate/aspartate transporter/EAAT1-induced System N-mediated glutamine release could be demonstrated. Furthermore, D-aspartate, a specific glutamate transporter ligand, was capable of enhancing the co-immunoprecipitation of Na⁺-dependent glutamate/aspartate transporter and Na⁺-dependent neutral amino acid transporter 3, whereas glutamine tended to reduce this association. Our results suggest that glial cells surrounding glutamatergic synapses may act as sensors of neuron-derived glutamate through their contribution to the neurotransmitter turnover. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  2. Effect of L-glutamine and isoniazid on torticollis and segmental dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korein, J; Lieberman, A; Kupersmith, M; Levidow, L

    1981-09-01

    Fourteen patients with spasmodic torticollis and other segmental dystonic syndromes, who were refractory to previous forms of therapy, were selected for treatment with drugs intended to elevate brain gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels. These patients were simultaneously given diazepam, isoniazid, pyridoxine, and large doses of L-glutamine. Involuntary spasmodic activity improved to varying degrees in 7 patients; in 2 the dyskinesia became worse. Transient alteration of renal or hepatic function occurred in 6 patients and mild euphoria unrelated to neurological improvement in 8. Two patients are still being treated. Deficiency of GABA may be a factor in some patients with these disorders.

  3. Imaging of renal osteodystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jevtic, V. E-mail: vladimir.jevtic@mf.uni-lj.si

    2003-05-01

    Chronic renal insufficiency, hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, renal transplantation and administration of different medications provoke complex biochemical disturbances of the calcium-phosphate metabolism with wide spectrum of bone and soft tissue abnormalities termed renal osteodystrophy. Clinically most important manifestation of renal bone disease includes secondary hyperparathyroidism, osteomalacia/rickets, osteoporosis, adynamic bone disease and soft tissue calcification. As a complication of long-term hemodialysis and renal transplantation amyloid deposition, destructive spondyloarthropathy, osteonecrosis, and musculoskeletal infections may occur. Due to more sophisticated diagnostic methods and more efficient treatment classical radiographic features of secondary hyperparathyroidism and osteomalacia/rickets are now less frequently seen. Radiological investigations play an important role in early diagnosis and follow-up of the renal bone disease. Although numerous new imaging modalities have been introduced in clinical practice (scintigraphy, CT, MRI, quantitative imaging), plain film radiography, especially fine quality hand radiograph, still represents most widely used examination.

  4. Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2-deficient rats exhibit renal tubule injury and perturbations in metabolic and immunological homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ness

    Full Text Available Genetic evidence links mutations in the LRRK2 gene with an increased risk of Parkinson's disease, for which no neuroprotective or neurorestorative therapies currently exist. While the role of LRRK2 in normal cellular function has yet to be fully described, evidence suggests involvement with immune and kidney functions. A comparative study of LRRK2-deficient and wild type rats investigated the influence that this gene has on the phenotype of these rats. Significant weight gain in the LRRK2 null rats was observed and was accompanied by significant increases in insulin and insulin-like growth factors. Additionally, LRRK2-deficient rats displayed kidney morphological and histopathological alterations in the renal tubule epithelial cells of all animals assessed. These perturbations in renal morphology were accompanied by significant decreases of lipocalin-2, in both the urine and plasma of knockout animals. Significant alterations in the cellular composition of the spleen between LRRK2 knockout and wild type animals were identified by immunophenotyping and were associated with subtle differences in response to dual infection with rat-adapted influenza virus (RAIV and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Ontological pathway analysis of LRRK2 across metabolic and kidney processes and pathological categories suggested that the thioredoxin network may play a role in perturbing these organ systems. The phenotype of the LRRK2 null rat is suggestive of a complex biology influencing metabolism, immune function and kidney homeostasis. These data need to be extended to better understand the role of the kinase domain or other biological functions of the gene to better inform the development of pharmacological inhibitors.

  5. Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2)-deficient rats exhibit renal tubule injury and perturbations in metabolic and immunological homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Daniel; Ren, Zhao; Gardai, Shyra; Sharpnack, Douglas; Johnson, Victor J; Brennan, Richard J; Brigham, Elizabeth F; Olaharski, Andrew J

    2013-01-01

    Genetic evidence links mutations in the LRRK2 gene with an increased risk of Parkinson's disease, for which no neuroprotective or neurorestorative therapies currently exist. While the role of LRRK2 in normal cellular function has yet to be fully described, evidence suggests involvement with immune and kidney functions. A comparative study of LRRK2-deficient and wild type rats investigated the influence that this gene has on the phenotype of these rats. Significant weight gain in the LRRK2 null rats was observed and was accompanied by significant increases in insulin and insulin-like growth factors. Additionally, LRRK2-deficient rats displayed kidney morphological and histopathological alterations in the renal tubule epithelial cells of all animals assessed. These perturbations in renal morphology were accompanied by significant decreases of lipocalin-2, in both the urine and plasma of knockout animals. Significant alterations in the cellular composition of the spleen between LRRK2 knockout and wild type animals were identified by immunophenotyping and were associated with subtle differences in response to dual infection with rat-adapted influenza virus (RAIV) and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Ontological pathway analysis of LRRK2 across metabolic and kidney processes and pathological categories suggested that the thioredoxin network may play a role in perturbing these organ systems. The phenotype of the LRRK2 null rat is suggestive of a complex biology influencing metabolism, immune function and kidney homeostasis. These data need to be extended to better understand the role of the kinase domain or other biological functions of the gene to better inform the development of pharmacological inhibitors.

  6. Effect of dietary cation-anion difference on ruminal metabolism, total apparent digestibility, blood and renal acid-base regulation in lactating dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, C M M R; Arcari, M A; Welter, K C; Gonçalves, J L; Santos, M V

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of dietary cation-anion difference (DCAD) on ruminal fermentation, total apparent digestibility, blood and renal metabolism of lactating dairy cows. Sixteen Holstein cows were distributed in four contemporary 4×4 Latin Square designs, which consisted of four periods of 21 days and four treatments according to DCAD: +290; +192; +98 and -71 milliequivalent (mEq)/kg dry matter (DM). Ruminal pH and concentrations of acetic and butyric acid increased linearly according to the increase of DCAD. Similarly, NDF total apparent digestibility linearly increased by 6.38% when DCAD increased from -71 to 290 mEq/kg DM [Y=65.90 (SE=2.37)+0.0167 (SE=0.0068)×DCAD (mEq/kg DM)]. Blood pH was also increased according to DCAD, which resulted in reduction of serum concentrations of Na, K and ionic calcium (iCa). To maintain the blood acid-base homeostasis, renal metabolism played an important role in controlling serum concentrations of Na and K, since the Na and K urinary excretion increased linearly by 89.69% and 46.06%, respectively, from -71 to 290 mEq/kg DM. Changes in acid-base balance of biological fluids may directly affect the mineral composition of milk, as milk concentrations of Na, K, iCa and chlorides were reduced according to blood pH increased. Thus, it can be concluded that the increase of DCAD raises the pH of ruminal fluid, NDF total apparent digestibility, and blood pH, and decreases the milk concentration of cationic minerals, as well as the efficiency of Na utilization to milk production.

  7. Dexamethasone regulates glutamine synthetase expression in rat skeletal muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Max, Stephen R.; Konagaya, Masaaki; Konagaya, Yoko; Thomas, John W.; Banner, Carl; Vitkovic, Ljubisa

    1986-01-01

    The regulation of glutamine synthetase by glucocorticoids in rat skeletal muscles was studied. Administration of dexamethasone strikingly enhanced glutamine synthetase activity in plantaris and soleus muscles. The dexamethasone-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase activity was blocked to a significant extent by orally administered RU38486, a glucocorticoid antagonist, indicating the involvement of intracellular glucocorticoid receptors in the induction. Northern blot analysis revealed that dexamethasone-mediated enhancement of glutamine synthetase activity involves dramatically increased levels of glutamine synthetase mRNA. The induction of glutamine synthetase was selective in that glutaminase activity of soleus and plantaris muscles was not increased by dexamethasone. Furthermore, dexamethasone treatment resulted in only a small increase in glutamine synthetase activity in the heart. Accordingly, there was only a slight change in glutamine synthetase mRNA level in this tissue. Thus, glucocorticoids regulate glutamine synthetase gene expression in rat muscles at the transcriptional level via interaction with intracellular glutamine production by muscle and to mechanisms underlying glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy.

  8. Glutamine: a major player in nitrogen catabolite repression in the yeast Dekkera bruxellensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cajueiro, Danielli Batista Bezerra; Parente, Denise Castro; Leite, Fernanda Cristina Bezerra; de Morais Junior, Marcos Antonio; de Barros Pita, Will

    2017-06-19

    In the present work we studied the expression of genes from nitrogen central metabolism in the yeast Dekkera bruxellensis and under regulation by the Nitrogen Catabolite Repression mechanism (NCR). These analyses could shed some light on the biological mechanisms involved in the adaptation and survival of this yeast in the sugarcane fermentation process for ethanol production. Nitrogen sources (N-sources) in the form of ammonium, nitrate, glutamate or glutamine were investigated with or without the addition of methionine sulfoximine, which inhibits the activity of the enzyme glutamine synthetase and releases cells from NCR. The results showed that glutamine might act as an intracellular sensor for nitrogen availability in D. bruxellensis, by activating NCR. Gene expression analyses indicated the existence of two different GATA-dependent NCR pathways, identified as glutamine-dependent and glutamine-independent mechanisms. Moreover, nitrate is sensed as a non-preferential N-source and releases NCR to its higher level. After grouping genes according to their regulation pattern, we showed that genes for ammonium assimilation represent a regulon with almost constitutive expression, while permease encoding genes are mostly affected by the nitrogen sensor mechanism. On the other hand, nitrate assimilation genes constitute a regulon that is primarily subjected to induction by nitrate and, to a lesser extent, to a repressive mechanism by preferential N-sources. This observation explains our previous reports showing that nitrate is co-consumed with ammonium, a trait that enables D. bruxellensis cells to scavenge limiting N-sources in the industrial substrate and, therefore, to compete with Saccharomyces cerevisiae in this environment.

  9. Astrocyte glutamine synthetase: importance in hyperammonemic syndromes and potential target for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusilow, Saul W; Koehler, Raymond C; Traystman, Richard J; Cooper, Arthur J L

    2010-10-01

    Many theories have been advanced to explain the encephalopathy associated with chronic liver disease and with the less common acute form. A major factor contributing to hepatic encephalopathy is hyperammonemia resulting from portacaval shunting and/or liver damage. However, an increasing number of causes of hyperammonemic encephalopathy have been discovered that present with the same clinical and laboratory features found in acute liver failure, but without liver failure. Here, we critically review the physiology, pathology, and biochemistry of ammonia (i.e., NH3 plus NH4+) and show how these elements interact to constitute a syndrome that clinicians refer to as hyperammonemic encephalopathy (i.e., acute liver failure, fulminant hepatic failure, chronic liver disease). Included will be a brief history of the status of ammonia and the centrality of the astrocyte in brain nitrogen metabolism. Ammonia is normally detoxified in the liver and extrahepatic tissues by conversion to urea and glutamine, respectively. In the brain, glutamine synthesis is largely confined to astrocytes, and it is generally accepted that in hyperammonemia excess glutamine compromises astrocyte morphology and function. Mechanisms postulated to account for this toxicity will be examined with emphasis on the osmotic effects of excess glutamine (the osmotic gliopathy theory). Because hyperammonemia causes osmotic stress and encephalopathy in patients with normal or abnormal liver function alike, the term "hyperammonemic encephalopathy" can be broadly applied to encephalopathy resulting from liver disease and from various other diseases that produce hyperammonemia. Finally, the possibility that a brain glutamine synthetase inhibitor may be of therapeutic benefit, especially in the acute form of liver disease, is discussed.

  10. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a particular food provides to the body. A chocolate bar has more calories than an apple, so ... acid phenylalanine, needed for normal growth and protein production). Inborn errors of metabolism can sometimes lead to ...

  11. Brain glutamate metabolism during metabolic alkalosis and acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, R C; Hoop, B; Kazemi, H

    1992-12-01

    Glutamate modifies ventilation by altering neural excitability centrally. Metabolic acid-base perturbations may also alter cerebral glutamate metabolism locally and thus affect ventilation. Therefore, the effect of metabolic acid-base perturbations on central nervous system glutamate metabolism was studied in pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs under normal acid-base conditions and during isocapnic metabolic alkalosis and acidosis. Cerebrospinal fluid transfer rates of radiotracer [13N]ammonia and of [13N]glutamine synthesized de novo via the reaction glutamate+NH3-->glutamine in brain glia were measured during normal acid-base conditions and after 90 min of acute isocapnic metabolic alkalosis and acidosis. Cerebrospinal fluid [13N]ammonia and [13N]glutamine transfer rates decreased in metabolic acidosis. Maximal glial glutamine efflux rate jm equals 85.6 +/- 9.5 (SE) mumol.l-1 x min-1 in all animals. No difference in jm was observed in metabolic alkalosis or acidosis. Mean cerebral cortical glutamate concentration was significantly lower in acidosis [7.01 +/- 0.45 (SE) mumol/g brain tissue] and tended to be larger in alkalosis, compared with 7.97 +/- 0.89 mumol/g in normal acid-base conditions. There was a similar change in cerebral cortical gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration. Within the limits of the present method and measurements, the results suggest that acute metabolic acidosis but not alkalosis reduces glial glutamine efflux, corresponding to changes in cerebral cortical glutamate metabolism. These results suggest that glutamatergic mechanisms may contribute to central respiratory control in metabolic acidosis.

  12. Rotational Study of Natural Amino Acid Glutamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Marcelino; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L.

    2014-06-01

    Recent improvements in laser ablation molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy (LA-MB-FTMW) have allowed the investigation of glutamine (COOH-CH(NH2)-CH2-CH2-CONH2), a natural amino acid with a long polar side chain. One dominant structure has been detected in the rotational spectrum. The nuclear quadrupole hyperfine structure of two 14N nuclei has been totally resolved allowing the conclusive identification of the observed species.

  13. Knockout of GAD65 has major impact on synaptic GABA synthesized from astrocyte-derived glutamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walls, Anne Byriel; Eyjolfsson, Elvar M.; Smeland, Olav B.

    2011-01-01

    was further investigated in GAD65 knockout and wild-type mice using [1,2-(13)C]acetate and in some cases γ-vinylGABA (GVG, Vigabatrin), an inhibitor of GABA degradation. A detailed metabolic mapping was obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis of tissue extracts of cerebral cortex...... glutamine both via direct synthesis and via a pathway involving mitochondrial metabolism. Furthermore, a severe neuronal hypometabolism, involving glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle activity, was observed in cerebral cortex of GAD65 knockout mice....

  14. Glutamine Triggers Acetylation-Dependent Degradation of Glutamine Synthetase via the Thalidomide Receptor Cereblon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T Van; Lee, J Eugene; Sweredoski, Michael J; Yang, Seung-Joo; Jeon, Seung-Je; Harrison, Joseph S; Yim, Jung-Hyuk; Lee, Sang Ghil; Handa, Hiroshi; Kuhlman, Brian; Jeong, Ji-Seon; Reitsma, Justin M; Park, Chul-Seung; Hess, Sonja; Deshaies, Raymond J

    2016-03-17

    Cereblon (CRBN), a substrate receptor for the cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase 4 (CRL4) complex, is a direct protein target for thalidomide teratogenicity and antitumor activity of immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs). Here we report that glutamine synthetase (GS) is an endogenous substrate of CRL4(CRBN). Upon exposing cells to high glutamine concentration, GS is acetylated at lysines 11 and 14, yielding a degron that is necessary and sufficient for binding and ubiquitylation by CRL4(CRBN) and degradation by the proteasome. Binding of acetylated degron peptides to CRBN depends on an intact thalidomide-binding pocket but is not competitive with IMiDs. These findings reveal a feedback loop involving CRL4(CRBN) that adjusts GS protein levels in response to glutamine and uncover a new function for lysine acetylation.

  15. A Novel Preparation Method of C-Terminal Glutamine Dipeptides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Shao-Song; LIU Yi; CHEN Ran; LI Jia-You; WU Xiao-Yan; JIAO Qing-Cai

    2006-01-01

    A novel synthesis method of dipeptides containing glutamine is reported. Protected L-amino acids were prepared by using inexpensive phthaloyl as the protecting group. Then the phthaloyl-L-amino acids were condensed with glutamine salts by the mixed anhydride method to afford phthaloyl dipeptides. Subsequently, the phthaloyl was removed from the dipeptides with hydrazine hydrate. As a result, optically pure glutamine-containing dipeptides were obtained in good yields.

  16. GLUTAMINE AND HYPERAMMONEMIC CRISES IN PATIENTS WITH UREA CYCLE DISORDERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B.; Diaz, G.A.; Rhead, W.; Lichter-Konecki, U.; Feigenbaum, A.; Berry, S.A.; Le Mons, C.; Bartley, J.; Longo, N.; Nagamani, S.C.; Berquist, W.; Gallagher, R.C.; Harding, C.O.; McCandless, S.E.; Smith, W.; Schulze, A.; Marino, M.; Rowell, R.; Coakley, D.F.; Mokhtarani, M.; Scharschmidt, B.F.

    2016-01-01

    Blood ammonia and glutamine levels are used as biomarkers of control in patients with urea cycle disorders (UCDs). This study was undertaken to evaluate glutamine variability and utility as a predictor of hyperammonemic crises (HACs) in UCD patients. Methods The relationships between glutamine and ammonia levels and the incidence and timing of HACs were evaluated in over 100 adult and pediatric UCD patients who participated in clinical trials of glycerol phenylbutyrate. Results The median (range) intra-subject 24-hour coefficient of variation for glutamine was 15% (8–29%) as compared with 56% (28%–154%) for ammonia, and the correlation coefficient between glutamine and concurrent ammonia levels varied from 0.17 to 0.29. Patients with baseline (fasting) glutamine values >900 µmol/L had higher baseline ammonia levels (mean [SD]: 39.6 [26.2] µmol/L) than patients with baseline glutamine ≤900 µmol/L (26.6 [18.0] µmol/L). Glutamine values >900 µmol/L during the study were associated with an approximately 2-fold higher HAC risk (odds ratio [OR]=1.98; p=0.173). However, glutamine lost predictive significance (OR=1.47; p=0.439) when concomitant ammonia was taken into account, whereas the predictive value of baseline ammonia ≥ 1.0 upper limit of normal (ULN) was highly statistically significant (OR=4.96; p=0.013). There was no significant effect of glutamine >900 µmol/L on time to first HAC crisis (hazard ratio [HR]=1.14; p=0.813), but there was a significant effect of baseline ammonia ≥ 1.0 ULN (HR=4.62; p=0.0011). Conclusions The findings in this UCD population suggest that glutamine is a weaker predictor of HACs than ammonia and that the utility of the predictive value of glutamine will need to take into account concurrent ammonia levels. PMID:26586473

  17. Up-regulation of glutamine synthesis in microglia activated with endotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Kazuyuki; Kanamatsu, Tomoyuki; Takezawa, Yosuke; Kohsaka, Shinichi

    2015-03-30

    We previously verified that newborn rat brain-derived microglia have the ability to uptake (14)C-glutamate (Glu) through glutamate transporter-1. A given amount of Glu incorporated into microglia was suspected to be metabolized to glutamine (Gln). However, the ability of microglia to do this had not been demonstrated. Thus, in the present study we examined the possibility that primary rat microglia metabolize Glu into Gln. Immunocytochemical and immunoblotting studies indicated that the microglia express glutamine synthetase (GS) protein. As expected from these results, GS activity was actually detected in microglia, although the specific activity was lower than that of astrocytes. Considering this microglial property, it seemed possible that the taken Glu is metabolized to Gln in the cells. To investigate this possibility, we exposed microglia to [(13)C]Glu-containing medium and analyzed the change of Glu to Gln in a nuclear magnetic resonance examination. The results clarified that non-stimulated microglia hardly changed Glu to Gln, but when stimulated with lipopolysaccharide the microglia significantly metabolized [(13)C]Glu to [(13)C]Gln. Microglia were thus, strongly suggested to metabolize Glu to Gln via GS activity when activated in the inflammatory/pathological state of the nervous system.

  18. Effect of glutamine supplementation on neutrophil function in male judoists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Eiji; Umeda, Takashi; Takahashi, Ippei; Arata, Kojima; Yamamoto, Yousuke; Tanabe, Masaru; Oyamada, Kazuyuki; Hashizume, Erika; Nakaji, Shigeyuki

    2013-01-01

    Glutamine is an important amino acid for immune function. Though high intensity and prolonged exercise decreases plasma glutamine concentration and causes immune suppression, the relationship between neutrophil functions and glutamine has not yet been found. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impacts of glutamine supplementation on neutrophil function. Twenty-six male university judoists were recruited. Subjects were classified into glutamine and control groups. The glutamine group ingested 3000 mg of glutamine per day and the control group ingested placebo for 2 weeks. Examinations were performed at the start of preunified loading exercise (pre-ULE), then 1 and 2 weeks after ULE (post-ULE). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, phagocytic activity, serum opsonic activity and serum myogenic enzymes were measured. Differences between the levels obtained in pre-ULE and post-ULE for the two groups were compared. In the glutamine group, ROS production activity increased 1 week after ULE, whereas it was not observed in the control group (P Glutamine supplementation has prevented excessive muscle damage and suppression of neutrophil function, especially in ROS production activity, even during an intensive training period.

  19. Positive correlations between cerebral choline and renal dysfunction in chronic renal failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Osamu; Nakahama, Hajime; Nakamura, Satoko; Inenaga, Takashi; Kawano, Yuhei [National Cardiovascular Center, Division of Hypertension and Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Hattori, Noriaki; Inoue, Noriko; Sawada, Tohru [BF Research Institute, Osaka (Japan); Kohno, Shigeru [Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Second Department of Internal Medicine, Nagasaki (Japan)

    2006-05-15

    Cerebral metabolism in chronic renal failure (CRF) patients has not been fully evaluated. This study examined cerebral metabolites in CRF, using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Subjects comprised 19 CRF patients and 21 healthy volunteers. Spectra were acquired from voxels of interest positioned in the parietal gray and white matter, and concentrations of the following cerebral metabolites were measured: N-acetyl group (NA), creatine + phosphocreatine (Cr), choline-containing compounds (Cho), myo-inositol and glutamate + glutamine. Among the 19 CRF patients, 9 who were started on hemodialysis (HD) underwent careful follow-up. Proton MRS was performed before and about 2 weeks after starting HD. In six patients in whom follow-up was possible, a third MRS was performed after about 18 months. The NA/Cr ratio was not significantly changed in CRF. However, elevations in the Cho/Cr ratio were found in both gray and white matter compared with controls. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of positive correlations between the Cho/Cr ratio in both regions and serum osmotic pressure. (orig.)

  20. [Renal transplantation and urinary lithiasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechevallier, E; Saussine, C; Traxer, O

    2008-12-01

    Renal lithiasis in renal donors is rare. A renal stone in a donor, or in a renal transplant, is not a contraindication for harvesting nor transplantation. If possible, the stone must be removed at the time of the transplantation. The risk of lithiasis is increased in the renal transplant recipient, with a frequency of 2-6%. Metabolic abnormalities for lithiasis are frequent and can be induced by the immunosuppressive treatment, anticalcineurins. Lithiasis can have a poor prognosis in the renal recipient with a risk for infection or renal dysfunction. Small (renal transplant can be followed-up. Stones of 0.5-1.5cm need an extracorporeal lithotripsy with a previous safety JJ stent. Stones greater than 1.5cm can be treated by ureteroscopy or percutaneous surgery.

  1. METABOLISM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To determine the allele frequencies of genetic variants 373 Ala→Pro and 451 Arg→Gln of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and to explore their potential impacts on serum lipid metabolism. Methods: The genotypes in CETP codon 373 and 451 in 91 German healthy students and 409 an-

  2. Kinetic properties of a phosphate-bond-driven glutamate-glutamine transport system in Streptococcus lactis and Streptococcus cremoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poolman, B; Smid, E J; Konings, W N

    1987-06-01

    In Streptococcus lactis ML3 and Streptococcus cremoris Wg2 the uptake of glutamate and glutamine is mediated by the same transport system, which has a 30-fold higher affinity for glutamine than for glutamate at pH 6.0. The apparent affinity constant for transport (KT) of glutamine is 2.5 +/- 0.3 microM, independent of the extracellular pH. The KTS for glutamate uptake are 3.5, 11.2, 77, and 1200 microM at pH 4.0, 5.1, 6.0, and 7.0, respectively. Recalculation of the affinity constants based on the concentration of glutamic acid in the solution yield KTS of 1.8 +/- 0.5 microM independent of the external pH, indicating that the protonated form of glutamate, i.e., glutamic acid, and glutamine are the transported species. The maximal rates of glutamate and glutamine uptake are independent of the extracellular pH as long as the intracellular pH is kept constant, despite large differences in the magnitude and composition of the components of the proton motive force. Uptake of glutamate and glutamine requires the synthesis of ATP either from glycolysis or from arginine metabolism and appears to be essentially unidirectional. Cells are able to maintain glutamate concentration gradients exceeding 4 X 10(3) for several hours even in the absence of metabolic energy. The t1/2s of glutamate efflux are 2, 12, and greater than 30 h at pH 5.0, 6.0, and 7.0, respectively. After the addition of lactose as energy source, the rate of glutamine uptake and the level of ATP are both very sensitive to arsenate. When the intracellular pH is kept constant, both parameters decrease approximately in parallel (between 0.2 and 1.0 mM ATP) with increasing concentrations of the inhibitor. These results suggest that the accumulation of glutamate and glutamine is energized by ATP or an equivalent energy-rich phosphorylated intermediate and not by the the proton motive force.

  3. Effects of aluminum on phosphate metabolism in rats: A possible interaction with vitamin D{sub 3} renal production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahieu, Stella T.; Navoni, Julio; Millen, Nestor; Contini, Maria del Carmen; Gonzalez, Marcela [Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Fisiologia Humana, Facultad de Bioquimica y Ciencias Biologicas, Santa Fe (Argentina); Elias, Maria Monica [Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnologicas (CONICET), Farmacologia, Departamento de Ciencias Fisiologicas, Facultad de Ciencias Bioquimicas y Farmaceuticas, Suipacha, Rosario (Argentina)

    2004-11-01

    The effect of chronic aluminum (Al) administration on the phosphorous (Pi) metabolism of different target tissues was studied. Male Wistar rats received aluminum lactate for 3 months (5.75 mg/kg bodyweight of Al, i.p., three times per week). The animals were studied at the end of the 1st, 2nd and 3rd month of treatment. They were housed individually in metabolic cages for 4 days to study Pi and calcium (Ca) balance. Daily food and water intakes were recorded for all animals and urine and feces were collected for Pi and calcium assays. After 3 months the Pi intestinal absorption and the Pi deposition in bone were studied using {sup 32}Pi. Another group of rats was treated daily for 7 days with calcitriol (0.08 {mu}g/kg body weight in sesame oil, i.p.) and the Pi balance was studied for the last 4 days. The results indicated that chronic administration of Al affected simultaneously the Pi and calcium balance, with a significant diminution of calcium and increased Pi accretion in bones, together with a diminution in the intestinal absorption of Pi. The treatment of the rats with calcitriol promoted a normalized Pi balance in Al treated rats. These findings suggest that Al could modify the Pi metabolism acting directly on intestine, kidney and bone, or indirectly through possible changes in the levels of vitamin D{sub 3}. (orig.)

  4. Glutamine deprivation induces interleukin-8 expression in ataxia telangiectasia fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Hyun; Kim, Aryung; Yu, Ji Hoon; Lim, Joo Weon; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2014-05-01

    To investigate whether glutamine deprivation induces expression of inflammatory cytokine interleukin-8 (IL-8) by determining NF-κB activity and levels of oxidative indices (ROS, reactive oxygen species; hydrogen peroxide; GSH, glutathione) in fibroblasts isolated from patients with ataxia telangiectasia (A-T). We used A-T fibroblasts stably transfected with empty vector (Mock) or with human full-length ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) cDNA (YZ5) and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) transiently transfected with ATM small interfering RNA (siRNA) or with non-specific control siRNA. The cells were cultured with or without glutamine or GSH. ROS levels were determined using a fluorescence reader and confocal microscopy. IL-8 or murine IL-8 homolog, keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC), and hydrogen peroxide levels in the medium were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and colorimetric assay. GSH level was assessed by enzymatic assay, while IL-8 (KC) mRNA level was measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and/or quantitative real-time PCR. NF-κB DNA-binding activity was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Catalase activity and ATM protein levels were determined by O2 generation and Western blotting. While glutamine deprivation induced IL-8 expression and increased NF-κB DNA-binding activity in Mock cells, both processes were decreased by treatment of cells with glutamine or GSH or both glutamine and GSH. Glutamine deprivation had no effect on IL-8 expression or NF-κB DNA-binding activity in YZ5 cells. Glutamine-deprived Mock cells had higher oxidative stress indices (increases in ROS and hydrogen peroxide, reduction in GSH) than glutamine-deprived YZ5 cells. In Mock cells, glutamine deprivation-induced oxidative stress indices were suppressed by treatment with glutamine or GSH or both glutamine and GSH. GSH levels and catalase activity were lower in Mock cells than YZ5 cells. MEFs transfected with ATM siRNA and

  5. Trauma renal Renal trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerson Alves Pereira Júnior

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available Apresentamos uma revisão sobre trauma renal, com ênfase na avaliação radiológica, particularmente com o uso da tomografia computadorizada, que tem se tornado o exame de eleição, ao invés da urografia excretora e arteriografia. O sucesso no tratamento conservador dos pacientes com trauma renal depende de um acurado estadiamento da extensão da lesão, classificado de acordo com a Organ Injury Scaling do Colégio Americano de Cirurgiões. O tratamento conservador não-operatório é seguro e consiste de observação contínua, repouso no leito, hidratação endovenosa adequada e antibioti- coterapia profilática, evitando-se uma exploração cirúrgica desnecessária e possível perda renal. As indicações para exploração cirúrgica imediata são abdome agudo, rápida queda do hematócrito ou lesões associadas determinadas na avaliação radiológica. Quando indicada, a exploração renal após controle vascular prévio é segura, permitindo cuidadosa inspeção do rim e sua reconstrução com sucesso, reduzindo a probabilidade de nefrectomia.We present a revision of the renal trauma with emphasis in the radiographic evaluation, particularly CT scan that it has largely replaced the excretory urogram and arteriogram in the diagnostic worh-up and management of the patient with renal trauma. The successful management of renal injuries depends upon the accurate assessment of their extent in agreement with Organ Injury Scaling classification. The conservative therapy managed by careful continuous observation, bed rest, appropriate fluid ressuscitation and prophylactic antibiotic coverage after radiographic staging for severely injured kidneys can yield favorable results and save patients from unnecessary exploration and possible renal loss. The indications for immediate exploratory laparotomy were acute abdomen, rapidly dropping hematocrit or associated injuries as determinated from radiologic evaluation. When indicated, renal exploration

  6. Introduction to the Glutamate-Glutamine Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnewald, Ursula; Schousboe, Arne

    2016-01-01

    released from neurons is transported into astrocytes, converted to glutamine which is subsequently returned to neurons and converted to glutamate by an enzyme the activity of which is much higher in neurons than in astrocytes. Originally this cycle was supposed to function in a stoichiometric fashion...... but more recent research has seriously questioned this.This volume of Advances in Neurobiology is intended to provide a detailed discussion of recent developments in research aimed at delineating the functional roles of the cycle taking into account that in order for this system to work there must...

  7. Renal arteriography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Read More Acute arterial occlusion - kidney Acute kidney failure Aneurysm Atheroembolic renal disease Blood clots Renal cell carcinoma Renal venogram X-ray Review Date 1/5/2016 Updated by: Jason Levy, ...

  8. The changes of lipid metabolism in advanced renal cell carcinoma patients treated with everolimus: a new pharmacodynamic marker?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Pantano

    Full Text Available Everolimus is a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitor approved for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC. We aimed to assess the association between the baseline values and treatmentrelated modifications of total serum cholesterol (C, triglycerides (T, body mass index (BMI, fasting blood glucose level (FBG and blood pressure (BP levels and the outcome of patients treated with everolimus for mRCC.177 patients were included in this retrospective analysis. Time to progression (TTP, clinical benefit (CB and overall survival (OS were evaluated.Basal BMI was significantly higher in patients who experienced a CB (p=0,0145. C,T and C+T raises were significantly associated with baseline BMI (p=0.0412, 0.0283 and 0.0001. Median TTP was significantly longer in patients with T raise compared to patients without T (10 vs 6, p=0.030, C (8 vs 5, p=0.042 and C+T raise (10.9 vs 5.0, p=0.003. At the multivariate analysis, only C+T increase was associated with improved TTP (p=0.005. T raise (21.0 vs 14.0, p=0.002 and C+T increase (21.0 vs 14.0, p=0.006 were correlated with improved OS but were not significant at multivariate analysis.C+T raise is an early predictor for everolimus efficacy for patients with mRCC.

  9. Angiotensin metabolism in renal proximal tubules, urine, and serum of sheep: evidence for ACE2-dependent processing of angiotensin II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltout, Hossam A; Westwood, Brian M; Averill, David B; Ferrario, Carlos M; Figueroa, Jorge P; Diz, Debra I; Rose, James C; Chappell, Mark C

    2007-01-01

    Despite the evidence that angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)2 is a component of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), the influence of ACE2 on angiotensin metabolism within the kidney is not well known, particularly in experimental models other than rats or mice. Therefore, we investigated the metabolism of the angiotensins in isolated proximal tubules, urine, and serum from sheep. Radiolabeled [(125)I]ANG I was hydrolyzed primarily to ANG II and ANG-(1-7) by ACE and neprilysin, respectively, in sheep proximal tubules. The ACE2 product ANG-(1-9) from ANG I was not detected in the absence or presence of ACE and neprilysin inhibition. In contrast, the proximal tubules contained robust ACE2 activity that converted ANG II to ANG-(1-7). Immunoblots utilizing an NH(2) terminal-directed ACE2 antibody revealed a single 120-kDa band in proximal tubule membranes. ANG-(1-7) was not a stable product in the tubule preparation and was rapidly hydrolyzed to ANG-(1-5) and ANG-(1-4) by ACE and neprilysin, respectively. Comparison of activities in the proximal tubules with nonsaturating concentrations of substrate revealed equivalent activities for ACE (ANG I to ANG II: 248 +/- 17 fmol x mg(-1) x min(-1)) and ACE2 [ANG II to ANG-(1-7): 253 +/- 11 fmol x mg(-1) x min(-1)], but lower neprilysin activity [ANG II to ANG-(1-4): 119 +/- 24 fmol x mg(-1) x min(-1); P < 0.05 vs. ACE or ACE2]. Urinary metabolism of ANG I and ANG II was similar to the proximal tubules; soluble ACE2 activity was also detectable in sheep serum. In conclusion, sheep tissues contain abundant ACE2 activity that converts ANG II to ANG-(1-7) but does not participate in the processing of ANG I into ANG-(1-9).

  10. Exogenous Glutamine in Respiratory Diseases: Myth or Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Gisele P; de Abreu, Marcelo Gama; Pelosi, Paolo; Rocco, Patricia R M

    2016-02-04

    Several respiratory diseases feature increased inflammatory response and catabolic activity, which are associated with glutamine depletion; thus, the benefits of exogenous glutamine administration have been evaluated in clinical trials and models of different respiratory diseases. Recent reviews and meta-analyses have focused on the effects and mechanisms of action of glutamine in a general population of critical care patients or in different models of injury. However, little information is available about the role of glutamine in respiratory diseases. The aim of the present review is to discuss the evidence of glutamine depletion in cystic fibrosis (CF), asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and lung cancer, as well as the results of exogenous glutamine administration in experimental and clinical studies. Exogenous glutamine administration might be beneficial in ARDS, asthma, and during lung cancer treatment, thus representing a potential therapeutic tool in these conditions. Further experimental and large randomized clinical trials focusing on the development and progression of respiratory diseases are necessary to elucidate the effects and possible therapeutic role of glutamine in this setting.

  11. Glutamine Synthetase Deficiency in Murine Astrocytes Results in Neonatal Death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. He; T.B.M. Hakvoort; J.L.M. Vermeulen; W.T. Labruyere; D.R. de Waart; W.S. van der Hel; J.M. Ruijter; H.B.M. Uylings; W.H. Lamers

    2010-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is a key enzyme in the "glutamine-glutamate cycle" between astrocytes and neurons, but its function in vivo was thus far tested only pharmacologically. Crossing GS(fl/lacZ) or GS(fl/f)l mice with hGFAP-Cre mice resulted in prenatal excision of the GS(fl) allele in astrocyte

  12. Exogenous Glutamine in Respiratory Diseases: Myth or Reality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele P. Oliveira

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Several respiratory diseases feature increased inflammatory response and catabolic activity, which are associated with glutamine depletion; thus, the benefits of exogenous glutamine administration have been evaluated in clinical trials and models of different respiratory diseases. Recent reviews and meta-analyses have focused on the effects and mechanisms of action of glutamine in a general population of critical care patients or in different models of injury. However, little information is available about the role of glutamine in respiratory diseases. The aim of the present review is to discuss the evidence of glutamine depletion in cystic fibrosis (CF, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, and lung cancer, as well as the results of exogenous glutamine administration in experimental and clinical studies. Exogenous glutamine administration might be beneficial in ARDS, asthma, and during lung cancer treatment, thus representing a potential therapeutic tool in these conditions. Further experimental and large randomized clinical trials focusing on the development and progression of respiratory diseases are necessary to elucidate the effects and possible therapeutic role of glutamine in this setting.

  13. Glutamine: A novel approach to chemotherapy-induced toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Gaurav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of cancer is associated with short- and long-term side-effects. Cancer produces a state of glutamine deficiency, which is further aggravated by toxic effects of chemotherapeutic agents leading to increased tolerance of tumor to chemotherapy as well as reduced tolerance of normal tissues to the side-effects of chemotherapy. This article reviews the possible role of glutamine supplementation in reducing the serious adverse events in patients treated with anticancer drugs. The literature related to the possible role of glutamine in humans with cancer and the supportive evidence from animal studies was reviewed. Searches were made and the literature was retrieved using PUBMED, MEDLINE, COCHRANE LIBRARY, CENAHL and EMBASE, with a greater emphasis on the recent advances and clinical trials. Glutamine supplementation was found to protect against radiation-induced mucositis, anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity and paclitaxel-related myalgias/arthralgias. Glutamine may prevent neurotoxicity of paclitaxel, cisplatin, oxaplatin bortezomib and lenolidamide, and is beneficial in the reduction of the dose-limiting gastrointestinal toxic effects of irinotecan and 5-FU-induced mucositis and stomatitis. Dietary glutamine reduces the severity of the immunosuppressive effect induced by methotrexate and improves the immune status of rats recovering from chemotherapy. In patients with acute myeloid leukemia requiring parenteral nutrition, glycyl-glutamine supplementation could hasten neutrophil recovery after intensive myelosuppressive chemotherapy. Current data supports the usefulness of glutamine supplementation in reducing complications of chemotherapy; however, paucity of clinical trials weakens the clear interpretation of these findings.

  14. c-Myc modulates glucose metabolism via regulation of miR-184/PKM2 pathway in clear-cell renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiwei; Kong, Wen; Zhang, Jin; Chen, Yonghui; Xue, Wei; Liu, Dongming; Huang, Yiran

    2016-10-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the most malignant tumors worldwide. Among all subtypes of RCC, clear-cell RCC (ccRCC) is the most common and aggressive one. The difficulty in overcoming resistance of traditional treatment is a threat for ccRCC therapies. Therefore, to understand the mechanism that underlies ccRCC progression is critical for new drug development. In the present study, we identified that miR-184 could be downregulated by c-Myc, which is different from the standard opinion that c-Myc is a target of miR-184. Overexpression of pre-miR-184 changed the metabolic and proliferation features of ccRCC cells by reducing cell glucose consumption, lactate production and cell proliferation. Further analysis by computer bioinformatics revealed that PKM2 is a target of miR-184. Both PKM2 mRNA and protein were significantly affected by addition of miR-184. Importantly, the PKM2 expression level was indeed increased in ccRCC samples, which is totally reverse compared to the decreased miR-184 expression level. Interestingly, we found that when PKM2 was knocked down in ccRCC cells, the rapid proliferation, high glucose consumption and high lactate production were all clearly inhibited, which indicates metabolic reprogramming and cancer progression blocking the in ccRCC cells. Our findings shed new light on ccRCC molecular study and provide a new and solid basis for developing ccRCC therapy.

  15. Yeast nitrogen catabolite repression is sustained by signals distinct from glutamine and glutamate reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayyad-Kazan, Mohammad; Feller, A; Bodo, E; Boeckstaens, M; Marini, A M; Dubois, E; Georis, I

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR) is a wide transcriptional regulation program enabling baker's yeast to downregulate genes involved in the utilization of poor nitrogen sources when preferred ones are available. Nowadays, glutamine and glutamate, the major nitrogen donors for biosyntheses, are assumed to be key metabolic signals regulating NCR. NCR is controlled by the conserved TORC1 complex, which integrates nitrogen signals among others to regulate cell growth. However, accumulating evidence indicate that the TORC1-mediated control of NCR is only partial, arguing for the existence of supplementary regulatory processes to be discovered. In this work, we developed a genetic screen to search for new players involved in NCR signaling. Our data reveal that the NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase activity of Gdh1 negatively regulates NCR-sensitive gene transcription. By determining the total, cytoplasmic and vacuolar pools of amino acids, we show that there is no positive correlation between glutamine/glutamate reservoirs and the extent of NCR. While our data indicate that glutamine could serve as initial trigger of NCR, they show that it is not a sufficient signal to sustain repression and point to the existence of yet unknown signals. Providing additional evidence uncoupling TORC1 activity and NCR, our work revisits the dogmas underlying NCR regulation.

  16. Understanding the mechanisms of glutamine action in critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele P. Oliveira

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine (Gln is an important energy source and has been used as a supplementary energy substrate. Furthermore, Gln is an essential component for numerous metabolic functions, including acid-base homeostasis, gluconeogenesis, nitrogen transport and synthesis of proteins and nucleic acids. Therefore, glutamine plays a significant role in cell homeostasis and organ metabolism. This article aims to review the mechanisms of glutamine action during severe illnesses. In critically ill patients, the increase in mortality was associated with a decreased plasma Gln concentration. During catabolic stress, Gln consumption rate exceeds the supply, and both plasma and skeletal muscle pools of free Gln are severely reduced. The dose and route of Gln administration clearly influence its effectiveness: high-dose parenteral appears to be more beneficial than low-dose enteral administration. Experimental studies reported that Gln may protect cells, tissues, and whole organisms from stress and injury through the following mechanisms: attenuation of NF (nuclear factor-kB activation, a balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, reduction in neutrophil accumulation, improvement in intestinal integrity and immune cell function, and enhanced of heat shock protein expression. In conclusion, high-doses of parenteral Gln (>0.50 g/kg/day demonstrate a greater potential to benefit in critically ill patients, although Gln pathophysiological mechanisms requires elucidation.A glutamina (Gln é uma importante fonte de energia e tem sido usada como substrato energético suplementar. Além disso, a Gln é um componente essencial para numerosas funções metabólicas tais como: homeostase ácido-base, gliconeogênese, transporte de nitrogênio e síntese de proteínas e ácidos nucléicos. Portanto, a glutamina desempenha um papel importante na homeostase celular e no metabolismo dos órgãos. Esse artigo objetiva rever os mecanismos de ação da glutamina na doen

  17. Glutamine synthetase induced spinal seizures in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong Won; Yoon, Young Sul; Matsumoto, Masato; Huang, Wencheng; Ceraulo, Phil; Young, Wise

    2003-02-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is a key enzyme in the regulation of glutamate neurotransmission in the central nervous system. It is responsible for converting glutamate to glutamine, consuming one ATP and NH3 in the process. Glutamate is neurotoxic when it accumulates in extracellular fluids. We investigated the effects of GS in both a spinal cord injury (SCI) model and normal rats. 0.1-ml of low (2- micro M) and high (55- micro M) concentrations of GS were applied, intrathecally, to the spinal cord of rats under pentobarbital anesthesia. Immediately after an intrathecal injection into the L1-L3 space, the rats developed convulsive movements. These movements initially consisted of myoclonic twitches of the paravertebral muscles close to the injection site, repeated tonic and clonic contractions and extensions of the hind limbs (hind limb seizures) that spread to the fore limbs, and finally rotational axial movements of the body. An EMG of the paravertebral muscles, fore and hind limbs, showed the extent of the muscle activities. GS (2- micro M) caused spinal seizures in the rats after the SCI, and GS (6- micro M) produced seizures in the uninjured anesthetized rats. Denatured GS (70 degrees C, 1 hour) also produced spinal seizures, although higher concentrations were required. We suggest that GS may be directly blocking the release of GABA, or the receptors, in the spinal cord.

  18. Metabolic changes induced by pre-administration of L-alanyl-glutamine and Omega-3 in Wistar rats subjected to sepsis Alterações metabólicas induzidas pela pré-administração de L-alanil-glutamina e ômega-3 em ratos Wistar submetidos à sepse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ivamberg Nobre de Sena

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the metabolic changes induced by pre-administration of L-alanyl-glutamine (L-Ala-Gln and omega-3 (ω-3 in rats subjected to sepsis. METHODS: Eighteen male Wistar rats were randomized into three groups (n=6 and treated with saline (group Control-G-1, L-Ala-Gln (0.75 mg /kg , G-2 or ω-3 (0.2 g /kg, G-3 administered intravenously 3, 2 and 1 day and 30 minutes before induction of sepsis. Samples (blood, striated muscle and liver were collected 48 hours after induction of sepsis, to measure the concentrations of metabolites (pyruvate, lactate, glucose and ketone bodies. RESULTS: There was a significant increase in muscle glycolysis and gluconeogenesis in the liver in rats treated with L-Ala-Gln and ω-3, compared to the control group, 48 hours after induction of sepsis. CONCLUSION: Pre-administration of L-Ala-Gln or ω-3 to rats subjected to sepsis resulted in similar metabolic changes, by rising glycolysis in peripheral tissues and stimulating hepatic gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis, resulting in increased energy supply to septic rats.OBJETIVO: Avaliar as alterações metabólicas induzidas pela pré-administração de L-alanil-glutamina (L-Ala-Gln e ômega-3 (ω-3 em ratos Wistar submetidos à sepse. MÉTODOS: Dezoito ratos machos Wistar, randomizados em três grupos iguais (n=6 e tratados com solução salina (grupo Controle-G-1, L-Ala-Gln (0,75mg/Kg ou ω-3 (0,2g/Kg por via endovenosa administrados 3, 2 e 1 dia e 30 minutos antes da indução do estado de sepse. Amostras (sangue, músculo estriado e fígado foram coletadas 48 horas após indução da sepse, para dosagem das concentrações de metabólitos (piruvato, lactato, glicose e corpos cetônicos. RESULTADOS: Houve aumento significante da glicólise no músculo e da gliconeogênese no fígado nos ratos tratados com L-Ala-Gln e ω-3, comparados ao controle, 48 horas após a indução da sepse. CONCLUSÃO: A pré-administração de L-Ala-Gln ou ω-3 em ratos submetidos

  19. Effects of HIF-1 and HIF2 on Growth and Metabolism of Clear-Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma 786-0 Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swethajit Biswas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In cultured clear-cell renal carcinoma (CCRCC 786-0 cells transfected with HIF1 (HIF-1+, HIF-2 (HIF-2+, or empty vector (EV, no significant differences were observed in the growth rates in vitro, but when grown in vivo as xenografts HIF-2 significantly increased, and HIF-1 significantly decreased growth rates, compared to EV tumors. Factors associated with proliferation were increased and factors associated with cell death were decreased in HIF-2+ tumors. Metabolite profiles showed higher glucose and lower lactate and alanine levels in the HIF-2+ tumors whilst immunostaining demonstrated higher pyruvate dehydrogenase and lower pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1, compared to control tumors. Taken together, these results suggest that overexpression of HIF-2 in CCRCC 786-0 tumors regulated growth both by maintaining a low level of glycolysis and by allowing more mitochondrial metabolism and tolerance to ROS induced DNA damage. The growth profiles observed may be mediated by adaptive changes to a more oxidative phenotype.

  20. Very Low-Protein Diet (VLPD) Reduces Metabolic Acidosis in Subjects with Chronic Kidney Disease: The "Nutritional Light Signal" of the Renal Acid Load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Iorio, Biagio Raffaele; Di Micco, Lucia; Marzocco, Stefania; De Simone, Emanuele; De Blasio, Antonietta; Sirico, Maria Luisa; Nardone, Luca; On Behalf Of Ubi Study Group

    2017-01-17

    Metabolic acidosis is a common complication of chronic kidney disease; current guidelines recommend treatment with alkali if bicarbonate levels are lower than 22 mMol/L. In fact, recent studies have shown that an early administration of alkali reduces progression of CKD. The aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of fruit and vegetables to reduce the acid load in CKD. We conducted a case-control study in 146 patients who received sodium bicarbonate. Of these, 54 patients assumed very low-protein diet (VLPD) and 92 were controls (ratio 1:2). We calculated every three months the potential renal acid load (PRAL) and the net endogenous acid production (NEAP), inversely correlated with serum bicarbonate levels and representing the non-volatile acid load derived from nutrition. Un-paired T-test and Chi-square test were used to assess differences between study groups at baseline and study completion. Two-tailed probability values ≤0.05 were considered statistically significant. At baseline, there were no statistical differences between the two groups regarding systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), protein and phosphate intake, urinary sodium, potassium, phosphate and urea nitrogen, NEAP, and PRAL. VLPD patients showed at 6 and 12 months a significant reduction of SBP (p acidosis, an important target in the treatment of CKD patients. We provide useful indications regarding acid load of food and drinks-the "acid load dietary traffic light".

  1. Renal calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Pyrah, Leslie N

    1979-01-01

    Stone in the urinary tract has fascinated the medical profession from the earliest times and has played an important part in the development of surgery. The earliest major planned operations were for the removal of vesical calculus; renal and ureteric calculi provided the first stimulus for the radiological investigation of the viscera, and the biochemical investigation of the causes of calculus formation has been the training ground for surgeons interested in metabolic disorders. It is therefore no surprise that stone has been the subject of a number of monographs by eminent urologists, but the rapid development of knowledge has made it possible for each one of these authors to produce something new. There is still a technical challenge to the surgeon in the removal of renal calculi, and on this topic we are always glad to have the advice of a master craftsman; but inevitably much of the interest centres on the elucidation of the causes of stone formation and its prevention. Professor Pyrah has had a long an...

  2. Metabolic effects of milk protein intake strongly depend on pre-existing metabolic and exercise status

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Milk protein intake has recently been suggested to improve metabolic health. This Perspective provides evidence that metabolic effects of milk protein intake have to be regarded in the context of the individual’s pre-existing metabolic and exercise status. Milk proteins provide abundant branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) and glutamine. Plasma BCAAs and glutamine are increased in obesity and insulin resistance, but decrease after gastric bypass surgery resulting in weight loss and improved insulin sensitivity. Milk protein consumption results in postprandial hyperinsulinemia in obese subjects, increases body weight of overweight adolescents and may thus deteriorate pre-existing metabolic disturbances of obese, insulin resistant individuals. PMID:24225036

  3. Global Transcriptional and Physiological Responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Ammonium, L-Alanine, or L-Glutamine Limitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Usaite, Renata; Patil, Kiran Raosaheb; Grotkjær, Thomas;

    2006-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encounters a range of nitrogen sources at various concentrations in its environment. The impact of these two parameters on transcription and metabolism was studied by growing S. cerevisiae in chemostat cultures with L-glutamine, L-alanine, or L-ammonium in limit......The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encounters a range of nitrogen sources at various concentrations in its environment. The impact of these two parameters on transcription and metabolism was studied by growing S. cerevisiae in chemostat cultures with L-glutamine, L-alanine, or L...... activity in L-alanine-limited cells. The changes in these cells were found to be focused around pyruvate, acetyl coenzyme A, glyoxylate, and alpha-ketoglutarate via increased levels of ALT1, DAL7, PYC1, GDH2, and ADH5 and decreased levels of GDH3, CIT2, and ACS1 transcripts. The transcript profiles were...

  4. Metabolic acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Salim

    2007-01-01

    Acute metabolic acidosis is frequently encountered in critically ill patients. Metabolic acidosis can occur as a result of either the accumulation of endogenous acids that consumes bicarbonate (high anion gap metabolic acidosis) or loss of bicarbonate from the gastrointestinal tract or the kidney (hyperchloremic or normal anion gap metabolic acidosis). The cause of high anion gap metabolic acidosis includes lactic acidosis, ketoacidosis, renal failure and intoxication with ethylene glycol, methanol, salicylate and less commonly with pyroglutamic acid (5-oxoproline), propylene glycole or djenkol bean (gjenkolism). The most common causes of hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis are gastrointestinal bicarbonate loss, renal tubular acidosis, drugs-induced hyperkalemia, early renal failure and administration of acids. The appropriate treatment of acute metabolic acidosis, in particular organic form of acidosis such as lactic acidosis, has been very controversial. The only effective treatment for organic acidosis is cessation of acid production via improvement of tissue oxygenation. Treatment of acute organic acidosis with sodium bicarbonate failed to reduce the morbidity and mortality despite improvement in acid-base parameters. Further studies are required to determine the optimal treatment strategies for acute metabolic acidosis.

  5. Nucleic acids encoding plant glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase (GPT) and uses thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unkefer, Pat J.; Anderson, Penelope S.; Knight, Thomas J.

    2016-03-29

    Glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase (GPT) proteins, nucleic acid molecules encoding GPT proteins, and uses thereof are disclosed. Provided herein are various GPT proteins and GPT gene coding sequences isolated from a number of plant species. As disclosed herein, GPT proteins share remarkable structural similarity within plant species, and are active in catalyzing the synthesis of 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline (2-oxoglutaramate), a powerful signal metabolite which regulates the function of a large number of genes involved in the photosynthesis apparatus, carbon fixation and nitrogen metabolism.

  6. Inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Glutamine Synthetase as a Novel Antibiotic Strategy against Tuberculosis: Demonstration of Efficacy In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains one of humankind's greatest killers, and new therapeutic strategies are needed to combat the causative agent, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which is rapidly developing resistance to conventional antibiotics. Using the highly demanding guinea pig model of pulmonary tuberculosis, we have investigated the feasibility of inhibiting M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase (GS), an enzyme that plays a key role in both nitrogen metabolism and cell wall biosynthesis, as a novel antibi...

  7. Glutamine synthetase in Medicago truncatula, unveiling new secrets of a very old enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita Seabra

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine Synthetase (GS catalyses the first step at which nitrogen is brought into cellular metabolism and is also involved in the reassimilation of ammonium released by a number of metabolic pathways. Due to its unique position in plant nitrogen metabolism, GS plays essential roles in all aspects of plant development, from germination to senescence, and is a key component of nitrogen use efficiency (NUE and plant yield. Understanding the mechanisms regulating GS activity is therefore of utmost importance and a great effort has been dedicated to understand how GS is regulated in different plant species. The present review summarizes exciting recent developments concerning the structure and regulation of glutamine synthetase isoenzymes, using the model legume Medicago truncatula. These include the understanding of the structural determinants of both the cytosolic and plastid located isoenzymes, the existence of a seed-specific GS gene unique to M. truncatula and closely related species and the discovery that GS isoenzymes are regulated by nitric oxide at the post-translational level. The data is discussed and integrated with the potential roles of the distinct GS isoenzymes within the whole plant context.

  8. Site-specific contributions of glutamine-dependent regulator GlnR and GlnR-regulated genes to virulence of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriksen, W.T.; Kloosterman, T.G.; Bootsma, H.J.; Estevao, S.; Groot, R. de; Kuipers, O.P.; Hermans, P.W.M.

    2008-01-01

    The transcriptional regulator GlnR of Streptococcus pneumoniae is involved in the regulation of glutamine and glutamate metabolism, controlling the expression of the glnRA and glnPQ-zwf operons, as well as the gdhA gene. To assess the contribution of the GlnR regulon to virulence, D39 wild-type and

  9. Site-specific contributions of glutamine-dependent regulator GlnR and GlnR-regulated genes to virulence of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.T. Hendriksen (Wouter); T.G. Kloosterman (Tomas); H.J. Bootsma (Hester); S. Estevão (Silvia); R. de Groot (Ronald); O.P. Kuipers (Oscar); P.W.M. Hermans (Peter)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe transcriptional regulator GlnR of Streptococcus pneumoniae is involved in the regulation of glutamine and glutamate metabolism, controlling the expression of the glnRA and glnPQ-zwf operons, as well as the gdhA gene. To assess the contribution of the GlnR regulon to virulence, D39 wi

  10. Site-specific contributions of glutamine-dependent regulator GlnR and GlnR-regulated genes to virulence of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriksen, Wouter T.; Kloosterman, Tomas G.; Bootsma, Hester J.; Estevao, Silvia; de Groot, Ronald; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Hermans, Peter W. M.

    2008-01-01

    The transcriptional regulator GlnR of Streptococcus pneumoniae is involved in the regulation of glutamine and glutamate metabolism, controlling the expression of the glnRA and glnPQ-zwf operons, as well as the gdhA gene. To assess the contribution of the GlnR regulon to virulence, D39 wild-type and

  11. Glutamine synthetase and Wnt-signaling%谷氨酰胺合成酶与Wnt信号转导通路

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭春伟; 燕敏

    2009-01-01

    GS(glutamine synthetase)或GLUL(glutamate-ammonia ligase),即谷氨酰胺合成酶,为人体内重要的功能酶,催化谷氨酸与氨生成谷氨酰胺.在体内氮的代谢中,尤其在维持氨离子和谷氨酰胺的稳定中发挥着重要的作用.GS表达和活性的异常常会导致人体很多疾病的发生.近年来研究发现GS表达和活性的异常与Wnt信号通路的异常密切相关.%GS is also called glutamine synthetase or glutamate-ammonia ligase, which is an important enzyme in human body. It can catalyze glutamine from glutamate and ammonia. Besides, it plays an important role in nitrogen metabolism, particularly in homeostasis of blood levels of ammonium ions and glutamine. The aberrant expression and activity will cause many human diseases. Recent studies show that the abnormality of its expression and activity has a close relationship with the aberrance of Wnt-signaling.

  12. H-independent glutamine transport in plant root tips.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaiyu Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glutamine is one of the primary amino acids in nitrogen assimilation and often the most abundant amino acid in plant roots. To monitor this important metabolite, a novel genetically encoded fluorescent FRET-reporter was constructed and expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana. As a candidate for the glutamine fluxes, the root tip localized, putative amino acid transporter CAT8 was analyzed and heterologously expressed in yeast and oocytes. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Rapid and reversible in vivo fluorescence changes were observed in reporter-expressing root tips upon exposure and removal of glutamine. FRET changes were detected at acid and neutral pH and in the presence of a protonophore, suggesting that part of the glutamine fluxes were independent of the pH. The putative amino acid transporter CAT8 transported glutamine, had a half maximal activity at approximately 100 microM and the transport was independent of external pH. CAT8 localized not only to the plasma membrane, but additionally to the tonoplast, when tagged with GFP. Ultrastructural analysis confirmed this dual localization and additionally identified CAT8 in membranes of autophagosomes. Loss-of function of CAT8 did not affect growth in various conditions, but over-expressor plants had increased sensitivity to a structural substrate analog, the glutamine synthetase inhibitor L-methionine sulfoximine. CONCLUSIONS: The combined data suggest that proton-independent glutamine facilitators exist in root tips.

  13. Glutaminólise em astrocitomas

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    O metabolismo da glutamina (Gln) é alvo de atenções recentes para a compreensão da reprogramação metabólica para o suprimento energético das células tumorais em proliferação e para o desenvolvimento de novas estratégias terapêuticas em câncer. Tanto a absorção de glutamina quanto a taxa de glutaminólise, o catabolismo da Gln para gerar adenosina trifosfato (ATP) e lactato na mitocôndria estão aumentados em diferentes tumores. A Gln e glicose participam do processo da proliferação de células t...

  14. Glucocorticoid receptor-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase in skeletal muscle cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Max, Stephen R.; Thomas, John W.; Banner, Carl; Vitkovic, Ljubisa; Konagaya, Masaaki

    1987-01-01

    The regulation by glucocorticoids of glutamine synthetase in L6 muscle cells in culture is studied. Glutamine synthetase activity was strikingly enhanced by dexamethasone. The dexamethasone-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase activity was blocked by RU38486, a glucocorticoid antagonist, indicating the involvement of intracellular glucocorticoid receptors in the induction process. RU38486 alone was without effect. Northern blot analysis revealed that dexamethasone-mediated enhancement of glutamine synthetase activity involves increased levels of glutamine synthetase mRNA. Glucocorticoids regulate the expression of glutamine synthetase mRNA in cultured muscle cells via interaction with intracellular receptors. Such regulation may be relevant to control of glutamine production by muscle.

  15. Hans Krebs and the foundation of the use of glutamine in clinical nutrition: a personal perspective%汉斯·克雷布斯与谷氨酰胺在临床营养的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Malcolm Watford; John T.Brosnan; 李娟

    2014-01-01

    glutamate; he showed that the "liver-type" isoform was not subject to this form of regulation.After the 1935 paper Krebs worked on other aspects of intermediary metabolism but continued to study glutamine,often applying the latest methodological advances.By the early 1970s,Krebs,and his colleagues,had established that glutamine was a good substrate for hepatic gluconeogenesis and urea synthesis,for renal gluconeogenesis and ammoniagenesis,and was a good respiratory substrate for enterocytes of the.small intestine.Furthermore,the Krebs group had showed that skeletal muscle released significant amounts of glutamine and had defined the role of the liver in both glutamine utilization and synthesis.At the time of his death (1981) he was still working on the relationship of branched chain amino acids to glutamine metabolism during the past quarter of a century numerous studies,initially from the groups of Wilmore and Füirst,have been published describing the use of supplemental glutamine in TPN.A number of meta-analyses have been published with most reporting positive effects of glutamine supplementation,although a few have indicated adverse effects in a select group of patients.Thus the use of glutamine in clinical medicine owes a lot to the work of Krebs and his collaborators and trainees.The authors include a section of "Personal Reflections" describing working with Krebs and both are grateful for the training in the art of scientific investigation receveived from Professor Sir Hans A.Krebs,the father of glutamine metabolism.

  16. Glutamate and CO2 production from glutamine in incubated enterocytes of adult and very old rats

    OpenAIRE

    Meynial-Denis, Dominique; Bielicki, Guy; Beaufrere, Anne-Marie; MIGNON, Michelle; Patureau Mirand, Philippe; Renou, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Glutamine is the major fuel for enterocytes and promotes the growth of intestinal mucosa. Although oral glutamine exerts a positive effect on intestinal villus height in very old rats, how glutamine is used by enterocytes is unclear. Adult (8 months) and very old (27 months) female rats were exposed to intermittent glutamine supplementation for 50% of their age lifetime. Treated rats received glutamine added to their drinking water, and control rats received water alone. Jejunal epithelial ce...

  17. Elevated global cerebral blood flow, oxygen extraction fraction and unchanged metabolic rate of oxygen in young adults with end-stage renal disease: an MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Gang; Lou, Yaxian; Pan, Zhiying; Liu, Ya [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, College of Aivil Aviation, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Wen, Jiqiu; Li, Xue; Zhang, Zhe [Medical School of Nanjing University, National Clinical Research Center of Kidney Diseases, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Lu, Hanzhang [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Advanced Imaging Research Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Liu, Wei [Siemens Shenzhen Magnetic Resonance Ltd., Shenzhen, Guangdong (China); Liu, Hui [Siemens MR NEA Collaboration, Siemens Ltd., Shanghai (China); Chen, Huijuan; Kong, Xiang; Luo, Song; Jiang, Xiaolu; Zhang, Zongjun; Zhang, Long Jiang; Lu, Guang Ming [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)

    2016-06-15

    To noninvasively assess global cerebral blood flow (CBF), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO{sub 2}) in young adults with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Thirty-six patients and 38 healthy volunteers were included and took part in MR examinations, blood and neuropsychological tests. CBF and OEF were measured by phase-contrast and T2-relaxation-under-spin-tagging MRI techniques, respectively. CMRO{sub 2} was computed from CBF, OEF and hematocrit according to Fick's principle. Correlations were performed between MR measurements, blood biochemistry measurements and neuropsychological test scores. Compared with controls, ESRD patients had elevated CBF (72.9 ± 12.5 vs. 63.8 ± 8.5 ml min{sup -1} 100 g{sup -1}, P < 0.001), elevated OEF (47.2 ± 10.2 vs. 35.8 ± 5.4 %, P < 0.001), but unaffected CMRO{sub 2} (199.5 ± 36.4 vs. 193.8 ± 28.6 μmol O{sub 2} min{sup -1} 100 g{sup -1}, P = 0.879). Hematocrit negatively correlated with CBF (r = -0.640, P < 0.001) and OEF (r = -0.701, P < 0.001), but not with CMRO{sub 2}. Altered neuropsychological test scores of ESRD patients were associated with OEF and CBF, but not with CMRO{sub 2}. There were weak relationships between eGFR and hematocrit (r = 0.308, P = 0.068) or CBF (r = 0.318, P = 0.059). Our findings suggested that anaemic young adults with ESRD may afford higher CBF and OEF to maintain a normal CMRO{sub 2}. Despite this compensatory process, however, cognitive function was still impaired and its severity was correlated with their CBF and OEF abnormality. (orig.)

  18. Very Low-Protein Diet (VLPD) Reduces Metabolic Acidosis in Subjects with Chronic Kidney Disease: The “Nutritional Light Signal” of the Renal Acid Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Iorio, Biagio Raffaele; Di Micco, Lucia; Marzocco, Stefania; De Simone, Emanuele; De Blasio, Antonietta; Sirico, Maria Luisa; Nardone, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Background: Metabolic acidosis is a common complication of chronic kidney disease; current guidelines recommend treatment with alkali if bicarbonate levels are lower than 22 mMol/L. In fact, recent studies have shown that an early administration of alkali reduces progression of CKD. The aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of fruit and vegetables to reduce the acid load in CKD. Methods: We conducted a case-control study in 146 patients who received sodium bicarbonate. Of these, 54 patients assumed very low-protein diet (VLPD) and 92 were controls (ratio 1:2). We calculated every three months the potential renal acid load (PRAL) and the net endogenous acid production (NEAP), inversely correlated with serum bicarbonate levels and representing the non-volatile acid load derived from nutrition. Un-paired T-test and Chi-square test were used to assess differences between study groups at baseline and study completion. Two-tailed probability values ≤0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: At baseline, there were no statistical differences between the two groups regarding systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), protein and phosphate intake, urinary sodium, potassium, phosphate and urea nitrogen, NEAP, and PRAL. VLPD patients showed at 6 and 12 months a significant reduction of SBP (p < 0.0001), DBP (p < 0.001), plasma urea (p < 0.0001) protein intake (p < 0.0001), calcemia (p < 0.0001), phosphatemia (p < 0.0001), phosphate intake (p < 0.0001), urinary sodium (p < 0.0001), urinary potassium (p < 0.002), and urinary phosphate (p < 0.0001). NEAP and PRAL were significantly reduced in VLPD during follow-up. Conclusion: VLPD reduces intake of acids; nutritional therapy of CKD, that has always taken into consideration a lower protein, salt, and phosphate intake, should be adopted to correct metabolic acidosis, an important target in the treatment of CKD patients. We provide useful indications regarding acid load of food and drinks

  19. Turnover of bacterial glutamine synthetase: oxidative inactivation precedes proteolysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Levine, R L; Oliver, C N; Fulks, R M; Stadtman, E R

    1981-01-01

    We partially purified a preparation from Escherichia coli that proteolytically degrades the enzyme glutamine synthetase [L-glutamate:ammonia ligase (ADP-forming), EC 6.3.1.2]. The degradation is at least a two-step process. First, the glutamine synthetase undergoes an oxidative modification. This modification leads to loss of catalytic activity and also renders the protein susceptible to proteolytic attack in the second step. The oxidative step displays characteristics of a mixed-function oxi...

  20. Glutamine and antioxidants: status of their use in critical illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zanten, Arthur R H

    2015-03-01

    Many studies in critically ill patients have addressed enteral or parenteral supplementation of glutamine and antioxidants to counteract assumed deficiencies and induce immune-modulating effects to reduce infections and improve outcome. Older studies showed marked reductions in mortality, infectious morbidity and length of stay. Recent studies no longer show beneficial effects and in contrast even demonstrated increased mortality. This opiniating review focuses on the latest information and the consequences for the use of glutamine and antioxidants in critically ill patients. Positive effects in systematic reviews and meta-analyses are based on results from older, smaller and mainly single-centre studies. New information has challenged the conditional deficiency hypothesis concerning glutamine in critically ill patients. The recent REDOXS and MetaPlus trials studying the effects of glutamine, selenium and other antioxidants have shown no benefits and increased mortality. Given that the first dictum in medicine is to do no harm, we cannot be confident that immune-modulating nutrient supplementation with glutamine and antioxidants is effective and well tolerated for critically ill patients. Until more data are available, it is probably better not to routinely administer glutamine and antioxidants in nonphysiological doses to mechanically ventilated critically ill patients.

  1. Efeitos metabólicos da L-alanil-glutamina em ratos submetidos à isquemia da pata traseira esquerda seguida de reperfusão Metabolic effects of L-alanyl-glutamine in rats subjected to left hind leg ischemia and reperfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Martins de Souza Torres

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Objetivou-se investigar os efeitos metabólicos da L-alanil glutamina no tecido muscular e sangue arterial de ratos Wistar submetidos à isquemia aguda da pata traseira. MÉTODOS: Utilizaram-se 48 ratos machos distribuídos em 4 grupos (1- controle / 2 - experimento, redistribuídos em 2 subgrupos (n=06. Trinta minutos após a injeção de uma solução a 20% de L-alanil-glutamina (0,75mg/ grupo 2 ou solução salina (grupo 1 na veia jugular direita ocluiu-se a artéria ilíaca comum esquerda por 30 minutos, por pinçamento. Amostras musculares e de sangue arterial foram obtidas logo após a remoção da pinça (tempo 0 e 5, 15 e 30 mais tarde. RESULTADOS: Observou-se redução significativa (p PURPOSE: An experimental study has been conducted to investigate acute ischemic changes in concentrations of glucose, piruvate, lactate and ketone bodies in rat hind leg muscle and arterial blood after intravenous injection of l-alanil-glutamine solution. METHODS: Forty-eight male Wistar rats were distributed into two groups: Group 1 (Control and Group 2 (Experiment. Each group was divided into 4 subgroups (n=6. Thirty minutes after administration of 20% solution of L-alanil-glutamine (0,75g/Kg, group 1 or saline solution (group 2 into right jugular vein, a clamp was placed across left common iliac artery for 30 minutes. Samples from left thigh muscle and arterial blood from abdominal aorta were collected at the end of ischemic period (subgroup 0 and 5, 15 and 30 minutes later. RESULTS: Glucose concentrations were decreased (p<0.05 in experiment group muscles, compared to respective control (subgroup 15 min and significantly increased in subgroups 15 and 30 min as compared to subgroup 0 min. There was no difference in glycemia and pyruvate concentrations when comparing experiment versus control rats. Decreased lactate concentrations might be related to L-alanyl glutamine effects. CONCLUSIONS: Increased availability of L-alanil-glutamine

  2. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase: a target for improvement of crop nitrogen use efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Hanne C; Eriksson, Dennis; Møller, Inge S; Schjoerring, Jan K

    2014-10-01

    Overexpression of the cytosolic enzyme glutamine synthetase 1 (GS1) has been investigated in numerous cases with the goal of improving crop nitrogen use efficiency. However, the outcome has generally been inconsistent. Here, we review possible reasons underlying the lack of success and conclude that GS1 activity may be downregulated via a chain of processes elicited by metabolic imbalances and environmental constraints. We suggest that a pivotal role of GS1 may be related to the maintenance of essential nitrogen (N) flows and internal N sensing during critical stages of plant development. A number of more refined overexpression strategies exploiting gene stacking combined with tissue and cell specific targeting to overcome metabolic bottlenecks are considered along with their potential in relation to new N management strategies.

  3. Glutamine Synthetase in Legumes: Recent Advances in Enzyme Structure and Functional Genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Betti

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine synthetase (GS is the key enzyme involved in the assimilation of ammonia derived either from nitrate reduction, N2 fixation, photorespiration or asparagine breakdown. A small gene family is encoding for different cytosolic (GS1 or plastidic (GS2 isoforms in legumes. We summarize here the recent advances carried out concerning the quaternary structure of GS, as well as the functional relationship existing between GS2 and processes such as nodulation, photorespiration and water stress, in this latter case by means of proline production. Functional genomic analysis using GS2-minus mutant reveals the key role of GS2 in the metabolic control of the plants and, more particularly, in carbon metabolism.

  4. Fluorescence study on ligand induced conformational changes of glutamine synthetase from Bacillus brevis Bb G1 under sporulating conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUJA ABRAHAM

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine synthetase, an important enzyme of nitrogen metabolism, was purified under sporulating conditions (GSala. The effect of ligands on the tryptophan fluorescence of the purified enzyme GSala was investigated. With increasing concentrations of L-glutamine in GSala, a blue shift in emission maximum with an increase in fluorescence intensity and decrease in life times were observed compared to the emission maximum, fluorescence intensity and life times of GSala. With increasing concentrations of glycine in GSala, a shift in emission maximum, change in fluorescence intensity and change in lifetimes were observed compared to the emission maximum, fluorescence intensity and life times of GSala. These observations strongly support the possibility that GSala undergoes a conformational change on binding with ligands and each ligand produced different conformational changes in GSala. Also, different concentrations of each ligand produced different protein conformations in the enzyme GSala.

  5. Glutamine synthetase I-deficiency in Mesorhizobium loti differentially affects nodule development and activity in Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chungopast, Sirinapa; Thapanapongworakul, Pilunthana; Matsuura, Hiroyuki; Van Dao, Tan; Asahi, Toshimasa; Tada, Kuninao; Tajima, Shigeyuki; Nomura, Mika

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we focused on the effect of glutamine synthetase (GSI) activity in Mesorhizobium loti on the symbiosis between the host plant, Lotus japonicus, and the bacteroids. We used a signature-tagged mutant of M. loti (STM30) with a transposon inserted into the GSI (mll0343) gene. The L. japonicus plants inoculated with STM30 had significantly more nodules, and the occurrence of senesced nodules was much higher than in plants inoculated with the wild-type. The acetylene reduction activity (ARA) per nodule inoculated with STM30 was lowered compared to the control. Also, the concentration of chlorophyll, glutamine, and asparagine in leaves of STM30-infected plants was found to be reduced. Taken together, these data demonstrate that a GSI deficiency in M. loti differentially affects legume-rhizobia symbiosis by modifying nodule development and metabolic processes.

  6. Functional interactions between a glutamine synthetase promoter and MYB proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Maldonado, Josefa; Avila, Concepción; Torre, Fernando; Cañas, Rafael; Cánovas, Francisco M; Campbell, Malcolm M

    2004-08-01

    In Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), ammonium assimilation is catalysed by glutamine synthetase (GS) [EC 6.3.1.2], which is encoded by two genes, PsGS1a and PsGS1b. PsGS1b is expressed in the vascular tissue throughout the plant body, where it is believed to play a role in recycling ammonium released by various facets of metabolism. The mechanisms that may underpin the transcriptional regulation of PsGS1b were explored. The PsGS1b promoter contains a region that is enriched in previously characterized cis-acting elements, known as AC elements. Pine nuclear proteins bound these AC element-rich regions in a tissue-specific manner. As previous experiments had shown that R2R3-MYB transcription factors could interact with AC elements, the capacity of the AC elements in the PsGS1b promoter to interact with MYB proteins was examined. Two MYB proteins from loblolly pine (Pinus taeda), PtMYB1 and PtMYB4, bound to the PsGS1b promoter were able to activate transcription from this promoter in yeast, arabidopsis and pine cells. Immunolocalization experiments revealed that the two MYB proteins were most abundant in cells previously shown to accumulate PsGS1b transcripts. Immunoprecipitation analysis and supershift electrophoretic mobility shift assays implicated these same two proteins in the formation of complexes between pine nuclear extracts and the PsGS1b promoter. Given that these MYB proteins were previously shown to have the capacity to activate gene expression related to lignin biosynthesis, we hypothesize that they may function to co-regulate lignification, a process that places significant demands on nitrogen recycling, and GS, the major enzyme involved in the nitrogen recycling pathway.

  7. Renal perfusion scintiscan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renal perfusion scintigraphy; Radionuclide renal perfusion scan; Perfusion scintiscan - renal; Scintiscan - renal perfusion ... supply the kidneys. This is a condition called renal artery stenosis. Significant renal artery stenosis may be ...

  8. Glutamine, insulin and glucocorticoids regulate glutamine synthetase expression in C2C12 myotubes, Hep G2 hepatoma cells and 3T3 L1 adipocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yanxin; Watford, Malcolm

    2006-01-01

    The cell-specific regulation of glutamine synthetase expression was studied in three cell lines. In C2C12 myotubes, glucocorticoids increased the abundance of both glutamine synthetase protein and mRNA. Culture in the absence of glutamine also resulted in very high glutamine synthetase protein abundance but mRNA levels were unchanged. Glucocorticoids also increased the abundance of glutamine synthetase mRNA in Hep G2 hepatoma cells but this was not reflected in changes in protein abundance. C...

  9. Glutamine synthetase activity fuels nucleotide biosynthesis and supports growth of glutamine-restricted glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardito, Saverio; Oudin, Anaïs; Ahmed, Shafiq U; Fack, Fred; Keunen, Olivier; Zheng, Liang; Miletic, Hrvoje; Sakariassen, Per Øystein; Weinstock, Adam; Wagner, Allon; Lindsay, Susan L; Hock, Andreas K; Barnett, Susan C; Ruppin, Eytan; Mørkve, Svein Harald; Lund-Johansen, Morten; Chalmers, Anthony J; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Niclou, Simone P; Gottlieb, Eyal

    2015-12-01

    L-Glutamine (Gln) functions physiologically to balance the carbon and nitrogen requirements of tissues. It has been proposed that in cancer cells undergoing aerobic glycolysis, accelerated anabolism is sustained by Gln-derived carbons, which replenish the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (anaplerosis). However, it is shown here that in glioblastoma (GBM) cells, almost half of the Gln-derived glutamate (Glu) is secreted and does not enter the TCA cycle, and that inhibiting glutaminolysis does not affect cell proliferation. Moreover, Gln-starved cells are not rescued by TCA cycle replenishment. Instead, the conversion of Glu to Gln by glutamine synthetase (GS; cataplerosis) confers Gln prototrophy, and fuels de novo purine biosynthesis. In both orthotopic GBM models and in patients, (13)C-glucose tracing showed that GS produces Gln from TCA-cycle-derived carbons. Finally, the Gln required for the growth of GBM tumours is contributed only marginally by the circulation, and is mainly either autonomously synthesized by GS-positive glioma cells, or supplied by astrocytes.

  10. Glutamine, insulin and glucocorticoids regulate glutamine synthetase expression in C2C12 myotubes, Hep G2 hepatoma cells and 3T3 L1 adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanxin; Watford, Malcolm

    2007-04-01

    The cell-specific regulation of glutamine synthetase expression was studied in three cell lines. In C2C12 myotubes, glucocorticoids increased the abundance of both glutamine synthetase protein and mRNA. Culture in the absence of glutamine also resulted in very high glutamine synthetase protein abundance but mRNA levels were unchanged. Glucocorticoids also increased the abundance of glutamine synthetase mRNA in Hep G2 hepatoma cells but this was not reflected in changes in protein abundance. Culture of Hep G2 cells without glutamine resulted in very high levels of protein, again with no change in mRNA abundance. Insulin was without effect in both C2C12 and Hep G2 cells. In 3T3 L1 adipocytes glucocorticoids increased the abundance of both glutamine synthetase mRNA and protein, insulin added alone had no effect but in the presence of glucocorticoids resulted in lower mRNA levels than seen with glucocorticoids alone, although protein levels remained high under such conditions. In contrast to the other cell lines glutamine synthetase protein levels were relatively unchanged by culture in the absence of glutamine. The results support the hypothesis that in myocytes, and hepatomas, but not in adipocytes, glutamine acts to moderate glutamine synthetase induction by glucocorticoids.

  11. Reassimilation of Photorespiratory Ammonium in Lotus japonicus Plants Deficient in Plastidic Glutamine Synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Delgado, Carmen M; García-Calderón, Margarita; Márquez, Antonio J; Betti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that the plastidic isoform of glutamine synthetase (GS2) is the enzyme in charge of photorespiratory ammonium reassimilation in plants. The metabolic events associated to photorespiratory NH4(+) accumulation were analyzed in a Lotus japonicus photorespiratory mutant lacking GS2. The mutant plants accumulated high levels of NH4(+) when photorespiration was active, followed by a sudden drop in the levels of this compound. In this paper it was examined the possible existence of enzymatic pathways alternative to GS2 that could account for this decline in the photorespiratory ammonium. Induction of genes encoding for cytosolic glutamine synthetase (GS1), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and asparagine synthetase (ASN) was observed in the mutant in correspondence with the diminishment of NH4(+). Measurements of gene expression, polypeptide levels, enzyme activity and metabolite levels were carried out in leaf samples from WT and mutant plants after different periods of time under active photorespiratory conditions. In the case of asparagine synthetase it was not possible to determine enzyme activity and polypeptide content; however, an increased asparagine content in parallel with the induction of ASN gene expression was detected in the mutant plants. This increase in asparagine levels took place concomitantly with an increase in glutamine due to the induction of cytosolic GS1 in the mutant, thus revealing a major role of cytosolic GS1 in the reassimilation and detoxification of photorespiratory NH4(+) when the plastidic GS2 isoform is lacking. Moreover, a diminishment in glutamate levels was observed, that may be explained by the induction of NAD(H)-dependent GDH activity.

  12. Reassimilation of Photorespiratory Ammonium in Lotus japonicus Plants Deficient in Plastidic Glutamine Synthetase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen M Pérez-Delgado

    Full Text Available It is well established that the plastidic isoform of glutamine synthetase (GS2 is the enzyme in charge of photorespiratory ammonium reassimilation in plants. The metabolic events associated to photorespiratory NH4(+ accumulation were analyzed in a Lotus japonicus photorespiratory mutant lacking GS2. The mutant plants accumulated high levels of NH4(+ when photorespiration was active, followed by a sudden drop in the levels of this compound. In this paper it was examined the possible existence of enzymatic pathways alternative to GS2 that could account for this decline in the photorespiratory ammonium. Induction of genes encoding for cytosolic glutamine synthetase (GS1, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH and asparagine synthetase (ASN was observed in the mutant in correspondence with the diminishment of NH4(+. Measurements of gene expression, polypeptide levels, enzyme activity and metabolite levels were carried out in leaf samples from WT and mutant plants after different periods of time under active photorespiratory conditions. In the case of asparagine synthetase it was not possible to determine enzyme activity and polypeptide content; however, an increased asparagine content in parallel with the induction of ASN gene expression was detected in the mutant plants. This increase in asparagine levels took place concomitantly with an increase in glutamine due to the induction of cytosolic GS1 in the mutant, thus revealing a major role of cytosolic GS1 in the reassimilation and detoxification of photorespiratory NH4(+ when the plastidic GS2 isoform is lacking. Moreover, a diminishment in glutamate levels was observed, that may be explained by the induction of NAD(H-dependent GDH activity.

  13. Coordinated Slowing of Metabolism in Enteric Bacteria under Nitrogen Limitation A Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Wingreen, N S; Wingreen, Ned S.; Kustu, Sydney

    2001-01-01

    It is natural to ask how bacteria coordinate metabolism when depletion of an essential nutrient limits their growth, and they must slow their entire rate of biosynthesis. A major nutrient with a fluctuating abundance is nitrogen. The growth rate of enteric bacteria under nitrogen-limiting conditions is known to correlate with the internal concentration of free glutamine, the glutamine pool. Here we compare the patterns of utilization of L-glutamine and L-glutamate, the two central intermediates of nitrogen metabolism. Monomeric precursors of all of the cell's macromolecules -- proteins, nucleic acids, and surface polymers -- require the amide group of glutamine at the first dedicated step of biosynthesis. This is the case even though only a minority (~12%) of total cell nitrogen derives from glutamine. In contrast, the amino group of glutamate, which provides the remainder of cell nitrogen, is generally required late in biosynthetic pathways, e.g. in transaminase reactions for amino acid synthesis. We propose...

  14. Tumor cell metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Garcia, Susana; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan; B´ez-Viveros, José Luis; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease that is caused by mutations in oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and stability genes. The fact that the metabolism of tumor cells is altered has been known for many years. However, the mechanisms and consequences of metabolic reprogramming have just begun to be understood. In this review, an integral view of tumor cell metabolism is presented, showing how metabolic pathways are reprogrammed to satisfy tumor cell proliferation and survival requirements. In tumor cells, glycolysis is strongly enhanced to fulfill the high ATP demands of these cells; glucose carbons are the main building blocks in fatty acid and nucleotide biosynthesis. Glutaminolysis is also increased to satisfy NADPH regeneration, whereas glutamine carbons replenish the Krebs cycle, which produces metabolites that are constantly used for macromolecular biosynthesis. A characteristic feature of the tumor microenvironment is acidosis, which results from the local increase in lactic acid production by tumor cells. This phenomenon is attributed to the carbons from glutamine and glucose, which are also used for lactic acid production. Lactic acidosis also directs the metabolic reprogramming of tumor cells and serves as an additional selective pressure. Finally, we also discuss the role of mitochondria in supporting tumor cell metabolism. PMID:22057267

  15. Effect of parenteral glutamine supplementation in premature infants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zheng-hong; WANG Dan-hua; DONG Mei

    2007-01-01

    Background Glutamine, proposed to be conditionally essential for critically ill patients, is not added routinely to parenteral amino acid formulations for premature infants and is provided in only small quantities by the enteral route when enteral feeding is Iow. Parenteral feeding is the basic way of nutrition in the first days of life of premature infants. In this study, we evaluated the effects of glutamine supplemented parenteral nutrition for premature infants on growth and development, feeding toleration, and infective episodes.Methods From December 2002 to July 2006, 53 premature infants were given either standard or glutamine supplemented parenteral nutrition for more than 2 weeks. Twenty-eight infants were in glutamine supplemented group, whose gestational age (31.4±2.0) weeks, birth weight range (1386±251) g; twenty-five infants were in control group, gestational age (31.1 ± 1.7) weeks, with birth weight range (1346± 199) g. There were no differences between the two groups. Various growth and biochemical indices were monitored throughout the duration of hospital stay. Data between groups were analyzed with Student's t test. Nonparametric data were analyzed using a Chi-square test. A two-tailed P value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant.Results The level of serum albumin was lower in the glutamine groups on the second week (3.0 vs 3.2 g/dl, P=0.028), and blood urea nitrogen was higher in glutamine groups on the fourth week (8.1 vs 4.9 mg/dl, P=0.014), but normal. Glutamine group infants took fewer days to regain birth weight (8.1 vs 10.4 days, P=0.017), required fewer days on parenteral nutrition (24.8 vs 30.8 days, P=0.035), with shorter stays in hospital (32.1 vs 38.6 days, P=0.047). Episodes of hospital acquired infection in glutamine supplemented infants were lower than that in control group (0.96 vs 1.84 times, P=0.000).Conclusion Parenteral glutamine supplementation in premature infants can shorten days on parenteral nutrition and

  16. Changes in the activity levels of glutamine synthetase, glutaminase and glycogen synthetase in rats subjected to hypoxic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vats, P.; Mukherjee, A. K.; Kumria, M. M. L.; Singh, S. N.; Patil, S. K. B.; Rangnathan, S.; Sridharan, K.

    Exposure to high altitude causes loss of body mass and alterations in metabolic processes, especially carbohydrate and protein metabolism. The present study was conducted to elucidate the role of glutamine synthetase, glutaminase and glycogen synthetase under conditions of chronic intermittent hypoxia. Four groups, each consisting of 12 male albino rats (Wistar strain), were exposed to a simulated altitude of 7620 m in a hypobaric chamber for 6 h per day for 1, 7, 14 and 21 days, respectively. Blood haemoglobin, blood glucose, protein levels in the liver, muscle and plasma, glycogen content, and glutaminase, glutamine synthetase and glycogen synthetase activities in liver and muscle were determined in all groups of exposed and in a group of unexposed animals. Food intake and changes in body mass were also monitored. There was a significant reduction in body mass (28-30%) in hypoxia-exposed groups as compared to controls, with a corresponding decrease in food intake. There was rise in blood haemoglobin and plasma protein in response to acclimatisation. Over a three-fold increase in liver glycogen content was observed following 1 day of hypoxic exposure (4.76+/-0.78 mg.g-1 wet tissue in normal unexposed rats; 15.82+/-2.30 mg.g-1 wet tissue in rats exposed to hypoxia for 1 day). This returned to normal in later stages of exposure. However, there was no change in glycogen synthetase activity except for a decrease in the 21-days hypoxia-exposed group. There was a slight increase in muscle glycogen content in the 1-day exposed group which declined significantly by 56.5, 50.6 and 42% following 7, 14, and 21 days of exposure, respectively. Muscle glycogen synthetase activity was also decreased following 21 days of exposure. There was an increase in glutaminase activity in the liver and muscle in the 7-, 14- and 21-day exposed groups. Glutamine synthetase activity was higher in the liver in 7- and 14-day exposed groups; this returned to normal following 21 days of exposure

  17. Formation of glutamine from [13n]ammonia, [13n]dinitrogen, and [14C]glutamate by heterocysts isolated from Anabaena cylindrica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J; Meeks, J C; Wolk, C P; Shaffer, P W; Austin, S M

    1977-03-01

    A method is described for the isolation of metabolically active heterocysts from Anabaena cylindrica. These isolated heterocysts accounted for up to 34% of the acetylene-reducing activity of whole filaments and had a specific activity of up to 1,560 nmol of C2H4 formed per mg of heterocyst chlorphyll per min. Activity of glutamine synthetase was coupled to activity of nitrogenase in isolated heterocysts as shown by acetylene-inhibitable formation of [13N]NH3 and of amidelabeled [13N]glutamine form [13N]N2. A method is also described for the production of 6-mCi amounts of [13N]NH3. Isolated heterocysts formed [13N]glutamine from [13N]NH3 and glutamate, and [14C]glutamine from NH3 and [14C]glutamate, in the presence of magnesium adenosine 5'-triphosphate. Methionine sulfoximine strongly inhibited these syntheses. Glutamate synthase is, after nitrogenase and glutamine synthetase, the third sequential enzyme involved in the assimilation of N2 by intact filaments. However, the kinetics of solubilization of the activity of glutamate synthase during cavitation of suspensions of A. cylindrica indicated that very little, if any, of the activity of that enzyme was located in heterocysts. Concordantly, isolated heterocysts failed to form substantial amounts of radioactive glutamate from either [13N]glutamine or alph-[14C]ketoglutarate in the presence of other substrates and cofactors of the glutamate synthase reaction. However, they formed [14C]glutamate rapidly from alpha-[14C]ketoglutarate by aminotransferase reactions, with various amino acids as the nitrogen donor. The implication of these findings with regard to the identities of the substances moving between heterocysts and vegetative cells are discussed.

  18. Glutamine analogs promote cytoophidium assembly in human and Drosophila cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kangni Chen; Jing Zhang; (O)mür Yilmaz Tastan; Zillah Anne Deussen; Mayte Yu-Yin Siswick; Ji-Long Liu

    2011-01-01

    CTP synthase is compartmentalized within a subcellular structure,termed the cytoophidium,in a range of organisms including bacteria,yeast,fruit fly and rat.Here we show that CTP synthase is also compartmentalized into cytoophidia in human cells.Surprisingly,the occurrence of cyloophidia in human cells increases upon treatment with a glutamine analog 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine (DON),an inhibitor of glutaminedependent enzymes including CTP synthase.Experiments in flies confirmned that DON globally promotes cytoophidium assembly.Clonal analysis via CTP synthase RNA interference in somatic cells indicates that CTP synthase expression level is critical for the formation of cytoophidia.Moreover,DON facilitates cytoophidium assembly even when CTP synthase level is low.A second glutamine analog azaserine also promotes cytoophidum formation.Our data demonstrate that glutamine analogs serve as useful tools in the study of cytoophidia.

  19. Single Prolonged Stress Decreases Glutamate, Glutamine, and Creatine Concentrations In The Rat Medial Prefrontal Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Dayan; Perrine, Shane A.; George, Sophie A.; Galloway, Matthew P.; Liberzon, Israel

    2010-01-01

    Application of Single Prolonged Stress (SPS) in rats induces changes in neuroendocrine function and arousal that are characteristic of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). PTSD, in humans, is associated with decreased neural activity in the prefrontal cortex, increased neural activity in the amygdala complex, and reduced neuronal integrity in the hippocampus. However, the extent to which SPS models these aspects of PTSD has not been established. In order to address this, we used high-resolution magic angle spinning proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HR-MAS 1H MRS) ex vivo to assay levels of neurochemicals critical for energy metabolism (creatine and lactate), excitatory (glutamate and glutamine) and inhibitory (gamma amino butyric acid (GABA)) neurotransmission, and neuronal integrity (N-acetyl aspartate (NAA)) in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), amygdala complex, and hippocampus of SPS and control rats. Glutamate, glutamine, and creatine levels were decreased in the mPFC of SPS rats when compared to controls, which suggests decreased excitatory tone in this region. SPS did not alter the neurochemical profiles of either the hippocampus or amygdala. These data suggest that SPS selectively attenuates excitatory tone, without a disruption of neuronal integrity, in the mPFC. PMID:20546834

  20. Time-resolved transcriptome analysis of Bacillus subtilis responding to valine, glutamate, and glutamine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bang-Ce Ye

    Full Text Available Microorganisms can restructure their transcriptional output to adapt to environmental conditions by sensing endogenous metabolite pools. In this paper, an Agilent customized microarray representing 4,106 genes was used to study temporal transcript profiles of Bacillus subtilis in response to valine, glutamate and glutamine pulses over 24 h. A total of 673, 835, and 1135 amino-acid-regulated genes were identified having significantly changed expression at one or more time points in response to valine, glutamate, and glutamine, respectively, including genes involved in cell wall, cellular import, metabolism of amino-acids and nucleotides, transcriptional regulation, flagellar motility, chemotaxis, phage proteins, sporulation, and many genes of unknown function. Different amino acid treatments were compared in terms of both the global temporal profiles and the 5-minute quick regulations, and between-experiment differential genes were identified. The highlighted genes were analyzed based on diverse sources of gene functions using a variety of computational tools, including T-profiler analysis, and hierarchical clustering. The results revealed the common and distinct modes of action of these three amino acids, and should help to elucidate the specific signaling mechanism of each amino acid as an effector.

  1. Activation of the TOR Signalling Pathway by Glutamine Regulates Insect Fecundity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yifan; Sun, Zhongxiang; Zhang, Jianqing; Kang, Kui; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Wenqing

    2015-05-29

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) positively controls cell growth in response to nutrients such as amino acids. However, research on the specific nutrients sensed by TOR is limited. Glutamine (Gln), a particularly important amino acid involved in metabolism in organisms, is synthesised and catalysed exclusively by glutamine synthetase (GS), and our previous studies have shown that Gln may regulate fecundity in vivo levels of the brown planthopper (BPH) Nilaparvata lugens. Until now, it has remained unclear whether Gln activates or inhibits the TOR signalling pathway. Here, we performed the combined analyses of iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification) and DGE (tag-based digital gene expression) data in N. lugens at the protein and transcript levels after GS RNAi, and we found that 52 pathways overlap, including the TOR pathway. We further experimentally demonstrate that Gln activates the TOR pathway by promoting the serine/threonine protein kinase AKT and inhibiting the 5'AMP-activated protein kinase AMPK phosphorylation activity in the pest. Furthermore, TOR regulates the fecundity of N. lugens probably by mediating vitellogenin (Vg) expression. This work is the first report that Gln activates the TOR pathway in vivo.

  2. Overexpression of a glutamine synthetase gene affects growth and development in sorghum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urriola, Jazmina; Rathore, Keerti S

    2015-06-01

    Nitrogen is a primary macronutrient in plants, and nitrogen fertilizers play a critical role in crop production and yield. In this study, we investigated the effects of overexpressing a glutamine synthetase (GS) gene on nitrogen metabolism, and plant growth and development in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L., Moench). GS catalyzes the ATP dependent reaction between ammonia and glutamate to produce glutamine. A 1,071 bp long coding sequence of a sorghum cytosolic GS gene (Gln1) under the control of the maize ubiquitin (Ubq) promoter was introduced into sorghum immature embryos by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Progeny of the transformants exhibited higher accumulation of the Gln1 transcripts and up to 2.2-fold higher GS activity compared to the non-transgenic controls. When grown under optimal nitrogen conditions, these Gln1 transgenic lines showed greater tillering and up to 2.1-fold increase in shoot vegetative biomass. Interestingly, even under greenhouse conditions, we observed a seasonal component to both these parameters and the grain yield. Our results, showing that the growth and development of sorghum Gln1 transformants are also affected by N availability and other environmental factors, suggest complexity of the relationship between GS activity and plant growth and development. A better understanding of other control points and the ability to manipulate these will be needed to utilize the transgenic technology to improve nitrogen use efficiency of crop plants.

  3. Assessment of glutamine synthetase activity by [13N]ammonia uptake in living rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momosaki, Sotaro; Ito, Miwa; Tonomura, Misato; Abe, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) plays an important role in glutamate neurotransmission or neurological disorder in the brain. [(13) N]Ammonia blood flow tracer has been reported to be metabolically trapped in the brain via the glutamate-glutamine pathway. The present study investigated the effect of an inhibitor of GS on [(13) N]ammonia uptake in order to clarify the feasibility of measuring GS activity in the living brain. l-Methionine sulfoximine (MSO), a selective GS inhibitor was microinjected into the ipsilateral striatum in rats. [(13) N]Ammonia uptake was quantified by autoradiography method as well as small animal positron emission tomography (PET) scans. The GS activity of the brain homogenate was assayed from the γ-glutamyl transferase reaction. Autoradiograms showed a decrease of [(13) N]ammonia radioactivity on the MSO-injected side compared with the saline-injected side of the striatum. This reduction could be detected with a small animal PET scanner. MSO had no effect on cerebral blood flow measured by uptake of [(15) O]H2 O. The reduction of [(13) N]ammonia uptake was closely related to the results of GS activity assay. These results indicated that [(13) N]ammonia may enable measurement of GS activity in the living brain.

  4. Glutamine synthetase 2 is not essential for biosynthesis of compatible solutes in Halobacillus halophilus

    OpenAIRE

    Anna eShiyan; Melanie eThompson; Saskia eKöcher; Michaela eTausendschön; Helena eSantos; Inga eHänelt; Volker eMüller

    2014-01-01

    Halobacillus halophilus, a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from salt marshes, produces various compatible solutes to cope with osmotic stress. Glutamate and glutamine are dominant compatible solutes at mild salinities. Glutamine synthetase activity in cell suspensions of Halobacillus halophilus wild type was shown to be salt dependent and chloride modulated. A possible candidate to catalyze glutamine synthesis is glutamine synthetase A2, whose transcription is stimulated by chloride....

  5. RENAL CRYOABLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Govorov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal cryoablation is an alternative minimally-invasive method of treatment for localized renal cell carcinoma. The main advantages of this methodology include visualization of the tumor and the forming of "ice ball" in real time, fewer complications compared with other methods of treatment of renal cell carcinoma, as well as the possibility of conducting cryotherapy in patients with concomitant pathology. Compared with other ablative technologies cryoablation has a low rate of repeat sessions and good intermediate oncological results. The studies of long-term oncological and functional results of renal cryoablation are presently under way.

  6. Renal angiomyolipoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm-Nielsen, P; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    1988-01-01

    lesion. Three cases of renal angiomyolipoma, 2 of which underwent perfusion-fixation, were studied by electron microscopy to clarify the cellular composition of this lesion. In the smooth muscle cells abundant accumulation of glycogen was found, whereas the lipocytes disclosed normal ultrastructural......-specific vesicular structures. These findings suggest a secondary vascular damage, i.e. the thickened vessels may not be a primary, integral part of renal angiomyolipoma. Evidence of a common precursor cell of renal angiomyolipoma was not disclosed. It is concluded that renal angiomyolipoma is a hamartoma composed...

  7. How to understand the results of studies of glutamine supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernerman, Jan

    2015-11-03

    The lack of understanding of the mechanisms behind possible beneficial and possible harmful effects of glutamine supplementation makes the design of interventional studies of glutamine supplementations difficult, perhaps even hazardous. What is the interventional target, and how might it relate to outcomes? Taking one step further and aggregating results from interventional studies into meta-analyses does not diminish the difficulties. Therefore, conducting basic research seems to be a better idea than groping in the dark and exposing patients to potential harm in this darkness.

  8. Effects of glutamine on wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesici, Ugur; Kesici, Sevgi; Ulusoy, Hulya; Yucesan, Fulya; Turkmen, Aygen U; Besir, Ahmet; Tuna, Verda

    2015-06-01

    Studies reporting the need for replacing amino acids such as glutamine (Gln), hydroxymethyl butyrate (HMB) and arginine (Arg) to accelerate wound healing are available in the literature. The primary objective of this study was to present the effects of Gln on tissue hydroxyproline (OHP) levels in wound healing. This study was conducted on 30 female Sprague Dawley rats with a mean weight of 230 ± 20 g. Secondary wounds were formed by excising 2 × 1 cm skin subcutaneous tissue on the back of the rats. The rats were divided into three equal groups. Group C (Control): the group received 1 ml/day isotonic solution by gastric gavage after secondary wound was formed. Group A (Abound): the group received 0·3 g/kg/day/ml Gln, 0·052 g/kg/day/ml HMB and 0·3 g/kg/day/ml Arg by gastric gavage after secondary wound was formed. Group R (Resource): the group received 0·3 g/kg/day/ml Gln by gastric gavage after secondary wound was formed. The OHP levels of the tissues obtained from the upper half region on the 8th day and the lower half region on the 21st day from the same rats in the groups were examined. Statistical analysis was performed using the statistics program SPSS version 17.0. No statistically significant differences were reported with regard to the OHP measurements on the 8th and 21st days (8th day: F = 0·068, P = 0·935 > 0·05; 21st day: F = 0·018, P = 0·983 > 0·05). The increase in mean OHP levels on the 8th and 21st days within each group was found to be statistically significant (F = 1146·34, P = 0·000 wound healing negatively and who do not have large tissue loss at critical level, Gln, Arg and HMB support would not be required to accelerate secondary wound healing. © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Pharmacologic or Genetic Targeting of Glutamine Synthetase Skews Macrophages toward an M1-like Phenotype and Inhibits Tumor Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika M. Palmieri

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine-synthetase (GS, the glutamine-synthesizing enzyme from glutamate, controls important events, including the release of inflammatory mediators, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR activation, and autophagy. However, its role in macrophages remains elusive. We report that pharmacologic inhibition of GS skews M2-polarized macrophages toward the M1-like phenotype, characterized by reduced intracellular glutamine and increased succinate with enhanced glucose flux through glycolysis, which could be partly related to HIF1α activation. As a result of these metabolic changes and HIF1α accumulation, GS-inhibited macrophages display an increased capacity to induce T cell recruitment, reduced T cell suppressive potential, and an impaired ability to foster endothelial cell branching or cancer cell motility. Genetic deletion of macrophagic GS in tumor-bearing mice promotes tumor vessel pruning, vascular normalization, accumulation of cytotoxic T cells, and metastasis inhibition. These data identify GS activity as mediator of the proangiogenic, immunosuppressive, and pro-metastatic function of M2-like macrophages and highlight the possibility of targeting this enzyme in the treatment of cancer metastasis.

  10. Adverse Renal, Endocrine, Hepatic, and Metabolic Events during Maintenance Mood Stabilizer Treatment for Bipolar Disorder: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph F Hayes

    2016-08-01

    to lithium. However, rates of greater than 15% weight gain on valproate, olanzapine, and quetiapine were higher (valproate HR 1.62; 95% CI 1.31-2.01; p < 0.001, olanzapine HR 1.84; 95% CI 1.47-2.30; p < 0.001, quetiapine HR 1.67; 95% CI 1.24-2.20; p < 0.001 than in individuals prescribed lithium, as were rates of hypertension in the olanzapine treated group (HR 1.41, 95% CI 1.06-1.87; p = 0.017. We found no significant difference in rates of chronic kidney disease stage 4 or more severe, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, or hepatotoxicity. Despite estimates being robust following sensitivity analyses, limitations include the potential for residual confounding and ascertainment bias and an inability to examine dosage effects.Lithium use is associated with more renal and endocrine adverse events but less weight gain than commonly used alternative mood stabilizers. Risks need to be offset with the effectiveness and anti-suicidal benefits of lithium and the potential metabolic side effects of alternative treatment options.

  11. Have we enough glutamine and how does it work? A clinician's view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeters, P B; Grecu, I

    2012-01-01

    There is a gap between the scientific basis of the claim that in several disease states glutamine is lacking and the widespread belief that supplementation of glutamine to the nutritional regimen is beneficial in severely ill patients. Glutamine shortage exists when consuming tissues, playing a crucial role in the response to trauma and disease, receive insufficient amounts of glutamine. In these tissues (immune system, wound), glutamine is only partly oxidized but has more specific roles as nontoxic nitrogen carrier, precursor of several crucial metabolites required for cell proliferation and for maintenance of the redox potential, and as osmolyte. In inflammatory states, glutamine concentrations in plasma and tissues are decreased due to many disease-related factors, precluding its use as a reliable indicator of shortage. Isotope studies have yielded equivocal results, precluding their use as a reliable indicator of glutamine shortage or adequacy. The increase in the net release of glutamine from peripheral tissues to central tissues (immune system, liver, spleen, wound) in inflammatory states provides a better basis for the necessity to supplement the organism with extra glutamine in these conditions. Glutamine supplementation was beneficial in a few studies in burn or trauma patients. The clinical benefit of parenteral glutamine supplementation in patients with severe inflammation has been demonstrated more convincingly. The amounts of glutamine supplemented approximate the amounts released by peripheral tissues and utilized by central organs operative in host defense and are therefore in the physiological range.

  12. Renal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corgna, Enrichetta; Betti, Maura; Gatta, Gemma; Roila, Fausto; De Mulder, Pieter H. M.

    2007-01-01

    In Europe, renal cancer (that is neoplasia of the kidney, renal pelvis or ureter (ICD-9 189 and ICD-10 C64-C66)) ranks as the seventh most common malignancy in men amongst whom there are 29,600 new cases each year (3.5% of all cancers). Tobacco, obesity and a diet poor in vegetables are all acknowle

  13. Renal fallure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    920705 Endothelin and acute renal failure:study on their relationship and possiblemechanisms. LIN Shanyan(林善锬), et al.Renal Res Lab, Huashan Hosp, Shanghai MedUniv, Shanghai, 200040. Natl Med J China 1992;72(4): 201-205. In order to investigate the role of endothelin

  14. Renal cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corgna, E.; Betti, M.; Gatta, G.; Roila, F.; Mulder, P.H.M. de

    2007-01-01

    In Europe, renal cancer (that is neoplasia of the kidney, renal pelvis or ureter (ICD-9 189 and ICD-10 C64-C66)) ranks as the seventh most common malignancy in men amongst whom there are 29,600 new cases each year (3.5% of all cancers). Tobacco, obesity and a diet poor in vegetables are all

  15. Renal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corgna, Enrichetta; Betti, Maura; Gatta, Gemma; Roila, Fausto; De Mulder, Pieter H. M.

    2007-01-01

    In Europe, renal cancer (that is neoplasia of the kidney, renal pelvis or ureter (ICD-9 189 and ICD-10 C64-C66)) ranks as the seventh most common malignancy in men amongst whom there are 29,600 new cases each year (3.5% of all cancers). Tobacco, obesity and a diet poor in vegetables are all

  16. Nitrogen Metabolism During Hepatectomy and Hyperbaric Oxygenation: Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Savilov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to examine nitrogen metabolism in the organs of the portal system during liver resection (LR and hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO.Material and methods: Experiments were conducted on 65 female albino rats. LR was made under ether anesthesia, by removing a portion of the left hepatic lobe with an electric knife, which amounted to 15—20% of the organ’s mass. HBO was performed using medical oxygen at 3 ata for 50 min once daily within the first three days after LR. Lung tissue, gastrointestinal tract (GIT, spleen, and choledochal bile were the subject of the study. The tissue and blood levels of ammonia, glutamine, and urea were measured.Results: LR leads to pathological ammonia accumulation and decreases arterial glutamine consumption in GIT organs. Concurrently, the urea contained in the organs begins to come into portal blood flow, splenic glutamine deficiency develops, and hepatic ammonia-absorptive, glutamine- and urea-excretory functions diminish. Post-LR HBO prevents the accumulation of ammonia in the liver and GIT, restores the ammonia-absorptive, glutamine- and urea-excretory functions of the liver, and stimulates its glutamine and urea accumulation. Concomitantly, under HBO, there is an increase in glutamine entrance from the GIT into blood flow, but there is a decrease in GIT urea excretion and portal venous blood ammonia levels. HBO eliminates arterial hyperammonemia after LR and splenic glutamine deficiency.Conclusion: Hyperbaric oxygen eliminates nitrogen metabolic disturbances in the portal system, regulates compensatory-adaptive ammonia metabolic reactions triggered in the GIT and spleen during LR. 

  17. Manganese toxicity in the central nervous system: the glutamine/glutamate-γ-aminobutyric acid cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidoryk-Wegrzynowicz, M; Aschner, M

    2013-05-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace element that is required for maintaining proper function and regulation of numerous biochemical and cellular reactions. Despite its essentiality, at excessive levels Mn is toxic to the central nervous system (CNS). Increased accumulation of Mn in specific brain regions, such as the substantia nigra, globus pallidus and striatum, triggers neurotoxicity resulting in a neurological brain disorder, termed manganism. Mn has been also implicated in the pathophysiology of several other neurodegenerative diseases. Its toxicity is associated with disruption of the glutamine (Gln)/glutamate (Glu)-γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) cycle (GGC) between astrocytes and neurons, thus leading to changes in Glu-ergic and/or GABAergic transmission and Gln metabolism. Here we discuss the common mechanisms underlying Mn-induced neurotoxicity and their relationship to CNS pathology and GGC impairment.

  18. X-ray signals in renal osteopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieden, K.

    1984-10-01

    Chronic renal insufficiency is associated with metabolic disturbances which ultimately lead to typical, partly extremely painful changes in the skeletal system the longer the disease persists. Regular X-ray control of certain skeletal segments allows early detection of renal oesteopathy if the radiological findings described in this article are carefully scrutinised and interpreted.

  19. OCULO-CEREBRO-RENAL SYNDROME (LOWE'S SYNDROME)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1991-01-01

    Oculo-cerebro-renal syndrome (Lowe's syndrome) is characterized by mental and motor retardation, cataract, glaucoma and renal abnormalities. It is an X-linked recessive metabolic disease. Two brothers suffering from Lowe's syndrome are reported. Their mother with lenticular opacities and peculiar facial appearance is in concordance with the obligate carrier. The ocular changes and heridity are discussed.

  20. Effect of dexamethasone on fetal hepatic glutamine-glutamate exchange

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Timmerman (Michelle); C. Teng; R.B. Wilkening; P.V. Fennessey (Paul); F.C. Battaglia (Frederick); G. Meschia

    2000-01-01

    textabstractIntravenous infusion of dexamethasone (Dex) in the fetal lamb causes a two- to threefold increase in plasma glutamine and other glucogenic amino acids and a decrease of plasma glutamate to approximately one-third of normal. To explore the underlying mechanis

  1. Glutamine, arginine, and leucine signaling in the intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marc Rhoads, J; Wu, Guoyao

    2009-05-01

    Glutamine and leucine are abundant constituents of plant and animal proteins, whereas the content of arginine in foods and physiological fluids varies greatly. Besides their role in protein synthesis, these three amino acids individually activate signaling pathway to promote protein synthesis and possibly inhibit autophagy-mediated protein degradation in intestinal epithelial cells. In addition, glutamine and arginine stimulate the mitogen-activated protein kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)/p70 (s6) kinase pathways, respectively, to enhance mucosal cell migration and restitution. Moreover, through the nitric oxide-dependent cGMP signaling cascade, arginine regulates multiple physiological events in the intestine that are beneficial for cell homeostasis and survival. Available evidence from both in vitro and in vivo animal studies shows that glutamine and arginine promote cell proliferation and exert differential cytoprotective effects in response to nutrient deprivation, oxidative injury, stress, and immunological challenge. Additionally, when nitric oxide is available, leucine increases the migration of intestinal cells. Therefore, through cellular signaling mechanisms, arginine, glutamine, and leucine play crucial roles in intestinal growth, integrity, and function.

  2. Synthesis of Biobased Succinonitrile from Glutamic Acid and Glutamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammens, T.M.; Nôtre, Le J.; Franssen, M.C.R.; Scott, E.L.; Sanders, J.P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Succinonitrile is the precursor of 1,4-diaminobutane, which is used for the industrial production of polyamides. This paper describes the synthesis of biobased succinonitrile from glutamic acid and glutamine, amino acids that are abundantly present in many plant proteins. Synthesis of the intermedia

  3. Synthesis of Biobased Succinonitrile from Glutamic Acid and Glutamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammens, T.M.; Nôtre, Le J.; Franssen, M.C.R.; Scott, E.L.; Sanders, J.P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Succinonitrile is the precursor of 1,4-diaminobutane, which is used for the industrial production of polyamides. This paper describes the synthesis of biobased succinonitrile from glutamic acid and glutamine, amino acids that are abundantly present in many plant proteins. Synthesis of the intermedia

  4. Glutamine attenuates post-traumatic glutathione depletion in human muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fläring, U B; Rooyackers, O E; Wernerman, J; Hammarqvist, F

    2003-03-01

    Glutathione is quantitatively the most important endogenous scavenger system. Glutathione depletion in skeletal muscle is pronounced following major trauma and sepsis in intensive care unit patients. Also, following elective surgery, glutathione depletion occurs in parallel with a progressive decline in muscle glutamine concentration. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that glutamine supplementation may counteract glutathione depletion in a human trauma model. A homogeneous group of patients (n = 17) undergoing a standardized surgical procedure were prospectively randomly allocated to receive glutamine (0.56 g x day(-1) x kg(-1)) or placebo as part of isonitrogenous and isocaloric nutrition. Percutaneous muscle biopsies and blood samples were taken pre-operatively and at 24 and 72 h after surgery. The concentrations of muscle glutathione and related amino acids were determined in muscle tissue and plasma. In the control (unsupplemented) subjects, total muscle glutathione had decreased by 47+/-8% and 37+/-11% and reduced glutathione had decreased by 53+/-10% and 45+/-16% respectively at 24 and 72 h after surgery (P glutamine supplementation attenuates glutathione depletion in skeletal muscle in humans following standardized surgical trauma.

  5. Intravenous glutamine enhances COX-2 activity giving cardioprotection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGuinness, Jonathan

    2009-03-01

    Preconditioning, a highly evolutionary conserved endogenous protective response, provides the most powerful form of anti-infarct protection known. We investigated whether acute intravenous glutamine, through an effect on cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and heat shock protein (HSP) 72, might induce preconditioning.

  6. Transport of glutamine into the xylem of sunflower (Helianthus annuus).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Findenegg, G.R.; Plaisier, W.; Posthumus, M.A.; Melger, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) plants were grown on nutrient solution with ammonium nitrogen. After 12 days of growth the ammonium in the nutrient solution was labeled with N (99%). Three hours later glutamine-N in the xylem exudate was labeled for 56% as shown by GC-MS; this percentage increased

  7. Effect of dexamethasone on fetal hepatic glutamine-glutamate exchange

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Timmerman (Michelle); C. Teng; R.B. Wilkening; P.V. Fennessey (Paul); F.C. Battaglia (Frederick); G. Meschia

    2000-01-01

    textabstractIntravenous infusion of dexamethasone (Dex) in the fetal lamb causes a two- to threefold increase in plasma glutamine and other glucogenic amino acids and a decrease of plasma glutamate to approximately one-third of normal. To explore the underlying

  8. Critical Evaluation of the Changes in Glutamine Synthetase Activity in Models of Cerebral Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeitner, Thomas M; Battaile, Kevin; Cooper, Arthur J L

    2015-12-01

    The following article addresses some seemingly paradoxical observations concerning cerebral glutamine synthetase in ischemia-reperfusion injury. In the brain, this enzyme is predominantly found in astrocytes and catalyzes part of the glutamine-glutamate cycle. Glutamine synthetase is also thought to be especially sensitive to inactivation by the oxygen- and nitrogen-centered radicals generated during strokes. Despite this apparent sensitivity, glutamine synthetase specific activity is elevated in the affected tissues during reperfusion. Given the central role of the glutamine-glutamate cycle in the brain, we sought to resolve these conflicting observations with the view of providing an alternative perspective for therapeutic intervention in stroke.

  9. Type 1 diabetes: can exercise impair the autoimmune event? The L-arginine/glutamine coupling hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Maurício da Silva; de Bittencourt, Paulo Ivo Homem

    2008-06-01

    Prevention of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) requires early intervention in the autoimmune process directed against beta-cells of the pancreatic islets of Langerhans, which is believed to result from a disorder of immunoregulation. According to this concept, a T-helper lymphocyte of type 1 (Th1) subset of T-lymphocytes and their cytokine products, the type 1 cytokines [e.g. interleukin 2 (IL-2), interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumour necrosis factor beta (TNF-beta)] prevail over immunoregulatory (anti-inflammatory) Th2 subset and its cytokine products, i.e. type 2 cytokines (e.g. IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10). This allows type 1 cytokines to initiate a cascade of immune/inflammatory processes in the islet (insulitis), culminating in beta-cell destruction. Activation of sympathetic-corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) axis by psychological stress induces specifically Th1 cell overactivity that determines enhanced glutamine utilization and consequent poor L-arginine supply for nitric oxide (NO)-assisted insulin secretion. This determines the shift of intraislet glutamate metabolism from the synthesis of glutathione (GSH) to that of L-arginine, leading to a redox imbalance that activates nuclear factor kappaB exacerbating inflammation and NO-mediated cytotoxicity. Physical exercise is capable of inducing changes in the pattern of cytokine production and release towards type 2 class and to normalize the glutamine supply to the circulation, which reduces the need for glutamate, whose metabolic fate may be restored in the direction of GSH synthesis and antioxidant defence. Also, the 70-kDa heat shock protein (hsp70), which is immunoregulatory, may modulate exercise-induced anti-inflammation. In this work, we envisage how exercise can intervene in the mechanisms involved in the autoimmune process against beta-cells and how novel therapeutic approaches may be inferred from these observations.

  10. Inhibition of glutamine synthetase in the central nucleus of the amygdala induces anhedonic behavior and recurrent seizures in a rat model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruenbaum, Shaun E; Wang, Helen; Zaveri, Hitten P; Tang, Amber B; Lee, Tih-Shih W; Eid, Tore; Dhaher, Roni

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of depression and suicide is increased in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE); however, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. Anhedonia, a core symptom of depression that is predictive of suicide, is common in patients with MTLE. Glutamine synthetase, an astrocytic enzyme that metabolizes glutamate and ammonia to glutamine, is reduced in the amygdala in patients with epilepsy and depression and in suicide victims. Here, we sought to develop a novel model of anhedonia in MTLE by testing the hypothesis that deficiency in glutamine synthetase in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) leads to epilepsy and comorbid anhedonia. Nineteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with an osmotic pump infusing either the glutamine synthetase inhibitor methionine sulfoximine [MSO (n=12)] or phosphate buffered saline [PBS (n=7)] into the right CeA. Seizure activity was monitored by video-intracranial electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings for 21days after the onset of MSO infusion. Sucrose preference, a measure of anhedonia, was assessed after 21days. Methionine sulfoximine-infused rats exhibited recurrent seizures during the monitoring period and showed decreased sucrose preference over days when compared with PBS-infused rats (pglutamine synthetase activity in the CeA is a possible common cause of anhedonia and seizures in TLE. We propose that the MSO CeA model can be used for mechanistic studies that will lead to the development and testing of novel drugs to prevent seizures, depression, and suicide in patients with TLE.

  11. Computational Sampling and Simulation Based Assessment of Novel Mycobacterium tuberculosis Glutamine Synthetase Inhibitors: Study Involving Structure Based Drug Design and Free Energy Perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryadevara, Priyanka; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Soni, Vijay; Devi, Parthiban Brindha; Nandicoori, Vinay Kumar; Sriram, Dharmarajan

    2016-01-01

    The highly persistent nature of Mycobacterium tuberculosis can be attributed to its lipophilic cell wall which acts as a major barrier in the process of drug discovery against tuberculosis. Glutamine synthetase plays a major role in nitrogen metabolism and cell wall biosynthesis of pathogenic mycobacteria. The current review focuses on the structural and functional aspects of Mtb glutamine synthetase and an overview of its reported inhibitors till date. Also in the present study, we employed a computational structure based drug design protocol for identifying novel inhibitors against Mtb glutamine synthetase (MtbGS). A total of 12 hits were identified based on e-pharmacophore related search and virtual screening, which were further tested for their in vitro MtbGS inhibitory activity. Three compounds (compound 6, 1 and 12) were found with IC50 less than 5 µM, of which compound 6 being top active with IC50 of 2.124 µM. Differential scanning fluorimetry studies were employed so as to measure the thermal stability of the protein complexed with the most active compound. Also the protein complexes with top three active compounds were subjected for molecular dynamics simulations to study their binding pattern and stabilization effect. The solvation free energies were also determined for these compounds, undertaking free energy perturbation studies, which can be used further for lead optimization in the process of anti-tubercular drug discovery targeting Mtb glutamine synthetase.

  12. Tumor Metabolism of Malignant Gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ru, Peng; Williams, Terence M.; Chakravarti, Arnab; Guo, Deliang, E-mail: deliang.guo@osumc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center & Arthur G James Cancer Hospital, Columbus, OH 43012 (United States)

    2013-11-08

    Constitutively activated oncogenic signaling via genetic mutations such as in the EGFR/PI3K/Akt and Ras/RAF/MEK pathways has been recognized as a major driver for tumorigenesis in most cancers. Recent insights into tumor metabolism have further revealed that oncogenic signaling pathways directly promote metabolic reprogramming to upregulate biosynthesis of lipids, carbohydrates, protein, DNA and RNA, leading to enhanced growth of human tumors. Therefore, targeting cell metabolism has become a novel direction for drug development in oncology. In malignant gliomas, metabolism pathways of glucose, glutamine and lipid are significantly reprogrammed. Moreover, molecular mechanisms causing these metabolic changes are just starting to be unraveled. In this review, we will summarize recent studies revealing critical gene alterations that lead to metabolic changes in malignant gliomas, and also discuss promising therapeutic strategies via targeting the key players in metabolic regulation.

  13. Tumor Metabolism of Malignant Gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deliang Guo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Constitutively activated oncogenic signaling via genetic mutations such as in the EGFR/PI3K/Akt and Ras/RAF/MEK pathways has been recognized as a major driver for tumorigenesis in most cancers. Recent insights into tumor metabolism have further revealed that oncogenic signaling pathways directly promote metabolic reprogramming to upregulate biosynthesis of lipids, carbohydrates, protein, DNA and RNA, leading to enhanced growth of human tumors. Therefore, targeting cell metabolism has become a novel direction for drug development in oncology. In malignant gliomas, metabolism pathways of glucose, glutamine and lipid are significantly reprogrammed. Moreover, molecular mechanisms causing these metabolic changes are just starting to be unraveled. In this review, we will summarize recent studies revealing critical gene alterations that lead to metabolic changes in malignant gliomas, and also discuss promising therapeutic strategies via targeting the key players in metabolic regulation.

  14. Dosing and efficacy of glutamine supplementation in human exercise and sport training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, Michael

    2008-10-01

    Some athletes can have high intakes of l-glutamine because of their high energy and protein intakes and also because they consume protein supplements, protein hydrolysates, and free amino acids. Prolonged exercise and periods of heavy training are associated with a decrease in the plasma glutamine concentration and this has been suggested to be a potential cause of the exercise-induced immune impairment and increased susceptibility to infection in athletes. However, several recent glutamine feeding intervention studies indicate that although the plasma glutamine concentration can be kept constant during and after prolonged strenuous exercise, the glutamine supplementation does not prevent the postexercise changes in several aspects of immune function. Although glutamine is essential for lymphocyte proliferation, the plasma glutamine concentration does not fall sufficiently low after exercise to compromise the rate of proliferation. Acute intakes of glutamine of approximately 20-30 g seem to be without ill effect in healthy adult humans and no harm was reported in 1 study in which athletes consumed 28 g glutamine every day for 14 d. Doses of up to 0.65 g/kg body mass of glutamine (in solution or as a suspension) have been reported to be tolerated by patients and did not result in abnormal plasma ammonia levels. However, the suggested reasons for taking glutamine supplements (support for immune system, increased glycogen synthesis, anticatabolic effect) have received little support from well-controlled scientific studies in healthy, well-nourished humans.

  15. Circumstantial evidence for a role of glutamine-synthetase in suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkman, Hans O

    2011-06-01

    Suicide occurs during depression, schizophrenia, diabetes and epilepsy. A common denominator of these disorders is the presence of inflammation. Inflammatory cytokines affect function and expression of the glial enzyme glutamine synthetase and post mortem studies indicate that brain glutamine synthetase function is suppressed in mood disorders and epilepsy. In a study of schizophrenia brains, the expression of glutamine synthetase was reduced in those cases where the cause of death was suicide. The glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) inhibitor, lithium, which has a proven efficacy against suicide, increased in an animal experiment the expression of glutamine synthetase. Based on these data one could reason that suicide may be prevented by centrally acting GSK3 inhibitors. However, since inhibition of glutamine synthetase may lead to a deficit in glutamine and as consequence a GABA and glutamate deficit, even simple food supplementation with glutamine might help to reduce suicide.

  16. Renal teratogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Thomas M; Jones, Deborah P; Cooper, William O

    2014-09-01

    In utero exposure to certain drugs early in pregnancy may adversely affect nephrogenesis. Exposure to drugs later in pregnancy may affect the renin-angiotensin system, which could have an impact on fetal or neonatal renal function. Reduction in nephron number and renal function could have adverse consequences for the child several years later. Data are limited on the information needed to guide decisions for patients and providers regarding the use of certain drugs in pregnancy. The study of drug nephroteratogenicity has not been systematized, a large, standardized, global approach is needed to evaluate the renal risks of in utero drug exposures.

  17. Nutrition and renal disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris de Castaño

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Kidney plays an important roll in body homeostasis through excretory, metabolic and endocrine functions. Kidneys filter fluids and solutes and reabsorbed water , electrolytes an minerals. Urine volume and solute excretion are adjusted to keep composition of the extracellular space, serum osmolarity and intravascular volume in constant balance. Kidneys also regulate acid base equilibrium, hormone metabolism and excretion and amino acid concentration. Vitamin D hydroxylation takes place in the kidney, this is the active form of this vitamin, which inhibits PTH. In addition they produce erythropoietin which control hemoglobin concentration in erythrocytes. When renal insufficiency develops, and glormerular filtration rate is between 50 to 75% of normal, this functions are decreased .When renal function is less than 10%, this functions ceased. In children small changes in water, solute, acid base, calcium and phosphorus can alter normal growth and development. If kidneys can not maintain internal equilibrium, specific nutrients should be used. Compensation should be done according to age, type or renal disease and level of glomerular filtration rate.

  18. l-glutamine and l-alanine supplementation increase glutamine-glutathione axis and muscle HSP-27 in rats trained using a progressive high-intensity resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Jaqueline Santos Moreira; Raizel, Raquel; Hypólito, Thaís Menezes; Rosa, Thiago Dos Santos; Cruzat, Vinicius Fernandes; Tirapegui, Julio

    2016-08-01

    In this study we investigated the chronic effects of oral l-glutamine and l-alanine supplementation, either in their free or dipeptide form, on glutamine-glutathione (GLN-GSH) axis and cytoprotection mediated by HSP-27 in rats submitted to resistance exercise (RE). Forty Wistar rats were distributed into 5 groups: sedentary; trained (CTRL); and trained supplemented with l-alanyl-l-glutamine, l-glutamine and l-alanine in their free form (GLN+ALA), or free l-alanine (ALA). All trained animals were submitted to a 6-week ladder-climbing protocol. Supplementations were offered in a 4% drinking water solution for 21 days prior to euthanasia. Plasma glutamine, creatine kinase (CK), myoglobin (MYO), and erythrocyte concentration of reduced GSH and glutathione disulfide (GSSG) were measured. In tibialis anterior skeletal muscle, GLN-GSH axis, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), and the expression of heat shock factor 1 (HSF-1), 27-kDa heat shock protein (HSP-27), and glutamine synthetase were determined. In CRTL animals, high-intensity RE reduced muscle glutamine levels and increased GSSG/GSH rate and TBARS, as well as augmented plasma CK and MYO levels. Conversely, l-glutamine-supplemented animals showed an increase in plasma and muscle levels of glutamine, with a reduction in GSSG/GSH rate, TBARS, and CK. Free l-alanine administration increased plasma glutamine concentration and lowered muscle TBARS. HSF-1 and HSP-27 were high in all supplemented groups when compared with CTRL (p < 0.05). The results presented herein demonstrate that l-glutamine supplemented with l-alanine, in both a free or dipeptide form, improve the GLN-GSH axis and promote cytoprotective effects in rats submitted to high-intensity RE training.

  19. Sarcoidose renal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AQUINO MARIA ENEDINA CLAUDINO DE

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Em uma mulher de 62 anos, branca, em avaliação pré-operatória de facectomia, foram detectadas alterações urinárias, tendo sido firmados os diagnósticos de calculose renal esquerda e exclusão renal homolateral. No pré-operatório da nefrectomia foram evidenciados processo pulmonar intersticial bilateral e adenopatia torácica, cuja investigação foi adiada para após a cirurgia. No rim retirado foram detectados granulomas epitelióides não necrotizantes, o mesmo ocorrendo posteriormente em biópsia transbrônquica. A paciente foi tratada com metilprednisolona, com discreta melhora pulmonar, o que não ocorreu com a função renal. O diagnóstico final foi de sarcoidose com envolvimento pulmonar, ganglionar torácico e renal.

  20. Renal failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930150 Epidermal growth factor and its recep-tor in the renal tissue of patients with acute re-nal failure and normal persons.LIU Zhihong(刘志红),et al.Jinling Hosp,Nanjing,210002.Natl Med J China 1992;72(10):593-595.Epidermal growth factor(EGF)and its receptor(EGF-R)were identified by immunohis-tochemical method(4 layer PAP)in the renaltissue specimens obtained from 11 normal kid-neys and 17 cases of acute renal failure(ARF).The quantitative EGF and EGF-R in the tissuewere expressed as positive tubules per mm~2.The amount of EGF and EGF-R in renal tissue

  1. [Acetaminophen (paracetamol) causing renal failure: report on 3 pediatric cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Vaillant, J; Pellerin, L; Brouard, J; Eckart, P

    2013-06-01

    Renal failure secondary to acetaminophen poisoning is rare and occurs in approximately 1-2 % of patients with acetaminophen overdose. The pathophysiology is still being debated, and renal acetaminophen toxicity consists of acute tubular necrosis, without complication if treated promptly. Renal involvement can sometimes occur without prior liver disease, and early renal manifestations usually occur between the 2nd and 7th day after the acute acetaminophen poisoning. While therapy is exclusively symptomatic, sometimes serious metabolic complications can be observed. The monitoring of renal function should therefore be considered as an integral part of the management of children with acute, severe acetaminophen intoxication. We report 3 cases of adolescents who presented with acute renal failure as a result of voluntary drug intoxication with acetaminophen. One of these 3 girls developed severe renal injury without elevated hepatic transaminases. None of the 3 girls' renal function required hemodialysis, but one of the 3 patients had metabolic complications after her acetaminophen poisoning.

  2. Renal failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    2005234 Association between serum fetuin-A and clinical outcome in end-stage renal disease patients. WANG Kai(王开), Dept Renal Dis, Renji Hosp Shanghai, 2nd Med Univ, Shanghai 200001. Chin J Nephrol, 2005;21(2):72-75. Objective: To investigate the change of serum fetuin-A level before and after dialysis, and the association of serum fetuin-A level with clinical parameters

  3. Renal failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    950351 Serum erythropoietin levels in chronic renalinsufficiency.ZHAI Depei(翟德佩),et al.DeptNephrol.General Hosp,Tianjin Med Univ,Tianjin,300000.Tianjin Med J 1995;23(1):19-21.Patients with chronic renal insufficiency(CRI) areoften associated with anemia.The deficiency of EPOproduction in the kidney is thought to be a key factorin the pathogenesis of renal anemia.Serum erythropoi-

  4. Renal failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008463 Protective effect of recombination rat augmenter of liver regeneration on kidney in acute renal failure rats. TANG Xiaopeng(唐晓鹏), et al. Dept Nephrol, 2nd Affili Hosp Chongqing Med Univ, Chongqing 400010.Chin J Nephrol 2008;24(6):417-421. Objective To investigate the protective effects of recombination rat augmenter of liver regeneration (rrALR) on tubular cell injury and renal dysfunction

  5. Renal Hemangiopericytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim Halil Bozkurt

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hemangiopericytoma is an uncommon perivascular tumor originating from pericytes in the pelvis, head and tneck, and the meninges; extremely rarely in the urinary system. We report a case of incidentally detected renal mass in which radiologic evaluation was suggestive of renal cell carcinoma. First, we performed partial nephrectomy, and then, radical nephrectomy because of positive surgical margins and the pathological examination of the surgical specimen that revealed a hemangiopericytoma. No additional treatment was administered.

  6. Glutamine synthetase in Medicago truncatula, unveiling new secrets of a very old enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabra, Ana R; Carvalho, Helena G

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the first step at which nitrogen is brought into cellular metabolism and is also involved in the reassimilation of ammonium released by a number of metabolic pathways. Due to its unique position in plant nitrogen metabolism, GS plays essential roles in all aspects of plant development, from germination to senescence, and is a key component of nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) and plant yield. Understanding the mechanisms regulating GS activity is therefore of utmost importance and a great effort has been dedicated to understand how GS is regulated in different plant species. The present review summarizes exciting recent developments concerning the structure and regulation of GS isoenzymes, using the model legume Medicago truncatula. These include the understanding of the structural determinants of both the cytosolic and plastid located isoenzymes, the existence of a seed-specific GS gene unique to M. truncatula and closely related species and the discovery that GS isoenzymes are regulated by nitric oxide at the post-translational level. The data is discussed and integrated with the potential roles of the distinct GS isoenzymes within the whole plant context.

  7. Serum glutamine, set-shifting ability and anorexia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collier David A

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Set-shifting is impaired in people with anorexia nervosa (AN, but the underlying physiological and biochemical processes are unclear. Animal studies have established that glutamatergic pathways in the prefrontal cortex play an important role in set-shifting ability. However, it is not yet understood whether levels of serum glutamatergic amino acids are associated with set-shifting performance in humans. The aim of this study was to determine whether serum concentrations of amino acids related to glutamatergic neurotransmission (glutamine, glutamate, glycine, l-serine, d-serine are associated with set-shifting ability in people with acute AN and those after recovery. Methods Serum concentrations of glutamatergic amino acids were measured in 27 women with current AN (AN group, 18 women recovered from AN (ANRec group and 28 age-matched healthy controls (HC group. Set-shifting was measured using the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST and the Trail Making Task (TMT. Dimensional measures of psychopathology were used, including the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDEQ, the Maudsley Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory (MOCI and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. Results Serum glutamine concentrations in the AN group (1,310.2 ± 265.6 μM, mean ± SD were significantly higher (by approximately 20% than those in the HC group (1,102.9 ± 152.7 μM, mean ± SD (F(2, 70 = 6.3, P = 0.003, 95% CI 61.2 to 353.4. Concentrations of serum glutamine were positively associated with markers of the illness severity: a negative correlation was present between serum glutamine concentrations and body mass index (BMI and lowest BMI and a positive correlation was found between duration of illness and EDEQ. The AN group showed significantly impaired set shifting in the WCST, both total errors, and perseverative errors. In the AN group, there were no correlations between serum glutamine concentrations and set shifting. Conclusions Serum

  8. Monocytoid differentiation of freshly isolated human myeloid leukemia cells and HL-60 cells induced by the glutamine antagonist acivicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, K E; Chitneni, S R; Moore, J O; Weinberg, J B

    1989-10-01

    Previously we showed that starvation of HL-60 promyelocytic leukemia cells for a single essential amino acid induced irreversible differentiation into more mature monocyte-like cells. Although not an essential amino acid, glutamine is important in the growth of normal and neoplastic cells. The glutamine analogue, alpha S,5S-alpha-amino-3-chloro-4,5-dihydro-5-isoxazoleacetic acid (acivicin) inhibits several glutamine-utilizing enzymes and therefore depletes cells of certain metabolic end products. The current study was designed to examine in vitro the effects of acivicin on growth and differentiation of several established human myeloid leukemia cell lines, including the HL-60 cell line, and of freshly isolated cells from patients with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL). Four-day culture of HL-60 cells with acivicin at concentrations of 0.1 to 10.0 micrograms/mL (0.56 to 56 nmol/L) decreased cell growth by 33% to 88% as compared with untreated control cells. Viability of cells was greater than 92% for untreated cells and 93% to 41% for acivicin-treated cells. Cells treated with acivicin differentiated along a monocytic pathway as shown by increased H2O2 production and alpha-naphthyl butyrate esterase (NSE) content. Differentiation was time and dose dependent, and was irreversible. Changes in H2O2 production and NSE content were partially abrogated by co-culture with 10 mmol/L exogenous cytidine and guanosine but not by co-culture with other nucleosides or glutamine. At these concentrations of acivicin, differentiation was associated with expression of the N-formyl-methyl-leucyl-phenylalanine-receptor (FMLP-R) on 8% to 29% of cells as compared with 8% for control cells. Acivicin potentiated the differentiating effects of interferon-gamma, tumor necrosis factor, dihydroxyvitamin D3, dimethylsulfoxide, and retinoic acid. Culture of cells from the U937 (monoblastic), K562 (erythroleukemia), and KG-1 (myeloblastic) cell lines resulted in decreased growth and viability

  9. N-acetylcysteine prevents HIV gp 120-related damage of human cultured astrocytes: correlation with glutamine synthase dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa Nicola

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV envelope gp 120 glycoprotein is released during active HIV infection of brain macrophages thereby generating inflammation and oxidative stress which contribute to the development of the AIDS-Dementia Complex (ADC. Gp120 has also been found capable to generate excitotoxic effect on brain tissue via enhancement of glutamatergic neurotransmission, leading to neuronal and astroglial damage, though the mechanism is still to be better understood. Here we investigated on the effect of N-acetylcysteine (NAC, on gp120-induced damage in human cultured astroglial cells and the possible contribution of gp120-related reacting oxygen species (ROS in the imbalanced activity of glutamine synthase (GS, the enzyme that metabolizes glutamate into glutamine within astroglial cells playing a neuroprotective role in brain disorders. Results Incubation of Lipari human cultured astroglial cells with gp 120 (0.1–10 nM produced a significant reduction of astroglial cell viability and apoptosis as evaluated by TUNEL reaction and flow cytometric analysis (FACS. This effect was accompanied by lipid peroxidation as detected by means of malondialdehyde assay (MDA. In addition, gp 120 reduced both glutamine concentration in astroglial cell supernatants and GS expression as detected by immunocytochemistry and western blotting analysis. Pre-treatment of cells with NAC (0.5–5 mM, dose-dependently antagonised astroglial apoptotic cell death induced by gp 120, an effect accompanied by significant attenuation of MDA accumulation. Furthermore, both effects were closely associated with a significant recovery of glutamine levels in cell supernatants and by GS expression, thus suggesting that overproduction of free radicals might contribute in gp 120-related dysfunction of GS in astroglial cells. Conclusion In conclusion, the present experiments demonstrate that gp 120 is toxic to astroglial cells, an effect accompanied by lipid peroxidation and by altered

  10. Effect of protein restriction diet on renal function and metabolic control in patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized clinical trial Efecto de la dieta con restricción proteica en la función renal y el control metabólico de pacientes con diabetes tipo 2: ensayo clínico de distribución aleatoria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Velázquez López

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the effect of a low protein diet (LPD on renal function and metabolic control in three sub-groups of patients with type 2 diabetes those with or without nephropathy. Research design and methods: A randomized clinical trial was conducted on 60 patients with type 2 diabetes in primary care -19 with normoalbuminuria, 22 with microalbuminuria, and 19 with macroalbuminuria-. All patients experienced a screening phase during the 3 months, and were designated according to percentages of daily caloric intake (e.g., carbohydrates 50%, fat 30%, and 20% of protein. After this period, they were randomly assigned to receive either LPD (0.6-0.8 g/kg per day or normal protein diet (NPD (1.0-1.2 g/kg per day for a period of 4 months. Twenty nine patients received LPD and 31 received NPD. Primary endpoints included measures of renal function (UAER, serum creatinine and GFR and glycemic control (fasting glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin A1c. Results: Renal function improved among patients with macroalbuminuria who received LPD: UAER decreased (1,280.7 ± 1,139.7 to 444.4 ± 329.8 mg/24 h; p Objetivo: Valorar el efecto de una dieta baja en proteínas (DBP sobre la función renal y el control metabólico en tres subgrupos de pacientes con diabetes tipo 2 con y sin nefropatía. Diseño del estudio y métodos: Ensayo clínico de distribución aleatoria en 60 pacientes con diabetes tipo 2, en atención primaria- 19 con normoalbuminuria, 22 con microalbuminuria y 19 con macroalbuminuria. Todos los pacientes pasaron una fase de pre-intervención durante 3 meses y se anotó los porcentajes de ingesta calórica diaria (p.ej., carbohidratos 50%, grasas 30%, proteínas 20%. Después de este periodo de lavado, fueron distribuidos de forma aleatoria, para recibir o bien una DBP (0,6-0,8 g/kg, al día o una dieta normoproteica (DNP (1,0-1,2 g/kg al día, durante un periodo de 4 meses. Veintinueve pacientes recibieron DBP y 31 DNP. Las principales

  11. An insight into the metabolic responses of ultra-small superparamagnetic particles of iron oxide using metabonomic analysis of biofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng Jianghua [Department of Physics, Fujian Key Laboratory of Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces, Xiamen University, Xiamen, 361005 (China); Liu Huili; Zhang Limin [State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Bhakoo, Kishore [Singapore Bioimaging Consortium, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A-STAR) 138667 (Singapore); Lu Lehui, E-mail: jianghua.feng@hotmail.com, E-mail: jianghua.feng@wipm.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, Jilin 130022 (China)

    2010-10-01

    Ultra-small superparamagnetic particles of iron oxides (USPIO) have been developed as intravenous organ/tissue-targeted contrast agents to improve magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in vivo. However, their potential toxicity and effects on metabolism have attracted particular attention. In the present study, uncoated and dextran-coated USPIO were investigated by analyzing both rat urine and plasma metabonomes using high-resolution NMR-based metabonomic analysis in combination with multivariate statistical analysis. The wealth of information gathered on the metabolic profiles from rat urine and plasma has revealed subtle metabolic changes in response to USPIO administration. The metabolic changes include the elevation of urinary {alpha}-hydroxy-n-valerate, o- and p-HPA, PAG, nicotinate and hippurate accompanied by decreases in the levels of urinary {alpha}-ketoglutarate, succinate, citrate, N-methylnicotinamide, NAG, DMA, allantoin and acetate following USPIO administration. The changes associated with USPIO administration included a gradual increase in plasma glucose, N-acetyl glycoprotein, saturated fatty acid, citrate, succinate, acetate, GPC, ketone bodies ({beta}-hydroxybutyrate, acetone and acetoacetate) and individual amino acids, such as phenylalanine, lysine, isoleucine, glycine, glutamine and glutamate and a gradual decrease of myo-inositol, unsaturated fatty acid and triacylglycerol. Hence USPIO administration effects are reflected in changes in a number of metabolic pathways including energy, lipid, glucose and amino acid metabolism. The size- and surface chemistry-dependent metabolic responses and possible toxicity were observed using NMR analysis of biofluids. These changes may be attributed to the disturbances of hepatic, renal and cardiac functions following USPIO administrations. The potential biotoxicity can be derived from metabonomic analysis and serum biochemistry analysis. Metabonomic strategy offers a promising approach for the detection of

  12. A fluorescence-coupled assay for gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA reveals metabolic stress-induced modulation of GABA content in neuroendocrine cancer.

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    Joseph E Ippolito

    Full Text Available Pathways involved in the synthesis of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA have been implicated in the pathogenesis of high grade neuroendocrine (NE neoplasms as well as neoplasms from a non-NE lineage. Using The Cancer Genome Atlas, overexpression of the GABA synthetic enzyme, glutamate decarboxylase 1 (GAD1, was found to be associated with decreased disease free-survival in prostate adenocarcinoma and decreased overall survival in clear cell renal cell carcinomas. Furthermore, GAD1 was found to be expressed in castrate-resistant prostate cancer cell lines, but not androgen-responsive cell lines. Using a novel fluorescence-coupled enzymatic microplate assay for GABA mediated through reduction of resazurin in a prostate neuroendocrine carcinoma (PNEC cell line, acid microenvironment-induced stress increased GABA levels while alkaline microenvironment-induced stress decreased GABA through modulation of GAD1 and glutamine synthetase (GLUL activities. Moreover, glutamine but not glucose deprivation decreased GABA through modulation of GLUL. Consistent with evidence in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms that GABA synthesis mediated through GAD1 may play a crucial role in surviving stress, GABA may be an important mediator of stress survival in neoplasms. These findings identify GABA synthesis and metabolism as a potentially important pathway for regulating cancer cell stress response as well as a potential target for therapeutic strategies.

  13. A fluorescence-coupled assay for gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) reveals metabolic stress-induced modulation of GABA content in neuroendocrine cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, Joseph E; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2014-01-01

    Pathways involved in the synthesis of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of high grade neuroendocrine (NE) neoplasms as well as neoplasms from a non-NE lineage. Using The Cancer Genome Atlas, overexpression of the GABA synthetic enzyme, glutamate decarboxylase 1 (GAD1), was found to be associated with decreased disease free-survival in prostate adenocarcinoma and decreased overall survival in clear cell renal cell carcinomas. Furthermore, GAD1 was found to be expressed in castrate-resistant prostate cancer cell lines, but not androgen-responsive cell lines. Using a novel fluorescence-coupled enzymatic microplate assay for GABA mediated through reduction of resazurin in a prostate neuroendocrine carcinoma (PNEC) cell line, acid microenvironment-induced stress increased GABA levels while alkaline microenvironment-induced stress decreased GABA through modulation of GAD1 and glutamine synthetase (GLUL) activities. Moreover, glutamine but not glucose deprivation decreased GABA through modulation of GLUL. Consistent with evidence in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms that GABA synthesis mediated through GAD1 may play a crucial role in surviving stress, GABA may be an important mediator of stress survival in neoplasms. These findings identify GABA synthesis and metabolism as a potentially important pathway for regulating cancer cell stress response as well as a potential target for therapeutic strategies.

  14. Cancerous epithelial cell lines shed extracellular vesicles with a bimodal size distribution that is sensitive to glutamine inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Steven Michael; Antonyak, Marc A.; Cerione, Richard A.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2014-12-01

    Extracellular shed vesicles (ESVs) facilitate a unique mode of cell-cell communication wherein vesicle uptake can induce a change in the recipient cell's state. Despite the intensity of ESV research, currently reported data represent the bulk characterization of concentrated vesicle samples with little attention paid to heterogeneity. ESV populations likely represent diversity in mechanisms of formation, cargo and size. To better understand ESV subpopulations and the signaling cascades implicated in their formation, we characterize ESV size distributions to identify subpopulations in normal and cancerous epithelial cells. We have discovered that cancer cells exhibit bimodal ESV distributions, one small-diameter and another large-diameter population, suggesting that two mechanisms may govern ESV formation, an exosome population and a cancer-specific microvesicle population. Altered glutamine metabolism in cancer is thought to fuel cancer growth but may also support metastatic niche formation through microvesicle production. We describe the role of a glutaminase inhibitor, compound 968, in ESV production. We have discovered that inhibiting glutamine metabolism significantly impairs large-diameter microvesicle production in cancer cells.

  15. Glutamine synthetase localization in cortisol-induced chick embryo retinas

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    We report here for the first time, in chick retina, Muller cell localization of glutamine synthetase (GS) activity by an immunohistochemical technique, in agreement with previous reports of glial localization of this enzyme in rat brain and retina. Age- dependent changes in the endogenous enzyme activity as well as cortisol- induced changes in GS activity, both in ovo and in vitro, measured biochemically, reflect the changes observed by staining.

  16. Glutamine synthetase activity in the ruminal bacterium Succinivibrio dextrinosolvens.

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson, J A; Hespell, R B

    1985-01-01

    Succinivibrio dextrinosolvens C18 was found to possess glutamine synthetase (GS), urease, glutamate dehydrogenase, and several other nitrogen assimilation enzymes. When grown in continuous culture under ammonia limitation, both GS and urease activities were high and glutamate dehydrogenase activity was low, but the opposite activity pattern was observed for growth in the presence of ample ammonia. The addition of high-level (15 mM) ammonium chloride to ammonia-limited cultures resulted in a r...

  17. Phytogenic additives and glutamine plus glutamic acid in broiler diets

    OpenAIRE

    VC Pelícia; AC Stradiotti; PC Araujo; MK Maruno; FB Carvalho; AC Pezzato; JR Sartori

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the dietary supplementation of phytogenic additives (PAs) and glutamine plus glutamic acid (Gln/Glu), associated or not, in replacement of antibiotic growth promoters and anticoccidials (AGP/AC) on the performance and carcass yield of broilers. Five hundred male Cobb broilers were housed in an experimental house and randomly distributed into five treatments, with four replicates of 25 birds each. Treatments consisted of a control diet ...

  18. Controlling the prion propensity of glutamine/asparagine-rich proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, Kacy R.; Ross, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae can harbor a number of distinct prions. Most of the yeast prion proteins contain a glutamine/asparagine (Q/N) rich region that drives prion formation. Prion-like domains, defined as regions with high compositional similarity to yeast prion domains, are common in eukaryotic proteomes, and mutations in various human proteins containing prion-like domains have been linked to degenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Here, we discu...

  19. El entrenamiento de fuerza reduce la acidosis metabólica y la hipertrofia hepática y renal consecuentes del consumo de una dieta hiperproteica en ratas Resistance training reduces the metabolic acidosis and hepatic and renal hypertrophy caused by the consumption of a high protein diet in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Aparicio

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: El consumo de dietas hiperproteicas (HP podría tener un efecto adverso sobre la acidosis metabólica y la salud hepática y renal. Sin embargo, existen pocos estudios que analicen los efectos del entrenamiento de fuerza sobre los parámetros sensibles de ser alterados por dichas dietas. Material y métodos: Un total de 32 ratas Wistar adultas fueron distribuidas de forma aleatoria en 4 grupos experimentales (n = 8: dieta normoproteica o HP, con o sin entrenamiento de fuerza. Las dietas estuvieron basadas en un hidrolizado de proteína de lactosuero (whey. Tras 90 días de diseño experimental los animales fueron sacrificados para los posteriores análisis. Resultados y discusión: El consumo de una dieta HP provocó acidosis metabólica (hipercalcemia e hipocitraturia urinarias, acidificación del pH urinario y niveles elevados de urea plasmática, (P Introduction: High protein (HP diet consumption may adversely affect metabolic acidosis and hepatic and renal health. Despite such potentially adverse effect, there are only few studies analyzing the effects of resistance training on the parameters that could be altered by such diets. Material and methods: A total of 32 adult male Wistar rats were randomly distributed in 4 experimental groups (n = 8: normoprotein or HP diets, with or without resistance training. Diets were based on a whey protein hydrolyzate, and the experimental period lasted for 90 days. Results and discussion: Consumption of HP diets and resistance training significantly affected food intake, body composition and plasmatic levels of total cholesterol and triglycerides. Consumption of HP diets led to a considerable increase in liver and kidney weight (P < 0.001, urinary volume and acidity, as well as in the urinary excretion of Ca, with a parallel reduction in the urinary excretion of citrate (P < 0.05. The buffering action of resistance training on such diet-induced alterations was especially evident in the

  20. Glutamine synthetase of Streptomyces cattleya: purification and regulation of synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paress, P S; Streicher, S L

    1985-08-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS; EC 6.3.1.2) from Streptomyces cattleya was purified using a single affinity-gel chromatography step, and some of its properties were determined. Levels of GS in S. cattleya cells varied by a factor of 8 depending upon the source of nitrogen in the growth medium. Of 24 nitrogen sources examined only glutamine or NH4Cl utilization resulted in very low GS activity. Addition of NH4Cl to a culture with high GS levels appeared to stop further synthesis and resulted in a progressive decrease in the specific activity of the enzyme. The GS inhibitor methionine sulphoximine (MSX) inhibited GS activity but had no effect on exponentially growing cells. The presence of MSX either lengthened or shortened the period between spore inoculation and initiation of exponential growth, depending on the source of nitrogen. In glutamine minimal medium MSX produced earlier and more efficient spore germination while in glutamate or nitrate minimal medium germination was delayed by its presence.

  1. The effect of immunonutrition (glutamine, alanine on fracture healing

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    Abdullah Küçükalp

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: There have been various studies related to fracture healing. Glutamine is an amino acid with an important role in many cell and organ functions. This study aimed to make a clinical, radiological, and histopathological evaluation of the effects of glutamine on fracture healing. Methods: Twenty rabbits were randomly allocated into two groups of control and immunonutrition. A fracture of the fibula was made to the right hind leg. All rabbits received standard food and water. From post-operative first day for 30 days, the study group received an additional 2 ml/kg/day 20% L-alanine L-glutamine solution via a gastric catheter, and the control group received 2 ml/kg/day isotonic via gastric catheter. At the end of 30 days, the rabbits were sacrificed and the fractures were examined clinically, radiologically, and histopathologically in respect to the degree of union. Results: Radiological evaluation of the control group determined a mean score of 2.5 according to the orthopaedists and 2.65 according to the radiologists. In the clinical evaluation, the mean score was 1.875 for the control group and 2.0 for the study group. Histopathological evaluation determined a mean score of 8.5 for the control group and 9.0 for the study group. Conclusion: One month after orally administered glutamine–alanine, positive effects were observed on fracture healing radiologically, clinically, and histopathologically, although no statistically significant difference was determined.

  2. Turnover of bacterial glutamine synthetase: oxidative inactivation precedes proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, R L; Oliver, C N; Fulks, R M; Stadtman, E R

    1981-04-01

    We partially purified a preparation from Escherichia coli that proteolytically degrades the enzyme glutamine synthetase [L-glutamate:ammonia ligase (ADP-forming), EC 6.3.1.2]. The degradation is at least a two-step process. First, the glutamine synthetase undergoes an oxidative modification. This modification leads to loss of catalytic activity and also renders the protein susceptible to proteolytic attack in the second step. The oxidative step displays characteristics of a mixed-function oxidation, requiring both molecular oxygen and a reduced nucleotide. This step can also be catalyzed by a purified, mammalian cytochrome P-450 system, as well as by a model system consisting of ascorbic acid and oxygen. Catalase blocks this oxidative modification step. Thus, the overall process of proteolytic degradation can be observed only if care is taken to remove catalase activity from the extracts. The inactivation reaction is dependent on the state of adenylylation of the glutamine synthetase, suggesting that this a physiologically important reaction. If so, then mixed-function oxidases are now implicated in the process of intracellular protein turnover.

  3. Glutamine supplementation and immune function during heavy load training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qing-Hua; Xu, Rong-Mei; Zhang, Quan-Hai; Shen, Guo-Qing; Ma, Ming; Zhao, Xin-Ping; Guo, Yan-Hua; Wang, Yi

    2015-05-01

    Athletes with heavy training loads are prone to infectious illnesses, suggesting that their training may suppress immune function. This study sought to determine whether supplementation with the amino acid glutamine, which supports immune health, alters immune function in athletes during heavy load training. 24 athletes were randomly assigned to either an experimental group (n = 12) or a control group (n = 12). Athletes exercised using heavy training loads for 6 weeks. Athletes in the experimental group took 10 g glutamine orally once a day beginning 3 weeks after initial testing, while athletes in the control group were given a placebo. Immune function was assessed by measuring the following immunity markers: CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T cell counts, serum IgA, IgG, and IgM levels, and natural killer (NK) cell activity both before and after the completion of training. The percentages of circulating CD8⁺ T cells were significantly different before (39.13 ± 5.87%) and after (26.63 ± 3.95%) training in the experimental group (p glutamine supplementation may be able to restore immune function and reduce the immunosuppressive effects of heavy-load training.

  4. Colonic luminal ammonia and portal blood L-glutamine and L-arginine concentrations: a possible link between colon mucosa and liver ureagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklou-Lawson, Mamy; Bernard, Françoise; Neveux, Nathalie; Chaumontet, Catherine; Bos, Cécile; Davila-Gay, Anne-Marie; Tomé, Daniel; Cynober, Luc; Blachier, François

    2009-10-01

    The highest ammonia concentration in the body is found in the colon lumen and although there is evidence that this metabolite can be absorbed through the colonic epithelium, there is little information on the capacity of the colonic mucosa to transfer and metabolize this compound. In the present study, we used a model of conscious pig with a canula implanted into the proximal colon to inject endoluminally increasing amounts of ammonium chloride and to measure during 5 h the kinetics of ammonia and amino acid concentration changes in the portal and arterial blood. By injecting as a single dose from 1 to 5 g ammonia into the colonic lumen, a dose-related increase in ammonia concentration in the portal blood was recorded. Ammonia concentration remained unchanged in the arterial blood except for the highest dose tested, i.e. 5 g which thus apparently exceeds the hepatic ureagenesis capacity. By calculating the apparent net ammonia absorption, it was determined that the pig colonic epithelium has the capacity to absorb 4 g ammonia. Ammonia absorption through the colonic epithelium was concomitant with increase of L-glutamine and L-arginine concentrations in the portal blood. This coincided with the expression of both glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthetase in isolated colonic epithelial cells. Since L-glutamine and L-arginine are known to represent activators for liver ureagenesis, we propose that increased portal concentrations of these amino acids following increased ammonia colonic luminal concentration represent a metabolic link between colon mucosa and liver urea biosynthesis.

  5. Glutamine-Glutamate Cycle Flux Is Similar in Cultured Astrocytes and Brain and Both Glutamate Production and Oxidation Are Mainly Catalyzed by Aspartate Aminotransferase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif Hertz

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The glutamine-glutamate cycle provides neurons with astrocyte-generated glutamate/γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA and oxidizes glutamate in astrocytes, and it returns released transmitter glutamate/GABA to neurons after astrocytic uptake. This review deals primarily with the glutamate/GABA generation/oxidation, although it also shows similarity between metabolic rates in cultured astrocytes and intact brain. A key point is identification of the enzyme(s converting astrocytic α-ketoglutarate to glutamate and vice versa. Most experiments in cultured astrocytes, including those by one of us, suggest that glutamate formation is catalyzed by aspartate aminotransferase (AAT and its degradation by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH. Strongly supported by results shown in Table 1 we now propose that both reactions are primarily catalyzed by AAT. This is possible because the formation occurs in the cytosol and the degradation in mitochondria and they are temporally separate. High glutamate/glutamine concentrations abolish the need for glutamate production from α-ketoglutarate and due to metabolic coupling between glutamate synthesis and oxidation these high concentrations render AAT-mediated glutamate oxidation impossible. This necessitates the use of GDH under these conditions, shown by insensitivity of the oxidation to the transamination inhibitor aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA. Experiments using lower glutamate/glutamine concentration show inhibition of glutamate oxidation by AOAA, consistent with the coupled transamination reactions described here.

  6. Immunotherapeutic potential of N-formylated peptides of ESAT-6 and glutamine synthetase in experimental tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Shabir Ahmad; Sharma, Sadhna

    2014-02-01

    Recent understanding of the pathogenesis of tuberculosis allows the possible application of immunotherapy for the treatment of tuberculosis. Therapies that would upregulate the host anti mycobacterial innate and/or adaptive immune response have been supposed to be useful in the treatment of tuberculosis. Since N-formyl peptides are products of bacterial metabolism, and their binding to a specific phagocyte receptor (FPR) induces chemotaxis and activation of phagocytes that are critical effectors in our innate immune system, it is reasonable to assume that the interaction between these two counterparts (i.e. formylated peptides and FPR) is also important in host defence against M. tuberculosis. In the present study the direct immunotherapeutic potential of N-formylated peptides of two non-classically secreted proteins (early secreted antigenic target-6 and glutamine synthetase) of M. tuberculosis H37Rv was evaluated. Treatment of M. tuberculosis H37Rv infected mice with N-formylated peptides of early secreted antigenic target-6 (ESAT-6) and glutamine synthetase (GS) markedly reduced the bacilli load in their lungs (p < 0.001) and spleen (p < 0.01) as compared to the untreated mice. In addition, the histopathological changes were observed to be in correlation with the CFU data with minor areas of consolidation in the lung sections of N-formylated peptide treated infected mice as compared to those of the untreated mice. Further, these N-formylated peptides were able to confer an additional therapeutic effect when given in combination with the anti tuberculosis drugs and hence can be used as an adjunct to the conventional chemotherapy against tuberculosis.

  7. Glutamine and citrulline concentrations reflect nitric oxide synthesis in the human nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Neri, I; Ramírez-Bermúdez, J; Ojeda-López, C; Montes, S; Soto-Hernández, J L; Ríos, C

    2017-08-31

    Although citrulline is produced by nitric oxide (NO) synthase upon activation of the NMDA glutamate receptor, nitrite and nitrate (NOx) concentration is considered the best marker of NO synthesis, as citrulline is also metabolised by other enzymes. This study analyses the correlation between human cerebrospinal fluid NOx and citrulline concentrations in order to determine the extent to which citrulline reflects NO synthesis and glutamatergic neurotransmission. Participants were patients with acute neurological diseases undergoing lumbar puncture (n=240). NOx and amino acid concentrations were determined by HPLC. NOx concentrations did not vary significantly where infection (p=0,110) or inflammation (p=0,349) were present. Multiple regression analysis showed that NOx concentration was correlated with glutamine (r=-0,319, p<0,001) and citrulline concentrations (r=0,293, p=0,005) but not with the citrulline/arginine ratio (r=-0,160, p=0,173). ANCOVA confirmed that NOx concentration was correlated with citrulline concentration (F=7,6, p=0,007) but not with the citrulline/arginine ratio (F=2,2, p=0,136), or presence of infection (F=1,8, p=0,173) or inflammation (F=1,4, p=0,227). No association was found between NOx and arginine or glutamate concentrations. The results suggest that CSF citrulline concentration reflects NOx synthesis to some extent, despite the contribution of other metabolic pathways. In addition, this study shows that glutamine is an important modulator of NO synthase activity, and that arginine and glutamate are not correlated with NOx. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Glutamate metabolism in the brain focusing on astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, Arne; Scafidi, Susanna; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer

    2014-01-01

    Metabolism of glutamate, the main excitatory neurotransmitter and precursor of GABA, is exceedingly complex and highly compartmentalized in brain. Maintenance of these neurotransmitter pools is strictly dependent on the de novo synthesis of glutamine in astrocytes which requires both the anaplero......Metabolism of glutamate, the main excitatory neurotransmitter and precursor of GABA, is exceedingly complex and highly compartmentalized in brain. Maintenance of these neurotransmitter pools is strictly dependent on the de novo synthesis of glutamine in astrocytes which requires both...... the anaplerotic enzyme pyruvate carboxylase and glutamine synthetase. Glutamate is formed directly from glutamine by deamidation via phosphate activated glutaminase a reaction that also yields ammonia. Glutamate plays key roles linking carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism via the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle......, as well as in nitrogen trafficking and ammonia homeostasis in brain. The anatomical specialization of astrocytic endfeet enables these cells to rapidly and efficiently remove neurotransmitters from the synaptic cleft to maintain homeostasis, and to provide glutamine to replenish neurotransmitter pools...

  9. Commentary on: "An integrated metabolic atlas of clear cell renal cell carcinoma." Hakimi AA, Reznik E, Lee CH, Creighton CJ, Brannon AR, Luna A, Aksoy BA, Liu EM, Shen R, Lee W, Chen Y, Stirdivant SM, Russo P, Chen YB, Tickoo SK, Reuter VE, Cheng EH, Sander C, Hsieh JJ.: Cancer Cell. 2016 Jan 11;29(1):104-16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byron H

    2017-09-01

    Dysregulated metabolism is a hallmark of cancer, manifested through alterations in metabolites. We performed metabolomic profiling on 138 matched clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC)/normal tissue pairs and found that ccRCC is characterized by broad shifts in central carbon metabolism, one-carbon metabolism, and antioxidant response. Tumor progression and metastasis were associated with metabolite increases in glutathione and cysteine/methionine metabolism pathways. We develop an analytic pipeline and visualization tool (metabolograms) to bridge the gap between TCGA transcriptomic profiling and our metabolomic data, which enables us to assemble an integrated pathway-level metabolic atlas and to demonstrate discordance between transcriptome and metabolome. Lastly, expression profiling was performed on a high-glutathione cluster, which corresponds to a poor-survival subgroup in the ccRCC TCGA cohort. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The role of glutamate dehydrogenase in mammalian ammonia metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanaki, Cleanthe; Plaitakis, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyzes the reversible inter-conversion of glutamate to α-ketoglutarate and ammonia. High levels of GDH activity is found in mammalian liver, kidney, brain, and pancreas. In the liver, GDH reaction appears to be close-to-equilibrium, providing the appropriate ratio of ammonia and amino acids for urea synthesis in periportal hepatocytes. In addition, GDH produces glutamate for glutamine synthesis in a small rim of pericentral hepatocytes. Hence, hepatic GDH can be either a source for ammonia or an ammonia scavenger. In the kidney, GDH function produces ammonia from glutamate to control acidosis. In the human, the presence of two differentially regulated isoforms (hGDH1 and hGDH2) suggests a complex role for GDH in ammonia homeostasis. Whereas hGDH1 is sensitive to GTP inhibition, hGDH2 has dissociated its function from GTP control. Furthermore, hGDH2 shows a lower optimal pH than hGDH1. The hGDH2 enzyme is selectively expressed in human astrocytes and Sertoli cells, probably facilitating metabolic recycling processes essential for their supportive role. Here, we report that hGDH2 is also expressed in the epithelial cells lining the convoluted tubules of the renal cortex. As hGDH2 functions more efficiently under acidotic conditions without the operation of the GTP energy switch, its presence in the kidney may increase the efficacy of the organ to maintain acid base equilibrium.

  11. Expression of glutamine synthetase in balloon cells: a basis of their antiepileptic role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Barba, Carmen; Giordano, Flavio; Baroni, Gianna; Genitori, Lorenzo; Guerrini, Renzo; Taddei, Gian Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase is an enzyme involved in the clearance of glutamate, the most potent excitatory neurotransmitter. We studied the immunohistochemical expression of glutamine synthetase in neocortical samples from 5 children who underwent surgery for pharmacoresistant epilepsy and a histological diagnosis of focal cortical dysplasia IIb. In all cases, balloon cells, but not dysmorphic neurons, were immunopositive for glutamine synthetase. This finding suggests that balloon cells can be involved in the neutralization of glutamate and play a protective anti-seizure role.