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Sample records for remote magnetic navigation

  1. Feasibility of remote magnetic navigation for epicardial ablation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Abraham; L.D. Abkenari; E.C.H. Peters; T. Szili-Torok (Tamas)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPercutaneous epicardial mapping and ablation is an emerging method to treat ventricular tachycardias (VT), premature ventricular complexes (PVC), and accessory pathways. The use of a remote magnetic navigation system (MNS) could enhance precision and maintain safety. This multiple case

  2. Safety of implantable pacemakers and cardioverter defibrillators in the magnetic field of a novel remote magnetic navigation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jilek, Clemens; Tzeis, Stylianos; Reents, Tilko; Estner, Heidi-Luise; Fichtner, Stephanie; Ammar, Sonia; Wu, Jinjin; Hessling, Gabriele; Deisenhofer, Isabel; Kolb, Christof

    2010-10-01

    Electromagnetic interference with pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) systems may cause temporary or permanent system malfunction of implanted devices. The aim of this study was to evaluate potential interference of a novel magnetic navigation system with implantable rhythm devices. A total of 121 devices (77 pacemakers, 44 ICDs) were exposed to an activated NIOBE II® Magnetic Navigation System (Stereotaxis, St. Louis, MO, USA) at the maximal magnetic field strength of 0.1 Tesla and evaluated in vitro with respect to changes in parameter settings of the device, changes of the battery status/detection of elective replacement indication, or alterations of data stored in the device. A total of 115 out of 121 (95%) devices were free of changes in parameter settings, battery status, and internally stored data after repeated exposition to the electromagnetic field of the remote magnetic navigation system. Interference with the magnetic navigation field was observed in 6 pacemakers, resulting in reprogramming to a power-on-reset mode with or without detection of the elective replacement indication in 5 devices and abnormal variance of battery status in one device. All pacemakers could be reprogrammed to the initial modes and the battery status proved to be normal some minutes after the pacemakers had been removed from the magnetic field. Interference of a remote magnetic navigation system (at maximal field strength) with pacemakers and ICDs not connected to leads with antitachycardic detection and therapies turned off is rare. Occurring functional abnormalities could be reprogrammed in our sample. An in vitro study will give information about interference of devices connected to leads. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Acute and long term outcomes of catheter ablation using remote magnetic navigation for the treatment of electrical storm in patients with severe ischemic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Qi; Jacobsen, Peter Karl; Pehrson, Steen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Catheter ablation with remote magnetic navigation (RMN) can offer some advantages compared to manual techniques. However, the relevant clinical evidence for how RMN-guided ablation affects electrical storm (ES) due to ventricular tachycardia (VT) in patients with severe ischemic heart......-guided catheter ablation can prevent VT recurrence and significantly reduce ICD shocks, suggesting that this strategy can be used as an alternative therapy for VT storm in SIHF patients with ICDs....

  4. Prediction and prognosis of ventricular tachycardia recurrence after catheter ablation with remote magnetic navigation for electrical storm in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Qi; Jacobsen, Peter Karl; Pehrson, Steen; Chen, Xu

    2017-11-01

    Ventricular tachycardia (VT) recurrence after catheter ablation for electrical storm is commonly seen in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM). We hypothesized that VT recurrence can be predicted and be related to the all-cause death after VT storm ablation guided by remote magnetic navigation (RMN) in patients with ICM. A total of 54 ICM patients (87% male; mean age, 65 ± 7.1 years) presenting with VT storm undergoing acute ablation using RMN were enrolled. Acute complete ablation success was defined as noninducibility of any sustained monomorphic VT at the end of the procedure. Early VT recurrence was defined as the occurrence of sustained VT within 1 month after the first ablation. After a mean follow-up of 17.1 months, 27 patients (50%) had freedom from VT recurrence. Sustained VT recurred in 12 patients (22%) within 1 month following the first ablation. In univariate analysis, VT recurrence was associated with incomplete procedural success (hazard ratio [HR]: 6.25, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.20-32.47, P = 0.029), lack of amiodarone usage before ablation (HR: 4.71, 95% CI: 1.12-19.7, P = 0.034), and a longer procedural time (HR: 1.023, 95% CI: 1.00-1.05, P = 0.05). The mortality of patients with early VT recurrence was higher than that of patients without recurrence (P storm guided by RMN is the strongest predictor of VT recurrence. ICM patients who have early recurrences after VT storm ablation are at high risk of all-cause death. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Initial experience of a novel mapping system combined with remote magnetic navigation in the catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Changjian; Pehrson, Steen; Jacobsen, Peter Karl

    2017-01-01

    the novel mapping system, LA mapping time was fast (308 ± 60 seconds) with detailed anatomy points (178,831 ± 70,897) collected and magnetic points throughout LA. At the end of the procedures in Group A, the LA model was confirmed to be stable and its location was within the distance threshold (1 mm......). Procedure time (117.9 ± 29.6 minutes vs. 119.2 ± 29.7 minutes, P = 0.89), fluoroscopy time (6.1 ± 2.4 minutes vs. 4.8 ± 2.2 minutes, P = 0.07), and ablation time (28.0 ± 12.9 minutes vs. 27.9 ± 15.8 minutes, P = 0.98) were similar in Group A versus Group B, respectively. No complications occurred in either...... of a novel 3D mapping system (EnSite Precision mapping system) combined with RMN (Niobe ES, Stereotaxis, Inc., St. Louis, MO, USA) for atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation. METHODS: In this prospective nonrandomized study, two groups of patients were treated in our center for drug refractory AF. Patients were...

  6. MAGNETIC VT study: a prospective, multicenter, post-market randomized controlled trial comparing VT ablation outcomes using remote magnetic navigation-guided substrate mapping and ablation versus manual approach in a low LVEF population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Biase, Luigi; Tung, Roderick; Szili-Torok, Tamás; Burkhardt, J David; Weiss, Peter; Tavernier, Rene; Berman, Adam E; Wissner, Erik; Spear, William; Chen, Xu; Neužil, Petr; Skoda, Jan; Lakkireddy, Dhanunjaya; Schwagten, Bruno; Lock, Ken; Natale, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    Patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM) are prone to scar-related ventricular tachycardia (VT). The success of VT ablation depends on accurate arrhythmogenic substrate localization, followed by optimal delivery of energy provided by constant electrode-tissue contact. Current manual and remote magnetic navigation (RMN)-guided ablation strategies aim to identify a reentry circuit and to target a critical isthmus through activation and entrainment mapping during ongoing tachycardia. The MAGNETIC VT trial will assess if VT ablation using the Niobe™ ES magnetic navigation system results in superior outcomes compared to a manual approach in subjects with ischemic scar VT and low ejection fraction. This is a randomized, single-blind, prospective, multicenter post-market study. A total of 386 subjects (193 per group) will be enrolled and randomized 1:1 between treatment with the Niobe ES system and treatment via a manual procedure at up to 20 sites. The study population will consist of patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) of ≤35% and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) who have sustained monomorphic VT. The primary study endpoint is freedom from any recurrence of VT through 12 months. The secondary endpoints are acute success; freedom from any VT at 1 year in a large-scar subpopulation; procedure-related major adverse events; and mortality rate through 12-month follow-up. Follow-up will consist of visits at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months, all of which will include ICD interrogation. The MAGNETIC VT trial will help determine whether substrate-based ablation of VT with RMN has clinical advantages over manual catheter manipulation. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT02637947.

  7. Magnetic navigation and tracking of underwater vehicles

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Teixeira, F.C.; Pascoal, A.M.

    for the navigation of AUVs has been proposed many years ago but the concept still requires practical demonstration. Implementation issues One of the advantages of mag- netic navigation consists in being passive and economical in terms of energy. Magnetic sensors do... like the present one, that require magnetic measurements with very high precision. A typical solution to this problem consists in the placement of magnetic sensors as far away as possible from the sources of noise but this may not be practical...

  8. Navigation: bat orientation using Earth's magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Richard A; Thorup, Kasper; Vonhof, Maarten J; Cochran, William W; Wikelski, Martin

    2006-12-07

    Bats famously orientate at night by echolocation, but this works over only a short range, and little is known about how they navigate over longer distances. Here we show that the homing behaviour of Eptesicus fuscus, known as the big brown bat, can be altered by artificially shifting the Earth's magnetic field, indicating that these bats rely on a magnetic compass to return to their home roost. This finding adds to the impressive array of sensory abilities possessed by this animal for navigation in the dark.

  9. Navigation: Bat orientation using Earth's magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holland, Richard A.; Thorup, Kasper; Vonhof, Maarten J.

    2006-01-01

    Bats famously orientate at night by echolocation 1 , but this works over only a short range, and little is known about how they navigate over longer distances 2 . Here we show that the homing behaviour of Eptesicus fuscus, known as the big brown bat, can be altered by artificially shifting the Ea...... the Earth's magnetic field, indicating that these bats rely on a magnetic compass to return to their home roost. This finding adds to the impressive array of sensory abilities possessed by this animal for navigation in the dark....

  10. Magnetic navigation in a coronary phantom: experimental results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, Héctor M; Tsuchida, Keiichi; Meulenbrug, Hans; Ong, Andrew T L; Van der Giessen, Willem J; Serruys, Patrick W

    2005-11-01

    The objective was to investigate the efficacy of a magnetic navigation system (MNS) in a coronary phantom. The number of coronary interventional procedures performed is steadily increasing with the availability of new devices to treat more complex lesions. Vessel tortuosity remains an important limiting factor in percutaneous coronary intervention. The MNS can orient the tip of magnetized wire. The coronary phantom is a representation of the coronary tree. Two operators using both a magnetic wire and a standard wire, measured the procedural time (PT), the fluoroscopic time (FT) and the radiation exposure/area product (DAP) required to navigate through to fourteen segments. Ten wire advancements were performed per segment. In all but two segments, the PT was significantly longer using magnetic navigation than using manual navigation. The median FT in the left main artery (LMA) - first septal segment was 7 seconds vs. 18 seconds, with magnetic and manual navigation respectively, (p=0.05); in the LMA - obtuse marginal segment the median FT was 15 seconds with magnetic navigation vs. 29.5 seconds with manual navigation, (p=0.01); in the segment from proximal right coronary artery (RCA1) to the acute marginal branch, the median FT was 8 seconds with magnetic vs. 11 seconds with manual navigation, (p=0.05); and in the RCA1 -posterior descending segment the median FT was 9.5 seconds with magnetic vs. 15 seconds with manual navigation, (p=0.006). The MNS facilitates wire access to distal segments in a coronary phantom, with a reduction in FT and radiation exposure using magnetic navigation in tortuous segments.

  11. Autonomous Magnetic Microrobots by Navigating Gates for Multiple Biomolecules Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xinghao; Lim, Byeonghwa; Torati, Sri Ramulu; Ding, Junjia; Novosad, Valentine; Im, Mi-Young; Reddy, Venu; Kim, Kunwoo; Jung, Eunjoo; Shawl, Asif Iqbal; Kim, Eunjoo; Kim, CheolGi

    2018-05-08

    The precise delivery of biofunctionalized matters is of great interest from the fundamental and applied viewpoints. In spite of significant progress achieved during the last decade, a parallel and automated isolation and manipulation of rare analyte, and their simultaneous on-chip separation and trapping, still remain challenging. Here, a universal micromagnet junction for self-navigating gates of microrobotic particles to deliver the biomolecules to specific sites using a remote magnetic field is described. In the proposed concept, the nonmagnetic gap between the lithographically defined donor and acceptor micromagnets creates a crucial energy barrier to restrict particle gating. It is shown that by carefully designing the geometry of the junctions, it becomes possible to deliver multiple protein-functionalized carriers in high resolution, as well as MCF-7 and THP-1 cells from the mixture, with high fidelity and trap them in individual apartments. Integration of such junctions with magnetophoretic circuitry elements could lead to novel platforms without retrieving for the synchronous digital manipulation of particles/biomolecules in microfluidic multiplex arrays for next-generation biochips. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Ground Vehicle Navigation Using Magnetic Field Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-13

    points on the sphere to resolve the calibration parameters. This approach is nearly identical to 5 Vasconcelos [44]. Additionally, the composition of...possible. 1.1.5 Three-axis Magnetometer Calibration. Vasconcelos et al., addressed three-dimensional ellipsoid calibration techniques for...Strangway, David W. History of the Earth’s Magnetic Field. McGraw-Hill, Inc., New York, NY, 1970. 44. Vasconcelos , J.F., G. Elkaim, C. Silvestre, P

  13. True navigation and magnetic maps in spiny lobsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boles, Larry C; Lohmann, Kenneth J

    2003-01-02

    Animals are capable of true navigation if, after displacement to a location where they have never been, they can determine their position relative to a goal without relying on familiar surroundings, cues that emanate from the destination, or information collected during the outward journey. So far, only a few animals, all vertebrates, have been shown to possess true navigation. Those few invertebrates that have been carefully studied return to target areas using path integration, landmark recognition, compass orientation and other mechanisms that cannot compensate for displacements into unfamiliar territory. Here we report, however, that the spiny lobster Panulirus argus oriented reliably towards a capture site when displaced 12-37 km to unfamiliar locations, even when deprived of all known orientation cues en route. Little is known about how lobsters and other animals determine position during true navigation. To test the hypothesis that lobsters derive positional information from the Earth's magnetic field, lobsters were exposed to fields replicating those that exist at specific locations in their environment. Lobsters tested in a field north of the capture site oriented themselves southwards, whereas those tested in a field south of the capture site oriented themselves northwards. These results imply that true navigation in spiny lobsters, and perhaps in other animals, is based on a magnetic map sense.

  14. Effects of Navigated Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation After Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervyakov, Alexander V; Poydasheva, Alexandra G; Lyukmanov, Roman H; Suponeva, Natalia A; Chernikova, Ludmila A; Piradov, Michael A; Ustinova, Ksenia I

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the effects of navigated repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, delivered in different modes, on motor impairments and functional limitations after stroke. The study sample included 42 patients (58.5 ± 10.7 years; 26 males) who experienced a single unilateral stroke (1-12 months previously) in the area of the middle cerebral artery. Patients completed a course of conventional rehabilitation, together with 10 sessions of navigated repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation or sham stimulation. Stimulation was scheduled five times a week over two consecutive weeks in an inpatient clinical setting. Patients were randomly assigned to one of four groups and received sham stimulation (n = 10), low-frequency (1-Hz) stimulation of the nonaffected hemisphere (n = 11), high-frequency (10-Hz) stimulation of the affected hemisphere (n = 13), or sequential combination of low- and high-frequency stimulations (n = 8). Participants were evaluated before and after stimulation with clinical tests, including the arm and hand section of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment Scale, modified Ashworth Scale of Muscle Spasticity, and Barthel Index of Activities of Daily Living. Participants in the three groups receiving navigated repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation showed improvements in arm and hand functions on the Fugl-Meyer Stroke Assessment Scale. Ashworth Scale of Muscle Spasticity and Barthel Index scores were significantly reduced in groups receiving low- or high-frequency stimulation alone. Including navigated repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in a conventional rehabilitation program positively influenced motor and functional recovery in study participants, demonstrating the clinical potential of the method. The results of this study will be used for designing a large-scale clinical trial.

  15. A navigator-based rigid body motion correction for magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullisch, Marcus Goerge

    2012-01-01

    A novel three-dimensional navigator k-space trajectory for rigid body motion detection for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - the Lissajous navigator - was developed and quantitatively compared to the existing spherical navigator trajectory [1]. The spherical navigator cannot sample the complete spherical surface due to slew rate limitations of the scanner hardware. By utilizing a two dimensional Lissajous figure which is projected onto the spherical surface, the Lissajous navigator overcomes this limitation. The complete sampling of the sphere consequently leads to rotation estimates with higher and more isotropic accuracy. Simulations and phantom measurements were performed for both navigators. Both simulations and measurements show a significantly higher overall accuracy of the Lissajous navigator and a higher isotropy of the rotation estimates. Measured under identical conditions with identical postprocessing, the measured mean absolute error of the rotation estimates for the Lissajous navigator was 38% lower (0.3 ) than for the spherical navigator (0.5 ). The maximum error of the Lissajous navigator was reduced by 48% relative to the spherical navigator. The Lissajous navigator delivers higher accuracy of rotation estimation and a higher degree of isotropy than the spherical navigator with no evident drawbacks; these are two decisive advantages, especially for high-resolution anatomical imaging.

  16. A navigator-based rigid body motion correction for magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullisch, Marcus Goerge

    2012-01-24

    A novel three-dimensional navigator k-space trajectory for rigid body motion detection for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - the Lissajous navigator - was developed and quantitatively compared to the existing spherical navigator trajectory [1]. The spherical navigator cannot sample the complete spherical surface due to slew rate limitations of the scanner hardware. By utilizing a two dimensional Lissajous figure which is projected onto the spherical surface, the Lissajous navigator overcomes this limitation. The complete sampling of the sphere consequently leads to rotation estimates with higher and more isotropic accuracy. Simulations and phantom measurements were performed for both navigators. Both simulations and measurements show a significantly higher overall accuracy of the Lissajous navigator and a higher isotropy of the rotation estimates. Measured under identical conditions with identical postprocessing, the measured mean absolute error of the rotation estimates for the Lissajous navigator was 38% lower (0.3 ) than for the spherical navigator (0.5 ). The maximum error of the Lissajous navigator was reduced by 48% relative to the spherical navigator. The Lissajous navigator delivers higher accuracy of rotation estimation and a higher degree of isotropy than the spherical navigator with no evident drawbacks; these are two decisive advantages, especially for high-resolution anatomical imaging.

  17. Navigation concepts for magnetic resonance imaging-guided musculoskeletal interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Harald; Kahn, Thomas; Moche, Michael

    2011-08-01

    Image-guided musculoskeletal (MSK) interventions are a widely used alternative to open surgical procedures for various pathological findings in different body regions. They traditionally involve one of the established x-ray imaging techniques (radiography, fluoroscopy, computed tomography) or ultrasound scanning. Over the last decades, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved into one of the most powerful diagnostic tools for nearly the whole body and has therefore been increasingly considered for interventional guidance as well.The strength of MRI for MSK applications is a combination of well-known general advantages, such as multiplanar and functional imaging capabilities, wide choice of tissue contrasts, and absence of ionizing radiation, as well as a number of MSK-specific factors, for example, the excellent depiction of soft-tissue tumors, nonosteolytic bone changes, and bone marrow lesions. On the downside, the magnetic resonance-compatible equipment needed, restricted space in the magnet, longer imaging times, and the more complex workflow have so far limited the number of MSK procedures under MRI guidance.Navigation solutions are generally a natural extension of any interventional imaging system, in particular, because powerful hardware and software for image processing have become routinely available. They help to identify proper access paths, provide accurate feedback on the instrument positions, facilitate the workflow in an MRI environment, and ultimately contribute to procedural safety and success.The purposes of this work were to describe some basic concepts and devices for MRI guidance of MSK procedures and to discuss technical and clinical achievements and challenges for some selected implementations.

  18. Catheter Ablation of Focal Atrial Tachycardia Using Remote Magnetic Navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Mark; Pasupati, Sanjeevan; Lever, Nigel; Stiles, Martin

    2018-05-01

    This first-in-human study evaluated the safety and technical feasibility of the Tempo temporary cardiac pacing lead (BioTrace Medical), which includes a novel fixation mechanism and soft tip. Complications of temporary pacing leads include dislodgment, arrhythmias, and ventricular perforation. Temporary pacing applications have increased with transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) growth, for rapid pacing during balloon valvuloplasty (BAV) and valve deployment, and for periprocedural bradyarrhythmia support. Eligible patients required temporary pacing for TAVR, BAV, or electrophysiology (EP) procedures. Transthoracic echocardiograms were obtained at baseline and 24 hours after lead removal. Safety was defined as freedom from pericardial effusion requiring intervention or evidence of tamponade. Technical feasibility involved successful intracardiac delivery and pace capture. Additional evaluations included pacing threshold (PCT), rapid pacing, dislodgment, or sustained ventricular arrhythmias. Follow-up was to 30 days. Twenty-five patients (60% female; mean age, 64 ± 19 years) underwent 13 TAVRs (7 Sapien 3 valves [Edwards Lifesciences], 4 CoreValves [Medtronic], and 2 Lotus valves [Boston Scientific]), 11 EP procedures, and 1 BAV at two New Zealand centers from January 2016 to June 2016. Safety was met in all patients, with no device-related adverse events. Technical feasibility was achieved in 23 cases (92%); 2 patients had unsuitable anatomy. No patient had lead dislodgment or sustained ventricular arrhythmias, and the final procedural PCT was 0.7 ± 0.5 mA. Rapid pacing was successful in all cases. Five patients had successful postprocedural use up to 5 days. This first-in-human study demonstrates the safety and technical feasibility of the Tempo lead, providing stable periprocedural temporary pacing support.

  19. Catheter Ablation of Focal Atrial Tachycardia Using Remote Magnetic Navigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiao-Yu; Jacobsen, Peter Karl; Pehrson, Steen

    2018-01-01

    , a total of 56 atrial foci were found. Acute success of the primary ablation was obtained in 52 patients (98%). Mean procedure duration was 109 ± 35 min, ablation duration was 401 sec (interquartile range [IQR], 332 sec), and fluoroscopy time was 5.0 min (IQR, 3.0 min). After a mean follow-up of 31 ± 18...

  20. Navigation and Remote Sensing Payloads and Methods of the Sarvant Unmanned Aerial System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, P.; Fortuny, P.; Colomina, I.; Remy, M.; Macedo, K. A. C.; Zúnigo, Y. R. C.; Vaz, E.; Luebeck, D.; Moreira, J.; Blázquez, M.

    2013-08-01

    In a large number of scenarios and missions, the technical, operational and economical advantages of UAS-based photogrammetry and remote sensing over traditional airborne and satellite platforms are apparent. Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) or combined optical/SAR operation in remote areas might be a case of a typical "dull, dirty, dangerous" mission suitable for unmanned operation - in harsh environments such as for example rain forest areas in Brazil, topographic mapping of small to medium sparsely inhabited remote areas with UAS-based photogrammetry and remote sensing seems to be a reasonable paradigm. An example of such a system is the SARVANT platform, a fixed-wing aerial vehicle with a six-meter wingspan and a maximumtake- of-weight of 140 kilograms, able to carry a fifty-kilogram payload. SARVANT includes a multi-band (X and P) interferometric SAR payload, as the P-band enables the topographic mapping of densely tree-covered areas, providing terrain profile information. Moreover, the combination of X- and P-band measurements can be used to extract biomass estimations. Finally, long-term plan entails to incorporate surveying capabilities also at optical bands and deliver real-time imagery to a control station. This paper focuses on the remote-sensing concept in SARVANT, composed by the aforementioned SAR sensor and envisioning a double optical camera configuration to cover the visible and the near-infrared spectrum. The flexibility on the optical payload election, ranging from professional, medium-format cameras to mass-market, small-format cameras, is discussed as a driver in the SARVANT development. The paper also focuses on the navigation and orientation payloads, including the sensors (IMU and GNSS), the measurement acquisition system and the proposed navigation and orientation methods. The latter includes the Fast AT procedure, which performs close to traditional Integrated Sensor Orientation (ISO) and better than Direct Sensor Orientation (Di

  1. Remote teaching experiments on magnetic domains in thin films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dobrogowski, W.; Maziewski, A.; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 28, - (2007), s. 71-83 ISSN 0143-0807 Grant - others:Marie Curie Felloships Transfer of Knowledge(XE) NANOMAG-LAB, 2004-003177 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : magnetic domains * remote experiment * education Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.608, year: 2007

  2. Surgical neuro navigator guided by preoperative magnetic resonance images, based on a magnetic position sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perini, Ana Paula; Siqueira, Rogerio Bulha; Carneiro, Antonio Adilton Oliveira; Oliveira, Lucas Ferrari de; Machado, Helio Rubens

    2009-01-01

    Image guided neurosurgery enables the neurosurgeon to navigate inside the patient's brain using pre-operative images as a guide and a tracking system, during a surgery. Following a calibration procedure, three-dimensional position and orientation of surgical instruments may be transmitted to computer. The spatial information is used to access a region of interest, in the pre-operative images, displaying them to the neurosurgeon during the surgical procedure. However, when a craniotomy is involved and the lesion is removed, movements of brain tissue can be a significant source of error in these conventional navigation systems. The architecture implemented in this work intends the development of a system to surgical planning and orientation guided by ultrasound image. For surgical orientation, the software developed allows the extraction of slices from the volume of the magnetic resonance images (MRI) with orientation supplied by a magnetic position sensor (Polhemus R ). The slices extracted with this software are important because they show the cerebral area that the neurosurgeon is observing during the surgery, and besides they can be correlated with the intra-operative ultrasound images to detect and to correct the deformation of brain tissue during the surgery. Also, a tool for per-operative navigation was developed, providing three orthogonal planes through the image volume. In the methodology used for the software implementation, the Python tm programming language and the Visualization Toolkit (VTK) graphics library were used. The program to extract slices of the MRI volume allowed the application of transformations in the volume, using coordinates supplied by the position sensor. (author)

  3. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging to update interactive navigation in neurosurgery: method and preliminary experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, C R; Bonsanto, M M; Knauth, M; Tronnier, V M; Albert, F K; Staubert, A; Kunze, S

    1997-01-01

    We report on the first successful intraoperative update of interactive image guidance based on an intraoperatively acquired magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) date set. To date, intraoperative imaging methods such as ultrasound, computerized tomography (CT), or MRI have not been successfully used to update interactive navigation. We developed a method of imaging patients intraoperatively with the surgical field exposed in an MRI scanner (Magnetom Open; Siemens Corp., Erlangen, Germany). In 12 patients, intraoperatively acquired 3D data sets were used for successful recalibration of neuronavigation, accounting for any anatomical changes caused by surgical manipulations. The MKM Microscope (Zeiss Corp., Oberkochen, Germany) was used as navigational system. With implantable fiducial markers, an accuracy of 0.84 +/- 0.4 mm for intraoperative reregistration was achieved. Residual tumor detected on MRI was consequently resected using navigation with the intraoperative data. No adverse effects were observed from intraoperative imaging or the use of navigation with intraoperative images, demonstrating the feasibility of recalibrating navigation with intraoperative MRI.

  4. Multi-Sensor Localization and Navigation for Remote Manipulation in Smoky Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Vicente Marti

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available When localizing mobile sensors and actuators in indoor environments laser meters, ultrasonic meters or even image processing techniques are usually used. On the other hand, in smoky conditions, due to a fire or building collapse, once the smoke or dust density grows, optical methods are not efficient anymore. In these scenarios other type of sensors must be used, such as sonar, radar or radiofrequency signals. Indoor localization in low-visibility conditions due to smoke is one of the EU GUARDIANS [1] project goals. The developed method aims to position a robot in front of doors, fire extinguishers and other points of interest with enough accuracy to allow a human operator to manipulate the robot's arm in order to actuate over the element. In coarse-grain localization, a fingerprinting technique based on ZigBee and WiFi signals is used, allowing the robot to navigate inside the building in order to get near the point of interest that requires manipulation. In fine-grained localization a remotely controlled programmable high intensity LED panel is used, which acts as a reference to the system in smoky conditions. Then, smoke detection and visual fine-grained localization are used to position the robot with precisely in the manipulation point (e.g., doors, valves, etc..

  5. An interactive videogame designed to improve respiratory navigator efficiency in children undergoing cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlet, Sean M; Haggerty, Christopher M; Suever, Jonathan D; Wehner, Gregory J; Grabau, Jonathan D; Andres, Kristin N; Vandsburger, Moriel H; Powell, David K; Sorrell, Vincent L; Fornwalt, Brandon K

    2016-09-06

    Advanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) acquisitions often require long scan durations that necessitate respiratory navigator gating. The tradeoff of navigator gating is reduced scan efficiency, particularly when the patient's breathing patterns are inconsistent, as is commonly seen in children. We hypothesized that engaging pediatric participants with a navigator-controlled videogame to help control breathing patterns would improve navigator efficiency and maintain image quality. We developed custom software that processed the Siemens respiratory navigator image in real-time during CMR and represented diaphragm position using a cartoon avatar, which was projected to the participant in the scanner as visual feedback. The game incentivized children to breathe such that the avatar was positioned within the navigator acceptance window (±3 mm) throughout image acquisition. Using a 3T Siemens Tim Trio, 50 children (Age: 14 ± 3 years, 48 % female) with no significant past medical history underwent a respiratory navigator-gated 2D spiral cine displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE) CMR acquisition first with no feedback (NF) and then with the feedback game (FG). Thirty of the 50 children were randomized to undergo extensive off-scanner training with the FG using a MRI simulator, or no off-scanner training. Navigator efficiency, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and global left-ventricular strains were determined for each participant and compared. Using the FG improved average navigator efficiency from 33 ± 15 to 58 ± 13 % (p < 0.001) and improved SNR by 5 % (p = 0.01) compared to acquisitions with NF. There was no difference in navigator efficiency (p = 0.90) or SNR (p = 0.77) between untrained and trained participants for FG acquisitions. Circumferential and radial strains derived from FG acquisitions were slightly reduced compared to NF acquisitions (-16 ± 2 % vs -17 ± 2 %, p < 0.001; 40 ± 10

  6. Magnetogenetics: Remote Control of Cellular Signaling with Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Jeremy P.

    Means for temporally regulating gene expression and cellular activity are invaluable for elucidating the underlying physiological processes and have therapeutic implications. Here we report the development of a system for remote regulation of gene expression by low frequency radiowaves (RF) or by a static magnetic field. We accomplished this by first adding iron oxide nanoparticles - either exogenously or as genetically encoded ferritin/ferric oxyhydroxide particle. These particles have been designed with affinity to the plasma membrane ion channel Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) by a conjugated antibody. Application of a magnetic field stimulates the particle to gate the ion channel and this, in turn, initiates calcium-dependent transgene expression. We first demonstrated in vitro that TRPV1 can be actuated to cause calcium flux into the cell by directly applying a localized magnetic field. In mice expressing these genetically encoded components, application of external magnetic field caused remote stimulation of insulin transgene expression and significantly lowered blood glucose. In addition, we are investigating mechanisms by which iron oxide nanoparticles can absorb RF, and transduce this energy to cause channel opening. This robust, repeatable method for remote cellular regulation in vivo may ultimately have applications in basic science, as well as in technology and therapeutics.

  7. Adding navigation, artificial audition and vital sign monitoring capabilities to a telepresence mobile robot for remote home care applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laniel, Sebastien; Letourneau, Dominic; Labbe, Mathieu; Grondin, Francois; Polgar, Janice; Michaud, Francois

    2017-07-01

    A telepresence mobile robot is a remote-controlled, wheeled device with wireless internet connectivity for bidirectional audio, video and data transmission. In health care, a telepresence robot could be used to have a clinician or a caregiver assist seniors in their homes without having to travel to these locations. Many mobile telepresence robotic platforms have recently been introduced on the market, bringing mobility to telecommunication and vital sign monitoring at reasonable costs. What is missing for making them effective remote telepresence systems for home care assistance are capabilities specifically needed to assist the remote operator in controlling the robot and perceiving the environment through the robot's sensors or, in other words, minimizing cognitive load and maximizing situation awareness. This paper describes our approach adding navigation, artificial audition and vital sign monitoring capabilities to a commercially available telepresence mobile robot. This requires the use of a robot control architecture to integrate the autonomous and teleoperation capabilities of the platform.

  8. A multi-modular helical magnetic millirobot navigating in curved tubular environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungmun Jeon

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel multi-modular helical magnetic millirobot (MHMM able to navigate in curved tubular environments. The proposed MHMM is basically composed of head, middle, and tail modules serially connected by a universal joint, and can employ more modules if necessary. The head module is a helical body with a magnetic rotary tip attached to the front end. Thus, once located in a curved tube filled with a fluid, the MHMM can effectively generate navigating or unclogging motions simply actuated by an external rotating magnetic field. This paper also examines the dynamic characteristics of the MHMM under various working conditions to manipulate the MHMM in a stable and safe manner. Then, it demonstrates various controlled motions of the MHMM in an in-vitro pulsatile flow environment to show the validity of the proposed structure and method.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of living systems by remote detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wemmer, David; Pines, Alexander; Bouchard, Louis; Xu, Shoujun; Harel, Elad; Budker, Dmitry; Lowery, Thomas; Ledbetter, Micah

    2013-10-29

    A novel approach to magnetic resonance imaging is disclosed. Blood flowing through a living system is prepolarized, and then encoded. The polarization can be achieved using permanent or superconducting magnets. The polarization may be carried out upstream of the region to be encoded or at the place of encoding. In the case of an MRI of a brain, polarization of flowing blood can be effected by placing a magnet over a section of the body such as the heart upstream of the head. Alternatively, polarization and encoding can be effected at the same location. Detection occurs at a remote location, using a separate detection device such as an optical atomic magnetometer, or an inductive Faraday coil. The detector may be placed on the surface of the skin next to a blood vessel such as a jugular vein carrying blood away from the encoded region.

  10. Remote tracking of a magnetic receiver using low frequency beacons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheinker, Arie; Ginzburg, Boris; Salomonski, Nizan; Frumkis, Lev; Kaplan, Ben-Zion

    2014-01-01

    Low frequency magnetic fields feature high penetration ability, which allows communication, localization, and tracking in environments where radio or acoustic waves are blocked or distorted by multipath interferences. In the present work, we propose a method for tracking a magnetic receiver using beacons of low frequency magnetic field, where the receiver includes a tri-axial search-coil magnetometer. Measuring the beacons’ magnetic fields and calculating the total-field signals enables localization without restrictions on magnetometer orientation, allowing on-the-move tracking. The total-field signals are used by a global search method, e.g., simulated annealing (SA) algorithm, to localize the receiver. The magnetic field produced by each beacon has a dipole structure and is governed by the beacon’s position and magnetic moment. We have investigated two different methods for estimating beacons’ magnetic moments prior to localization. The first method requires directional measurements, whereas for the second method the total-field signal is used. Effectiveness of these methods has been proved in numerous field tests. In the present work, we introduce a method for tracking a moving receiver by successive localizations. Using previous localization as a starting point of the search method for the next localization can reduce execution time and chances for divergence. The proposed method has been tested using numerous computer simulations. Successful system operation has been verified in field conditions. The good tracking capability together with simple implementation makes the proposed method attractive for real-time, low power field applications, such as mobile robots navigation. (paper)

  11. Application of talairach coordinates for transcranial magnetic stimulation navigation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Se-Jong; Kim, Jong-Woo; Sin, Sung-Wook; Yoo, Jin-Young; An, Hyojin; Chung, Sung-Taek; Yoon, Sejin

    2011-01-01

    Since the development of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in 1985, its clinical and experimental studies and therapeutic applications have been widely being investigated. MRI-based neuronavigational systems have been developed and used for positioning of the magnetic coil, which is the main problem of most TMS studies. The functional brain map provided by these systems, however, may be unsuitable for a population-based study since it does not describe the location of brain structures independent from individual differences in brain, and also, it would be difficult to localize particular point of brain since there is no reference point excepting anatomical structure. In this paper, neuronavigational approach of TMS and application of Talairach coordinate system are introduced. We expect that this concept of the system will allow not only to perform the population-based study taking individual anatomy into account, but also to help physician to localize specific point in the Talairach coordinates. (author)

  12. Remote auscultatory patient monitoring during magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, S; Hök, B; Wiklund, L

    1992-01-01

    A system for patient monitoring during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is described. The system is based on remote auscultation of heart sounds and respiratory sounds using specially developed pickup heads that are positioned on the precordium or at the nostrils and connected to microphones via...... can be simultaneously auscultated both inside and outside the shielded MRI room by infrared transmission through a metal mesh window. Bench tests of the system show that common mode acoustic noise is suppressed by approximately 30 dB in the frequency region of interest (100-1,000 Hz), and that polymer...

  13. The geomagnetic environment in which sea turtle eggs incubate affects subsequent magnetic navigation behaviour of hatchlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuxjager, Matthew J; Davidoff, Kyla R; Mangiamele, Lisa A; Lohmann, Kenneth J

    2014-09-22

    Loggerhead sea turtle hatchlings (Caretta caretta) use regional magnetic fields as open-ocean navigational markers during trans-oceanic migrations. Little is known, however, about the ontogeny of this behaviour. As a first step towards investigating whether the magnetic environment in which hatchlings develop affects subsequent magnetic orientation behaviour, eggs deposited by nesting female loggerheads were permitted to develop in situ either in the natural ambient magnetic field or in a magnetic field distorted by magnets placed around the nest. In orientation experiments, hatchlings that developed in the normal ambient field oriented approximately south when exposed to a field that exists near the northern coast of Portugal, a direction consistent with their migratory route in the northeastern Atlantic. By contrast, hatchlings that developed in a distorted magnetic field had orientation indistinguishable from random when tested in the same north Portugal field. No differences existed between the two groups in orientation assays involving responses to orbital movements of waves or sea-finding, neither of which involves magnetic field perception. These findings, to our knowledge, demonstrate for the first time that the magnetic environment present during early development can influence the magnetic orientation behaviour of a neonatal migratory animal. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  14. DRIFT-FREE INDOOR NAVIGATION USING SIMULTANEOUS LOCALIZATION AND MAPPING OF THE AMBIENT HETEROGENEOUS MAGNETIC FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. K. Chow

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the absence of external reference position information (e.g. surveyed targets or Global Navigation Satellite Systems Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM has proven to be an effective method for indoor navigation. The positioning drift can be reduced with regular loop-closures and global relaxation as the backend, thus achieving a good balance between exploration and exploitation. Although vision-based systems like laser scanners are typically deployed for SLAM, these sensors are heavy, energy inefficient, and expensive, making them unattractive for wearables or smartphone applications. However, the concept of SLAM can be extended to non-optical systems such as magnetometers. Instead of matching features such as walls and furniture using some variation of the Iterative Closest Point algorithm, the local magnetic field can be matched to provide loop-closure and global trajectory updates in a Gaussian Process (GP SLAM framework. With a MEMS-based inertial measurement unit providing a continuous trajectory, and the matching of locally distinct magnetic field maps, experimental results in this paper show that a drift-free navigation solution in an indoor environment with millimetre-level accuracy can be achieved. The GP-SLAM approach presented can be formulated as a maximum a posteriori estimation problem and it can naturally perform loop-detection, feature-to-feature distance minimization, global trajectory optimization, and magnetic field map estimation simultaneously. Spatially continuous features (i.e. smooth magnetic field signatures are used instead of discrete feature correspondences (e.g. point-to-point as in conventional vision-based SLAM. These position updates from the ambient magnetic field also provide enough information for calibrating the accelerometer bias and gyroscope bias in-use. The only restriction for this method is the need for magnetic disturbances (which is typically not an issue for indoor environments; however

  15. Drift-Free Indoor Navigation Using Simultaneous Localization and Mapping of the Ambient Heterogeneous Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, J. C. K.

    2017-09-01

    In the absence of external reference position information (e.g. surveyed targets or Global Navigation Satellite Systems) Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) has proven to be an effective method for indoor navigation. The positioning drift can be reduced with regular loop-closures and global relaxation as the backend, thus achieving a good balance between exploration and exploitation. Although vision-based systems like laser scanners are typically deployed for SLAM, these sensors are heavy, energy inefficient, and expensive, making them unattractive for wearables or smartphone applications. However, the concept of SLAM can be extended to non-optical systems such as magnetometers. Instead of matching features such as walls and furniture using some variation of the Iterative Closest Point algorithm, the local magnetic field can be matched to provide loop-closure and global trajectory updates in a Gaussian Process (GP) SLAM framework. With a MEMS-based inertial measurement unit providing a continuous trajectory, and the matching of locally distinct magnetic field maps, experimental results in this paper show that a drift-free navigation solution in an indoor environment with millimetre-level accuracy can be achieved. The GP-SLAM approach presented can be formulated as a maximum a posteriori estimation problem and it can naturally perform loop-detection, feature-to-feature distance minimization, global trajectory optimization, and magnetic field map estimation simultaneously. Spatially continuous features (i.e. smooth magnetic field signatures) are used instead of discrete feature correspondences (e.g. point-to-point) as in conventional vision-based SLAM. These position updates from the ambient magnetic field also provide enough information for calibrating the accelerometer bias and gyroscope bias in-use. The only restriction for this method is the need for magnetic disturbances (which is typically not an issue for indoor environments); however, no assumptions

  16. Permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance plasma source with remote window

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, L.A.; Gorbatkin, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma has been used in conjunction with a solid metal sputter target for Cu deposition over 200 mm diameters. The goal is to develop a deposition system and process suitable for filling submicron, high-aspect ratio ULSI features. The system uses a permanent magnet for creation of the magnetic field necessary for ECR, and is significantly more compact than systems equipped with electromagnets. A custom launcher design allows remote microwave injection with the microwave entrance window shielded from the copper flux. When microwaves are introduced at an angle with respect to the plasma, high electron densities can be produced with a plasma frequency significantly greater than the electron cyclotron frequency. Copper deposition rates of 1000 A/min have been achieved

  17. Drift Reduction in Pedestrian Navigation System by Exploiting Motion Constraints and Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ilyas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Pedestrian navigation systems (PNS using foot-mounted MEMS inertial sensors use zero-velocity updates (ZUPTs to reduce drift in navigation solutions and estimate inertial sensor errors. However, it is well known that ZUPTs cannot reduce all errors, especially as heading error is not observable. Hence, the position estimates tend to drift and even cyclic ZUPTs are applied in updated steps of the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF. This urges the use of other motion constraints for pedestrian gait and any other valuable heading reduction information that is available. In this paper, we exploit two more motion constraints scenarios of pedestrian gait: (1 walking along straight paths; (2 standing still for a long time. It is observed that these motion constraints (called “virtual sensor”, though considerably reducing drift in PNS, still need an absolute heading reference. One common absolute heading estimation sensor is the magnetometer, which senses the Earth’s magnetic field and, hence, the true heading angle can be calculated. However, magnetometers are susceptible to magnetic distortions, especially in indoor environments. In this work, an algorithm, called magnetic anomaly detection (MAD and compensation is designed by incorporating only healthy magnetometer data in the EKF updating step, to reduce drift in zero-velocity updated INS. Experiments are conducted in GPS-denied and magnetically distorted environments to validate the proposed algorithms.

  18. Real-Time Two-Dimensional Magnetic Particle Imaging for Electromagnetic Navigation in Targeted Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tuan-Anh; Zhang, Xingming; Hoshiar, Ali Kafash; Yoon, Jungwon

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are effective drug carriers. By using electromagnetic actuated systems, MNPs can be controlled noninvasively in a vascular network for targeted drug delivery (TDD). Although drugs can reach their target location through capturing schemes of MNPs by permanent magnets, drugs delivered to non-target regions can affect healthy tissues and cause undesirable side effects. Real-time monitoring of MNPs can improve the targeting efficiency of TDD systems. In this paper, a two-dimensional (2D) real-time monitoring scheme has been developed for an MNP guidance system. Resovist particles 45 to 65 nm in diameter (5 nm core) can be monitored in real-time (update rate = 2 Hz) in 2D. The proposed 2D monitoring system allows dynamic tracking of MNPs during TDD and renders magnetic particle imaging-based navigation more feasible. PMID:28880220

  19. Endovascular MR-guided Renal Embolization by Using a Magnetically Assisted Remote-controlled Catheter System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillaney, Prasheel V; Yang, Jeffrey K; Losey, Aaron D; Martin, Alastair J; Cooke, Daniel L; Thorne, Bradford R H; Barry, David C; Chu, Andrew; Stillson, Carol; Do, Loi; Arenson, Ronald L; Saeed, Maythem; Wilson, Mark W; Hetts, Steven W

    2016-10-01

    Purpose To assess the feasibility of a magnetically assisted remote-controlled (MARC) catheter system under magnetic resonance (MR) imaging guidance for performing a simple endovascular procedure (ie, renal artery embolization) in vivo and to compare with x-ray guidance to determine the value of MR imaging guidance and the specific areas where the MARC system can be improved. Materials and Methods In concordance with the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee protocol, in vivo renal artery navigation and embolization were tested in three farm pigs (mean weight 43 kg ± 2 [standard deviation]) under real-time MR imaging at 1.5 T. The MARC catheter device was constructed by using an intramural copper-braided catheter connected to a laser-lithographed saddle coil at the distal tip. Interventionalists controlled an in-room cart that delivered electrical current to deflect the catheter in the MR imager. Contralateral kidneys were similarly embolized under x-ray guidance by using standard clinical catheters and guidewires. Changes in renal artery flow and perfusion were measured before and after embolization by using velocity-encoded and perfusion MR imaging. Catheter navigation times, renal parenchymal perfusion, and renal artery flow rates were measured for MR-guided and x-ray-guided embolization procedures and are presented as means ± standard deviation in this pilot study. Results Embolization was successful in all six kidneys under both x-ray and MR imaging guidance. Mean catheterization time with MR guidance was 93 seconds ± 56, compared with 60 seconds ± 22 for x-ray guidance. Mean changes in perfusion rates were 4.9 au/sec ± 0.8 versus 4.6 au/sec ± 0.6, and mean changes in renal flow rate were 2.1 mL/min/g ± 0.2 versus 1.9 mL/min/g ± 0.2 with MR imaging and x-ray guidance, respectively. Conclusion The MARC catheter system is feasible for renal artery catheterization and embolization under real-time MR imaging in vivo, and quantitative physiologic

  20. A novel low-cost approach for navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodseth, Jakob; Washabaugh, Edward P; Krishnan, Chandramouli

    2017-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is commonly used for assessing or modulating brain excitability. However, the credibility of TMS outcomes depends on accurate and reliable coil placement during stimulation. Navigated TMS systems can address this issue, but these systems are expensive for routine use in clinical and research environments. The purpose of this study was to provide a high-quality open source framework for navigated TMS and test its reliability and accuracy using standard TMS procedures. A navigated TMS system was created using a low-cost 3D camera system (OptiTrack Trio), which communicates with our free and open source software environment programmed using the Unity 3D gaming engine. The environment is user friendly and has functions to allow for a variety of stimulation procedures (e.g., head and coil co-registration, multiple hotspot/grid tracking, intuitive matching, and data logging). The system was then validated using a static mockup of a TMS session. The clinical utility was also evaluated by assessing the repeatability and operator accuracy when collecting motor evoked potential (MEP) data from human subjects. The system was highly reliable and improved coil placement accuracy (position error = 1.2 mm and orientation error = 0.3°) as well as the quality and consistency (ICC >0.95) of MEPs recorded during TMS. These results indicate that the proposed system is a viable tool for reliable coil placement during TMS procedures, and can improve accuracy in locating the coil over a desired hotspot both within and between sessions.

  1. Non-invasive mapping of bilateral motor speech areas using navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation and functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Könönen, Mervi; Tamsi, Niko; Säisänen, Laura; Kemppainen, Samuli; Määttä, Sara; Julkunen, Petro; Jutila, Leena; Äikiä, Marja; Kälviäinen, Reetta; Niskanen, Eini; Vanninen, Ritva; Karjalainen, Pasi; Mervaala, Esa

    2015-06-15

    Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) is a modern precise method to activate and study cortical functions noninvasively. We hypothesized that a combination of nTMS and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) could clarify the localization of functional areas involved with motor control and production of speech. Navigated repetitive TMS (rTMS) with short bursts was used to map speech areas on both hemispheres by inducing speech disruption during number recitation tasks in healthy volunteers. Two experienced video reviewers, blinded to the stimulated area, graded each trial offline according to possible speech disruption. The locations of speech disrupting nTMS trials were overlaid with fMRI activations of word generation task. Speech disruptions were produced on both hemispheres by nTMS, though there were more disruptive stimulation sites on the left hemisphere. Grade of the disruptions varied from subjective sensation to mild objectively recognizable disruption up to total speech arrest. The distribution of locations in which speech disruptions could be elicited varied among individuals. On the left hemisphere the locations of disturbing rTMS bursts with reviewers' verification followed the areas of fMRI activation. Similar pattern was not observed on the right hemisphere. The reviewer-verified speech disruptions induced by nTMS provided clinically relevant information, and fMRI might explain further the function of the cortical area. nTMS and fMRI complement each other, and their combination should be advocated when assessing individual localization of speech network. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. WiFi-Aided Magnetic Matching for Indoor Navigation with Consumer Portable Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Li

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a WiFi-aided magnetic matching (MM algorithm for indoor pedestrian navigation with consumer portable devices. This algorithm reduces both the mismatching rate (i.e., the rate of matching to an incorrect point that is more than 20 m away from the true value and computational load of MM by using WiFi positioning solutions to limit the MM search space. Walking tests with Samsung Galaxy S3 and S4 smartphones in two different indoor environments (i.e., Environment #1 with abundant WiFi APs and significant magnetic features, and Environment #2 with less WiFi and magnetic information were conducted to evaluate the proposed algorithm. It was found that WiFi fingerprinting accuracy is related to the signal distributions. MM provided results with small fluctuations but had a significant mismatch rate; when aided by WiFi, MM’s robustness was significantly improved. The outcome of this research indicates that WiFi and MM have complementary characteristics as the former is a point-by-point matching approach and the latter is based on profile-matching. Furthermore, performance improvement through integrating WiFi and MM depends on the environment (e.g., the signal distributions of magnetic intensity and WiFi RSS: In Environment #1 tests, WiFi-aided MM and WiFi provided similar results; in Environment #2 tests, the former was approximately 41.6% better. Our results supported that the WiFi-aided MM algorithm provided more reliable solutions than both WiFi and MM in the areas that have poor WiFi signal distribution or indistinctive magnetic-gradient features.

  3. Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation in preoperative planning for the treatment of motor area cavernous angiomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Wellingson Silva; Fonoff, Erich Talamoni; Marcolin, Marco Antonio; Bor-Seng-Shu, Edson; Figueiredo, Eberval Gadelha; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen

    2013-01-01

    Since the introduction of microscopic techniques, radical surgery for cavernous angiomas has become a recommended treatment option. However, the treatment of motor area cavernous angioma represents a great challenge for the surgical team. Here, we describe an approach guided by frameless neuronavigation and preoperative functional mapping with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), for surgical planning. We used TMS to map the motor cortex and its relationship with the angioma. We achieved complete resection of the lesions in the surgeries, while avoiding areas of motor response identified during the preoperative mapping. We verified the complete control of seizures (Engel class 1A) in the patients with previous refractory epilepsy. Postsurgery, one patient was seizure-free without medication, and two patients required only one medication for seizure control. Thus, navigated TMS appears to be a useful tool, in preoperative planning for cavernous angiomas of the motor area. PMID:24353424

  4. Does a patent foramen ovale matter when using a remote-controlled magnetic system for pulmonary vein isolation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gate-Martinet, Alexie; Da Costa, Antoine; Romeyer-Bouchard, Cécile; Bisch, Laurence; Levallois, Marie; Isaaz, Karl

    2014-02-01

    Pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) takes longer when using a patent foramen ovale (PFO) compared with a transseptal puncture in paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) with manual catheter ablation. To our knowledge, no data exist concerning the impact of a PFO on AF ablation procedure variables when using a remote magnetic navigation (RMN) system. To assess the impact of a PFO when using an RMN system in patients requiring AF ablation. Between December 2011 and December 2012, catheter ablation was performed remotely using the CARTO(®) 3 system in 167 consecutive patients who underwent PVI for symptomatic drug-refractory AF. The radiofrequency generator was set to a fixed power ≤ 35 W. The primary endpoint was wide-area circumferential PVI confirmed by spiral catheter recording during ablation for all patients and including additional lesion lines (left atrial roof) or complex fractionated atrial electrograms for persistent AF. Secondary endpoints included procedural data. Mean age 58±10 years; 18% women; 107 (64%) patients with symptomatic paroxysmal AF; 60 (36%) with persistent AF; CHA2DS2-VASc score 1.2 ± 1. The PFO presence was evidenced in 49/167 (29.3%) patients during the procedure but in only 26/167 (16%) by transoesophageal echocardiography. Median procedure time 2.5 ± 1 hours; median total X-ray exposure time 14 ± 7 minutes; transseptal puncture and catheter positioning time 7.5 ± 5 minutes; left atrium electroanatomical reconstruction time 3 ± 2.3 minutes; catheter ablation time 3 ± 3 minutes. No procedure time or X-ray exposure differences were observed between patients with or without a PFO during magnetic navigation catheter ablation. X-ray exposure time was significantly reduced using a PFO compared with double transseptal puncture access. A PFO does not affect magnetic navigation during AF ablation; procedure times and X-ray exposure were similar. Septal catheter probing is mandatory to limit X-ray exposure and prevent potential complications

  5. Real-time virtual sonography for navigation during targeted prostate biopsy using magnetic resonance imaging data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyagawa, Tomoaki; Ishikawa, Satoru; Kimura, Tomokazu; Suetomi, Takahiro; Tsutsumi, Masakazu; Irie, Toshiyuki; Kondoh, Masanao; Mitake, Tsuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the medical navigation technique, namely, Real-time Virtual Sonography (RVS), for targeted prostate biopsy. Eighty-five patients with suspected prostate cancer lesions using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were included in this study. All selected patients had at least one negative result on the previous transrectal biopsies. The acquired MRI volume data were loaded onto a personal computer installed with RVS software, which registers the volumes between MRI and real-time ultrasound data for real-time display. The registered MRI images were displayed adjacent to the ultrasonographic sagittal image on the same computer monitor. The suspected lesions on T2-weighted images were marked with a red circle. At first suspected lesions were biopsied transperineally under real-time navigation with RVS and then followed by the conventional transrectal and transperineal biopsy under spinal anesthesia. The median age of the patients was 69 years (56-84 years), and the prostate-specific antigen level and prostate volume were 9.9 ng/mL (4.0-34.2) and 37.2 mL (18-141), respectively. Prostate cancer was detected in 52 patients (61%). The biopsy specimens obtained using RVS revealed 45/52 patients (87%) positive for prostate cancer. A total of 192 biopsy cores were obtained using RVS. Sixty-two of these (32%) were positive for prostate cancer, whereas conventional random biopsy revealed cancer only in 75/833 (9%) cores (P<0.01). Targeted prostate biopsy with RVS is very effective to diagnose lesions detected with MRI. This technique only requires additional computer and RVS software and thus is cost-effective. Therefore, RVS-guided prostate biopsy has great potential for better management of prostate cancer patients. (author)

  6. Accelerometer-based automatic voice onset detection in speech mapping with navigated repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitikainen, Anne-Mari; Mäkelä, Elina; Lioumis, Pantelis; Jousmäki, Veikko; Mäkelä, Jyrki P

    2015-09-30

    The use of navigated repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in mapping of speech-related brain areas has recently shown to be useful in preoperative workflow of epilepsy and tumor patients. However, substantial inter- and intraobserver variability and non-optimal replicability of the rTMS results have been reported, and a need for additional development of the methodology is recognized. In TMS motor cortex mappings the evoked responses can be quantitatively monitored by electromyographic recordings; however, no such easily available setup exists for speech mappings. We present an accelerometer-based setup for detection of vocalization-related larynx vibrations combined with an automatic routine for voice onset detection for rTMS speech mapping applying naming. The results produced by the automatic routine were compared with the manually reviewed video-recordings. The new method was applied in the routine navigated rTMS speech mapping for 12 consecutive patients during preoperative workup for epilepsy or tumor surgery. The automatic routine correctly detected 96% of the voice onsets, resulting in 96% sensitivity and 71% specificity. Majority (63%) of the misdetections were related to visible throat movements, extra voices before the response, or delayed naming of the previous stimuli. The no-response errors were correctly detected in 88% of events. The proposed setup for automatic detection of voice onsets provides quantitative additional data for analysis of the rTMS-induced speech response modifications. The objectively defined speech response latencies increase the repeatability, reliability and stratification of the rTMS results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Apparatus and method for detecting a magnetic anomaly contiguous to remote location by SQUID gradiometer and magnetometer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, W.C. Jr.; Steyert, W.A. Jr.

    1981-05-22

    A superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetic detection apparatus detects magnetic fields, signals, and anomalies at remote locations. Two remotely rotatable SQUID gradiometers may be housed in a cryogenic environment to search for and locate unambiguously magnetic anomalies. The SQUID magnetic detection apparatus can be used to determine the azimuth of a hydrofracture by first flooding the hydrofracture with a ferrofluid to create an artificial magnetic anomaly therein.

  8. Annealing of magnetic nanoparticles for their encapsulation into microcarriers guided by vascular magnetic resonance navigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pouponneau, Pierre; Segura, Vincent [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal (EPM), NanoRobotics Laboratory, Department of Computer and Software Engineering and Institute of Biomedical Engineering (Canada); Savadogo, Oumarou [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal (EPM), Laboratoire de Nouveaux Materiaux pour l' electrochimie et l' energie (Canada); Leroux, Jean-Christophe [Universite de Montreal, Faculty of Pharmacy (Canada); Martel, Sylvain, E-mail: sylvain.martel@polymtl.ca [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal (EPM), NanoRobotics Laboratory, Department of Computer and Software Engineering and Institute of Biomedical Engineering (Canada)

    2012-12-15

    Iron, cobalt and iron-cobalt nanoparticle properties, such as diameter, saturation magnetization (Ms), crystal structure, surface composition and stability in physiological solutions, were investigated according to the annealing temperature used prior to their encapsulation into poly(d, l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microcarriers. These new 60-{mu}m microparticles should exhibit an Ms around 70 emu g{sup -1} to be guided in real time from their intravascular injection site to a tumor with a magnetic resonance imaging scanner. The challenge in the preparation of the nanoparticles consisted in limiting Ms loss by oxidation and the release of metallic ions. It was found that when the annealing temperature reached 650 Degree-Sign C, Fe nanoparticles coalesced, the mean diameter reached (O) 361 {+-} 138 nm and Ms increased to 171 emu g{sup -1}. These nanoparticles exhibited a core of {alpha}-Fe and a shell of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. On the opposite, Co nanoparticle properties were not affected by the annealing temperature: O and Ms were around 120 nm and 140 emu g{sup -1}, respectively. FeCo (60:40, atomic percent) nanoparticles coalesced at an annealing temperature >550 Degree-Sign C, O and Ms reached 217 nm and 213 emu g{sup -1}, respectively. Co and FeCo nanoparticles with a Co atomic proportion >15 % were coated with a graphite shell when the temperature was set to 550 Degree-Sign C. In physiological solution, Fe and Co nanoparticles significantly released more ions than FeCo nanoparticles. After the preparation steps prior to their encapsulation, the Ms of Fe and FeCo nanoparticles decreased by 25 and 3 %, respectively. FeCo-PLGA microparticles possessed a relatively high Ms (73 emu g{sup -1}) while that of Fe-PLGA microparticle (20 emu g{sup -1}) was too low for efficient targeting. The graphite shell was efficient to preserve Ms during the encapsulation.

  9. The orientation and navigation of juvenile alligators: evidence of magnetic sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodda, Gordon H.

    1984-01-01

    Displaced juvenile alligators, Alligator mississipiensis, were released on land in a 9 m diameter dodecagonal arena to test their ability to orient in the absence of terrestrial landmarks. Navigational ability seemed to improve with age. When displaced along a fairly direct route yearlings (age 7–14 months) compensated for their displacement, moving in the direction from the arena to their home sites. When displaced by a circuitous route, yearlings failed to compensate for their displacement, exhibiting instead simple compass orientation in a direction that would have returned them to water had they been released on land near the site where they were captured. The older juveniles were oriented in a homeward direction under all displacement and test conditions. The latter animals may have been using geomagnetic map information to select their homeward directions as the errors in their homeward bearings correlated with small deviations in the geomagnetic field's dip angle at the time of the test (1980r s=−0.6047,P=0.0131, all testsr s= −0.4652,P=0.0084). This effect appeared to depend on a very short-term assessment of geomagnetic conditions, as values measured 20 min before or 30 min after the tests began did not correlate with the directions the animals moved. The older juveniles appeared to use magnetically quiet hours on the night of their capture as the baseline from which to measure the geomagnetic deviations that occurred at the time of the arena test. The magnitude of the magnetic effect in the older animals suggests that the geomagnetic information may have been used to perform a ‘map’ step, as small fluctuations in dip angle correlated with much larger deviations in homeward bearings. In addition, the compass-oriented yearlings and the seemingly route-based behavior of the homeward-oriented yearlings did not appear to be influenced by geomagnetic conditions. These findings have many parallels in results obtained from bird orientation studies

  10. Non-invasive mapping of calculation function by repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Stefanie; Tanigawa, Noriko; Sollmann, Nico; Hauck, Theresa; Ille, Sebastian; Boeckh-Behrens, Tobias; Meyer, Bernhard; Krieg, Sandro M

    2016-11-01

    Concerning calculation function, studies have already reported on localizing computational function in patients and volunteers by functional magnetic resonance imaging and transcranial magnetic stimulation. However, the development of accurate repetitive navigated TMS (rTMS) with a considerably higher spatial resolution opens a new field in cognitive neuroscience. This study was therefore designed to evaluate the feasibility of rTMS for locating cortical calculation function in healthy volunteers, and to establish this technique for future scientific applications as well as preoperative mapping in brain tumor patients. Twenty healthy subjects underwent rTMS calculation mapping using 5 Hz/10 pulses. Fifty-two previously determined cortical spots of the whole hemispheres were stimulated on both sides. The subjects were instructed to perform the calculation task composed of 80 simple arithmetic operations while rTMS pulses were applied. The highest error rate (80 %) for all errors of all subjects was observed in the right ventral precentral gyrus. Concerning division task, a 45 % error rate was achieved in the left middle frontal gyrus. The subtraction task showed its highest error rate (40 %) in the right angular gyrus (anG). In the addition task a 35 % error rate was observed in the left anterior superior temporal gyrus. Lastly, the multiplication task induced a maximum error rate of 30 % in the left anG. rTMS seems feasible as a way to locate cortical calculation function. Besides language function, the cortical localizations are well in accordance with the current literature for other modalities or lesion studies.

  11. Electric field-navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation for chronic tinnitus: a randomized, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahlsten, Hanna; Virtanen, Juuso; Joutsa, Juho; Niinivirta-Joutsa, Katri; Löyttyniemi, Eliisa; Johansson, Reijo; Paavola, Janika; Taiminen, Tero; Sjösten, Noora; Salonen, Jaakko; Holm, Anu; Rauhala, Esa; Jääskeläinen, Satu K

    2017-09-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) may alleviate tinnitus. We evaluated effects of electric field (E-field) navigated rTMS targeted according to tinnitus pitch. No controlled studies have investigated anatomically accurate E-field-rTMS for tinnitus. Effects of E-field-rTMS were evaluated in a prospective randomised placebo-controlled 6-month follow-up study on parallel groups. Patients received 10 sessions of 1 Hz rTMS or placebo targeted to the left auditory cortex corresponding to tonotopic representation of tinnitus pitch. Effects were evaluated immediately after treatment and at 1, 3 and 6 months. Primary outcome measures were visual analogue scores (VAS 0-100) for tinnitus intensity, annoyance and distress, and the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI). Thirty-nine patients (mean age 50.3 years). The mean tinnitus intensity (F 3  = 15.7, p tinnitus, differences between active and placebo groups remained non-significant, due to large placebo-effect and wide inter-individual variation.

  12. Magnetic navigation system for the precise helical and translational motions of a microrobot in human blood vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, S. M.; Jang, G. H.; Choi, H. C.; Park, S. H.; Park, J. O.

    2012-04-01

    Different magnetic navigation systems (MNSs) have been investigated for the wireless manipulation of microrobots in human blood vessels. Here we propose a MNS and methodology for generation of both the precise helical and translational motions of a microrobot to improve its maneuverability in complex human blood vessel. We then present experiments demonstrating the helical and translational motions of a spiral-type microrobot to verify the proposed MNS.

  13. Numerical study of remote detection outside the magnet with travelling wave Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 3T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López, M; Vázquez, F; Solís-Nájera, S; Rodriguez, A O

    2015-01-01

    The use of the travelling wave approach for high magnetic field magnetic resonance imaging has been used recently with very promising results. This approach offer images one with greater field-of-view and a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio using a circular waveguide. This scheme has been proved to be successful at 7 T and 9.4 T with whole-body imager. Images have also been acquired with clinical magnetic resonance imaging systems whose resonant frequencies were 64 MHz and 128 MHz. These results motivated the use of remote detection of the magnetic resonance signal using a parallel-plate waveguide together with 3 T clinical scanners, to acquired human leg images. The cut-off frequency of this waveguide is zero for the principal mode, allowing us to overcome the barrier of transmitting waves at lower frequency than 300 MHz or 7 T for protons. These motivated the study of remote detection outside the actual magnet. We performed electromagnetic field simulations of a parallel-plate waveguide and a phantom. The signal transmission was done at 128 MHz and using a circular surface coil located almost 200 cm away for the magnet isocentre. Numerical simulations demonstrated that the magnetic field of the principal mode propagate inside a waveguide outside the magnet. Numerical results were compared with previous experimental-acquired image data under similar conditions

  14. [Functional neuro-navigation and intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging for the resection of gliomas involving eloquent language structures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-lei; Xu, Bai-nan; Wang, Fei; Meng, Xiang-hui; Zhang, Jun; Jiang, Jin-li; Yu, Xin-guang; Zhou, Ding-biao

    2011-08-01

    To explore the clinical value of functional neuro-navigation and high-field-strength intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) for the resection of intracerebral gliomas involving eloquent language structures. From April 2009 to April 2010, 48 patients with intracerebral gliomas involving eloquent language structures, were operated with functional neuro-navigation and iMRI. Blood oxygen level dependent functional MRI (BOLD-fMRI) was used to depict both Broca and Wernicke cortex, while diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) based fiber tracking was used to delineate arcuate fasciculus. The reconstructed language structures were integrated into a navigation system, so that intra-operative microscopic-based functional neuro-navigation could be achieved. iMRI was used to update the images for both language structures and residual tumors. All patients were evaluated for language function pre-operatively and post-operatively upon short-term and long-term follow-up. In all patients, functional neuro-navigation and iMRI were successfully achieved. In 38 cases (79.2%), gross total resection was accomplished, while in the rest 10 cases (20.8%), subtotal resection was achieved. Only 1 case (2.1%) developed long-term (more than 3 months) new language function deficits at post-operative follow-up. No peri-operative mortality was recorded. With functional neuro-navigation and iMRI, the eloquent structures for language can be precisely located, while the resection size can be accurately evaluated intra-operatively. This technique is safe and helpful for preservation of language function.

  15. Volunteers Oriented Interface Design for the Remote Navigation of Rescue Robots at Large-Scale Disaster Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhixiao; Ito, Kazuyuki; Saijo, Kazuhiko; Hirotsune, Kazuyuki; Gofuku, Akio; Matsuno, Fumitoshi

    This paper aims at constructing an efficient interface being similar to those widely used in human daily life, to fulfill the need of many volunteer rescuers operating rescue robots at large-scale disaster sites. The developed system includes a force feedback steering wheel interface and an artificial neural network (ANN) based mouse-screen interface. The former consists of a force feedback steering control and a six monitors’ wall. It provides a manual operation like driving cars to navigate a rescue robot. The latter consists of a mouse and a camera’s view displayed in a monitor. It provides a semi-autonomous operation by mouse clicking to navigate a rescue robot. Results of experiments show that a novice volunteer can skillfully navigate a tank rescue robot through both interfaces after 20 to 30 minutes of learning their operation respectively. The steering wheel interface has high navigating speed in open areas, without restriction of terrains and surface conditions of a disaster site. The mouse-screen interface is good at exact navigation in complex structures, while bringing little tension to operators. The two interfaces are designed to switch into each other at any time to provide a combined efficient navigation method.

  16. Free-breathing steady-state free precession cine cardiac magnetic resonance with respiratory navigator gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghari, Mehdi H; Komarlu, Rukmini; Annese, David; Geva, Tal; Powell, Andrew J

    2015-04-01

    To develop and validate a respiratory motion compensation method for free-breathing cardiac cine imaging. A free-breathing navigator-gated cine steady-state free precession acquisition (Cine-Nav) was developed which preserves the equilibrium state of the net magnetization vector, maintains the high spatial and temporal resolutions of standard breath-hold (BH) acquisition, and images entire cardiac cycle. Cine image data is accepted only from cardiac cycles occurring entirely during end-expiration. Prospective validation was performed in 10 patients by obtaining in each three complete ventricular image stacks with different respiratory motion compensation approaches: (1) BH, (2) free-breathing with 3 signal averages (3AVG), and (3) free-breathing with Cine-Nav. The subjective image quality score (1 = worst, 4 = best) for Cine-Nav (3.8 ± 0.4) was significantly better than for 3AVG (2.2 ± 0.5, P = 0.002), and similar to BH (4.0 ± 0.0, P = 0.13). The blood-to-myocardium contrast ratio for Cine-Nav (6.3 ± 1.5) was similar to BH (5.9 ± 1.6, P = 0.52) and to 3AVG (5.6 ± 2.5, P = 0.43). There were no significant differences between Cine-Nav and BH for the ventricular volumes and mass. In contrast, there were significant differences between 3AVG and BH in all of these measurements but right ventricular mass. Free-breathing cine imaging with Cine-Nav yielded comparable image quality and ventricular measurements to BH, and was superior to 3AVG. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Language function distribution in left-handers: A navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tussis, Lorena; Sollmann, Nico; Boeckh-Behrens, Tobias; Meyer, Bernhard; Krieg, Sandro M

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies suggest that in left-handers, the right hemisphere (RH) is more involved in language function when compared to right-handed subjects. Since data on lesion-based approaches is lacking, we aimed to investigate language distribution of left-handers by repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). Thus, rTMS was applied to the left hemisphere (LH) and RH in 15 healthy left-handers during an object-naming task, and resulting naming errors were categorized. Then, we calculated error rates (ERs=number of errors per number of stimulations) for both hemispheres separately and defined a laterality score as the quotient of the LH ER - RH ER through the LH ER + RH ER (abbreviated as (L-R)/(L+R)). In this context, (L-R)/(L+R)>0 indicates that the LH is dominant, whereas (L-R)/(L+R)left-handers and right-handers (source data of another study) for all errors (mean 0.01±0.14 vs. 0.19±0.20, p=0.0019) and all errors without hesitation (mean -0.02±0.20 vs. 0.19±0.28, p=0.0051) was revealed, whereas the comparison for no responses did not show a significant difference (mean: -0.004±0.27 vs. 0.09±0.44, p=0.64). Accordingly, left-handers present a comparatively equal language distribution across both hemispheres with language dominance being nearly equally distributed between hemispheres in contrast to right-handers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mesoscopic Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy with a Remote Spin Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Tianyu; Shi, Fazhan; Chen, Sanyou; Guo, Maosen; Chen, Yisheng; Zhang, Yixing; Yang, Yu; Gao, Xingyu; Kong, Xi; Wang, Pengfei; Tateishi, Kenichiro; Uesaka, Tomohiro; Wang, Ya; Zhang, Bo; Du, Jiangfeng

    2018-06-01

    Quantum sensing based on nitrogen-vacancy (N -V ) centers in diamond has been developed as a powerful tool for microscopic magnetic resonance. However, the reported sensor-to-sample distance is limited within tens of nanometers resulting from the cubic decrease of the signal of spin fluctuation with the increasing distance. Here we extend the sensing distance to tens of micrometers by detecting spin polarization rather than spin fluctuation. We detect the mesoscopic magnetic resonance spectra of polarized electrons of a pentacene-doped crystal, measure its two typical decay times, and observe the optically enhanced spin polarization. This work paves the way for the N -V -based mesoscopic magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging at ambient conditions.

  19. INTRAOPERATIVE IMAGE NAVIGATION: EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF THE FEASIBILITY AND SURGEON PREFERENCE BETWEEN A STERILE ENCASED NINTENDO WIITM REMOTE AND STANDARD WIRELESS COMPUTER MOUSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Ryan; Zur Linden, Alex; Sears, William

    2017-05-01

    Diagnostic imaging plays an important role in the operating room, providing surgeons with a reference and surgical plan. Surgeon autonomy in the operating room has been suggested to decrease errors that stem from communication mistakes. A standard computer mouse was compared to a wireless remote-control style controller for computer game consoles (Wiimote) for the navigation of diagnostic imaging studies by sterile personnel in this prospective survey study. Participants were recruited from a cohort of residents and faculty that use the surgical suites at our institution. Outcome assessments were based on survey data completed by study participants following each use of either the mouse or Wiimote, and compared using an analysis of variance. The mouse was significantly preferred by the study participants in the categories of handling, accuracy and efficiency, and overall satisfaction (P <0.05). The mouse was preferred to both the Wiimote and to no device, when participants were asked to rank options for image navigation. This indicates the need for the implementation of intraoperative image navigation devices, to increase surgeon autonomy in the operating room. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  20. Treatment response assessment of radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma: Usefulness of virtual CT sonography with magnetic navigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, Yasunori; Kitai, Satoshi; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Virtual CT sonography using magnetic navigation provides cross sectional images of CT volume data corresponding to the angle of the transducer in the magnetic field in real-time. The purpose of this study was to clarify the value of this virtual CT sonography for treatment response of radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma. Patients and methods: Sixty-one patients with 88 HCCs measuring 0.5–1.3 cm (mean ± SD, 1.0 ± 0.3 cm) were treated by radiofrequency ablation. For early treatment response, dynamic CT was performed 1–5 days (median, 2 days). We compared early treatment response between axial CT images and multi-angle CT images using virtual CT sonography. Results: Residual tumor stains on axial CT images and multi-angle CT images were detected in 11.4% (10/88) and 13.6% (12/88) after the first session of RFA, respectively (P = 0.65). Two patients were diagnosed as showing hyperemia enhancement after the initial radiofrequency ablation on axial CT images and showed local tumor progression shortly because of unnoticed residual tumors. Only virtual CT sonography with magnetic navigation retrospectively showed the residual tumor as circular enhancement. In safety margin analysis, 10 patients were excluded because of residual tumors. The safety margin more than 5 mm by virtual CT sonographic images and transverse CT images were determined in 71.8% (56/78) and 82.1% (64/78), respectively (P = 0.13). The safety margin should be overestimated on axial CT images in 8 nodules. Conclusion: Virtual CT sonography with magnetic navigation was useful in evaluating the treatment response of radiofrequency ablation therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

  1. Efficacy and Safety of Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Using Remote Magnetic Navigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Q I; Pehrson, Steen; Jacobsen, Peter Karl

    2016-01-01

    .0 minutes, PerAF, P = 0.17). The overall complication rate was 0.6%. One PAF patient experienced cardiac tamponade. AF repeat ablations by RMN significantly reduced the procedural and ablation times when compared with their first ablation times. CONCLUSIONS: AF ablation guided by RMN is safe as evidenced...

  2. Optimal timing of pulse onset for language mapping with navigated repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieg, Sandro M; Tarapore, Phiroz E; Picht, Thomas; Tanigawa, Noriko; Houde, John; Sollmann, Nico; Meyer, Bernhard; Vajkoczy, Peter; Berger, Mitchel S; Ringel, Florian; Nagarajan, Srikantan

    2014-10-15

    Within the primary motor cortex, navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) has been shown to yield maps strongly correlated with those generated by direct cortical stimulation (DCS). However, the stimulation parameters for repetitive nTMS (rTMS)-based language mapping are still being refined. For this purpose, the present study compares two rTMS protocols, which differ in the timing of pulse train onset relative to picture presentation onset during object naming. Results were the correlated with DCS language mapping during awake surgery. Thirty-two patients with left-sided perisylvian tumors were examined by rTMS prior to awake surgery. Twenty patients underwent rTMS pulse trains starting at 300 ms after picture presentation onset (delayed TMS), whereas another 12 patients received rTMS pulse trains starting at the picture presentation onset (ONSET TMS). These rTMS results were then evaluated for correlation with intraoperative DCS results as gold standard in terms of differential consistencies in receiver operating characteristics (ROC) statistics. Logistic regression analysis by protocols and brain regions were conducted. Within and around Broca's area, there was no difference in sensitivity (onset TMS: 100%, delayed TMS: 100%), negative predictive value (NPV) (onset TMS: 100%, delayed TMS: 100%), and positive predictive value (PPV) (onset TMS: 55%, delayed TMS: 54%) between the two protocols compared to DCS. However, specificity differed significantly (onset TMS: 67%, delayed TMS: 28%). In contrast, for posterior language regions, such as supramarginal gyrus, angular gyrus, and posterior superior temporal gyrus, early pulse train onset stimulation showed greater specificity (onset TMS: 92%, delayed TMS: 20%), NPV (onset TMS: 92%, delayed TMS: 57%) and PPV (onset TMS: 75%, delayed TMS: 30%) with comparable sensitivity (onset TMS: 75%, delayed TMS: 70%). Logistic regression analysis also confirmed the greater fit of the predictions by rTMS that had the

  3. Observability Analysis of a Matrix Kalman Filter-Based Navigation System Using Visual/Inertial/Magnetic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohu Feng

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A matrix Kalman filter (MKF has been implemented for an integrated navigation system using visual/inertial/magnetic sensors. The MKF rearranges the original nonlinear process model in a pseudo-linear process model. We employ the observability rank criterion based on Lie derivatives to verify the conditions under which the nonlinear system is observable. It has been proved that such observability conditions are: (a at least one degree of rotational freedom is excited, and (b at least two linearly independent horizontal lines and one vertical line are observed. Experimental results have validated the correctness of these observability conditions.

  4. Remote manipulation of posterior lamellar corneal grafts using a magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahum, Yoav; Barliya, Tilda; Bahar, Irit; Livnat, Tami; Nisgav, Yael; Weinberger, Dov

    2013-06-01

    In posterior lamellar keratoplasty procedures such as Descemet stripping endothelial keratoplasty and Descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty, the lamellar graft is manipulated directly or by injecting an air bubble. This preliminary study sought to evaluate the feasibility of guiding lamellar corneal grafts by generating a magnetic field. Rabbit and porcine Descemet stripping endothelial keratoplasty and Descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty grafts were manually produced and immersed in a ferromagnetic solution containing nanomagnetic particles conjugated to streptavidin or in gadoteric acid. For the feasibility study, grafts were transferred to an artificial anterior chamber or plastic test tube and a magnetic field was generated with a handheld NdFeB disc magnet. The presence and the sustainability of graft motion were documented under various conditions. For the semiquantitative study, whole or partial grafts were transferred to a plastic test tube after immersion, and the amount of tissue retraction induced by the remote magnet was graded. The grafts were successfully manipulated in all directions by the magnet, from a distance of up to 7 mm. They remained ferromagnetic more than 24 hours after immersion in the ferromagnetic solutions. The degree of retraction was affected by graft size, immersion time, time from immersion, and immersion solution. Posterior lamellar corneal grafts may be made ferromagnetic and remotely manipulated by creation of a magnetic field. The ferromagnetic properties are adjustable. This technique holds promise in attaching and repositioning grafts during keratoplasty. Further research is needed to assess the possible effects of ferromagnetic solutions on corneal endothelial cells and on lamellar graft clarity.

  5. A High-Rate Virtual Instrument of Marine Vehicle Motions for Underwater Navigation and Ocean Remote Sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Gelin, Chrystel

    2013-01-01

    Dead-Reckoning aided with Doppler velocity measurement has been the most common method for underwater navigation for small vehicles. Unfortunately DR requires frequent position recalibrations and underwater vehicle navigation systems are limited to periodic position update when they surface. Finally standard Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers are unable to provide the rate or precision required when used on a small vessel. To overcome this, a low cost high rate motion measurement system for an Unmanned Surface Vehicle (USV) with underwater and oceanographic purposes is proposed. The proposed onboard system for the USV consists of an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) with accelerometers and rate gyros, a GPS receiver, a flux-gate compass, a roll and tilt sensor and an ADCP. Interfacing all the sensors proved rather challenging because of their different characteristics. The proposed data fusion technique integrates the sensors and develops an embeddable software package, using real time data fusion method...

  6. Design of a control card for remote operation of the magnet power supply of microtron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.M.; Hanumaiah, B.; Ganesh; Siddappa, K.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: In this paper we report on a control card developed for remote operation of the magnet power supply of the Microtron. We have used a microcontroller, an ADC, a DAC and some circuit components to make the microcontroller perform the control operations according to the in built program. The value of the parameter to be controlled (i.e. the magnetic field) is given by the main program in the PC kept away from the system. When the user wants to use the magnet power supply system operate the microtron, he will switch ON the system and feed a particular value of the parameter (i.e. magnetic field in Gauss). This value is passed on to the control program in the microcontroller. With this value and the read back value obtained from the sensor the control card activates its control circuitary to maintain the system at the defined parameter value

  7. Contactless remote induction of shear waves in soft tissues using a transcranial magnetic stimulation device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grasland-Mongrain, Pol; Miller-Jolicoeur, Erika; Cloutier, Guy; Tang, An; Catheline, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the first observation of shear waves induced remotely within soft tissues. It was performed through the combination of a transcranial magnetic stimulation device and a permanent magnet. A physical model based on Maxwell and Navier equations was developed. Experiments were performed on a cryogel phantom and a chicken breast sample. Using an ultrafast ultrasound scanner, shear waves of respective amplitudes of 5 and 0.5 μm were observed. Experimental and numerical results were in good agreement. This study constitutes the framework of an alternative shear wave elastography method. (paper)

  8. Contactless remote induction of shear waves in soft tissues using a transcranial magnetic stimulation device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasland-Mongrain, Pol; Miller-Jolicoeur, Erika; Tang, An; Catheline, Stefan; Cloutier, Guy

    2016-03-01

    This study presents the first observation of shear waves induced remotely within soft tissues. It was performed through the combination of a transcranial magnetic stimulation device and a permanent magnet. A physical model based on Maxwell and Navier equations was developed. Experiments were performed on a cryogel phantom and a chicken breast sample. Using an ultrafast ultrasound scanner, shear waves of respective amplitudes of 5 and 0.5 μm were observed. Experimental and numerical results were in good agreement. This study constitutes the framework of an alternative shear wave elastography method.

  9. Magnetic, Acceleration Fields and Gyroscope Quaternion (MAGYQ-Based Attitude Estimation with Smartphone Sensors for Indoor Pedestrian Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Renaudin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The dependence of proposed pedestrian navigation solutions on a dedicated infrastructure is a limiting factor to the deployment of location based services. Consequently self-contained Pedestrian Dead-Reckoning (PDR approaches are gaining interest for autonomous navigation. Even if the quality of low cost inertial sensors and magnetometers has strongly improved, processing noisy sensor signals combined with high hand dynamics remains a challenge. Estimating accurate attitude angles for achieving long term positioning accuracy is targeted in this work. A new Magnetic, Acceleration fields and GYroscope Quaternion (MAGYQ-based attitude angles estimation filter is proposed and demonstrated with handheld sensors. It benefits from a gyroscope signal modelling in the quaternion set and two new opportunistic updates: magnetic angular rate update (MARU and acceleration gradient update (AGU. MAGYQ filter performances are assessed indoors, outdoors, with dynamic and static motion conditions. The heading error, using only the inertial solution, is found to be less than 10° after 1.5 km walking. The performance is also evaluated in the positioning domain with trajectories computed following a PDR strategy.

  10. A 3D magnetic tissue stretcher for remote mechanical control of embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Vicard; Luciani, Nathalie; Richard, Sophie; Mary, Gaëtan; Gay, Cyprien; Mazuel, François; Reffay, Myriam; Menasché, Philippe; Agbulut, Onnik; Wilhelm, Claire

    2017-09-12

    The ability to create a 3D tissue structure from individual cells and then to stimulate it at will is a major goal for both the biophysics and regenerative medicine communities. Here we show an integrated set of magnetic techniques that meet this challenge using embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We assessed the impact of magnetic nanoparticles internalization on ESCs viability, proliferation, pluripotency and differentiation profiles. We developed magnetic attractors capable of aggregating the cells remotely into a 3D embryoid body. This magnetic approach to embryoid body formation has no discernible impact on ESC differentiation pathways, as compared to the hanging drop method. It is also the base of the final magnetic device, composed of opposing magnetic attractors in order to form embryoid bodies in situ, then stretch them, and mechanically stimulate them at will. These stretched and cyclic purely mechanical stimulations were sufficient to drive ESCs differentiation towards the mesodermal cardiac pathway.The development of embryoid bodies that are responsive to external stimuli is of great interest in tissue engineering. Here, the authors culture embryonic stem cells with magnetic nanoparticles and show that the presence of magnetic fields could affect their aggregation and differentiation.

  11. Electrospun magnetic nanofibre mats – A new bondable biomaterial using remotely activated magnetic heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Yi [Department of Materials Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Key Laboratory of Science & Technology of Eco-Textile, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Donghua University, Shanghai (China); Leung, Victor; Yuqin Wan, Lynn [Department of Materials Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Dutz, Silvio [Institut für Biomedizinische Technik und Informatik, Technische Universität Ilmenau (Germany); Department of Nano Biophotonics, Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Jena (Germany); Ko, Frank K., E-mail: frank.ko@ubc.ca [Department of Materials Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Häfeli, Urs O., E-mail: urs.hafeli@ubc.ca [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)

    2015-04-15

    A solvothermal process was adopted to produce hydrophilic magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles which were subsequently emulsified with a chloroform/methanol (70/30 v/v) solution of poly(caprolactone) (PCL) and then electrospun into a 0.2 mm thick PCL mat. The magnetic heating of the mats at a field amplitude of 25 kA/m and frequency of 400 kHz exhibited promising efficiency for magnetic hyperthermia, with a specific absorption rate of about 40 W/g for the magnetic mat. The produced heat was used to melt the magnetic mat onto the surrounding non-magnetic polymer mat from within, without destroying the nanostructure of the non-magnetic polymer more than 0.5 mm away. Magnetic nanofibre mats might thus be useful for internal heat sealing applications, and potentially also for thermotherapy.

  12. Multicenter, randomized comparison between magnetically navigated and manually guided radiofrequency ablation of atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia (the MagMa-AVNRT-trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reents, Tilko; Jilek, Clemens; Schuster, Peter; Nölker, Georg; Koch-Büttner, Katharina; Ammar-Busch, Sonia; Semmler, Verena; Bourier, Felix; Kottmaier, Marc; Kornmayer, Marie; Brooks, Stephanie; Fichtner, Stephanie; Kolb, Christof; Deisenhofer, Isabel; Hessling, Gabriele

    2017-12-01

    Remote magnetic navigation (RMN) is attributed to diminish radiation exposure for both patient and operator performing catheter ablation for different arrhythmia substrates. The purpose of this prospective, randomized study was to compare RMN with manually guided catheter ablation for AV nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT) regarding fluoroscopy time/dosage, acute and long-term efficacy as well as safety. A total of 218 patients with AVNRT undergoing catheter ablation at three centers (male 34%, mean age 50 ± 17 years) were randomized to a manual approach (n = 113) or RMN (n = 105) using the Niobe ® magnetic navigation system. The primary study endpoint was total fluoroscopy time/dosage for patient and operator at the end of the procedure. Secondary endpoints included acute success, procedure duration, complications and success rate after 6 months. Fluoroscopy time and dosage for the patient were significantly reduced in the RMN group compared to the manual group (6 ± 6 vs. 11 ± 10 min; p < 0.001 and 425 ± 558 vs. 751 ± 900 cGycm 2 , p = 0.002). A reduction in fluoroscopy time/dose also applied to the operator (3 ± 5 vs. 7 ± 9 min 209 ± 444 vs. 482 ± 689 cGycm 2 , p < 0.001). Procedure duration was significantly longer in the RMN group (88 ± 29 vs. 79 ± 29 min; p = 0.03) and crossover from the RMN group to manual ablation occurred in 7.6% of patients (7.6 vs. 0.1%; p = 0.02). Acute success was achieved in 100% of patients in both groups. Midterm success after 6 months was 97 vs. 98% (p = 0.67). No complications occurred in both groups. The use of RMN for catheter ablation of AVNRT compared to a manual approach results in a reduction of fluoroscopy time and dosage of about 50% for both patients and physicians. Acute and midterm success and safety are comparable. RMN is a good alternative to a manual approach for AVNRT ablation.

  13. Review of design principles for ITER VV remote inspection in magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izard, Jean-Baptiste; Perrot, Yann; Friconneau, Jean-Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Because ITER magnet system has a limited number of mechanical and thermal stress cycles, shut down number of the toroidal field is limited during lifetime of ITER. Any inspection device able to withstand the toroidal field between two plasma shots will enhance the inspection frequency capacity of ITER during operation phase. In addition to the high magnetic field the system should also cope with high temperature, ultra-high vacuum and high radiation, in order to keep the reactor availability high. Radiation, ultra-high vacuum and temperature constraints already addressed by on going R and D activities within Europe-considering the required level of radiation is to date the highest encountered in remote handling, and that facing all these constraints at once is an additional issue to overcome. Whereas, operating remote handling systems in high magnetic field is quite new field of investigation. This paper aims to be a guideline for future designers to help them choose among options the adequate solution for an ITER relevant inspection device. It provides the designer an objective view of the different effects that stem from technical choices and help them deciding whether a technology is relevant or not depending on the task's requirements. We have selected a set of technologies and products available for structural design, actuation, sensing and data transmission in order to design inspection remote handling equipment for ITER in the given constraints. These different solutions are commented with specific considerations and directions to have them fit in the specifications. Different design strategies to cope with magnetic field are then discussed, which imply either insensitive design or using the magnetic field as a potential energy source and as a positioning help. This analysis is the first result of one of the projects in the PREFIT partnership, part of the European Fusion Training Scheme.

  14. Remote detection of oil spilled under ice and snow using nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedwed, T.; Srnka, L.; Thomann, H.

    2008-01-01

    The technical challenge of detecting oil that has been accidentally spilled under ice and snow was discussed with particular reference to the tools used to characterize the molecular composition of liquids and solids. One such tool is nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) which works by releasing electromagnetic energy. The NMR signals from oil and water can be differentiated based on the inherent differences in the NMR signal responses from different fluid types. The method can also use the Earth's magnetic field as the static magnetic field and thereby eliminate the complexity and cost of generating an independent magnetic field for remotely detecting fluids below a surface. This study examined the feasibility of altering existing surface-based instruments and placing them in a helicopter for aerial monitoring. The goal of this research was to develop a tool for remote detection of oil under ice in a marine environment, or for detection of oil under snow on land using an inexpensive tool that can quickly inspect large areas. The proposed tool and technique produces a direct hydrocarbon signal that may not have interference from ice and snow. 9 refs., 6 figs

  15. A remote monitoring system of environmental electromagnetic field in magnetic confinement fusion test facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Masahiro; Uda, Tatsuhiko; Takami, Shigeyuki; Wang, Jianqing; Fujiwara, Osamu

    2010-01-01

    A remote, continuous environmental electromagnetic field monitoring system for use in magnetic confinement fusion test facilities is developed. Using this system, both the static magnetic field and the high frequency electromagnetic field could be measured. The required frequency range of the measurement system is from 25 to 100 MHz for the ICRF (Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies) heating system. The outputs from the measurement instruments are measured simultaneously by custom-built software using a laptop-type personal computer connected to a local area network. In this way, the electromagnetic field strength could be monitored from a control room located about 200 m from the fusion device building. Examples of measurement data from the vicinity of a high-frequency generator and amplifier and the leakage static magnetic field from a fusion test device are presented. (author)

  16. Efficacy of navigation in skull base surgery using composite computer graphics of magnetic resonance and computed tomography images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Nakamasa; Kurimoto, Masanori; Hirashima, Yutaka; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Shibata, Takashi; Tomita, Takahiro; Endo, Shunro

    2001-01-01

    The efficacy of a neurosurgical navigation system using three-dimensional composite computer graphics (CGs) of magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) images was evaluated in skull base surgery. Three-point transformation was used for integration of MR and CT images. MR and CT image data were obtained with three skin markers placed on the patient's scalp. Volume-rendering manipulations of the data produced three-dimensional CGs of the scalp, brain, and lesions from the MR images, and the scalp and skull from the CT. Composite CGs of the scalp, skull, brain, and lesion were created by registering the three markers on the three-dimensional rendered scalp images obtained from MR imaging and CT in the system. This system was used for 14 patients with skull base lesions. Three-point transformation using three-dimensional CGs was easily performed for multimodal registration. Simulation of surgical procedures on composite CGs aided in comprehension of the skull base anatomy and selection of the optimal approaches. Intraoperative navigation aided in determination of actual spatial position in the skull base and the optimal trajectory to the tumor during surgical procedures. (author)

  17. Low-magnetization magnetic microcapsules: A synergistic theranostic platform for remote cancer cells therapy and imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Wei; Deng, Lin; Wang, Guangchao; Guo, Xianrong; Li, Qiujin; Zhang, Jianfei; Khashab, Niveen M.

    2014-01-01

    Multifunctional magnetic microcapsules (MMCs) for the combined cancer cells hyperthermia and chemotherapy in addition to MR imaging are successfully developed. A classical layer-by-layer technique of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes (poly

  18. Osmotically driven drug delivery through remote-controlled magnetic nanocomposite membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Zaher, A.

    2015-09-29

    Implantable drug delivery systems can provide long-term reliability, controllability, and biocompatibility, and have been used in many applications, including cancer pain and non-malignant pain treatment. However, many of the available systems are limited to zero-order, inconsistent, or single burst event drug release. To address these limitations, we demonstrate prototypes of a remotely operated drug delivery device that offers controllability of drug release profiles, using osmotic pumping as a pressure source and magnetically triggered membranes as switchable on-demand valves. The membranes are made of either ethyl cellulose, or the proposed stronger cellulose acetate polymer, mixed with thermosensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) hydrogel and superparamagnetic iron oxide particles. The prototype devices\\' drug diffusion rates are on the order of 0.5–2 μg/h for higher release rate designs, and 12–40 ng/h for lower release rates, with maximum release ratios of 4.2 and 3.2, respectively. The devices exhibit increased drug delivery rates with higher osmotic pumping rates or with magnetically increased membrane porosity. Furthermore, by vapor deposition of a cyanoacrylate layer, a drastic reduction of the drug delivery rate from micrograms down to tens of nanograms per hour is achieved. By utilizing magnetic membranes as the valve-control mechanism, triggered remotely by means of induction heating, the demonstrated drug delivery devices benefit from having the power source external to the system, eliminating the need for a battery. These designs multiply the potential approaches towards increasing the on-demand controllability and customizability of drug delivery profiles in the expanding field of implantable drug delivery systems, with the future possibility of remotely controlling the pressure source.

  19. Osmotically driven drug delivery through remote-controlled magnetic nanocomposite membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Zaher, Amir; Li, S.; Wolf, K. T.; Pirmoradi, F. N.; Yassine, Omar; Lin, L.; Khashab, Niveen M.; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2015-01-01

    Implantable drug delivery systems can provide long-term reliability, controllability, and biocompatibility, and have been used in many applications, including cancer pain and non-malignant pain treatment. However, many of the available systems are limited to zero-order, inconsistent, or single burst event drug release. To address these limitations, we demonstrate prototypes of a remotely operated drug delivery device that offers controllability of drug release profiles, using osmotic pumping as a pressure source and magnetically triggered membranes as switchable on-demand valves. The membranes are made of either ethyl cellulose, or the proposed stronger cellulose acetate polymer, mixed with thermosensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) hydrogel and superparamagnetic iron oxide particles. The prototype devices' drug diffusion rates are on the order of 0.5–2 μg/h for higher release rate designs, and 12–40 ng/h for lower release rates, with maximum release ratios of 4.2 and 3.2, respectively. The devices exhibit increased drug delivery rates with higher osmotic pumping rates or with magnetically increased membrane porosity. Furthermore, by vapor deposition of a cyanoacrylate layer, a drastic reduction of the drug delivery rate from micrograms down to tens of nanograms per hour is achieved. By utilizing magnetic membranes as the valve-control mechanism, triggered remotely by means of induction heating, the demonstrated drug delivery devices benefit from having the power source external to the system, eliminating the need for a battery. These designs multiply the potential approaches towards increasing the on-demand controllability and customizability of drug delivery profiles in the expanding field of implantable drug delivery systems, with the future possibility of remotely controlling the pressure source.

  20. Computers in plasma physics: remote data access and magnetic configuration design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackwell, B.D.; McMillan, B.F.; Searle, A.C.; Gardner, H.J.; Price, D.M.; Fredian, T.W.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Two graphically intensive examples of the application of computers in plasma physics are described remote data access for plasma confinement experiments, and a code for real-time magnetic field tracing and optimisation. The application for both of these is the H-1NF National Plasma Fusion Research Facility, a Commonwealth Major National Research Facility within the Research School of Physical Science, Institute of Advanced Studies, ANU. It is based on the 'flexible' heliac stellarator H-1, a plasma confinement device in which the confining fields are generated solely by external conductors. These complex, fully three dimensional magnetic fields are used as examples for the magnetic design application, and data from plasma physics experiments are used to illustrate the remote access techniques. As plasma fusion experiments grow in size, increased remote access allows physicists to participate in experiments and data analysis from their home base. Three types of access will be described and demonstrated - a simple Java-based web interface, an example TCP client-server built around the widely used MDSPlus data system and the visualisation package IDL (RSI Inc), and a virtual desktop Environment (VNC: AT and T Research) that simulates terminals local to the plasma facility. A client server TCP/IP - web interface to the programmable logic controller that provides user interface to the programmable high power magnet power supplies is described. A very general configuration file allows great flexibility, and allows new displays and interfaces to be created (usually) without changes to the underlying C++ and Java code. The magnetic field code BLINE provides accurate calculation of complex magnetic fields, and 3D visualisation in real time, using a low cost multiprocessor computer and an OpenGL-compatible graphics accelerator. A fast, flexible multi-mesh interpolation method is used for tracing vacuum magnetic field lines created by arbitrary filamentary

  1. Preoperative Navigated Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Tractography to Guide Endoscopic Cystoventriculostomy: A Technical Note and Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Philipp; Senger, Sebastian; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Simgen, Andreas; Linsler, Stefan; Oertel, Joachim

    2018-01-01

    To report a technique for endoscopic cystoventriculostomy guided by preoperative navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) and tractography in a patient with a large speech eloquent arachnoid cyst. A 74-year old woman presented with a seizure and subsequent persistent anomic aphasia from a progressive left-sided parietal arachnoid cyst. An endoscopic cystoventriculostomy and endoscope-assisted ventricle catheter placement were performed. Surgery was guided by preoperative nTMS and tractography to avoid eloquent language, motor, and visual pathways. Preoperative nTMS motor and language mapping were used to guide tractography of motor and language white matter tracts. The ideal locations of entry point and cystoventriculostomy as well as trajectory for stent-placement were determined preoperatively with a pseudo-3-dimensional model visualizing eloquent language, motor, and visual cortical and subcortical information. The early postoperative course was uneventful. At her 3-month follow-up visit, her language impairments had completely recovered. Additionally, magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated complete collapse of the arachnoid cyst. The combination of nTMS and tractography supports the identification of a safe trajectory for cystoventriculostomy in eloquent arachnoid cysts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Image correction during large and rapid B(0) variations in an open MRI system with permanent magnets using navigator echoes and phase compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianqi; Wang, Yi; Jiang, Yu; Xie, Haibin; Li, Gengying

    2009-09-01

    An open permanent magnet system with vertical B(0) field and without self-shielding can be quite susceptible to perturbations from external magnetic sources. B(0) variation in such a system located close to a subway station was measured to be greater than 0.7 microT by both MRI and a fluxgate magnetometer. This B(0) variation caused image artifacts. A navigator echo approach that monitored and compensated the view-to-view variation in magnetic resonance signal phase was developed to correct for image artifacts. Human brain imaging experiments using a multislice gradient-echo sequence demonstrated that the ghosting and blurring artifacts associated with B(0) variations were effectively removed using the navigator method.

  3. MagnetoSperm: A microrobot that navigates using weak magnetic fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khalil, I.S.M.; Dijkslag, Herman C.; Abelmann, Leon; Misra, Sarthak

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a propulsion system similar in motion to a sperm-cell is investigated. This system consists of a structure resembling a sperm-cell with a magnetic head and a flexible tail of 42 μm and 280 μm in length, respectively. The thickness, length, and width of this structure are 5.2 μm, 322

  4. A low noise remotely controllable wireless telemetry system for single-unit recording in rats navigating in a vertical maze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Yung; Wu, Jin-Shang; Hyland, Brian; Lu, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Jia Jin Jason

    2008-08-01

    The use of cables for recording neural activity limits the scope of behavioral tests used in conscious free-moving animals. Particularly, cable attachments make it impossible to record in three-dimensional (3D) mazes where levels are vertically stacked or in enclosed spaces. Such environments are of particular interest in investigations of hippocampal place cells, in which neural activity is correlated with spatial position in the environment. We developed a flexible miniaturized Bluetooth-based wireless data acquisition system. The wireless module included an 8-channel analogue front end, digital controller, and Bluetooth transceiver mounted on a backpack. Our bidirectional wireless design allowed all data channels to be previewed at 1 kHz sample rate, and one channel, selected by remote control, to be sampled at 10 kHz. Extracellular recordings of neuronal activity are highly susceptible to ambient electrical noise due to the high electrode impedance. Through careful design of appropriate shielding and hardware configuration to avoid ground loops, mains power and Bluetooth hopping frequency noise were reduced sufficiently to yield signal quality comparable to those recorded by wired systems. With this system we were able to obtain single-unit recordings of hippocampal place cells in rats running an enclosed vertical maze, over a range of 5 m.

  5. Preliminary study on magnetic tracking-based planar shape sensing and navigation for flexible surgical robots in transoral surgery: methods and phantom experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shuang; Zhang, Changchun; Liu, Li; Meng, Max Q-H

    2018-02-01

    Flexible surgical robot can work in confined and complex environments, which makes it a good option for minimally invasive surgery. In order to utilize flexible manipulators in complicated and constrained surgical environments, it is of great significance to monitor the position and shape of the curvilinear manipulator in real time during the procedures. In this paper, we propose a magnetic tracking-based planar shape sensing and navigation system for flexible surgical robots in the transoral surgery. The system can provide the real-time tip position and shape information of the robot during the operation. We use wire-driven flexible robot to serve as the manipulator. It has three degrees of freedom. A permanent magnet is mounted at the distal end of the robot. Its magnetic field can be sensed with a magnetic sensor array. Therefore, position and orientation of the tip can be estimated utilizing a tracking method. A shape sensing algorithm is then carried out to estimate the real-time shape based on the tip pose. With the tip pose and shape display in the 3D reconstructed CT model, navigation can be achieved. Using the proposed system, we carried out planar navigation experiments on a skull phantom to touch three different target positions under the navigation of the skull display interface. During the experiments, the real-time shape has been well monitored and distance errors between the robot tip and the targets in the skull have been recorded. The mean navigation error is [Formula: see text] mm, while the maximum error is 3.2 mm. The proposed method provides the advantages that no sensors are needed to mount on the robot and no line-of-sight problem. Experimental results verified the feasibility of the proposed method.

  6. Group-level variations in motor representation areas of thenar and anterior tibial muscles: Navigated Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niskanen, Eini; Julkunen, Petro; Säisänen, Laura; Vanninen, Ritva; Karjalainen, Pasi; Könönen, Mervi

    2010-08-01

    Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can be used to stimulate functional cortical areas at precise anatomical location to induce measurable responses. The stimulation has commonly been focused on anatomically predefined motor areas: TMS of that area elicits a measurable muscle response, the motor evoked potential. In clinical pathologies, however, the well-known homunculus somatotopy theory may not be straightforward, and the representation area of the muscle is not fixed. Traditionally, the anatomical locations of TMS stimulations have not been reported at the group level in standard space. This study describes a methodology for group-level analysis by investigating the normal representation areas of thenar and anterior tibial muscle in the primary motor cortex. The optimal representation area for these muscles was mapped in 59 healthy right-handed subjects using navigated TMS. The coordinates of the optimal stimulation sites were then normalized into standard space to determine the representation areas of these muscles at the group-level in healthy subjects. Furthermore, 95% confidence interval ellipsoids were fitted into the optimal stimulation site clusters to define the variation between subjects in optimal stimulation sites. The variation was found to be highest in the anteroposterior direction along the superior margin of the precentral gyrus. These results provide important normative information for clinical studies assessing changes in the functional cortical areas because of plasticity of the brain. Furthermore, it is proposed that the presented methodology to study TMS locations at the group level on standard space will be a suitable tool for research purposes in population studies. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Observing Crustal Magnetic Anomalies in Remote Ocean Regions: Filling in the Gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, B.; Kinsey, J. C.; Tominaga, M.; Tivey, M.

    2016-12-01

    The use of long duration ocean observing platforms is necessary for filling in broad gaps in the observational record of magnetic anomaly measurements in the ocean basins -- observations that are necessary for understanding a variety of geophysical processes. Such an instrument would need to gather 1000s of kilometers of magnetic data untended, requiring in-situ calibration methods and minimization of energy usage. In this work an autonomous underwater glider (AUG) has been equipped with a low power flux-gate magnetic sensor. Sensor integration was tested locally in shallow water followed by deep water trials to verify the calibration procedure in June of 2016. During this cruise a 160 kilometer magnetic tow was also collected across the East Coast Shelf Anomaly to the South-East of Cape Cod. Following these tests, the AUG was deployed such that it followed the trajectory of the towed magnetic survey to provide a baseline comparison against a known methodology. For these deployments an in-situ calibration procedure was used whereby the vehicle was commanded to perform descending and ascending spirals with its actuators at various discrete locations. When combined with a temperature model for the sensor the calibrated measurements were found to be in agreement with the towed data to within several 10's of nT. These comparative measurements demonstrate the utility of using directed long duration autonomous ocean observing platforms to gather medium wavelength crustal magnetic anomaly features. This ability is especially desirable for collecting measurements in remote ocean basins, such as the Southern Ocean, where presently only a few ship tracks exist and are likely to never be sampled by conventional research vessels surveys.

  8. Low-magnetization magnetic microcapsules: A synergistic theranostic platform for remote cancer cells therapy and imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Wei

    2014-04-02

    Multifunctional magnetic microcapsules (MMCs) for the combined cancer cells hyperthermia and chemotherapy in addition to MR imaging are successfully developed. A classical layer-by-layer technique of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes (poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and poly(4-styrene sulfonate sodium) (PSS)) is used as it affords great controllability over the preparation together with enhanced loading of the chemotherapeutic drug (doxorubicin, DOX) in the microcapsules. Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIOs) nanoparticles are layered in the system to afford MMC1 (one SPIOs layer) and MMC2 (two SPIOs layers). Most interestingly, MMC1 and MMC2 show efficient hyperthermia cell death and controlled DOX release although their magnetic saturation value falls below 2.5 emu g-1, which is lower than the 7-22 emu g-1 reported to be the minimum value needed for biomedical applications. Moreover, MMCs are pH responsive where a pH 5.5 (often reported for cancer cells) combined with hyperthermia increases DOX release predictably. Both systems prove viable when used as T2 contrast agents for MR imaging in HeLa cells with high biocompatibility. Thus, MMCs hold a great promise to be used commercially as a theranostic platform as they are controllably prepared, reproducibly enhanced, and serve as drug delivery, hyperthermia, and MRI contrast agents at the same time.

  9. A portable single-sided magnet system for remote NMR measurements of pulmonary function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabaghyan, Mikayel; Muradyan, Iga; Hrovat, Alan; Butler, James; Frederick, Eric; Zhou, Feng; Kyriazis, Angelos; Hardin, Charles; Patz, Samuel; Hrovat, Mirko

    2014-12-01

    In this work, we report initial results from a light-weight, low field magnetic resonance device designed to make relative pulmonary density measurements at the bedside. The development of this device necessarily involves special considerations for the magnet, RF and data acquisition schemes as well as a careful analysis of what is needed to provide useful information in the ICU. A homogeneous field region is created remotely from the surface of the magnet such that when the magnet is placed against the chest, an NMR signal is measured from a small volume in the lung. In order to achieve portability, one must trade off field strength and therefore spatial resolution. We report initial measurements from a ping-pong ball size region in the lung as a function of lung volume. As expected, we measured decreased signal at larger lung volumes since lung density decreases with increasing lung volume. Using a CPMG sequence with ΔTE=3.5 ms and a 20 echo train, a signal to noise ratio ~1100 was obtained from an 8.8mT planar magnet after signal averaging for 43 s. This is the first demonstration of NMR measurements made on a human lung with a light-weight planar NMR device. We argue that very low spatial resolution measurements of different lobar lung regions will provide useful diagnostic information for clinicians treating Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as clinicians want to avoid ventilator pressures that cause either lung over distension (too much pressure) or lung collapse (too little pressure). Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. A small scale remote cooling system for a superconducting cyclotron magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, F.; Berkowitz Zamorra, D.; Michels, M.; Gomez Bosch, R.; Schmid, J.; Striebel, A.; Krueger, A.; Diez, M.; Jakob, M.; Keh, M.; Herberger, W.; Oesterle, D.

    2017-02-01

    Through a technology transfer program CERN is involved in the R&D of a compact superconducting cyclotron for future clinical radioisotope production, a project led by the Spanish research institute CIEMAT. For the remote cooling of the LTc superconducting magnet operating at 4.5 K, CERN has designed a small scale refrigeration system, the Cryogenic Supply System (CSS). This refrigeration system consists of a commercial two-stage 1.5 W @ 4.2 K GM cryocooler and a separate forced flow circuit. The forced flow circuit extracts the cooling power of the first and the second stage cold tips, respectively. Both units are installed in a common vacuum vessel and, at the final configuration, a low loss transfer line will provide the link to the magnet cryostat for the cooling of the thermal shield with helium at 40 K and the two superconducting coils with two-phase helium at 4.5 K. Currently the CSS is in the testing phase at CERN in stand-alone mode without the magnet and the transfer line. We have added a “validation unit” housed in the vacuum vessel of the CSS representing the thermo-hydraulic part of the cyclotron magnet. It is equipped with electrical heaters which allow the simulation of the thermal loads of the magnet cryostat. A cooling power of 1.4 W at 4.5 K and 25 W at the thermal shield temperature level has been measured. The data produced confirm the design principle of the CSS which could be validated.

  11. A novel approach for monitoring writing interferences during navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation mappings of writing related cortical areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogić Vidaković, Maja; Gabelica, Dragan; Vujović, Igor; Šoda, Joško; Batarelo, Nikolina; Džimbeg, Andrija; Zmajević Schönwald, Marina; Rotim, Krešimir; Đogaš, Zoran

    2015-11-30

    It has recently been shown that navigated repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) is useful in preoperative neurosurgical mapping of motor and language brain areas. In TMS mapping of motor cortices the evoked responses can be quantitatively monitored by electromyographic (EMG) recordings. No such setup exists for monitoring of writing during nTMS mappings of writing related cortical areas. We present a novel approach for monitoring writing during nTMS mappings of motor writing related cortical areas. To our best knowledge, this is the first demonstration of quantitative monitoring of motor evoked responses from hand by EMG, and of pen related activity during writing with our custom made pen, together with the application of chronometric TMS design and patterned protocol of rTMS. The method was applied in four healthy subjects participating in writing during nTMS mapping of the premotor cortical area corresponding to BA 6 and close to the superior frontal sulcus. The results showed that stimulation impaired writing in all subjects. The corresponding spectra of measured signal related to writing movements was observed in the frequency band 0-20 Hz. Magnetic stimulation affected writing by suppressing normal writing frequency band. The proposed setup for monitoring of writing provides additional quantitative data for monitoring and the analysis of rTMS induced writing response modifications. The setup can be useful for investigation of neurophysiologic mechanisms of writing, for therapeutic effects of nTMS, and in preoperative mapping of language cortical areas in patients undergoing brain surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Measuring Coronal Magnetic Fields with Remote Sensing Observations of Shock Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bemporad, Alessandro; Susino, Roberto; Frassati, Federica; Fineschi, Silvano, E-mail: bemporad@oato.inaf.it [INAF, Turin Astrophysical Observatory, Pino Torinese (Italy)

    2016-05-27

    Our limited knowledge of the magnetic fields structuring in the solar corona represents today the main hurdle in our understanding of its structure and dynamic. Over the last decades significant efforts have been dedicated to measure these fields, by approaching the problem on many different sides and in particular: (i) by improving our theoretical understanding of the modification (via Zeeman and Hanle effects) induced by these fields on the polarization of coronal emission lines, (ii) by developing new instrumentation to measure directly with spectro-polarimeters these modifications, (iii) by improving the reliability of the extrapolated coronal fields starting from photospheric measurements, (iv) by developing new techniques to analyse existing remote sensing data and infer properties of these fields, or by combining all these different approaches (e.g., Chifu et al.,).

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided navigation with a thermoplastic shell for breast-conserving surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, M; Kiryu, T; Sonoda, K; Kashiki, Y

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) marking technique with a drape-type thermoplastic shell for planning breast-conserving surgery (BCS). A prospective review was performed on 35 consecutive patients who underwent MRI in the supine position and used the specified MRI marking technique. Eleven cases underwent pre-operative chemotherapy and 24 cases did not. After immobilizing the breast mound with a drape-type thermoplastic shell, patients underwent MRI, and the location of the lesion was marked on the shell. Resection lines were dyed blue by indigo carmine, which was pushed through the pores of the shell. Specimens obtained during BCS were sliced into 5-mm contiguous sections, and the margin was assessed for each specimen. Cancer foci less than 5 mm from the margin were classified as positive. Of 35 patients, 33 were included in the analysis; 2 were excluded due to a lack of effect of pre-operative chemotherapy. Of these 33 patients, 25 (75.8%) had negative margins and 7 (21.2%) had positive margins. Our MRI marking technique may be useful for evaluating the extent of tumors that were determined by MRI alone. Long-term outcomes of this technique should be evaluated further. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Base for a remote quality control system for magnetic resonance images machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Dalmau, Evelio R; Cabal Mirabal, Carlos; Noda Guerra, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The medical images systems convert characteristic of the tissues in gray levels or color, using a physical method and a specific mathematical transformation. In Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) these levels have a multi-parametric dependence, this a reason of their strong presence in the daily clinical practice. This technological complexity, the high costs and the importance that have these study for the patient's life, confer to the Quality Control (QC) human, technological, economic and juridical implications. Several international groups dedicated to the QC in MRI and diversity of approaches to carry out the tests of acceptance and periodic control of the quality exist. The characterization is habitually carried out, with global methods that don't allow a detailed quantitative parametric study. A novel system of quantitative control was developed based on quantitative describers by slices and temporal. This system is formed for: 1) standard methodology of acquisition of the experimental data, 2) subsystem of functions and programs developed in MatLab, 3) subsystem of graphics and reports, and 4) the expert. It is used successfully in the characterization and the periodic control of MRI machines of several magnetic fields in Cuba and in Venezuela. They were defined and established quantitative descriptors for MRI machines. The software flexibility allows carry out the QC to any machine facilitating the standardization and its use in multi-center studies. The retrospective and predictive value of the system was demonstrated. They feel the bases for the remote realization of the test

  15. Correlating subcortical interhemispheric connectivity and cortical hemispheric dominance in brain tumor patients: A repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollmann, Nico; Ille, Sebastian; Tussis, Lorena; Maurer, Stefanie; Hauck, Theresa; Negwer, Chiara; Bauer, Jan S; Ringel, Florian; Meyer, Bernhard; Krieg, Sandro M

    2016-02-01

    The present study aims to investigate the relationship between transcallosal interhemispheric connectivity (IC) and hemispheric language lateralization by using a novel approach including repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), hemispheric dominance ratio (HDR) calculation, and rTMS-based diffusion tensor imaging fiber tracking (DTI FT). 31 patients with left-sided perisylvian brain lesions underwent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and rTMS language mapping. Cortical language-positive rTMS spots were used to calculate HDRs (HDR: quotient of the left-sided divided by right-sided naming error rates for corresponding left- and right-sided cortical regions) and to create regions of interest (ROIs) for DTI FT. Then, fibers connecting the rTMS-based ROIs of both hemispheres were tracked, and the correlation of IC to HDRs was calculated via Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rs). Fibers connecting rTMS-based ROIs of both hemispheres were detected in 12 patients (38.7%). Within the patients in which IC was detected, the mean number of subcortical IC fibers ± standard deviation (SD) was 138.0 ± 346.5 (median: 7.5; range: 1-1,217 fibers). Regarding rs for the correlation of HDRs and fiber numbers of patients that showed IC, only moderate correlation was revealed. Our approach might be beneficial and technically feasible for further investigation of the relationship between IC and language lateralization. However, only moderate correlation was revealed in the present study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The impact of preoperative language mapping by repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation on the clinical course of brain tumor patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollmann, Nico; Ille, Sebastian; Hauck, Theresa; Maurer, Stefanie; Negwer, Chiara; Zimmer, Claus; Ringel, Florian; Meyer, Bernhard; Krieg, Sandro M

    2015-04-11

    Language mapping by repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is used for resection planning in patients suffering from brain lesions within regions known to be involved in language function. Yet we also need data that show whether patients benefit clinically from preoperative rTMS for language mapping. We enrolled 25 patients with language eloquently located brain lesions undergoing preoperative rTMS language mapping (GROUP 1, 2011-2013), with the mapping results not being available for the surgeon, and we matched these patients with 25 subjects who also underwent preoperative rTMS (GROUP 2, 2013-2014), but the mapping results were taken into account during tumor resection. Additionally, cortical language maps were generated by analyzing preoperative rTMS and intraoperative direct cortical stimulation (DCS) data. Mean anterior-posterior (ap) craniotomy extents and overall craniotomy sizes were significantly smaller for the patients in GROUP 2 (Ap: p = 0.0117; overall size: p = 0.0373), and postoperative language deficits were found significantly more frequently for the patients in GROUP 1 (p = 0.0153), although the preoperative language status did not differ between groups (p = 0.7576). Additionally, there was a trend towards fewer unexpected tumor residuals, shorter surgery duration, less peri- or postoperative complications, shorter inpatient stay, and higher postoperative Karnofsky performance status scale (KPS) for the patients in GROUP 2. The present study provides a first hint that the clinical course of patients suffering from brain tumors might be improved by preoperative rTMS language mapping. However, a significant difference between both groups was only found for craniotomy extents and postoperative deficits, but not for other clinical parameters, which only showed a trend toward better results in GROUP 2. Therefore, multicenter trials with higher sample sizes are needed to further investigate the distinct impact of r

  17. Hemispheric language dominance measured by repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation and postoperative course of language function in brain tumor patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ille, Sebastian; Kulchytska, Nataliia; Sollmann, Nico; Wittig, Regina; Beurskens, Eva; Butenschoen, Vicki M; Ringel, Florian; Vajkoczy, Peter; Meyer, Bernhard; Picht, Thomas; Krieg, Sandro M

    2016-10-01

    The resection of left-sided perisylvian brain lesions harbors the risk of postoperative aphasia. Because it is known that language function can shift between hemispheres in brain tumor patients, the preoperative knowledge of the patient's language dominance could be helpful. We therefore investigated the hemispheric language dominance by repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and surgery-related deficits of language function. We pooled the bicentric language mapping data of 80 patients undergoing the resection of left-sided perisylvian brain lesions in our two university neurosurgical departments. We calculated error rates (ERs; ER = errors per stimulations) for both hemispheres and defined the hemispheric dominance ratio (HDR) as the quotient of the left- and right-sided ER (HDR >1= left dominant; HDR right dominant). The course of the patient's language function was evaluated and correlated with the preoperative HDR. Only three of 80 patients (4%) presented with permanent surgery-related aphasia and 24 patients (30%) with transient surgery-related aphasia. The mean HDR (± standard deviation) of patients with new aphasia after five days was significantly higher (1.68±1.07) than the HDR of patients with no new language deficit (1.37±1.08) (p=0.0482). With a predefined cut-off value of 0.5 for HDR, we achieved a sensitivity for predicting new aphasia of 100%. A higher preoperative HDR significantly correlates with an increased risk for transient aphasia. Moreover, the intensive preoperative workup in this study led to a considerably low rate of permanent aphasia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Motor Cortex Reorganization in Patients with Glioma Assessed by Repeated Navigated Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation-A Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barz, Anne; Noack, Anika; Baumgarten, Peter; Seifert, Volker; Forster, Marie-Therese

    2018-04-01

    Evidence for cerebral reorganization after resection of low-grade glioma has mainly been obtained by serial intraoperative cerebral mapping. Noninvasively collected data on cortical plasticity in tumor patients over a surgery-free period are still scarce. The present study therefore aimed at evaluating motor cortex reorganization by navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) in patients after perirolandic glioma surgery. nTMS was performed preoperatively and postoperatively in 20 patients, separated by 26.1 ± 24.8 months. Further nTMS mapping was conducted in 14 patients, resulting in a total follow-up period of 46.3 ± 25.4 months. Centers of gravity (CoGs) were calculated for every muscle representation area, and Euclidian distances between CoGs over time were defined. Results were compared with data from 12 healthy individuals, who underwent motor cortex mapping by nTMS in 2 sessions. Preoperatively and postoperatively pooled CoGs from the area of the dominant abductor pollicis brevis muscle and of the nondominant leg area differed significantly compared with healthy individuals (P < 0.05). Most remarkably, during the ensuing follow-up period, a reorganization of all representation areas was observed in 3 patients, and a significant shift of hand representation areas was identified in further 3 patients. Complete functional recovery of postoperative motor deficits was exclusively associated with cortical reorganization. Despite the low potential of remodeling within the somatosensory region, long-term reorganization of cortical motor function can be observed. nTMS is best suited for a noninvasive evaluation of this reorganization. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The invisible cues that guide king penguin chicks home: use of magnetic and acoustic cues during orientation and short-range navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterova, Anna P; Chiffard, Jules; Couchoux, Charline; Bonadonna, Francesco

    2013-04-15

    King penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus) live in large and densely populated colonies, where navigation can be challenging because of the presence of many conspecifics that could obstruct locally available cues. Our previous experiments demonstrated that visual cues were important but not essential for king penguin chicks' homing. The main objective of this study was to investigate the importance of non-visual cues, such as magnetic and acoustic cues, for chicks' orientation and short-range navigation. In a series of experiments, the chicks were individually displaced from the colony to an experimental arena where they were released under different conditions. In the magnetic experiments, a strong magnet was attached to the chicks' heads. Trials were conducted in daylight and at night to test the relative importance of visual and magnetic cues. Our results showed that when the geomagnetic field around the chicks was modified, their orientation in the arena and the overall ability to home was not affected. In a low sound experiment we limited the acoustic cues available to the chicks by putting ear pads over their ears, and in a loud sound experiment we provided additional acoustic cues by broadcasting colony sounds on the opposite side of the arena to the real colony. In the low sound experiment, the behavior of the chicks was not affected by the limited sound input. In the loud sound experiment, the chicks reacted strongly to the colony sound. These results suggest that king penguin chicks may use the sound of the colony while orienting towards their home.

  20. Associations between clinical outcome and navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation characteristics in patients with motor-eloquent brain lesions: a combined navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation-diffusion tensor imaging fiber tracking approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollmann, Nico; Wildschuetz, Noémie; Kelm, Anna; Conway, Neal; Moser, Tobias; Bulubas, Lucia; Kirschke, Jan S; Meyer, Bernhard; Krieg, Sandro M

    2018-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) and diffusion tensor imaging fiber tracking (DTI FT) based on nTMS data are increasingly used for preoperative planning and resection guidance in patients suffering from motor-eloquent brain tumors. The present study explores whether nTMS-based DTI FT can also be used for individual preoperative risk assessment regarding surgery-related motor impairment. METHODS Data derived from preoperative nTMS motor mapping and subsequent nTMS-based tractography in 86 patients were analyzed. All patients suffered from high-grade glioma (HGG), low-grade glioma (LGG), or intracranial metastasis (MET). In this context, nTMS-based DTI FT of the corticospinal tract (CST) was performed at a range of fractional anisotropy (FA) levels based on an individualized FA threshold ([FAT]; tracking with 50%, 75%, and 100% FAT), which was defined as the highest FA value allowing for visualization of fibers (100% FAT). Minimum lesion-to-CST distances were measured, and fiber numbers of the reconstructed CST were assessed. These data were then correlated with the preoperative, postoperative, and follow-up status of motor function and the resting motor threshold (rMT). RESULTS At certain FA levels, a statistically significant difference in lesion-to-CST distances was observed between patients with HGG who had no impairment and those who developed surgery-related transient or permanent motor deficits (75% FAT: p = 0.0149; 100% FAT: p = 0.0233). In this context, no patient with a lesion-to-CST distance ≥ 12 mm suffered from any new surgery-related permanent paresis (50% FAT and 75% FAT). Furthermore, comparatively strong negative correlations were observed between the rMT and lesion-to-CST distances of patients with surgery-related transient paresis (Spearman correlation coefficient [r s ]; 50% FAT: r s = -0.8660; 75% FAT: r s = -0.8660) or surgery-related permanent paresis (50% FAT: r s = -0.7656; 75% FAT: r s = -0.6763). CONCLUSIONS

  1. Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation for glioma removal: prognostic value in motor function recovery from postsurgical neurological deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakura, Tomokazu; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Tamura, Manabu; Maruyama, Takashi; Nitta, Masayuki; Niki, Chiharu; Kawamata, Takakazu

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of the present study was to evaluate the usefulness of navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) as a prognostic predictor for upper-extremity motor functional recovery from postsurgical neurological deficits. METHODS Preoperative and postoperative nTMS studies were prospectively applied in 14 patients (mean age 39 ± 12 years) who had intraparenchymal brain neoplasms located within or adjacent to the motor eloquent area in the cerebral hemisphere. Mapping by nTMS was done 3 times, i.e., before surgery, and 1 week and 3 weeks after surgery. To assess the response induced by nTMS, motor evoked potential (nTMS-MEP) was recorded using a surface electromyography electrode attached to the abductor pollicis brevis (APB). The cortical locations that elicited the largest electromyography response by nTMS were defined as hotspots. Hotspots for APB were confirmed as positive responsive sites by direct electrical stimulation (DES) during awake craniotomy. The distances between hotspots and lesions (D HS-L ) were measured. Postoperative neurological deficits were assessed by manual muscle test and dynamometer. To validate the prognostic value of nTMS in recovery from upper-extremity paresis, the following were investigated: 1) the correlation between D HS-L and the serial grip strength change, and 2) the correlation between positive nTMS-MEP at 1 week after surgery and the serial grip strength change. RESULTS From the presurgical nTMS study, MEPs from targeted muscles were identified in 13 cases from affected hemispheres. In one case, MEP was not evoked due to a huge tumor. Among 9 cases from which intraoperative DES mapping for hand motor area was available, hotspots for APB identified by nTMS were concordant with DES-positive sites. Compared with the adjacent group (D HS-L < 10 mm, n = 6), the nonadjacent group (D HS-L ≥ 10 mm, n = 7) showed significantly better recovery of grip strength at 3 months after surgery (p < 0.01). There were

  2. Impairment of preoperative language mapping by lesion location: a functional magnetic resonance imaging, navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation, and direct cortical stimulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ille, Sebastian; Sollmann, Nico; Hauck, Theresa; Maurer, Stefanie; Tanigawa, Noriko; Obermueller, Thomas; Negwer, Chiara; Droese, Doris; Boeckh-Behrens, Tobias; Meyer, Bernhard; Ringel, Florian; Krieg, Sandro M

    2015-08-01

    Language mapping by repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is increasingly used and has already replaced functional MRI (fMRI) in some institutions for preoperative mapping of neurosurgical patients. Yet some factors affect the concordance of both methods with direct cortical stimulation (DCS), most likely by lesions affecting cortical oxygenation levels. Therefore, the impairment of the accuracy of rTMS and fMRI was analyzed and compared with DCS during awake surgery in patients with intraparenchymal lesions. Language mapping was performed by DCS, rTMS, and fMRI using an object-naming task in 27 patients with left-sided perisylvian lesions, and the induced language errors of each method were assigned to the cortical parcellation system. Subsequently, the receiver operating characteristics were calculated for rTMS and fMRI and compared with DCS as ground truth for regions with (w/) and without (w/o) the lesion in the mapped regions. The w/ subgroup revealed a sensitivity of 100% (w/o 100%), a specificity of 8% (w/o 5%), a positive predictive value of 34% (w/o: 53%), and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 100% (w/o: 100%) for the comparison of rTMS versus DCS. Findings for the comparison of fMRI versus DCS within the w/ subgroup revealed a sensitivity of 32% (w/o: 62%), a specificity of 88% (w/o: 60%), a positive predictive value of 56% (w/o: 62%), and a NPV of 73% (w/o: 60%). Although strengths and weaknesses exist for both rTMS and fMRI, the results show that rTMS is less affected by a brain lesion than fMRI, especially when performing mapping of language-negative cortical regions based on sensitivity and NPV.

  3. Combined noninvasive language mapping by navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation and functional MRI and its comparison with direct cortical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ille, Sebastian; Sollmann, Nico; Hauck, Theresa; Maurer, Stefanie; Tanigawa, Noriko; Obermueller, Thomas; Negwer, Chiara; Droese, Doris; Zimmer, Claus; Meyer, Bernhard; Ringel, Florian; Krieg, Sandro M

    2015-07-01

    Repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is now increasingly used for preoperative language mapping in patients with lesions in language-related areas of the brain. Yet its correlation with intraoperative direct cortical stimulation (DCS) has to be improved. To increase rTMS's specificity and positive predictive value, the authors aim to provide thresholds for rTMS's positive language areas. Moreover, they propose a protocol for combining rTMS with functional MRI (fMRI) to combine the strength of both methods. The authors performed multimodal language mapping in 35 patients with left-sided perisylvian lesions by using rTMS, fMRI, and DCS. The rTMS mappings were conducted with a picture-to-trigger interval (PTI, time between stimulus presentation and stimulation onset) of either 0 or 300 msec. The error rates (ERs; that is, the number of errors per number of stimulations) were calculated for each region of the cortical parcellation system (CPS). Subsequently, the rTMS mappings were analyzed through different error rate thresholds (ERT; that is, the ER at which a CPS region was defined as language positive in terms of rTMS), and the 2-out-of-3 rule (a stimulation site was defined as language positive in terms of rTMS if at least 2 out of 3 stimulations caused an error). As a second step, the authors combined the results of fMRI and rTMS in a predefined protocol of combined noninvasive mapping. To validate this noninvasive protocol, they correlated its results to DCS during awake surgery. The analysis by different rTMS ERTs obtained the highest correlation regarding sensitivity and a low rate of false positives for the ERTs of 15%, 20%, 25%, and the 2-out-of-3 rule. However, when comparing the combined fMRI and rTMS results with DCS, the authors observed an overall specificity of 83%, a positive predictive value of 51%, a sensitivity of 98%, and a negative predictive value of 95%. In comparison with fMRI, rTMS is a more sensitive but less specific

  4. Development of a passive and remote magnetic microsensor with thin-film giant magnetoimpedance element and surface acoustic wave transponder

    KAUST Repository

    Al Rowais, Hommood; Li, Bodong; Liang, Cai; Green, Scott Ryan; Gianchandani, Yogesh B.; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a wireless magnetic field sensor consisting of a three-layer thin-film giant magnetoimpedance sensor and a surface acoustic wave device on one substrate. The goal of this integration is a passive and remotely interrogated sensor that can be easily mass fabricated using standard microfabrication tools. The design parameters, fabrication process, and a model of the integrated sensor are presented together with experimental results of the sensor. © 2011 American Institute of Physics.

  5. Remote Cherenkov imaging-based quality assurance of a magnetic resonance image-guided radiotherapy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreozzi, Jacqueline M; Mooney, Karen E; Brůža, Petr; Curcuru, Austen; Gladstone, David J; Pogue, Brian W; Green, Olga

    2018-06-01

    Tools to perform regular quality assurance of magnetic resonance image-guided radiotherapy (MRIgRT) systems should ideally be independent of interference from the magnetic fields. Remotely acquired optical Cherenkov imaging-based dosimetry measurements in water were investigated for this purpose, comparing measures of dose accuracy, temporal dynamics, and overall integrated IMRT delivery. A 40 × 30.5 × 37.5 cm 3 water tank doped with 1 g/L of quinine sulfate was imaged using an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) to capture the Cherenkov emission while being irradiated by a commercial MRIgRT system (ViewRay™). The ICCD was placed down-bore at the end of the couch, 4 m from treatment isocenter and behind the 5-Gauss line of the 0.35-T MRI. After establishing optimal camera acquisition settings, square beams of increasing size (4.2 × 4.2 cm 2 , 10.5 × 10.5 cm 2 , and 14.7 × 14.7 cm 2 ) were imaged at 0.93 frames per second, from an individual cobalt-60 treatment head, to develop projection measures related to percent depth dose (PDD) curves and cross beam profiles (CPB). These Cherenkov-derived measurements were compared to ionization chamber (IC) and radiographic film dosimetry data, as well as simulation data from the treatment planning system (TPS). An intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) commissioning plan from AAPM TG-119 (C4:C-Shape) was also imaged at 2.1 frames per second, and the single linear sum image from 509 s of plan delivery was compared to the dose volume prediction generated by the TPS using gamma index analysis. Analysis of standardized test target images (1024 × 1024 pixels) yielded a pixel resolution of 0.37 mm/pixel. The beam width measured from the Cherenkov image-generated projection CBPs was within 1 mm accuracy when compared to film measurements for all beams. The 502 point measurements (i.e., pixels) of the Cherenkov image-based projection percent depth dose curves (pPDDs) were compared to p

  6. Remote monitoring system for the cryogenic system of superconducting magnets in the SuperKEKB interaction region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, K.; Ohuchi, N.; Zong, Z.; Arimoto, Y.; Wang, X.; Yamaoka, H.; Kawai, M.; Kondou, Y.; Makida, Y.; Hirose, M.; Endou, T.; Iwasaki, M.; Nakamura, T.

    2017-12-01

    A remote monitoring system was developed based on the software infrastructure of the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) for the cryogenic system of superconducting magnets in the interaction region of the SuperKEKB accelerator. The SuperKEKB has been constructed to conduct high-energy physics experiments at KEK. These superconducting magnets consist of three apparatuses, the Belle II detector solenoid, and QCSL and QCSR accelerator magnets. They are each contained in three cryostats cooled by dedicated helium cryogenic systems. The monitoring system was developed to read data of the EX-8000, which is an integrated instrumentation system to control all cryogenic components. The monitoring system uses the I/O control tools of EPICS software for TCP/IP, archiving techniques using a relational database, and easy human-computer interface. Using this monitoring system, it is possible to remotely monitor all real-time data of the superconducting magnets and cryogenic systems. It is also convenient to share data among multiple groups.

  7. Remote viewing with the artist Ingo Swann: neuropsychological profile, electroencephalographic correlates, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and possible mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persinger, M A; Roll, W G; Tiller, S G; Koren, S A; Cook, C M

    2002-06-01

    In the present study, the artist Ingo Swann, who helped develop the process of remote viewing (awareness of distant objects or places without employing normal senses), was exposed during a single setting of 30 min. to specific patterns of circumcerebral magnetic fields that significantly altered his subjective experiences. Several times during subsequent days, he was asked to sit in a quiet chamber and to sketch and to describe verbally distant stimuli (pictures or places) beyond his normal senses. The proportions of unusual 7-Hz spike and slow wave activity over the occipital lobes per trial were moderately correlated (rho=.50) with the ratings of accuracy between these distal, hidden stimuli and his responses. A neuropsychological assessment and Magnetic Resonance Imaging indicated a different structural and functional organization within the parieto-occipital region of the subject's right hemisphere from organizations typically noted. The results suggest that this type of paranormal phenomenon, often dismissed as methodological artifact or accepted as proofs of spiritual existence, is correlated with neurophysiological processes and physical events. Remote viewing may be enhanced by complex experimentally generated magnetic fields designed to interact with the neuromagnetic "binding factor" of consciousness.

  8. A Novel High Sensitivity Sensor for Remote Field Eddy Current Non-Destructive Testing Based on Orthogonal Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojie Xu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Remote field eddy current is an effective non-destructive testing method for ferromagnetic tubular structures. In view of conventional sensors’ disadvantages such as low signal-to-noise ratio and poor sensitivity to axial cracks, a novel high sensitivity sensor based on orthogonal magnetic field excitation is proposed. Firstly, through a three-dimensional finite element simulation, the remote field effect under orthogonal magnetic field excitation is determined, and an appropriate configuration which can generate an orthogonal magnetic field for a tubular structure is developed. Secondly, optimized selection of key parameters such as frequency, exciting currents and shielding modes is analyzed in detail, and different types of pick-up coils, including a new self-differential mode pick-up coil, are designed and analyzed. Lastly, the proposed sensor is verified experimentally by various types of defects manufactured on a section of a ferromagnetic tube. Experimental results show that the proposed novel sensor can largely improve the sensitivity of defect detection, especially for axial crack whose depth is less than 40% wall thickness, which are very difficult to detect and identify by conventional sensors. Another noteworthy advantage of the proposed sensor is that it has almost equal sensitivity to various types of defects, when a self-differential mode pick-up coil is adopted.

  9. Clinical indications for high-field 1.5 T intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging and neuro-navigation for neurosurgical procedures. Review of initial 100 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maesawa, Satoshi; Nakahara, Norimoto; Watanabe, Tadashi; Fujii, Masazumi; Saito, Kiyoshi; Kajita, Yasukazu; Nagatani, Tetsuya; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Yoshida, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Initial experiences are reviewed in an integrated operation theater equipped with an intraoperative high-field (1.5 T) magnetic resonance (MR) imager and neuro-navigation (BrainSUITE), to evaluate the indications and limitations. One hundred consecutive cases were treated, consisting of 38 gliomas, 49 other tumors, 11 cerebrovascular diseases, and 2 functional diseases. The feasibility and usefulness of the integrated theater were evaluated for individual diseases, focusing on whether intraoperative images (including diffusion tensor imaging) affected the surgical strategy. The extent of resection and outcomes in each histological category of brain tumors were examined. Intraoperative high-field MR imaging frequently affected or modified the surgical strategy in the glioma group (27/38 cases, 71.1%), but less in the other tumor group (13/49 cases, 26.5%). The surgical strategy was not modified in cerebrovascular or functional diseases, but the success of procedures and the absence of complications could be confirmed. In glioma surgery, subtotal or greater resection was achieved in 22 of the 31 patients (71%) excluding biopsies, and intraoperative images revealed tumor remnants resulting in the extension of resection in 21 of the 22 patients (95.4%), the highest rate of extension among all types of pathologies. The integrated neuro-navigation improved workflow. The best indication for intraoperative high-field MR imaging and integrated neuro-navigation is brain tumors, especially gliomas, and is supplementary in assuring quality in surgery for cerebrovascular or functional diseases. Immediate quality assurance is provided in several types of neurosurgical procedures. (author)

  10. Kawasaki disease-associated coronary artery lesions with navigator echo-based. Respiratory-gated three dimensional coronary magnetic resonance angiography compared with echocardiography in young children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amino, Masayuki; Teraoka, Kunihiko; Hirano, Masaharu; Kawashima, Naoshi; Kakizaki, Dai; Ookubo, Yasuo; Sasaki, Kazuyoshi; Katuyama, Hiroaki

    2004-01-01

    Navigator echo-based respiratory-gated three dimensional coronary magnetic resonance angiography (3D-CMRA) was compared with echocardiography, to determine whether 3D-CMRA was useful for the evaluation of Kawasaki disease-associated coronary artery lesions. Sixteen consecutive patients (imaging was performed 17 times in total) who were given a diagnosis of Kawasaki's disease at the pediatric department of our hospital and examined for the precise examination of complicating coronary artery lesions on MRI using a navigator-echo technique because of their incapability of holding their breath during imaging were entered into the present study. A 1.5T MRI system was used. Gd-DOTA was given at a total volume of 0.1 mmol/kg. During imaging, CMRA visualized the left coronary arteries in all 17 cases and the right coronary arteries in 16 cases, but not in one case. The left main coronary trunk segment no.5 was demonstrated in all cases with CMRA, but not in 4 cases with echocardiography. The left anterior descending branch no.6 was visualized in 11 of the 17 cases with CMRA, but only in 5 cases with echocardiography. The left circumflex branch no.11 was observed in 6 cases with CMRA, but only in 2 cases with echocardiography. As for the right coronary arteries, branches no.1 and no.2 were observed in 16 and 9 cases with CMRA, respectively, and in 13 and 3 cases with echocardiography, respectively. Vascular diameters measured on CMRA were almost identical to those on echocardiography, within the range of arteries visualized. 3D-CMRA combined with a navigator echo technique appears to be a useful tool for the observation of coronary artery lesions associated with Kawasaki's disease because it is superior in lesion visualization to echocardiography. (author)

  11. Surgical neuro navigator guided by preoperative magnetic resonance images, based on a magnetic position sensor;Neuronavegador cirurgico guiado por imagens de ressonancia magnetica pre-operatoria, baseado num transdutor de posicao magnetico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perini, Ana Paula; Siqueira, Rogerio Bulha; Carneiro, Antonio Adilton Oliveira, E-mail: adilton@ffclrp.usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras. Dept. de Fisica e Matematica; Oliveira, Lucas Ferrari de [Universidade Federal de Pelotas (UFPel), RS (Brazil). Dept. de Informatica; Machado, Helio Rubens [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Neurocirurgia

    2009-08-15

    Image guided neurosurgery enables the neurosurgeon to navigate inside the patient's brain using pre-operative images as a guide and a tracking system, during a surgery. Following a calibration procedure, three-dimensional position and orientation of surgical instruments may be transmitted to computer. The spatial information is used to access a region of interest, in the pre-operative images, displaying them to the neurosurgeon during the surgical procedure. However, when a craniotomy is involved and the lesion is removed, movements of brain tissue can be a significant source of error in these conventional navigation systems. The architecture implemented in this work intends the development of a system to surgical planning and orientation guided by ultrasound image. For surgical orientation, the software developed allows the extraction of slices from the volume of the magnetic resonance images (MRI) with orientation supplied by a magnetic position sensor (Polhemus{sup R}). The slices extracted with this software are important because they show the cerebral area that the neurosurgeon is observing during the surgery, and besides they can be correlated with the intra-operative ultrasound images to detect and to correct the deformation of brain tissue during the surgery. Also, a tool for per-operative navigation was developed, providing three orthogonal planes through the image volume. In the methodology used for the software implementation, the Python{sup tm} programming language and the Visualization Toolkit (VTK) graphics library were used. The program to extract slices of the MRI volume allowed the application of transformations in the volume, using coordinates supplied by the position sensor. (author)

  12. Ecodesign Navigator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simon, M; Evans, S.; McAloone, Timothy Charles

    The Ecodesign Navigator is the product of a three-year research project called DEEDS - DEsign for Environment Decision Support. The initial partners were Manchester Metropolitan University, Cranfield University, Engineering 6 Physical Sciences Resaech Council, Electrolux, ICL, and the Industry...

  13. Development of a Three-dimensional Surgical Navigation System with Magnetic Resonance Angiography and a Three-dimensional Printer for Robot-assisted Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomoto, Wataru; Tanooka, Masao; Doi, Hiroshi; Kikuchi, Keisuke; Mitsuie, Chiemi; Yamada, Yusuke; Suzuki, Toru; Yamano, Toshiko; Ishikura, Reiichi; Kotoura, Noriko; Yamamoto, Shingo

    2018-01-02

    We sought to develop a surgical navigation system using magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and a three-dimensional (3D) printer for robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). Six patients with pathologically proven localized prostate cancer were prospectively enrolled in this study. Prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), consisting of T2-weighted sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts using different flip-angle evolutions (SPACE) and true fast imaging with steady-state precession (true FISP), reconstructed by volume rendering, was followed by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRA performed with a volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) during intravenous bolus injection of gadobutrol. Images of arterial and venous phases were acquired over approximately 210 seconds. Selected images were sent to a workstation for generation of 3D volume-rendered images and standard triangulated language (STL) files for 3D print construction. The neurovascular bundles (NVBs) were found in sequence on non-contrast images. Accessory pudendal arteries (APAs) were found in all cases in the arterial phase of contrast enhancement but were ill-defined on non-contrast enhanced MRA. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRA helped to detect APAs, suggesting that this 3D system using MRI will be useful in RARP.

  14. Sensory bases of navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, J L

    1998-10-08

    Navigating animals need to know both the bearing of their goal (the 'map' step), and how to determine that direction (the 'compass' step). Compasses are typically arranged in hierarchies, with magnetic backup as a last resort when celestial information is unavailable. Magnetic information is often essential to calibrating celestial cues, though, and repeated recalibration between celestial and magnetic compasses is important in many species. Most magnetic compasses are based on magnetite crystals, but others make use of induction or paramagnetic interactions between short-wavelength light and visual pigments. Though odors may be used in some cases, most if not all long-range maps probably depend on magnetite. Magnetitebased map senses are used to measure only latitude in some species, but provide the distance and direction of the goal in others.

  15. Surgical Navigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azarmehr, Iman; Stokbro, Kasper; Bell, R. Bryan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This systematic review investigates the most common indications, treatments, and outcomes of surgical navigation (SN) published from 2010 to 2015. The evolution of SN and its application in oral and maxillofacial surgery have rapidly developed over recent years, and therapeutic indicatio...

  16. Responsibility navigator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuhlmann, Stefan; Edler, Jakob; Ordonez Matamoros, Hector Gonzalo; Randles, Sally; Walhout, Bart; Walhout, Bart; Gough, Clair; Lindner, Ralf; Lindner, Ralf; Kuhlmann, Stefan; Randles, Sally; Bedsted, Bjorn; Gorgoni, Guido; Griessler, Erich; Loconto, Allison; Mejlgaard, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Research and innovation activities need to become more responsive to societal challenges and concerns. The Responsibility Navigator, developed in the Res-AGorA project, supports decision-makers to govern such activities towards more conscious responsibility. What is considered “responsible” will

  17. Cislunar navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesarone, R. J.; Burke, J. D.; Hastrup, R. C.; Lo, M. W.

    2003-01-01

    In the future, navigation and communication in Earth-Moon space and on the Moon will differ from past practice due to evolving technology and new requirements. Here we describe likely requirements, discuss options for meeting them, and advocate steps that can be taken now to begin building the navcom systems needed in coming years for exploring and using the moon.

  18. Introduction to tractography-guided navigation: using 3-tesla magnetic resonance tractography in surgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuta, K; Takagi, Y; Nozaki, K; Hashimoto, N

    2008-01-01

    To examine the effectiveness of magnetic resonance (MR) tractography in surgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). A preoperative evaluation of major neural tracts around the nidus was carried out with 3-tesla (3 T) MR tractography in 25 consecutive patients with cerebral AVMs. The patients were 12 men and 13 women ranging in age from 4 to 60 years of age (mean age: 31.2 +/- 14.1 years). Twelve presented with hemorrhage. Images were obtained with T2-weighted turbo spin echo sequences, axial T1-weighted three-dimensional magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient-echo (MPRAGE) sequences, three-dimensional time-of-flight MR angiography (3D TOF MRA), and thin-section diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI). The AVMs were obliterated in 22 of the 25 patients. A postoperative study of the MR tractography was carried out in 24 patients. In 21 patients, tracts were preserved and no postoperative neurological worsening was observed. Disruption of the tracts was found in 3 patients, and postoperative worsening was observed in 2 patients. However, no deterioration occurred in 1 patient with cerebellar AVM. Notwithstanding the limitations of this method, MR tractography can be considered useful for confirming the integrity of deviated tracts, for localizing deviated tracts, and for evaluating surgical risk, especially in cases of non-hemorrhagic AVM.

  19. Mapping of arithmetic processing by navigated repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with parietal brain tumors and correlation with postoperative outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ille, Sebastian; Drummer, Katharina; Giglhuber, Katrin; Conway, Neal; Maurer, Stefanie; Meyer, Bernhard; Krieg, Sandro M

    2018-03-26

    Preserving functionality is of significant importance during neurosurgical resection of brain tumors. Specialized centers also map further brain functions apart from motor and language functions, such as arithmetic processing (AP). The mapping of AP by navigated repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (nrTMS) in healthy volunteers has been demonstrated. The present study aimed to correlate the results of mapping AP with functional patient outcomes. We included 26 patients with parietal brain tumors. Due to preoperative impairment of AP, mapping was not possible in 8 patients (31%). We stimulated 52 cortical sites by nrTMS while patients performed a calculation task. Pre- and postoperatively, patients underwent a standardized number-processing and calculation test (NPCT). Tumor resection was blinded to nrTMS results, and the change in NPCT performance was correlated to resected AP-positive spots as identified by nrTMS. The resection of AP-positive sites correlated with a worsening of the postoperative NPCT result in 12 cases. In 3 cases, no AP-positive sites were resected and the postoperative NPCT result was similar to or better than preoperatively. Also, in 3 cases, the postoperative NPCT result was better than preoperatively, although AP-positive sites were resected. Despite only presenting a low number of cases, nrTMS might be a useful tool for preoperative mapping of AP. However, the reliability of the present results has to be evaluated in a larger series and by intraoperative mapping data. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Repeated mapping of cortical language sites by preoperative navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation compared to repeated intraoperative DCS mapping in awake craniotomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) was recently described for mapping of human language areas. However, its capability of detecting language plasticity in brain tumor patients was not proven up to now. Thus, this study was designed to evaluate such data in order to compare rTMS language mapping to language mapping during repeated awake surgery during follow-up in patients suffering from language-eloquent gliomas. Methods Three right-handed patients with left-sided gliomas (2 opercular glioblastomas, 1 astrocytoma WHO grade III of the angular gyrus) underwent preoperative language mapping by rTMS as well as intraoperative language mapping provided via direct cortical stimulation (DCS) for initial as well as for repeated Resection 7, 10, and 15 months later. Results Overall, preoperative rTMS was able to elicit clear language errors in all mappings. A good correlation between initial rTMS and DCS results was observed. As a consequence of brain plasticity, initial DCS and rTMS findings only corresponded with the results obtained during the second examination in one out of three patients thus suggesting changes of language organization in two of our three patients. Conclusions This report points out the usefulness but also the limitations of preoperative rTMS language mapping to detect plastic changes in language function or for long-term follow-up prior to DCS even in recurrent gliomas. However, DCS still has to be regarded as gold standard. PMID:24479694

  1. Remote Numerical Simulations of the Interaction of High Velocity Clouds with Random Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillan, Alfredo; Hernandez--Cervantes, Liliana; Gonzalez--Ponce, Alejandro; Kim, Jongsoo

    The numerical simulations associated with the interaction of High Velocity Clouds (HVC) with the Magnetized Galactic Interstellar Medium (ISM) are a powerful tool to describe the evolution of the interaction of these objects in our Galaxy. In this work we present a new project referred to as Theoretical Virtual i Observatories. It is oriented toward to perform numerical simulations in real time through a Web page. This is a powerful astrophysical computational tool that consists of an intuitive graphical user interface (GUI) and a database produced by numerical calculations. In this Website the user can make use of the existing numerical simulations from the database or run a new simulation introducing initial conditions such as temperatures, densities, velocities, and magnetic field intensities for both the ISM and HVC. The prototype is programmed using Linux, Apache, MySQL, and PHP (LAMP), based on the open source philosophy. All simulations were performed with the MHD code ZEUS-3D, which solves the ideal MHD equations by finite differences on a fixed Eulerian mesh. Finally, we present typical results that can be obtained with this tool.

  2. Altered carotid plaque signal among different repetition times on T1-weighted magnetic resonance plaque imaging with self-navigated radial-scan technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narumi, Shinsuke; Ohba, Hideki; Mori, Kiyofumi; Ohura, Kazumasa; Ono, Ayumi; Terayama, Yasuo [Iwate Medical University, Department of Neurology and Gerontology, Morioka (Japan); Sasaki, Makoto [Iwate Medical University, Advanced Medical Research Center, Morioka (Japan); Ogasawara, Kuniaki [Iwate Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Morioka (Japan); Hitomi, Jiro [Iwate Medical University, Department of Anatomy, Morioka (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) plaque imaging for carotid arteries is usually performed by using an electrocardiograph (ECG)-gating technique to eliminate pulsation-related artifacts, which can affect the plaque signals because of varied repetition time (TR) among patients. Hence, we investigated whether differences in TR causes signal alterations of the carotid plaque by using a non-gated plaque imaging technique. We prospectively examined 19 patients with carotid stenosis by using a T1-weighted self-navigated radial-scan technique with TRs of 500, 700, and 900 ms. The signal intensity of the carotid plaque was measured, and the contrast ratio (CR) relative to the adjacent muscle was calculated. CRs of the carotid plaques were 1.39 {+-} 0.39, 1.29 {+-} 0.29, and 1.23 {+-} 0.24 with TRs of 500, 700, and 900 ms, respectively, and were significantly different. Among the plaques, those with a hyperintensity signal (CR > 1.5) and moderate-intensity signal (CR 1.2-1.5) at 500 ms showed a TR-dependent signal decrease (hyperintensity plaques, 1.82 {+-} 0.26; 1.61 {+-} 0.19; and 1.48 {+-} 0.17; moderate-intensity plaques, 1.33 {+-} 0.08; 1.26 {+-} 0.08; and 1.19 {+-} 0.07), while those with an isointensity signal (CR < 1.2) remained unchanged regardless of TR (0.96 {+-} 0.12, 0.96 {+-} 0.11, and 0.97 {+-} 0.13). The signal intensity of the carotid plaque on T1-weighted imaging significantly varies among different TRs and tends to decrease with longer TR. MR plaque imaging with short and constant TR settings that the ECG-gating method cannot realize would be preferable for evaluating plaque characteristics. (orig.)

  3. The Impact of Diffusion Tensor Imaging Fiber Tracking of the Corticospinal Tract Based on Navigated Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Surgery of Motor-Eloquent Brain Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffa, Giovanni; Conti, Alfredo; Scibilia, Antonino; Cardali, Salvatore Massimiliano; Esposito, Felice; Angileri, Filippo Flavio; La Torre, Domenico; Sindorio, Carmela; Abbritti, Rosaria Viola; Germanò, Antonino; Tomasello, Francesco

    2017-11-29

    Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) enables preoperative mapping of the motor cortex (M1). The combination of nTMS with diffusion tensor imaging fiber tracking (DTI-FT) of the corticospinal tract (CST) has been described; however, its impact on surgery of motor-eloquent lesions has not been addressed. To analyze the impact of nTMS-based mapping on surgery of motor-eloquent lesions. In this retrospective case-control study, we reviewed the data of patients operated for suspected motor-eloquent lesions between 2012 and 2015. The patients underwent nTMS mapping of M1 and, from 2014, nTMS-based DTI-FT of the CST. The impact on the preoperative risk/benefit analysis, surgical strategy, craniotomy size, extent of resection (EOR), and outcome were compared with a control group. We included 35 patients who underwent nTMS mapping of M1 (group A), 35 patients who also underwent nTMS-based DTI-FT of the CST (group B), and a control group composed of 35 patients treated without nTMS (group C). The patients in groups A and B received smaller craniotomies (P = .01; P = .001), had less postoperative seizures (P = .02), and a better postoperative motor performance (P = .04) and Karnofsky Performance Status (P = .009) than the controls. Group B exhibited an improved risk/benefit analysis (P = .006), an increased EOR of nTMS-negative lesions in absence of preoperative motor deficits (P = .01), and less motor and Karnofsky Performance Status worsening in case of preoperative motor deficits (P = .02, P = .03) than group A. nTMS-based mapping enables a tailored surgical approach for motor-eloquent lesions. It may improve the risk/benefit analysis, EOR and outcome, particularly when nTMS-based DTI-FT is performed. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  4. The Migration Matrix: Marine Vertebrate Movements in Magnetic Coordinate Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, T. W.; Holdaway, R. N.; Clapham, P. J.; Zerbini, A. N.; Andriolo, A.; Hays, G. C.; Egevang, C.; Domeier, M. L.; Lucas, N.

    2011-12-01

    Determining how vertebrates navigate during their long-distance migrations remains one of the most enduring and fundamental challenges of behavioral ecology. It is widely accepted that spatial orientation relative to a reference datum is a fundamental requirement of long-distance return migration between seasonal habitats, and a variety of viable positional and directional orientation cues, including the sun, stars, and magnetic field, have been documented experimentally. However, a fundamental question remains unanswered: Are empirically observed migratory movements compatible with modern theoretical frameworks of spatial orientation? To address this question, we analysed leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea), arctic tern (Sterna paradisaea), humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae), and great white shark (Carcharodon carcharias) track maps, frequency distribution diagrams and time-series plots of animal locations in spherical magnetic coordinate space. Our analyses indicates that, although individual migration tracks are spatially and temporally distinct, vertebrate movements are non-randomly distributed in all three spherical magnetic coordinates (i.e. intensity, inclination, and declination). Stop-over locations, migratory destinations, and re-orientation points occur at similar magnetic coordinate locations, relative to tagging areas, in all four species, suggesting that a common system of magnetic orientation likely informs the navigational behaviors of these phylogenetically diverse taxa. Although our analyses demonstrate that the experiment-derived 'magnetic map' goal orientation theoretical framework of animal navigation is compatible with remotely-sensed migration track data, they also indicate that magnetic information is complemented by spatially and temporally contingent celestial stimuli during navigation.

  5. Navigation Lights - USACE IENC

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — These inland electronic Navigational charts (IENCs) were developed from available data used in maintenance of Navigation channels. Users of these IENCs should be...

  6. Minimally invasive neurosurgery within a 0.5 tesla intraoperative magnetic resonance scanner using an off-line neuro-navigation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mursch, K; Gotthardt, T; Kröger, R; Bublat, M; Behnke-Mursch, J

    2005-08-01

    We evaluated an advanced concept for patient-based navigation during minimally invasive neurosurgical procedures. An infrared-based, off-line neuro-navigation system (LOCALITE, Bonn, Germany) was applied during operations within a 0.5 T intraoperative MRI scanner (iMRI) (Signa SF, GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI, USA) in addition to the conventional real-time system. The three-dimensional (3D) data set was acquired intraoperatively and up-dated when brain-shift was suspected. Twenty-three patients with subcortical lesions were operated upon with the aim to minimise the operative trauma. Small craniotomies (median diameter 30 mm, mean diameter 27 mm) could be placed exactly. In all cases, the primary goal of the operation (total resection or biopsy) was achieved in a straightforward procedure without permanent morbidity. The navigation system could be easily used without technical problems. In contrast to the real-time navigation mode of the MR system, the higher quality as well as the real-time display of the MR images reconstructed from the 3D reference data provided sufficient visual-manual coordination. The system combines the advantages of conventional neuro-navigation with the ability to adapt intraoperatively to the continuously changing anatomy. Thus, small and/or deep lesions can be operated upon in straightforward minimally invasive operations.

  7. Navigation Problems in Blind-to-Blind Pedestrians Tele-assistance Navigation

    OpenAIRE

    Balata , Jan; Mikovec , Zdenek; Maly , Ivo

    2015-01-01

    International audience; We raise a question whether it is possible to build a large-scale navigation system for blind pedestrians where a blind person navigates another blind person remotely by mobile phone. We have conducted an experiment, in which we observed blind people navigating each other in a city center in 19 sessions. We focused on problems in the navigator’s attempts to direct the traveler to the destination. We observed 96 problems in total, classified them on the basis of the typ...

  8. Remote actuated valve implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Timothy E; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Jr., Kenneth J; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S; Wilgen, John B; Evans, III, Boyd McCutchen

    2014-02-25

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  9. Mars rover local navigation and hazard avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, B. H.; Gennery, D. B.; Mishkin, A. H.

    1989-01-01

    A Mars rover sample return mission has been proposed for the late 1990's. Due to the long speed-of-light delays between earth and Mars, some autonomy on the rover is highly desirable. JPL has been conducting research in two possible modes of rover operation, Computer-Aided Remote Driving and Semiautonomous Navigation. A recently-completed research program used a half-scale testbed vehicle to explore several of the concepts in semiautonomous navigation. A new, full-scale vehicle with all computational and power resources on-board will be used in the coming year to demonstrate relatively fast semiautonomous navigation. The computational and power requirements for Mars rover local navigation and hazard avoidance are discussed.

  10. Towards Safe Navigation by Formalizing Navigation Rules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Kreutzmann

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available One crucial aspect of safe navigation is to obey all navigation regulations applicable, in particular the collision regulations issued by the International Maritime Organization (IMO Colregs. Therefore, decision support systems for navigation need to respect Colregs and this feature should be verifiably correct. We tackle compliancy of navigation regulations from a perspective of software verification. One common approach is to use formal logic, but it requires to bridge a wide gap between navigation concepts and simple logic. We introduce a novel domain specification language based on a spatio-temporal logic that allows us to overcome this gap. We are able to capture complex navigation concepts in an easily comprehensible representation that can direcly be utilized by various bridge systems and that allows for software verification.

  11. Prediction and prognosis of ventricular tachycardia recurrence after catheter ablation with remote magnetic navigation for electrical storm in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Qi; Jacobsen, Peter Karl; Pehrson, Steen

    2017-01-01

    at the end of the procedure. Early VT recurrence was defined as the occurrence of sustained VT within 1 month after the first ablation. RESULTS: After a mean follow-up of 17.1 months, 27 patients (50%) had freedom from VT recurrence. Sustained VT recurred in 12 patients (22%) within 1 month following...

  12. Impact of catheter ablation with remote magnetic navigation on procedural outcomes in patients with persistent and long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Qi; Pehrson, Steen; Jacobsen, Peter Karl

    2015-01-01

    with RMN. METHODS: A total of 313 patients (275 male, age 59 ± 9.5 years) with PsAF (187/313) or L-PsAF (126/313) undergoing ablation using RMN were included. Patients' disease history, pulmonary venous anatomy, left atrial (LA) volume, procedure time, mapping plus ablation time, radiofrequency (RF...

  13. Radar and electronic navigation

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnenberg, G J

    2013-01-01

    Radar and Electronic Navigation, Sixth Edition discusses radar in marine navigation, underwater navigational aids, direction finding, the Decca navigator system, and the Omega system. The book also describes the Loran system for position fixing, the navy navigation satellite system, and the global positioning system (GPS). It reviews the principles, operation, presentations, specifications, and uses of radar. It also describes GPS, a real time position-fixing system in three dimensions (longitude, latitude, altitude), plus velocity information with Universal Time Coordinated (UTC). It is accur

  14. Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1984-01-01

    A magnet pole piece for an NMR imaging magnet is made of a plurality of magnetic wires with one end of each wire held in a non-magnetic spacer, the other ends of the wires being brought to a pinch, and connected to a magnetic core. The wires may be embedded in a synthetic resin and the magnetisation and uniformity thereof can be varied by adjusting the density of the wires at the spacer which forms the pole piece. (author)

  15. Chemical compass for bird navigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Hore, Peter J.; Ritz, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Migratory birds travel spectacular distances each year, navigating and orienting by a variety of means, most of which are poorly understood. Among them is a remarkable ability to perceive the intensity and direction of the Earth's magnetic field. Biologically credible mechanisms for the detection...... increased interest following the proposal in 2000 that free radical chemistry could occur in the bird's retina initiated by photoexcitation of cryptochrome, a specialized photoreceptor protein. In the present paper we review the important physical and chemical constraints on a possible radical...

  16. EVIDENCE OF THE SOLAR EUV HOT CHANNEL AS A MAGNETIC FLUX ROPE FROM REMOTE-SENSING AND IN SITU OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SONG, H. Q.; CHEN, Y.; Wang, B. [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy and Solar-Terrestrial Environment, and Institute of Space Sciences, Shandong University, Weihai, Shandong 264209 (China); ZHANG, J. [School of Physics, Astronomy and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); CHENG, X. [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210093 (China); HU, Q.; LI, G. [Department of Space Science and CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); WANG, Y. M., E-mail: hqsong@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, University of Science and Technology of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2015-07-20

    Hot channels (HCs), high-temperature erupting structures in the lower corona of the Sun, have been proposed as a proxy of magnetic flux ropes (MFRs) since their initial discovery. However, it is difficult to provide definitive proof given the fact that there is no direct measurement of the magnetic field in the corona. An alternative method is to use the magnetic field measurement in the solar wind from in situ instruments. On 2012 July 12, an HC was observed prior to and during a coronal mass ejection (CME) by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly high-temperature images. The HC is invisible in the EUVI low-temperature images, which only show the cooler leading front (LF). However, both the LF and an ejecta can be observed in the coronagraphic images. These are consistent with the high temperature and high density of the HC and support that the ejecta is the erupted HC. Meanwhile, the associated CME shock was identified ahead of the ejecta and the sheath through the COR2 images, and the corresponding ICME was detected by the Advanced Composition Explorer, showing the shock, sheath, and magnetic cloud (MC) sequentially, which agrees with the coronagraphic observations. Further, the MC average Fe charge state is elevated, containing a relatively low-ionization-state center and a high-ionization-state shell, consistent with the preexisting HC observation and its growth through magnetic reconnection. All of these observations support that the MC detected near the Earth is the counterpart of the erupted HC in the corona for this event. The study provides strong observational evidence of the HC as an MFR.

  17. Evidence of the Solar EUV Hot Channel as a Magnetic Flux Rope from Remote-sensing and in situ Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, H.

    2015-12-01

    Hot channels (HCs), high-temperature erupting structures in the lower corona of the Sun, have been proposed as a proxy of magnetic flux ropes (MFRs) since their initial discovery. However, it is difficult to provide definitive proof given the fact that there is no direct measurement of the magnetic field in the corona. An alternative method is to use the magnetic field measurement in the solar wind from in situ instruments. On 2012 July 12, an HC was observed prior to and during a coronal mass ejection (CME) by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly high-temperature images. The HC is invisible in the EUVI low-temperature images, which only show the cooler leading front (LF). However, both the LF and an ejecta can be observed in the coronagraphic images. These are consistent with the high temperature and high density of the HC and support that the ejecta is the erupted HC. Meanwhile, the associated CME shock was identified ahead of the ejecta and the sheath through the COR2 images, and the corresponding ICME was detected by the Advanced Composition Explorer, showing the shock, sheath, and magnetic cloud (MC) sequentially, which agrees with the coronagraphic observations. Further, the MC average Fe charge state is elevated, containing a relatively low-ionization-state center and a high-ionization-state shell, consistent with the preexisting HC observation and its growth through magnetic reconnection. All of these observations support that the MC detected near the Earth is the counterpart of the erupted HC in the corona for this event. The study provides strong observational evidence of the HC as an MFR.

  18. Indoor wayfinding and navigation

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Due to the widespread use of navigation systems for wayfinding and navigation in the outdoors, researchers have devoted their efforts in recent years to designing navigation systems that can be used indoors. This book is a comprehensive guide to designing and building indoor wayfinding and navigation systems. It covers all types of feasible sensors (for example, Wi-Fi, A-GPS), discussing the level of accuracy, the types of map data needed, the data sources, and the techniques for providing routes and directions within structures.

  19. Expected Navigation Flight Performance for the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Corwin; Wright, Cinnamon; Long, Anne

    2012-01-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission consists of four formation-flying spacecraft placed in highly eccentric elliptical orbits about the Earth. The primary scientific mission objective is to study magnetic reconnection within the Earth s magnetosphere. The baseline navigation concept is the independent estimation of each spacecraft state using GPS pseudorange measurements (referenced to an onboard Ultra Stable Oscillator) and accelerometer measurements during maneuvers. State estimation for the MMS spacecraft is performed onboard each vehicle using the Goddard Enhanced Onboard Navigation System, which is embedded in the Navigator GPS receiver. This paper describes the latest efforts to characterize expected navigation flight performance using upgraded simulation models derived from recent analyses.

  20. Navigation in diagnosis and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vannier, Michael W.; Haller, John W.

    1999-01-01

    Image-guided navigation for surgery and other therapeutic interventions has grown in importance in recent years. During image-guided navigation a target is detected, localized and characterized for diagnosis and therapy. Thus, images are used to select, plan, guide and evaluate therapy, thereby reducing invasiveness and improving outcomes. A shift from traditional open surgery to less-invasive image-guided surgery will continue to impact the surgical marketplace. Increases in the speed and capacity of computers and computer networks have enabled image-guided interventions. Key elements in image navigation systems are pre-operative 3D imaging (or real-time image acquisition), a graphical display and interactive input devices, such as surgical instruments with light emitting diodes (LEDs). CT and MRI, 3D imaging devices, are commonplace today and 3D images are useful in complex interventions such as radiation oncology and surgery. For example, integrated surgical imaging workstations can be used for frameless stereotaxy during neurosurgical interventions. In addition, imaging systems are being expanded to include decision aids in diagnosis and treatment. Electronic atlases, such as Voxel Man or others derived from the Visible Human Project, combine a set of image data with non-image knowledge such as anatomic labels. Robot assistants and magnetic guidance technology are being developed for minimally invasive surgery and other therapeutic interventions. Major progress is expected at the interface between the disciplines of radiology and surgery where imaging, intervention and informatics converge

  1. Intraoperative magnetic tracker calibration using a magneto-optic hybrid tracker for 3-D ultrasound-based navigation in laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamoto, Masahiko; Nakada, Kazuhisa; Sato, Yoshinobu; Konishi, Kozo; Hashizume, Makoto; Tamura, Shinichi

    2008-02-01

    This paper describes a ultrasound (3-D US) system that aims to achieve augmented reality (AR) visualization during laparoscopic surgery, especially for the liver. To acquire 3-D US data of the liver, the tip of a laparoscopic ultrasound probe is tracked inside the abdominal cavity using a magnetic tracker. The accuracy of magnetic trackers, however, is greatly affected by magnetic field distortion that results from the close proximity of metal objects and electronic equipment, which is usually unavoidable in the operating room. In this paper, we describe a calibration method for intraoperative magnetic distortion that can be applied to laparoscopic 3-D US data acquisition; we evaluate the accuracy and feasibility of the method by in vitro and in vivo experiments. Although calibration data can be acquired freehand using a magneto-optic hybrid tracker, there are two problems associated with this method--error caused by the time delay between measurements of the optical and magnetic trackers, and instability of the calibration accuracy that results from the uniformity and density of calibration data. A temporal calibration procedure is developed to estimate the time delay, which is then integrated into the calibration, and a distortion model is formulated by zeroth-degree to fourth-degree polynomial fitting to the calibration data. In the in vivo experiment using a pig, the positional error caused by magnetic distortion was reduced from 44.1 to 2.9 mm. The standard deviation of corrected target positions was less than 1.0 mm. Freehand acquisition of calibration data was performed smoothly using a magneto-optic hybrid sampling tool through a trocar under guidance by realtime 3-D monitoring of the tool trajectory; data acquisition time was less than 2 min. The present study suggests that our proposed method could correct for magnetic field distortion inside the patient's abdomen during a laparoscopic procedure within a clinically permissible period of time, as well as

  2. Long-term MRI cell tracking after intraventricular delivery in a patient with global cerebral ischemia and prospects for magnetic navigation of stem cells within the CSF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslaw Janowski

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to evaluate the long-term clinical tracking of magnetically labeled stem cells after intracerebroventricular transplantation as well as to investigate in vitro feasibility for magnetic guidance of cell therapy within large fluid compartments.After approval by our Institutional Review Board, an 18-month-old patient, diagnosed as being in a vegetative state due to global cerebral ischemia, underwent cell transplantation to the frontal horn of the lateral ventricle, with umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO contrast agent. The patient was followed over 33 months with clinical examinations and MRI. To evaluate the forces governing the distribution of cells within the fluid compartment of the ventricular system in vivo, a gravity-driven sedimentation assay and a magnetic field-driven cell attraction assay were developed in vitro.Twenty-four hours post-transplantation, MR imaging (MRI was able to detect hypointense cells in the occipital horn of the lateral ventricle. The signal gradually decreased over 4 months and became undetectable at 33 months. In vitro, no significant difference in cell sedimentation between SPIO-labeled and unlabeled cells was observed (p = NS. An external magnet was effective in attracting cells over distances comparable to the size of human lateral ventricles.MR imaging of SPIO-labeled cells allows monitoring of cells within lateral ventricles. While the initial biodistribution is governed by gravity-driven sedimentation, an external magnetic field may possibly be applied to further direct the distribution of labeled cells within large fluid compartments such as the ventricular system.

  3. Remote RemoteRemoteRemote sensing potential for sensing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Remote RemoteRemoteRemote sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing p. A Ngie, F Ahmed, K Abutaleb ...

  4. Coronary artery assessment using self-navigated free-breathing radial whole-heart magnetic resonance angiography in patients with congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrecht, Moritz H. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Charleston, SC (United States); University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Varga-Szemes, Akos; Schoepf, U.J.; Xu, Jiaqian; Jin, Kwang-Nam; Hlavacek, Anthony M.; Chowdhury, Shahryar M.; Suranyi, Pal; Tesche, Christian; De Cecco, Carlo N.; Nutting, Arni [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Charleston, SC (United States); Apfaltrer, Georg [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Charleston, SC (United States); University Hospital Graz, Department of Radiology, Graz (Austria); Piccini, Davide [University Hospital of Lausanne (CHUV), Department of Radiology, Centre for Biomedical Imaging (CIBM), Lausanne (Switzerland); Siemens Healthcare, IM BM PI, Advanced Clinical Imaging Technology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Stuber, Matthias; Ginami, Giulia [University Hospital of Lausanne (CHUV), Department of Radiology, Centre for Biomedical Imaging (CIBM), Lausanne (Switzerland); Vogl, Thomas J. [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2018-03-15

    To evaluate a self-navigated free-breathing three-dimensional (SNFB3D) radial whole-heart MRA technique for assessment of main coronary arteries (CAs) and side branches in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). SNFB3D-MRA datasets of 109 patients (20.1±11.8 years) were included. Three readers assessed the depiction of CA segments, diagnostic confidence in determining CA dominance, overall image quality and the ability to freeze cardiac and respiratory motion. Vessel sharpness was quantitatively measured. The percentages of cases with excellent CA depiction were as follows (mean score): left main, 92.6 % (1.92); left anterior descending (LAD), 88.3 % (1.88); right (RCA), 87.8 % (1.85); left circumflex, 82.8 % (1.82); posterior descending, 50.2 % (1.50) and first diagonal, 39.8 % (1.39). High diagnostic confidence for the assessment of CA dominance was achieved in 56.2 % of MRA examinations (mean score, 1.56). Cardiac motion freezing (mean score, 2.18; Pearson's r=0.73, P<0.029) affected image quality more than respiratory motion freezing (mean score, 2.20; r=0.58, P<0.029). Mean quantitative vessel sharpness of the internal thoracic artery, RCA and LAD were 53.1, 52.5 and 48.7 %, respectively. Most SNFB3D-MRA examinations allow for excellent depiction of the main CAs in young CHD patients; visualisation of side branches remains limited. (orig.)

  5. A Leapfrog Navigation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opshaug, Guttorm Ringstad

    There are times and places where conventional navigation systems, such as the Global Positioning System (GPS), are unavailable due to anything from temporary signal occultations to lack of navigation system infrastructure altogether. The goal of the Leapfrog Navigation System (LNS) is to provide localized positioning services for such cases. The concept behind leapfrog navigation is to advance a group of navigation units teamwise into an area of interest. In a practical 2-D case, leapfrogging assumes known initial positions of at least two currently stationary navigation units. Two or more mobile units can then start to advance into the area of interest. The positions of the mobiles are constantly being calculated based on cross-range distance measurements to the stationary units, as well as cross-ranges among the mobiles themselves. At some point the mobile units stop, and the stationary units are released to move. This second team of units (now mobile) can then overtake the first team (now stationary) and travel even further towards the common goal of the group. Since there always is one stationary team, the position of any unit can be referenced back to the initial positions. Thus, LNS provides absolute positioning. I developed navigation algorithms needed to solve leapfrog positions based on cross-range measurements. I used statistical tools to predict how position errors would grow as a function of navigation unit geometry, cross-range measurement accuracy and previous position errors. Using this knowledge I predicted that a 4-unit Leapfrog Navigation System using 100 m baselines and 200 m leap distances could travel almost 15 km before accumulating absolute position errors of 10 m (1sigma). Finally, I built a prototype leapfrog navigation system using 4 GPS transceiver ranging units. I placed the 4 units in the vertices a 10m x 10m square, and leapfrogged the group 20 meters forwards, and then back again (40 m total travel). Average horizontal RMS position

  6. Multifunctional Nanocarpets for Cancer Theranostics: Remotely Controlled Graphene Nanoheaters for Thermo-Chemosensitisation and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandra Kurup Sasikala, Arathyram; Thomas, Reju George; Unnithan, Afeesh Rajan; Saravanakumar, Balasubramaniam; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Park, Chan Hee; Kim, Cheol Sang

    2016-02-01

    A new paradigm in cancer theranostics is enabled by safe multifunctional nanoplatform that can be applied for therapeutic functions together with imaging capabilities. Herein, we develop a multifunctional nanocomposite consisting of Graphene Oxide-Iron Oxide -Doxorubicin (GO-IO-DOX) as a theranostic cancer platform. The smart magnetic nanoplatform acts both as a hyperthermic agent that delivers heat when an alternating magnetic field is applied and a chemotherapeutic agent in a cancer environment by providing a pH-dependent drug release to administer a synergistic anticancer treatment with an enhanced T2 contrast for MRI. The novel GO-IO-DOX nanocomposites were tested in vitro and were observed to exhibit an enhanced tumoricidal effect through both hyperthermia and cancer cell-specific DOX release along with an excellent MRI performance, enabling a versatile theranostic platform for cancer. Moreover the localized antitumor effects of GO-IO-DOX increased substantially as a result of the drug sensitization through repeated application of hyperthermia.

  7. Vdrive Evaluation of Remote Steering and Testing in Lasso Electrophysiology Procedures Study: The VERSATILE Study in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nölker, Georg; Schwagten, Bruno; Deville, J Brian; Burkhardt, J David; Horton, Rodney P; Sha, Qun; Tomassoni, Gery

    2016-03-01

    Circular mapping catheters (CMC) are an essential tool in most atrial fibrillation ablation procedures. The Vdrive™ with V-Loop™ system enables a physician to remotely manipulate a CMC during electrophysiology studies. Our aim was to compare the clinical performance of the system to conventional CMC navigation according to efficiency and safety endpoints. A total of 120 patients scheduled to undergo a CMC study followed by pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) were included. Treatment allocation was randomized 2:1, remote navigation:manual navigation. The primary effectiveness endpoint was assessed based on both successful navigation to the targeted pulmonary vein (PV) and successful recording of PV electrograms. All PVs were treated independently within and between patients. The primary safety endpoint was assessed based on the occurrence of major adverse events (MAEs) through seven days after the study procedure. Primary effectiveness endpoints were achieved in 295/302 PVs in the Vdrive arm (97.7%) and 167/167 PVs in the manual arm (100%). Effectiveness analysis indicates Vdrive non-inferiority (pnon-inferiority = 0.0405; δ = -0.05) per the Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test adjusted for PV correlation. Five MAEs related to the ablation procedure occurred (three in the Vdrive arm-3.9%; two in the manual arm-2.33%). No device-related MAEs were observed; safety analysis indicates Vdrive non-inferiority (pnon-inferiority = 0.0441; δ = 0.07) per the normal Z test. Remote navigation of a CMC is equivalent to manual in PVI in terms of safety and effectiveness. This allows for single-operator procedures in conjunction with a magnetically guided ablation catheter. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Restricted Navigation Areas - USACE IENC

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — These inland electronic Navigational charts (IENCs) were developed from available data used in maintenance of Navigation channels. Users of these IENCs should be...

  9. Cloud Absorption Radiometer Autonomous Navigation System - CANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, Duncan; Gatebe, Charles; McCune, Bill; Hellwig, Dustan

    2013-01-01

    CAR (cloud absorption radiometer) acquires spatial reference data from host aircraft navigation systems. This poses various problems during CAR data reduction, including navigation data format, accuracy of position data, accuracy of airframe inertial data, and navigation data rate. Incorporating its own navigation system, which included GPS (Global Positioning System), roll axis inertia and rates, and three axis acceleration, CANS expedites data reduction and increases the accuracy of the CAR end data product. CANS provides a self-contained navigation system for the CAR, using inertial reference and GPS positional information. The intent of the software application was to correct the sensor with respect to aircraft roll in real time based upon inputs from a precision navigation sensor. In addition, the navigation information (including GPS position), attitude data, and sensor position details are all streamed to a remote system for recording and later analysis. CANS comprises a commercially available inertial navigation system with integral GPS capability (Attitude Heading Reference System AHRS) integrated into the CAR support structure and data system. The unit is attached to the bottom of the tripod support structure. The related GPS antenna is located on the P-3 radome immediately above the CAR. The AHRS unit provides a RS-232 data stream containing global position and inertial attitude and velocity data to the CAR, which is recorded concurrently with the CAR data. This independence from aircraft navigation input provides for position and inertial state data that accounts for very small changes in aircraft attitude and position, sensed at the CAR location as opposed to aircraft state sensors typically installed close to the aircraft center of gravity. More accurate positional data enables quicker CAR data reduction with better resolution. The CANS software operates in two modes: initialization/calibration and operational. In the initialization/calibration mode

  10. Getting Lost Through Navigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debus, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    In this presentation, I argued two things. First, that it is navigation that lies at the core of contemporary (3D-) videogames and that its analysis is of utmost importance. Second, that this analysis needs a more rigorous differentiation between specific acts of navigation. Considering the Oxford...... in videogames is a configurational rather than an interpretational one (Eskelinen 2001). Especially in the case of game spaces, navigation appears to be of importance (Wolf 2009; Flynn 2008). Further, it does not only play a crucial role for the games themselves, but also for the experience of the player...

  11. Inertial navigation without accelerometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, M.

    The Kennedy-Thorndike (1932) experiment points to the feasibility of fiber-optic inertial velocimeters, to which state-of-the-art technology could furnish substantial sensitivity and accuracy improvements. Velocimeters of this type would obviate the use of both gyros and accelerometers, and allow inertial navigation to be conducted together with vehicle attitude control, through the derivation of rotation rates from the ratios of the three possible velocimeter pairs. An inertial navigator and reference system based on this approach would probably have both fewer components and simpler algorithms, due to the obviation of the first level of integration in classic inertial navigators.

  12. Robotics and remote systems applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabold, D.E.

    1996-01-01

    This article is a review of numerous remote inspection techniques in use at the Savannah River (and other) facilities. These include: (1) reactor tank inspection robot, (2) californium waste removal robot, (3) fuel rod lubrication robot, (4) cesium source manipulation robot, (5) tank 13 survey and decontamination robots, (6) hot gang valve corridor decontamination and junction box removal robots, (7) lead removal from deionizer vessels robot, (8) HB line cleanup robot, (9) remote operation of a front end loader at WIPP, (10) remote overhead video extendible robot, (11) semi-intelligent mobile observing navigator, (12) remote camera systems in the SRS canyons, (13) cameras and borescope for the DWPF, (14) Hanford waste tank camera system, (15) in-tank precipitation camera system, (16) F-area retention basin pipe crawler, (17) waste tank wall crawler and annulus camera, (18) duct inspection, and (19) deionizer resin sampling

  13. Low-resistance magnetic tunnel junctions prepared by partial remote plasma oxidation of 0.9 nm Al barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Ricardo; Freitas, Paulo P.; MacKenzie, Maureen; Chapman, John N.

    2005-01-01

    Current perpendicular to the plane read-head elements suitable for high-density magnetic storage require low resistance while maintaining a reasonable magnetoresistive (MR) signal (RxA 2 and MR>20% for areal densities >200 Gb/in 2 ). This letter shows that competitive low RxA junctions can be produced using underoxidized barriers starting from 0.9 nm thick Al layers. For as-deposited junctions, tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) ∼20% for RxA∼2-15 Ω μm 2 is obtained, while in the RxA∼60-150 Ω μm 2 range, TMR values between 40% to 45% are achieved. A limited number of junctions exhibits considerably lower RxA values with respect to the average, while keeping a similar MR (down to 0.44 Ω μm 2 with TMR of 20% and down to 2.2 Ω μm 2 with TMR of 52%). Experimental data suggest that current confinement to small regions (barrier defects/hot spots) may explain these results

  14. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    by B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet operation was very satisfactory till the technical stop at the end of the year 2010. The field was ramped down on 5th December 2010, following the successful regeneration test of the turbine filters at full field on 3rd December 2010. This will limit in the future the quantity of magnet cycles, as it is no longer necessary to ramp down the magnet for this type of intervention. This is made possible by the use of the spare liquid Helium volume to cool the magnet while turbines 1 and 2 are stopped, leaving only the third turbine in operation. This obviously requires full availability of the operators to supervise the operation, as it is not automated. The cryogenics was stopped on 6th December 2010 and the magnet was left without cooling until 18th January 2011, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The maintenance of the vacuum pumping was done immediately after the magnet stop, when the magnet was still at very low temperature. Only the vacuum pumping of the ma...

  15. Semiotic resources for navigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Brian Lystgaard; Lange, Simon Bierring

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes two typical semiotic resources blind people use when navigating in urban areas. Everyone makes use of a variety of interpretive semiotic resources and senses when navigating. For sighted individuals, this especially involves sight. Blind people, however, must rely on everything...... else than sight, thereby substituting sight with other modalities and distributing the navigational work to other semiotic resources. Based on a large corpus of fieldwork among blind people in Denmark, undertaking observations, interviews, and video recordings of their naturally occurring practices...... of walking and navigating, this paper shows how two prototypical types of semiotic resources function as helpful cognitive extensions: the guide dog and the white cane. This paper takes its theoretical and methodological perspective from EMCA multimodal interaction analysis....

  16. USACE Navigation Channels 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — This dataset represents both San Francisco and Los Angeles District navigation channel lines. All San Francisco District channel lines were digitized from CAD files...

  17. Visual Guided Navigation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Banks, Martin

    1999-01-01

    .... Similarly, the problem of visual navigation is the recovery of an observer's self-motion with respect to the environment from the moving pattern of light reaching the eyes and the complex of extra...

  18. Tinnitus Patient Navigator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cure About Us Initiatives News & Events Professional Resources Tinnitus Patient Navigator Want to get started on the ... unique and may require a different treatment workflow. Tinnitus Health-Care Providers If you, or someone you ...

  19. Remote Research

    CERN Document Server

    Tulathimutte, Tony

    2011-01-01

    Remote studies allow you to recruit subjects quickly, cheaply, and immediately, and give you the opportunity to observe users as they behave naturally in their own environment. In Remote Research, Nate Bolt and Tony Tulathimutte teach you how to design and conduct remote research studies, top to bottom, with little more than a phone and a laptop.

  20. Magnetic resonance neurography evaluation of chronic extraspinal sciatica after remote proximal hamstring injury: a preliminary retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucknor, Matthew D; Steinbach, Lynne S; Saloner, David; Chin, Cynthia T

    2014-08-01

    Extraspinal sciatica can present unique challenges in clinical diagnosis and management. In this study, the authors evaluated qualitative and quantitative patterns of sciatica-related pathology at the ischial tuberosity on MR neurography (MRN) studies performed for chronic extraspinal sciatica. Lumbosacral MRN studies obtained in 14 patients at the University of California, San Francisco between 2007 and 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. The patients had been referred by neurosurgeons or neurologists for chronic unilateral sciatica (≥ 3 months), and the MRN reports described asymmetrical increased T2 signal within the sciatic nerve at the level of the ischial tuberosity. MRN studies were also performed prospectively in 6 healthy volunteers. Sciatic nerve T2 signal intensity (SI) and cross-sectional area at the ischial tuberosity were calculated and compared between the 2 sides in all 20 subjects. The same measurements were also performed at the sciatic notch as an internal reference. Adjacent musculoskeletal pathology was compared between the 2 sides in all subjects. Seven of the 9 patients for whom detailed histories were available had a specific history of injury or trauma near the proximal hamstring preceding the onset of sciatica. Eight of the 14 patients also demonstrated soft-tissue abnormalities adjacent to the proximal hamstring origin. The remaining 6 had normal muscles, tendons, and marrow in the region of the ischial tuberosity. There was a significant difference in sciatic nerve SI and size between the symptomatic and asymptomatic sides at the level of the ischial tuberosity, with a mean adjusted SI of 1.38 compared with 1.00 (p sciatica remains a diagnosis of exclusion, this distinct category of patients has not been described in the radiographic literature and merits special attention from clinicians and radiologists in the management of extraspinal sciatica. Magnetic resonance neurography is useful for evaluating chronic sciatic neuropathy both

  1. Real-Time Ultrasound-Guided Catheter Navigation for Approaching Deep-Seated Brain Lesions: Role of Intraoperative Neurosonography with and without Fusion with Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjila, Sunil; Karhade, Aditya; Phi, Ji Hoon; Scott, R Michael; Smith, Edward R

    2017-01-01

    Brain shift during the exposure of cranial lesions may reduce the accuracy of frameless stereotaxy. We describe a rapid, safe, and effective method to approach deep-seated brain lesions using real-time intraoperative ultrasound placement of a catheter to mark the dissection trajectory to the lesion. With Institutional Review Board approval, we retrospectively reviewed the radiographic, pathologic, and intraoperative data of 11 pediatric patients who underwent excision of 12 lesions by means of this technique. Full data sets were available for 12 lesions in 11 patients. Ten lesions were tumors and 2 were cavernous malformations. Lesion locations included the thalamus (n = 4), trigone (n = 3), mesial temporal lobe (n = 3), and deep white matter (n = 2). Catheter placement was successful in all patients, and the median time required for the procedure was 3 min (range 2-5 min). There were no complications related to catheter placement. The median diameter of surgical corridors on postresection magnetic resonance imaging was 6.6 mm (range 3.0-12.1 mm). Use of real-time ultrasound guidance to place a catheter to aid in the dissection to reach a deep-seated brain lesion provides advantages complementary to existing techniques, such as frameless stereotaxy. The catheter insertion technique described here provides a quick, accurate, and safe method for reaching deep-seated lesions. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Remote Sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Khorram, Siamak; Koch, Frank H; van der Wiele, Cynthia F

    2012-01-01

    Remote Sensing provides information on how remote sensing relates to the natural resources inventory, management, and monitoring, as well as environmental concerns. It explains the role of this new technology in current global challenges. "Remote Sensing" will discuss remotely sensed data application payloads and platforms, along with the methodologies involving image processing techniques as applied to remotely sensed data. This title provides information on image classification techniques and image registration, data integration, and data fusion techniques. How this technology applies to natural resources and environmental concerns will also be discussed.

  3. Mathematical Formulation of the Remote Electric and Magnetic Emissions of the Lightning Dart Leader and Return Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemann, Edward M. B.

    analytic solution to Maxwell's Equations for the lightning leader followed by a novel return stroke model. I model the leader as a downward propagating boxcar function of uniform charge density and constant velocity, and the subsequent return stroke is modeled as an upward propagating boxcar with a time dependent velocity. Charge conservation is applied to ensure self-consistency of the driving current and charge sources, and physical observations are used to support model development. The resulting transient electric and magnetic fields are presented at various distances and delay times and compared with measured waveforms and previously published models.

  4. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    Operation of the magnet has gone quite smoothly during the first half of this year. The magnet has been at 4.5K for the full period since January. There was an unplanned short stop due to the CERN-wide power outage on May 28th, which caused a slow dump of the magnet. Since this occurred just before a planned technical stop of the LHC, during which access in the experimental cavern was authorized, it was decided to leave the magnet OFF until 2nd June, when magnet was ramped up again to 3.8T. The magnet system experienced a fault also resulting in a slow dump on April 14th. This was triggered by a thermostat on a filter choke in the 20kA DC power converter. The threshold of this thermostat is 65°C. However, no variation in the water-cooling flow rate or temperature was observed. Vibration may have been the root cause of the fault. All the thermostats have been checked, together with the cables, connectors and the read out card. The tightening of the inductance fixations has also been checked. More tem...

  5. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet was energised at the beginning of March 2012 at a low current to check all the MSS safety chains. Then the magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T on 6 March 2012. Unfortunately two days later an unintentional switch OFF of the power converter caused a slow dump. This was due to a misunderstanding of the CCC (CERN Control Centre) concerning the procedure to apply for the CMS converter control according to the beam-mode status at that time. Following this event, the third one since 2009, a discussion was initiated to define possible improvement, not only on software and procedures in the CCC, but also to evaluate the possibility to upgrade the CMS hardware to prevent such discharge from occurring because of incorrect procedure implementations. The magnet operation itself was smooth, and no power cuts took place. As a result, the number of magnetic cycles was reduced to the minimum, with only two full magnetic cycles from 0 T to 3.8 T. Nevertheless the magnet suffered four stops of the cryogeni...

  6. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      Following the unexpected magnet stops last August due to sequences of unfortunate events on the services and cryogenics [see CMS internal report], a few more events and initiatives again disrupted the magnet operation. All the magnet parameters stayed at their nominal values during this period without any fault or alarm on the magnet control and safety systems. The magnet was stopped for the September technical stop to allow interventions in the experimental cavern on the detector services. On 1 October, to prepare the transfer of the liquid nitrogen tank on its new location, several control cables had to be removed. One cable was cut mistakenly, causing a digital input card to switch off, resulting in a cold-box (CB) stop. This tank is used for the pre-cooling of the magnet from room temperature down to 80 K, and for this reason it is controlled through the cryogenics control system. Since the connection of the CB was only allowed for a field below 2 T to avoid the risk of triggering a fast d...

  7. Internet-Based Indoor Navigation Services

    OpenAIRE

    Zeinalipour-Yazti, Demetrios; Laoudias, Christos; Georgiou, Kyriakos

    2017-01-01

    Smartphone advances are leading to a class of Internet-based Indoor Navigation services. IIN services rely on geolocation databases that store indoor models, comprising floor maps and points of interest, along with wireless, light, and magnetic signals for localizing users. Developing IIN services creates new information management challenges - such as crowdsourcing indoor models, acquiring and fusing big data velocity signals, localization algorithms, and custodians' location privacy. Here, ...

  8. Development and Validation of a Controlled Virtual Environment for Guidance, Navigation and Control of Quadrotor UAV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Width Modulation QuarC Quanser Real-time Control RC Remote Controlled RPV Remotely Piloted Vehicles SLAM Simultaneous Localization and Mapping UAV...development of the following systems: 1. Navigation (GPS, Lidar , etc.) 2. Communication (Datalink) 3. Ground Control Station (GUI, software programming

  9. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet and its sub-systems were stopped at the beginning of the winter shutdown on 8th December 2011. The magnet was left without cooling during the cryogenics maintenance until 17th January 2012, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The vacuum pumping was maintained during this period. During this shutdown, the yearly maintenance was performed on the cryogenics, the vacuum pumps, the magnet control and safety systems, and the power converter and discharge lines. Several preventive actions led to the replacement of the electrovalve command coils, and the 20A DC power supplies of the magnet control system. The filters were cleaned on the demineralised water circuits. The oil of the diffusion pumps was changed. On the cryogenics, warm nitrogen at 343 K was circulated in the cold box to regenerate the filters and the heat exchangers. The coalescing filters have been replaced at the inlet of both the turbines and the lubricant trapping unit. The active cha...

  10. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

      The magnet was operated without any problem until the end of the LHC run in February 2013, apart from a CERN-wide power glitch on 10 January 2013 that affected the CMS refrigerator, causing a ramp down to 2 T in order to reconnect the coldbox. Another CERN-wide power glitch on 15 January 2013 didn’t affect the magnet subsystems, the cryoplant or the power converter. At the end of the magnet run, the reconnection of the coldbox at 2.5 T was tested. The process will be updated, in particular the parameters of some PID valve controllers. The helium flow of the current leads was reduced but only for a few seconds. The exercise will be repeated with the revised parameters to validate the automatic reconnection process of the coldbox. During LS1, the water-cooling services will be reduced and many interventions are planned on the electrical services. Therefore, the magnet cryogenics and subsystems will be stopped for several months, and the magnet cannot be kept cold. In order to avoid unc...

  11. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet was successfully operated at the end of the year 2009 despite some technical problems on the cryogenics. The magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T at the end of November until December 16th when the shutdown started. The magnet operation met a few unexpected stops. The field was reduced to 3.5 T for about 5 hours on December 3rd due to a faulty pressure sensor on the helium compressor. The following day the CERN CCC stopped unintentionally the power converters of the LHC and the experiments, triggering a ramp down that was stopped at 2.7 T. The magnet was back at 3.8 T about 6 hours after CCC sent the CERN-wide command. Three days later, a slow dump was triggered due to a stop of the pump feeding the power converter water-cooling circuit, during an intervention on the water-cooling plant done after several disturbances on the electrical distribution network. The magnet was back at 3.8 T in the evening the same day. On December 10th a break occurred in one turbine of the cold box producing the liquid ...

  12. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The CMS magnet has been running steadily and smoothly since the summer, with no detected flaw. The magnet instrumentation is entirely operational and all the parameters are at their nominal values. Three power cuts on the electrical network affected the magnet run in the past five months, with no impact on the data-taking as the accelerator was also affected at the same time. On 22nd June, a thunderstorm caused a power glitch on the service electrical network. The primary water cooling at Point 5 was stopped. Despite a quick restart of the water cooling, the inlet temperature of the demineralised water on the busbar cooling circuit increased by 5 °C, up to 23.3 °C. It was kept below the threshold of 27 °C by switching off other cooling circuits to avoid the trigger of a slow dump of the magnet. The cold box of the cryogenics also stopped. Part of the spare liquid helium volume was used to maintain the cooling of the magnet at 4.5 K. The operators of the cryogenics quickly restarted ...

  13. The attack navigator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Probst, Christian W.; Willemson, Jan; Pieters, Wolter

    2016-01-01

    The need to assess security and take protection decisions is at least as old as our civilisation. However, the complexity and development speed of our interconnected technical systems have surpassed our capacity to imagine and evaluate risk scenarios. This holds in particular for risks...... that are caused by the strategic behaviour of adversaries. Therefore, technology-supported methods are needed to help us identify and manage these risks. In this paper, we describe the attack navigator: a graph-based approach to security risk assessment inspired by navigation systems. Based on maps of a socio...

  14. Navigating in higher education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thingholm, Hanne Balsby; Reimer, David; Keiding, Tina Bering

    Denne rapport er skrevet på baggrund af spørgeskemaundersøgelsen – Navigating in Higher Education (NiHE) – der rummer besvarelser fra 1410 bachelorstuderende og 283 undervisere fordelt på ni uddannelser fra Aarhus Universitet: Uddannelsesvidenskab, Historie, Nordisk sprog og litteratur, Informati......Denne rapport er skrevet på baggrund af spørgeskemaundersøgelsen – Navigating in Higher Education (NiHE) – der rummer besvarelser fra 1410 bachelorstuderende og 283 undervisere fordelt på ni uddannelser fra Aarhus Universitet: Uddannelsesvidenskab, Historie, Nordisk sprog og litteratur...

  15. Navigating ‘riskscapes’

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gee, Stephanie; Skovdal, Morten

    2017-01-01

    This paper draws on interview data to examine how international health care workers navigated risk during the unprecedented Ebola outbreak in West Africa. It identifies the importance of place in risk perception, including how different spatial localities give rise to different feelings of threat...... or safety, some from the construction of physical boundaries, and others mediated through aspects of social relations, such as trust, communication and team dynamics. Referring to these spatial localities as ‘riskscapes’, the paper calls for greater recognition of the role of place in understanding risk...... perception, and how people navigate risk....

  16. Environmental layout complexity affects neural activity during navigation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slone, Edward; Burles, Ford; Iaria, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    Navigating large-scale surroundings is a fundamental ability. In humans, it is commonly assumed that navigational performance is affected by individual differences, such as age, sex, and cognitive strategies adopted for orientation. We recently showed that the layout of the environment itself also influences how well people are able to find their way within it, yet it remains unclear whether differences in environmental complexity are associated with changes in brain activity during navigation. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate how the brain responds to a change in environmental complexity by asking participants to perform a navigation task in two large-scale virtual environments that differed solely in interconnection density, a measure of complexity defined as the average number of directional choices at decision points. The results showed that navigation in the simpler, less interconnected environment was faster and more accurate relative to the complex environment, and such performance was associated with increased activity in a number of brain areas (i.e. precuneus, retrosplenial cortex, and hippocampus) known to be involved in mental imagery, navigation, and memory. These findings provide novel evidence that environmental complexity not only affects navigational behaviour, but also modulates activity in brain regions that are important for successful orientation and navigation. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet ran smoothly in the last few months until a fast dump occurred on 9th May 2011. Fortunately, this occurred in the afternoon of the first day of the technical stop. The fast dump was due to a valve position controller that caused the sudden closure of a valve. This valve is used to regulate the helium flow on one of the two current leads, which electrically connects the coil at 4.5 K to the busbars at room temperature. With no helium flow on the lead, the voltage drop and the temperatures across the leads increase up to the defined thresholds, triggering a fast dump through the Magnet Safety System (MSS). The automatic reaction triggered by the MSS worked properly. The helium release was limited as the pressure rise was just at the limit of the safety valve opening pressure. The average temperature of the magnet reached 72 K. It took four days to recover the temperature and refill the helium volumes. The faulty valve controller was replaced by a spare one before the magnet ramp-up resumed....

  18. Navigating on handheld displays: Dynamic versus Static Keyhole Navigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehra, S.; Werkhoven, P.; Worring, M.

    2006-01-01

    Handheld displays leave little space for the visualization and navigation of spatial layouts representing rich information spaces. The most common navigation method for handheld displays is static peephole navigation: The peephole is static and we move the spatial layout behind it (scrolling). A

  19. Improving Canada's Marine Navigation System through e-Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Breton

    2016-06-01

    The conclusion proposed is that on-going work with key partners and stakeholders can be used as the primary mechanism to identify e-Navigation related innovation and needs, and to prioritize next steps. Moving forward in Canada, implementation of new e-navigation services will continue to be stakeholder driven, and used to drive improvements to Canada's marine navigation system.

  20. Nautical Navigation Aids (NAVAID) Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Structures intended to assist a navigator to determine position or safe course, or to warn of dangers or obstructions to navigation. This dataset includes lights,...

  1. Inland Electronic Navigational Charts (IENC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — These Inland Electronic Navigational Charts (IENCs) were developed from available data used in maintenance of Navigation channels. Users of these IENCs should be...

  2. Navigating ECA-Zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Carsten Ørts; Grønsedt, Peter; Hendriksen, Christian

    This report examines the effect that ECA-zone regulation has on the optimal vessel fuel strategies for compliance. The findings of this report are trifold, and this report is coupled with a calculation tool which is released to assist ship-owners in the ECA decision making. The first key insight...... much time their operated vessels navigate the ECA in the future....

  3. Dynamic Liver Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Free-Breathing: Feasibility of a Cartesian T1-Weighted Acquisition Technique With Compressed Sensing and Additional Self-Navigation Signal for Hard-Gated and Motion-Resolved Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenbach, Benjamin; Bucher, Andreas M; Wichmann, Julian L; Nickel, Dominik; Polkowski, Christoph; Hammerstingl, Renate; Vogl, Thomas J; Bodelle, Boris

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of a free-breathing dynamic liver imaging technique using a prototype Cartesian T1-weighted volumetric interpolated breathhold examination (VIBE) sequence with compressed sensing and simultaneous acquisition of a navigation signal for hard-gated and motion state-resolved reconstruction. A total of 43 consecutive oncologic patients (mean age, 66 ± 11 years; 44% female) underwent free-breathing dynamic liver imaging for the evaluation of liver metastases from colorectal cancer using a prototype Cartesian VIBE sequence (field of view, 380 × 345 mm; image matrix, 320 × 218; echo time/repetition time, 1.8/3.76 milliseconds; flip angle, 10 degrees; slice thickness, 3.0 mm; acquisition time, 188 seconds) with continuous data sampling and additionally acquired self-navigation signal. Data were iteratively reconstructed using 2 different approaches: first, a hard-gated reconstruction only using data associated to the dominating motion state (CS VIBE, Compressed Sensing VIBE), and second, a motion-resolved reconstruction with 6 different motion states as additional image dimension (XD VIBE, eXtended dimension VIBE). Continuous acquired data were grouped in 16 subsequent time increments with 11.57 seconds each to resolve arterial and venous contrast phases. For image quality assessment, both CS VIBE and XD VIBE were compared with the patient's last staging dynamic liver magnetic resonance imaging including a breathhold (BH) VIBE as reference standard 4.5 ± 1.2 months before. Representative quality parameters including respiratory artifacts were evaluated for arterial and venous phase images independently, retrospectively and blindly by 3 experienced radiologists, with higher scores indicating better examination quality. To assess diagnostic accuracy, same readers evaluated the presence of metastatic lesions for XD VIBE and CS VIBE compared with reference BH examination in a second session. Compared with CS VIBE, XD VIBE

  4. Surgery of language-eloquent tumors in patients not eligible for awake surgery: the impact of a protocol based on navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation on presurgical planning and language outcome, with evidence of tumor-induced intra-hemispheric plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffa, Giovanni; Quattropani, Maria C; Scibilia, Antonino; Conti, Alfredo; Angileri, Filippo Flavio; Esposito, Felice; Sindorio, Carmela; Cardali, Salvatore Massimiliano; Germanò, Antonino; Tomasello, Francesco

    2018-05-01

    Awake surgery and intraoperative monitoring represent the gold standard for surgery of brain tumors located in the perisylvian region of the dominant hemisphere due to their ability to map and preserve the language network during surgery. Nevertheless, in some cases awake surgery is not feasible. This could increase the risk of postoperative language deficit. Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) and nTMS-based DTI fiber tracking (DTI-FT) provide a preoperative mapping and reconstruction of the cortico-subcortical language network. This can be used to plan and guide the surgical strategy to preserve the language function. The objective if this study is to describe the impact of a non-invasive preoperative protocol for mapping the language network through the nTMS and nTMS-based DTI-FT in patients not eligible for awake surgery and thereby operated under general anesthesia for suspected language-eloquent brain tumors. We reviewed clinical data of patients not eligible for awake surgery and operated under general anaesthesia between 2015 and 2016. All patients underwent nTMS language cortical mapping and nTMS-based DTI-FT of subcortical language fascicles. The nTMS findings were used to plan and guide the maximal safe resection of the tumor. The impact on postoperative language outcome and the accuracy of the nTMS-based mapping in predicting language deficits were evaluated. Twenty patients were enrolled in the study. The nTMS-based reconstruction of the language network was successful in all patients. Interestingly, we observed a significant association between tumor localization and the cortical distribution of the nTMS errors (p = 0.004), thereby suggesting an intra-hemispheric plasticity of language cortical areas, probably induced by the tumor itself. The nTMS mapping disclosed the true-eloquence of lesions in 12 (60%) of all suspected cases. In the remaining 8 cases (40%) the suspected eloquence of the lesion was disproved. The n

  5. Remotely controllable liquid marbles

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Lianbin

    2012-07-26

    Liquid droplets encapsulated by self-organized hydrophobic particles at the liquid/air interface - liquid marbles - are prepared by encapsulating water droplets with novel core/shell-structured responsive magnetic particles, consisting of a responsive block copolymer-grafted mesoporous silica shell and magnetite core (see figure; P2VP-b-PDMS: poly(2-vinylpyridine-b- dimethylsiloxane)). Desirable properties of the liquid marbles include that they rupture upon ultraviolet illumination and can be remotely manipulated by an external magnetic field. 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Laboratory experiments in mobile robot navigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kar, Asim; Pal, Prabir K.

    1997-01-01

    Mobile robots have potential applications in remote surveillance and operation in hazardous areas. To be effective, they must have the ability to navigate on their own to desired locations. Several experimental navigational runs of a mobile robot developed have been conducted. The robot has three wheels of which the front wheel is steered and the hind wheels are driven. The robot is equipped with an ultrasonic range sensor, which is turned around to get range data in all directions. The range data is fed to the input of a neural net, whose output steers the robot towards the goal. The robot is powered by batteries (12V 10Ah). It has an onboard stepper motor controller for driving the wheels and the ultrasonic setup. It also has an onboard computer which runs the navigation program NAV. This program sends the range data and configuration parameters to the operator''s console program OCP, running on a stationary PC, through radio communication on a serial line. Through OCP, an operator can monitor the progress of the robot from a distant control room and intervene if necessary. In this paper the control modules of the mobile robot, its ways of operation and also results of some of the experimental runs recorded are reported. It is seen that the trained net guides the mobile robot through gaps of 1m and above to its destination with about 84% success measured over a small sample of 38 runs

  7. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet worked very well at 3.8 T as expected, despite a technical issue that manifested twice in the cryogenics since June. All the other magnet sub-systems worked without flaw. The issue in the cryogenics was with the cold box: it could be observed that the cold box was getting progressively blocked, due to some residual humidity and air accumulating in the first thermal exchanger and in the adsorber at 65 K. This was later confirmed by the analysis during the regeneration phases. An increase in the temperature difference between the helium inlet and outlet across the heat exchanger and a pressure drop increase on the filter of the adsorber were observed. The consequence was a reduction of the helium flow, first compensated by the automatic opening of the regulation valves. But once they were fully opened, the flow and refrigeration power reduced as a consequence. In such a situation, the liquid helium level in the helium Dewar decreased, eventually causing a ramp down of the magnet current and a field...

  8. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    MAGNET During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bough...

  9. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé.

    The magnet operation restarted end of June this year. Quick routine checks of the magnet sub-systems were performed at low current before starting the ramps up to higher field. It appeared clearly that the end of the field ramp down to zero was too long to be compatible with the detector commissioning and operations plans. It was decided to perform an upgrade to keep the ramp down from 3.8T to zero within 4 hours. On July 10th, when a field of 1.5T was reached, small movements were observed in the forward region support table and it was decided to fix this problem before going to higher field. At the end of July the ramps could be resumed. On July 28th, the field was at 3.8T and the summer CRAFT exercise could start. This run in August went smoothly until a general CERN wide power cut took place on August 3rd, due to an insulation fault on the high voltage network outside point 5. It affected the magnet powering electrical circuit, as it caused the opening of the main circuit breakers, resulting in a fast du...

  10. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

    The magnet is fully stopped and at room temperature. The maintenance works and consolidation activities on the magnet sub-systems are progressing. To consolidate the cryogenic installation, two redundant helium compressors will be installed as ‘hot spares’, to avoid the risk of a magnet downtime in case of a major failure of a compressor unit during operation. The screw compressors, their motors, the mechanical couplings and the concrete blocks are already available and stored at P5. The metallic structure used to access the existing compressors in SH5 will be modified to allow the installation of the two redundant ones. The plan is to finish the installation and commissioning of the hot spare compressors before the summer 2014. In the meantime, a bypass on the high-pressure helium piping will be installed for the connection of a helium drier unit later during the Long Shutdown 1, keeping this installation out of the schedule critical path. A proposal is now being prepared for the con...

  11. Satellite Imagery Assisted Road-Based Visual Navigation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkova, A.; Gibbens, P. W.

    2016-06-01

    There is a growing demand for unmanned aerial systems as autonomous surveillance, exploration and remote sensing solutions. Among the key concerns for robust operation of these systems is the need to reliably navigate the environment without reliance on global navigation satellite system (GNSS). This is of particular concern in Defence circles, but is also a major safety issue for commercial operations. In these circumstances, the aircraft needs to navigate relying only on information from on-board passive sensors such as digital cameras. An autonomous feature-based visual system presented in this work offers a novel integral approach to the modelling and registration of visual features that responds to the specific needs of the navigation system. It detects visual features from Google Earth* build a feature database. The same algorithm then detects features in an on-board cameras video stream. On one level this serves to localise the vehicle relative to the environment using Simultaneous Localisation and Mapping (SLAM). On a second level it correlates them with the database to localise the vehicle with respect to the inertial frame. The performance of the presented visual navigation system was compared using the satellite imagery from different years. Based on comparison results, an analysis of the effects of seasonal, structural and qualitative changes of the imagery source on the performance of the navigation algorithm is presented. * The algorithm is independent of the source of satellite imagery and another provider can be used

  12. Interdisciplinary Navigation Unit for Mathematics and Earth Science Using Geospatial Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaglik, S. M.; Harris, V.

    2006-12-01

    Central Wyoming College (CWC) is located northeast of the Wind River Mountains. Although many people find recreation in the wilderness and remote areas surrounding the area, people still lose their lives because they become lost or disoriented. Creating an interdisciplinary field-based curriculum unit within mathematics (MATH 1000) and earth science (GEOL 1070) courses for non-science and education majors, provides students an opportunity to develop critical thinking skills and quantitative literacy. It also provides some necessary skills for survival and an understanding of landscape formation and wilderness navigation using geoscience. A brief history of navigation, including the importance of finding latitude and longitude, and the fairly recent implementation of the Global Positioning System, precedes activities in which students learn to use a basic compass. In addition to learning how to adjust for magnetic declination they read topographic maps, specifically USGS quadrangles, and learn how to use the scale in the legend to verify calculations using the Pythagorean Theorem. Students learn how to estimate distance and time required for traveling a pre- determined distance while using dimensional analysis to convert from the English system to metric. They learn how to read and measure latitude and longitude, as well as universal transverse Mercator projection measurements (UTM's), to find their position. The basic mathematical skills are assessed through hands-on activities such as finding their location on a map using a compass, a GPS unit, and Google Earth, and using a combination of maps, compasses, and GPS units to navigate through a course. Our goal is to provide life-saving information to students while incorporating necessary core curriculum from both mathematics and earth science classes. We work to create field-based activities, as well as assessments, to insure that students who complete the course are prepared to safely enjoy the outdoors and are

  13. Control algorithms for autonomous robot navigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorgensen, C.C.

    1985-01-01

    This paper examines control algorithm requirements for autonomous robot navigation outside laboratory environments. Three aspects of navigation are considered: navigation control in explored terrain, environment interactions with robot sensors, and navigation control in unanticipated situations. Major navigation methods are presented and relevance of traditional human learning theory is discussed. A new navigation technique linking graph theory and incidental learning is introduced

  14. Unraveling navigational strategies in migratory insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlin, Christine; Heinze, Stanley; Reppert, Steven M

    2012-04-01

    Long-distance migration is a strategy some animals use to survive a seasonally changing environment. To reach favorable grounds, migratory animals have evolved sophisticated navigational mechanisms that rely on a map and compasses. In migratory insects, the existence of a map sense (sense of position) remains poorly understood, but recent work has provided new insights into the mechanisms some compasses use for maintaining a constant bearing during long-distance navigation. The best-studied directional strategy relies on a time-compensated sun compass, used by diurnal insects, for which neural circuits have begun to be delineated. Yet, a growing body of evidence suggests that migratory insects may also rely on other compasses that use night sky cues or the Earth's magnetic field. Those mechanisms are ripe for exploration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Solar-based navigation for robotic explorers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shillcutt, Kimberly Jo

    2000-12-01

    This thesis introduces the application of solar position and shadowing information to robotic exploration. Power is a critical resource for robots with remote, long-term missions, so this research focuses on the power generation capabilities of robotic explorers during navigational tasks, in addition to power consumption. Solar power is primarily considered, with the possibility of wind power also contemplated. Information about the environment, including the solar ephemeris, terrain features, time of day, and surface location, is incorporated into a planning structure, allowing robots to accurately predict shadowing and thus potential costs and gains during navigational tasks. By evaluating its potential to generate and expend power, a robot can extend its lifetime and accomplishments. The primary tasks studied are coverage patterns, with a variety of plans developed for this research. The use of sun, terrain and temporal information also enables new capabilities of identifying and following sun-synchronous and sun-seeking paths. Digital elevation maps are combined with an ephemeris algorithm to calculate the altitude and azimuth of the sun from surface locations, and to identify and map shadows. Solar navigation path simulators use this information to perform searches through two-dimensional space, while considering temporal changes. Step by step simulations of coverage patterns also incorporate time in addition to location. Evaluations of solar and wind power generation, power consumption, area coverage, area overlap, and time are generated for sets of coverage patterns, with on-board environmental information linked to the simulations. This research is implemented on the Nomad robot for the Robotic Antarctic Meteorite Search. Simulators have been developed for coverage pattern tests, as well as for sun-synchronous and sun-seeking path searches. Results of field work and simulations are reported and analyzed, with demonstrated improvements in efficiency

  16. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    The magnet subsystems resumed operation early this spring. The vacuum pumping was restarted mid March, and the cryogenic power plant was restarted on March 30th. Three and a half weeks later, the magnet was at 4.5 K. The vacuum pumping system is performing well. One of the newly installed vacuum gauges had to be replaced at the end of the cool-down phase, as the values indicated were not coherent with the other pressure measurements. The correction had to be implemented quickly to be sure no helium leak could be at the origin of this anomaly. The pressure measurements have been stable and coherent since the change. The cryogenics worked well, and the cool-down went quite smoothly, without any particular difficulty. The automated start of the turbines had to be fine-tuned to get a smooth transition, as it was observed that the cooling power delivered by the turbines was slightly higher than needed, causing the cold box to stop automatically. This had no consequence as the cold box safety system acts to keep ...

  17. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bought. Th...

  18. Mobile Robot Navigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Christian

    2007-01-01

    the current position to a desired destination. This thesis presents and experimentally validates solutions for road classification, obstacle avoidance and mission execution. The road classification is based on laser scanner measurements and supported at longer ranges by vision. The road classification...... is sufficiently sensitive to separate the road from flat roadsides, and to distinguish asphalt roads from gravelled roads. The vision-based road detection uses a combination of chromaticity and edge detection to outline the traversable part of the road based on a laser scanner classified sample area....... The perception of these two sensors are utilised by a path planner to allow a number of drive modes, and especially the ability to follow road edges are investigated. The navigation mission is controlled by a script language. The navigation script controls route sequencing, junction detection, junction crossing...

  19. Magnetic Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils

    2015-01-01

    he Earth has a large and complicated magnetic field, the major part of which is produced by a self-sustaining dynamo operating in the fluid outer core. Magnetic field observations provide one of the few tools for remote sensing the Earth’s deep interior, especially regarding the dynamics...... of the fluid flow at the top of the core. However, what is measured at or near the surface of the Earth is the superposition of the core field and fields caused by magnetized rocks in the Earth’s crust, by electric currents flowing in the ionosphere, magnetosphere, and oceans, and by currents induced...... in the Earth by time-varying external fields. These sources have their specific characteristics in terms of spatial and temporal variations, and their proper separation, based on magnetic measurements, is a major challenge. Such a separation is a prerequisite for remote sensing by means of magnetic field...

  20. 33 CFR 2.36 - Navigable waters of the United States, navigable waters, and territorial waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Navigable waters of the United States, navigable waters, and territorial waters. 2.36 Section 2.36 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL JURISDICTION Jurisdictional Terms § 2.36 Navigable waters...

  1. 3D Reconfigurable MPSoC for Unmanned Spacecraft Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekoulis, George

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the design of a new lightweight spacecraft navigation system for unmanned space missions. The system addresses the demands for more efficient autonomous navigation in the near-Earth environment or deep space. The proposed instrumentation is directly suitable for unmanned systems operation and testing of new airborne prototypes for remote sensing applications. The system features a new sensor technology and significant improvements over existing solutions. Fluxgate type sensors have been traditionally used in unmanned defense systems such as target drones, guided missiles, rockets and satellites, however, the guidance sensors' configurations exhibit lower specifications than the presented solution. The current implementation is based on a recently developed material in a reengineered optimum sensor configuration for unprecedented low-power consumption. The new sensor's performance characteristics qualify it for spacecraft navigation applications. A major advantage of the system is the efficiency in redundancy reduction achieved in terms of both hardware and software requirements.

  2. Distributed Ship Navigation Control System Based on Dual Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ying; Lv, Wu

    2017-10-01

    Navigation system is very important for ship’s normal running. There are a lot of devices and sensors in the navigation system to guarantee ship’s regular work. In the past, these devices and sensors were usually connected via CAN bus for high performance and reliability. However, as the development of related devices and sensors, the navigation system also needs the ability of high information throughput and remote data sharing. To meet these new requirements, we propose the communication method based on dual network which contains CAN bus and industrial Ethernet. Also, we import multiple distributed control terminals with cooperative strategy based on the idea of synchronizing the status by multicasting UDP message contained operation timestamp to make the system more efficient and reliable.

  3. Neonicotinoids interfere with specific components of navigation in honeybees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Fischer

    Full Text Available Three neonicotinoids, imidacloprid, clothianidin and thiacloprid, agonists of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in the central brain of insects, were applied at non-lethal doses in order to test their effects on honeybee navigation. A catch-and-release experimental design was applied in which feeder trained bees were caught when arriving at the feeder, treated with one of the neonicotinoids, and released 1.5 hours later at a remote site. The flight paths of individual bees were tracked with harmonic radar. The initial flight phase controlled by the recently acquired navigation memory (vector memory was less compromised than the second phase that leads the animal back to the hive (homing flight. The rate of successful return was significantly lower in treated bees, the probability of a correct turn at a salient landscape structure was reduced, and less directed flights during homing flights were performed. Since the homing phase in catch-and-release experiments documents the ability of a foraging honeybee to activate a remote memory acquired during its exploratory orientation flights, we conclude that non-lethal doses of the three neonicotinoids tested either block the retrieval of exploratory navigation memory or alter this form of navigation memory. These findings are discussed in the context of the application of neonicotinoids in plant protection.

  4. Neonicotinoids Interfere with Specific Components of Navigation in Honeybees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Johannes; Müller, Teresa; Spatz, Anne-Kathrin; Greggers, Uwe; Grünewald, Bernd; Menzel, Randolf

    2014-01-01

    Three neonicotinoids, imidacloprid, clothianidin and thiacloprid, agonists of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in the central brain of insects, were applied at non-lethal doses in order to test their effects on honeybee navigation. A catch-and-release experimental design was applied in which feeder trained bees were caught when arriving at the feeder, treated with one of the neonicotinoids, and released 1.5 hours later at a remote site. The flight paths of individual bees were tracked with harmonic radar. The initial flight phase controlled by the recently acquired navigation memory (vector memory) was less compromised than the second phase that leads the animal back to the hive (homing flight). The rate of successful return was significantly lower in treated bees, the probability of a correct turn at a salient landscape structure was reduced, and less directed flights during homing flights were performed. Since the homing phase in catch-and-release experiments documents the ability of a foraging honeybee to activate a remote memory acquired during its exploratory orientation flights, we conclude that non-lethal doses of the three neonicotinoids tested either block the retrieval of exploratory navigation memory or alter this form of navigation memory. These findings are discussed in the context of the application of neonicotinoids in plant protection. PMID:24646521

  5. Magnetic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboud, Essam; El-Masry, Nabil; Qaddah, Atef; Alqahtani, Faisal; Moufti, Mohammed R. H.

    2015-06-01

    The Rahat volcanic field represents one of the widely distributed Cenozoic volcanic fields across the western regions of the Arabian Peninsula. Its human significance stems from the fact that its northern fringes, where the historical eruption of 1256 A.D. took place, are very close to the holy city of Al-Madinah Al-Monawarah. In the present work, we analyzed aeromagnetic data from the northern part of Rahat volcanic field as well as carried out a ground gravity survey. A joint interpretation and inversion of gravity and magnetic data were used to estimate the thickness of the lava flows, delineate the subsurface structures of the study area, and estimate the depth to basement using various geophysical methods, such as Tilt Derivative, Euler Deconvolution and 2D modeling inversion. Results indicated that the thickness of the lava flows in the study area ranges between 100 m (above Sea Level) at the eastern and western boundaries of Rahat Volcanic field and getting deeper at the middle as 300-500 m. It also showed that, major structural trend is in the NW direction (Red Sea trend) with some minor trends in EW direction.

  6. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    The cooling down to the nominal temperature of 4.5 K was achieved at the beginning of August, in conjunction with the completion of the installation work of the connection between the power lines and the coil current leads. The temperature gradient on the first exchanger of the cold box is now kept within the nominal range. A leak of lubricant on a gasket of the helium compressor station installed at the surface was observed and several corrective actions were necessary to bring the situation back to normal. The compressor had to be refilled with lubricant and a regeneration of the filters and adsorbers was necessary. The coil cool down was resumed successfully, and the cryogenics is running since then with all parameters being nominal. Preliminary tests of the 20kA coil power supply were done earlier at full current through the discharge lines into the dump resistors, and with the powering busbars from USC5 to UXC5 without the magnet connected. On Monday evening August 25th, at 8pm, the final commissionin...

  7. MAGNET

    CERN Document Server

    B. Curé

    The first phase of the commissioning ended in August by a triggered fast dump at 3T. All parameters were nominal, and the temperature recovery down to 4.5K was carried out in two days by the cryogenics. In September, series of ramps were achieved up to 3 and finally 3.8T, while checking thoroughly the detectors in the forward region, measuring any movement of and around the HF. After the incident of the LHC accelerator on September 19th, corrective actions could be undertaken in the forward region. When all these displacements were fully characterized and repetitive, with no sign of increments in displacement at each field ramp, it was possible to start the CRAFT, Cosmic Run at Four Tesla (which was in fact at 3.8T). The magnet was ramped up to 18.16kA and the 3 week run went smoothly, with only 4 interruptions: due to the VIP visits on 21st October during the LHC inauguration day; a water leak on the cooling demineralized water circuit, about 1 l/min, that triggered a stop of the cooling pumps, and resulte...

  8. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance work and consolidation activities on the magnet cryogenics and its power distribution are progressing according to the schedules. The manufacturing of the two new helium compressor frame units has started. The frame units support the valves, all the sensors and the compressors with their motors. This activity is subcontracted. The final installation and the commissioning at CERN are scheduled for March–April 2014. The overhauls of existing cryogenics equipment (compressors, motors) are in progress. The reassembly of the components shall start in early 2014. The helium drier, to be installed on the high-pressure helium piping, has been ordered and will be delivered in the first trimester of 2014. The power distribution for the helium compressors in SH5 on the 3.3kV network is progressing. The 3.3kV switches, between each compressor and its hot spare compressor, are being installed, together with the power cables for the new compressors. The 3.3kV electrical switchboards in SE5 will ...

  9. Development of standard components for remote handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Kou; Kakudate, Satoshi; Nakahira, Masataka; Ito, Akira

    1998-01-01

    The core of Fusion Experimental Reactor consists of various components such as superconducting magnets and forced-cooled in-vessel components, which are remotely maintained due to intense of gamma radiation. Mechanical connectors such as cooling pipe connections, insulation joints and electrical connectors are commonly used for maintenance of these components and have to be standardized in terms of remote handling. This paper describes these mechanical connectors developed as the standard component compatible with remote handling and tolerable for radiation. (author)

  10. Development of standard components for remote handling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taguchi, Kou; Kakudate, Satoshi; Nakahira, Masataka; Ito, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-04-01

    The core of Fusion Experimental Reactor consists of various components such as superconducting magnets and forced-cooled in-vessel components, which are remotely maintained due to intense of gamma radiation. Mechanical connectors such as cooling pipe connections, insulation joints and electrical connectors are commonly used for maintenance of these components and have to be standardized in terms of remote handling. This paper describes these mechanical connectors developed as the standard component compatible with remote handling and tolerable for radiation. (author)

  11. Indoor navigation by image recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Io Teng; Leong, Chi Chong; Hong, Ka Wo; Pun, Chi-Man

    2017-07-01

    With the progress of smartphones hardware, it is simple on smartphone using image recognition technique such as face detection. In addition, indoor navigation system development is much slower than outdoor navigation system. Hence, this research proves a usage of image recognition technique for navigation in indoor environment. In this paper, we introduced an indoor navigation application that uses the indoor environment features to locate user's location and a route calculating algorithm to generate an appropriate path for user. The application is implemented on Android smartphone rather than iPhone. Yet, the application design can also be applied on iOS because the design is implemented without using special features only for Android. We found that digital navigation system provides better and clearer location information than paper map. Also, the indoor environment is ideal for Image recognition processing. Hence, the results motivate us to design an indoor navigation system using image recognition.

  12. Robotics Vision-based Heuristic Reasoning for Underwater Target Tracking and Navigation

    OpenAIRE

    Kia, Chua; Arshad, Mohd Rizal

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a robotics vision-based heuristic reasoning system for underwater target tracking and navigation. This system is introduced to improve the level of automation of underwater Remote Operated Vehicles (ROVs) operations. A prototype which combines computer vision with an underwater robotics system is successfully designed and developed to perform target tracking and intelligent navigation. This study focuses on developing image processing algorithms and fuzzy inference system ...

  13. Estimation with applications to tracking and navigation theory, algorthims and software

    CERN Document Server

    Bar-Shalom, Yaakov; Kirubarajan, Thiagalingam

    2001-01-01

    Expert coverage of the design and implementation of state estimation algorithms for tracking and navigation Estimation with Applications to Tracking and Navigation treats the estimation of various quantities from inherently inaccurate remote observations. It explains state estimator design using a balanced combination of linear systems, probability, and statistics. The authors provide a review of the necessary background mathematical techniques and offer an overview of the basic concepts in estimation. They then provide detailed treatments of all the major issues in estimatio

  14. Juvenile Osprey Navigation during Trans-Oceanic Migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis W Horton

    Full Text Available To compensate for drift, an animal migrating through air or sea must be able to navigate. Although some species of bird, fish, insect, mammal, and reptile are capable of drift compensation, our understanding of the spatial reference frame, and associated coordinate space, in which these navigational behaviors occur remains limited. Using high resolution satellite-monitored GPS track data, we show that juvenile ospreys (Pandion haliaetus are capable of non-stop constant course movements over open ocean spanning distances in excess of 1500 km despite the perturbing effects of winds and the lack of obvious landmarks. These results are best explained by extreme navigational precision in an exogenous spatio-temporal reference frame, such as positional orientation relative to Earth's magnetic field and pacing relative to an exogenous mechanism of keeping time. Given the age (<1 year-old of these birds and knowledge of their hatching site locations, we were able to transform Enhanced Magnetic Model coordinate locations such that the origin of the magnetic coordinate space corresponded with each bird's nest. Our analyses show that trans-oceanic juvenile osprey movements are consistent with bicoordinate positional orientation in transformed magnetic coordinate or geographic space. Through integration of movement and meteorological data, we propose a new theoretical framework, chord and clock navigation, capable of explaining the precise spatial orientation and temporal pacing performed by juvenile ospreys during their long-distance migrations over open ocean.

  15. Understanding how birds navigate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Schulten, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    A proposed model for migrating birds' magnetic sense can withstand moderate orientational disorder of a key protein in the eye.......A proposed model for migrating birds' magnetic sense can withstand moderate orientational disorder of a key protein in the eye....

  16. China Satellite Navigation Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jingnan; Fan, Shiwei; Wang, Feixue

    2016-01-01

    These Proceedings present selected research papers from CSNC2016, held during 18th-20th May in Changsha, China. The theme of CSNC2016 is Smart Sensing, Smart Perception. These papers discuss the technologies and applications of the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), and the latest progress made in the China BeiDou System (BDS) especially. They are divided into 12 topics to match the corresponding sessions in CSNC2016, which broadly covered key topics in GNSS. Readers can learn about the BDS and keep abreast of the latest advances in GNSS techniques and applications.

  17. China Satellite Navigation Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jingnan; Yang, Yuanxi; Fan, Shiwei; Yu, Wenxian

    2017-01-01

    These proceedings present selected research papers from CSNC2017, held during 23th-25th May in Shanghai, China. The theme of CSNC2017 is Positioning, Connecting All. These papers discuss the technologies and applications of the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), and the latest progress made in the China BeiDou System (BDS) especially. They are divided into 12 topics to match the corresponding sessions in CSNC2017, which broadly covered key topics in GNSS. Readers can learn about the BDS and keep abreast of the latest advances in GNSS techniques and applications.

  18. Understanding satellite navigation

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, Rajat

    2014-01-01

    This book explains the basic principles of satellite navigation technology with the bare minimum of mathematics and without complex equations. It helps you to conceptualize the underlying theory from first principles, building up your knowledge gradually using practical demonstrations and worked examples. A full range of MATLAB simulations is used to visualize concepts and solve problems, allowing you to see what happens to signals and systems with different configurations. Implementation and applications are discussed, along with some special topics such as Kalman Filter and Ionosphere. W

  19. Remote viewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, C

    1988-04-15

    Remote viewing is the supposed faculty which enables a percipient, sited in a closed room, to describe the perceptions of a remote agent visiting an unknown target site. To provide convincing demonstration of such a faculty poses a range of experimental and practical problems, especially if feedback to the percipient is allowed after each trial. The precautions needed are elaborate and troublesome; many potential loopholes have to be plugged and there will be strong temptations to relax standards, requiring exceptional discipline and dedication by the experimenters. Most reports of remote viewing experiments are rather superficial and do not permit assessment of the experimental procedures with confidence; in many cases there is clear evidence of particular loopholes left unclosed. Any serious appraisal of the evidence would have to go beyond the reports. Meanwhile the published evidence is far from compelling, and certainly insufficient to justify overthrow of well-established scientific principles.

  20. Multitarget Approaches to Robust Navigation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The performance, stability, and statistical consistency of a vehicle's navigation algorithm are vitally important to the success and safety of its mission....

  1. Advancements in Optical Navigation Capabilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Goddard Image Analysis and Navigation Tool (GIANT) is a tool that was developed for the Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification,...

  2. Sensitivity of Magnetospheric Multi-Scale (MMS) Mission Navigation Accuracy to Major Error Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Corwin; Long, Anne; Car[emter. Russell

    2011-01-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission consists of four satellites flying in formation in highly elliptical orbits about the Earth, with a primary objective of studying magnetic reconnection. The baseline navigation concept is independent estimation of each spacecraft state using GPS pseudorange measurements referenced to an Ultra Stable Oscillator (USO) with accelerometer measurements included during maneuvers. MMS state estimation is performed onboard each spacecraft using the Goddard Enhanced Onboard Navigation System (GEONS), which is embedded in the Navigator GPS receiver. This paper describes the sensitivity of MMS navigation performance to two major error sources: USO clock errors and thrust acceleration knowledge errors.

  3. Urban, Indoor and Subterranean Navigation Sensors and Systems (Capteurs et systemes de navigation urbains, interieurs et souterrains)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    3-10 Multiple Images of an Image Sequence Figure 3-10 A Digital Magnetic Compass from KVH Industries 3-11 Figure 3-11 Earth’s Magnetic Field 3-11...ARINO SENER – Ingenieria y Sistemas S.A Aerospace Division Parque Tecnologico de Madrid Calle Severo Ocho 4 28760 Tres Cantos Madrid Email...experts from government, academia, industry and the military produced an analysis of future navigation sensors and systems whose performance

  4. Recent advances in navigation of underwater remotely operated vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca Viviana Martínez Carvajal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta una revisión de las publicaciones técnicas más significativas sobre la navegación de vehículos submarinos operados remotamente, con especial interés en la navegación inercial asistida. Se definen los sensores que se utilizan para su implementación, los algoritmos de estimación y los modelos que describen los sistemas de navegación. Con esta revisión, se concluye que la implementación de un estimador basado en los modelos cinemático y dinámico del vehículo ayuda a limitar el crecimiento del error de estimación, incluso cuando sólo está disponible la información proporcionada por una unidad de medición inercial.

  5. Particle Filter Based Fault-tolerant ROV Navigation using Hydro-acoustic Position and Doppler Velocity Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Bo; Blanke, Mogens; Skjetne, Roger

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a fault tolerant navigation system for a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). The navigation system uses hydro-acoustic position reference (HPR) and Doppler velocity log (DVL) measurements to achieve an integrated navigation. The fault tolerant functionality is based on a modied...... particle lter. This particle lter is able to run in an asynchronous manner to accommodate the measurement drop out problem, and it overcomes the measurement outliers by switching observation models. Simulations with experimental data show that this fault tolerant navigation system can accurately estimate...

  6. Absolute Navigation Information Estimation for Micro Planetary Rovers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ilyas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides algorithms to estimate absolute navigation information, e.g., absolute attitude and position, by using low power, weight and volume Microelectromechanical Systems-type (MEMS sensors that are suitable for micro planetary rovers. Planetary rovers appear to be easily navigable robots due to their extreme slow speed and rotation but, unfortunately, the sensor suites available for terrestrial robots are not always available for planetary rover navigation. This makes them difficult to navigate in a completely unexplored, harsh and complex environment. Whereas the relative attitude and position can be tracked in a similar way as for ground robots, absolute navigation information, unlike in terrestrial applications, is difficult to obtain for a remote celestial body, such as Mars or the Moon. In this paper, an algorithm called the EASI algorithm (Estimation of Attitude using Sun sensor and Inclinometer is presented to estimate the absolute attitude using a MEMS-type sun sensor and inclinometer, only. Moreover, the output of the EASI algorithm is fused with MEMS gyros to produce more accurate and reliable attitude estimates. An absolute position estimation algorithm has also been presented based on these on-board sensors. Experimental results demonstrate the viability of the proposed algorithms and the sensor suite for low-cost and low-weight micro planetary rovers.

  7. Learning for Autonomous Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, Anelia; Howard, Andrew; Matthies, Larry; Tang, Benyang; Turmon, Michael; Mjolsness, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Robotic ground vehicles for outdoor applications have achieved some remarkable successes, notably in autonomous highway following (Dickmanns, 1987), planetary exploration (1), and off-road navigation on Earth (1). Nevertheless, major challenges remain to enable reliable, high-speed, autonomous navigation in a wide variety of complex, off-road terrain. 3-D perception of terrain geometry with imaging range sensors is the mainstay of off-road driving systems. However, the stopping distance at high speed exceeds the effective lookahead distance of existing range sensors. Prospects for extending the range of 3-D sensors is strongly limited by sensor physics, eye safety of lasers, and related issues. Range sensor limitations also allow vehicles to enter large cul-de-sacs even at low speed, leading to long detours. Moreover, sensing only terrain geometry fails to reveal mechanical properties of terrain that are critical to assessing its traversability, such as potential for slippage, sinkage, and the degree of compliance of potential obstacles. Rovers in the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission have got stuck in sand dunes and experienced significant downhill slippage in the vicinity of large rock hazards. Earth-based off-road robots today have very limited ability to discriminate traversable vegetation from non-traversable vegetation or rough ground. It is impossible today to preprogram a system with knowledge of these properties for all types of terrain and weather conditions that might be encountered.

  8. Computer Navigation-aided Resection of Sacral Chordomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Kun Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resection of sacral chordomas is challenging. The anatomy is complex, and there are often no bony landmarks to guide the resection. Achieving adequate surgical margins is, therefore, difficult, and the recurrence rate is high. Use of computer navigation may allow optimal preoperative planning and improve precision in tumor resection. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and feasibility of computer navigation-aided resection of sacral chordomas. Methods: Between 2007 and 2013, a total of 26 patients with sacral chordoma underwent computer navigation-aided surgery were included and followed for a minimum of 18 months. There were 21 primary cases and 5 recurrent cases, with a mean age of 55.8 years old (range: 35-84 years old. Tumors were located above the level of the S3 neural foramen in 23 patients and below the level of the S3 neural foramen in 3 patients. Three-dimensional images were reconstructed with a computed tomography-based navigation system combined with the magnetic resonance images using the navigation software. Tumors were resected via a posterior approach assisted by the computer navigation. Mean follow-up was 38.6 months (range: 18-84 months. Results: Mean operative time was 307 min. Mean intraoperative blood loss was 3065 ml. For computer navigation, the mean registration deviation during surgery was 1.7 mm. There were 18 wide resections, 4 marginal resections, and 4 intralesional resections. All patients were alive at the final follow-up, with 2 (7.7% exhibiting tumor recurrence. The other 24 patients were tumor-free. The mean Musculoskeletal Tumor Society Score was 27.3 (range: 19-30. Conclusions: Computer-assisted navigation can be safely applied to the resection of the sacral chordomas, allowing execution of preoperative plans, and achieving good oncological outcomes. Nevertheless, this needs to be accomplished by surgeons with adequate experience and skill.

  9. Performance Improvement of Inertial Navigation System by Using Magnetometer with Vehicle Dynamic Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daehee Won

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A navigation algorithm is proposed to increase the inertial navigation performance of a ground vehicle using magnetic measurements and dynamic constraints. The navigation solutions are estimated based on inertial measurements such as acceleration and angular velocity measurements. To improve the inertial navigation performance, a three-axis magnetometer is used to provide the heading angle, and nonholonomic constraints (NHCs are introduced to increase the correlation between the velocity and the attitude equation. The NHCs provide a velocity feedback to the attitude, which makes the navigation solution more robust. Additionally, an acceleration-based roll and pitch estimation is applied to decrease the drift when the acceleration is within certain boundaries. The magnetometer and NHCs are combined with an extended Kalman filter. An experimental test was conducted to verify the proposed method, and a comprehensive analysis of the performance in terms of the position, velocity, and attitude showed that the navigation performance could be improved by using the magnetometer and NHCs. Moreover, the proposed method could improve the estimation performance for the position, velocity, and attitude without any additional hardware except an inertial sensor and magnetometer. Therefore, this method would be effective for ground vehicles, indoor navigation, mobile robots, vehicle navigation in urban canyons, or navigation in any global navigation satellite system-denied environment.

  10. Dynamic Transportation Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiaofeng; Chen, Jidong

    Miniaturization of computing devices, and advances in wireless communication and sensor technology are some of the forces that are propagating computing from the stationary desktop to the mobile outdoors. Some important classes of new applications that will be enabled by this revolutionary development include intelligent traffic management, location-based services, tourist services, mobile electronic commerce, and digital battlefield. Some existing application classes that will benefit from the development include transportation and air traffic control, weather forecasting, emergency response, mobile resource management, and mobile workforce. Location management, i.e., the management of transient location information, is an enabling technology for all these applications. In this chapter, we present the applications of moving objects management and their functionalities, in particular, the application of dynamic traffic navigation, which is a challenge due to the highly variable traffic state and the requirement of fast, on-line computations.

  11. Comprehension of Navigation Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Vivian I.; Healy, Alice F.

    2000-01-01

    In an experiment simulating communication between air traffic controllers and pilots, subjects were given navigation instructions varying in length telling them to move in a space represented by grids on a computer screen. The subjects followed the instructions by clicking on the grids in the locations specified. Half of the subjects read the instructions, and half heard them. Half of the subjects in each modality condition repeated back the instructions before following them,and half did not. Performance was worse for the visual than for the auditory modality on the longer messages. Repetition of the instructions generally depressed performance, especially with the longer messages, which required more output than did the shorter messages, and especially with the visual modality, in which phonological recoding from the visual input to the spoken output was necessary. These results are explained in terms of the degrading effects of output interference on memory for instructions.

  12. Coupled solar-magnetic orientation during leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea), great white shark (Carcharodon carcharias), arctic tern (Sterna paradisaea), and humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) long-distance migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, T. W.; Holdaway, R. N.; Zerbini, A.; Andriolo, A.; Clapham, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    Determining how animals perform long-distance animal migration remains one of the most enduring and fundamental mysteries of behavioural ecology. It is widely accepted that navigation relative to a reference datum is a fundamental requirement of long-distance return migration between seasonal habitats, and significant experimental research has documented a variety of viable orientation and navigation cues. However, relatively few investigations have attempted to reconcile experimentally determined orientation and navigation capacities of animals with empirical remotely sensed animal track data, leaving most theories of navigation and orientation untested. Here we show, using basic hypothesis testing, that leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea), great white shark (Carcharodon carcharias), arctic tern (Sterna paradisaea), and humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) migration paths are non-randomly distributed in magnetic coordinate space, with local peaks in magnetic coordinate distributions equal to fractional multiples of the angular obliquity of Earth’s axis of rotation. Time series analysis of humpback whale migratory behaviours, including migration initiation, changes in course, and migratory stop-overs, further demonstrate coupling of magnetic and celestial orientation cues during long-distance migration. These unexpected and highly novel results indicate that diverse taxa integrate magnetic and celestial orientation cues during long-distance migration. These results are compatible with a 'map and compass' orientation and navigation system. Humpback whale migration track geometries further indicate a map and compass orientation system is used. Several humpback whale tracks include highly directional segments (Mercator latitude vs. longitude r2>0.99) exceeding 2000 km in length, despite exposure to variable strength (c. 0-1 km/hr) surface cross-currents. Humpback whales appear to be able to compensate for surface current drift. The remarkable directional

  13. Navigation concepts for MR image-guided interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moche, Michael; Trampel, Robert; Kahn, Thomas; Busse, Harald

    2008-02-01

    The ongoing development of powerful magnetic resonance imaging techniques also allows for advanced possibilities to guide and control minimally invasive interventions. Various navigation concepts have been described for practically all regions of the body. The specific advantages and limitations of these concepts largely depend on the magnet design of the MR scanner and the interventional environment. Open MR scanners involve minimal patient transfer, which improves the interventional workflow and reduces the need for coregistration, ie, the mapping of spatial coordinates between imaging and intervention position. Most diagnostic scanners, in contrast, do not allow the physician to guide his instrument inside the magnet and, consequently, the patient needs to be moved out of the bore. Although adequate coregistration and navigation concepts for closed-bore scanners are technically more challenging, many developments are driven by the well-known capabilities of high-field systems and their better economic value. Advanced concepts such as multimodal overlays, augmented reality displays, and robotic assistance devices are still in their infancy but might propel the use of intraoperative navigation. The goal of this work is to give an update on MRI-based navigation and related techniques and to briefly discuss the clinical experience and limitations of some selected systems. (Copyright) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Planetary Magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connerney, J. E. P.

    2007-01-01

    The chapter on Planetary Magnetism by Connerney describes the magnetic fields of the planets, from Mercury to Neptune, including the large satellites (Moon, Ganymede) that have or once had active dynamos. The chapter describes the spacecraft missions and observations that, along with select remote observations, form the basis of our knowledge of planetary magnetic fields. Connerney describes the methods of analysis used to characterize planetary magnetic fields, and the models used to represent the main field (due to dynamo action in the planet's interior) and/or remnant magnetic fields locked in the planet's crust, where appropriate. These observations provide valuable insights into dynamo generation of magnetic fields, the structure and composition of planetary interiors, and the evolution of planets.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic ...

  16. An Overview of GNSS Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-27

    Aplicaciones Cientificas-C (SAC-C) satellites. CHAMP provided 8 years of radio oc- cultation data consisting of around 440,000 measurements from February...applications, various modifi- cations of terrestrial receivers are required, including hardware and software modifications to enhance surviv- ability in a...Dop- pler shifts. On the other hand, special hardware and software is required to support non-navigation remote sensing applications in space, such

  17. Navigation System of Marks Areas - USACE IENC

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — These inland electronic Navigational charts (IENCs) were developed from available data used in maintenance of Navigation channels. Users of these IENCs should be...

  18. Lunar Navigation Architecture Design Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Christopher; Getchius, Joel; Holt, Greg; Moreau, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Constellation Program is aiming to establish a long-term presence on the lunar surface. The Constellation elements (Orion, Altair, Earth Departure Stage, and Ares launch vehicles) will require a lunar navigation architecture for navigation state updates during lunar-class missions. Orion in particular has baselined earth-based ground direct tracking as the primary source for much of its absolute navigation needs. However, due to the uncertainty in the lunar navigation architecture, the Orion program has had to make certain assumptions on the capabilities of such architectures in order to adequately scale the vehicle design trade space. The following paper outlines lunar navigation requirements, the Orion program assumptions, and the impacts of these assumptions to the lunar navigation architecture design. The selection of potential sites was based upon geometric baselines, logistical feasibility, redundancy, and abort support capability. Simulated navigation covariances mapped to entry interface flightpath- angle uncertainties were used to evaluate knowledge errors. A minimum ground station architecture was identified consisting of Goldstone, Madrid, Canberra, Santiago, Hartebeeshoek, Dongora, Hawaii, Guam, and Ascension Island (or the geometric equivalent).

  19. Magnetism a very short introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Blundell, Stephen J

    2012-01-01

    Magnetism: A Very Short Introduction explains the mysteries and importance of magnetism. For centuries magnetism has been used for various exploits: as a great healer, a navigation aid through compasses, and through motors, generators, and turbines it has given us power. Our understanding of electricity and magnetism, from the work of Galvani, Ampère, Faraday, and Tesla is explored, and how Maxwell and Faraday's work led to the unification of electricity and magnetism is explained. With a discussion of the relationship between magnetism and relativity, quantum magnetism, and its impact on computers and information storage, how magnetism has changed our fundamental understanding of the Universe is shown.

  20. Digital waterway construction based on inland electronic navigation chart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue; Pan, Junfeng; Zhu, Weiwei

    2015-12-01

    With advantages of large capacity, long distance, low energy consumption, low cost, less land occupation and light pollution, inland waterway transportation becomes one of the most important constituents of the comprehensive transportation system and comprehensive water resources utilization in China. As one of "three elements" of navigation, waterway is the important basis for the development of water transportation and plays a key supporting role in shipping economic. The paper discuss how to realize the informatization and digitization of waterway management based on constructing an integrated system of standard inland electronic navigation chart production, waterway maintenance, navigation mark remote sensing and control, ship dynamic management, and water level remote sensing and report, which can also be the foundation of the intelligent waterway construction. Digital waterway construction is an information project and also has a practical meaning for waterway. It can not only meet the growing high assurance and security requirements for waterway, but also play a significant advantage in improving transport efficiency, reducing costs, promoting energy conservation and so on. This study lays a solid foundation on realizing intelligent waterway and building a smooth, efficient, safe, green modern inland waterway system, and must be considered as an unavoidable problem for the coordinated development between "low carbon" transportation and social economic.

  1. Monitoring Completed Navigation Projects Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bottin, Jr., Robert R

    2001-01-01

    ... (MCNP) Program. The program was formerly known as the Monitoring Completed Coastal Projects Program, but was modified in the late 1990s to include all navigation projects, inland as well as coastal...

  2. NOAA Electronic Navigational Charts (ENC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Office of Coast Survey (OCS) has been involved in the development of a NOAA Electronic Navigational Chart (NOAA ENC) suite to support the marine transportation...

  3. Use of Earth's magnetic field for mitigating gyroscope errors regardless of magnetic perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Muhammad Haris; Renaudin, Valérie; Lachapelle, Gérard

    2011-01-01

    Most portable systems like smart-phones are equipped with low cost consumer grade sensors, making them useful as Pedestrian Navigation Systems (PNS). Measurements of these sensors are severely contaminated by errors caused due to instrumentation and environmental issues rendering the unaided navigation solution with these sensors of limited use. The overall navigation error budget associated with pedestrian navigation can be categorized into position/displacement errors and attitude/orientation errors. Most of the research is conducted for tackling and reducing the displacement errors, which either utilize Pedestrian Dead Reckoning (PDR) or special constraints like Zero velocity UPdaTes (ZUPT) and Zero Angular Rate Updates (ZARU). This article targets the orientation/attitude errors encountered in pedestrian navigation and develops a novel sensor fusion technique to utilize the Earth's magnetic field, even perturbed, for attitude and rate gyroscope error estimation in pedestrian navigation environments where it is assumed that Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) navigation is denied. As the Earth's magnetic field undergoes severe degradations in pedestrian navigation environments, a novel Quasi-Static magnetic Field (QSF) based attitude and angular rate error estimation technique is developed to effectively use magnetic measurements in highly perturbed environments. The QSF scheme is then used for generating the desired measurements for the proposed Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) based attitude estimator. Results indicate that the QSF measurements are capable of effectively estimating attitude and gyroscope errors, reducing the overall navigation error budget by over 80% in urban canyon environment.

  4. Navigating "Assisted Dying".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, Harvey

    2016-02-01

    Carter is a bellwether decision, an adjudication on a narrow point of law whose implications are vast across society, and whose impact may not be realized for years. Coupled with Quebec's Act Respecting End-of-life Care it has sharply changed the legal landscape with respect to actively ending a person's life. "Medically assisted dying" will be permitted under circumstances, and through processes, which have yet to be operationally defined. This decision carries with it moral assumptions, which mean that it will be difficult to reach a unifying consensus. For some, the decision and Act reflect a modern acknowledgement of individual autonomy. For others, allowing such acts is morally unspeakable. Having opened the Pandora's Box, the question becomes one of navigating a tolerable societal path. I believe it is possible to achieve a workable solution based on the core principle that "medically assisted dying" should be a very rarely employed last option, subject to transparent ongoing review, specifically as to why it was deemed necessary. My analysis is based on 1. The societal conditions in which have fostered demand for "assisted dying", 2. Actions in other jurisdictions, 3. Carter and Quebec Bill 52, 4. Political considerations, 5. Current medical practice. Leading to a series of recommendations regarding. 1. Legislation and regulation, 2. The role of professional regulatory agencies, 3. Medical professions education and practice, 4. Public education, 5. Health care delivery and palliative care. Given the burden of public opinion, and the legal steps already taken, a process for assisted-dying is required. However, those legal and regulatory steps should only be considered a necessary and defensive first step in a two stage process. The larger goal, the second step, is to drive the improvement of care, and thus minimize assisted-dying.

  5. Remote Sensing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    up to - 0.9 p,m) and dynamic range, non-amenability to digital processing ... ing systems used in space to get the imagery of the Earth telemetered .... by the satellites and are recorded on to magnetic media using ... Let us illustrate this process.

  6. Remote field eddy current testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheong, Y. M.; Jung, H. K.; Huh, H.; Lee, Y. S.; Shim, C. M.

    2001-03-01

    The state-of-art technology of the remote field eddy current, which is actively developed as an electromagnetic non-destructive testing tool for ferromagnetic tubes, is described. The historical background and recent R and D activities of remote-field eddy current technology are explained including the theoretical development of remote field eddy current, such as analytical and numerical approach, and the results of finite element analysis. The influencing factors for actual applications, such as the effect of frequency, magnetic permeability, receiving sensitivity, and difficulties of detection and classification of defects are also described. Finally, two examples of actual application, 1) the gap measurement between pressure tubes and calandria tube in CANDU reactor and, 2) the detection of defects in the ferromagnetic heat exchanger tubes, are described. The future research efforts are also included

  7. Compact autonomous navigation system (CANS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Y. C.; Ying, L.; Xiong, K.; Cheng, H. Y.; Qiao, G. D.

    2017-11-01

    Autonomous navigation of Satellite and constellation has series of benefits, such as to reduce operation cost and ground station workload, to avoid the event of crises of war and natural disaster, to increase spacecraft autonomy, and so on. Autonomous navigation satellite is independent of ground station support. Many systems are developed for autonomous navigation of satellite in the past 20 years. Along them American MANS (Microcosm Autonomous Navigation System) [1] of Microcosm Inc. and ERADS [2] [3] (Earth Reference Attitude Determination System) of Honeywell Inc. are well known. The systems anticipate a series of good features of autonomous navigation and aim low cost, integrated structure, low power consumption and compact layout. The ERADS is an integrated small 3-axis attitude sensor system with low cost and small volume. It has the Earth center measurement accuracy higher than the common IR sensor because the detected ultraviolet radiation zone of the atmosphere has a brightness gradient larger than that of the IR zone. But the ERADS is still a complex system because it has to eliminate many problems such as making of the sapphire sphere lens, birefringence effect of sapphire, high precision image transfer optical fiber flattener, ultraviolet intensifier noise, and so on. The marginal sphere FOV of the sphere lens of the ERADS is used to star imaging that may be bring some disadvantages., i.e. , the image energy and attitude measurements accuracy may be reduced due to the tilt image acceptance end of the fiber flattener in the FOV. Besides Japan, Germany and Russia developed visible earth sensor for GEO [4] [5]. Do we have a way to develop a cheaper/easier and more accurate autonomous navigation system that can be used to all LEO spacecraft, especially, to LEO small and micro satellites? To return this problem we provide a new type of the system—CANS (Compact Autonomous Navigation System) [6].

  8. Possible disruption of remote viewing by complex weak magnetic fields around the stimulus site and the possibility of accessing real phase space: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, S A; Persinger, M A

    2002-12-01

    In 2002 Persinger, Roll, Tiller, Koren, and Cook considered whether there are physical processes by which recondite information exists within the space and time of objects or events. The stimuli that compose this information might be directly detected within the whole brain without being processed by the typical sensory modalities. We tested the artist Ingo Swann who can reliably draw and describe randomly selected photographs sealed in envelopes in another room. In the present experiment the photographs were immersed continuously in repeated presentations (5 times per sec.) of one of two types of computer-generated complex magnetic field patterns whose intensities were less than 20 nT over most of the area. WINDOWS-generated but not DOS-generated patterns were associated with a marked decrease in Mr. Swann's accuracy. Whereas the DOS software generated exactly the same pattern, WINDOWS software phase-modulated the actual wave form resulting in an infinite bandwidth and complexity. We suggest that information obtained by processes attributed to "paranormal" phenomena have physical correlates that can be masked by weak, infinitely variable magnetic fields.

  9. 33 CFR 401.54 - Interference with navigation aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interference with navigation aids. 401.54 Section 401.54 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION... with navigation aids. (a) Aids to navigation shall not be interfered with or used as moorings. (b) No...

  10. Optimal motion planning using navigation measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Umesh

    2018-05-01

    We introduce navigation measure as a new tool to solve the motion planning problem in the presence of static obstacles. Existence of navigation measure guarantees collision-free convergence at the final destination set beginning with almost every initial condition with respect to the Lebesgue measure. Navigation measure can be viewed as a dual to the navigation function. While the navigation function has its minimum at the final destination set and peaks at the obstacle set, navigation measure takes the maximum value at the destination set and is zero at the obstacle set. A linear programming formalism is proposed for the construction of navigation measure. Set-oriented numerical methods are utilised to obtain finite dimensional approximation of this navigation measure. Application of the proposed navigation measure-based theoretical and computational framework is demonstrated for a motion planning problem in a complex fluid flow.

  11. GPS Navigation and Tracking Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Salameh Khraisat

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Since the introduction of GPS Navigation systems in the marketplace, consumers and businesses have been coming up with innovative ways to use the technology in their everyday life. GPS Navigation and Tracking systems keep us from getting lost when we are in strange locations, they monitor children when they are away from home, keep track of business vehicles and can even let us know where a philandering partner is at all times. Because of this we attend to build a GPS tracking device to solve the mentioned problems. Our work consists of the GPS module that collects data from satellites and calculates the position information before transmitting them to the user’s PC (of Navigation system or observers (of Tracking System using wireless technology (GSM.

  12. Comparison between electric-field-navigated and line-navigated TMS for cortical motor mapping in patients with brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollmann, Nico; Goblirsch-Kolb, Moritz F; Ille, Sebastian; Butenschoen, Vicki M; Boeckh-Behrens, Tobias; Meyer, Bernhard; Ringel, Florian; Krieg, Sandro M

    2016-12-01

    For the navigation of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), various techniques are available. Yet, there are two basic principles underlying them all: electric-field-navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (En-TMS) and line-navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (Ln-TMS). The current study was designed to compare both methods. To explore whether there is a difference in clinical applicability, workflow, and mapping results of both techniques, we systematically compared motor mapping via En-TMS and Ln-TMS in 12 patients suffering from brain tumors. The number of motor-positive stimulation spots and the ratio of positive spots per overall stimulation numbers were significantly higher for En-TMS (motor-positive spots: En-TMS vs. Ln-TMS: 128.3 ± 35.0 vs. 41.3 ± 26.8, p mapping in the neurosurgical context for the first time. Although both TMS systems tested in the present study are explicitly designed for application during motor mapping in patients with brain lesions, there are differences in applicability, workflow, and results between En-TMS and Ln-TMS, which should be distinctly considered during clinical use of the technique. However, to draw final conclusions about accuracy, confirmation of motor-positive Ln-TMS spots by intraoperative stimulation is crucial within the scope of upcoming investigations.

  13. 33 CFR 66.05-100 - Designation of navigable waters as State waters for private aids to navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... as State waters for private aids to navigation. 66.05-100 Section 66.05-100 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION PRIVATE AIDS TO NAVIGATION State Aids to Navigation § 66.05-100 Designation of navigable waters as State waters for private aids to...

  14. Remote possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, J.

    1995-01-01

    The impact that wireless communications has had for gas and oil producers was discussed. Wireless communication, which has been replacing the traditional formats of radio and telephone data networks, has proved to be cheaper, smaller, and faster than creating privately owned communication networks. With highly developed supervisory control and data acquisition systems - combined with cellular or satellite technology - information from drill sites can be online at the corporate headquarters instantaneously. Eighty percent of Canada's land mass is beyond reach of traditional wireline and wireless services. Research into advanced communications, including telecommunication and mobile applications, yielded lucrative results for service providers such as BCTel, SaskTel, Bell Mobility and AGT. The latest data transmission technology is the cellular digital packet data (CDPD) which will operate over existing cellular networks. However, unlike circuit-switched cellular, CDPD technology provides an airlink where data is secure. It will be available to the marketplace over the course of the coming year. Among other advantages, CDPD will allow producers to remotely monitor production information and downtime alarms from wells and compressor stations. It will also provide fleet operators with the means to monitor operating vital signs on rolling stock

  15. Surface navigation on Mars with a Navigation Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, A.; Thurman, Sam W.; Kahn, Robert D.; Hastrup, Rolf C.

    Radiometric navigation data from the Deep Space Network (DSN) stations on the earth to transponders and other surface elements such as rovers and landers on Mars, can determine their positions to only within a kilometer in inertial space. The positional error is mostly in the z-component of the surface element parallel to the Martian spin-axis. However, with Doppler and differenced-Doppler data from a Navigation Satellite in orbit around Mars to two or more of such transponders on the planetary surface, their positions can be determined to within 15 meters (or 20 meters for one-way Doppler beacons on Mars) in inertial space. In this case, the transponders (or other vehicles) on Mars need not even be capable of directly communicating to the earth. When the Navigation Satellite data is complemented by radiometric observations from the DSN stations also, directly to the surface elements on Mars, their positions can be determined to within 3 meters in inertial space. The relative positions of such surface elements on Mars (relative to one another) in Mars-fixed coordinates, however, can be determined to within 5 meters from simply range and Doppler data from the DSN stations to the surface elements. These results are obtained from covariance studies assuming X-band data noise levels and data-arcs not exceeding 10 days. They are significant in the planning and deployment of a Mars-based navigation network necessary to support real-time operations during critical phases of manned exploration of Mars.

  16. The role of geomagnetic cues in green turtle open sea navigation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Benhamou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Laboratory and field experiments have provided evidence that sea turtles use geomagnetic cues to navigate in the open sea. For instance, green turtles (Chelonia mydas displaced 100 km away from their nesting site were impaired in returning home when carrying a strong magnet glued on the head. However, the actual role of geomagnetic cues remains unclear, since magnetically treated green turtles can perform large scale (>2000 km post-nesting migrations no differently from controls. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present homing experiment, 24 green turtles were displaced 200 km away from their nesting site on an oceanic island, and tracked, for the first time in this type of experiment, with Global Positioning System (GPS, which is able to provide much more frequent and accurate locations than previously used tracking methods. Eight turtles were magnetically treated for 24-48 h on the nesting beach prior to displacement, and another eight turtles had a magnet glued on the head at the release site. The last eight turtles were used as controls. Detailed analyses of water masses-related (i.e., current-corrected homing paths showed that magnetically treated turtles were able to navigate toward their nesting site as efficiently as controls, but those carrying magnets were significantly impaired once they arrived within 50 km of home. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: While green turtles do not seem to need geomagnetic cues to navigate far from the goal, these cues become necessary when turtles get closer to home. As the very last part of the homing trip (within a few kilometers of home likely depends on non-magnetic cues, our results suggest that magnetic cues play a key role in sea turtle navigation at an intermediate scale by bridging the gap between large and small scale navigational processes, which both appear to depend on non-magnetic cues.

  17. New Navigation Post-Processing Tools for Oceanographic Submersibles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsey, J. C.; Whitcomb, L. L.; Yoerger, D. R.; Howland, J. C.; Ferrini, V. L.; Hegrenas, O.

    2006-12-01

    We report the development of Navproc, a new set of software tools for post-processing oceanographic submersible navigation data that exploits previously reported improvements in navigation sensing and estimation (e.g. Eos Trans. AGU, 84(46), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract OS32A- 0225, 2003). The development of these tools is motivated by the need to have post-processing software that allows users to compensate for errors in vehicle navigation, recompute the vehicle position, and then save the results for use with quantitative science data (e.g. bathymetric sonar data) obtained during the mission. Navproc does not provide real-time navigation or display of data nor is it capable of high-resolution, three dimensional (3D) data display. Navproc supports the ASCII data formats employed by the vehicles of the National Deep Submergence Facility (NDSF) operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI). Post-processing of navigation data with Navproc is comprised of three tasks. First, data is converted from the logged ASCII file to a binary Matlab file. When loaded into Matlab, each sensor has a data structure containing the time stamped data sampled at the native update rate of the sensor. An additional structure contains the real-time vehicle navigation data. Second, the data can be displayed using a Graphical User Interface (GUI), allowing users to visually inspect the quality of the data and graphically extract portions of the data. Third, users can compensate for errors in the real-time vehicle navigation. Corrections include: (i) manual filtering and median filtering of long baseline (LBL) ranges; (ii) estimation of the Doppler/gyro alignment using previously reported methodologies; and (iii) sound velocity, tide, and LBL transponder corrections. Using these corrections, the Doppler and LBL positions can be recomputed to provide improved estimates of the vehicle position compared to those computed in real-time. The data can be saved in either binary or ASCII

  18. Navigation in Cross-cultural business relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul Houman

    2001-01-01

    Cross-cultural business navigation concerns the process of handling the complexity of several interacting cultural spheres of influence......Cross-cultural business navigation concerns the process of handling the complexity of several interacting cultural spheres of influence...

  19. An Integrated Approach to Electronic Navigation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shaw, Peter; Pettus, Bill

    2001-01-01

    While the Global Positioning System (GPS) is and will continue to be an excellent navigation system, it is neither flawless nor is it the only system employed in the navigation of today's seagoing warfighters...

  20. Global Positioning System Navigation Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-05-01

    Historical Remarks on Navigation In Greek mythology , Odysseus sailed safely by the Sirens only to encounter the monsters Scylla and Charybdis...TNED 000 00 1(.7 BIBLIOGRAPHY 1. Pinsent, John. Greek Mythology . Paul Hamlyn, London, 1969. 2. Kline, Morris. Mathematical Thought from Ancient to

  1. Conceptual Grounds of Navigation Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Torskiy

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The most important global problem being solved by the whole world community nowadays is to provide sustainable mankind development. Recent research in the field of sustainable development states that civilization safety is impossible without transfer sustainable development. At the same time, sustainable development (i.e. preservation of human culture and biosphere is impossible as a system that serves to meet economical, cultural, scientific, recreational and other human needs without safety. Safety plays an important role in sustainable development goals achievement. An essential condition of effective navigation functioning is to provide its safety. The “prescriptive” approach to the navigation safety, which is currently used in the world maritime field, is based on long-term experience and ship accidents investigation results. Thus this approach acted as an the great fact in reduction of number of accidents at sea. Having adopted the International Safety Management Code all the activities connected with navigation safety problems solution were transferred to the higher qualitative level. Search and development of new approaches and methods of ship accidents prevention during their operation have obtained greater importance. However, the maritime safety concept (i.e. the different points on ways, means and methods that should be used to achieve this goal hasn't been formed and described yet. The article contains a brief review of the main provisions of Navigation Safety Conceptions, which contribute to the number of accidents and incidents at sea reduction.

  2. Surgical navigation with QR codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katanacho Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The presented work is an alternative to established measurement systems in surgical navigation. The system is based on camera based tracking of QR code markers. The application uses a single video camera, integrated in a surgical lamp, that captures the QR markers attached to surgical instruments and to the patient.

  3. Navigation system for interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strassmann, G.; Kolotas, C.; Heyd, R.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the stud was to develop a computed tomography (CT) based electromagnetic navigation system for interstitial brachytherapy. This is especially designed for situations when needles have to be positioned adjacent to or within critical anatomical structures. In such instances interactive 3D visualisation of the needle positions is essential. The material consisted of a Polhemus electromagnetic 3D digitizer, a Pentium 200 MHz laptop and a voice recognition for continuous speech. In addition, we developed an external reference system constructed of Perspex which could be positioned above the tumour region and attached to the patient using a non-invasive fixation method. A specially designed needle holder and patient bed were also developed. Measurements were made on a series of phantoms in order to study the efficacy and accuracy of the navigation system. The mean navigation accuracy of positioning the 20.0 cm length metallic needles within the phantoms was in the range 2.0-4.1 mm with a maximum of 5.4 mm. This is an improvement on the accuracy of a CT-guided technique which was in the range 6.1-11.3 mm with a maximum of 19.4 mm. The mean reconstruction accuracy of the implant geometry was 3.2 mm within a non-ferromagnetic environment. We found that although the needles were metallic this did not have a significant influence. We also found for our experimental setups that the CT table and operation table non-ferromagnetic parts had no significant influence on the navigation accuracy. This navigation system will be a very useful clinical tool for interstitial brachytherapy applications, particularly when critical structures have to be avoided. It also should provide a significant improvement on our existing technique

  4. Navigational challenges in the oceanic migrations of leatherback sea turtles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sale, Alessandro; Luschi, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    The open-sea movements of marine animals are affected by the drifting action of currents that, if not compensated for, can produce non-negligible deviations from the correct route towards a given target. Marine turtles are paradigmatic skilful oceanic navigators that are able to reach remote goals at the end of long-distance migrations, apparently overcoming current drift effects. Particularly relevant is the case of leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea), which spend entire years in the ocean, wandering in search of planktonic prey. Recent analyses have revealed how the movements of satellite-tracked leatherbacks in the Indian, Atlantic and Pacific Oceans are strongly dependent on the oceanic currents, up to the point that turtles are often passively transported over long distances. However, leatherbacks are known to return to specific areas to breed every 2–3 years, thus finding their way back home after long periods in the oceanic environment. Here we examine the navigational consequences of the leatherbacks' close association with currents and discuss how the combined reliance on mechanisms of map-based navigation and local orientation cues close to the target may allow leatherbacks to accomplish the difficult task of returning to specific sites after years spent wandering in a moving medium. PMID:19625321

  5. Tele-auscultation support system with mixed reality navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Kenta; Uchida, Yusuke; Kan, Tsukasa; Minami, Maya; Naito, Chisako; Kuroda, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Hideya; Ando, Masahiko; Kawamura, Takashi; Kume, Naoto; Okamoto, Kazuya; Takemura, Tadamasa; Yoshihara, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research is to develop an information support system for tele-auscultation. In auscultation, a doctor requires to understand condition of applying a stethoscope, in addition to auscultatory sounds. The proposed system includes intuitive navigation system of stethoscope operation, in addition to conventional audio streaming system of auscultatory sounds and conventional video conferencing system for telecommunication. Mixed reality technology is applied for intuitive navigation of the stethoscope. Information, such as position, contact condition and breath, is overlaid on a view of the patient's chest. The contact condition of the stethoscope is measured by e-textile contact sensors. The breath is measured by a band type breath sensor. In a simulated tele-auscultation experiment, the stethoscope with the contact sensors and the breath sensor were evaluated. The results show that the presentation of the contact condition was not understandable enough for navigating the stethoscope handling. The time series of the breath phases was usable for the remote doctor to understand the breath condition of the patient.

  6. 77 FR 42637 - Navigation and Navigable Waters; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments; Corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Parts 84 and 115 [Docket No. USCG-2012-0306] RIN 1625-AB86 Navigation and Navigable Waters; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments...), the Coast Guard published a final rule entitled ``Navigation and Navigable Waters; Technical...

  7. 32 CFR 644.3 - Navigation Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Navigation Projects. 644.3 Section 644.3 National... HANDBOOK Project Planning Civil Works § 644.3 Navigation Projects. (a) Land to be acquired in fee. All... construction and borrow areas. (3) In navigation-only projects, the right to permanently flood should be...

  8. Ultra-Wideband Sensors for Improved Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Cardiovascular Monitoring and Tumour Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Seifert

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The specific advantages of ultra-wideband electromagnetic remote sensing (UWB radar make it a particularly attractive technique for biomedical applications. We partially review our activities in utilizing this novel approach for the benefit of high and ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and other applications, e.g., for intensive care medicine and biomedical research. We could show that our approach is beneficial for applications like motion tracking for high resolution brain imaging due to the non-contact acquisition of involuntary head motions with high spatial resolution, navigation for cardiac MRI due to our interpretation of the detected physiological mechanical contraction of the heart muscle and for MR safety, since we have investigated the influence of high static magnetic fields on myocardial mechanics. From our findings we could conclude, that UWB radar can serve as a navigator technique for high and ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging and can be beneficial preserving the high resolution capability of this imaging modality. Furthermore it can potentially be used to support standard ECG analysis by complementary information where sole ECG analysis fails. Further analytical investigations have proven the feasibility of this method for intracranial displacements detection and the rendition of a tumour’s contrast agent based perfusion dynamic. Beside these analytical approaches we have carried out FDTD simulations of a complex arrangement mimicking the illumination of a human torso model incorporating the geometry of the antennas applied.

  9. Ultra-wideband sensors for improved magnetic resonance imaging, cardiovascular monitoring and tumour diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Florian; Kosch, Olaf; Seifert, Frank

    2010-01-01

    The specific advantages of ultra-wideband electromagnetic remote sensing (UWB radar) make it a particularly attractive technique for biomedical applications. We partially review our activities in utilizing this novel approach for the benefit of high and ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and other applications, e.g., for intensive care medicine and biomedical research. We could show that our approach is beneficial for applications like motion tracking for high resolution brain imaging due to the non-contact acquisition of involuntary head motions with high spatial resolution, navigation for cardiac MRI due to our interpretation of the detected physiological mechanical contraction of the heart muscle and for MR safety, since we have investigated the influence of high static magnetic fields on myocardial mechanics. From our findings we could conclude, that UWB radar can serve as a navigator technique for high and ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging and can be beneficial preserving the high resolution capability of this imaging modality. Furthermore it can potentially be used to support standard ECG analysis by complementary information where sole ECG analysis fails. Further analytical investigations have proven the feasibility of this method for intracranial displacements detection and the rendition of a tumour's contrast agent based perfusion dynamic. Beside these analytical approaches we have carried out FDTD simulations of a complex arrangement mimicking the illumination of a human torso model incorporating the geometry of the antennas applied.

  10. Dissociable cerebellar activity during spatial navigation and visual memory in bilateral vestibular failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandl, N M; Sprenger, A; Wojak, J F; Göttlich, M; Münte, T F; Krämer, U M; Helmchen, C

    2015-10-01

    Spatial orientation and navigation depends on information from the vestibular system. Previous work suggested impaired spatial navigation in patients with bilateral vestibular failure (BVF). The aim of this study was to investigate event-related brain activity by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during spatial navigation and visual memory tasks in BVF patients. Twenty-three BVF patients and healthy age- and gender matched control subjects performed learning sessions of spatial navigation by watching short films taking them through various streets from a driver's perspective along a route to the Cathedral of Cologne using virtual reality videos (adopted and modified from Google Earth). In the scanner, participants were asked to respond to questions testing for visual memory or spatial navigation while they viewed short video clips. From a similar but not identical perspective depicted video frames of routes were displayed which they had previously seen or which were completely novel to them. Compared with controls, posterior cerebellar activity in BVF patients was higher during spatial navigation than during visual memory tasks, in the absence of performance differences. This cerebellar activity correlated with disease duration. Cerebellar activity during spatial navigation in BVF patients may reflect increased non-vestibular efforts to counteract the development of spatial navigation deficits in BVF. Conceivably, cerebellar activity indicates a change in navigational strategy of BVF patients, i.e. from a more allocentric, landmark or place-based strategy (hippocampus) to a more sequence-based strategy. This interpretation would be in accord with recent evidence for a cerebellar role in sequence-based navigation. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Theoretical Limits of Lunar Vision Aided Navigation with Inertial Navigation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    THEORETICAL LIMITS OF LUNAR VISION AIDED NAVIGATION WITH INERTIAL NAVIGATION SYSTEM THESIS David W. Jones, Capt, USAF AFIT-ENG-MS-15-M-020 DEPARTMENT...Government and is not subject to copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENG-MS-15-M-020 THEORETICAL LIMITS OF LUNAR VISION AIDED NAVIGATION WITH...DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED. AFIT-ENG-MS-15-M-020 THEORETICAL LIMITS OF LUNAR VISION AIDED NAVIGATION WITH INERTIAL NAVIGATION SYSTEM THESIS David W. Jones

  12. Development of field navigation system; Field navigation system no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibara, S; Minode, M; Nishioka, K [Daihatsu Motor Co. Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

    1995-04-20

    This paper describes the following matters on a field navigation system developed for the purpose of covering a field of several kilometer square. This system consists of a center system and a vehicle system, and the center system comprises a map information computer and a communication data controlling computer; since the accuracy for a vehicle position detected by a GPS is not sufficient, an attempt of increasing the accuracy of vehicle position detection is made by means of a hybrid system; the hybrid system uses a satellite navigation method of differential system in which the error components in the GPS are transmitted from the center, and also uses a self-contained navigation method which performs an auxiliary function when the accuracy in the GPS has dropped; corrected GPS values, emergency messages to all of the vehicles and data of each vehicle position are communicated by wireless transmission in two ways between the center and vehicles; and accommodation of the map data adopted a system that can respond quickly to any change in roads and facilities. 3 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Autonomous Robot Navigation based on Visual Landmarks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livatino, Salvatore

    2005-01-01

    The use of landmarks for robot navigation is a popular alternative to having a geometrical model of the environment through which to navigate and monitor self-localization. If the landmarks are defined as special visual structures already in the environment then we have the possibility of fully a...... automatically learn and store visual landmarks, and later recognize these landmarks from arbitrary positions and thus estimate robot position and heading.......The use of landmarks for robot navigation is a popular alternative to having a geometrical model of the environment through which to navigate and monitor self-localization. If the landmarks are defined as special visual structures already in the environment then we have the possibility of fully...... autonomous navigation and self-localization using automatically selected landmarks. The thesis investigates autonomous robot navigation and proposes a new method which benefits from the potential of the visual sensor to provide accuracy and reliability to the navigation process while relying on naturally...

  14. Observability during planetary approach navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Robert H.; Burkhart, P. Daniel; Thurman, Sam W.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the research is to develop an analytic technique to predict the relative navigation capability of different Earth-based radio navigation measurements. In particular, the problem is to determine the relative ability of geocentric range and Doppler measurements to detect the effects of the target planet gravitational attraction on the spacecraft during the planetary approach and near-encounter mission phases. A complete solution to the two-dimensional problem has been developed. Relatively simple analytic formulas are obtained for range and Doppler measurements which describe the observability content of the measurement data along the approach trajectories. An observability measure is defined which is based on the observability matrix for nonlinear systems. The results show good agreement between the analytic observability analysis and the computational batch processing method.

  15. Navigating the Internet of Things

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rassia, Stamatina; Steiner, Henriette

    2017-01-01

    Navigating the Internet of Things is an exploration of interconnected objects, functions, and situations in networks created to ease and manage our daily lives. The Internet of Things represents semi-automated interconnections of different objects in a network based on different information...... technologies. Some examples of this are presented here in order to better understand, explain, and discuss the elements that compose the Internet of Things. In this chapter, we provide a theoretical and practical perspective on both the micro- and macro-scales of ‘things’ (objects), small and large (e.......g. computers or interactive maps), that suggest new topographic relationships and challenge our understanding of users’ involvement with a given technology against the semi-automated workings of these systems. We navigate from a philosophical enquiry into the ‘thingness of things’ dating from the 1950s...

  16. Remote Control of TJ-II Diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Sanchez, A.; Vega, J.; Montoro, A.; Encabo, J.

    2001-01-01

    The present paper is about the design and development of ten remote control diagnostic systems used in the study of plasma fusion in the TJ-II device installed at CIEMAT. This development goes from the definition of sensors and devices necessary in carrying out these remote controls, to its assembly, wiring, development of electronic circuits inserted between sensors and PLC, development of programs for these PLC, connections and administration of the real time automation network, and later development of the necessary programs via the appropriate software tools for web access through a navigator to a specific web page, allowing visual and real time access over the auxiliary systems that make up all the diagnostics. (Author)

  17. A clinical study of navigation accuracy during surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirabayashi, Hidehiro; Uchiyama, Yoshitomo; Hoshida, Toru; Nakase, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Tetsuya; Sakaki, Toshisuke

    2000-01-01

    It is essential to implement image-guided surgery or neuronavigation technologies that can be applied during functional surgery to localize targets accurately in the surgical field. Various navigation systems have been developed, such as the optical system and mechanical-arm-based system, to localize targets in the operative field. However, either the reference system, in optical systems, or the arm joint, in mechanical-arm-based systems, can sometimes interfere with surgical maneuvers. Therefore, we used the magnetic-force-based Computed Assisted Neurosurgery system (CANS system, Shimadzu, Co. Ltd., Kyoto, Japan) for neuronavigation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the CANS navigation system. Ten patients with medically refractory epilepsy underwent implantation of subdural electrode grids to detect the epilepsy focus, and then lobectomy or multiple subpial transection was performed after informed consent was obtained. The male/female ratio was 6:4 and the mean age was 30.7 years. The CANS navigator system consists mainly of a magnetic source, a localizer probe with magnetic sensor, a three-dimensional locating measuring instrument (digitizer), an image scanner, and a personal computer. To determine the localization accuracy, the probe was moved on the subdural electrode grid which typically consists of 64 or 16 platinum-iridium electrode contacts (3 mm in the diameter) embedded in a Silastic sheet. The array of electrodes was 8 x 8 cm or 2 x 8 cm and the center-to-center inter-electrode distance was 10 mm. We evaluated the inter-electrode distances and spatial relationships among the electrodes to quantitate the precision of the probe tip localization and assumed the nasion origin reference system to assess the distribution of target coordinates. The measurement errors of each component derived from different planes for the same targets were evaluated in ten patients. The error in X-dimension ranged from 0.38 mm to 7.8 mm, the error in Y

  18. Remote Network Access (RNA)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2002-01-01

    .... Remote Network Access (RNA) includes or is associated with all communication devices/software, firewalls, intrusion detection systems and virus protection applications to ensure security of the OIG, DoD, Network from remote...

  19. Introduction to remote sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Cracknell, Arthur P

    2007-01-01

    Addressing the need for updated information in remote sensing, Introduction to Remote Sensing, Second Edition provides a full and authoritative introduction for scientists who need to know the scope, potential, and limitations in the field. The authors discuss the physical principles of common remote sensing systems and examine the processing, interpretation, and applications of data. This new edition features updated and expanded material, including greater coverage of applications from across earth, environmental, atmospheric, and oceanographic sciences. Illustrated with remotely sensed colo

  20. Remote detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nixon, K.V.; France, S.W.; Garcia, C.; Hastings, R.D.

    1981-05-01

    A newly designed remote detection system has been developed at Los Alamos that allows the collection of high-resolution gamma-ray spectra and neutron data from a remote location. The system consists of the remote unit and a command unit. The remote unit collects data in a potentially hostile environment while the operator controls the unit by either radio or wire link from a safe position. Both units are battery powered and are housed in metal carrying cases

  1. Beginnings of remote handling at the RAL Spallation Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liska, D.J.; Hirst, J.

    1985-01-01

    Expenditure of funds and resources for remote maintenance systems traditionally are delayed until late in an accelerator's development. However, simple remote-surveillance equipment can be included early in facility planning to set the stage for future remote-handling needs and to identify appropriate personnel. Some basic equipment developed in the UK at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) that serves this function and that has been used to monitor beam loss during commissioning is described. A photograph of this equipment, positioned over the extractor septum magnet, is shown. This method can serve as a pattern approach to the problem of initiating remote-handling activities in other facilities

  2. Remote operations in a Fusion Engineering Research Facility (FERF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doggett, J.N.

    1975-01-01

    The proposed Fusion Engineering Research Facility (FERF) has been designed for the test and evaluation of materials that will be exposed to the hostile radiation environment created by fusion reactors. Because the FERF itself must create a very hostile radiation environment, extensive remote handling procedures will be required as part of its routine operations as well as for both scheduled and unscheduled maintenance. This report analyzes the remote-handling implications of a vertical- rather than horizontal-orientation of the FERF magnet, describes the specific remote-handling facilities of the proposed FERF installation and compares the FERF remote-handling system with several other existing and proposed facilities. (U.S.)

  3. Miniature Inertial and Augmentation Sensors for Integrated Inertial/GPS Based Navigation Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Magnetometer (Ref [23]) Until miniature atomic magnetometers transition from laboratory demonstration units to a mass produced product, fluxgate ...and/or magnetoresistive designs are a better suited magnetometer technology for a miniature navigation system. Figure 8 below shows the basic fluxgate ...is required to resolve magnetic field orientation. Fig 8. Fluxgate Magnetometer Schematic The PNI Sensor Corporation (Santa Rosa, CA

  4. Emergency navigation without an infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelenbe, Erol; Bi, Huibo

    2014-08-18

    Emergency navigation systems for buildings and other built environments, such as sport arenas or shopping centres, typically rely on simple sensor networks to detect emergencies and, then, provide automatic signs to direct the evacuees. The major drawbacks of such static wireless sensor network (WSN)-based emergency navigation systems are the very limited computing capacity, which makes adaptivity very difficult, and the restricted battery power, due to the low cost of sensor nodes for unattended operation. If static wireless sensor networks and cloud-computing can be integrated, then intensive computations that are needed to determine optimal evacuation routes in the presence of time-varying hazards can be offloaded to the cloud, but the disadvantages of limited battery life-time at the client side, as well as the high likelihood of system malfunction during an emergency still remain. By making use of the powerful sensing ability of smart phones, which are increasingly ubiquitous, this paper presents a cloud-enabled indoor emergency navigation framework to direct evacuees in a coordinated fashion and to improve the reliability and resilience for both communication and localization. By combining social potential fields (SPF) and a cognitive packet network (CPN)-based algorithm, evacuees are guided to exits in dynamic loose clusters. Rather than relying on a conventional telecommunications infrastructure, we suggest an ad hoc cognitive packet network (AHCPN)-based protocol to adaptively search optimal communication routes between portable devices and the network egress nodes that provide access to cloud servers, in a manner that spares the remaining battery power of smart phones and minimizes the time latency. Experimental results through detailed simulations indicate that smart human motion and smart network management can increase the survival rate of evacuees and reduce the number of drained smart phones in an evacuation process.

  5. Emergency Navigation without an Infrastructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erol Gelenbe

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Emergency navigation systems for buildings and other built environments, such as sport arenas or shopping centres, typically rely on simple sensor networks to detect emergencies and, then, provide automatic signs to direct the evacuees. The major drawbacks of such static wireless sensor network (WSN-based emergency navigation systems are the very limited computing capacity, which makes adaptivity very difficult, and the restricted battery power, due to the low cost of sensor nodes for unattended operation. If static wireless sensor networks and cloud-computing can be integrated, then intensive computations that are needed to determine optimal evacuation routes in the presence of time-varying hazards can be offloaded to the cloud, but the disadvantages of limited battery life-time at the client side, as well as the high likelihood of system malfunction during an emergency still remain. By making use of the powerful sensing ability of smart phones, which are increasingly ubiquitous, this paper presents a cloud-enabled indoor emergency navigation framework to direct evacuees in a coordinated fashion and to improve the reliability and resilience for both communication and localization. By combining social potential fields (SPF and a cognitive packet network (CPN-based algorithm, evacuees are guided to exits in dynamic loose clusters. Rather than relying on a conventional telecommunications infrastructure, we suggest an ad hoc cognitive packet network (AHCPN-based protocol to adaptively search optimal communication routes between portable devices and the network egress nodes that provide access to cloud servers, in a manner that spares the remaining battery power of smart phones and minimizes the time latency. Experimental results through detailed simulations indicate that smart human motion and smart network management can increase the survival rate of evacuees and reduce the number of drained smart phones in an evacuation process.

  6. Indoor integrated navigation and synchronous data acquisition method for Android smartphone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chunsheng; Wei, Wenjian; Qin, Shiqiao; Wang, Xingshu; Habib, Ayman; Wang, Ruisheng

    2015-08-01

    Smartphones are widely used at present. Most smartphones have cameras and kinds of sensors, such as gyroscope, accelerometer and magnet meter. Indoor navigation based on smartphone is very important and valuable. According to the features of the smartphone and indoor navigation, a new indoor integrated navigation method is proposed, which uses MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) IMU (Inertial Measurement Unit), camera and magnet meter of smartphone. The proposed navigation method mainly involves data acquisition, camera calibration, image measurement, IMU calibration, initial alignment, strapdown integral, zero velocity update and integrated navigation. Synchronous data acquisition of the sensors (gyroscope, accelerometer and magnet meter) and the camera is the base of the indoor navigation on the smartphone. A camera data acquisition method is introduced, which uses the camera class of Android to record images and time of smartphone camera. Two kinds of sensor data acquisition methods are introduced and compared. The first method records sensor data and time with the SensorManager of Android. The second method realizes open, close, data receiving and saving functions in C language, and calls the sensor functions in Java language with JNI interface. A data acquisition software is developed with JDK (Java Development Kit), Android ADT (Android Development Tools) and NDK (Native Development Kit). The software can record camera data, sensor data and time at the same time. Data acquisition experiments have been done with the developed software and Sumsang Note 2 smartphone. The experimental results show that the first method of sensor data acquisition is convenient but lost the sensor data sometimes, the second method is much better in real-time performance and much less in data losing. A checkerboard image is recorded, and the corner points of the checkerboard are detected with the Harris method. The sensor data of gyroscope, accelerometer and magnet meter have

  7. Integrated Navigation System Design for Micro Planetary Rovers: Comparison of Absolute Heading Estimation Algorithms and Nonlinear Filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyas, Muhammad; Hong, Beomjin; Cho, Kuk; Baeg, Seung-Ho; Park, Sangdeok

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides algorithms to fuse relative and absolute microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) navigation sensors, suitable for micro planetary rovers, to provide a more accurate estimation of navigation information, specifically, attitude and position. Planetary rovers have extremely slow speed (~1 cm/s) and lack conventional navigation sensors/systems, hence the general methods of terrestrial navigation may not be applicable to these applications. While relative attitude and position can be tracked in a way similar to those for ground robots, absolute navigation information is hard to achieve on a remote celestial body, like Moon or Mars, in contrast to terrestrial applications. In this study, two absolute attitude estimation algorithms were developed and compared for accuracy and robustness. The estimated absolute attitude was fused with the relative attitude sensors in a framework of nonlinear filters. The nonlinear Extended Kalman filter (EKF) and Unscented Kalman filter (UKF) were compared in pursuit of better accuracy and reliability in this nonlinear estimation problem, using only on-board low cost MEMS sensors. Experimental results confirmed the viability of the proposed algorithms and the sensor suite, for low cost and low weight micro planetary rovers. It is demonstrated that integrating the relative and absolute navigation MEMS sensors reduces the navigation errors to the desired level. PMID:27223293

  8. Robotics_MobileRobot Navigation, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Robots and rovers exploring planets need to autonomously navigate to specified locations. Advanced Scientific Concepts, Inc. (ASC) and the University of Minnesota...

  9. Usability Testing of Two Ambulatory EHR Navigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultman, Gretchen; Marquard, Jenna; Arsoniadis, Elliot; Mink, Pamela; Rizvi, Rubina; Ramer, Tim; Khairat, Saif; Fickau, Keri; Melton, Genevieve B

    2016-01-01

    Despite widespread electronic health record (EHR) adoption, poor EHR system usability continues to be a significant barrier to effective system use for end users. One key to addressing usability problems is to employ user testing and user-centered design. To understand if redesigning an EHR-based navigation tool with clinician input improved user performance and satisfaction. A usability evaluation was conducted to compare two versions of a redesigned ambulatory navigator. Participants completed tasks for five patient cases using the navigators, while employing a think-aloud protocol. The tasks were based on Meaningful Use (MU) requirements. The version of navigator did not affect perceived workload, and time to complete tasks was longer in the redesigned navigator. A relatively small portion of navigator content was used to complete the MU-related tasks, though navigation patterns were highly variable across participants for both navigators. Preferences for EHR navigation structures appeared to be individualized. This study demonstrates the importance of EHR usability assessments to evaluate group and individual performance of different interfaces and preferences for each design.

  10. Applications of navigation for orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobek, Samuel L

    2014-11-01

    Stereotactic surgical navigation has been used in oral and maxillofacial surgery for orbital reconstruction, reduction of facial fractures, localization of foreign bodies, placement of implants, skull base surgery, tumor removal, temporomandibular joint surgery, and orthognathic surgery. The primary goals in adopting intraoperative navigation into these different surgeries were to define and localize operative anatomy, to localize implant position, and to orient the surgical wound. Navigation can optimize the functional and esthetic outcomes in patients with dentofacial deformities by identifying pertinent anatomic structures, transferring the surgical plan to the patient, and verifying the surgical result. This article discusses the principles of navigation-guided orthognathic surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Airports and Navigation Aids Database System -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Airport and Navigation Aids Database System is the repository of aeronautical data related to airports, runways, lighting, NAVAID and their components, obstacles, no...

  12. Youth Mobilisation as Social Navigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigh, Henrik Erdman

    2010-01-01

     ties and options that arise in such situations. Building on the Guinean Creole term of dubriagem, the article proposes the concept of social navigation as an analytical optic able to shed light on praxis in unstable environments. The concept of social navigation makes it possible to focus on the way we move within changing social environments. It is processuality squared, illuminating motion within motion. The article thus advocates an analysis of praxis that takes its point of departure in a Batesonian and intermorphological understanding of action in order to further our understanding of the acts of youth in conflict....

  13. Lunar remote sensing and measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, H.J.; Boyce, J.M.; Schaber, G.G.; Scott, D.H.

    1980-01-01

    Remote sensing and measurements of the Moon from Apollo orbiting spacecraft and Earth form a basis for extrapolation of Apollo surface data to regions of the Moon where manned and unmanned spacecraft have not been and may be used to discover target regions for future lunar exploration which will produce the highest scientific yields. Orbital remote sensing and measurements discussed include (1) relative ages and inferred absolute ages, (2) gravity, (3) magnetism, (4) chemical composition, and (5) reflection of radar waves (bistatic). Earth-based remote sensing and measurements discussed include (1) reflection of sunlight, (2) reflection and scattering of radar waves, and (3) infrared eclipse temperatures. Photographs from the Apollo missions, Lunar Orbiters, and other sources provide a fundamental source of data on the geology and topography of the Moon and a basis for comparing, correlating, and testing the remote sensing and measurements. Relative ages obtained from crater statistics and then empirically correlated with absolute ages indicate that significant lunar volcanism continued to 2.5 b.y. (billion years) ago-some 600 m.y. (million years) after the youngest volcanic rocks sampled by Apollo-and that intensive bombardment of the Moon occurred in the interval of 3.84 to 3.9 b.y. ago. Estimated fluxes of crater-producing objects during the last 50 m.y. agree fairly well with fluxes measured by the Apollo passive seismic stations. Gravity measurements obtained by observing orbiting spacecraft reveal that mare basins have mass concentrations and that the volume of material ejected from the Orientale basin is near 2 to 5 million km 3 depending on whether there has or has not been isostatic compensation, little or none of which has occurred since 3.84 b.y. ago. Isostatic compensation may have occurred in some of the old large lunar basins, but more data are needed to prove it. Steady fields of remanent magnetism were detected by the Apollo 15 and 16 subsatellites

  14. Off the Beaten tracks: Exploring Three Aspects of Web Navigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weinreich, H.; Obendorf, H.; Herder, E.; Mayer, M.; Edmonds, H.; Hawkey, K.; Kellar, M.; Turnbull, D.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents results of a long-term client-side Web usage study, updating previous studies that range in age from five to ten years. We focus on three aspects of Web navigation: changes in the distribution of navigation actions, speed of navigation and within-page navigation. “Navigation

  15. Remote Experiments in Control Engineering Education Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milica B Naumović

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents Automatic Control Engineering Laboratory (ACEL - WebLab, an under-developed, internet-based remote laboratory for control engineering education at the Faculty of Electronic Engineering in Niš. Up to now, the remote laboratory integrates two physical systems (velocity servo system and magnetic levitation system and enables some levels of measurement and control. To perform experiments in ACEL-WebLab, the "LabVIEW Run Time Engine"and a standard web browser are needed.

  16. Remote Monitoring Transparency Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhoruchkin, V.K.; Shmelev, V.M.; Roumiantsev, A.N.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the Remote Monitoring Transparency Program is to evaluate and demonstrate the use of remote monitoring technologies to advance nonproliferation and transparency efforts that are currently being developed by Russia and the United States without compromising the national security to the participating parties. Under a lab-to-lab transparency contract between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Kurchatov Institute (KI RRC), the Kurchatov Institute will analyze technical and procedural aspects of the application of remote monitoring as a transparency measure to monitor inventories of direct- use HEU and plutonium (e.g., material recovered from dismantled nuclear weapons). A goal of this program is to assist a broad range of political and technical experts in learning more about remote monitoring technologies that could be used to implement nonproliferation, arms control, and other security and confidence building measures. Specifically, this program will: (1) begin integrating Russian technologies into remote monitoring systems; (2) develop remote monitoring procedures that will assist in the application of remote monitoring techniques to monitor inventories of HEU and Pu from dismantled nuclear weapons; and (3) conduct a workshop to review remote monitoring fundamentals, demonstrate an integrated US/Russian remote monitoring system, and discuss the impacts that remote monitoring will have on the national security of participating countries

  17. Remote Observational Techniques in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieman, J.; Mayo, L.

    2002-09-01

    The ability to observe celestial objects remotely is making a major impact into classroom access to astronomical instrumentation previously impossible to encorporate into curriculum. Two programs, Radio Jove and Telescopes In Education have made important contributions in this field. Radio JOVE is an interactive, hands-on, educational activity for learning the scientific method through the medium of radio observations of Jupiter, the Sun, and the galactic radio background. Students build radio receivers from relatively inexpensive non-profit kits (about \\$125 plus shipping) and use them to record data, analyze the data, and share the results with others. Alternatively, for no cost, the students can record and analyze data from remote radio receivers connected to the web. The projects are useful adjuncts to activities in optical observing since students should recognize that we learn about the universe through more than just the optical spectrum. The projects are mini-electronics courses and also teach about charged particles and magnetic fields. The Radio JOVE web site (http://radiojove.gsfc.nasa.gov) should be consulted for further information. The NASA-sponsored Telescopes In Education (TIE) network (http://tie.jpl.nasa.gov) has been wildly successful in engaging the K-12 education community in real-time, hands-on, interactive astronomy activities. Hundreds of schools in the US, Australia, Canada, England, and Japan have participated in the TIE program, remotely controlling the 24-inch telescope at the Mount Wilson Observatory from their classrooms. In recent years, several (approximately 20 to date) other telescopes have been, or are in the process of being, outfitted for remote use as TIE affiliates. These telescopesare integrated seamlessly into one virtual observatory providing the services required to operate this facility, including a scheduling service, tools for data manipulation, an online proposal review environment, an online "Virtual TIE Student Ap J

  18. Success of sky-polarimetric Viking navigation: revealing the chance Viking sailors could reach Greenland from Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Száz, Dénes; Horváth, Gábor

    2018-04-01

    According to a famous hypothesis, Viking sailors could navigate along the latitude between Norway and Greenland by means of sky polarization in cloudy weather using a sun compass and sunstone crystals. Using data measured in earlier atmospheric optical and psychophysical experiments, here we determine the success rate of this sky-polarimetric Viking navigation. Simulating 1000 voyages between Norway and Greenland with varying cloudiness at summer solstice and spring equinox, we revealed the chance with which Viking sailors could reach Greenland under the varying weather conditions of a 3-week-long journey as a function of the navigation periodicity Δ t if they analysed sky polarization with calcite, cordierite or tourmaline sunstones. Examples of voyage routes are also presented. Our results show that the sky-polarimetric navigation is surprisingly successful on both days of the spring equinox and summer solstice even under cloudy conditions if the navigator determined the north direction periodically at least once in every 3 h, independently of the type of sunstone used for the analysis of sky polarization. This explains why the Vikings could rule the Atlantic Ocean for 300 years and could reach North America without a magnetic compass. Our findings suggest that it is not only the navigation periodicity in itself that is important for higher navigation success rates, but also the distribution of times when the navigation procedure carried out is as symmetrical as possible with respect to the time point of real noon.

  19. Success of sky-polarimetric Viking navigation: revealing the chance Viking sailors could reach Greenland from Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Száz, Dénes; Horváth, Gábor

    2018-04-01

    According to a famous hypothesis, Viking sailors could navigate along the latitude between Norway and Greenland by means of sky polarization in cloudy weather using a sun compass and sunstone crystals. Using data measured in earlier atmospheric optical and psychophysical experiments, here we determine the success rate of this sky-polarimetric Viking navigation. Simulating 1000 voyages between Norway and Greenland with varying cloudiness at summer solstice and spring equinox, we revealed the chance with which Viking sailors could reach Greenland under the varying weather conditions of a 3-week-long journey as a function of the navigation periodicity Δt if they analysed sky polarization with calcite, cordierite or tourmaline sunstones. Examples of voyage routes are also presented. Our results show that the sky-polarimetric navigation is surprisingly successful on both days of the spring equinox and summer solstice even under cloudy conditions if the navigator determined the north direction periodically at least once in every 3 h, independently of the type of sunstone used for the analysis of sky polarization. This explains why the Vikings could rule the Atlantic Ocean for 300 years and could reach North America without a magnetic compass. Our findings suggest that it is not only the navigation periodicity in itself that is important for higher navigation success rates, but also the distribution of times when the navigation procedure carried out is as symmetrical as possible with respect to the time point of real noon.

  20. Navigation control of a multi-functional eye robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, F.A.M.; Hashmi, B.; Younas, A.; Abid, B.

    2016-01-01

    The advancement in robotic field is enhanced rigorously in the past Few decades. Robots are being used in different fields of science as well as warfare. The research shows that in the near future, robots would be able to serve in fighting wars. Different countries and their armies have already deployed several military robots. However, there exist some drawbacks of robots like their inefficiency and inability to work under abnormal conditions. Ascent of artificial intelligence may resolve this issue in the coming future. The main focus of this paper is to provide a low cost and long range most efficient mechanical as well as software design of an Eye Robot. Using a blend of robotics and image processing with an addition of artificial intelligence path navigation techniques, this project is designed and implemented by controlling the robot (including robotic arm and camera) through a 2.4 GHz RF module manually. Autonomous function of the robot includes navigation based on the path assigned to the robot. The path is drawn on a VB based application and then transferred to the robot wirelessly or through serial port. A Wi-Fi based Optical Character Recognition (OCR) implemented video streaming can also be observed at remote devices like laptops. (author)

  1. A remotely interrogatable sensor for chemical monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyanov, P. G.; Doherty, S. A.; Grimes, C. A.; Seitz, W. R.

    1998-01-01

    A new type of continuously operating, in-situ, remotely monitored sensor is presented. The sensor is comprised of a thin film array of magnetostatically coupled, magnetically soft ferromagnetic thin film structures, adhered to or encased within a thin polymer layer. The polymer is made so that it swells or shrinks in response to the chemical analyte of interest, which in this case is pH. As the polymer swells or shrinks, the magnetostatic coupling between the magnetic elements changes, resulting in changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the sensor. Placed within a sinusoidal magnetic field the magnetization vector of the coupled sensor elements periodically reverses directions, generating magnetic flux that can be remotely detected as a series of voltage spikes in appropriately placed pickup coils. one preliminary sensor design consists of four triangles, initially spaced approximately 50 micrometers apart, arranged to form a 12 mm x 12 mm square with the triangle tips centered at a common origin. Our preliminary work has focused on monitoring of pH using a lightly crosslinked pH sensitive polymer layer of hydroxyethylmethacrylate and 2-(dimethylamino) ethylmethacrylate. As the polymer swells or shrinks the magnetostatic coupling between the triangles changes, resulting in measurable changes in the amplitude of the detected voltage spirits.

  2. Vibrotactile in-vehicle navigation system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, J.B.F. van; Veen, H.J. van

    2004-01-01

    A vibrotactile display, consisting ofeight vibrating elements or tactors mounted in a driver's seat, was tested in a driving simulator. Participants drove with visual, tactile and multimodal navigation displays through a built-up area. Workload and the reaction time to navigation messages were

  3. Parsimonious Ways to Use Vision for Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Graham

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The use of visual information for navigation appears to be a universal strategy for sighted animals, amongst which, one particular group of expert navigators are the ants. The broad interest in studies of ant navigation is in part due to their small brains, thus biomimetic engineers expect to be impressed by elegant control solutions, and psychologists might hope for a description of the minimal cognitive requirements for complex spatial behaviours. In this spirit, we have been taking an interdisciplinary approach to the visual guided navigation of ants in their natural habitat. Behavioural experiments and natural image statistics show that visual navigation need not depend on the remembering or recognition of objects. Further modelling work suggests how simple behavioural routines might enable navigation using familiarity detection rather than explicit recall, and we present a proof of concept that visual navigation using familiarity can be achieved without specifying when or what to learn, nor separating routes into sequences of waypoints. We suggest that our current model represents the only detailed and complete model of insect route guidance to date. What's more, we believe the suggested mechanisms represent useful parsimonious hypotheses for the visually guided navigation in larger-brain animals.

  4. A Semantic Navigation Model for Video Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Driel, Leonard; Bidarra, Rafael

    Navigational performance of artificial intelligence (AI) characters in computer games is gaining an increasingly important role in the perception of their behavior. While recent games successfully solve some complex navigation problems, there is little known or documented on the underlying approaches, often resembling a primitive conglomerate of ad-hoc algorithms for specific situations.

  5. Sex differences in navigation strategy and efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Alexander P; Gong, Xinyi; Hegarty, Mary

    2018-05-22

    Research on human navigation has indicated that males and females differ in self-reported navigation strategy as well as objective measures of navigation efficiency. In two experiments, we investigated sex differences in navigation strategy and efficiency using an objective measure of strategy, the dual-solution paradigm (DSP; Marchette, Bakker, & Shelton, 2011). Although navigation by shortcuts and learned routes were the primary strategies used in both experiments, as in previous research on the DSP, individuals also utilized route reversals and sometimes found the goal location as a result of wandering. Importantly, sex differences were found in measures of both route selection and navigation efficiency. In particular, males were more likely to take shortcuts and reached their goal location faster than females, while females were more likely to follow learned routes and wander. Self-report measures of strategy were only weakly correlated with objective measures of strategy, casting doubt on their usefulness. This research indicates that the sex difference in navigation efficiency is large, and only partially related to an individual's navigation strategy as measured by the dual-solution paradigm.

  6. Navigator. Volume 45, Number 2, Winter 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Science Education Leadership Association, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The National Science Education Leadership Association (NSELA) was formed in 1959 to meet a need to develop science education leadership for K-16 school systems. "Navigator" is published by NSELA to provide the latest NSELA events. This issue of "Navigator" contains the following reports: (1) A Message from the President: Creating Networks of…

  7. Navigator. Volume 45, Number 3, Spring 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Science Education Leadership Association, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The National Science Education Leadership Association (NSELA) was formed in 1959 to meet a need to develop science education leadership for K-16 school systems. "Navigator" is published by NSELA to provide the latest NSELA events. This issue of "Navigator" includes the following items: (1) A Message from the President (Brenda Wojnowski); (2) NSELA…

  8. Natural Language Navigation Support in Virtual Reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Luin, J.; Nijholt, Antinus; op den Akker, Hendrikus J.A.; Giagourta, V.; Strintzis, M.G.

    2001-01-01

    We describe our work on designing a natural language accessible navigation agent for a virtual reality (VR) environment. The agent is part of an agent framework, which means that it can communicate with other agents. Its navigation task consists of guiding the visitors in the environment and to

  9. Risk management model of winter navigation operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdez Banda, Osiris A.; Goerlandt, Floris; Kuzmin, Vladimir; Kujala, Pentti; Montewka, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    The wintertime maritime traffic operations in the Gulf of Finland are managed through the Finnish–Swedish Winter Navigation System. This establishes the requirements and limitations for the vessels navigating when ice covers this area. During winter navigation in the Gulf of Finland, the largest risk stems from accidental ship collisions which may also trigger oil spills. In this article, a model for managing the risk of winter navigation operations is presented. The model analyses the probability of oil spills derived from collisions involving oil tanker vessels and other vessel types. The model structure is based on the steps provided in the Formal Safety Assessment (FSA) by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and adapted into a Bayesian Network model. The results indicate that ship independent navigation and convoys are the operations with higher probability of oil spills. Minor spills are most probable, while major oil spills found very unlikely but possible. - Highlights: •A model to assess and manage the risk of winter navigation operations is proposed. •The risks of oil spills in winter navigation in the Gulf of Finland are analysed. •The model assesses and prioritizes actions to control the risk of the operations. •The model suggests navigational training as the most efficient risk control option.

  10. The Navigation Metaphor in Security Economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pieters, Wolter; Barendse, Jeroen; Ford, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    The navigation metaphor for cybersecurity merges security architecture models and security economics. By identifying the most efficient routes for gaining access to assets from an attacker's viewpoint, an organization can optimize its defenses along these routes. The well-understood concept of na...... of navigation makes it easier to motivate and explain security investment to a wide audience, encouraging strategic security decisions....

  11. Evolved Navigation Theory and Horizontal Visual Illusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Russell E.; Willey, Chela R.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental perception is prerequisite to most vertebrate behavior and its modern investigation initiated the founding of experimental psychology. Navigation costs may affect environmental perception, such as overestimating distances while encumbered (Solomon, 1949). However, little is known about how this occurs in real-world navigation or how…

  12. Rosetta Star Tracker and Navigation Camera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Gøsta

    1998-01-01

    Proposal in response to the Invitation to Tender (ITT) issued by Matra Marconi Space (MSS) for the procurement of the ROSETTA Star Tracker and Navigation Camera.......Proposal in response to the Invitation to Tender (ITT) issued by Matra Marconi Space (MSS) for the procurement of the ROSETTA Star Tracker and Navigation Camera....

  13. Optical remote sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Prasad, Saurabh; Chanussot, Jocelyn

    2011-01-01

    Optical remote sensing relies on exploiting multispectral and hyper spectral imagery possessing high spatial and spectral resolutions respectively. These modalities, although useful for most remote sensing tasks, often present challenges that must be addressed for their effective exploitation. This book presents current state-of-the-art algorithms that address the following key challenges encountered in representation and analysis of such optical remotely sensed data: challenges in pre-processing images, storing and representing high dimensional data, fusing different sensor modalities, patter

  14. REMOTE SENSING IN OCEANOGRAPHY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    remote sensing from satellites. Sensing of oceanographic variables from aircraft began with the photographing of waves and ice. Since then remote measurement of sea surface temperatures and wave heights have become routine. Sensors tested for oceanographic applications include multi-band color cameras, radar scatterometers, infrared spectrometers and scanners, passive microwave radiometers, and radar imagers. Remote sensing has found its greatest application in providing rapid coverage of large oceanographic areas for synoptic and analysis and

  15. Quantum imaging for underwater arctic navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzagorta, Marco

    2017-05-01

    The precise navigation of underwater vehicles is a difficult task due to the challenges imposed by the variable oceanic environment. It is particularly difficult if the underwater vehicle is trying to navigate under the Arctic ice shelf. Indeed, in this scenario traditional navigation devices such as GPS, compasses and gyrocompasses are unavailable or unreliable. In addition, the shape and thickness of the ice shelf is variable throughout the year. Current Arctic underwater navigation systems include sonar arrays to detect the proximity to the ice. However, these systems are undesirable in a wartime environment, as the sound gives away the position of the underwater vehicle. In this paper we briefly describe the theoretical design of a quantum imaging system that could allow the safe and stealthy navigation of underwater Arctic vehicles.

  16. Ethical Navigation in Leadership Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Øyvind Kvalnes

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Business leaders frequently face dilemmas, circumstances where whatever course of action they choose, something of important value will be offended. How can an organisation prepare its decision makers for such situations? This article presents a pedagogical approach to dilemma training for business leaders and managers. It has evolved through ten years of experience with human resource development, where ethics has been an integral part of programs designed to help individuals to become excellent in their professional roles. The core element in our approach is The Navigation Wheel, a figure used to keep track of relevant decision factors. Feedback from participants indicates that dilemma training has helped them to recognise the ethical dimension of leadership. They respond that the tools and concepts are highly relevant in relation to the challenges that occur in the working environment they return to after leadership training.http://dx.doi.org/10.5324/eip.v6i1.1778

  17. Autonomous navigation system and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruemmer, David J [Idaho Falls, ID; Few, Douglas A [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-09-08

    A robot platform includes perceptors, locomotors, and a system controller, which executes instructions for autonomously navigating a robot. The instructions repeat, on each iteration through an event timing loop, the acts of defining an event horizon based on the robot's current velocity, detecting a range to obstacles around the robot, testing for an event horizon intrusion by determining if any range to the obstacles is within the event horizon, and adjusting rotational and translational velocity of the robot accordingly. If the event horizon intrusion occurs, rotational velocity is modified by a proportion of the current rotational velocity reduced by a proportion of the range to the nearest obstacle and translational velocity is modified by a proportion of the range to the nearest obstacle. If no event horizon intrusion occurs, translational velocity is set as a ratio of a speed factor relative to a maximum speed.

  18. Advanced Remote Sensing Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonecker, Terrence; Jones, John W.; Price, Susan D.; Hogan, Dianna

    2008-01-01

    'Remote sensing' is a generic term for monitoring techniques that collect information without being in physical contact with the object of study. Overhead imagery from aircraft and satellite sensors provides the most common form of remotely sensed data and records the interaction of electromagnetic energy (usually visible light) with matter, such as the Earth's surface. Remotely sensed data are fundamental to geographic science. The Eastern Geographic Science Center (EGSC) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is currently conducting and promoting the research and development of three different aspects of remote sensing science: spectral analysis, automated orthorectification of historical imagery, and long wave infrared (LWIR) polarimetric imagery (PI).

  19. Remote Maintenance Monitoring System -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Remote Maintenance and Monitoring System (RMMS) is a collection of subsystems that includes telecommunication components, hardware, and software, which serve to...

  20. Optical Remote Sensing Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Optical Remote Sensing Laboratory deploys rugged, cutting-edge electro-optical instrumentation for the collection of various event signatures, with expertise in...

  1. Remote Systems Design & Deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, Sharon A.; Baker, Carl P.; Valdez, Patrick LJ

    2009-08-28

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) to provide information and lessons learned relating to the design, development and deployment of remote systems, particularly remote arm/manipulator systems. This report reflects PNNL’s experience with remote systems and lays out the most important activities that need to be completed to successfully design, build, deploy and operate remote systems in radioactive and chemically contaminated environments. It also contains lessons learned from PNNL’s work experiences, and the work of others in the national laboratory complex.

  2. Remote docking apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dent, T.H.; Sumpman, W.C.; Wilhelm, J.J.

    1981-01-01

    The remote docking apparatus comprises a support plate with locking devices mounted thereon. The locking devices are capable of being inserted into tubular members for suspending the support plate therefrom. A vertical member is attached to the support plate with an attachment mechanism attached to the vertical member. A remote access manipulator is capable of being attached to the attachment mechanism so that the vertical member can position the remote access manipulator so that the remote access manipulator can be initially attached to the tubular members in a well defined manner

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... MRI equipment look like? How does the procedure work? How is the ... use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... the equipment look like? How does the procedure work? How is the ... use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency ...

  9. An advanced unmanned vehicle for remote applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pletta, J.B.; Sackos, J.

    1998-03-01

    An autonomous mobile robotic capability is critical to developing remote work applications for hazardous environments. A few potential applications include humanitarian demining and ordnance neutralization, extraterrestrial science exploration, and hazardous waste cleanup. The ability of the remote platform to sense and maneuver within its environment is a basic technology requirement which is currently lacking. This enabling technology will open the door for force multiplication and cost effective solutions to remote operations. The ultimate goal of this work is to develop a mobile robotic platform that can identify and avoid local obstacles as it traverses from its current location to a specified destination. This goal directed autonomous navigation scheme uses the Global Positioning System (GPS) to identify the robot's current coordinates in space and neural network processing of LADAR range images for local obstacle detection and avoidance. The initial year funding provided by this LDRD project has developed a small exterior mobile robotic development platform and a fieldable version of Sandia's Scannerless Range Imager (SRI) system. The robotic testbed platform is based on the Surveillance And Reconnaissance ground Equipment (SARGE) robotic vehicle design recently developed for the US DoD. Contingent upon follow-on funding, future enhancements will develop neural network processing of the range map data to traverse unstructured exterior terrain while avoiding obstacles. The SRI will provide real-time range images to a neural network for autonomous guidance. Neural network processing of the range map data will allow real-time operation on a Pentium based embedded processor board

  10. Remote tuning of NMR probe circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodibagkar, V D; Conradi, M S

    2000-05-01

    There are many circumstances in which the probe tuning adjustments cannot be located near the rf NMR coil. These may occur in high-temperature NMR, low-temperature NMR, and in the use of magnets with small diameter access bores. We address here circuitry for connecting a fixed-tuned probe circuit by a transmission line to a remotely located tuning network. In particular, the bandwidth over which the probe may be remotely tuned while keeping the losses in the transmission line acceptably low is considered. The results show that for all resonant circuit geometries (series, parallel, series-parallel), overcoupling of the line to the tuned circuit is key to obtaining a large tuning bandwidth. At equivalent extents of overcoupling, all resonant circuit geometries have nearly equal remote tuning bandwidths. Particularly for the case of low-loss transmission line, the tuning bandwidth can be many times the tuned circuit's bandwidth, f(o)/Q. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  11. China national space remote sensing infrastructure and its application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming

    2016-07-01

    Space Infrastructure is a space system that provides communication, navigation and remote sensing service for broad users. China National Space Remote Sensing Infrastructure includes remote sensing satellites, ground system and related systems. According to the principle of multiple-function on one satellite, multiple satellites in one constellation and collaboration between constellations, series of land observation, ocean observation and atmosphere observation satellites have been suggested to have high, middle and low resolution and fly on different orbits and with different means of payloads to achieve a high ability for global synthetically observation. With such an infrastructure, we can carry out the research on climate change, geophysics global surveying and mapping, water resources management, safety and emergency management, and so on. I This paper gives a detailed introduction about the planning of this infrastructure and its application in different area, especially the international cooperation potential in the so called One Belt and One Road space information corridor.

  12. Hyperspectral remote sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Eismann, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing is an emerging, multidisciplinary field with diverse applications that builds on the principles of material spectroscopy, radiative transfer, imaging spectrometry, and hyperspectral data processing. This book provides a holistic treatment that captures its multidisciplinary nature, emphasizing the physical principles of hyperspectral remote sensing.

  13. SLS Model Based Design: A Navigation Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, T. Emerson; Anzalone, Evan; Park, Thomas; Geohagan, Kevin

    2018-01-01

    The SLS Program has implemented a Model-based Design (MBD) and Model-based Requirements approach for managing component design information and system requirements. This approach differs from previous large-scale design efforts at Marshall Space Flight Center where design documentation alone conveyed information required for vehicle design and analysis and where extensive requirements sets were used to scope and constrain the design. The SLS Navigation Team is responsible for the Program-controlled Design Math Models (DMMs) which describe and represent the performance of the Inertial Navigation System (INS) and the Rate Gyro Assemblies (RGAs) used by Guidance, Navigation, and Controls (GN&C). The SLS Navigation Team is also responsible for navigation algorithms. The navigation algorithms are delivered for implementation on the flight hardware as a DMM. For the SLS Block 1B design, the additional GPS Receiver hardware model is managed as a DMM at the vehicle design level. This paper describes the models, and discusses the processes and methods used to engineer, design, and coordinate engineering trades and performance assessments using SLS practices as applied to the GN&C system, with a particular focus on the navigation components.

  14. Remote handling at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisham, D.L.; Lambert, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental area A at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) encompasses a large area. Presently there are four experimental target cells along the main proton beam line that have become highly radioactive, thus dictating that all maintenance be performed remotely. The Monitor remote handling system was developed to perform in situ maintenance at any location within area A. Due to the complexity of experimental systems and confined space, conventional remote handling methods based upon hot cell and/or hot bay concepts are not workable. Contrary to conventional remote handling which require special tooling for each specifically planned operation, the Monitor concept is aimed at providing a totally flexible system capable of remotely performing general mechanical and electrical maintenance operations using standard tools. The Monitor system is described

  15. Remote vehicle survey tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, G.A.; Burks, B.L.; Kress, R.L.; Wagner, D.G.; Ward, C.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Remote Vehicle Survey Tool (RVS7) is a color graphical display tool for viewing remotely acquired scientific data. The RVST displays the data in the form of a color two-dimensional world model map. The world model map allows movement of the remote vehicle to be tracked by the operator and the data from sensors to be graphically depicted in the interface. Linear and logarithmic meters, dual channel oscilloscopes, and directional compasses are used to display sensor information. The RVST is user-configurable by the use of ASCII text files. The operator can configure the RVST to work with any remote data acquisition system and teleoperated or autonomous vehicle. The modular design of the RVST and its ability to be quickly configured for varying system requirements make the RVST ideal for remote scientific data display in all environmental restoration and waste management programs

  16. Navigating nuclear science: Enhancing analysis through visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irwin, N.H.; Berkel, J. van; Johnson, D.K.; Wylie, B.N.

    1997-09-01

    Data visualization is an emerging technology with high potential for addressing the information overload problem. This project extends the data visualization work of the Navigating Science project by coupling it with more traditional information retrieval methods. A citation-derived landscape was augmented with documents using a text-based similarity measure to show viability of extension into datasets where citation lists do not exist. Landscapes, showing hills where clusters of similar documents occur, can be navigated, manipulated and queried in this environment. The capabilities of this tool provide users with an intuitive explore-by-navigation method not currently available in today`s retrieval systems.

  17. Venous catheterization with ultrasound navigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasatkin, A. A.; Nigmatullina, A. R.; Urakov, A. L.

    2015-01-01

    By ultrasound scanning it was determined that respiratory movements made by chest of healthy and sick person are accompanied by respiratory chest rise of internal jugular veins. During the exhalation of an individual diameter of his veins increases and during the breath it decreases down to the complete disappearing if their lumen. Change of the diameter of internal jugular veins in different phases can influence significantly the results of vein puncture and cauterization in patients. The purpose of this research is development of the method increasing the efficiency and safety of cannulation of internal jugular veins by the ultrasound visualization. We suggested the method of catheterization of internal jugular veins by the ultrasound navigation during the execution of which the puncture of venous wall by puncture needle and the following conduction of J-guide is carried out at the moment of patient’s exhalation. This method decreases the risk of complications development during catheterization of internal jugular vein due to exclusion of perforating wound of vein and subjacent tissues and anatomical structures

  18. Venous catheterization with ultrasound navigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasatkin, A. A., E-mail: ant-kasatkin@yandex.ru; Nigmatullina, A. R. [Izhevsk State Medical Academy, Kommunarov street, 281, Izhevsk, Russia, 426034 (Russian Federation); Urakov, A. L., E-mail: ant-kasatkin@yandex.ru [Institute of Mechanics Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, T.Baramzinoy street 34, Izhevsk, Russia, 426067, Izhevsk (Russian Federation); Izhevsk State Medical Academy, Kommunarov street, 281, Izhevsk, Russia, 426034 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    By ultrasound scanning it was determined that respiratory movements made by chest of healthy and sick person are accompanied by respiratory chest rise of internal jugular veins. During the exhalation of an individual diameter of his veins increases and during the breath it decreases down to the complete disappearing if their lumen. Change of the diameter of internal jugular veins in different phases can influence significantly the results of vein puncture and cauterization in patients. The purpose of this research is development of the method increasing the efficiency and safety of cannulation of internal jugular veins by the ultrasound visualization. We suggested the method of catheterization of internal jugular veins by the ultrasound navigation during the execution of which the puncture of venous wall by puncture needle and the following conduction of J-guide is carried out at the moment of patient’s exhalation. This method decreases the risk of complications development during catheterization of internal jugular vein due to exclusion of perforating wound of vein and subjacent tissues and anatomical structures.

  19. Qatari Women Navigating Gendered Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Golkowska

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ADespite growing interest in the lived experience of Muslim women in Arab countries, there is still a dearth of studies on the Gulf region. This article focuses on Qatar, a Gulf Corporation Council (GCC country, to explore its changing sociocultural landscape and reflect on Qatari women’s agency within the framework of the traditional gendered space model. Applying Grounded Theory methodology to data collected from a variety of scholarly and non-scholarly sources, the author offers a themed overview of factors that facilitate and constrain Qatari women’s mobility. The findings testify to a significant increase in female presence and visibility in the public sphere—specifically in the spaces of education, employment, and sports. They also show that young Qatari women exercise agency through navigating the existing systems rather than question traditional socio-cultural norms. The paper identifies this search for a middle ground between tradition and modernity and its ideological underpinnings as the area of future research that should be led by Qatari women themselves.

  20. Interaction Between Hippocampus and Cerebellum Crus I in Sequence-Based but not Place-Based Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglói, Kinga; Doeller, Christian F.; Paradis, Anne-Lise; Benchenane, Karim; Berthoz, Alain; Burgess, Neil; Rondi-Reig, Laure

    2015-01-01

    To examine the cerebellar contribution to human spatial navigation we used functional magnetic resonance imaging and virtual reality. Our findings show that the sensory-motor requirements of navigation induce activity in cerebellar lobules and cortical areas known to be involved in the motor loop and vestibular processing. By contrast, cognitive aspects of navigation mainly induce activity in a different cerebellar lobule (VIIA Crus I). Our results demonstrate a functional link between cerebellum and hippocampus in humans and identify specific functional circuits linking lobule VIIA Crus I of the cerebellum to medial parietal, medial prefrontal, and hippocampal cortices in nonmotor aspects of navigation. They further suggest that Crus I belongs to 2 nonmotor loops, involved in different strategies: place-based navigation is supported by coherent activity between left cerebellar lobule VIIA Crus I and medial parietal cortex along with right hippocampus activity, while sequence-based navigation is supported by coherent activity between right lobule VIIA Crus I, medial prefrontal cortex, and left hippocampus. These results highlight the prominent role of the human cerebellum in both motor and cognitive aspects of navigation, and specify the cortico-cerebellar circuits by which it acts depending on the requirements of the task. PMID:24947462

  1. Enhanced Pedestrian Navigation Based on Course Angle Error Estimation Using Cascaded Kalman Filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jin Woo; Park, Chan Gook

    2018-04-21

    An enhanced pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR) based navigation algorithm, which uses two cascaded Kalman filters (TCKF) for the estimation of course angle and navigation errors, is proposed. The proposed algorithm uses a foot-mounted inertial measurement unit (IMU), waist-mounted magnetic sensors, and a zero velocity update (ZUPT) based inertial navigation technique with TCKF. The first stage filter estimates the course angle error of a human, which is closely related to the heading error of the IMU. In order to obtain the course measurements, the filter uses magnetic sensors and a position-trace based course angle. For preventing magnetic disturbance from contaminating the estimation, the magnetic sensors are attached to the waistband. Because the course angle error is mainly due to the heading error of the IMU, and the characteristic error of the heading angle is highly dependent on that of the course angle, the estimated course angle error is used as a measurement for estimating the heading error in the second stage filter. At the second stage, an inertial navigation system-extended Kalman filter-ZUPT (INS-EKF-ZUPT) method is adopted. As the heading error is estimated directly by using course-angle error measurements, the estimation accuracy for the heading and yaw gyro bias can be enhanced, compared with the ZUPT-only case, which eventually enhances the position accuracy more efficiently. The performance enhancements are verified via experiments, and the way-point position error for the proposed method is compared with those for the ZUPT-only case and with other cases that use ZUPT and various types of magnetic heading measurements. The results show that the position errors are reduced by a maximum of 90% compared with the conventional ZUPT based PDR algorithms.

  2. ANALYSIS OF FREE ROUTE AIRSPACE AND PERFORMANCE BASED NAVIGATION IMPLEMENTATION IN THE EUROPEAN AIR NAVIGATION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Pavlova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available European Air Traffic Management system requires continuous improvements as air traffic is increasingday by day. For this purpose it was developed by international organizations Free Route Airspace and PerformanceBased Navigation concepts that allow to offer a required level of safety, capacity, environmental performance alongwith cost-effectiveness. The aim of the article is to provide detailed analysis of Free Route Airspace and PerformanceBased Navigation implementation status within European region including Ukrainian air navigation system.

  3. Real-time precision pedestrian navigation solution using Inertial Navigation System and Global Positioning System

    OpenAIRE

    Yong-Jin Yoon; King Ho Holden Li; Jiahe Steven Lee; Woo-Tae Park

    2015-01-01

    Global Positioning System and Inertial Navigation System can be used to determine position and velocity. A Global Positioning System module is able to accurately determine position without sensor drift, but its usage is limited in heavily urbanized environments and heavy vegetation. While high-cost tactical-grade Inertial Navigation System can determine position accurately, low-cost micro-electro-mechanical system Inertial Navigation System sensors are plagued by significant errors. Global Po...

  4. Smart parking management and navigation system

    KAUST Repository

    Saadeldin, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    Various examples are provided for smart parking management, which can include navigation. In one example, a system includes a base station controller configured to: receive a wireless signal from a parking controller located at a parking space

  5. Challenges in navigational strategies for flexible endoscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Stap, N.; van der Heijden, Ferdinand; Broeders, Ivo Adriaan Maria Johannes

    Automating flexible endoscope navigation could lead to an increase in patient safety for endoluminal therapeutic procedures. Additionally, it may decrease the costs of diagnostic flexible endoscope procedures by shortening the learning curve and increasing the efficiency of insertion. Earlier

  6. Fuzzy Logic Controller for Small Satellites Navigation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Della Pietra, G; Falzini, S; Colzi, E; Crisconio, M

    2005-01-01

    .... The navigator aims at operating satellites in orbit with a minimum ground support and very good performances, by the adoption of innovative technologies, such as attitude observation GPS, attitude...

  7. From Navigation to Star Hopping: Forgotten Formulae

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Mathematics and wrote a book Navigation and Nautical Astronomy for Sea-men in 1821 with tables ... and arcseconds. The reference ... Roger W Sinnott, an astronomy graduate from Harvard, served on the editorial board of the monthly ...

  8. Comprehension and navigation of networked hypertexts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, Helen; Segers, Eliane; Knoors, Harry; Hermans, Daan; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to investigate secondary school students' reading comprehension and navigation of networked hypertexts with and without a graphic overview compared to linear digital texts. Additionally, it was studied whether prior knowledge, vocabulary, verbal, and visual working memory moderated

  9. 78 FR 68077 - Navigation Safety Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-13

    ... Privacy Act notice regarding our public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73... commence in calendar year 2014. (4) Navigation Rules Regulatory Project. The Council will receive an update...

  10. Navigation with a passive brain based interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, J.B.F. van; Werkhoven, P.J.; Thurlings, M.E.; Brouwer, A.-M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a Brain Computer Interface (BCI) for navigation. The system is based on detecting brain signals that are elicited by tactile stimulation on the torso indicating the desired direction.

  11. Onboard Optical Navigation Measurement Processing in GEONS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Optical Navigation (OpNav) measurements derived from spacecraft-based images are a powerful data type in the precision orbit determination process.  OpNav...

  12. NOAA Seamless Raster Navigational Charts (RNC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Seamless Raster Chart Server provides a seamless collarless mosaic of the NOAA Raster Navigational Charts (RNC). The RNC are a collection of approximately...

  13. Remote spatial memory in aging: all is not lost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Shayna eRosenbaum

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The ability to acquire and retain spatial memories in order to navigate in new environments is known to decline with age, but little is known about the effect of aging on representations of environments learned long ago, in the remote past. To investigate the status of remote spatial memory in old age, we tested healthy young and older adults on a variety of mental navigation tests based on a large-scale city environment that was very familiar to participants but rarely visited by the older adults in recent years. We show that whereas performance on a route learning test of new spatial learning was significantly worse in older than younger adults, performance was comparable or better in the older adults on mental navigation tests based on a well-known environment learned long ago. An exception was in the older adults’ ability to vividly re-experience the well-known environment, and recognize and represent the visual details contained within it. The results are seen as analogous to the pattern of better semantic than episodic memory that has been found to accompany healthy aging.

  14. Autonomous vehicle navigation utilizing fuzzy controls concepts for a next generation wheelchair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, J D; Barrett, S F; Wright, C H G; Wilcox, M

    2008-01-01

    Three different positioning techniques were investigated to create an autonomous vehicle that could accurately navigate towards a goal: Global Positioning System (GPS), compass dead reckoning, and Ackerman steering. Each technique utilized a fuzzy logic controller that maneuvered a four-wheel car towards a target. The reliability and the accuracy of the navigation methods were investigated by modeling the algorithms in software and implementing them in hardware. To implement the techniques in hardware, positioning sensors were interfaced to a remote control car and a microprocessor. The microprocessor utilized the sensor measurements to orient the car with respect to the target. Next, a fuzzy logic control algorithm adjusted the front wheel steering angle to minimize the difference between the heading and bearing. After minimizing the heading error, the car maintained a straight steering angle along its path to the final destination. The results of this research can be used to develop applications that require precise navigation. The design techniques can also be implemented on alternate platforms such as a wheelchair to assist with autonomous navigation.

  15. Neurobiologically inspired mobile robot navigation and planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Quoy

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available After a short review of biologically inspired navigation architectures, mainly relying on modeling the hippocampal anatomy, or at least some of its functions, we present a navigation and planning model for mobile robots. This architecture is based on a model of the hippocampal and prefrontal interactions. In particular, the system relies on the definition of a new cell type “transition cells” that encompasses traditional “place cells”.

  16. Unraveling navigational strategies in migratory insects

    OpenAIRE

    Merlin, Christine; Heinze, Stanley; Reppert, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    Long-distance migration is a strategy some animals use to survive a seasonally changing environment. To reach favorable grounds, migratory animals have evolved sophisticated navigational mechanisms that rely on a map and compasses. In migratory insects, the existence of a map sense (sense of position) remains poorly understood, but recent work has provided new insights into the mechanisms some compasses use for maintaining a constant bearing during long-distance navigation. The best-studied d...

  17. Navigational Strategies of Migrating Monarch Butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-10

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0339 NAVIGATIONAL STRATEGIES OF MIGRATING MONARCH BUTTERFLIES Steven Reppert UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS Final Report 11/10/2014...Final Progress Statement to (Dr. Patrick Bradshaw) Contract/Grant Title: Navigational Strategies of Migrating Monarch Butterflies Contract...Grant #: FA9550-10-1-0480 Reporting Period: 01-Sept-10 to 31-Aug-14 Overview of accomplishments: Migrating monarch butterflies (Danaus

  18. Clinical applications of virtual navigation bronchial intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajiwara, Naohiro; Maehara, Sachio; Maeda, Junichi; Hagiwara, Masaru; Okano, Tetsuya; Kakihana, Masatoshi; Ohira, Tatsuo; Kawate, Norihiko; Ikeda, Norihiko

    2018-01-01

    In patients with bronchial tumors, we frequently consider endoscopic treatment as the first treatment of choice. All computed tomography (CT) must satisfy several conditions necessary to analyze images by Synapse Vincent. To select safer and more precise approaches for patients with bronchial tumors, we determined the indications and efficacy of virtual navigation intervention for the treatment of bronchial tumors. We examined the efficacy of virtual navigation bronchial intervention for the treatment of bronchial tumors located at a variety of sites in the tracheobronchial tree using a high-speed 3-dimensional (3D) image analysis system, Synapse Vincent. Constructed images can be utilized to decide on the simulation and interventional strategy as well as for navigation during interventional manipulation in two cases. Synapse Vincent was used to determine the optimal planning of virtual navigation bronchial intervention. Moreover, this system can detect tumor location and alsodepict surrounding tissues, quickly, accurately, and safely. The feasibility and safety of Synapse Vincent in performing useful preoperative simulation and navigation of surgical procedures can lead to safer, more precise, and less invasion for the patient, and makes it easy to construct an image, depending on the purpose, in 5-10 minutes using Synapse Vincent. Moreover, if the lesion is in the parenchyma or sub-bronchial lumen, it helps to perform simulation with virtual skeletal subtraction to estimate potential lesion movement. By using virtual navigation system for simulation, bronchial intervention was performed with no complications safely and precisely. Preoperative simulation using virtual navigation bronchial intervention reduces the surgeon's stress levels, particularly when highly skilled techniques are needed to operate on lesions. This task, including both preoperative simulation and intraoperative navigation, leads to greater safety and precision. These technological instruments

  19. Shape Perception and Navigation in Blind Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gori, Monica; Cappagli, Giulia; Baud-Bovy, Gabriel; Finocchietti, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Different sensory systems interact to generate a representation of space and to navigate. Vision plays a critical role in the representation of space development. During navigation, vision is integrated with auditory and mobility cues. In blind individuals, visual experience is not available and navigation therefore lacks this important sensory signal. In blind individuals, compensatory mechanisms can be adopted to improve spatial and navigation skills. On the other hand, the limitations of these compensatory mechanisms are not completely clear. Both enhanced and impaired reliance on auditory cues in blind individuals have been reported. Here, we develop a new paradigm to test both auditory perception and navigation skills in blind and sighted individuals and to investigate the effect that visual experience has on the ability to reproduce simple and complex paths. During the navigation task, early blind, late blind and sighted individuals were required first to listen to an audio shape and then to recognize and reproduce it by walking. After each audio shape was presented, a static sound was played and the participants were asked to reach it. Movements were recorded with a motion tracking system. Our results show three main impairments specific to early blind individuals. The first is the tendency to compress the shapes reproduced during navigation. The second is the difficulty to recognize complex audio stimuli, and finally, the third is the difficulty in reproducing the desired shape: early blind participants occasionally reported perceiving a square but they actually reproduced a circle during the navigation task. We discuss these results in terms of compromised spatial reference frames due to lack of visual input during the early period of development. PMID:28144226

  20. Effects of Visual, Auditory, and Tactile Navigation Cues on Navigation Performance, Situation Awareness, and Mental Workload

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Davis, Bradley M

    2007-01-01

    .... Results from both experiments indicate that augmented visual displays reduced time to complete navigation, maintained situation awareness, and drastically reduced mental workload in comparison...

  1. Lesions of the basal forebrain cholinergic system in mice disrupt idiothetic navigation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam S Hamlin

    Full Text Available Loss of integrity of the basal forebrain cholinergic neurons is a consistent feature of Alzheimer's disease, and measurement of basal forebrain degeneration by magnetic resonance imaging is emerging as a sensitive diagnostic marker for prodromal disease. It is also known that Alzheimer's disease patients perform poorly on both real space and computerized cued (allothetic or uncued (idiothetic recall navigation tasks. Although the hippocampus is required for allothetic navigation, lesions of this region only mildly affect idiothetic navigation. Here we tested the hypothesis that the cholinergic medial septo-hippocampal circuit is important for idiothetic navigation. Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons were selectively lesioned in mice using the toxin saporin conjugated to a basal forebrain cholinergic neuronal marker, the p75 neurotrophin receptor. Control animals were able to learn and remember spatial information when tested on a modified version of the passive place avoidance test where all extramaze cues were removed, and animals had to rely on idiothetic signals. However, the exploratory behaviour of mice with cholinergic basal forebrain lesions was highly disorganized during this test. By contrast, the lesioned animals performed no differently from controls in tasks involving contextual fear conditioning and spatial working memory (Y maze, and displayed no deficits in potentially confounding behaviours such as motor performance, anxiety, or disturbed sleep/wake cycles. These data suggest that the basal forebrain cholinergic system plays a specific role in idiothetic navigation, a modality that is impaired early in Alzheimer's disease.

  2. A State-of-the-Art Survey of Indoor Positioning and Navigation Systems and Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Sakpere

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The research and use of positioning and navigation technologies outdoors has seen a steady and exponential growth. Based on this success, there have been attempts to implement these technologies indoors, leading to numerous studies. Most of the algorithms, techniques and technologies used have been implemented outdoors. However, how they fare indoors is different altogether. Thus, several technologies have been proposed and implemented to improve positioning and navigation indoors. Among them are Infrared (IR, Ultrasound, Audible Sound, Magnetic, Optical and Vision, Radio Frequency (RF, Visible Light, Pedestrian Dead Reckoning (PDR/Inertial Navigation System (INS and Hybrid. The RF technologies include Bluetooth, Ultra-wideband (UWB, Wireless Sensor Network (WSN, Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN, Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID and Near Field Communication (NFC. In addition, positioning techniques applied in indoor positioning systems include the signal properties and positioning algorithms. The prevalent signal properties are Angle of Arrival (AOA, Time of Arrival (TOA, Time Difference of Arrival (TDOA and Received Signal Strength Indication (RSSI, while the positioning algorithms are Triangulation, Trilateration, Proximity and Scene Analysis/ Fingerprinting. This paper presents a state-of-the-art survey of indoor positioning and navigation systems and technologies, and their use in various scenarios. It analyses distinct positioning technology metrics such as accuracy, complexity, cost, privacy, scalability and usability. This paper has profound implications for future studies of positioning and navigation.

  3. NFC Internal: An Indoor Navigation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdenizci, Busra; Coskun, Vedat; Ok, Kerem

    2015-01-01

    Indoor navigation systems have recently become a popular research field due to the lack of GPS signals indoors. Several indoors navigation systems have already been proposed in order to eliminate deficiencies; however each of them has several technical and usability limitations. In this study, we propose NFC Internal, a Near Field Communication (NFC)-based indoor navigation system, which enables users to navigate through a building or a complex by enabling a simple location update, simply by touching NFC tags those are spread around and orient users to the destination. In this paper, we initially present the system requirements, give the design details and study the viability of NFC Internal with a prototype application and a case study. Moreover, we evaluate the performance of the system and compare it with existing indoor navigation systems. It is seen that NFC Internal has considerable advantages and significant contributions to existing indoor navigation systems in terms of security and privacy, cost, performance, robustness, complexity, user preference and commercial availability. PMID:25825976

  4. NFC Internal: An Indoor Navigation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busra Ozdenizci

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Indoor navigation systems have recently become a popular research field due to the lack of GPS signals indoors. Several indoors navigation systems have already been proposed in order to eliminate deficiencies; however each of them has several technical and usability limitations. In this study, we propose NFC Internal, a Near Field Communication (NFC-based indoor navigation system, which enables users to navigate through a building or a complex by enabling a simple location update, simply by touching NFC tags those are spread around and orient users to the destination. In this paper, we initially present the system requirements, give the design details and study the viability of NFC Internal with a prototype application and a case study. Moreover, we evaluate the performance of the system and compare it with existing indoor navigation systems. It is seen that NFC Internal has considerable advantages and significant contributions to existing indoor navigation systems in terms of security and privacy, cost, performance, robustness, complexity, user preference and commercial availability.

  5. Sensitivity quantification of remote detection NMR and MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granwehr, J.; Seeley, J. A.

    2006-04-01

    A sensitivity analysis is presented of the remote detection NMR technique, which facilitates the spatial separation of encoding and detection of spin magnetization. Three different cases are considered: remote detection of a transient signal that must be encoded point-by-point like a free induction decay, remote detection of an experiment where the transient dimension is reduced to one data point like phase encoding in an imaging experiment, and time-of-flight (TOF) flow visualization. For all cases, the sensitivity enhancement is proportional to the relative sensitivity between the remote detector and the circuit that is used for encoding. It is shown for the case of an encoded transient signal that the sensitivity does not scale unfavorably with the number of encoded points compared to direct detection. Remote enhancement scales as the square root of the ratio of corresponding relaxation times in the two detection environments. Thus, remote detection especially increases the sensitivity of imaging experiments of porous materials with large susceptibility gradients, which cause a rapid dephasing of transverse spin magnetization. Finally, TOF remote detection, in which the detection volume is smaller than the encoded fluid volume, allows partial images corresponding to different time intervals between encoding and detection to be recorded. These partial images, which contain information about the fluid displacement, can be recorded, in an ideal case, with the same sensitivity as the full image detected in a single step with a larger coil.

  6. Differential GNSS and Vision-Based Tracking to Improve Navigation Performance in Cooperative Multi-UAV Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amedeo Rodi Vetrella

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous navigation of micro-UAVs is typically based on the integration of low cost Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS receivers and Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS-based inertial and magnetic sensors to stabilize and control the flight. The resulting navigation performance in terms of position and attitude accuracy may not suffice for other mission needs, such as the ones relevant to fine sensor pointing. In this framework, this paper presents a cooperative UAV navigation algorithm that allows a chief vehicle, equipped with inertial and magnetic sensors, a Global Positioning System (GPS receiver, and a vision system, to improve its navigation performance (in real time or in the post processing phase exploiting formation flying deputy vehicles equipped with GPS receivers. The focus is set on outdoor environments and the key concept is to exploit differential GPS among vehicles and vision-based tracking (DGPS/Vision to build a virtual additional navigation sensor whose information is then integrated in a sensor fusion algorithm based on an Extended Kalman Filter. The developed concept and processing architecture are described, with a focus on DGPS/Vision attitude determination algorithm. Performance assessment is carried out on the basis of both numerical simulations and flight tests. In the latter ones, navigation estimates derived from the DGPS/Vision approach are compared with those provided by the onboard autopilot system of a customized quadrotor. The analysis shows the potential of the developed approach, mainly deriving from the possibility to exploit magnetic- and inertial-independent accurate attitude information.

  7. Conversion Timing of Seafarer’s Decision-making for Unmanned Ship Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruolan Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to construct an unmanned ship swarms monitoring model to improve autonomous decision-making efficiency and safety performance of unmanned ship navigation. A framework is proposed to determine the relationship between on-board decision-making and shore side monitoring, the process of ship data detection, tracking, analysis and loss, and the application of decision-making algorithm, to discuss the different risk responses of specific unmanned ship types under various latent hazard environments, particularly in terms of precise conversion timing in switching over to remote control and full manual monitoring, to ensure safe navigation when the capability of automatic risk response inadequate. This frame-work makes it easier to train data and the adjustment for machine learning based on Bayesian risk prediction. It can be concluded that the automation level can be increased and the workload of shore-based seafarers can be reduced easily.

  8. Remote Sensing Information Gateway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remote Sensing Information Gateway, a tool that allows scientists, researchers and decision makers to access a variety of multi-terabyte, environmental datasets and to subset the data and obtain only needed variables, greatly improving the download time.

  9. Remote handling equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, G.

    1984-01-01

    After a definition of intervention, problems encountered for working in an adverse environment are briefly analyzed for development of various remote handling equipments. Some examples of existing equipments are given [fr

  10. Hyperspectral remote sensing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eismann, Michael Theodore

    2012-01-01

    ..., and hyperspectral data processing. While there are many resources that suitably cover these areas individually and focus on specific aspects of the hyperspectral remote sensing field, this book provides a holistic treatment...

  11. The remote control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansweijer, P.P.M.

    1988-01-01

    The remote-control system is applied in order to control various signals in the car of the spectrometer at distance. The construction (hardware and software) as well as the operation of the system is described. (author). 20 figs

  12. Fuzzy Behavior Modulation with Threshold Activation for Autonomous Vehicle Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunstel, Edward

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes fuzzy logic techniques used in a hierarchical behavior-based architecture for robot navigation. An architectural feature for threshold activation of fuzzy-behaviors is emphasized, which is potentially useful for tuning navigation performance in real world applications. The target application is autonomous local navigation of a small planetary rover. Threshold activation of low-level navigation behaviors is the primary focus. A preliminary assessment of its impact on local navigation performance is provided based on computer simulations.

  13. Accessing Remote Knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maskell, Peter

    2014-01-01

    young, single-site firms search for distant sources of complementary competences. The discussion is positioned within a comprehensive framework that allows a systematic investigation of the approaches available to firms engaged in globally extended learning. By utilizing the distinction between problem...... awareness (what remote knowledge is needed?) and source awareness (where does this knowledge reside?) the article explores the relative merits and inherent limitations of pipelines, listening posts, crowdsourcing and trade fairs to acquire knowledge and solutions from geographically and relationally remote...

  14. Remote maintenance development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zook, C.R.

    1979-01-01

    The concept of remote maintenance as it pertains to nuclear fuel fabrication facilities is quite unique. The future may require completely remote facilities where maintenance will be performed by hybrid manipulators/robots. These units will be capable of being preprogrammed for automatic operation or manually operated with the operator becoming a part of the closed loop control system. These robots will mesh television, computer control, and direct force feedback manual control in a usable new concept of robotics

  15. E-navigation Services for Non-SOLAS Ships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang An

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available It is clearly understood that the main benefits of e-navigation are improved safety and better protection of the environment through the promotion of standards of navigational system and a reduction in human error. In order to meet the expectations on the benefit of e-navigation, e-navigation services should be more focused on non-SOLAS ships. The purpose of this paper is to present necessary e-navigation services for non-SOLAS ships in order to prevent marine accidents in Korean coastal waters. To meet the objectives of the study, an examination on the present navigation and communication system for non-SOLAS ships was performed. Based on the IMO's e-navigation Strategy Implementation Plan (SIP and Korea's national SIP for e-navigation, future trends for the development and implementation of e-navigation were discussed. Consequently, Electronic Navigational Chart (ENC download and ENC up-date service, ENC streaming service, route support service and communication support service based on Maritime Cloud were presented as essential e-navigation services for non-SOLAS ships. This study will help for the planning and designing of the Korean e-navigation system. It is expected that the further researches on the navigation support systems based on e-navigation will be carried out in order to implement the essential e-navigation services for non-SOLAS ships.

  16. LOW AND MEAN RADIATION DOSES IMPACT ON THE CEREBRAL TRACTS STRUCTURE OF THE CHERNOBYL ACCIDENT LIQUIDATORS IN THE REMOTE PERIOD (BASED ON ROUTINE AND DIFFUSION-TENSOR MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING DATA)

    OpenAIRE

    I. M. Levashkina; S. S. Aleksanin; S. V. Serebryakova; T. G. Gribanova

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate correlation between brain structural damages and radiation exposure level for the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident liquidators, routine and diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging methods are efficient to visualize and evaluate those damages; it is also important to compare magnetic resonance imaging data of liquidators with results, received for people of the same age and the same stage of cerebral vascular disease (the discirculatory encephalopathy of I and II stage), ...

  17. 78 FR 41304 - Navigation and Navigable Waters; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 105 [Docket No. USCG-2013-0397] RIN 1625-AC06 Navigation and Navigable Waters; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments; Correction AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule; correction. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard published a final rule...

  18. 75 FR 48564 - Navigation and Navigable Waters; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments, Sector...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Parts 3 and 165 [Docket No. USCG-2010-0351] RIN 1625-ZA25 Navigation and Navigable Waters; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments, Sector Columbia River, WA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This rule makes non-substantive...

  19. Target relative navigation results from hardware-in-the-loop tests using the sinplex navigation system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steffes, S.; Dumke, M.; Heise, D.; Sagliano, M.; Samaan, M.; Theil, S.; Boslooper, E.C.; Oosterling, J.A.J.; Schulte, J.; Skaborn, D.; Söderholm, S.; Conticello, S.; Esposito, M.; Yanson, Y.; Monna, B.; Stelwagen, F.; Visee, R.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the SINPLEX project is to develop an innovative solution to significantly reduce the mass of the navigation subsystem for exploration missions which include landing and/or rendezvous and capture phases. The system mass is reduced while still maintaining good navigation performance as

  20. Integrated navigation method of a marine strapdown inertial navigation system using a star sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Qiuying; Diao, Ming; Gao, Wei; Zhu, Minghong; Xiao, Shu

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated navigation method of the strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS) using a star sensor. According to the principle of SINS, its own navigation information contains an error that increases with time. Hence, the inertial attitude matrix from the star sensor is introduced as the reference information to correct the SINS increases error. For the integrated navigation method, the vehicle’s attitude can be obtained in two ways: one is calculated from SINS; the other, which we have called star sensor attitude, is obtained as the product between the SINS position and the inertial attitude matrix from the star sensor. Therefore, the SINS position error is introduced in the star sensor attitude error. Based on the characteristics of star sensor attitude error and the mathematical derivation, the SINS navigation errors can be obtained by the coupling calculation between the SINS attitude and the star sensor attitude. Unlike several current techniques, the navigation process of this method is non-radiating and invulnerable to jamming. The effectiveness of this approach was demonstrated by simulation and experimental study. The results show that this integrated navigation method can estimate the attitude error and the position error of SINS. Therefore, the SINS navigation accuracy is improved. (paper)

  1. 75 FR 50884 - Navigation and Navigable Waters; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments, Sector...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... 3 and 165 to reflect changes in Coast Guard internal organizational structure. Sector Portland and... 1625-ZA25 Navigation and Navigable Waters; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments, Sector... Waters; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments, Sector Columbia River.'' 2. On page 48564...

  2. Remote Sensing Open Access Journal: Increasing Impact through Quality Publications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad S. Thenkabail

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Remote Sensing, an open access journal (http://www.mdpi.com/journal/remotesensing has grown at rapid pace since its first publication five years ago, and has acquired a strong reputation. It is a “pathfinder” being the first open access journal in remote sensing. For those academics who were used to waiting a year or two for their peer-reviewed scientific work to be reviewed, revised, edited, and published, Remote Sensing offers a publication time frame that is unheard of (in most cases, less than four months. However, we do this after multiple peer-reviews, multiple revisions, much editorial scrutiny and decision-making, and professional editing by an editorial office before a paper is published online in our tight time frame, bringing a paradigm shift in scientific publication. As a result, there has been a swift increase in submissions of higher and higher quality manuscripts from the best authors and institutes working on Remote Sensing, Geographic Information Systems (GIS, Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS, GIScience, and all related geospatial science and technologies from around the world. The purpose of this editorial is to update everyone interested in Remote Sensing on the progress made over the last year, and provide an outline of our vision for the immediate future. [...

  3. Use of clinical guidelines in remote Australia: A realist evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Sandeep; Orpin, Victoria; Herring, Sally; Mackie-Schneider, Stephanie; Struber, Janet

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this evaluation was to assess the acceptability, accessibility, and compliance with the 2014 editions of the Remote Primary Health Care Manuals (RPHCM) in health care centres across remote areas of Northern and Central Australia. To undertake a comprehensive evaluation that considered context, the evaluation used a realist evaluation framework. The evaluation used a variety of methods including interviews and survey to develop and test a programme theory. Many remote health practitioners have adopted standardized, evidence-based practice because of the use of the RPHCM. The mechanisms that led to the use of the manuals include acceptance of the worth of the protocols to their clinical practice, reliance on manual content to guide their practice, the perception of credibility, the applicability of RPHCM content to the context, and a fear of the consequences of not using the RPHCMs. Some remote health practitioners are less inclined to use the RPHCM regularly because of a perception that the content is less suited to their needs and daily practice or it is hard to navigate or understand. The evaluation concluded that there is work to be done to widen the RPHCM user base, and organizations need to increase support for their staff to use the RPHCM protocols better. These measures are expected to enable standardized clinical practice in the remote context. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Intelligent navigation to improve obstetrical sonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Lami; Romero, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    'Manual navigation' by the operator is the standard method used to obtain information from two-dimensional and volumetric sonography. Two-dimensional sonography is highly operator dependent and requires extensive training and expertise to assess fetal anatomy properly. Most of the sonographic examination time is devoted to acquisition of images, while 'retrieval' and display of diagnostic planes occurs rapidly (essentially instantaneously). In contrast, volumetric sonography has a rapid acquisition phase, but the retrieval and display of relevant diagnostic planes is often time-consuming, tedious and challenging. We propose the term 'intelligent navigation' to refer to a new method of interrogation of a volume dataset whereby identification and selection of key anatomical landmarks allow the system to: 1) generate a geometrical reconstruction of the organ of interest; and 2) automatically navigate, find, extract and display specific diagnostic planes. This is accomplished using operator-independent algorithms that are both predictable and adaptive. Virtual Intelligent Sonographer Assistance (VIS-Assistance®) is a tool that allows operator-independent sonographic navigation and exploration of the surrounding structures in previously identified diagnostic planes. The advantage of intelligent (over manual) navigation in volumetric sonography is the short time required for both acquisition and retrieval and display of diagnostic planes. Intelligent navigation technology automatically realigns the volume, and reorients and standardizes the anatomical position, so that the fetus and the diagnostic planes are consistently displayed in the same manner each time, regardless of the fetal position or the initial orientation. Automatic labeling of anatomical structures, subject orientation and each of the diagnostic planes is also possible. Intelligent navigation technology can operate on conventional computers, and is not dependent on specific ultrasound platforms or on the

  5. Gradient waveform synthesis for magnetic propulsion using MRI gradient coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, B H; Lee, S Y; Park, S

    2008-01-01

    Navigating an untethered micro device in a living subject is of great interest for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Magnetic propulsion of an untethered device carrying a magnetic core in it is one of the promising methods to navigate the device. MRI gradients coils are thought to be suitable for navigating the device since they are capable of magnetic propulsion in any direction while providing magnetic resonance images. For precise navigation of the device, especially in the peripheral region of the gradient coils, the concomitant gradient fields, as well as the linear gradient fields in the main magnetic field direction, should be considered in driving the gradient coils. For simple gradient coil configurations, the Maxwell coil in the z-direction and the Golay coil in the x- and y-directions, we have calculated the magnetic force fields, which are not necessarily the same as the conventional linear gradient fields of MRI. Using the calculated magnetic force fields, we have synthesized gradient waveforms to navigate the device along a desired path

  6. Navigation Architecture for a Space Mobile Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Jennifer E.; Ashman, Benjamin; Gramling, Cheryl; Heckler, Gregory W.; Carpenter, Russell

    2016-01-01

    The Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) Augmentation Service for Satellites (TASS) is a proposed beacon service to provide a global, space based GPS augmentation service based on the NASA Global Differential GPS (GDGPS) System. The TASS signal will be tied to the GPS time system and usable as an additional ranging and Doppler radiometric source. Additionally, it will provide data vital to autonomous navigation in the near Earth regime, including space weather information, TDRS ephemerides, Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP), and forward commanding capability. TASS benefits include enhancing situational awareness, enabling increased autonomy, and providing near real-time command access for user platforms. As NASA Headquarters' Space Communication and Navigation Office (SCaN) begins to move away from a centralized network architecture and towards a Space Mobile Network (SMN) that allows for user initiated services, autonomous navigation will be a key part of such a system. This paper explores how a TASS beacon service enables the Space Mobile Networking paradigm, what a typical user platform would require, and provides an in-depth analysis of several navigation scenarios and operations concepts. This paper provides an overview of the TASS beacon and its role within the SMN and user community. Supporting navigation analysis is presented for two user mission scenarios: an Earth observing spacecraft in low earth orbit (LEO), and a highly elliptical spacecraft in a lunar resonance orbit. These diverse flight scenarios indicate the breadth of applicability of the TASS beacon for upcoming users within the current network architecture and in the SMN.

  7. An on-line monitoring system for navigation equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Yang, Ping; Liu, Jing; Yang, Zhengbo; Liang, Fei

    2017-10-01

    Civil air navigation equipment is the most important infrastructure of Civil Aviation, which is closely related to flight safety. In addition to regular flight inspection, navigation equipment's patrol measuring, maintenance measuring, running measuring under special weather conditions are the important means of ensuring aviation flight safety. According to the safety maintenance requirements of Civil Aviation Air Traffic Control navigation equipment, this paper developed one on-line monitoring system with independent intellectual property rights for navigation equipment, the system breakthroughs the key technologies of measuring navigation equipment on-line including Instrument Landing System (ILS) and VHF Omni-directional Range (VOR), which also meets the requirements of navigation equipment ground measurement set by the ICAO DOC 8071, it provides technical means of the ground on-line measurement for navigation equipment, improves the safety of navigation equipment operation, and reduces the impact of measuring navigation equipment on airport operation.

  8. Experiences with remote collaborations in fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurden, G.A.; Davis, S.; Barnes, D.

    1998-03-01

    The magnetic fusion research community has considerable experience in placing remote collaboration tools in the hands of real user. The ability to remotely view operations and to control selected instrumentation and analysis tasks has been demonstrated. University of Wisconsin scientists making turbulence measurements on TFTR: (1) were provided with a remote control room from which they could operate their diagnostic, while keeping in close contact with their colleagues in Princeton. LLNL has assembled a remote control room in Livermore in support of a large, long term collaboration on the DIII-D tokamak in San Diego. (2) From the same control room, a joint team of MIT and LLNL scientists has conducted full functional operation of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak located 3,000 miles away in Cambridge Massachusetts. (3) These early efforts have been highly successful, but are only the first steps needed to demonstrate the technical feasibility of a complete facilities on line environment. These efforts have provided a proof of principle for the collaboratory concept and they have also pointed out shortcomings in current generation tools and approaches. Current experiences and future directions will be discussed

  9. Development of remote laser welding technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soo-Sung; Kim, Woong-Ki; Lee, Jung-Won; Yang, Myung-Seung; Park, Hyun-Soo

    1999-01-01

    Various welding processes are now available for end cap closure of nuclear fuel element such as TIG(Tungsten Inert Gas) welding, magnetic resistance welding and laser welding. Even though the resistance and TIG welding process are widely used for manufacturing of the commercial fuel elements, it can not be recommended for the remote seal welding of fuel element at PIE facility due to its complexity of the electrode alignment, difficulty in the replacement of parts in the remote manner and its large heat input for thin sheath. Therefore, Nd:YAG laser system using the optical fiber transmission was selected for Zircaloy-4 end cap welding. Remote laser welding apparatus is developed using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser of 500 watt average power with optical fiber transmission. The laser weldability is satisfactory in respect of the microstructures and mechanical properties comparing with the TIG and resistance welding. The optimum operation processes of laser welding and the optical fiber transmission system for hot cell operation in remote manner have been developed. (author)

  10. Remote control of a fusion facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schissel, D.P. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States)], E-mail: schissel@fusion.gat.com; Abla, G.; Humphreys, D.A.; Penaflor, B.G.; Sammuli, B.S.; Walker, M.L. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Magnetic fusion experiments keep growing in size and complexity resulting in a concurrent growth in collaboration between experimental sites and laboratories worldwide. This scientific collaboration activity is strong at existing experimental sites, is a major element of machines just coming on line, and is also a thrust of experiments that will come on line in the next decade. Computer science research into enhancing the ability to scientifically participate in a fusion experiment remotely has been growing in size in an attempt to better address the needs of fusion scientists worldwide. The natural progression of this research is to examine how to move from remote scientific participation to remote hardware control. This paper examines the challenges associated with remote experimental device control and proposes a solution based on a semantic approach that defines a Gatekeeper software system that will be the only channel of interaction for incoming requests to the experimental site. The role of the Gatekeeper is to validate the identification and access privilege of the requestor and to ensure the validity of the proposed request. The Gatekeeper will be a modular system, transparent to end-users, and allow a high volume of activity.

  11. Remote control of a fusion facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schissel, D.P.; Abla, G.; Humphreys, D.A.; Penaflor, B.G.; Sammuli, B.S.; Walker, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic fusion experiments keep growing in size and complexity resulting in a concurrent growth in collaboration between experimental sites and laboratories worldwide. This scientific collaboration activity is strong at existing experimental sites, is a major element of machines just coming on line, and is also a thrust of experiments that will come on line in the next decade. Computer science research into enhancing the ability to scientifically participate in a fusion experiment remotely has been growing in size in an attempt to better address the needs of fusion scientists worldwide. The natural progression of this research is to examine how to move from remote scientific participation to remote hardware control. This paper examines the challenges associated with remote experimental device control and proposes a solution based on a semantic approach that defines a Gatekeeper software system that will be the only channel of interaction for incoming requests to the experimental site. The role of the Gatekeeper is to validate the identification and access privilege of the requestor and to ensure the validity of the proposed request. The Gatekeeper will be a modular system, transparent to end-users, and allow a high volume of activity.

  12. An investigation of secure remote instrument control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schissel, D.P.; Abla, G.; Fredian, T.; Greenwald, M.; Penaflor, B.G.; Stillerman, J.; Walker, M.L.; Ciarlette, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the computer science issues associated with secure remote instrumentation control for magnetic fusion experiments. Computer science research into enhancing the ability to scientifically participate in a fusion experiment remotely has been growing in size in an attempt to better address the needs of fusion scientists worldwide. The natural progression of this research is to examine how to move from remote scientific participation to remote hardware control. The vision is to define a gatekeeper software system that will be the only channel of interaction for incoming requests to the secured area of the experimental site. The role of the gatekeeper is to validate the identification and access privilege of the requestor and to insure the general validity of the proposed request. The vision for the gatekeeper is that it be a modular system that is simple in design and defined in a way that makes its implementation and operation transparent and obvious. The architecture of the module interface is flexible enough that it can easily allow the future addition of new modules. At the same time, it should be transparent to end-users and allow a high volume of activity so as to not provide a work bottleneck. The results of the gatekeeper design and initial implementation are presented as well as a discussion on the implication of this research on the operation of fusion experimental machines such as ITER.

  13. An investigation of secure remote instrument control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schissel, D.P., E-mail: schissel@fusion.gat.co [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Abla, G. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Fredian, T.; Greenwald, M. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Penaflor, B.G. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Stillerman, J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Walker, M.L. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Ciarlette, D.J. [US ITER Project Office, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2010-07-15

    This paper examines the computer science issues associated with secure remote instrumentation control for magnetic fusion experiments. Computer science research into enhancing the ability to scientifically participate in a fusion experiment remotely has been growing in size in an attempt to better address the needs of fusion scientists worldwide. The natural progression of this research is to examine how to move from remote scientific participation to remote hardware control. The vision is to define a gatekeeper software system that will be the only channel of interaction for incoming requests to the secured area of the experimental site. The role of the gatekeeper is to validate the identification and access privilege of the requestor and to insure the general validity of the proposed request. The vision for the gatekeeper is that it be a modular system that is simple in design and defined in a way that makes its implementation and operation transparent and obvious. The architecture of the module interface is flexible enough that it can easily allow the future addition of new modules. At the same time, it should be transparent to end-users and allow a high volume of activity so as to not provide a work bottleneck. The results of the gatekeeper design and initial implementation are presented as well as a discussion on the implication of this research on the operation of fusion experimental machines such as ITER.

  14. Benchmark Framework for Mobile Robots Navigation Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson David Muñoz-Ceballos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the wide variety of studies and research on mobile robot systems, performance metrics are not often examined. This makes difficult to establish an objective comparison of achievements. In this paper, the navigation of an autonomous mobile robot is evaluated. Several metrics are described. These metrics, collectively, provide an indication of navigation quality, useful for comparing and analyzing navigation algorithms of mobile robots. This method is suggested as an educational tool, which allows the student to optimize the algorithms quality, relating to important aspectsof science, technology and engineering teaching, as energy consumption, optimization and design.

  15. Wavefront Propagation and Fuzzy Based Autonomous Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Al-Jumaily

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Path planning and obstacle avoidance are the two major issues in any navigation system. Wavefront propagation algorithm, as a good path planner, can be used to determine an optimal path. Obstacle avoidance can be achieved using possibility theory. Combining these two functions enable a robot to autonomously navigate to its destination. This paper presents the approach and results in implementing an autonomous navigation system for an indoor mobile robot. The system developed is based on a laser sensor used to retrieve data to update a two dimensional world model of therobot environment. Waypoints in the path are incorporated into the obstacle avoidance. Features such as ageing of objects and smooth motion planning are implemented to enhance efficiency and also to cater for dynamic environments.

  16. Mobile Robot Designed with Autonomous Navigation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Feng; Chen, Qiang; Zha, Yanfang; Tao, Wenyin

    2017-10-01

    With the rapid development of robot technology, robots appear more and more in all aspects of life and social production, people also ask more requirements for the robot, one is that robot capable of autonomous navigation, can recognize the road. Take the common household sweeping robot as an example, which could avoid obstacles, clean the ground and automatically find the charging place; Another example is AGV tracking car, which can following the route and reach the destination successfully. This paper introduces a new type of robot navigation scheme: SLAM, which can build the environment map in a totally strange environment, and at the same time, locate its own position, so as to achieve autonomous navigation function.

  17. Navigation of robotic system using cricket motes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Yogendra J.; Baine, Nicholas A.; Rattan, Kuldip S.

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithm for self-mapping of the cricket motes that can be used for indoor navigation of autonomous robotic systems. The cricket system is a wireless sensor network that can provide indoor localization service to its user via acoustic ranging techniques. The behavior of the ultrasonic transducer on the cricket mote is studied and the regions where satisfactorily distance measurements can be obtained are recorded. Placing the motes in these regions results fine-grain mapping of the cricket motes. Trilateration is used to obtain a rigid coordinate system, but is insufficient if the network is to be used for navigation. A modified SLAM algorithm is applied to overcome the shortcomings of trilateration. Finally, the self-mapped cricket motes can be used for navigation of autonomous robotic systems in an indoor location.

  18. Earth magnetism a guided tour through magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, Wallace H

    2001-01-01

    An introductory guide to global magnetic field properties, Earth Magnetism addresses, in non-technical prose, many of the frequently asked questions about Earth''s magnetic field. Magnetism surrounds and penetrates our Earth in ways basic science courses can rarely address. It affects navigation, communication, and even the growth of crystals. As we observe and experience an 11-year solar maximum, we may witness spectacular satellite-destroying solar storms as they interact with our magnetic field. Written by an acknowledged expert in the field, this book will enrich courses in earth science, atmospheric science, geology, meteorology, geomagnetism, and geophysics. Contains nearly 200 original illustrations and eight pages of full-color plates.* Largely mathematics-free and with a wide breadth of material suitable for general readers* Integrates material from geomagnetism, paleomagnetism, and solar-terrestrial space physics.* Features nearly 200 original illustrations and 4 pages of colour plates

  19. An advanced unmanned vehicle for remote applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pletta, J.B.; Sackos, J.

    1998-03-01

    An autonomous mobile robotic capability is critical to developing remote work applications for hazardous environments. A few potential applications include humanitarian demining and ordnance neutralization, extraterrestrial science exploration, and hazardous waste cleanup. The ability of the remote platform to sense and maneuver within its environment is a basic technology requirement which is currently lacking. This enabling technology will open the door for force multiplication and cost effective solutions to remote operations. The ultimate goal of this work is to develop a mobile robotic platform that can identify and avoid local obstacles as it traverses from its current location to a specified destination. This goal directed autonomous navigation scheme uses the Global Positioning System (GPS) to identify the robot`s current coordinates in space and neural network processing of LADAR range images for local obstacle detection and avoidance. The initial year funding provided by this LDRD project has developed a small exterior mobile robotic development platform and a fieldable version of Sandia`s Scannerless Range Imager (SRI) system. The robotic testbed platform is based on the Surveillance And Reconnaissance ground Equipment (SARGE) robotic vehicle design recently developed for the US DoD. Contingent upon follow-on funding, future enhancements will develop neural network processing of the range map data to traverse unstructured exterior terrain while avoiding obstacles. The SRI will provide real-time range images to a neural network for autonomous guidance. Neural network processing of the range map data will allow real-time operation on a Pentium based embedded processor board.

  20. Remote connector development study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parazin, R.J.

    1995-05-01

    Plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) connectors, the most common connectors used at the Hanford site, offer a certain level of flexibility in pipe routing, process system configuration, and remote equipment/instrument replacement. However, these desirable features have inherent shortcomings like leakage, high pressure drop through the right angle bends, and a limited range of available pipe diameters that can be connect by them. Costs for construction, maintenance, and operation of PUREX connectors seem to be very high. The PUREX connector designs include a 90 degree bend in each connector. This increases the pressure drop and erosion effects. Thus, each jumper requires at least two 90 degree bends. PUREX connectors have not been practically used beyond 100 (4 in.) inner diameter. This study represents the results of a survey on the use of remote pipe-connection systems in US and foreign plants. This study also describes the interdependence between connectors, remote handling equipment, and the necessary skills of the operators

  1. Use of remote monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournel, E; Gouilloux, C

    1977-01-01

    Paper traces the development of remote monitoring devices, since their first appearance for safety purposes. Discusses their uses in coal mines: working and safety (definitions); sources and channels of information (transmission of information by automatic or verbal means); mine control stations; duties and responsibilities of persons in charge. Examines the contribution made by remote monitoring to management in production sector. Gives examples of assistance given to production management showing a very advantageous result on balance, by their use. The use of computers in real time and in batched mode is compared. Discusses their use in monitoring mine atmosphere. Very favorable results have already been obtained in France and abroad. The broadening scope and future of remote monitoring is considered.

  2. Prospective navigator-echo-based real-time triggering of fetal head movement for the reduction of artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonel, H; Frei, K A; Raio, L; Meyer-Wittkopf, M; Remonda, L; Wiest, R

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the neuroimaging quality and accuracy of prospective real-time navigator-echo acquisition correction versus untriggered intrauterine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. Twenty women in whom fetal motion artifacts compromised the neuroimaging quality of fetal MRI taken during the 28.7 +/- 4 week of pregnancy below diagnostic levels were additionally investigated using a navigator-triggered half-Fourier acquired single-shot turbo-spin echo (HASTE) sequence. Imaging quality was evaluated by two blinded readers applying a rating scale from 1 (not diagnostic) to 5 (excellent). Diagnostic criteria included depiction of the germinal matrix, grey and white matter, CSF, brain stem and cerebellum. Signal-difference-to-noise ratios (SDNRs) in the white matter and germinal zone were quantitatively evaluated. Imaging quality improved in 18/20 patients using the navigator echo technique (2.4 +/- 0.58 vs. 3.65 +/- 0.73 SD, p < 0.01 for all evaluation criteria). In 2/20 patients fetal movement severely impaired image quality in conventional and navigated HASTE. Navigator-echo imaging revealed additional structural brain abnormalities and confirmed diagnosis in 8/20 patients. The accuracy improved from 50% to 90%. Average SDNR increased from 0.7 +/- 7.27 to 19.83 +/- 15.71 (p < 0.01). Navigator-echo-based real-time triggering of fetal head movement is a reliable technique that can deliver diagnostic fetal MR image quality despite vigorous fetal movement.

  3. Lucy: Navigating a Jupiter Trojan Tour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanbridge, Dale; Williams, Ken; Williams, Bobby; Jackman, Coralie; Weaver, Hal; Berry, Kevin; Sutter, Brian; Englander, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    In January 2017, NASA selected the Lucy mission to explore six Jupiter Trojan asteroids. These six bodies, remnants of the primordial material that formed the outer planets, were captured in the Sun-Jupiter L4 and L5 Lagrangian regions early in the solar system formation. These particular bodies were chosen because of their diverse spectral properties and the chance to observe up close for the first time two orbiting approximately equal mass binaries, Patroclus and Menoetius. KinetX, Inc. is the primary navigation supplier for the Lucy mission. This paper describes preliminary navigation analyses of the approach phase for each Trojan encounter.

  4. BOREAS Level-0 ER-2 Navigation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strub, Richard; Dominguez, Roseanne; Newcomer, Jeffrey A.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS Staff Science effort covered those activities that were BOREAS community-level activities or required uniform data collection procedures across sites and time. These activities included the acquisition, processing, and archiving of aircraft navigation/attitude data to complement the digital image data. The level-0 ER-2 navigation data files contain aircraft attitude and position information acquired during the digital image and photographic data collection missions. Temporally, the data were acquired from April to September 1994. Data were recorded at intervals of 5 seconds. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  5. NET remote workstation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leinemann, K.

    1990-10-01

    The goal of this NET study was to define the functionality of a remote handling workstation and its hardware and software architecture. The remote handling workstation has to fulfill two basic functions: (1) to provide the man-machine interface (MMI), that means the interface to the control system of the maintenance equipment and to the working environment (telepresence) and (2) to provide high level (task level) supporting functions (software tools) during the maintenance work and in the preparation phase. Concerning the man-machine interface, an important module of the remote handling workstation besides the standard components of man-machine interfacing is a module for graphical scene presentation supplementing viewing by TV. The technique of integrated viewing is well known from JET BOOM and TARM control using the GBsim and KISMET software. For integration of equipment dependent MMI functions the remote handling workstation provides a special software module interface. Task level support of the operator is based on (1) spatial (geometric/kinematic) models, (2) remote handling procedure models, and (3) functional models of the equipment. These models and the related simulation modules are used for planning, programming, execution monitoring, and training. The workstation provides an intelligent handbook guiding the operator through planned procedures illustrated by animated graphical sequences. For unplanned situations decision aids are available. A central point of the architectural design was to guarantee a high flexibility with respect to hardware and software. Therefore the remote handling workstation is designed as an open system based on widely accepted standards allowing the stepwise integration of the various modules starting with the basic MMI and the spatial simulation as standard components. (orig./HP) [de

  6. Proceedings of FED remote maintenance equipment workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sager, P.; Garin, J.; Hager, E.R.; Spampinato, P.T.; Tobias, D.; Young, N.

    1981-11-01

    A workshop was convened in two sessions in January and March 1981, on the remote maintenance equipment for the Fusion Engineering Device (FED). The objectives of the first session were to familiarize the participants with the status of the design of the FED and to develop a remote maintenance equipment list for the FED. The objective of the second session was to have the participants present design concepts for the equipment which had been identified in the first session. The equipment list was developed for general purpose and special purpose equipment. The general purpose equipment was categorized as manipulators and other, while the special purpose equipment was subdivided according to the reactor subsystem it serviced: electrical, magnetic, and nuclear. Both mobile and fixed base manipulators were identified. Handling machines were identified as the major requirement for special purpose equipment

  7. Remote Reactor Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, Adam [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dazeley, Steve [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dobie, Doug [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Marleau, Peter [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brennan, Jim [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gerling, Mark [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sumner, Matthew [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sweany, Melinda [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-10-21

    The overall goal of the WATCHMAN project is to experimentally demonstrate the potential of water Cerenkov antineutrino detectors as a tool for remote monitoring of nuclear reactors. In particular, the project seeks to field a large prototype gadolinium-doped, water-based antineutrino detector to demonstrate sensitivity to a power reactor at ~10 kilometer standoff using a kiloton scale detector. The technology under development, when fully realized at large scale, could provide remote near-real-time information about reactor existence and operational status for small operating nuclear reactors out to distances of many hundreds of kilometers.

  8. Remote sensing image fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Alparone, Luciano; Baronti, Stefano; Garzelli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    A synthesis of more than ten years of experience, Remote Sensing Image Fusion covers methods specifically designed for remote sensing imagery. The authors supply a comprehensive classification system and rigorous mathematical description of advanced and state-of-the-art methods for pansharpening of multispectral images, fusion of hyperspectral and panchromatic images, and fusion of data from heterogeneous sensors such as optical and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images and integration of thermal and visible/near-infrared images. They also explore new trends of signal/image processing, such as

  9. Introduction to remote sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, James B

    2012-01-01

    A leading text for undergraduate- and graduate-level courses, this book introduces widely used forms of remote sensing imagery and their applications in plant sciences, hydrology, earth sciences, and land use analysis. The text provides comprehensive coverage of principal topics and serves as a framework for organizing the vast amount of remote sensing information available on the Web. Including case studies and review questions, the book's four sections and 21 chapters are carefully designed as independent units that instructors can select from as needed for their courses. Illustrations in

  10. Radar Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    This lecture was just a taste of radar remote sensing techniques and applications. Other important areas include Stereo radar grammetry. PolInSAR for volumetric structure mapping. Agricultural monitoring, soil moisture, ice-mapping, etc. The broad range of sensor types, frequencies of observation and availability of sensors have enabled radar sensors to make significant contributions in a wide area of earth and planetary remote sensing sciences. The range of applications, both qualitative and quantitative, continue to expand with each new generation of sensors.

  11. Imaging the Messier objects remotely from your laptop

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, Len

    2018-01-01

    This is a guide for anyone interested in practical astronomy but intimidated by the idea of investing in a telescope. It explores the world of remote observing, which requires nothing more than a laptop and an Internet connection. The book aims to make readers comfortable navigating the plethora of online equipment at their disposal and to show that a challenge like imaging the Messier objects can be fun, simple, and achievable for all. In this text, all 110 Messier objects are discussed, each one remotely imaged with clear instructions on what telescope and camera combinations give the best results. Common astronomical phrases and units are all explained and illustrated to help newcomers get a grasp of terminology. Tidbits of history and quotes from Messier and other astronomers round out this beginner-friendly read, which also features a handy Quick Reference Image Library.

  12. Identification of groundwater prospective zones by using remote ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    remote sensing and geoelectrical methods in Jharia and. Raniganj coalfields, Dhanbad district, Jharkhand state. Basudeo Rai. 1,∗ ... are most promising for groundwater exploration and dug wells may be dug up to depths of. 30 ± 5 m. 1. ..... Gupta A 1980 Correlation of Landsat and airborne magnetic anomaly data of a part ...

  13. LOW AND MEAN RADIATION DOSES IMPACT ON THE CEREBRAL TRACTS STRUCTURE OF THE CHERNOBYL ACCIDENT LIQUIDATORS IN THE REMOTE PERIOD (BASED ON ROUTINE AND DIFFUSION-TENSOR MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Levashkina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate correlation between brain structural damages and radiation exposure level for the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident liquidators, routine and diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging methods are efficient to visualize and evaluate those damages; it is also important to compare magnetic resonance imaging data of liquidators with results, received for people of the same age and the same stage of cerebral vascular disease (the discirculatory encephalopathy of I and II stage, but who did not participate in the Chernobyl accident liquidation and did not suffer from other liquidation factors and radiation catastrophe aftermaths. As a result, the Chernobyl accident liquidators group (49 subjects and group of control (50 subjects were examined with routine magnetic resonance imaging methods and standard protocols. In addition, the innovative method of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging was applied to examine 11 cerebral tracts, bilaterally (22 tracts in both hemispheres for every subject of the research. It was for the first time when diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging was applied to conduct visual analysis of polymorphic brain changes for the Chernobyl accident liquidators and special research conducted to find correlation between fractional anisotropy coefficient and radiation exposure for these patients. The results of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging indicated no statistically significant (p > 0,05 difference in the level of cerebral morphological changes and between average fraction anisotropy coefficient value in any cerebral tract for both sub-groups of liquidators with different level of irradiation: 28 subjects, who were exposed by low and very low radiation doses (0–100 micro-Sv, sub-group A and 21 subjects, who were exposed by mean radiation doses (100–1000 micro-Sv, sub-group B. However, comparing diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging results of control group and liquidators group

  14. Magnetic catheter manipulation in the interventional MR imaging environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mark W; Martin, Alastair B; Lillaney, Prasheel; Losey, Aaron D; Yee, Erin J; Bernhardt, Anthony; Malba, Vincent; Evans, Lee; Sincic, Ryan; Saeed, Maythem; Arenson, Ronald L; Hetts, Steven W

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate deflection capability of a prototype endovascular catheter, which is remotely magnetically steerable, for use in the interventional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging environment. Copper coils were mounted on the tips of commercially available 2.3-3.0-F microcatheters. The coils were fabricated in a novel manner by plasma vapor deposition of a copper layer followed by laser lithography of the layer into coils. Orthogonal helical (ie, solenoid) and saddle-shaped (ie, Helmholtz) coils were mounted on a single catheter tip. Microcatheters were tested in water bath phantoms in a 1.5-T clinical MR scanner, with variable simultaneous currents applied to the coils. Catheter tip deflection was imaged in the axial plane by using a "real-time" steady-state free precession MR imaging sequence. Degree of deflection and catheter tip orientation were measured for each current application. The catheter tip was clearly visible in the longitudinal and axial planes. Magnetic field artifacts were visible when the orthogonal coils at the catheter tip were energized. Variable amounts of current applied to a single coil demonstrated consistent catheter deflection in all water bath experiments. Changing current polarity reversed the observed direction of deflection, whereas current applied to two different coils resulted in deflection represented by the composite vector of individual coil activations. Microcatheter navigation through the vascular phantom was successful through control of applied current to one or more coils. Controlled catheter deflection is possible with laser lithographed multiaxis coil-tipped catheters in the MR imaging environment. Copyright © 2013 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. PresenceRemote

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokoler, Tomas; Svensson, Marcus Sanchez

    2008-01-01

    how these technologies can accommodate the specific challenges related to the everyday life of elderly people. In particular, using an example concept – the PresenceRemote – we will discuss how the stigma associated with being lonely, an inherent part of senior living, can be addressed by leaving room...

  16. A Remote WIRELESS Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kees Uiterwijk

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Continuing need for available distance learning facilities has led to the development of a remote lab facility focusing on wireless technology. In the field of engineering there is a student need of gaining experience in set-up, monitoring and maintenance of 802.11A/B/G based wireless LAN environments.

  17. Remote sensing: best practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Gareth [Sgurr Energy (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents remote sensing best practice in the wind industry. Remote sensing is a technique whereby measurements are obtained from the interaction of laser or acoustic pulses with the atmosphere. There is a vast diversity of tools and techniques available and they offer wide scope for reducing project uncertainty and risk but best practice must take into account versatility and flexibility. It should focus on the outcome in terms of results and data. However, traceability of accuracy requires comparison with conventional instruments. The framework for the Boulder protocol is given. Overviews of the guidelines for IEA SODAR and IEA LIDAR are also mentioned. The important elements of IEC 61400-12-1, an international standard for wind turbines, are given. Bankability is defined based on the Boulder protocol and a pie chart is presented that illustrates the uncertainty area covered by remote sensing. In conclusion it can be said that remote sensing is changing perceptions about how wind energy assessments can be made.

  18. Remote RF Battery Charging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, H.J.; Pop, V.; Op het Veld, J.H.G.; Vullers, R.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    The design of a remote RF battery charger is discussed through the analysis and design of the subsystems of a rectenna (rectifying antenna): antenna, rectifying circuit and loaded DC-to-DC voltage (buck-boost) converter. Optimum system power generation performance is obtained by adopting a system

  19. Section summary: Remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belinda Arunarwati Margono

    2013-01-01

    Remote sensing is an important data source for monitoring the change of forest cover, in terms of both total removal of forest cover (deforestation), and change of canopy cover, structure and forest ecosystem services that result in forest degradation. In the context of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), forest degradation monitoring requires information...

  20. Remote Voice Detection System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blackmon, Fletcher A

    2007-01-01

    A device and system to remotely detect vocalizations of speech. The skin located on the throat region of a speaking person or a reflective layer on the skin on the throat region vibrates in response to vocalizations of speech by the person...

  1. Remotely controlled spray gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, William C. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A remotely controlled spray gun is described in which a nozzle and orifice plate are held in precise axial alignment by an alignment member, which in turn is held in alignment with the general outlet of the spray gun by insert. By this arrangement, the precise repeatability of spray patterns is insured.

  2. Designs for remote inspection of the ALMR Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, F.J.; Carroll, D.G.; Chen, C.; Crane, C.; Dalton, R.; Taylor, J.R.; Tosunoglu, S.; Weymouth, T.

    1993-01-01

    One of the most important safety systems in General Electric's (GI) Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) is the Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS). Because of high temperature, radiation, and restricted space conditions, GI desired methods to remotely inspect the RVACS, emissive coatings, and reactor vessel welds during normal refueling operations. The DOE/NE Robotics for Advanced Reactors program formed a team to evaluate the ALMR design for remote inspection of the RVACS. Conceptual designs for robots to perform the required inspection tasks were developed by the team. Design criteria for these remote systems included robot deployment, power supply, navigation, environmental hardening of components, tether management, communication with an operator, sensing, and failure recovery. The operation of the remote inspection concepts were tested using 3-D simulation models of the ALMR. In addition, the team performed an extensive technology review of robot components that could survive the environmental conditions in the RVACS

  3. Adaptive Landmark-Based Navigation System Using Learning Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeidan, Bassel; Dasgupta, Sakyasingha; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2014-01-01

    The goal-directed navigational ability of animals is an essential prerequisite for them to survive. They can learn to navigate to a distal goal in a complex environment. During this long-distance navigation, they exploit environmental features, like landmarks, to guide them towards their goal. In...... hexapod robots. As a result, it allows the robots to successfully learn to navigate to distal goals in complex environments.......The goal-directed navigational ability of animals is an essential prerequisite for them to survive. They can learn to navigate to a distal goal in a complex environment. During this long-distance navigation, they exploit environmental features, like landmarks, to guide them towards their goal....... Inspired by this, we develop an adaptive landmark-based navigation system based on sequential reinforcement learning. In addition, correlation-based learning is also integrated into the system to improve learning performance. The proposed system has been applied to simulated simple wheeled and more complex...

  4. GRIP DC-8 NAVIGATION AND HOUSEKEEPING DATA V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GRIP DC-8 Navigation and Housekeeping Data contains aircraft navigational data obtained during the GRIP campaign (15 Aug 2010 - 30 Sep 2010). The major goal was...

  5. GRIP DC-8 NAVIGATION AND HOUSEKEEPING DATA V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains aircraft navigational data obtained during the GRIP campaign (15 Aug 2010 - 30 Sep 2010). The NASA DC-8 is outfitted with a navigational...

  6. Issues in symbol design for electronic displays of navigation information

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-10-24

    An increasing number of electronic displays, ranging from small hand-held displays for general aviation to installed displays for air transport, are showing navigation information, such as symbols representing navigational aids. The wide range of dis...

  7. GPM Ground Validation Navigation Data ER-2 OLYMPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation NASA ER-2 Navigation Data OLYMPEX dataset supplies navigation data collected by the NASA ER-2 aircraft for flights that occurred during...

  8. Enabling Autonomous Navigation for Affordable Scooters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaikai Liu

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the technical success of existing assistive technologies, for example, electric wheelchairs and scooters, they are still far from effective enough in helping those in need navigate to their destinations in a hassle-free manner. In this paper, we propose to improve the safety and autonomy of navigation by designing a cutting-edge autonomous scooter, thus allowing people with mobility challenges to ambulate independently and safely in possibly unfamiliar surroundings. We focus on indoor navigation scenarios for the autonomous scooter where the current location, maps, and nearby obstacles are unknown. To achieve semi-LiDAR functionality, we leverage the gyros-based pose data to compensate the laser motion in real time and create synthetic mapping of simple environments with regular shapes and deep hallways. Laser range finders are suitable for long ranges with limited resolution. Stereo vision, on the other hand, provides 3D structural data of nearby complex objects. To achieve simultaneous fine-grained resolution and long range coverage in the mapping of cluttered and complex environments, we dynamically fuse the measurements from the stereo vision camera system, the synthetic laser scanner, and the LiDAR. We propose solutions to self-correct errors in data fusion and create a hybrid map to assist the scooter in achieving collision-free navigation in an indoor environment.

  9. Enabling Autonomous Navigation for Affordable Scooters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kaikai; Mulky, Rajathswaroop

    2018-06-05

    Despite the technical success of existing assistive technologies, for example, electric wheelchairs and scooters, they are still far from effective enough in helping those in need navigate to their destinations in a hassle-free manner. In this paper, we propose to improve the safety and autonomy of navigation by designing a cutting-edge autonomous scooter, thus allowing people with mobility challenges to ambulate independently and safely in possibly unfamiliar surroundings. We focus on indoor navigation scenarios for the autonomous scooter where the current location, maps, and nearby obstacles are unknown. To achieve semi-LiDAR functionality, we leverage the gyros-based pose data to compensate the laser motion in real time and create synthetic mapping of simple environments with regular shapes and deep hallways. Laser range finders are suitable for long ranges with limited resolution. Stereo vision, on the other hand, provides 3D structural data of nearby complex objects. To achieve simultaneous fine-grained resolution and long range coverage in the mapping of cluttered and complex environments, we dynamically fuse the measurements from the stereo vision camera system, the synthetic laser scanner, and the LiDAR. We propose solutions to self-correct errors in data fusion and create a hybrid map to assist the scooter in achieving collision-free navigation in an indoor environment.

  10. Gamifying Navigation in Location-Based Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nadarajah, Stephanie Githa; Overgaard, Benjamin Nicholas; Pedersen, Peder Walz

    2017-01-01

    Location-based games entertain players usually by interactions at points of interest (POIs). Navigation between POIs often involve the use of either a physical or digital map, not taking advantage of the opportunity available to engage users in activities between POIs. The paper presents riddle s...

  11. Navigation in musculoskeletal oncology: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Vernon Morris

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Navigation in surgery has increasingly become more commonplace. The use of this technological advancement has enabled ever more complex and detailed surgery to be performed to the benefit of surgeons and patients alike. This is particularly so when applying the use of navigation within the field of orthopedic oncology. The developments in computer processing power coupled with the improvements in scanning technologies have permitted the incorporation of navigational procedures into day-to-day practice. A comprehensive search of PubMed using the search terms “navigation”, “orthopaedic” and “oncology” yielded 97 results. After filtering for English language papers, excluding spinal surgery and review articles, this resulted in 38 clinical studies and case reports. These were analyzed in detail by the authors (GM and JS and the most relevant papers reviewed. We have sought to provide an overview of the main types of navigation systems currently available within orthopedic oncology and to assess some of the evidence behind its use.

  12. Ohio River Navigation: Past-Present-Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-10-01

    navigation structures had been built: the auxillary 56- by 360-foot lock at dam 41 (Louisville), 1930; Montgomery Locks and Dam, 1936; and Gallipolis...Mile 974.2. This project was approved in 1963, but substantial ’ delay is anticipated ina decision concerning its execu- tion. For this reason a

  13. Mobile Screens: The Visual Regime of Navigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeff, N.

    2012-01-01

    In this book on screen media, space, and mobility I compare synchronically, as well as diachronically, diverse and variegated screen media - their technologies and practices – as sites for virtual mobility and navigation. Mobility as a central trope can be found on the multiple levels that are

  14. The "Set Map" Method of Navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippett, Julian

    1998-01-01

    Explains the "set map" method of using the baseplate compass to solve walkers' navigational needs as opposed to the 1-2-3 method for taking a bearing. The map, with the compass permanently clipped to it, is rotated to the position in which its features have the same orientation as their counterparts on the ground. Includes directions and…

  15. Neurosurgical robotic arm drilling navigation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chung-Chih; Lin, Hsin-Cheng; Lee, Wen-Yo; Lee, Shih-Tseng; Wu, Chieh-Tsai

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a neurosurgical robotic arm drilling navigation system that provides assistance throughout the complete bone drilling process. The system comprised neurosurgical robotic arm navigation combining robotic and surgical navigation, 3D medical imaging based surgical planning that could identify lesion location and plan the surgical path on 3D images, and automatic bone drilling control that would stop drilling when the bone was to be drilled-through. Three kinds of experiment were designed. The average positioning error deduced from 3D images of the robotic arm was 0.502 ± 0.069 mm. The correlation between automatically and manually planned paths was 0.975. The average distance error between automatically planned paths and risky zones was 0.279 ± 0.401 mm. The drilling auto-stopping algorithm had 0.00% unstopped cases (26.32% in control group 1) and 70.53% non-drilled-through cases (8.42% and 4.21% in control groups 1 and 2). The system may be useful for neurosurgical robotic arm drilling navigation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. 77 FR 67658 - Navigation Safety Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard [Docket No. USCG-2012-0212] Navigation Safety Advisory.../en/hotels/florida/embassy-suites-tampa-downtown-convention-center-TPAESES/index.html . For... possible. To facilitate public participation, we are inviting public comment on the issues to be considered...

  17. Orchard navigation using derivative free Kalman filtering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Søren; Bayramoglu, Enis; Andersen, Jens Christian

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the use of derivative free filters for mobile robot localization and navigation in an orchard. The localization algorithm fuses odometry and gyro measurements with line features representing the surrounding fruit trees of the orchard. The line features are created on basis of 2...

  18. Cloud-Induced Uncertainty for Visual Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-26

    can occur due to interference, jamming, or signal blockage in urban canyons. In GPS-denied environments, a GP- S/INS navigation system is forced to rely...physics-based approaches use equations that model fluid flow, thermodynamics, water condensation , and evapora- tion to generate clouds [4]. The drawback

  19. Requirements for e-Navigation Architectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Hahn

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Technology is changing the way of navigation. New technologies for communication and navigation can be found on virtually every vessel. System architectures define structure and cooperation of components and subsystems. IMO, IALA, costal authorities, technology provider and many more actually propose new architectures for e-Navigation. This paper looks at other transportation domains and technical as normative requirements for e-Navigation architectures. With the aim of identifying possible synergies in the research, development, certification and standardization, this paper sets out to compare requirements and approaches of these two domains with respect to safety and security aspects. Since from an autonomy perspective, the automotive domain has started earlier and therefore has achieved a higher degree of technical progress, we will start with an overview of the developments in this domain. After that, the paper discusses the requirements on automation and assistance systems in the maritime domain and gives an overview of the developments into this direction within the maritime domain. This then allows us to compare developments in both domains and to derive recommendations for further developments in the maritime domain at the end of this paper.

  20. 'Outsmarting Traffic, Together': Driving as Social Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Hind

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The automotive world is evolving. Ten years ago Nigel Thrift (2004: 41 made the claim that the experience of driving was slipping into our 'technological unconscious'. Only recently the New York Times suggested that with the rise of automated driving, standalone navigation tools as we know them would cease to exist, instead being 'fully absorbed into the machine' (Fisher, 2013. But in order to bridge the gap between past and future driving worlds, another technological evolution is emerging. This short, critical piece charts the rise of what has been called 'social navigation' in the industry; the development of digital mapping platforms designed to foster automotive sociality. It makes two provisional points. Firstly, that 'ludic' conceptualisations can shed light on the ongoing reconfiguration of drivers, vehicles, roads and technological aids such as touch-screen satellite navigation platforms. And secondly, that as a result of this, there is a coming-into-being of a new kind of driving politics; a 'casual politicking' centred on an engagement with digital interfaces. We explicate both by turning our attention towards Waze; a social navigation application that encourages users to interact with various driving dynamics.

  1. Celestial Navigation on the Surface of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malay, Benjamin P.

    2001-05-01

    A simple, accurate, and autonomous method of finding position on the surface of Mars currently does not exist. The goal of this project is to develop a celestial navigation process that will fix a position on Mars with 100-meter accuracy. This method requires knowing the position of the stars and planets referenced to the Martian surface with one arcsecond accuracy. This information is contained in an ephemeris known as the Aeronautical Almanac (from Ares, the god of war) . Naval Observatory Vector Astrometry Subroutines (NOVAS) form the basis of the code used to generate the almanac. Planetary position data come the JPL DE405 Planetary Ephemeris. The theoretical accuracy of the almanac is determined mathematically and compared with the Ephemeris for Physical Observations of Mars contained in the Astronautical Almanac. A preliminary design of an autonomous celestial navigation system is presented. Recommendations of how to integrate celestial navigation into NASA=s current Mars exploration program are also discussed. This project is a useful and much-needed first step towards establishing celestial navigation as a practical way to find position on the surface of Mars.

  2. Autonomous Rule Based Robot Navigation In Orchards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Christian; Ravn, Ole; Andersen, Nils Axel

    2010-01-01

    Orchard navigation using sensor-based localization and exible mission management facilitates successful missions independent of the Global Positioning System (GPS). This is especially important while driving between tight tree rows where the GPS coverage is poor. This paper suggests localization ...

  3. Navigating Transitions: Challenges for Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore-Russo, Deborah; Wilsey, Jillian N.; Parthum, Michael J., Sr.; Lewis, Kemper

    2017-01-01

    As college students enter engineering, they face challenges when they navigate across various transitions. These challenges impact whether a student can successfully adapt to the rigorous curricular requirements of an engineering degree and to the norms and expectations that are particular to engineering. This article focuses on the transitions…

  4. Navigable windows of the Northwest Passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xing-he; Ma, Long; Wang, Jia-yue; Wang, Ye; Wang, Li-na

    2017-09-01

    Artic sea ice loss trends support a greater potential for Arctic shipping. The information of sea ice conditions is important for utilizing Arctic passages. Based on the shipping routes given by ;Arctic Marine Shipping Assessment 2009 Report;, the navigable windows of these routes and the constituent legs were calculated by using sea ice concentration product data from 2006 to 2015, by which a comprehensive knowledge of the sea ice condition of the Northwest Passage was achieved. The results showed that Route 4 (Lancaster Sound - Barrow Strait - Prince Regent Inlet and Bellot Strait - Franklin Strait - Larsen Sound - Victoria Strait - Queen Maud Gulf - Dease Strait - Coronation Gulf - Dolphin and Union Strait - Amundsen Gulf) had the best navigable expectation, Route 2 (Parry Channel - M'Clure Strait) had the worst, and the critical legs affecting the navigation of Northwest Passage were Viscount Melville Sound, Franklin Strait, Victoria Strait, Bellot Strait, M'Clure Strait and Prince of Wales Strait. The shortest navigable period of the routes of Northwest Passage was up to 69 days. The methods used and the results of the study can help the selection and evaluation of Arctic commercial routes.

  5. The Navigation Metaphor in Security Economics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, W.; Barendse, Jeroen; Ford, Margaret; Heath, Claude P R; Probst, Christian W.; Verbij, Ruud

    2016-01-01

    The navigation metaphor for cybersecurity merges security architecture models and security economics. By identifying the most efficient routes for gaining access to assets from an attacker's viewpoint, an organization can optimize its defenses along these routes. The well-understood concept of

  6. The navigation metaphor in security economics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, Wolter; Barendse, Jeroen; Ford, Margaret; Heath, Claude P.R.; Probst, Christian W.; Verbij, Ruud

    2016-01-01

    The navigation metaphor for cybersecurity merges security architecture models and security economics. By identifying the most efficient routes for gaining access to assets from an attacker's viewpoint, an organization can optimize its defenses along these routes. The well-understood concept of

  7. Spatial navigation by congenitally blind individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinazi, Victor R; Thrash, Tyler; Chebat, Daniel-Robert

    2016-01-01

    Spatial navigation in the absence of vision has been investigated from a variety of perspectives and disciplines. These different approaches have progressed our understanding of spatial knowledge acquisition by blind individuals, including their abilities, strategies, and corresponding mental representations. In this review, we propose a framework for investigating differences in spatial knowledge acquisition by blind and sighted people consisting of three longitudinal models (i.e., convergent, cumulative, and persistent). Recent advances in neuroscience and technological devices have provided novel insights into the different neural mechanisms underlying spatial navigation by blind and sighted people and the potential for functional reorganization. Despite these advances, there is still a lack of consensus regarding the extent to which locomotion and wayfinding depend on amodal spatial representations. This challenge largely stems from methodological limitations such as heterogeneity in the blind population and terminological ambiguity related to the concept of cognitive maps. Coupled with an over-reliance on potential technological solutions, the field has diffused into theoretical and applied branches that do not always communicate. Here, we review research on navigation by congenitally blind individuals with an emphasis on behavioral and neuroscientific evidence, as well as the potential of technological assistance. Throughout the article, we emphasize the need to disentangle strategy choice and performance when discussing the navigation abilities of the blind population. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2015 The Authors. WIREs Cognitive Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Robust Pedestrian Navigation for Challenging Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Gilliéron, PY; Renaudin, V

    2009-01-01

    Presentation of a concept for robust indoor navigation. The concept is based on three key elements: - the use of an absolute geographical reference - the hybridisation of complementary technologies - specific motion models. This concept is illustrated by the means of two applications: the urban displacement of blind people and the indoor guidance of fire-fighters

  9. From translation to navigation of different discourses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livonen, Mirja; Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    1998-01-01

    ' own search experience. Data further suggest that searchers navigate these discourses dynamically and have preferences for certain discourses. Conceptualizing the selection of search terms as a meeting place of different discourses provides new insights into the complex nature of the search term...

  10. Navigating the Bio-Politics of Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nick; Motzkau, Johanna

    2011-01-01

    Childhood research has long shared a bio-political terrain with state agencies in which children figure primarily as "human futures". In the 20th century bio-social dualism helped to make that terrain navigable by researchers, but, as life processes increasingly become key sites of bio-political action, bio-social dualism is becoming…

  11. A GPS inspired Terrain Referenced Navigation algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaman, D.

    2014-01-01

    Terrain Referenced Navigation (TRN) refers to a form of localization in which measurements of distances to the terrain surface are matched with a digital elevation map allowing a vehicle to estimate its own position within the map. The main goal of this dissertation is to improve TRN performance

  12. Autonomous Collision-Free Navigation of Microvehicles in Complex and Dynamically Changing Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianlong; Chang, Xiaocong; Wu, Zhiguang; Li, Jinxing; Shao, Guangbin; Deng, Xinghong; Qiu, Jianbin; Guo, Bin; Zhang, Guangyu; He, Qiang; Li, Longqiu; Wang, Joseph

    2017-09-26

    Self-propelled micro- and nanoscale robots represent a rapidly emerging and fascinating robotics research area. However, designing autonomous and adaptive control systems for operating micro/nanorobotics in complex and dynamically changing environments, which is a highly demanding feature, is still an unmet challenge. Here we describe a smart microvehicle for precise autonomous navigation in complicated environments and traffic scenarios. The fully autonomous navigation system of the smart microvehicle is composed of a microscope-coupled CCD camera, an artificial intelligence planner, and a magnetic field generator. The microscope-coupled CCD camera provides real-time localization of the chemically powered Janus microsphere vehicle and environmental detection for path planning to generate optimal collision-free routes, while the moving direction of the microrobot toward a reference position is determined by the external electromagnetic torque. Real-time object detection offers adaptive path planning in response to dynamically changing environments. We demonstrate that the autonomous navigation system can guide the vehicle movement in complex patterns, in the presence of dynamically changing obstacles, and in complex biological environments. Such a navigation system for micro/nanoscale vehicles, relying on vision-based close-loop control and path planning, is highly promising for their autonomous operation in complex dynamic settings and unpredictable scenarios expected in a variety of realistic nanoscale scenarios.

  13. Remote sensing for water quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giardino, Claudia

    2006-01-01

    The application of remote sensing to the study of lakes is begun in years 80 with the lunch of the satellites of second generation. Many experiences have indicated the contribution of remote sensing for the limnology [it

  14. Time-sensitive remote sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Lippitt, Christopher; Coulter, Lloyd

    2015-01-01

    This book documents the state of the art in the use of remote sensing to address time-sensitive information requirements. Specifically, it brings together a group of authors who are both researchers and practitioners, who work toward or are currently using remote sensing to address time-sensitive information requirements with the goal of advancing the effective use of remote sensing to supply time-sensitive information. The book addresses the theoretical implications of time-sensitivity on the remote sensing process, assessments or descriptions of methods for expediting the delivery and improving the quality of information derived from remote sensing, and describes and analyzes time-sensitive remote sensing applications, with an emphasis on lessons learned. This book is intended for remote sensing scientists, practitioners (e.g., emergency responders or administrators of emergency response agencies), and students, but will also be of use to those seeking to understand the potential of remote sensing to addres...

  15. Light-Activated Magnetic Compass in Birds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Greiner, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Migrating birds fly thousand miles without having a map, or a GPS unit. But they may carry their own sensitive navigational tool, which allows them "see" the Earth’s magnetic field. Here we review the important physical and chemical constraints on a possible compass sensor and discuss the suggest......Migrating birds fly thousand miles without having a map, or a GPS unit. But they may carry their own sensitive navigational tool, which allows them "see" the Earth’s magnetic field. Here we review the important physical and chemical constraints on a possible compass sensor and discuss...... the suggestion that radical pairs in a photoreceptor cryptochrome might provide a biological realization for a magnetic compass. Finally, we review the current evidence supporting a role for radical pair reactions in the magnetic compass of birds....

  16. Navigated Waterways of Louisiana, Geographic NAD83, LOSCO (1999) [navigated_waterways_LOSCO_1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This is a line dataset of navigated waterways fitting the LOSCO definition: it has been traveled by vessels transporting 10,000 gallons of oil or fuel as determined...

  17. Lunar Navigator - A Miniature, Fully Autonomous, Lunar Navigation, Surveyor, and Range Finder System, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Microcosm will use existing hardware and software from related programs to create a prototype Lunar Navigation Sensor (LNS) early in Phase II, such that most of the...

  18. Vision/INS Integrated Navigation System for Poor Vision Navigation Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngsun Kim

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the performance of an inertial navigation system, many aiding sensors can be used. Among these aiding sensors, a vision sensor is of particular note due to its benefits in terms of weight, cost, and power consumption. This paper proposes an inertial and vision integrated navigation method for poor vision navigation environments. The proposed method uses focal plane measurements of landmarks in order to provide position, velocity and attitude outputs even when the number of landmarks on the focal plane is not enough for navigation. In order to verify the proposed method, computer simulations and van tests are carried out. The results show that the proposed method gives accurate and reliable position, velocity and attitude outputs when the number of landmarks is insufficient.

  19. Lunar Navigator - A Miniature, Fully Autonomous, Lunar Navigation, Surveyor, and Range Finder System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Microcosm proposes to design and develop a fully autonomous Lunar Navigator based on our MicroMak miniature star sensor and a gravity gradiometer similar to one on a...

  20. Developments in Remote Collaboration and Computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burruss, J.R.; Abla, G.; Flanagan, S.; Keahey, K.; Leggett, T.; Ludesche, C.; McCune, D.; Papka, M.E.; Peng, Q.; Randerson, L.; Schissel, D.P.

    2005-01-01

    The National Fusion Collaboratory (NFC) is creating and deploying collaborative software tools to unite magnetic fusion research in the United States. In particular, the NFC is developing and deploying a national FES 'Grid' (FusionGrid) for secure sharing of computation, visualization, and data resources over the Internet. The goal of FusionGrid is to allow scientists at remote sites to participate as fully in experiments, machine design, and computational activities as if they were working on site thereby creating a unified virtual organization of the geographically dispersed U.S. fusion community

  1. Evaluation of navigation interfaces in virtual environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestre, Daniel R.

    2014-02-01

    When users are immersed in cave-like virtual reality systems, navigational interfaces have to be used when the size of the virtual environment becomes larger than the physical extent of the cave floor. However, using navigation interfaces, physically static users experience self-motion (visually-induced vection). As a consequence, sensorial incoherence between vision (indicating self-motion) and other proprioceptive inputs (indicating immobility) can make them feel dizzy and disoriented. We tested, in two experimental studies, different locomotion interfaces. The objective was twofold: testing spatial learning and cybersickness. In a first experiment, using first-person navigation with a flystick ®, we tested the effect of sensorial aids, a spatialized sound or guiding arrows on the ground, attracting the user toward the goal of the navigation task. Results revealed that sensorial aids tended to impact negatively spatial learning. Moreover, subjects reported significant levels of cybersickness. In a second experiment, we tested whether such negative effects could be due to poorly controlled rotational motion during simulated self-motion. Subjects used a gamepad, in which rotational and translational displacements were independently controlled by two joysticks. Furthermore, we tested first- versus third-person navigation. No significant difference was observed between these two conditions. Overall, cybersickness tended to be lower, as compared to experiment 1, but the difference was not significant. Future research should evaluate further the hypothesis of the role of passively perceived optical flow in cybersickness, but manipulating the virtual environment'sperrot structure. It also seems that video-gaming experience might be involved in the user's sensitivity to cybersickness.

  2. Robotics Vision-based Heuristic Reasoning for Underwater Target Tracking and Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chua Kia

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a robotics vision-based heuristic reasoning system for underwater target tracking and navigation. This system is introduced to improve the level of automation of underwater Remote Operated Vehicles (ROVs operations. A prototype which combines computer vision with an underwater robotics system is successfully designed and developed to perform target tracking and intelligent navigation. This study focuses on developing image processing algorithms and fuzzy inference system for the analysis of the terrain. The vision system developed is capable of interpreting underwater scene by extracting subjective uncertainties of the object of interest. Subjective uncertainties are further processed as multiple inputs of a fuzzy inference system that is capable of making crisp decisions concerning where to navigate. The important part of the image analysis is morphological filtering. The applications focus on binary images with the extension of gray-level concepts. An open-loop fuzzy control system is developed for classifying the traverse of terrain. The great achievement is the system's capability to recognize and perform target tracking of the object of interest (pipeline in perspective view based on perceived condition. The effectiveness of this approach is demonstrated by computer and prototype simulations. This work is originated from the desire to develop robotics vision system with the ability to mimic the human expert's judgement and reasoning when maneuvering ROV in the traverse of the underwater terrain.

  3. Robotics Vision-based Heuristic Reasoning for Underwater Target Tracking and Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chua Kia

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a robotics vision-based heuristic reasoning system for underwater target tracking and navigation. This system is introduced to improve the level of automation of underwater Remote Operated Vehicles (ROVs operations. A prototype which combines computer vision with an underwater robotics system is successfully designed and developed to perform target tracking and intelligent navigation. This study focuses on developing image processing algorithms and fuzzy inference system for the analysis of the terrain. The vision system developed is capable of interpreting underwater scene by extracting subjective uncertainties of the object of interest. Subjective uncertainties are further processed as multiple inputs of a fuzzy inference system that is capable of making crisp decisions concerning where to navigate. The important part of the image analysis is morphological filtering. The applications focus on binary images with the extension of gray-level concepts. An open-loop fuzzy control system is developed for classifying the traverse of terrain. The great achievement is the system's capability to recognize and perform target tracking of the object of interest (pipeline in perspective view based on perceived condition. The effectiveness of this approach is demonstrated by computer and prototype simulations. This work is originated from the desire to develop robotics vision system with the ability to mimic the human expert's judgement and reasoning when maneuvering ROV in the traverse of the underwater terrain.

  4. Unmanned aerial systems for photogrammetry and remote sensing: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomina, I.; Molina, P.

    2014-06-01

    We discuss the evolution and state-of-the-art of the use of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) in the field of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (PaRS). UAS, Remotely-Piloted Aerial Systems, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles or simply, drones are a hot topic comprising a diverse array of aspects including technology, privacy rights, safety and regulations, and even war and peace. Modern photogrammetry and remote sensing identified the potential of UAS-sourced imagery more than thirty years ago. In the last five years, these two sister disciplines have developed technology and methods that challenge the current aeronautical regulatory framework and their own traditional acquisition and processing methods. Navety and ingenuity have combined off-the-shelf, low-cost equipment with sophisticated computer vision, robotics and geomatic engineering. The results are cm-level resolution and accuracy products that can be generated even with cameras costing a few-hundred euros. In this review article, following a brief historic background and regulatory status analysis, we review the recent unmanned aircraft, sensing, navigation, orientation and general data processing developments for UAS photogrammetry and remote sensing with emphasis on the nano-micro-mini UAS segment.

  5. Remote Sensing and the Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosius, Craig A.; And Others

    This document is designed to help senior high school students study remote sensing technology and techniques in relation to the environmental sciences. It discusses the acquisition, analysis, and use of ecological remote data. Material is divided into three sections and an appendix. Section One is an overview of the basics of remote sensing.…

  6. Biologically inspired autonomous agent navigation using an integrated polarization analyzing CMOS image sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarkaer, M.; San Segundo Bello, D.; Van Hoof, C.; Theuwissen, A.

    2010-01-01

    The navigational strategies of insects using skylight polarization are interesting for applications in autonomous agent navigation because they rely on very little information for navigation. A polarization navigation sensor using the Stokes parameters to determine the orientation is presented. The

  7. 22 CFR 401.25 - Government brief regarding navigable waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Government brief regarding navigable waters. 401... PROCEDURE Applications § 401.25 Government brief regarding navigable waters. When in the opinion of the Commission it is desirable that a decision should be rendered which affects navigable waters in a manner or...

  8. Gray and White Matter Correlates of Navigational Ability in Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegman, J.B.T.; Fonteijn, H.M.; Ekert, J. van; Tyborowska, A.B.; Jansen, C.; Janzen, G.

    2014-01-01

    Humans differ widely in their navigational abilities. Studies have shown that self-reports on navigational abilities are good predictors of performance on navigation tasks in real and virtual environments. The caudate nucleus and medial temporal lobe regions have been suggested to subserve different

  9. PRIVATE GRAPHS – ACCESS RIGHTS ON GRAPHS FOR SEAMLESS NAVIGATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Dorner

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available After the success of GNSS (Global Navigational Satellite Systems and navigation services for public streets, indoor seems to be the next big development in navigational services, relying on RTLS – Real Time Locating Services (e.g. WIFI and allowing seamless navigation. In contrast to navigation and routing services on public streets, seamless navigation will cause an additional challenge: how to make routing data accessible to defined users or restrict access rights for defined areas or only to parts of the graph to a defined user group? The paper will present case studies and data from literature, where seamless and especially indoor navigation solutions are presented (hospitals, industrial complexes, building sites, but the problem of restricted access rights was only touched from a real world, but not a technical perspective. The analysis of case studies will show, that the objective of navigation and the different target groups for navigation solutions will demand well defined access rights and require solutions, how to make only parts of a graph to a user or application available to solve a navigational task. The paper will therefore introduce the concept of private graphs, which is defined as a graph for navigational purposes covering the street, road or floor network of an area behind a public street and suggest different approaches how to make graph data for navigational purposes available considering access rights and data protection, privacy and security issues as well.

  10. 76 FR 27337 - Houston/Galveston Navigation Safety Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard [USCG-2010-1116] Houston/Galveston Navigation Safety...: The Houston/Galveston Navigation Safety Advisory Committee postponed its originally scheduled February... Houston Ship Channel, and various other navigation safety matters in the Galveston Bay area. The meeting...

  11. Benefits of multisensory presentation on perception, memory and navigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Philippi, T.G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313711577

    2012-01-01

    Navigation is the process of planning and following routes to travel from the current location to a target location. In comparison with real world navigation, we have considerable difficulty with navigation in virtual environments. An important cause is that less information is presented in a

  12. 76 FR 58105 - Regulated Navigation Area; Saugus River, Lynn, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ... final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a Regulated Navigation Area (RNA) on the navigable... INFORMATION: Regulatory Information The Coast Guard is issuing this temporary rule without prior notice and... Pipeline bridge poses to the navigational channel necessitates that all mariners comply with this RNA...

  13. Time and Motion Study of a Community Patient Navigator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara S. Phillips

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Research on patient navigation has focused on validating the utility of navigators by defining their roles and analyzing their effects on patient outcomes, patient satisfaction, and cost effectiveness. Patient navigators are increasingly used outside the research context, and their roles without research responsibilities may look very different. This pilot study captured the activities of a community patient navigator for uninsured women with a positive screening test for breast cancer, using a time and motion approach over a period of three days. We followed the actions of this navigator minute by minute to assess the relative ratios of actions performed and to identify areas for time efficiency improvement to increase direct time with patients. This novel approach depicts the duties of a community patient navigator no longer fettered by navigation logs, research team meetings, surveys, and the consent process. We found that the community patient navigator was able to spend more time with patients in the clinical context relative to performing paperwork or logging communication with patients as a result of her lack of research responsibilities. By illuminating how community patient navigation functions as separate from the research setting, our results will inform future hiring and training of community patient navigators, system design and operations for improving the efficiency and efficacy of navigators, and our understanding of what community patient navigators do in the absence of research responsibilities.

  14. Navigating oceans and cultures: Polynesian and European navigation systems in the late eighteenth century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, M.

    2012-05-01

    Significant differences in the rotation of the celestial dome between the tropical and temperate zones did not stop the peoples of either the tropical Pacific or temperate Europe from using geocentric astronomy to guide exploration of the oceans. Although the differences in the night sky contributed to differences between the Pacific Island and European systems for navigation at sea, the two navigation systems exhibit substantial similarities. Both systems define positions on the surface of the Earth using two coordinates that vary at right angles to each other and use stars, and to a lesser extent the sun, to determine directions. This essay explores similarities and differences in the use of geocentric astronomy for navigation at sea by the peoples of Polynesia and Europe in the late eighteenth century. Captain Cook's orders to discover the unknown southern continent after observing the transit of Venus combined with differences in language and culture to obscure the deeper similarities between the navigation systems used by Cook and the Polynesians. Although it was a further 200 years before anthropologists studied Pacific navigation, collaborations in voyaging with communities in Oceania demonstrated the effectiveness of Pacific navigation systems, revived interest in traditional voyaging in island communities around the Pacific, and potentially open the way for further collaborations in other areas.

  15. Remote sensing, airborne radiometric survey and aeromagnetic survey data processing and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Xiuzhen; Liu Dechang; Ye Fawang; Xuan Yanxiu

    2009-01-01

    Taking remote sensing data, airborne radiometric data and aero magnetic survey data as an example, the authors elaborate about basic thinking of remote sensing data processing methods, spectral feature analysis and adopted processing methods, also explore the remote sensing data combining with the processing of airborne radiometric survey and aero magnetic survey data, and analyze geological significance of processed image. It is not only useful for geological environment research and uranium prospecting in the study area, but also reference to applications in another area. (authors)

  16. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA is a noninvasive test that uses a powerful magnetic field and a ...

  17. SLS Navigation Model-Based Design Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, T. Emerson; Anzalone, Evan; Geohagan, Kevin; Bernard, Bill; Park, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    The SLS Program chose to implement a Model-based Design and Model-based Requirements approach for managing component design information and system requirements. This approach differs from previous large-scale design efforts at Marshall Space Flight Center where design documentation alone conveyed information required for vehicle design and analysis and where extensive requirements sets were used to scope and constrain the design. The SLS Navigation Team has been responsible for the Program-controlled Design Math Models (DMMs) which describe and represent the performance of the Inertial Navigation System (INS) and the Rate Gyro Assemblies (RGAs) used by Guidance, Navigation, and Controls (GN&C). The SLS Navigation Team is also responsible for the navigation algorithms. The navigation algorithms are delivered for implementation on the flight hardware as a DMM. For the SLS Block 1-B design, the additional GPS Receiver hardware is managed as a DMM at the vehicle design level. This paper provides a discussion of the processes and methods used to engineer, design, and coordinate engineering trades and performance assessments using SLS practices as applied to the GN&C system, with a particular focus on the Navigation components. These include composing system requirements, requirements verification, model development, model verification and validation, and modeling and analysis approaches. The Model-based Design and Requirements approach does not reduce the effort associated with the design process versus previous processes used at Marshall Space Flight Center. Instead, the approach takes advantage of overlap between the requirements development and management process, and the design and analysis process by efficiently combining the control (i.e. the requirement) and the design mechanisms. The design mechanism is the representation of the component behavior and performance in design and analysis tools. The focus in the early design process shifts from the development and

  18. 14 CFR 121.349 - Communication and navigation equipment for operations under VFR over routes not navigated by...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Communication and navigation equipment for... § 121.349 Communication and navigation equipment for operations under VFR over routes not navigated by... receiver providing visual and aural signals; and (iii) One ILS receiver; and (3) Any RNAV system used to...

  19. Remote maintenance development for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Eisuke; Shibanuma, Kiyoshi

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the overall ITER remote maintenance design concept developed mainly for in-vessel components such as diverters and blankets, and outlines the ITER R and D program to develop remote handling equipment and radiation hard components. Reactor structures inside the ITER cryostat must be maintained remotely due to DT operation, making remote handling technology basic to reactor design. The overall maintenance scenario and design concepts have been developed, and maintenance design feasibility, including fabrication and testing of full-scale in-vessel remote maintenance handling equipment and tool, is being verified. (author)

  20. Remote maintenance development for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tada, Eisuke [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Shibanuma, Kiyoshi

    1998-04-01

    This paper describes the overall ITER remote maintenance design concept developed mainly for in-vessel components such as diverters and blankets, and outlines the ITER R and D program to develop remote handling equipment and radiation hard components. Reactor structures inside the ITER cryostat must be maintained remotely due to DT operation, making remote handling technology basic to reactor design. The overall maintenance scenario and design concepts have been developed, and maintenance design feasibility, including fabrication and testing of full-scale in-vessel remote maintenance handling equipment and tool, is being verified. (author)

  1. Inspection-Class Remotely Operated Vehicles—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romano Capocci

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a review of inspection-class Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs. The review divides the classification of inspection-class ROVs; categorising the vehicles in order of size and capability. A state of the art technology review is undertaken, discussing various common subsystems of the ROV. Standard and novel ROV shapes and designs are reviewed, with emphasis on buoyancy, frame materials and hydrodynamics. Several power considerations and designs are discussed, accounting for battery fed and mains fed systems. ROV telemetry is split into a discussion on the various transmission hardware systems and the communication protocols that are most widely used in industry and research today. A range of thruster technologies is then introduced with consideration taken of the various thruster architectures available. Finally, the navigation and positioning sensors employed for ROV navigation and control are reviewed. The author has also created a number of comparison tables throughout the review; tables include comparison of wired data transmission technology, comparison of common ROV communication protocols and comparisons of various inertial navigation systems. By the end of the review the reader will have clearer understanding on the fundamentals of inspection-class ROV technologies and can use this as an introduction to further paper investigation.

  2. Arrangement of magnets for magnetic support or guide system. Magnetanordnung fuer ein magnetisches Trag- oder Fuehrungssystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohn, G; Schwaerzler, P

    1978-01-26

    The invention refers to an arrangement of magnets for a magnetic support or guide system, particularly for a levitation vehicle. A magnetic tape which can be moved without touching along a fixed armature rail is provided, having an additional magnet at its ends. The pole surfaces of each additional magnet increase their spacing from the armature rail with increasing distance from the end of the magnetic tape concerned. The purpose of the invention is to improve such an arrangement of magnets so that the extra expense of additional magnets is avoided. According to the invention, this is achieved by the pole surfaces of the outer electromagnets of the magnetic tape, instead of the additional magnets, having an increased spacing from the armature rail with increasing approach to the end of the core free of connected electromagnets. The part of the pole faces remote from the armature rail is made curved in order to produce great leakage of the magnetic field.

  3. 33 CFR 209.170 - Violations of laws protecting navigable waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Violations of laws protecting navigable waters. 209.170 Section 209.170 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF... navigable waters. (a) [Reserved] (b) Injuries to Government works. Section 14 of the River and Harbor Act of...

  4. 33 CFR 64.16 - Duration of marking on sunken vessels in navigable waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Duration of marking on sunken vessels in navigable waters. 64.16 Section 64.16 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Sunken Vessels and Other Obstructions § 64.16 Duration of marking on sunken vessels in navigable waters...

  5. 33 CFR 117.458 - Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans. 117.458 Section 117.458 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans. (a) The draws of the SR 46 (St. Claude Avenue) bridge, mile 0.5...

  6. 33 CFR 207.600 - Rochester (Charlotte) Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rochester (Charlotte) Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation. 207.600 Section 207.600 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF... (Charlotte) Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation. (a)-(b) [Reserved] (c) No vessel shall moor or...

  7. 33 CFR 207.580 - Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation. 207.580 Section 207.580 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.580 Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.; use...

  8. Remote monitoring demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caskey, Susan; Olsen, John

    2006-01-01

    The recently upgraded remote monitoring system at the Joyo Experimental Reactor uses a DCM-14 camera module and GEMINI software. The final data is compatible both with the IAEA-approved GARS review software and the ALIS software that was used for this demonstration. Features of the remote monitoring upgrade emphasized compatibility with IAEA practice. This presentation gives particular attention to the selection process for meeting network security considerations at the O'arai site. The Joyo system is different from the NNCA's ACPF system, in that it emphasizes use of IAEA standard camera technology and data acquisition and transmission software. In the demonstration itself, a temporary virtual private network (VPN) between the meeting room and the server at Sandia in Albuquerque allowed attendees to observe data stored from routine transmissions from the Joyo Fresh Fuel Storage to Sandia. Image files from a fuel movement earlier in the month showed Joyo workers and IAEA inspectors carrying out a transfer. (author)

  9. RemoteLabs Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Crabeel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a first step towards the implementation of a framework for remote experimentation of electric machines – the RemoteLabs platform. This project was focused on the development of two main modules: the user Web-based and the electric machines interfaces. The Web application provides the user with a front-end and interacts with the back-end – the user and experiment persistent data. The electric machines interface is implemented as a distributed client server application where the clients, launched by the Web application, interact with the server modules located in platforms physically connected the electric machines drives. Users can register and authenticate, schedule, specify and run experiments and obtain results in the form of CSV, XML and PDF files. These functionalities were successfully tested with real data, but still without including the electric machines. This inclusion is part of another project scheduled to start soon.

  10. Recruiting in remote locations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ionel, C. [Enerflex Systems Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    This presentation provided details of Enerflex, a leading supplier of products and services to the oil and gas industry, and outlined their personnel hiring policies. Enerflex's core values include community involvement and divisional logo branding. The extensive training that is provided places an emphasis on employee empowerment. The company also places an emphasis on employee safety, diversity, and team building. Competitive salaries are offered along with generous equipment allowances and a flexible benefits program. Benefits include travel and overtime rates; health benefits; retirement savings; scholarship programs; career opportunities; and apprenticeship programs. External technical training is provided. An employee referral program has been developed, and the company's recruitment program also advertises in remote newspapers to develop career streams within remote communities. tabs., figs.

  11. Remote handling in ZEPHYR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andelfinger, C.; Lackner, E.; Ulrich, M.; Weber, G.; Schilling, H.B.

    1982-04-01

    A conceptual design of the ZEPHYR building is described. The listed radiation data show that remote handling devices will be necessary in most areas of the building. For difficult repair and maintenance works it is intended to transfer complete units from the experimental hall to a hot cell which provides better working conditions. The necessary crane systems and other transport means are summarized as well as suitable commercially available manipulators and observation devices. The conept of automatic devices for cutting and welding and other operations inside the vacuum vessel and the belonging position control system is sketched. Guidelines for the design of passive components are set up in order to facilitate remote operation. (orig.)

  12. Remote Ischemic Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusch, Gerd; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Przyklenk, Karin; Redington, Andrew; Yellon, Derek

    2014-01-01

    In remote ischemic conditioning (RIC) brief, reversible episodes of ischemia with reperfusion in one vascular bed, tissue or organ confer a global protective phenotype and render remote tissues and organs resistant to ischemia/reperfusion injury. The peripheral stimulus can be chemical, mechanical or electrical and involves activation of peripheral sensory nerves. The signal transfer to the heart or other organs is through neuronal and humoral communications. Protection can be transferred, even across species, with plasma-derived dialysate and involves nitric oxide, stromal derived factor-1α, microRNA-144, but also other, not yet identified factors. Intracardiac signal transduction involves: adenosine, bradykinin, cytokines, and chemokines, which activate specific receptors; intracellular kinases; and mitochondrial function. RIC by repeated brief inflation/deflation of a blood pressure cuff protects against endothelial dysfunction and myocardial injury in percutaneous coronary interventions, coronary artery bypass grafting and reperfused acute myocardial infarction. RIC is safe and effective, noninvasive, easily feasible and inexpensive. PMID:25593060

  13. Parallels in Communication and Navigation Technology and Natural Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanofsky, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The premise is more than art imitates life, or technology imitates nature it is a nascent step to see how we might be unwittingly inspired and influenced. An example that might immediately come to mind is a starling murmuration (a phenomenon called scale-free correlation) and Intels recent Coachella music festival drone performance. Superconductivity is a macroscopic manifestation of a quantum phenomenon - choreographed electrons (i.e. an electron murmuration) that enable astonishing devices. There is indeed an intimate connectedness between biology and electromagnetism. Our brains are complex neural circuits generating magnetic fields with a magnitude around 100 femtoTesla (roughly one billion times weaker than a typical magnet used to tack notes to a refrigerator door). Migratory birds navigate by orienteering with respect to the Earth's magnetic field. Electromagnetic field therapy is used in orthopedics to aid in bone repair. The electric eel generates a large electric field for self-defense. Sharks apparently detect extremely weak electric fields for finding prey. And so on. There are similarities between the way a field of wheat responds to a breeze and the natural restoring forces of a semiconductor crystal. And waves in a slowly moving river can lap backwards against a peninsular shoreline mimicking a diffraction effect. Getting back to the introductory sentence and mysterious links over cosmic distances, in August 2016, China launched the Quantum Experiments at Space Scale (QUESS) satellite. The technology is based on a non-linear crystal that produces pairs of entangled photons whose attributes apparently remain entwined regardless of how far apart they are separated. This paper will, no doubt superficially, attempt to enumerate and examine these types of connections and parallelisms.

  14. Optical surgical navigation system causes pulse oximeter malfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Masaaki; Hara, Tetsuhito; Tamai, Kenji; Shiba, Juntaro; Hotta, Kunihisa; Takeuchi, Mamoru; Watanabe, Eiju

    2015-01-01

    An optical surgical navigation system is used as a navigator to facilitate surgical approaches, and pulse oximeters provide valuable information for anesthetic management. However, saw-tooth waves on the monitor of a pulse oximeter and the inability of the pulse oximeter to accurately record the saturation of a percutaneous artery were observed when a surgeon started an optical navigation system. The current case is thought to be the first report of this navigation system interfering with pulse oximetry. The causes of pulse jamming and how to manage an optical navigation system are discussed.

  15. Does Market Remoteness Matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Moctar, Ndiaye; Elodie, Maitre d’Hôtel; Tristan, Le Cotty

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the role of market remoteness in explaining maize price volatility in Burkina Faso. A model of price formation is introduced to demonstrate formally that transport costs between urban and rural markets exacerbate maize price volatility. Empirical support is provided to the proposition by exploring an unusually rich data set of monthly maize price series across 28 markets over 2004-13. The methodology relies on an autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity model to inve...

  16. Remote entanglement distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, B.C.; Gour, G.; Meyer, D.A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Shared bipartite entanglement is a crucial shared resource for many quantum information tasks such as teleportation, entanglement swapping, and remote state preparation. In general different nodes of a quantum network share an entanglement resource, such as ebits, that are consumed during the task. In practice, generating entangled states is expensive, but here we establish a protocol by which a quantum network requires only a single supplier of entanglement to all nodes who, by judicious measurements and classical communication, provides the nodes with a unique pair wise entangled state independent of the measurement outcome. Furthermore, we extend this result to a chain of suppliers and nodes, which enables an operational interpretation of concurrence. In the special case that the supplier shares bipartite states with two nodes, and such states are pure and maximally entangled, our protocol corresponds to entanglement swapping. However, in the practical case that initial shared entanglement between suppliers and nodes involves partially entangled or mixed states, we show that general local operations and classical communication by all parties (suppliers and nodes) yields distributions of entangled states between nodes. In general a distribution of bipartite entangled states between any two nodes will include states that do not have the same entanglement; thus we name this general process remote entanglement distribution. In our terminology entanglement swapping with partially entangled states is a particular class of remote entanglement distribution protocols. Here we identify which distributions of states that can or cannot be created by remote entanglement distribution. In particular we prove a powerful theorem that establishes an upper bound on the entanglement of formation that can be produced between two qubit nodes. We extend this result to the case of a linear chain of parties that play the roles of suppliers and nodes; this extension provides

  17. Remote earth sensing experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trifonov, Yu V

    1981-01-01

    Description of data devices for deriving multi-spectral measuring television measurement data of middle and high resolution through use of second generation Meteor-type satellites. Options for developing a permanent and active remote sensing system in USSR are discussed. It is noted that the present experiment is an important step in that direction. Design and structural data for this particular device and its application in the experiment are covered.

  18. Remote maintenance development for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Eisuke; Shibanuma, Kiyoshi

    1997-01-01

    This paper both describes the overall design concept of the ITER remote maintenance system, which has been developed mainly for use with in-vessel components such as divertor and blanket, and outlines of the ITER R and D program, which has been established to develop remote handling equipment/tools and radiation hard components. In ITER, the reactor structures inside cryostat have to be maintained remotely because of activation due to DT operation. Therefore, remote-handling technology is fundamental, and the reactor-structure design must be made consistent with remote maintainability. The overall maintenance scenario and design concepts of the required remote handling equipment/tools have been developed according to their maintenance classification. Technologies are also being developed to verify the feasibility of the maintenance design and include fabrication and testing of a fullscale remote-handling equipment/tools for in-vessel maintenance. (author)

  19. Magnets and magnetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meuris, Ch.; Rifflet, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world's largest highest-energy particle collider that the CERN plans to commission in 2008, gets a double boost from superconducting magnet technology. Superconducting magnets are first used to guide the particles scheduled for collision through the accelerator, and then to observe the events triggered by the collision inside giant detectors in a known magnetic field. Despite the installation's massive dimensions, all this is done with minimal expenditure of energy. (author)

  20. Remote repair appliance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heumann, F.K.; Wilkinson, J.C.; Wooding, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    A remote appliance for supporting a tool for performing work at a work site on a substantially circular bore of a work piece and for providing video signals of the work site to a remote monitor comprises: a base plate having an inner face and an outer face; a plurality of rollers, wherein each roller is rotatably and adjustably attached to the inner face of the base plate and positioned to roll against the bore of the work piece when the base plate is positioned against the mouth of the bore such that the appliance may be rotated about the bore in a plane substantially parallel to the base plate; a tool holding means for supporting the tool, the tool holding means being adjustably attached to the outer face of the base plate such that the working end of the tool is positioned on the inner face side of the base plate; a camera for providing video signals of the work site to the remote monitor; and a camera holding means for supporting the camera on the inner face side of the base plate, the camera holding means being adjustably attached to the outer face of the base plate. In a preferred embodiment, roller guards are provided to protect the rollers from debris and a bore guard is provided to protect the bore from wear by the rollers and damage from debris. 5 figs