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Sample records for removing explosive mines

  1. Safety explosives in coal mining. Explosivos de seguridad en la mineria de carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    (Union Espanola de Explosivos y Rio Blast, S.A., Madrid (Spain))

    1990-06-01

    The use of explosives in underground coal mining is essential for two reasons. The first is the highly resistant nature of the rock surrounding coal which requires explosives to remove it during development work. The second is that certain types of coal need to be blasted in order to achieve a higher output in coal winning operations. This article examines the characteristics, the types and the conditions under which safety or ion exchange explosives are used in underground coal mines where explosive atmospheres are sometimes encountered. 3 tabs. 2 pts.

  2. [Death by explosion of an aerial mine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockhausen, Sarah; Wöllner, Kirsten; Madea, Burkhard; Doberentz, Elke

    2014-01-01

    Civilians are rarely killed by military weapons except in times of war. In early 2014, a 50-year-old man died in an explosion of an aerial mine from the Second World War when he was crushing concrete chunks with an excavator at a recycling plant. In the burned operator's cab, the remains of a body were found on the driver's seat. The thorax and the head were missing. Still sticking in the shoe, the right foot severed at the ankle was found about 7 m from the excavator together with numerous small to tiny body parts. At autopsy, the completely disrupted, strongly charred lower torso of a male connected to the left extremities as well as a large number of small tissue fragments and calcined bones were found. According to calculations performed by the seismographical station on the basis of seismic data, only about 45-60 percent of the charge had detonated. The autopsy results illustrate all the more the massive impact of such an explosion.

  3. A line technology of subterranean mining by means of nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gushchin, V.V.; Vasin, K.D.; Nifontov, B.I.; Odrov, Yu.L.; Myasnikov, K.V.; Kol'tsov, V.M.; Kornev, G.N.; Degtyarev, V.A.

    1976-01-01

    The basic principles of a line technology of extracting firm ores, including break-up of ore by means of subterranean nuclear explosions, the removal of ore from sorting blocks by means of vibrator feeders and transporting it to intermediate levels via a new type of belt conveyor on mobile supports are considered. A method of crushing ore by nuclear explosions on reflecting surfaces is proposed to obtain a more uniform fragmentation of ore, increase the output of fragmented ore per unit capacity, and to preserve mining output. The basic principles of designing a system of mining based on a line technology are formulated and one variant of such a system is presented

  4. Current trends in development of explosives in world mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobnikar, S.

    1987-01-01

    Surveys development of manufacturing industrial explosives in the 19th and 20th centuries, from first use of black powder, ammonium nitrate and TNT to the use of ANFO, slurries and water gel type explosives. Achievements of explosive producers with worldwide reputation (Ireco Chemicals, Du Pont, Atlas Powder Chemical, Nitro Nobel, Nippon Oil and Fats Co., Thermex Energy Co.) for manufacturing safe, reliable explosives used in surface and underground coal and ore mining (including gassy coal mines) and for quarrying are mentioned. Main characteristics of IREMITE, IREGEL, TOVEX, POURVEX, DRIVEX, Detagel, ANFO (both gel- and emulsion-type), Emulgite and Emulite are presented. A critical opinion about future trends in industrial explosive development is given. 10 refs., 7 tabs.

  5. Atmospheric emission of NOx from mining explosives: A critical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluwoye, Ibukun; Dlugogorski, Bogdan Z.; Gore, Jeff; Oskierski, Hans C.; Altarawneh, Mohammednoor

    2017-10-01

    High-energy materials such as emulsions, slurries and ammonium-nitrate fuel-oil (ANFO) explosives play crucial roles in mining, quarrying, tunnelling and many other infrastructure activities, because of their excellent transport and blasting properties. These explosives engender environmental concerns, due to atmospheric pollution caused by emission of dust and nitrogen oxides (NOx) from blasts, the latter characterised by the average emission factor of 5 kg (t AN explosive)-1. This first-of-its-kind review provides a concise literature account of the formation of NOx during blasting of AN-based explosives, employed in surface operations. We estimate the total NOx emission rate from AN-based explosives as 0.05 Tg (i.e., 5 × 104 t) N per annum, compared to the total global annual anthropogenic NOx emissions of 41.3 × 106 t N y-1. Although minor in the global sense, the large localised plumes from blasting exhibit high NOx concentration (500 ppm) exceeding up to 3000 times the international standards. This emission has profound consequences at mining sites and for adjacent atmospheric environment, necessitating expensive management of exclusion zones. The review describes different types of AN energetic materials for civilian applications, and summarises the essential properties and terminologies pertaining to their use. Furthermore, we recapitulate the mechanisms that lead to the formation of the reactive nitrogen species in blasting of AN-based explosives, review their implications to atmospheric air pollution, and compare the mechanisms with those experienced in other thermal and combustion operations. We also examine the mitigation approaches, including guidelines and operational-control measures. The review discusses the abatement technologies such as the formulation of new explosive mixtures, comprising secondary fuels, spin traps and other additives, in light of their effectiveness and efficiency. We conclude the review with a summary of unresolved problems

  6. Development of mine explosion ground truth smart sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Steven R. [Rocky Mountain Geophysics, Inc., Los Alamos, NM (United States); Harben, Phillip E. [Rocky Mountain Geophysics, Inc., Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jarpe, Steve [Jarpe Data Solutions, Prescott, AZ (United States); Harris, David B. [Deschutes Signal Processing, Maupin, OR (United States)

    2015-09-14

    Accurate seismo-acoustic source location is one of the fundamental aspects of nuclear explosion monitoring. Critical to improved location is the compilation of ground truth data sets for which origin time and location are accurately known. Substantial effort by the National Laboratories and other seismic monitoring groups have been undertaken to acquire and develop ground truth catalogs that form the basis of location efforts (e.g. Sweeney, 1998; Bergmann et al., 2009; Waldhauser and Richards, 2004). In particular, more GT1 (Ground Truth 1 km) events are required to improve three-dimensional velocity models that are currently under development. Mine seismicity can form the basis of accurate ground truth datasets. Although the location of mining explosions can often be accurately determined using array methods (e.g. Harris, 1991) and from overhead observations (e.g. MacCarthy et al., 2008), accurate origin time estimation can be difficult. Occasionally, mine operators will share shot time, location, explosion size and even shot configuration, but this is rarely done, especially in foreign countries. Additionally, shot times provided by mine operators are often inaccurate. An inexpensive, ground truth event detector that could be mailed to a contact, placed in close proximity (< 5 km) to mining regions or earthquake aftershock regions that automatically transmits back ground-truth parameters, would greatly aid in development of ground truth datasets that could be used to improve nuclear explosion monitoring capabilities. We are developing an inexpensive, compact, lightweight smart sensor unit (or units) that could be used in the development of ground truth datasets for the purpose of improving nuclear explosion monitoring capabilities. The units must be easy to deploy, be able to operate autonomously for a significant period of time (> 6 months) and inexpensive enough to be discarded after useful operations have expired (although this may not be part of our business

  7. Ground truth data collection on mining industrial explosions registered by the International Monitoring System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehl'tekov, A.Yu.; Gordon, V.P.; Firsov, V.A.; Chervyakov, V.B.

    2004-01-01

    The presentation is dedicated to organizational and technical issues connected with the task of Comprehensive Test-Ban-Treaty Organization timely notification on large chemical explosions including data on explosion location and time, on applied explosive substance quantity and type, and also on configuration and assumed purpose of explosion. Explosions registered by International Monitoring System are of special interest. Their data could be used for calibration of the monitoring system. Ground truth data collection and some explosions location results on Russia's mining enterprises were given. Ground truth data collection peculiarities according to mining industrial explosions were considered. (author)

  8. Planar compaction of ceramic powders with mining explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuivinga, M.; Verbeek, H.J.; Carton, E.P.

    2000-01-01

    Shock compaction experiments of B 4 C powders have been performed using a planar configuration. The powders were contained between metal plates. On top of the upper plate, having a thickness of about 10 mm, was a layer of mining explosives. For this configuration, computer simulations have been performed with use of the hydrocode Autodyn. In comparison with the cylindrical compaction process the planar compaction process appears to be quite different. The reason is the very low detonation velocity of the used mining explosives (2-4 km/s), which is much lower than the sound and shock speeds of the steel plate, in combination with the relatively large thickness of the metal layer. As a result, the nature of the compaction process of the powder initially more resembles a quasi-static compaction process than a shock compaction process. Due to the quasi-static nature of the compaction, the pressure release in the powder after compression is very gradual. Therefore, no strong rarefaction waves leading to high tensile stresses in the compact arise. Flat plates (10x10 cm, 0.6-0.8 cm thick) of Al (20-30 vol %) infiltrated B 4 C have been fabricated using this configuration

  9. Mountaintop Removal Mining and Catchment Hydrology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Miller

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Mountaintop mining and valley fill (MTM/VF coal extraction, practiced in the Central Appalachian region, represents a dramatic landscape-scale disturbance. MTM operations remove as much as 300 m of rock, soil, and vegetation from ridge tops to access deep coal seams and much of this material is placed in adjacent headwater streams altering landcover, drainage network, and topography. In spite of its scale, extent, and potential for continued use, the effects MTM/VF on catchment hydrology is poorly understood. Previous reviews focus on water quality and ecosystem health impacts, but little is known about how MTM/VF affects hydrology, particularly the movement and storage of water, hence the hydrologic processes that ultimately control flood generation, water chemistry, and biology. This paper aggregates the existing knowledge about the hydrologic impacts of MTM/VF to identify areas where further scientific investigation is needed. While contemporary surface mining generally increases peak and total runoff, the limited MTM/VF studies reveal significant variability in hydrologic response. Significant knowledge gaps relate to limited understanding of hydrologic processes in these systems. Until the hydrologic impact of this practice is better understood, efforts to reduce water quantity and quality problems and ecosystem degradation will be difficult to achieve.

  10. 30 CFR 785.14 - Mountaintop removal mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mountaintop removal mining. 785.14 Section 785.14 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SURFACE COAL MINING AND RECLAMATION OPERATIONS PERMITS AND COAL EXPLORATION SYSTEMS UNDER REGULATORY...

  11. Using Dynamic Fourier Analysis to Discriminate Between Seismic Signals from Natural Earthquakes and Mining Explosions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria C. Mariani

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A sequence of intraplate earthquakes occurred in Arizona at the same location where miningexplosions were carried out in previous years. The explosions and some of the earthquakes generatedvery similar seismic signals. In this study Dynamic Fourier Analysis is used for discriminating signalsoriginating from natural earthquakes and mining explosions. Frequency analysis of seismogramsrecorded at regional distances shows that compared with the mining explosions the earthquake signalshave larger amplitudes in the frequency interval ~ 6 to 8 Hz and significantly smaller amplitudes inthe frequency interval ~ 2 to 4 Hz. This type of analysis permits identifying characteristics in theseismograms frequency yielding to detect potentially risky seismic events.

  12. Possibilities for using emulsion explosives in the Pljevlja coal surface mine. Mogucnost primjene emulzionih eksploziva na povrsinskim kopovima rudnika uglja Pljevlja

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Memic, M.; Pejatovic, Z.; Rocen, V. (Rudnik Uglja, Pljevlja (Yugoslavija))

    1990-01-01

    Conducts experimental blasting experiments with ANFO and slurry explosives in the Potrlica surface mine (Yugoslavia). The study aimed at assessing the possibility of reducing overburden removal cost by replacing conventional solid explosives. Effects of experimental fragmentation blasting of marlstone layers in the overburden of this mine in the Pljevlja coal basin are described. Multi-row delayed blasting (4 rows, 85 boreholes with 115 mm diameter) was carried out on a 10 m high working bench. A total of 7,855 kg of slurry DETOLIT PEM explosive, mixed on the spot and strengthened with aluminium powder, were pumped into boreholes and activated by boosters. The effects of experimental blasting are regarded as promising in respect to fragmentation of blasted material, lower seismic effects and cost (30% less than that of conventional explosives).

  13. Removal method of radium in mine water by filter sand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taki, Tomihiro; Naganuma, Masaki

    2003-01-01

    Trace radium is contained in mine water from the old mine road in Ningyo-Toge Environmental Engineering Center, JNC. We observed that filter sand with hydrated manganese oxide adsorbed radium in the mine water safely for long time. The removal method of radium by filter sand cladding with hydrated manganese oxide was studied. The results showed that radium was removed continuously and last for a long time from mine water with sodium hypochlorite solution by passing through the filter sand cladding with hydrated manganese. Only sodium hypochlorite solution was used. When excess of it was added, residue chlorine was used as chlorine disinfection. Filter sand cladding with hydrated manganese on the market can remove radium in the mine water. The removal efficiency of radium is the same as the radium coprecipitation method added with barium chloride. The cost is much lower than the ordinary methods. Amount of waste decreased to about 1/20 of the coprecipitation method. (S.Y.)

  14. Methane Explosion Mitigation in Coal Mines by Water Mist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikhradze, Nikoloz; Mataradze, Edgar; Chikhradze, Mikheil; Krauthammer, Ted; Mansurov, Zulkhair; Alyiev, Erhan

    2017-12-01

    Statistics shows that the majority of accidents with fatal outcome are caused by methane and/or coal dust explosion. This leads to assume that contemporary counter-explosion systems of various designs cannot be considered effective. Considering the growing threat of methane explosion in the coming years along with the development of deeper levels, the improvement of a system for protecting people in underground opening appears urgent. This paper focuses on technical solutions to be used in designing a protective system for minimizing the consequences of methane explosions in coalmines. The new protective system consists of three main modules: i) a high-speed shock wave suppression section; ii) a suppression section with a long-term action and iii) a system activating device. The shock wave suppressor contains a 200 litre volume water tank with a built-in gas generator and nozzles. It is activated after 12ms from the blast moment, the duration of discharge is 40 s. The suppression section with a long-term action contains a 2000 litre volume water tank, a high-pressure pump, a hydraulic accumulator, solenoid valves, and a system of pipes with built-in nozzles. It is activated after 4 s from the blast moment, the duration of discharge is 8 min. The activation device includes a detection block containing sensors, an emergency signal generation module, a signal transmission module, a signal receiving module and a power supply module. The system operates in a waiting mode and activates immediately upon the receipt of the start signal generated by the detector. The paper also addresses the preliminary results of the system prototype testing in the tunnel.

  15. Peak particle velocity for rockbursts in underground coal mines and for shot-hole explosions in open-pit mines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holub, Karel; Rušajová, Jana

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 1 (2011), s. 104-114 ISSN 1217-8977 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : hole-shot explosion * open-pit mine * peak particle velocity Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 0.346, year: 2011 http://www.akademiai.com/content/k3u1334gw21u4x27/

  16. Review of potential impacts to sea turtles from underwater explosive removal of offshore structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viada, Stephen T.; Hammer, Richard M.; Racca, Roberto; Hannay, David; Thompson, M. John; Balcom, Brian J.; Phillips, Neal W.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to collect and synthesize existing information relevant to the explosive removal of offshore structures (EROS) in aquatic environments. Data sources were organized and summarized by topic - explosive removal methods, physics of underwater explosions, sea turtle resources, documented impacts to sea turtles, and mitigation of effects. Information was gathered via electronic database searches and literature source review. Bulk explosive charges are the most commonly used technique in EROS. While the physical principles of underwater detonations and the propagation of pressure and acoustic waves are well understood, there are significant gaps in the application of this knowledge. Impacts to sea turtles from explosive removal operations may range from non-injurious effects (e.g. acoustic annoyance; mild tactile detection or physical discomfort) to varying levels of injury (i.e. non-lethal and lethal injuries). Very little information exists regarding the impacts of underwater explosions on sea turtles. Effects of explosions on turtles often must be inferred from documented effects to other vertebrates with lungs or other gas-containing organs, such as mammals and most fishes. However, a cautious approach should be used when determining impacts to sea turtles based on extrapolations from other vertebrates. The discovery of beached sea turtles and bottlenose dolphins following an explosive platform removal event in 1986 prompted the initiation of formal consultation between the U.S. Department of the Interior, Minerals Management Service (MMS) and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), authorized through the Endangered Species Act Section 7, to determine a mechanism to minimize potential impacts to listed species. The initial consultation resulted in a requirement for oil and gas companies to obtain a permit (through separate consultations on a case-by-case basis) prior to using explosives in Federal waters. Because many offshore

  17. Terrestrial salamander abundance on reclaimed mountaintop removal mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Petra Bohall; Williams, Jennifer M.

    2013-01-01

    Mountaintop removal mining, a large-scale disturbance affecting vegetation, soil structure, and topography, converts landscapes from mature forests to extensive grassland and shrubland habitats. We sampled salamanders using drift-fence arrays and coverboard transects on and near mountaintop removal mines in southern West Virginia, USA, during 2000–2002. We compared terrestrial salamander relative abundance and species richness of un-mined, intact forest with habitats on reclaimed mountaintop removal mines (reclaimed grassland, reclaimed shrubland, and fragmented forest). Salamanders within forests increased in relative abundance with increasing distance from reclaimed mine edge. Reclaimed grassland and shrubland habitats had lower relative abundance and species richness than forests. Characteristics of reclaimed habitats that likely contributed to lower salamander abundance included poor soils (dry, compacted, little organic matter, high rock content), reduced vertical structure of vegetation and little tree cover, and low litter and woody debris cover. Past research has shown that salamander populations reduced by clearcutting may rebound in 15–24 years. Time since disturbance was 7–28 years in reclaimed habitats on our study areas and salamander populations had not reached levels found in adjacent mature forests.

  18. Responses of Terrestrial Herpetofauna to Persistent, Novel Ecosystems Resulting from Mountaintop Removal Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer M. Williams; Donald J. Brown; Petra B. Wood

    2017-01-01

    Mountaintop removal mining is a large-scale surface mining technique that removes entire floral and faunal communities, along with soil horizons located above coal seams. In West Virginia, the majority of this mining occurs on forested mountaintops. However, after mining ceases the land is typically reclaimed to grasslands and shrublands, resulting in novel ecosystems...

  19. Systematic review of community health impacts of mountaintop removal mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyles, Abee L; Blain, Robyn B; Rochester, Johanna R; Avanasi, Raghavendhran; Goldhaber, Susan B; McComb, Sofie; Holmgren, Stephanie D; Masten, Scott A; Thayer, Kristina A

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this evaluation is to understand the human health impacts of mountaintop removal (MTR) mining, the major method of coal mining in and around Central Appalachia. MTR mining impacts the air, water, and soil and raises concerns about potential adverse health effects in neighboring communities; exposures associated with MTR mining include particulate matter (PM), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), metals, hydrogen sulfide, and other recognized harmful substances. A systematic review was conducted of published studies of MTR mining and community health, occupational studies of MTR mining, and any available animal and in vitro experimental studies investigating the effects of exposures to MTR-mining-related chemical mixtures. Six databases (Embase, PsycINFO, PubMed, Scopus, Toxline, and Web of Science) were searched with customized terms, and no restrictions on publication year or language, through October 27, 2016. The eligibility criteria included all human population studies and animal models of human health, direct and indirect measures of MTR-mining exposure, any health-related effect or change in physiological response, and any study design type. Risk of bias was assessed for observational and experimental studies using an approach developed by the National Toxicology Program (NTP) Office of Health Assessment and Translation (OHAT). To provide context for these health effects, a summary of the exposure literature is included that focuses on describing findings for outdoor air, indoor air, and drinking water. From a literature search capturing 3088 studies, 33 human studies (29 community, four occupational), four experimental studies (two in rat, one in vitro and in mice, one in C. elegans), and 58 MTR mining exposure studies were identified. A number of health findings were reported in observational human studies, including cardiopulmonary effects, mortality, and birth defects. However, concerns for risk of bias were identified, especially

  20. Removal of radium-226 from uranium mining effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averill, D.W.; Moffett, D.; Webber, R.T.; Whittle, L.; Wood, J.A.

    1984-12-01

    Uranium mining and milling operations usually generate large quantities of solid and liquid waste materials. A slurry, consisting of waste rock and chemical solutions from the milling operation, is discharged to impoundment areas (tailings basins). Most of the radioactive material dissolved in tailings slurries is precipitated by the addition of lime and limestone prior to discharge from the mill. However, the activity of one radioisotope, radium-226, remains relatively high in the tailings basin effluents. In Canada, radium-226 is removed from uranium mining and milling effluents by the addition of barium chloride to precipitate barium-radium sulphate [(Ba,Ra)SO 4 ]. Although dissolved radium-226 activities are generally reduced effectively, the process is considered to have two undesirable characteristics: the first related to suspended radium-226 in the effluents and the second to ultimate disposal of the (Ba,Ra)SO 4 sludge. A government-industry mining task force established a radioactivity sub-group in 1974 to assist in the development of effluent guidelines and regulations for the uranium mining industry (Radioactivity Sub-group, 1974). The investigation of more effective removal methods was recommended, including the development of mechanical treatment systems as alternatives to settling ponds. Environment Canada's Wastewater Technology Centre (WTC) initiated a bench scale study in March, 1976 which was designed to assess the feasibility of using precipitation, coagulation, flocculation and sedimentation for the removal of radium-226. In 1977, the study was accelerated with financial assistance from the Atomic Energy Control Board. The results were favourable, with improved radium removals obtained in bench scale batch tests using barium chloride as the precipitant and either alum or ferric chloride as the coagulant. A more comprehensive bench scale and pilot scale process development and demonstration program was formulated. The results of the joint study

  1. Nitrogen removal in Northern peatlands treating mine wastewaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Katharina; Karlsson, Teemu; Turunen, Kaisa; Liisa Räisänen, Marja; Backnäs, Soile

    2015-04-01

    Natural peatlands can be used as passive purification systems for mine wastewaters. These treatment peatlands are well-suited for passive water treatment as they delay the flow of water, and provide a large filtration network with many adsorptive surfaces on plant roots or soil particles. They have been shown to remove efficiently harmful metals and metalloids from mine waters due to variety of chemical, physical and biological processes such as adsorption, precipitation, sedimentation, oxidation and reduction reactions, as well as plant uptake. Many factors affect the removal efficiency such as inflow water quality, wetland hydrology, system pH, redox potential and temperature, the nature of the predominating purification processes, and the presence of other components such as salts. However, less attention has been paid to nitrogen (N) removal in peatlands. Thus, this study aimed to assess the efficiency of N removal and seasonal variation in the removal rate in two treatment peatlands treating mine dewatering waters and process effluent waters. Water sampling from treatment peatland inflow and outflow waters as well as pore waters in peatland were conducted multiple times during 2012-2014. Water samples were analysed for total N, nitrate-N and ammonium-N. Additionally, an YSI EXO2 device was used for continuous nitrate monitoring of waters discharged from treatment peatlands to the recipient river during summer 2014. The results showed that the oxic conditions in upper peat layer and microbial activity in treatment peatlands allowed the efficient oxidation of ammonium-N to nitrite-N and further to nitrate-N during summer time. However, the slow denitrification rate restricts the N removal as not all of the nitrate produced during nitrification is denitrified. In summer time, the removal rate of total N varied between 30-99 % being highest in late summer. N removal was clearly higher for treatment peatland treating process effluent waters than for peatland

  2. [General principles of treatment of mine-explosive wounds of ENT-organs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beliakin, S A; Egorov, V I; Luk'ianenko, A V

    2011-11-01

    The relevance of diagnosis and treatment of mine-explosive wounds ENT high. Treatment of explosives, Russian Academy of Sciences-the challenge and consists of a series of sequential steps that need to be applied, taking into account all the particularities of each injury. Concepts of specialized surgical care of the wounded are formulated. The main are: 1) one-stage surgical treatment of comprehensive primary wounds with detent of bone fragments, reconstruction of defects of soft tissue with positive wound and related fascial spatium drainage; 2) general intensive care during the postoperative period, including water-electrolytic balance correction, sympathetic block, controlled hemodilution and adequate analgesia; 3) intensive therapy of postoperative wounds, aimed at creating favorable conditions for its healing and includes targeted selective influence on hemophoresis in the wound and the local proteoclastic processes.

  3. SELENIUM TREATMENT/REMOVAL ALTERNATIVES DEMONSTRATION PROJECT - MINE WASTE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM ACTIVITY III, PROJECT 20

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document is the final report for EPA's Mine WAste Technology Program (MWTP) Activity III, Project 20--Selenium Treatment/Removal Alternatives Demonstration project. Selenium contamination originates from many sources including mining operations, mineral processing, abandoned...

  4. The characteristics of mine explosion injury of wading in shoal: A study on an animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen ZHANG

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To study the characteristics and mechanism of mine blast injury that wading in shoal of different depths through an animal model. Methods Ninety-six healthy adult New Zealand white rabbits weighing 2.19±0.12kg were randomly divided into land group (n=16, limb wading group (n=16, the water depth reaching up the middle of the thighs of rabbits, and chest wading group (n=16, the water depth reaching up the thoracic xiphoid, stress test group (n=30, fake injury group (n=18. Punctiform burster was used to simulate landmine. Electric ignited the simulated mine away, causing landmine explosion injury to rabbits' one-sided hind limbs in upright state. High-speed photography was used to observe the movement of water accompanying the simulated mine explosion. Arterial blood serum markers of myocardial injury (CK-MB, cTnI and nerve injury (MBP, NSE were detected before injury, and 3, 6 and 12h after injury, and echocardiography, electrocardiography, CT, DSA and other examinations were implemented at the same time. Survival animals were killed 12h after injury for anatomy to record their injuries to the limbs and distant organs. The histopathological examination was done to define the injury characteristics further. Results Feet and distal tibia were broken, and closed femoral fractures and arterial damage were often found away from the stump in limb wading group. This type of injury was different from the mop-like tearing tissue in the land group. Chest, abdominal organs and the brain, spinal cord injury in wading group were more severe than those in land group. There were higher incidences of chest, abdominal organs and spinal cord injury in chest wading Group. Conclusion The energy transfer of underwater explosion is affected by water depth and limbs or trunk mutually, which is an important mechanism of the complex and serious injuries in the wading group. The wading depth is an important factor affecting severity of the injury. Based on

  5. Fish Mortalities From Explosive Removal of Petroleum Platforms in the Gulf of Mexico 1993 to 1999 (NCEI Accession 0156750)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data describe the first comprehensive study to quantitatively assess impacts of the explosive removal of offshore oil and gas structures on fish. The most...

  6. Testing the electrostatic characteristics of polypropylene fabric with metallic yarns, intended for use in coal mines threatened by the explosion hazard. Part 2: Tests in coal mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talarek, M; Orzech, L

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to assess the electrostatic safety of polypropylene fabric with metallic yarns intended for use in coal mines. Such fabrics have not been used in the Polish mining industry yet. The tests conducted have been divided into two subgroups: laboratory tests and tests in a coal mine. This paper presents the results of tests in a coal mine, where we have focused on the resistance-to-ground in some specific situations. Bags made of fabric at the roadway face were tested, as well as the roll of fabric during transport and carried by a miner. The results obtained allow the reliable assessment of the risk of using fabrics with metallic yarns in the explosive atmosphere which often occurs in coal mines.

  7. Farco Mining makes productivity gains using emulsion-Anfo blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, N. [Nelson Brothers, Inc., Parrish, AL (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Describes the use of a 40:60 emulsion: Auto blend for overburden removal at Farco Minings surface coal mine near Laredo, Texas. The use of this explosives mixture maximized the explosive per foot of blasthole, increasing overburden removal to 925,000 buy per month and improving mine productivity. Increases in powder factors produced further increases in cast yardage and mine production. 2 figs.

  8. Subcritical water treatment of explosive and heavy metals co-contaminated soil: Removal of the explosive, and immobilization and risk assessment of heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammad Nazrul; Jung, Ho-Young; Park, Jeong-Hun

    2015-11-01

    Co-contamination of explosives and heavy metals (HMs) in soil, particularly army shooting range soil, has received increasing environmental concern due to toxicity and risks to ecological systems. In this study, a subcritical water (SCW) extraction process was used to remediate the explosives-plus-HMs-co-contaminated soil. A quantitative evaluation of explosives in the treated soil, compared with untreated soil, was applied to assess explosive removal. The immobilization of HMs was assessed by toxicity characteristic leaching procedure tests, and by investigating the migration of HMs fractions. The environmental risk of HMs in the soil residue was assessed according to the risk assessment code (RAC) and ecological risk indices (Er and RI). The results indicated that SCW treatment could eliminate the explosives, >99%, during the remediation, while the HM was effectively immobilized. The effect of water temperature on reducing the explosives and the risk of HMs in soil was observed. A marked increase in the non-bioavailable concentration of each HM was observed, and the leaching rate of HMs was decreased by 70-97% after SCW treatment at 250 °C, showing the effective immobilization of HMs. According to the RAC or RI, each tested HM showed no or low risk to the environment after treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Radium removal from Canadian uranium mining effluents by a radium-selective ion exchange complexer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    A laboratory test program was initiated by the Department of Energy, Mines and Resources as part of the National Uranium Tailings Program to investigate the applicability of a radium-selective ion exchange complexer for removing radium from Canadian uranium mining effluents. The ion exchange complexer was shown to be efficient in removing radium from contaminated water of uranium mining operations, with the ultimate loading capacity of the resin on one type of water treated being determined as approximately 1,600 Bq/cm 3 of new resin. The results showed that the resin was effective in removing radium but not any other contaminants

  10. Аpplying of Explosives of the Type an-fo and Slurry in the Open Pit Mine "Bucim"

    OpenAIRE

    Dambov, Risto; Nikolic, Miroslav; Dambov, Ilija

    2012-01-01

    In this paper shows the way of application of ANFO and SLURRY bulk explosives and blasting methods that are characteristic for this open pit mine. According to the physical - mechanical characteristics of the working environment and condition of the blast hole are defining some parameters for each series separately. In this open pit are defined 5(five) different working environments - rocks with copper mineralization (0,25%Cu) or rocks waste. According to the effects of blasting are make cert...

  11. Analysis, comparison, and modeling of radar interferometry, date of surface deformation signals associated with underground explosions, mine collapses and earthquakes. Phase I: underground explosions, Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foxall, W; Vincent, P; Walter, W

    1999-01-01

    We have previously presented simple elastic deformation modeling results for three classes of seismic events of concern in monitoring the CTBT-underground explosions, mine collapses and earthquakes. Those results explored the theoretical detectability of each event type using synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) based on commercially available satellite data. In those studies we identified and compared the characteristics of synthetic interferograms that distinguish each event type, as well the ability of the interferograms to constrain source parameters. These idealized modeling results, together with preliminary analysis of InSAR data for the 1995 mb 5.2 Solvay mine collapse in southwestern Wyoming, suggested that InSAR data used in conjunction with regional seismic monitoring holds great potential for CTBT discrimination and seismic source analysis, as well as providing accurate ground truth parameters for regional calibration events. In this paper we further examine the detectability and ''discriminating'' power of InSAR by presenting results from InSAR data processing, analysis and modeling of the surface deformation signals associated with underground explosions. Specifically, we present results of a detailed study of coseismic and postseismic surface deformation signals associated with underground nuclear and chemical explosion tests at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Several interferograms were formed from raw ERS-1/2 radar data covering different time spans and epochs beginning just prior to the last U.S. nuclear tests in 1992 and ending in 1996. These interferograms have yielded information about the nature and duration of the source processes that produced the surface deformations associated with these events. A critical result of this study is that significant post-event surface deformation associated with underground nuclear explosions detonated at depths in excess of 600 meters can be detected using differential radar interferometry. An

  12. Biological manganese removal from acid mine drainage in constructed wetlands and prototype bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallberg, Kevin B; Johnson, D Barrie

    2005-02-01

    Mine drainage waters vary considerably in the range and concentration of heavy metals they contain. Besides iron, manganese is frequently present at elevated concentrations in waters draining both coal and metal mines. Passive treatment systems (aerobic wetlands and compost bioreactors) are designed to remove iron by biologically induced oxidation/precipitation. Manganese, however, is problematic as it does not readily form sulfidic minerals and requires elevated pH (>8) for abiotic oxidation of Mn (II) to insoluble Mn (IV). As a result, manganese removal in passive remediation systems is often less effective than removal of iron. This was found to be the case at the pilot passive treatment plant (PPTP) constructed to treat water draining the former Wheal Jane tin mine in Cornwall, UK, where effective removal of manganese occurred only in one of the three rock filter components of the composite systems over a 1-year period of monitoring. Water in the two rock filter systems where manganese removal was relatively poor was generally system. These differences in water chemistry and manganese removal were due to variable performances in the compost bioreactors that feed the rock filter units in the composite passive systems at Wheal Jane. An alternative approach for removing soluble manganese from mine waters, using fixed bed bioreactors, was developed. Ferromanganese nodules (about 2 cm diameter), collected from an abandoned mine adit in north Wales, were used to inoculate the bioreactors (working volume ca. 700 ml). Following colonization by manganese-oxidizing microbes, the aerated bioreactor catalysed the removal of soluble manganese, via oxidation of Mn (II) and precipitation of the resultant Mn (IV) in the bioreactor, in synthetic media and mine water from the Wheal Jane PPTP. Such an approach has potential application for removing soluble Mn from mine streams and other Mn-contaminated water courses.

  13. 76 FR 12070 - Incidental Taking of Marine Mammals; Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to the Explosive Removal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-04

    ... Energy's EROS operations in 2010: Marine mammals Biological impacts Company Structure Dates sighted... Taking of Marine Mammals; Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to the Explosive Removal of Offshore Structures in the Gulf of Mexico AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and...

  14. 76 FR 35856 - Incidental Taking of Marine Mammals; Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to the Explosive Removal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-20

    ... Taking of Marine Mammals; Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to the Explosive Removal of Offshore Structures in the Gulf of Mexico AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and... accordance with the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) and implementing regulations, notification is hereby...

  15. 75 FR 8921 - Incidental Taking of Marine Mammals; Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to the Explosive Removal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... Taking of Marine Mammals; Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to the Explosive Removal of Offshore Structures in the Gulf of Mexico AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and... accordance with the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) and implementing regulations, notification is hereby...

  16. 76 FR 33704 - Incidental Taking of Marine Mammals; Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to the Explosive Removal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-09

    ... Taking of Marine Mammals; Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to the Explosive Removal of Offshore Structures in the Gulf of Mexico AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and... accordance with the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) and implementing regulations, notification is hereby...

  17. 77 FR 45341 - Incidental Taking of Marine Mammals; Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to the Explosive Removal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-31

    ... Taking of Marine Mammals; Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to the Explosive Removal of Offshore Structures in the Gulf of Mexico AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and...). SUMMARY: In accordance with the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) and implementing regulations...

  18. 77 FR 10481 - Incidental Taking of Marine Mammals; Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to the Explosive Removal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ... Taking of Marine Mammals; Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to the Explosive Removal of Offshore Structures in the Gulf of Mexico AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and... accordance with the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) and implementing regulations, notification is hereby...

  19. 77 FR 16539 - Incidental Taking of Marine Mammals; Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to the Explosive Removal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-21

    ... Taking of Marine Mammals; Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to the Explosive Removal of Offshore Structures in the Gulf of Mexico AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and...). SUMMARY: In accordance with the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) and implementing regulations...

  20. 76 FR 23570 - Incidental Taking of Marine Mammals; Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to the Explosive Removal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-27

    ... Taking of Marine Mammals; Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to the Explosive Removal of Offshore Structures in the Gulf of Mexico AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and... accordance with the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) and implementing regulations, notification is hereby...

  1. 75 FR 28566 - Incidental Taking of Marine Mammals; Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to the Explosive Removal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    ... Taking of Marine Mammals; Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to the Explosive Removal of Offshore Structures in the Gulf of Mexico AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and... accordance with the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) and implementing regulations, notification is hereby...

  2. 78 FR 22517 - Incidental Taking of Marine Mammals; Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to the Explosive Removal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-16

    ... Taking of Marine Mammals; Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to the Explosive Removal of Offshore Structures in the Gulf of Mexico AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and...). SUMMARY: In accordance with the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) and implementing regulations...

  3. 75 FR 31423 - Incidental Taking of Marine Mammals; Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to the Explosive Removal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-03

    ... Taking of Marine Mammals; Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to the Explosive Removal of Offshore Structures in the Gulf of Mexico AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and...: In accordance with the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) and implementing regulations, notification...

  4. 78 FR 13865 - Incidental Taking of Marine Mammals; Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to the Explosive Removal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    ... Taking of Marine Mammals; Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to the Explosive Removal of Offshore Structures in the Gulf of Mexico AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and...). SUMMARY: In accordance with the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) and implementing regulations...

  5. 75 FR 54851 - Incidental Taking of Marine Mammals; Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to the Explosive Removal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-09

    ... Taking of Marine Mammals; Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to the Explosive Removal of Offshore Structures in the Gulf of Mexico AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and... accordance with the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) and implementing regulations, notification is hereby...

  6. 75 FR 38078 - Incidental Taking of Marine Mammals; Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to the Explosive Removal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Taking of Marine Mammals; Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to the Explosive Removal of Offshore Structures in the Gulf of Mexico AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and... accordance with the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) and implementing regulations, notification is hereby...

  7. 77 FR 39485 - Incidental Taking of Marine Mammals; Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to the Explosive Removal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-03

    ... Taking of Marine Mammals; Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to the Explosive Removal of Offshore Structures in the Gulf of Mexico AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and...). SUMMARY: In accordance with the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) and implementing regulations...

  8. Enhanced mass removal due to phase explosion during high irradiance nanosecond laser ablation of silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jong Hyun [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-05-01

    The morphology of craters resulting from high irradiance laser ablation of silicon was measured using a white light interferometry microscope. The craters show a dramatic increase in their depth and volume at a certain irradiance, indicating a change in the primary mechanism for mass removal. Laser shadowgraph imaging was used to characterize and differentiate the mass ejection processes for laser irradiances above and below the threshold value. Time-resolved images show distinct features of the mass ejected at irradiances above the threshold value including the presence of micron-sized particulates; this begins at approximately 300 ~ 400 ns after the start of laser heating. The analysis of the phenomena was carried out by using two models: a thermal evaporation model and a phase explosion model. Estimation of the crater depth due to the thermally evaporated mass led to a large underestimation of the crater depth for irradiances above the threshold. Above the threshold irradiance, the possibility of phase explosion was analyzed. Two important results are the thickness of the superheated liquid layer that is close to the critical temperature and the time for vapor bubbles that are generated in the superheated liquid to achieve a critical size. After reaching the critical size, vapor bubbles can grow spontaneously resulting in a violent ejection of liquid droplets from the superheated volume. The effects of an induced transparency, i.e. of liquid silicon turning into an optically transparent liquid dielectric medium, are also introduced. The estimated time for a bubble to reach the critical size is in agreement with the delay time measured for the initiation of large mass ejection. Also, the thickness of the superheated liquid layer that is close to the critical temperature at the time of the beginning of the large mass ejection is representative of the crater depth at the threshold irradiance. These results suggest that phase explosion is a plausible thermal

  9. Investigation into the potential for dust and gas explosions in underground coal mines with reference to pick tip geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawood, Albert D.

    2011-01-01

    In underground coal mines, methane gas, if present in sufficient concentration, may be ignited by sparks from hot spots on the picks of coal cutting machines striking hard bands of rock. During the coal cutting, wear-flat areas develop on the trailing side of the tips of picks. As pick wear progresses, the generation of frictional heat and coal dust increases and the development of hot spots at the cutting tips may lead to an explosion of methane gas. Field experience and research work over the last few years have facilitated excellent cutting performance for certain picks through the optimisation of the cutting parameters. Such performance improvements show great promise in preventing the incidence of gas or dust explosions occurring at the coal face area. This study sets out some of the fundamentals of pick geometry and cutting parameters and the methods which have been employed to achieve improvements in reducing the hazards of gas or dust explosions. It is based on the comparative trial results of two types of picks with different designs and on a range of available research information on the subject. My investigation looked at the fundamentals of pick geometry and cutting parameters and the current suppression techniques in place to control the dust and gas explosions on the coal operating face.

  10. The effect of magnesium on partial sulphate removal from mine water as gypsum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolonen, Emma-Tuulia; Rämö, Jaakko; Lassi, Ulla

    2015-08-15

    The aim of this research was to investigate the effect of magnesium on the removal efficiency of sulphate as gypsum from mine water. The precipitation conditions were simulated with MINEQL + software and the simulation results were compared with the results from laboratory jar test experiments. Both the simulation and the laboratory results showed that magnesium in the mine water was maintaining sulphate in a soluble form as magnesium sulphate (MgSO4) at pH 9.6. Thus magnesium was preventing the removal of sulphate as gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O). However, change in the lime precipitation pH from 9.6 to 12.5 resulted in magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH)2) precipitation and improved sulphate removal. Additionally, magnesium hydroxide could act as seed crystals for gypsum precipitation or co-precipitate sulphate further enhancing the removal of sulphate from mine water. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Concept Study of Multi Sensor Detection Imaging and Explosive Confirmation of Mines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stolarczyk, Larry

    1998-01-01

    ...) cannot detect non-metallic mines and detection sensitivity degrades in magnetic soil. Because metal detection sensitivity can be increased to detect low metal content in some non-metallic mines, some alarms significantly increase...

  12. Liquid explosives

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jiping

    2015-01-01

    The book drawing on the author's nearly half a century of energetic materials research experience intends to systematically review the global researches on liquid explosives. The book focuses on the study of the conception, explosion mechanism, properties and preparation of liquid explosives. It provides a combination of theoretical knowledge and practical examples in a reader-friendly style. The book is likely to be interest of university researchers and graduate students in the fields of energetic materials, blasting engineering and mining.

  13. Removal of phosphorus from agricultural wastewaters using adsorption media prepared from acid mine drainage sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibrell, Philip L.; Montgomery, Gary A.; Ritenour, Kelsey L.; Tucker, Travis W.

    2009-01-01

    Excess phosphorus in wastewaters promotes eutrophication in receiving waterways. A??cost-effective method for the removal of phosphorus from water would significantly reduce the impact of such wastewaters on the environment. Acid mine drainage sludge is a waste product produced by the neutralization of acid mine drainage, and consists mainly of the same metal hydroxides used in traditional wastewater treatment for the removal of phosphorus. In this paper, we describe a method for the drying and pelletization of acid mine drainage sludge that results in a particulate media, which we have termed Ferroxysorb, for the removal of phosphorus from wastewater in an efficient packed bed contactor. Adsorption capacities are high, and kinetics rapid, such that a contact time of less than 5 min is sufficient for removal of 60-90% of the phosphorus, depending on the feed concentration and time in service. In addition, the adsorption capacity of the Ferroxysorb media was increased dramatically by using two columns in an alternating sequence so that each sludge bed receives alternating rest and adsorption cycles. A stripping procedure based on treatment with dilute sodium hydroxide was also developed that allows for recovery of the P from the media, with the possibility of generating a marketable fertilizer product. These results indicate that acid mine drainage sludges - hitherto thought of as undesirable wastes - can be used to remove phosphorus from wastewater, thus offsetting a portion of acid mine drainage treatment costs while at the same time improving water quality in sensitive watersheds.

  14. Rapid removal of fine particles from mine water using sequential processes of coagulation and flocculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, M.; Lee, H.J.; Shim, Y. [Korean Mine Reclamation Corporation MIRECO, Seoul (Republic of Korea)

    2010-07-01

    The processes of coagulation and flocculation using high molecular weight long-chain polymers were applied to treat mine water having fine flocs of which about 93% of the total mass was less than 3.02 {mu} m, representing the size distribution of fine particles. Six different combinations of acryl-type anionic flocculants and polyamine-type cationic coagulants were selected to conduct kinetic tests on turbidity removal in mine water. Optimization studies on the types and concentrations of the coagulant and flocculant showed that the highest rate of turbidity removal was obtained with 10 mg L{sup -1} FL-2949 (coagulant) and 12 mg L{sup -1} A333E (flocculant), which was about 14.4 and 866.7 times higher than that obtained with A333E alone and that obtained through natural precipitation by gravity, respectively. With this optimized condition, the turbidity of mine water was reduced to 0 NTU within 20 min. Zeta potential measurements were conducted to elucidate the removal mechanism of the fine particles, and they revealed that there was a strong linear relationship between the removal rate of each pair of coagulant and flocculant application and the zeta potential differences that were obtained by subtracting the zeta potential of flocculant-treated mine water from the zeta potential of coagulant-treated mine water. Accordingly, through an optimization process, coagulation-flocculation by use of polymers could be advantageous to mine water treatment, because the process rapidly removes fine particles in mine water and only requires a small-scale plant for set-up purposes owing to the short retention time in the process.

  15. Pervious concrete reactive barrier for removal of heavy metals from acid mine drainage − column study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shabalala, Ayanda N., E-mail: Ayanda.Shabalala@ump.ac.za [University of Johannesburg, PO Box 524, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa); Ekolu, Stephen O. [University of Johannesburg, PO Box 524, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa); Diop, Souleymane [Council for Geoscience, Private bag x112, Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa); Solomon, Fitsum [University of Johannesburg, PO Box 524, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa)

    2017-02-05

    Highlights: • Pervious concrete raises the low pH of acid mine drainage up to 12; heavy metals precipitate. • Pervious concrete successfully removed greater than 99% of inorganic contaminants. • Ca(OH){sub 2} in pervious concrete reacts with SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} in acid mine drainage to form expansive gypsum. • Incorporating fly ash into pervious concrete mitigates damage caused by gypsum. • Pervious concrete reactive barrier offers a promising alternative method for treatment of acid mine drainage. - Abstract: This paper presents a column study conducted to investigate the potential use of pervious concrete as a reactive barrier for treatment of water impacted by mine waste. The study was done using acid mine drainage (AMD) collected from a gold mine (WZ) and a coalfield (TDB). Pervious concrete mixtures consisting of Portland cement CEM I 52.5R with or without 30% fly ash (FA) were prepared at a water-cementitious ratio of 0.27 then used to make cubes which were employed in the reactor columns. It was found that the removal efficiency levels of Al, Fe, Mn, Co and Ni were 75%, 98%, 99%, 94% and 95% for WZ; 87%, 96%, 99%, 98% and 90% for TDB, respectively. The high rate of acid reduction and metal removal by pervious concrete is attributed to dissolution of portlandite which is a typical constituent of concrete. The dominant reaction product in all four columns was gypsum, which also contributed to some removal of sulphate from AMD. Formation of gypsum, goethite, and Glauber’s salt were identified. Precipitation of metal hydroxides seems to be the dominant metal removal mechanism. Use of pervious concrete offers a promising alternative treatment method for polluted or acidic mine water.

  16. Pervious concrete reactive barrier for removal of heavy metals from acid mine drainage − column study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabalala, Ayanda N.; Ekolu, Stephen O.; Diop, Souleymane; Solomon, Fitsum

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Pervious concrete raises the low pH of acid mine drainage up to 12; heavy metals precipitate. • Pervious concrete successfully removed greater than 99% of inorganic contaminants. • Ca(OH)_2 in pervious concrete reacts with SO_4"2"− in acid mine drainage to form expansive gypsum. • Incorporating fly ash into pervious concrete mitigates damage caused by gypsum. • Pervious concrete reactive barrier offers a promising alternative method for treatment of acid mine drainage. - Abstract: This paper presents a column study conducted to investigate the potential use of pervious concrete as a reactive barrier for treatment of water impacted by mine waste. The study was done using acid mine drainage (AMD) collected from a gold mine (WZ) and a coalfield (TDB). Pervious concrete mixtures consisting of Portland cement CEM I 52.5R with or without 30% fly ash (FA) were prepared at a water-cementitious ratio of 0.27 then used to make cubes which were employed in the reactor columns. It was found that the removal efficiency levels of Al, Fe, Mn, Co and Ni were 75%, 98%, 99%, 94% and 95% for WZ; 87%, 96%, 99%, 98% and 90% for TDB, respectively. The high rate of acid reduction and metal removal by pervious concrete is attributed to dissolution of portlandite which is a typical constituent of concrete. The dominant reaction product in all four columns was gypsum, which also contributed to some removal of sulphate from AMD. Formation of gypsum, goethite, and Glauber’s salt were identified. Precipitation of metal hydroxides seems to be the dominant metal removal mechanism. Use of pervious concrete offers a promising alternative treatment method for polluted or acidic mine water.

  17. Rapid removal of fine particles from mine water using sequential processes of coagulation and flocculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Min; Lee, Hyun-Ju; Shim, Yonsik

    2010-04-01

    The processes of coagulation and flocculation using high molecular weight long-chain polymers were applied to treat mine water having fine flocs of which about 93% of the total mass was less than 3.02 microm, representing the size distribution of fine particles. Six different combinations of acryl-type anionic flocculants and polyamine-type cationic coagulants were selected to conduct kinetic tests on turbidity removal in mine water. Optimization studies on the types and concentrations of the coagulant and flocculant showed that the highest rate of turbidity removal was obtained with 10 mg L(-1) FL-2949 (coagulant) and 12 mg L(-1) A333E (flocculant), which was about 14.4 and 866.7 times higher than that obtained with A333E alone and that obtained through natural precipitation by gravity, respectively. With this optimized condition, the turbidity of mine water was reduced to 0 NTU within 20 min. Zeta potential measurements were conducted to elucidate the removal mechanism of the fine particles, and they revealed that there was a strong linear relationship between the removal rate of each pair of coagulant and flocculant application and the zeta potential differences that were obtained by subtracting the zeta potential of flocculant-treated mine water from the zeta potential of coagulant-treated mine water. Accordingly, through an optimization process, coagulation-flocculation by use of polymers could be advantageous to mine water treatment, because the process rapidly removes fine particles in mine water and only requires a small-scale plant for set-up purposes owing to the short retention time in the process.

  18. Effect of solids concentration on removal of heavy metals from mine tailings via bioleaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yunguo; Zhou Ming; Zeng Guangming; Li Xin; Xu Weihua; Fan Ting

    2007-01-01

    Mining of mineral ore and disposal of resulting waste tailings pose a significant risk to the surrounding environment. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the feasibility to remove heavy metals from mine tailings with the use of bioleaching and meanwhile to investigate the effect of solids concentration on removal of heavy metals from mine tailings by indigenous sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and the transformation of heavy metal forms after the bioleaching process. This work showed the laboratory results of bioleaching experiments on Pb-Zn-Cu mine tailings. The results showed that 98.08% Zn, 96.44% Cu, and 43.52% Pb could be removed from mine tailings by the bioleaching experiment after 13 days at 1% (w/v) solids concentration and the rates of pH reduction, ORP rise and sulfate production were reduced with the increase of solids concentration, due to the buffering capacity of mine tailing solids. The results also indicated that solid concentration 1% was found to be best to bacterial activity and metal solubilization of the five solids concentration tested (1%, 2%, 5%, 8% and 10%) under the chosen experimental conditions. In addition, the bioleaching had a significant impact on changes in partitioning of heavy metals

  19. Effect of solids concentration on removal of heavy metals from mine tailings via bioleaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Yunguo [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)]. E-mail: axore@163.com; Zhou Ming [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Zeng Guangming [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Li Xin [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Xu Weihua [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Fan Ting [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2007-03-06

    Mining of mineral ore and disposal of resulting waste tailings pose a significant risk to the surrounding environment. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the feasibility to remove heavy metals from mine tailings with the use of bioleaching and meanwhile to investigate the effect of solids concentration on removal of heavy metals from mine tailings by indigenous sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and the transformation of heavy metal forms after the bioleaching process. This work showed the laboratory results of bioleaching experiments on Pb-Zn-Cu mine tailings. The results showed that 98.08% Zn, 96.44% Cu, and 43.52% Pb could be removed from mine tailings by the bioleaching experiment after 13 days at 1% (w/v) solids concentration and the rates of pH reduction, ORP rise and sulfate production were reduced with the increase of solids concentration, due to the buffering capacity of mine tailing solids. The results also indicated that solid concentration 1% was found to be best to bacterial activity and metal solubilization of the five solids concentration tested (1%, 2%, 5%, 8% and 10%) under the chosen experimental conditions. In addition, the bioleaching had a significant impact on changes in partitioning of heavy metals.

  20. Ion exchange system design for removal of heavy metals from acid mine drainage wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Sapkal

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the methodology used to determine the optimal ion-exchange column size to process all separate batchesof feeds from acid mine drainage wastewater.The optimal design ensures the best utilization of resin material and therefore results in a minimum amount of spent resins.Ion exchanger materials have been studied for removing heavy metals from a metal bearing wastes. For the current treatment,a facility has been designed for the removal of heavy metals from the acid mine drainage (AMD waste by the ion-exchange technology.

  1. Manganese removal from mine waters - investigating the occurrence and importance of manganese carbonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamforth, Selina M.; Manning, David A.C.; Singleton, Ian; Younger, Paul L.; Johnson, Karen L.

    2006-01-01

    Manganese is a common contaminant of mine water and other waste waters. Due to its high solubility over a wide pH range, it is notoriously difficult to remove from contaminated waters. Previous systems that effectively remove Mn from mine waters have involved oxidising the soluble Mn(II) species at an elevated pH using substrates such as limestone and dolomites. However it is currently unclear what effect the substrate type has upon abiotic Mn removal compared to biotic removal by in situ micro-organisms (biofilms). In order to investigate the relationship between substrate type, Mn precipitation and the biofilm community, net-alkaline Mn-contaminated mine water was treated in reactors containing one of the pure materials: dolomite, limestone, magnesite and quartzite. Mine water chemistry and Mn removal rates were monitored over a 3-month period in continuous-flow reactors. For all substrates except quartzite, Mn was removed from the mine water during this period, and Mn minerals precipitated in all cases. In addition, the plastic from which the reactor was made played a role in Mn removal. Manganese oxyhydroxides were formed in all the reactors; however, Mn carbonates (specifically kutnahorite) were only identified in the reactors containing quartzite and on the reactor plastic. Magnesium-rich calcites were identified in the dolomite and magnesite reactors, suggesting that the Mg from the substrate minerals may have inhibited Mn carbonate formation. Biofilm community development and composition on all the substrates was also monitored over the 3-month period using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The DGGE profiles in all reactors showed no change with time and no difference between substrate types, suggesting that any microbiological effects are independent of mineral substrate. The identification of Mn carbonates in these systems has important implications for the design of Mn treatment systems in that the provision of a carbonate-rich substrate

  2. An innovative carbonate coprecipitation process for the removal of zinc and manganese from mining impacted waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibrell, P.L.; Chambers, M.A.; Deaguero, A.L.; Wildeman, T.R.; Reisman, D.J.

    2007-01-01

    Although mine drainage is usually thought of as acidic, there are many cases where the water is of neutral pH, but still contains metal species that can be harmful to human or aquatic animal health, such as manganese (Mn) and zinc (Zn). Typical treatment of mine drainage waters involves pH adjustment, but this often results in excessive sludge formation and removal of nontoxic species such as magnesium and calcium. Theoretical consideration of the stability of metal carbonate species suggests that the target metals could be removed from solution by coprecipitation with calcium carbonate. The U.S. Geological Survey has developed a limestone-based process for remediation of acid mine drainage that increases calcium carbonate saturation. This treatment could then be coupled with carbonate coprecipitation as an innovative method for removal of toxic metals from circumneutral mine drainage waters. The new process was termed the carbonate coprecipitation (CCP) process. The CCP process was tested at the laboratory scale using a synthetic mine water containing 50 mg/L each of Mn and Zn. Best results showed over 95% removal of both Mn and Zn in less than 2 h of contact in a limestone channel. The process was then tested on a sample of water from the Palmerton zinc superfund site, near Palmerton, Pennsylvania, containing over 300 mg/L Zn and 60 mg/L Mn. Treatment of this water resulted in removal of over 95% of the Zn and 40% of the Mn in the limestone channel configuration. Because of the potential economic advantages of the CCP process, further research is recommended for refinement of the process for the Palmerton water and for application to other mining impacted waters as well. ?? Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  3. Systems to limit coal dust and methane explosions in coal mines.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Plessis, JJL

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available In response to the need for enhanced precautionary measures to safeguard mine workers in collieries from the consequences of methane ignitions in a heading, the coal mining industry has expressed the desire for the development and testing of active...

  4. REMOVAL AND CONCENTRATION OF URANIUM FROM WASTE MINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizângela Augusta Santos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of leaching agents, such as sodium citrate and ammonium carbonate, were assessed for the extraction of uranium from one mining residue containing 0.25% U. Concentration techniques such as precipitation and ion exchange were employed to recover the uranium from the leaching liquor. Leaching results showed maximum uranium extraction of about 40% for both reagents. The use 10 mol L-1 NaOH to precipitate the uranium from the leach liquor leads to a recovery of 62%; what was considered not satisfactory. In view of this, resins were used to concentrate the uranium from the liquor and the metal loading obtained at pH 3.9 was higher for the resin DOWEX RPU, whose maximum loading maximum capacity was 148.3 mg g-1, compared to 126.9 mg g-1 presented by the resin IRA 910 U.

  5. Filter materials for metal removal from mine drainage--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westholm, Lena Johansson; Repo, Eveliina; Sillanpää, Mika

    2014-01-01

    A large number of filter materials, organic and inorganic, for removal of heavy metals in mine drainage have been reviewed. Bark, chitin, chitosan, commercial ion exchangers, dairy manure compost, lignite, peat, rice husks, vegetal compost, and yeast are examples of organic materials, while bio-carbons, calcareous shale, dolomite, fly ash, limestone, olivine, steel slag materials and zeolites are examples of inorganic materials. The majority of these filter materials have been investigated in laboratory studies, based on various experimental set-ups (batch and/or column tests) and different conditions. A few materials, for instance steel slag materials, have also been subjects to field investigations under real-life conditions. The results from these investigations show that steel slag materials have the potential to remove heavy metals under different conditions. Ion exchange has been suggested as the major metal removal mechanisms not only for steel slag but also for lignite. Other suggested removal mechanisms have also been identified. Adsorption has been suggested important for activated carbon, precipitation for chitosan and sulphate reduction for olivine. General findings indicate that the results with regard to metal removal vary due to experimental set ups, composition of mine drainage and properties of filter materials and the discrepancies between studies renders normalisation of data difficult. However, the literature reveals that Fe, Zn, Pb, Hg and Al are removed to a large extent. Further investigations, especially under real-life conditions, are however necessary in order to find suitable filter materials for treatment of mine drainage.

  6. MMSReefish Study Databases from 1993-1999 field collections (SEC7-95-11 Fish Mortalities From Explosive Removal of Petroleum Platforms)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Impacts of the Explosive Removal of Offshore Oil and Gas Structureson Fish Stocks in the Gulf of MexicoOffshore oil and gas platforms in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM)...

  7. Acidity removal from Lusatian mining lakes through eutrophication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fyson, A.; Nixdorf, B.; Steinberg, C.F.W. [Brandenburg University of Technology, Cottbus (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    The flooded, disused lignite pits of Lusatia in north-eastern Germany are characterised by low pH (2 - 3.5) and high concentrations of iron which contribute to high acidity. Removal of acidity from these lakes using low-cost, environmentally acceptable technologies is being investigated. One option is the enhancement of biologically mediated, alkalinity generating processes, through controlled eutrophication to sustainably increase nutrient cycling and carbon inputs. Although the primary production of these waters is potentially high and diverse algae grow in these lakes, the growth of autotrophic organisms is usually limited by extremely low concentrations of P and inorganic C. Theoretical considerations and laboratory mesocosm results are used to demonstrate the potential productivity of these acid waters and the direct and indirect role of controlled eutrophication in removing acidity. Such data are being used to generate self-sustaining, environmentally friendly, affordable remediation strategies to develop these lakes for recreation and wildlife. 14 refs., 1 tab.

  8. The Metal And Sulphate Removal From Mine Drainage Waters By Biological-Chemical Ways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenčárová Jana

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mine drainage waters are often characterized by high concentrations of sulphates and metals as a consequence of the mining industry of sulphide minerals. The aims of this work are to prove some biological-chemical processes utilization for the mine drainage water treatment. The studied principles of contamination elimination from these waters include sulphate reduction and metal bioprecipitation by the application of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB. Other studied process was metal sorption by prepared biogenic sorbent. Mine drainage waters from Slovak localities Banská Štiavnica and Smolník were used to the pollution removal examination. In Banská Štiavnica water, sulphates decreased below the legislative limit. The elimination of zinc by sorption experiments achieved 84 % and 65 %, respectively.

  9. Preparation and characterization of gum karaya hydrogel nanocomposite flocculant for metal ions removal from mine effluents

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fosso-Kankeu, E

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This research paper reports the removal of heavy metal ions from mine effluents using the gum karaya (GK)-grafted poly(acrylamide-co-acrylic acid) incorporated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4 MNPs) hydrogel nanocomposite [i.e., GK...

  10. Estimated use of explosives in the mining industries of Algeria, Iran, Iraq, and Libya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilburn, D.R.; Russell, J.A.; Bleiwas, D.I. [and others

    1995-09-01

    This work was performed under Memorandum of Agreement B291534 Between the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the United States Bureau of Mines. The Bureau of Mines authors are members of the Minerals Availability Field Office (MAFO) in Denver, CO, which uses an extensive network of information sources to develop and maintain the Minerals Availability database concerning mining and minerals properties worldwide. This study was initiated and directed by F. Heuze at LLNL. A previous study on the same subject had been commissioned by LLNL from the Mining Journal Research Services (MJRS) in London ,UK. Its results were integrated into this report. MJRS is shown as one of the numerous sources which were used for this work. All sources are listed in the report. This document is arranged in four sections, one for each country, in alphabetical order. Thie outline is the same for each country.

  11. Iron removal from acid mine drainage by wetlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sexstone, A.J.; Skousen, J.G.; Calabrese, J.; Bhumbla, D.K.; Cliff, J.; Sencindiver, J.C.; Bissonnette, G.K.

    1999-07-01

    Neutralization of acid mine drainage (AMD) in man-made cattail (Typha) wetlands was investigated over a four-year period utilizing experimental models constructed in a greenhouse. A naturally occurring AMD (430 mg/L Fe, 5 mg/L Mn, 2,900 mg/L sulfate, pH 2.75) was collected in the field and added to the greenhouse wetlands at 60.5 L/day. Monthly water samples from four depths (10, 20, 30, and 40 cm) were obtained from the influent, midpoint, and effluent locations of the wetland. During the first year of AMD treatment, near neutral pH (6.5) and anoxic conditions ({minus}300 mV) were observed in subsurface sediments of wetlands. The wetlands retained an estimated 65% of the total applied iron in the first year, primarily in the exchangeable, organically bound, and oxide form. During later years, 20 to 30% of the influent iron was retained predominantly as precipitated oxides. Iron sulfides resulting form sulfate reduction accounted for less than 5% of the iron retained, and were recovered primarily as monosulfides during the first year and as disulfides in the fourth year. Improvement in effluent pH was primarily attributed to limestone dissolution in the anaerobic subsurface sediments, which decreased with time. Constructed wetlands exhibit finite lives for effective AMD treatment and provisions should be made for their periodic rejuvenation or replacement.

  12. Kinetic Study on the Removal of Iron from Gold Mine Tailings by Citric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashifana, T.; Mavimbela, N.; Sithole, N.

    2018-03-01

    The Gold mining generates large volumes of tailings, with consequent disposal and environmental problems. Iron tends to react with sulphur to form pyrite and pyrrhotite which then react with rain water forming acid rain. The study focuses on the removal of iron (Fe) from Gold Mine tailings; Fe was leached using citric acid as a leaching reagent. Three parameters which have an effect on the removal of Fe from the gold mine tailings, namely; temperature (25 °C and 50 °C), reagent concentration (0.25 M, 0.5 M, 0.75 M and 1 M) and solid loading ratio (20 %, 30 % and 40 %) were investigated. It was found that the recovery of Fe from gold mine tailings increased with increasing temperature and reagent concentration, but decreased with increasing solid loading ratio. The optimum conditions for the recovery of Fe from gold mine tailings was found to be at a temperature of 50 ºC, reagent concentration of 1 M and solid loading of 20 %. Three linear kinetic models were investigated and Prout-Tompkins kinetic model was the best fit yielding linear graphs with the highest R2 values.

  13. Mountaintop removal mining: One coal company's response to the public debate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emerson, L.D.

    1999-01-01

    Mountaintop Mining has been practiced in West Virginia and surrounding Central Appalachian states for over twenty years. In recent months, however, media coverage and other events have increased public and regulatory scrutiny of the practice, which has led to mine permitting delays and employee layoffs. A law suit was filed in federal court alleging, among other things, that the construction of valley fills for excess spoil disposal is a violation of the Clean Water Act. West Virginia's Governor appointed a Task Force to study the issue and has made recommendations for further regulations. Arch Coal, Inc., operates four large surface mines in West Virginia, and many of it's mining subsidiaries have won federal and state honors for excellence in reclamation. Arch has also funded several studies that address many of the issues that have been at the core of the public debate. One study involves the assessment of the long term impact of large scale mining and valley fills on downstream water quality and aquatic life. Another evaluates the rate of forest plant invasion onto reclaimed lands. A third study compares the value of the wildlife habitats created on reclaimed lands relative to undisturbed ridge top and stream side habitats. The results of these studies show that mountaintop removal mining, when done responsibly, has minimal impacts on the environment, and can in fact provide valuable lands for future development. Arch Coal, Inc., has taken a leading role in addressing the scientific and public policy aspects of this controversial issue

  14. Optimization of spacing between explosion holes in advancing shafts of uranium mine in Saghand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikgoftar, M. R.; Bahrami, A.; Shoja, A.

    2004-01-01

    Uranium mine in Saghand area can be mined and exploited using different underground methods. In order to achieve this goal, two vertical shafts each 350 m in length were sunk and equipped. In this article two methods which have been applied by Russian and China experts will be explained and then they will be compared with each other. Based on the advantages and disadvantages of the applied methods, a third method has been derived from their comparisons. This last method was found to have many advantages and was accepted as an selected method for the Saghand uranium exploitation

  15. From explosions to black lung: a history of efforts to control coal mine dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, J L

    1993-01-01

    Highlights in the history of efforts to prevent occupational lung disease among coal miners in the United States are reviewed. The Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969 is summarized, and the sources and effects of its provisions to prevent coal workers' pneumoconiosis are examined. Descriptions follow of the identification of coal workers' pneumoconiosis as a disease, identification of respirable coal mine dust as its cause, and establishment and enforcement of an exposure limit. The development of prevention efforts focusing on surveillance of both exposure and outcome and of enforcement of dust control methods is examined.

  16. Indirect Manganese Removal by Stenotrophomonas sp. and Lysinibacillus sp. Isolated from Brazilian Mine Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Rocha Barboza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Manganese is a contaminant in the wastewaters produced by Brazilian mining operations, and the removal of the metal is notoriously difficult because of the high stability of the Mn(II ion in aqueous solutions. To explore a biological approach for removing excessive amounts of aqueous Mn(II, we investigated the potential of Mn(II oxidation by both consortium and bacterial isolates from a Brazilian manganese mine. A bacterial consortium was able to remove 99.7% of the Mn(II. A phylogenetic analysis of isolates demonstrated that the predominant microorganisms were members of Stenotrophomonas, Bacillus, and Lysinibacillus genera. Mn(II removal rates between 58.5% and 70.9% were observed for Bacillus sp. and Stenotrophomonas sp. while the Lysinibacillus isolate 13P removes 82.7%. The catalytic oxidation of Mn(II mediated by multicopper oxidase was not properly detected; however, in all of the experiments, a significant increase in the pH of the culture medium was detected. No aggregates inside the cells grown for a week were found by electronic microscopy. Nevertheless, an energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy of the isolates revealed the presence of manganese in Stenotrophomonas sp. and Lysinibacillus sp. grown in K medium. These results suggest that members of Stenotrophomonas and Lysinibacillus genera were able to remove Mn(II by a nonenzymatic pathway.

  17. Preparation of ore blocks for mine leaching by reagent explosion injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, YuS

    2017-02-01

    The current drilling-and-blasting operations fail to prepare intact ore body underlying a production horizon for subsequent mining and leaching. It is found that the required preparation quality is possible by means of advanced implementation of ore body discontinuity and filling of the resultant system of joints with active leaching solutions.

  18. A simple economic and quantitative method for the removal of uranium from Gogi mine water using powdered red brick

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nathan, Usha; Cyriac, Bincy; Hegde, G.N.; Premadas, A.; Rai, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    A simple and economical method for the removal of uranium from Gogi mine water using the powdered red brick as a good adsorbent is discussed. Preliminary studies for the removal of uranium using brick showed encouraging results. Further studies were carried to find the amount and size of brick for the quantitative removal of uranium. The results of these studies showed that 50 g of brick with 10 mesh size was enough to remove uranium quantitatively from 100 ml of mine water containing 1800 μg/L of uranium. However the column studies indicated considerable decrease (∼ 5 g for 100 ml of mine water) in the amount of brick required to remove uranium from 100 ml of mine water

  19. Hydrotalcite formation facilitates effective contaminant and radionuclide removal from acidic uranium mine barren lixiviant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, Grant; Shackleton, Mark; Woods, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Remediation of barren lixiviant using hydrotalcite precipitation. • High U and rare earth element concentration factor. • Hydrotalcite may be further modified for long-term disposal. • Potential application to U and other commodities. - Abstract: An assessment of hydrotalcite (HT) formation as a method to neutralise acidity and remove trace elements was undertaken using barren lixiviant from Heathgate Resources’ Beverley North in situ recovery (ISR) U mine in South Australia. This study demonstrated proof of concept in terms of the neutralisation of acidity and concomitant removal of a range of trace elements and U–Th series radionuclides from the barren lixiviant using MgCl 2 as a supplementary Mg source to optimise Mg:Al mol ratios and NaOH as the neutralising agent. Hydrotalcite was the predominant mineral formed during neutralisation, hosting a range of elements including substantial U (∼0.2%) and rare earth elements (REE ∼0.1%). High U and REE recovery (∼99%) from barren lixiviant after HT precipitation indicates a potential to both remediate barren lixiviant and to offset remediation costs. Alternatively, HT precipitates formed during barren lixiviant neutralisation may be further stabilised via calcination, silicification or a combination thereof forming minerals potentially amenable for inclusion in a long-term waste repository at the cessation of ISR mining. Importantly, the composition of the neutralised barren lixiviant produced via HT precipitation is similar to that of existing groundwater allowing for the possibility of direct aquifer re-injection after remediation. A potential exists to apply this HT-based remediation technology to conventional or ISR U mines (or mines exploiting other commodities) and allows for the prospect of a fully integrated ISR mining, processing and lixiviant remediation strategy consistent with stringent environmental and mine closure standards

  20. Responses of terrestrial herpetofauna to persistent, novel ecosystems resulting from mountaintop removal mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jennifer M.; Brown, Donald J.; Wood, Petra B.

    2017-01-01

    Mountaintop removal mining is a large-scale surface mining technique that removes entire floral and faunal communities, along with soil horizons located above coal seams. In West Virginia, the majority of this mining occurs on forested mountaintops. However, after mining ceases the land is typically reclaimed to grasslands and shrublands, resulting in novel ecosystems. In this study, we examined responses of herpetofauna to these novel ecosystems 10–28 y postreclamation. We quantified differences in species-specific habitat associations, (sub)order-level abundances, and habitat characteristics in four habitat types: reclaimed grassland, reclaimed shrubland, forest fragments in mined areas, and nonmined intact forest. Habitat type accounted for 33.2% of the variation in species-specific captures. With few exceptions, forest specialists were associated with intact forest and fragmented forest sites, while habitat generalists were either associated with grassland and shrubland sites or were distributed among all habitat types. At the (sub)order level, salamander (Order Urodela) captures were highest at fragmented and intact forest sites, frog and toad (Order Anura) captures were lowest at intact forest sites, and snake (Suborder Serpentes) captures were highest at shrubland sites. Habitat type was a strong predictor for estimated total abundance of urodeles, but not for anurans or snakes. Tree stem densities in grasslands differed from the other three habitat types, and large trees (>38 cm diameter at breast height) were only present at forest sites. Overstory vegetation cover was greater in forested than in reclaimed habitat types. Ground cover in reclaimed grasslands was distinct from forest treatments with generally less woody debris and litter cover and more vegetative cover. It is important to consider the distributions of habitat specialists of conservation concern when delineating potential mountaintop mine sites, as these sites will likely contain unsuitable

  1. Removal of radionuclides from acid mine waters by retention on adsorbing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, M.R.L.; Fukuma, H.T.; Costa da, W.C.; Quinelato, A.L.; Gomes, H.A.; Garcia, O.Jr.

    2006-01-01

    This study proposes a method for decontamination of acid drainage water from a uranium mine, as an alternative process to lime treatment. The research embodied the recovery of uranium with an ion-exchange resin, treatment of effluent resin with lime, or with inorganic adsorbents and biosorbents. The uranium decontamination level using the resin process was 94% and allowed the recovery of this element as a commercial product. Among the inorganic adsorbents studied, phosphogypsum was effective for 226 Ra, 228 Ra, and 210 Pb removal. Among the biosorbents, Sargassum sp. was superior in relation to its specific capacity to accumulate and remove 226 Ra. (author)

  2. The removal of heavy metals by iron mine drainage sludge and Phragmites australis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang Ha, Nguyen Thi; Anh, Bui Thi Kim

    2017-06-01

    This study was conducted to assess the removal of heavy metals from solutions by the combination of modified iron mine drainage sludge (sorbent column) and surface and subsurface flow constructed wetlands using the common reed (Phragmites australis) during 30 days of experiment. The results of this study demonstrated that the average removal rates of Zn, Pb, Mn, and As by sorbent column were 59.0, 55.1, 38.7, and 42.4%, respectively. The decreasing trend of removal rates of metals by sorbent column was obtained during the experiment. The average removal rates of Zn, Pb, Mn, and As by sorbent column-surface constructed wetland were 78.9, 73.5, 91.2, and 80.5%, respectively; those by sorbent column-subsurface flow constructed wetland were 81.7, 81.1, 94.1, and 83.1% which reflected that subsurface flow constructed wetland showed higher removal rate than the surface system. Concentrations of heavy metals in the outlet water were lower than the Vietnamese standard limits regulated for industrial wastewater. The results indicate the feasibility of integration of iron mine drainage sludge and constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment.

  3. Estimating benthic secondary production from aquatic insect emergence in streams affected by mountaintop removal coal mining, West Virginia USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountaintop removal and valley fill (MTR/VF) coal mining recountours the Appalachian landscape, buries headwater stream channels, and degrades downstream water quality. The goal of this study was to compare benthic community production estimates, based on seasonal insect emergen...

  4. Electro-remediation of copper mine tailings. Comparing copper removal efficiencies for two tailings of different age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik K.; Lamas, Victor; Gutierrez, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    This work compares and evaluates the copper removal efficiency when applying electric fields to two mine tailings originating from the same mine but of different age. Eight experiments were carried out - four on tailings deposited more than 20 years ago (old tailings) and four on tailings deposit...

  5. Export of detritus and invertebrate from headwater streams: linking mountaintop removal and valley fill coal mining to downstream receiving waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountaintop removal and valley fill (MTR/VF) coal mining has resulted in large scale alteration of the topography, reduced forest productivity, and burial of headwater streams in the U.S. Central Appalachians. Although MTR/VF coal mining has occurred for several decades and the ...

  6. Mining the Sky for Explosive Optical Transients with Both Eyes Open

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vestrand, W.T.; Casperson, D.J.; Davis, H.; Fenimore, E.; Galassi, M.; White, R.R.; Wren, J.; Borozdin, K.; Davidoff, S.; McGowan, K.; Starr, D.; Wozniak, P.

    2004-01-01

    While it has been known for centuries that the optical sky is variable, monitoring the sky for optical transients with durations as short as a minute is an area of astronomical research that remains largely unexplored. Prompt follow-up observations of Gamma Ray Bursts have shown that bright, explosive, optical transients exist. However, there are many reasons to suspect the existence of explosive optical transients that cannot be located through sky monitoring by high-energy satellites. The RAPTOR sky monitoring system is an autonomous system of telescope arrays at Los Alamos National Laboratory that identifies fast optical transients as short as a minute and makes follow-up observations in real time. The core of the RAPTOR system is composed of two arrays of telescopes, separated by 38 kilometers, that stereoscopically monitor a field of about 1300 square degrees for transients down to about 12.5th magnitude in 30 seconds. Both arrays are coupled to real-time data analysis pipelines that are designed to identify transients on timescales of seconds. Each telescope array also contains a more sensitive higher resolution 'fovea' telescope, capable of both measuring the light curve at a faster cadence and providing color information. In a manner analogous to human vision, each array is mounted on a rapidly slewing mount so that the 'fovea' of the array can be rapidly directed for real-time follow-up observations of any interesting transient identified by the wide-field system. We discuss the first results from RAPTOR and show that stereoscopic imaging and the absence of measurable parallax is a powerful tool for distinguishing real celestial transients in the 'forest' of false positives

  7. The removal of uranium from mining waste water using algal/microbial biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalin, Margarete; Wheeler, W.N.; Meinrath, G.

    2004-01-01

    We describe a three step process for the removal of uranium (U) from dilute waste waters. Step one involves the sequestration of U on, in, and around aquatic plants such as algae. Cell wall ligands efficiently remove U(VI) from waste water. Growing algae continuously renew the cellular surface area. Step 2 is the removal of U-algal particulates from the water column to the sediments. Step 3 involves reducing U(VI) to U(IV) and transforming the ions into stable precipitates in the sediments. The algal cells provide organic carbon and other nutrients to heterotrophic microbial consortia to maintain the low E H , within which the U is transformed. Among the microorganisms, algae are of predominant interest for the ecological engineer because of their ability to sequester U and because some algae can live under many extreme environments, often in abundance. Algae grow in a wide spectrum of water qualities, from alkaline environments (Chara, Nitella) to acidic mine drainage waste waters (Mougeotia, Ulothrix). If they could be induced to grow in waste waters, they would provide a simple, long-term means to remove U and other radionuclides from U mining effluents. This paper reviews the literature on algal and microbial adsorption, reduction, and transformation of U in waste streams, wetlands, lakes and oceans

  8. Using decomposition kinetics to model the removal of mine water pollutants in constructed wetlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarutis, W J; Unz, R F [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Although numerous mathematical models have been used to describe decomposition, few, if any, have been used to model the removal of pollutants in constructed wetlands. A steady state method based on decomposition kinetics and reaction stoichiometry has been developed which simulates the removal of ferrous iron entering wetlands constructed for mine drainage treatment. Input variables for the model include organic matter concentration, reaction rate coefficient, porosity and dry density, and hydraulic detection time. Application of the model assumes complete anaerobic conditions within the entire substrate profile, constant temperature, no additional organic matter input, and subsurface flow only. For these ideal conditions, model simulations indicate that wetlands constructed with readily decomposable substrates rich in organic carbon are initially capable of removing far greater amounts of iron than wetlands built with less biodegradable substrates. However, after three to five years of operation this difference becomes negligible. For acceptable long-term treatment performance, therefore, periodic additions of decomposable organic matter will be required.

  9. Removal of metals from lead-zinc mine tailings using bioleaching and followed by sulfide precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Maoyou; Li, Guojian; Yan, Pingfang; Ren, Jie; Zheng, Li; Han, Dajian; Sun, Shuiyu; Huang, Shaosong; Zhong, Yujian

    2017-10-01

    Mine tailings often contain significant amounts of metals and sulfide, many traditional operations used to minerals was not as good as those currently available. This study investigated metals removal from lead-zinc mine tailings using bioleaching and followed by sulfide precipitation. Metals were dissolved from the tailings by the bacteria in a bioleaching reactor. During a 10% pulp density bioleaching experiment, approximately 0.82% Pb, 97.38% Zn, and 71.37% Fe were extracted after 50 days. With the pulp density of 10% and 20%, the dissolution of metals followed shrinking core kinetic model. Metals (Pb, Zn, and Fe) present in the pregnant bioleaching leachate. Metals were next precipitated as a sulfide phase using sodium sulfide (Na 2 S). Metal precipitations were selectively and quantitatively produced from the bioleaching leachate by adding Na 2 S. More than 99% of the zinc and 75% of the iron was precipitated using 25 g/L Na 2 S in the bioleaching leachate. The results in the study were to provide useful information for recovering or removing metals from lead-zinc mine tailings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Removal of mercury from gold mine effluents using Limnocharis flava in constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrugo-Negrete, José; Enamorado-Montes, Germán; Durango-Hernández, José; Pinedo-Hernández, José; Díez, Sergi

    2017-01-01

    Phytoremediation has received increased attention over the recent decades, as an emerging and eco-friendly approach that utilizes the natural properties of plants to remediate contaminated water, soils or sediments. The current study provides information about a pilot-scale experiment designed to evaluate the potential of the anchored aquatic plant Limnocharis flava for phytoremediation of water contaminated with mercury (Hg), in a constructed wetland (CW) with horizontal subsurface flow (HSSF). Mine effluent used in this experiment was collected from a gold mining area located at the Alacran mine in Colombia (Hg: 0.11 ± 0.03 μg mL -1 ) and spiked with HgNO 3 (1.50 ± 0.09 μg mL -1 ). Over a 30 day test period, the efficiency of the reduction in the heavy metal concentration in the wetlands, and the relative metal sorption by the L. flava, varied according to the exposure time. The continued rate of removal of Hg from the constructed wetland was 9 times higher than the control, demonstrating a better performance and nearly 90% reduction in Hg concentrations in the contaminated water in the presence of L. flava. The results in this present study show the great potential of the aquatic macrophyte L. flava for phytoremediation of Hg from gold mining effluents in constructed wetlands. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The influence of the gaseous by-products from detonation and inert additives to explosives on the efficiency of mining rock breakdown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komir, V.M.; Chebenko, V.N.; Napadailo, V.I.; Rodak, S.N.

    1981-01-01

    Results are given from experiments to determine the influence of inert additives to explosives on the intensity of crushing mining rock. The mechanism of the blast action during the destruction of the samples using carbonic acid and sand as the additives is examined. An analysis of the experimental results demonstrated that the disjoining action of the detonation products is the result of the determinate role of the radial cracks in increasing the radius of the zone--these waves are generated by the shock wave. The efficiency of the blast may be increased by using easily-decomposing additives in the explosive that during explosion, evaporate, and both give off a large amount of gas and decrease the temperature of the detonation products, and consequently, the intensity of heat exchange with the rock.

  12. Concept Study of Multi Sensor Detection Imaging and Explosive Confirmation of Mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-03-20

    surface feature removal can be achieved in LMR images. Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Solicitation Topic 97T006 Mufi -Sensor Detection...divided by the applied voltage. This is mathematically given by: 00 Y-I-G+jB = 1o+2E’. COS m4; m1l 1-1 = j120 72(+a) where G = the input conductance...of detector operation that are incorporated into a mathematical algorithm to convert detector impedance characteristics into recognizable indicators

  13. Optimization of Fe2+ Removal from Coal Mine Wastewater using Activated Biochar of Colocasia esculenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Soumya; LaminKa-Ot, Augustine; Joshi, S R; Mandal, Tamal; Halder, Gopinath

    2017-09-01

      The present study investigates the sorptive removal of Fe2+ from simulated coal mine waste water using steam activated biochar (SABC) developed from the roots of Colocasia esculenta. The process was optimized by response surface methodology (RSM) under the influence of pH, temperature, adsorbent dosage and contact time at a constant shaking speed of 180 rpm with an initial concentration of 3 mg/L. The uptake performance of the biosorbent was assessed following a 24 full factorial experimental matrix developed by central composite design approach. Adsorbent was characterised by SEM, EDAX, XRD and B.E.T surface area analyzer. Maximum removal of 72.96% of Fe2+ was observed at pH 7.75, temperature 37.5 °C, adsorbent dosage 1.5 g/L for a time period of 180 mins. The study suggested that SABC prepared from roots of Colocasia esculenta could be used as an efficient and cost effective sorbent for removal of Fe2+ from coal mine wastewater.

  14. Application of banana peels nanosorbent for the removal of radioactive minerals from real mine water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyewo, Opeyemi A; Onyango, Maurice S; Wolkersdorfer, Christian

    2016-11-01

    Transformation of agricultural waste such as banana peels into a valuable sorbent material has been proven effective and efficient in wastewater treatment. Further, transformation into nanosorbent to enhance the removal capacity of actinides (uranium and thorium) from synthetic and real mine water is extensively investigated in this study. The nanosorbent samples before and after adsorption were characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR), zetasizer nanoseries and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) while the amount of radioactive substances adsorbed was determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. Results revealed that there was a crystallite size and particle size reduction from 108 to 12 nm and banana peels capability to coordinate and remove metal ions were identified at absorption bands of 1730 cm -1 (carboxylic groups) and 889 cm -1 (amine groups) via FTIR analysis. Equilibrium isotherm results demonstrated that the adsorption process was endothermic for both uranium and thorium. The Langmuir maximum adsorption capacity was 27.1 mg g -1 , 34.13 mg g -1 for uranium and 45.5 mg g -1 , 10.10 mg g -1 for thorium in synthetic and real mine water, respectively. The results obtained indicate that nanostructured banana peels is a potential adsorbent for the removal of radioactive substances from aqueous solution and also from real mine water. However, the choice of this sorbent material for any application depends on the composition of the effluent to be treated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Removal of copper in leachate from mining residues using electrochemical technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Andréa; Drogui, Patrick; Daghrir, Rimeh; Zaviska, François; Benzaazoua, Mostafa

    2014-01-15

    This research is related to a laboratory study on the performance of a successive mining residues leaching and electrochemical copper recovery process. To clearly define the experimental region for response surface methodology (RSM), a preliminary study was performed by applying a current intensity varying from 0.5 A to 4.0 A for 60 min. By decreasing the current intensity from 4.0 A to 0.5 A, a good adhesion and a very smooth and continuous interface of copper was formed and deposited on the cathode electrode. However, the removal rate of Cu decreased from 83.7% to 37.9% when the current intensity passed from 4.0 A to 0.5 A, respectively. Subsequently, the factorial design and central composite design methodologies were successively employed to define the optimal operating conditions for copper removal in the mining residues leachate. Using a 2(3) factorial matrix, the best performance for copper removal (97.7%) was obtained at a current intensity of 2.0 A during 100 min. The current intensity and electrolysis time were found to be the most influent parameters. The contribution of current intensity and electrolysis time was around 65.8% and 33.9%, respectively. The treatment using copper electrode and current intensity of 1.3 A during 80 min was found to be the optimal conditions in terms of cost/effectiveness. Under these conditions, 86% of copper can be recovered for a total cost of 0.56 $ per cubic meter of treated mining residues leachate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Enhancing phosphorus removal in constructed wetlands with ochre from mine drainage treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heal, K V; Dobbie, K E; Bozika, E; McHaffie, H; Simpson, A E; Smith, K A

    2005-01-01

    No single end-use has yet been identified that is capable of consuming the projected production of ochre (mainly iron (III) oxides) from mine drainage treatment. However, the high sorption capacity of ochre for phosphorus (up to 26 mg kg(-1)) means that it could be used in constructed wetlands to enhance phosphorus removal. Laboratory batch experiments showed that coarse-grained ochre removes 90% of all phosphorus forms from sewage effluent after 15 minutes of shaking. From a larger-scale experiment, it is estimated that constructed wetlands with an ochre substrate should remove phosphorus from sewage effluent for up to 200-300 years. The suitability of ochre for phosphorus removal is being investigated at the field scale in a wastewater constructed wetland (175 m2 area) in Berwickshire, UK. The hydraulic and treatment performance of the wetland were monitored for 15 months prior to installation at the inlet in November 2003 of a tank containing approximately 1200 kg ochre. Results so far show that improved hydraulic design is required for ochre to increase the mean phosphorus removal efficiency of the system (27 +/- 28%), but potentially toxic metals (Al, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, Zn) have not been released from the ochre into the wetland outflow.

  17. Relative importance of plant uptake and plant associated denitrification for removal of nitrogen from mine drainage in sub-arctic wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallin, Sara; Hellman, Maria; Choudhury, Maidul I; Ecke, Frauke

    2015-11-15

    Reactive nitrogen (N) species released from undetonated ammonium-nitrate based explosives used in mining or other blasting operations are an emerging environmental problem. Wetlands are frequently used to treat N-contaminated water in temperate climate, but knowledge on plant-microbial interactions and treatment potential in sub-arctic wetlands is limited. Here, we compare the relative importance of plant uptake and denitrification among five plant species commonly occurring in sub-arctic wetlands for removal of N in nitrate-rich mine drainage in northern Sweden. Nitrogen uptake and plant associated potential denitrification activity and genetic potential for denitrification based on quantitative PCR of the denitrification genes nirS, nirK, nosZI and nosZII were determined in plants growing both in situ and cultivated in a growth chamber. The growth chamber and in situ studies generated similar results, suggesting high relevance and applicability of results from growth chamber experiments. We identified denitrification as the dominating pathway for N-removal and abundances of denitrification genes were strong indicators of plant associated denitrification activity. The magnitude and direction of the effect differed among the plant species, with the aquatic moss Drepanocladus fluitans showing exceptionally high ratios between denitrification and uptake rates, compared to the other species. However, to acquire realistic estimates of N-removal potential of specific wetlands and their associated plant species, the total plant biomass needs to be considered. The species-specific plant N-uptake and abundance of denitrification genes on the root or plant surfaces were affected by the presence of other plant species, which show that both multi- and inter-trophic interactions are occurring. Future studies on N-removal potential of wetland plant species should consider how to best exploit these interactions in sub-arctic wetlands. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  18. Blast furnace residues for arsenic removal from mining-contaminated groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Pedroza, Fco Raúl; Soria-Aguilar, Ma de Jesús; Martínez-Luevanos, Antonia; Narvaez-García, Víctor

    2014-01-01

    In this work, blast furnace (BF) residues were well characterized and then evaluated as an adsorbent material for arsenic removal from a mining-contaminated groundwater. The adsorption process was analysed using the theories of Freundlich and Langmuir. BF residues were found to be an effective sorbent for As (V) ions. The modelling of adsorption isotherms by empirical models shows that arsenate adsorption is fitted by the Langmuir model, suggesting a monolayer adsorption of arsenic onto adsorbents. Arsenate adsorption onto BF residue is explained by the charge density surface affinity and by the formation of Fe (II) and Fe (III) corrosion products onto BF residue particles. The results indicate that BF residues represent an attractive low-cost absorbent option for the removal of arsenic in wastewater treatment.

  19. Nutrient and dissolved organic carbon removal from water using mining and metallurgical by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendling, Laura A; Douglas, Grant B; Coleman, Shandel; Yuan, Zheng

    2012-05-15

    Excess nutrient input to water bodies frequently results in algal blooms and development of oxygen deficient conditions. Mining or metallurgical by-products can potentially be utilised as filtration media within water treatment systems such as constructed wetlands, permeable reactive barriers, or drain liners. These materials may offer a cost-effective solution for the removal of nutrients and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from natural waters. This study investigated steel-making, alumina refining (red mud and red sand) and heavy mineral processing by-products, as well as the low-cost mineral-based material calcined magnesia, in laboratory column trials. Influent water and column effluents were analysed for pH and flow rate, alkalinity, nutrient species and DOC, and a range of major cations and anions. In general, by-products with high Ca or Mg, and to a lesser extent those with high Fe content, were well-suited to nutrient and DOC removal from water. Of the individual materials examined, the heavy mineral processing residue neutralised used acid (NUA) exhibited the highest sorption capacity for P, and removed the greatest proportions of all N species and DOC from influent water. In general, NUA and mixtures containing NUA, particularly those with calcined magnesia or red mud/red sand were the most effective in removing nutrients and DOC from influent water. Post-treatment effluents from columns containing NUA and NUA/steel-making by-product, NUA/red sand and NUA/calcined magnesia mixtures exhibited large reductions in DOC, P and N concentrations and exhibited a shift in nutrient ratios away from potential N- and Si-limitation and towards potential P-limitation. If employed as part of a large-scale water treatment scheme, use of these mining and metallurgical by-products for nutrient removal could result in reduced algal biomass and improved water quality. Identification and effective implementation of mining by-products or blends thereof in constructed wetlands

  20. Removal of Mn(II) from the acid mine wastewaters using coal fired bottom ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahidin, M.; Sulaiman, T. N.; Muslim, A.; Gani, A.

    2017-06-01

    Acid mine wastewater (AMW), the wastewater from mining activities which has low pH about 3-5 and contains hazardous heavy metals such as Cu, Fe, Mn, Zn, Pb, etc. Those heavy metals pollution is of prime concern from the environmental view point. Among the heavy metals, Mn occupies the third position in the AMW from one the iron ore mining company in Aceh, Indonesia. In this study, the possibility use of bottom ash from coal fired boiler of steam power plants for the removal of Mn(II) in AMW has been investigated. Experimental has been conducted as follows. Activation of bottom ash was done both by physical and chemical treatments through heating at 270 °C and washing with NaOH activator 0.5 and 1 M. Adsorption test contains two parts observation; preliminary and primary experiments. Preliminary study is addressed to select the best condition of three independent variables i.e.: pH of AMW (3 & 7), bottom ash particle size (40, 60 & 100 mesh) and initial Mn(II) concentrations (100 & 600 mg/l). AMW used was synthetics wastewater. It was found that the best value for NaOH is 1 M, pH is 7, particle size is 100 meshes and initial Mn(II) concentration is 600 mg/l from the adsorption efficiency point of view. The maximum adsorption capacity (q e) is 63.7 mg/g with the efficiency of 85%.

  1. Heavy Metal Tolerance and Removal Capacity of Trichoderma species Isolated from Mine Tailings in Itogon, Benguet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myra Tansengco

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Waste from mining industries contains various heavy metals that can pollute the environment. Bioremediation using efficient fungi can help in eliminating these heavy metal contaminants. This study focused on the isolation, identification, and characterization of heavy metal-resistant fungi from mine tailings in Itogon, Benguet. Isolation of fungi was done by serial dilution and spread plate techniques on potato dextrose agar (PDA with an individual heavy metal, i.e. chromium (Cr, copper (Cu, lead (Pb, zinc (Zn, and nickel (Ni. Of the 29 fungal isolates, four species were selected and molecularly identified as Trichoderma virens, T. harzianum, T. saturnisporum, and T. gamsii. Growth tolerance on PDA with increasing concentrations (200-1000 ppm of an individual heavy metal indicated the following trend: T. virens > T. harzianum > T. gamsii > T. saturnisporum. Growth test indicates that all Trichoderma isolates can tolerate high levels of Cr and Pb, however tolerance to Cu, Zn, and Ni was species specific. Shakeflask culture using T. virens showed high lead removal (91-96% over broad pH range while and at neutral pH, T. virens had 70% and 63% reductions for Cu and Cr, respectively. Results of this study highlights the potential of Trichoderma isolates for biological wastewater treatment in mining industries.

  2. Removing and recovering of uranium from the acid mine waters by using ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, Marcos Roberto Lopes do

    1998-01-01

    Ion exchange using resins is one of the few processes capable of reducing ionic contaminants in effluents to very low levels. In this study the process was used to remove and recovery uranium from acid mine waters at Pocos de Caldas-MG Uranium Mining and Milling Plant. The local mineralogical features, allied to the biogeochemical phenomena, owing to presence of pyrite in the rock piles, moreover another factors, resulting acid drainage with several pollutants, including uranium ranging from 6 to 14 mg/l, as sulfate complex, that can be removed by anionic exchanger. The iron interference is eliminated by lime pretreatment of water, increasing pH from 2.6 to 3.3-3.8 to precipitate this cation, without changing the uranium amount. Eight anionic resins were tested, based on the uranium loading, in sorption studies. Retention time, and pH influence was verified for the exchanger chose. With breakthrough of 1 mg U/L and 10 mg U/l in the feed solution, the uranium decontamination level was 94%. Typical values of loading resin were 20-30 g U/l and 70-90 g SO 4 /l. Uranium elution was done with Na Cl solution. Retention time, saline, and acid concentration were the parameters studied. The concentrate, obtained from the eluate by ammonia precipitation, presented uranium (86,8% as U 3 O 8 ) and impurities within commercial specifications. (author)

  3. Adsorption and removal of arsenic from water by iron ore mining waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tien Vinh; Nguyen, Thi Van Trang; Pham, Tuan Linh; Vigneswaran, Saravanamuth; Ngo, Huu Hao; Kandasamy, J; Nguyen, Hong Khanh; Nguyen, Duc Tho

    2009-01-01

    There is a global need to develop low-cost technologies to remove arsenic from water for individual household water supply. In this study, a purified and enriched waste material (treated magnetite waste, TMW) from the Trai Cau's iron ore mine in the Thai Nguyen Province in Vietnam was examined for its capacity to remove arsenic. The treatment system was packed with TMW that consisted of 75% of ferrous-ferric oxide (Fe(3)O(4)) and had a large surface area of 89.7 m(2)/g. The experiments were conducted at a filtration rate of 0.05 m/h to treat groundwater with an arsenic concentration of 380 microg/L and iron, manganese and phosphate concentrations of 2.07 mg/L, 0.093 mg/L and 1.6 mg/L respectively. The batch experimental results show that this new material was able to absorb up to 0.74 mg arsenic/g. The results also indicated that the treatment system removed more than 90% arsenic giving an effluent with an arsenic concentration of less than 30 microg/L while achieving a removal efficiency of about 80% for Mn(2 + ) and PO(4) (3-). This could be a promising and cost-effective new material for capturing arsenic as well as other metals from groundwater.

  4. Application of granular ferric hydroxides for removal elevated concentrations of arsenic from mine waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szlachta, Małgorzata; Włodarczyk, Paweł; Wójtowicz, Patryk

    2015-04-01

    Arsenic is naturally occurring element in the environment. Over three hundred minerals are known to contain some form of arsenic and among them arsenopyrite is the most common one. Arsenic-bearing minerals are frequently associated with ores containing mined metals such as copper, tin, nickel, lead, uranium, zinc, cobalt, platinum and gold. In the aquatic environment arsenic is typically present in inorganic forms, mainly in two oxidation states (+5, +3). As(III) is dominant in more reduced conditions, whereas As(V) is mostly present in an oxidizing environment. However, due to certain human activities the elevated arsenic levels in aquatic ecosystems are arising to a serious environmental problem. High arsenic concentrations found in surface and groundwaters, in some regions originate from mining activities and ore processing. Therefore, the major concern of mining industry is to maintain a good quality of effluents discharged in large volumes. This requires constant monitoring of effluents quality that guarantee the efficient protection of the receiving waters and reacting to possible negative impact of contamination on local communities. A number of proven technologies are available for arsenic removal from waters and wastewaters. In the presented work special attention is given to the adsorption method as a technically feasible, commonly applied and effective technique for the treatment of arsenic rich mine effluents. It is know that arsenic has a strong affinity towards iron rich materials. Thus, in this study the granular ferric hydroxides (CFH 12, provided by Kemira Oyj, Finland) was applied to remove As(III) and As(V) from aqueous solutions. The batch adsorption experiments were carried out to assess the efficiency of the tested Fe-based material under various operating parameters, including composition of treated water, solution pH and temperature. The results obtained from the fixed bed adsorption tests demonstrated the benefits of applying granular

  5. Removal of phosphorus, fluoride and metals from a gypsum mining leachate using steel slag filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claveau-Mallet, Dominique; Wallace, Scott; Comeau, Yves

    2013-03-15

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the capacity of steel slag filters to treat a gypsum mining leachate containing 11-107 mg P/L ortho-phosphates, 9-37 mg/L fluoride, 0.24-0.83 mg/L manganese, 0.20-3.3 zinc and 1.7-8.2 mg/L aluminum. Column tests fed with reconstituted leachates were conducted for 145-222 days and sampled twice a week. Two types of electric arc furnace (EAF) slags and three filter sequences were tested. The voids hydraulic retention time (HRT(v)) of columns ranged between 4.3 and 19.2 h. Precipitates of contaminants present in columns were sampled and analyzed with X-ray diffraction at the end of tests. The best removal efficiencies over a period of 179 days were obtained with sequential filters that were composed of Fort Smith EAF slag operated at a total HRT(v) of 34 h which removed 99.9% of phosphorus, 85.3% of fluoride, 98.0% of manganese and 99.3% of zinc. Mean concentration at this system's effluent was 0.04 mg P/L ortho-phosphates, 4 mg/L fluoride, 0.02 mg/L manganese, 0.02 zinc and 0.5 mg/L aluminum. Thus, slag filters are promising passive and economical systems for the remediation of mining effluents. Phosphorus was removed by the formation of apatite (hydroxyapatite, Ca(5)(PO(4))(3)OH or fluoroapatite, Ca(5)(PO(4))(3)F) as confirmed by visual and X-ray diffraction analyses. The growth rate of apatite was favored by a high phosphorus concentration. Calcite crystals were present in columns and appeared to be competing for calcium and volume needed for apatite formation. The calcite crystal growth rate was higher than that of apatite crystals. Fluoride was removed by precipitation of fluoroapatite and its removal was favored by a high ratio of phosphorus to fluoride in the wastewater. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Arsenic removal using steel manufacturing byproducts as permeable reactive materials in mine tailing containment systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Joo Sung; Chon, Chul-Min; Moon, Hi-Soo; Kim, Kyoung-Woong

    2003-05-01

    Steel manufacturing byproducts were tested as a means of treating mine tailing leachate with a high As concentration. Byproduct materials can be placed in situ as permeable reactive barriers to control the subsurface release of leachate from tailing containment systems. The tested materials had various compositions of elemental Fe, Fe oxides, Ca-Fe oxides and Ca hydroxides typical of different steel manufacturing processes. Among these materials, evaporation cooler dust (ECD), oxygen gas sludge (OGS), basic oxygen furnace slag (BOFS) and to a lesser degree, electrostatic precipitator dust (EPD) effectively removed both As(V) and As(III) during batch experiments. ECD, OGS and BOFS reduced As concentrations to <0.5mg/l from 25mg/l As(V) or As(III) solution in 72 h, exhibiting higher removal capacities than zero-valent iron. High Ca concentrations and alkaline conditions (pH ca. 12) provided by the dissolution of Ca hydroxides may promote the formation of stable, sparingly soluble Ca-As compounds. When initial pH conditions were adjusted to 4, As reduction was enhanced, probably by adsorption onto iron oxides. The elution rate of retained As from OGS and ECD decreased with treatment time, and increasing the residence time in a permeable barrier strategy would be beneficial for the immobilization of As. When applied to real tailing leachate, ECD was found to be the most efficient barrier material to increase pH and to remove As and dissolved metals.

  7. The removal of sulphate from mine water by precipitation as ettringite and the utilisation of the precipitate as a sorbent for arsenate removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolonen, Emma-Tuulia; Hu, Tao; Rämö, Jaakko; Lassi, Ulla

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate sulphate removal from mine water by precipitation as ettringite (Ca6Al2(SO4)3(OH)12·26H2O) and the utilisation of the precipitate as a sorbent for arsenate removal. The mine water sulphate concentration was reduced by 85-90% from the initial 1400 mg/L during ettringite precipitation depending on the treatment method. The precipitation conditions were also simulated with MINEQL + software, and the computational results were compared with the experimental results. The precipitated solids were characterised with X-ray diffraction and a scanning electron microscope. The precipitated solids were tested as sorbents for arsenate removal from the model solution. The arsenic(V) model solution concentration reduced 86-96% from the initial 1.5 mg/L with a 1 g/L sorbent dosage. The effect of initial arsenate concentration on the sorption of arsenate on the precipitate was studied and Langmuir, Freundlich, and Langmuir-Freundlich sorption isotherm models were fitted to the experimental data. The maximum arsenate sorption capacity (qm = 11.2 ± 4.7 mg/g) of the precipitate was obtained from the Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm. The results indicate that the precipitate produced during sulphate removal from mine water by precipitation as ettringite could be further used as a sorbent for arsenate removal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. COMPARISON OF APATITE II™ TREATMENT SYSTEM AT TWO MINES FOR METALS REMOVAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two abandoned lead-zinc mine sites, the Nevada Stewart Mine (NSM) and Success Mine, are located within the Coeur d'Alene Mining District, in northern Idaho. An Apatite II™ Treatment System (ATS) was implemented at each site to treat metal-laden water, mainly zinc. In the ATS, f...

  9. Removal of 226Ra from tailings pond effluents and stabilization of uranium mine tailings. Bench and pilot scale studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidtke, N.W.; Averill, D.; Bryant, D.N.; Wilkinson, P.; Schmidt, J.W.

    1978-01-01

    Increased world demand for uranium has resulted in recent expansion of Canadian uranium mining operations. Problems have been identified with the discharge of radionuclides such as 226 Ra from tailings pond effluents and with the stabilization of mine tailings. At Environment Canada's Wastewater Technology Centre (WTC) two projects were undertaken in cooperation with the Canadian Uranium Mining Industry and other federal government agencies to address these problems. The first project reports on the progress of bench and pilot scale process simulations for the development of a data base for the design of a full scale mechanical physical/chemical 226 Ra removal waste treatment system with an effluent target level of 10 pCi 226 Ra total per litre. The second project addresses problems of the leachability of radionuclides and the stabilization of both uranium mine tailings and BaRaSO 4 sediments from the treatment of acid seepages

  10. March 2016 Memo: Planning for Removal and Remedial Activities at Hardrock Mining and Mineral Processing Sites with Fluid Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memo from EPA Assistant Administrator Mathy Stanislaus, regarding planning for removal and remedial activities at hardrock mining and mineral processing sites with fluid hazards, and to share the Agency’s expectations for the work that is done at these sit

  11. Structural and functional characteristics of natural and constructed channels draining a reclaimed mountaintop removal and valley fill coal mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountaintop removal and valley fill (MTR/VF) coal mining has altered the landscape of the Central Appalachian region in the United States. The goals of this study were to 1) compare the structure and function of natural and constructed stream channels in forested and MTR/VF catch...

  12. Novel approach to zinc removal from circum-neutral mine waters using pelletised recovered hydrous ferric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, William M; Potter, Hugh A B; Jarvis, Adam P

    2009-02-15

    Data are presented which evaluate the performance of a pilot-scale treatment system using pelletised hydrous ferric oxide (HFO; a waste stream from coal mine water treatment) as a high surface area sorbent for removing zinc (Zn) from a metal mine water discharge in the North Pennines Orefield, UK. Over a 10-month period the system removed Zn at mean area- and volume-adjusted removal rates of 3.7 and 8.1gm(-3)day(-1), respectively, with a mean treatment efficiency of 32% at a low mean residence time of 49min. There were seasonal effects in Zn removal owing to establishment and dieback of algae in the treatment tank. This led to increased Zn uptake in early summer months followed by slight Zn release upon algae senescence. In addition to these biosorptive processes, the principal sinks for Zn appear to be (1) sorption onto the HFO surface, and (2) precipitation with calcite-dominated secondary minerals. The latter were formed as a product of dissolution of portlandite in the cement binder and calcium recarbonation. Further optimisation of the HFO pelletisation process holds the possibility for providing a low-cost, low footprint treatment option for metal rich mine waters, in addition to a valuable after-use for recovered HFO from coal mine water treatment facilities.

  13. Ball-milling effect on Indonesian natural bentonite for manganese removal from acid mine drainage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prastistho Widyawanto

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The influences of mechanical milling on Indonesian Natural Bentonite (INB characteristics and manganese (Mn removal from acid mine drainage (AMD were investigated. The INB characteristics were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, nitrogen adsorption-desorption for specific surface area (SSA and microporosity measurement, cation exchange capacity (CEC and particle size distribution (PSD analyzer. Four minutes milling with frequency 20 Hz on INB caused morphological change which showed more crumbled and destructed particle, lost the (001 peak but still retained the (100 peak that indicated delamination of montmorillonite mineral without breaking the tetrahedral-octahedral-tetrahedral (T-O-T structure, rose the CEC from 28.49 meq/100g to 35.51 meq/100g, increase in the SSA from 60.63 m2/g to 104.88 m2/g, significant increase in microporosity which described in the t plots and decrease in the mean particle size distribution peak from 49.28 μm to 38.84 μm. The effect of contact time and effect of adsorbent dosage on Mn sorption was studied. Both unmilled and milled samples reached equilibrium at 24 hours and the pH rose from 4 to 7 in first 30 minutes. The Mn removal percentage increased significantly after milling. Using Langmuir isotherm, the maximum adsorbed metals (qmax also increased from 0.570 to 4.219 mg/g.

  14. Copper removal from acid mine drainage-polluted water using glutaraldehyde-polyethyleneimine modified diatomaceous earth particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikael Larsson

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Mine waters and tailings generated from mining and mineral processing activities often have detrimental impact on the local environment. One example is acid mine drainage, in which sulphides in the mining waste react with water and oxygen to produce an acidic environment that subsequently dissolves host rock minerals from the waste containing toxic metals and trace elements. Copper is one such metal of significance, as it is mined at large volumes in sulphide containing ores. It has strong biocidal activity that greatly affects ecosystems. We have previously reported that glutaraldehyde (GA-crosslinked polyethyleneimine (PEI has strong affinity and selectivity for copper and that diatomaceous earth (DE particles can be modified with the material to form a copper-extraction resin. In this study, the copper uptake of GA-PEI-DE particles was investigated from synthetic and real acid mine drainage samples under different pHs and their copper removal performance was compared with that of selected commercial resins. The results revealed that copper could effectively and preferentially bind to the material at pH 4, and that the copper could be completely eluted by lowering of the pH. In addition, effective copper uptake and elution was demonstrated using real legacy acid mine drainage water from Mount Lyell in Tasmania.

  15. Biochemical process for the removal of uranium from acid mine drainages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roig, M.G.; Manzano, T.; Diaz, M.

    1997-01-01

    A biochemical process has been assessed with a view to removing heavy metals from acid mine drainages in which the metal cation removed is accumulated in situ as insoluble metal phosphate on the surface of Citrobacter N 14 cells (Roig et al., 1995). The localized presence of inorganic phosphate (P i ) is brought about via the hydrolysis of a ''donor'' organic phosphate added to the solution of metals with precipitation as MHPO 4 bound to the cells. The present work explores the potential of immobilized Citrobacter biomass for the recovery of uranium from the acid drainage waters of the ''Faith'' mine exploited by ENUSA (Ciudad Rodrigo, Salamanca). A physicochemical characterization of the acid waste-water from ENUSA was carried out and flow injection analysis methods for the determination of uranium and P i in such water were developed and improved. The efficiencies of chemical precipitation (by the addition of P i to the acid water) with regard to bioinsolubilization (supplementing the water with an organic phosphate that is (later) hydrolysed to P i ) were investigated and compared. Additionally, the efficiency of chemical and biochemical precipitation as phosphates of uranium present in ENUSA acid drainage water were assessed. Furthermore, the relative importance of chemical precipitation (by the addition of P i to the acid water) with regard to bioinsolubilization (supplementing the water with an organic phosphate that is (later) hydrolysed to P i plus alcohol) was established. To do so, a series of mass balances for chemical precipitation and for bioinsolubilization of the metal phosphate was performed. Once the efficiency of the bioprocess as regards the removal of uranium when glycerol-2-phosphate is used as a substrate had been determined, a major question was forthcoming: the search for an efficient and much more economical substrate for the process. In this sense, sodium tripolyphosphate, one of the main components of many formulations of commercial

  16. Investigation of As(V) removal from acid mine drainage by iron (hydr) oxide modified zeolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekhunguni, Pfano Mathews; Tavengwa, Nikita Tawanda; Tutu, Hlanganani

    2017-07-15

    In this work, the synthesis of iron (hydr) oxide modified zeolite was achieved through precipitation of iron on the zeolite. The structure and surface morphology of iron (hydr) oxide modified zeolite (IHOMZ) was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), coupled with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra. The efficiency of IHOMZ was then investigated through batch technique for the extraction of As(V) from mine waste water. The optimum parameters for maximum As(V) adsorption were: an initial As(V) concentration (10 mg L -1 ), adsorbent dosage (3.0 g), contact time (90 min) and temperature (53 °C). The initial pH of the solution had no compelling effect on As(V) adsorption by IHOMZ. However, adsorption capacity was significantly affected by the solution temperature with 53 °C registering the maximum removal efficiency. The thermodynamic parameters: Entropy (ΔS° = 0.00815 kJ (K mol) -1 ), variation of the Gibbs free energy (ΔG°) and enthalpy (ΔH° = 9.392 kJ mol -1 ) of As(V) adsorption onto IHOMZ system signified a non-spontaneous and endothermic process. It was noted that Freundlich isotherm model exhibited a better fit to the equilibrium experimental data, implying that the adsorption process occurred on a heterogeneous surface. The kinetic data from As(V) adsorption experiments was depicted by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model (R 2  > 0.999), suggesting a chemisorption adsorption process. The experimental batch equilibrium results indicated that IHOMZ could be used as an effective sorbent for As(V) ion extraction from acid mine drainage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of the potential of indigenous calcareous shale for neutralization and removal of arsenic and heavy metals from acid mine drainage in the Taxco mining area, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, F M; Núñez, L; Gutiérrez, M E; Armienta, M A; Ceniceros-Gómez, A E

    2011-02-01

    In the Taxco mining area, sulfide mineral oxidation from inactive tailings impoundments and abandoned underground mines has produced acid mine drainage (AMD; pH 2.2-2.9) enriched in dissolved concentrations (mg l⁻¹) sulfate, heavy metals, and arsenic (As): SO₄²⁻ (pH 1470-5454), zinc (Zn; 3.0-859), iron (Fe; pH 5.5-504), copper (Cu; pH 0.7-16.3), cadmium (Cd; pH 0.3-6.7), lead (Pb; pH acid-neutralizing potential of limestone decreases when surfaces of the calcite particles become less reactive as they are progressively coated by metal precipitates. This study constitutes first-stage development of passive-treatment systems for treating AMD in the Taxco mine area using indigenous calcareous shale. This geologic material consists of a mixture of calcite, quartz, muscovite, albite, and montmorillonite. Results of batch leaching test indicate that calcareous shale significantly increased the pH (to values of 6.6-7.4) and decreased heavy metal and As concentrations in treated mine leachates. Calcareous shale had maximum removal efficiency (100%) for As, Pb, Cu, and Fe. The most mobile metals ions were Cd and Zn, and their average percentage removal was 87% and 89%, respectively. In this natural system (calcareous shale), calcite provides a source of alkalinity, whereas the surfaces of quartz and aluminosilicate minerals possibly serve as a preferred locus of deposition for metals, resulting in the neutralizing agent (calcite) beings less rapidly coated with the precipitating metals and therefore able to continue its neutralizing function for a longer time.

  18. Conversion of coal mine drainage ochre to water treatment reagent: Production, characterisation and application for P and Zn removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapsford, Devin; Santonastaso, Marco; Thorn, Peter; Kershaw, Steven

    2015-09-01

    Coal mine drainage ochre is a ferruginous precipitate that forms from mine water in impacted watercourses and during treatment. With thousands of tonnes per annum of such ochre arising from mine water treatment in the UK alone, management of these wastes is a substantive issue. This paper demonstrates that the ochre from both active and passive treatment of coal mine drainage can be transformed into an effective water treatment reagent by simple acid dissolution and that the reagent can be used for the removal of dissolved phosphorous from municipal wastewater and zinc from non-coal mine waters. Ochre is readily soluble in H2SO4 and HCl. Ochre is more soluble in HCl with solubilities of up to 100 g/L in 20% (w/w) HCl and 68 g/L in 10% (w/w) H2SO4. For four of the eight tested ochres solubility decreased in higher concentrations of H2SO4. Ochre compositional data demonstrate that the coal mine ochres tested are relatively free from problematic levels of elements seen by other authors from acid mine drainage-derived ochre. Comparison to British Standards for use of iron-based coagulants in drinking water treatment was used as an indicator of the acceptability of use of the ochre-derived reagents in terms of potentially problematic elements. The ochre-derived reagents were found to meet the 'Grade 3' specification, except for arsenic. Thus, for application in municipal wastewater and mine water treatment additional processing may not be required. There was little observed compositional difference between solutions prepared using H2SO4 or HCl. Ochre-derived reagents showed applicability for the removal of P and Zn with removals of up to 99% and 97% respectively measured for final pH 7-8, likely due to sorption/coprecipitation. Furthermore, the results demonstrate that applying a Fe dose in the form of liquid reagent leads to a better Fe:P and Fe:Zn removal ratio compared to ochre-based sorption media tested in the literature. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by

  19. Assessing the Impact of Removing Select Materials from Coal Mine Overburden, Central Appalachia Region, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The exposure of readily soluble components of overburden materials from surface coal mining to air and water results in mineral oxidation and carbonate mineral dissolution, thus increasing coal mine water conductivity. A conductivity benchmark of 300 µS/cm for mine water dischar...

  20. Detection of land mines by amplified fluorescence quenching of polymer films: a man-portable chemical sniffer for detection of ultratrace concentrations of explosives emanating from land mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    la Grone, Marcus J.; Cumming, Colin J.; Fisher, Mark E.; Fox, Michael J.; Jacob, Sheena; Reust, Dennis; Rockley, Mark G.; Towers, Eric

    2000-08-01

    The explosive charge within a landmine is the source for a mixture of chemical vapors that form a distinctive 'chemical signature' indicative of a landmine. The concentration of these compounds in the air over landmines is extremely low, well below the minimum detection limits of most field- portable chemical sensors. Described in this paper is a man- portable landmine detection system that has for the first time demonstrated the ability to detect landmines by direct sensing of the vapors of signature compounds in the air over landmines. The system utilizes fluorescent polymers developed by collaborators at the MIT. The sensor can detect ultra-trace concentrations of TNT vapor and other nitroaromatic compounds found in many landmine explosives. Thin films of the polymers exhibit intense fluorescence, but when exposed to vapors of nitroaromatic explosives the intensity of the light emitted from the films decreases. A single molecule of TNT binding to a receptor site quenches the fluorescence from many polymer repeat units, increasing the sensitivity by orders of magnitude. A sensor prototype has been develop that response in near real-time to low femtogram quantities of nitroaromatic explosives. The prototype is portable, lightweight, has low power consumption, is simple to operate, and is relatively inexpensive. Simultaneous field testing of the sensor and experienced canine landmine detection teams was recently completed. Although the testing was limited in scope, the performance of the senor met or exceeded that of the canines against buried landmines.

  1. Optimization of the operation of packed bed bioreactor to improve the sulfate and metal removal from acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dev, Subhabrata; Roy, Shantonu; Bhattacharya, Jayanta

    2017-09-15

    The present study discusses the potentiality of using anaerobic Packed Bed Bioreactor (PBR) for the treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD). The multiple process parameters such as pH, hydraulic retention time (HRT), concentration of marine waste extract (MWE), total organic carbon (TOC) and sulfate were optimized together using Taguchi design. The order of influence of the parameters towards biological sulfate reduction was found to be pH > MWE > sulfate > HRT > TOC. At optimized conditions (pH - 7, 20% (v/v) MWE, 1500 mg/L sulfate, 48 h HRT and 2300 mg/L TOC), 98.3% and 95% sulfate at a rate of 769.7 mg/L/d. and 732.1 mg/L/d. was removed from the AMD collected from coal and metal mine, respectively. Efficiency of metal removal (Fe, Cu, Zn, Mg and Ni) was in the range of 94-98%. The levels of contaminants in the treated effluent were below the minimum permissible limits of industrial discharge as proposed by Bureau of Indian Standards (IS 2490:1981). The present study establishes the optimized conditions for PBR operation to completely remove sulfate and metal removal from AMD at high rate. The study also creates the future scope to develop an efficient treatment process for sulfate and metal-rich mine wastewater in a large scale. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A law of removing radon by ventilation and air requirement calculation for eliminating radon daughters in uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Gang

    1988-06-01

    In accordance with testing data of removing radon and its daughters by ventilation from shrinkage and filling stopes of uranium mines, a law of removing radon by ventilation from the stopes is analyzed and summed. According to the decay law of radon and its daughters, an accumulation equation of potential alpha energy from radon daughters is presented with hyperbolic regression equation. the calculating formulae of ventilation flow are derived from the accumulation equation for eliminating radon daughters in inlet flow with or without contamination. It has been proved that the amount of ventilation air calcuated could meet the requirements of radiation safety rationally and economically

  3. Mechanism of removal and retention of heavy metals from the acid mine drainage to coastal wetland in the Patagonian marsh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idaszkin, Yanina L; Carol, Eleonora; María Del Pilar, Alvarez

    2017-09-01

    The attenuation of the acid mine drainage is one of the most important environmental challenges facing the mining industry worldwide. Mining waste deposits from an ancient metallurgical extraction of heavy metals were found near to the San Antonio marsh in Patagonia. The aim of this work was to determinate which mechanisms regulate the mobilization and retention of metals by acid drainage. A geological and geomorphological survey was carried out and samples from the mining waste deposits and the marsh were collected to determine soil texture, Eh pH, organic matter, Cu, Pb, Zn and Fe content, and soil mineralogical composition. Metals in marsh plants were determined in above- and below-ground structures. In the mining waste deposits polymetallic sulphides were recognized where the oxidation and formation of oxy-hydroxides and sulphates of Fe, Cu, Pb and Zn occurs. Then, by the alteration of those minerals, the metals enter in solution and are mobilized with the surface drainage towards the marsh where adsorption in the soils fine fraction and organic matter and/or by plants occurs. Locally, in the mining waste deposits, the precipitation/dissolution of Cu, Pb, and Zn sulphates take place in small centripetal drainage basins. In topographically lower portions of the marsh desorption and removal of metals by tidal flow could also be happen. The results allow to concluding that the marsh adjacent to the mining waste deposits is a geochemically active environment that naturally mitigates the contamination caused by acid drainage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Synergistic wetland treatment of sewage and mine water: pollutant removal performance of the first full-scale system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younger, Paul L; Henderson, Robin

    2014-05-15

    Wetland systems are now well-established unit processes in the treatment of diverse wastewater streams. However, the development of wetland technology for sewage treatment followed an entirely separate trajectory from that for polluted mine waters. In recent years, increased networking has led to recognition of possible synergies which might be obtained by hybridising approaches to achieve co-treatment of otherwise distinct sewage and mine-derived wastewaters. As polluted discharges from abandoned mines often occur in or near the large conurbations to which the former mining activities gave rise, there is ample scope for such co-treatment in many places worldwide. The first full-scale co-treatment wetland anywhere in the world receiving large inflows of both partially-treated sewage (∼100 L s(-)(1)) and mine water (∼300 L s(-1)) was commissioned in Gateshead, England in 2005, and a performance evaluation has now been made. The evaluation is based entirely on routinely-collected water quality data, which the operators gather in fulfillment of their regulatory obligations. The principal parameters of concern in the sewage effluent are suspended solids, BOD5, ammoniacal nitrogen (NH4-N) and phosphate (P); in the mine water the only parameter of particular concern is total iron (Fe). Aerobic treatment processes are appropriate for removal of BOD5, NH4-N and Fe; for the removal of P, reaction with iron to form ferric phosphate solids is a likely pathway. With these considerations in mind, the treatment wetland was designed as a surface-flow aerobic system. Sample concentration level and daily flow rate date from April 2007 until March 2011 have been analyzed using nonparametric statistical methods. This has revealed sustained, high rates of absolute removal of all pollutants from the combined wastewater flow, quantified in terms of differences between influent and effluent loadings (i.e. mass per unit time). In terms of annual mass retention rates, for instance

  5. Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairullah Khan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Opinion mining is an interesting area of research because of its applications in various fields. Collecting opinions of people about products and about social and political events and problems through the Web is becoming increasingly popular every day. The opinions of users are helpful for the public and for stakeholders when making certain decisions. Opinion mining is a way to retrieve information through search engines, Web blogs and social networks. Because of the huge number of reviews in the form of unstructured text, it is impossible to summarize the information manually. Accordingly, efficient computational methods are needed for mining and summarizing the reviews from corpuses and Web documents. This study presents a systematic literature survey regarding the computational techniques, models and algorithms for mining opinion components from unstructured reviews.

  6. An Innovative Carbonate Coprecipitation Process For The Removal Of Zinc And Manganese From Mining Impacted Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although mine drainage is usually thought of as acidic, there are many cases where the water is of neutral pH, but still contains metal species that can be harmful to human or aquatic animal health, such as manganese (Mn) and zinc (Zn). Typical treatment of mine drainage waters ...

  7. Bench-Scale and Pilot-Scale Treatment Technologies for the Removal of Total Dissolved Solids from Coal Mine Water: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coal mine water (CMW) is typically treated to remove suspended solids, acidity, and soluble metals, but high concentrations of total dissolved solids (TDS) have been reported to impact the environment at several CMW discharge points. Consequently, various states have establishe...

  8. Past explosive outbursts of entrapped carbon dioxide in salt mines provide a new perspective on the hazards of carbon dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedlund, Frank Huess

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a source of past carbon dioxide accidents which so far has only been sporadically mentioned in the literature. Violent and highly destructive outbursts of hundreds of tons of CO2 occurred regularly, if not routinely, in the now closed salt mines of the former DDR. The Menzen...

  9. An examination of the effects of mountaintop removal coal mining on respiratory symptoms and COPD using propensity scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendryx, Michael; Luo, Juhua

    2015-01-01

    Previous research on public health consequences of mountaintop removal (MTR) coal mining has been limited by the observational nature of the data. The current study used propensity scores, a method designed to overcome this limitation, to draw more confident causal inferences about mining effects on respiratory health using non-experimental data. These data come from a health survey of 682 adults residing in two rural areas of Virginia, USA characterized by the presence or absence of MTR mining. Persons with a history of occupational exposure as coal miners were excluded. Nine covariates including age, sex, current and former smoking, overweight, obesity, high school education, college education, and exposure to coal as a home-heating source were selected to estimate propensity scores. Propensity scores were tested for balance and then used as weights to create quasi-experimental exposed and unexposed groups. Results indicated that persons in the mountaintop mining group had significantly (p < 0.0001) elevated prevalence of respiratory symptoms and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The results suggest that impaired respiratory health results from exposure to MTR environments and not from other risks.

  10. Technology study on removal of Ra, U, Mn and F from the acid wastewater of uranium mining and metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yongyong; Zhong Pingru; Wang Gaoshan

    2014-01-01

    The laboratory study for decreasing the concentration of Ra, U, Mn and F ions in acid wastewater of uranium mining and metallurgy was investigated based on lime neutralization-precipitation technology. The technological flowsheet was composed of removing radium by barium chloride, manganese by air aeration and fluorin by aluminum sulfate, and the quality of the disposed effluent could be accorded with the discharge criteria defined by the state, as the neutralization conditions of pH just being 8.5. Furthermore, the lower precipitation pH value can effectively decrease sediment volume, and reduce the subsequent processing pressures. The technological methods were viable and universally applicable for uranium mining and metallurgy wastewater purification. (authors)

  11. Organic substrates as electron donors in permeable reactive barriers for removal of heavy metals from acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijjanapanich, P; Pakdeerattanamint, K; Lens, P N L; Annachhatre, A P

    2012-12-01

    This research was conducted to select suitable natural organic substrates as potential carbon sources for use as electron donors for biological sulphate reduction in a permeable reactive barrier (PRB). A number of organic substrates were assessed through batch and continuous column experiments under anaerobic conditions with acid mine drainage (AMD) obtained from an abandoned lignite coal mine. To keep the heavy metal concentration at a constant level, the AMD was supplemented with heavy metals whenever necessary. Under anaerobic conditions, sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) converted sulphate into sulphide using the organic substrates as electron donors. The sulphide that was generated precipitated heavy metals as metal sulphides. Organic substrates, which yielded the highest sulphate reduction in batch tests, were selected for continuous column experiments which lasted over 200 days. A mixture of pig-farm wastewater treatment sludge, rice husk and coconut husk chips yielded the best heavy metal (Fe, Cu, Zn and Mn) removal efficiencies of over 90%.

  12. Zinc and nickel removal in limestone based treatment of acid mine drainage: The relative role of adsorption and co-precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Andrew; Wildeman, Thomas; Figueroa, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Limestone treatment of mining impacted water was simulated in batch reactors. • Zinc and nickel removals were quantified/characterized with a sequential extraction. • Removals were described with a surface complexation and a surface precipitation model. • Extraction/modeling results imply mechanisms beyond adsorption dominate metal removal. - Abstract: Mining influenced water may contain high metal and sulfate loads, and have low pH (acid mine drainage). Removal of these metals prior to environmental discharge is critical to maintain ecosystem vitality. Limestone based passive treatment systems are commonly used for pH neutralization. The same conditions that lead to pH neutralization may also remove a substantial amount of metals from solution, but the connection between treatment conditions and metal removal are not well understood. In this study, zinc and nickel removals are quantified in batch reactor simulated limestone treatment of acid mine drainage. The resulting solid phase is characterized with a sequential extraction procedure, and the removals are interpreted using surface complexation and surface precipitation models. Zinc and nickel removals are closely linked to the initial iron concentration in the mine water, but are also affected by pH, alkalinity, calcium and sulfate concentrations. The surface complexation model was based on literature descriptions of hydrous ferric oxide. In order to obtain a sufficient fit to the data, the surface site density was increased to an unrealistically high value. Uptake data was also fit to an existing surface precipitation model. The values used are similar to those found in previous studies. Both models indicate that adsorption is not the dominant removal process in the treatment system. Using adsorption only models will generally underpredict metal removals within limestone based treatment systems

  13. Improving elasticity and hydroinsulation of supports in an explosives storage room as well as adaptation of its parts for temporary storage room during construction of the Czeczott black coal mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janusz, E; Perun, S

    1986-05-01

    Design and construction are discussed of an explosives storage room in sandstone strata at 500 m depth in the Czeczott mine. The storage room has a capacity of 3000 kg of explosives, a volume of 5932 m/sup 3/ and consists of 7 storage chambers. Design of supports and liners was aimed at increasing their elasticity and reducing water hazards. Support system consists of the following elements: LP arched steel supports, a 30-40 cm thick layer of slag, a waterproof layer of textiles with a rubber cover, brick liners 40 cm thick. The roof zone of the brick liners is covered by 2 layers of waterproof mortar. Perforated pipes are installed in the slag layer close to the floor. Use of the slag layer increases elasticity of the support system; waterproof textiles, rubber, waterproof mortar and perforated pipes eliminate water hazards as well as hazards associated with stray currents. Design of the explosive storage room is shown in 5 schemes.

  14. Evaluation of Point of Use Water Treatment Devices for Removal of Mine Wastes from Well Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.S. EPA Region VII and the Office of Research and Development (ORD) are conducting a large-scale study to identify the prevalence of lead (Pb) and other contaminants in drinking water at four mine waste areas in Washington County, Missouri. Numerous households in Potosi, Richwoo...

  15. [A case of carbon monoxide poisoning by explosion of coal mine presenting as visual agnosia: re-evaluation after 40 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaiwa, Akiko; Yamashita, Kenichiro; Nomura, Takuo; Shida, Kenshiro; Taniwaki, Takayuki

    2005-11-01

    We re-evaluated a case of carbon monoxide poisoning presenting as visual agnosia who had been injured by explosion of Miike-Mikawa coal mine 40 years ago. In an early stage, his main neuropsychological symptoms were visual agnosia, severe anterograde amnesia, alexia, agraphia, constructional apraxia, left hemispatial neglect and psychic paralysis of gaze, in addition to pyramidal and extra pyramidal signs. At the time of re-evaluation after 40 years, he still showed visual agnosia associated with agraphia and constructional apraxia. Concerning visual agnosia, recognition of the real object was preserved, while recognition of object photographs and picture was impaired. Thus, this case was considered to have picture agnosia as he could not recognize the object by pictorial cues on the second dimensional space. MRI examination revealed low signal intensity lesions and cortical atrophy in the bilateral parieto-occipital lobes on T1-weighted images. Therefore, the bilateral parieto-occipital lesions are likely to be responsible for his picture agnosia.

  16. A case of carbon monoxide poisoning by explosion of coal mine presenting as visual agnosia: re-evaluation after 40 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takaiwa, A.; Yamashita, K.; Nomura, T.; Shida, K.; Taniwaki, T. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Department of Neurology, Graduate School of Medical Science

    2005-11-15

    We re-evaluated a case of carbon monoxide poisoning presenting as visual agnosia who had been injured by explosion of Miike-Mikawa coal mine 40 years ago. In an early stage, his main neuropsychological symptoms were visual agnosia, severe anterograde amnesia, alexia, agraphia, constructional apraxia, left hemispatial neglect and psychic paralysis of gaze, in addition to pyramidal and extra pyramidal signs. At the time of re-evaluation after 40 years, he still showed visual agnosia associated with agraphia and constructional apraxia. Concerning visual agnosia, recognition of the real object was preserved, while recognition of object photographs and picture was impaired. Thus, this case was considered to have picture agnosia as he could not recognize the object by pictorial cues on the second dimensional space. MRI examination revealed low signal intensity lesions and cortical atrophy in the bilateral parieto-occipital lobes on T1-weighted images. Therefore, the bilateral parieto-occipital lesions are likely to be responsible for his picture agnosia.

  17. Removal of arsenic from synthetic acid mine drainage by electrochemical pH adjustment and coprecipitation with iron hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jenny Weijun; Bejan, Dorin; Bunce, Nigel J

    2003-10-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD), which is caused by the biological oxidation of sulfidic materials, frequently contains arsenic in the form of arsenite, As(III), and/or arsenate, As(V), along with much higher concentrations of dissolved iron. The present work is directed toward the removal of arsenic from synthetic AMD by raising the pH of the solution by electrochemical reduction of H+ to elemental hydrogen and coprecipitation of arsenic with iron(III) hydroxide, following aeration of the catholyte. Electrolysis was carried out at constant current using two-compartment cells separated with a cation exchange membrane. Four different AMD model systems were studied: Fe(III)/As(V), Fe(III)/As(III), Fe(II)/As(V), and Fe(II)/As(III) with the initial concentrations for Fe(III) 260 mg/L, Fe(II) 300 mg/L, As(V), and As(III) 8 mg/L. Essentially quantitative removal of arsenic and iron was achieved in all four systems, and the results were independent of whether the pH was adjusted electrochemically or by the addition of NaOH. Current efficiencies were approximately 85% when the pH of the effluent was 4-7. Residual concentrations of arsenic were close to the drinking water standard proposed by the World Health Organization (10 microg/L), far below the mine waste effluent standard (500 microg/L).

  18. Extremely acidic mine lake ecosystems in Lusatia (Germany) : characterisation and development of sustainable, biology-based acidity removal technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fyson, A.; Deneke, R.; Nixdorf, B.; Steinberg, C.E.W.

    2003-01-01

    There are approximately 500 infilled open-cast lignite pits in Germany that are extremely acidic because of high concentrations of dissolved metals, mostly iron and aluminium. The mining lakes have pH values of 2.4 to 3.4 and also have high sulphate concentrations. Efforts are being made to neutralize the lakes for recreational purposes. The acidity can be removed from the lakes in an economical and environmentally sustainable manner by flooding through diversion of neutral, nutrient-rich river water. This paper described the living conditions of the acidic mining lakes in the Lausitz region of Germany and summarized the benefits of the controlled eutrophication approach to enhance natural, self-sustaining processes for acid neutralization. Compared to infilling with river water, eutrophication increases lake productivity and removes acidity through sediment bound and water column biologically-mediated processes. The study involved basic research on particle transport in streams and lakes, pelagic food web interactions and submerged macrophyte metabolism. It also looked at the role of wetlands, bacterial interactions at the water-sediment interface, and modelling. It was shown that the addition of phosphorus and carbon to the water column can enhance primary production. Future studies will examine environmentally acceptable treatment strategies that offer an alternative to chemical treatment. 20 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs

  19. New slurry explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kale, D.C.

    1982-12-01

    Mining engineers will soon have an additional 2 or 3 types of explosives which increase rock yield without increasing cost. A new variety of Ammonium Nitrate and Fuel Oil (ANFO), which is much heavier and more powerful, is being introduced in the US. New types of NCN (nitrocarbonitrate) blasting agents have also been developed.

  20. Removing of the fuel element storage basin by explosive technique in the course of decommissioning of the Nuclear research reactor FR 2 in the research center Karlsruhe. Permission and technical execution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jehle, P.; Freund, H.U.

    1999-01-01

    The fuel element storage basin was removed by explosive technique in the course of the decommissioning of the nuclear research reactor FR 2. This basin consisted of 6.800 tons of heavily reinforced concrete with 25 tons of stainless steel lining. The reactor building including residual radioactive inventory was constructionally connected to the basin and had to stay undamaged. For this reason and due to the fact that the storage basin as operational part of the nuclear facility was subject to the German nuclear law the dismantling had to follow stringent licensing and control requirements. Special restrictions concerned the tolerable reactor building vibrations and the direct blast loadings which could affect the structural integrity of the building enclosing the basin. The explosive dismantling operations which also included the final removal of the building foundation were successfully performed in 90 separate blasts employing 490 kg of commercial explosives. (orig.) [de

  1. Grass-cellulose as energy source for biological sulphate removal from acid mine effluents

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Greben, HA

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The biological sulphate removal technology requires carbon and energy sources to reduce sulphate to sulphide. Plant biomass, e.g. grass, is a sustainable source of energy when cellulose is utilised during anaerobic degradation, producing volatile...

  2. Complete removal of arsenic and zinc from a heavily contaminated acid mine drainage via an indigenous SRB consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Pape, Pierre, E-mail: pierrelp.hm@gmail.com [Sorbonne Universités – Institut de Minéralogie, de Physique des Matériaux et de Cosmochimie (IMPMC), UMR IRD 206, UPMC Université Paris VI, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05 (France); Battaglia-Brunet, Fabienne; Parmentier, Marc; Joulian, Catherine; Gassaud, Cindy [French Geological Survey (BRGM), 3 av. Claude Guillemin, 45060, BP 36009, Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Fernandez-Rojo, Lidia [HydroSciences Montpellier, UMR 5569 CNRS-IRD-UM, CC57, 163 rue Auguste Broussonet, 34090 Montpellier (France); Guigner, Jean-Michel; Ikogou, Maya; Stetten, Lucie [Sorbonne Universités – Institut de Minéralogie, de Physique des Matériaux et de Cosmochimie (IMPMC), UMR IRD 206, UPMC Université Paris VI, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05 (France); Olivi, Luca [Sincrotrone Trieste ELETTRA, I-34012 Trieste (Italy); Casiot, Corinne [HydroSciences Montpellier, UMR 5569 CNRS-IRD-UM, CC57, 163 rue Auguste Broussonet, 34090 Montpellier (France); Morin, Guillaume [Sorbonne Universités – Institut de Minéralogie, de Physique des Matériaux et de Cosmochimie (IMPMC), UMR IRD 206, UPMC Université Paris VI, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05 (France)

    2017-01-05

    Highlights: • SRB activity is evidenced at acidic pH in acid mine drainage water. • Total arsenic and zinc removal from solution is observed. • As, Zn and Fe are observed to precipitate as biogenic sulfides. • Amorphous orpiment (As{sup III}{sub 2}S{sub 3}) and realgar (As{sup II}S) are observed as main As-bearing sulfides. • A mechanism is proposed for the reduction of As{sub 2}S{sub 3} to AsS by biogenic H{sub 2}S under acidic conditions. - Abstract: Acid mine drainages (AMD) are major sources of pollution to the environment. Passive bio-remediation technologies involving sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are promising for treating arsenic contaminated waters. However, mechanisms of biogenic As-sulfide formation need to be better understood to decontaminate AMDs in acidic conditions. Here, we show that a high-As AMD effluent can be decontaminated by an indigenous SRB consortium. AMD water from the Carnoulès mine (Gard, France) was incubated with the consortium under anoxic conditions and As, Zn and Fe concentrations, pH and microbial activity were monitored during 94 days. Precipitated solids were analyzed using electron microscopy (SEM/TEM-EDXS), and Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy at the As K-edge. Total removal of arsenic and zinc from solution (1.06 and 0.23 mmol/L, respectively) was observed in two of the triplicates. While Zn precipitated as ZnS nanoparticles, As precipitated as amorphous orpiment (am-As{sup III}{sub 2}S{sub 3}) (33–73%), and realgar (As{sup II}S) (0–34%), the latter phase exhibiting a particular nanowire morphology. A minor fraction of As is also found as thiol-bound As{sup III} (14–23%). We propose that the formation of the As{sup II}S nanowires results from As{sup III}{sub 2}S{sub 3} reduction by biogenic H{sub 2}S, enhancing the efficiency of As removal. The present description of As immobilization may help to set the basis for bioremediation strategies using SRB.

  3. Removal of mercury (Hg) from contaminated water at traditional gold mining area in Central Kalimantan

    OpenAIRE

    Wilopo, Wahyu; Rahman, Denizar; Eka Putra, Doni Prakasa; Warmada, I Wayan

    2015-01-01

    There are many traditional gold mining and processing in Murung Raya Regency, Central Kalimantan. The processing of gold mostly uses mercury (Hg) and produces a lot of waste water. It just throws to the river without any treatment. Therefore the concentration of mercury (Hg) in the river water is over than the standard of drinking water and reach up to 0.346 mg dm-3. This situation is very dangerous because almost of the people in the downstream area depend on the river water for their daily ...

  4. Resource Wars: An On the Ground Understanding of Mountaintop Removal Coal Mining in Appalachia, West Virginia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Fabricant

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article sketches student responses and subsequent political action to directly witnessing the tragedy of Mountaintop Coal Mining (MTR on Kayford Mountain in West Virginia. I have created an "engaged anthropological curriculum" as part of my Resource Wars of 21st Century (an upper level elective course where students spend four days on an active battlefield in order to a expose students first-hand to the stories and testimonials of social, economic, physical degradation caused by MTR.

  5. Cost effectiveness of methods for removing radium and thorium in uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, V.C.; Nielson, K.K.

    1981-01-01

    The potential health impact from uranium milling operations is mainly associated with long-term releases of radioactive contaminants from the mill tailings. The major mechanisms for mitigating these potential releases focus on increasing the tailings containment with the addition of migration barriers such as thick earthern covers and clay liners. Some limited investigation has also focused on reducing the radionuclide source terms. This alternative approach has some desirable features, but stringent cost requirements are placed upon source removal methods in order for them to be economically favorable. A cost effectiveness evaluation is presented herein, in which costs for containment methods are used to establish maximum cost guidelines for the source removal methods

  6. Microbial Community Structure and Functions in Ethanol-Fed Sulfate Removal Bioreactors for Treatment of Mine Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malin Bomberg

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sulfate-rich mine water must be treated before it is released into natural water bodies. We tested ethanol as substrate in bioreactors designed for biological sulfate removal from mine water containing up to 9 g L−1 sulfate, using granular sludge from an industrial waste water treatment plant as inoculum. The pH, redox potential, and sulfate and sulfide concentrations were measured twice a week over a maximum of 171 days. The microbial communities in the bioreactors were characterized by qPCR and high throughput amplicon sequencing. The pH in the bioreactors fluctuated between 5.0 and 7.7 with the highest amount of up to 50% sulfate removed measured around pH 6. Dissimilatory sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB constituted only between 1% and 15% of the bacterial communities. Predicted bacterial metagenomes indicated a high prevalence of assimilatory sulfate reduction proceeding to formation of l-cystein and acetate, assimilatory and dissimilatory nitrate reduction, denitrification, and oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde with further conversion to ethanolamine, but not to acetate. Despite efforts to maintain optimal conditions for biological sulfate reduction in the bioreactors, only a small part of the microorganisms were SRB. The microbial communities were highly diverse, containing bacteria, archaea, and fungi, all of which affected the overall microbial processes in the bioreactors. While it is important to monitor specific physicochemical parameters in bioreactors, molecular assessment of the microbial communities may serve as a tool to identify biological factors affecting bioreactor functions and to optimize physicochemical attributes for ideal bioreactor performance.

  7. Primary explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matyas, Robert; Pachman, Jiri [Pardubice Univ. (Czech Republic). Faculty of Chemical Technology

    2013-06-01

    The first chapter provides background such as the basics of initiation and differences between requirements on primary explosives used in detonators and igniters. The authors then clarify the influence of physical characteristics on explosive properties, focusing on those properties required for primary explosives. Furthermore, the issue of sensitivity is discussed. All the chapters on particular groups of primary explosives are structured in the same way, including introduction, physical and chemical properties, explosive properties, preparation and documented use.

  8. Complete sulphate removal from neutralised acidic mine drainage with barium carbonate

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Swanepoel, H

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available -barium-calcium) Desalination process which uses barium salts to further reduce the sulphate concentration to acceptable levels with the added advantage that sulphate removal can be controlled due to the low solubility of BaSO4. This paper reports on the results...

  9. Rapid manganese removal from mine waters using an aerated packed-bed bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Karen L; Younger, Paul L

    2005-01-01

    In the UK, the Environmental Quality Standard for manganese has recently been lowered to 30 microg/L (annual average), which is less than the UK Drinking Water Inspectorate's Maximum Permitted Concentration Value (50 microg/L). Current passive treatment systems for manganese removal operate as open-air gravel-bed filters, designed to maximize either influent light and/or dissolved oxygen. This requires large areas of land. A novel enhanced bioremediation treatment system for manganese removal has been developed that consists of a passively aerated subsurface gravel bed. The provision of air at depth and the use of catalytic substrates help overcome the slow kinetics usually associated with manganese oxidation. With a residence time of only 8 h and an influent manganese concentration of approximately 20 mg/L, >95% of the manganese was removed. The treatment system also operates successfully at temperatures as low as 4 degrees C and in total darkness. These observations have positive implications for manganese treatment using this technique in both colder climates and where large areas of land are unavailable. Furthermore, as the operation of this passive treatment system continually generates fresh manganese oxyhydroxide, which is a powerful sorbent for most pollutant metals, it potentially has major ancillary benefits as a removal process for other metals, such as zinc.

  10. Biological sulphate removal from acid mine effluent using ethanol as carbon and energy source

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Greben, HA

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available nutrients (P and N) added to the feed were completely uti- lized. Iron and copper were removed completely and aluminium, manganese and zinc decreased to less than 4 mg/l. Aluminium precipitated as Al(OH)3 and the other metals as metal sulphides. Conclusions...

  11. Landscape-Scale Disturbance: Insights into the Complexity of Catchment Hydrology in the Mountaintop Removal Mining Region of the Eastern United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Miller

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Few land disturbances impact watersheds at the scale and extent of mountaintop removal mining (MTM. This practice removes forests, soils and bedrock to gain access to underground coal that results in likely permanent and wholesale changes that impact catchment hydrology, geochemistry and ecosystem health. MTM is the dominant driver of land cover changes in the central Appalachian Mountains region of the United States, converting forests to mine lands and burying headwater streams. Despite its dominance on the landscape, determining the hydrological impacts of MTM is complicated by underground coal mines that significantly alter groundwater hydrology. To provide insight into how coal mining impacts headwater catchments, we compared the hydrologic responses of an MTM and forested catchment using event rainfall-runoff analysis, modeling and isotopic approaches. Despite similar rainfall characteristics, hydrology in the two catchments differed in significant ways, but both catchments demonstrated threshold-mediated hydrologic behavior that was attributed to transient storage and the release of runoff from underground mines. Results suggest that underground mines are important controls for runoff generation in both obviously disturbed and seemingly undisturbed catchments and interact in uncertain ways with disturbance from MTM. This paper summarizes our results and demonstrates the complexity of catchment hydrology in the MTM region.

  12. Uranium recovery and uranium remove from acid mine waters by ion exchange resin; Remocao e recuperacao de uranio de aguas acidas de mina com resina de troca ionica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Marcos R.L. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Coordenacao do Laborarorio; Fatibello Filho, Orlando [Sao Carlos Univ., SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    1999-11-01

    Ion exchange using resins is one of few processes capable of reducing contaminants in effluents to very low levels according to environmental legislation. In this study the process was used to remove and recovery uranium from acid mine waters at Pocos de Caldas-MG Uranium Mining and Milling Plant. The presence of pyrite in the waste rock piles, resulting acid drainage with several pollutants. Including uranium ranging from 6 to 14 mg/l, as sulfate complex, that can be removed by an anionic exchanger. Studies of uranium sorption without treatment, and with lime pretreatment of water to precipitate the iron and recovery uranium as commercial product, are presented. Uranium elution was done with NaCl solutions. Saline concentration and retention time were the parameters studied. the uranium decontaminations level in the effluents from acid mine water was 94%. (author) 10 refs., 6 tabs., 3 figs.

  13. Assessment of corn and banana leaves as potential standardized substrates for leaf decomposition in streams affected by mountaintop removal coal mining, West Virginia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountaintop removal and valley filling is a method of coal mining that buries Central Appalachian headwater streams. A 2007 federal court ruling highlighted the need for measurement of both ecosystem structure and function when assessing streams for mitigaton. Rapid functional as...

  14. Enhancing Nitrification at Low Temperature with Zeolite in a Mining Operations Retention Pond

    OpenAIRE

    Miazga-Rodriguez, Misha; Han, Sukkyun; Yakiwchuk, Brian; Wei, Kai; English, Colleen; Bourn, Steven; Bohnert, Seth; Stein, Lisa Y.

    2012-01-01

    Ammonium nitrate explosives are used in mining operations at Diavik Diamond Mines Inc. in the Northwest Territories, Canada. Residual nitrogen is washed into the mine pit and piped to a nearby retention pond where its removal is accomplished by microbial activity prior to a final water treatment step and release into the sub-Arctic lake, Lac de Gras. Microbial removal of ammonium in the retention pond is rapid during the brief ice-free summer, but often slows under ice cover that persists up ...

  15. Blasting activity of the mining industry in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, P.G. [Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    About 2 megatons of chemcial explosives are used annually in the U.S., principally in mining for coal and metal ores. Most of this explosive is used in surface mines rather than underground mines. On a typical work day there are about 30 explosions greater than 50 tons, including one shot greater than 200 tons. Shots in underground mines are typically much smaller, because of safety considerations. Almost all chemical explosions above 1 ton in the U.S. are ripple-fired and almost all above 10 tons are also shallow. Almost all are intended to break rock or to remove overburden, and are therefore very inefficient, relative to contained single shots, in generating seismic signals at regional ore teleseismic distances. These attributes make explosions used in industry quite different from the Non-Proliferation Experiment. There is very little correlation between the total amount of explosive used in a ripple-fired blast, and the seismic magnitude. Statistics on blasting magnitudes are of interest in the context of monitoring network. There is a blast reported with regional (or duration) magnitude 3.5 or above, in the U.S., a few tens of times a year; but it would appear that the teleseismic magnitude (m{sub b}) of such events are significantly lower than 3.5. Only about 10 to 30 chemical explosions per year in the U.S. are detected teleseismically with m{sub b}>3. Methods of routinely discriminating most chemical explosions from other seismic sources use spectra of regional phases at frequencies up to about 30 Hz, which is significantly higher than frequencies needed for recording teleseismic signals. The best discriminants appear to be the high-frequency spectral ratio of waves with P-wave energy (e.g. Pn or Pg) to waves with S-wave energy (Sn or Lg); and the use of spectrograms, which can be particularly useful in identifying ripple-firing.

  16. Radium and barium removal through blending hydraulic fracturing fluids with acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondash, Andrew J; Warner, Nathaniel R; Lahav, Ori; Vengosh, Avner

    2014-01-21

    Wastewaters generated during hydraulic fracturing of the Marcellus Shale typically contain high concentrations of salts, naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), and metals, such as barium, that pose environmental and public health risks upon inadequate treatment and disposal. In addition, fresh water scarcity in dry regions or during periods of drought could limit shale gas development. This paper explores the possibility of using alternative water sources and their impact on NORM levels through blending acid mine drainage (AMD) effluent with recycled hydraulic fracturing flowback fluids (HFFFs). We conducted a series of laboratory experiments in which the chemistry and NORM of different mix proportions of AMD and HFFF were examined after reacting for 48 h. The experimental data combined with geochemical modeling and X-ray diffraction analysis suggest that several ions, including sulfate, iron, barium, strontium, and a large portion of radium (60-100%), precipitated into newly formed solids composed mainly of Sr barite within the first ∼ 10 h of mixing. The results imply that blending AMD and HFFF could be an effective management practice for both remediation of the high NORM in the Marcellus HFFF wastewater and beneficial utilization of AMD that is currently contaminating waterways in northeastern U.S.A.

  17. Assessment of Environmental Effects of Post-Blasted Explosive on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF HORSFALL

    Assessment of Environmental Effects of Post-Blasted Explosive on the Ecosystem of Old ... intensity and temperature of explosive dissolution in the mine environment shows that TNT ... based on their physical/chemical properties as: gelatin.

  18. Hydraulic residence time and iron removal in a wetland receiving ferruginous mine water over a 4 year period from commissioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusin, F M; Jarvis, A P; Gandy, C J

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of residence time distribution (RTD) has been conducted for the UK Coal Authority's mine water treatment wetland at Lambley, Northumberland, to determine the hydraulic performance of the wetland over a period of approximately 4 years since site commissioning. The wetland RTD was evaluated in accordance with moment analysis and modelled based on a tanks-in-series (TIS) model to yield the hydraulic characteristics of system performance. Greater hydraulic performance was seen during the second site monitoring after 21 months of site operation i.e. longer hydraulic residence time to reflect overall system hydraulic efficiency, compared to wetland performance during its early operation. Further monitoring of residence time during the third year of wetland operation indicated a slight reduction in hydraulic residence time, thus a lower system hydraulic efficiency. In contrast, performance during the fourth year of wetland operation exhibited an improved overall system hydraulic efficiency, suggesting the influence of reed growth over the lifetime of such systems on hydraulic performance. Interestingly, the same pattern was found for iron (which is the primary pollutant of concern in ferruginous mine waters) removal efficiency of the wetland system from the second to fourth year of wetland operation. This may therefore, reflect the maturity of reeds for maintaining efficient flow distribution across the wetland to retain a longer residence time and significant fractions of water involved to enhance the extent of treatment received for iron attenuation. Further monitoring will be conducted to establish whether such performance is maintained, or whether efficiency decreases over time due to accumulation of dead plant material within the wetland cells.

  19. Pyrolusite Process® to remove acid mine drainage contaminants from Kimble Creek in Ohio: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiv Hiremath; Kirsten Lehtoma; Mike Nicklow; Gary. Willison

    2013-01-01

    The Kimble Creek abandoned coal mine site, located on Wayne National Forest in southeastern Ohio, is among several abandoned coal mine sites that have been responsible for the acid mine drainage (AMD) polluting ground and surface water. Materials released by AMD include iron, aluminum, manganese, other hazardous substances, and acidity that are harmful to aquatic life...

  20. Mesocosm studies to assess acidity removal from acidic mine lakes through controlled eutrophication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fyson, A.; Nixdorf, B.; Kalin, M.; Steinberg, C.E.W.

    1998-01-01

    Flooded lignite pits (Tagebaurestseen) in Lusatia, Germany, are acidic (pH 2.5-4) with high concentrations of iron. Mesocosms (total volume 20 l) were set up with water and sediment from a Tagebaurestsee to assess the effects of phosphate and organic amendments under natural light and low temperature. Chemical and biological parameters were observed over a 9-month period. Phosphate rock addition resulted in sustained reduction in acidity in the water column and induced the growth of Chlamydomonas spp. (Chlorophyceae) near the water surface and Lepocinclis teres (Euglenophyceae) in a band above the sediment. Addition of potatoes to mesocosms resulted in the generation of near-anoxic conditions above the sediment, and phosphorus, ammonium and carbon (organic and inorganic) were released as the potatoes decomposed. A pH > 6 was attained with 5.1 g (dry weight) of potatoes and pH > 8 with 34 g (dry weight). In both mesocosms, more than 90% of total acidity was removed

  1. Toxic metal removal from aqueous solution by advanced Carbon allotropes: a case study from the Sungun Copper Mine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmaeil Rahimi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The sorption efficiencies of graphene oxide (GO and functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs were investigated and elucidated to study their potential in treating acid mine drainage (AMD containing Cu2+, Mn2+, Zn2+, Pb2+, Fe3+ and Cd2+ metal ions. Several layered GO nanosheets and f-MWCNTs were formed via the modified Hummers’ method and the acid treatment of the MWCNTs, respectively. The prepared nanoadsorbents were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM, Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, and BET surface area analysis. The batch method was utilized to evaluate the pH effect, sorption kinetics and isotherms. The results demonstrated that the sorption capacities of the MWCNTs increased greatly after oxidation and those of the GO decreased after reduction. Hence, the sorption mechanisms seemed principally assignable to the chemical interactions between the metal ions and the surface functional groups of the adsorbents. Additionally, the adsorption isotherm results clearly depicted that the adsorption of the Cu2+ ion onto the GO adsorbent surface was well fitted and found to be in good agreement with the Langmuir isotherm model as the obtained regression constant value (R2 was found to be 0.9981. All results indicated that GO was a promising material for the removal of toxic metal ions from aqueous solutions in actual pollution management.

  2. Validity of manganese as a surrogate of heavy metals removal in constructed wetlands treating acidic mine water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royer, E.; Unz, R.F.; Hellier, W.W.

    1998-01-01

    The evaluation of manganese as a surrogate for heavy metal behavior in two wetland treatment systems receiving acidic coal mine drainage in central Pennsylvania was investigated. The use of manganese as an indicator is based on physical/chemical treatment processes quite different from wetland treatment. The treatment systems represented one anoxic, subsurface flow system and one oxic surface flow system. Water quality parameters measured included pH, alkalinity, acidity, and a suite of metals. Correlation and linear regression analysis were used to evaluate the ability of a candidate predictor variable (indicator) to predict heavy metal concentrations and removal. The use of manganese as a predictor of effluent quality proved to be poor in both wetland treatment systems, as evidenced by low linear R 2 values and negative correlations. Zinc emerged as the best predictor of the detectable heavy metals at the anoxic wetland. Zinc exhibited positive strong linear correlations with copper, cobalt, and nickel (R 2 values of 0.843, 0.881, and 0.970, respectively). Effluent pH was a slightly better predictor of effluent copper levels in the anoxic wetland. Iron and cobalt effluent concentrations showed the only strong relationship (R 2 value = 0.778) in the oxic system. The lack of good correlations with manganese strongly challenges its appropriateness as a surrogate for heavy metals in these systems

  3. Method of controlling thermo-catalytic explosion alarms in mine monitoring systems. Verfahren zur Kontrolle von thermokatalytischen Schlagwetteranzeiger in Bergwerks-Ueberwachungssystemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpov, E F; Birenberg, I E; Basovsky, B I; Popov, V V

    1979-09-06

    The test procedure for thermo-catalytic explosion alarms for the remote measurement of the methane concentration was changed, so that the readiness of the explosion alarm to operate or faults in it could be measured remotely above ground, without the use of named gas mixtures or master gas analysis equipment. The maximum output signal of indicators is determined simultaneously with switching on the indicators and applying the voltage to the sensors, and its dynamic response characteristic is then measured.

  4. Experimental data sulfate and metal removal from mining impacted water collected at the Formosa Mine, OR, and sulfur speciation in the obtained solid residues.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The data set contains the elemental composition, pH, and sulfate content of the utilized mining impacted water used as influent in the columns study, the data for...

  5. Removal of Arsenic Using Acid/Metal-Tolerant Sulfate Reducing Bacteria: A New Approach for Bioremediation of High-Arsenic Acid Mine Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennyfer Serrano

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Fluvial sediments, soils, and natural waters in northern Chile are characterized by high arsenic (As content. Mining operations in this area are potential sources of As and other metal contaminants, due to acid mine drainage (AMD generation. Sulfate Reducing Bacteria (SRB has been used for the treatment of AMD, as they allow for the reduction of sulfate, the generation of alkalinity, and the removal of dissolved heavy metals and metalloids by precipitation as insoluble metal sulfides. Thus, SRB could be used to remove As and other heavy metals from AMD, however the tolerance of SRB to high metal concentrations and low pH is limited. The present study aimed to quantify the impact of SRB in As removal under acidic and As-Fe-rich conditions. Our results show that SRB tolerate low pH (up to 3.5 and high concentrations of As (~3.6 mg·L−1. Batch experiments showed As removal of up to 73%, Iron (Fe removal higher than 78% and a neutralization of pH from acidic to circum-neutral conditions (pH 6–8. In addition, XRD analysis showed the dominance of amorphous minerals, while Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (SEM-EDX analysis showed associations between As, Fe, and sulfur, indicating the presence of Fe-S-As compounds or interaction of As species with amorphous and/or nanocrystalline phases by sorption processes. These results indicate that the As removal was mediated by acid/metal-tolerant SRB and open the potential for the application of new strains of acid/metal-tolerant SRB for the remediation of high-As acid mine waters.

  6. Heavy metals removal from acid mine drainage water using biogenic hydrogen sulphide and effluent from anaerobic treatment: Effect of pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez-Rodriguez, A.M.; Duran-Barrantes, M.M.; Borja, R.; Sanchez, E.; Colmenarejo, M.F.; Raposo, F.

    2009-01-01

    Four alternatives (runs A, B, C and D) for heavy metals removal (Fe, Cu, Zn and Al) from acid mine drainage water (AMDW) produced in the mining areas of the Huelva Province, Spain, were evaluated. In run A, the anaerobic effluent from the treatment of acid mine drainage water (cheese whey added as a source of carbon) was mixed with the raw AMDW. The pH increased to 3.5 with the addition of KOH. In run B, biogas with around 30% of hydrogen sulphide obtained in the anaerobic reactor was sparged to the mixture obtained in run A, but in this case at a pH of 5.5. In run C, the pH of the raw AMDW was increased to 3.5 by the addition of KOH solution. Finally, in run D, the pH of the raw AMDW was increased to 5.5 by the addition of KOH solution and further biogas was sparged under the same conditions as in run A. It was found that heavy metal removal was a function of pH. At a pH of 3.5 most of the iron was removed while Zn and Cu were partially removed. At a pH of 5.5 the removal of all metals increased considerably. The best results were obtained in run B where the percentages of removal of Fe, Cu, Zn and Al achieved values of 91.3, 96.1, 79.0 and 99.0%, respectively. According to the experimental results obtained tentative schemas of the flow diagram of the processes were proposed.

  7. Mining face equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G, Litvinskiy G; Babyuk, G V; Yakovenko, V A

    1981-01-07

    Mining face equipment includes drilling advance wells, drilling using explosives on the contour bore holes, loading and transporting the crushed mass, drilling reinforcement shafts, injecting reinforcement compounds and moving the timber. Camouflet explosives are used to form relaxed rock stress beyond the mining area to decrease costs of reinforcing the mining area by using nonstressed rock in the advance well as support. The strengthening solution is injected through advanced cementing wells before drilling the contour bores as well as through radial cementing wells beyond the timbers following loading and transport of the mining debris. The advance well is 50-80 m.

  8. Explosives Removal from Groundwater of the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant in Continuous-Flow Laboratory Systems Planted with Aquatic and Wetland Plants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Best, Elly

    1998-01-01

    A 49-day, continuous-flow, laboratory study was performed to evaluate the ability of two submersed and one emergent plant species to phytoremediate explosives-contaminated groundwater from the Iowa...

  9. Simultaneous removal of Ni(II), As(III), and Sb(III) from spiked mine effluent with metakaolin and blast-furnace-slag geopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luukkonen, Tero; Runtti, Hanna; Niskanen, Mikko; Tolonen, Emma-Tuulia; Sarkkinen, Minna; Kemppainen, Kimmo; Rämö, Jaakko; Lassi, Ulla

    2016-01-15

    The mining industry is a major contributor of various toxic metals and metalloids to the aquatic environment. Efficient and economical water treatment methods are therefore of paramount importance. The application of natural or low-cost sorbents has attracted a great deal of interest due to the simplicity of its process and its potential effectiveness. Geopolymers represent an emerging group of sorbents. In this study, blast-furnace-slag and metakaolin geopolymers and their raw materials were tested for simultaneous removal of Ni(II), As(III) and Sb(III) from spiked mine effluent. Blast-furnace-slag geopolymer proved to be the most efficient of the studied materials: the experimental maximum sorption capacities for Ni, As and, Sb were 3.74 mg/g, 0.52 mg/g, and 0.34 mg/g, respectively. Although the capacities were relatively low due to the difficult water matrix, 90-100% removal of Ni, As, and Sb was achieved when the dose of sorbent was increased appropriately. Removal kinetics fitted well with the pseudo-second-order model. Our results indicate that geopolymer technology could offer a simple and effective way to turn blast-furnace slag to an effective sorbent with a specific utilization prospect in the mining industry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Stellar explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suraud, E.

    1987-01-01

    What is the energy source and which physical processes are powerful enough to generate this explosion which scatters the star. The knowledge progress of very dense matter allows the scenario reconstitution. An instability in the star core which is developing during milliseconds is the cause of this explosion [fr

  11. Remediation of antimony-rich mine waters: Assessment of antimony removal and shifts in the microbial community of an onsite field-scale bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Weimin; Xiao, Enzong; Kalin, Margarete; Krumins, Valdis; Dong, Yiran; Ning, Zengping; Liu, Tong; Sun, Min; Zhao, Yanlong; Wu, Shiliang; Mao, Jianzhong; Xiao, Tangfu

    2016-08-01

    An on-site field-scale bioreactor for passive treatment of antimony (Sb) contamination was installed downstream of an active Sb mine in Southwest China, and operated for one year (including a six month monitoring period). This bioreactor consisted of five treatment units, including one pre-aerobic cell, two aerobic cells, and two microaerobic cells. With the aerobic cells inoculated with indigenous mine water microflora, the bioreactor removed more than 90% of total soluble Sb and 80% of soluble antimonite (Sb(III)). An increase in pH and decrease of oxidation-reduction potential (Eh) was also observed along the flow direction. High-throughput sequencing of the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene variable (V4) region revealed that taxonomically diverse microbial communities developed in the bioreactor. Metal (loid)-oxidizing bacteria including Ferrovum, Thiomonas, Gallionella, and Leptospirillum, were highly enriched in the bioreactor cells where the highest total Sb and Sb(III) removal occurred. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) indicated that a suite of in situ physicochemical parameters including pH and Eh were substantially correlated with the overall microbial communities. Based on an UPGMA (Unweighted Pair Group Method with Arithmetic Mean) tree and PCoA (Principal Coordinates Analysis), the microbial composition of each cell was distinct, indicating these in situ physicochemical parameters had an effect in shaping the indigenous microbial communities. Overall, this study was the first to employ a field-scale bioreactor to treat Sb-rich mine water onsite and, moreover, the findings suggest the feasibility of the bioreactor in removing elevated Sb from mine waters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. 30 CFR 57.22003 - Mine category or subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., or is capable of forming explosive mixtures with air, or have the potential to do so based on the... such mines is explosive or is capable of forming explosive mixtures if mixed with air as illustrated by... and which liberate a concentration of methane that is not explosive nor capable of forming explosive...

  13. A Novel Method for Borehole Blockage Removal and Experimental Study on a Hydraulic Self-Propelled Nozzle in Underground Coal Mines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaolong Ge

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available When coal bed methane (CBM drainage boreholes cross fractured, soft, or water-swelling strata, they collapse and block frequently. Borehole blockages result in a rapid decrease in CBM extraction ability, which leads to a reduction in CBM output and threatens coal mine safety production. To solve these problems, a novel method that uses a self-propelled water-jet nozzle to dredge blocked boreholes in coal seams has been proposed on the basis of the existing technology. Based on a theoretical analysis of the reason for borehole caving and the theory of blockage removal, we optimized the nozzle inlet pressure and selected an appropriate high-pressure resin pipe. A field experiment on the blockage removal of blocked CBM drainage boreholes using the proposed method was run in the Fengchun coal mine, Qijiang, Chongqing, southwest China. In this field trial, the time spent to unblock a borehole varied between 18.52 and 34.98 min, which is much shorter than using a drilling rig. After blockage removal, the average pure volume of the methane drainage of a single borehole was increased from 0.03 L/min to ~1.91–7.30 L/min, and the methane drainage concentration of a single borehole increased from 5% to ~44%–85%. The extraction effect increased significantly.

  14. Occurrence, emission and ignition of combustible strata gases in Witwatersrand gold mines and Bushveld platinum mines, and means of ameliorating related ignition and explosion hazards, Part 1: literature and technical review.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cook, AP

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available 60 62 63 64 9 Terminology and abbreviations The terms combustible, flammable and inflammable, to describe gases encountered in mining, are all used commonly in literature and within the South African mining industry. The Concise Oxford English... dictionary defines them as: combustible: capable of burning inflammable: easily set on fire flammable: rarely used except in “nonflammable”. In this report combustible and flammable are used to describe gas or gases that will burn or explode in air...

  15. Anaerobic Biochemical Reactor (BCR) Treatment Of Mining-Influenced Water (MIW) - Investigation Of Metal Removal Efficiency and Ecotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    BCR have been successful at removing a high percentage of metals from MIW, while BCR effluent toxicity has not been examined previously in the field. This study examined 4 active pilot BCR systems for removal of metals and toxicity. Removal efficiency for Al, As, Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb...

  16. The writing of 'The Westray Story': a discourse analysis of the aftermath of the Westray coal mine explosion (Nova Scotia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodd, S.M. [York University (Canada). Toronto, ON (Canada). Department of Sociology

    2002-07-01

    This is a critical discourse analysis of the report of the public inquiry of the Westray mining disaster. The conflicting interests and values of the factions involved, the availability of information in the workplace, and the assignment of blame for the disaster are among the factors considered. The 'new prudentialism' that holds individuals responsible for risk assessment and avoidance, but forces them to act within the organizational framework, is discussed.

  17. Study on explosives and their quality performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabiullah, M.; Pingua, B.M.P.; Jagdish Khan, M.; Emranuzzaman [Central Mining Research Institute, Dhanbad (India)

    2005-07-01

    There are about forty suppliers of explosive and blasting accessories in India manufacturing site mixed emulsion, site mixed slurry, ANFO, HANFO, packed products, and blasting accessories of use in surface and underground mines. A field laboratory was set up to measure explosive properties of explosive samples, cast booster, detonating fuse, detonators, cord relay, MS connector, and shock tubes. Density, velocity of detonation, water percentage, water resistance, and energy output were considered as the important properties of explosives. A rating system was designed for selection of good explosive products. The delay interval and delay scattering in cord relay and shock tube was studied to improve blast performance. This paper describes in detail the method of measurement and vender rating system for explosive products as per marking system accepted by Coal India. 12 refs., 4 figs., 22 tabs.

  18. Control of adverse effects of explosive blasting in mines by using shock tube (non-electric) initiation systems and its future challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, P.D. [Maharashtra Explosives Ltd., Nagpur (India)

    2000-04-01

    Every kind of blasting in mines produces some adverse effects on environment, such as ground vibration, noise, fly rock etc. Presently, for restricting these adverse effects, use of shock tube (non-electric) initiation systems are gaining momentum. There are some inherent shortcomings of this initiation system regarding chances of misfires. This paper discusses the various adverse effects of blasting, advantages of shock tube initiation system and the shortcomings of shock tube initiation system regarding chances of misfire and how misfire arises out of failure of shock tube initiation system is different and more dangerous than the misfire occurring due to failure of conventional system (with detonating fuse and cord relays). 1 tab.

  19. Performance evaluation of granular activated carbon system at Pantex: Rapid small-scale column tests to simulate removal of high explosives from contaminated groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henke, J.L.; Speitel, G.E. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1998-08-01

    A granular activated carbon (GAC) system is now in operation at Pantex to treat groundwater from the perched aquifer that is contaminated with high explosives. The main chemicals of concern are RDX and HMX. The system consists of two GAC columns in series. Each column is charged with 10,000 pounds of Northwestern LB-830 GAC. At the design flow rate of 325 gpm, the hydraulic loading is 6.47 gpm/ft{sup 2}, and the empty bed contact time is 8.2 minutes per column. Currently, the system is operating at less than 10% of its design flow rate, although flow rate increases are expected in the relatively near future. This study had several objectives: Estimate the service life of the GAC now in use at Pantex; Screen several GACs to provide a recommendation on the best GAC for use at Pantex when the current GAC is exhausted and is replaced; Determine the extent to which natural organic matter in the Pantex groundwater fouls GAC adsorption sites, thereby decreasing the adsorption capacity for high explosives; and Determine if computer simulation models could match the experimental results, thereby providing another tool to follow system performance.

  20. Performance evaluation of granular activated carbon system at Pantex: Rapid small-scale column tests to simulate removal of high explosives from contaminated groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henke, J.L.; Speitel, G.E.

    1998-08-01

    A granular activated carbon (GAC) system is now in operation at Pantex to treat groundwater from the perched aquifer that is contaminated with high explosives. The main chemicals of concern are RDX and HMX. The system consists of two GAC columns in series. Each column is charged with 10,000 pounds of Northwestern LB-830 GAC. At the design flow rate of 325 gpm, the hydraulic loading is 6.47 gpm/ft 2 , and the empty bed contact time is 8.2 minutes per column. Currently, the system is operating at less than 10% of its design flow rate, although flow rate increases are expected in the relatively near future. This study had several objectives: Estimate the service life of the GAC now in use at Pantex; Screen several GACs to provide a recommendation on the best GAC for use at Pantex when the current GAC is exhausted and is replaced; Determine the extent to which natural organic matter in the Pantex groundwater fouls GAC adsorption sites, thereby decreasing the adsorption capacity for high explosives; and Determine if computer simulation models could match the experimental results, thereby providing another tool to follow system performance

  1. A Computational Investigation of Various Water-Induced Explosion Mitigation Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Guidelines for Evaluating the Characteristics of Vapor Cloud Explosions, Flash Fires, and BLEVEs , Center for Chemical Process Safety, AIChE, New York, NY...1994. [6]. Liebman and J. K. Richmond, Suppression of Coal Dust Explosions by Passive Water Barriers in a single Entry Mine , U.S. Bureau of Mines ...R.I. 8294, 1974. [7]. Liebman, J. Corry and J. K. Richmond, Water Barriers for Suppressing Coal Dust Explosions, U.S. Bureau of Mines R.I. 8170

  2. Spot test kit for explosives detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagoria, Philip F; Whipple, Richard E; Nunes, Peter J; Eckels, Joel Del; Reynolds, John G; Miles, Robin R; Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L

    2014-03-11

    An explosion tester system comprising a body, a lateral flow membrane swab unit adapted to be removeably connected to the body, a first explosives detecting reagent, a first reagent holder and dispenser operatively connected to the body, the first reagent holder and dispenser containing the first explosives detecting reagent and positioned to deliver the first explosives detecting reagent to the lateral flow membrane swab unit when the lateral flow membrane swab unit is connected to the body, a second explosives detecting reagent, and a second reagent holder and dispenser operatively connected to the body, the second reagent holder and dispenser containing the second explosives detecting reagent and positioned to deliver the second explosives detecting reagent to the lateral flow membrane swab unit when the lateral flow membrane swab unit is connected to the body.

  3. Use of explosives in pipeline construction work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, M J

    1976-08-01

    Explosives are an essential tool in Great Britain's pipeline-construction industry, with applications on dry land and under water, in trench blasting and tunneling for road and service crossings, demolition of unwanted sections, and removal of coatings. Nobels Explosive Co. Ltd. describes basic explosives operations as pertaining to the requirements of rock trenching, submarine operations, thrust-bore and tunneling operations, demolitions, and precision blasting.

  4. Safety problems with abandoned explosive facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtright, W.C.

    1969-01-01

    Procedures were developed for the safe removal of explosive and radioactive contaminated materials structures and drains from abandoned sites, including explosives processing and service buildings with a goal to return the entire area to its natural state and to permit public access. The safety problems encountered in the cleanup and their solutions are applicable to modification and maintenance work in operating explosive facilities. (U.S.)

  5. Explosives remain preferred methods for platform abandonment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsipher, A.; Daniel, W. IV; Kiesler, J.E.; Mackey, V. III

    1996-01-01

    Economics and safety concerns indicate that methods involving explosives remain the most practical and cost-effective means for abandoning oil and gas structures in the Gulf of Mexico. A decade has passed since 51 dead sea turtles, many endangered Kemp's Ridleys, washed ashore on the Texas coast shortly after explosives helped remove several offshore platforms. Although no relationship between the explosions and the dead turtles was ever established, in response to widespread public concern, the US Minerals Management Service (MMS) and National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) implemented regulations limiting the size and timing of explosive charges. Also, more importantly, they required that operators pay for observers to survey waters surrounding platforms scheduled for removal for 48 hr before any detonations. If observers spot sea turtles or marine mammals within the danger zone, the platform abandonment is delayed until the turtles leave or are removed. However, concern about the effects of explosives on marine life remains

  6. The production and use of citric acid for the removal of potassium from the iron ore concentrate of the Sishen Iron Ore Mine, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Williams

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The depletion of the richer iron ore worldwide has made it necessary to process lower quality iron ore. Certain substances, such as potassium, contained within the lower quality iron ore, have a detrimental effect on the smelting process during steel manufacturing. Therefore, international steel-making companies charge penalties when purchasing iron ore concentrates containing high concentrations of potassium. To date, lower quality iron ore has been blended with high quality iron ore in an attempt to alleviate the potassium concentrations in the export iron ore; however, the ratio of low quality iron ore to high quality iron ore is increasing, thereby becoming an escalating problem within the economic functioning of the Sishen Iron Ore Mine. It has, therefore, become necessary to develop an economically viable and environmentally friendly process to reduce the high potassium concentrations contained in the iron ore concentrate of the Sishen Iron Ore Mine. In this study, we compared solid substrate and submerged fermentation using Aspergillus niger for the production of citric acid, which is used for the chemical leaching of potassium from the iron ore concentrate. It was found that submerged fermentation proved to be more economical and efficient, producing a maximum citric acid concentration of 102.3 g/L in 96 h of fermentation. ‘Heap leaching’ simulation experiments were found to be uneconomical, due to the required addition of fungal growth medium every 5 days as a result of growth factor depletion within this time; however, this process removed 17.65% of the potassium from the iron ore concentrate. By contrast, chemical leaching of potassium from the iron ore concentrate proved to be most efficient when using a 1 mol citric acid leaching solution at 60 ºC, removing 23.53% of the potassium contained within the iron ore concentrate. Therefore, the most economical and efficient process for the removal of potassium from the iron

  7. To Walk the Earth in Safety: The United States' Commitment to Humanitarian Mine Action and Conventional Weapons Destruction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2008-01-01

    .... Collectively, the program operates worldwide to clear landmines and all types of explosive remnants of war, provide mine risk education, render survivors assistance, advance the technology of mine...

  8. Bulk-loaded emulsion explosives technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, D.G. [Blasting Analysis International, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The largest use of emulsion explosives and emulsion-Anfo blends is in surface mining operations. An emulsion explosive is a two-phase system: the inner phase is madeup of an oxidizer solution; the outer phase is made up of oils or an oil/wax blend. Emulsion Anfo blends have been used to expand drill patterns, increase fragmentation, and provide extra energy for blast casting. 3 tabs.

  9. Explosive simulants for testing explosive detection systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kury, John W.; Anderson, Brian L.

    1999-09-28

    Explosives simulants that include non-explosive components are disclosed that facilitate testing of equipment designed to remotely detect explosives. The simulants are non-explosive, non-hazardous materials that can be safely handled without any significant precautions. The simulants imitate real explosives in terms of mass density, effective atomic number, x-ray transmission properties, and physical form, including moldable plastics and emulsions/gels.

  10. Method of removing uranium and its compounds from mine wastewaters and from aqueous solutions discharged in hydrometallurgical uranium ore treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jilek, R.; Prochazka, H.; Kuhr, I.; Fuska, J.; Nemec, P.; Katzer, J.

    1974-01-01

    The separation of uranium and its compounds from mine wastewaters and from water solutions discharged from uranium ore hydrometallurgical treatment, and its eventual simultaneous concentration in the biomass during uranium ore technological processing are described. The solutions are replenished with nutrients necessary for the growth of microorganisms, mainly with nitrogen, carbon and phosphorus and inoculated with fungi. During submersion cultivation, uranium incorporates in the mycelium, or is bound physico-chemically to the mycelium components. Together with these components, uranium is mechanically separated, i.e., by filtration, centrifugation or sedimentation. Organisms of the Fungi imperfecti class, mainly the Aspergillus and Penicillium genera are used for cultivation which may be continuous or semicontinuous. (B.S.)

  11. Data Stream Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaber, Mohamed Medhat; Zaslavsky, Arkady; Krishnaswamy, Shonali

    Data mining is concerned with the process of computationally extracting hidden knowledge structures represented in models and patterns from large data repositories. It is an interdisciplinary field of study that has its roots in databases, statistics, machine learning, and data visualization. Data mining has emerged as a direct outcome of the data explosion that resulted from the success in database and data warehousing technologies over the past two decades (Fayyad, 1997,Fayyad, 1998,Kantardzic, 2003).

  12. Explosive Pleuritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pleural effusions associated with pneumonia (parapneumonic effusions are one of the most common causes of exudative pleural effusions in the world. Approximately 20 to 40% of patients hospitalized with pneumonia will have an accompanying pleural effusion. The term 'Explosive pleuritis' was originally described by Braman and Donat in 1986 as pleural effusions developing within hours of admission. We report a 38 years old male patient with minimal pleural effusion which progressed rapidly within one day to involve almost whole of the hemithorax. There were multiple loculations on ultrasonography of thorax. Pleural fluid was sero-sanguinous and revealed gram positive diplococcic. The patient improved with antibiotics and pigtail catheter drainage.

  13. Exploration on feasibility of using in-situ leaching after explosion on the bottom of Huangfengling open pit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Zuyuan

    1992-01-01

    According to the situation of mining and the faced problems in Huangfengling open pit, it was proposed to use in-situ leaching after explosion to recover uranium in order to overcome the difficulties with open mining of the deposit and high mining cost. The feasibility and necessity of using in-situ leaching after explosion in Huangfengling open pit was explored

  14. Explosive advances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosby, W. [Mining Resource Engineering Ltd. (Canada)

    2002-08-01

    The paper explores the way in which various control blast designs can offer large mines improved final wall angles, resulting in significant overall cost reductions. The recent introduction of the Bucyrus 39R drill which can drill at reverse angles can produce steeper pit walls if geotechnical conditions allow, by employing large low cost rotary drills for final wall development. 9 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. 30 CFR 75.1310 - Explosives and blasting equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... for use so long as the present approval is maintained. (e) Electric detonators shall be compatible... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Explosives and blasting equipment. 75.1310... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1310...

  16. Wireless gas sensing in South African underground platinum mines

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Abu-Mahfouz, Adnan M

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 70% of South African mines are classified as fiery, where methane gas potentially could cause explosions. The number of flammable gas reports and accidents are increasing steadily for both gold and platinum mines. However...

  17. Pilot-scale passive bioreactors for the treatment of acid mine drainage: efficiency of mushroom compost vs. mixed substrates for metal removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hocheol; Yim, Gil-Jae; Ji, Sang-Woo; Neculita, Carmen Mihaela; Hwang, Taewoon

    2012-11-30

    Pilot-scale field-testing of passive bioreactors was performed to evaluate the efficiency of a mixture of four substrates (cow manure compost, mushroom compost, sawdust, and rice straw) relative to mushroom compost alone, and of the effect of the Fe/Mn ratio, during the treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD) over a 174-day period. Three 141 L columns, filled with either mushroom compost or the four substrate mixture (in duplicate), were set-up and fed with AMD from a closed mine site, in South Korea, using a 4-day hydraulic retention time. In the former bioreactor, effluent deterioration was observed over 1-2 months, despite the good efficiency predicted by the physicochemical characterization of mushroom compost. Steady state effluent quality was then noted for around 100 days before worsening in AMD source water occurred in response to seasonal variations in precipitation. Such changes in AMD quality resulted in performance deterioration in all reactors followed by a slow recovery toward the end of testing. Both substrates (mushroom compost and mixtures) gave satisfactory performance in neutralizing pH (6.1-7.8). Moreover, the system was able to consistently reduce sulfate from day 49, after the initial leaching out from organic substrates. Metal removal efficiencies were on the order of Al (∼100%) > Fe (68-92%) > Mn (49-61%). Overall, the mixed substrates showed comparable performance to mushroom compost, while yielding better effluent quality upon start-up. The results also indicated mushroom compost could release significant amounts of Mn and sulfate during bioreactor operation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Neutron-based techniques for detection of explosives and drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiraly, B.; Olah, L.; Csikai, G.J.

    2000-01-01

    Neutron reflection, scattering and transmission methods combined with the detection of characteristic gamma rays have an increasing role in the identification of hidden explosives, illicit drugs and other contraband materials. There are about 100 million land mines buried in some 70 countries. Among the abandoned anti-personnel land mines (APL) certain types have low mass (about 100 g) and contain little or no metal. Therefore, these plastic APL cannot be detected by the usual metal detectors. The IAEA Physics Section has organized a CRP in 1999 for the development of novel methods in order to speed up the removing process of APL. The transportation of illicit drugs has shown an increasing trend during the last decade. Developments of fast, non-destructive interrogation methods are required for the inspection of cargo containers, trucks and airline baggage. The major constituents of plastic APL and drugs are H, C, N and O which can be identified by the different neutron interactions. The atom fractions of these elements, in particular the C/O, C/N and C/H ratios, are quite different for drugs and explosives as compared to other materials used to hide them. Recently, we have carried out systematic measurements and calculations on the neutron fields from the 9 Be(d,n), 2 H(d,n), 252 Cf and Pu-Be sources passing through different bulky samples, on the possible use of elastically backscattered Pu-Be neutrons in elemental analysis and on the advantages and limitations of the thermal neutron reflection method in the identification of land mines and illicit drugs. The measured spectral shapes of neutrons were compared with the calculated results using the MCNP-4A and MCNP-4B codes. (author)

  19. Explosive compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1971-04-01

    An explosive composition containing ammonium nitrate consists of (1) from 40 to 75 Pt. by wt of particulate ammonium nitrate, (2) from 20 to 35 Pt. by wt of a solution selected from the group consisting of aqueous magnesium nitrate, aqueous ammonium nitrate and aqueous ammoniacal ammonium nitrate; and (3) at least 2 Pt. by wt of a setting agent selected from the group consisting of alkaline earth metal oxides, zinc oxide, lead monoxide, calcined dolomitic limestone, anhydrous calcium sulfate, anhydrous magnesium sulfate, anhydrous sodium tetrapyrophosphate and anhydrous sodium thiosulfate. The setting agent is further characterized in setting the composition to a solid material which contains solvent used in the liquid phase. (Abstract only - original article not available from T.U.)

  20. Explosive composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slykhouse, T E

    1968-05-09

    An ammonium nitrate explosive composition is characterized in that it contains from 40 to 75 parts by wt of particulate ammonium nitrate, from 20 to 35 parts by wt of a solution selected from the group consisting of aqueous magnesium nitrate, aqueous ammonium nitrate, and aqueous ammoniacal ammonium nitrate. It also contains at least 2 parts by wt of a setting agent selected from the group consisting of alkaline earth metal oxides, zinc oxide, lead monoxide, calcined dolomitic limestone, substantially anhydrous calcium sulfate, substantially anhydrous magnesium sulfate, substantially anhydrous sodium tetrapyrophosphate and substantially anhydrous sodium thiosulfate. The setting agent is further characterized in that it sets the composition to a solid material which contains solvent used in the liquid phase. (12 claims)

  1. Slurry explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1973-08-23

    A slurry explosive is comprised of (1) a composition consisting of ammonium nitrate or a mixture of ammonium nitrate and an alkali metal nitrate; or an alkaline earth metal nitrate; or an alkali metal nitrate and an alkaline earth metal nitrate; at least one member selected from the group consisting of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, aluminum, smokeless powder and fuels; and water; (2) 0.1 to 2.0% of guar gum; (3) between 0% and 0.3% of a sodium, potassium, calcium or magnesium borate; and greater than 0% but not more than 20% of hexamethylene tetramine; and (4) 0.02 to 2.0% of antimony potassium tartarate, antimony trioxide, antimony trisulfide or a mixture of these antimony compounds, % by wt.

  2. Proceedings of the seventeenth annual conference on explosives and blasting technique. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Papers from this conference dealt with the following topics: surface and underground mine blasting, ground vibrations and blast effects, design for explosive fracturing of rock, sequential timing for blasting control, design for production optimization, use of blasting for abandoned mine reclamation, chemical explosives, lightning warning systems, magazine security, fire safety, and drilling equipment. Papers have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base

  3. Enhanced Al and Zn removal from coal-mine drainage during rapid oxidation and precipitation of Fe oxides at near-neutral pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Jill E.; Cravotta, Charles A.; Peters, Stephen C.

    2017-01-01

    Net-alkaline, anoxic coal-mine drainage containing ∼20 mg/L FeII and ∼0.05 mg/L Al and Zn was subjected to parallel batch experiments: control, aeration (Aer 1 12.6 mL/s; Aer 2 16.8 mL/s; Aer 3 25.0 mL/s), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to test the hypothesis that aeration increases pH, FeII oxidation, hydrous FeIII oxide (HFO) formation, and trace-metal removal through adsorption and coprecipitation with HFO. During 5.5-hr field experiments, pH increased from 6.4 to 6.7, 7.1, 7.6, and 8.1 for the control, Aer 1, Aer 2, and Aer 3, respectively, but decreased to 6.3 for the H2O2 treatment. Aeration accelerated removal of dissolved CO2, Fe, Al, and Zn. In Aer 3, dissolved Al was completely removed within 1 h, but increased to ∼20% of the initial concentration after 2.5 h when pH exceeded 7.5. H2O2 promoted rapid removal of all dissolved Fe and Al, and 13% of dissolved Zn.Kinetic modeling with PHREEQC simulated effects of aeration on pH, CO2, Fe, Zn, and Al. Aeration enhanced Zn adsorption by increasing pH and HFO formation while decreasing aqueous CO2 available to form ZnCO30 and Zn(CO3)22− at high pH. Al concentrations were inconsistent with solubility control by Al minerals or Al-containing HFO, but could be simulated by adsorption on HFO at pH oxidation with pH adjustment to ∼7.5 could be effective for treating high-Fe and moderate-Zn concentrations, whereas chemical oxidation without pH adjustment may be effective for treating high-Fe and moderate-Al concentrations.

  4. 78 FR 64246 - Commerce in Explosives; List of Explosives Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ..., including non-cap sensitive slurry and water gel explosives. Blasting caps. Blasting gelatin. Blasting.... Explosive conitrates. Explosive gelatins. Explosive liquids. Explosive mixtures containing oxygen-releasing... powder. [[Page 64247

  5. 30 CFR 15.32 - Tolerances for weight of explosive, sheath, wrapper, and specific gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., wrapper, and specific gravity. 15.32 Section 15.32 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... explosive, sheath, wrapper, and specific gravity. (a) The weight of the explosive, the sheath, and the outer.... (c) The specific gravity of the explosive and sheath shall be within ±7.5 percent of that specified...

  6. 30 CFR 75.1312 - Explosives and detonators in underground magazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... magazines. 75.1312 Section 75.1312 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Blasting § 75.1312 Explosives and detonators in underground magazines. (a) The quantity of explosives kept..., explosives and detonators taken underground shall be kept in— (1) Separate, closed magazines at least 5 feet...

  7. 30 CFR 18.62 - Tests to determine explosion-proof characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... characteristics. 18.62 Section 18.62 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Inspections and Tests § 18.62 Tests to determine explosion-proof characteristics. (a) In testing for explosion-proof characteristics of an enclosure, it shall be filled and surrounded with various explosive mixtures...

  8. The potential of Lemna gibba L. and Lemna minor L. to remove Cu, Pb, Zn, and As in gallery water in a mining area in Keban, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasmaz, Merve; Arslan Topal, Emine Işıl; Obek, Erdal; Sasmaz, Ahmet

    2015-11-01

    This study was designed to investigate removal efficiencies of Cu, Pb, Zn, and As in gallery water in a mining area in Keban, Turkey by Lemna gibba L. and Lemna minor L. These plants were placed in the gallery water of Keban Pb-Zn ore deposits and adapted individually fed to the reactors. During the study period (8 days), the plant and water samples were collected daily and the temperature, pH, and electric conductivity of the gallery water were measured daily. The plants were washed, dried, and burned at 300 °C for 24 h in a drying oven. These ash and water samples were analyzed by ICP-MS to determine the amounts of Cu, Pb, Zn, and As. The Cu, Pb, Zn and As concentrations in the gallery water of the study area detected 67, 7.5, 7230, and 96 μg L(-1), respectively. According to the results, the obtained efficiencies in L. minor L. and L. gibba L. are: 87% at day 2 and 36% at day 3 for Cu; 1259% at day 2 and 1015% at day 2 for Pb; 628% at day 3 and 382% at day 3 for Zn; and 7070% at day 3 and 19,709% at day 2 for As, respectively. The present study revealed that both L. minor L. and L. gibba L. had very high potential to remove Cu, Pb, Zn, and As in gallery water contaminated by different ores. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. 78 FR 79010 - Criteria to Certify Coal Mine Rescue Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... coal requires more heat to combust; (3) anthracite dust does not propagate an explosion; and (4) there... to Certify Coal Mine Rescue Teams AGENCY: Mine Safety and Health Administration, Labor. ACTION... updated the coal mine rescue team certification criteria. The Mine Improvement and New Emergency Response...

  10. 30 CFR 75.1315 - Boreholes for explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... (e) When blasting slab rounds off the solid, opener holes shall not be drilled beyond the rib line... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1315 Boreholes for...; and (2) Shots fired in anthracite mines for battery starting or for blasting coal overhangs. No person...

  11. Supernova explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Branch, David

    2017-01-01

    Targeting advanced students of astronomy and physics, as well as astronomers and physicists contemplating research on supernovae or related fields, David Branch and J. Craig Wheeler offer a modern account of the nature, causes and consequences of supernovae, as well as of issues that remain to be resolved. Owing especially to (1) the appearance of supernova 1987A in the nearby Large Magellanic Cloud, (2) the spectacularly successful use of supernovae as distance indicators for cosmology, (3) the association of some supernovae with the enigmatic cosmic gamma-ray bursts, and (4) the discovery of a class of superluminous supernovae, the pace of supernova research has been increasing sharply. This monograph serves as a broad survey of modern supernova research and a guide to the current literature. The book’s emphasis is on the explosive phases of supernovae. Part 1 is devoted to a survey of the kinds of observations that inform us about supernovae, some basic interpreta tions of such data, and an overview of t...

  12. Removal and co-transport of Zn, As(V), and Cd during leachate seepage through downgradient mine soils: A batch sorption and column study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Juhee [Division of Environmental Science and Ecological Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Seung Mo [Korea Testing and Research Institute, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Hyun, Seunghun, E-mail: soilhyun@korea.ac.kr [Division of Environmental Science and Ecological Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-01

    The removal of Zn, As(V), and Cd during the leachate seepage process was measured in single, binary, and ternary solute systems by batch sorption and 1-D column flow experiments, followed by a sequential extraction procedure (SEP). In single-solute systems, sorption (K{sub d}{sup ⁎}) occurred in the order of As(V) > Zn ≫ Cd, and this sequence did not change in the presence of other solutes. In multi-solute systems, the sorption of Zn (~ 20%) and Cd (~ 27%) was enhanced by As(V), while Zn and Cd suppressed the sorption of each other. In all cases, As(V) sorption was not affected by the cations, indicating that As(V) is prioritized by sorption sites to a much greater degree than Zn and Cd. Element retention by column soils was strongly correlated (r{sup 2} = 0.77) with K{sub d}{sup ⁎}. Across column segments, mass retention was in the order of inlet (36–54%) > middle (26–35%) > outlet (20–31%), except for Cd in the Zn–Cd binary system. The result of SEP revealed that most of the retained Cd (98–99%) and Zn (56–71%) was in the labile fraction (e.g., the sum of F1 and F2) while only 9–12% of As(V) was labile and most (> 55%) was specifically adsorbed to Fe/Al oxides. Plots of the labile fraction (f{sub labile}) and the fast sorption fraction (f{sub fast}) suggested that the kinetics of specific As(V) sorption occur rapidly (f{sub fast} > f{sub labile}), whereas labile Zn and Cd sorption occurs slowly (f{sub labile} > f{sub fast}), indicating the occurrence of kinetically limited labile sorption sites, probably due to Zn–Cd competition. In conclusion, the element leaching potential of mine leachate can be greatly attenuated during downgradient soil seepage. However, when assessing the soil attenuation process, the impact of sorption competitors and the lability of adsorbed elements should first be considered. - Highlights: • During soil seepage, element leaching potential is reduced as As(V) > Zn > Cd. • Element removal during leachate seepage

  13. Metal interferences and their removal prior to the determination of As(T) and As(III) in acid mine waters by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleskey, R. Blaine; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; Ball, James W.

    2003-01-01

    Hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS) is a sensitive and selective method for the determination of total arsenic (arsenic(III) plus arsenic(V)) and arsenic(III); however, it is subject to metal interferences for acid mine waters. Sodium borohydride is used to produce arsine gas, but high metal concentrations can suppress arsine production. This report investigates interferences of sixteen metal species including aluminum, antimony(III), antimony(V), cadmium, chromium(III), chromium(IV), cobalt, copper(II), iron(III), iron(II), lead, manganese, nickel, selenium(IV), selenium(VI), and zinc ranging in concentration from 0 to 1,000 milligrams per liter and offers a method for removing interfering metal cations with cation exchange resin. The degree of interference for each metal without cation-exchange on the determination of total arsenic and arsenic(III) was evaluated by spiking synthetic samples containing arsenic(III) and arsenic(V) with the potential interfering metal. Total arsenic recoveries ranged from 92 to 102 percent for all metals tested except antimony(III) and antimony(V) which suppressed arsine formation when the antimony(III)/total arsenic molar ratio exceeded 4 or the antimony(V)/total arsenic molar ratio exceeded 2. Arsenic(III) recoveries for samples spiked with aluminum, chromium(III), cobalt, iron(II), lead, manganese, nickel, selenium(VI), and zinc ranged from 84 to 107 percent over the entire concentration range tested. Low arsenic(III) recoveries occurred when the molar ratios of metals to arsenic(III) were copper greater than 120, iron(III) greater than 70, chromium(VI) greater than 2, cadmium greater than 800, antimony(III) greater than 3, antimony(V) greater than 12, or selenium(IV) greater than 1. Low recoveries result when interfering metals compete for available sodium borohydride, causing incomplete arsine production, or when the interfering metal oxidizes arsenic(III). Separation of interfering metal cations using

  14. Understanding vented gas explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lautkaski, R. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Systems

    1997-12-31

    The report is an introduction to vented gas explosions for nonspecialists, particularly designers of plants for flammable gases and liquids. The phenomena leading to pressure generation in vented gas explosions in empty and congested rooms are reviewed. The four peak model of vented gas explosions is presented with simple methods to predict the values of the individual peaks. Experimental data on the external explosion of dust and gas explosions is discussed. The empirical equation relating the internal and external peak pressures in vented dust explosions is shown to be valid for gas explosion tests in 30 m{sup 3} and 550 m{sup 3} chambers. However, the difficulty of predicting the internal peak pressure in large chambers remains. Methods of explosion relief panel design and principles of vent and equipment layout to reduce explosion overpressures are reviewed. (orig.) 65 refs.

  15. Understanding vented gas explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lautkaski, R [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Systems

    1998-12-31

    The report is an introduction to vented gas explosions for nonspecialists, particularly designers of plants for flammable gases and liquids. The phenomena leading to pressure generation in vented gas explosions in empty and congested rooms are reviewed. The four peak model of vented gas explosions is presented with simple methods to predict the values of the individual peaks. Experimental data on the external explosion of dust and gas explosions is discussed. The empirical equation relating the internal and external peak pressures in vented dust explosions is shown to be valid for gas explosion tests in 30 m{sup 3} and 550 m{sup 3} chambers. However, the difficulty of predicting the internal peak pressure in large chambers remains. Methods of explosion relief panel design and principles of vent and equipment layout to reduce explosion overpressures are reviewed. (orig.) 65 refs.

  16. Explosive and accessories in rock blasting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pingua, B.M.P.; Nabiullah, M.; Jagdish, S.; Mishra, G.D.; Singh, T.N. [Central Mining Research Institute, Dhanbad (India)

    1999-02-01

    Chemical explosives are commonly used in the mining industry. Those used in India include nitroglycerine (NG) base, ammonium nitrate fuel oil mixture (ANFO), slurry emulsion and liquid oxygen (LOX). Examples of each type and their general properties are lighted. The electric and non-electric detonating systems used are described. Two Indian companies are producing non-electric in-hole delay system. Raydet (IDL-make) and Excel (ICI-make). Their firing characteristics are listed. Tables are given for burden for different density of rock and explosive strength. Causes of bad blast are itemised. 7 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. EVENT, Explosive Transients in Flow Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrae, R.W.; Tang, P.K.; Bolstad, J.W.; Gregory, W.S.

    1985-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: A major concern of the chemical, nuclear, and mining industries is the occurrence of an explosion in one part of a facility and subsequent transmission of explosive effects through the ventilation system. An explosive event can cause performance degradation of the ventilation system or even structural failures. A more serious consequence is the release of hazardous materials to the environment if vital protective devices such as air filters, are damaged. EVENT was developed to investigate the effects of explosive transients through fluid-flow networks. Using the principles of fluid mechanics and thermodynamics, governing equations for the conservation of mass, energy, and momentum are formulated. These equations are applied to the complete network subdivided into two general components: nodes and branches. The nodes represent boundaries and internal junctions where the conservation of mass and energy applies. The branches can be ducts, valves, blowers, or filters. Since in EVENT the effect of the explosion, not the characteristics of the explosion itself, is of interest, the transient is simulated in the simplest possible way. A rapid addition of mass and energy to the system at certain locations is used. This representation is adequate for all of the network except the region where the explosion actually occurs. EVENT84 is a modification of EVENT which includes a new explosion chamber model subroutine based on the NOL BLAST program developed at the Naval Ordnance Laboratory, Silver Spring, Maryland. This subroutine calculates the confined explosion near-field parameters and supplies the time functions of energy and mass injection. Solid-phase or TNT-equivalent explosions (which simulate 'point source' explosions in nuclear facilities) as well as explosions in gas-air mixtures can be simulated. The four types of explosions EVENT84 simulates are TNT, hydrogen in air, acetylene in air, and tributyl phosphate (TBP or 'red oil

  18. Advancing Explosion Source Theory through Experimentation: Results from Seismic Experiments Since the Moratorium on Nuclear Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, J. L.; Stump, B. W.

    2011-12-01

    On 23 September 1992, the United States conducted the nuclear explosion DIVIDER at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). It would become the last US nuclear test when a moratorium ended testing the following month. Many of the theoretical explosion seismic models used today were developed from observations of hundreds of nuclear tests at NTS and around the world. Since the moratorium, researchers have turned to chemical explosions as a possible surrogate for continued nuclear explosion research. This talk reviews experiments since the moratorium that have used chemical explosions to advance explosion source models. The 1993 Non-Proliferation Experiment examined single-point, fully contained chemical-nuclear equivalence by detonating over a kiloton of chemical explosive at NTS in close proximity to previous nuclear explosion tests. When compared with data from these nearby nuclear explosions, the regional and near-source seismic data were found to be essentially identical after accounting for different yield scaling factors for chemical and nuclear explosions. The relationship between contained chemical explosions and large production mining shots was studied at the Black Thunder coal mine in Wyoming in 1995. The research led to an improved source model for delay-fired mining explosions and a better understanding of mining explosion detection by the International Monitoring System (IMS). The effect of depth was examined in a 1997 Kazakhstan Depth of Burial experiment. Researchers used local and regional seismic observations to conclude that the dominant mechanism for enhanced regional shear waves was local Rg scattering. Travel-time calibration for the IMS was the focus of the 1999 Dead Sea Experiment where a 10-ton shot was recorded as far away as 5000 km. The Arizona Source Phenomenology Experiments provided a comparison of fully- and partially-contained chemical shots with mining explosions, thus quantifying the reduction in seismic amplitudes associated with partial

  19. Hazard mitigation in coal mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashmi, R. V.; Devalal, Shilpa; Jacob, Anjali; Vidhyapathi, C. M.

    2017-11-01

    Today’s world witnesses increased number of mine accidents caused due to explosion and fire. When the methane gas concentration goes high, it causes fire leading to explosion. In this paper, an IoT based system is proposed to ensure safety to the mine workers in underground collieries. The proposed system consists of DHT-11 sensor to monitor the temperature and humidity of coal mines. When the gas sensor detects high methane gas level, blower is activated so that the atmospheric air can be pumped in from outside to dilute the gas concentration. The smoke sensor is also used to detect the fire. In case of any abnormality in any of these parameters the buzzer sounds. All these parameters are uploaded to the cloud directly so that the people at the control station can be well informed of the underground mines.

  20. Methane emissions from coal mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, C.M.; Kelafant, J.R.; Kuuskraa, V.A.; Manger, K.C.; Kruger, D.

    1990-09-01

    The report estimates global methane emissions from coal mining on a country specific basis, evaluates the technologies available to degasify coal seams and assesses the economics of recovering methane liberated during mining. 33 to 64 million tonnes were liberated in 1987 from coal mining, 75 per cent of which came from China, the USSR, Poland and the USA. Methane emissions from coal mining are likely to increase. Emission levels vary between surface and underground mines. The methane currently removed from underground mines for safety reasons could be used in a number of ways, which may be economically attractive. 55 refs., 19 figs., 24 tabs

  1. When Everything Changes: Mountaintop Mining Effects on Watershed Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nippgen, F.; Ross, M. R.; McGlynn, B. L.; Bernhardt, E. S.

    2015-12-01

    Mountaintop removal coal mining (MTM) in the Central Appalachians has expanded over the last 40 years to cover ~7% of this mountainous landscape. MTM operations remove mountaintops and ridges with explosives and machinery to access underlying coal seams. Much of this crushed rock overburden is subsequently deposited into nearby valleys, creating valley fills that often bury headwater streams. In contrast to other disturbances such as forest clear-cutting, perturbations from MTM can extend hundreds of meters deep into the critical zone and completely reshape landscapes. Despite the expansiveness and intensity of the disturbance, MTM has only recently begun to receive focused attention from the hydrologic community and the effect of MTM on the hydrology of impacted watersheds is still not well understood. We are using a two-pronged approach consisting of GIS analysis to quantify spoil volumes and landscape change, together with empirical analysis and modeling of rainfall and runoff data collected in two sets of paired watersheds. We seek to investigate how MTM affects basic hydrologic metrics, including storm peakflows, runoff response times, baseflow, statistics of flow duration curves, and longer-term water balances. Each pair consists of a mined and an unmined watershed; the first set contains headwater streams (size ~100ha), the second set consists of 3rd order streams, draining ~3500ha. Mining covers ~ 95% of the headwater watershed, and 40% of the 3rd-order watershed. Initial GIS analysis indicates that the overburden moved during the mining process could be up to three times greater than previously estimated. Storm runoff peaks in the mined watersheds were muted as compared to the unmined watersheds and runoff ratios were reduced by up to 75% during both wet and dry antecedent conditions. The natural reference watersheds were highly responsive while the additional storage in the mined watersheds led to decreased peak flows during storms and enhanced baseflow

  2. Report on the treatability study for inerting small quantities of radioactive explosives and explosive components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loyola, V.M.; Reber, S.D.

    1996-02-01

    As a result of Sandia's radiation hardening testing on a variety of its explosive components, radioactive waste streams were generated and have to be disposed of as radioactive waste. Due to the combined hazards of explosives and radioactivity, Sandia's Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management organization did not have a mechanism for disposal of these waste streams. This report documents the study done to provide a method for the removal of the explosive hazard from those waste streams. The report includes the design of the equipment used, procedures followed, results from waste stream analog tests and the results from the actual explosive inerting tests on radioactive samples. As a result of the inerting treatment, the waste streams were rendered non-explosive and, thus, manageable through normal radioactive waste disposal channels

  3. New Mix Explosives for Explosive Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreevskikh, Leonid

    2011-06-01

    Suggested and tested were some mix explosives--powder mixtures of a brisant high explosive (HE = RDX, PETN) and an inert diluent (baking soda)--for use in explosive welding. RDX and PETN were selected in view of their high throwing ability and low critical diameter. Since the decomposition of baking soda yields a huge amount of gaseous products, its presence ensures (even at a low HE percentage) a throwing speed that is sufficient for realization of explosive welding, at a reduced brisant action of charge. Mix chargers containing 30-70 wt % HE (the rest baking soda) have been tested experimentally and optimized. For study of possibility to reduce critical diameter of HE mixture, the mixture was prepared where HE crystal sizes did not exceed 10 μm. The tests, which were performed with this HE, revealed that the mixture detonated stably with the velocity D ~ 2 km/s, if the layer thickness was d = 2 mm. The above explosives afford to markedly diminish deformations within the oblique impact zone and thus to carry out explosive welding of hollow items and thin metallic foils.

  4. The concept of explosives malfunctioning in rock blasting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Q.

    1993-11-01

    The purpose is to identify the critical conditions that cause malfunctioning for some commonly used explosives. Experiments are described that measure sympathetic detonation, desensitization, and cut-offs for two variables: spacing and delay. Explosive malfunctioning is depicted on a delay spacing chart that has different regions. On the chart, the shape and size of each region can vary from one explosive to another. Results are presented from over 70 blasts, that were conducted in the underground drift at the CANMET Experimental Mine, to identify the malfunctioning characteristics of specific emulsion, water gel, and dynamite explosives. For each experiment, two parallel blastholes (with diameter of 32 mm and depth of 1.7 m) were drilled downwards, and full coupling was achieved. The results are presented for the three types of explosives tested. 11 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Free radical explosive composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Franklin E.; Wasley, Richard J.

    1979-01-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a getter additive comprising a compound or mixture of compounds capable of capturing or deactivating free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and which is not an explosive. Exemplary getter additives are isocyanates, olefins and iodine.

  6. Nuclear explosives and hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, P

    1971-10-01

    A nuclear explosive 12 in. in diam and producing very little tritium is feasible in France. Such a device would be well adapted for contained nuclear explosions set off for the purpose of hydrocarbon storage or stimulation. The different aspects of setting off the explosive are reviewed. In the particular case of gas storage in a nuclear cavity in granite, it is demonstrated that the dose of irradiation received is extremely small. (18 refs.)

  7. Chernobyl explosion bombshell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, S.; Arnott, D.

    1988-01-01

    It is suggested that the explosion at the Chernobyl-4 reactor in April 1986 was a nuclear explosion. The evidence for this is examined. The sequence of events at Chernobyl is looked at to see if the effects were like those from a nuclear explosion. The question of whether a United Kingdom reactor could go prompt critical is discussed. It is concluded that prompt criticality excursions are possible, but the specific Chernobyl sequence is impossible. (UK)

  8. Explosive Technology Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Explosive Technology Group (ETG) provides diverse technical expertise and an agile, integrated approach to solve complex challenges for all classes of energetic...

  9. Mining in 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hood, M.; Hatherly, P.; Gurgenci, H. [Centre for Mining Technology and Equipment (Australia)

    1999-10-01

    New technology in open-pit and underground hard rock mining in 2015 is anticipated in this article, based on a paper presented to the 1998 invitation symposium - 'Technology - Australia's future: new technology for traditional industry', held in Freemantle, WA, 24-25 November 1998. It is expected that essential mining operations of rock breakage and transport and ore processing will still exist but the use of drills, shovels/LHDs and trucks is likely to be replaced by continuous, intelligent, automated mining systems. Rock blasting models need to be fed data on rock properties at each blasthole for high accuracy. The authors believe that in 2015 measurements of rock properties will be a routine part of the drilling process. Blasthole drills will be fitted with a range of mechanical and geophysical sensors. New, non-explosive methods of rock breaking such as oscillating disc cutting, may be available. Mining automation will improve safety and productivity, perhaps with the automation of dragline swing LHDs and trucks may be able to drive themselves, with operators monitoring and intervening when necessary. Performance and machine condition data may be applied to improve equipment design. Australian mining stands to gain by these advances in mining technology. 1 fig., 3 photos.

  10. Sustainable mining management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tejera Oliver, J. L.

    2009-01-01

    Mining activities are carried out by the older man and have provided resources, since ancient times, for their development and progress. With the discovery of fire will show the first metals that have marked the civilizations of copper, bronze and iron, and is the prehistory of the Stone Age tools that man has made from the exploitation of quarries first. The industrial revolution of the nineteenth century is linked to coal and steel, and could not conceiver of todays society without oil and gas, without silicon and coltan. But the mines are often aggressive and, despite their need and what they contribute to the development are answered by the societies where are made. during recent years there has been growing international efforts to try to make the minimum requirements of sustainable exploitation (European Directives, GMI, GRI, etc.) In AENOR, and within the Technical Committee of Standardization 22 Mining and Explosives, chaired by AITEMIN, was established the subcommittee 3, chaired by IGME, where, with the participation of all stake holders, have developed some standards on sustainable mining management sustainable mining that will be a tool available to mining companies to demonstrate their sustainable use to Society. (Author)

  11. Motivation for a High Explosive Testing Program in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-04

    environment for several decades. Much has been learned about the impact of high in situ stress and its influence on rock bursts (violent rock ...is the possibility of evasive nuclear testing in deep mine environments where the release of high stress fields by an explosion can resemble a rock ... burst or natural earthquake. This paper provides background information on previous research in and around the deep mines of South Africa and lays

  12. Arsenic, Zinc, and Aluminium Removal from Gold Mine Wastewater Effluents and Accumulation by Submerged Aquatic Plants (Cabomba piauhyensis, Egeria densa, and Hydrilla verticillata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Farid Abu Bakar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential of three submerged aquatic plant species (Cabomba piauhyensis, Egeria densa, and Hydrilla verticillata to be used for As, Al, and Zn phytoremediation was tested. The plants were exposed for 14 days under hydroponic conditions to mine waste water effluents in order to assess the suitability of the aquatic plants to remediate elevated multi-metals concentrations in mine waste water. The results show that the E. densa and H. verticillata are able to accumulate high amount of arsenic (95.2% and zinc (93.7% and resulted in a decrease of arsenic and zinc in the ambient water. On the other hand, C. piauhyensis shows remarkable aluminium accumulation in plant biomass (83.8% compared to the other tested plants. The ability of these plants to accumulate the studied metals and survive throughout the experiment demonstrates the potential of these plants to remediate metal enriched water especially for mine drainage effluent. Among the three tested aquatic plants, H. verticillata was found to be the most applicable (84.5% and suitable plant species to phytoremediate elevated metals and metalloid in mine related waste water.

  13. Arsenic, Zinc, and Aluminium Removal from Gold Mine Wastewater Effluents and Accumulation by Submerged Aquatic Plants (Cabomba piauhyensis, Egeria densa, and Hydrilla verticillata)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusoff, Ismail; Fatt, Ng Tham; Othman, Faridah; Ashraf, Muhammad Aqeel

    2013-01-01

    The potential of three submerged aquatic plant species (Cabomba piauhyensis, Egeria densa, and Hydrilla verticillata) to be used for As, Al, and Zn phytoremediation was tested. The plants were exposed for 14 days under hydroponic conditions to mine waste water effluents in order to assess the suitability of the aquatic plants to remediate elevated multi-metals concentrations in mine waste water. The results show that the E. densa and H. verticillata are able to accumulate high amount of arsenic (95.2%) and zinc (93.7%) and resulted in a decrease of arsenic and zinc in the ambient water. On the other hand, C. piauhyensis shows remarkable aluminium accumulation in plant biomass (83.8%) compared to the other tested plants. The ability of these plants to accumulate the studied metals and survive throughout the experiment demonstrates the potential of these plants to remediate metal enriched water especially for mine drainage effluent. Among the three tested aquatic plants, H. verticillata was found to be the most applicable (84.5%) and suitable plant species to phytoremediate elevated metals and metalloid in mine related waste water. PMID:24102060

  14. Removing and recovering of uranium from the acid mine waters by using ion exchange resin; Remocao e recuperacao de uranio de aguas acidas de mina por resina de troca ionica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Marcos Roberto Lopes do

    1998-07-01

    Ion exchange using resins is one of the few processes capable of reducing ionic contaminants in effluents to very low levels. In this study the process was used to remove and recovery uranium from acid mine waters at Pocos de Caldas-MG Uranium Mining and Milling Plant. The local mineralogical features, allied to the biogeochemical phenomena, owing to presence of pyrite in the rock piles, moreover another factors, resulting acid drainage with several pollutants, including uranium ranging from 6 to 14 mg/l, as sulfate complex, that can be removed by anionic exchanger. The iron interference is eliminated by lime pretreatment of water, increasing pH from 2.6 to 3.3-3.8 to precipitate this cation, without changing the uranium amount. Eight anionic resins were tested, based on the uranium loading, in sorption studies. Retention time, and pH influence was verified for the exchanger chose. With breakthrough of 1 mg U/L and 10 mg U/l in the feed solution, the uranium decontamination level was 94%. Typical values of loading resin were 20-30 g U/l and 70-90 g SO{sub 4}/l. Uranium elution was done with Na Cl solution. Retention time, saline, and acid concentration were the parameters studied. The concentrate, obtained from the eluate by ammonia precipitation, presented uranium (86,8% as U{sub 3} O{sub 8}) and impurities within commercial specifications. (author)

  15. Lunar construction/mining equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Levent

    1990-01-01

    For centuries, mining has utilized drill and blast as the primary method of rock excavation. Although this technique has undergone significant improvements, it still remains a cyclic, labor intensive operation with inherent safety hazards. Other drawbacks include damage to the surrounding ground, creation of blast vibrations, rough excavation walls resulting in increased ventilation requirements, and the lack of selective mining ability. Perhaps the most important shortcoming of drill and blast is that it is not conducive to full implementation of automation or robotics technologies. Numerous attempts have been made in the past to automate drill and blast operations to remove personnel from the hazardous work environment. Although most of the concepts devised look promising on paper, none of them was found workable on a sustained production basis. In particular, the problem of serious damage to equipment during the blasting cycle could not be resolved regardless of the amount of charge used in excavation. Since drill and blast is not capable of meeting the requirements of a fully automated rock fragmentation method, its role is bound to gradually decrease. Mechanical excavation, in contrast, is highly suitable to automation because it is a continuous process and does not involve any explosives. Many of the basic principles and trends controlling the design of an earth-based mechanical excavator will hold in an extraterrestrial environment such as on the lunar surface. However, the economic and physical limitations for transporting materials to space will require major rethinking of these machines. In concept, then, a lunar mechanical excavator will look and perform significantly different from one designed for use here on earth. This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of such mechanical excavator systems.

  16. Deconstructing the deconstruction of Appalachia: Mountaintop mining effects on hydrology across temporal and spatial scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nippgen, F.; Ross, M. R. V.; Bernhardt, E. S.; McGlynn, B. L.

    2017-12-01

    Mountaintop mining (MTM) is an especially destructive form of surface coal mining. It is widespread in Central Appalachia and is practiced around the world. In the process of accessing coal seams up to several hundred meters below the surface, mountaintops and ridges are removed via explosives and heavy machinery with the resulting overburden pushed into nearby valleys. This broken up rock and soil material represents a largely unknown amount of storage for incoming precipitation that facilitates enhanced chemical weathering rates and increased dissolved solids exports to streams. However, assessing the independent impact of MTM can be difficult in the presence of other forms of mining, especially underground mining. Here, we evaluate the effect of MTM on water quantity and quality on annual, seasonal, and event time scales in two sets of paired watersheds in southwestern West Virginia impacted by MTM. On an annual timescale, the mined watersheds sustained baseflow throughout the year, while the first order watersheds ceased flowing during the latter parts of the growing season. In fractionally mined watersheds that continued to flow, the water in the stream was exclusively generated from mined portions of the watersheds, leading to elevated total dissolved solids in the stream water. On the event time scale, we analyzed 50 storm events over a water year for a range of hydrologic response metrics. The mined watersheds exhibited smaller runoff ratios and longer response times during the wet dormant season, but responded similarly to rainfall events during the growing season or even exceeded the runoff magnitude of the reference watersheds. Our research demonstrates a clear difference in hydrologic response between mined and unmined watersheds during the growing season and the dormant season that are detectable at annual, seasonal, and event time scales. For larger spatial scales (up to 2,000km2) the effect of MTM on water quantity is not as easily detectable. At

  17. Real time explosive hazard information sensing, processing, and communication for autonomous operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versteeg, Roelof J; Few, Douglas A; Kinoshita, Robert A; Johnson, Doug; Linda, Ondrej

    2015-02-24

    Methods, computer readable media, and apparatuses provide robotic explosive hazard detection. A robot intelligence kernel (RIK) includes a dynamic autonomy structure with two or more autonomy levels between operator intervention and robot initiative A mine sensor and processing module (ESPM) operating separately from the RIK perceives environmental variables indicative of a mine using subsurface perceptors. The ESPM processes mine information to determine a likelihood of a presence of a mine. A robot can autonomously modify behavior responsive to an indication of a detected mine. The behavior is modified between detection of mines, detailed scanning and characterization of the mine, developing mine indication parameters, and resuming detection. Real time messages are passed between the RIK and the ESPM. A combination of ESPM bound messages and RIK bound messages cause the robot platform to switch between modes including a calibration mode, the mine detection mode, and the mine characterization mode.

  18. Explosion metal welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popoff, A.A.

    1976-01-01

    Process parameters pertaining to welding similar and dissimilar metals using explosives are reviewed. The discussion centers on the interrelationship of physical parameters which play a part in achieving desirable metallurgical results. Present activities in explosion metal welding at LASL are presented and shown how they related to the interests of the ERDA community

  19. Explosions and static electricity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonassen, Niels M

    1995-01-01

    The paper deals with the problem of electrostatic discharges as causes of ignition of vapor/gas and dust/gas mixtures. A series of examples of static-caused explosions will be discussed. The concepts of explosion limits, the incendiveness of various discharge types and safe voltages are explained...

  20. Steam explosion studies review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Moon Kyu; Kim, Hee Dong

    1999-03-01

    When a cold liquid is brought into contact with a molten material with a temperature significantly higher than the liquid boiling point, an explosive interaction due to sudden fragmentation of the melt and rapid evaporation of the liquid may take place. This phenomenon is referred to as a steam explosion or vapor explosion. Depending upon the amount of the melt and the liquid involved, the mechanical energy released during a vapor explosion can be large enough to cause serious destruction. In hypothetical severe accidents which involve fuel melt down, subsequent interactions between the molten fuel and coolant may cause steam explosion. This process has been studied by many investigators in an effort to assess the likelihood of containment failure which leads to large scale release of radioactive materials to the environment. In an effort to understand the phenomenology of steam explosion, extensive studies has been performed so far. The report presents both experimental and analytical studies on steam explosion. As for the experimental studies, both small scale tests which involve usually less than 20 g of high temperature melt and medium/large scale tests which more than 1 kg of melt is used are reviewed. For the modelling part of steam explosions, mechanistic modelling as well as thermodynamic modelling is reviewed. (author)

  1. Cell phone explosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atreya, Alok; Kanchan, Tanuj; Nepal, Samata; Pandey, Bhuwan Raj

    2016-03-01

    Cell phone explosions and resultant burn injuries are rarely reported in the scientific literature. We report a case of cell phone explosion that occurred when a young male was listening to music while the mobile was plugged in for charging. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. ANFO bulk loading in coal mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gajjar, A.

    1987-08-01

    With India's total coal production projected to increase from 152 to 237 million tons by 1990, net additional production from new mines must be more because of substantial depletion in existing mines. This article discusses the best possible application of explosive techniques in open-cast coal mines to economize production cost. The most energy-efficient and safest explosive is ANFO (ammonium nitrate, fuel oil); however, manual charging by INFO is not possible. Therefore, the solution is the application of bulk-loading systems of ANFO for giant mining operations. Cost of blasting per ton of coal production in India is in the range of Rs 25. Thus, the author suggests it will be the responsibility of mining engineers to see that the ANFO based bulk-loading system is implemented and the cost of production per ton reduced to Rs 19.50.

  3. Trust Mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    The United States and the Navajo Nation entered into settlement agreements that provide funds to conduct investigations and any needed cleanup at 16 of the 46 priority mines, including six mines in the Northern Abandoned Uranium Mine Region.

  4. Remote control of safety and technological mining processes in underground coal mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marjanovic, D. (Elektronska Industrija RO IRI OOUR Razvoj, Nis (Yugoslavia))

    1989-02-01

    Discusses importance of data relevant to remote monitoring of production and safety at work in underground coal mines. The EI PS 2000 multi-purpose system developed by Elektronska Industrija, Nis, for use with AP-X1 and AP-X2 microcomputers in Serbian mines is described. Component parts include the CUM-8 central unit, the CIP-8 communication interface processor, the SNM-64 disjunction unit, the NM-64 energy supply unit and the CRT alarm monitor. This system is designed to warn of mine fires, methane and coal dust explosions, to help in evacuating mine crews, to control production processes and mine management and other functions. 8 refs

  5. Underground nuclear explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, Gary H [Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1970-05-01

    In the Third Plowshare Symposium, held in 1964, data from a number of nuclear explosions were presented. At that time the basic elements of the nuclear explosion appeared to be well understood and relationships for predicting the gross nuclear effects were presented. Since that time, additional work has been done and many of the concepts have been extended. For example, nuclear explosions have been conducted at greater depths and with much greater yields. The physical and chemical properties of the material in which the explosions occur have been more accurately measured and related to explosion effects. Interpretation of the new information seems to indicate that the earlier relationships are valid over the ranges of energy and depths for which data is available but that effects relating to cavity and chimney sizes or fracturing had been overestimated at great depths of burst and higher yields. (author)

  6. Underground nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, Gary H.

    1970-01-01

    In the Third Plowshare Symposium, held in 1964, data from a number of nuclear explosions were presented. At that time the basic elements of the nuclear explosion appeared to be well understood and relationships for predicting the gross nuclear effects were presented. Since that time, additional work has been done and many of the concepts have been extended. For example, nuclear explosions have been conducted at greater depths and with much greater yields. The physical and chemical properties of the material in which the explosions occur have been more accurately measured and related to explosion effects. Interpretation of the new information seems to indicate that the earlier relationships are valid over the ranges of energy and depths for which data is available but that effects relating to cavity and chimney sizes or fracturing had been overestimated at great depths of burst and higher yields. (author)

  7. Expert system for assessing risk and prevention of methane explosions in coal mines. Sistema experto para evaluacion del riesgo y la prevencion de explosiones de grisu en minas de carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-05-01

    The expert system described here was developed by members of AITEMIN as part of a project financed by Ocicarbon, the General Directorate of Mines and MINER Construction. The article begins by asking the question, 'What is an expert system '. 1 tab.

  8. Research topics in explosives - a look at explosives behaviors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maienschein, J L

    2014-01-01

    The behaviors of explosives under many conditions - e.g., sensitivity to inadvertent reactions, explosion, detonation - are controlled by the chemical and physical properties of the explosive materials. Several properties are considered for a range of improvised and conventional explosives. Here I compare these properties across a wide range of explosives to develop an understanding of explosive behaviors. For improvised explosives, which are generally heterogeneous mixtures of ingredients, a range of studies is identified as needed to more fully understand their behavior and properties. For conventional explosives, which are generally comprised of crystalline explosive molecules held together with a binder, I identify key material properties that determine overall sensitivity, including the extremely safe behavior of Insensitive High Explosives, and discuss an approach to predicting the sensitivity or insensitivity of an explosive.

  9. Simultaneous selenate reduction and denitrification by a consortium of enriched mine site bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subedi, Gaurav; Taylor, Jon; Hatam, Ido; Baldwin, Susan A

    2017-09-01

    Increasing selenium concentrations in aquatic environments downstream of mine sites is of great concern due to selenium's bioaccumulation propensity and teratogenic toxicity. Removal of selenium from mine influenced water is complicated by the presence of nitrate, which is also elevated in mine influenced water due to the use of explosives in mining. In many biological treatment processes, nitrate as a thermodynamically more preferable electron acceptor inhibits selenate reduction. Here we report on an enrichment of a bacterial assemblage from a mine impacted natural marsh sediment that was capable of simultaneous selenate reduction and denitrification. Selenate reduction followed first order kinetics with respect to the concentration of total dissolved selenium. The kinetic rate constant was independent of initial nitrate concentration over the range 3-143 mg L -1 -NO 3 - -N. The initial concentration of selenate inhibited selenate reduction kinetics over the range 1-24 mg-Se L -1 . Dominant taxa that grew in selenate only medium were classified in the genera Pseudomonas, Lysinibacillus and Thauera. When nitrate was introduced in addition to selenate, previously rare taxa that became dominant were relatives of Exiguobacterium, Tissierella and Clostridium. Open reading frames (ORFs) associated with dissimilatory denitrification were identified for Pseudomonas, Thauera and Clostridium. In addition, ORFs were found that were homologous with known selenate reductase subunits (SerA and SerB). These findings suggest that native mine site bacteria can be used for removing selenate and nitrate from mine wastewater. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mechanization of drill-and-blast operations in surface mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogan, B.

    1985-07-01

    Comments on recent developments in blasting techniques in modern surface mines and quarries. The tendency to use large boreholes (up to 320 mm diameter) and on site manufactured ANFO and slurry explosives is stressed. Soviet experience with ANFO and slurry explosives and with 9 types of explosive-mixing/charging vehicles is presented. One type of vehicle is used as a stable explosive mixing unit, the others (SUZN-1B, SUZN-2, SUZN-5A, SUZN-5AM, ZS-1B, MZS-1M, MAZ-509P) are used as mobile explosive mixing and loading units. Some also incorporate a borehole stemming device. Mixtures of ANFO and slurry (aquatol) explosives, explosive charging capacities (outputs 9-30 t/h) and other characteristics of mechanized explosive charging vehicles are described. Obligatory safety measures during usage are quoted. 4 refs.

  11. Multi-scale fracture damage associated with underground chemical explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, E. M.; Sussman, A. J.; Wilson, J. E.; Townsend, M. J.; Prothro, L. B.; Gang, H. E.

    2018-05-01

    Understanding rock damage induced by explosions is critical for a number of applications including the monitoring and verification of underground nuclear explosions, mine safety issues, and modeling fluid flow through fractured rock. We use core observations, televiewer logs, and thin section observations to investigate fracture damage associated with two successive underground chemical explosions (SPE2 and SPE3) in granitic rock at both the mesoscale and microscale. We compare the frequency and orientations of core-scale fractures, and the frequency of microfractures, between a pre-experiment core and three post-experiment cores. Natural fault zones and explosion-induced fractures in the vicinity of the explosive source are readily apparent in recovered core and in thin sections. Damage from faults and explosions is not always apparent in fracture frequency plots from televiewer logs, although orientation data from these logs suggests explosion-induced fracturing may not align with the pre-existing fracture sets. Core-scale observations indicate the extent of explosion-induced damage is 10.0 m after SPE2 and 6.8 m after SPE3, despite both a similar size and location for both explosions. At the microscale, damage is observed to a range distance of 10.2 ± 0.9 m after SPE2, and 16.6 ± 0.9 and 11.2 ± 0.6 in two different cores collected after SPE3. Additional explosion-induced damage, interpreted to be the result of spalling, is readily apparent near the surface, but only in the microfracture data. This depth extent and intensity of damage in the near-surface region also increased after an additional explosion. This study highlights the importance of evaluating structural damage at multiple scales for a more complete characterization of the damage, and particularly shows the importance of microscale observations for identifying spallation-induced damage.

  12. Criticality safety in high explosives dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troyer, S.D.

    1997-01-01

    In 1992, an incident occurred at the Pantex Plant in which the cladding around a fissile material component (pit) cracked during dismantlement of the high explosives portion of a nuclear weapon. Although the event did not result in any significant contamination or personnel exposures, concerns about the incident led to the conclusion that the current dismantlement process was unacceptable. Options considered for redesign, dissolution tooling design considerations, dissolution tooling design features, and the analysis of the new dissolution tooling are summarized. The final tooling design developed incorporated a number of safety features and provides a simple, self-contained, low-maintenance method of high explosives removal for nuclear explosive dismantlement. Analyses demonstrate that the tooling design will remain subcritical under normal, abnormal, and credible accident scenarios. 1 fig

  13. Explosives 92. Conference proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farnfield, R.A. (ed.)

    1992-01-01

    17 papers are presented. Topics covered include: the POG system - a new concept in the use of ANFO; demolition of a motorway bridge; presplit and smooth blasting; VIBReX - a predictive code for assessing the effect of blast design on ground vibration; ground vibrations from blasting; digital seismographs; human response to blasting and the effects on planning conditions; landform construction by restoration blasting; use of small diameter explosives; efficient priming; safety management in the explosives industry; and the law on packaging of explosives. Two papers have been abstracted separately.

  14. 30 CFR 18.80 - Approval of machines assembled with certified or explosion-proof components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval of machines assembled with certified... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Machines Assembled With Certified or Explosion-Proof Components, Field...

  15. Ignitability and explosibility of gases and vapors

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Tingguang

    2015-01-01

    The book provides a systematic view on flammability and a collection of solved engineering problems in the fields of dilution and purge, mine gas safety, clean burning safety and gas suppression modeling. For the first time, fundamental principles of energy conservation are used to develop theoretical flammability diagrams and are then explored to understand various safety-related mixing problems. This provides the basis for a fully-analytical solution to any flammability problem. Instead of the traditional view that flammability is a fundamental material property, here flammability is discovered to be a result of the explosibility of air and the ignitability of fuel, or a process property. By exploring the more fundamental concepts of explosibility and ignitability, the safety targets of dilution and purge can be better defined and utilized for guiding safe operations in process safety. This book provides various engineering approaches to mixture flammability, benefiting not only the safety students, but al...

  16. Decline in Performance of Biochemical Reactors for Sulphate Removal from Mine-Influenced Water is Accompanied by Changes in Organic Matter Characteristics and Microbial Population Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parissa Mirjafari

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Successful long-term bioremediation of mining-influenced water using complex organic matter and naturally-occurring microorganisms in sub-surface flow constructed wetlands requires a balance between easily and more slowly degrading material. This can be achieved by combining different types of organic materials. To provide guidance on what mixture combinations to use, information is needed on how the ratio of labile to recalcitrant components affects the degradation rate and the types of microbial populations supported. To investigate this, different ratios of wood and hay were used in up-flow column bioreactors treating selenium- and sulphate-containing synthetic mine-influenced water. The degradation rates of crude fibre components appeared to be similar regardless of the relative amounts of wood and hay. However, the nature of the degradation products might have differed in that those produced in the hay-rich bioreactors were more biodegradable and supported high sulphate-reduction rates. Microorganisms in the sulphate-reducing and cellulose-degrading inocula persisted in the bioreactors indicating that bio-augmentation was effective. There was a shift in microbial community composition over time suggesting that different microbial groups were involved in decomposition of more recalcitrant material. When dissolved organic carbon (DOC was over-supplied, the relative abundance of sulphate-reducers was low even through high sulphate-reduction rates were achieved. As DOC diminished, sulphate-reducers become more prevalent and their relative abundance correlated with sulphate concentrations rather than sulphate-reduction rate.

  17. The control and prevention of dust explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    Papers presented discussed: explosion characteristics and hybrid mixtures explosion characteristics and influencing factors, propagation of dust explosions in ducts, prevention of dust explosions, desensitization, explosion-proof type of construction, explosion pressure relief, optical flame barriers, slide-valves for explosion protection, Ventex explosion barrier valves, grinding and mixing plants, spray driers, dust explosions in silos, and explosion-proof bucket elevators. One paper has been abstracted separately.

  18. Thermal explosion models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ping, Tso Chin [Malaya Univ., Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    1984-12-01

    The phenomenon of thermal explosion arises in several important safety problems, yet scientists are still baffled by its origin. This article reviews some of the models that have been proposed to explain the phenomenon.

  19. Thermal explosion models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tso Chin Ping

    1984-01-01

    The phenomenon of thermal explosion arises in several important safety problems, yet scientists are still baffled by its origin. This article reviews some of the models that have been proposed to explain the phenomenon. (author)

  20. Parametric Explosion Spectral Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, S R; Walter, W R

    2012-01-19

    Small underground nuclear explosions need to be confidently detected, identified, and characterized in regions of the world where they have never before occurred. We develop a parametric model of the nuclear explosion seismic source spectrum derived from regional phases that is compatible with earthquake-based geometrical spreading and attenuation. Earthquake spectra are fit with a generalized version of the Brune spectrum, which is a three-parameter model that describes the long-period level, corner-frequency, and spectral slope at high-frequencies. Explosion spectra can be fit with similar spectral models whose parameters are then correlated with near-source geology and containment conditions. We observe a correlation of high gas-porosity (low-strength) with increased spectral slope. The relationship between the parametric equations and the geologic and containment conditions will assist in our physical understanding of the nuclear explosion source.

  1. Ammonium nitrate explosion hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negovanović Milanka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium nitrate (AN primarily is used as a fertilizer but it is also very important compound in the production of industrial explosives. The application of ammonium nitrate in the production of industrial explosives was related with the early era of Nobel dynamite and widely increased with the appearance of blasting agents such as ANFO and Slurry, in the middle of the last Century. Throughout the world millions of tons of ammonium nitrate are produced annually and handled without incident. Although ammonium nitrate generally is used safely, accidental explosions involving AN have high impact resulting in loss of lives and destruction of property. The paper presents the basic properties of ammonium nitrate as well as hazards in handling of ammonium nitrate in order to prevent accidents. Several accidents with explosions of ammonium nitrate resulted in catastrophic consequences are listed in the paper as examples of non-compliance with prescribed procedures.

  2. Nuclear explosive driven experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragan, C.E.

    1981-01-01

    Ultrahigh pressures are generated in the vicinity of a nuclear explosion. We have developed diagnostic techniques to obtain precise high pressures equation-of-state data in this exotic but hostile environment

  3. Shock waves & explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Sachdev, PL

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the causes and effects of explosions is important to experts in a broad range of disciplines, including the military, industrial and environmental research, aeronautic engineering, and applied mathematics. Offering an introductory review of historic research, Shock Waves and Explosions brings analytic and computational methods to a wide audience in a clear and thorough way. Beginning with an overview of the research on combustion and gas dynamics in the 1970s and 1980s, the author brings you up to date by covering modeling techniques and asymptotic and perturbative methods and ending with a chapter on computational methods.Most of the book deals with the mathematical analysis of explosions, but computational results are also included wherever they are available. Historical perspectives are provided on the advent of nonlinear science, as well as on the mathematical study of the blast wave phenomenon, both when visualized as a point explosion and when simulated as the expansion of a high-pressure ...

  4. Intermittent Explosive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... explosive disorder involves repeated, sudden episodes of impulsive, aggressive, violent behavior or angry verbal outbursts in which you react grossly out of proportion to the situation. Road rage, domestic abuse, throwing or breaking objects, or other temper tantrums ...

  5. Explosive Components Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The 98,000 square foot Explosive Components Facility (ECF) is a state-of-the-art facility that provides a full-range of chemical, material, and performance analysis...

  6. Idaho Explosives Detection System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reber, Edward L.; Blackwood, Larry G.; Edwards, Andrew J.; Jewell, J. Keith; Rohde, Kenneth W.; Seabury, Edward H.; Klinger, Jeffery B.

    2005-01-01

    The Idaho Explosives Detection System was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to respond to threats imposed by delivery trucks potentially carrying explosives into military bases. A full-scale prototype system has been built and is currently undergoing testing. The system consists of two racks, one on each side of a subject vehicle. Each rack includes a neutron generator and an array of NaI detectors. The two neutron generators are pulsed and synchronized. A laptop computer controls the entire system. The control software is easily operable by minimally trained staff. The system was developed to detect explosives in a medium size truck within a 5-min measurement time. System performance was successfully demonstrated with explosives at the INL in June 2004 and at Andrews Air Force Base in July 2004

  7. Idaho Explosives Detection System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reber, Edward L. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 N. Freemont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2114 (United States)]. E-mail: reber@inel.gov; Blackwood, Larry G. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 N. Freemont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2114 (United States); Edwards, Andrew J. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 N. Freemont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2114 (United States); Jewell, J. Keith [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 N. Freemont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2114 (United States); Rohde, Kenneth W. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 N. Freemont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2114 (United States); Seabury, Edward H. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 N. Freemont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2114 (United States); Klinger, Jeffery B. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 N. Freemont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2114 (United States)

    2005-12-15

    The Idaho Explosives Detection System was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to respond to threats imposed by delivery trucks potentially carrying explosives into military bases. A full-scale prototype system has been built and is currently undergoing testing. The system consists of two racks, one on each side of a subject vehicle. Each rack includes a neutron generator and an array of NaI detectors. The two neutron generators are pulsed and synchronized. A laptop computer controls the entire system. The control software is easily operable by minimally trained staff. The system was developed to detect explosives in a medium size truck within a 5-min measurement time. System performance was successfully demonstrated with explosives at the INL in June 2004 and at Andrews Air Force Base in July 2004.

  8. Intermittent Explosive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lut Tamam

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent explosive disorder is an impulse control disorder characterized by the occurrence of discrete episodes of failure to resist aggressive impulses that result in violent assault or destruction of property. Though the prevalence intermittent explosive disorder has been reported to be relatively rare in frontier studies on the field, it is now common opinion that intermittent explosive disorder is far more common than previously thought especially in clinical psychiatry settings. Etiological studies displayed the role of both psychosocial factors like childhood traumas and biological factors like dysfunctional neurotransmitter systems and genetics. In differential diagnosis of the disorder, disorders involving agression as a symptom such as alcohol and drug intoxication, antisocial and borderline personality disorders, personality changes due to general medical conditions and behavioral disorder should be considered. A combination of pharmacological and psychotherapeutic approaches are suggested in the treatment of the disorder. This article briefly reviews the historical background, diagnostic criteria, epidemiology, etiology and treatment of intermittent explosive disorder.

  9. Sensitivities of ionic explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politzer, Peter; Lane, Pat; Murray, Jane S.

    2017-03-01

    We have investigated the relevance for ionic explosive sensitivity of three factors that have been demonstrated to be related to the sensitivities of molecular explosives. These are (1) the maximum available heat of detonation, (2) the amount of free space per molecule (or per formula unit) in the crystal lattice and (3) specific features of the electrostatic potential on the molecular or ionic surface. We find that for ionic explosives, just as for molecular ones, there is an overall tendency for impact sensitivity to increase as the maximum detonation heat release is greater. This means that the usual emphasis upon designing explosives with large heats of detonation needs to be tempered somewhat. We also show that a moderate detonation heat release does not preclude a high level of detonation performance for ionic explosives, as was already demonstrated for molecular ones. Relating the free space per formula unit to sensitivity may require a modified procedure for ionic explosives; this will continue to be investigated. Finally, an encouraging start has been made in linking impact sensitivities to the electrostatic potentials on ionic surfaces, although limited so far to ammonium salts.

  10. A study on vapor explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, N.; Shoji, M.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out for vapor explosions of molten tin falling in water. For various initial metal temperatures and subcooling of water, transient pressure of the explosions, relative frequency of the explosions and the position where the explosions occur were measured in detail. The influence of ambient pressure was also investigated. From the results, it was concluded that the vapor explosion is closely related to the collapse of a vapor film around the molten metal. (author)

  11. Proceedings of the eighteenth annual conference on explosives and blasting technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    This edition of the Proceedings of the Annual Conference on Explosives and Blasting Techniques is the eighteenth in a series published by the International Society of Explosives Engineers. The papers cover a wide variety of explosives and blasting techniques, including: rock mechanics, rock drilling, perimeter control handling and documenting blasting complaints, blast vibration frequencies, blasting techniques for surface and underground coal mines, explosives for permafrost blasting, lightning detection, use of slow motion video to analyze blasts, tunneling, and close-in blasting control. Papers have been processed individually for inclusion on the data base

  12. Golden prospects for uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    Beisa Mines Ltd, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Union Corporation, looks a born winner. Although only due for completion in 1982 it can already boast several 'firsts' in the mining industry. It is, of course, the first mine in South Africa to be developed as a primary producer of uranium with gold as a by-product. Its No. 1 Ventilation Shaft is also the smallest diameter shaft in SA to use a rocker-arm shovel loader for rock removal. Moreover, Beisa will be the first mine to use the revolutionary carbon-in-pulp process on a large scale

  13. Relative source comparison of the NPE to underground nuclear explosions at local distances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A.T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE) provides an opportunity to compare broadband characteristics of chemical to nuclear explosions at a group of local stations (4 to 40 km distant). The locations for these stations were established on bedrock to record a small partially decoupled nuclear explosion and two nearby nuclear experiments, all shots within {open_quotes}N{close_quotes} Tunnel on Rainier Mesa, Area 12. These sites were also occupied to record aftershocks from the Little Skull Mountain earthquake and chemical explosions from the USGS Sierra Experiment. To minimize calibration errors during this period, redundant instrumentation were used for each event. THe analysis emphasizes the source characteristics of the different explosions. The 300-lb chemical calibration explosion allows removal of path effects from each explosion. The NPE and nearby experiments produce very similar waveforms. The decoupled nuclear explosion and the 300-lb chemical calibration explosion show higher frequency content consistent with a higher corner frequency for the sources.

  14. 30 CFR 75.213 - Roof support removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... mining experience shall perform permanent roof support removal work. (b) Prior to the removal of... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Roof support removal. 75.213 Section 75.213... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Roof Support § 75.213 Roof support removal. (a)(1) All...

  15. Explosion safety in industrial electrostatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, S. V.; Kiss, I.; Berta, I.

    2011-01-01

    Complicated industrial systems are often endangered by electrostatic hazards, both from atmospheric (lightning phenomenon, primary and secondary lightning protection) and industrial (technological problems caused by static charging and fire and explosion hazards.) According to the classical approach protective methods have to be used in order to remove electrostatic charging and to avoid damages, however no attempt to compute the risk before and after applying the protective method is made, relying instead on well-educated and practiced expertise. The Budapest School of Electrostatics - in close cooperation with industrial partners - develops new suitable solutions for probability based decision support (Static Control Up-to-date Technology, SCOUT) using soft computing methods. This new approach can be used to assess and audit existing systems and - using the predictive power of the models - to design and plan activities in industrial electrostatics.

  16. Data mining methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lawrence, Kenneth D; Klimberg, Ronald K

    2007-01-01

    With today's information explosion, many organizations are now able to access a wealth of valuable data. Unfortunately, most of these organizations find they are ill-equipped to organize this information, let alone put it to work for them. Gain a Competitive Advantage Employ data mining in research and forecasting Build models with data management tools and methodology optimization Gain sophisticated breakdowns and complex analysis through multivariate, evolutionary, and neural net methodsLearn how to classify data and maintain qualityTransform Data into Business Acumen Data Mining Methods and

  17. Analysis of ventilation systems subjected to explosive transients: far-field analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, P.K.; Andrae, R.W.; Bolstad, J.W.; Duerre, K.H.; Gregory, W.S.

    1981-11-01

    Progress in developing a far-field explosion simulation computer code is outlined. The term far-field implies that this computer code is suitable for modeling explosive transients in ventilation systems that are far removed from the explosive event and are rather insensitive to the particular characteristics of the explosive event. This type of analysis is useful when little detailed information is available and the explosive event is described parametrically. The code retains all the features of the TVENT code and allows completely compressible flow with inertia and choking effects. Problems that illustrate the capabilities and limitations of the code are described

  18. Uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheeseman, E.W.

    1980-01-01

    The international uranium market appears to be currently over-supplied with a resultant softening in prices. Buyers on the international market are unhappy about some of the restrictions placed on sales by the government, and Canadian sales may suffer as a result. About 64 percent of Canada's shipments come from five operating Ontario mines, with the balance from Saskatchewan. Several other properties will be producing within the next few years. In spite of the adverse effects of the Three Mile Island incident and the default by the T.V.A. of their contract, some 3 600 tonnes of new uranium sales were completed during the year. The price for uranium had stabilized at US $42 - $44 by mid 1979, but by early 1980 had softened somewhat. The year 1979 saw the completion of major environmental hearings in Ontario and Newfoundland and the start of the B.C. inquiry. Two more hearings are scheduled for Saskatchewan in 1980. The Elliot Lake uranium mining expansion hearings are reviewed, as are other recent hearings. In the production of uranium for nuclear fuel cycle, environmental matters are of major concern to the industry, the public and to governments. Research is being conducted to determine the most effective method for removing radium from tailings area effluents. Very stringent criteria are being drawn up by the regulatory agencies that must be met by the industry in order to obtain an operating licence from the AECB. These criteria cover seepages from the tailings basin and through the tailings retention dam, seismic stability, and both short and long term management of the tailings waste management area. (auth)

  19. R-22 vapor explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.P.; Armstrong, D.R.

    1977-01-01

    Previous experimental and theoretical studies of R-22 vapor explosions are reviewed. Results from two experimental investigations of vapor explosions in a medium scale R-22/water system are reported. Measurements following the drop of an unrestrained mass of R-22 into a water tank demonstrated the existence of two types of interaction behavior. Release of a constrained mass of R-22 beneath the surface of a water tank improved the visual resolution of the system thus allowing identification of two interaction mechansims: at low water temperatures, R-22/water contact would produce immediate violent boiling; at high water temperatures a vapor film formed around its R-22 as it was released, explosions were generated by a surface wave which initiated at a single location and propagated along the vapor film as a shock wave. A new vapor explosion model is proposed, it suggests explosions are the result of a sequence of three independent steps: an initial mixing phase, a trigger and growth phase, and a mature phase where a propagating shock wave accelerates the two liquids into a collapsing vapor layer causing a high velocity impact which finely fragments and intermixes the two liquids

  20. Development and Application of Blast Casting Technique in Large-Scale Surface Mines: A Case Study of Heidaigou Surface Coal Mine in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Blast casting is a high-efficiency technique applied in surface mines for overburden removal and results in stripping cost savings. According to ballistic theory and center-of-mass frame basic movement principles, key factors influencing blast casting effect were analyzed, which include bench height and mining panel width, inclined angle of blast holes, explosive unit consumption (EUC, delay-time interval, presplitting, and blast hole pattern parameters. An intelligent design software was developed for obtaining better breaking and casting effect, and the error rates predicted with actual result can be controlled with 10%. Blast casting technique was successfully applied in Heidaigou Surface Coal Mine (HSCM with more than 34% of material casted into the inner dump. A ramp ditch was set within the middle inner dump for coal transportation. The procedure of stripping and excavating was implemented separately and alternately in the two sections around the middle ramp ditch. An unconstrained-nonlinear model was deduced for optimizing the shift distance of the middle ramp. The calculation results show that optimum shift distance of HSCM is 480 m, and the middle ditch should be shifted after 6 blast casting mining panels being stripped.

  1. Mine drivage in hydraulic mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehkber, B Ya

    1983-09-01

    From 20 to 25% of labor cost in hydraulic coal mines falls on mine drivage. Range of mine drivage is high due to the large number of shortwalls mined by hydraulic monitors. Reducing mining cost in hydraulic mines depends on lowering drivage cost by use of new drivage systems or by increasing efficiency of drivage systems used at present. The following drivage methods used in hydraulic mines are compared: heading machines with hydraulic haulage of cut rocks and coal, hydraulic monitors with hydraulic haulage, drilling and blasting with hydraulic haulage of blasted rocks. Mining and geologic conditions which influence selection of the optimum mine drivage system are analyzed. Standardized cross sections of mine roadways driven by the 3 methods are shown in schemes. Support systems used in mine roadways are compared: timber supports, roof bolts, roof bolts with steel elements, and roadways driven in rocks without a support system. Heading machines (K-56MG, GPKG, 4PU, PK-3M) and hydraulic monitors (GMDTs-3M, 12GD-2) used for mine drivage are described. Data on mine drivage in hydraulic coal mines in the Kuzbass are discussed. From 40 to 46% of roadways are driven by heading machines with hydraulic haulage and from 12 to 15% by hydraulic monitors with hydraulic haulage.

  2. Death and injury caused by land mines in Burma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougen, H P; Petersen, H D; Lykke, J

    2000-01-01

    One hundred and eighty-eight Burmese refugees in Thailand were interviewed. One hundred and five of those interviewed had knowledge of a total of 313 persons who had been exposed to land mine explosions. Twenty-three of the interviewed were land mine survivors. They were all male, aged between ei...

  3. Novel high explosive compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, D.D.; Fein, M.M.; Schoenfelder, C.W.

    1968-04-16

    This is a technique of preparing explosive compositions by the in-situ reaction of polynitroaliphatic compounds with one or more carboranes or carborane derivatives. One or more polynitroaliphatic reactants are combined with one or more carborane reactants in a suitable container and mixed to a homogeneous reaction mixture using a stream of inert gas or conventional mixing means. Ordinarily the container is a fissure, crack, or crevice in which the explosive is to be implanted. The ratio of reactants will determine not only the stoichiometry of the system, but will effect the quality and quantity of combustion products, the explosive force obtained as well as the impact sensitivity. The test values can shift with even relatively slight changes or modifications in the reaction conditions. Eighteen illustrative examples accompany the disclosure. (46 claims)

  4. EVIDENCE FOR METAL ATTENUATION IN ACID MINE WATER BY SULFATE REDUCTION, PENN MINE, CALAVERAS COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Penn Mine in Calaveras County, California, produced Cu from massive sulfide ores from 1861 to 1953. Mine wastes were removed to a landfill during the late 1990s, improving surface-water quality, but deep mine workings were not remediated and contain metalliferous water with p...

  5. Web Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürnkranz, Johannes

    The World-Wide Web provides every internet citizen with access to an abundance of information, but it becomes increasingly difficult to identify the relevant pieces of information. Research in web mining tries to address this problem by applying techniques from data mining and machine learning to Web data and documents. This chapter provides a brief overview of web mining techniques and research areas, most notably hypertext classification, wrapper induction, recommender systems and web usage mining.

  6. Bioremediation of mine water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Robert; Tischler, Judith S; Mühling, Martin; Schlömann, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Caused by the oxidative dissolution of sulfide minerals, mine waters are often acidic and contaminated with high concentrations of sulfates, metals, and metalloids. Because the so-called acid mine drainage (AMD) affects the environment or poses severe problems for later use, treatment of these waters is required. Therefore, various remediation strategies have been developed to remove soluble metals and sulfates through immobilization using physical, chemical, and biological approaches. Conventionally, iron and sulfate-the main pollutants in mine waters-are removed by addition of neutralization reagents and subsequent chemical iron oxidation and sulfate mineral precipitation. Biological treatment strategies take advantage of the ability of microorganisms that occur in mine waters to metabolize iron and sulfate. As a rule, these can be grouped into oxidative and reductive processes, reflecting the redox state of mobilized iron (reduced form) and sulfur (oxidized form) in AMD. Changing the redox states of iron and sulfur results in iron and sulfur compounds with low solubility, thus leading to their precipitation and removal. Various techniques have been developed to enhance the efficacy of these microbial processes, as outlined in this review.

  7. High-nitrogen explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naud, D. (Darren); Hiskey, M. A. (Michael A.); Kramer, J. F. (John F.); Bishop, R. L. (Robert L.); Harry, H. H. (Herbert H.); Son, S. F. (Steven F.); Sullivan, G. K. (Gregg K.)

    2002-01-01

    The syntheses and characterization of various tetrazine and furazan compounds offer a different approach to explosives development. Traditional explosives - such as TNT or RDX - rely on the oxidation of the carbon and hydrogen atoms by the oxygen carrying nitro group to produce the explosive energy. High-nitrogen compounds rely instead on large positive heats of formation for that energy. Some of these high-nitrogen compounds have been shown to be less sensitive to initiation (e.g. by impact) when compared to traditional nitro-containing explosives of similar performances. Using the precursor, 3,6-bis-(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)-s-tetrazine (BDT), several useful energetic compounds based on the s-tetrazine system have been synthesized and studied. The compound, 3,3{prime}-azobis(6-amino-s-tetrazine) or DAAT, detonates as a half inch rate stick despite having no oxygen in the molecule. Using perfluoroacetic acid, DAAT can be oxidized to give mixtures of N-oxide isomers (DAAT03.5) with an average oxygen content of about 3.5. This energetic mixture burns at extremely high rates and with low dependency on pressure. Another tetrazine compound of interest is 3,6-diguanidino-s-tetrazine(DGT) and its dinitrate and diperchlorate salts. DGT is easily synthesized by reacting BDT with guanidine in methanol. Using Caro's acid, DGT can be further oxidized to give 3,6-diguanidino-s-tetrazine-1,4-di-N-oxide (DGT-DO). Like DGT, the di-N-oxide can react with nitric acid or perchloric acid to give the dinitrate and the diperchlorate salts. The compounds, 4,4{prime}-diamino-3,3{prime}-azoxyfurazan (DAAF) and 4,4{prime}-diamino-3,3{prime}-azofurazan (DAAzF), may have important future roles in insensitive explosive applications. Neither DAAF nor DAAzF can be initiated by laboratory impact drop tests, yet both have in some aspects better explosive performances than 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene TATB - the standard of insensitive high explosives. The thermal stability of DAAz

  8. Removal of ammonium ions by laboratory-synthesized zeolite linde type A adsorption from water samples affected by mining activities in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwakye-Awuah, Bright; Labik, Linus Kweku; Nkrumah, Isaac; Williams, Craig

    2014-03-01

    Ammonium ion adsorption by laboratory-synthesized zeolite (linde type A; LTA) was investigated in batch kinetics experiments. Synthesized zeolite LTA was characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and particle size analysis. Water samples were taken from the Nyam and Tano rivers in Ghana, and 0.8 g of zeolite was added to 100 ml portions of each sample. Portions of the samples were withdrawn every 30 min for 150 min and the concentration of ammonia in each sample was determined. The removal efficiency of zeolite LTA was evaluated by retrieving the zeolite from the water samples and adding to a fresh sample to repeat the process. Equilibrium data were fitted by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Maximum adsorption capacities were 72.99 mg g(-1) for samples from the River Nyam and 72.87 mg g(-1) for samples from the River Tano. The equilibrium kinetic data were analysed using adsorption kinetic models: pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order kinetic models. Linear regression was used to estimate the adsorption and kinetic parameters. The results showed that the adsorption followed pseudo-second order kinetics and suggest that zeolite LTA is a good adsorbent for the removal of nitrogen ammonia from water.

  9. Removal of zinc by live, dead, and dried biomass of Fusarium spp. isolated from the abandoned-metal mine in South Korea and its perspective of producing nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velmurugan, Palanivel; Shim, Jaehong; You, Youngnam; Choi, Songho; Kamala-Kannan, Seralathan; Lee, Kui-Jae; Kim, Hee Joung; Oh, Byung-Taek

    2010-01-01

    Bioremediation is an innovative and alternative technology to remove heavy metal pollutants from aqueous solution using biomass from various microorganisms like algae, fungi and bacteria. In this study biosorption of zinc onto live, dead and dried biomass of Fusarium spp. was investigated as a function of initial zinc(II) concentration, pH, temperature, agitation and inoculum volume. It was observed that dried, dead and live biomass efficiently removed zinc at 60 min at an initial pH of 6.0 ± 0.3. Temperature of 40 deg. C was optimum at agitation speed of 150 or 200 rpm. The initial metal concentration (10-320 mg L -1 ) significantly influenced the biosorption of the fungi. Overall, biosorption was high with 30-60% by dried, live and dead biomass. In addition to this, the potential of Fusarium spp. to produce zinc nanocrystals was determined by transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, which showed that dead biomass was not significantly involved in production of zinc nanocrystals.

  10. Removal of zinc by live, dead, and dried biomass of Fusarium spp. isolated from the abandoned-metal mine in South Korea and its perspective of producing nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velmurugan, Palanivel; Shim, Jaehong; You, Youngnam; Choi, Songho; Kamala-Kannan, Seralathan; Lee, Kui-Jae [Division of Biotechnology, Advanced institute of Environment and Bioscience, College of Environmental and Bioresource Sciences, Chonbuk National University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee Joung [Institute of Environmental Research, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Byung-Taek, E-mail: btoh@jbnu.ac.kr [Division of Biotechnology, Advanced institute of Environment and Bioscience, College of Environmental and Bioresource Sciences, Chonbuk National University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Bioremediation is an innovative and alternative technology to remove heavy metal pollutants from aqueous solution using biomass from various microorganisms like algae, fungi and bacteria. In this study biosorption of zinc onto live, dead and dried biomass of Fusarium spp. was investigated as a function of initial zinc(II) concentration, pH, temperature, agitation and inoculum volume. It was observed that dried, dead and live biomass efficiently removed zinc at 60 min at an initial pH of 6.0 {+-} 0.3. Temperature of 40 deg. C was optimum at agitation speed of 150 or 200 rpm. The initial metal concentration (10-320 mg L{sup -1}) significantly influenced the biosorption of the fungi. Overall, biosorption was high with 30-60% by dried, live and dead biomass. In addition to this, the potential of Fusarium spp. to produce zinc nanocrystals was determined by transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, which showed that dead biomass was not significantly involved in production of zinc nanocrystals.

  11. Prevention and protection against propagation of explosionsin underground coal mines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Л. М. Пейч

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the past century, the coal mining industry experienced a large number of explosions leading to a considerable loss of life. The objective of this study is preventing the propagation of methane and/or coal dust explosions through the use of passive water barriers and its implementation to the Spanish coal mining industry. Physical and chemical properties, flammability and explosibility parameters of typical Spanish coals are presented. In this paper,   a flexible approach to meet the requirements of the EN-14591-2:2007 standard is presented for the very specific local conditions, characterized by small cross-sections galleries, vertical seem, use of explosives, etc. Authors have proven the viability of standard requirements to the typical roadway from Spanish underground mines, considering realistic roadway lengths as well as available cross-sections taking into account ubiquitous obstacles such as: locomotives, conveyor belt, ventilation ducts, etc.

  12. False alarms and mine seismicity: An example from the Gentry Mountain mining region, Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, S.R.

    1992-01-01

    Mining regions are a cause of concern for monitoring of nuclear test ban treaties because they present the opportunity for clandestine nuclear tests (i.e. decoupled explosions). Mining operations are often characterized by high seismicity rates and can provide the cover for excavating voids for decoupling. Chemical explosions (seemingly as part of normal mining activities) can be used to complicate the signals from a simultaneous decoupled nuclear explosion. Thus, most concern about mines has dealt with the issue of missed violations to a test ban treaty. In this study, we raise the diplomatic concern of false alarms associated with mining activities. Numerous reports and papers have been published about anomalous seismicity associated with mining activities. As part of a large discrimination study in the western US (Taylor et al., 1989), we had one earthquake that was consistently classified as an explosion. The magnitude 3.5 disturbance occurred on May 14, 1981 and was conspicuous in its lack of Love waves, relative lack of high- frequency energy, low Lg/Pg ratio, and high m b - M s . A moment-tensor solution by Patton and Zandt (1991) indicated the event had a large implosional component. The event occurred in the Gentry Mountain coal mining region in the eastern Wasatch Plateau, Utah. Using a simple source representation, we modeled the event as a tabular excavation collapse that occurred as a result of normal mining activities. This study raises the importance of having a good catalogue of seismic data and information about mining activities from potential proliferant nations

  13. Text Mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trybula, Walter J.

    1999-01-01

    Reviews the state of research in text mining, focusing on newer developments. The intent is to describe the disparate investigations currently included under the term text mining and provide a cohesive structure for these efforts. A summary of research identifies key organizations responsible for pushing the development of text mining. A section…

  14. Surface mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert Leopold; Bruce Rowland; Reed Stalder

    1979-01-01

    The surface mining process consists of four phases: (1) exploration; (2) development; (3) production; and (4) reclamation. A variety of surface mining methods has been developed, including strip mining, auger, area strip, open pit, dredging, and hydraulic. Sound planning and design techniques are essential to implement alternatives to meet the myriad of laws,...

  15. Uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, G.

    1975-01-01

    The winning of uranium ore is the first stage of the fuel cycle. The whole complex of questions to be considered when evaluating the profitability of an ore mine is shortly outlined, and the possible mining techniques are described. Some data on uranium mining in the western world are also given. (RB) [de

  16. Explosive material treatment in particular the explosive compaction of powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruemmer, R.

    1985-01-01

    The constructive use of explosives in the last decades has led to new procedures in manufacturing techniques. The most important of these are explosive forming and cladding, the latter especially for the production of compound materials. The method of explosive compaction has the highest potential for further innovation. Almost theoretical densities are achievable in the green compacts as the pressure released by detonating explosives are very high. Also, the production of new conditions of materials (metastable high pressure phases) is possible. (orig.) [de

  17. Radiological control in a mine with a naturally-occurring radioactive material -NORM: III assessment of removable surface contamination in a pilot plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, W.S.; Py Junior, D.A.; Silva, A.C.A.; Garcia Filho, O., E-mail: pereiraws@gmail.com [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Unidade de Tratamento de Minerio. Grupo Multidisciplinar de Radioprotecao; Kelecom, A., E-mail: akelecom@id.uff.br [Universidade Federal Fluminense (GETA/LARARA-PLS/UFF), Niteroi, RJ, (Brazil). Grupo de Estudos em Temas Ambientais. Lab. de Radiobiologia e Radiometria; Pereira, J.R.S., E-mail: pereirarsj@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Alfenas (UNIFAL), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Ore Treatment Unit (OUT) possesses a process laboratory. Considering the uranium ore processing, this laboratory works in close cooperation with the Radiation Protection Service of the Unit. In the year of 2009 a pilot plant for the development of solvent uranium extraction from the phosphate ore of the mine of Santa Quiteria city, in Ceara State, Brazil was developed. In this kind of plant the surface contamination may cause contamination for Occupational Exposed Individuals (OEI). In order to control this kind of contamination and offer a safety work's condition for OEIs, a monitoring program of transferable contamination using swab samples was developed. 162 swabs were made. For the alpha emitters the monitoring results varied from 0.001 Bq cm{sup -2} to 0.014 Bq cm{sup -2}, with average value of 0.002 Bq cm{sup -2}. For beta emitters the results varied from 0.010 Bq cm{sup -2} to 0.031 Bq cm{sup -2} with average equal to 0.011 Bq cm{sup -2}. For alpha emitters, 87.65 % of the results were below 0.004 Bq cm{sup -2}, values that are one order of magnitude smaller than the limit and the maximum value stayed in 35 % of the limit for an object to be considered contaminated. For beta emitters, 90 % of the results were below 0.010 Bq cm{sup -2} that corresponds to 25 % of the limit and 100 % were below 0.031 Bq cm{sup -2} below the limit for an object to be considered contaminated. In both cases any object monitored during the operation, was not considered contaminated, proving the good practices employed in the laboratory, resultant of the good planning of the Radiation Protection Service for the operations' process. (author)

  18. Radiological control in a mine with a naturally-occurring radioactive material -NORM: III assessment of removable surface contamination in a pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, W.S.; Py Junior, D.A.; Silva, A.C.A.; Garcia Filho, O.

    2013-01-01

    Ore Treatment Unit (OUT) possesses a process laboratory. Considering the uranium ore processing, this laboratory works in close cooperation with the Radiation Protection Service of the Unit. In the year of 2009 a pilot plant for the development of solvent uranium extraction from the phosphate ore of the mine of Santa Quiteria city, in Ceara State, Brazil was developed. In this kind of plant the surface contamination may cause contamination for Occupational Exposed Individuals (OEI). In order to control this kind of contamination and offer a safety work's condition for OEIs, a monitoring program of transferable contamination using swab samples was developed. 162 swabs were made. For the alpha emitters the monitoring results varied from 0.001 Bq cm -2 to 0.014 Bq cm -2 , with average value of 0.002 Bq cm -2 . For beta emitters the results varied from 0.010 Bq cm -2 to 0.031 Bq cm -2 with average equal to 0.011 Bq cm -2 . For alpha emitters, 87.65 % of the results were below 0.004 Bq cm -2 , values that are one order of magnitude smaller than the limit and the maximum value stayed in 35 % of the limit for an object to be considered contaminated. For beta emitters, 90 % of the results were below 0.010 Bq cm -2 that corresponds to 25 % of the limit and 100 % were below 0.031 Bq cm -2 below the limit for an object to be considered contaminated. In both cases any object monitored during the operation, was not considered contaminated, proving the good practices employed in the laboratory, resultant of the good planning of the Radiation Protection Service for the operations' process. (author)

  19. Advanced mercury removal from gold leachate solutions prior to gold and silver extraction: a field study from an active gold mine in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlock, Matthew M; Howerton, Brock S; Van Aelstyn, Mike A; Nordstrom, Fredrik L; Atwood, David A

    2002-04-01

    Mercury contamination in the Gold-Cyanide Process (GCP) is a serious health and environmental problem. Following the heap leaching of gold and silver ores with NaCN solutions, portions of the mercury-cyano complexes often adhere to the activated carbon (AC) used to extract the gold. During the electrowinning and retorting steps, mercury can be (and often is) emitted to the air as a vapor. This poses a severe health hazard to plant workers and the local environment. Additional concerns relate to the safety of workers when handling the mercury-laden AC. Currently, mercury treatment from the heap leach solution is nonexistent. This is due to the fact that chelating ligands which can effectively work under the adverse pH conditions (as present in the heap leachate solutions) do not exist. In an effort to economically and effectively treat the leachate solution prior to passing over the AC, a dipotassium salt of 1,3-benzenediamidoethanethiol (BDET2-) has been developed to irreversibly bind and precipitate the mercury. The ligand has proven to be highly effective by selectively reducing mercury levels from average initial concentrations of 34.5 ppm (parts per million) to 0.014 ppm within 10 min and to 0.008 ppm within 15 min. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR), Raman, and infrared (IR) spectroscopy demonstrate the formation of a mercury-ligand compound, which remains insoluble over pH ranges of 0.0-14.0. Leachate samples from an active gold mine in Peru have been analyzed using cold vapor atomic fluorescence (CVAF) and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) for metal concentrations before and after treatment with the BDET2- ligand.

  20. Natural gas production from underground nuclear explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1965-01-01

    A remote location in Rio Arriba County, NW. New Mexico, is being considered as the site for an experiment in the use of a nuclear explosive to increase production from a natural gas field. A feasibility study has been conducted by the El Paso Natural Gas Co., the U.S. Atomic Energy commission, and the U.S. Bureau of Mines. As presently conceived, a nuclear explosive would be set in an emplacement hole and detonated. The explosion would create a cylinder or ''chimney'' of collapsed rock, and a network of fractures extending beyond the chimney. The fractures are the key effect. These would consist of new fractures, enlargement of existing ones, and movement along planes where strata overlap. In addition, there are a number of intangible but important benefits that could accrue from the stimulating effect. Among these are the great increase in recoverable reserves and the deliverability of large volumes of gas during the periods of high demand. It is believed that this type of well stimulation may increase the total gas production of these low permeability natural gas fields by about 7 times the amounts now attainable.

  1. 75 FR 1085 - Commerce in Explosives; List of Explosive Materials (2009R-18T)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-08

    ... sensitive slurry and water gel explosives. Blasting caps. Blasting gelatin. Blasting powder. BTNEC [bis.... Explosive conitrates. Explosive gelatins. Explosive liquids. Explosive mixtures containing oxygen-releasing... powder. Fulminate of mercury. Fulminate of silver. Fulminating gold. Fulminating mercury. Fulminating...

  2. 75 FR 70291 - Commerce in Explosives; List of Explosive Materials (2010R-27T)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-17

    ..., including non-cap sensitive slurry and water gel explosives. Blasting caps. Blasting gelatin. Blasting.... Explosive conitrates. Explosive gelatins. Explosive liquids. Explosive mixtures containing oxygen-releasing... powder. Fulminate of mercury. Fulminate of silver. Fulminating gold. Fulminating mercury. Fulminating...

  3. Explosive composition containing water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cattermole, G.R.; Lyerly, W.M.; Cummings, A.M.

    1971-11-26

    This addition to Fr. 1,583,223, issued 31 May 1968, describes an explosive composition containing a water in oil emulsion. The composition contains an oxidizing mineral salt, a nitrate base salt as sensitizer, water, an organic fuel, a lipophilic emulsifier, and incorporates gas bubbles. The composition has a performance which is improved over and above the original patent.

  4. 75 FR 5545 - Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ... the Storage of Ammonium Nitrate. OSHA subsequently made several minor revisions to the standard (37 FR... explosives; storing ammonium nitrate; and storing small arms ammunition, small arms primers, and small arms..., which is extremely widespread, causes lung disease, silicosis and lung cancer. Terminating the...

  5. Contract Mining versus Owner Mining

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owner

    mining companies can concentrate on their core businesses while using specialists for ... 2 Definition of Contract and Owner. Mining ... equipment maintenance, scheduling and budgeting ..... No. Region. Amount Spent on. Contract Mining. ($ billion). Percent of. Total. 1 ... cost and productivity data based on a large range.

  6. Elaboration of the Charge Constructions of Explosives for the Structure of Facing Stone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomeriki, Sergo; Mataradze, Edgar; Chikhradze, Nikoloz; Losaberidze, Marine; Khomeriki, Davit; Shatberashvili, Grigol

    2017-12-01

    Increased demand for high-strength facing material caused the enhancement of the volume of explosives use in modern technologies of blocks production. The volume of broken rocks and crushing quality depends on the rock characteristics and on the properties of the explosive, in particular on its brisance and serviceability. Therefore, the correct selection of the explosive for the specific massif is of a considerable practical importance. For efficient mining of facing materials by explosion method the solving of such problems as determination of the method of blasthole drilling as well as of the regime and charge values, selection of the explosive, blastholes distribution in the face and their order is necessary. This paper focuses on technical solutions for conservation of rock natural structure in the blocks of facing material, mined by the use of the explosives. It has been established that the efficient solving of mentioned problem is attained by reducing of shock pulse duration. In such conditions the rigidity of crystalline lattice increases in high pressure area. As a result, the hazard if crack formation in structural unites and the increases of natural cracks are excluded. Short-time action of explosion pulse is possible only by linear charges of the explosives, characterized by high detonation velocity which detonate by the velocity of 7-7.5 km/sec and are characterized by very small critical diameter.

  7. Removal of Pb(II) ions from aqueous solution by a waste mud from copper mine industry: equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdes, Duygu; Gundogdu, Ali; Kemer, Baris; Duran, Celal; Senturk, Hasan Basri; Soylak, Mustafa

    2009-07-30

    The objective of this study was to assess the adsorption potential of a waste mud (WM) for the removal of lead (Pb(II)) ions from aqueous solutions. The WM was activated with NaOH in order to increase its adsorption capacity. Adsorption studies were conducted in a batch system as a function of solution pH, contact time, initial Pb(II) concentration, activated-waste mud (a-WM) concentration, temperature, etc. Optimum pH was specified as 4.0. The adsorption kinetic studies indicated that the overall adsorption process was best described by pseudo-second-order kinetics. The equilibrium adsorption capacity of a-WM was obtained by using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models and both models fitted well. Adsorption capacity for Pb(II) was found to be 24.4 mg g(-1) for 10 g L(-1) of a-WM concentration. Thermodynamic parameters including the Gibbs free energy (Delta G degrees), enthalpy (Delta H degrees), and entropy (DeltaS degrees) indicated that the adsorption of Pb(II) ions on the a-WM was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic, at temperature range of 0-40 degrees C. Desorption studies were carried out successfully with diluted HCl solutions. The results indicate that a-WM can be used as an effective and no-cost adsorbent for the treatment of industrial wastewaters contaminated with Pb(II) ions.

  8. Removal of Pb(II) ions from aqueous solution by a waste mud from copper mine industry: Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozdes, Duygu; Gundogdu, Ali; Kemer, Baris; Duran, Celal; Senturk, Hasan Basri; Soylak, Mustafa

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the adsorption potential of a waste mud (WM) for the removal of lead (Pb(II)) ions from aqueous solutions. The WM was activated with NaOH in order to increase its adsorption capacity. Adsorption studies were conducted in a batch system as a function of solution pH, contact time, initial Pb(II) concentration, activated-waste mud (a-WM) concentration, temperature, etc. Optimum pH was specified as 4.0. The adsorption kinetic studies indicated that the overall adsorption process was best described by pseudo-second-order kinetics. The equilibrium adsorption capacity of a-WM was obtained by using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models and both models fitted well. Adsorption capacity for Pb(II) was found to be 24.4 mg g -1 for 10 g L -1 of a-WM concentration. Thermodynamic parameters including the Gibbs free energy (ΔG o ), enthalpy (ΔH o ), and entropy (ΔS o ) indicated that the adsorption of Pb(II) ions on the a-WM was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic, at temperature range of 0-40 o C. Desorption studies were carried out successfully with diluted HCl solutions. The results indicate that a-WM can be used as an effective and no-cost adsorbent for the treatment of industrial wastewaters contaminated with Pb(II) ions.

  9. Intracellular biosynthesis and removal of copper nanoparticles by dead biomass of yeast isolated from the wastewater of a mine in the Brazilian Amazonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia R Salvadori

    Full Text Available In this study was developed a natural process using a biological system for the biosynthesis of nanoparticles (NPs and possible removal of copper from wastewater by dead biomass of the yeast Rhodotorula mucilaginosa. Dead and live biomass of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa was used to analyze the equilibrium and kinetics of copper biosorption by the yeast in function of the initial metal concentration, contact time, pH, temperature, agitation and inoculum volume. Dead biomass exhibited the highest biosorption capacity of copper, 26.2 mg g(-1, which was achieved within 60 min of contact, at pH 5.0, temperature of 30°C, and agitation speed of 150 rpm. The equilibrium data were best described by the Langmuir isotherm and Kinetic analysis indicated a pseudo-second-order model. The average size, morphology and location of NPs biosynthesized by the yeast were determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The shape of the intracellularly synthesized NPs was mainly spherical, with an average size of 10.5 nm. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS analysis of the copper NPs confirmed the formation of metallic copper. The dead biomass of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa may be considered an efficiently bioprocess, being fast and low-cost to production of copper nanoparticles and also a probably nano-adsorbent of this metal ion in wastewater in bioremediation process.

  10. Removal of Pb(II) ions from aqueous solution by a waste mud from copper mine industry: Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozdes, Duygu; Gundogdu, Ali; Kemer, Baris; Duran, Celal; Senturk, Hasan Basri [Department of Chemistry, Karadeniz Technical University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Soylak, Mustafa, E-mail: soylak@erciyes.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Erciyes University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)

    2009-07-30

    The objective of this study was to assess the adsorption potential of a waste mud (WM) for the removal of lead (Pb(II)) ions from aqueous solutions. The WM was activated with NaOH in order to increase its adsorption capacity. Adsorption studies were conducted in a batch system as a function of solution pH, contact time, initial Pb(II) concentration, activated-waste mud (a-WM) concentration, temperature, etc. Optimum pH was specified as 4.0. The adsorption kinetic studies indicated that the overall adsorption process was best described by pseudo-second-order kinetics. The equilibrium adsorption capacity of a-WM was obtained by using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models and both models fitted well. Adsorption capacity for Pb(II) was found to be 24.4 mg g{sup -1} for 10 g L{sup -1} of a-WM concentration. Thermodynamic parameters including the Gibbs free energy ({Delta}G{sup o}), enthalpy ({Delta}H{sup o}), and entropy ({Delta}S{sup o}) indicated that the adsorption of Pb(II) ions on the a-WM was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic, at temperature range of 0-40 {sup o}C. Desorption studies were carried out successfully with diluted HCl solutions. The results indicate that a-WM can be used as an effective and no-cost adsorbent for the treatment of industrial wastewaters contaminated with Pb(II) ions.

  11. 30 CFR 817.87 - Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste...-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES § 817.87 Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization. (a) Coal mine... extinguishing operations. (b) No burning or unburned coal mine waste shall be removed from a permitted disposal...

  12. 30 CFR 816.87 - Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste...-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.87 Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization. (a) Coal mine... extinguishing operations. (b) No burning or burned coal mine waste shall be removed from a permitted disposal...

  13. Auxiliary mine ventilation manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Workplace Safety North

    2010-01-01

    An adequate ventilation system is needed for air quality and handling in a mine and is comprised of many different pieces of equipment for removing contaminated air and supplying fresh air and thereby provide a satisfactory working environment. This manual highlights auxiliary ventilation systems made up of small fans, ducts, tubes, air movers, deflectors and additional air flow controls which distribute fresh air delivered by the primary system to all areas. A review of auxiliary ventilation is provided. Design, operation and management issues are discussed and guidelines are furnished. This manual is limited to underground hard rock operations and does not address directly other, specific auxiliary systems, either in underground coal mines or uranium mines.

  14. Auxiliary mine ventilation manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Workplace Safety North

    2010-07-01

    An adequate ventilation system is needed for air quality and handling in a mine and is comprised of many different pieces of equipment for removing contaminated air and supplying fresh air and thereby provide a satisfactory working environment. This manual highlights auxiliary ventilation systems made up of small fans, ducts, tubes, air movers, deflectors and additional air flow controls which distribute fresh air delivered by the primary system to all areas. A review of auxiliary ventilation is provided. Design, operation and management issues are discussed and guidelines are furnished. This manual is limited to underground hard rock operations and does not address directly other, specific auxiliary systems, either in underground coal mines or uranium mines.

  15. Characterization of airborne float coal dust emitted during continuous mining, longwall mining and belt transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahan, M R; Seaman, C E; Beck, T W; Colinet, J F; Mischler, S E

    2017-09-01

    Float coal dust is produced by various mining methods, carried by ventilating air and deposited on the floor, roof and ribs of mine airways. If deposited, float dust is re-entrained during a methane explosion. Without sufficient inert rock dust quantities, this float coal dust can propagate an explosion throughout mining entries. Consequently, controlling float coal dust is of critical interest to mining operations. Rock dusting, which is the adding of inert material to airway surfaces, is the main control technique currently used by the coal mining industry to reduce the float coal dust explosion hazard. To assist the industry in reducing this hazard, the Pittsburgh Mining Research Division of the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health initiated a project to investigate methods and technologies to reduce float coal dust in underground coal mines through prevention, capture and suppression prior to deposition. Field characterization studies were performed to determine quantitatively the sources, types and amounts of dust produced during various coal mining processes. The operations chosen for study were a continuous miner section, a longwall section and a coal-handling facility. For each of these operations, the primary dust sources were confirmed to be the continuous mining machine, longwall shearer and conveyor belt transfer points, respectively. Respirable and total airborne float dust samples were collected and analyzed for each operation, and the ratio of total airborne float coal dust to respirable dust was calculated. During the continuous mining process, the ratio of total airborne float coal dust to respirable dust ranged from 10.3 to 13.8. The ratios measured on the longwall face were between 18.5 and 21.5. The total airborne float coal dust to respirable dust ratio observed during belt transport ranged between 7.5 and 21.8.

  16. Preliminary report on LLNL mine seismicity deployment at the Twentymile Coal Mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, W.R.; Hunter, S.L.; Glenn, L.A.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes the preliminary results of a just completed experiment at the Twentymile Coal Mine, operated by the Cyprus Amax Coal Company near Oak Creek, CO. The purpose of the experiment was to obtain local and regional seismic data from roof caves associated with long-wall mining activities and to use this data to help determine the effectiveness with which these events can be discriminated from underground nuclear explosions under a future Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty

  17. Cavities produced by underground nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butkovich, T.R.

    1976-01-01

    This investigation studied the displacement of rock that formerly occupied cavities produced by underground nuclear explosions. There are three possible explanations for this displacement: the volume could be displaced to the free surface; it could occupy previously air-filled pores removed from the surrounding rock through compaction; or it could be accounted for by persisting compressive stresses induced by the outgoing shock wave. The analysis shows it unlikely that stored residual elastic stresses account for large fractions of cavity volumes. There is limited experimental evidence that free surface displacement accounts for a significant portion of this volume. Whenever the explosion mediums contain air-filled pores, the compaction of these pores most likely accounts for all the volume. Calculations show that 4 percent air-filled porosity can account for all the cavity volume within about 4 cavity radii and that even 1 percent can account for a significant fraction of the volume

  18. Gas pollutants from detonation and combustion of industrial explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, J.; Pines, A.; Gois, J.C.; Portugal, A. (University of Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal). Mechanical Engineering Dept.)

    1993-01-01

    The potential hazards of fumes, from blasting operations in underground mines, have long been recognised. Beyond this normal use of explosives, there are also large amounts of energy substances which cannot be used because their life time is outdated or they are not within the minimal quality requirements. There is a lack of information concerning tests, procedures and theoretical predictions of pollutant concentrations in fumes from detonation and combustion operations with industrial explosives. The most common industrial explosives in Portugal are ammonium nitrate-fuel oil compositions (anfo), and dynamite. Recently, ammonium nitrate based emulsion explosives are more and more used in industrial applications. This paper presents the structure and fundamental thermodynamic equations of THOR computer code to calculate the combustion and detonation products (CO[sub 2], CO, H[sub 2]O, N[sub 2], O[sub 2], H[sub 2], OH, NO, H, N, O, HCN, NH[sub 3], NO[sub 2], N[sub 2]O, CH[sub 4] gases and two kinds of solid carbon - graphite and diamond) for the minimum value of Gibbs free energy, using three well known equations of state - BKW, H9 and H12. Detonation experiments are described and gas analysis discussed. Measured pollutants concentrations (CO, CO[sub 2], NO and NO[sub 2]), as a function of volume of explosion chamber, prove the dependence of expansion mechanisms on CO and NO formation and recombination and validate theoretical predictions. Incineration of explosives in a fluidised bed is described. Products composition from isobare adiabatic combustion of selected explosives has been calculated and correlated with previous calculations for a detonation regime. The obtained results demonstrate the possibility of predicting gas composition of detonation and combustion products of industrial explosives. 22 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Health in mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breuer, H

    1978-01-01

    This report summarizes the information gained from research carried out under the five-year programme (1971-1976) relating to health in mines. This programme concentrates on technical means of dust control, and the various aspects of this topic are reviewed. The purpose of the epidemiology of pneumoconiosis is to determine the origin and development of this endemic disease with a view to formulating a policy of worker protection. The constituents of dust and their possible influences are studied. Measuring and determining the characteristics of dusts are the subject of the second group of research projects. Prevention techniques have been proposed, tried out and developed, thus providing the mining industry with a set of dust control methods. water infusion, dedusting on coal-getting and heading machines, control of dust produced by caving, etc. A chapter devoted to iron ore mines discusses means of protection against noxious emissions from Diesel engines and explosives. (Editions available in English, in German, in French, in Italian, and in Dutch)

  20. Development of active barriers for removing heavy metals from mine water: Freiberg colliery, Sachsen; Entwicklung aktiver Barrieren fuer die Entfernung von Schwermetallen aus Grubenwaessern am Beispiel der Freiberger Grube, Sachsen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoumis, T.

    2003-07-01

    Mine water treatment is costly, difficult, and requires extensive surface installations. The author explains the development of geochemical ('active') barriers of low-cost materials. The materials investigated were industrial residues (red sludge, fly ash, tinder residues, porous concrete residues), natural materials (bark, zeolite, bentonite, hydroxyl apatite), and commercial products (GEH, Ratio Pur MF-S). Investigations focused on density, specific surface, grain size, and acid neutralization capacity. In the final stage, experiments were made on heavy metal removal from a model water. [German] Einen grossen Anteil an der Schwermetallbelastung in Fluessen haben toxische Abwaesser aus Bergbaugebieten (Grubenwaesser). Die Moeglichkeit der Behandlung sind sehr aufwendig, kostenintensiv und nur 'ueber Tage' durchfuehrbar. Die vorliegende Arbeit erlaeutert die Behandlung von Grubenwaessern mit geochemischen ('aktiven') Barrieren. Es werden aktive Barrieren entwickelt, die in einen Schacht eingebracht werden koennen, um eine Schwermetallausbreitung zu unterbinden. In diesem Zusammenhang werden kostenguenstige Materialien untersucht, die Schadstoffe durch chemische und/oder physikalische Mechanismen aus Wasser entfernen koennen. Untersucht wurden industrielle Reststoffe (Rotschlamm, Flugasche, Zunderrueckstaende, Porenbetonabfall), natuerliche Materialien (Baumrinde, Zeolith, Bentonit, Hydroxylapatit) und kommerzielle Produkte (GEH, Ratio Pur MF-S). Die Materialien werden hinsichtlich der Dichte, der spezifischen Oberflaeche, der Korngroesse und der Saeureneutralisationskapazitaet charakterisiert. Anschliessend wurden Versuche zur Schwermetallentfernung aus einem Modellwasser durchgefuehrt. (orig.)

  1. Novel methods for detecting buried explosive devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kercel, S.W.; Burlage, R.S.; Patek, D.R.; Smith, C.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hibbs, A.D.; Rayner, T.J. [Quantum Magnetics, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Quantum Magnetics, Inc. (QM) are exploring novel landmine detection technologies. Technologies considered here include bioreporter bacteria, swept acoustic resonance, nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), and semiotic data fusion. Bioreporter bacteria look promising for third-world humanitarian applications; they are inexpensive, and deployment does not require high-tech methods. Swept acoustic resonance may be a useful adjunct to magnetometers in humanitarian demining. For military demining, NQR is a promising method for detecting explosive substances; of 50,000 substances that have been tested, none has an NQR signature that can be mistaken for RDX or TNT. For both military and commercial demining, sensor fusion entails two daunting tasks, identifying fusible features in both present-day and emerging technologies, and devising a fusion algorithm that runs in real-time on cheap hardware. Preliminary research in these areas is encouraging. A bioreporter bacterium for TNT detection is under development. Investigation has just started in swept acoustic resonance as an approach to a cheap mine detector for humanitarian use. Real-time wavelet processing appears to be a key to extending NQR bomb detection into mine detection, including TNT-based mines. Recent discoveries in semiotics may be the breakthrough that will lead to a robust fused detection scheme.

  2. Services Textbook of Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-03-01

    the propagation in such systems of the detonation wave which had been observed in 1881 by Berthelot and Vieille and by Mallard and le Chatelier . In...detonation, Berthelot and Le Chatelier , Dautrich 4 - 63: Calorometric value 4 -- 66, Power of explosive, lead block, Trauzl 4 - 67- Ballistic pendulum 4...the principles of electric ignition were applied to this system also. 75. In 1890-91 Curtius first prepared lead, silver and mercury azides. The

  3. Explosive Leidenfrost droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colinet, Pierre; Moreau, Florian; Dorbolo, Stéphane

    2017-11-01

    We show that Leidenfrost droplets made of an aqueous solution of surfactant undergo a violent explosion in a wide range of initial volumes and concentrations. This unexpected behavior turns out to be triggered by the formation of a gel-like shell, followed by a sharp temperature increase. Comparing a simple model of the radial surfactant distribution inside a spherical droplet with experiments allows highlighting the existence of a critical surface concentration for the shell to form. The temperature rise (attributed to boiling point elevation with surface concentration) is a key feature leading to the explosion, instead of the implosion (buckling) scenario reported by other authors. Indeed, under some conditions, this temperature increase is shown to be sufficient to trigger nucleation and growth of vapor bubbles in the highly superheated liquid bulk, stretching the surrounding elastic shell up to its rupture limit. The successive timescales characterizing this explosion sequence are also discussed. Funding sources: F.R.S. - FNRS (ODILE and DITRASOL projects, RD and SRA positions of P. Colinet and S. Dorbolo), BELSPO (IAP 7/38 MicroMAST project).

  4. Mining and Reclamation Technology Symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None Available

    1999-06-24

    The Mining and Reclamation Technology Symposium was commissioned by the Mountaintop Removal Mining/Valley Fill Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) Interagency Steering Committee as an educational forum for the members of the regulatory community who will participate in the development of the EIS. The Steering Committee sought a balanced audience to ensure the input to the regulatory community reflected the range of perspectives on this complicated and emotional issue. The focus of this symposium is on mining and reclamation technology alternatives, which is one of eleven topics scheduled for review to support development of the EIS. Others include hydrologic, environmental, ecological, and socio-economic issues.

  5. The effect of explosive percentage on underwater explosion energy release of hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane and octogen based aluminized explosives

    OpenAIRE

    Qingjie Jiao; Qiushi Wang; Jianxin Nie; Xueyong Guo; Wei Zhang; Wenqi Fan

    2018-01-01

    To control the explosion energy output by optimizing explosive components is a key requirement in a number of different application areas. The effect of different Al/O Ratio on underwater explosion of aluminized explosives has been studied detailedly. However, the effect of explosive percentage in the same Al/O Ratio is rarely researched, especially for Hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) based aluminized explosives. In this study, we performed the underwater explosion experiments with 1.2-...

  6. Magnesium Aluminum Borides as Explosive Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-20

    pestle and screened -325 mesh to remove the filter paper. However, some of the filter paper remained in this powder. Table 13 Compositions of...Property of Si-B System Ceramics,” J. Japan Soc. Pow. and Pow. Met., 41[11] 1299-1303 (1994). 53. H. Nakamura, K. Murata, T. Anan, and Y. Hara...Oxidation of Zirconium Borides,” J. Japan Explosives Society, 55[4] 142-146 (1994). 54. M. Woerle, R.Nesper, G. Mair, M. Schwarz, and H. G. von Schnering

  7. Mine Water Treatment in Hongai Coal Mines

    OpenAIRE

    Dang Phuong Thao; Dang Vu Chi

    2018-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is recognized as one of the most serious environmental problem associated with mining industry. Acid water, also known as acid mine drainage forms when iron sulfide minerals found in the rock of coal seams are exposed to oxidizing conditions in coal mining. Until 2009, mine drainage in Hongai coal mines was not treated, leading to harmful effects on humans, animals and aquatic ecosystem. This report has examined acid mine drainage problem and techniques for acid mine ...

  8. The classification of explosion-proof protected induction motor into adequate temperature and efficiency class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinovar, Iztok; Srpčič, Gregor; Seme, Sebastijan; Štumberger, Bojan; Hadžiselimović, Miralem

    2017-07-01

    This article deals with the classification of explosion-proof protected induction motors, which are used in hazardous areas, into adequate temperature and efficiency class. Hazardous areas are defined as locations with a potentially explosive atmosphere where explosion may occur due to present of flammable gasses, liquids or combustible dusts (industrial plants, mines, etc.). Electric motors and electrical equipment used in such locations must be specially designed and tested to prevent electrical initiation of explosion due to high surface temperature and arcing contacts. This article presents the basic tests of three-phase explosion-proof protected induction motor with special emphasis on the measuring system and temperature rise test. All the measurements were performed with high-accuracy instrumentation and accessory equipment and carried out at the Institute of energy technology in the Electric machines and drives laboratory and Applied electrical engineering laboratory.

  9. Effect of filling ratio on premixed methane/air explosion in an open-end pipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Guo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The propagation characteristics of premixed methane/air explosion under different filling ratios (20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, 60%, and 100% were studied using an experimental system. The results indicate that the peak overpressure showed a decreasing trend at the initial stage but then showed an increasing trend until reaching its maximum value under different filling ratios. As the explosion propagated to the open end, the overpressure showed a downtrend. At this point, the flame speed initially increased along the pipe but then dropped dramatically. In addition, the explosion overpressure and flame speed increased with the increase of filling ratio. However, when the filling ratio reached 50%, the explosion overpressure and flame speed tended to be stable and the increase was not obvious. These results will be of great importance in evaluating the explosive damage to equipment and human personnel working in coal mines or other chemical industries.

  10. Improvised explosive devices: pathophysiology, injury profiles and current medical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, A; Hill, A M; Clasper, J C

    2009-12-01

    The improvised explosive device (IED), in all its forms, has become the most significant threat to troops operating in Afghanistan and Iraq. These devices range from rudimentary home made explosives to sophisticated weapon systems containing high-grade explosives. Within this broad definition they may be classified as roadside explosives and blast mines, explosive formed pojectile (EFP) devices and suicide bombings. Each of these groups causeinjury through a number of different mechanisms and can result in vastly different injury profiles. The "Global War on Terror" has meant that incidents which were previously exclusively seen in conflict areas, can occur anywhere, and clinicians who are involved in emergency trauma care may be required to manage casualties from similar terrorist attacks. An understanding of the types of devices and their pathophysiological effects is necessary to allow proper planning of mass casualty events and to allow appropriate management of the complex poly-trauma casualties they invariably cause. The aim of this review article is to firstly describe the physics and injury profile from these different devices and secondly to present the current clinical evidence that underpins their medical management.

  11. Extending mine life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Mine layouts, new machines and techniques, research into problem areas of ground control and so on, are highlighted in this report on extending mine life. The main resources taken into account are coal mining, uranium mining, molybdenum and gold mining

  12. Uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The economic and environmental sustainability of uranium mining has been analysed by Monash University researcher Dr Gavin Mudd in a paper that challenges the perception that uranium mining is an 'infinite quality source' that provides solutions to the world's demand for energy. Dr Mudd says information on the uranium industry touted by politicians and mining companies is not necessarily inaccurate, but it does not tell the whole story, being often just an average snapshot of the costs of uranium mining today without reflecting the escalating costs associated with the process in years to come. 'From a sustainability perspective, it is critical to evaluate accurately the true lifecycle costs of all forms of electricity production, especially with respect to greenhouse emissions, ' he says. 'For nuclear power, a significant proportion of greenhouse emissions are derived from the fuel supply, including uranium mining, milling, enrichment and fuel manufacture.' Dr Mudd found that financial and environmental costs escalate dramatically as the uranium ore is used. The deeper the mining process required to extract the ore, the higher the cost for mining companies, the greater the impact on the environment and the more resources needed to obtain the product. I t is clear that there is a strong sensitivity of energy and water consumption and greenhouse emissions to ore grade, and that ore grades are likely to continue to decline gradually in the medium to long term. These issues are critical to the current debate over nuclear power and greenhouse emissions, especially with respect to ascribing sustainability to such activities as uranium mining and milling. For example, mining at Roxby Downs is responsible for the emission of over one million tonnes of greenhouse gases per year and this could increase to four million tonnes if the mine is expanded.'

  13. Implication of the dominant design in electronic initiation systems in the South African mining industry

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smit, FC

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes an emerging technological innovation, namely, electronic initiation systems for mining explosives in South Africa. The concept of electronic initiation is presenting itself as a challenge to traditional initiation systems...

  14. Explosive processes in nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, R.N.

    2002-01-01

    There are many explosive processes in nucleosynthesis: big bang nucleosynthesis, the rp-process, the γ-process, the ν-process, and the r-process. However, I will discuss just the rp-process and the r-process in detail, primarily because both seem to have been very active research areas of late, and because they have great potential for studies with radioactive nuclear beams. I will also discuss briefly the γ-process because of its inevitability in conjunction with the rp-process. (orig.)

  15. Trust Mines: Legal Documents and Settlements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legal Documents and Settlements related to the Northern Abandoned Uranium Mines Region including the Phase 1 Settlement Agreement and Environmental Response Trust Agreement, Phase 2 Settlement Agreement Removal Site Evaluation (RSE) Trust Agreement.

  16. Mine seismicity and the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiappetta, F. [Blasting Analysis International, Allentown, PA (United States); Heuze, F.; Walter, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hopler, R. [Powderman Consulting Inc., Oxford, MD (United States); Hsu, V. [Air Force Technical Applications Center, Patrick AFB, FL (United States); Martin, B. [Thunder Basin Coal Co., Wright, WY (United States); Pearson, C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Stump, B. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States); Zipf, K. [Univ. of New South Wales (Australia)

    1998-12-09

    Surface and underground mining operations generate seismic ground motions which are created by chemical explosions and ground failures. It may come as a surprise to some that the ground failures (coal bumps, first caves, pillar collapses, rockbursts, etc.) can send signals whose magnitudes are as strong or stronger than those from any mining blast. A verification system that includes seismic, infrasound, hydroacoustic and radionuclide sensors is being completed as part of the CTBT. The largest mine blasts and ground failures will be detected by this system and must be identified as distinct from signals generated by small nuclear explosions. Seismologists will analyze the seismic records and presumably should be able to separate them into earthquake-like and non earthquake-like categories, using a variety of so-called seismic discriminants. Non-earthquake essentially means explosion- or implosion-like. Such signals can be generated not only by mine blasts but also by a variety of ground failures. Because it is known that single-fired chemical explosions and nuclear explosion signals of the same yield give very similar seismic records, the non-earthquake signals will be of concern to the Treaty verification community. The magnitude of the mine-related events is in the range of seismicity created by smaller nuclear explosions or decoupled tests, which are of particular concern under the Treaty. It is conceivable that legitimate mining blasts or some mine-induced ground failures could occasionally be questioned. Information such as shot time, location and design parameters may be all that is necessary to resolve the event identity. In rare instances where the legitimate origin of the event could not be resolved by a consultation and clarification procedure, it might trigger on On-Site Inspection (OSI). Because there is uncertainty in the precise location of seismic event as determined by the International Monitoring System (IMS), the OSI can cover an area of up to 1

  17. SLIFER measurement for explosive yield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, R.C.; Benjamin, B.C.; Miller, H.M.; Breding, D.R.

    1976-04-01

    This report describes the shorted location indicator by frequency of electrical resonance (SLIFER) system used at Sandia Laboratories for determination of explosive yield of under ground nuclear tests

  18. Zirconium hydride containing explosive composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Franklin E.; Wasley, Richard J.

    1981-01-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a donor additive comprising a non-explosive compound or mixture of non-explosive compounds which when subjected to an energy fluence of 1000 calories/cm.sup.2 or less is capable of releasing free radicals each having a molecular weight between 1 and 120. Exemplary donor additives are dibasic acids, polyamines and metal hydrides.

  19. Big data mining analysis method based on cloud computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qing Qiu; Cui, Hong Gang; Tang, Hao

    2017-08-01

    Information explosion era, large data super-large, discrete and non-(semi) structured features have gone far beyond the traditional data management can carry the scope of the way. With the arrival of the cloud computing era, cloud computing provides a new technical way to analyze the massive data mining, which can effectively solve the problem that the traditional data mining method cannot adapt to massive data mining. This paper introduces the meaning and characteristics of cloud computing, analyzes the advantages of using cloud computing technology to realize data mining, designs the mining algorithm of association rules based on MapReduce parallel processing architecture, and carries out the experimental verification. The algorithm of parallel association rule mining based on cloud computing platform can greatly improve the execution speed of data mining.

  20. Industrial Mining's flexibility aids in customer satisfaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-08-01

    Mining flexibility and customer specification keeps Industrial Mining of Youngstown, Ohio competitive in a tough environment. The company fills the needs of the small customer who requires a special blend or sized product. Industrial Mining works terrain that was uneconomical to mine before but is now profitable. Draglines and mobile equipment are used for overburden removal for economical and flexible mining with most mining by the contour method. Industrial Mining's preparation plant was constructed in 1979 to enable the company to wash and screen different stoker products and utility coal with a modern on-site lab a quality product can be constantly maintained. A wheel loader is used to feed the hopper from selective stockpiles and this allows blending on the raw side or within the plant.

  1. 76 FR 64974 - Commerce in Explosives; List of Explosive Materials (2011R-18T)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-19

    ... slurry and water gel explosives. Blasting caps. Blasting gelatin. Blasting powder. BTNEC [bis.... Esters of nitro-substituted alcohols. Ethyl-tetryl. Explosive conitrates. Explosive gelatins. Explosive... silver. Fulminating gold. Fulminating mercury. Fulminating platinum. Fulminating silver. G Gelatinized...

  2. 77 FR 58410 - Commerce in Explosives; List of Explosive Materials (2012R-10T)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-20

    ... sensitive slurry and water gel explosives. Blasting caps. Blasting gelatin. Blasting powder. BTNEC [bis.... Esters of nitro-substituted alcohols. Ethyl-tetryl. Explosive conitrates. Explosive gelatins. Explosive.... Fulminate of silver. Fulminating gold. Fulminating mercury. Fulminating platinum. Fulminating silver. G...

  3. Peaceful nuclear explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1975-07-01

    Article V of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) specifies that the potential benefits of peaceful applications of nuclear explosions be made available to non-nuclear weapon states party to the Treaty 'under appropriate international observation and through appropriate international procedures'. The International Atomic Energy Agency's responsibility and technical competence in this respect have been recognized by its Board of Governors, the Agency's General Conference and the United Nations' General Assembly. Since 1968 when the United Nations Conference of Non-Nuclear Weapon States also recommended that the Agency initiate the necessary studies in the peaceful nuclear explosions (PNE) field, the Agency has taken the following steps: 1. The exchange of scientific and technical information has been facilitated by circulating information on the status of the technology and through the Agency's International Nuclear Information System. A bibliography of PNE-related literature was published in 1970. 2. In 1972, guidelines for 'the international observation of PNE under the provisions of NPT and analogous provisions in other international agreements' were developed and approved by the Board of Governors. These guidelines defined the basic purpose of international observation as being to verify that in the course of conducting a PNE project the intent and letter of Articles I and II of the NPT are not violated. 3. In 1974, an advisory group developed 'Procedures for the Agency to Use in Responding to Requests for PNE-Related Services'. These procedures have also been approved by the Board of Governors. 4. The Agency has convened a series of technical meetings which reviewed the 'state-of-the- art'. These meetings were convened in 1970, 1971, 1972 and in January 1975. The Fourth Technical Committee was held in Vienna from 20-24 January 1975 under the chairmanship of Dr. Allen Wilson of Australia with Experts from: Australia, France, Federal

  4. Aspects regarding explosion risk assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Părăian Mihaela

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Explosive risk occurs in all activities involving flammable substances in the form of gases, vapors, mists or dusts which, in mixture with air, can generate an explosive atmosphere. As explosions can cause human losses and huge material damage, the assessment of the explosion risk and the establishment of appropriate measures to reduce it to acceptable levels according to the standards and standards in force is of particular importance for the safety and health of people and goods.There is no yet a recognized method of assessing the explosion risk, but regardless of the applied method, the likelihood of an explosive atmosphere occurrence has to be determined, together with the occurrence of an efficient ignition source and the magnitude of foreseeable consequences. In assessment processes, consequences analysis has a secondary importance since it’s likely that explosions would always involve considerable damage, starting from important material damages and up to human damages that could lead to death.The purpose of the work is to highlight the important principles and elements to be taken into account for a specific risk assessment. An essential element in assessing the risk of explosion in workplaces where explosive atmospheres may occur is technical installations and personal protective equipment (PPE that must be designed, manufactured, installed and maintained so that they cannot generate a source of ignition. Explosion prevention and protection requirements are governed by specific norms and standards, and a main part of the explosion risk assessment is related to the assessment of the compliance of the equipment / installation with these requirements.

  5. Establishing Cynodon dactylon on mining tailings and mining ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mining for copper and cobalt generates extensive mounds of removed topsoil and subsoil, and tailings with toxic levels of copper and cobalt. The threat of soil erosion in a high rainfall regime can be countered with rapid establishment of a sod-forming grass, such as Cynodon dactylon, that covers and binds the soil.

  6. Social big data mining

    CERN Document Server

    Ishikawa, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Social Media. Big Data and Social Data. Hypotheses in the Era of Big Data. Social Big Data Applications. Basic Concepts in Data Mining. Association Rule Mining. Clustering. Classification. Prediction. Web Structure Mining. Web Content Mining. Web Access Log Mining, Information Extraction and Deep Web Mining. Media Mining. Scalability and Outlier Detection.

  7. Introduction to High Explosives Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skidmore, Cary Bradford [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Preston, Daniel N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-17

    These are a set of slides for educational outreach to children on high explosives science. It gives an introduction to the elements involved in this science: carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen. Combined, these form the molecule HMX. Many pictures are also included to illustrate explosions.

  8. Kaliski's explosive driven fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, J.

    1979-01-01

    An experiment performed by a group in Poland on the production of DD fusion neutrons by purely explosive means is discussed. A method for multiplying shock velocities ordinarily available from high explosives by a factor of ten is described, and its application to DD fusion experiments is discussed

  9. False alarms and mine seismicity: An example from the Gentry Mountain mining region, Utah. Los Alamos Source Region Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, S.R.

    1992-09-23

    Mining regions are a cause of concern for monitoring of nuclear test ban treaties because they present the opportunity for clandestine nuclear tests (i.e. decoupled explosions). Mining operations are often characterized by high seismicity rates and can provide the cover for excavating voids for decoupling. Chemical explosions (seemingly as part of normal mining activities) can be used to complicate the signals from a simultaneous decoupled nuclear explosion. Thus, most concern about mines has dealt with the issue of missed violations to a test ban treaty. In this study, we raise the diplomatic concern of false alarms associated with mining activities. Numerous reports and papers have been published about anomalous seismicity associated with mining activities. As part of a large discrimination study in the western US (Taylor et al., 1989), we had one earthquake that was consistently classified as an explosion. The magnitude 3.5 disturbance occurred on May 14, 1981 and was conspicuous in its lack of Love waves, relative lack of high- frequency energy, low Lg/Pg ratio, and high m{sub b} {minus} M{sub s}. A moment-tensor solution by Patton and Zandt (1991) indicated the event had a large implosional component. The event occurred in the Gentry Mountain coal mining region in the eastern Wasatch Plateau, Utah. Using a simple source representation, we modeled the event as a tabular excavation collapse that occurred as a result of normal mining activities. This study raises the importance of having a good catalogue of seismic data and information about mining activities from potential proliferant nations.

  10. Data preprocessing in data mining

    CERN Document Server

    García, Salvador; Herrera, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Data Preprocessing for Data Mining addresses one of the most important issues within the well-known Knowledge Discovery from Data process. Data directly taken from the source will likely have inconsistencies, errors or most importantly, it is not ready to be considered for a data mining process. Furthermore, the increasing amount of data in recent science, industry and business applications, calls to the requirement of more complex tools to analyze it. Thanks to data preprocessing, it is possible to convert the impossible into possible, adapting the data to fulfill the input demands of each data mining algorithm. Data preprocessing includes the data reduction techniques, which aim at reducing the complexity of the data, detecting or removing irrelevant and noisy elements from the data. This book is intended to review the tasks that fill the gap between the data acquisition from the source and the data mining process. A comprehensive look from a practical point of view, including basic concepts and surveying t...

  11. Nuclear explosions and their effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-01-01

    A brief historical background is given of the development of the atomic bomb. Also included is an account of the Hiroshima-Nagasaki bombing, plus some information on the testing and production of nuclear weapons by the United States, United Kingdom, and Russia. More detailed consideration is given to the following: the scientific principles of fission and fusion explosions; the energy released in fission and the radioactivity of fission products; blast, thermal, and radiologicalal effects of nuclear explosions; long-term radiological hazards from fall-out; and genetic effects of nuclear explosions. A brief account is given of the fission chain process, the concept of critical size, and the principles of implosion as applied to nuclear explosions. Limited information is presented on the controlled release of thermonuclear energy and catalyzed fusion reaction. Discussions are included on dose rates from radiation sources inside and outside the body, the effect of nuclear explosions on the weather, and the contamination of fish and marine organisms.

  12. Hair Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Hair Removal KidsHealth / For Teens / Hair Removal What's in ... you need any of them? Different Types of Hair Before removing hair, it helps to know about ...

  13. Operational and geotechnical constraints to coal mining in Alaska's interior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corser, P; Usibelli, M

    1989-01-01

    Surface mining of coal from the Poker Flats mining area to the north of Healy, Alaska began in 1978. Current operations involve a 25 m/sup 3/ walking dragline which strips two coal seams, using an extended bench on the second pass; a fleet of trucks and shovels are used for coal removal and some limited overburden stripping. Geotechnical constraints to mining within the steeply dipping coal deposits are discussed. The area had a number of landslides. During 1984, mining operations close to a landslide caused movement to resume. A mine plan was developed which allowed the coal to be safely removed without inducing additional movement. This involves a dipline mining scheme through the slide area. Future mine plans will acknowledge the hazards of mining through potentially unstable zones. Aerial photographs, field mapping and geological exploration were used. 1 ref., 6 figs.

  14. Nucleosynthesis in stellar explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woosley, S.E.; Axelrod, T.S.; Weaver, T.A.

    1983-01-01

    The final evolution and explosion of stars from 10 M/sub solar/ to 10/sup 6/ M/sub solar/ are reviewed with emphasis on factors affecting the expected nucleosynthesis. We order our paper in a sequence of decreasing mass. If, as many suspect, the stellar birth function was peaked towards larger masses at earlier times (see e.g., Silk 1977; but also see Palla, Salpeter, and Stahler 1983), this sequence of masses might also be regarded as a temporal sequence. At each stage of Galactic chemical evolution stars form from the ashes of preceding generations which typically had greater mass. A wide variety of Type I supernova models, most based upon accreting white dwarf stars, are also explored using the expected light curves, spectra, and nucleosynthesis as diagnostics. No clearly favored Type I model emerges that is capable of simultaneously satisfying all three constraints.

  15. Nucleosynthesis in stellar explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woosley, S.E.; Axelrod, T.S.; Weaver, T.A.

    1983-01-01

    The final evolution and explosion of stars from 10 M/sub solar/ to 10 6 M/sub solar/ are reviewed with emphasis on factors affecting the expected nucleosynthesis. We order our paper in a sequence of decreasing mass. If, as many suspect, the stellar birth function was peaked towards larger masses at earlier times (see e.g., Silk 1977; but also see Palla, Salpeter, and Stahler 1983), this sequence of masses might also be regarded as a temporal sequence. At each stage of Galactic chemical evolution stars form from the ashes of preceding generations which typically had greater mass. A wide variety of Type I supernova models, most based upon accreting white dwarf stars, are also explored using the expected light curves, spectra, and nucleosynthesis as diagnostics. No clearly favored Type I model emerges that is capable of simultaneously satisfying all three constraints

  16. Data mining concepts and techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Jiawei

    2005-01-01

    Our ability to generate and collect data has been increasing rapidly. Not only are all of our business, scientific, and government transactions now computerized, but the widespread use of digital cameras, publication tools, and bar codes also generate data. On the collection side, scanned text and image platforms, satellite remote sensing systems, and the World Wide Web have flooded us with a tremendous amount of data. This explosive growth has generated an even more urgent need for new techniques and automated tools that can help us transform this data into useful information and knowledge.Like the first edition, voted the most popular data mining book by KD Nuggets readers, this book explores concepts and techniques for the discovery of patterns hidden in large data sets, focusing on issues relating to their feasibility, usefulness, effectiveness, and scalability. However, since the publication of the first edition, great progress has been made in the development of new data mining methods, systems, and app...

  17. Thermochemistry of mixed explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janney, J.L.; Rogers, R.N.

    1982-01-01

    In order to predict thermal hazards of high-energy materials, accurate kinetics constants must be determined. Predictions of thermal hazards for mixtures of high-energy materials require measurements on the mixtures, because interactions among components are common. A differential-scanning calorimeter (DSC) can be used to observe rate processes directly, and isothermal methods enable detection of mechanism changes. Rate-controlling processes will change as components of a mixture are depleted, and the correct depletion function must be identified for each specific stage of a complex process. A method for kinetics measurements on mixed explosives can be demonstrated with Composition B is an approximately 60/40 mixture of RDX and TNT, and is an important military explosive. Kinetics results indicate that the mator process is the decomposition of RDX in solution in TNT with a perturbation caused by interaction between the two components. It is concluded that a combination of chemical kinetics and experimental self-heating procedures provides a good approach to the production of predictive models for thermal hazards of high-energy materials. Systems involving more than one energy-contributing component can be studied. Invalid and dangerous predictive models can be detected by a failure of agreement between prediction and experiment at a specific size, shape, and density. Rates of thermal decomposition for Composition B appear to be modeled adequately for critical-temperature predictions with the following kinetics constants: E = 180.2 kJ mole -1 and Z = 4.62 X 10 16 s -1

  18. Enhancing nitrification at low temperature with zeolite in a mining operations retention pond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misha eMiazga-Rodriguez

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium nitrate explosives are used in mining operations at Diavik Diamond Mines Inc. in the Northwest Territories, Canada. Residual nitrogen is washed into the mine pit and piped to a nearby retention pond where its removal is accomplished by microbial activity prior to a final water treatment step and release into the sub-Arctic lake, Lac de Gras. Microbial removal of ammonium in the retention pond is rapid during the brief ice-free summer, but often slows under ice cover that persists up to nine months of the year. The aluminosilicate mineral zeolite was tested as an additive to retention pond water to increase rates of ammonium removal at 4 °C. Water samples were collected across the length of the retention pond monthly over a year. The structure of the microbial community (bacteria, archaea, and eukarya, as determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of PCR-amplified small subunit ribosomal RNA genes, was more stable during cold months than during July-September, when there was a marked phytoplankton bloom. Of the ammonia-oxidizing community, only bacterial amoA genes were consistently detected. Zeolite (10 g was added to retention pond water (100 mL amended with 5 mM ammonium and incubated at 12 °C to encourage development of a nitrifying biofilm. The biofilm community was composed of different amoA phylotypes from those identified in gene clone libraries of native water samples. Zeolite biofilm was added to fresh water samples collected at different times of the year, resulting in a significant increase in laboratory measurements of potential nitrification activity at 4 °C. A significant positive correlation between the amount of zeolite biofilm and potential nitrification activity was observed; rates were unaffected in incubations containing 1-20 mM ammonium. Addition of zeolite to retention ponds in cold environments could effectively increase nitrification rates year round by concentrating active nitrifying biomass.

  19. Mine Water Treatment in Hongai Coal Mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Phuong Thao; Dang, Vu Chi

    2018-03-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is recognized as one of the most serious environmental problem associated with mining industry. Acid water, also known as acid mine drainage forms when iron sulfide minerals found in the rock of coal seams are exposed to oxidizing conditions in coal mining. Until 2009, mine drainage in Hongai coal mines was not treated, leading to harmful effects on humans, animals and aquatic ecosystem. This report has examined acid mine drainage problem and techniques for acid mine drainage treatment in Hongai coal mines. In addition, selection and criteria for the design of the treatment systems have been presented.

  20. Mine Water Treatment in Hongai Coal Mines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dang Phuong Thao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Acid mine drainage (AMD is recognized as one of the most serious environmental problem associated with mining industry. Acid water, also known as acid mine drainage forms when iron sulfide minerals found in the rock of coal seams are exposed to oxidizing conditions in coal mining. Until 2009, mine drainage in Hongai coal mines was not treated, leading to harmful effects on humans, animals and aquatic ecosystem. This report has examined acid mine drainage problem and techniques for acid mine drainage treatment in Hongai coal mines. In addition, selection and criteria for the design of the treatment systems have been presented.

  1. Blasting and Blast Effects in Cold Regions. Part 3. Explosions in Ground Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    121- York, Ontario: Technical Marketing Services- 123. Explosives, Canadian Industries, 6th edition. Gaffney, E.S. (1984b) Hugoniot of water ice. In...Mines, blasting. U.S. Bureau of Nlines , Report of Insesti- Report of lnsestigations RI 7751. gations 8507. Piekutoiski. A.J. (1974) I.aborator,, scale

  2. Development of active guidance systems to overcome problems of disorientation and low visibility following severe explosions.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Phillips, HR

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research project was to review methods of overcoming the disorientation of underground mine workers following an explosion or severe fire. The results of this project indicate that different strategies may be required for fires...

  3. Optical detection of explosives: spectral signatures for the explosive bouquet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Tabetha; Kaimal, Sindhu; Causey, Jason; Burns, William; Reeve, Scott

    2009-05-01

    Research with canines suggests that sniffer dogs alert not on the odor from a pure explosive, but rather on a set of far more volatile species present in an explosive as impurities. Following the explosive trained canine example, we have begun examining the vapor signatures for many of these volatile impurities utilizing high resolution spectroscopic techniques in several molecular fingerprint regions. Here we will describe some of these high resolution measurements and discuss strategies for selecting useful spectral signature regions for individual molecular markers of interest.

  4. Data mining for social network data

    CERN Document Server

    Memon, Nasrullah; Hicks, David L; Chen, Hsinchun

    2010-01-01

    Driven by counter-terrorism efforts, marketing analysis and an explosion in online social networking in recent years, data mining has moved to the forefront of information science. This proposed Special Issue on ""Data Mining for Social Network Data"" will present a broad range of recent studies in social networking analysis. It will focus on emerging trends and needs in discovery and analysis of communities, solitary and social activities, and activities in open fora, and commercial sites as well. It will also look at network modeling, infrastructure construction, dynamic growth and evolution

  5. A Review of Mine Rescue Ensembles for Underground Coal Mining in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilinc, F Selcen; Monaghan, William D; Powell, Jeffrey B

    The mining industry is among the top ten industries nationwide with high occupational injury and fatality rates, and mine rescue response may be considered one of the most hazardous activities in mining operations. In the aftermath of an underground mine fire, explosion or water inundation, specially equipped and trained teams have been sent underground to fight fires, rescue entrapped miners, test atmospheric conditions, investigate the causes of the disaster, or recover the dead. Special personal protective ensembles are used by the team members to improve the protection of rescuers against the hazards of mine rescue and recovery. Personal protective ensembles used by mine rescue teams consist of helmet, cap lamp, hood, gloves, protective clothing, boots, kneepads, facemask, breathing apparatus, belt, and suspenders. While improved technology such as wireless warning and communication systems, lifeline pulleys, and lighted vests have been developed for mine rescuers over the last 100 years, recent research in this area of personal protective ensembles has been minimal due to the trending of reduced exposure of rescue workers. In recent years, the exposure of mine rescue teams to hazardous situations has been changing. However, it is vital that members of the teams have the capability and proper protection to immediately respond to a wide range of hazardous situations. Currently, there are no minimum requirements, best practice documents, or nationally recognized consensus standards for protective clothing used by mine rescue teams in the United States (U.S.). The following review provides a summary of potential issues that can be addressed by rescue teams and industry to improve potential exposures to rescue team members should a disaster situation occur. However, the continued trending in the mining industry toward non-exposure to potential hazards for rescue workers should continue to be the primary goal. To assist in continuing this trend, the mining industry

  6. Underground coal mine air quality in mines using disposable diesel exhaust filter control devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, D.H.; Johnson, J.H.; Bagley, S.T.; Gratz, L.D. [Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI (United States). Dept. of Mining Engineering

    1996-07-01

    As part of a collaborative study with the US Bureau of Mines, in-mine studies have been conducted to assess the effects of a low temperature disposable diesel exhaust filter. The mines have been designed as mines R and S in US Bureau of Mines publications. Each mine operated three to four Jeffrey 4110 ramcar haulage vehicles in the test section. The ramcars were equipped with MWM D916-6 diesel engines, rated at 74.6 kW (100 hp), and were operated for 3 days with the disposal diesel exhaust filter and 2 days without in both mines. Average diesel particulate matter control efficiencies, as measured by samplers located on the coal haulage vehicle, were 80% in mine R and 76% in mine S. Diesel particulate matter average control efficiencies, as measured in the diesel engine tailpipe, were 52% for mine R (for two ramcar vehicles) and 86% for mine S (for four ramcar vehicles). The air quality index control efficiencies, as measured by samplers located on the coal haulage vehicle were 48% in mine R and 51% in mine S. The exhaust quality index control efficiencies from tailpipe measurements were 45% for mine R and 63% for mine S. As measured by a high volume sampler in mine S, diesel particulate matter and associated organics and mutagenic activity were reduced approximately 50% with the use of the disposal diesel exhaust filter. Similar results were found with modified personal samplers in mine R. Little effect was found on relative removal of semivolatile organics. The disposal diesel exhaust filter resulted in about a 50% reduction in the most volatile polynuclear hydrocarbons; however, there appeared to be little effect on the less volatile polynuclear hydrocarbons. The disposable diesel exhaust filter appears to be very effective in reducing the levels of all the diesel exhaust particulate components, while having minor effects on the relative breakdown of the individual components of the particulate. 30 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Development of Mine Explosion Ground Truth Smart Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    interest. The two candidates are the GS11-D by Oyo Geospace that is used extensively in seismic monitoring of geothermal fields and the Sensor Nederland SM...Technologies 853 Figure 4. Our preferred sensors and processor for the GTMS. (a) Sensor Nederland SM-6 geophone with emplacement spike. (b

  8. Numerical Simulation and Experimental Study on Formation of High Concentration of H2 Generated by Gas Explosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Baiwei

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In coal mine fire rescues, if the abnormal increase of gas concentration occurs, it is the primary thing to analyze the reasons and identify sources of the abnormal forming, which is also the basis of judge the combustion state of fire area and formulate proper fire reliefs. Nowadays, related researches have recognized the methane explosion as the source of high concentration of H2 formation, but there are few studies about the conditions and reaction mechanism of gas explosion generating high concentration of H2.Therefore, this paper uses the chemical kinetic calculation software, ChemKin, and the 20L spherical explosion experimental device to simulate the generating process and formation conditions of H2 in gas explosion. The experimental results show that: the decomposition of water vapor is the main base element reaction (R84 which leads to the generation of H2.The free radical H is the key factor to influence the formation of H2 generated from gas explosion. With the gradual increase of gas explosion concentration, the explosive reaction becomes more incomplete, and then the generating quantity of H2 increases gradually. Experimental results of 20L spherical explosion are consistent with the change trend about simulation results, which verifies the accuracy of simulation analysis. The results of explosion experiments show that when gas concentration is higher than 9%, the incomplete reaction of methane explosion increases which leads to the gradual increase of H2 formation.

  9. Cavity pressure history of contained nuclear explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapin, C E [Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1970-05-01

    Knowledge of pressure in cavities created by contained nuclear explosions is useful for estimating the possibility of venting radioactive debris to the atmosphere. Measurements of cavity pressure, or temperature, would be helpful in evaluating the correctness of present code predictions of underground explosions. In instrumenting and interpreting such measurements it is necessary to have good theoretical estimates of cavity pressures. In this paper cavity pressure is estimated at the time when cavity growth is complete. Its subsequent decrease due to heat loss from the cavity to the surrounding media is also predicted. The starting pressure (the pressure at the end of cavity growth) is obtained by adiabatic expansion to the final cavity size of the vaporized rock gas sphere created by the explosion. Estimates of cavity size can be obtained by stress propagation computer codes, such as SOC and TENSOR. However, such estimates require considerable time and effort. In this paper, cavity size is estimated using a scheme involving simple hand calculations. The prediction is complicated by uncertainties in the knowledge of silica water system chemistry and a lack of information concerning possible blowoff of wall material during cavity growth. If wall material blows off, it can significantly change the water content in the cavity, compared to the water content in the ambient media. After cavity growth is complete, the pressure will change because of heat loss to the surrounding media. Heat transfer by convection, radiation and conduction is considered, and its effect on the pressure is calculated. Analysis of cavity heat transfer is made difficult by the complex nature of processes which occur at the wall where melting, vaporization and condensation of the gaseous rock can all occur. Furthermore, the melted wall material could be removed by flowing or dripping to the cavity floor. It could also be removed by expansion of the steam contained in the melt (blowoff) and by

  10. Coastal mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Peter M.

    The Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) declared by President Reagan in March 1983 has met with a mixed response from those who would benefit from a guaranteed, 200-nautical-mile (370-km) protected underwater mining zone off the coasts of the United States and its possessions. On the one hand, the U.S. Department of the Interior is looking ahead and has been very successful in safeguarding important natural resources that will be needed in the coming decades. On the other hand, the mining industry is faced with a depressed metals and mining market.A report of the Exclusive Economic Zone Symposium held in November 1983 by the U.S. Geological Survey, the Mineral Management Service, and the Bureau of Mines described the mixed response as: “ … The Department of Interior … raring to go into promotion of deep-seal mining but industrial consortia being very pessimistic about the program, at least for the next 30 or so years.” (Chemical & Engineering News, February 5, 1983).

  11. Fire and explosion hazards to flora and fauna from explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrifield, R

    2000-06-30

    Deliberate or accidental initiation of explosives can produce a range of potentially damaging fire and explosion effects. Quantification of the consequences of such effects upon the surroundings, particularly on people and structures, has always been of paramount importance. Information on the effects on flora and fauna, however, is limited, with probably the weakest area lying with fragmentation of buildings and their effects on different small mammals. Information has been used here to gain an appreciation of the likely magnitude of the potential fire and explosion effects on flora and fauna. This is based on a number of broad assumptions and a variety of data sources including World War II bomb damage, experiments performed with animals 30-40 years ago, and more recent field trials on building break-up under explosive loading.

  12. Surface Mines, Other - Longwall Mining Panels

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Coal mining has occurred in Pennsylvania for over a century. A method of coal mining known as Longwall Mining has become more prevalent in recent decades. Longwall...

  13. Peaceful applications of nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallin, L.B.

    1975-12-01

    The intension of this report is to give a survey of the field of peaceful applications of nuclear explosions. As an introduction some examples of possibilities of application are given together with a simple description of nuclear explosions under ground. After a summary of what has been done and will be done in this field nationally and internationally, a short discussion of advantages and problems with peaceful application of nuclear explosions follows. The risks of spreading nuclear weapons due to this applications are also touched before the report is finished with an attempt to judge the future development in this field. (M.S.)

  14. Donor free radical explosive composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Franklin E. [15 Way Points Rd., Danville, CA 94526; Wasley, Richard J. [4290 Colgate Way, Livermore, CA 94550

    1980-04-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a donor additive comprising an organic compound or mixture of organic compounds capable of releasing low molecular weight free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and which is not an explosive, or an inorganic compound or mixture of inorganic compounds capable of releasing low molecular weight free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and selected from ammonium or alkali metal persulfates.

  15. Explosive coalescence of Magnetic Islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, T.; Sakai, J.I.

    1985-04-01

    An explosive reconnection process associated with nonlinear evolution of the coalescence instability is found through studies of particle and magnetohydrodynamic simulations. The explosive coalescence is a self-similar process of magnetic collapse, in which the magnetic and electrostatic energies and temperatures explode toward the explosion time t 0 as (t 0 -t)/sup 8/3/,(t 0 -t) -4 , and (t 0 -t)/sup -8/3/, respectively. Ensuing amplitude oscillations in these quantities are identified by deriving an equation of motion for the scale factor in the Sagdeev potential

  16. Safety and health in the Canadian mine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenier, M.G.; Hardcastle, S.G.

    1990-01-01

    CANMET's Mining Research Laboratories (MRL) in Elliot Lake and Bell's Corners, Ontario, with the cooperation of the mining industry, have contributed to improving environmental conditions in underground and surface mining and milling operations. The extent of collaboration and efforts vary widely from long-term, multi-million dollar projects between several interested parties to smaller projects involving one laboratory and a single mining operation. This paper gives examples of such collaborative efforts and potential future directions as they apply to mine ventilation analysis using tracer gas techniques, optimization of mine ventilation network efficiency using real-time monitoring and controlled recirculation (heat saving), respirable dust and radiation sampling and control techniques, diesel emission control using regenerative ceramic filters and, the control of sulphide dust explosions and resulting sulphur dioxide production. (27 refs., 6 tabs., 3 figs.)

  17. Metal removal efficiency and ecotoxicological assessment of field-scale passive treatment biochemical reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaerobic biochemical reactors (BCRs) are useful for removing metals from mining-impacted water (MIW) at remote sites. Removal processes include sorption and precipitation of metal sulfides, carbonates and hydroxides. A question of interest is whether BCRs remove aquatic toxicit...

  18. Process mining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Aalst, W.M.P.; Rubin, V.; Verbeek, H.M.W.

    2010-01-01

    Process mining includes the automated discovery of processes from event logs. Based on observed events (e.g., activities being executed or messages being exchanged) a process model is constructed. One of the essential problems in process mining is that one cannot assume to have seen all possible...... behavior. At best, one has seen a representative subset. Therefore, classical synthesis techniques are not suitable as they aim at finding a model that is able to exactly reproduce the log. Existing process mining techniques try to avoid such “overfitting” by generalizing the model to allow for more...... support for it). None of the existing techniques enables the user to control the balance between “overfitting” and “underfitting”. To address this, we propose a two-step approach. First, using a configurable approach, a transition system is constructed. Then, using the “theory of regions”, the model...

  19. Data mining

    CERN Document Server

    Gorunescu, Florin

    2011-01-01

    The knowledge discovery process is as old as Homo sapiens. Until some time ago, this process was solely based on the 'natural personal' computer provided by Mother Nature. Fortunately, in recent decades the problem has begun to be solved based on the development of the Data mining technology, aided by the huge computational power of the 'artificial' computers. Digging intelligently in different large databases, data mining aims to extract implicit, previously unknown and potentially useful information from data, since 'knowledge is power'. The goal of this book is to provide, in a friendly way

  20. Mining wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradel, J.

    1981-01-01

    In this article mining wastes means wastes obtained during extraction and processing of uranium ores including production of uraniferous concentrates. The hazards for the population are irradiation, ingestion, dust or radon inhalation. The different wastes produced are reviewed. Management of liquid effluents, water treatment, contamined materials, gaseous wastes and tailings are examined. Environmental impact of wastes during and after exploitation is discussed. Monitoring and measurements are made to verify that ICRP recommendations are met. Studies in progress to improve mining waste management are given [fr

  1. Explosive actuated valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrne, K.G.

    1983-01-01

    1. A device of the character described comprising the combination of a housing having an elongate bore and including a shoulder extending inwardly into said bore, a single elongate movable plunger disposed in said bore including an outwardly extending flange adjacent one end thereof overlying said shoulder, normally open conduit means having an inlet and an outlet perpendicularly piercing said housing intermediate said shoulder and said flange and including an intermediate portion intersecting and normally openly communicating with said bore at said shoulder, normally closed conduit means piercing said housing and intersecting said bore at a location spaced from said normally open conduit means, said elongate plunger including a shearing edge adjacent the other end thereof normally disposed intermediate both of said conduit means and overlying a portion of said normally closed conduit means, a deformable member carried by said plunger intermediate said flange and said shoulder and normally spaced from and overlying the intermediate portion of said normally open conduit means, and means on the housing communicating with the bore to retain an explosive actuator for moving said plunger to force the deformable member against the shoulder and extrude a portion of the deformable member out of said bore into portions of the normally open conduit means for plugging the same and to effect the opening of said normally closed conduit means by the plunger shearing edge substantially concomitantly with the plugging of the normally open conduit means

  2. Furball Explosive Breakout Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, Joshua David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-05

    For more than 30 years the Onionskin test has been the primary way to study the surface breakout of a detonation wave. Currently the Onionskin test allows for only a small, one dimensional, slice of the explosive in question to be observed. Asymmetrical features are not observable with the Onionskin test and its one dimensional view. As a result, in 2011, preliminary designs for the Hairball and Furball were developed then tested. The Hairball used shorting pins connected to an oscilloscope to determine the arrival time at 24 discrete points. This limited number of data points, caused by the limited number of oscilloscope channels, ultimately led to the Hairball’s demise. Following this, the Furball was developed to increase the number of data points collected. Instead of shorting pins the Furball uses fiber optics imaged by a streak camera to determine the detonation wave arrival time for each point. The original design was able to capture the detonation wave’s arrival time at 205 discrete points with the ability to increase the number of data points if necessary.

  3. Suppression of stratified explosive interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meeks, M.K.; Shamoun, B.I.; Bonazza, R.; Corradini, M.L. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics

    1998-01-01

    Stratified Fuel-Coolant Interaction (FCI) experiments with Refrigerant-134a and water were performed in a large-scale system. Air was uniformly injected into the coolant pool to establish a pre-existing void which could suppress the explosion. Two competing effects due to the variation of the air flow rate seem to influence the intensity of the explosion in this geometrical configuration. At low flow rates, although the injected air increases the void fraction, the concurrent agitation and mixing increases the intensity of the interaction. At higher flow rates, the increase in void fraction tends to attenuate the propagated pressure wave generated by the explosion. Experimental results show a complete suppression of the vapor explosion at high rates of air injection, corresponding to an average void fraction of larger than 30%. (author)

  4. Phenomenological modelling of steam explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corradini, M.L.; Drumheller, D.S.

    1980-01-01

    During a hypothetical core meltdown accident, an important safety issue to be addressed is the potential for steam explosions. This paper presents analysis and modelling of experimental results. There are four observations that can be drawn from the analysis: (1) vapor explosions are suppressed by noncondensible gases generated by fuel oxidation, by high ambient pressure, and by high water temperatures; (2) these effects appear to be trigger-related in that an explosion can again be induced in some cases by increasing the trigger magnitude; (3) direct fuel liquid-coolant liquid contact can explain small scale fuel fragmentation; (4) heat transfer during the expansion phase of the explosion can reduce the work potential

  5. Water-bearing explosive compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay, G M

    1970-12-21

    An explosive water-bearing composition, with high detonation velocity, comprises a mixture of (1) an inorganic oxidizer salt; (2) nitroglycerine; (3) nitrocellulose; (4) water; and (5) a water thickening agent. (11 claims)

  6. 30 CFR 77.1301 - Explosives; magazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Explosives; magazines. 77.1301 Section 77.1301... and Blasting § 77.1301 Explosives; magazines. (a) Detonators and explosives other than blasting agents shall be stored in magazines. (b) Detonators shall not be stored in the same magazine with explosives...

  7. Explosives mimic for testing, training, and monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, John G.; Durban, Matthew M.; Gash, Alexander E.; Grapes, Michael D.; Kelley, Ryan S.; Sullivan, Kyle T.

    2018-02-13

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) is used to make mimics for explosives. The process uses mixtures of explosives and matrices commonly used in AM. The explosives are formulated into a mixture with the matrix and printed using AM techniques and equipment. The explosive concentrations are kept less than 10% by wt. of the mixture to conform to requirements of shipping and handling.

  8. 8. Peaceful uses of nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musilek, L.

    1992-01-01

    The chapter deals with peaceful uses of nuclear explosions. Described are the development of the underground nuclear explosion, properties of radionuclides formed during the explosion, their distribution, the release of radioactive products of underground nuclear explosions into the air, their propagation in the atmosphere, and fallout in the landscape. (Z.S.). 1 tab., 8 figs., 19 refs

  9. Computer simulation of explosion crater in dams with different buried depths of explosive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhichao; Ye, Longzhen

    2018-04-01

    Based on multi-material ALE method, this paper conducted a computer simulation on the explosion crater in dams with different buried depths of explosive using LS-DYNA program. The results turn out that the crater size increases with the increase of buried depth of explosive at first, but closed explosion cavity rather than a visible crater is formed when the buried depth of explosive increases to some extent. The soil in the explosion cavity is taken away by the explosion products and the soil under the explosion cavity is compressed with its density increased. The research can provide some reference for the anti-explosion design of dams in the future.

  10. Hydrocarbon production with nuclear explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade Watkins, J.

    1970-01-01

    The tremendous energy of nuclear explosives and the small dimensions of the explosive package make an ideal combination for drill-hole explosive emplacement in deep, thick hydrocarbon deposits. Potential applications exist in fracturing low permeability natural-gas and petroleum formations for stimulating production, fracturing oil shale to permit in situ retorting, and creating storage chimneys for natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, petroleum, petroleum products, helium, and other fluids. Calculations show, for example, that less than 100 shots per year would be needed to stabilize the natural gas reserves to production ratio. Under the Government-industry Plowshare program, two experiments, Projects Gasbuggy and Rulison, were conducted to stimulate natural gas production from low-permeability formations. Incomplete information indicates that both were technically successful. Potential problems associated with the use of nuclear explosives for underground engineering applications are radioactive contamination, maximum yield limitations, high costs of detonating contained nuclear explosives, and adverse public opinion. Results at Project Gasbuggy and other considerations indicated that the problem of radioactive contamination was about as predicted and not an insurmountable one. Also, it was demonstrated that shots at adequate depths could be detonated without appreciable damage to existing surface and subsurface buildings, natural features, and equipment. However, costs must be reduced and the public must be better informed before these techniques can be widely used in field operations. On the basis of present knowledge, the potential of nuclear-explosive stimulation of hydrocarbon production appears good. Additional field experiments will be required to adequately explore that potential. (author)

  11. Hydrocarbon production with nuclear explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade Watkins, J [Petroleum Research, Bureau of Mines, U.S. Department of the Interior, Washington, DC (United States)

    1970-05-01

    The tremendous energy of nuclear explosives and the small dimensions of the explosive package make an ideal combination for drill-hole explosive emplacement in deep, thick hydrocarbon deposits. Potential applications exist in fracturing low permeability natural-gas and petroleum formations for stimulating production, fracturing oil shale to permit in situ retorting, and creating storage chimneys for natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, petroleum, petroleum products, helium, and other fluids. Calculations show, for example, that less than 100 shots per year would be needed to stabilize the natural gas reserves to production ratio. Under the Government-industry Plowshare program, two experiments, Projects Gasbuggy and Rulison, were conducted to stimulate natural gas production from low-permeability formations. Incomplete information indicates that both were technically successful. Potential problems associated with the use of nuclear explosives for underground engineering applications are radioactive contamination, maximum yield limitations, high costs of detonating contained nuclear explosives, and adverse public opinion. Results at Project Gasbuggy and other considerations indicated that the problem of radioactive contamination was about as predicted and not an insurmountable one. Also, it was demonstrated that shots at adequate depths could be detonated without appreciable damage to existing surface and subsurface buildings, natural features, and equipment. However, costs must be reduced and the public must be better informed before these techniques can be widely used in field operations. On the basis of present knowledge, the potential of nuclear-explosive stimulation of hydrocarbon production appears good. Additional field experiments will be required to adequately explore that potential. (author)

  12. Safety engineering experiments of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Noboru

    1987-07-24

    The outline of large scale experiments carried out every year since 1969 to obtain fundamental data and then establish the safety engineering standards concerning the manufacturing, storage and transportation, etc. of all explosives was described. Because it becomes recently difficult to ensure the safety distance in powder magazines and powder plants, the sandwich structure with sand is thought to be suitable as the neighboring barrier walls. The special vertical structure for embankments to provide against a emergency explosion is effective to absorb the blast. Explosion behaviors such as initiating sensitivity, detonation, sympathetic detonation, and shock occurence of the ANFO explosives in place of dynamite and the slurry explosives were studied. The safety engineering standards for the manufacturing and application of explosives were studied to establish because accidents by tabacco fire are not still distinguished. Much data concerning early stage fire fighting, a large quantity of flooding and shock occurence from a assumption of ignition during machining in the propellants manufacturing plant, could be obtained. Basic studies were made to prevent pollution in blasting sites. Collected data are utilized for the safety administration after sufficient discussion. (4 figs, 2 tabs, 3 photos, 17 refs)

  13. Explosive Characteristics of Carbonaceous Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkevich, Leonid; Fernback, Joseph; Dastidar, Ashok

    2013-03-01

    Explosion testing has been performed on 20 codes of carbonaceous particles. These include SWCNTs (single-walled carbon nanotubes), MWCNTs (multi-walled carbon nanotubes), CNFs (carbon nanofibers), graphene, diamond, fullerene, carbon blacks and graphites. Explosion screening was performed in a 20 L explosion chamber (ASTM E1226-10 protocol), at a (dilute) concentration of 500 g/m3, using a 5 kJ ignition source. Time traces of overpressure were recorded. Samples exhibited overpressures of 5-7 bar, and deflagration index KSt = V1/3 (dp/pt)max ~ 10 - 80 bar-m/s, which places these materials in European Dust Explosion Class St-1 (similar to cotton and wood dust). There was minimal variation between these different materials. The explosive characteristics of these carbonaceous powders are uncorrelated with particle size (BET specific surface area). Additional tests were performed on selected materials to identify minimum explosive concentration [MEC]. These materials exhibit MEC ~ 101 -102 g/m3 (lower than the MEC for coals). The concentration scans confirm that the earlier screening was performed under fuel-rich conditions (i.e. the maximum over-pressure and deflagration index exceed the screening values); e.g. the true fullerene KSt ~ 200 bar-m/s, placing it borderline St-1/St-2. Work supported through the NIOSH Nanotechnology Research Center (NTRC)

  14. Trace explosives sensor testbed (TESTbed)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Greg E.; Malito, Michael P.; Tamanaha, Cy R.; Hammond, Mark H.; Giordano, Braden C.; Lubrano, Adam L.; Field, Christopher R.; Rogers, Duane A.; Jeffries, Russell A.; Colton, Richard J.; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan L.

    2017-03-01

    A novel vapor delivery testbed, referred to as the Trace Explosives Sensor Testbed, or TESTbed, is demonstrated that is amenable to both high- and low-volatility explosives vapors including nitromethane, nitroglycerine, ethylene glycol dinitrate, triacetone triperoxide, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, pentaerythritol tetranitrate, and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine. The TESTbed incorporates a six-port dual-line manifold system allowing for rapid actuation between a dedicated clean air source and a trace explosives vapor source. Explosives and explosives-related vapors can be sourced through a number of means including gas cylinders, permeation tube ovens, dynamic headspace chambers, and a Pneumatically Modulated Liquid Delivery System coupled to a perfluoroalkoxy total-consumption microflow nebulizer. Key features of the TESTbed include continuous and pulseless control of trace vapor concentrations with wide dynamic range of concentration generation, six sampling ports with reproducible vapor profile outputs, limited low-volatility explosives adsorption to the manifold surface, temperature and humidity control of the vapor stream, and a graphical user interface for system operation and testing protocol implementation.

  15. Research of explosives in an environment of high pressure and temperature using a new test stand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Drzewiecki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the test stand for determining the blast abilities of explosives in high pressure and temperature conditions as well as the initial results of the research are presented. Explosives are used in rock burst and methane prevention to destroy precisely defined fragments of the rock mass where energy and methane are accumulated. Using this preventive method for fracturing the structure of the rocks which accumulate the energy or coal of the methane seam very often does not bring the anticipated results. It is because of the short range of destructive action of the post-blast gases around the blast hole. Evaluation of the blast dynamics of explosives in a test chamber, i.e. in the pressure and temperature conditions comparable to those found “in situ”, will enable evaluation of their real usefulness in commonly used mining hazard preventive methods. At the same time, it will enable the development of new designs of the explosive charges used for precisely determined mining hazards. In order to test the explosives for their use in difficult environmental conditions and to determine the characteristics of their explosion, a test chamber has been built. It is equipped with a system of sensors and a high-frequency recording system of pressure and temperature during a controlled explosion of an explosive charge. The results of the research will enable the development of new technologies for rock burst and methane prevention which will significantly increase workplace health and safety level. This paper presented results constitute the initial phase of research started in the middle of 2014.

  16. Thermal stability and mechanism of decomposition of emulsion explosives in the presence of pyrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhi-Xiang; Wang, Qian [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Fu, Xiao-Qi, E-mail: xzx19820708@163.com [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University Zhenjiang 212013 (China)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • An exothermic reaction occurs at about 200 °C between pyrite and ammonium nitrate (emulsion explosives). • The essence of reaction between emulsion explosives and pyrite is reaction between ammonium nitrate and pyrite. • The excellent thermal stability of emulsion explosives does not mean it was also showed when pyrite was added. • A new overall reaction has been proposed as: • 14FeS{sub 2}(s) + 91NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}(s) → 52NO(g) + 26SO{sub 2}(g) + 6Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}(s) + 78NH{sub 3}(g) + 26N{sub 2}O(g) + 2FeSO{sub 4}(s) + 65H{sub 2}O(g). - Abstract: The reaction of emulsion explosives (ammonium nitrate) with pyrite was studied using techniques of TG-DTG-DTA. TG–DSC–MS was also used to analyze samples thermal decomposition process. When a mixture of pyrite and emulsion explosives was heated at a constant heating rate of 10 K/min from room temperature to 350 °C, exothermic reactions occurred at about 200 °C. The essence of reaction between emulsion explosives and pyrite is the reaction between ammonium nitrate and pyrite. Emulsion explosives have excellent thermal stability but it does not mean it showed the same excellent thermal stability when pyrite was added. Package emulsion explosives were more suitable to use in pyrite shale than bulk emulsion explosives. The exothermic reaction was considered to take place between ammonium nitrate and pyrite where NO, NO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, SO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O gases were produced. Based on the analysis of the gaseous, a new overall reaction was proposed, which was thermodynamically favorable. The results have significant implication in the understanding of stability of emulsion explosives in reactive mining grounds containing pyrite minerals.

  17. Thermal stability and mechanism of decomposition of emulsion explosives in the presence of pyrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Zhi-Xiang; Wang, Qian; Fu, Xiao-Qi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • An exothermic reaction occurs at about 200 °C between pyrite and ammonium nitrate (emulsion explosives). • The essence of reaction between emulsion explosives and pyrite is reaction between ammonium nitrate and pyrite. • The excellent thermal stability of emulsion explosives does not mean it was also showed when pyrite was added. • A new overall reaction has been proposed as: • 14FeS_2(s) + 91NH_4NO_3(s) → 52NO(g) + 26SO_2(g) + 6Fe_2O_3(s) + 78NH_3(g) + 26N_2O(g) + 2FeSO_4(s) + 65H_2O(g). - Abstract: The reaction of emulsion explosives (ammonium nitrate) with pyrite was studied using techniques of TG-DTG-DTA. TG–DSC–MS was also used to analyze samples thermal decomposition process. When a mixture of pyrite and emulsion explosives was heated at a constant heating rate of 10 K/min from room temperature to 350 °C, exothermic reactions occurred at about 200 °C. The essence of reaction between emulsion explosives and pyrite is the reaction between ammonium nitrate and pyrite. Emulsion explosives have excellent thermal stability but it does not mean it showed the same excellent thermal stability when pyrite was added. Package emulsion explosives were more suitable to use in pyrite shale than bulk emulsion explosives. The exothermic reaction was considered to take place between ammonium nitrate and pyrite where NO, NO_2, NH_3, SO_2 and N_2O gases were produced. Based on the analysis of the gaseous, a new overall reaction was proposed, which was thermodynamically favorable. The results have significant implication in the understanding of stability of emulsion explosives in reactive mining grounds containing pyrite minerals.

  18. Hydrogen explosion testing with a simulated transuranic drum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dykes, K.L.; Meyer, M.L.

    1990-01-01

    Transuranic (TRU) waste generated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently stored onsite for future retrieval and permanent disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Some of the TRU waste is stored in vented 210-liter (55-gallon) drums and consists of gloves, wipes, plastic valves, tools, etc. Gas generation caused by radiolysis and biodegradation of these organic waste materials may produce a flammable hydrogen-air mixture (>4% v/v) in the multi-layer plastic waste bags. Using a worst case scenario, a drum explosion test program was carried out to determine the hydrogen concentration necessary to cause removal of the drum lid. Test results indicate an explosive mixture up to 15% v/v of hydrogen can be contained in an SRS TRU drum without total integrity failure via lid removal

  19. GRAVITATIONAL FIELD SHIELDING AND SUPERNOVA EXPLOSIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, T. X.

    2010-01-01

    A new mechanism for supernova explosions called gravitational field shielding is proposed, in accord with a five-dimensional fully covariant Kaluza-Klein theory with a scalar field that unifies the four-dimensional Einsteinian general relativity and Maxwellian electromagnetic theory. It is shown that a dense compact collapsing core of a star will suddenly turn off or completely shield its gravitational field when the core collapses to a critical density, which is inversely proportional to the square of mass of the core. As the core suddenly turns off its gravity, the extremely large pressure immediately stops the core collapse and pushes the mantle material of supernova moving outward. The work done by the pressure in the expansion can be the order of energy released in a supernova explosion. The gravity will resume and stop the core from a further expansion when the core density becomes less than the critical density. Therefore, the gravitational field shielding leads a supernova to impulsively explode and form a compact object such as a neutron star as a remnant. It works such that a compressed spring will shoot the oscillator out when the compressed force is suddenly removed.

  20. Mining Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Shik; Lee, Kyung Woon; Kim, Oak Hwan; Kim, Dae Kyung [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    The reducing coal market has been enforcing the coal industry to make exceptional rationalization and restructuring efforts since the end of the eighties. To the competition from crude oil and natural gas has been added the growing pressure from rising wages and rising production cost as the workings get deeper. To improve the competitive position of the coal mines against oil and gas through cost reduction, studies to improve mining system have been carried out. To find fields requiring improvements most, the technologies using in Tae Bak Colliery which was selected one of long running mines were investigated and analyzed. The mining method appeared the field needing improvements most to reduce the production cost. The present method, so-called inseam roadway caving method presently is using to extract the steep and thick seam. However, this method has several drawbacks. To solve the problems, two mining methods are suggested for a long term and short term method respectively. Inseam roadway caving method with long-hole blasting method is a variety of the present inseam roadway caving method modified by replacing timber sets with steel arch sets and the shovel loaders with chain conveyors. And long hole blasting is introduced to promote caving. And pillar caving method with chock supports method uses chock supports setting in the cross-cut from the hanging wall to the footwall. Two single chain conveyors are needed. One is installed in front of chock supports to clear coal from the cutting face. The other is installed behind the supports to transport caved coal from behind. This method is superior to the previous one in terms of safety from water-inrushes, production rate and productivity. The only drawback is that it needs more investment. (author). 14 tabs., 34 figs.

  1. Thermal stability and mechanism of decomposition of emulsion explosives in the presence of pyrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhi-Xiang; Wang, Qian; Fu, Xiao-Qi

    2015-12-30

    The reaction of emulsion explosives (ammonium nitrate) with pyrite was studied using techniques of TG-DTG-DTA. TG-DSC-MS was also used to analyze samples thermal decomposition process. When a mixture of pyrite and emulsion explosives was heated at a constant heating rate of 10K/min from room temperature to 350°C, exothermic reactions occurred at about 200°C. The essence of reaction between emulsion explosives and pyrite is the reaction between ammonium nitrate and pyrite. Emulsion explosives have excellent thermal stability but it does not mean it showed the same excellent thermal stability when pyrite was added. Package emulsion explosives were more suitable to use in pyrite shale than bulk emulsion explosives. The exothermic reaction was considered to take place between ammonium nitrate and pyrite where NO, NO2, NH3, SO2 and N2O gases were produced. Based on the analysis of the gaseous, a new overall reaction was proposed, which was thermodynamically favorable. The results have significant implication in the understanding of stability of emulsion explosives in reactive mining grounds containing pyrite minerals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Applications of Geomatics in Surface Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blachowski, Jan; Górniak-Zimroz, Justyna; Milczarek, Wojciech; Pactwa, Katarzyna

    2017-12-01

    In terms of method of extracting mineral from deposit, mining can be classified into: surface, underground, and borehole mining. Surface mining is a form of mining, in which the soil and the rock covering the mineral deposits are removed. Types of surface mining include mainly strip and open-cast methods, as well as quarrying. Tasks associated with surface mining of minerals include: resource estimation and deposit documentation, mine planning and deposit access, mine plant development, extraction of minerals from deposits, mineral and waste processing, reclamation and reclamation of former mining grounds. At each stage of mining, geodata describing changes occurring in space during the entire life cycle of surface mining project should be taken into consideration, i.e. collected, analysed, processed, examined, distributed. These data result from direct (e.g. geodetic) and indirect (i.e. remote or relative) measurements and observations including airborne and satellite methods, geotechnical, geological and hydrogeological data, and data from other types of sensors, e.g. located on mining equipment and infrastructure, mine plans and maps. Management of such vast sources and sets of geodata, as well as information resulting from processing, integrated analysis and examining such data can be facilitated with geomatic solutions. Geomatics is a discipline of gathering, processing, interpreting, storing and delivering spatially referenced information. Thus, geomatics integrates methods and technologies used for collecting, management, processing, visualizing and distributing spatial data. In other words, its meaning covers practically every method and tool from spatial data acquisition to distribution. In this work examples of application of geomatic solutions in surface mining on representative case studies in various stages of mine operation have been presented. These applications include: prospecting and documenting mineral deposits, assessment of land accessibility

  3. P-ANFO: new era in surface coal mining; P-ANFO: acik ocak komur isletmeciliginde yeni bir cag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tek, A. [Atlas Ltd., Istanbul (Turkey)

    1999-07-01

    ANFO, an effective and inexpensive explosive, is widely used in rock blasting operations. However, for weak strata, ANFO often produces too much shock energy and leads to inefficiencies in the mining operation. Especially in Turkish surface coal mines where ANFO is used with the decking system, it is desirable to develop a low shock energy but a high heave energy ammonium nitrate based explosive. 3 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Protecting reliability of mining at individual levels against phase conflict at the Belchatow mine and power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sztandera, T [Akademia Gorniczo-Hutnicza, Cracow (Poland)

    1988-01-01

    Discusses problems of overburden removal and mining at the Belchatow brown coal surface mine in Poland. The analysis is based on the results of the statistical data on surface mining in Belchatow from 1985 to 1987. Information on number of benches, their dimensions (height, width), slope inclination and volume of overburden is evaluated. The analysis showed that time delay from overburden removal to coal mining is excessively low; reserves of coal ready for mining are too low, especially in winter. This phenomenon is illustrated by the increasing slope inclinations of the whole cut in winter as the mine yields coal reserves made ready for excavation. In summer the rate of overburden removal increases. Such seasonal fluctuations negatively affect safety conditions in winter and especially in spring when increased content of moisture in sedimentary rocks reduce their resistance to landslide. 5 refs.

  5. Condition for Contur Blasting use on Openpit Mines

    OpenAIRE

    Krsmanovic, I; Dambov, Risto

    2010-01-01

    For purpose of obtaining a stable final slope in open pit mines practice, the most common approach is the contour blasting method and investigation of possible applications of various primary blasting methods for purpose of gaining the optimal techno-economical effects. This paper presents one of the contour blasting methods, drilling and blasting parameters, construction of explosive charges and method of initiation.

  6. Explosive coalescence of magnetic islands and explosive particle acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, T.; Sakai, J.I.

    1985-07-01

    An explosive reconnection process associated with the nonlinear evolution of the coalescence instability is found through studies of the electromagnetic particle simulation and the magnetohydrodynamic particle simulation. The explosive coalescence is a process of magnetic collapse, in which we find the magnetic and electrostatic field energies and temperatures (ion temperature in the coalescing direction, in particular) explode toward the explosion time t 0 as (t 0 - t)/sup -8/3/, (t 0 - t) -4 , and (t 0 - t)/sup -8/3/, respectively for a canonical case. Single-peak, double-peak, and triple-peak structures of magnetic energy, temperature, and electrostatic energy, respectively, are observed on the simulation as overshoot amplitude oscillations and are theoretically explained. The heuristic model of Brunel and Tajima is extended to this explosive coalescence in order to extract the basic process. Since the explosive coalescence exhibits self-similarity, a temporal universality, we theoretically search for a self-similar solution to the two-fluid plasma equations

  7. Mine-built ponds economically clear acid mine waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chironis, N P

    1987-01-01

    One of the by-products of surface mining is acid mine drainage. Traditional treatment of acid drainage is the addition of a base chemical such as sodium hydroxide, soda ash or lime to neutralize the water and allow metals, such as iron and manganese, to settle out. However researchers were intrigued by the idea of using home-made wetlands containing bogs of sphagnum moss to do the job naturally and more cheaply without the heavy application of chemicals. Such plants as cattails were found to be very effective. Aspects considered are: the wetlands affinity for acid water; the aid of algae and bacteria; building a wetland; and recommendations by the Bureau of Mines for constructing wetlands including flow capacity, pH goal, minerals removal, design criteria, plant materials, growing media, plant settling, nutrients, water level and flow control.

  8. The effect of explosive percentage on underwater explosion energy release of hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane and octogen based aluminized explosives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingjie Jiao

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available To control the explosion energy output by optimizing explosive components is a key requirement in a number of different application areas. The effect of different Al/O Ratio on underwater explosion of aluminized explosives has been studied detailedly. However, the effect of explosive percentage in the same Al/O Ratio is rarely researched, especially for Hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20 based aluminized explosives. In this study, we performed the underwater explosion experiments with 1.2-kilogram explosives in order to investigate the explosion energy released from CL-20 and Octogen (HMX based aluminized explosives. The percentage of the explosive varied from 5% to 30% and it is shown that: the shockwave peak pressure (pm grows gradually; shock wave energy (Es continues increasing, bubble energy (Eb increases then decreases peaking at 15% for both formulas, and the total energy (E and energy release rate (η peak at 20% for CL-20 and 15% for HMX. This paper outlines the physical mechanism of Eb change under the influence of an aluminium initial reaction temperature and reaction active detonation product percentage coupling. The result shows that CL-20 is superior as a new high explosive and has promising application prospects in the regulation of explosive energy output for underwater explosives.

  9. The effect of explosive percentage on underwater explosion energy release of hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane and octogen based aluminized explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Qingjie; Wang, Qiushi; Nie, Jianxin; Guo, Xueyong; Zhang, Wei; Fan, Wenqi

    2018-03-01

    To control the explosion energy output by optimizing explosive components is a key requirement in a number of different application areas. The effect of different Al/O Ratio on underwater explosion of aluminized explosives has been studied detailedly. However, the effect of explosive percentage in the same Al/O Ratio is rarely researched, especially for Hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) based aluminized explosives. In this study, we performed the underwater explosion experiments with 1.2-kilogram explosives in order to investigate the explosion energy released from CL-20 and Octogen (HMX) based aluminized explosives. The percentage of the explosive varied from 5% to 30% and it is shown that: the shockwave peak pressure (pm) grows gradually; shock wave energy (Es) continues increasing, bubble energy (Eb) increases then decreases peaking at 15% for both formulas, and the total energy (E) and energy release rate (η) peak at 20% for CL-20 and 15% for HMX. This paper outlines the physical mechanism of Eb change under the influence of an aluminium initial reaction temperature and reaction active detonation product percentage coupling. The result shows that CL-20 is superior as a new high explosive and has promising application prospects in the regulation of explosive energy output for underwater explosives.

  10. Molecular Outflows: Explosive versus Protostellar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapata, Luis A.; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Palau, Aina; Loinard, Laurent [Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, UNAM, Apdo. Postal 3-72 (Xangari), 58089 Morelia, Michoacán, México (Mexico); Schmid-Burgk, Johannes [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121, Bonn (Germany)

    2017-02-10

    With the recent recognition of a second, distinctive class of molecular outflows, namely the explosive ones not directly connected to the accretion–ejection process in star formation, a juxtaposition of the morphological and kinematic properties of both classes is warranted. By applying the same method used in Zapata et al., and using {sup 12}CO( J = 2-1) archival data from the Submillimeter Array, we contrast two well-known explosive objects, Orion KL and DR21, to HH 211 and DG Tau B, two flows representative of classical low-mass protostellar outflows. At the moment, there are only two well-established cases of explosive outflows, but with the full availability of ALMA we expect that more examples will be found in the near future. The main results are the largely different spatial distributions of the explosive flows, consisting of numerous narrow straight filament-like ejections with different orientations and in almost an isotropic configuration, the redshifted with respect to the blueshifted components of the flows (maximally separated in protostellar, largely overlapping in explosive outflows), the very-well-defined Hubble flow-like increase of velocity with distance from the origin in the explosive filaments versus the mostly non-organized CO velocity field in protostellar objects, and huge inequalities in mass, momentum, and energy of the two classes, at least for the case of low-mass flows. Finally, all the molecular filaments in the explosive outflows point back to approximately a central position (i.e., the place where its “exciting source” was located), contrary to the bulk of the molecular material within the protostellar outflows.

  11. Automation and robotics technology for intelligent mining systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Jeffrey H.

    1989-01-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines is approaching the problems of accidents and efficiency in the mining industry through the application of automation and robotics to mining systems. This technology can increase safety by removing workers from hazardous areas of the mines or from performing hazardous tasks. The short-term goal of the Automation and Robotics program is to develop technology that can be implemented in the form of an autonomous mining machine using current continuous mining machine equipment. In the longer term, the goal is to conduct research that will lead to new intelligent mining systems that capitalize on the capabilities of robotics. The Bureau of Mines Automation and Robotics program has been structured to produce the technology required for the short- and long-term goals. The short-term goal of application of automation and robotics to an existing mining machine, resulting in autonomous operation, is expected to be accomplished within five years. Key technology elements required for an autonomous continuous mining machine are well underway and include machine navigation systems, coal-rock interface detectors, machine condition monitoring, and intelligent computer systems. The Bureau of Mines program is described, including status of key technology elements for an autonomous continuous mining machine, the program schedule, and future work. Although the program is directed toward underground mining, much of the technology being developed may have applications for space systems or mining on the Moon or other planets.

  12. Mining of sedimentary-type ore deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruha, J.; Slovacek, T.; Berka, J.; Sadilek, P.

    1992-01-01

    A procedure is proposed for mining sedimentary-type ore deposits, particularly uranium deposits, using the stope-pillar technique. The stope having been mined out, the free room is filled with hydro-setting gob from the surface. A precondition for the application of this technique is horizontal ore mineralization in sediments where the total thickness of the mineralized ore layer is at least 3 to 5 m. Mining losses do not exceed 5%. For thicknesses greater than 5 m, the roof is reinforced and the walls are secured with netting. The assets of the technique include higher labor productivity of the driving, lower material demands in reinforcing and filling, lower power consumption, and reduced use of explosives. (Z.S.). 3 figs

  13. Assistance in MSD Research and Development: Part 2, Full scale field testing at mining operations: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worsey, P.N.; Canon, C.

    1988-06-01

    Full scale and field testing of a simple mechanical stemming aid is described. The aid comprises a solid unit placed in the stemming above the explosive column and is designed to improve blasting efficiency and reduce drilling and blasting costs. It is designed to work with back filled drill cuttings or any other suitable stemming material. The results of Phase I testing were highly successful, indicating that the stemming aid has technically an extremely good chance of success at full scale when constructed of low cost materials. Phase II of the stemming aid research and development program comprised of the testing of various forms of the stemming is at full scale in non-research oriented i.e. field settings. The stemming aid was field tested at 4 different sites for a variety of mining application: First in underground workings at the UMR experimental mine in one and three quarter inch diameter horizontal blast holes incorporated into full blast patterns; three and three and a half inch blast holes at two crushed rock/limestone quarries in the Rolla area and at a surface coal mine operation run by Peabody Coal Company at Lynnville, Indiana in which nine and seven eighths, ten and five eighths and fifteen and a quarter inch diameter blast holes were used for parting and overburden removal. 2 refs., 37 figs., 11 tabs.

  14. General phenomenology of underground nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derlich, S.; Supiot, F.

    1969-01-01

    An essentially qualitatively description is given of the phenomena related to underground nuclear explosions (explosion of a single unit, of several units in line, and simultaneous explosions). In the first chapter are described the phenomena which are common to contained explosions and to explosions forming craters (formation and propagation of a shock-wave causing the vaporization, the fusion and the fracturing of the medium). The second chapter describes the phenomena related to contained explosions (formation of a cavity with a chimney). The third chapter is devoted to the phenomenology of test explosions which form a crater; it describes in particular the mechanism of formation and the different types of craters as a function of the depth of the explosion and of the nature of the ground. The aerial phenomena connected with explosions which form a crater: shock wave in the air and focussing at a large distance, and dust clouds, are also dealt with. (authors) [fr

  15. Electromagnetic field effects in explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasker, Douglas

    2009-06-01

    Present and previous research on the effects of electromagnetic fields on the initiation and detonation of explosives and the electromagnetic properties of explosives are reviewed. Among the topics related to detonating explosives are: measurements of conductivity; enhancement of performance; and control of initiation and growth of reaction. Hayes...()^1 showed a strong correlation of peak electrical conductivity with carbon content of the detonation products. Ershov.......^2 linked detailed electrical conductivity measurements with reaction kinetics and this work was extended to enhance detonation performance electrically;...^3 for this, electrical power densities of the order of 100 TW/m^2 of explosive surface normal to the detonation front were required. However, small electrical powers are required to affect the initiation and growth of reaction.......^4,5 A continuation of this work will be reported. LA-UR 09-00873 .^1 B. Hayes, Procs. of 4th Symposium (International) on Detonation (1965), p. 595. ^2 A. Ershov, P. Zubkov, and L. Luk'yanchikov, Combustion, Explosion, and Shock Waves 10, 776-782 (1974). ^3 M. Cowperthwaite, Procs. 9th Detonation Symposium (1989), p. 388-395. ^4 M. A. Cook and T. Z. Gwyther, ``Influence of Electric Fields on Shock to Detonation Transition,'' (1965). ^5 D. Salisbury, R. Winter, and L. Biddle, Procs. of the APS Topical Conference on Shock Compression of Condensed Matter (2005) p. 1010-1013.

  16. Sustainable mining management; Gestion minera sostenible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejera Oliver, J. L.

    2009-07-01

    Mining activities are carried out by the older man and have provided resources, since ancient times, for their development and progress. With the discovery of fire will show the first metals that have marked the civilizations of copper, bronze and iron, and is the prehistory of the Stone Age tools that man has made from the exploitation of quarries first. The industrial revolution of the nineteenth century is linked to coal and steel, and could not conceiver of todays society without oil and gas, without silicon and coltan. But the mines are often aggressive and, despite their need and what they contribute to the development are answered by the societies where are made. during recent years there has been growing international efforts to try to make the minimum requirements of sustainable exploitation (European Directives, GMI, GRI, etc.) In AENOR, and within the Technical Committee of Standardization 22 Mining and Explosives, chaired by AITEMIN, was established the subcommittee 3, chaired by IGME, where, with the participation of all stake holders, have developed some standards on sustainable mining management sustainable mining that will be a tool available to mining companies to demonstrate their sustainable use to Society. (Author)

  17. Gas migration from closed coal mines to the surface. Risk assessment methodology and prevention means

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokryszka, Z.; Tauziede, Ch.; Lagny, C.; Guise, Y.; Gobillot, R.; Planchenault, J.M.; Lagarde, R.

    2005-01-01

    French law as regards renunciation to mining concessions calls for the mining operator to first undertake analyses of the risks represented by their underground mining works. The problem of gas migration to the surface is especially significant in the context of coal mines. This is because mine gas can migrate to the earth's surface, then present significant risks: explosion, suffocation or gas poisoning risks. As part of the scheduled closure of all coal mining operations in France, INERIS has drawn up, at the request of national mining operator Charbonnages de France, a general methodology for assessing the risk linked to gas in the context of closed coal mines. This article presents the principles of this methodology. An application example based on a true case study is then described. This is completed by a presentation of the preventive and monitoring resources recommended and usually applied in order to manage the risk linked to gaseous emissions. (authors)

  18. Mine games

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patchett, A. [Hitachi Construction Equipment (United Kingdom)

    2006-09-15

    The article describes various excavators used in the UK by Hall Construction for coal mining and reclamation projects. They include machines from Hitachi Construction Machinery that have been modified with a coal shovel at the front end. The ZX350LC-3, for example incorporates a coal shovel, manufactured by Kocurek, to allow it to work at the rock face and lift coal into road wagons or dump trucks. 5 figs.

  19. Hydrolysis of Miscanthus for bioethanol production using dilute acid presoaking combined with wet explosion pre-treatment and enzymatic treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Annette; Teller, Philip Johan; Hilstrøm, Troels

    2008-01-01

    xylose prior to wet explosion. The acid presoaking extracted 63.2% xylose and 5.2% glucose. Direct enzymatic hydrolysis of the presoaked biomass was found to give only low sugar yields of 24-26% glucose. Wet explosion is a pre-treatment method that combines wet-oxidation and steam explosion. The effect...... of wet explosion on non-presoaked and presoaked Miscanthus was investigated using both atmospheric air and hydrogen peroxide as the oxidizing agent. All wet explosion pre-treatments showed to have a disrupting effect on the lignocellulosic biomass, making the sugars accessible for enzymatic hydrolysis......Miscanthus is a high yielding bioenergy crop. In this study we used acid presoaking, wet explosion, and enzymatic hydrolysis to evaluate the combination of the different pre-treatment methods for bioethanol production with Miscanthus. Acid presoaking is primarily carried out in order to remove...

  20. Inhomogeneous wire explosion in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwangbo, C.K.; Kong, H.J.; Lee, S.S.

    1980-01-01

    Inhomogeneous processes are observed in underwater copper wire explosion induced by a condensed capacitor discharge. The wire used is 0.1 mm in diameter and 10 mm long, and the capacitor of 2 μF is charged to 5 KV. A N 2 laser is used for the diagnostic of spatial extension of exploding copper vapour. The photographs obtained in this experiment show unambiguously the inhomogeneous explosion along the exploding wire. The quenching of plasma by the surrounding water inhibits the expansion of the vapour. It is believed the observed inhomogeneous explosion along the wire is located and localized around Goronkin's striae, which was first reported by Goronkin and discussed by Froengel as a pre-breakdown phenomenon. (author)

  1. Seismic coupling of nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, D.B.

    1989-01-01

    The new Giant Magnet Experimental Facility employing digital recording of explosion induced motion has been constructed and successfully tested. Particle velocity and piezoresistance gage responses can be measured simultaneously thus providing the capability for determining the multi-component stress-strain history in the test material. This capability provides the information necessary for validation of computer models used in simulation of nuclear underground testing, chemical explosion testing, dynamic structural response, earth penetration response, and etc. This report discusses fully coupled and cavity decoupled explosions of the same energy (0.622 kJ) were carried out as experiments to study wave propagation and attenuation in polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). These experiments produced particle velocity time histories at strains from 2 x 10 -3 to as low as 5.8 x 10 -6 . Other experiments in PMMA, reported recently by Stout and Larson 8 provide additional particle velocity data to strains of 10 -1

  2. Optimal dynamic detection of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, David Steven [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcgrane, Shawn D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Greenfield, Margo T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scharff, R J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rabitz, Herschel A [PRINCETON UNIV; Roslund, J [PRINCETON UNIV

    2009-01-01

    The detection of explosives is a notoriously difficult problem, especially at stand-off distances, due to their (generally) low vapor pressure, environmental and matrix interferences, and packaging. We are exploring optimal dynamic detection to exploit the best capabilities of recent advances in laser technology and recent discoveries in optimal shaping of laser pulses for control of molecular processes to significantly enhance the standoff detection of explosives. The core of the ODD-Ex technique is the introduction of optimally shaped laser pulses to simultaneously enhance sensitivity of explosives signatures while reducing the influence of noise and the signals from background interferents in the field (increase selectivity). These goals are being addressed by operating in an optimal nonlinear fashion, typically with a single shaped laser pulse inherently containing within it coherently locked control and probe sub-pulses. With sufficient bandwidth, the technique is capable of intrinsically providing orthogonal broad spectral information for data fusion, all from a single optimal pulse.

  3. Calculating overpressure from BLEVE explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Planas-Cuchi, E.; Casal, J. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain). Department of Chemical Engineering, Centre for Technological Risk Studies; Salla, J.M. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain). Department of Heat Engines

    2004-11-01

    Although a certain number of authors have analyzed the prediction of boiling liquid expanding vapour explosion (BLEVE) and fireball effects, only very few of them have proposed methodologies for predicting the overpressure from such explosions. In this paper, the methods previously published are discussed and shown to introduce a significant overestimation due to erroneous thermodynamic assumptions - ideal gas behaviour and isentropic vapour expansion - on which they are based (in fact, they give the maximum value of overpressure which can be caused by a BLEVE). A new approach is proposed, based on the - more realistic - assumption of an adiabatic and irreversible expansion process; the real properties of the substance involved in the explosion are used. The two methods are compared through the application to a given case. (author)

  4. The vapor pressures of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, Robert G.; Waltman, Melanie J.; Atkinson, David A.; Grate, Jay W.; Hotchkiss, Peter

    2013-01-05

    The vapor pressures of many explosive compounds are extremely low and thus determining accurate values proves difficult. Many researchers, using a variety of methods, have measured and reported the vapor pressures of explosives compounds at single temperatures, or as a function of temperature using vapor pressure equations. There are large variations in reported vapor pressures for many of these compounds, and some errors exist within individual papers. This article provides a review of explosive vapor pressures and describes the methods used to determine them. We have compiled primary vapor pressure relationships traceable to the original citations and include the temperature ranges for which they have been determined. Corrected values are reported as needed and described in the text. In addition, after critically examining the available data, we calculate and tabulate vapor pressures at 25 °C.

  5. Evidence for nearby supernova explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benitez, Narciso; Maiz-Apellaniz, Jesus; Canelles, Matilde

    2002-01-01

    Supernova (SN) explosions are one of the most energetic--and potentially lethal--phenomena in the Universe. We show that the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association, a group of young stars currently located at ∼130 pc from the Sun, has generated 20 SN explosions during the last 11 Myr, some of them probably as close as 40 pc to our planet. The deposition on Earth of 60 Fe atoms produced by these explosions can explain the recent measurements of an excess of this isotope in deep ocean crust samples. We propose that ∼2 Myr ago, one of the SNe exploded close enough to Earth to seriously damage the ozone layer, provoking or contributing to the Pliocene-Pleistocene boundary marine extinction

  6. Estimation of active rockburst prevention effectiveness during longwall mining under disadvantageous geological and mining conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Wojtecki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Underground longwall mining of coal seams in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin is currently being carried out under increasingly difficult geological and mining conditions. Mining depth, dislocations and mining remnants are the main factors responsible for the most significant rockburst hazard, which can be minimized via the use of active and passive rockburst prevention. Active rockburst prevention in longwalls is usually based on blasting, in order to either destress local stress concentrations in the rock mass or to fracture the thick layers of strong roof rocks to prevent or minimize the impact of high energy tremors on excavations. The accurate estimation of active rockburst prevention effectiveness is particularly important when mining under disadvantageous geological and mining conditions, which are associated with high levels of this hazard. The efficiency of blasting applied for this purpose is typically evaluated from the seismic effect, which is calculated based on seismic monitoring data and the weight of the charged explosive. This method, as used previously in the Czech Republic, was adopted in the present study to analyze conditions occurring in a Polish hard coal mine in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin. Parameters of long hole destress blastings in roof rocks (torpedo blastings from the face of the assigned longwall in coal seam no. 507 were correct a success according to the seismic effect method and corresponded to observations made in situ. The analytical method presented enables the rapid estimation of destress blasting effectiveness and could also be useful when determining appropriate active rockburst prevention.

  7. Causes of Coal Mine Accidents in the World and Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küçük, Filiz Çağla Uyanusta; Ilgaz, Aslıhan

    2015-04-01

    Occupational accidents and occupational diseases are common in the mining sector in Turkey and throughout the world. The most common causes of accidents in coal mining are firedamp and dust explosions, landslips, mine fires, and technical failures related to transport and mechanization. An analysis of occupational accidents in the consideration of social and economic factors will let understand the real causes behind these accidents, which are said to happen inevitably due to technical deficiencies or failures. Irregular working conditions, based on profit maximization and cost minimization, are related to strategic operational preferences and public policies. Proving that accidents in mines, where occupational health and safety measures are not implemented and inspections are not done properly or at all, are caused by the fact that production is imposed to be carried out in the fastest, cheapest, and most profitable way will allow us to take steps to prevent further mine accidents.

  8. The Performance Parameters Of Wireless Sensor Networks In Underground Mines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinan UGUZ

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years underground mines have increasingly remained on the agenda with both difficult working conditions and problems such as collapsed and firedamp explosion in our country and in the world. In terms of life safety of miners and their health mine sites are required to be continuously monitored and controlled. This is difficult to achieve with existing wired systems due to the topography of mine sites. The applications have increased with the development of wireless sensor networks WSN technology in mine sites in recent years. This case has also caused an increase in studies on improving WSN performance. Especially energy efficiency is very important for the WSN hardware with a low energy source. In this study information about things to consider while using WSN technologies in underground mines and studies on their performance has been provided.

  9. Causes of Coal Mine Accidents in the World and Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küçük, Filiz Çağla Uyanusta; Ilgaz, Aslıhan

    2015-01-01

    Occupational accidents and occupational diseases are common in the mining sector in Turkey and throughout the world. The most common causes of accidents in coal mining are firedamp and dust explosions, landslips, mine fires, and technical failures related to transport and mechanization. An analysis of occupational accidents in the consideration of social and economic factors will let understand the real causes behind these accidents, which are said to happen inevitably due to technical deficiencies or failures. Irregular working conditions, based on profit maximization and cost minimization, are related to strategic operational preferences and public policies. Proving that accidents in mines, where occupational health and safety measures are not implemented and inspections are not done properly or at all, are caused by the fact that production is imposed to be carried out in the fastest, cheapest, and most profitable way will allow us to take steps to prevent further mine accidents. PMID:29404108

  10. ICPP custom dissolver explosion recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demmer, R.; Hawk, R.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the recovery from the February 9, 1991 small scale explosion in a custom processing dissolver at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. Custom processing is a small scale dissolution facility which processes nuclear material in an economical fashion. The material dissolved in this facility was uranium metal, uranium oxides, and uranium/fissium alloy in nitric acid. The paper explained the release of fission material, and the decontamination and recovery of the fuel material. The safety and protection procedures were also discussed. Also described was the chemical analysis which was used to speculate the most probable cause of the explosion. (MB)

  11. Explosions in Landau Vlasov dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suraud, E.; Cussol, D.; Gregoire, C.; Boilley, D.; Pi, M.; Schuck, P.; Remaud, B.; Sebille, F.

    1988-01-01

    A microscopic study of the quasi-fusion/explosion transition is presented in the framework of Landau-Vlasov simulations of intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions (bombarding energies between 10 and 100 MeV/A). A detailed analysis in terms of the Equation of State of the system is performed. In agreement with schematic models we find that the composite nuclear system formed in the collision does explode when it stays long enough in the mechanically unstable region (spinodal region). Quantitative estimates of the explosion threshold are given for central symmetric reactions (Ca+Ca and Ar+Ti). The effect of the nuclear matter compressibility modulus is discussed

  12. System for detecting nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawls, L.E.

    1978-01-01

    Apparatus for detecting underground nuclear explosions is described that is comprised of an antenna located in the dielectric substance of a deep waveguide in the earth and adapted to detect low frequency electromagnetic waves generated by a nuclear explosion, the deep waveguide comprising the high conductivity upper sedimentary layers of the earth, the dielectric basement rock, and a high conductivity layer of basement rock due to the increased temperature thereof at great depths, and means for receiving the electromagnetic waves detected by said antenna means

  13. Biological consequences of atomic explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messerschmidt, O.

    1984-01-01

    After an introductory chapter of the development and properties of nuclear weapons and the events of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, this books shows the effects of atomic explosions for man: effects of the pressure wave, thermal radiation, initial nuclear radiation alone or in conjunction and possible medical help. In addition the less massive damage caused by induced radioactivity and fallout, their prevention resp. treatment and the malignant/nonmalignant late effects are discussed. A further chapter deals with the psychological and epidemiological effects of atomic explosions, the consequences for food and water supply, and the construction of shetters. The last chapter is concerned with the problem of organising medical help. (MG) [de

  14. Swords into plowshares: the 'invention' of peaceful nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Findlay, T.

    1986-11-01

    This paper examines the early history of so-called peaceful nuclear explosions or PNEs: the proposed use of nuclear explosives for non-military purposes such as digging canals, building harbours, mining precious metals and increasing the flow of oil wells and natural gas deposits. It traces the origins of the United States PNE program, Project Plowshare, with particular focus on the role of Edward Teller and the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The paper also deals with the relationship between Plowshare and the 1958-61 nuclear test moratorium and the nuclear fallout controversy during that period. A key question addressed is whether Project Plowshare was simply a 'political' ploy designed to advance the anti-moratorium, anti-test ban and pro-nuclear weapon cause or whether its roots are to be found in the almost manic enthusiasm of the time for exploiting the 'peaceful atom'. The paper concludes that peaceful nuclear explosions were indeed largely a product of the same 1950s' ethos that gave the world such atomic-age 'white elephants' as the nuclear powered rocket, the nuclear-powered aircraft and the plutonium pacemaker

  15. Electrostatic Properties of Selected Personal Protective Equipment Regarding Explosion Hazard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Jachowicz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In industries such as the mining, petrochemistry or power industries, personal protective equipment is often used in explosive atmospheres. What causes the occurrence of explosive hazards is ever-present in the work environment they include, electrostatic phenomena as well as the build-up of electrical charges on the surface of the protective equipment used. This paper presents the results of studies which were aimed at determining the fundamental electrostatic parameters of protective helmets as well as eye and face protection, surface resistance and the voltage of electrostatic fields. Examinations on the typical structure of the above mentioned equipment was conducted including the variable values of ambient humidity, which can occur in the working environment and with the use of various types of materials used to generate a charge. The adopted methods and testing equipment have been presented. Using the current, general requirements regarding the electrostatic properties of materials, the examined helmets and eye protection were assessed for their use in explosive atmospheres.

  16. Exploration and Mining Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2002-09-01

    This Exploration and Mining Technology Roadmap represents the third roadmap for the Mining Industry of the Future. It is based upon the results of the Exploration and Mining Roadmap Workshop held May 10 ñ 11, 2001.

  17. Ghana Mining Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... in the Ghana mining journal: Geology and Mineral Exploration, Mining, Quarrying, Geomechanics, Groundwater Studies, Hydrocarbon Development, Mineral Processing, Metallurgy, Material Science, Mineral Management Policies, Mineral Economics, Environmental Aspects, Computer Applications and Mining Education.

  18. Coal Mine Permit Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — ESRI ArcView shapefile depicting New Mexico coal mines permitted under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA), by either the NM Mining these...

  19. Uranium mining in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The mining of uranium in Australia is criticised in relation to it's environmental impact, economics and effects on mine workers and Aborigines. A brief report is given on each of the operating and proposed uranium mines in Australia

  20. Dewatering blastholes cuts explosives costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilshaw, S.R.

    1987-11-01

    Large mining operations often require a combination of presplitting and dewatering with blasthole pumps. Increasing the percentage of bulk ANFO in any blast will reduce cost and should increase profitability.

  1. Mining royalties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelenković Rade J.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mineral resources are finite and nonrenewable in the sense that their extraction permanently depletes a country's resource inventory. The role of governments should be to manage the exploitation of these resources to maximize the economic benefits to their community, consistent with the need to attract and retain the exploration and development capital necessary to continue to realize these benefits for as long as possible. In designing mineral sector taxation systems, policy makers must carefully seek to balance tax types, rates, and incentives that satisfy the needs of both the nation and the mining investor.

  2. 30 CFR 18.82 - Permit to use experimental electric face equipment in a gassy mine or tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permit to use experimental electric face... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Machines Assembled With Certified or Explosion-Proof Components, Field...

  3. Excavation research with chemical explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandenberg, William E.; Day, Walter C.

    1970-01-01

    The US Army Engineer Nuclear Cratering Group (NCG) is located at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory in Livermore, California. NCG was established in 1962 and assigned responsibility for technical program direction of the Corps of Engineers Nuclear Excavation Research Program. The major part of the experimental program has been the execution of chemical explosive excavation experiments. In the past these experiments were preliminary to planned nuclear excavation experiments. The experience gained and technology developed in accomplishing these experiments has led to an expansion of NCG's research mission. The overall research and development mission now includes the development of chemical explosive excavation technology to enable the Corps of Engineers to more economically accomplish Civil Works Construction projects of intermediate size. The current and future chemical explosive excavation experiments conducted by NCG will be planned so as to provide data that can be used in the development of both chemical and nuclear excavation technology. In addition, whenever possible, the experiments will be conducted at the specific sites of authorized Civil Works Construction Projects and will be designed to provide a useful portion of the engineering structures planned in that project. Currently, the emphasis in the chemical explosive excavation program is on the development of design techniques for producing specific crater geometries in a variety of media. Preliminary results of two such experiments are described in this paper; Project Pre-GONDOLA III, Phase III, Reservoir Connection Experiment; and a Safety Calibration Series for Project TUGBOAT, a small boat harbor excavation experiment

  4. Excavation research with chemical explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandenberg, William E; Day, Walter C [U.S. Army Engineer Nuclear Cratering Group, Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1970-05-01

    The US Army Engineer Nuclear Cratering Group (NCG) is located at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory in Livermore, California. NCG was established in 1962 and assigned responsibility for technical program direction of the Corps of Engineers Nuclear Excavation Research Program. The major part of the experimental program has been the execution of chemical explosive excavation experiments. In the past these experiments were preliminary to planned nuclear excavation experiments. The experience gained and technology developed in accomplishing these experiments has led to an expansion of NCG's research mission. The overall research and development mission now includes the development of chemical explosive excavation technology to enable the Corps of Engineers to more economically accomplish Civil Works Construction projects of intermediate size. The current and future chemical explosive excavation experiments conducted by NCG will be planned so as to provide data that can be used in the development of both chemical and nuclear excavation technology. In addition, whenever possible, the experiments will be conducted at the specific sites of authorized Civil Works Construction Projects and will be designed to provide a useful portion of the engineering structures planned in that project. Currently, the emphasis in the chemical explosive excavation program is on the development of design techniques for producing specific crater geometries in a variety of media. Preliminary results of two such experiments are described in this paper; Project Pre-GONDOLA III, Phase III, Reservoir Connection Experiment; and a Safety Calibration Series for Project TUGBOAT, a small boat harbor excavation experiment.

  5. Experimental approach to explosive nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubono, S.

    1991-07-01

    Recent development of experimental studies on explosive nucleosynthesis, especially the rapid proton process and the primordial nucleosynthesis were discussed with a stress on unstable nuclei. New development in the experimental methods for the nuclear astrophysics is also discussed which use unstable nuclear beams. (author)

  6. Lead-free primary explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, My Hang V.

    2010-06-22

    Lead-free primary explosives of the formula (cat).sub.Y[M.sup.II(T).sub.X(H.sub.2O).sub.6-X].sub.Z, where T is 5-nitrotetrazolate, and syntheses thereof are described. Substantially stoichiometric equivalents of the reactants lead to high yields of pure compositions thereby avoiding dangerous purification steps.

  7. Explosive micro-bubble actuator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, D.M.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2007-01-01

    Explosive evaporation occurs when a thin layer of liquid reaches a very high temperature in a very short time. At these temperatures homogeneous nucleation takes place. The nucleated bubbles almost instantly coalesce forming a vapour film followed by rapid growth due to the pressure impulse and

  8. The behavior limestone under explosive load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, M. Yu; Orlova, Yu N.; Bogomolov, G. N.

    2016-11-01

    Limestone behavior under explosive loading was investigated. The behavior of the limestone by the action of the three types of explosives, including granular, ammonite and emulsion explosives was studied in detail. The shape and diameter of the explosion craters were obtained. The observed fragments after the blast have been classified as large, medium and small fragments. Three full-scale experiments were carried out. The research results can be used as a qualitative test for the approbation of numerical methods.

  9. Behavior of explosion debris clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    In the normal course of events the behavior of debris clouds created by explosions will be of little concern to the atomic energy industry. However, two situations, one of them actual and one postulated, exist where the rise and spread of explosion clouds can affect site operations. The actual occurrence would be the detonation of nuclear weapons and the resultant release and transport of radioactive debris across the various atomic energy installations. Although the activity of the diffusing cloud is not of biological concern, it may still be sufficiently above background to play havoc with the normal readings of sensitive monitoring instruments. If it were not known that these anomalous readings resulted from explosion debris, considerable time and expense might be required for on-site testing and tracing. Fortunately it is usually possible, with the use of meteorological data and forecasts, to predict when individual sites are affected by nuclear weapon debris effects. The formation rise, and diffusion of weapon clouds will be discussed. The explosion of an atomic reactor is the postulated situation. It is common practice in reactor hazard analysis to assume a combination of circumstances which might result in a nuclear incident with a release of material to the atmosphere. It is not within the scope of this report to examine the manifold plausibilities that might lead to an explosion or the possible methods of release of gaseous and/or particulates from such an occurrence. However, if the information of a cloud is assumed and some idea of its energy content is obtainable, estimates of the cloud behavior in the atmosphere can be made

  10. Ideas for peaceful nuclear explosions in USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    Three papers prepared in USSR have been made available to the Agency for circulation among Member States. One examines radioactive contamination and methods for predicting it, of natural environments during underground explosions. Another deals with the mechanical effect of underground explosions. The third, which forms the basis of this article, reviews possible applications of peaceful nuclear explosions in the Soviet economy. (author)

  11. A summary paper on nuclear mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaelson, S.D.

    1970-01-01

    Fifteen years ago a handful of men began to dream of the potentials of nuclear energy in peaceful applications. In 1957, AEC's Plowshare program was organized to promote and coordinate the work which might convert the dreams into realities. Then, some specific ideas for using nuclear energy in mining were set down in meaningful detail and with reasonable thought. In the 12 years of the Plowshare program nuclear energy concepts for mining have been developed in increasing detail and for a fairly broad range of possible applications. Although it may seem, at times, that progress is slow and month-to-month achievements almost nonexistent, a closer look throws a somewhat different light on the picture. In the first 7 years of Plowshare, from 1957 through 1964, the most obvious mining applications were delineated. These included the use of nuclear explosives to break ore for block caving, for in-situ leaching, and for stripping overburden from large low-grade deposits. Although numerous variations of these applications have been proposed in recent years, these three basic concepts still appear to hold the greatest potential. During those same seven years a number of DOD and Plowshare tests, involving both conventional and nuclear explosives, were conducted so that the phenomena and parameters bearing on mining applications could be evaluated in addition to acquiring other data. The tests, such as Projects Gnome, Sedan, Hard Hat and Danny Boy, have been discussed and reported at these and other meetings, and it would be redundant to review them now. Suffice it to say that from these tests and related work in AEC laboratories, scaling laws for relating yield, crater size, chimney size, fracture extent, and rock types were largely confirmed. Chimney rubble size distribution was determined and contamination problems were evaluated. Aside from these findings, however, the most important development during that 7-year period was the policy that relevant engineering data would

  12. A summary paper on nuclear mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaelson, S D [Kennecott Copper Corporation, Metal Mining Division, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1970-05-15

    Fifteen years ago a handful of men began to dream of the potentials of nuclear energy in peaceful applications. In 1957, AEC's Plowshare program was organized to promote and coordinate the work which might convert the dreams into realities. Then, some specific ideas for using nuclear energy in mining were set down in meaningful detail and with reasonable thought. In the 12 years of the Plowshare program nuclear energy concepts for mining have been developed in increasing detail and for a fairly broad range of possible applications. Although it may seem, at times, that progress is slow and month-to-month achievements almost nonexistent, a closer look throws a somewhat different light on the picture. In the first 7 years of Plowshare, from 1957 through 1964, the most obvious mining applications were delineated. These included the use of nuclear explosives to break ore for block caving, for in-situ leaching, and for stripping overburden from large low-grade deposits. Although numerous variations of these applications have been proposed in recent years, these three basic concepts still appear to hold the greatest potential. During those same seven years a number of DOD and Plowshare tests, involving both conventional and nuclear explosives, were conducted so that the phenomena and parameters bearing on mining applications could be evaluated in addition to acquiring other data. The tests, such as Projects Gnome, Sedan, Hard Hat and Danny Boy, have been discussed and reported at these and other meetings, and it would be redundant to review them now. Suffice it to say that from these tests and related work in AEC laboratories, scaling laws for relating yield, crater size, chimney size, fracture extent, and rock types were largely confirmed. Chimney rubble size distribution was determined and contamination problems were evaluated. Aside from these findings, however, the most important development during that 7-year period was the policy that relevant engineering data would

  13. Gas explosion in domestic buildings. The vented gas explosion[sub][/sub

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeusz Chyży

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the basic information, related to the so-called vented gas explosion, has been presented. The vented explosion it is an explosion, during which the destruction of the weakest elements of the structure occurs. Through the resulting holes (decompressing surfaces can flow both combustion products and non-burned gas mixture. In consequence, reduction of the maximum explosion pressure[i] P[sub]red [/sub][/i] may be significant. Often, a gas explosion occurs inside residential buildings. In this case, natural vents are window and door openings.[b]Keywords[/b]: gas, explosion, combustion, explosion vents

  14. 30 CFR 57.12036 - Fuse removal or replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuse removal or replacement. 57.12036 Section 57.12036 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12036 Fuse removal or replacement. Fuses shall not be removed or...

  15. 30 CFR 56.12036 - Fuse removal or replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuse removal or replacement. 56.12036 Section 56.12036 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... § 56.12036 Fuse removal or replacement. Fuses shall not be removed or replaced by hand in an energized...

  16. Safety trends in small-scale coal mines in developing countries with particular reference to China, India and Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jadoon, K.G.; Akbar, S.; Edwards, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    Small-scale mining for coal is practiced all over the world. But major proportions of these mines are located in developing countries in Asia. China, India and Pakistan are the main producers of coal from small- scale mines. Due to prevailing poor safety conditions in these mines, a large number of workers receive injuries ranging from minor to fatal. Gas explosions/outbursts, roof falls, material handling, etc. are the main causes of majority of accidents occurring in small-scale mines. In China, thousands of workers are killed due to gas explosions/outbursts every year. Lack of financial resources, inadequate education and training of workers, contractual labour systems and lack of commitment to improve safety and health are the reasons that mainly contribute to the poor safety performance in this sector of mining. (author)

  17. Behavior and Release of Nitrogen at Mines and Quarries in Nordic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Teemu; Neitola, Raisa; Jermakka, Johannes; Merta, Elina; Mroueh, Ulla-Maija

    2015-04-01

    The increased extraction of mineral resources and mining activities creates added pressure on the environmental issues and a proper water management in mining areas in Finland. Among others, nitrogen compounds released from explosives or from mining processes can have a detrimental effect on the environment. Thus, this project aimed at comprehensive understanding on the nitrogen issue in the extractive industry. The project collected essential data on nitrogen compounds present in the environments of mines and quarries, and generated better understanding of the discharge and behaviour of nitrogen compounds in mining areas. The sources and balances of explosives-originated nitrogen compounds at mines and quarries of different sizes were investigated and compared. Additionally, the focus was in 'nitrogen smudging' problem of waste rocks and the intensity, as well as evolution and chemical characteristics of their nitrogen contamination. According to the results, the total load of potential nitrogen to the environment depends on the scale and type of the activity as well as the type of explosives used. The main emission sources of nitrogen are process and dewatering waters. A lysimeter study showed that the explosives originated nitrogen content of left over stones from natural stone quarrying is relatively low and ca. half of the nitrogen is leached within the first weeks after detonation. The "nitrogen smudging" of natural stone quarrying left over stones is relatively low to begin with and enhanced by the rapid flushing by rainwater, thus the residues of explosives should not be considered to prevent the utilization of otherwise mineralogically inert waste rocks of good technical quality. The overall nitrogen management should take into account the background concentrations and sensitivity of the local ecosystem. The research project "Solution for Control of Nitrogen Discharges at Mines and Quarries, (MINIMAN)" was realized during years 2012-2014 as a cooperative

  18. Low-frequency electromagnetic measurements as a zero-time discriminant of nuclear and chemical explosions - OSI research final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, J.J.

    1996-12-01

    This is the final report on a series of investigations of low frequency (1-40 Hz) electromagnetic signals produced by above ground and underground chemical explosions and their use for confidence building under the Comprehensive Test-Ban Treaty. I conclude that low frequency electromagnetic measurements can be a very powerful tool for zero-time discrimination of chemical and nuclear explosions for yields of 1 Kt or greater, provided that sensors can be placed within 1-2 km of the suspected detonation point in a tamper-proof, low noise environment. The report includes descriptions and analyses of low frequency electromagnetic measurements associated with chemical explosions carried out in a variety of settings (shallow borehole, open pit mining, underground mining). I examine cavity pressure data from the Non-Proliferation Experiment (underground chemical explosion) and present the hypothesis that electromagnetic signals produced by underground chemical explosions could be produced during rock fracturing. I also review low frequency electromagnetic data from underground nuclear explosions acquired by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory during the late 1980s. (author)

  19. Advances in neutron based bulk explosive detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozani, Tsahi; Strellis, Dan

    2007-08-01

    Neutron based explosive inspection systems can detect a wide variety of national security threats. The inspection is founded on the detection of characteristic gamma rays emitted as the result of neutron interactions with materials. Generally these are gamma rays resulting from thermal neutron capture and inelastic scattering reactions in most materials and fast and thermal neutron fission in fissile (e.g.235U and 239Pu) and fertile (e.g.238U) materials. Cars or trucks laden with explosives, drugs, chemical agents and hazardous materials can be detected. Cargo material classification via its main elements and nuclear materials detection can also be accomplished with such neutron based platforms, when appropriate neutron sources, gamma ray spectroscopy, neutron detectors and suitable decision algorithms are employed. Neutron based techniques can be used in a variety of scenarios and operational modes. They can be used as stand alones for complete scan of objects such as vehicles, or for spot-checks to clear (or validate) alarms indicated by another inspection system such as X-ray radiography. The technologies developed over the last two decades are now being implemented with good results. Further advances have been made over the last few years that increase the sensitivity, applicability and robustness of these systems. The advances range from the synchronous inspection of two sides of vehicles, increasing throughput and sensitivity and reducing imparted dose to the inspected object and its occupants (if any), to taking advantage of the neutron kinetic behavior of cargo to remove systematic errors, reducing background effects and improving fast neutron signals.

  20. Active sampling technique to enhance chemical signature of buried explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, John S.; French, Patrick D.

    2004-09-01

    Deminers and dismounted countermine engineers commonly use metal detectors, ground penetrating radar and probes to locate mines. Many modern landmines have a very low metal content, which severely limits the effectiveness of metal detectors. Canines have also been used for landmine detection for decades. Experiments have shown that canines smell the explosives which are known to leak from most types of landmines. The fact that dogs can detect landmines indicates that vapor sensing is a viable approach to landmine detection. Several groups are currently developing systems to detect landmines by "sniffing" for the ultra-trace explosive vapors above the soil. The amount of material that is available to passive vapor sensing systems is limited to no more than the vapor in equilibrium with the explosive related chemicals (ERCs) distributed in the surface soils over and near the landmine. The low equilibrium vapor pressure of TNT in the soil/atmosphere boundary layer and the limited volume of the boundary layer air imply that passive chemical vapor sensing systems require sensitivities in the picogram range, or lower. ADA is working to overcome many of the limitations of passive sampling methods, by the use of an active sampling method that employs a high-powered (1,200+ joules) strobe lamp to create a highly amplified plume of vapor and/or ERC-bearing fine particulates. Initial investigations have demonstrated that this approach can amplify the detectability of TNT by two or three orders of magnitude. This new active sampling technique could be used with any suitable explosive sensor.

  1. Guaranteeing high output of a mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shetser, M G

    1983-05-01

    Operation of the Im. Kalinina coal mine in the Central Donbass is evluated. Seventeen coal seams, on the average 0.87 m thick, are prone to methane and coal dust explosions and to rock bursts. Some of the seams are also prone to spontaneous combustion. Rock layers in the roofs are prone to rock falls. Mining depth ranges from 740 to 850 m. Another working level is being constructed at a depth of 960 m. The steep coal seams are mined by means of the ANShch shield systems and the KGU system (with the 'Poisk' cutter loader). Strata control methods used in the mine are evaluated. Design of timber cribbings used for strata control in inclined workings is shown in a scheme. Construction of coal chutes and strata control in coal chutes are also described. Operation of KGU-1 powered supports which have been used in the mine for 10 years is evaluated. Improved strata control permitted daily coal output from a working face to be increased from 135 t in 1979 to 169 t in 1982. Yearly coal output increased from 605,000 t to 760,000 t. Labor productivity increased from 21.1 t/month to 25.9 t/month per miner. (In Russian)

  2. Acid mine water neutralisation with ammonium hydroxide and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study showed that NH4OH can be used for treatment of acid mine drainage rich in sulphates and NH4OH can be recycled in the process. Hydrated lime treatment resulted in removal of the remaining ammonia using a rotary evaporator. Keywords: acid mine water, ammonium hydroxide, barium hydroxide, sulphate ...

  3. Research on deeply purifying effluent from uranium mining and metallurgy to remove uranium by ion exchange. Pt.2: Elution uranium from lower loaded uranium resin by the intense fractionation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jianguo; Chen Shaoqiang; Qi Jing

    2002-01-01

    Developing macroporous resin for purifying uranium effluent from uranium mining and metallurgy is presented. The Intense Fractionation Process is employed to elute uranium from lower loaded uranium resin by the eluent of sulfuric acid and ammonium sulfate. The result is indicated that the uranium concentration in the rich elutriant is greatly increased, and the rich liquor is only one bed column volume, uranium concentration in the elutriant is increased two times which concentration is 10.1 g/L. The eluent is saved about 50% compared with the conventional fixed bed elution operation. And also the acidity in the rich elutriant is of benefit to the later precipitation process in uranium recovery

  4. Reduction of radioactivity produced by nuclear explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lessler, Richard M [Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1970-05-15

    Four main sources contribute to the radioactivity produced by a nuclear explosive: 1. Fission products from the nuclear explosive, 2. Fusion products from the nuclear explosive, 3. Induced radioactivity in the nuclear explosive, 4. Induced radioactivity in the environment. This paper will summarize some of the work done at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory at Livermore to reduce the radioactivity from these sources to levels acceptable for peaceful applications. Although it is theoretically possible to have no radioactivity produced by nuclear explosives, this goal has not been achieved.

  5. Perancangan Data Mining Untuk Analisis Kriteria Nasabah Kredit Yang Potensial Dan Manfaatnya Untuk Customer Relationship Management Perbankan

    OpenAIRE

    Kurniawan, Putu Sukma

    2015-01-01

    The presence of data mining problems caused by the explosion of data experienced by many organizations that have accumulated so many years of data (purchasing data, sales data, customer data, transaction data, and others). Examples of industries that use data mining is the banking industry. There are still many banks using conventional methods in the analysis of their customers. This would lead to high operating costs for the bank. The concept of data mining can help banks to get a better ana...

  6. Quantum control for initiation and detection of explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenfield, Margo T.; McGrane, Shawn D.; Scharff, R. Jason; Moore, David S.

    2010-01-01

    We employ quantum control methods towards detection and quantum controlled initiation (QCI) of energetic materials. Ultrafast pulse shaping of broadband Infrared (∼750 nm to 850 run) and ultraviolet (266 nm, 400 nm) light is utilized for control. The underlying principals behind optimal control can be utilized to both detect and initiate explosives. In each case, time dependent phase shaped electric fields drive the chemical systems towards a desired state. For optimal dynamic detection of explosives (ODD-Ex) a phase specific broadband infrared pulse is created which increases not only the sensitivity of detection but also the selectivity of an explosive's spectral signatures in a background of interferents. QCI on the other hand, seeks to initiate explosives by employing shaped ultraviolet light. QCI is ideal for use with explosive detonators as it removes the possibility of unintentional initiation from an electrical source while adding an additional safety feature, initiation only with the proper pulse shape. Quantum control experiments require: (1) the ability to phase and amplitude shape the laser pulse and (2) the ability to effectively search for the pulse shape which controls the reaction. In these adaptive experiments we utilize both global and local optimization search routines such as genetic algorithm, differential evolution, and downhill simplex. Pulse shaping the broadband IR light, produced by focusing 800 nm light through a pressurized tube of Argon, is straightforward as commercial pulse shapers are available at and around 800 nm. Pulse shaping in the UV requires a home built shaper. Our system is an acoustic optical modulator (AOM) pulse shaper in which consists of a fused silica AOM crystal placed in the Fourier plane of a 4-f zero dispersion compressor.

  7. New ANFO explosives made of ammonium nitrate of increased porosity and naphtha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutsarov, B.; Mavrodieva, R.; Ivanov, I.; Stoyanov, V.; Georgiev, N.; Krumov, I.; Katsarski, I.; Vakliev, I.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses results achieved by the KNIIPPI Niproruda Research Institute and the Osogovo enterprise in improving the quality of ANFO explosives. Ammonium nitrate with increased porosity was treated by water steam and wetting agents and then thermally treated. Naphtha in a quantity of up to 8% was then added to the ammonium nitrate to produce a powerful and stable explosive. The quality of explosive cartridges was tested first in the laboratory using the Schaffler apparatus. Test results were very satisfactory (better porosity, higher detonation velocity (2200-3600 m/s), better stability). Industrial experiments carried out in several underground mines also produced satisfactory results (better output in roadway drivage at lower operating cost and better safety). 8 refs.

  8. DEMONSTRATION OF AQUAFIX AND SAPS PASSIVE MINE WATER TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES AT SUMMITVILLE MINE SITE, INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency evaluated two passive water treatment (PWT) technologies for metals removal from acid mine drainage (AMD) at the Summitville Mine Superfund Site in southern Colorado...

  9. Hydrothermal pretreatment of wood by mild steam explosion and hot water extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtasz-Mucha, Joanna; Hasani, Merima; Theliander, Hans

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this work was to compare the two most common hydrothermal pre-treatments for wood - mild steam explosion and hot water extraction - both with the prospect of enabling extraction of hemicelluloses and facilitating further processing. Although both involve autohydrolysis of the lignocellulosic tissue, they are performed under different conditions: the most prominent difference is the rapid, disintegrating, discharge employed in the steam explosion opening up the structure. In this comparative study, the emphasis was placed on local composition of the pre-treated wood chips (of industrially relevant size). The results show that short hot water extraction treatments lead to significant variations in the local composition within the wood chips, while steam explosion accomplishes a comparably more even removal of hemicelluloses due to the advective mass transport during the explosion step. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Spleen removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spleen. Sickle cell anemia . Splenic artery aneurysm (rare). Trauma to the spleen. Risks Risks for anesthesia and surgery in general ... removal - series References Brandow AM, Camitta BM. Hyposplenism, splenic trauma, and splenectomy. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. ...

  11. Sensitivity to friction for primary explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyáš, Robert; Šelešovský, Jakub; Musil, Tomáš

    2012-04-30

    The sensitivity to friction for a selection of primary explosives has been studied using a small BAM friction apparatus. The probit analysis was used for the construction of a sensitivity curve for each primary explosive tested. Two groups of primary explosives were chosen for measurement (a) the most commonly used industrially produced primary explosives (e.g. lead azide, tetrazene, dinol, lead styphnate) and (b) the most produced improvised primary explosives (e.g. triacetone triperoxide, hexamethylenetriperoxide diamine, mercury fulminate, acetylides of heavy metals). A knowledge of friction sensitivity is very important for determining manipulation safety for primary explosives. All the primary explosives tested were carefully characterised (synthesis procedure, shape and size of crystals). The sensitivity curves obtained represent a unique set of data, which cannot be found anywhere else in the available literature. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Problems in the theory of point explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobeinikov, V. P.

    The book is concerned with the development of the theory of point explosions, which is relevant to the study of such phenomena as the initiation of detonation, high-power explosions, electric discharges, cosmic explosions, laser blasts, and hypersonic aerodynamics. The discussion covers the principal equations and the statement of problems; linearized non-self-similar one-dimensional problems; spherical, cylindrical, and plane explosions with allowance for counterpressure under conditions of constant initial density; explosions in a combustible mixture of gases; and point explosions in inhomogeneous media with nonsymmetric energy release. Attention is also given to point explosions in an electrically conducting gas with allowance for the effect of the magnetic field and to the propagation of perturbations from solar flares.

  13. Kiruna research mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oestensen, A

    1983-12-01

    The research mine at Kiruna is the first large-scale mining research project sponsored by the Swedish government. Under the leadership of the Swedish Mining Research Foundation, a five-year project involving development of new mining systems and machinery will be carried out in cooperation with the Lulea Institute of Technology and a number of Swedish industrial companies.

  14. Application for trackless mining technique in Benxi uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Bingguo

    1998-01-01

    The author narrates the circumstances achieving constructional target in Benxi Uranium Mine under relying on advance of science and technology and adopting small trackless mining equipment, presents the application of trackless mining equipment at mining small mine and complex mineral deposit and discusses the unique superiority of trackless mining technique in development work, mining preparation work and backstoping

  15. Seismic verification of underground explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glenn, L.A.

    1985-06-01

    The first nuclear test agreement, the test moratorium, was made in 1958 and lasted until the Soviet Union unilaterally resumed testing in the atmosphere in 1961. It was followed by the Limited Test Ban Treaty of 1963, which prohibited nuclear tests in the atmosphere, in outer space, and underwater. In 1974 the Threshold Test Ban Treaty (TTBT) was signed, limiting underground tests after March 1976 to a maximum yield of 250 kt. The TTBT was followed by a treaty limiting peaceful nuclear explosions and both the United States and the Soviet Union claim to be abiding by the 150-kt yield limit. A comprehensive test ban treaty (CTBT), prohibiting all testing of nuclear weapons, has also been discussed. However, a verifiable CTBT is a contradiction in terms. No monitoring technology can offer absolute assurance that very-low-yield illicit explosions have not occurred. The verification process, evasion opportunities, and cavity decoupling are discussed in this paper

  16. 76 FR 76104 - Arkansas Regulatory Program and Abandoned Mine Land Reclamation Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-06

    ... of their regulatory program and abandoned mine land plan, make grammatical changes, correct..., make grammatical changes, correct punctuation, revise dates, and add citations. The Arkansas... SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF MINING 785.14, 785.16, 785.18, and 785.25 Mountaintop Removal Mining; Permits...

  17. Bipolar explosion models for hypernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Keiichi; Nomoto, Ken'ichi

    2003-01-01

    Bipolar explosion models for hypernovae (very energetic supernovae) are presented. These models provide a favorable situation to explain some unexpected features in observations of hypernovae, e.g., high velocity matter dominated by Fe and low velocity matter dominated by O. The overall abundance of these models gives a good fit, at least qualitatively, to abundances in extremely metal-poor stars. We suggest hypernovae be driven by bipolar jets and contribute significantly to the early Galactic chemical evolution

  18. Mass extinctions and supernova explosions

    OpenAIRE

    Korschinek, Gunther

    2016-01-01

    A nearby supernova (SN) explosion could have negatively influenced life on Earth, maybe even been responsible for mass extinctions. Mass extinction poses a significant extinction of numerous species on Earth, as recorded in the paleontologic, paleoclimatic, and geological record of our planet. Depending on the distance between the Sun and the SN, different types of threats have to be considered, such as ozone depletion on Earth, causing increased exposure to the Sun's ultraviolet radiation, o...

  19. Mathematical modeling of seismic explosion waves impact on rock mass with a working

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. П. Господариков

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In the article, within the framework of the dynamic theory of elasticity, a mathematical model of the impact of seismic blast waves on rock mass is presented, including a working. The increase in the volume of mining operations in complex mining and geological conditions, taking into account the influence of the explosion energy, is closely connected with the analysis of the main parameters of the stress-strain state of the rock massif including a working. The latter leads to the need to determine the safe parameters of drilling and blasting operations that ensure the operational state of mining. The main danger in detonation of an explosive charge near an active working is a seismic explosive wave which characteristics are determined by the properties of soil and parameters of drilling and blasting operations. The determination of stress fields and displacement velocities in rock mass requires the use of a modern mathematical apparatus for its solution. For numerical solution of the given boundary value problem by the method of finite differences, an original calculation-difference scheme is constructed. The application of the splitting method for solving a two-dimensional boundary value problem is reduced to the solution of spatially one-dimensional differential equations. For the obtained numerical algorithm, an effective computational software has been developed. Numerical solutions of the model problem are given for the case when the shape of the working has a form of an ellipse.

  20. Performance properties of commercial explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.N.; Mader, C.L.; Goldstein, S.

    1983-01-01

    The aquarium test is a proven means of obtaining nonidial performance property data for commercial blasting agents. Optical data on the detonation velocity, shock wave in water, and expansion rate of the pipe enclosing the detonation products (in combination with the equilibrium thermodynamic chemistry code BKW) give the C-J state and degree of chemical reaction at the detonation front, as well as information on additional chemical reaction that occurs as the detonation products expand. Specific explosive systems that are studied are ammonium nitrate-fuel oil mixture (ANFO), aluminized ANFO, flaked trinitrotoluene (TNT), and several other commercial products in 10-cm diam and 20-cm-diam pipes of Plexiglas and clay. Experimental shock-pressure data are obtained with lithium niobate transducers placed in the water surrounding the explosive charge. These data show that the addition of approx.100-..mu..m aluminum particles to ANFO significantly increases the initial peak shock pressure delivered to the surrounding medium. Peak shock pressures in the water, calculated from the shock-wave orientation, are also useful in comparing performance properties of various commercial explosives. 20 references, 17 figures, 2 tables.

  1. Nuclear Explosions 1945-1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergkvist, Nils-Olov; Ferm, Ragnhild

    2000-07-01

    The main part of this report is a list of nuclear explosions conducted by the United States, the Soviet Union, the United Kingdom, France, China, India and Pakistan in 1945-98. The list includes all known nuclear test explosions and is compiled from a variety of sources including officially published information from the USA, Russia and France. The details given for each explosion (date, origin time, location, yield, type, etc.) are often compiled from more than one source because the individual sources do not give complete information. The report includes a short background to nuclear testing and provides brief information on the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty and the verification regime now being established to verify compliance with the treaty. It also summarizes nuclear testing country by country. The list should be used with some caution because its compilation from a variety of sources means that some of the data could be incorrect. This report is the result of cooperation between the Defence Research Establishment (FOA) and the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI)

  2. A model of vulcanian explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, A.W.

    1995-01-01

    We present a model of the initial stages of the explosive eruption of magma from a volcanic conduit as occurs in Vulcanian style eruptions. We assume there is a volatile rich (1-10 wt%) mixture of magma, vaporised groundwater and exsolved volatiles, trapped at high pressure (1-100 atm) just below a plug in a volcanic conduit. If the plug disrupts, there is an explosive eruption in which a rarefaction wave propagates into the conduit allowing the volatile rich mixture to expand and discharge into the atmosphere ahead of the vent. Typically, the explosions are so rapid that coarse grained ejecta (>0.5 mm) do not remain in thermal equilibrium with the gas, and this leads to significantly lower velocities and temperatures than predicted by an equilibrium model. Material may erupt from the vent at speeds of 100-400 m s -1 with an initial mass flux of order 10 7 -10 9 kg s -1 , consistent with video observations of eruptions and measurements of the ballistic dispersal of large clasts. (orig.)

  3. Designing vertical mine shafts under conditions of increasing shaft depth with rock hoisting to the operating mining level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durov, E.M.

    1983-05-01

    A system for shaft excavation in deep coal mines with mining depth exceeding 1,000 m is discussed. During mine sinking rocks are removed to the ground surface. When depth of a deep mine shaft is increased rocks are removed to the operating mining level, causing lower investment costs than the system with rock hoisting to the ground surface. The Yuzhgiproshakht design firm carries out investigations on the optimum methods for increasing shaft depth in coal mines. Coal mines with the following coal output are included in evaluations: 0.9, 1.2, 1.5, and 1.8 Mt/year. Mine shaft depth of 600, 800, 1000, 1200, 1400 and 1600 m is analyzed. Shaft depth is increased by 100, 200, 300 or 400 m. Shaft sinking rate ranges from 10 to 70 m/month. Effects of rock hoisting from the shaft bottom on the hoisting scheme in a mine shaft are analyzed. Position of hoisting bucket in relation to cages or skips moving in a shaft is investigated. Investigation results are given in 5 schemes. Analyses show that use of a shaft sinking system with rock hoisting to the ground surface during shaft excavation and with rock hoisting to the operating mining level during shaft depth increasing is economical when a shaft with skips is from 7 to 8 m in diameter or when a cage shaft is 6 m, 7 m or 8 m in diameter. Use of standardized shaft excavation systems is recommended. (In Russian)

  4. Tube bundle system: for monitoring of coal mine atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipf, R Karl; Marchewka, W; Mohamed, K; Addis, J; Karnack, F

    2013-05-01

    A tube bundle system (TBS) is a mechanical system for continuously drawing gas samples through tubes from multiple monitoring points located in an underground coal mine. The gas samples are drawn via vacuum pump to the surface and are typically analyzed for oxygen, methane, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide. Results of the gas analyses are displayed and recorded for further analysis. Trends in the composition of the mine atmosphere, such as increasing methane or carbon monoxide concentration, can be detected early, permitting rapid intervention that prevents problems, such as a potentially explosive atmosphere behind seals, fire or spontaneous combustion. TBS is a well-developed technology and has been used in coal mines around the world for more than 50 years. Most longwall coal mines in Australia deploy a TBS, usually with 30 to 40 monitoring points as part of their atmospheric monitoring. The primary uses of a TBS are detecting spontaneous combustion and maintaining sealed areas inert. The TBS might also provide mine atmosphere gas composition data after a catastrophe occurs in an underground mine, if the sampling tubes are not damaged. TBSs are not an alternative to statutory gas and ventilation airflow monitoring by electronic sensors or people; rather, they are an option to consider in an overall mine atmosphere monitoring strategy. This paper describes the hardware, software and operation of a TBS and presents one example of typical data from a longwall coal mine.

  5. Human health and safety risks management in underground coal mines using fuzzy TOPSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahdevari, Satar, E-mail: satar.mahdevari@aut.ac.ir [Department of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahriar, Kourosh [Department of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Esfahanipour, Akbar [Industrial Engineering Department, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-08-01

    The scrutiny of health and safety of personnel working in underground coal mines is heightened because of fatalities and disasters that occur every year worldwide. A methodology based on fuzzy TOPSIS was proposed to assess the risks associated with human health in order to manage control measures and support decision-making, which could provide the right balance between different concerns, such as safety and costs. For this purpose, information collected from three hazardous coal mines namely Hashouni, Hojedk and Babnizu located at the Kerman coal deposit, Iran, were used to manage the risks affecting the health and safety of their miners. Altogether 86 hazards were identified and classified under eight categories: geomechanical, geochemical, electrical, mechanical, chemical, environmental, personal, and social, cultural and managerial risks. Overcoming the uncertainty of qualitative data, the ranking process is accomplished by fuzzy TOPSIS. After running the model, twelve groups with different risks were obtained. Located in the first group, the most important risks with the highest negative effects are: materials falling, catastrophic failure, instability of coalface and immediate roof, firedamp explosion, gas emission, misfire, stopping of ventilation system, wagon separation at inclines, asphyxiation, inadequate training and poor site management system. According to the results, the proposed methodology can be a reliable technique for management of the minatory hazards and coping with uncertainties affecting the health and safety of miners when performance ratings are imprecise. The proposed model can be primarily designed to identify potential hazards and help in taking appropriate measures to minimize or remove the risks before accidents can occur. - Highlights: • Risks associated with health and safety of coal miners were investigated. • A reliable methodology based on Fuzzy TOPSIS was developed to manage the risks. • Three underground mines in Kerman

  6. Human health and safety risks management in underground coal mines using fuzzy TOPSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahdevari, Satar; Shahriar, Kourosh; Esfahanipour, Akbar

    2014-01-01

    The scrutiny of health and safety of personnel working in underground coal mines is heightened because of fatalities and disasters that occur every year worldwide. A methodology based on fuzzy TOPSIS was proposed to assess the risks associated with human health in order to manage control measures and support decision-making, which could provide the right balance between different concerns, such as safety and costs. For this purpose, information collected from three hazardous coal mines namely Hashouni, Hojedk and Babnizu located at the Kerman coal deposit, Iran, were used to manage the risks affecting the health and safety of their miners. Altogether 86 hazards were identified and classified under eight categories: geomechanical, geochemical, electrical, mechanical, chemical, environmental, personal, and social, cultural and managerial risks. Overcoming the uncertainty of qualitative data, the ranking process is accomplished by fuzzy TOPSIS. After running the model, twelve groups with different risks were obtained. Located in the first group, the most important risks with the highest negative effects are: materials falling, catastrophic failure, instability of coalface and immediate roof, firedamp explosion, gas emission, misfire, stopping of ventilation system, wagon separation at inclines, asphyxiation, inadequate training and poor site management system. According to the results, the proposed methodology can be a reliable technique for management of the minatory hazards and coping with uncertainties affecting the health and safety of miners when performance ratings are imprecise. The proposed model can be primarily designed to identify potential hazards and help in taking appropriate measures to minimize or remove the risks before accidents can occur. - Highlights: • Risks associated with health and safety of coal miners were investigated. • A reliable methodology based on Fuzzy TOPSIS was developed to manage the risks. • Three underground mines in Kerman

  7. Examining microbial community response to a strong chemical gradient: the effects of surface coal mining on stream bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bier, R.; Lindberg, T. T.; Wang, S.; Ellis, J. C.; Di Giulio, R. T.; Bernhardt, E. S.

    2012-12-01

    Surface coal mining is the dominant form of land cover change in northern and central Appalachia. In this process, shallow coal seams are exposed by removing overlying rock with explosives. The resulting fragmented carbonate rock and coal residues are disposed of in stream valleys. These valley fills generate alkaline mine drainage (AlkMD), dramatically increasing alkalinity, ionic strength, substrate supply (esp. SO42-), and trace element (Mn, Li, Se, U) concentrations in downstream rivers as well as significant losses of sensitive fish and macroinvertebrate species. In prior work within the Mud River, which drains the largest surface mine complex in Appalachia, we found that concentrations of AlkMD increase proportionally with the extent of upstream mining. Here we ask "How do stream microbial communities change along this strong chemical gradient?" We collected surface water and benthic biofilms from 25 stream reaches throughout the Mud River spanning the full range of surface mining impacts, with 0-96% of the contributing watershed area converted to surface coal mines. Microbial communities were collected from biofilms grown on a common substrate (red maple veneers) that were incubated in each stream reach for four months prior to collection in April, 2011. 16S rRNA genes from microbial communities at each study site were examined using 454 sequencing and compared with a generalized UniFrac distance matrix (674 sequence eveness) that was used in statistical analyses. Water chemistry at the sites was sampled monthly from July 2010 to December 2010 and again in April 2011. In April, surface water concentrations of SO42-, Ca2+, Mg2+, and Se2- increased linearly with the extent of upstream mining (all regressions R2 >0.43; pPERMANOVA; p=0.029). Bacterial diversity (OTU richness defined at 3% sequence difference) peaked at intermediate conductivities (600 μS cm-1). Environmental data that correlated significantly with the ordination axes were a variety of surface

  8. Blast mines: physics, injury mechanisms and vehicle protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, A; Hill, A M; Hepper, A E; Bull, A M J; Clasper, J C

    2009-12-01

    Since World War II, more vehicles have been lost to land mines than all other threats combined. Anti-vehicular (AV) mines are capable of disabling a heavy vehicle, or completely destroying a lighter vehicle. The most common form of AV mine is the blast mine, which uses a large amount of explosive to directly damage the target. In a conventional military setting, landmines are used as a defensive force-multiplier and to restrict the movements of the opposing force. They are relatively cheap to purchase and easy to acquire, hence landmines are also potent weapons in the insurgents' armamentarium. The stand-offnature of its design has allowed insurgents to cause significant injuries to security forces in current conflicts with little personal risk. As a result, AV mines and improvised explosive devices (IEDs) have become the most common cause of death and injury to Coalition and local security forces operating in Iraq and Afghanistan. Detonation of an AV mine causes an explosive, exothermic reaction which results in the formation of a shockwave followed by a rapid expansion of gases. The shockwave is mainly reflected by the soillair interface and fractures the soil cap overthe mine. The detonation products then vent through the voids in the soil, resulting in a hollow inverse cone which consists of the detonation gases surrounded by the soil ejecta. It is the combination of the detonation products and soil ejecta that interact with the target vehicle and cause injury to the vehicle occupants. A number of different strategies are required to mitigate the blast effects of an explosion. Primary blast effects can be reduced by increasing the standoff distance between the seat of the explosion and the crew compartment. Enhancement of armour on the base of the vehicle, as well as improvements in personal protection can prevent penetration of fragments. Mitigating tertiary effects can be achieved by altering the vehicle geometry and structure, increasing vehicle mass, as

  9. Report on the Austrian Mining Conference 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinmetz, R

    1982-02-01

    The conference took place in Leoben from 19 to 22 May, 1981, under the auspices of the Montanuniversitaet Leoben and the Bergmaennischer Verband of Austria. A total of 14 talks were held, which are summarized in brief. Main topics of the talks concerned prospects of the international coal industry, concepts of Austria' energy supply, coal exploration in Austria, uranium reserves of Austria, development of international coal trade, brown coal deposits of Hungary, aspects of overburden removal in surface mines and of roadway drivage in underground mines, prediction of rock behavior in deep mines, hydraulic salt mining, and protection of an iron ore preparation plant in India by the Austrian VOEST-ALPINE AG. (In German)

  10. Electrodialytic remediation of copper mine tailings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik K.; Rojo, A.; Ottpsen, Lisbeth M.

    2005-01-01

    electrodialytic remediation experiments on copper mine tailings. The results show that electric current could remove copper from watery tailing if the potential gradient was higher than 2V/cm during 21 days. With addition of sulphuric acid, the process was enhanced because the pH decreased to around 4...

  11. Membrane technology applied to acid mine drainage from copper mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambiado, K; Bustos, C; Schwarz, A; Bórquez, R

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the treatment of high-strength acid mine drainage (AMD) from copper mining by nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) at pilot scale. The performances of two commercial spiral-wound membranes - NF99 and RO98pHt, both from Alfa Laval - were compared. The effects of pressure and feed flow on ion rejection and permeate flux were evaluated. The results showed high ion removal under optimum pressure conditions, which reached 92% for the NF99 membrane and 98% for the RO98pHt membrane. Sulfate removal reached 97% and 99% for NF99 and RO98pHt, respectively. In the case of copper, aluminum, iron and manganese, the removal percentage surpassed 95% in both membranes. Although concentration polarization limited NF performance at higher pressures, permeate fluxes observed in NF were five times greater than those obtained by RO, with only slightly lower divalent ion rejection rates, making it a promising option for the treatment of AMD.

  12. Hair Removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hædersdal, Merete

    2011-01-01

    Hair removal with optical devices has become a popular mainstream treatment that today is considered the most efficient method for the reduction of unwanted hair. Photothermal destruction of hair follicles constitutes the fundamental concept of hair removal with red and near-infrared wavelengths...... suitable for targeting follicular and hair shaft melanin: normal mode ruby laser (694 nm), normal mode alexandrite laser (755 nm), pulsed diode lasers (800, 810 nm), long-pulse Nd:YAG laser (1,064 nm), and intense pulsed light (IPL) sources (590-1,200 nm). The ideal patient has thick dark terminal hair......, white skin, and a normal hormonal status. Currently, no method of lifelong permanent hair eradication is available, and it is important that patients have realistic expectations. Substantial evidence has been found for short-term hair removal efficacy of up to 6 months after treatment with the available...

  13. Hair removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haedersdal, Merete; Haak, Christina S

    2011-01-01

    Hair removal with optical devices has become a popular mainstream treatment that today is considered the most efficient method for the reduction of unwanted hair. Photothermal destruction of hair follicles constitutes the fundamental concept of hair removal with red and near-infrared wavelengths...... suitable for targeting follicular and hair shaft melanin: normal mode ruby laser (694 nm), normal mode alexandrite laser (755 nm), pulsed diode lasers (800, 810 nm), long-pulse Nd:YAG laser (1,064 nm), and intense pulsed light (IPL) sources (590-1,200 nm). The ideal patient has thick dark terminal hair......, white skin, and a normal hormonal status. Currently, no method of lifelong permanent hair eradication is available, and it is important that patients have realistic expectations. Substantial evidence has been found for short-term hair removal efficacy of up to 6 months after treatment with the available...

  14. Appraisal of the radiological situation following a nuclear explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, E.

    1976-01-01

    The physical laws governing a nuclear explosion and the characteristics of initial and residual radiation are set forth for an atomic and a neutron bomb. Consequent issues are successively discussed for local, continental, and global fallout, and formation of the radioactive trace. Impact aspects considered include: physico-chemical characteristics of fission products; inhalation, ingestion, and percutaneous routes of intake; distribution, localization, and removal from the body. Assessment is also made of external gamma irradiation from the radioactive trace. Finally, consideration is given to problems of radiation injuries sorting, of dosimetry, and early diagnostics in an emergency situation. (A.B.)

  15. Working group report: methane emissions from coal mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, D.

    1993-01-01

    The process of coalification inherently generates methane and other byproducts. The amount of methane released during coal mining is a function of coal rank and depth, gas content, and mining methods, as well as other factors such as moisture. In most underground mines, methane is removed by drawing large quantities of air through the mine releasing the air into the atmosphere. In surface mines, exposed coal faces and surfaces, as well as areas of coal rubble created by blasting operations are believed to be the major sources of methane. A portion of the methane emitted from coal mining comes from post-mining activities such as coal processing, transportation, and utilisation. Some methane is also released from coal waste piles and abandoned mines. This paper highlights difficulties with previous methane emission studies namely: absence of data on which to base estimates; use of national data to develop global estimates; failure to include all possible emission sources; overreliance on statistical estimation methodologies. It recommends a 'tiered' approach for the estimation of emissions from underground mines, surface mines and post-mining activities. For each source, two or more approaches (or 'tiers') are presented, with the first tier requiring basic and readily available data and higher tiers requiring additional data. 29 refs., 3 tabs

  16. Steam explosion pretreatment of softwood: the effect of the explosive decompression on enzymatic digestibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pielhop, Thomas; Amgarten, Janick; von Rohr, Philipp Rudolf; Studer, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    Steam explosion pretreatment has been examined in many studies for enhancing the enzymatic digestibility of lignocellulosic biomass and is currently the most common pretreatment method in commercial biorefineries. The information available about the effect of the explosive decompression on the biochemical conversion is, however, very limited, and no studies prove that the latter is actually enhanced by the explosion. Hence, it is of great value to discern between the effect of the explosion on the one hand and the steaming on the other hand, to identify their particular influences on enzymatic digestibility. The effect of the explosive decompression in the steam explosion pretreatment of spruce wood chips on their enzymatic cellulose digestibility was studied systematically. The explosion had a high influence on digestibility, improving it by up to 90 % compared to a steam pretreatment without explosion. Two factors were identified to be essentially responsible for the effect of the explosion on enzymatic digestibility: pretreatment severity and pressure difference of the explosion. A higher pretreatment severity can soften up and weaken the lignocellulose structure more, so that the explosion can better break up the biomass and decrease its particle size, which enhances its digestibility. In particular, increasing the pressure difference of the explosion leads to more defibration, a smaller particle size and a better digestibility. Though differences were found in the micro- and nanostructure of exploded and non-exploded biomass, the only influence of the explosion on digestibility was found to be the macroscopic particle size reduction. Steam explosion treatments with a high severity and a high pressure difference of the explosion lead to a comparatively high cellulose digestibility of the-typically very recalcitrant-softwood biomass. This is the first study to show that explosion can enhance the enzymatic digestibility of lignocellulosic biomass. If the

  17. Mining with communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veiga, Marcello M.; Scoble, Malcolm; McAllister, Mary Louise

    2001-01-01

    To be considered as sustainable, a mining community needs to adhere to the principles of ecological sustainability, economic vitality and social equity. These principles apply over a long time span, covering both the life of the mine and post-mining closure. The legacy left by a mine to the community after its closure is emerging as a significant aspect of its planning. Progress towards sustainability is made when value is added to a community with respect to these principles by the mining operation during its life cycle. This article presents a series of cases to demonstrate the diverse potential challenges to achieving a sustainable mining community. These case studies of both new and old mining communities are drawn mainly from Canada and from locations abroad where Canadian companies are now building mines. The article concludes by considering various approaches that can foster sustainable mining communities and the role of community consultation and capacity building. (author)

  18. A multi- sensor system for land mine detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megahid, R.M.

    2005-01-01

    In this review article, description and discussion are given to the methods and techniques which can be used to remove the millions of land mines that are buried in the ground of more than 60 countries worldwide. These buried land mines cause very serious social and economical problems especially in countries such as Egypt with nearly 23 millions land mine contaminating very vast areas in the northern cost of the western desert, north and west of Sinai, Suez Gulf and western cost of the Red Sea. This will challenge scientists in different related disciplines to find a specific, rapid and cost effective detection techniques to remove the millions of land mines from the ground of their countries. It is worth mentioning that the real problem in demining is not defusing the mines but locating them in the ground

  19. A research for environmental problems in the vicinity of mining area. Investigation into the impact of metallic mining on the environment and solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Jeong Sik; Cheong, Young Wook; Lee, Hyun Joo; Song, Duk Young [Korea Inst. of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    This study is focused on the impacts of metalliferous mines on the environment in the vicinity of the abandoned and active mines and establishment of abatements of mining environmental problems. Total number of metalliferous mines surveyed were 40 in which samples of waters, mine wastes and soil were taken. Water parameters such as the pH, Eh, TDS, conductivity, turbidity, dissolved oxygen and temperature were measured in the field. Elements such as As, Cd, Pb, Zn, Cu, Al, Mn, sulfate and cyanide were analyzed. Significant concentrations of heavy metals, mainly Cd, Zn, Cu, Fe, Mn and Al, were found in mine waters from adit and in leachates extracted from mine wastes. The mine waters flowing out from the Dalsung and Ilgwang mines were the typical acid mine drainage(AMD) contaminated by the heavy metals. Passive biological systems(Anoxic wetland) to treat AMD for metals were designed and monitored for effluents from the reactors with 4 types of composts, cow manure and limestones, Results showed that the mushroom compost with cow manure and limestone was the best substrates in metal removing efficiencies. Results from leaching of mine wastes showed that As, Cd and Cu were extracted from some of mine wastes. AMD from the mine waste dump of the Daduk mine was found. These mean that mine wastes can contaminate the soil, surface water and ground waters in vicinity of mines. Therefore cover systems or liner system for containments of mine wastes were suggested to preserve the environment. Cu and As concentrations in soils surveyed were below the heavy metal concentrations in soils of Korean standard preventing plant of the crops. However, most of the acid mine waters are drained untreated, and mine wastes with heavy metals are distributed near soil environment. Therefore efforts to reduce possibilities of soil contamination in the vicinity of mining areas is required. (author). 33 refs.

  20. Protecting the lower extremity against a/p blast mines

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    van Dyk, T

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available the Lower Extremity against a/p Blast Mines J T van Dyk DEFENCE, PEACE, SAFETY AND SECURITY LANDWARDS SCIENCES COMPETENCY AREA Slide 2 © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za Contents • R&D overview • Effect of a/p blast mines • Basic... explosive principles – Shock effect (brisance) – Blast effect • Test methods • Protection concepts • Test results Slide 3 © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za Goals: Compare LEAP study results with field injuries Investigate energy...